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Sample records for magnetic resonance observation

  1. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrichs, E. E.; Jaeger, H. M.; Karczmar, Greg S.; Knight, James B.; Kuperman, Vadim Yu.; Nagel, Sidney R.

    1995-03-01

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here.

  2. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrichs, E.E.; Jaeger, H.M.; Knight, J.B.; Nagel, S.R.; Karczmar, G.S.; Kuperman, V.Yu.

    1995-03-17

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Observation of narrow isotopic optical magnetic resonances in individual emission spectral lines of neon

    SciTech Connect

    Saprykin, E G; Sorokin, V A; Shalagin, A M

    2015-07-31

    Narrow resonances are observed in the course of recording the individual emission lines of the glow discharge in the mixture of isotopes {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne, depending on the strength of the longitudinal magnetic field. The position of resonances in the magnetic scale corresponds to the compensation of the isotopic shift for certain spectral lines due to the Zeeman effect. It is found that the contrast of the resonances is higher for the transitions between the highly excited energy levels, and the resonances themselves are formed in the zone of longitudinal spatial nonuniformity of the magnetic field. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Resonances in the Earth-ionosphere cavity according to the data of magnetic observations in Tomsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnik, S. A.; Kolmakov, A. A.; Nedosekov, D. A.

    2014-11-01

    The article describes magnetic measurements technique of natural electromagnetic fields in ELF range. The analysis results of the amplitude characteristics of the Schumann resonance modes in a suburban area in the seasonal cycle of observations is presented.

  5. First observation of rotation acceleration of magnetic island by using rotating resonant magnetic perturbation on the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, B.; Ding, Y. H.; Hu, Q. M.; Wang, N. C.; Yi, B.; Zheng, M. Y.; Jin, W.; Li, J. C.; Cheng, Z. F.; Yu, Q.; Yu, K. X.; Zhuang, G.

    2013-12-01

    A set of in-vessel saddle coils called dynamic resonant magnetic perturbation (DRMP) for generating rotating resonant magnetic perturbations has recently been constructed on the J-TEXT tokamak. The phenomenon of tearing mode locking to DRMP and rotating together with the DRMP field has been observed. There is an apparent decrease of the island width during the locking and unlocking procedure. Similar results are obtained in the numerical simulation.

  6. Observation of Magnetic Resonances in Electron Clouds in a Positron Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Ng, J.S.T.; Cooper, F.; Kharakh, D.; King, F.; Kirby, R.E.; Kuekan, B.; Spencer, Cherrill M.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Wang, L.F.; /SLAC

    2011-08-24

    The first experimental observation of magnetic resonances in electron clouds is reported. The resonance was observed as a modulation in cloud intensity for uncoated as well as TiN-coated aluminum surfaces in the positron storage ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. Electron clouds frequently arise in accelerators of positively charged particles, and severely impact the machines performance. The TiN coating was found to be an effective remedy, reducing the cloud intensity by three orders of magnitude.

  7. Relaxation and Saturation in High-Gradient Force-Detected Magnetic Resonance: Theory and Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, William; Bruland, Kelly; Chao, Shih-Hui; Garbini, Joseph; Jensen, Seth; Sidles, John

    1999-05-01

    We have observed microwave power-scaling behavior of electron spin resonance in a field gradient of 250,000 Tesla per meter by the technique of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). Resonance was induced in a dilute sample of DPPH in polystyrene at 77 and 10 K by an amplitude-modulated microwave field in a polarizing field produced by a micrometer-scale SmCo magnet mounted on a force microscope cantilever. Microwave power-dependent spin-gradient forces of 10--10,000 attonewtons were observed, with an electron spin-moment sensitivity comparable to the most sensitive SQUIDs. At low power, data were in good accord with analytical expressions derived from the Bloch equations for high gradients. At high power, saturation effects modify the induced forces, creating a distinct ``knee" in the force-response curve. The values of spin-lattice relaxation times inferred from the phase lag of the cantilever response agree with published values for similar samples obtained by conventional resonance spectroscopy at 77 K, but were shorter than published values at 10 K. MRFM techniques allow the observation of magnetic resonance in external field gradients which can meet or exceed the local intermolecular gradients, providing an interesting experimental and theoretical regime in which to test models of spin diffusion and relaxation.

  8. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for making ...

  9. Observations of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaru, S. Kubota, H.; Yakushiji, K.; Konoto, M.; Nozaki, T.; Fukushima, A.; Imamura, H.; Taniguchi, T.; Arai, H.; Tsunegi, S.; Yuasa, S.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-05-07

    Measurements of thermally excited ferromagnetic resonance were performed on spin torque oscillators having a perpendicularly magnetized free layer and in-plane magnetized reference layer (abbreviated as PMF-STO in the following) for the purpose of obtaining magnetic properties in the PMF-STO structure. The measured spectra clearly showed a large main peak and multiple smaller peaks on the high frequency side. A Lorentzian fit on the main peak yielded Gilbert damping factor of 0.0041. The observed peaks moved in proportion to the out-of-plane bias field. From the slope of the main peak frequency as a function of the bias field, Lande g factor was estimated to be about 2.13. The mode intervals showed a clear dependence on the diameter of the PMF-STOs, i.e., intervals are larger for a smaller diameter. These results suggest that the observed peaks should correspond to eigenmodes of lateral spin wave resonance in the perpendicularly magnetized free layer.

  10. Observation of thermal spin-transfer torque via ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Bai, Lihui; Chen, Xiaobin; Guo, Hong; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Houssameddine, D.; Hu, C.-M.

    2016-08-01

    The thermal spin-transfer torque (TSTT) in magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) was systematically studied using electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Evidence for the existence of TSTT in MTJs is observed. A temperature difference was applied across an MTJ acting as a TSTT on the free layer of the MTJ. The FMR of the free layer was then excited by a microwave current and electrically detected as a dc voltage. We found that the FMR line shape was changed by the TSTT, indicated by the ratio of dispersive and Lorentz components of the FMR spectra (D /L ). D /L increases by increasing the temperature difference. In addition, we analyze the magnetization orientation dependence of TSTT and provide solid evidence that this dependence differs from the magnetization orientation dependence of spin-transfer torque driven by a dc bias.

  11. Observation of force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance in a homogeneous field

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, L. A.; Leskowitz, G. M.; Weitekamp, D. P.

    2004-01-01

    We report the experimental realization of BOOMERANG (better observation of magnetization, enhanced resolution, and no gradient), a sensitive and general method of magnetic resonance. The prototype millimeter-scale NMR spectrometer shows signal and noise levels in agreement with the design principles. We present 1H and 19F NMR in both solid and liquid samples, including time-domain Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy, multiple-pulse echoes, and heteronuclear J spectroscopy. By measuring a 1H-19F J coupling, this last experiment accomplishes chemically specific spectroscopy with force-detected NMR. In BOOMERANG, an assembly of permanent magnets provides a homogeneous field throughout the sample, while a harmonically suspended part of the assembly, a detector, is mechanically driven by spin-dependent forces. By placing the sample in a homogeneous field, signal dephasing by diffusion in a field gradient is made negligible, enabling application to liquids, in contrast to other force-detection methods. The design appears readily scalable to μm-scale samples where it should have sensitivity advantages over inductive detection with microcoils and where it holds great promise for application of magnetic resonance in biology, chemistry, physics, and surface science. We briefly discuss extensions of the BOOMERANG method to the μm and nm scales. PMID:15326302

  12. Observation of the Oxygen Diffusion Barrier in Soybean (Glycine max) Nodules with Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    MacFall, Janet S.; Pfeffer, Philip E.; Rolin, Dominique B.; MacFall, James R.; Johnson, G. Allan

    1992-01-01

    The effects of selected gas perfusion treatments on the spinlattice relaxation times (T1) of the soybean (Glycine max) nodule cortex and inner nodule tissue were studied with 1H high resolution magnetic resonance microscopy. Three gas treatments were used: (a) perfusion with O2 followed by N2; (b) O2 followed by O2; and (c) air followed by N2. Soybean plants with intact attached nodules were placed into the bore of a superconducting magnet and a selected root with nodules was perfused with the gas of interest. Magnetic resonance images were acquired with repetition times from 50 to 3200 ms. The method of partial saturation was used to calculate T1 times on selected regions of the image. Calculated images based on T1 showed longer T1 values in the cortex than in the inner nodule during all of the gas perfusions. When nodules were perfused with O2-O2, there was no significant change in the T1 of the nodule between the two gas treatments. When the nodule was perfused with O2-N2 or air-N2, however, the T1 of both the cortex and inner nodule increased. In these experiments, the increase in T1 of the cortex was 2- to 3-fold greater than the increase observed in the inner nodule. A similar change in T1 was found in detached live nodules, but there was no change in T1 with selective gas perfusion of detached dead nodules. These observations suggest that cortical cells respond differently to selected gas perfusion than the inner nodule, with the boundary of T1 change sharply delineated at the interface of the inner nodule and the inner cortex. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16653185

  13. In vivo observation of quadrupolar splitting in (39)K magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Rösler, M B; Nagel, A M; Umathum, R; Bachert, P; Benkhedah, N

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the origin of oscillations of the T(*)2 decay curve of (39)K observed in studies of (39)K magnetic resonance imaging of the human thigh. In addition to their magnetic dipole moment, spin-3/2 nuclei possess an electric quadrupole moment. Its interaction with non-vanishing electrical field gradients leads to oscillations in the free induction decay and to splitting of the resonance. All measurements were performed on a 7T whole-body MRI scanner (MAGNETOM 7T, Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany) with customer-built coils. According to the theory of quadrupolar splitting, a model with three Lorentzian-shaped peaks is appropriate for (39)K NMR spectra of the thigh and calf. The frequency shifts of the satellites depend on the angle between the calf and the static magnetic field. When the leg is oriented parallel to the static magnetic field, the satellites are shifted by about 200 Hz. In the thigh, rank-2 double quantum coherences arising from anisotropic quadrupolar interaction are observed by double-quantum filtration with magic-angle excitation. In addition to the spectra, an image of the thigh with a nominal resolution of (16 × 16 × 32) mm(3) was acquired with this filtering technique in 1:17 h. From the line width of the resonances, (39)K transverse relaxation time constants T(*)2, fast  = (0.51 ± 0.01) ms and T(*)2, slow  = (6.21 ± 0.05) ms for the head were determined. In the thigh, the left and right satellite, both corresponding to the short component of the transverse relaxation time constant, take the following values: T(*)2, fast  = (1.56 ± 0.03) ms and T(*)2, fast  = (1.42 ± 0.03) ms. The centre line, which corresponds to the slow component, is T(*)2, slow  = (9.67 ± 0.04) ms. The acquisition time of the spectra was approximately 10 min. Our results agree well with a non-vanishing electrical field gradient interacting with (39)K nuclei in the intracellular space of

  14. Observation of Time-Invariant Coherence in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Isabela A.; Souza, Alexandre M.; Bromley, Thomas R.; Cianciaruso, Marco; Marx, Raimund; Sarthour, Roberto S.; Oliveira, Ivan S.; Lo Franco, Rosario; Glaser, Steffen J.; deAzevedo, Eduardo R.; Soares-Pinto, Diogo O.; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-10-01

    The ability to live in coherent superpositions is a signature trait of quantum systems and constitutes an irreplaceable resource for quantum-enhanced technologies. However, decoherence effects usually destroy quantum superpositions. It was recently predicted that, in a composite quantum system exposed to dephasing noise, quantum coherence in a transversal reference basis can stay protected for an indefinite time. This can occur for a class of quantum states independently of the measure used to quantify coherence, and it requires no control on the system during the dynamics. Here, such an invariant coherence phenomenon is observed experimentally in two different setups based on nuclear magnetic resonance at room temperature, realizing an effective quantum simulator of two- and four-qubit spin systems. Our study further reveals a novel interplay between coherence and various forms of correlations, and it highlights the natural resilience of quantum effects in complex systems.

  15. Observation of Time-Invariant Coherence in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Simulator.

    PubMed

    Silva, Isabela A; Souza, Alexandre M; Bromley, Thomas R; Cianciaruso, Marco; Marx, Raimund; Sarthour, Roberto S; Oliveira, Ivan S; Lo Franco, Rosario; Glaser, Steffen J; deAzevedo, Eduardo R; Soares-Pinto, Diogo O; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-10-14

    The ability to live in coherent superpositions is a signature trait of quantum systems and constitutes an irreplaceable resource for quantum-enhanced technologies. However, decoherence effects usually destroy quantum superpositions. It was recently predicted that, in a composite quantum system exposed to dephasing noise, quantum coherence in a transversal reference basis can stay protected for an indefinite time. This can occur for a class of quantum states independently of the measure used to quantify coherence, and it requires no control on the system during the dynamics. Here, such an invariant coherence phenomenon is observed experimentally in two different setups based on nuclear magnetic resonance at room temperature, realizing an effective quantum simulator of two- and four-qubit spin systems. Our study further reveals a novel interplay between coherence and various forms of correlations, and it highlights the natural resilience of quantum effects in complex systems.

  16. Single spin magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution.

  17. Single spin magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Wrachtrup, Jörg; Finkler, Amit

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches have improved the sensitivity of either electron or nuclear magnetic resonance to the single spin level. For optical detection it has essentially become routine to observe a single electron spin or nuclear spin. Typically, the systems in use are carefully designed to allow for single spin detection and manipulation, and of those systems, diamond spin defects rank very high, being so robust that they can be addressed, read out and coherently controlled even under ambient conditions and in a versatile set of nanostructures. This renders them as a new type of sensor, which has been shown to detect single electron and nuclear spins among other quantities like force, pressure and temperature. Adapting pulse sequences from classic NMR and EPR, and combined with high resolution optical microscopy, proximity to the target sample and nanoscale size, the diamond sensors have the potential to constitute a new class of magnetic resonance detectors with single spin sensitivity. As diamond sensors can be operated under ambient conditions, they offer potential application across a multitude of disciplines. Here we review the different existing techniques for magnetic resonance, with a focus on diamond defect spin sensors, showing their potential as versatile sensors for ultra-sensitive magnetic resonance with nanoscale spatial resolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Resonant magnetic vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Decanini, Yves; Folacci, Antoine

    2003-04-01

    By using the complex angular momentum method, we provide a semiclassical analysis of electron scattering by a magnetic vortex of Aharonov-Bohm type. Regge poles of the S matrix are associated with surface waves orbiting around the vortex and supported by a magnetic field discontinuity. Rapid variations of sharp characteristic shapes can be observed on scattering cross sections. They correspond to quasibound states which are Breit-Wigner-type resonances associated with surface waves and which can be considered as quantum analogues of acoustic whispering-gallery modes. Such a resonant magnetic vortex could provide a different kind of artificial atom while the semiclassical approach developed here could be profitably extended in various areas of the physics of vortices.

  19. Antiferromagnetic coupling between martensitic twin variants observed by magnetic resonance in Ni-Mn-Sn-Co films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, V. O.; Lvov, V. A.; Aseguinolaza, I.; Salyuk, O.; Popadiuk, D.; Kharlan, Y.; Kakazei, G. N.; Araujo, J. P.; Barandiaran, J. M.; Chernenko, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic properties of N i46.0M n36.8S n11.4C o5.8/MgO (001 ) epitaxial thin film, which undergo a martensitic phase transformation from cubic austenitic phase to a twinned orthorhombic martensitic phase at 270 K, were studied by the magnetic resonance at the microwave frequency of 9.45 GHz. It was found that the single resonance line observed in the austenite splits into three lines in the martensitic phase. A theoretical approach was developed to show that the additional resonance lines are caused by the weak antiferromagnetic coupling of the ferromagnetic twin components across twin boundaries. Fitting of the experimental resonance lines to model gives an effective field of antiferromagnetic coupling of about 1.5 kOe, which is two or three orders of magnitude lower than in the conventional antiferromagnetic solids because the number of magnetic ions interacting antiferromagnetically through the twin boundary is much less than the total number of magnetic ions in the twin. This feature shows a strong resemblance between the submicron twinned martensite and artificial antiferromagnetic superlattices, whereby providing a distinctive insight into magnetism of the studied magnetic shape memory material.

  20. Non-destructive observation of electrically detected magnetic resonance in bulk material using AC bias.

    PubMed

    Sato, Toshiyuki; Yokoyama, Hidekatsu; Ohya, Hiroaki

    2005-07-01

    DC bias is normally found in conventional measurements of electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). Usually, electrodes are formed on the sample surface to make ohmic contacts for detecting changes in the electrical characteristics of the sample material. Thus, destructive procedures are required to detect the EDMR signal of bulk material with such methods. An AC bias detection technique was developed to allow the non-destructive EDMR measurement of bulk materials. An AC bridge circuit was constructed to detect the change in impedance of the sample, which when changed by ESR, an unbalanced AC voltage can be detected. By detecting this AC bias, it is possible to cancel the effects, such as Shottky barriers, that disturb the ohmic contact between the electrodes and a sample material. Further, the AC bias current penetrates the thin surface layer of a sample such as silicon oxide, which normally obstructs a DC current. This method was utilized using conductive rubber contacts for non-destructive EDMR measurements of part of a silicon wafer. EDMR spectra observed were the same as those obtained by the conventional method of using DC bias detection.

  1. Non-destructive observation of electrically detected magnetic resonance in bulk material using AC bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Toshiyuki; Yokoyama, Hidekatsu; Ohya, Hiroaki

    2005-07-01

    DC bias is normally found in conventional measurements of electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). Usually, electrodes are formed on the sample surface to make ohmic contacts for detecting changes in the electrical characteristics of the sample material. Thus, destructive procedures are required to detect the EDMR signal of bulk material with such methods. An AC bias detection technique was developed to allow the non-destructive EDMR measurement of bulk materials. An AC bridge circuit was constructed to detect the change in impedance of the sample, which when changed by ESR, an unbalanced AC voltage can be detected. By detecting this AC bias, it is possible to cancel the effects, such as Shottky barriers, that disturb the ohmic contact between the electrodes and a sample material. Further, the AC bias current penetrates the thin surface layer of a sample such as silicon oxide, which normally obstructs a DC current. This method was utilized using conductive rubber contacts for non-destructive EDMR measurements of part of a silicon wafer. EDMR spectra observed were the same as those obtained by the conventional method of using DC bias detection.

  2. Direct nuclear magnetic resonance observation of odorant binding to mouse odorant receptor MOR244-3.

    PubMed

    Burger, Jessica L; Jeerage, Kavita M; Bruno, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    Mammals are able to perceive and differentiate a great number of structurally diverse odorants through the odorant's interaction with odorant receptors (ORs), proteins found within the cell membrane of olfactory sensory neurons. The natural gas industry has used human olfactory sensitivity to sulfur compounds (thiols, sulfides, etc.) to increase the safety of fuel gas transport, storage, and use through the odorization of this product. In the United States, mixtures of sulfur compounds are used, but the major constituent of odorant packages is 2-methylpropane-2-thiol, also known as tert-butyl mercaptan. It has been fundamentally challenging to understand olfaction and odorization due to the low affinity of odorous ligands to the ORs and the difficulty in expressing a sufficient number of OR proteins. Here, we directly observed the binding of tert-butyl mercaptan and another odiferous compound, cis-cyclooctene, to mouse OR MOR244-3 on living cells by saturation transfer difference (STD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This effort lays the groundwork for resolving molecular mechanisms responsible for ligand binding and resulting signaling, which in turn will lead to a clearer understanding of odorant recognition and competition. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Depth-dependent swimbladder compression in herring Clupea harengus observed using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fässler, S M M; Fernandes, P G; Semple, S I K; Brierley, A S

    2009-01-01

    Changes in swimbladder morphology in an Atlantic herring Clupea harengus with pressure were examined by magnetic resonance imaging of a dead fish in a purpose-built pressure chamber. Swimbladder volume changed with pressure according to Boyle's Law, but compression in the lateral aspect was greater than in the dorsal aspect. This uneven compression has a reduced effect on acoustic backscattering than symmetrical compression and would elicit less pronounced effects of depth on acoustic biomass estimates of C. harengus.

  4. Role of Seed Coat in Imbibing Soybean Seeds Observed by Micro-magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Mika; Kikuchi, Kaori; Isobe, Seiichiro; Ishida, Nobuaki; Naito, Shigehiro; Kano, Hiromi

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Imbibition of Japanese soybean (Glycine max) cultivars was studied using micro-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to elucidate the mechanism of soaking injury and the protective role of the seed coat. Methods Time-lapse images during water uptake were acquired by the single-point imaging (SPI) method at 15-min intervals, for 20 h in the dry seed with seed coat, and for 2 h in seeds with the seed coat removed. The technique visualized water migration within the testa and demonstrated the distortion associated with cotyledon swelling during the very early stages of water uptake. Key Results Water soon appeared in the testa and went around the dorsal surface of the seed from near the raphe, then migrated to the hilum region. An obvious protrusion was noted when water reached the hypocotyl and the radicle, followed by swelling of the cotyledons. A convex area was observed around the raphe with the enlargement of the seed. Water was always incorporated into the cotyledons from the abaxial surfaces, leading to swelling and generating a large air space between the adaxial surfaces. Water uptake greatly slowed, and the internal structures, veins and oil-accumulating tissues in the cotyledons developed after the seed stopped expanding. When the testa was removed from the dry seeds before imbibition, the cotyledons were severely damaged within 1·5 h of water uptake. Conclusions The activation of the water channel seemed unnecessary for water entry into soybean seeds, and the testa rapidly swelled with steeping in water. However, the testa did not regulate the water incorporation in itself, but rather the rate at which water encountered the hypocotyl, the radicle, and the cotyledons through the inner layer of the seed coat, and thus prevented the destruction of the seed tissues at the beginning of imbibition. PMID:18565982

  5. Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopic observations in 4 cases with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Kato, T; Shioiri, T; Murashita, J; Inubushi, T

    1997-05-01

    1. Brain phosphorus metabolism was examined using phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 4 patients with anorexia nervosa. 2. In 4 patients examined before treatment, phosphodiester (PDE) peak area was significantly higher than that in 13 normal females. 3. In 6 data points in 4 patients, lower levels of PME were associated with malnutrition reflected by endocrinological abnormalities. 4. These data suggest that severe malnutrition in patients with anorexia nervosa may result in abnormality in membrane phospholipid metabolism, which might be responsible for brain atrophy in anorexia nervosa.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-02-07

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor.

  7. Spin-flop transition on Gd5Ge4 observed by x-ray resonant magnetic scattering and first-principles calculations of magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, L.; Kreyssig, A.; Nandi, S.; Jia, S.; Lee, Y. B.; Lang, J. C.; Islam, Z.; Lograsso, T.; Schlagel, D.; Pecharsky, V.; Gschneidner, K.; Canfield, P.; Harmon, B.; McQueeney, R.; Goldman, A.

    2008-02-21

    X-ray resonant magnetic scattering was employed to study a fully reversible spin-flop transition in orthorhombic Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} and to elucidate details of the magnetic structure in the spin-flop phase. The orientation of the moments at the three Gd sites flop 90{sup o} from the c axis to the a axis when a magnetic field, H{sub sf} = 9 kOe, is applied along the c axis at T = 9 K. The magnetic space group changes from Pnm'a to Pn'm'a' for all three Gd sublattices. The magnetic anisotropy energy determined from experimental measurements is in good agreement with the calculations of the magnetic anisotropy based on the spin-orbit coupling of the conduction electrons and an estimation of the dipolar interactions anisotropy. No significant magnetostriction effects were observed at the spin-flop transition.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine: technical and clinical observations

    SciTech Connect

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Boumphrey, F.; Starnes, D.; Duchesneau, P.M.

    1983-12-01

    Seventy-two patients were examined to determine the clinical potential for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine. MRI using different pulse sequences was compared with plain radiography, high-resolution computed tomography, and myelography. There were 35 normal patients; pathologic conditions studied included canal stenosis, herniated disk, metastatic tumor, neurofibroma, trauma, Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, arteriovenous malformation, and rheumatoid arthritis. MRI provided sharply defined anatomic delineation and tissue characterization. It was diagnostic in syringomyelia and Chiari malformation and was useful in the evaluation of trauma and spinal canal block from any cause. MRI was sensitive to degenerative disk disease and infection. The spin-echo technique, with three pulse sequence variations, seems very promising. A short echo time (TE) produces the best signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Lengthening the TE enhances differentiation of various tissues by their signal intensity, whil the combined increase of TE and recovery time (TR) produces selective enhancement of the cerebrospinal fluid signal intensity.

  9. Brain of rats intoxicated with acrylamide: observation with 4.7 tesla magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Y; Matsumura, H; Igisu, H; Yokota, A

    2000-10-01

    When rats were injected intraperitoneally with acrylamide (50 mg/kg per day) for 8 days, all animals developed ataxia and weakness in the hindlimbs. On examining their brain with an ultrahigh-field (4.7 T) magnetic resonance (MR) spectrometer, the lateral ventricles on both sides and the third ventricle were dilated. The aqueduct and cisterns were also enlarged. The size of the cerebral cortex was quantified in three MR image slices covering the cerebrum. Compared with the images of the brain of body weight-matched controls, the cerebral cortex of rats intoxicated with acrylamide was found to be smaller in the primary motor area in all slices, and in the primary or secondary sensory area in two slices. Taken together with previous enzymatic analyses, rats intoxicated with acrylamide (50 mg/kg per day for 8 days) seem to represent an animal model of acrylamide encephalopathy not only biochemically but also structurally.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z.; Suh, B.J.; Roukes, M.L.; Midzor, M.; Wigen, P.E.; Childress, J.R.

    1999-06-03

    Our objectives were to develop the Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) into an instrument capable of scientific studies of buried structures in technologically and scientifically important electronic materials such as magnetic multilayer materials. This work resulted in the successful demonstration of MRFM-detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) as a microscopic characterization tool for thin magnetic films. Strong FMR spectra obtained from microscopic Co thin films (500 and 1000 angstroms thick and 40 x 200 microns in lateral extent) allowed us to observe variations in sample inhomogeneity and magnetic anisotropy field. We demonstrated lateral imaging in microscopic FMR for the first time using a novel approach employing a spatially selective local field generated by a small magnetically polarized spherical crystallite of yttrium iron garnet. These successful applications of the MRFM in materials studies provided the basis for our successful proposal to DOE/BES to employ the MRF M in studies of buried interfaces in magnetic materials.

  11. Magnetic resonance annual, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book features reviews of high-resolution MRI of the knee, MRI of the normal and ischmeic hip, MRI of the heart, and temporomandibular joint imaging, as well as thorough discussion on artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging. Contributors consider the clinical applications of gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging and the clinical use of partial saturation and saturation recovery sequences. Timely reports assess the current status of rapid MRI and describe a new rapid gated cine MRI technique. Also included is an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow effects during MRI of the central nervous system.

  12. Neurometabolic abnormalities in schizophrenia and depression observed with magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7 T

    PubMed Central

    Osuch, Elizabeth A.; Schaefer, Betsy; Rajakumar, Nagalingam; Neufeld, Richard W. J.; Théberge, Jean; Williamson, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Examining neurometabolic abnormalities in critical brain areas in schizophrenia and major depressive disorder (MDD) may help guide future pharmacological interventions including glutamate-modulating treatments. Aims To measure metabolite concentrations within the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and thalamus of people with schizophrenia and people with MDD. Methods Spectra were acquired from 16 volunteers with schizophrenia, 17 with MDD and 18 healthy controls using magnetic resonance spectroscopy on a 7 Tesla scanner. Results In the thalamus, there were lower glycine concentrations in the schizophrenia group relative to control (P=0.017) and MDD groups (P=0.012), and higher glutamine concentrations relative to healthy controls (P=0.009). In the thalamus and the ACC, the MDD group had lower myo-inositol concentrations than the control (P=0.014, P=0.009, respectively) and schizophrenia (P=0.004, P=0.002, respectively) groups. Conclusion These results support the glutamatergic theory of schizophrenia and indicate a potential glycine deficiency in the thalamus. In addition, reduced myo-inositol concentrations in MDD suggest its involvement in the disorder. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:28243459

  13. Observation of magnetic resonance and Faraday rotation in a spinel ZnCr2Se4 single crystal in the terahertz region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Su, Fuhai; Chen, Xuliang; Zhang, Shile; Mei, Hongying; Yang, Zhaorong; Dai, Jianming; Pi, Li

    2016-10-01

    The terahertz (THz) time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) of a ZnCr2Se4 single crystal has been performed under magnetic fields up to 9 Tesla at low temperatures. It was found that the magnetic resonance absorption originating from screw-spin-structure precession emerges in the THz region and evolves into ferromagnetic resonance absorption with the application of an external magnetic field. Benefiting from the phase- and polarization-sensitive detection technique of THz-TDS, the THz Faraday rotations of ZnCr2Se4 were observed in both time and frequency domains, whose temperature and magnetic field dependences manifest typical magnetic structure transitions.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Du, An-Tao; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews recent studies of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, idiopathic Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and vascular dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can detect structural alteration and biochemical abnormalities in the brain of demented subjects and may help in the differential diagnosis and early detection of affected individuals, monitoring disease progression, and evaluation of therapeutic effect. PMID:11563438

  15. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  16. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  17. Magnetic Resonance Annual, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The inaugural volume of Magnetic Resonance Annual includes reviews of MRI of the posterior fossa, cerebral neoplasms, and the cardiovascular and genitourinary systems. A chapter on contrast materials outlines the mechanisms of paramagnetic contrast enhancement and highlights several promising contrast agents.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a review of magnetic resonance imaging. Many topics are explored from instrumentation, spectroscopy, blood flow and sodium imaging to detailed clinical applications such as the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis or adrenal adenoma. The emphasis throughout is on descriptions of normal multiplanar anatomy and pathology as displayed by MRI.

  19. Reflecting on Mirror Mechanisms: Motor Resonance Effects during Action Observation Only Present with Low-Intensity Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Loporto, Michela; Holmes, Paul S.; Wright, David J.; McAllister, Craig J.

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies indicate that the observation of other people's actions influences the excitability of the observer's motor system. Motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes typically increase in muscles which would be active during the execution of the observed action. This ‘motor resonance’ effect is thought to result from activity in mirror neuron regions, which enhance the excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1) via cortico-cortical pathways. The importance of TMS intensity has not yet been recognised in this area of research. Low-intensity TMS predominately activates corticospinal neurons indirectly, whereas high-intensity TMS can directly activate corticospinal axons. This indicates that motor resonance effects should be more prominent when using low-intensity TMS. A related issue is that TMS is typically applied over a single optimal scalp position (OSP) to simultaneously elicit MEPs from several muscles. Whether this confounds results, due to differences in the manner that TMS activates spatially separate cortical representations, has not yet been explored. In the current study, MEP amplitudes, resulting from single-pulse TMS applied over M1, were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles during the observation of simple finger abductions. We tested if the TMS intensity (110% vs. 130% resting motor threshold) or stimulating position (FDI-OSP vs. ADM-OSP) influenced the magnitude of the motor resonance effects. Results showed that the MEP facilitation recorded in the FDI muscle during the observation of index-finger abductions was only detected using low-intensity TMS. In contrast, changes in the OSP had a negligible effect on the presence of motor resonance effects in either the FDI or ADM muscles. These findings support the hypothesis that MN activity enhances M1 excitability via cortico-cortical pathways and highlight a methodological framework by which the neural

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging and behavioral analysis of immature rats with kaolin-induced hydrocephalus: pre- and postshunting observations.

    PubMed

    Del Bigio, M R; Crook, C R; Buist, R

    1997-11-01

    The motor and cognitive dysfunction associated with hydrocephalus remains a clinical problem in children. We hypothesized that young rats with hydrocephalus should exhibit similar dysfunction and that the dysfunction should be reversible by shunting. Hydrocephalus was induced in 3-week-old rats by injection of kaolin into the cisterna magna. Rats were assessed by T2-weighted images obtained with a 7-T magnetic resonance device and by repeated behavioral testing including ability to traverse a narrow beam and ability to find a hidden platform in a water pool. Some of the rats underwent a shunting procedure 1 or 4 weeks after kaolin injection. Magnetic resonance images were used to measure ventricle size. They clearly demonstrated increased signal in periventricular white matter, which corresponded to increased brain water content. A flow-void phenomenon was observed in the cerebral aqueduct. Ability to traverse the beam did not correlate with the degree of ventriculomegaly. Ability to swim to the hidden platform demonstrated a progressive impairment of learning function which may have been accentuated by motor disability. When rats were shunted after 1 week, the behavioral dysfunction was prevented. Late shunting after 4 weeks was associated with gradual recovery of the behavioral disability which was not complete after 4 weeks. We conclude that early shunting is superior to late shunting with regard to behavioral dysfunction. High-resolution MR imaging shows features in hydrocephalic rats similar to those found in hydrocephalic humans.

  1. In-situ visual observation for the formation and dissociation of methane hydrates in porous media by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiafei; Lv, Qin; Li, Yanghui; Yang, Mingjun; Liu, Weiguo; Yao, Lei; Wang, Shenglong; Zhang, Yi; Song, Yongchen

    2015-05-01

    In this work, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was employed to observe the in-situ formation and dissociation of methane hydrates in porous media. Methane hydrate was formed in a high-pressure cell with controlled temperature, and then the hydrate was dissociated by thermal injection. The process was photographed by the MRI, and the pressure was recorded. The images confirmed that the direct visual observation was achieved; these were then employed to provide detailed information of the nucleation, growth, and decomposition of the hydrate. Moreover, the saturation of methane hydrate during the dissociation was obtained from the MRI intensity data. Our results showed that the hydrate saturation initially decreased rapidly, and then slowed down; this finding is in line with predictions based only on pressure. The study clearly showed that MRI is a useful technique to investigate the process of methane hydrate formation and dissociation in porous media. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Safety

    PubMed Central

    Sammet, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has a superior soft-tissue contrast compared to other radiological imaging modalities and its physiological and functional applications have led to a significant increase in MRI scans worldwide. A comprehensive MRI safety training to protect patients and other healthcare workers from potential bio-effects and risks of the magnetic fields in an MRI suite is therefore essential. The knowledge of the purpose of safety zones in an MRI suite as well as MRI appropriateness criteria is important for all healthcare professionals who will work in the MRI environment or refer patients for MRI scans. The purpose of this article is to give an overview of current magnetic resonance safety guidelines and discuss the safety risks of magnetic fields in an MRI suite including forces and torque of ferromagnetic objects, tissue heating, peripheral nerve stimulation and hearing damages. MRI safety and compatibility of implanted devices, MRI scans during pregnancy and the potential risks of MRI contrast agents will also be discussed and a comprehensive MRI safety training to avoid fatal accidents in an MRI suite will be presented. PMID:26940331

  3. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  4. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  5. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed.

  6. Functional pools of oxidative and glycolytic fibers in human muscle observed by /sup 31/P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Brown, R.L.; Park, C.R.; McCully, K.; Cohn, M.; Haselgrove, J.; Chance, B.

    1987-12-01

    Quantitative probing of heterogeneous regions in muscle is feasible with phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy because of the differentiation of metabolic patterns of glycolytic and oxidative fibers. A differential recruitment of oxidative and glycolytic fibers during exercise was demonstrated in 4 of 10 untrained young men by following changes in phosphate metabolites. Concentrations of inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), phosphocreatine, and ATP were estimated in the wrist flexor muscles of the forearm at rest, during two cycles of three grades of exercise, and in recovery. At high work levels (40% of maximum strength), two distinct P/sub i/ peaks were observed and identified with P/sub i/ pools at pH 6.9 and pH 5.9-6.4, respectively. These could be accounted for as follows. At the lowest level of work (using 20% of maximum strength), early recruitment primarily of oxidative (type I) and possibly some intermediate (type IIA) muscle fibers occurs with relatively little net lactate production and consequently little decrease in pH. At higher work loads, however, primarily glycolytic (type IIB) muscle fibers are recruited, which have relatively high net lactate production and therefore generate a second pool of P/sub i/ at low pH. These observations indicated exhaustion of glycolytic type IIB fibers, removal of lactate by high local blood flow, and sustained contractions largely by oxidative type I and IIA fibers. A functional differentiation of fiber types could also be demonstrated during recovery if exercise was stopped while two pools of P/sub i/ were still apparent. The potential of magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize oxidative and glycolytic fibers, predict capacity for aerobic performance, and signal the presence of muscle pathology is discussed.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, design, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Larsen, Michael; Mirijanian, James

    2012-06-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation is concluding the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This poster will describe the history, operational principles, and design basics of the NMRG including an overview of the NSD designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program. General performance results from phases 3 and 4 will also be presented.

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael; Griffith, Robert; Bulatowicz, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The navigation grade micro Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (micro-NMRG) being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) has concluded the fourth and final phase of the DARPA Navigation Grade Integrated Micro Gyro (NGIMG) program. Traditional MEMS gyros utilize springs as an inherent part of the sensing mechanism, leading to bias and scale factor sensitivity to acceleration and vibration. As a result, they have not met performance expectations in real world environments and to date have been limited to tactical grade applications. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as an inertial reference for determining rotation. The nuclear spin precession rate sensitivity to acceleration and vibration is negligible for most applications. Therefore, the application of new micro and batch fabrication methods to NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost and compact gyro. This presentation will describe the operational principles, design basics, and demonstrated performance of the NMRG including an overview of the NGC designs developed and demonstrated in the DARPA gyro development program.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance blood flowmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Battocletti, J.H.; Halbach, R.E.; Antonich, F.J.; Sances, A. Jr.; Knox, T.A.

    1986-09-23

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance blood flowmeter is described for non-invasively measuring blood flow in a human limb comprising; polarizing magnet means for generating a substantially uniform magnetic field; a limb receiving lumen for supporting a human limb within the field generated by the polarizing magnet means so that blood molecules within the limb are magnetically polarized thereby; transmitter means located adjacent the lumen for inducing a nuclear magnetic resonance response in the blood molecules of the human limb disposed within the lumen; scanning means including: first means for generating a first pair of opposing magnetic fields within the lumen for cancelling the nuclear magnetic resonance response induced by the transmitter means everywhere except within a first null plane along which the first opposing magnetic fields cancel each other; second means for generating a second pair of opposing magnetic fields; and control means coupled to the first and second means for generating the first and second pair of opposing magnetic fields.

  12. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelc, Norbert

    2000-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are a major source of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early detection of disease can often be used to improved outcomes, either through direct interventions (e.g. surgical corrections) or by causing the patient to modify his or her behavior (e.g. smoking cessation or dietary changes). Ideally, the detection process should be noninvasive (i.e. it should not be associated with significant risk). Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) refers to the formation of images by localizing NMR signals, typically from protons in the body. As in other applications of NMR, a homogeneous static magnetic field ( ~0.5 to 4 T) is used to create ``longitudinal" magnetization. A magnetic field rotating at the Larmor frequency (proportional to the static field) excites spins, converting longitudinal magnetization to ``transverse" magnetization and generating a signal. Localization is performed using pulsed gradients in the static field. MRI can produce images of 2-D slices, 3-D volumes, time-resolved images of pseudo-periodic phenomena such as heart function, and even real-time imaging. It is also possible to acquire spatially localized NMR spectra. MRI has a number of advantages, but perhaps the most fundamental is the richness of the contrast mechanisms. Tissues can be differentiated by differences in proton density, NMR properties, and even flow or motion. We also have the ability to introduce substances that alter NMR signals. These contrast agents can be used to enhance vascular structures and measure perfusion. Cardiovascular MRI allows the reliable diagnosis of important conditions. It is possible to image the blood vessel tree, quantitate flow and perfusion, and image cardiac contraction. Fundamentally, the power of MRI as a diagnostic tool stems from the richness of the contrast mechanisms and the flexibility in control of imaging parameters.

  13. nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Karwacki, F. A.; Griffin, J.

    1985-04-02

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope which derives angular rotation thereof from the phases of precessing nuclear moments utilizes a single-resonance cell situated in the center of a uniform DC magnetic field. The field is generated by current flow through a circular array of coils between parallel plates. It also utilizes a pump and read-out beam and associated electronics for signal processing and control. Encapsulated in the cell for sensing rotation are odd isotopes of Mercury Hg/sup 199/ and Hg/sup 201/. Unpolarized intensity modulated light from a pump lamp is directed by lenses to a linear polarizer, quarter wave plate combination producing circularly polarized light. The circularly polarized light is reflected by a mirror to the cell transverse to the field for optical pumping of the isotopes. Unpolarized light from a readout lamp is directed by lenses to another linear polarizer. The linearly polarized light is reflected by another mirror to the cell transverse to the field and orthogonal to the pump lamp light. The linear light after transversing the cell strikes an analyzer where it is converted to an intensity-modulated light. The modulated light is detected by a photodiode processed and utilized as feedback to control the field and pump lamp excitation and readout of angular displacement.

  14. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  15. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-01-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density. PMID:28186135

  16. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R

    2017-02-10

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  17. Observation of electro-osmotic flow echoes in porous media by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendel, P.; Bernardo, M.; Dunsmuir, J. H.; Thomann, H.

    2003-04-01

    A method for assessing the time reversibility of molecular displacements in fluids is presented. The method utilizes pulsed field gradient NMR experiments, in which the flow driving force is inverted during the magnetization lifetime in each measurement cycle. The method is suitable for opaque three-dimensional systems and short displacements, and provides inherent separation between thermal diffusion and displacements driven by externally controlled forces. This approach was applied to study the time reversibility of an electric-field-driven flow of water in natural sand samples, over time scales of up to 0.4 s and displacement scales of the order of one particle diameter. It is demonstrated that the intensity loss of the NMR signal, caused by flow-induced phase dispersion, is fully refocused upon inversion of the polarity of the applied electric field, resulting in flow echoes.

  18. Clinical interpretation of asymptomatic medial collateral ligament injury observed on magnetic resonance imaging in adolescent baseball players.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenta; Okamoto, Yoshikazu; Makihara, Takeshi; Maehara, Kiyoshi; Yoshizawa, Tomohiro; Minami, Manabu; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury of the elbow was often observed in asymptomatic adolescent baseball players. We aimed to clarify the clinical interpretation of "asymptomatic MCL injury observed on MRI" by comparing MRI, ultrasonography (US), and physical findings. Sixty-four asymptomatic adolescent baseball players (mean 11.2 years) were enrolled. An open-type 0.2T MRI was used. MCL function was evaluated by measuring the opening of the ulnohumeral joint using US. Physical findings included MCL tenderness, the moving valgus test, and the Milking test. The correlation between MRI and US, and MRI and physical findings were analyzed. Thirty-four subjects (53.1%) showed MCL injury by MRI. The mean laterality of the ulnohumeral joint opening showed no significant difference (P = 0.16) between the group with (0.29 ± 1.06 mm) and without (0.08 ± 0.96 mm) MCL injury on MRI. There was no correlation between MRI and physical findings except for a weak correlation between subjects with positive Milking test and MCL injury on MRI (φ coefficient = 0.3, P = 0.02). 'Asymptomatic MCL injury on MRI' had little correlation to ligament dysfunction. It might represent the transition period to MCL thickening called "adaptation."

  19. Magnetic resonance urography.

    PubMed

    Leyendecker, John R; Gianini, John W

    2009-07-01

    Excellent contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation make magnetic resonance urography (MRU) a promising technique for noninvasively evaluating the entire urinary tract. While MRU currently lags behind CT urography (CTU) in spatial resolution and efficiency, new hardware and sequence developments have contributed to a resurgence of interest in MRU techniques. By combining unenhanced sequences with multiphase contrast-enhanced and excretory phase imaging, a comprehensive assessment of the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and surrounding structures is possible with image quality rivaling that obtained with other techniques. At the same time, formidable challenges remain to be overcome and further clinical validation is necessary before MRU can replace other forms of urography. In this article, we demonstrate the current potential of MRU to demonstrate a spectrum of urologic pathology involving the kidneys, ureters, and bladder while discussing the limitations and current status of this evolving technique.

  20. Mirror observation of finger action enhances activity in anterior intraparietal sulcus: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Numata, Kenji; Murayama, Takashi; Takasugi, Jun; Monma, Masahiko; Oga, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Mirror therapy can be used to promote recovery from paralysis in patients with post-stroke hemiplegia, There are a lot of reports that mirror-image observation of the unilateral moving hand enhanced the excitability of the primary motor area (M1) ipsilateral to the moving hand in healthy subjects. but the neural mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effects are currently unclear. To investigate this issue, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure activity in brain regions related to visual information processing during mirror image movement observation. Thirteen healthy subjects performed a finger-thumb opposition task with the left and right hands separately, with or without access to mirror observation. In the mirror condition, one hand was reflected in a mirror placed above the abdomen in the MRI scanner. In the masked mirror condition, subjects performed the same task but with the mirror obscured. In both conditions, the other hand was held at rest behind the mirror. A between-task comparison (mirror versus masked mirror) revealed significant activation in the ipsilateral hemisphere in the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIP) while performing all tasks, regardless of which hand was used. The right aIP was significantly activated while moving the right hand. In contrast, in the left aIP, a small number of voxels showed a tendency toward activation during both left and right hand movement. The enhancement of ipsilateral aIP activity by the mirror image observation of finger action suggests that bimodal aIP neurons can be activated by visual information. We propose that activation in the M1 ipsilateral to the moving hand can be induced by information passing through the ventral premotor area from the aIP.

  1. Mirror Observation of Finger Action Enhances Activity in Anterior Intraparietal Sulcus: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Takashi; Takasugi, Jun; Monma, Masahiko; Oga, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Mirror therapy can be used to promote recovery from paralysis in patients with post-stroke hemiplegia, There are a lot of reports that mirror-image observation of the unilateral moving hand enhanced the excitability of the primary motor area (M1) ipsilateral to the moving hand in healthy subjects. but the neural mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effects are currently unclear. To investigate this issue, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure activity in brain regions related to visual information processing during mirror image movement observation. Thirteen healthy subjects performed a finger-thumb opposition task with the left and right hands separately, with or without access to mirror observation. In the mirror condition, one hand was reflected in a mirror placed above the abdomen in the MRI scanner. In the masked mirror condition, subjects performed the same task but with the mirror obscured. In both conditions, the other hand was held at rest behind the mirror. A between-task comparison (mirror versus masked mirror) revealed significant activation in the ipsilateral hemisphere in the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIP) while performing all tasks, regardless of which hand was used. The right aIP was significantly activated while moving the right hand. In contrast, in the left aIP, a small number of voxels showed a tendency toward activation during both left and right hand movement. The enhancement of ipsilateral aIP activity by the mirror image observation of finger action suggests that bimodal aIP neurons can be activated by visual information. We propose that activation in the M1 ipsilateral to the moving hand can be induced by information passing through the ventral premotor area from the aIP. PMID:25792898

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Michael; Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Mirijanian, James; Pavell, James

    2015-05-01

    The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) is being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC). Cold and hot atom interferometer based gyroscopes have suffered from Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP) challenges and limits in bandwidth, scale factor stability, dead time, high rotation rate, vibration, and acceleration. NMRG utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as a reference for determining rotation, providing continuous measurement, high bandwidth, stable scale factor, high rotation rate measurement, and low sensitivity to vibration and acceleration in a low SWaP package. The sensitivity to vibration has been partially tested and demonstrates no measured sensitivity within error bars. Real time closed loop implementation of the sensor significantly decreases environmental and systematic sensitivities and supports a compact and low power digital signal processing and control system. Therefore, the NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost SWaP package. The poster will describe the history, operation, and design of the NMRG. General performance results will also be presented along with recent vibration test results.

  3. Annual water storage variability in Southwest Niger: confrontation of absolute gravimetric measurements and magnetic resonance soundings surveys with hydrological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, J.; Boucher, M.; Hinderer, J.; Favreau, G.; Boy, J.; de Linage, C.; Luck, B.; Oi, M.

    2009-12-01

    Advances in methods of observation are essential to ensure a better understanding of the evolution of water resources considering climate changes and human activities. The GHYRAF (Gravity and Hydrology in Africa) project aims to combine geodetic and gravimetric measurements with dense hydrological surveys to better characterize the annual water storage variability in tropical West Africa. In Southwest Niger periodic absolute gravimetric measurements are performed near a temporary pond where rapid infiltration to the unconfined aquifer occurs. In parallel, pond water level, piezometry, and soil water content are regularly measured. As gravity is sensitive both to local and global variations of water mass distribution, the large scale contribution is first removed using either GRACE satellite data or global hydrology models like GLDAS or ECMWF. The comparison of local water storage variations estimated by gravimetric and hydrological in-situ measurements allows estimating the specific yield of the aquifer to a value ranging between 5 and 7 %. This value is consistent with the 5 to 13 % porosity estimated by Magnetic Resonance Sounding survey. The good agreement between these two independent methods proves the interest in using gravimetric measurements to constrain parameterization of local hydrological modeling. Additional measurements with relative spring gravimeters are scheduled to better characterize spatial heterogeneity in water storage variability.

  4. 7Li-nuclear magnetic resonance observations of lithium insertion into coke carbon modified with mesophase-pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuichi; Tanuma, Ken-ichi; Takayama, Toshio; Kobayakawa, Koichi; Kawai, Takanobu; Yokoyama, Akira

    Lithium intercalation into coke carbon modified with mesophase-pitch and heat-treated at 800, 1000, and 3000°C was observed using solid-state 7Li-nuclear magnetic resonance ( 7Li-NMR) spectroscopy. It was found that the fully lithiated state charged to 0 V in the modified coke heat-treated at 3000°C showed a peak at about 45 ppm; on the other hand, two peaks appeared at about 45 and 16-17 ppm in the modified coke heat-treated below 1000°C. The peak appearing at 45 ppm indicated that Li-GIC is present in the first stage, and the peak at about 16-17 ppm indicated that the lithium stored in the modified part has an ionic character greater than in the coke part and is not a lithium cluster. The lithiated states charged to 0.1 and 0.2 V and discharged to 0.1, 0.2 and 1.5 V from the charged state (0 V) are also described.

  5. Stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with observation unit care reduces cost for patients with emergent chest pain: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chadwick D; Hwang, Wenke; Hoekstra, James W; Case, Doug; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hiestand, Brian; Diercks, Deborah B; Hamilton, Craig A; Harper, Erin N; Hundley, W Gregory

    2010-09-01

    We determine whether imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an observation unit would reduce medical costs among patients with emergent non-low-risk chest pain who otherwise would be managed with an inpatient care strategy. Emergency department patients (n=110) at intermediate or high probability for acute coronary syndrome without electrocardiographic or biomarker evidence of a myocardial infarction provided consent and were randomized to stress cardiac MRI in an observation unit versus standard inpatient care. The primary outcome was direct hospital cost calculated as the sum of hospital and provider costs. Estimated median cost differences (Hodges-Lehmann) and distribution-free 95% confidence intervals (Moses) were used to compare groups. There were 110 participants with 53 randomized to cardiac MRI and 57 to inpatient care; 8 of 110 (7%) experienced acute coronary syndrome. In the MRI pathway, 49 of 53 underwent stress cardiac MRI, 11 of 53 were admitted, 1 left against medical advice, 41 were discharged, and 2 had acute coronary syndrome. In the inpatient care pathway, 39 of 57 patients initially received stress testing, 54 of 57 were admitted, 3 left against medical advice, and 6 had acute coronary syndrome. At 30 days, no subjects in either group experienced acute coronary syndrome after discharge. The cardiac MRI group had a reduced median hospitalization cost (Hodges-Lehmann estimate $588; 95% confidence interval $336 to $811); 79% were managed without hospital admission. Compared with inpatient care, an observation unit strategy involving stress cardiac MRI reduced incident cost without any cases of missed acute coronary syndrome in patients with emergent chest pain. Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stress Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Observation Unit Care Reduces Cost for Patients With Emergent Chest Pain: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Chadwick D.; Hwang, Wenke; Hoekstra, James W.; Case, Doug; Lefebvre, Cedric; Blumstein, Howard; Hiestand, Brian; Diercks, Deborah B.; Hamilton, Craig A.; Harper, Erin N.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Study objective We determine whether imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an observation unit would reduce medical costs among patients with emergent non-low-risk chest pain who otherwise would be managed with an inpatient care strategy. Methods Emergency department patients (n=110) at intermediate or high probability for acute coronary syndrome without electrocardiographic or biomarker evidence of a myocardial infarction provided consent and were randomized to stress cardiac MRI in an observation unit versus standard inpatient care. The primary outcome was direct hospital cost calculated as the sum of hospital and provider costs. Estimated median cost differences (Hodges-Lehmann) and distribution-free 95% confidence intervals (Moses) were used to compare groups. Results There were 110 participants with 53 randomized to cardiac MRI and 57 to inpatient care; 8 of 110 (7%) experienced acute coronary syndrome. In the MRI pathway, 49 of 53 underwent stress cardiac MRI, 11 of 53 were admitted, 1 left against medical advice, 41 were discharged, and 2 had acute coronary syndrome. In the inpatient care pathway, 39 of 57 patients initially received stress testing, 54 of 57 were admitted, 3 left against medical advice, and 6 had acute coronary syndrome. At 30 days, no subjects in either group experienced acute coronary syndrome after discharge. The cardiac MRI group had a reduced median hospitalization cost (Hodges-Lehmann estimate $588; 95% confidence interval $336 to $811); 79% were managed without hospital admission. Conclusion Compared with inpatient care, an observation unit strategy involving stress cardiac MRI reduced incident cost without any cases of missed acute coronary syndrome in patients with emergent chest pain. PMID:20554078

  7. A guide to the metabolic pathways and function of metabolites observed in human brain 1H magnetic resonance spectra.

    PubMed

    Rae, Caroline D

    2014-01-01

    The current knowledge of the normal biochemistry of compounds that give rise to resonances in human brain proton magnetic resonance spectra measureable at readily available field strengths (i.e. ≤3 T) is reviewed. Molecules covered include myo- and scyllo-inositol, glycerophospho- and phospho-choline and choline, creatine and phosphocreatine, N-acetylaspartate, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, glutamate, glutamine, γ-aminobutyrate, glucose, glutathione and lactate. The factors which influence changes in the levels of these compounds are discussed. As most proton resonances in the brain at low field are derived from a combination of moieties whose biochemistry is complex and interrelated, an understanding of the mechanisms underlying why these species change is crucial to meaningful interpretation of human brain spectra.

  8. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  9. Action anticipation beyond the action observation network: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in expert basketball players.

    PubMed

    Abreu, A M; Macaluso, E; Azevedo, R T; Cesari, P; Urgesi, C; Aglioti, S M

    2012-05-01

    The ability to predict the actions of others is quintessential for effective social interactions, particularly in competitive contexts (e.g. in sport) when knowledge about upcoming movements allows anticipating rather than reacting to opponents. Studies suggest that we predict what others are doing by using our own motor system as an internal forward model and that the fronto-parietal action observation network (AON) is fundamental for this ability. However, multiple-duty cells dealing with action perception and execution have been found in a variety of cortical regions. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore, in expert basketball athletes and novices, whether the ability to make early predictions about the fate of sport-specific actions (i.e. free throws) is underpinned by neural regions beyond the classical AON. We found that, although involved in action prediction, the fronto-parietal AON was similarly activated in novices and experts. Importantly, athletes exhibited relatively greater activity in the extrastriate body area during the prediction task, probably due to their expert reading of the observed action kinematics. Moreover, experts exhibited higher activation in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus and in the right anterior insular cortex when producing errors, suggesting that they might become aware of their own errors. Correct action prediction induced higher posterior insular cortex activity in experts and higher orbito-frontal activity in novices, suggesting that body awareness is important for performance monitoring in experts, whereas novices rely more on higher-order decision-making strategies. This functional reorganization highlights the tight relationship between action anticipation, error awareness and motor expertise leading to body-related processing and differences in decision-making processes. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell

  10. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks.

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuhs, Bradley L.; Simsek, Senay

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful analytical technique with a wide variety of applications. It may be used for complex structural studies, for protocol or process development, or as a simple quality assay for which structural information is important. It is nondestructive, and high-quality data may be obtained from milligram, even microgram, quantities of sample. Whereas other spectroscopy techniques may be used to determine the nature of the functional groups present in a sample, only NMR spectroscopy can provide the data necessary to determine the complete structure of a molecule. The applicability of NMR to food analysis has increased over the last three decades. In addition to improved instrumentation and much lower costs, very complex and specialized NMR techniques can now be routinely performed by a student or technician. These experiments can be set up with the click of a button/icon, as all the basic parameters are embedded into default experiment files listed in the data/work station software, and the results are obtained in a short time.

  12. Pediatric magnetic resonance urography.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard A; Grattan-Smith, J Damien; Little, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) is a powerful clinical tool that fuses anatomic information with functional data in a single test without the use of ionizing radiation. This article provides an overview of the technical aspects, as well as common clinical applications with an emphasis on the evaluation of hydronephrosis. A fluid challenge is an essential part of our MRU protocol and enables the definition of compensated or decompensated kidneys within the spectrum of hydronephrosis. This classification may have prognostic implications when surgery is being considered. In addition, underlying uropathy can be identified on the anatomical scans and renal scarring can be seen on both the anatomical and dynamic scans. MRU can identify and categorize dysmorphic kidneys in vivo and may provide insight into congenital abnormalities seen in conjunction with vesicoureteric reflux. MRU is still in its infancy and as the technique develops and becomes widely available, it seems likely that it will supplant renal scintigraphy in the evaluation of renal tract disorders in children. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Paul H.; Brainard, James R.; Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Ryan, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  15. Introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Mlynárik, Vladimír

    2016-05-19

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a useful tool for studying normal and pathological biochemical processes in tissues. In this review, the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance and methods of obtaining nuclear magnetic resonance spectra are briefly outlined. The origin of the most important spectroscopic parameters-chemical shifts, coupling constants, longitudinal and transverse relaxation times, and spectroscopic line intensities-is explained, and the role of these parameters in interpretation of spectra is addressed. Basic methodological concepts of localized spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging for the study of tissue metabolism in vivo are also described.

  16. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a set of simple, inexpensive, classical demonstrations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) principles that illustrate the resonance condition associated with magnetic dipoles and the dependence of the resonance frequency on environment. (WRM)

  17. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a set of simple, inexpensive, classical demonstrations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) principles that illustrate the resonance condition associated with magnetic dipoles and the dependence of the resonance frequency on environment. (WRM)

  18. The association between cerebral developmental venous anomaly and concomitant cavernous malformation: an observational study using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Meng, Guolu; Bai, Chuanfeng; Yu, Tengfei; Wu, Zhen; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Junting; zhao, Jizong

    2014-03-15

    Some studies reported that cerebral developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is often concurrent with cavernous malformation (CM). But there is lack of statistical evidence and study of bulk cases. The factors associated with concurrency are still unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of concomitant DVA and CM using observational data on Chinese patients and analyze the factors associated with the concurrency. The records of all cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed between January 2001 and December 2012 in Beijing Tiantan Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. The DVA and CM cases were selected according to imaging reports that met diagnostic criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using the Pearson chi-square statistic for binary variables and multivariable logistic regression analysis for predictors associated with the concurrent CM. We reviewed a total of 165,230 cranial MR images performed during the previous 12 year period, and identified 1,839 cases that met DVA radiographic criteria. There were 205 patients who presented concomitant CM among the 1,839 DVAs. The CM prevalence in DVA cases (11.1%) was significantly higher than that in the non-DVA cases (2.3%) (P<0.01). In the multivariate analysis, we found that DVAs with three or more medullary veins in the same MRI section (adjusted OR = 2.37, 95% CI: 1.73-3.24), infratentorial DVAs (adjusted OR = 1.71, 95% CI: 1.26-2.33) and multiple DVAs (adjusted OR = 2.08, 95% CI: 1.04-4.16) have a higher likelihood of being concomitant with CM. CM are prone to coexisting with DVA. There is a higher chance of concurrent CM with DVA when the DVA has three or more medullary veins in the same MRI scanning section, when the DVA is infratentorial, and when there are multiple DVAs. When diagnosing DVA cases, physicians should be alerted to the possibility of concurrent CM.

  19. Direct Numerical Simulation of Pore-Scale Flow in a Bead Pack: Comparison with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Codd, Sarah L.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Mckinley, Matthew I.

    2013-04-01

    A significant body of current research is aimed at developing methods for numerical simulation of flow and transport in porous media that explicitly resolve complex pore and solid geometries, and at utilizing such models to study the relationships between fundamental pore-scale processes and macroscopic manifestations at larger (i.e., Darcy) scales. A number of different numerical methods for pore-scale simulation have been developed, and have been extensively tested and validated for simplified geometries. However, validation of pore-scale simulations of fluid velocity for complex, three-dimensional (3D) pore geometries that are representative of natural porous media is challenging due to our limited ability to measure pore-scale velocity in such systems. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offer the opportunity to measure not only the pore geometry, but also local fluid velocities under steady-state flow conditions in 3D and with high spatial resolution. In this paper, we present a 3D velocity field measured at sub-pore resolution (tens of micrometers) over a centimeter-scale 3D domain using MRI methods. We have utilized the measured pore geometry to perform 3D simulations of Navier-Stokes flow over the same domain using direct numerical simulation techniques. We present a comparison of the numerical simulation results with the measured velocity field. It is shown that the numerical results match the observed velocity patterns well overall except for a variance and small systematic scaling which can be attributed to the known experimental error in the MRI measurements. The comparisons presented here provide strong validation of the pore-scale simulation methods and new insights for interpretation of uncertainty in MRI measurements of pore-scale velocity. This study also provides a potential benchmark for future comparison of other pore-scale simulation methods.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of pore-scale flow in a bead pack: Comparison with magnetic resonance imaging observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Codd, Sarah L.; Seymour, Joseph D.; McKinley, Matthew I.

    2013-04-01

    A significant body of current research is aimed at developing methods for numerical simulation of flow and transport in porous media that explicitly resolve complex pore and solid geometries, and at utilizing such models to study the relationships between fundamental pore-scale processes and macroscopic manifestations at larger (i.e., Darcy) scales. A number of different numerical methods for pore-scale simulation have been developed, and have been extensively tested and validated for simplified geometries. However, validation of pore-scale simulations of fluid velocity for complex, three-dimensional (3D) pore geometries that are representative of natural porous media is challenging due to our limited ability to measure pore-scale velocity in such systems. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offer the opportunity to measure not only the pore geometry, but also local fluid velocities under steady-state flow conditions in 3D and with high spatial resolution. In this paper, we present a 3D velocity field measured at sub-pore resolution (tens of micrometers) over a centimeter-scale 3D domain using MRI methods. We have utilized the measured pore geometry to perform 3D simulations of Navier-Stokes flow over the same domain using direct numerical simulation techniques. We present a comparison of the numerical simulation results with the measured velocity field. It is shown that the numerical results match the observed velocity patterns well overall except for a variance and small systematic scaling which can be attributed to the known experimental uncertainty in the MRI measurements. The comparisons presented here provide strong validation of the pore-scale simulation methods and new insights for interpretation of uncertainty in MRI measurements of pore-scale velocity. This study also provides a potential benchmark for future comparison of other pore-scale simulation methods. 2012 Elsevier Science.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does ... the area being scanned include: Metallic spinal rod Plates, pins, screws, or metal mesh used to repair ...

  2. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-07-01

    Several demonstrations of resonance phenomena associated with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are described. The demonstrations comprise common orienteering compasses, whose needles represent magnetic dipoles, along with three collinear permanent magnets and a magnetic stir plate or pulseable electromagnets. The trio of permanent magnets provides a laterally uniform magnetic field, whose strength decreases with distance from the magnets. Resonance can be observed by adjusting the frequency of the magnetic stirrer to match the resonant frequency of the compass needle, which is shown to depend on magnetic field strength, that is, the needle's position relative to the permanent magnets. Another demonstration involves pulsing electromagnets that apply a perpendicular magnetic field that causes the compass needles to oscillate. The effects of shielding, spin-spin coupling, magnetogyric ratio, and free induction decay can also be demonstrated. By moving the trio of permanent magnets relative to the compasses, the MRI experiment can be mimicked. Complete instructions for the construction of the demonstrations, which can be used on an overhead projector, are included.

  3. Detection and estimation of magnetization induced resonances in unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu Gaunkar, N.; Bulu, I.; Song, Y. Q.; Mina, M.; Jiles, D. C.

    2017-05-01

    In this work a systematic identification of factors contributing to signal ringing in unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors is conducted. Resonant peaks that originate due to multiple factors such as NMR, electrical, magneto-acoustic, core material response, eddy currents and other factors were observed. The peaks caused by the measurement system or electrical resonances and induced magnet vibrations are further analyzed. They appear in every measurement and are considered as interference to signals received from the magnetic core. Forming a distinction between different peaks is essential in identifying the primary contribution to the captured resonant signal. The measurements for the magnetic core indicate that the magnetization induced resonant peaks of the core have relatively higher amplitudes and shorter decay times at low frequencies.

  4. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  5. Early History of Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, N. F.

    1999-06-01

    The early history of magnetic resonance to around 1950 is discussed from the point of view of a participant in it. I. I. Rabi's theory of space quantization in a gyrating magnetic field and his molecular beam experiments in the 1930s laid the foundation of the magnetic resonance method, which he and his associates subsequently pursued and developed further at Columbia University, leading eventually to the development of NMR after World War II and the invention of the separated oscillatory fields method in 1950.

  6. Basics of magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Beginning with the behavior of a compass needle in a magnetic field, this text uses analogies from everyday experience to explain the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and how it is used for imaging. Using a minimum of scientific abbreviations and symbols, the basics of tissue visualization and characterization are presented. A description of the various types of magnets and scanners is followed by the practical advantages and limitations of MRI relative to x-ray CT scanning.

  7. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  8. The association between cerebral developmental venous anomaly and concomitant cavernous malformation: an observational study using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Some studies reported that cerebral developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is often concurrent with cavernous malformation (CM). But there is lack of statistical evidence and study of bulk cases. The factors associated with concurrency are still unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of concomitant DVA and CM using observational data on Chinese patients and analyze the factors associated with the concurrency. Methods The records of all cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed between January 2001 and December 2012 in Beijing Tiantan Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. The DVA and CM cases were selected according to imaging reports that met diagnostic criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using the Pearson chi-square statistic for binary variables and multivariable logistic regression analysis for predictors associated with the concurrent CM. Results We reviewed a total of 165,230 cranial MR images performed during the previous 12 year period, and identified 1,839 cases that met DVA radiographic criteria. There were 205 patients who presented concomitant CM among the 1,839 DVAs. The CM prevalence in DVA cases (11.1%) was significantly higher than that in the non-DVA cases (2.3%) (P<0.01). In the multivariate analysis, we found that DVAs with three or more medullary veins in the same MRI section (adjusted OR = 2.37, 95% CI: 1.73-3.24), infratentorial DVAs (adjusted OR = 1.71, 95% CI: 1.26-2.33) and multiple DVAs (adjusted OR = 2.08, 95% CI: 1.04-4.16) have a higher likelihood of being concomitant with CM. Conclusions CM are prone to coexisting with DVA. There is a higher chance of concurrent CM with DVA when the DVA has three or more medullary veins in the same MRI scanning section, when the DVA is infratentorial, and when there are multiple DVAs. When diagnosing DVA cases, physicians should be alerted to the possibility of concurrent CM. PMID:24628866

  9. Ventilation defects observed with hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging in a mouse model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Abe C; Nouls, John C; Driehuys, Bastiaan; Voltz, James W; Fubara, Boma; Foley, Julie; Bradbury, J Alyce; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2011-05-01

    Regions of diminished ventilation are often evident during functional pulmonary imaging studies, including hyperpolarized gas magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography, and computed tomography (CT). The objective of this study was to characterize the hypointense regions observed via (3)He MRI in a murine model of acute lung injury. LPS at doses ranging from 15-50 μg was intratracheally administered to C57BL/6 mice under anesthesia. Four hours after exposure to either LPS or saline vehicle, mice were imaged via hyperpolarized (3)He MRI. All images were evaluated to identify regions of hypointense signals. Lungs were then characterized by conventional histology, or used to obtain tissue samples from regions of normal and hypointense (3)He signals and analyzed for cytokine content. The characterization of (3)He MRI images identified three distinct types of hypointense patterns: persistent defects, atelectatic defects, and dorsal lucencies. Persistent defects were associated with the administration of LPS. The number of persistent defects depended on the dose of LPS, with a significant increase in mean number of defects in 30-50-μg LPS-dosed mice versus saline-treated control mice. Atelectatic defects predominated in LPS-dosed mice under conditions of low-volume ventilation, and could be reversed with deep inspiration. Dorsal lucencies were present in nearly all mice studied, regardless of the experimental conditions, including control animals that did not receive LPS. A comparison of (3)He MRI with histopathology did not identify tissue abnormalities in regions of low (3)He signal, with the exception of a single region of atelectasis in one mouse. Furthermore, no statistically significant differences were evident in concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, MIP-2, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (KC), TNFα, and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 between hypointense and normally ventilated lung regions in LPS

  10. Water entry for the black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) seeds observed by dedicated micro-magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Mika; Kano, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    Water entry at germination for black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) seeds which are known as hard seeds with impermeable seed coat to water, was examined using micro-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI apparatus equipped with a low-field (1 T; Tesla) permanent magnet was used, which is open access, easy maintenance, operable and transportable. The excellent point of the apparatus is that T 1-enhancement of water signals absorbed in dry seeds against steeping free water is stronger than the apparatuses with high-field superconducting magnets, which enabled clear detection of water entry. Water hardly penetrated into the seeds for more than 8 h but approximately 60 % of seeds germinated by incubating on wet filter papers for several days. Hot water treatments above 75 °C for 3 min effectively induced water gap; scarification was 70 % at 100 °C and 75 °C, declined to 15 % at 50 °C and decreased further at room temperature. Water entered into the scarified seeds exclusively through the lens, spread along the dorsal side of the seeds and reached the hypocotyl, whereas water migrated slowly through hilum side to radicle within 3 h.

  11. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.T.; Hsieh, H.C.H.; Jackson, J.W.; Damadian, R.V.

    1988-08-23

    This patent describes a medical NMR scanner comprising a primary field magnet assembly including: (a) a ferromagnetic frame defining a patient-receiving space adapted to receive a human body, the frame having a pair of opposed polar regions aligned on a polar axis and disposed on opposite sides of the patient-receiving space, and the frame including a substantially continuous ferro-magnetic flux return path extending between the polar regions remote from the patient-receiving space; (b) flux-generating means including superconductive windings and cryostat means for maintaining the windings at superconducting temperatures; and (c) support means for maintaining the windings in proximity to the frame so that when a current passes through the windings magnetic flux emanating from the windings produces a magnetic field within the patient-receiving space and at least a portion of the flux passes into the patient-receiving space by way of the polar regions.

  13. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cholangiopancreatography or MRCP uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to evaluate the liver, gallbladder, ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radio waves redirect alignment of hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ...

  16. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, R. R.

    1996-05-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Imaging, now more commonly referred to as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), developed into an important clinical modality between the years of 1978 and 1985. In 1945 it was demonstrated independently by Bloch(F. Bloch, The Principle of Nuclear Induction, Nobel Lectures in Physics: 1946-1962 New York, Elsevier Science Publishing Co., Inc. 1964.) and Purcell(E.M. Purcell, Research in Nuclear Magnetism, Nobel Lectures in Physics: 1946-1962, New York. Elsevier Science Publishing Co., Inc. 1964.) that magnetic nuclei in a sample when placed in a static magnetic field exhibit a characteristic resonance frequency which is proportional to the field strength and unique to nuclei of the same type and same environment. The net magnetization of the sample when irradiated by an RF wave at the resonance frequency could thus be manipulated to produce an induced "NMR signal" in a conducting loop placed near the sample. In the early 1970's, methods were developed whereby the NMR signal could be spatially encoded in both frequency and phase by means of superimposed linear magnetic field gradients to produce NMR images. NMR image contrast is a function of nuclear concentration and magnetic relaxation times (T1 and T2). MRI became the first medical imaging modality to provide both high resolution and high contrast images of soft tissue. Current clinical MRI systems produce images of the distribution of ^1H nuclei (primarily water) within the body. Other biologically important nuclei (^13C, ^23N, ^31P), as well as the imaging of hyperpolarized inert gases (^3He, ^129Xe) are under investigation. Recent developments in ^1H-MRI have included chemical shift imaging (hydrogen containing metabolites), blood flow imaging (MR angiography), ultra high-speed imaging (Echo Planar), and imaging of brain function based upon magnetic susceptibility differences resulting from blood oxygenation changes during brain activity.

  17. Interventional Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Saikus, Christina E.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) combines excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar views, and dynamic imaging of cardiac function without ionizing radiation exposure. Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance (iCMR) leverages these features to enhance conventional interventional procedures or to enable novel ones. Although still awaiting clinical deployment, this young field has tremendous potential. We survey promising clinical applications for iCMR. Next, we discuss the technologies that allow CMR-guided interventions and, finally, what still needs to be done to bring them to the clinic. PMID:19909937

  18. Magnetic resonance apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Jasper A.; Cooper, Richard K.

    1982-01-01

    Means for producing a region of homogeneous magnetic field remote from the source of the field, wherein two equal field sources are arranged axially so their fields oppose, producing a region near the plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the sources where the radial component of the field goes through a maximum. Near the maximum, the field is homogeneous over prescribed regions.

  19. Euclidean resonance in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, B.

    2007-08-15

    An analogy is found between Wigner resonant tunneling and tunneling across a static potential barrier in a static magnetic field. Whereas in the process of Wigner tunneling an electron encounters a classically allowed region where a discrete energy level coincides with its energy, in the magnetic field the potential barrier is constant in the direction of tunneling. Along the tunneling path, certain regions are formed where, in the classical language, the kinetic energy of the motion perpendicular to tunneling is negative. These regions play the role of potential wells, where a discrete energy level can coincide with the electron energy. This phenomenon, which occurs at a certain magnetic field, is called Euclidean resonance and substantially depends on the shape of the potential forces in the direction perpendicular to tunneling. Under conditions of Euclidean resonance, a long-distance underbarrier motion is possible, which can be observed in experiments.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Image Wavelet Enhancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    1Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica , UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico−DF, 09340, Mexico email:arog@xanum.uam.mx. Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics...Number Task Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica , UAM Iztapalapa, Mexico-DF

  1. Magnetic resonance apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, J.A.; Cooper, R.K.

    1980-10-10

    The patent consists of means for producing a region of homogeneous magnetic field remote from the source of the field, wherein two equal field sources are arranged axially so their fields oppose, producing a region near the plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the sources where the radial correspondent of the field goes through a maximum. Near the maximum, the field is homogeneous over prescribed regions.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy Detected Long-Lived Spin Magnetization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Longenecker, Jonilyn G; Moore, Eric W; Marohn, John A

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), which combines magnetic resonance imaging with scanning probe microscopy together, is capable of performing ultra-sensitive detection of spin magnetization. In an attempt to observe dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in an MRFM experiment, which could possibly further improve its sensitivity towards a single proton spin, a film of perdeuterated polystyrene doped with a nitroxide electron-spin probe was prepared. A high-compliance cantilever with a 4 μm diameter magnetic tip was brought near the film at a temperature of 7.3 K and in a background magnetic field of ~0.6 T. The film was irradiated with 16.7 GHz microwaves while the resulting transient change in cantilever frequency was recorded in real time. In addition to observing the expected prompt change in cantilever frequency due to saturation of the nitroxide's electron-spin magnetization, we observed a persistent cantilever frequency change. Based on its magnitude, lifetime, and field dependence, we tentatively attribute the persistent signal to polarized deuteron magnetization created via transfer of magnetization from electron spins. Further measurements of the persistent signal's dependence on the cantilever amplitude and tip-sample separation are presented and explained by the cross-effect DNP mechanism in high magnetic field gradients.

  3. The principles of magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Longmore, D B

    1989-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR), which has no known biological hazard, is capable of producing high resolution thin tomographic images in any plane and blocks of 3-dimensional information. It can be used to study blood flow and to gain information about the composition of important materials seen and quantified on dimensionally accurate images. The MR image is a thin tomographic slice or a true three dimensional block of data which can be reconstructed in any desired way rather than a shadowgram of all the structures in the beam. It is the only imaging technique which can acquire data in a 3-dimensional format. CT images can be reconstructed to form a pseudo 3-D image or a hologram but the flexibility conferred by acquiring the data as a true 3-D block gives many advantages. The spatial resolution of MR images are theoretically those of low powered microscopy, the practical limits with the present generation of equipment are voxel sizes of one third by one third by two millimetres. The term Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is used commonly, particularly in the USA, avoiding association with the term, nuclear, and emphasizing the imaging potential of the technique. The terms Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) or Magnetic Resonance (MR) more correctly describe the most powerful diagnostic instrument yet devised. The simplified description of the phenomena involved in MR which follows is intended to be comprehensive and does not require foreknowledge of classical physics, quantum mechanics, fluency with mathematical formulae or an understanding of image reconstruction. There are many explanations of MR, some omitting the more difficult concepts. An accurate, comprehensive description is found on the textbook on MR by Gadian, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and its Applications for Living Systems (Oxford University Press, 1982).

  4. Three-dimensional analysis of shear wave propagation observed by in vivo magnetic resonance elastography of the brain.

    PubMed

    Hamhaber, U; Sack, I; Papazoglou, S; Rump, J; Klatt, D; Braun, J

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a non-invasive method for the quantitative determination of the mechanical properties of soft tissues in vivo. In MRE, shear waves are generated in the tissue and visualized using phase-sensitive MR imaging methods. The resulting two-dimensional (2-D) wave images can reveal in-plane elastic properties when possible geometrical biases of the wave patterns are taken into account. In this study, 3-D MRE experiments of in vivo human brain are analyzed to gain knowledge about the direction of wave propagation and to deduce in-plane elastic properties. The direction of wave propagation was determined using a new algorithm which identifies minimal wave velocities along rays from the surface into the brain. It was possible to quantify biases of the elastic parameters due to projections onto coronal, sagittal and transversal image planes in 2-D MRE. It was found that the in-plane shear modulus is increasingly overestimated when the image slice is displaced from narrow slabs of 2-5cm through the center of the brain. The mean shear modulus of the brain was deduced from 4-D wave data with about 3.5kPa. Using the proposed slice positions in 2-D MRE, this shear modulus can be reproduced with an acceptable error within a fraction of the full 3-D examination time.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth > For Parents > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain ... child may be given headphones to listen to music or earplugs to block the noise, and will ...

  6. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. ...

  7. Introduction to magnetic resonance methods in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Huber, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and, more recently, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have been employed to study photosynthetic processes, primarily related to the light-induced charge separation. Information obtained on the electronic structure, the relative orientation of the cofactors, and the changes in structure during these reactions should help to understand the efficiency of light-induced charge separation. A short introduction to the observables derived from magnetic resonance experiments is given. The relation of these observables to the electronic structure is sketched using the nitroxide group of spin labels as a simple example. © The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com

  8. Off-resonance frequency filtered magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Medic, Jure; Tomazic, Saso

    2010-05-01

    One of the main problems with rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques is the artifacts that result from off-resonance effects. The proposed off-resonance frequency filtered MRI (OFF-MRI) method focuses on the elimination of off-resonance components from the image of the observed object. To maintain imaging speed and simultaneously achieve good frequency selectivity, MRI is divided into two steps: signal acquisition and post-processing. After the preliminary phase in which we determine imaging parameters, MRI takes place; the signal from the same object is successively acquired M times. As a result, we obtain M partial signals in k-space, from which we form the image of the observed object in the post-processing phase, after signal acquisition has been completed. This paper demonstrates that with proper selection of acquisition parameters and weighting coefficients in the post-processing phase, OFF-MRI is equivalent to filtering the signal by finite impulse response filter of length M. It is shown that with M successive acquisitions M-1 off-resonance components can be eliminated (filtered-out) from images, and therefore, only two acquisitions are needed to eliminate one off-resonance components. On the other hand, with OFF-MRI, it is also possible to form the image of an arbitrary off-resonance component by eliminating all other off-resonance components, including the on-resonance component. The proposed OFF-MRI method is suitable for MRI where rapid acquisition is required and elimination of off-resonance components can improve reliability of measurements. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Proton magnetic resonance spectrum of polywater.

    PubMed

    Petsko, G A

    1970-01-09

    With the aid of a time average computer, the proton magnetic resonance spectrum of anomalous water (polywater) is obtained. The spectrum conisists of a single broad resonance shifted approximately 300 hertz downfield from the resonance of ordinary water.

  10. Shiftless nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin H; Opella, Stanley J

    2008-02-07

    The acquisition and analysis of high resolution one- and two-dimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra without chemical shift frequencies are described. Many variations of shiftless NMR spectroscopy are feasible. A two-dimensional experiment that correlates the dipole-dipole and dipole-dipole couplings in the model peptide , (15)N labeled N-acetyl-leucine is demonstrated. In addition to the resolution of resonances from individual sites in a single crystal sample, the bond lengths and angles are characterized by the two-dimensional powder pattern obtained from a polycrystalline sample.

  11. Posterior Displacement of Supraspinatus Central Tendon Observed on Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Useful Preoperative Indicator of Rotator Cuff Tear Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Updegrove, Gary F; Armstrong, April D; Mosher, Timothy J; Kim, H Mike

    2015-11-01

    To characterize the orientation of the normal supraspinatus central tendon and describe the displacement patterns of the central tendon in rotator cuff tears using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based method. We performed a retrospective MRI and chart review of 183 patients with a rotator cuff tear (cuff tear group), 52 with a labral tear but no rotator cuff tear (labral tear group), and 74 with a normal shoulder (normal group). The orientation of the supraspinatus central tendon relative to the bicipital groove was evaluated based on axial MRI and was numerically represented by the shortest distance from the lateral extension line of the central tendon to the bicipital groove. Tear size, fatty degeneration, and involvement of the anterior supraspinatus were evaluated to identify the factors associated with orientation changes. The mean distance from the bicipital groove to the central tendon line was 0.7 mm and 1.3 mm in the normal group and labral tear group, respectively. Full-thickness cuff tears involving the anterior supraspinatus showed a significantly greater distance (17.7 mm) than those sparing the anterior supraspinatus (4.9 mm, P = .001). Fatty degeneration of the supraspinatus was significantly correlated with the distance (P = .006). Disruption of the anterior supraspinatus and fatty degeneration of the supraspinatus were independent predictors of posterior displacement. The supraspinatus central tendon has a constant orientation toward the bicipital groove in normal shoulders, and the central tendon is frequently displaced posteriorly in full-thickness rotator cuff tears involving the anterior leading edge of the supraspinatus. The degree of posterior displacement is proportional to tear size and severity of fatty degeneration of the supraspinatus muscle. A simple and quick assessment of the central tendon orientation on preoperative MRI can be a useful indicator of tear characteristics, potentially providing insight into the intraoperative

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Observation of α-Synuclein Membrane Interaction by Monitoring the Acetylation Reactivity of Its Lysine Side Chains

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between α-synuclein (αS) protein and lipid membranes is key to its role in synaptic vesicle homeostasis and plays a role in initiating fibril formation, which is implicated in Parkinson’s disease. The natural state of αS inside the cell is generally believed to be intrinsically disordered, but chemical cross-linking experiments provided evidence of a tetrameric arrangement, which was reported to be rich in α-helical secondary structure based on circular dichroism (CD). Cross-linking relies on chemical modification of the protein’s Lys Cε amino groups, commonly by glutaraldehyde, or by disuccinimidyl glutarate (DSG), with the latter agent preferred for cellular assays. We used ultra-high-resolution homonuclear decoupled nuclear magnetic resonance experiments to probe the reactivity of the 15 αS Lys residues toward N-succinimidyl acetate, effectively half the DSG cross-linker, which results in acetylation of Lys. The intensities of both side chain and backbone amide signals of acetylated Lys residues provide direct information about the reactivity, showing a difference of a factor of 2.5 between the most reactive (K6) and the least reactive (K102) residue. The presence of phospholipid vesicles decreases reactivity of most Lys residues by up to an order of magnitude at high lipid:protein stoichiometries (500:1), but only weakly at low ratios. The decrease in Lys reactivity is found to be impacted by lipid composition, even for vesicles that yield similar αS CD signatures. Our data provide new insight into the αS–bilayer interaction, including the pivotal state in which the available lipid surface is limited. Protection of Lys Cε amino groups by αS–bilayer interaction will strongly impact quantitative interpretation of DSG cross-linking experiments. PMID:27455358

  13. Pediatric Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Goyal, Ankur; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging modality with excellent contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Since ionizing radiation is an important concern in the pediatric population, MRI serves as a useful alternative to computed tomography (CT) and also provides additional clues to diagnosis, not discernible on other investigations. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), urography, angiography, enterography, dynamic multiphasic imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging provide wealth of information. The main limitations include, long scan time, need for sedation/anesthesia, cost and lack of widespread availability. With the emergence of newer sequences and variety of contrast agents, MRI has become a robust modality and may serve as a one-stop shop for both anatomical and functional information.

  14. Fast fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Lall, Chandana; Aisen, Alex A; Rajesh, Arumugam; Cohen, Mervyn D

    2005-01-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used as a problem-solving tool when ultrasonic findings are equivocal. The role of fetal MRI has increased as obstetricians become aware of its potential and in utero therapy for anomalies becomes increasingly sophisticated. In this pictorial essay, we present a wide range of anomalies diagnosed or confirmed using MRI and discuss findings that help in the differential diagnosis.

  15. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging combined with T2-weighted images in the detection of small breast cancer: a single-center multi-observer study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lian-Ming; Chen, Jie; Hu, Jiani; Gu, Hai-Yan; Xu, Jian-Rong; Hua, Jia

    2014-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. However, it remains a difficult diagnosis problem to differentiate between benign and malignant breast lesions, especially in small early breast lesions. To assess the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) combined with T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) for small breast cancer characterization. Fifty-eight patients (65 lesions) with a lesion <2 cm in diameter underwent 3.0 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including DWI and histological analysis. Three observers with varying experience levels reviewed MRI. The probability of breast cancer in each lesion on MR images was recorded with a 5-point scale. Areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUCs) were compared by using the Z test; sensitivity and specificity were determined with the Z test after adjusting for data clustering. AUC of T2WI and DWI (Observer 1, 0.95; Observer 2, 0.91; Observer 3, 0.83) was greater than that of T2WI (Observer 1, 0.80; Observer 2, 0.74; Observer 3, 0.70) for all observers (P < 0.0001 in all comparisons). Sensitivity of T2WI and DWI (Observer 1, 90%; Observer 2, 93%; and Observer 3, 86%) was greater than that of T2WI alone (Observer 1, 76%; Observer 2, 83%; Observer 3, 79%) for all observers (P < 0.0001 in all comparisons). Specificity of T2WI and DWI was greater than that of T2WI alone for observer 1 (89% vs. 72%, P < 0.01) and observer 2 (94% vs. 78%, P < 0.001). DWI combined with T2WI can improve the diagnostic performance of MRI in small breast cancer characterization. It should be considered selectively in the preoperative evaluation of patients with small lesions of the breast.

  16. Magnetic resonances in nano-scale metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zhao; Liddle, Alex; Martin, Michael

    2006-03-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and optically measured several different kinds of nano-scale metamaterials. We make use e-beam nano-lithography technology at LBNL's Center for X-Ray Optics for fabricating these structures on extremely thin SiN substrates so that they are close to free-standing. Optical properties were measured as a function of incidence angle and polarization. We directly observe a strong magnetic resonance consistent with a negative magnetic permeability in our samples at mid- and near-IR optical frequencies. We will discuss the results in comparison with detailed simulations, and will discuss the electric dipole or quadrupole resonances observed in the samples. Finally, we will report on our progress towards constructing a fully negative index of refraction meta-material.

  17. [Magnetic resonance and hepatic siderosis].

    PubMed

    Rocchi, E

    1994-09-01

    The principles of generation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are resumed by briefly explaining the effects of an external magnetic field (EMF) on hydrogen nuclei and of pulses of radiofrequency (RF) radiation. The latter creates a resonant effect, and the same nuclei, moved from the external field axis, when RF pulse is stopped, will "relax" to their original alignment in the magnetic field and in so doing radiate the absorbed energy to their surroundings. This energy provides a signal that can be detected and spatially resolved by the receiver coil wrapped around the patient, through a computerized system. After briefly explaining also the distinctive parameters T2 and T1, the author presents his experience in the MRI detection of different degrees of siderosis of the liver--ranging from idiopathic and secondary haemochromatosis to milder siderosis of alcoholic liver disease and porphyria cutanea tarda. The results were accomplished by employing an equipment operating at an enhanced field strength (1.5 Tesla). Previous reports have validated this technique in order to distinguish idiopathic from secondary haemochromatosis. Furthermore, the present study shows that even low to moderate degrees of liver iron deposition can be appreciated and roughly quantitated by the decrease of the transverse relaxation time (T2), which resulted proportional to the amount of liver iron, under these operating conditions. Thus, MRI is proposed as an useful and non-invasive way to detect iron deposition and to follow up iron depletion treatments.

  18. Wide-range nuclear magnetic resonance detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.; Jirberg, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Compact and easy to use solid state nuclear magnetic resonance detector is designed for measuring field strength to 20 teslas in cryogenically cooled magnets. Extremely low noise and high sensitivity make detector applicable to nearly all types of analytical nuclear magnetic resonance measurements and can be used in high temperature and radiation environments.

  19. Nerves on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J. D.; Shaver, M. L.; Batra, P.; Brown, K.

    1989-01-01

    Nerves are often visualized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the soft tissues on the chest and shoulder girdle. To learn the reasons for the contrast between the nerves and adjacent tissues, the authors obtained a fresh specimen containing part of the brachial plexus nerves from the left axilla and compared MRI with x-ray projections and photomicrographs of histologic sections. The results suggest that the high signals from the nerves stand out in contrast to the low signals from their rich vascular supply. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6A Figure 6B Figure 7 PMID:2733051

  20. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging. PMID:26751800

  1. Introduction to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, Stanley L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to try to give a short overview of what the status is on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's a subject where one really has to spend some time to look at the physics in detail to develop a proper working understanding. I feel it's not appropriate to present to you density matrices, Hamiltonians of all sorts, and differential equations representing the motion of spins. I'm really going to present some history and status, and show a few very simple concepts involved in NMR. It is a form of radio frequency spectroscopy and there are a great number of nuclei that can be studied very usefully with the technique. NMR requires a magnet, a r.f. transmitter/receiver system, and a data acquisition system.

  2. Rotational resonance of nonaxisymmetric magnetic braking in the KSTAR tokamak.

    PubMed

    Park, J-K; Jeon, Y M; Menard, J E; Ko, W H; Lee, S G; Bae, Y S; Joung, M; You, K-I; Lee, K-D; Logan, N; Kim, K; Ko, J S; Yoon, S W; Hahn, S H; Kim, J H; Kim, W C; Oh, Y-K; Kwak, J-G

    2013-08-30

    One of the important rotational resonances in nonaxisymmetric neoclassical transport has been experimentally validated in the KSTAR tokamak by applying highly nonresonant n=1 magnetic perturbations to rapidly rotating plasmas. These so-called bounce-harmonic resonances are expected to occur in the presence of magnetic braking perturbations when the toroidal rotation is fast enough to resonate with periodic parallel motions of trapped particles. The predicted and observed resonant peak along with the toroidal rotation implies that the toroidal rotation in tokamaks can be controlled naturally in favorable conditions to stability, using nonaxisymmetric magnetic perturbations.

  3. Plasma-induced magnetic responses during nonlinear dynamics of magnetic islands due to resonant magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2014-12-15

    Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) produce magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas. Self-healing (annihilation) of RMP-induced magnetic islands has been observed in helical systems, where a possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by plasma flows, which is well known in tokamaks. Thus, fundamental physics of RMP shielding is commonly investigated in both tokamaks and helical systems. In order to check this mechanism, detailed informations of magnetic island phases are necessary. In experiments, measurement of radial magnetic responses is relatively easy. In this study, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands, behavior of radial magnetic fields during the self-healing is investigated. It is confirmed that flips of radial magnetic fields are typically observed during the self-healing. Such behavior of radial magnetic responses is also observed in LHD experiments.

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of ancient buried wood-I. Observations on the origin of coal to the brown coal stage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Breger, I.A.; Earl, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    Various wood fragments buried in sediments under anaerobic conditions for from 450 yr to approximately 8 Myr have been examined by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance. Cellulose and other carbohydrates, the major components of Holocene wood, have been shown to be gradually hydrolyzed or otherwise lost under the conditions of burial. Lignin structures, however, are preserved relatively unchanged and become concentrated by difference as the carbohydrates disappear. Thus, a fragment of coalified wood isolated from a Miocene brown coal was found to be still composed of approximately 75% lignin and 25% cellulose. On the basis of our observations, we suggest that coalification of woody tissue progresses directly from lignin to coal and that such coalification may be retarded until most of the cellulose disappears. ?? 1981.

  5. Gynecologic masses: value of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hricak, H; Lacey, C; Schriock, E; Fisher, M R; Amparo, E; Dooms, G; Jaffe, R

    1985-09-01

    Forty-two women with gynecologic abnormalities were studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging correctly assessed the origin of the pelvic mass in all patients. In the evaluation of leiomyoma, magnetic resonance imaging accurately depicted the number, size, and location of the lesion. In the evaluation of endometrial carcinoma, magnetic resonance imaging depicted the location of the lesion, the presence of cervical extension, and the depth of myometrial penetration in the majority of the cases. In the analysis of adnexal cysts, magnetic resonance imaging was sensitive in localizing the lesion and was able to distinguish serous from hemorrhagic fluid. This preliminary report indicates that magnetic resonance imaging may become a valuable imaging modality in the diagnosis of gynecologic abnormalities.

  6. Fluctuating magnetic field induced resonant activation

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Shrabani; Das, Sudip; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2014-12-14

    In this paper, we have studied the properties of a Brownian particle at stationary state in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field. Time dependence of the field makes the system thermodynamically open. As a signature of that the steady state distribution function becomes function of damping strength, intensity of fluctuations and constant parts of the applied magnetic field. It also depends on the correlation time of the fluctuating magnetic field. Our another observation is that the random magnetic field can induce the resonant activation phenomenon. Here correlation time is increased under the fixed variance of the fluctuating field. But if the correlation time (τ) increases under the fixed field strength then the mean first passage time rapidly grows at low τ and it almost converges at other limit. This is sharp contrast to the usual colored noise driven open system case where the mean first passage time diverges exponentially. We have also observed that a giant enhancement of barrier crossing rate occurs particularly at large strength of constant parts of the applied magnetic field even for very weak fluctuating magnetic field. Finally, break down of the Arrhenius result and disappearance of the Kramers’ turn over phenomenon may occur in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field.

  7. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yungsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe-based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  8. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  9. Apparatus for investigating resonance with application to magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Sytil; Jones, Dyan L.; Gross, Josh; Zollman, Dean

    2015-11-01

    Resonance is typically studied in the context of either a pendulum or a mass on a spring. We have developed an apparatus that enables beginning students to investigate resonant behavior of changing magnetic fields, in addition to the properties of the magnetic field due to a wire and the superposition of magnetic fields. In this resonant system, a compass oscillates at a frequency determined by the compass's physical properties and an external magnetic field. While the analysis is mathematically similar to that of the pendulum, this apparatus has an advantage that the magnetic field is easily controlled, while it is difficult to control the strength of gravity. This apparatus has been incorporated into a teaching module on magnetic resonance imaging.

  10. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging.

    PubMed

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E

    2008-08-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are "stiffness weighted" and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery.

  11. MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Yogesh K; Glaser, Kevin J; Ehman, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) is a rapidly developing technology for quantitatively assessing the mechanical properties of tissue. The technology can be considered to be an imaging-based counterpart to palpation, commonly used by physicians to diagnose and characterize diseases. The success of palpation as a diagnostic method is based on the fact that the mechanical properties of tissues are often dramatically affected by the presence of disease processes such as cancer, inflammation, and fibrosis. MRE obtains information about the stiffness of tissue by assessing the propagation of mechanical waves through the tissue with a special magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique. The technique essentially involves three steps: generating shear waves in the tissue,acquiring MR images depicting the propagation of the induced shear waves andprocessing the images of the shear waves to generate quantitative maps of tissue stiffness, called elastograms. MRE is already being used clinically for the assessment of patients with chronic liver diseases and is emerging as a safe, reliable and noninvasive alternative to liver biopsy for staging hepatic fibrosis. MRE is also being investigated for application to pathologies of other organs including the brain, breast, blood vessels, heart, kidneys, lungs and skeletal muscle. The purpose of this review article is to introduce this technology to clinical anatomists and to summarize some of the current clinical applications that are being pursued. PMID:20544947

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and method

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.E.; Vidrine, D.W.

    1981-08-18

    A nuclear magnetic resonance techniis described that allows simultaneous temperature determination and spectral acquisition. The technique employs a modification of the lock circuit of a varian xl-100 spectrometer which permits accurate measurement of the difference in resonance frequency between a primary lock nucleus and another , secondary, nucleus. The field stabilization function of the main lock circuit is not compromised. A feedback signal having a frequency equal to the frequency difference is substituted for the normal power supply in the spectrometer's existing radio frequency transmitter to modulate that transmitter. Thus, the transmitter's radio frequency signal is enhanced in a frequency corresponding to the resonance peak of the secondary nucleus. Determination of the frequency difference allows the determination of temperature without interference with the observed spectrum. The feedback character of the circuit and the presence of noise make the circuit self-activating.

  13. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    PubMed Central

    Hundley, W Gregory; Bluemke, David; Bogaert, Jan G; Friedrich, Matthias G; Higgins, Charles B; Lawson, Mark A; McConnell, Michael V; Raman, Subha V; van Rossum, Albert C; Flamm, Scott; Kramer, Christopher M; Nagel, Eike; Neubauer, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) examinations. PMID:19257889

  14. Torque-mixing magnetic resonance spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losby, Joseph; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Grandmont, Dylan T.; Diao, Zhu; Belov, Miro; Burgess, Jacob A.; Compton, Shawn R.; Hiebert, Wayne K.; Vick, Doug; Mohammad, Kaveh; Salimi, Elham; Bridges, Gregory E.; Thomson, Douglas J.; Freeman, Mark R.

    2016-10-01

    An optomechanical platform for magnetic resonance spectroscopy will be presented. The method relies on frequency mixing of orthogonal RF fields to yield a torque amplitude (arising from the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment, in analogy to magnetic resonance detection by electromagnetic induction) on a miniaturized resonant mechanical torsion sensor. In contrast to induction, the method is fully broadband and allows for simultaneous observation of the equilibrium net magnetic moment alongside the associated magnetization dynamics. To illustrate the method, comprehensive electron spin resonance spectra of a mesoscopic, single-crystal YIG disk at room temperature will be presented, along with situations where torque spectroscopy can offer complimentary information to existing magnetic resonance detection techniques. The authors are very grateful for support from NSERC, CRC, AITF, and NINT. Reference: Science 350, 798 (2015).

  15. Advances in mechanical detection of magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Seppe; Hickman, Steven A.; Marohn, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The invention and initial demonstration of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the early 1990s launched a renaissance of mechanical approaches to detecting magnetic resonance. This article reviews progress made in MRFM in the last decade, including the demonstration of scanned probe detection of magnetic resonance (electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance) and the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance from a single spin. Force and force-gradient approaches to mechanical detection are reviewed and recent related work using attonewton sensitivity cantilevers to probe minute fluctuating electric fields near surfaces is discussed. Given recent progress, pushing MRFM to single proton sensitivity remains an exciting possibility. We will survey some practical and fundamental issues that must be resolved to meet this challenge. PMID:18266413

  16. Torque-mixing magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Losby, J E; Fani Sani, F; Grandmont, D T; Diao, Z; Belov, M; Burgess, J A J; Compton, S R; Hiebert, W K; Vick, D; Mohammad, K; Salimi, E; Bridges, G E; Thomson, D J; Freeman, M R

    2015-11-13

    A universal, torque-mixing method for magnetic resonance spectroscopy is presented. In analogy to resonance detection by magnetic induction, the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment can be measured in sensitive broadband spectroscopy, here using a resonant mechanical torque sensor. Unlike induction, the torque amplitude allows equilibrium magnetic properties to be monitored simultaneously with the spin dynamics. Comprehensive electron spin resonance spectra of a single-crystal, mesoscopic yttrium iron garnet disk at room temperature reveal assisted switching between magnetization states and mode-dependent spin resonance interactions with nanoscale surface imperfections. The rich detail allows analysis of even complex three-dimensional spin textures. The flexibility of microelectromechanical and optomechanical devices combined with broad generality and capabilities of torque-mixing magnetic resonance spectroscopy offers great opportunities for development of integrated devices.

  17. Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging from metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, L. H.; Wang, P. S.; Donahue, M. J.

    1996-04-01

    Metallic biomedical implants, such as aneurysm clips, endoprostheses, and internal orthopedic devices give rise to artifacts in the magnetic resonance image (MRI) of patients. Such artifacts impair the information contained in the image in precisely the region of most interest, namely near the metallic device. Ferromagnetic materials are contraindicated because of the hazards associated with their movement during the MRI procedure. In less-magnetic metals, it has been suggested that the extent of the artifact is related to the magnetic susceptibility of the metal, but no systematic data appear to be available. When the susceptibility is sufficiently small, an additional artifact due to electrical conductivity is observed. We present an initial systematic study of MRI artifacts produced by two low susceptibility metals, titanium (relative permeability μr≊1.0002) and copper (μr≊0.99998), including experimental, theoretical, and computer simulation results.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  19. Microcoil nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Webb, A G

    2005-08-10

    In comparison with most analytical chemistry techniques, nuclear magnetic resonance has an intrinsically low sensitivity, and many potential applications are therefore precluded by the limited available quantity of certain types of sample. In recent years, there has been a trend, both commercial and academic, towards miniaturization of the receiver coil in order to increase the mass sensitivity of NMR measurements. These small coils have also proved very useful in coupling NMR detection with commonly used microseparation techniques. A further development enabled by small detectors is parallel data acquisition from many samples simultaneously, made possible by incorporating multiple receiver coils into a single NMR probehead. This review article summarizes recent developments and applications of "microcoil" NMR spectroscopy.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Elastography of Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Sudhakar K.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases cause substantial changes in the mechanical properties of tissue and this provides motivation for developing methods to non-invasively assess the stiffness of tissue using imaging technology. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a versatile MRI-based technique, based on direct visualization of propagating shear waves in the tissues. The most established clinical application of MRE in the abdomen is in chronic liver disease. MRE is currently regarded as the most accurate non-invasive technique for detection and staging of liver fibrosis. Increasing experience and ongoing research is leading to exploration of applications in other abdominal organs. In this review article, the current use of MRE in liver disease and the potential future applications of this technology in other parts of the abdomen are surveyed. PMID:25488346

  1. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyuan E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in 1992, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has become an indispensible tool for studying cognition in both the healthy and dysfunctional brain. FMRI monitors changes in the oxygenation of brain tissue resulting from altered metabolism consequent to a task-based evoked neural response or from spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity in the absence of conscious mentation (the “resting state”). Task-based studies have revealed neural correlates of a large number of important cognitive processes, while fMRI studies performed in the resting state have demonstrated brain-wide networks that result from brain regions with synchronized, apparently spontaneous activity. In this article, we review the methods used to acquire and analyze fMRI signals. PMID:26248581

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevil, Stephen F.

    2001-11-01

    Over the past twenty years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most important imaging modalities available to clinical medicine. It offers great technical flexibility, and is free of the hazards associated with ionizing radiation. In addition to its role as a routine imaging technique with a growing range of clinical applications, the pace of development in MRI methodology remains high, and new ideas with significant potential emerge on a regular basis. MRI is a prime example of the spin-off benefits of basic science, and is an area of medicine in which physical science continues to play a major role, both in supporting clinical applications and in developing new techniques. This article presents a brief history of MRI and an overview of the underlying physics, followed by a short survey of current and emerging clinical applications.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S. )

    1990-10-15

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence.

  5. Advances in breast imaging: magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bartella, Lia; Morris, Elizabeth A

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast is rapidly becoming incorporated into clinical practice. Indications for breast MRI include staging of known breast cancer, monitoring response to chemotherapy, assessing recurrence, problem solving, and high-risk screening. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a promising technique that may decrease the number of benign biopsies generated by breast MRI in the clinical setting.

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  7. Clinical applications of magnetic resonance angiography.

    PubMed

    Glazer, M; McCormack, J; Dross, P

    1992-08-01

    Recent technical advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now allow for the noninvasive study of blood flow in vessels, or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). We describe several case reports involving the use of MRA and discuss its advantages in evaluating patients for carotid artery stenosis, intracerebral aneurysms, and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs).

  8. Magnetic resonance sees lesions of multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ziporyn, T.

    1985-02-15

    The value of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and quantitation of the progression of multiple sclerosis is discussed. Magnetic resonance imaging generates images that reflect differential density and velocity of hydrogen nuclei between cerebral gray and white matter, as well as between white matter and pathological lesions of the disease.

  9. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  10. Tuning Coler Magnetic Current Apparatus with Magneto-Acoustic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Thorsten

    An attempt was made to tune the Coler magnetic current apparatus with the magneto acoustic resonance of the magnetic rods. Measurements with a replica of the famous Coler "Magnetstromapparat" were conducted. In order to tune the acoustic, magnetic and electric resonance circuits of the Coler device the magneto-acoustic resonance was measured with a frequency scan through a function generator and a lock-in amplifier. The frequency generator was powering a driving coil, while the lock-in was connected to a pickup coil. Both coils were placed on a magnetic rod. Resonances were observed up to the 17th harmonic. The quality Q of the observed resonances was 270. To study the magneto-acoustic resonance in the time domain a pair of Permendur rods were employed. The magneto-acoustic resonances of the Permendur rods were observed with an oscilloscope. Spectra of the magneto acoustic resonance were measured for the Permendur rods and for a Coler replica magnet in the frequency range from 25 kHz to 380 kHz. The next step was to bring the resonances of the Permendur rods close together so that they overlap. The 10thharmonic was chosen because it was close to the 180 kHz that Hans Coler related to ferromagnetism. Further more magneto-acoustic coupling between the Permendur rods was studied. Finally the question was explored if Hans Coler converted vacuum fluctuations via magnetic and acoustic resonance into electricity. There is a strong connection between magnetism and quantum field zero point energy (ZPE). An outlook is given on next steps in the experiments to unveil the working mechanism of the Coler magnetic current apparatus.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hayt, M W; Abrahams, J J; Blair, J

    2000-04-01

    The spectrum of disease that affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can be varied. To differentiate among the diseases that cause pain and dysfunction, an intimate knowledge of the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of this region is necessary. Due to the joint's complex anatomy and relationship to the skin, it has been difficult to image in the past. Magnetic resonance imaging is ideally suited for visualizing TMJ because of its superb contrast resolution when imaging soft tissues. Magnetic resonance imaging allows simultaneous bilateral visualization of both joints. The ability to noninvasively resolve anatomic detail can be performed easily and quickly using magnetic resonance imaging. The development of magnetic resonance imaging has greatly aided the diagnosis of TMJ disorders. An understanding of TMJ anatomy and pathogenesis of TMJ pain is crucial for interpretation of magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent treatment.

  12. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Practical, computer-aided registration of multiple, three-dimensional, magnetic-resonance observations of the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, C.; Sanders, J.A.; Orrison, W.W. Jr.

    1992-12-31

    Researchers working with MR observations generally agree that far more information is available in a volume (3D) observation than is considered for diagnosis. The key to the new alignment method is in basing it on available information on surfaces. Using the skin surface is effective a robust algorithm can reliably extract this surface from almost any scan of the head, and a human operator`s exquisite sensitivity to facial features is allows him to manually align skin surfaces with precision. Following the definitions, we report on a preliminary experiment where we align three MR observations taken during a single MR examination, each weighting arterial, venous, and tissue features. When accurately aligned, a neurosurgeon can use these features as anatomical landmarks for planning and executing interventional procedures.

  14. Dynamic nuclear polarization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment.

    PubMed

    Issac, Corinne E; Gleave, Christine M; Nasr, Paméla T; Nguyen, Hoang L; Curley, Elizabeth A; Yoder, Jonilyn L; Moore, Eric W; Chen, Lei; Marohn, John A

    2016-04-07

    We report achieving enhanced nuclear magnetization in a magnetic resonance force microscope experiment at 0.6 tesla and 4.2 kelvin using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) effect. In our experiments a microwire coplanar waveguide delivered radiowaves to excite nuclear spins and microwaves to excite electron spins in a 250 nm thick nitroxide-doped polystyrene sample. Both electron and proton spin resonance were observed as a change in the mechanical resonance frequency of a nearby cantilever having a micron-scale nickel tip. NMR signal, not observable from Curie-law magnetization at 0.6 T, became observable when microwave irradiation was applied to saturate the electron spins. The resulting NMR signal's size, buildup time, dependence on microwave power, and dependence on irradiation frequency was consistent with a transfer of magnetization from electron spins to nuclear spins. Due to the presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field introduced by the cantilever's magnetic tip, the electron spins in the sample were saturated in a microwave-resonant slice 10's of nm thick. The spatial distribution of the nuclear polarization enhancement factor ε was mapped by varying the frequency of the applied radiowaves. The observed enhancement factor was zero for spins in the center of the resonant slice, was ε = +10 to +20 for spins proximal to the magnet, and was ε = -10 to -20 for spins distal to the magnet. We show that this bipolar nuclear magnetization profile is consistent with cross-effect DNP in a ∼10(5) T m(-1) magnetic field gradient. Potential challenges associated with generating and using DNP-enhanced nuclear magnetization in a nanometer-resolution magnetic resonance imaging experiment are elucidated and discussed.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... If You Have Questions en español Resonancia magnética: columna lumbar What It Is Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Cervical Spine Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  16. Inter-observer agreement and diagnostic accuracy of myocardial perfusion reserve quantification by cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 3 Tesla in comparison to quantitative coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Ikuye, Katharina; Buckert, Dominik; Schaaf, Lisa; Walcher, Thomas; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Bernhardt, Peter

    2013-03-27

    Quantification of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) at 1.5 Tesla has been shown to correlate to invasive evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD) and to yield good inter-observer agreement. However, little is known about quantitative adenosine-perfusion CMR at 3 Tesla and no data about inter-observer agreement is available. Aim of our study was to evaluate inter-observer agreement and to assess the diagnostic accuracy in comparison to quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Fifty-three patients referred for coronary x-ray angiography were previously examined in a 3 Tesla whole-body scanner. Adenosine and rest perfusion CMR were acquired for the quantification of MPR in all segments. Two blinded and independent readers analyzed all images. QCA was performed in case of coronary stenosis. QCA data was used to assess diagnostic accuracy of the MPR measurements. Inter-observer agreement was high for all myocardial perfusion territories (ρ = 0.92 for LAD, ρ = 0.93 for CX and RCA perfused segments). Compared to QCA receiver-operating characteristics yielded an area under the curve of 0.78 and 0.73 for RCA, 0.66 and 0.69 for LAD, and 0.52 and 0.53 for LCX perfused territories. Inter-observer agreement of MPR quantification at 3 Tesla CMR is very high for all myocardial segments. Diagnostic accuracy in comparison to QCA yields good values for the RCA and LAD perfused territories, but moderate values for the posterior LCX perfused myocardial segments.

  17. Hair product artifact in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chenji, Sneha; Wilman, Alan H; Mah, Dennell; Seres, Peter; Genge, Angela; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    The presence of metallic compounds in facial cosmetics and permanent tattoos may affect the quality of magnetic resonance imaging. We report a case study describing a signal artifact due to the use of a leave-on powdered hair dye. On reviewing the ingredients of the product, it was found to contain several metallic compounds. In lieu of this observation, we suggest that MRI centers include the use of metal- or mineral-based facial cosmetics or hair products in their screening protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Magnetic resonance of the musculoskeletal system

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.; Ehman, R.L.; Richardson, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of the Musculoskeletal System features coverage of the use of MRI in evaluation of specific diseases: bone and soft tissue tumors; infections; musculoskeletal trauma; spinal disorders; and miscellaneous conditions. The authors comparisons of MRI with computed tomography, ultrasound, isotopes, and other techniques will assist the physician in determining which clinical problems are best evaluated by MRI. Where MRI is the optimal technique, the text outlines the examination procedure, indicates which sequences provide the most information, and describes the pathologic findings that can be observed in MRI scans. An outstanding selection of more than 250 detail-revealing illustrations depicts representatives MRI findings.

  19. Observation of temperature-gradient-induced magnetization

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dazhi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Iguchi, R.; Sato, K.; Vehstedt, E. K.; Uchida, K.; Bauer, G. E. W.; Saitoh, E.

    2016-01-01

    Applying magnetic fields has been the method of choice to magnetize non-magnetic materials, but they are difficult to focus. The magneto-electric effect and voltage-induced magnetization generate magnetization by applied electric fields, but only in special compounds or heterostructures. Here we demonstrate that a simple metal such as gold can be magnetized by a temperature gradient or magnetic resonance when in contact with a magnetic insulator by observing an anomalous Hall-like effect, which directly proves the breakdown of time-reversal symmetry. Such Hall measurements give experimental access to the spectral spin Hall conductance of the host metal, which is closely related to other spin caloritronics phenomena such as the spin Nernst effect and serves as a reference for theoretical calculation. PMID:27457185

  20. Observer agreement in the reporting of knee and lumbar spine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations: selectively trained MR radiographers and consultant radiologists compared with an index radiologist.

    PubMed

    Brealey, S; Piper, K; King, D; Bland, M; Caddick, J; Campbell, P; Gibbon, A; Highland, A; Jenkins, N; Petty, D; Warren, D

    2013-10-01

    To assess agreement between trained radiographers and consultant radiologists compared with an index radiologist when reporting on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of the knee and lumbar spine and to examine the subsequent effect of discordant reports on patient management and outcome. At York Hospital two MR radiographers, two consultant radiologists and an index radiologist reported on a prospective, random sample of 326 MRI examinations. The radiographers reported in clinical practice conditions and the radiologists during clinical practice. An independent consultant radiologist compared these reports with the index radiologist report for agreement. Orthopaedic surgeons then assessed whether the discordance between reports was clinically important. Overall observer agreement with the index radiologist was comparable between observers and ranged from 54% to 58%; for the knee it was 46-57% and for the lumbar spine was 56-66%. There was a very small observed difference of 0.6% (95% CI -11.9 to 13.0) in mean agreement between the radiographers and radiologists (P=0.860). For the knee, lumbar spine and overall, radiographers' discordant reports, when compared with the index radiologist, were less likely to have a clinically important effect on patient outcome than the radiologists' discordant reports. Less than 10% of observer's reports were sufficiently discordant with the index radiologist's reports to be clinically important. Carefully selected MR radiographers with postgraduate education and training reported in clinical practice conditions on specific MRI examinations of the knee and lumbar spine to a level of agreement comparable with non-musculoskeletal consultant radiologists. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. First observation of amino acid side chain dynamics in membrane proteins using high field deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, R.A.; Kintanar, A.; Tsai, M.D.; Smith, R.L.; Janes, N.; Oldfield, E.

    1981-05-10

    The first deuterium NMR spectra of an individual membrane protein, bacteriohodopsin in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium R1 has been obtained. Biosynthetic isotopic enrichment with (gamma-2H6) valine and high field Fourier transform operation permitted rapid data acquisition on intact membranes, including measurement of relaxation times. At some temperatures high quality spectra could be obtained in less than 1 s. (U-14C)Valine tracer studies indicate that less than or equal to 2% of valine added to the growth medium is broken down and incorporated into other membrane constituents. The NMR results indicate that the valine side chain is a rather rigid structure. Motion about C alpha-C beta is slow (less than 10(5) s-1) at growth temperature, while motion about C beta-C gamma is as expected fast (much greater than 10(5) s-1) at all accessible temperatures. The activation energy for methyl group rotation from spin-lattice relaxation data between -75 and 53 degrees C is approximately 2.4 kcal/mol, in good agreement with previous 1H NMR studies on solid alkanes. Preliminary data on (gamma-2H6)valine-labeled Acholeplasma laidlawii B (PG9) cell membranes are also presented. Results strongly suggest that it should now be possible to observe in great detail the motions of any type of amino acid side chain in membrane proteins, including the effects of lipid composition on protein dynamics.

  2. Thoracic outlet syndromes and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Panegyres, P K; Moore, N; Gibson, R; Rushworth, G; Donaghy, M

    1993-08-01

    The thoracic outlet syndromes encompass the diverse clinical entities affecting the branchial plexus or subclavian artery including cervical ribs or bands. Thoracic outlet syndrome are often difficult to diagnose on existing clinical and electrophysiological criteria and new diagnostic methods are necessary. This study reports our experience with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brachial plexus in 20 patients with suspected thoracic outlet syndrome. The distribution of pain and sensory disturbance varied widely, weakness and wasting usually affected C8/T1 innervated muscles, and electrophysiology showed combinations of reduced sensory nerve action potentials from the fourth and fifth digits, and prolonged F-responses or tendon reflex latencies. The MRI study was interpreted blind. Deviation of the brachial plexus was recorded in 19 out of the 24 symptomatic sides (sensitivity 79%). Absence of distortion was correctly identified in 14 out of 16 asymptomatic sides (specificity 87.5%). The false positive rate was 9.5%. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated all seven cervical ribs visible on plain cervical spine radiographs. Magnetic resonance imaging also showed a band-like structure extending from the C7 transverse process in 25 out of 33 sides; similar structures were detected in three out of 18 sides in control subjects. These MRI bands often underlay the brachial plexus distortion observed in our patients. We also observed instances of plexus distortion by post-traumatic callus of the first rib, and by a hypertrophied serratus anterior muscle. If they did not demonstrate a cervical rib, plain cervical spine radiographs had no value in predicting brachial plexus distortion. We believe MRI to be of potential value in the diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome by: (i) demonstrating deviation or distortion of nerves or blood vessels; (ii) suggesting the presence of radiographically invisible bands; (iii) disclosing other causes of thoracic outlet syndrome

  3. Accuracy of magnetic resonance based susceptibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdevig, Hannah E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Carnicka, Slavka; Stupic, Karl F.; Keenan, Kathryn E.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map the magnetic susceptibility of tissue to identify cerebral microbleeds associated with traumatic brain injury and pathological iron deposits associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Accurate measurements of susceptibility are important for determining oxygen and iron content in blood vessels and brain tissue for use in noninvasive clinical diagnosis and treatment assessments. Induced magnetic fields with amplitude on the order of 100 nT, can be detected using MRI phase images. The induced field distributions can then be inverted to obtain quantitative susceptibility maps. The focus of this research was to determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements using simple phantom geometries and to compare the susceptibility measurements with magnetometry measurements where SI-traceable standards are available. The susceptibilities of paramagnetic salt solutions in cylindrical containers were measured as a function of orientation relative to the static MRI field. The observed induced fields as a function of orientation of the cylinder were in good agreement with simple models. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry using NIST-traceable standards. MRI can accurately measure relative magnetic susceptibilities while SQUID magnetometry measures absolute magnetic susceptibility. Given the accuracy of moment measurements of tissue mimicking samples, and the need to look at small differences in tissue properties, the use of existing NIST standard reference materials to calibrate MRI reference structures is problematic and better reference materials are required.

  4. Magnetic resonance elastometry using a single-sided permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Carl S.; Marble, Andrew E.; Ono, Yuu

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a magnetic resonance method of measuring material elasticity using a single-sided magnet with a permanent static field gradient. This method encodes sample velocity in a reciprocal space using Hahn spin-echoes with variable timing. The experimental results show a strong correlation between magnetic resonance signal attenuation and elasticity when an oscillating force is applied on the sample. This relationship in turn provides us with information about the displacement velocity experienced by the sample, which is inversely proportional to Young's modulus. The proposed method shows promise in offering a portable and cost-effective magnetic resonance elastography system.

  5. Cerebral perivascular spaces visible on magnetic resonance imaging: development of a qualitative rating scale and its observer reliability.

    PubMed

    Potter, Gillian M; Chappell, Francesca M; Morris, Zoe; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-01-01

    due to very faint PVS, coexisting extensive white matter hyperintensities (WMH) or the presence of lacunes. We developed a more inclusive and robust visual PVS rating scale allowing rating of all grades of PVS severity on structural brain imaging. The revised PVS rating scale has good observer reliability for basal ganglia and centrum semiovale PVS, best for basal ganglia PVS, and moderate reliability for midbrain PVS. Agreement is influenced by PVS severity and the presence of background features of SVD. The current scale can be used in further studies to assess the clinical implications of PVS. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Magnetism of gold nanorods probed using electron spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Y.; Yonemura, H.; Sakai, N.; Makihara, Y.; Kawae, T.; Yamada, S.

    2016-08-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy has been performed for gold nanorods (AuNRs) of four different sizes covered with a diamagnetic stabilizing component, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. ESR signals were detected in AuNRs except the largest one. Two smallest AuNRs showed an abrupt change in the temperature dependence of resonance field and line width at around 60 K, indicating ferromagnetic phase transition. In medium-size AuNRs, the resonance with a large shift was observed below 100 K. The resonance field shifts at the lowest temperature exhibit systematic variation with the system size, which is explained by considering magnetic anisotropy for the ferromagnetic resonance.

  7. Magnetism of gold nanorods probed using electron spin resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, Y. Kawae, T.; Yonemura, H.; Yamada, S.; Sakai, N.; Makihara, Y.

    2016-08-15

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy has been performed for gold nanorods (AuNRs) of four different sizes covered with a diamagnetic stabilizing component, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. ESR signals were detected in AuNRs except the largest one. Two smallest AuNRs showed an abrupt change in the temperature dependence of resonance field and line width at around 60 K, indicating ferromagnetic phase transition. In medium-size AuNRs, the resonance with a large shift was observed below 100 K. The resonance field shifts at the lowest temperature exhibit systematic variation with the system size, which is explained by considering magnetic anisotropy for the ferromagnetic resonance.

  8. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) is investigated. Single element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 tesla (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 tesla in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in transmit magnetic field, as well as, RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus SAR) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements. PMID:23508243

  9. Stepped impedance resonators for high-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Akgun, Can E; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high-field magnetic resonance imaging. In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections, referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs), is investigated. Single-element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 T (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 T in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in a transmit magnetic field, as well as RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus specific absorption rate) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements.

  10. Pseudolesion of the liver observed on gadoxetate disodium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging obtained shortly after transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Yoshinobu; Sakamoto, Keiko; Fujimitsu, Ritsuko; Ida, Mikiko; Urakawa, Hiroshi; Kora, Shin-Ichi; Higashihara, Hideyuki; Takano, Kouichi; Yoshimitsu, Kengo

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this report was to describe pseudolesions of the liver that mimicked residual hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), as observed on gadoxetate disodium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI) obtained shortly after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). Between June 2008 and December 2008, three patients underwent MRI within 12 days after TACE to rule out remaining viable cancerous tissue or to assess the treatment effect. In all three patients, nontumorous liver tissue adjacent to the treated HCC exhibited focal arterial enhancement on dynamic phase and subsequent diminished uptake of gadoxetate disodium on hepatocellular phase images, which mimicked residual HCC. All three patients had mild postembolization syndrome at the time of EOB-MRI and showed no evidence of residual or recurrent tumors on follow-up. The findings of these areas may represent transient focal hyperemia and damage to the liver cell function caused by TACE. Radiologists should be aware that EOB-MRI obtained shortly after TACE may show pseudolesions around the treated tumors and should not mistake them for residual or recurrent tumors.

  11. Magnetic resonance image guided brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila N; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J

    2014-07-01

    The application of magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the past 2 decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and resulted in mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome regarding local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapies have improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high-quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education.

  12. Use of magnetic resonance urography.

    PubMed

    Klein, L T; Frager, D; Subramanium, A; Lowe, F C

    1998-10-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) is a new technique that uses heavily weighted T2 coronal images with fat suppression pulse. Urine appears white on MRU, resembling an intravenous urogram (IVU). Contrast agents are not necessary. This study describes the use of MRU in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with hematuria. One hundred six patients with microscopic or gross hematuria and 6 normal volunteers underwent MRU between 1992 and 1995. A modified, heavily weighted T2 technique with intravenous administration of furosemide and ureteral compression was used. Thirty-two patients had other imaging techniques as well for comparison. MRU provided high-resolution images in almost all cases; 73 (69%) had a normal MRU. Significant findings in the 33 patients with abnormalities included renal cysts in 17 (51%), renal cell carcinoma in 6 (18%), transitional cell carcinoma in 5 (15%), ureteropelvic junction obstruction in 3 (9%), and stones causing obstruction in 6 (18%). Five patients with renal failure also had good visualization of the entire urinary tract. MRU was comparable to other imaging modalities except in identifying nonobstructing calculi. MRU provides an alternative to conventional imaging of the urinary tract, especially in those patients who have contraindications to ionizing radiation and contrast agents. Improvements in resolution, technique, and cost have to be addressed before it can be used regularly in urologic practice.

  13. [Presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Stippich, C

    2010-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an important and novel neuroimaging modality for patients with brain tumors. By non-invasive measurement, localization and lateralization of brain activiation, most importantly of motor and speech function, fMRI facilitates the selection of the most appropriate and sparing treatment and function-preserving surgery. Prerequisites for the diagnostic use of fMRI are the application of dedicated clinical imaging protocols and standardization of the respective imaging procedures. The combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) also enables tracking and visualization of important fiber bundles such as the pyramidal tract and the arcuate fascicle. These multimodal MR data can be implemented in computer systems for functional neuronavigation or radiation treatment. The practicability, accuracy and reliability of presurgical fMRI have been validated by large numbers of published data. However, fMRI cannot be considered as a fully established modality of diagnostic neuroimaging due to the lack of guidelines of the responsible medical associations as well as the lack of medical certification of important hardware and software components. This article reviews the current research in the field and provides practical information relevant for presurgical fMRI.

  14. Effects of magnetic resonance imaging on implantable permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M L; Walker, G B; Dormer, K J

    1995-09-01

    Implantable permanent magnets are increasingly used in devices for otolaryngologic applications. It is likely that at least some of the patients with implanted magnets will be in need of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The effect of an MRI scan on the magnetic properties of implanted permanent magnets has not been previously demonstrated. Some of the basic concepts and descriptive terminology used in industry regarding permanent magnets are reviewed. Experiments presented show that the MRI scan is capable of demagnetizing permanent magnets. A case history is also presented that demonstrates demagnetizing of an implanted Audiant magnet by an MRI scan.

  15. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  16. Normal perinatal and paediatric postmortem magnetic resonance imaging appearances.

    PubMed

    Arthurs, Owen J; Barber, Joy L; Taylor, Andrew M; Sebire, Neil J

    2015-04-01

    As postmortem imaging becomes more widely used following perinatal and paediatric deaths, the correct interpretation of images becomes imperative, particularly given the increased use of postmortem magnetic resonance imaging. Many pathological processes may have similar appearances in life and following death. A thorough knowledge of normal postmortem changes is therefore required within postmortem magnetic resonance imaging to ensure that these are not mistakenly interpreted as significant pathology. Similarly, some changes that are interpreted as pathological if they occur during life may be artefacts on postmortem magnetic resonance imaging that are of limited significance. This review serves to illustrate briefly those postmortem magnetic resonance imaging changes as part of the normal changes after death in fetuses and children, and highlight imaging findings that may confuse or mislead an observer to identifying pathology where none is present.

  17. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.D.; Goldberg, H.I.; Moss, A.A.; Bass, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR.

  18. Polywater: proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum.

    PubMed

    Page, T F; Jakobsen, R J; Lippincott, E R

    1970-01-02

    In the presence of water, the resonance of the strongly hydrogenbonded protons characteristic of polywater appears at 5 parts per million lower applied magnetic field than water. Polywater made by a new method confirms the infrared spectrum reported originally.

  19. Pocket atlas of cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Haughton, V.M.; Daniels, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas illustrates normal cerebral anatomy in magnetic resonance images. From their studies in cerebral anatomy utilizing cryomicrotome and other techniques, the authors selected more than 100 high-resolution images that represent the most clinically useful scans.

  20. Coronary computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Birgit; Nagel, Eike; Schoenhagen, Paul; Barkhausen, Jörg; Gerber, Thomas C

    2009-04-01

    Cardiac computed tomography and magnetic resonance are relatively new imaging modalities that can exceed the ability of established imaging modalities to detect present pathology or predict patient outcomes. Coronary calcium scoring may be useful in asymptomatic patients at intermediate risk. Computed tomographic coronary angiography is a first-line indication to evaluate congenitally abnormal coronary arteries and, along with stress magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging, is useful in symptomatic patients with nondiagnostic conventional stress tests. Cardiac magnetic resonance is indicated for visualizing cardiac structure and function, and delayed enhancement magnetic resonance is a first-line indication for assessing myocardial viability. Imaging plaque and molecular mechanisms related to plaque rupture holds great promise for the presymptomatic detection of patients at risk for coronary events but is not yet suitable for routine clinical use.

  1. International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join the ISMRM Journals History & Mission Central Office Society Award Winners Strategic Plan Policies Corporate Members Contact ... E-Library Virtual Meetings Connect With Us International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 2300 Clayton Road, ...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cryptorchid testis.

    PubMed

    Landa, H M; Gylys-Morin, V; Mattrey, R F; Krous, H F; Kaplan, G W; Packer, M G

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to evaluate seven patients with undescended testes. In six patients the presence or absence of testicular tissue was predicted correctly prior to surgery. Spermatic cord structures, if present, were accurately visualized in all patients.

  3. Coronary Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Birgit; Nagel, Eike; Schoenhagen, Paul; Barkhausen, Jörg; Gerber, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography and magnetic resonance are relatively new imaging modalities that can exceed the ability of established imaging modalities to detect present pathology or predict patient outcomes. Coronary calcium scoring may be useful in asymptomatic patients at intermediate risk. Computed tomographic coronary angiography is a first-line indication to evaluate congenitally abnormal coronary arteries and, along with stress magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging, is useful in symptomatic patients with nondiagnostic conventional stress tests. Cardiac magnetic resonance is indicated for visualizing cardiac structure and function, and delayed enhancement magnetic resonance is a first-line indication for assessing myocardial viability. Imaging plaque and molecular mechanisms related to plaque rupture holds great promise for the presymptomatic detection of patients at risk for coronary events but is not yet suitable for routine clinical use. PMID:19269527

  4. Miniature Magnet for Electron Spin Resonance Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupp, L. W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes commercially available permanent magnets that have been incorporated in a compact and inexpensive structure providing both field sweep and modulation suitable for electron spin resonance at microwave frequencies. (MLH)

  5. Toroidal and magnetic Fano resonances in planar THz metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Song; Gupta, Manoj; Cong, Longqing; Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Singh, Ranjan

    2017-09-01

    The toroidal dipole moment, a localized electromagnetic excitation of torus magnetic fields, has been observed experimentally in metamaterials. However, the metamaterial based toroidal moment was restricted at higher frequencies by the complex three-dimensional structure. Recently, it has been shown that toroidal moment could also be excited in a planar metamaterial structure. Here, we use asymmetric Fano resonators to illustrate theoretically and experimentally the underlying physics of the toroidal coupling in an array of planar metamaterials. It is observed that the anti-parallel magnetic moment configuration shows toroidal excitation with higher quality (Q) factor Fano resonance, while the parallel magnetic moment shows relatively lower Q factor resonance. Moreover, the electric and toroidal dipole interferes destructively to give rise to an anapole excitation. The magnetic dipole-dipole interaction is employed to understand the differences between the toroidal and magnetic Fano resonances. We further study the impact of intra unit-cell coupling between the Fano resonator pairs in the mirrored and non-mirrored arrangements. The numerical and theoretical approach for modelling the near-field effects and experimental demonstration of toroidal and magnetic Fano resonances in planar systems are particularly promising for tailoring the loss in metamaterials across a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  6. Interaction between Octenidine-based Solution and Sodium Hypochlorite: A Mass Spectroscopy, Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, and Scanning Electron Microscopy-based Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Thaha, Khaleel Ahamed; Varma, R Luxmi; Nair, Mali G; Sam Joseph, V G; Krishnan, Unni

    2017-01-01

    Octenisept (OCT; Schülke & Mayr, Nordersdedt, Germany), an antimicrobial, antibiofilm agent and a promising root canal irrigant, can be potentially combined with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) during endodontic treatment. The aim of this study was first to identify the precipitate formed on the interaction between OCT and NaOCl and secondly to compare its effect on dentinal tubules with that of precipitate formed on combining chlorhexidine (CHX) and NaOCl. This observational study was conducted in 3 stages. Initially, the color changes and precipitate formation were assessed when the test solution 0.1% OCT and 5.2% NaOCl were mixed. Color changes were compared with those observed when 2% CHX was mixed with 5.2% NaOCl. The residue obtained on combining OCT and NaOCl was subjected to proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) and mass spectrometric (MS) analysis. In the final stage, dentinal surfaces irrigated alternatively with OCT and NaOCl were compared using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with the dentinal surface irrigated with CHX and NaOCl. The OCT-NaOCl mixture changed in color from initial milky white to transparent over time, whereas the CHX-NaOCl mixture showed an immediate peach-brown discoloration. (1)H NMR and MS analysis established that the whitish precipitate obtained on combining OCT and NaOCl solutions correlated with the structure of phenoxyethanol (PE). SEM revealed dense precipitate occluding the dentinal tubules with the CHX and NaOCl group, whereas the precipitate was sparse and partially occluded in the OCT and NaOCl group. The whitish precipitate formed with the OCT-NaOCl mixture was identified as PE, a compound already present in OCT, and it partly occluded the dentinal tubules. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetic resonance force microscopy using ferromagnetic resonance of a magnetic tip excited by microwave transmission via a coaxial resonator.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yukinori; Li, Yanjun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2017-10-04

    The present work proposes magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) based on ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) modulation of a magnetic tip using microwave transmission via a coaxial resonator instead of using conventional microwave irradiation by an external antenna. In this MRFM, the coaxial resonator is electrically connected to the magnetic cantilever tip, which enables simple implementation of FMR excitation of a magnetic tip in conventional magnetic force microscopy. The FMR frequency of the tip can be easily extracted from the reflection spectrum of a transmission line connected to the magnetic tip. The excitation of tip FMR is confirmed from the microwave frequency dependence of the mechanical response of the tip oscillation. This MRFM is effective for extracting the magnetic interaction force near a sample surface without perturbation of its sample magnetic state. Nanometer-scale imaging of magnetic domain structures on a demagnetized thin-film permanent magnet is successfully demonstrated. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. Detection of atherosclerosis via magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Andrew L.; Pytlewski, Victor T.; Brown, Michael F.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    1992-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of atherosclerotic lipids using a stimulated-echo diffusion- weighted (STED) sequence is demonstrated. The STED sequence exploits the large difference in diffusion between lipid (primarily cholesteryl ester) and water. The optimization of the STED sequence is discussed. The results of lipid imaging are corroborated with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This technique is non-invasive, and therefore, it is potentially useful in following the progression of the disease in animal models and in humans.

  9. Single Nuclear Spin Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-02

    Lab. In work not directly supported by this grant, these projects advanced MRFM detected Ferromagnetic Resonance ( FMR ) to enable studies of...directly supported by this grant, these projects advanced MRFM detected Ferromagnetic Resonance ( FMR ) to enable studies of submicron magnetic structures...our earlier NMR detection of 19F spins in CaF2 we have conducted 65Cu, 63Cu NMR stud- ies for studies of interface phenomena in multilayered magnetic

  10. [Nuclear magnetic resonance in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Hamad, H

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a more recent technique than computerized tomography (CT), with which morphological, high quality, three-dimensional images can be obtained, it is capable of differentiating gray/white matter without patients' exposure to radiation. Clinical investigation studies demonstrate the following findings: In Schizophrenics: Enlargement of lateral ventricles volume in 67-73%, in naive patients 21-33%. The increase of the third ventricle varies from 19 to 73%, whose patients have significant flat affect. The temporal lobe gray matter is reduced, including amygdala-hippocampal complex, and parahippocampal gyrus. No specific corpus callosum results are concluded. There is cortical atrophy, specially of bilateral prefrontal regions. Basal ganglia (lenticular and caudate nuclei) are increased. The prefrontal, temporal and limbic dysfunction supports the abnormal connection hypothesis in schizophrenics. Basal ganglia also are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Clinical cortical atrophy symptoms are demonstrated by neuropsychological tests, although some cognitive deficits are remediable. Perinatal complications are more frequent, in children who will be schizophrenics, than their siblings (23.6% vs 12.8%); those of special interest are: toxemia, prematurity, long labor, jaundice and bleeding during pregnancy. In affective Bipolar Disorders: There is increase (19-50%) in the number of focal signal hyperintensities at the lateral limits of ventricles and in both hemispheres, and a trend towards larger ventricular size. The temporal lobe is smaller bilaterally, but the right side is 15% larger; its volume correlates negatively with long-term illness in males. In Unipolar Disorder an increase of frontal white matter T1 values is registered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Torque-mixing Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losby, Joseph; Fani Sani, Fatemeh; Grandmont, Dylan; Diao, Zhu; Belov, Miro; Burgess, Jacob; Compton, Shawn; Hiebert, Wayne; Vick, Doug; Mohammad, Kaveh; Salimi, Elham; Bridges, Gregory; Thomson, Douglas; Freeman, Mark

    A universal, mechanical torque method for magnetic resonance spectroscopy is presented. In analogy to resonance detection by induction, a signal proportional to the transverse component of a precessing dipole moment can be measured as a pure mechanical torque in broadband, frequency-swept spectroscopy. Comprehensive electron spin resonance of a single-crystal, mesoscopic yttrium iron garnet disk at room temperature are presented to demonstrate the method. The rich detail allows analysis of even complex 3D spin textures.

  12. Catheter steering using a Magnetic Resonance Imaging system.

    PubMed

    Lalande, Viviane; Gosselin, Frederick P; Martel, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    A catheter is successfully bent and steered by applying magnetic gradients inside a Magnetic Resonance Imaging system (MRI). One to three soft ferromagnetic spheres are attached at the distal tip of the catheter with different spacing between the spheres. Depending on the interactions between the spheres, progressive or discontinuous/jumping displacement was observed for increasing magnetic load. This phenomenon is accurately predicted by a simple theoretical dipole interaction model.

  13. Magnetic resonance methods in fetal neurology.

    PubMed

    Mailath-Pokorny, M; Kasprian, G; Mitter, C; Schöpf, V; Nemec, U; Prayer, D

    2012-10-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an established clinical adjunct for the in-vivo evaluation of human brain development. Normal fetal brain maturation can be studied with MRI from the 18th week of gestation to term and relies primarily on T2-weighted sequences. Recently diffusion-weighted sequences have gained importance in the structural assessment of the fetal brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides quantitative information about water motion and tissue microstructure and has applications for both developmental and destructive brain processes. Advanced magnetic resonance techniques, such as spectroscopy, might be used to demonstrate metabolites that are involved in brain maturation, though their development is still in the early stages. Using fetal MRI in addition to prenatal ultrasound, morphological, metabolic, and functional assessment of the fetus can be achieved. The latter is not only based on observation of fetal movements as an indirect sign of activity of the fetal brain but also on direct visualization of fetal brain activity, adding a new component to fetal neurology. This article provides an overview of the MRI methods used for fetal neurologic evaluation, focusing on normal and abnormal early brain development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Observing shadow motions: resonant activity within the observer's motor system?

    PubMed

    Alaerts, Kaat; Van Aggelpoel, Tinne; Swinnen, Stephan P; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2009-09-25

    Several studies have demonstrated that the human motor cortex is activated by the mere observation of actions performed by others. In the present study, we explored whether the perception of 'impoverished motion stimuli', such as shadow animations, is sufficient to activate motor areas. To do so, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied over the hand area of the primary motor cortex (M1) while subjects observed shadow animations depicting finger motions. Data showed that resonant motor responses in M1 were only found when a biological effector was recognized from the observed shadow animation. Interestingly, M1 responses were similar for observing shadow or real motions. Therefore, the loss of 'pictorial' movement features in a shadow animation appeared to have no effect on motor resonance in M1. In summary, these findings suggest that the 'recognition' of biological motion from sparse visual input is both necessary and sufficient to recruit motor areas. This supports the hypothesis that the motor system is involved in recognizing the actions performed by others.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... radiation. Instead, MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves, rapidly changing magnetic fields, and a computer to ... in most of the body's tissues. The applied radio waves then cause these protons to produce signals that ...

  16. Magnetic resonance force detection using a membrane resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scozzaro, N.; Ruchotzke, W.; Belding, A.; Cardellino, J.; Blomberg, E. C.; McCullian, B. A.; Bhallamudi, V. P.; Pelekhov, D. V.; Hammel, P. C.

    2016-10-01

    The availability of compact, low-cost magnetic resonance imaging instruments would further broaden the substantial impact of this technology. We report highly sensitive detection of magnetic resonance using low-stress silicon nitride (SiNx) membranes. We use these membranes as low-loss, high-frequency mechanical oscillators and find they are able to mechanically detect spin-dependent forces with high sensitivity enabling ultrasensitive magnetic resonance detection. The high force detection sensitivity stems from their high mechanical quality factor Q ∼106 [1,2] combined with the low mass of the resonator. We use this excellent mechanical force sensitivity to detect the electron spin magnetic resonance using a SiNx membrane as a force detector. The demonstrated force sensitivity at 300 K is 4 fN/√{Hz } , indicating a potential low temperature (4 K) sensitivity of 25 aN/√{Hz } . Given their sensitivity, robust construction, large surface area and low cost, SiNx membranes can potentially serve as the central component of a compact room-temperature ESR and NMR instrument having spatial resolution superior to conventional approaches.

  17. Preoperative planning of renal transplantation: a comparison of non-contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance angiography with observations from surgery.

    PubMed

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte; Pedersen, Bodil G; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Andersen, Gratien; Hørlyck, Arne; Østrat, Ernst Ø; Laustsen, Sussie; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2015-12-01

    Many candidates for kidney transplantation need to undergo vessel examination before the transplantation procedure. To identify the optimal preoperative modality for the examination of vessel status without the use of contrast agents in kidney transplant candidates. Fifty-three consecutive patients were examined and 31 patients were transplanted. Ultrasonography (US), non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (NCCT), and non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCMRA) were compared using inspection during kidney transplantation (TX) as a reference standard. The sensitivity and specificity to severe arteriosclerotic changes and the accuracy were calculated. Kappa statistics were used to assess the agreement between TX and the different examination modalities, and McNemar's test was used to test for significant differences. US had higher sensitivity (1.0) and better agreement with observations from surgery (k = 0.89) than both NCCT (sensitivity = 0.60; k = 0.72) and NCMRA (sensitivity = 0.20; k = 0.30). No significant difference was found between TX and US (P = 0.3173) or TX and NCCT (P = 0.1573), but there was a significant difference between TX and NCMRA (P = 0.0455). US was inconclusive in 20% of cases, and the internal iliac artery could not be visualized in 69% of cases. Either US or NCCT can be used as the preferred preoperative imaging modality to examine vessel status before kidney transplantation, but a combination of the two is preferable. NCMRA should not be used as the sole imaging modality for preoperative imaging before kidney transplantation because of its low sensitivity in detecting severe arteriosclerotic disease without the presence of stenosis. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014.

  18. A systematic review of the reporting of sample size calculations and corresponding data components in observational functional magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing; Thabane, Lehana; Hall, Geoffrey; McKinnon, Margaret; Goeree, Ron; Pullenayegum, Eleanor

    2014-02-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies rarely consider statistical power when setting a sample size. This raises concerns since undersized studies may fail to detect effects of interest and encourage data dredging. Although sample size methodology in this field exists, implementation requires specifications of estimated effect size and variance components. We therefore systematically evaluated how often estimates of effect size and variance components were reported in observational fMRI studies involving clinical human participants published in six leading journals between January 2010 and December 2011. A random sample of 100 eligible articles was included in data extraction and analyses. Two independent reviewers assessed the reporting of sample size calculations and the data components required to perform the calculations in the fMRI literature. One article (1%) reported sample size calculations. The reporting of parameter estimates for effect size (8%), between-subject variance (4%), within-subject variance (1%) and temporal autocorrelation matrix (0%) was uncommon. Three articles (3%) reported Cohen's d or F effect sizes. The majority (83%) reported peak or average t, z or F statistics. The inter-rater agreement was very good, with a prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) value greater than 0.88. We concluded that sample size calculations were seldom reported in fMRI studies. Moreover, omission of parameter estimates for effect size, between- and within-subject variances, and temporal autocorrelation matrix could limit investigators' ability to perform power analyses for new studies. We suggest routine reporting of these quantities, and recommend strategies for reducing bias in their reported values.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of ancient buried wood-II. Observations on the origin of coal from lignite to bituminous coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Breger, I.A.; Szeverenyi, N.; Maciel, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    Coalified logs ranging in age from Late Pennsylvania to Miocene and in rank from lignite B to bituminous coal were analyzed by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) utilizing the cross-polarization, magic-angle spinning technique, as well as by infrared spectroscopy. The results of this study indicate that at least three major stages of coalification can be observed as wood gradually undergoes transformation to bituminous coal. The first stage involves hydrolysis and loss of cellulose from wood with retention and differential concentration of the resistant lignin. The second stage involves conversion of the lignin residues directly to coalified wood of lignitic rank, during which the oxygen content of intermediate diagenetic products remains constant as the hydrogen content and the carbon content increases. These changes are thought to involve loss of methoxyl groups, water, and C3 side chains from the lignin. In the third major stage of coalification, the coalified wood increases in rank to subbituminous and bituminous coal; during this stage the oxygen content decreases, hydrogen remains constant, and the carbon content increases. These changes are thought to result from loss of soluble humic acids that are rich in oxygen and that are mobilized during compaction and dewatering. Relatively resistant resinous substances are differentially concentrated in the coal during this stage. The hypothesis that humic acids are formed as mobile by-products of the coalification of lignin and function only as vehicles for removal of oxygen represents a dramatic departure from commonly accepted views that they are relatively low-molecular-weight intermediates formed during the degradation of lignin that then condense to form high-molecular-weight coal structures. ?? 1982.

  20. Prediction of malignant middle cerebral artery infarction by magnetic resonance imaging within 6 hours of symptom onset: A prospective multicenter observational study.

    PubMed

    Thomalla, Götz; Hartmann, Frank; Juettler, Eric; Singer, Oliver C; Lehnhardt, Fritz-Georg; Köhrmann, Martin; Kersten, Jan F; Krützelmann, Anna; Humpich, Marek C; Sobesky, Jan; Gerloff, Christian; Villringer, Arno; Fiehler, Jens; Neumann-Haefelin, Tobias; Schellinger, Peter D; Röther, Joachim

    2010-10-01

    Early identification of patients at risk of space-occupying "malignant" middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction (MMI) is needed to enable timely decision for potentially life-saving treatment such as decompressive hemicraniectomy. We tested the hypothesis that acute stroke magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) predicts MMI within 6 hours of stroke onset. In a prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study patients with acute ischemic stroke and MCA main stem occlusion were studied by MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion imaging (PI), and MR-angiography within 6 hours of symptom onset. Multivariate regression analysis was used to identify clinical and imaging predictors of MMI. Of 140 patients included, 27 (19.3%) developed MMI. The following parameters were identified as independent predictors of MMI: larger acute DWI lesion volume (per 1 ml odds ratio [OR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.06; p < 0.001), combined MCA + internal carotid artery occlusion (5.38, 1.55-18.68; p = 0.008), and severity of neurological deficit on admission assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (per 1 point 1.16, 1.00-1.35; p = 0.053). The prespecified threshold of a DWI lesion volume >82 ml predicted MMI with high specificity (0.98, 95% CI 0.94-1.00), negative predictive value (0.90, 0.83-0.94), and positive predictive value (0.88, 0.62-0.98), but sensitivity was low (0.52, 0.32-0.71). Stroke MRI on admission predicts malignant course in severe MCA stroke with high positive and negative predictive value and may help in guiding treatment decisions, such as decompressive surgery. In a subset of patients with small initial DWI lesion volumes, repeated diagnostic tests are required.

  1. Magnetic hysteresis of dynamic response of one-dimensional magnonic crystals consisting of homogenous and alternating width nanowires observed with broadband ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, J.; Kostylev, M.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2011-08-01

    We systematically probed the dynamic behavior of homogenous and alternating width (AW) Ni80Fe20 nanowire (NW) arrays using broadband ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy as a function of geometrical parameters such as wire width and interwire spacing. For homogenous width NWs, the FMR responses are markedly sensitive to wire widths and interwire spacing due to spatially varying demagnetizing field. The collective spin-wave mode profile for ferromagneticly and antiferromagneticly ordered ground state has been investigated by controlling the relative alignment of magnetization of neighboring NWs. We show that magnetic ground states of coupled AW NW arrays can be controlled by applying different magnetic field histories, and the collective spin-wave mode is very sensitive to the difference in the widths of wires constituting AW wire arrays. We have also mapped the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic ground states magnetic configurations using magnetic force microscopy. Our experimental results are in good agreements with a simple analytical theory we suggest for phenomenological description of the collective oscillations.

  2. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance linewidth measurement of magnetic tunnel junction multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, J. F.; Aliev, F. G.; Heindl, R.; Russek, S. E.; Rippard, W. H.

    2009-01-01

    The broadband ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth of the free layer of magnetic tunnel junctions is used as a simple diagnostic of the quality of the magnetic structure. The FMR linewidth increases near the field regions of free layer reversal and pinned layer reversal, and this increase correlates with an increase in magnetic hysteresis in unpatterned films, low-frequency noise in patterned devices, and previous observations of magnetic domain ripple by use of Lorentz microscopy. Postannealing changes the free layer FMR linewidth, indicating that considerable magnetic disorder, originating in the exchange-biased pinned layer, is transferred to the free layer.

  3. Investigation of laser polarized xenon magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    1998-01-01

    Ground-based investigations of a new biomedical diagnostic technology: nuclear magnetic resonance of laser polarized noble gas are addressed. The specific research tasks discussed are: (1) Development of a large-scale noble gas polarization system; (2) biomedical investigations using laser polarized noble gas in conventional (high magnetic field) NMR systems; and (3) the development and application of a low magnetic field system for laser polarized noble gas NMR.

  4. The effect of initial teaching on evaluation of left ventricular volumes by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: comparison between complete and intermediate beginners and experienced observers.

    PubMed

    Hedström, Erik; Ishida, Masaki; Sepúlveda-Martínez, Alvaro; Salehi, Daniel; Sperling, Johannes; Engblom, Henrik; Nagel, Eike

    2017-05-17

    High reproducibility and low intra- and interobserver variability are important strengths of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). In clinical practice a significant learning curve may however be observed. Basic CMR courses offer an average of 1.4 h dedicated to lecturing and demonstrating left ventricular (LV) function analysis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of initial teaching on complete and intermediate beginners' quantitative measurements of LV volumes and function by CMR. Standard clinical cine CMR sequences were acquired in 15 patients. Five observers (two complete beginners, one intermediate, two experienced) measured LV volumes. Before initial evaluation beginners read the SCMR guidelines on CMR analysis. After initial evaluation, beginners participated in a two-hour teaching session including cases and hands-on training, representative for most basic CMR courses, after which it is uncertain to what extent different centres provide continued teaching and feedback in-house. Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) assessed delineations. Agreement, accuracy, precision, repeatability and reliability were assessed by Bland-Altman, coefficient of variation, and intraclass correlation coefficient methods. Endocardial DSC improved after teaching (+0.14 ± 0.17;p < 0.001) for complete beginners. Low intraobserver variability was found before and after teaching, however with wide limits of agreement. Beginners underestimated volumes by up to 44 ml (EDV), 27 ml (ESV) and overestimated LVM by up to 53 g before teaching, improving to an underestimation of up to 9 ml (EDV), 7 ml (ESV) and an overestimation of up to 30 g (LVM) after teaching. For the intermediate beginner, however, accuracy was quite high already before teaching. Initial teaching to complete beginners increases accuracy for assessment of LV volumes, however with high bias and low precision even after standardised teaching as offered in most basic CMR courses. Even though the

  5. Coherence of magnetic resonators in a metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Yumin

    2013-12-15

    The coherence of periodic magnetic resonators (MRs) under oblique incidence is studied using simulations. The correlated phase of interaction including both the retardation effect and relative phase difference between two MRs is defined, and it plays a key role in the MR interaction. The correlated phase is anisotropic, as is the coherence condition. The coherence condition is the same as the Wood's anomaly and verified by the Fano resonance. This study shows that the applications of the Fano resonance of periodic MRs will become widespread owing to achieving the Fano resonance simply by tuning the incident angle.

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance proton imaging provides anatomical definition of normal and abnormal tissues with a contrast and detection sensitivity superior to those of x-ray computed tomography in the human head and pelvis and parts of the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. Recent improvements in technology should lead to advances in diagnostic imaging of the breast and regions of the abdomen. Selected-region nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of protons, carbon-13, and phosphorus-31 has developed into a basic science tool for in vivo studies on man and a unique tool for clinical diagnoses of metabolic disorders. At present, nuclear magnetic resonance is considered safe if access to the magnet environment is controlled. Technological advances employing field strengths over 2 teslas will require biophysical studies of heating and static field effects.

  7. Changes observed in multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging characteristics correlate with histopathological development of chronic granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy.

    PubMed

    Logan, Jennifer K; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Merino, Maria J; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    Administration of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to cause granulomatous prostatitis, a rare inflammatory process that can be mistaken for prostate cancer. We present a case of a 78-year-old man on active surveillance for prostate cancer with a subsequent diagnosis of high-grade urothelial carcinoma. After intravesical BCG therapy, he developed chronic granulomatous prostatitis. We present serial magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy data demonstrating the time interval between BCG administration and the manifestation of chronic granulomatous prostatitis.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  9. Current-induced spin torque resonance of a magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Michael; Chiba, Takahiro; Niedermayr, Arthur; Lotze, Johannes; Huebl, Hans; Geprägs, Stephan; Takahashi, Saburo; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2015-10-01

    We report the observation of current-induced spin torque resonance in yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers. An alternating charge current at GHz frequencies in the platinum gives rise to dc spin pumping and spin Hall magnetoresistance rectification voltages, induced by the Oersted fields of the ac current and the spin Hall effect-mediated spin transfer torque. In ultrathin yttrium iron garnet films, we observe spin transfer torque actuated magnetization dynamics which are significantly larger than those generated by the ac Oersted field. Spin transfer torques thus efficiently couple charge currents and magnetization dynamics also in magnetic insulators, enabling charge current-based interfacing of magnetic insulators with microwave devices.

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  11. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, W.S.

    1980-11-01

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible.

  12. Stem cell labeling for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Himmelreich, Uwe; Hoehn, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    In vivo applications of cells for the monitoring of their cell dynamics increasingly use non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. This imaging modality allows in particular to follow the migrational activity of stem cells intended for cell therapy strategies. All these approaches require the prior labeling of the cells under investigation for excellent contrast against the host tissue background in the imaging modality. The present review discusses the various routes of cell labeling and describes the potential to observe both cell localization and their cell-specific function in vivo. Possibilities for labeling strategies, pros and cons of various contrast agents are pointed out while potential ambiguities or problems of labeling strategies are emphasized.

  13. Pediatric obesity phenotyping by magnetic resonance methods

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wei; Liu, Haiying; Punyanitya, Mark; Chen, Jun; Heymsfield, Steven B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose of review Accurate measurement of adiposity in obese children is required for characterizing the condition’s phenotype, severity, and treatment effects in vivo. Non-invasive and safe, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy provide an important new approach for characterizing key aspects of pediatric obesity. This review focuses on recent advances in non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy for quantifying total body and regional adiposity, mapping adipose tissue distribution, and evaluating selected metabolic disturbances in children. The aim is to provide an investigator-focused overview of magnetic resonance methods for use in the study of pediatric body composition and metabolism. Recent findings Whole body axial images can be rapidly acquired on most clinical magnetic resonance imaging scanners. The images can then be semi-automatically segmented into subcutaneous, visceral, and intramuscular adipose tissue. Specific pediatric studies of errors related to slice gap and number are available. The acquisition of scans in healthy and premature infants is now feasible with recent technological advances. Spectroscopic, Dixon, and other approaches can be used to quantify the lipid content of liver, skeletal muscle, and other organs. Protocol selection is based on factors such as subject age and cost. Particular attention should be directed towards identification of landmarks in growth studies. Recent advances promise to reduce the requirement of subjects to remain motionless for relatively long periods. Summary Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy are safe, practical, and widely available methods for phenotyping adiposity in children that open new opportunities for metabolism and nutritional research. PMID:16205458

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging measurement of iron overload

    PubMed Central

    Wood, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To highlight recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging estimation of somatic iron overload. This review will discuss the need and principles of magnetic resonance imaging-based iron measurements, the validation of liver and cardiac iron measurements, and the key institutional requirements for implementation. Recent findings Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of liver and cardiac iron has achieved critical levels of availability, utility, and validity to serve as the primary endpoint of clinical trials. Calibration curves for the magnetic resonance imaging parameters R2 and R2* (or their reciprocals, T2 and T2*) have been developed for the liver and the heart. Interscanner variability for these techniques has proven to be on the order of 5–7%. Summary Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of tissue iron is becoming increasingly important in the management of transfusional iron load because it is noninvasive, relatively widely available and offers a window into presymptomatic organ dysfunction. The techniques are highly reproducible within and across machines and have been chemically validated in the liver and the heart. These techniques will become the standard of care as industry begins to support the acquisition and postprocessing software. PMID:17414205

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Koltzenburg, Martin; Yousry, Tarek

    2007-10-01

    Clinical investigations of neuromuscular diseases routinely involve genetic, neurophysiological, biochemical and histopathological methods. More recently, various magnetic resonance imaging techniques have become available and extended the differential diagnostic possibilities. Using magnetic resonance imaging it is now possible to quantify muscle volume in selected body regions and measure wasting and exercise-induced muscle hypertrophy. Evidence is forthcoming that many hereditary myopathies are characterized by distinct patterns of muscle degeneration and this helps in selecting other relevant genetic and biochemical investigations. With diffusion-weighted tensor imaging it is possible to identify the microstructure of normal and diseased muscles. Arterial spin labelling is an emerging non-invasive tool to assess blood-flow changes in individual muscles. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy now provides an exciting opportunity to visualize metabolic changes and the pathophysiologically relevant cellular perturbations in muscle channelopathies affecting the muscle-specific sodium-channel isoform Na(v)1.4. Magnetic resonance imaging supplements investigations for the differential diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases. An advantage over routine neurophysiological or histopathological methods is that they are operator-independent, non-invasive and painless. Magnetic resonance imaging also has the advantage of providing a lasting detailed topographical picture of regional variations and allows robust measurements of muscle volume and various functional parameters.

  16. Observation of a Hybrid Spin Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, M.; Allgower, C.; Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Chu, C. M.; Courant, E. D.; Glenn, J. W.; Huang, H.; Jeon, D.; Kponou, A. E.; Krueger, K.; Luccio, A.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Lee, S. Y.; Ratner, L.; Reece, K.; Roser, T.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M. J.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D. G.; van Asselt, W.; Williams, N.; Yokosawa, A.

    2000-02-01

    A new type of spin depolarization resonance has been observed at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). This spin resonance is identified as a strong closed-orbit sideband around the dominant intrinsic spin resonance. The strength of the resonance was proportional to the 9th harmonic component of the horizontal closed orbit and proportional to the vertical betatron oscillation amplitude. This ``hybrid'' spin resonance cannot be overcome by the partial snake at the AGS, but it can be corrected by the harmonic orbit correctors.

  17. Observation of a hybrid spin resonance

    PubMed

    Bai; Allgower; Ahrens; Alessi; Brown; Bunce; Cameron; Chu; Courant; Glenn; Huang; Jeon; Kponou; Krueger; Luccio; Makdisi; Lee; Ratner; Reece; Roser; Spinka; Syphers; Tsoupas; Underwood; van Asselt W; Williams

    2000-02-07

    A new type of spin depolarization resonance has been observed at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). This spin resonance is identified as a strong closed-orbit sideband around the dominant intrinsic spin resonance. The strength of the resonance was proportional to the 9th harmonic component of the horizontal closed orbit and proportional to the vertical betatron oscillation amplitude. This "hybrid" spin resonance cannot be overcome by the partial snake at the AGS, but it can be corrected by the harmonic orbit correctors.

  18. Magnetic material arrangement in oriented termites: a magnetic resonance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, O. C.; Wajnberg, E.; de Oliveira, J. F.; Esquivel, D. M. S.

    2004-06-01

    Temperature dependence of the magnetic resonance is used to study the magnetic material in oriented Neocapritermes opacus (N.o.) termite, the only prey of the migratory ant Pachycondyla marginata (P.m.). A broad line in the g=2 region, associated to isolated nanoparticles shows that at least 97% of the magnetic material is in the termite's body (abdomen + thorax). From the temperature dependence of the resonant field and from the spectral linewidths, we estimate the existence of magnetic nanoparticles 18.5 ± 0.3 nm in diameter and an effective magnetic anisotropy constant, Keff between 2.1 and 3.2 × 10 4 erg/cm 3. A sudden change in the double integrated spectra at about 100 K for N.o. with the long body axis oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field can be attributed to the Verwey transition, and suggests an organized film-like particle system.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging by using nano-magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokrollahi, H.; Khorramdin, A.; Isapour, Gh.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetism and magnetic materials play a major role in various biological applications, such as magnetic bioseparation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia treatment of cancer and drug delivery. Among these techniques, MRI is a powerful method not only for diagnostic radiology but also for therapeutic medicine that utilizes a magnetic field and radio waves. Recently, this technique has contributed greatly to the promotion of the human quality life. Thus, this paper presents a short review of the physical principles and recent advances of MRI, as well as providing a summary of the synthesis methods and properties of contrast agents, like different core materials and surfactants.

  20. Magnetic resonance tracking of fluorescent nanodiamond fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shames, A. I.; Osipov, V. Yu; Boudou, J. P.; Panich, A. M.; von Bardeleben, H. J.; Treussart, F.; Vul', A. Ya

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance techniques (electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)) are used for tracking the multi-stage process of the fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) produced by high-energy electron irradiation, annealing, and subsequent nano-milling. Pristine commercial high pressure and high temperature microdiamonds (MDs) with mean size 150 μm contain ~5  ×  1018 spins/g of singlet (S = 1/2) substitutional nitrogen defects P1, as well as sp3 C-C dangling bonds in the crystalline lattice. The half-field X-band EPR clearly shows (by the appearance of the intense ‘forbidden’ g = 4.26 line) that high-energy electron irradiation and annealing of MDs induce a large amount (~5  ×  1017 spins/g) of triplet (S = 1) magnetic centers, which are identified as negatively charged nitrogen vacancy defects (NV-). This is supported by EPR observations of the ‘allowed’ transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the triplet state. After progressive milling of the fluorescent MDs down to an ultrasubmicron scale (≤100 nm), the relative abundance of EPR active NV- defects in the resulting fluorescent NDs (FND) substantially decreases and, vice versa, the content of C-inherited singlet defects correlatively increases. In the fraction of the finest FNDs (mean particle size <20 nm), which are contained in the dried supernatant of ultracentrifuged aqueous dispersion of FNDs, the NV- content is found to be reduced by one order of magnitude whereas the singlet defects content increases up to ~2  ×  1019 spins/g. In addition, another triplet-type defect, which is characterized by the g = 4.00 ‘forbidden’ line, appears. On reduction of the particle size below the 20 nm limit, the ‘allowed’ EPR lines become practically unobservable, whereas the ‘forbidden’ lines remain as a reliable fingerprint of the presence of NV- centers in small ND systems. The same size reduction causes the disappearance of the

  1. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Gadofosveset-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    PubMed Central

    Goyen, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    Gadofosveset (Vasovist®, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin/Germany) is the first intravascular contrast agent approved for use with magnetic resonance angiography in the European Union, Switzerland, Turkey, Canada, and Australia. Gadofosveset reversibly binds to albumin providing extended intravascular enhancement compared wth existing extracellular magnetic resonance contrast agents. Prior to approval, gadofosveset underwent extensive testing to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the drug; the clinical trials show that gadofosveset-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is safe and well tolerated in patients with vascular disease and effective for the detection of vascular stenosis and aneurysms gadofosveset has the potential to open new horizons in diagnostic MRA by increasing the spatial resolution and the robustness of MRA examinations and facilitating the examination of multiple vascular beds. PMID:18629367

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the body

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Hricak, H.

    1987-01-01

    This text provides reference to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the body. Beginning with explanatory chapters on the physics, instrumentation, and interpretation of MRI, it proceeds to the normal anatomy of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Other chapters cover magnetic resonance imaging of blood flow, the larynx, the lymph nodes, and the spine, as well as MRI in obstetrics. The text features detailed coverage of magnetic resonance imaging of numerous disorders and disease states, including neck disease, thoracic disease; breast disease; congenital and acquired heart disease; vascular disease; diseases of the liver, pancreas, and spleen; diseases of the kidney, adrenals, and retroperitoneum; diseases of the male and female pelvis; and musculoskeletal diseases. Chapters on the biological and environmental hazards of MRI, the current clinical status of MRI in comparison to other imaging modalities, and economic considerations are also included.

  4. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridjonsson, E. O.; Creber, S. A.; Vrouwenvelder, J. S.; Johns, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system.

  5. Magnetic resonance signal moment determination using the Earth's magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Fridjonsson, E O; Creber, S A; Vrouwenvelder, J S; Johns, M L

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a method to manipulate magnetic resonance data such that the moments of the signal spatial distribution are readily accessible. Usually, magnetic resonance imaging relies on data acquired in so-called k-space which is subsequently Fourier transformed to render an image. Here, via analysis of the complex signal in the vicinity of the centre of k-space we are able to access the first three moments of the signal spatial distribution, ultimately in multiple directions. This is demonstrated for biofouling of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane module, rendering unique information and an early warning of the onset of fouling. The analysis is particularly applicable for the use of mobile magnetic resonance spectrometers; here we demonstrate it using an Earth's magnetic field system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Magnetic Microparticle Aggregation For Viscosity Determination By Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Rui; Cima, Michael J.; Weissleder, Ralph; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Micron-sized magnetic particles were induced to aggregate when placed in homogeneous magnetic fields, like those of magnetic resonance (MR) imagers and relaxometers, and then spontaneously returned to their dispersed state when removed from the field. Associated with the aggregation and dispersion of the magnetic particles were time dependent increases and decreases in the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of the water. Magnetic nanoparticles, with far smaller magnetic moments per particle, did not undergo magnetically induced aggregation, and exhibited time independent values of T2. The rate of T2 change associated with magnetic micro-particle aggregation was used to determine the viscosity of liquid samples, providing a method that can be of particular advantage for determining the viscosity of small volumes of potentially biohazardous samples of blood or blood plasma. PMID:18306403

  7. Magnetic force microscopy using tip magnetization modulated by ferromagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Arima, Eiji; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Nomura, Hikaru; Nakatani, Ryoichi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-27

    In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the tip-sample distance should be reduced to analyze the microscopic magnetic domain structure with high spatial resolution. However, achieving a small tip-sample distance has been difficult because of superimposition of interaction forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces induced by the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of MFM using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to extract only the magnetic field near the sample surface. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by FMR to separate the magnetic field and topographic structure. We demonstrate the modulation of the magnetization of the cantilever and the identification of the polarities of a perpendicular magnetic medium.

  8. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of anomalous coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anitha; Keegan, Jennifer; Pennell, Dudley J

    2005-09-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of anomalous coronary arteries is a class I indication. The term anomalous coronary artery encompasses those with an abnormal origin (from the incorrect sinus, too-high or too-low from the correct sinus, or from the pulmonary artery) and/or number of ostia. Their clinical significance results from the increased risk of myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death associated with those traversing an interarterial course between the aorta and main pulmonary artery/right ventricular outflow tract. In this article, we review the role and practice of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in this field.

  9. Magnetic resonance neurography of the brachial plexus

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyaya, Vaishali; Upadhyaya, Divya Narain; Kumar, Adarsh; Pandey, Ashok Kumar; Gujral, Ratni; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is being increasingly recognised all over the world as the imaging modality of choice for brachial plexus and peripheral nerve lesions. Recent refinements in MRI protocols have helped in imaging nerve tissue with greater clarity thereby helping in the identification, localisation and classification of nerve lesions with greater confidence than was possible till now. This article on Magnetic Resonance Neurography (MRN) is based on the authors’ experience of imaging the brachial plexus and peripheral nerves using these protocols over the last several years. PMID:26424974

  10. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalchuk, Nataliya

    Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Mammography (MREIM) is a new imaging technique under development by Wollin Ventures, Inc. in conjunction with the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. MREIM addresses the problem of low specificity of magnetic resonance mammography and high false-positive rates, which lead to unnecessary biopsies. Because cancerous tissue has a higher electrical conductivity than benign tissue, it may serve as a biomarker for differentiation between malignant and benign lesions. The MREIM principle is based on measuring both magnetic resonance and electric properties of the breast by adding a quasi-steady-state electric field to the standard magnetic resonance breast image acquisition. This applied electric field produces a current density that creates an additional magnetic field that in turn alters the native magnetic resonance signal in areas of higher electrical conductivity, corresponding to cancerous tissue. This work comprises MREIM theory, computer simulations, and experimental developments. First, a general overview and background review of tissue modeling and electrical-impedance imaging techniques are presented. The experimental part of this work provides a description of the MREIM apparatus and the imaging results of a custom-made breast phantom. This phantom was designed and developed to mimic the magnetic resonance and electrical properties of the breast. The theoretical part of this work provides an extension to the initial MREIM theoretical developments to further understand the MREIM effects. MREIM computer simulations were developed for both idealized and realistic tumor models. A method of numerical calculation of electric potential and induced magnetic field distribution in objects with irregular boundaries and anisotropic conductivity was developed based on the Finite Difference Method. Experimental findings were replicated with simulations. MREIM effects were analyzed with contrast diagrams to show the

  11. Magnetic elliptical polarization of Schumann resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of orthogonal, horizontal components of the magnetic field in the ELF range obtained during September 1985 show that the Schumann resonance eigenfrequencies determined separately for the north-south and east-west magnetic components differ by as much as 0.5 Hz, suggesting that the underlying magnetic signal is not linearly polarized at such times. The high degree of magnetic ellipticity found suggests that the side multiplets of the Schumann resonances corresponding to azimuthally inhomogeneous normal modes are strongly excited in the highly asymmetric earth-ionosphere cavity. The dominant sense of polarization over the measurement passband is found to be right-handed during local daylight hours, and to be left-handed during local nighttime hours.

  12. Observation of wide rf induced synchrotron sideband depolarizing resonances.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, M. A.; Anferov, V. A.; Blinov, B. B.; Courant, E. D.; Crandell, D. A.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Kaufman, W. A.; Krisch, A. D.; Lorenzon, W.; Nurushev, T. S.; Phelps, R. A.; Wong, V. K.; Caussyn, D. D.; Chu, C. M.; Ellison, T. J. P.; Lee, S. Y.; Rinckel, T.; Schwandt, P.; Sperisen, F.; Stephenson, E. J.; von Przewoski, B.; Ohmori, C.; Minty, M. G.; Russell, A. D.

    1997-04-01

    In a recent experiment with a stored 104.1 MeV vertically polarized proton beam at the IUCF Cooler Ring, we depolarized the beam using an rf solenoid with a magnetic field of about 1.3\\cdot10-3T\\cdotm. We observed the two expected rf depolarizing resonances centered around the protons' 1.5 MHz circulation frequency as in previous experiments. Near each of these resonances, we also found synchrotron sidebands which are caused by the proton's energy oscillations. The strengths and widths of the synchrotron resonances were quite different for the sidebands above and below the circulation frequency.

  13. Magnetic resonance microscopy in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Serša, I

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy is a special modality of MRI with an emphasis on high spatial resolution. While its main principle is identical to conventional clinical MRI, there are several differences between the two that are mainly associated with a use of stronger magnets and gradients. MR microscopy has numerous interesting applications in material and bio sciences in which high spatial resolution is demanded and long experiment times are allowed.

  14. Association between the findings on magnetic resonance imaging screening for syringomyelia in asymptomatic Cavalier King Charles spaniels and observation of clinical signs consistent with syringomyelia in later life.

    PubMed

    Ives, E J; Doyle, L; Holmes, M; Williams, T L; Vanhaesebrouck, A E

    2015-01-01

    A questionnaire-based study was used to investigate the association between the findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening for syringomyelia (SM) in 79 asymptomatic Cavalier King Charles spaniels (CKCS) and the subsequent development of clinical signs consistent with SM in later life. Owners reported clinical signs consistent with SM in 13/79 (16%) dogs at the time of the questionnaire. A significantly greater proportion of CKCS with a syrinx visible on MRI screening showed clinical signs in later life (9/25, 36%) than dogs without a visible syrinx (4/54, 7%; odds ratio 6.9). Whether the findings of MRI screening can be used to indicate the likelihood of an asymptomatic CKCS developing clinical signs consistent with SM in later life warrants further prospective study in a larger cohort of dogs.

  15. Direct observation of ion exchange in mechanically activated LiH+MgB2 system using ultrahigh field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo; Wan, Xuefei; Shaw, Leon L.

    2009-04-01

    The LiBH4+MgH2 system has great potential for hydrogen vehicle applications. In this study, the reported solid-state hydrogenation system made of LiH+1/2MgB2 has been investigated using ultrahigh field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It is found that Mg-Li ion exchange occurs within MgB2 during ball milling to form a compound of (Mg1-xLi2x)B2, which facilitates the formation of LiBH4 in the subsequent hydriding reaction. This discovery offers a scientific foundation for investigating the detailed mechanisms of solid-state hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the LiBH4+MgH2 system in the future.

  16. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Markovich, Dmitry; Baryshnikova, Kseniia; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    All-dielectric “magnetic light” nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here an approach for enhancing of magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of the magnetic moment, tailoring the latter in the dynamical range of 100% and delivering enhancement up to 36% relative to performances of standalone spherical particles. The proposed approach provides pathways for designs of all-dielectric metamaterials and metasurfaces with strong magnetic responses. PMID:26941126

  17. The internal magnetic field distribution, and single exponential magnetic resonance free induction decay, in rocks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Marble, Andrew E; Colpitts, Bruce G; Balcom, Bruce J

    2005-08-01

    When fluid saturated porous media are subjected to an applied uniform magnetic field, an internal magnetic field, inside the pore space, is induced due to magnetic susceptibility differences between the pore-filling fluid and the solid matrix. The microscopic distribution of the internal magnetic field, and its gradients, was simulated based on the thin-section pore structure of a sedimentary rock. The simulation results were verified experimentally. We show that the 'decay due to diffusion in internal field' magnetic resonance technique may be applied to measure the pore size distribution in partially saturated porous media. For the first time, we have observed that the internal magnetic field and its gradients in porous rocks have a Lorentzian distribution, with an average gradient value of zero. The Lorentzian distribution of internal magnetic field arises from the large susceptibility contrast and an intrinsic disordered pore structure in these porous media. We confirm that the single exponential magnetic resonance free induction decay commonly observed in fluid saturated porous media arises from a Lorentzian internal field distribution. A linear relationship between the magnetic resonance linewidth, and the product of the susceptibility difference in the porous media and the applied magnetic field, is observed through simulation and experiment.

  18. Huygens’ Metasurfaces Enabled by Magnetic Dipole Resonance Tuning in Split Dielectric Nanoresonators

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Sheng; Vaskin, Aleksandr; Campione, Salvatore; ...

    2017-06-07

    Dielectric metasurfaces that exploit the different Mie resonances of nanoscale dielectric resonators are a powerful platform for manipulating electromagnetic fields and can provide novel optical behavior. Here in this work, we experimentally demonstrate independent tuning of the magnetic dipole resonances relative to the electric dipole resonances of split dielectric resonators (SDRs). By increasing the split dimension, we observe a blue shift of the magnetic dipole resonance toward the electric dipole resonance. Therefore, SDRs provide the ability to directly control the interaction between the two dipole resonances within the same resonator. For example, we achieve the first Kerker condition by spectrallymore » overlapping the electric and magnetic dipole resonances and observe significantly suppressed backward scattering. Moreover, we show that a single SDR can be used as an optical nanoantenna that provides strong unidirectional emission from an electric dipole source.« less

  19. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of Single Magnetic Moment on a Surface

    PubMed Central

    Berggren, P.; Fransson, J.

    2016-01-01

    We address electron spin resonance of single magnetic moments in a tunnel junction using time-dependent electric fields and spin-polarized current. We show that the tunneling current directly depends on the local magnetic moment and that the frequency of the external electric field mixes with the characteristic Larmor frequency of the local spin. The importance of the spin-polarized current induced anisotropy fields acting on the local spin moment is, moreover, demonstrated. Our proposed model thus explains the absence of an electron spin resonance for a half integer spin, in contrast with the strong signal observed for an integer spin. PMID:27156935

  20. Electrically detected magnetic resonance studies of phosphorus doped diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, T.; Brandt, M. S.; Nebel, C. E.; Stutzmann, M.; Koizumi, S.

    2001-12-01

    Phosphorus doped n-type epitaxial diamond films have been studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). At low electric field, the dominant defects influencing the electronic transport are carbon dangling bonds, while at higher fields the anisotropic spin resonance signal of a new phosphorus-related center with g⊥=2.0026, g||=2.0042, Aiso=17.6 G, and Aaniso=1.8 G is observed. These results indicate that room temperature conductivity in this film is dominated by hopping via phosphorus-related defect centers rather than via hydrogenic donor states of phosphorus atoms on substitutional sites.

  1. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of semicircular canals.

    PubMed Central

    Sbarbati, A; Leclercq, F; Zancanaro, C; Antonakis, K

    1992-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of the first investigation of the semicircular canals in a living, small animal by means of high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging. This procedure is noninvasive and allows identification of the endolymphatic and perilymphatic spaces yielding a morphology quite consistent with direct anatomical examination. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1506290

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Biomedical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaśpar, Jan; Hána, Karel; Smrčka, Pavel; Brada, Jiří; Beneš, Jiří; Šunka, Pavel

    2007-11-01

    The basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging covering physical principles and basic imaging techniques will be presented as a strong tool in biomedical engineering. Several applications of MRI in biomedical research practiced at the MRI laboratory of the FBMI CTU including other laboratory instruments and activities are introduced.

  4. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Giovanni; Tortora, Fabio; Baldelli, Roberto; Cocchiara, Francesco; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Sbardella, Emilia; Simeoli, Chiara; Caranci, Ferdinando; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria

    2017-03-01

    Adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary tumor represents about 10 % of pituitary adenomas and at the time of diagnosis most of them are microadenomas. Transsphenoidal surgery is the first-line treatment of Cushing's disease and accurate localization of the tumor within the gland is essential for selectively removing the lesion and preserving normal pituitary function. Magnetic resonance imaging is the best imaging modality for the detection of pituitary tumors, but adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary microadenomas are not correctly identified in 30-50 % of cases, because of their size, location, and enhancing characteristics. Several recent studies were performed with the purpose of better localizing the adrenocorticotropin-secreting microadenomas through the use in magnetic resonance imaging of specific sequences, reduced contrast medium dose and high-field technology. Therefore, an improved imaging technique for pituitary disease is mandatory in the suspect of Cushing's disease. The aims of this paper are to present an overview of pituitary magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of Cushing's disease and to provide a magnetic resonance imaging protocol to be followed in case of suspicion adrenocorticotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma.

  5. An improved nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Manatt, S. L.

    1967-01-01

    Cylindrical sample container provides a high degree of nuclear stabilization to a nuclear magnetic resonance /nmr/ spectrometer. It is placed coaxially about the nmr insert and contains reference sample that gives a signal suitable for locking the field and frequency of an nmr spectrometer with a simple audio modulation system.

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  7. Sample spinner for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, E.O.

    1984-05-01

    A sample spinner for a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer having improved operating characteristics is described comprising a rotor supported at both ends by support gas bearings and positioned by a thrust gas bearing. Improved support gas bearings are also described which result in a spinner exhibiting long-term stable operation characteristics.

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Technology for Medical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budinger, Thomas F.; Lauterbur, Paul C.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on the status of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from theoretical and clinical perspectives, reviewing NMR theory and relaxation parameters relevant to NMR imaging. Also reviews literature related to modern imaging strategies, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast agents, in vivo spectroscopy, spectroscopic imaging, clinical applications, and…

  9. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  10. Giant infantile gliosarcoma: magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Bulakbasi, Nail; Kocaoglu, Murat; Onguru, Onder; Chen, Lina

    2008-08-01

    Gliosarcoma is an uncommon variant of glioblastoma multiforme, which is composed of gliomatous and sarcomatous elements. The tumor is rarely encountered in childhood. This case report presents the magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of a giant gliosarcoma in a 3-year-old girl. Size and location of the tumor are described.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Principles and Applications.

    PubMed

    Dyke, Lara M

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Principles and Applications. Carr J. C., Carroll T. J., Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg/New York, 2012. 412 pp. Price $179.00. ISBN 978-1-4419-1685-3 (hardcover). © 2013 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance: physics and terminology.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Christopher T; Robson, Matthew D

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is the branch of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) whose acquisition methods are adapted to surmount the particular challenges caused by motion of the heart and blood in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging is supremely flexible; it can produce images showing the spatial distribution of diverse tissue characteristics, for example, proton density, T(1), T(2), T(2)(⁎), fat concentration, flow rate, and diffusion parameters. The image contrast may usefully be modified by intravenous infusion of contrast agents. Magnetic resonance imaging permits 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional acquisitions with arbitrary slice orientation. Unfortunately, MRI's flexibility is matched by a remarkable complexity not only in its fundamental principles but also in the optimization of applications in the clinic. This article attempts to demystify the basic principles of CMR and provides a primer on the terminology used in CMR. Complete confidence in the principles of CMR is not essential to use the technology. Nevertheless, knowledge of the principal terminology of MRI is a valuable first step when seeking to understand and apply modern methods in a clinical or research setting. Thus, the article closes with a glossary of terminology and references to high-quality educational resources. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intralabyrinthine schwannoma shown by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Saeed, S R; Birzgalis, A R; Ramsden, R T

    1994-01-01

    Intralabyrinthine schwannomas are rare benign tumours which present with progressive or fluctuant audiovestibular symptoms and may mimic Meniéres disease. The size and position of these lesions make preoperative diagnosis unusual and most are discovered incidentally at labyrinthectomy. A case is reported which was diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed at surgery.

  15. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  16. Optimal magnetic resonance imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Quality magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is complex and requires optimization of many technical factors. The most important factors are: magnet field and gradient strengths, coil selection, receiver bandwidth, field of view and image matrix size, number of excitations, slice thickness, image weighting and contrast, imaging planes and the direction of the phase, and frequency gradients. The ability to augment a standard MR study with additional sequences, and the need to ensure the completed study is comprehensive and robust must be balanced against the time the patient spends under anesthesia in the magnet.

  17. Magnetic resonance investigation of magnetic-labeled baker's yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy Morais, J. P. M.; Azevedo, R. B.; Silva, L. P.; Lacava, Z. G. M.; Báo, S. N.; Silva, O.; Pelegrini, F.; Gansau, C.; Buske, N.; Safarik, I.; Safarikova, M.; Morais, P. C.

    2004-05-01

    In this study, the interaction of DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles (5 and 10 nm core-size) with Saccharomyces cerevisae was investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM micrographs revealed magnetite nanoparticles attached externally to the cell wall. The MR data support the strong interaction among the nanoparticles supported by the cells. A remarkable shift in the resonance field was used as signature of particle attachment to the cell wall.

  18. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Yumin

    2013-12-15

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE oscillating and decaying with distance with the period equal to resonance wavelength directly shows the retardation effect. Simulation also shows that the interaction at normal incidence is sensitive to the phase correlation which is related with retardation effect and is ultra-long-distance interaction when the two MRs are strongly localized. When the distance is very short, the amplitude of magnetic resonance is oppressed by the strong interaction and thus the MFE can be much lower than that of single MR. This study provides the design rules of metamaterials for engineering resonant properties of MRs.

  19. Dynamic magnetic susceptibility and electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yin; Wang, X. S.; Yuan, H. Y.; Kang, S. S.; Zhang, H. W.; Wang, X. R.

    2017-03-01

    The dynamic magnetic susceptibility of magnetic materials near ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is very important in interpreting the dc voltage obtained in its electrical detection. Based on the causality principle and the assumption that the usual microwave absorption lineshape of a homogeneous magnetic material around FMR is Lorentzian, the general forms of the dynamic magnetic susceptibility of an arbitrary sample and the corresponding dc voltage lineshapes of its electrical detection were obtained. Our main findings are as follows. (1) The dynamic magnetic susceptibility is not a Polder tensor for a material with an arbitrary magnetic anisotropy. The two off-diagonal matrix elements of the tensor near FMR are not, in general, opposite to each other. However, the linear response coefficient of the magnetization to the total radio frequency (rf) field (the sum of the external and internal rf fields due to precessing magnetization is a quantity which cannot be measured directly) is a Polder tensor. This may explain why the two off-diagonal susceptibility matrix elements were always wrongly assumed to be opposite to each other in almost all analyses. (2) The frequency dependence of dynamic magnetic susceptibility near FMR is fully characterized by six real numbers, while its field dependence is fully characterized by seven real numbers. (3) A recipe of how to determine these numbers by standard microwave absorption measurements for a sample with an arbitrary magnetic anisotropy is proposed. Our results allow one to unambiguously separate the contribution of the anisotropic magnetoresistance to the dc voltage signals from the anomalous Hall effect. With these results, one can reliably extract the information of spin pumping and the inverse spin-Hall effect, and determine the spin-Hall angle. (4) In the case that resonance frequency is not sensitive to the applied static magnetic field, the field dependence of the matrix elements of dynamic magnetic susceptibility, as

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging. South Carolina Health Service Area 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Contents include: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI); (Clinical applications, Magnet types, Comparisons with other systems, Manpower, Manufacturers, Contraindications); Analysis of systems; (Availability, Accessibility, Cost, Quality, Continuity, Acceptability).

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance properties of lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, D.; Weeks, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of Na-23, Al-27, and P-31 in fines samples 10084,60 and 14163,168 and in crystalline rock samples 12021,55 and 14321,166, have been recorded over a range of frequencies up to 20 MHz. A shift in the field at which maximum absorption occurs for all of the spectra relative to the field at which maximum absorption occurs for terrestrial analogues is attributed to a sample-dependent magnetic field at the Na, Al, and P sites opposing the laboratory field. The magnitude of these fields internal to the samples is sample dependent and varies from 5 to 10 G. These fields do not correlate with the iron content of the samples. However, the presence of single-domain particles of iron distributed throughout the plagioclase fraction that contains the principal fraction of Na and Al is inferred from electron magnetic resonance spectra shapes.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory rheumatoid diseases.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Mróz, Joanna; Ostrowska, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is used more and more frequently to diagnose changes in the musculoskeletal system in the course of rheumatic diseases, at their initial assessment, for treatment monitoring and for identification of complications. The article presents the history of magnetic resonance imaging, the basic principles underlying its operation as well as types of magnets, coils and MRI protocols used in the diagnostic process of rheumatic diseases. It enumerates advantages and disadvantages of individual MRI scanners. The principles of MRI coil operation are explained, and the sequences used for MR image analysis are described, particularly in terms of their application in rheumatology, including T1-, T2-, PD-weighted, STIR/TIRM and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Furthermore, views on the need to use contrast agents to optimise diagnosis, particularly in synovitis-like changes, are presented. Finally, methods for the assessment of MR images are listed, including the semi-quantitative method by RAMRIS and quantitative dynamic examination.

  3. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1994-01-01

    The Community College Division is pleased to report progress of NASA funded research at West Virginia State College. During this reporting period, the project research group has continued with activities to develop instrumentation capability designed to monitor resonant cavity frequencies in the atmospheric region between the Earth's surface and the ionosphere. In addition, the project's principal investigator, Dr. Craig Spaniol, and NASA technical officer, Dr. John Sutton, have written and published technical papers intended to expand the scientific and technical framework needed for project research. This research continues to provide an excellent example of government and education working together to provide significant research in the college environment. This cooperative effort has provided many students with technical project work which compliments their education.

  4. An introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Andrew, E R

    1990-02-01

    In this paper the author illustrates the historical aspects of the development, first, of the fundamental principles of nuclear magnetic resonance and, second, the extension of these principles to magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo spectroscopy.

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation assisted by neuronavigation of magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, N. Angeline; Alcauter, S. Sarael; Barrios, A. Fernando; González, O. Jorge J.; Márquez, F. Jorge A.

    2012-10-01

    Technological advance has improved the way scientists and doctors can learn about the brain and treat different disorders. A non-invasive method used for this is Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) based on neuron excitation by electromagnetic induction. Combining this method with functional Magnetic Resonance Images (fMRI), it is intended to improve the localization technique of cortical brain structures by designing an extracranial localization system, based on Alcauter et al. work.

  6. Meralgia paresthetica: 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Del Grande, Filippo; Soldatos, Theodoros; Chalian, Majid; Belzberg, Allan J; Williams, Eric H; Jalali, Farahani S; Thawait, Gaurav K; Eng, John; Carrino, John A

    2013-06-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy and observer performance of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) in the evaluation of meralgia paresthetica (MP). Two independent readers were blinded to the clinical diagnosis and evaluated the MRN studies of the pelvis of 11 patients with MP and 28 control participants. In each study, the lateral femoral cutaneous nerves were assessed for signal alteration and/or neuroma formation, indicating lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy, at various levels along their course. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was evaluated. Both readers exhibited substantial intraobserver agreement in detecting signal alterations and neuroma formation of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN). The readers demonstrated moderate interobserver agreement in detecting signal alteration of the LFCN and poor interobserver agreement in diagnosing neuroma formation. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of LFCN neuropathy diagnosis were ≥ 71 % and ≥ 94 % for both readers respectively. The diagnostic test accuracy was ≥ 90 % for both readers. 3-Tesla MRN provides reliable and accurate diagnostic evaluation of meralgia paresthetica.

  7. Ultracold Molecule Production via a Resonant Oscillating Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, S.T.; Hodby, E.; Wieman, C.E.

    2005-11-04

    A novel atom-molecule conversion technique has been investigated. Ultracold {sup 85}Rb atoms sitting in a dc magnetic field near the 155 G Feshbach resonance are associated by applying a small sinusoidal oscillation to the magnetic field. There is resonant atom to molecule conversion when the modulation frequency closely matches the molecular binding energy. We observe that the atom to molecule conversion efficiency depends strongly on the frequency, amplitude, and duration of the applied modulation and on the phase space density of the sample. This technique offers high conversion efficiencies without the necessity of crossing or closely approaching the Feshbach resonance and allows precise spectroscopic measurements. Efficiencies of 55% have been observed for pure Bose-Einstein condensates.

  8. Probing arrays of circular magnetic microdots by ferromagnetic resonance.

    SciTech Connect

    Kakazei, G. N.; Mewes, T.; Wigen, P. E.; Hammel, P. C.; Slavin, A. N.; Pogorelov, Y. G.; Costa, M. D.; Golub, V. O.; Guslienko, K. Y.; Novosad, V.

    2008-06-01

    X-band ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) was used to characterize in-plane magnetic anisotropies in rectangular and square arrays of circular nickel and Permalloy microdots. In the case of a rectangular lattice, as interdot distances in one direction decrease, the in-plane uniaxial anisotropy field increases, in good agreement with a simple theory of magnetostatically interacting uniformly magnetized dots. In the case of a square lattice a four-fold anisotropy of the in-plane FMR field H(r) was found when the interdot distance a gets comparable to the dot diameter D. This anisotropy, not expected in the case of uniformly magnetized dots, was explained by a non-uniform magnetization m(r) in a dot in response to dipolar forces in the patterned magnetic structure. It is well described by an iterative solution of a continuous variation procedure. In the case of perpendicular magnetization multiple sharp resonance peaks were observed below the main FMR peak in all the samples, and the relative positions of these peaks were independent of the interdot separations. Quantitative description of the observed multiresonance FMR spectra was given using the dipole-exchange spin wave dispersion equation for a perpendicularly magnetized film where in-plane wave vector is quantized due to the finite dot radius, and the inhomogenetiy of the intradot static demagnetization field in the nonellipsoidal dot is taken into account. It was demonstrated that ferromagnetic resonance force microscopy (FMRFM) can be used to determine both local and global properties of patterned submicron ferromagnetic samples. Local spectroscopy together with the possibility to vary the tip-sample spacing enables the separation of those two contributions to a FMRFM spectrum. The global FMR properties of circular submicron dots determined using magnetic resonance force microscopy are in a good agreement with results obtained using conventional FMR and with theoretical descriptions.

  9. Study of nonlinear ferromagnetic resonance in a nanoscale magnetic tunnel junction using diode effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, Hirofumi; Kudo, Kiwamu; Nagasawa, Tazumi; Kanao, Taro; Mizushima, Koichi; Sato, Rie

    2016-09-01

    We use the diode effect caused by magnetization excitation in a microwave magnetic field to analyze the ferromagnetic resonance and magnetization switching in a nanoscale perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction. The cone angle and the lag angle with respect to the applied microwave field of the magnetization precession are accurately estimated by utilizing the homodyne nature of the diode effect. We observe a ferromagnetic resonance peak of the cone angle accompanied by an increase in the lag angle, and a nonlinear shift of the peak position with increasing the microwave field amplitude. We also reveal magnetization switching assisted by ferromagnetic resonance excitation.

  10. Magnetic resonance of calcified tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrli, Felix W.

    2013-04-01

    MRI of the human body is largely made possible by the favorable relaxation properties of protons of water and triacyl glycerides prevalent in soft tissues. Hard tissues - key among them bone - are generally less amenable to measurement with in vivo MR imaging techniques, not so much as a result of the lower proton density but rather due to the extremely short life-times of the proton signal in water bound to solid-like entities, typically collagen, or being trapped in micro-pores. Either mechanism can enhance T2 relaxation by up to three orders of magnitude relative to their soft-tissue counterparts. Detection of these protons requires solid-state techniques that have emerged in recent years and that promise to add a new dimension to the study of hard tissues. Alternative approaches to probe calcified tissues exploit their characteristic magnetic properties. Bone, teeth and extra-osseous calcium-containing biomaterials are unique in that they are more diamagnetic than all other tissues and thus yield information indirectly by virtue of the induced magnetic fields present in their vicinity. Progress has also been made in methods allowing very high-resolution structural imaging of trabecular and cortical bone relying on detection of the surrounding soft-tissues. This brief review, much of it drawn from work conducted in the author's laboratory, seeks to highlight opportunities with focus on early-stage developments for image-based assessment of structure, function, physiology and mechanics of calcified tissues in humans via liquid and solid-state approaches, including proton, deuteron and phosphorus NMR and MRI.

  11. Magnetic resonance of calcified tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wehrli, Felix W.

    2016-01-01

    MRI of the human body is largely made possible by the favorable relaxation properties of protons of water and triacyl glycerides prevalent in soft tissues. Hard tissues – key among them bone – are generally less amenable to measurement with in vivo MR imaging techniques, not so much as a result of the lower proton density but rather due to the extremely short life-times of the proton signal in water bound to solid-like entities, typically collagen, or being trapped in micro-pores. Either mechanism can enhance T2 relaxation by up to three orders of magnitude relative to their soft-tissue counterparts. Detection of these protons requires solid-state techniques that have emerged in recent years and that promise to add a new dimension to the study of hard tissues. Alternative approaches to probe calcified tissues exploit their characteristic magnetic properties. Bone, teeth and extra-osseous calcium-containing biomaterials are unique in that they are more diamagnetic than all other tissues and thus yield information indirectly by virtue of the induced magnetic fields present in their vicinity. Progress has also been made in methods allowing very high-resolution structural imaging of trabecular and cortical bone relying on detection of the surrounding soft-tissues. This brief review, much of it drawn from work conducted in the author’s laboratory, seeks to highlight opportunities with focus on early-stage developments for image-based assessment of structure, function, physiology and mechanics of calcified tissues in humans via liquid and solid-state approaches, including proton, deuteron and phosphorus NMR and MRI. PMID:23414678

  12. OBSERVATIONS OF SNAKE RESONANCE IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; HUANG, H.; MACKAY, W.W.; PITISYN, V.; ROSER, T.; TEPIKIAN, S.

    2005-05-16

    Siberian snakes now become essential in the polarized proton acceleration. With proper configuration of Siberian snakes, the spin precession tune of the beam becomes 1/2 which avoids all the spin depolarizing resonance. However, the enhancement of the perturbations on the spin motion can still occur when the spin precession tune is near some low order fractional numbers, called snake resonances, and. the beam can be depolarized when passing through the resonance. The snake resonances have been confirmed in the spin tracking calculations, and observed in RHIC with polarized proton beam. Equipped with two full Siberian snakes in each ring, RHIC provides us a perfect facility for snake resonance studies. This paper presents latest experimental results. New insights are also discussed.

  13. Energy metabolism of the untrained muscle of elite runners as observed by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy: evidence suggesting a genetic endowment for endurance exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Park, J H; Brown, R L; Park, C R; Cohn, M; Chance, B

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether genetically determined properties of muscle metabolism contribute to the exceptional physical endurance of world-class distance runners. ATP, phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate, and pH were quantitatively determined by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the wrist flexor muscles of elite long-distance runners and sedentary control subjects. These muscles had not been exposed to any specific program of exercise training in either group of subjects. The "untrained" muscles were examined at rest, during two cycles of three grades of exercise, and in recovery. The flexor muscles of the athletes had higher concentrations of phosphocreatine and ATP than did those of the control subjects at rest and during exercise. The athletes' muscles possessed a higher capacity for generation of ATP by oxidative metabolism than did control subjects' muscles according to the following criteria: (i) high force output, 60% of maximum voluntary contraction, was more easily reached and better maintained in both exercise cycles; (ii) the ratio of inorganic phosphate to phosphocreatine rose less during exercise and recovered faster in the postexercise period; (iii) there was no loss of adenine nucleotides or total phosphate from the athletes' muscles but significant losses from the control subjects' muscles; and (iv) the pH decreased no more than 0.1 unit in the athletes' muscles during exercise, attesting to a relatively slow glycolysis and/or a rapid oxidation of lactate. In the muscles of the control subjects, on the other hand, the pH decreased nearly 0.4 unit early in the first exercise cycle, indicating a relatively fast glycolysis and/or slower oxidation of lactate. In the second exercise cycle, the pH returned to near normal in the control subjects' muscles, reflecting diminished lactate formation because of glycogen depletion and lactate washout by the high blood flow induced by exercise. By the end of the exercise

  14. RF Magnetic Field Uniformity of Rectangular Planar Coils for Resonance Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-04

    which can also be applied to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( MRI ). Index Terms—NQR, NMR, rectangle coil, planar coil, overlap, tuning, decoupling, RF...related to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and its offspring, magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI ). One significant advantage of NQR is the absence...pulsed RF excitation [1]. These observed signals are usually detected using a surface coil. Surface coil arrays are used in unilateral NMR scans

  15. 21 CFR 892.1000 - Magnetic resonance diagnostic device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... reflect frequency and distribution of nuclei exhibiting nuclear magnetic resonance. Other physical... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnetic resonance diagnostic device. 892.1000... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1000 Magnetic resonance...

  16. 21 CFR 892.1000 - Magnetic resonance diagnostic device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reflect frequency and distribution of nuclei exhibiting nuclear magnetic resonance. Other physical... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnetic resonance diagnostic device. 892.1000... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1000 Magnetic resonance...

  17. 21 CFR 892.1000 - Magnetic resonance diagnostic device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reflect frequency and distribution of nuclei exhibiting nuclear magnetic resonance. Other physical... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnetic resonance diagnostic device. 892.1000... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1000 Magnetic resonance...

  18. 21 CFR 892.1000 - Magnetic resonance diagnostic device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... reflect frequency and distribution of nuclei exhibiting nuclear magnetic resonance. Other physical... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnetic resonance diagnostic device. 892.1000... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1000 Magnetic resonance...

  19. 21 CFR 892.1000 - Magnetic resonance diagnostic device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... reflect frequency and distribution of nuclei exhibiting nuclear magnetic resonance. Other physical... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnetic resonance diagnostic device. 892.1000... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1000 Magnetic resonance...

  20. Cardiac magnetic resonance for prediction of arrhythmogenic areas

    PubMed Central

    Ipek, Esra Gucuk; Nazarian, Saman

    2015-01-01

    Catheter ablation has been widely used to manage recurrent atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. It has been established that contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance can accurately characterize the myocardium. In this review, we summarize the role of cardiac magnetic resonance in identification of arrhythmogenic substrates, and the potential utility of cardiac magnetic resonance for catheter ablation of complex atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:25937045

  1. Is a magic angle effect observed in the collateral ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint or the oblique sesamoidean ligaments during standing magnetic resonance imaging?

    PubMed

    Smith, Meredith A; Dyson, Sue J; Murray, Rachel C

    2008-01-01

    Collagen fibers oriented at 55 degrees to the static magnetic field (B0) are characterized by an artifactual increase in signal intensity due to the magic angle effect. We hypothesized that there would be increased signal intensity in the collateral ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint and oblique sesamoidean ligaments when these ligaments were at angles approaching 55 degrees to a horizontal B0 during standing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. MR imaging was performed on four cadaver forelimbs in a 0.27 T standing system. Transverse and dorsal images were obtained using various sequences, with limbs angled at 0 degrees, 4 degrees, 8 degrees, and 12 degrees to the vertical. Images were analyzed and the angle of each ligament to B0 determined. Mean signal intensity in the ligament and cortex of the adjacent phalanx was measured and ratios calculated. With subjective interpretation, there was increased signal intensity in the collateral ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint and oblique sesamoidean ligaments over ranges of angles of 60-78 degrees and 57-69 degrees, respectively, to B0. In fast spin echo (FSE) sequences, with a long echo time (72ms), the effect was less pronounced. FSE sequences can help determine the significance of increased signal intensity within tissues. In spite of limited positions of a limb during standing MR imaging compared with horses under general anesthesia, deviation from a vertical posture sufficient to cause a magic angle effect can still occur in both ligaments tested. Conformation may contribute to the occurrence of the magic angle effect during standing MR imaging. Effort should be made to position horses squarely and to minimize leaning during image acquisition.

  2. Observational Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is often referred to as the primary source of energy release during solar flares. Directly observing reconnection occurring in the solar atmosphere, however, is not trivial considering that the scale size of the diffusion region is magnitudes smaller than the observational capabilities of current instrumentation, and coronal magnetic field measurements are not currently sufficient to capture the process. Therefore, predicting and studying observationally feasible signatures of the precursors and consequences of reconnection is necessary for guiding and verifying the simulations that dominate our understanding. I will present a set of such observations, particularly in connection with long-duration solar events, and compare them with recent simulations and theoretical predictions.

  3. [Magnetic resonance compatibility research for coronary mental stents].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Li; Wang, Shuo; Shang, Ruyao; Wang, Chunren

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to research magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents, and to evaluate the magnetic resonance compatibility based on laboratory testing results. Coronary stents magnetic resonance compatibility test includes magnetically induced displacement force test, magnetically induced torque test, radio frequency induced heating and evaluation of MR image. By magnetic displacement force and torque values, temperature, and image distortion values to determine metal coronary stent demagnetization effect. The methods can be applied to test magnetic resonance compatibility for coronary mental stents and evaluate its demagnetization effect.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of oscillating electrical currents

    PubMed Central

    Halpern-Manners, Nicholas W.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Teisseyre, Thomas Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI has become an important tool of researchers and clinicians who seek to understand patterns of neuronal activation that accompany sensory and cognitive processes. However, the interpretation of fMRI images rests on assumptions about the relationship between neuronal firing and hemodynamic response that are not firmly grounded in rigorous theory or experimental evidence. Further, the blood-oxygen-level-dependent effect, which correlates an MRI observable to neuronal firing, evolves over a period that is 2 orders of magnitude longer than the underlying processes that are thought to cause it. Here, we instead demonstrate experiments to directly image oscillating currents by MRI. The approach rests on a resonant interaction between an applied rf field and an oscillating magnetic field in the sample and, as such, permits quantitative, frequency-selective measurements of current density without spatial or temporal cancellation. We apply this method in a current loop phantom, mapping its magnetic field and achieving a detection sensitivity near the threshold required for the detection of neuronal currents. Because the contrast mechanism is under spectroscopic control, we are able to demonstrate how ramped and phase-modulated spin-lock radiation can enhance the sensitivity and robustness of the experiment. We further demonstrate the combination of these methods with remote detection, a technique in which the encoding and detection of an MRI experiment are separated by sample flow or translation. We illustrate that remotely detected MRI permits the measurement of currents in small volumes of flowing water with high sensitivity and spatial resolution. PMID:20421504

  5. Travelling wave magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, F.; Martin, R.; Marrufo, O.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2013-08-01

    Waveguides have been successfully used to generate magnetic resonance images at 7 T with whole-body systems. The bore diameter limits the magnetic resonance signal transmitted because its specific cut-off frequency is greater than the majority of resonant frequencies in magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. This restriction can be overcome by using a parallel-plate waveguide whose cut-off frequency is zero for the transverse electromagnetic modes and it can propagate any frequency. To study the potential benefits of travelling-wave excitation for whole-body imaging at 3 T, we compare numerical simulations of the principal mode propagation for a parallel-plate waveguide filled with a cylindrical phantom and two surface coils for all simulations at 1.5 T, 3 T, 4.7, 7 T, and 9.4 T. The principal mode shows very little variation of the field magnitude along the propagation direction at 3 T when compared to other higher resonant frequencies. Unlike the standard method for travelling-wave magnetic resonance imaging, a parallel-plate waveguide prototype was built and used together with a whole-body birdcage coil for signal transmission and a pair of circular coils for reception. Experimental B1 mapping was computed to investigate the feasibility of this approach and, the point spread function method was used to measure the imager performance. Human leg images were acquired to experimentally validate this approach. The numerical magnetic field and specific absorption rate of a simulated leg were computed and results are within the safety limits. The B1 mapping and point spread function results showed that it is possible to conduct travelling-wave imaging experiments with good imager performance. Human leg images were also obtained with the whole-body birdcage coil for comparison purposes. The simulated and in vivo travelling-wave results of the human leg correspond very well for the signal received. A similar image signal-to-noise ratio was observed for the

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging with an optical atomicmagnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shoujun; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Donaldson, Marcus H.; Rochester, Simon M.; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2006-05-09

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive andversatile methodology that has been applied in many disciplines1,2. Thedetection sensitivity of conventional Faraday detection of MRI depends onthe strength of the static magnetic field and the sample "fillingfactor." Under circumstances where only low magnetic fields can be used,and for samples with low spin density or filling factor, the conventionaldetection sensitivity is compromised. Alternative detection methods withhigh sensitivity in low magnetic fields are thus required. Here we showthe first use of a laser-based atomic magnetometer for MRI detection inlow fields. Our technique also employs remote detection which physicallyseparates the encoding and detection steps3-5, to improve the fillingfactor of the sample. Potentially inexpensive and using a compactapparatus, our technique provides a novel alternative for MRI detectionwith substantially enhanced sensitivity and time resolution whileavoiding the need for cryogenics.

  7. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B; Mewis, Ryan E; Highton, Louise A R; Kenny, Stephen M; Green, Gary G R; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all ¹H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10⁻³ Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application.

  8. A hyperpolarized equilibrium for magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Schwaderlapp, Niels; Lickert, Thomas; Duckett, Simon B.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Highton, Louise A. R.; Kenny, Stephen M.; Green, Gary G. R.; Leibfritz, Dieter; Korvink, Jan G.; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) play an indispensable role in science and healthcare but use only a tiny fraction of their potential. No more than ≈10 p.p.m. of all 1H nuclei are effectively detected in a 3-Tesla clinical MRI system. Thus, a vast array of new applications lays dormant, awaiting improved sensitivity. Here we demonstrate the continuous polarization of small molecules in solution to a level that cannot be achieved in a viable magnet. The magnetization does not decay and is effectively reinitialized within seconds after being measured. This effect depends on the long-lived, entangled spin-order of parahydrogen and an exchange reaction in a low magnetic field of 10−3 Tesla. We demonstrate the potential of this method by fast MRI and envision the catalysis of new applications such as cancer screening or indeed low-field MRI for routine use and remote application. PMID:24336292

  9. Identification and long-term observation of early joint damage by magnetic resonance imaging in clinically asymptomatic joints in patients with haemophilia A or B despite prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, M; Kurnik, K; Pfluger, T; Bidlingmaier, C

    2012-05-01

    Severe haemophilia is associated with recurrent joint bleeds, which can lead to haemophilic arthropathy. Subclinical joint bleeds have also been associated with joint damage detected using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We investigated the development of early changes in clinically asymptomatic joints using MRI in haemophilia A or B patients receiving prophylactic therapy. In this single-centre retrospective cohort study, patients with clinical evidence of joint damage in one ankle and one clinically asymptomatic ankle, in which we performed an MRI scan of both ankles in one session, were enrolled. MRI findings were graded using a 4-point scoring system (0 = normal findings and III = severe joint damage). Since 2000, 38 MRIs in 26 patients have been performed. Starting at a median age of 4 years, 23 patients received prophylaxis 2-3 times weekly. On-demand treatment was performed in three patients. Eight patients (31%) presented with an MRI score of 0, 12 (46%) had a score of I, four (15%) had a score of II, and two (8%) had a score of III in the clinically unaffected ankle. The six patients with MRI scores of II and III had started regular prophylaxis between the ages of 2 years and 15 years; none had developed an inhibitor or experienced a clinically evident bleed in the asymptomatic ankle. During our study, five of 26 patients had a worsening of MRI findings without experiencing a joint bleed. Early morphological changes in clinically asymptomatic ankles can be detected using MRI, despite adequate prophylaxis.

  10. Preliminary observation of dynamic changes in alcohol concentration in the human brain with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy on a 3T MR instrument.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Hitoshi; Harada, Masafumi; Sakama, Minoru; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Otsuka, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Our purposes were to establish suitable conditions for proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to measure dynamic changes in alcohol concentration in the human brain, to evaluate these changes, and to compare the findings with data from analysis of breath vapor and blood samples. We evaluated 4 healthy volunteers (mean age 26.5 years; 3 males, one female) with no neurological findings. All studies were performed with 3-tesla clinical equipment using an 8-channel head coil. We applied our modified single-voxel point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence. Continuous measurements of MRS, breath vapor, and blood samples were conducted before and after the subjects drank alcohol with a light meal. The obtained spectra were quantified by LCModel Ver. 6.1, and the accuracy of the MRS measurements was estimated using the estimated standard deviation expressed in percentage (%SD) as a criterion. Alcohol peaks after drinking were clearly detected at 1.2 ppm for all durations of measurement. Good correlations between breath vapor or blood sample and MRS were found by sub-minute MRS measurement. The continuous measurement showed time-dependent changes in alcohol in the brain and various patterns that differed among subjects. The clinical 3T equipment enables direct evaluation of sub-minute changes in alcohol metabolism in the human brain.

  11. Role of breast magnetic resonance imaging in predicting malignant invasion of the nipple-areolar complex: Potential predictors and reliability between inter-observers.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chiung-Ying; Wu, Yu-Ting; Wu, Wen-Pei; Chen, Chih-Jung; Wu, Hwa-Koon; Lin, Ying-Jen; Chen, Shou-Tung; Chen, Dar-Ren; Lee, Chi-Wei; Chen, Shu-Ling; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Lai, Hung-Wen

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we assessed the diagnostic accuracy of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluation of malignant invasion of the nipple-areolar complex (NAC).Patients with primary operable breast cancer who underwent preoperative breast MRI and received surgery during January 2011 to December 2013 were collected. The accuracy and potential factors of MRI in predicting nipple invasion were evaluated by comparing preoperative MRI with postoperative histopathologic findings. The consistency of interobservers' variances across different radiologists was also compared.Totally, 704 patients were enrolled in this study, and 56 (8%) patients have pathologic NAC invasion. Several MRI factors were potential predictors of nipple invasion. Only unilateral nipple enhancement on MRI was the most significant independent predictor of NAC involvement in multivariate analysis. The statistical measures, such as sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and the accuracy of breast MRI were 71.4%, 81.6%, 25.2%, 97.1%, and 80.8%, respectively, in one investigator and 78.6%, 88.1%, 36.4%, 97.9%, and 87.4%, respectively, in the other investigator.MR images showed acceptable accuracy and impressive NPV, but low PPV in evaluation of malignant NAC invasion preoperatively. MRI finding of unilateral nipple enhancement was the most significant predictor of NAC involvement.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal placenta.

    PubMed

    Blaicher, Wibke; Brugger, Peter C; Mittermayer, Christoph; Schwindt, Jens; Deutinger, Josef; Bernaschek, Gerhard; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-02-01

    The goal of this study was to provide a representative description of the normal placenta with contrast medium-free magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to determine a standard of reference. One hundred consecutive singleton pregnancies were investigated by MRI without application of a contrast medium. The mean gestational age (GA) at the time of investigation was 29.5 weeks (range 19-40). Patients with suspected utero-placental insufficiency (UPI) or placental anomalies were excluded. Signal intensities were assessed and correlated with the respective GA. Antenatal MRI without contrast medium was able to depict placental status and morphological changes during gestation. A regular homogeneous structure was found in weeks 19-23. Subsequently, sporadic, slightly marked lobules appeared, which increased in number and markedness with ongoing gestation. Stratification of the lobules was observed after 36 weeks. The ratio of placental and amniotic fluid signal intensities decreased significantly with higher GA and with placental grading. MRI is well suited as an imaging method for the placenta. Our data may be used as a reference in the assessment of the placenta on MRI, and may have further clinical impact with respect to the determination of UPI.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Elastography: Inversions in Bounded Media

    PubMed Central

    Kolipaka, Arunark; McGee, Kiaran P.; Manduca, Armando; Romano, Anthony J.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Araoz, Philip A.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive imaging technique capable of quantifying and spatially resolving the shear stiffness of soft tissues by visualization of synchronized mechanical wave displacement fields. However, MRE inversions generally assume that the measured tissue motion consists primarily of shear waves propagating in a uniform, infinite medium. This assumption is not valid in organs such as the heart, eye, bladder, skin, fascia, bone and spinal cord in which the shear wavelength approaches the geometric dimensions of the object. The aim of this study was to develop and test mathematical inversion algorithms capable of resolving shear stiffness from displacement maps of flexural waves propagating in bounded media such as beams, plates and spherical shells using geometry-specific equations of motion. MRE and finite element modeling (FEM) of beam, plate, and spherical shell phantoms of various geometries were performed. Mechanical testing of the phantoms agreed with the stiffness values obtained from FEM and MRE data and a linear correlation of r2 ≥ 0.99 was observed between the stiffness values obtained using MRE and FEM data. In conclusion, we have demonstrated new inversion methods for calculating shear stiffness that may be more appropriate for waves propagating in bounded media. PMID:19780146

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kathryn J

    2010-05-01

    Elbow pain is frequently encountered in clinical practice and can result in significant morbidity, particularly in athletes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent diagnostic imaging tool for the evaluation of soft tissue and osteochondral pathology around the elbow. Recent advances in magnetic field strength and coil design have lead to improved spatial resolution and superior soft tissue contrast, making it ideal for visualization of complex joint anatomy. This article describes the normal imaging appearances of anatomy around the elbow and reviews commonly occurring ligamentous, myotendinous, neural, and bursal pathology around the elbow.

  15. Omnidirectional magnetic-resonance transmission and its elimination in a metallic metamaterial comprising rings and plates.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zheng-Gao; Xu, Ming-Xiang; Liu, Hui; Li, Tao; Zhu, Shi-Ning

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic resonance is numerically investigated in a metallic metamaterial comprising rings and plates. It is found that a transmission band, instead of a stop band, results from the magnetic resonance as long as the electric field of the incident wave is polarized parallel to the ring plane, and thus it is an omnidirectional magnetic resonance transmission. We also observe an elimination phenomenon of the magnetic resonance transmission by tailoring the size of the plate, which implies a magnitude modulation of magnetic resonance. In addition, the equivalent LC circuit model is applied to analyze the geometry dependence of the magnetic resonance frequency, which is consistent with the numerical results by parametric simulations on the structural variations.

  16. Resonantly Detecting Axion-Mediated Forces with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A.

    2014-10-01

    We describe a method based on precision magnetometry that can extend the search for axion-mediated spin-dependent forces by several orders of magnitude. By combining techniques used in nuclear magnetic resonance and short-distance tests of gravity, our approach can substantially improve upon current experimental limits set by astrophysics, and probe deep into the theoretically interesting regime for the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion. Our method is sensitive to PQ axion decay constants between 109 and 1012 GeV or axion masses between 10-6 and 10-3 eV, independent of the cosmic axion abundance.

  17. Combined Confocal and Magnetic Resonance Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wind, Robert A.; Majors, Paul D.; Minard, Kevin R.; Ackerman, Eric J.; Daly, Don S.; Holtom, Gary R.; Thrall, Brian D.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2002-05-12

    Confocal and magnetic resonance microscopy are both used to study live cells in a minimally invasive way. Both techniques provide complementary information. Therefore, by examining cells simultaneously with both methodologies, more detailed information is obtained than is possible with each of the microscopes individually. In this paper two configurations of a combined confocal and magnetic resonance microscope described. In both cases the sample compartment is part of a temperature regulated perfusion system. The first configuration is capable of studying large single cells or three-dimensional cell agglomerates, whereas with the second configuration monolayers of mammalian cells can be investigated . Combined images are shown of Xenopus laevis frog oocytes, model JB6 tumor spheroids, and a single layer of Chinese hamster ovary cells. Finally, potential applications of the combined microscope are discussed.

  18. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolinsky, J.S.; Narayana, P.A.; Fenstermacher, M.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Regional in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides quantitative data on selected chemical constituents of brain. We imaged 16 volunteers with clinically definite multiple sclerosis on a 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance scanner to define plaque-containing volumes of interest, and obtained localized water-suppressed proton spectra using a stimulated echo sequence. Twenty-five of 40 plaque-containing regions provided spectra of adequate quality. Of these, 8 spectra from 6 subjects were consistent with the presence of cholesterol or fatty acids; the remainder were similar to those obtained from white matter of normal volunteers. This early experience with regional proton spectroscopy suggests that individual plaques are distinct. These differences likely reflect dynamic stages of the evolution of the demyelinative process not previously accessible to in vivo investigation.

  19. UK Biobank's cardiovascular magnetic resonance protocol.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Steffen E; Matthews, Paul M; Francis, Jane M; Robson, Matthew D; Zemrak, Filip; Boubertakh, Redha; Young, Alistair A; Hudson, Sarah; Weale, Peter; Garratt, Steve; Collins, Rory; Piechnik, Stefan; Neubauer, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    UK Biobank's ambitious aim is to perform cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in 100,000 people previously recruited into this prospective cohort study of half a million 40-69 year-olds. We describe the CMR protocol applied in UK Biobank's pilot phase, which will be extended into the main phase with three centres using the same equipment and protocols. The CMR protocol includes white blood CMR (sagittal anatomy, coronary and transverse anatomy), cine CMR (long axis cines, short axis cines of the ventricles, coronal LVOT cine), strain CMR (tagging), flow CMR (aortic valve flow) and parametric CMR (native T1 map). This report will serve as a reference to researchers intending to use the UK Biobank resource or to replicate the UK Biobank cardiovascular magnetic resonance protocol in different settings.

  20. Antiferromagnetic resonance excitation by terahertz magnetic field resonantly enhanced with split ring resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Y.; Hirori, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kageyama, H.; Tanaka, K.

    2014-07-14

    Excitation of antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) in a HoFeO{sub 3} crystal combined with a split ring resonator (SRR) is studied using terahertz (THz) electromagnetic pulses. The magnetic field in the vicinity of the SRR is induced by the incident THz electric field component and excites spin oscillations that correspond to the AFMR, which are directly probed by the Faraday rotation of the polarization of a near-infrared probe pulse. The good agreement of the temperature-dependent magnetization dynamics with the calculation using the two-lattice Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation confirms that the AFMR is excited by the THz magnetic field, which is enhanced at the SRR resonance frequency by a factor of 20 compared to the incident magnetic field.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging: Principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kean, D.; Smith, M.

    1986-01-01

    This text covers the physics underlying magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; pulse sequences; image production; equipment; aspects of clinical imaging; and the imaging of the head and neck, thorax, abdomen and pelvis, and musculoskeletal system; and MR imaging. The book provides about 150 examples of MR images that give an overview of the pathologic conditions imaged. There is a discussion of the physics of MR imaging and also on the spin echo.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of diabetic foot complications

    PubMed Central

    Low, Keynes TA; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2015-01-01

    This pictorial review aims to illustrate the various manifestations of the diabetic foot on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The utility of MR imaging and its imaging features in the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis are illustrated. There is often difficulty encountered in distinguishing osteomyelitis from neuroarthropathy, both clinically and on imaging. By providing an accurate diagnosis based on imaging, the radiologist plays a significant role in the management of patients with complications of diabetic foot. PMID:25640096

  3. Neurosurgical uses for intraprocedural magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mutchnick, Ian S; Moriarty, Thomas M

    2005-10-01

    Neurosurgical procedures demand precision, and efforts to create accurate neurosurgical navigation have been central to the profession through its history. Magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided navigation offers the possibility of real-time, image-based stereotactic information for the neurosurgeon, which makes possible a number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. This article will review both current options for intraoperative MRI operative suite arrangements and the current therapeutic/diagnostic uses of intraoperative MRI.

  4. Magnetic resonance venography and liver transplant complications.

    PubMed

    Strovski, Evgeny; Liu, Dave; Scudamore, Charles; Ho, Stephen; Yoshida, Eric; Klass, Darren

    2013-09-28

    Hepatic vein stenosis is a rare but serious complication following liver transplantation. Multiple modalities can be utilized to image the hepatic vasculature. Magnetic resonance venography (MRV) provides certain advantages over ultrasound, computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction venography. MRV utilizes the same imaging principles of magnetic resonance angiography in order to image the venous system. Blood pool contrast agents, specifically gadofosveset trisodium, allow for steady state imaging up to 1 h following injection, with improved visualisation of vital venous structures by utilising delayed steady state imaging. Additionally, the inherent physics properties of magnetic resonance imaging also provide excellent soft tissue detail and thus help define the extent of complications that often plague the post-liver transplant patient. This case report describes the use of gadofosveset trisodium in a patient with hepatic venous stenosis following liver transplantation. Initial venography failed to outline the stenoses and thus MRV using a blood pool contrast agent was utilised in order to delineate the anatomy and plan a therapeutic endovascular procedure.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Solitary Hypothalamitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Wang, Jing; Wu, Yue; Tang, Ying; Tao, Ran; Ye, Hongying; Yao, Zhenwei

    The study aimed to characterize magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of solitary hypothalamitis and evaluate their clinical value in diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging scans, including T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), T2-weighted imaging (T2WI), and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences, of 8 biopsy-proven hypothalamitis lesions were retrospectively analyzed along with MRI features including size, shape, signal intensity, enhancement pattern, correlation with adjacent tissues, and changes in infundibular stalk and sella turcica. Of 8 patients, 5 were diagnosed with lymphoplasmacytic proliferative inflammation, 2 with Langerhans cell histocytosis, and 1 with Rosai-Dorfman disease. Solitary hypothalamitis predominantly demonstrated mild hypointensity/isointensity in T1WI and mild hyperintensity in T2-weighted imaging. In contrast-enhanced T1WI, all lesions showed heterogeneous but primarily peripheral enhancement patterns. Seven cases showed the polygon sign. In T1WI, the normal high signal intensity of neurohypophysis was absent from all patients, with no infundibular stalk thickening. Seven patients presented with optic chiasma edema, and 5 with edema-like changes along the optic tract (OTE), but most showed no visual impairment (n = 7). Magnetic resonance imaging, particularly postcontrast MRI, is the optimal modality for assessment of hypothalamic lesions. Peripheral enhancement with polygon sign and optic tract or chiasm edema without visual impairment are highly suggestive of hypothalamitis.

  6. In vivo proton observed carbon edited (POCE) (13) C magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the rat brain using a volumetric transmitter and receive-only surface coil on the proton channel.

    PubMed

    Kumaragamage, Chathura; Madularu, Dan; Mathieu, Axel P; De Feyter, Henk; Rajah, M Natasha; Near, Jamie

    2017-05-12

    In vivo carbon-13 ((13) C) MR spectroscopy (MRS) is capable of measuring energy metabolism and neuroenergetics, noninvasively in the brain. Indirect ((1) H-[(13) C]) MRS provides sensitivity benefits compared with direct (13) C methods, and normally includes a (1) H surface coil for both localization and signal reception. The aim was to develop a coil platform with homogenous B1+ and use short conventional pulses for short echo time proton observed carbon edited (POCE) MRS. A (1) H-[(13) C] MRS coil platform was designed with a volumetric resonator for (1) H transmit, and surface coils for (1) H reception and (13) C transmission. The Rx-only (1) H surface coil nullifies the requirement for a T/R switch before the (1) H preamplifier; the highpass filter and preamplifier can be placed proximal to the coil, thus minimizing sensitivity losses inherent with POCE-MRS systems described in the literature. The coil platform was evaluated with a PRESS-POCE sequence (TE = 12.6 ms) on a rat model. The coil provided excellent localization, uniform spin nutation, and sensitivity. (13) C labeling of Glu-H4 and Glx-H3 peaks, and the Glx-H2 peaks were observed approximately 13 and 21 min following the infusion of 1-(13) C glucose, respectively. A convenient and sensitive platform to study energy metabolism and neurotransmitter cycling is presented. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. Experimental Observation of Resonance-Assisted Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Gehler, Stefan; Löck, Steffen; Shinohara, Susumu; Bäcker, Arnd; Ketzmerick, Roland; Kuhl, Ulrich; Stöckmann, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-09-04

    We present the first experimental observation of resonance-assisted tunneling, a wave phenomenon, where regular-to-chaotic tunneling is strongly enhanced by the presence of a classical nonlinear resonance chain. For this we use a microwave cavity made of oxygen free copper with the shape of a desymmetrized cosine billiard designed with a large nonlinear resonance chain in the regular region. It is opened in a region, where only chaotic dynamics takes place, such that the tunneling rate of a regular mode to the chaotic region increases the line width of the mode. Resonance-assisted tunneling is demonstrated by (i) a parametric variation and (ii) the characteristic plateau and peak structure towards the semiclassical limit.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the crystallization kinetics in soft magnetic nanocrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbatti, C. F.; Sinnecker, E. H. C. P.; Sarthour, R. S.; Guimarães, A. P.

    2002-05-01

    We used the nuclear magnetic resonance technique to study the evolution of the structural and magnetic properties of Fe-based melt-spun ribbons of Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9, Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si18.5B4, and Fe86Zr7Cu1B6, as-cast and annealed at 500, 540, and 430 °C, respectively. Experiments were carried out at 4.2 K and zero-applied magnetic field, and in a controlled radio-frequency (rf) field. This type of measurement allows us to observe B and Nb sites, and makes it possible to distinguish signals associated with regions of different magnetic hardnesses. The results exhibit a high dependence of the spectra on rf power. For Fe-Si-based alloys, we observe well-defined 93Nb resonance signals from three distinct sites according to the concentration of Fe atoms in their neighborhood. In the Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si18.5B4 spectra we also observe a peak around 34 MHz, connected to the 11B resonance in different Fe-B compounds, which remains as the rf power decreases, suggesting that the signals come from atoms inside a soft magnetic region. As for the Fe-Zr alloy, we also observe a peak around 36 MHz, identified as the 11B resonance, and a broad line around 62 MHz.

  9. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  10. Direct observation of resonance scattering patterns in single silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valuckas, Vytautas; Paniagua-Domínguez, Ramón; Fu, Yuan Hsing; Luk'yanchuk, Boris; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.

    2017-02-01

    We present the first direct observation of the scattering patterns of electric and magnetic dipole resonances excited in a single silicon nanosphere. Almost perfectly spherical silicon nanoparticles were fabricated and deposited on a 30 nm-thick silicon nitride membrane in an attempt to minimize particle—substrate interaction. Measurements were carried out at visible wavelengths by means of the Fourier microscopy in a dark-field illumination setup. The obtained back-focal plane images clearly reveal the characteristic scattering patterns associated with each resonance and are found to be in a good agreement with the simulated results.

  11. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Enterography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography in Crohn’s Disease: An Observational Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Rune; Peters, David A.; Nielsen, Agnete H.; Hovgaard, Valeriya P.; Glerup, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Purpose e Cross-sectional imaging methods are important for objective evaluationof small intestinal inflammationinCrohn’sdisease(CD).The primary aim was to compare relative parameters of intestinal perfusion between contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance enterography (DCE-MRE) in CD. Furthermore, we aimed at testing the repeatability of regions of interest (ROIs) for CEUS. Methods This prospective study included 25 patients: 12 females (age: 37, range: 19–66) with moderate to severe CD and a bowel wall thickness>3mm evaluated with DCE-MRE and CEUS. CEUS bolus injection was performed twice for repeatability and analyzed in VueBox®. Correlations between modalities were described with Spearman’s rho, limits of agreement(LoA) and intraclass correlation coefficient(ICC). ROIrepeatability for CEUS was assessed. Results s The correlation between modalities was good and very good for bowel wall thickness (ICC=0.71, P<0.001) and length of the inflamed segment (ICC=0.89, P<0.001). Moderate-weak correlations were found for the time-intensity curve parameters: peak intensity (r=0.59, P=0.006), maximum wash-in-rate (r=0.62, P=0.004), and wash-in perfusion index (r=0.47, P=0.036). Best CEUS repeatability for peak enhancement was a mean difference of 0.73 dB (95% CI: 0.17 to 1.28, P=0.01) and 95% LoA from −3.8 to 5.3 dB. Good quality of curve fit improved LoA to −2.3 to 2.8 dB. Conclusion The relative perfusion of small intestinal CD assessed with DCE-MRE and CEUS shows only a moderate correlation. Applying strict criteria for ROIs is important and allows for good CEUS repeatability PMID:28286879

  12. Optically detected magnetic resonances of nitrogen-vacancy ensembles in 13C-enriched diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarmola, A.; Bodrog, Z.; Kehayias, P.; Markham, M.; Hall, J.; Twitchen, D. J.; Acosta, V. M.; Gali, A.; Budker, D.

    2016-09-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of the optically detected magnetic resonance signals for ensembles of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in a 13C isotopically enriched single-crystal diamond. We observe four broad transition peaks with superimposed sharp features at zero magnetic field and study their dependence on an applied magnetic field. A theoretical model that reproduces all qualitative features of these spectra is developed. Understanding the magnetic-resonance spectra of NV centers in an isotopically enriched diamond is important for emerging applications in nuclear magnetic resonance.

  13. Electromagnetically induced transparency with large delay-bandwidth product induced by magnetic resonance near field coupling to electric resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hai-ming; Liu, Shao-bin Liu, Si-yuan; Zhang, Hai-feng; Bian, Bo-rui; Kong, Xiang-kun; Wang, Shen-yun

    2015-03-16

    In this paper, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like spectral response with magnetic resonance near field coupling to electric resonance. Six split-ring resonators and a cut wire are chosen as the bright and dark resonator, respectively. An EIT-like transmission peak located between two dips can be observed with incident magnetic field excitation. A large delay bandwidth product (0.39) is obtained, which has potential application in quantum optics and communications. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulated results.

  14. Patterns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast colonies via magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tenório, Rômulo P; Barros, Wilson

    2017-01-23

    We report the use of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods to observe pattern formation in colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results indicate substantial signal loss localized in specific regions of the colony rendering useful imaging contrast. This imaging contrast is recognizable as being due to discontinuities in magnetic susceptibility (χ) between different spatial regions. At the microscopic pixel level, the local variations in the magnetic susceptibility (Δχ) induce a loss in the NMR signal, which was quantified via T2 and T2* maps, permitting estimation of Δχ values for different regions of the colony. Interestingly the typical petal/wrinkling patterns present in the colony have a high degree of correlation with the estimated susceptibility distribution. We conclude that the presence of magnetic susceptibility inclusions, together with their spatial arrangement within the colony, may be a potential cause of the susceptibility distribution and therefore the contrast observed on the images.

  15. Observations of Mercury's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic field data obtained by Mariner 10 during the third and final encounter with the planet Mercury on 16 March 1975 were studied. A well developed bow shock and modest magnetosphere, previously observed at first encounter on 29 March 1974, were again observed. In addition, a much stronger magnetic field near closest approach, 400 gamma versus 98 gamma, was observed at an altitude of 327 km and approximately 70 deg north Mercurian latitude. Spherical harmonic analysis of the data provide an estimate of the centered planetary magnetic dipole of 4.7 x 10 to the 22nd power Gauss/cu cm with the axis tilted 12 deg to the rotation axis and in the same sense as Earth's. The interplanetary field was sufficiently different between first and third encounters that in addition to the very large field magnitude observed, it argues strongly against a complex induction process generating the observed planetary field. While a possibility exists that Mercury possesses a remanent field due to magnetization early in its formation, a present day active dynamo seems to be a more likely candidate for its origin.

  16. Observation of superconductivity in hydrogen sulfide from nuclear resonant scattering.

    PubMed

    Troyan, Ivan; Gavriliuk, Alexander; Rüffer, Rudolf; Chumakov, Alexander; Mironovich, Anna; Lyubutin, Igor; Perekalin, Dmitry; Drozdov, Alexander P; Eremets, Mikhail I

    2016-03-18

    High-temperature superconductivity remains a focus of experimental and theoretical research. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to be superconducting at high pressures and with a high transition temperature. We report on the direct observation of the expulsion of the magnetic field in H2S compressed to 153 gigapascals. A thin (119)Sn film placed inside the H2S sample was used as a sensor of the magnetic field. The magnetic field on the (119)Sn sensor was monitored by nuclear resonance scattering of synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that an external static magnetic field of about 0.7 tesla is expelled from the volume of (119)Sn foil as a result of the shielding by the H2S sample at temperatures between 4.7 K and approximately 140 K, revealing a superconducting state of H2S.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Sefrova, Jana; Odrazka, Karel; Paluska, Petr; Belobradek, Zdenek; Brodak, Milos; Dolezel, Martin; Prosvic, Petr; Macingova, Zuzana; Vosmik, Milan; Hoffmann, Petr; Louda, Miroslav; Nejedla, Anna

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prostate bed treatment planning could influence definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk. Methods and Materials: A total of 21 consecutive patients referred for prostate bed radiotherapy were included in the present retrospective study. The CTV was delineated according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer recommendations on computed tomography (CT) and T{sub 1}-weighted (T{sub 1}w) and T{sub 2}-weighted (T{sub 2}w) MRI. The CTV magnitude, agreement, and spatial differences were evaluated on the planning CT scan after registration with the MRI scans. Results: The CTV was significantly reduced on the T{sub 1}w and T{sub 2}w MRI scans (13% and 9%, respectively) compared with the CT scans. The urinary bladder was drawn smaller on the CT scans and the rectum was smaller on the MRI scans. On T{sub 1}w MRI, the rectum and urinary bladder were delineated larger than on T{sub 2}w MRI. Minimal agreement was observed between the CT and T{sub 2}w images. The main spatial differences were measured in the superior and superolateral directions in which the CTV on the MRI scans was 1.8-2.9 mm smaller. In the posterior and inferior border, no difference was seen between the CT and T{sub 1}w MRI scans. On the T{sub 2}w MRI scans, the CTV was larger in these directions (by 1.3 and 1.7 mm, respectively). Conclusions: The use of MRI in postprostatectomy radiotherapy planning resulted in a reduction of the CTV. The main differences were found in the superior part of the prostate bed. We believe T{sub 2}w MRI enables more precise definition of prostate bed CTV than conventional planning CT.

  18. Portal biliopathy, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography findings: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Baskan, Ozdil; Erol, Cengiz; Sahingoz, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy (PB) is a rare disorder, characterized by biliary ductal and gallbladder wall abnormalities seen in patients with portal hypertension. It most commonly occurs due to idiopathic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO). The abnormalities consist mainly of bile duct compression, stenoses, fibrotic strictures and dilation of both extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts, as well as gallbladder varices. PB may mimic cholangiocarcinoma, sclerosing cholangitis, or choledocholithiasis. Misdiagnosis can be avoided using appropriate imaging modalities to prevent complications. We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRCP) features of three patients with PB. PMID:25216728

  19. Biomarker Profiling by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for the Prediction of All-Cause Mortality: An Observational Study of 17,345 Persons

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Toomas; Havulinna, Aki S.; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Esko, Tõnu; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Mägi, Reedik; Smit, Steven; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Perola, Markus; Metspalu, Andres

    2014-01-01

    Background Early identification of ambulatory persons at high short-term risk of death could benefit targeted prevention. To identify biomarkers for all-cause mortality and enhance risk prediction, we conducted high-throughput profiling of blood specimens in two large population-based cohorts. Methods and Findings 106 candidate biomarkers were quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of non-fasting plasma samples from a random subset of the Estonian Biobank (n = 9,842; age range 18–103 y; 508 deaths during a median of 5.4 y of follow-up). Biomarkers for all-cause mortality were examined using stepwise proportional hazards models. Significant biomarkers were validated and incremental predictive utility assessed in a population-based cohort from Finland (n = 7,503; 176 deaths during 5 y of follow-up). Four circulating biomarkers predicted the risk of all-cause mortality among participants from the Estonian Biobank after adjusting for conventional risk factors: alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (hazard ratio [HR] 1.67 per 1–standard deviation increment, 95% CI 1.53–1.82, p = 5×10−31), albumin (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.65–0.76, p = 2×10−18), very-low-density lipoprotein particle size (HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.62–0.77, p = 3×10−12), and citrate (HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.21–1.45, p = 5×10−10). All four biomarkers were predictive of cardiovascular mortality, as well as death from cancer and other nonvascular diseases. One in five participants in the Estonian Biobank cohort with a biomarker summary score within the highest percentile died during the first year of follow-up, indicating prominent systemic reflections of frailty. The biomarker associations all replicated in the Finnish validation cohort. Including the four biomarkers in a risk prediction score improved risk assessment for 5-y mortality (increase in C-statistics 0.031, p = 0.01; continuous reclassification improvement 26.3%, p = 0.001). Conclusions Biomarker associations

  20. Multiple magnetic mode-based Fano resonance in split-ring resonator/disk nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wen, Xinglin; Li, Guangyuan; Ruan, Qifeng; Wang, Jianfang; Xiong, Qihua

    2013-12-23

    Plasmonic Fano resonance, enabled by the weak interaction between a bright super-radiant and a subradiant resonance mode, not only is fundamentally interesting, but also exhibits potential applications ranging from extraordinary optical transmission to biosensing. Here, we demonstrate strong Fano resonances in split-ring resonators/disk (SRR/D) nanocavities. The high-order magnetic modes are observed in SRRs by polarization-resolved transmission spectroscopy. When a disk is centered within the SRRs, multiple high-order magnetic modes are coupled to a broad electric dipole mode of SRR/D, leading to significant Fano resonance spectral features in near-IR regime. The strength and line shape of the Fano resonances are tuned through varying the SRR split-angle and interparticle distance between SRR and disk. Finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) simulations are conducted to understand the coupling mechanism, and the results show good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the coupled structure gives a sensitivity of ∼282 nm/RIU with a figure of merit ∼4.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory rheumatoid diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mróz, Joanna; Ostrowska, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is used more and more frequently to diagnose changes in the musculoskeletal system in the course of rheumatic diseases, at their initial assessment, for treatment monitoring and for identification of complications. The article presents the history of magnetic resonance imaging, the basic principles underlying its operation as well as types of magnets, coils and MRI protocols used in the diagnostic process of rheumatic diseases. It enumerates advantages and disadvantages of individual MRI scanners. The principles of MRI coil operation are explained, and the sequences used for MR image analysis are described, particularly in terms of their application in rheumatology, including T1-, T2-, PD-weighted, STIR/TIRM and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Furthermore, views on the need to use contrast agents to optimise diagnosis, particularly in synovitis-like changes, are presented. Finally, methods for the assessment of MR images are listed, including the semi-quantitative method by RAMRIS and quantitative dynamic examination. PMID:27826171

  2. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strózik-Kotlorz, D.

    2014-01-01

    I give a brief description of the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in the human brain examinations. MRS allows a noninvasive chemical analysis of the brain using a standard high field MR system. Nowadays, the dominant form of MR brain spectroscopy is proton spectroscopy. Two main techniques of MRS, which utilize the chemical shift of metabolites in the external magnetic field, are SVS (single voxel) and CSI (single slice). The major peaks in the spectrum of a normal brain include NAA, Cr, Cho and m-Ins, which are neuronal, energetic, membrane turnover and glial markers, respectively. In disease, two pathological metabolites can be found in the brain spectra: Lac, which is end product of anaerobic glycolysis and Lip, which is a marker of membrane breakdown, occurring in necrosis. The common way to analyze clinical spectra is to determine metabolite ratios, e.g. NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, Cho/NAA. This analysis permits a safe and noninvasive examination of the brain tissue as each disease state has its own characteristic spectroscopic image. MRS is a valuable diagnostic tool in such clinical applications as detecting brain tumors and differentiating tumors from inflammatory and infectious processes. Proton MRS is also very helpful in diagnostic of ischemic lesions, Alzheimer's disease and hepatic encephalopathy. The MRS brain spectra should always be correlated with the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) results and alone cannot make neurological diagnosis.

  3. Quantitative Neuromorphometry Using Magnetic Resonance Histology

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Alexandra; Jiang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), now common in the clinical domain, has been adapted for use by the neuropathologist by increasing the spatial resolution over 100,000-times what is common in human clinical imaging. This increase in spatial resolution has been accomplished through a variety of technical advances—higher magnetic fields, more sensitive receivers, and clever encoding methods. Magnetic resonance histology (MRH), i.e. the application of MRI to study tissue specimens, now makes three-dimensional imaging of the fixed brain in the cranium routine. Active staining (perfusion fixation with a paramagnetic contrast agent) has allowed us to reduce the scan time by more than 8-times over earlier methods. The result is a three-dimensional isotropic image array that can be viewed along any direction without loss of spatial resolution. Homologous slices can be chosen interactively. Since the tissue is still fully hydrated in the cranium, tissue shrinkage and distortion are virtually eliminated. Volume measurements of neural structures can be made with a high degree of precision and accuracy. MRH will not replace more traditional methods, but it promises enormous value in choosing particular areas and times for more traditional sectioning and assessment. PMID:21119052

  4. Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography for Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Paul D.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Fowler, Sarah E.; Goodman, Lawrence R.; Gottschalk, Alexander; Hales, Charles A.; Hull, Russell D.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Leeper, Kenneth V.; Naidich, David P.; Sak, Daniel J.; Sostman, H. Dirk; Tapson, Victor F.; Weg, John G.; Woodard, Pamela K.

    2011-01-01

    Background The accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography and magnetic resonance venography for diagnosing pulmonary embolism has not been determined conclusively. Objective To investigate performance characteristics of magnetic resonance angiography, with or without magnetic resonance venography, for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Design Prospective, multicenter study from 10 April 2006 to 30 September 2008. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00241826) Setting 7 hospitals and their emergency services. Patients 371 adults with diagnosed or excluded pulmonary embolism. Measurements Sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were measured by comparing independently read magnetic resonance imaging with the reference standard for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. Reference standard diagnosis or exclusion was made by using various tests, including computed tomographic angiography and venography, ventilation–perfusion lung scan, venous ultra-sonography, D-dimer assay, and clinical assessment. Results Magnetic resonance angiography, averaged across centers, was technically inadequate in 25% of patients (92 of 371). The proportion of technically inadequate images ranged from 11% to 52% at various centers. Including patients with technically inadequate images, magnetic resonance angiography identified 57% (59 of 104) with pulmonary embolism. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography had a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 99%. Technically adequate magnetic resonance angiography and venography had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 96%, but 52% of patients (194 of 370) had technically inadequate results. Limitation A high proportion of patients with suspected embolism was not eligible or declined to participate. Conclusion Magnetic resonance pulmonary angiography should be considered only at centers that routinely perform it well and only for patients for whom standard tests are contraindicated. Magnetic

  5. Magnetic resonance force detection using a membrane resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scozzaro, Nicolas; Ruchotzke, William; Belding, Amanda; Cardellino, Jeremy; Blomberg, Erick; McCullian, Brendan; Bhallamudi, Vidya; Pelekhov, Denis; Hammel, P. Chris

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) membranes are commercially-available, versatile structures that have a variety of applications. Although most commonly used as the support structure for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies, membranes are also ultrasensitive high-frequency mechanical oscillators. The sensitivity stems from the high quality factor Q 106 , which has led to applications in sensitive quantum optomechanical experiments. The high sensitivity also opens the door to ultrasensitive force detection applications. We report force detection of electron spin magnetic resonance at 300 K using a Si3N4 membrane with a force sensitivity of 4 fN/√{ Hz}, and a potential low temperature sensitivity of 25 aN/√{ Hz}. Given membranes' sensitivity, robust construction, large surface area and low cost, SiN membranes can potentially serve as the central component of a compact room-temperature ESR and NMR instrument that has superior spatial resolution to conventional NMR.

  6. Multipoint observations of Ionospheric Alfvén Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, N. A.; Koloskov, A. V.; Yampolsky, Y. M.; Rakhmatulin, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    Among the processes that form properties of the geospace in the circumterrestrial plasma the electromagnetic resonances of the Earth, such as Schummann Resonance (SR) and Ionospheric Alfvén Resonance (IAR) are of great importance. IAR is more localized in space than SR and its properties largely depend on the characteristics of the propagation medium. In contrast to the SR, which has global nature and which is continuously observable at any time of the day, IAR signals are registered mostly during the nighttime and demonstrate more variability of the parameters than SR signals. At the Earth surface IAR is registered as Spectral Resonance Structure of the natural electromagnetic noise at frequency range 0.1-40 Hz. In this work we studied an influence of the environment characteristics on IAR parameters by the means of multipoint observations. Annual data series recorded at Ukrainian Antarctic Station "Akademik Vernadsky", Low Frequency Observatory of the Institute of Radio Astronomy near Kharkov (Ukraine) and magnetic station of Sayan Solar Observatory Mondy near Irkutsk (Russia) were used for the analysis. We investigated the behaviour of IAR parameters, such as probability of resonance lines registration and frequency spacing Δ F, for annual and diurnal intervals. These parameters were compared with characteristics of the ionosphere above all of the observation points and geomagnetic activity.

  7. Achilles Impingement Tendinopathy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Mark J; Mourelatos, Jan; Mar, Alice

    2017-02-28

    Haglund's syndrome is impingement of the retrocalcaneal bursa and Achilles tendon caused by a prominence of the posterosuperior calcaneus. Radiographic measurements are not sensitive or specific for diagnosing Haglund's deformity. Localization of a bone deformity and tendinopathy in the same sagittal section of a magnetic resonance imaging scan can assist with the diagnosis in equivocal cases. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of Haglund's syndrome in patients presenting with Achilles tendinopathy and note any associated findings to determine the criteria for a diagnosis of Haglund's syndrome. We reviewed 40 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles tendinopathy and 19 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles high-grade tears and/or ruptures. Achilles tendinopathy was often in close proximity to the superior aspect of the calcaneal tuberosity, consistent with impingement (67.5%). Patients with Achilles impingement tendinopathy were more often female (p < .04) and were significantly heavier than patients presenting with noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy (p = .014) or Achilles tendon rupture (p = .010). Impingement tendinopathy occurred medially (8 of 20) and centrally (10 of 20) more often than laterally (2 of 20) and was associated with a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with a loss of calcaneal recess more often than a superior projection (22 of 27 versus 8 of 27; p < .001). Haglund's deformity should be reserved for defining a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with loss of calcaneal recess because this corresponds with impingement. Achilles impingement tendinopathy might be more appropriate terminology for Haglund's syndrome, because the bone deformity is often subtle. Of the 27 images with Achilles impingement tendinopathy, 10 (37.0%) extended to a location prone to Achilles tendon rupture. Given these findings, insertional and noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy are not mutually

  8. [Comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Meladze, N V; Ternovoĭ, S K; Sharia, M A; Solopova, A E

    2013-01-01

    To enhance the efficiency of diagnosis of breast tumors by comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) involving dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Eighty-seven women aged 32 to 75 years with breast neoplasms were examined. MRM was performed on a Philips Achieva 3.0T TX scanner. The MRI protocol consisted of axial fat-suppressed T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images and 8 postcontrast dynamic series. Changes in contrast-enhanced MRI of breast cancer (BC) were estimated by constructing the signal intensity-time curves. MRS was carried out using a PRESS sequence. Dynamic MRM determined type III signal intensity-time curve in 83.9% of the patients with BC and type II curve in 16.1% of those with breast malignancies and in 33.3% of those with breast fibroadenomas. Type I signal intensity-time curve was identified in 66.7% of the cases of fibroadenomas. Elevated choline concentrations in the malignancies were detected in 17.7% of cases. Their tumors were larger than 2 cm. The choline peak in the malignancies could not be revealed in the other cases, which was associated to the large voxel size exceeding the mass size. There was a drastic fall in the signal-to-noise ratio with smaller voxel sizes. Furthermore, higher choline levels were determined in 9.5% of the fibroadenoma cases. Comparison of MRS findings before and after contrast injection revealed the advantage of the latter, which is primarily attributed to the more accurate voxel position on the tumor than that during non-contrast-enhanced MRS. Dynamic intravenous contrast-enhanced MRM is an effective method for the differential diagnosis of breast masses. MRS cannot be included in the standard study protocol for women with breast masses for the present.

  9. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension. PMID:22559053

  10. Magnetic Resonance of Pelvic and Gastrointestinal Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Kaewlai, Rathachai; Dattwyler, Matthew; Abujudeh, Hani H; Singh, Ajay K

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is gaining increased acceptance in the emergency setting despite the continued dominance of computed tomography. MR has the advantages of more precise tissue characterization, superior soft tissue contrast, and a lack of ionizing radiation. Traditional barriers to emergent MR are being overcome by streamlined imaging protocols and newer rapid-acquisition sequences. As the utilization of MR imaging in the emergency department increases, a strong working knowledge of the MR appearance of the most commonly encountered abdominopelvic pathologies is essential. In this article, MR imaging protocols and findings of acute pelvic, scrotal, and gastrointestinal pathologies are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Imaging of myocardial perfusion with magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Barkhausen, Jörg; Hunold, Peter; Jochims, Markus; Debatin, Jörg F

    2004-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is currently the leading cause of death in developed nations. Reflecting the complexity of cardiac function and morphology, noninvasive diagnosis of CAD represents a major challenge for medical imaging. Although coronary artery stenoses can be depicted with magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) techniques, its functional or hemodynamic impact frequently remains elusive. Therefore, there is growing interest in other, target organ-specific parameters such as myocardial function at stress and first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging to assess myocardial blood flow. This review explores the pathophysiologic background, recent technical developments, and current clinical status of first-pass MR imaging (MRI) of myocardial perfusion.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Timothy Q.; Muir, Eric R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its application to image anatomy, physiology, and function in the retina of animals. It describes technical issues and solutions in performing retinal MRI, anatomical MRI, blood oxygenation level-dependent functional MRI (fMRI), and blood-flow MRI both of normal retinas and of retinal degeneration. MRI offers unique advantages over existing retinal imaging techniques, including the ability to image multiple layers without depth limitation and to provide multiple clinically relevant data in a single setting. Retinal MRI has the potential to complement existing retinal imaging techniques. PMID:19763752

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Epidemic Adenoviral Keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jonathan C.; Miller, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Most clinicians would agree that there is no reason to obtain a magnetic resonance (MR) scan to evaluate a patient with viral conjunctivitis. We scheduled a patient for an annual MR scan to monitor his optic nerve meningiomas. By coincidence, he had florid viral conjunctivitis the day the scan was performed. It showed severe eyelid edema, contrast enhancement of the anterior orbit, enlargement of the lacrimal gland, and obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct. Adenovirus produces deep orbital inflammation, in addition to infection of the conjunctival surface. PMID:26022084

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Spinal Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Kawakyu-O'Connor, Daniel; Bordia, Ritu; Nicola, Refky

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the spine is increasingly being used in the evaluation of spinal emergencies because it is highly sensitive and specific in the diagnosis of acute conditions of the spine. The prompt and accurate recognition allows for appropriate medical and surgical intervention. This article reviews the MR imaging features of common emergent conditions, such as spinal trauma, acute disc herniation, infection, and tumors. In addition, we describe common MR imaging sequences, discuss challenges encountered in emergency imaging of the spine, and illustrate multiple mimics of acute conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of granulomatous mastitis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Amanda N; Seiler, Stephen J; Hayes, Jody C; Wooldridge, Rachel; Porembka, Jessica H

    Granulomatous mastitis (GM) is a benign chronic inflammatory condition of the breast. This study was performed to determine the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in differentiating GM from malignancy. MRI findings in 12 women with clinical or histopathologically-proven GM were retrospectively reviewed. Non-mass enhancement on MRI was present in all 12 patients with clustered ring enhancement being the most common pattern (n=7, 58%). Architectural distortion (n=10, 83%), skin thickening (n=10, 83%) and focal skin enhancement (n=10, 83%) were also very common. MRI features of GM are often identical to features considered suspicious for malignancy on MRI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sciatic neuropathy: findings on magnetic resonance neurography

    PubMed Central

    Agnollitto, Paulo Moraes; Chu, Marcio Wen King; Simão, Marcelo Novelino; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2017-01-01

    Injuries of the sciatic nerve are common causes of pain and limitation in the lower limbs. Due to its particular anatomy and its long course, the sciatic nerve is often involved in diseases of the pelvis or leg. In recent years, magnetic resonance neurography has become established as an important tool for the study of peripheral nerves and can be widely applied to the study of the sciatic nerve. Therefore, detailed knowledge of its anatomy and of the most prevalent diseases affecting it is essential to maximizing the accuracy of diagnostic imaging. PMID:28670031

  17. Creating a magnetic resonance imaging ontology

    PubMed Central

    Lasbleiz, Jérémy; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Duvauferrier, Régis; Burgun, Anita

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to build an ontology of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The MRI domain has been analysed regarding MRI simulators and the DICOM standard. Tow MRI simulators have been analysed: JEMRIS, which is developed in XML and C++, has a hierarchical organisation and SIMRI, which is developed in C, has a good representation of MRI physical processes. To build the ontology we have used Protégé 4, owl2 that allows quantitative representations. The ontology has been validated by a reasoner (Fact++) and by a good representation of DICOM headers and of MRI processes. The MRI ontology would improved MRI simulators and eased semantic interoperability. PMID:21893854

  18. Review: Magnetic resonance imaging techniques in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the eye with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved difficult due to the eye’s propensity to move involuntarily over typical imaging timescales, obscuring the fine structure in the eye due to the resulting motion artifacts. However, advances in MRI technology help to mitigate such drawbacks, enabling the acquisition of high spatiotemporal resolution images with a variety of contrast mechanisms. This review aims to classify the MRI techniques used to date in clinical and preclinical ophthalmologic studies, describing the qualitative and quantitative information that may be extracted and how this may inform on ocular pathophysiology. PMID:23112569

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the nasopharynx

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, W.P.; Mills, C.M.; Kjos, B.; DeGroot, J.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1984-09-01

    Thirty subjects with normal nasopharyngeal anatomy and 12 patients with a variety of abnormalities were examined with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR), using a prototype 0.35-T superconducting system. MR was superior to CT for display of both superficial and deep nasopharyngeal soft tissues in all 30 normal subjects and 10 of the 12 abnormal patients. MR was also superior to CT in distinguishing tumor from soft tissues and more sensitive to carotid sheath adenopathy. Bones, calcification, and subtle abnormalities at the base of the skull were shown better by CT. The specificity of MR and its ability to differentiate nodal metastases from reactive lymphadenopathy require further evaluation.

  20. Optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance of semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Sophia E; Mui, Stacy; Ramaswamy, Kannan

    2008-02-07

    Optically pumped NMR (OPNMR) of direct gap and indirect gap semiconductors has been an area of active research interest, motivated by both basic science and technological perspectives. Proposals to enhance and to spatially localize nuclear polarization have stimulated interest in this area. Recent progress in OPNMR has focused on exploring the experimental parameter space in order to elucidate details of the underlying photophysics of optical pumping phenomena. The focus of this review is on recent studies of bulk samples of GaAs and InP, namely, the photon energy dependence, the magnetic field dependence, and the phase dependence of OPNMR resonances. Models for the development of nuclear polarization are discussed.

  1. Breast magnetic resonance imaging: current clinical indications.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Eren D

    2010-05-01

    Breast magnetic resonance (MR) is highly sensitive in the detection of invasive breast malignancies. As technology improves, as interpretations and reporting by radiologists become standardized through the development of guidelines by expert consortiums, and as scientific investigation continues, the indications and uses of breast MR as an adjunct to mammography continue to evolve. This article discusses the current clinical indications for breast MR including screening for breast cancer, diagnostic indications for breast MR, and MR guidance for interventional procedures. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nael, Kambiz; Kubal, Wayne

    2016-05-01

    Neuroimaging plays a critical role in the management of patients with acute stroke syndrome, with diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic implications. A multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol in the emergency setting can address both primary goals of neuroimaging (ie, detection of infarction and exclusion of hemorrhage) and secondary goals of neuroimaging (ie, identifying the site of arterial occlusion, tissue characterization for defining infarct core and penumbra, and determining stroke cause/mechanism). MR imaging provides accurate diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and can differentiate AIS from other potential differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Ros Mendoza, L H; Cañete Celestino, E; Velilla Marco, O

    2008-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small joint with complex anatomy and function. Diverse pathologies with very different symptoms can affect the TMJ. While various imaging techniques such as plain-film radiography and computed tomography can be useful, magnetic resonance imaging's superior contrast resolution reveals additional structures like the articular disk, making this technique essential for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. We analyze the MRI signs of the different pathologies that can affect the TMJ from the structural and functional points of view.

  4. Magnetic resonance-guided prostate interventions.

    PubMed

    Haker, Steven J; Mulkern, Robert V; Roebuck, Joseph R; Barnes, Agnieska Szot; Dimaio, Simon; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M C

    2005-10-01

    We review our experience using an open 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) interventional unit to guide procedures in the prostate. This system allows access to the patient and real-time MR imaging simultaneously and has made it possible to perform prostate biopsy and brachytherapy under MR guidance. We review MR imaging of the prostate and its use in targeted therapy, and describe our use of image processing methods such as image registration to further facilitate precise targeting. We describe current developments with a robot assist system being developed to aid radioactive seed placement.

  5. Basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Joseph C

    2008-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become the dominant clinical imaging modality with widespread, primarily noninvasive, applicability throughout the body and across many disease processes. The flexibility of MR imaging enables the development of purpose-built optimized applications. Concurrent developments in digital image processing, microprocessor power, storage, and computer-aided design have spurred and enabled further growth in capability. Although MR imaging may be viewed as "mature" in some respects, the field is rich with new proposals and applications that hold great promise for future research health care uses. This article delineates the basic principles of MR imaging and illuminates specific applications.

  6. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  7. Magnetic damping: domain wall dynamics versus local ferromagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Weindler, T; Bauer, H G; Islinger, R; Boehm, B; Chauleau, J-Y; Back, C H

    2014-12-05

    Magnetic relaxation is one of the dominating features of magnetization dynamics. Depending on the magnetic structure and the experimental approach, different magnitudes of the damping parameter are reported even for a given material. In this study, we experimentally address this issue by accessing the damping parameter in the same magnetic nanotracks using different approaches: local ferromagnetic resonance (α=0.0072) and field-driven domain wall dynamics (α=0.023). The experimental results cannot fully be accounted for by modeling only roughness in micromagnetic simulations. Consequently, we have included nonlocal texture induced damping to the micromagnetic code. We find excellent agreement with the observed increased damping in the vortex structures for the same input Gilbert alpha when texture-induced nonlocal damping is included.

  8. Emission anomalous optical magnetic resonances in a mixture of even neon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Saprykin, E. G.; Sorokin, V. A. Shalagin, A. M.

    2013-04-15

    Unusual resonances have been detected in the dependence of the discharge glow in neon on the longitudinal magnetic field. The resonances appear in fairly high magnetic fields and are observed only at low gas pressures and exclusively in a mixture of {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne isotopes. This phenomenon is an evidence of collective resonant radiation processes involving atoms of different neon isotopes.

  9. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  10. Magnetic Field Gradient Calibration as an Experiment to Illustrate Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seedhouse, Steven J.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described that encompasses both qualitative and quantitative pedagogical goals. Qualitatively, the experiment illustrates how images are obtained in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitatively, students experience the…

  11. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  12. Nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance with chemical resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Nabeel; Pfender, Matthias; Neumann, Philipp; Reuter, Rolf; Zappe, Andrea; Fávaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Denisenko, Andrej; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Onoda, Shinobu; Isoya, Junichi; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a key analytical technique in chemistry, biology, and medicine. However, conventional NMR spectroscopy requires an at least nanoliter-sized sample volume to achieve sufficient signal. We combined the use of a quantum memory and high magnetic fields with a dedicated quantum sensor based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond to achieve chemical shift resolution in 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy of 20-zeptoliter sample volumes. We demonstrate the application of NMR pulse sequences to achieve homonuclear decoupling and spin diffusion measurements. The best measured NMR linewidth of a liquid sample was ~1 part per million, mainly limited by molecular diffusion. To mitigate the influence of diffusion, we performed high-resolution solid-state NMR by applying homonuclear decoupling and achieved a 20-fold narrowing of the NMR linewidth.

  13. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, A.

    1986-05-01

    During the past year the Woodlands Baylor Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facility became fully operational. A detailed description of this facility is given. One significant instrument addition this year was the 100 MHz, 40cm bore superconducting imaging spectrometer. This instrument gives researchers the capability to acquire high energy phosphate spectra. This will be used to investigate ATP, phosphocreatinine and inorganic phosphate changes in normal and atrophied muscle before, during and after exercise. An exercise device for use within the bore of the imaging magnet is under design/construction. The results of a study of T sub 1 and T sub 2 changes in atrophied muscle in animals and human subjects are given. The imaging and analysis of the lower leg of 15 research subjects before and after 5 weeks of complete bedrest was completed. A compilation of these results are attached.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of liver hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Sigal, R.; Lanir, A.; Atlan, H.; Naschitz, J.E.; Simon, J.S.; Enat, R.; Front, D.; Israel, O.; Chisin, R.; Krausz, Y.

    1985-10-01

    Nine patients with cavernous hemangioma of the liver were examined by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a 0.5 T superconductive magnet. Spin-echo technique was used with varying time to echo (TE) and repetition times (TR). Results were compared with /sup 99m/Tc red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), echography, and arteriography. Four illustrated cases are reported. It was possible to establish a pattern for MRI characteristics of cavernous hemangiomas; rounded or smooth lobulated shape, marked increase in T1 and T2 values as compared with normal liver values. It is concluded that, although more experience is necessary to compare the specificity with that of ultrasound and CT, MRI proved to be very sensitive for the diagnosis of liver hemangioma, especially in the case of small ones which may be missed by /sup 99m/Tc-labeled RBC scintigraphy.

  15. Collective resonant dynamics of the chiral spin soliton lattice in a monoaxial chiral magnetic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalves, F. J. T.; Sogo, T.; Shimamoto, Y.; Kousaka, Y.; Akimitsu, J.; Nishihara, S.; Inoue, K.; Yoshizawa, D.; Hagiwara, M.; Mito, M.; Stamps, R. L.; Bostrem, I. G.; Sinitsyn, V. E.; Ovchinnikov, A. S.; Kishine, J.; Togawa, Y.

    2017-03-01

    The magnetic resonance properties of microsized monoaxial chiral crystals of CrNb3S6 are investigated. We observed that the resonance of the chiral soliton lattice is sensitive to the polarization of the driving microwave field. When the microwave field is parallel to the helical axis, the resonance is symmetric with regards to the magnetic field direction. In contrast, asymmetric field dependence emerges when the microwave field is perpendicular to the helical axis. The robustness of the chiral magnetic order, due to topological protection, allows tuning the resonance frequency in ways hardly accessible using nanopatterned films.

  16. Plasmon coupling of magnetic resonances in an asymmetric gold semishell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jian; Kong, Yan; Liu, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The generation of magnetic dipole resonances in metallic nanostructures is of great importance for constructing near-zero or even negative refractive index metamaterials. Commonly, planar two-dimensional (2D) split-ring resonators or relevant structures are basic elements of metamaterials. In this work, we introduce a three-dimensional (3D) asymmetric Au semishell composed of two nanocups with a face-to-face geometry and demonstrate two distinct magnetic resonances spontaneously in the visible-near infrared optical wavelength regime. These two magnetic resonances are from constructive and destructive hybridization of magnetic dipoles of individual nanocups in the asymmetric semishell. In contrast, complete cancellation of magnetic dipoles in the symmetric semishell leads to only a pronounced electric mode with near-zero magnetic dipole moment. These 3D asymmetric resonators provide new ways for engineering hybrid resonant modes and ultra-high near-field enhancement for the design of 3D metamaterials.

  17. The evaluation of the influence of selected patellofemoral joint geometry indicators observed in magnetic resonance imaging on the incidence of anterior knee pain in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using hamstrings.

    PubMed

    Osowska, Katarzyna; Fabiś, Jarosław; Fabiś, Anna; Grodzka, Magdalena; Zwierzchowski, Jacek Tomasz

    2013-12-10

    Anterior knee pain (AKP) is a frequent serious clinical problem after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, regardless of the graft material used. The author conducted prospective studies of the correlation between AKP and disturbed geometry of patello-femoral joint observed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in patients with injured ACL reconstructed with the use of hamstrings. The study included 60 patients (34 males and 26 females), at the mean age of 31, who underwent ACL reconstruction with flexors. Only patients without clinical AKP symptoms or AKP factors after reconstruction were included in the study. Before surgery, in all patients MRI was performed in order to evaluate the patellar height, excessive patellar pressure (EPP) and patellar lateralization (PL). In the postoperative course, AKP and its correlation with the ratios mentioned above were observed. In the group of patients included in the study, pathological patellar height was not observed, EPP was diagnosed in 15%, PL in 13.3% and EPP and PL jointly in 11.9% of the patients. AKP was observed in 8 out of 9 patients with abnormal lateral pressure, 7 patients with EPP and 7 patients with concomitant excessive lateral pressure and PL. The first symptoms of AKP appeared between the seventh and twelfth week after surgery and increased after 12 weeks. The occurrence of excessive lateral pressure syndrom (EPP) and PL confirmed in MRI was very strongly correlated (89% and 100%, respectively) with the occurrence of AKP after ACL reconstruction. The evaluation of the patellofemoral joint geometry, taking into account the EPP and PL ratios in pre-operative magnetic resonance image (MRI) in patients with injured anterior cruciate ligament, may allow us to establish the AKP risk group and administer suitable preventive treatment (prophylaxis).

  18. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  19. Developing hyperpolarized krypton-83 for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Zackary I.

    This dissertation discusses the production of highly nonequilibrium nuclear spin polarization, referred to as hyperpolarization or hp, in the nuclear spin I = 9/2 noble gas isotope krypton-83 using spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP). This nonequilibrium polarization yields nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals that are enhanced three or more orders of magnitude above those of thermally polarized krypton and enables experiments that would otherwise be impossible. Krypton-83 possesses a nuclear electric quadrupole moment that dominates the longitudinal (T1) relaxation due to coupling of the quadrupole moment to fluctuating electric field gradients generated by distortions to the spherical symmetry of the electronic environment. Relaxation slows polarization buildup and limits the maximum signal intensity but makes krypton-83 a sensitive probe of its environment. The gas-phase krypton-83 longitudinal relaxation rate increases linearly with total gas density due to binary collisions. Density independent relaxation, caused by the formation of krypton-krypton van der Waals molecules and surface adsorption, also contributes to the observed rate. Buffer gases suppress van der Waals molecule mediated relaxation by breaking apart the weakly bound krypton dimers. Surface relaxation is gas composition independent and therefore more difficult to suppress. However, this relaxation mechanism makes hp krypton-83 sensitive to important surface properties including surface-to-volume ratio, surface chemistry, and surface temperature. The presence of surfaces with high krypton adsorption affinities (i.e. hydrophobic surfaces) accelerates the relaxation times and can produce T1 contrast in hp krypton-83 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tobacco smoke deposited on surfaces generates strong T1 contrast allowing the observation of smoke deposition with spatial resolution. Conversely, water adsorption on surfaces significantly lengths the T1 times due competitive surface adsorption

  20. Familial Essential Tremor Studied With Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, A.; Salgado, P.; Gil, A.; Barrios, F. A.

    2003-09-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging has become an important analytical tool to study neurodegenerative diseases. We applied the EPI-BOLD functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging technique to acquire functional images of patients with familial essential tremor (FET) disorder and healthy control volunteers, during a motor task activity. Functional and anatomic images were used to produce the brain activation maps of the patients and volunteers. These functional maps of the primary somatosensorial and motor cortexes of patients and control subjects were compared for functional differences per subject. The averaged functional brain images of eight of each case were acquired were, it can be clearly observed the differences in active zones. The results presented in this work show that there are differences in the functional maps during motor task activation between control subjects and FET patients suggesting a cerebral functional reorganization that can be mapped with BOLD-fMRI.

  1. 0{sup ++} Resonances Observed at BES

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, B. S.

    2008-08-31

    In last 10 years, 0{sup ++} resonances have been observed and studied at BES in many processes, such as J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {gamma}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {gamma}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, {gamma}K{sup +}K{sup -}, {gamma}K{sub S}K{sub S}, {gamma}{omega}{phi}, {omega}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {omega}K{sup +}K{sup -}, {phi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {phi}K{sup +}K{sup -}, {psi}(2S){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {chi}{sub c0}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}K{sup -}, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} etc. The results on 0{sup ++} resonances observed at BES are reviewed.

  2. Observations of Interstellar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutcher, R.; Heiles, C.; Troland, T.

    This article describes how interstellar magnetic fields are detected, measured, and mapped, the results of such observations, and the role played by interstellar magnetic fields in the physics of the interstellar medium. A goal of the observations is the measurement of the morphology and strengths of the uniform (Bu) and random (Br) components of magnetic fields. Observational techniques probe either the component of B parallel to the line of sight (B_parallel) or in the plane of the sky (B_⊥). Tracers of B_parallel are Faraday rotation of the position angle of linearly polarized radiation and Zeeman splitting of spectral lines. Tracers of B_⊥ are the strength of synchrotron radiation and linear polarization of syn chrotron radiation and of emission or absorption from dust and spectral lines. Starlight polarization shows that on large spatial scales the Galactic magnetic field is not heavily tangled (B_u/B_r ≈ 0.7 - 1.0), that the field is generally parallel to the Galactic plane near the plane, that the local field points approximately along the local spiral arm (pitch angle 9.4(°) , center of curvature 7.8 kpc distant towards ℓ ≈ -15.4(°) ), and that off the Galactic plane there is considerable small-scale structure to the field. Galactic synchrotron emission shows magnetic spiral arms with a total strength B_t ≈ 6 #55G and B_u ≈ 4 #55G. Pulsar data show evidence for reversals of the field direction with Galactic radius and yield B_r ≈ 5 #55G and B_u ≈ 1.5 #55G; the morphology of the large-scale mean field is consistent with dynamo generation. H I Zeeman detections for diffuse clouds yield B_parallel char 126 5 - 20 #55G with many limits B_parallel #55G. A recent survey of Galactic H I in absorption against extragalactic sources confirms the result that the fields in diffuse clouds are often quite weak. The critical parameter for evaluating the importance of magnetic fields in star formation is the ratio of the mass to the magnetic flux, M

  3. Multifold Enhancement of Third-Harmonic Generation in Dielectric Nanoparticles Driven by Magnetic Fano Resonances.

    PubMed

    Shorokhov, Alexander S; Melik-Gaykazyan, Elizaveta V; Smirnova, Daria A; Hopkins, Ben; Chong, Katie E; Choi, Duk-Yong; Shcherbakov, Maxim R; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E; Neshev, Dragomir N; Fedyanin, Andrey A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-08-10

    Strong Mie-type magnetic dipole resonances in all-dielectric nanostructures provide novel opportunities for enhancing nonlinear effects at the nanoscale due to the intense electric and magnetic fields trapped within the individual nanoparticles. Here we study third-harmonic generation from quadrumers of silicon nanodisks supporting high-quality collective modes associated with the magnetic Fano resonance. We observe nontrivial wavelength and angular dependencies of the generated harmonic signal featuring a multifold enhancement of the nonlinear response in oligomeric systems.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stannarius, Ralf

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become one of the most important tools to screen humans in medicine; virtually every modern hospital is equipped with a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) tomograph. The potential of NMR in 3D imaging tasks is by far greater, but there is only "a handful" of MRI studies of particulate matter. The method is expensive, time-consuming, and requires a deep understanding of pulse sequences, signal acquisition, and processing. We give a short introduction into the physical principles of this imaging technique, describe its advantages and limitations for the screening of granular matter, and present a number of examples of different application purposes, from the exploration of granular packing, via the detection of flow and particle diffusion, to real dynamic measurements. Probably, X-ray computed tomography is preferable in most applications, but fast imaging of single slices with modern MRI techniques is unmatched, and the additional opportunity to retrieve spatially resolved flow and diffusion profiles without particle tracking is a unique feature.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of fetal pelvic cysts.

    PubMed

    Archontaki, Styliani; Vial, Yvan; Hanquinet, Sylviane; Meuli, Reto; Alamo, Leonor

    2016-12-01

    The detection of fetal anomalies has improved in the last years as a result of the generalization of ultrasound pregnancy screening exams. The presence of a cystic imaging in the fetal pelvis is a relatively common finding, which can correspond to a real congenital cystic lesion or result from the anomalous liquid accumulation in a whole pelvic organ, mainly the urinary bladder, the uterus, or the vagina. In selected cases with poor prognosis and/or inconclusive echographic findings, magnetic resonance may bring additional information in terms of the characterization, anatomical location, and real extension of the pathology. This pictorial essay describes the normal pelvic fetal anatomy, as well as the most common pelvic cysts. It also describes the causes of an anomalous distension of the whole pelvic organs detected in utero, with emphasis on prenatal magnetic resonance imaging exams. Moreover, it proposes practical teaching points to reduce the differential diagnosis of these lesions based on the sex of the fetus, the division of the pelvis in anatomical spaces, and the imaging findings of the pathology. Finally, it discusses the real utility of complementary MRI.

  6. General review of magnetic resonance elastography

    PubMed Central

    Low, Gavin; Kruse, Scott A; Lomas, David J

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an innovative imaging technique for the non-invasive quantification of the biomechanical properties of soft tissues via the direct visualization of propagating shear waves in vivo using a modified phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence. Fundamentally, MRE employs the same physical property that physicians utilize when performing manual palpation - that healthy and diseased tissues can be differentiated on the basis of widely differing mechanical stiffness. By performing “virtual palpation”, MRE is able to provide information that is beyond the capabilities of conventional morphologic imaging modalities. In an era of increasing adoption of multi-parametric imaging approaches for solving complex problems, MRE can be seamlessly incorporated into a standard MRI examination to provide a rapid, reliable and comprehensive imaging evaluation at a single patient appointment. Originally described by the Mayo Clinic in 1995, the technique represents the most accurate non-invasive method for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis and is currently performed in more than 100 centers worldwide. In this general review, the mechanical properties of soft tissues, principles of MRE, clinical applications of MRE in the liver and beyond, and limitations and future directions of this discipline -are discussed. Selected diagrams and images are provided for illustration. PMID:26834944

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Liver Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, Ali Devrim; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Ozmen, Mustafa Nasuh; Akata, Deniz; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay

    2016-12-01

    Liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming the gold standard in liver metastasis detection and treatment response assessment. The most sensitive magnetic resonance sequences are diffusion-weighted images and hepatobiliary phase images after Gd-EOB-DTPA. Peripheral ring enhancement, diffusion restriction, and hypointensity on hepatobiliary phase images are hallmarks of liver metastases. In patients with normal ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT findings and high clinical suspicion of metastasis, MRI should be performed for diagnosis of unseen metastasis. In melanoma, colon cancer, and neuroendocrine tumor metastases, MRI allows confident diagnosis of treatment-related changes in liver and enables differential diagnosis from primary liver tumors. Focal nodular hyperplasia-like nodules in patients who received platinum-based chemotherapy, hypersteatosis, and focal fat can mimic metastasis. In cancer patients with fatty liver, MRI should be preferred to CT. Although the first-line imaging for metastases is CT, MRI can be used as a problem-solving method. MRI may be used as the first-line method in patients who would undergo curative surgery or metastatectomy. Current limitation of MRI is low sensitivity for metastasis smaller than 3mm. MRI fingerprinting, glucoCEST MRI, and PET-MRI may allow simpler and more sensitive diagnosis of liver metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. General review of magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Low, Gavin; Kruse, Scott A; Lomas, David J

    2016-01-28

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an innovative imaging technique for the non-invasive quantification of the biomechanical properties of soft tissues via the direct visualization of propagating shear waves in vivo using a modified phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence. Fundamentally, MRE employs the same physical property that physicians utilize when performing manual palpation - that healthy and diseased tissues can be differentiated on the basis of widely differing mechanical stiffness. By performing "virtual palpation", MRE is able to provide information that is beyond the capabilities of conventional morphologic imaging modalities. In an era of increasing adoption of multi-parametric imaging approaches for solving complex problems, MRE can be seamlessly incorporated into a standard MRI examination to provide a rapid, reliable and comprehensive imaging evaluation at a single patient appointment. Originally described by the Mayo Clinic in 1995, the technique represents the most accurate non-invasive method for the detection and staging of liver fibrosis and is currently performed in more than 100 centers worldwide. In this general review, the mechanical properties of soft tissues, principles of MRE, clinical applications of MRE in the liver and beyond, and limitations and future directions of this discipline -are discussed. Selected diagrams and images are provided for illustration.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    PubMed Central

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda; Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Volpe, Gustavo Jardim; Trad, Henrique Simão; Schmidt, André

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. Objective To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Methods Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Results Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). Conclusion CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility. PMID:23887734

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of granular materials.

    PubMed

    Stannarius, Ralf

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become one of the most important tools to screen humans in medicine; virtually every modern hospital is equipped with a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) tomograph. The potential of NMR in 3D imaging tasks is by far greater, but there is only "a handful" of MRI studies of particulate matter. The method is expensive, time-consuming, and requires a deep understanding of pulse sequences, signal acquisition, and processing. We give a short introduction into the physical principles of this imaging technique, describe its advantages and limitations for the screening of granular matter, and present a number of examples of different application purposes, from the exploration of granular packing, via the detection of flow and particle diffusion, to real dynamic measurements. Probably, X-ray computed tomography is preferable in most applications, but fast imaging of single slices with modern MRI techniques is unmatched, and the additional opportunity to retrieve spatially resolved flow and diffusion profiles without particle tracking is a unique feature.

  11. Magnetic resonance elastography hardware design: a survey.

    PubMed

    Tse, Z T H; Janssen, H; Hamed, A; Ristic, M; Young, I; Lamperth, M

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an emerging technique capable of measuring the shear modulus of tissue. A suspected tumour can be identified by comparing its properties with those of tissues surrounding it; this can be achieved even in deep-lying areas as long as mechanical excitation is possible. This would allow non-invasive methods for cancer-related diagnosis in areas not accessible with conventional palpation. An actuating mechanism is required to generate the necessary tissue displacements directly on the patient in the scanner and three different approaches, in terms of actuator action and position, exist to derive stiffness measurements. However, the magnetic resonance (MR) environment places considerable constraints on the design of such devices, such as the possibility of mutual interference between electrical components, the scanner field, and radio frequency pulses, and the physical space restrictions of the scanner bore. This paper presents a review of the current solutions that have been developed for MRE devices giving particular consideration to the design criteria including the required vibration frequency and amplitude in different applications, the issue of MR compatibility, actuation principles, design complexity, and scanner synchronization issues. The future challenges in this field are also described.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging. Application to family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, R. H.; Somers, S.; Jurriaans, E.; Yu, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review indications, contraindications, and risks of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to help primary care physicians refer patients appropriately for MRI, screen for contraindications to using MRI, and educate patients about MRI. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Recommendations are based on classic textbooks, the policies of our MRI group, and a literature search using MEDLINE with the MeSH headings magnetic resonance imaging, brain, musculoskeletal, and spine. The search was limited to human, English-language, and review articles. Evidence in favour of using MRI for imaging the head, spine, and joints is well established. For cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic conditions, MRI has been shown useful for certain indications, usually to complement other modalities. MAIN MESSAGE: For demonstrating soft tissue conditions, MRI is better than computed tomography (CT), but CT shows bone and acute bleeding better. Therefore, patients with trauma or suspected intracranial bleeding should have CT. Tumours, congenital abnormalities, vascular structures, and the cervical or thoracic spine show better on MRI. Either modality can be used for lower back pain. Cardiac, abdominal, and pelvic abnormalities should be imaged with ultrasound or CT before MRI. Contraindications for MRI are mainly metallic implants or shrapnel, severe claustrophobia, or obesity. CONCLUSIONS: With the increasing availability of MRI scanners in Canada, better understanding of the indications, contraindications, and risks will be helpful for family physicians and their patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:10509224

  13. [Surface coils for magnetic-resonance images].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-González, Alfredo Odón; Amador-Baheza, Ricardo; Rojas-Jasso, Rafael; Barrios-Alvarez, Fernando Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    Since the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico, the development of this important medical imaging technology has been almost non-existing in our country. The very first surface coil prototypes for clinical applications in magnetic resonance imaging has been developed at the Center of Research in Medical Imaging and Instrumentation of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa (Metropolitan Autonomous University, Campus Iztapalapa). Two surface coil prototypes were built: a) a circular-shaped coil and b) a square-shaped coil for multiple regions of the body, such as heart, brain, knee, hands, and ankles. These coils were tested on the 1.5T imager of the ABC Hospital-Tacubaya, located in Mexico City. Brain images of healthy volunteers were obtained in different orientations: sagittal, coronal, and axial. Since images showed a good-enough clinical quality for diagnosis, it is fair to say that these coil prototypes can be used in the clinical environment, and with small modifications, they can be made compatible with almost any commercial scanner. This type of development can offer new alternatives for further collaboration between the research centers and the radiology community, in the search of new applications and developments of this imaging technique.

  14. Analysis of ringing effects due to magnetic core materials in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu Gaunkar, N. Bouda, N. R. Y.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Hadimani, R. L.; Mina, M.; Jiles, D. C.; Bulu, I.; Ganesan, K.; Song, Y. Q.

    2015-05-07

    This work presents investigations and detailed analysis of ringing in a non-resonant pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) circuit. Ringing is a commonly observed phenomenon in high power switching circuits. The oscillations described as ringing impede measurements in pulsed NMR systems. It is therefore desirable that those oscillations decay fast. It is often assumed that one of the causes behind ringing is the role of the magnetic core used in the antenna (acting as an inductive load). We will demonstrate that an LRC subcircuit is also set-up due to the inductive load and needs to be considered due to its parasitic effects. It is observed that the parasitics associated with the inductive load become important at certain frequencies. The output response can be related to the response of an under-damped circuit and to the magnetic core material. This research work demonstrates and discusses ways of controlling ringing by considering interrelationships between different contributing factors.

  15. Triaxial magnetic field gradient system for microcoil magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeber, D. A.; Hoftiezer, J. H.; Daniel, W. B.; Rutgers, M. A.; Pennington, C. H.

    2000-11-01

    There is a great advantage in signal to noise ratio (S/N) that can be obtained in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments on very small samples (having spatial dimensions ˜100 μm or less) if one employs NMR "micro" receiver coils, "microcoils," which are of similarly small dimensions. The gains in S/N could enable magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) microscopy with spatial resolution of ˜1-2 μm, much better than currently available. Such MRI microscopy however requires very strong (>10 T/m), rapidly switchable triaxial magnetic field gradients. Here, we report the design and construction of such a triaxial gradient system, producing gradients substantially greater than 15 T/m in all three directions, x, y, and z (and as high as 50 T/m for the x direction). The gradients are switchable within time ˜10 μs and adequately uniform (within 5% over a volume of [600μm3] for microcoil MRI of small samples.

  16. Non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    Non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography has gained renewed interest since the discovery of the association between gadolinium-based contrast agents and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. The following article is an overview of the different magnetic resonance angiography sequences, the technical possibilities and new developments. Clinical options and recent advancements will be highlighted, and recommendations for non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography techniques in different anatomical regions will be given. Furthermore, the authors seek to predict the future of non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography, with special focus on patients at risk.

  17. Recent Advances in Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance: Techniques and Applications.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Michael; Sharif, Behzad; Arheden, Håkan; Kumar, Andreas; Axel, Leon; Li, Debiao; Neubauer, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has become the gold standard for evaluating myocardial function, volumes, and scarring. Additionally, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is unique in its comprehensive tissue characterization, including assessment of myocardial edema, myocardial siderosis, myocardial perfusion, and diffuse myocardial fibrosis. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has become an indispensable tool in the evaluation of congenital heart disease, heart failure, cardiac masses, pericardial disease, and coronary artery disease. This review will highlight some recent novel cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging techniques, concepts, and applications. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Reciprocity and gyrotropism in magnetic resonance transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tropp, James

    2006-12-15

    We give formulas for transduction in magnetic resonance - i.e., the appearance of an emf due to Larmor precession of spins - based upon the modified Lorentz reciprocity principle for gyrotropic (also called 'nonreciprocal') media, i.e., in which a susceptibility tensor is carried to its transpose by reversal of an external static field [cf., R. F. Harrington and A. T. Villeneuve IRE Trans. Microwave Theory and Technique MTT6, 308 (1958)]. Prior applications of reciprocity to magnetic resonance, despite much success, have ignored the gyrotropism which necessarily arises due to nuclear and/or unpaired electronic spins. For detection with linearly polarized fields, oscillating at the Larmor frequency, the emf is written in terms of a volume integral containing a product of two factors which we define as the antenna patterns, i.e. (H{sub 1x}{+-}iH{sub 1y}), where, e.g., for a single transceive antenna, the H's are just the spatially dependent oscillatory magnetic field strengths, per the application of some reference current at the antenna terminals, with the negative sign obtaining for transmission, and the positive for reception. Similar expressions hold for separate transmit and receive antennas; expressions are also given for circular polarization of the fields. We then exhibit a receive-only array antenna of two elements for magnetic resonance imaging of protons, which, due an intensity artifact arising from stray reactive coupling of the elements, produces, despite its own bilateral symmetry, asymmetric proton NMR images of a symmetric cylindrical phantom containing aqueous saline solution [J. Tropp and T. Schirmer, J. Magn. Reson. 151, 146 (2001)]. Modification of this two-port antenna, to function in transmit-receive mode, allows us to demonstrate highly nonreciprocal behavior: that is, to record images (of cylindrical test phantoms containing aqueous saline solution) whose appearance dramatically changes, when the roles of transmission and reception are

  19. Pulsed low-field electrically detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreher, L.; Hoehne, F.; Morishita, H.; Huebl, H.; Stutzmann, M.; Itoh, K. M.; Brandt, M. S.

    2015-02-01

    We present pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) measurements at low magnetic fields using phosphorus-doped silicon with natural isotope composition as a model system. Our measurements show that pulsed EDMR experiments, well established at X -band frequencies (10 GHz), such as coherent spin rotations, Hahn echoes, and measurements of parallel and antiparallel spin pair life times are also feasible at frequencies in the megahertz (MHz) regime. We find that the Rabi frequency of the coupled 31P electron-nuclear spin system scales with the magnetic field as predicted by the spin Hamiltonian, while the measured spin coherence and recombination times do not strongly depend on the magnetic field in the region investigated. The usefulness of pulsed low-field EDMR for measurements of small hyperfine interactions is demonstrated by electron spin echo envelope modulation measurements of the Pb 0 dangling-bond state at the Si /SiO2 interface. A pronounced modulation with a frequency at the free Larmor frequency of hydrogen nuclei was observed for radio frequencies between 38 and 400 MHz, attributed to the nuclear magnetic resonance of hydrogen in an adsorbed layer of water. This demonstrates the high sensitivity of low-field EDMR also for spins not directly participating in the spin-dependent transport investigated.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: current state of the art and novel approaches.

    PubMed

    Postal, M; Lapa, A Tamires; Reis, F; Rittner, L; Appenzeller, S

    2017-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic, inflammatory, immune-mediated disease affecting 0.1% of the general population. Neuropsychiatric manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus have been more frequently recognized and reported in recent years, occurring in up to 75% of patients during the disease course. Magnetic resonance imaging is known to be a useful tool for the detection of structural brain abnormalities in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients because of the excellent soft-tissue contrast observed with MRI and the ability to acquire multiplanar images. In addition to conventional magnetic resonance imaging techniques to evaluate the presence of atrophy and white matter lesions, several different magnetic resonance imaging techniques have been used to identify microstructural or functional abnormalities. This review will highlight different magnetic resonance imaging techniques, including the advanced magnetic resonance imaging methods used to determine central nervous system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  1. Identifying microwave magnetic resonance in chiral elements for creation of controlled matched absorbing metastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraftmakher, G. A.; Butylkin, V. S.; Kazantsev, Yu. N.; Mal'tsev, V. P.; Temirov, Yu. Sh.

    2017-01-01

    It has been suggested a method for identifying and separating magnetic and electric microwave resonance responses of conductive chiral and bianisotropic elements by reflection of electromagnetic waves in the standing and traveling-wave modes. It has been observed experimentally (in waveguide) and confirmed numerically (in free space) that magnetic resonance, which is excited by microwave magnetic field h, and electric resonances, excited by electric field E, show drastically different resonance curves of reflection. These distinctions allow to identifying the magnetic resonance response and using magnetically excited elements for broadband matching of absorbers instead of traditional quarter-wavelength layer. We have fabricated and investigated matched absorbing metastructures which are controlled by voltage as well by light of remote laser pointer.

  2. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, M E; Melcher, J R; Kiang, N Y

    2000-10-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 microPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager's permanent magnet and the room air-handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions.

  3. BROADBAND EXCITATION IN NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tycko, R.

    1984-10-01

    Theoretical methods for designing sequences of radio frequency (rf) radiation pulses for broadband excitation of spin systems in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are described. The sequences excite spins uniformly over large ranges of resonant frequencies arising from static magnetic field inhomogeneity, chemical shift differences, or spin couplings, or over large ranges of rf field amplitudes. Specific sequences for creating a population inversion or transverse magnetization are derived and demonstrated experimentally in liquid and solid state NMR. One approach to broadband excitation is based on principles of coherent averaging theory. A general formalism for deriving pulse sequences is given, along with computational methods for specific cases. This approach leads to sequences that produce strictly constant transformations of a spin system. The importance of this feature in NMR applications is discussed. A second approach to broadband excitation makes use of iterative schemes, i.e. sets of operations that are applied repetitively to a given initial pulse sequences, generating a series of increasingly complex sequences with increasingly desirable properties. A general mathematical framework for analyzing iterative schemes is developed. An iterative scheme is treated as a function that acts on a space of operators corresponding to the transformations produced by all possible pulse sequences. The fixed points of the function and the stability of the fixed points are shown to determine the essential behavior of the scheme. Iterative schemes for broadband population inversion are treated in detail. Algebraic and numerical methods for performing the mathematical analysis are presented. Two additional topics are treated. The first is the construction of sequences for uniform excitation of double-quantum coherence and for uniform polarization transfer over a range of spin couplings. Double-quantum excitation sequences are demonstrated in a liquid crystal system. The

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods in Soil Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, A.; van Dusschoten, D.; Blümler, P.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique to study water content, dynamics and transport in natural porous media. However, MRI systems and protocols have been developed mainly for medical purposes, i.e. for media with comparably high water contents and long relaxation times. In contrast, natural porous media like soils and rocks are characterized by much lower water contents, typically 0 < theta < 0.4, and much faster T1 and T2 relaxation times. So, the usage of standard medical scanners and protocols is of limited benefit. Three strategies can be applied for the monitoring of water contents and dynamics in natural porous media: i) Dedicated high-field scanners (with vertical bore) allowing stronger gradients and faster switching so that shorter echo times can be realized. ii) Special measurement sequences using ultrashort rf- and gradient-pulses like single point imaging derivates (SPI, SPRITE)(1) and multi-echo methods, which monitor series of echoes and allow for extrapolation to zero time(2). Hence, the loss of signal during the first echo period may be compensated to determine the initial magnetization (= water content) as well as relaxation time maps simultaneously. iii) Finally low field( < 1T) scanners also provide longer echo times and hence detect larger fractions of water, since the T2 relaxation time of water in most porous media increases with decreasing magnetic field strength(3). In the presentation examples for all three strategies will be given. References 1) Pohlmeier et al. Vadose Zone J. 7, 1010-1017 (2008) 2) Edzes et al., Magn. Res. Imag. 16, 185-196 (1998) 3) Raich H, and Blümler P, Concepts in Magn. Reson. B 23B, 16-25 (2004) 4) Pohlmeier et al. Magn. Res. Imag. doi:10.1016/j.mri.2008.06.007 (2008)

  5. Magnetically induced Mie resonance in a magnetic sphere suspended in a ferrofluid.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Hem; Patel, Rajesh; Mehta, R V

    2010-04-01

    Mie scattering functions for a magnetizable sphere whose relative refractive index is dependent on the externally applied magnetic field are computed for four different sizes of the sphere. It is found that Mie resonances are observed at certain critical fields when the incident light is polarized with its electric vector perpendicular to the applied field. The width of resonance as well as the critical fields shifts with the increase in size of the spheres. Results are compared with the experimentally observed scattering effects in a dispersion of magnetite spheres in a ferrofluid.

  6. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the retina.

    PubMed

    Duong, Timothy Q; Ngan, Shing-Chung; Ugurbil, Kamil; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2002-04-01

    This study explored the feasibility of mapping the retina's responses to visual stimuli noninvasively, by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). fMRI was performed on a 9.4-Tesla scanner to map activity-evoked signal changes of the retina-choroid complex associated with visual stimulation in anesthetized cats (n = 6). Three to 12 1-mm slices were acquired in a single shot using inversion-recovery, echo-planar imaging with a nominal in-plane resolution of 468 x 468 microm(2). Visual stimuli were presented to the full visual field and to the upper and lower visual fields. The stimuli were drifting or stationary gratings, which were compared with the dark condition. Activation maps were computed using cross-correlation analysis and overlaid on anatomic images. Multislice activation maps were reconstructed and flattened onto a two-dimensional surface. fMRI activation maps showed robust increased activity in the retina-choroid complex after visual stimulation. The average stimulus-evoked fMRI signal increase associated with drifting-grating stimulus was 1.7% +/- 0.5% (P < 10(-4), n = 6) compared with dark. Multislice functional images of the retina flattened onto a two-dimensional surface showed relatively uniform activation. No statistically significant activation was observed in and around the optic nerve head. Hemifield stimulation studies demonstrated that stimuli presented to the upper half of the visual field activated the lower part of the retina, and stimuli presented to the lower half of the visual field activated the upper part of the retina, as expected. Signal changes evoked by the stationary gratings compared with the dark basal condition were positive but were approximately half that evoked by the drifting gratings (1.0% +/- 0.1% versus 2.1% +/- 0.3%, P < 10(-4)). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first fMRI study of the retina, demonstrating its feasibility in imaging retinal function dynamically in a noninvasive manner and at

  7. Magnetic resonance image enhancement using stochastic resonance in Fourier domain.

    PubMed

    Rallabandi, V P Subramanyam; Roy, Prasun Kumar

    2010-11-01

    In general, low-field MRI scanners such as the 0.5- and 1-T ones produce images that are poor in quality. The motivation of this study was to lessen the noise and enhance the signal such that the image quality is improved. Here, we propose a new approach using stochastic resonance (SR)-based transform in Fourier space for the enhancement of magnetic resonance images of brain lesions, by utilizing an optimized level of Gaussian fluctuation that maximizes signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We acquired the T1-weighted MR image of the brain in DICOM format. We processed the original MR image using the proposed SR procedure. We then tested our approach on about 60 patients of different age groups with different lesions, such as arteriovenous malformation, benign lesion and malignant tumor, and illustrated the image enhancement by using just-noticeable difference visually as well as by utilizing the relative enhancement factor quantitatively. Our method can restore the original image from noisy image and optimally enhance the edges or boundaries of the tissues, clarify indistinct structural brain lesions without producing ringing artifacts, as well as delineate the edematous area, active tumor zone, lesion heterogeneity or morphology, and vascular abnormality. The proposed technique improves the enhancement factor better than the conventional techniques like the Wiener- and wavelet-based procedures. The proposed method can readily enhance the image fusing a unique constructive interaction of noise and signal, and enables improved diagnosis over conventional methods. The approach well illustrates the novel potential of using a small amount of Gaussian noise to improve the image quality. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Inter- and intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of amount of fibroglandular breast tissue with magnetic resonance imaging: comparison to automated quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Wengert, G J; Helbich, T H; Woitek, R; Kapetas, P; Clauser, P; Baltzer, P A; Vogl, W-D; Weber, M; Meyer-Baese, A; Pinker, Katja

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the inter-/intra-observer agreement of BI-RADS-based subjective visual estimation of the amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to investigate whether FGT assessment benefits from an automated, observer-independent, quantitative MRI measurement by comparing both approaches. Eighty women with no imaging abnormalities (BI-RADS 1 and 2) were included in this institutional review board (IRB)-approved prospective study. All women underwent un-enhanced breast MRI. Four radiologists independently assessed FGT with MRI by subjective visual estimation according to BI-RADS. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT with MRI was performed using a previously described measurement system. Inter-/intra-observer agreements of qualitative and quantitative FGT measurements were assessed using Cohen's kappa (k). Inexperienced readers achieved moderate inter-/intra-observer agreement and experienced readers a substantial inter- and perfect intra-observer agreement for subjective visual estimation of FGT. Practice and experience reduced observer-dependency. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurement of FGT was successfully performed and revealed only fair to moderate agreement (k = 0.209-0.497) with subjective visual estimations of FGT. Subjective visual estimation of FGT with MRI shows moderate intra-/inter-observer agreement, which can be improved by practice and experience. Automated observer-independent quantitative measurements of FGT are necessary to allow a standardized risk evaluation. • Subjective FGT estimation with MRI shows moderate intra-/inter-observer agreement in inexperienced readers. • Inter-observer agreement can be improved by practice and experience. • Automated observer-independent quantitative measurements can provide reliable and standardized assessment of FGT with MRI.

  9. Extended MHD simulation of resonant magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, H. R.; Sugiyama, L.; Park, G. Y.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S.; Joseph, I.

    2009-05-01

    Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) have been found effective in suppressing edge localized modes (ELMs) in the DIII-D experiment (Evans et al 2006 Phys. Plasmas 13 056121, Moyer et al 2005 Phys. Plasmas 12 056119). Simulations with the M3D initial value code indicate that plasma rotation, due to an MHD toroidal rotation or to two-fluid drifts, has an essential effect on the RMP. When the flow is below a threshold, the RMP field can couple to a resistive mode with a helical structure, different from the usual ELM, that amplifies the non-axisymmetric field. The magnetic field becomes stochastic in the outer part of the plasma, causing density and temperature loss. At higher rotation speed, the resistive mode is stabilized and the applied RMP is screened from the plasma, so that the stochastic magnetic layer is thinner and the temperature remains similar to the initial unperturbed state. The rotational flow effects, along with the remnants of the screened RMP, cause a density loss which extends into the plasma core. The two-fluid model contains intrinsic drift motion and axisymmetric toroidal rotation may not be needed to screen the RMP nor stabilize the resistive mode.

  10. A desktop magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Wright, Steven M; Brown, David G; Porter, Jay R; Spence, David C; Esparza, Emilio; Cole, David C; Huson, F Russell

    2002-01-01

    Modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems consist of several complex, high cost subsystems. The cost and complexity of these systems often makes them impractical for use as routine laboratory instruments, limiting their use to hospitals and dedicated laboratories. However, advances in the consumer electronics industry have led to the widespread availability of inexpensive radio-frequency integrated circuits with exceptional abilities. We have developed a small, low-cost MR system derived from these new components. When combined with inexpensive desktop magnets, this type of MR scanner has the promise of becoming standard laboratory equipment for both research and education. This paper describes the development of a prototype desktop MR scanner utilizing a 0.21 T permanent magnet with an imaging region of approximately 2 cm diameter. The system uses commercially available components where possible and is programmed in LabVIEW software. Results from 3D data sets of resolution phantoms and fixed, newborn mice demonstrate the capability of this system to obtain useful images from a system constructed for approximately $13,500.

  11. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Keevil, Stephen F

    2006-08-21

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications.

  12. Multidataset Refinement Resonant Diffraction, and Magnetic Structures

    PubMed Central

    Attfield, J. Paul

    2004-01-01

    The scope of Rietveld and other powder diffraction refinements continues to expand, driven by improvements in instrumentation, methodology and software. This will be illustrated by examples from our research in recent years. Multidataset refinement is now commonplace; the datasets may be from different detectors, e.g., in a time-of-flight experiment, or from separate experiments, such as at several x-ray energies giving resonant information. The complementary use of x rays and neutrons is exemplified by a recent combined refinement of the monoclinic superstructure of magnetite, Fe3O4, below the 122 K Verwey transition, which reveals evidence for Fe2+/Fe3+ charge ordering. Powder neutron diffraction data continue to be used for the solution and Rietveld refinement of magnetic structures. Time-of-flight instruments on cold neutron sources can produce data that have a high intensity and good resolution at high d-spacings. Such profiles have been used to study incommensurate magnetic structures such as FeAsO4 and β–CrPO4. A multiphase, multidataset refinement of the phase-separated perovskite (Pr0.35Y0.07Th0.04Ca0.04Sr0.5)MnO3 has been used to fit three components with different crystal and magnetic structures at low temperatures. PMID:27366599

  13. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance in isolated perfused rat pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Takehisa; Kanno, Tomio; Seo, Yoshiteru; Murakami, Masataka; Watari, Hiroshi National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki )

    1988-04-01

    Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to measure phosphorus energy metabolites in isolated perfused rat pancreas. The gland was perfused with a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution at room temperature (25{degree}C). {sup 31}P resonances of creatine phosphate (PCr), ATP, ADP, inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) and phosphomonoesters (PMEs) were observed in all the preparations of pancreas. In different individual preparations, the resonance of PCr varied, but those of ATP were almost the same. The initial levels of PCr and ATP in individual preparations, however, remained almost unchanged during perfusion with the standard solution for 2 h. When the perfusion was stopped, the levels of ATP and PCr decreased, while the levels of PME and P{sub i} increased. At that time, the P{sub i} resonance shfted to a higher magnetic field, indicating that the tissue pH decreased. On reperfusion, the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds and the tissue pH were restored to their initial resting levels. Continuous infusion of 0.1 {mu}M acetylcholine caused marked and sustained increases in the flow of pancreatic juice and protein output. During the stimulation the tissue levels of phosphorus compounds remained unchanged, while the tissue pH was decreased slightly.

  14. Tissue discrimination in magnetic resonance imaging of the rotator cuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschino, G. J.; Comas, D. S.; González, M. A.; Capiel, C.; Ballarin, V. L.

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation and diagnosis of diseases of the muscles within the rotator cuff can be done using different modalities, being the Magnetic Resonance the method more widely used. There are criteria to evaluate the degree of fat infiltration and muscle atrophy, but these have low accuracy and show great variability inter and intra observer. In this paper, an analysis of the texture features of the rotator cuff muscles is performed to classify them and other tissues. A general supervised classification approach was used, combining forward-search as feature selection method with kNN as classification rule. Sections of Magnetic Resonance Images of the tissues of interest were selected by specialist doctors and they were considered as Gold Standard. Accuracies obtained were of 93% for T1-weighted images and 92% for T2-weighted images. As an immediate future work, the combination of both sequences of images will be considered, expecting to improve the results, as well as the use of other sequences of Magnetic Resonance Images. This work represents an initial point for the classification and quantification of fat infiltration and muscle atrophy degree. From this initial point, it is expected to make an accurate and objective system which will result in benefits for future research and for patients’ health.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guided Vacuum Assisted and Core Needle Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Kılıç, Fahrettin; Eren, Abdulkadir; Tunç, Necmettin; Velidedeoğlu, Mehmet; Bakan, Selim; Aydoğan, Fatih; Çelik, Varol; Gazioğlu, Ertuğrul; Yılmaz, Mehmet Halit

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study to present the results of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided cutting needle biopsy procedures of suspicious breast lesions that can be solely detected on Magnetic resonance (MR) examination. The study included 48 patients with 48 lesions which were solely be observed in breast MRI, indistinguishable in ultrasonography and mammography, for MR guided vacuum-assisted cutting needle biopsy and 42 patients with 42 lesions for MR guided cutting needle biopsy for the lesions of the same nature. MR imaging was performed using a 1.5-Tesla MRI device. Acquired MR images were determined and biopsy protocol was performed using computer-aided diagnosis system on the workstation. Vacuum biopsies were performed using 10 G or 12 G automatic biopsy systems, cutting needle biopsy procedures were performed using fully automated 12 G biopsy needle. All biopsy procedures were finalized successfully without major complications. The lesions were 54 mass (60%), 28 were non-mass contrast enhancement (31%) and 8 were foci (9%) in the MR examination. Histopathological evaluation revealed 18 malignant (invasive, in-situ ductal carcinoma and lobular carcinoma), 66 benign (apocrine metaplasia, fibrosis, fibroadenomatoid lesion, sclerosing adenosis, fibrocystic disease and mild-to-severe epithelial proliferation) and 6 high-risk (atypical ductal hyperplasia, intraductal papilloma, radial scar) lesions. Magnetic resonance guided vacuum and cutting needle biopsy methods are successful methods fort he evaluation of solely MRI detected suspicious breast lesions. There are several advantages relative to each other in both methods.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lens transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, C.F.

    1989-01-01

    Transparency of normal lens cytoplasm and loss of transparency in cataract were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. Phosphorus ({sup 31}P) NMR spectroscopy was used to measure the {sup 31}P constituents and pH of calf lens cortical and nuclear homogenates and intact lenses as a function of time after lens enucleation and in opacification produced by calcium. Transparency was measured with laser spectroscopy. Despite complete loss of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) within 18 hrs of enucleation, the homogenates and lenses remained 100% transparent. Additions of calcium to ATP-depleted cortical homogenates produced opacification as well as concentration-dependent changes in inorganic phosphate, sugar phosphates, glycerol phosphorylcholine and pH. {sup 1}H relaxation measurements of lens water at 200 MHz proton Larmor frequency studied temperature-dependent phase separation of lens nuclear homogenates. Preliminary measurements of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} with non-equilibrium temperature changes showed a change in the slope of the temperature dependence of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} at the phase separation temperature. Subsequent studies with equilibrium temperature changes showed no effect of phase separation on T{sub 1} or T{sub 2}, consistent with the phase separation being a low-energy process. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) studies (measurements of the magnetic field dependence of the water proton 1/T{sub 1} relaxation rates) were performed on (1) calf lens nuclear and cortical homogenates (2) chicken lens homogenates, (3) native and heat-denatured egg white and (4) pure proteins including bovine {gamma}-II crystallin bovine serum albumin (BSA) and myoglobin. The NMRD profiles of all samples exhibited decreases in 1/T{sub 1} with increasing magnetic field.

  17. Influence of an electric field on the ferromagnetic resonance in a plane-layered magnetic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karashtin, E. A.; Fraerman, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of an electric field on the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in a multilayer magnetic system consisting of two magnetic layers separated by a thin nonmagnetic interlayer has been investigated. It has been shown that, upon the excitation of magnetization oscillations by a microwave magnetic field, the eigenfrequencies of the ferromagnetic resonance depend on the stationary electric field applied in the plane of the layers. It has also been demonstrated that, in this system, high-frequency magnetization oscillations can be excited by an electric microwave field. The results of the investigation of the polarization properties of the excitation mechanism indicate that this effect can be observed experimentally.

  18. Maximum Likelihood Reconstruction for Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Setsompop, Kawin; Ye, Huihui; Cauley, Stephen; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces a statistical estimation framework for magnetic resonance (MR) fingerprinting, a recently proposed quantitative imaging paradigm. Within this framework, we present a maximum likelihood (ML) formalism to estimate multiple parameter maps directly from highly undersampled, noisy k-space data. A novel algorithm, based on variable splitting, the alternating direction method of multipliers, and the variable projection method, is developed to solve the resulting optimization problem. Representative results from both simulations and in vivo experiments demonstrate that the proposed approach yields significantly improved accuracy in parameter estimation, compared to the conventional MR fingerprinting reconstruction. Moreover, the proposed framework provides new theoretical insights into the conventional approach. We show analytically that the conventional approach is an approximation to the ML reconstruction; more precisely, it is exactly equivalent to the first iteration of the proposed algorithm for the ML reconstruction, provided that a gridding reconstruction is used as an initialization. PMID:26915119

  19. Chronic subdural hematoma: demonstration by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Sipponen, J.T.; Sepponen, R.E.; Sivula, A.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of magnetic resonance (MR) to identify intracranial hematomas was tested in five patients with clinical and computed tomographic signs of chronic subdural hematoma. The extracerebral collections were displayed as a zone of bright intensity using the T1-weighted inversion recovery (IR 1500/400) sequence, reflecting the lesions' short T1 relaxation times. The collections also showed high intensity using the spin echo (SE) sequence, with a longer delay of 100ms and 160ms, reflecting the long T2 relaxation time. The spin echo sequence with a repetition time of 500ms and an echo delay of 160ms (SE 500/160) almost effaced other structures in the image, thus increasing the specificity of this pulse scheme for detection of chronic blood collections. Although in two of the five patients the subdural hematomas were in the isodense CT phase, all were easily visualized with MR.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies. PMID:26752822

  1. Magnetic resonance image segmentation using multifractal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue-e.; Wang, Fang; Liu, Li-lin

    2015-11-01

    In order to delineate target region for magnetic resonance image (MRI) with diseases, the classical multifractal spectrum (MFS)-segmentation method and latest multifractal detrended fluctuation spectrum (MF-DFS)-based segmentation method are employed in our study. One of our main conclusions from experiments is that both of the two multifractal-based methods are workable for handling MRIs. The best result is obtained by MF-DFS-based method using Lh10 as local characteristic. The anti-noises experiments also suppot the conclusion. This interest finding shows that the features can be better represented by the strong fluctuations instead of the weak fluctuations for the MRIs. By comparing the multifractal nature between lesion and non-lesion area on the basis of the segmentation results, an interest finding is that the gray value's fluctuation in lesion area is much severer than that in non-lesion area.

  2. Small-Volume Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratila, Raluca M.; Velders, Aldrik H.

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most information-rich analytical techniques available. However, it is also inherently insensitive, and this drawback precludes the application of NMR spectroscopy to mass- and volume-limited samples. We review a particular approach to increase the sensitivity of NMR experiments, namely the use of miniaturized coils. When the size of the coil is reduced, the sample volume can be brought down to the nanoliter range. We compare the main coil geometries (solenoidal, planar, and microslot/stripline) and discuss their applications to the analysis of mass-limited samples. We also provide an overview of the hyphenation of microcoil NMR spectroscopy to separation techniques and of the integration with lab-on-a-chip devices and microreactors.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of experimental cerebral oedema.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D; McDonald, W I; Tofts, P S; Johnson, G; Landon, D N

    1986-01-01

    Triethyl tin(TET)-induced cerebral oedema has been studied in cats by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the findings correlated with the histology and fine structure of the cerebrum following perfusion-fixation. MRI is a sensitive technique for detecting cerebral oedema, and the distribution and severity of the changes correlate closely with the morphological abnormalities. The relaxation times, T1 and T2 increase progressively as the oedema develops, and the proportional increase in T2 is approximately twice that in T1. Analysis of the magnetisation decay curves reveals slowly-relaxing and rapidly-relaxing components which probably correspond to oedema fluid and intracellular water respectively. The image appearances taken in conjunction with relaxation data provide a basis for determining the nature of the oedema in vivo. Images PMID:3806109

  4. Overview of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Glover, Gary H.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) depicts changes in deoxyhemoglobin concentration consequent to task-induced or spontaneous modulation of neural metabolism. Since its inception in 1990, this method has been widely employed in thousands of studies of cognition for clinical applications such as surgical planning, for monitoring treatment outcomes, and as a biomarker in pharmacologic and training programs. Technical developments have solved most of the challenges of applying fMRI in practice. These challenges include low contrast to noise ratio of BOLD signals, image distortion, and signal dropout. More recently, attention is turning to the use of pattern classification and other statistical methods to draw increasingly complex inferences about cognitive brain states from fMRI data. This paper reviews the methods, some of the challenges and the future of fMRI. PMID:21435566

  5. Chest magnetic resonance imaging: a protocol suggestion*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Marchiori, Edson; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Elias Junior, Jorge; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Araujo Neto, César Augusto; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of ultrafast sequences, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a valuable diagnostic modality in body imaging. Because of improvements in speed and image quality, MRI is now ready for routine clinical use also in the study of pulmonary diseases. The main advantage of MRI of the lungs is its unique combination of morphological and functional assessment in a single imaging session. In this article, the authors review most technical aspects and suggest a protocol for performing chest MRI. The authors also describe the three major clinical indications for MRI of the lungs: staging of lung tumors; evaluation of pulmonary vascular diseases; and investigation of pulmonary abnormalities in patients who should not be exposed to radiation. PMID:26811555

  6. Myocardial Viability on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Souto, Ana Luiza Mansur; Souto, Rafael Mansur; Teixeira, Isabella Cristina Resende; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2017-01-01

    The study of myocardial viability is of great importance in the orientation and management of patients requiring myocardial revascularization or angioplasty. The technique of delayed enhancement (DE) is accurate and has transformed the study of viability into an easy test, not only for the detection of fibrosis but also as a binary test detecting what is viable or not. On DE, fibrosis equal to or greater than 50% of the segmental area is considered as non-viable, whereas that below 50% is considered viable. During the same evaluation, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) may also use other techniques for functional and perfusion studies to obtain a global evaluation of ischemic heart disease. This study aims to highlight the current concepts and broadly emphasize the use of CMR as a method that over the last 20 years has become a reference in the detection of infarction and assessment of myocardial viability. PMID:28591322

  7. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1993-01-01

    The West Virginia State College Community College Division NASA Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) study is described. During this contract period, the two most significant and professionally rewarding events were the presentation of the research activity at the Sir Isaac Newton Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the second Day of Discovery Conference, focusing on economic recovery in West Virginia. An active antenna concept utilizing a signal feedback principle similar to regenerative receivers used in early radio was studied. The device has potential for ELF research and other commercial applications for improved signal reception. Finally, work continues to progress on the development of a prototype monitoring station. Signal monitoring, data display, and data storage are major areas of activity. In addition, we plan to continue our dissemination of research activity through presentations at seminars and other universities.

  8. Whole body postmortem magnetic resonance angiography.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Thomas D; Hatch, Gary M; Ebert, Lars C; Flach, Patricia M; Ross, Steffen; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Thali, Michael J

    2012-05-01

      Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging have become important elements of forensic radiology. Whereas the feasibility and potential of CT angiography have long been explored, postmortem MR angiography (PMMRA) has so far been neglected. We tested the feasibility of PMMRA on four adult human cadavers. Technical quality of PMMRA was assessed relative to postmortem CT angiography (PMCTA), separately for each body region. Intra-aortic contrast volumes were calculated on PMCTA and PMMRA with segmentation software. The results showed that technical quality of PMMRA images was equal to PMCTA in 4/4 cases for the head, the heart, and the chest, and in 3/4 cases for the abdomen, and the pelvis. There was a mean decrease in intra-aortic contrast volume from PMCTA to PMMRA of 46%. PMMRA is technically feasible and allows combining the soft tissue detail provided by MR and the information afforded by angiography. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    PubMed Central

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  10. A novel digital magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengmin; Zhao, Cong; Zhou, Heqin; Feng, Huanqing

    2006-01-01

    Spectrometer is the essential part of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. It controls the transmitting and receiving of signals. Many commercial spectrometers are now available. However, they are usually costly and complex. In this paper, a new digital spectrometer based on PCI extensions for instrumentation (PXI) architecture is presented. Radio frequency (RF) pulse is generated with the method of digital synthesis and its frequency and phase are continuously tunable. MR signal acquired by receiver coils is processed by digital quadrature detection and filtered to get the k-space data, which avoid the spectral distortion due to amplitude and phase errors between two channels of traditional detection. Compared to the conventional design, the presented spectrometer is built with general PXI platform and boards. This design works in a digital manner with features of low cost, high performance and accuracy. The experiments demonstrate its efficiency.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Hash, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affords high-resolution visualization of the soft tissue structures (menisci, ligaments, cartilage, etc) and bone marrow of the knee. Evidence Acquisition: Pertinent clinical and research articles in the orthopaedic and radiology literature over the past 30 years using PubMed. Results: Ligament tears can be accurately assessed with MRI, but distinguishing partial tears from ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be challenging. Determining the extent of a partial tear is often extremely difficult to accurately assess. The status of the posterolateral corner structures, menisci, and cartilage can be accurately evaluated, although limitations in the evaluation of certain structures exist. Patellofemoral joint, marrow, tibiofibular joint, and synovial pathology can supplement physical examination findings and provide definitive diagnosis. Conclusions: MRI provides an accurate noninvasive assessment of knee pathology. PMID:24381701

  12. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Evans, H.; Bryan, R. N.; Johnson, P.; Schonfeld, E.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    A number of physiological changes have been demonstrated in bone, muscle and blood after exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long duration space missions is an important NASA goal. The advent of tomographic nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR or MRI) gives NASA a way to greatly extend early studies of this phenomena in ways not previously possible; NMR is also noninvasive and safe. NMR provides both superb anatomical images for volume assessments of individual organs and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. The feasibility of NMR as a tool for human physiological research as it is affected by microgravity is demonstrated. The animal studies employed the rear limb suspended rat as a model of mucle atrophy that results from microgravity. And bedrest of normal male subjects was used to simulate the effects of microgravity on bone and muscle.

  13. Myocardial Tissue Characterization by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Vanessa M.; Piechnik, Stefan K.; Robson, Matthew D.; Neubauer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a well-established noninvasive imaging modality in clinical cardiology. Its unsurpassed accuracy in defining cardiac morphology and function and its ability to provide tissue characterization make it well suited for the study of patients with cardiac diseases. Late gadolinium enhancement was a major advancement in the development of tissue characterization techniques, allowing the unique ability of CMR to differentiate ischemic heart disease from nonischemic cardiomyopathies. Using T2-weighted techniques, areas of edema and inflammation can be identified in the myocardium. A new generation of myocardial mapping techniques are emerging, enabling direct quantitative assessment of myocardial tissue properties in absolute terms. This review will summarize recent developments involving T1-mapping and T2-mapping techniques and focus on the clinical applications and future potential of these evolving CMR methodologies. PMID:24576837

  14. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Agosta, Federica; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is playing an increasingly important role in the study of neurodegenerative diseases, delineating the structural and functional alterations determined by these conditions. Advanced MRI techniques are of special interest for their potential to characterize the signature of each neurodegenerative condition and aid both the diagnostic process and the monitoring of disease progression. This aspect will become crucial when disease-modifying (personalized) therapies will be established. MRI techniques are very diverse and go from the visual inspection of MRI scans to more complex approaches, such as manual and automatic volume measurements, diffusion tensor MRI, and functional MRI. All these techniques allow us to investigate the different features of neurodegeneration. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances concerning the use of MRI in some of the most important neurodegenerative conditions, putting an emphasis on the advanced techniques.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Starnes, D.L.; Duchesneau, P.M.; Boumphrey, F.; Hardy, R.J. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Forty subjects were examined to determine the accuracy and clinical usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination of the spine. The NMR images were compared with plain radiographs, high-resolution computed tomograms, and myelograms. The study included 15 patients with normal spinal cord anatomy and 25 patients whose pathological conditions included canal stenosis, herniated discs, metastatic tumors, primary cord tumor, trauma, Chiari malformations, syringomyelia, and developmental disorders. Saturation recovery images were best in differentiating between soft tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. NMR was excellent for the evaluation of the foramen magnum region and is presently the modality of choice for the diagnosis of syringomyelia and Chiari malformation. NMR was accurate in diagnosing spinal cord trauma and spinal canal block.

  16. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance: deeper insights through bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Young, A A; Prince, J L

    2013-01-01

    Heart disease is the main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with coronary artery disease, diabetes, and obesity being major contributing factors. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) can provide a wealth of quantitative information on the performance of the heart, without risk to the patient. Quantitative analyses of these data can substantially augment the diagnostic quality of CMR examinations and can lead to more effective characterization of disease and quantification of treatment benefit. This review provides an overview of the current state of the art in CMR with particular regard to the quantification of motion, both microscopic and macroscopic, and the application of bioengineering analysis for the evaluation of cardiac mechanics. We discuss the current clinical practice and the likely advances in the next 5-10 years, as well as the ways in which clinical examinations can be augmented by bioengineering analysis of strain, compliance, and stress.

  17. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1993-06-01

    The West Virginia State College Community College Division NASA Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) study is described. During this contract period, the two most significant and professionally rewarding events were the presentation of the research activity at the Sir Isaac Newton Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the second Day of Discovery Conference, focusing on economic recovery in West Virginia. An active antenna concept utilizing a signal feedback principle similar to regenerative receivers used in early radio was studied. The device has potential for ELF research and other commercial applications for improved signal reception. Finally, work continues to progress on the development of a prototype monitoring station. Signal monitoring, data display, and data storage are major areas of activity. In addition, we plan to continue our dissemination of research activity through presentations at seminars and other universities.

  18. Magnetic resonance urography by virtual reality modelling.

    PubMed

    Beigi, Navid; Sangild, Thomas; Terkildsen, Søren Vorre; Deding, Dorthe; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Pedersen, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a 3D visualization of the urinary tract by a novel virtual reality approach, and to evaluate the usefulness of this method for papillary classification as compared with 2D urogram obtained by maximum intensity projection (MIP). In one healthy pig, magnetic resonance urography was performed using a T1-weighted 3D gradient echo pulse sequence. Post-processing was performed by means of an MIP algorithm and by using 3D virtual reality modelling, followed by manual classification of papillae as being either simple or compound. The 2D MIP urogram demonstrated 6 simple and 6 compound papillae, whereas the 3D urogram demonstrated 5 simple and 7 compound papillae. In both urograms, some papillae were unsuccessfully classified. The possibility of using virtual reality devices allowed 3D rotation and offered additional diagnostic information. However, further studies should reveal its feasibility in diseased kidneys.

  19. The magnetic resonance imaging-linac system.

    PubMed

    Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W; van Vulpen, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The current image-guided radiotherapy systems are suboptimal in the esophagus, pancreas, kidney, rectum, lymph node, etc. These locations in the body are not easily accessible for fiducials and cannot be visualized sufficiently on cone-beam computed tomographies, making daily patient set-up prone to geometrical uncertainties and hinder dose optimization. Additional interfraction and intrafraction uncertainties for those locations arise from motion with breathing and organ filling. To allow real-time imaging of all patient tumor locations at the actual treatment position a fully integrated 1.5-T, diagnostic quality, magnetic resonance imaging with a 6-MV linear accelerator is presented. This system must enable detailed dose painting at all body locations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Geochemical Controls on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Rosemary; Prasad, Manika; Keating, Kristina

    2003-11-11

    OAK-B135 Our research objectives are to determine, through an extensive set of laboratory experiments, the effect of the specific mineralogic form of iron and the effect of the distribution of iron on proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation mechanisms. In the first nine months of this project, we have refined the experimental procedures to be used in the acquisition of the laboratory NMR data; have ordered, and conducted preliminary measurements on, the sand samples to be used in the experimental work; and have revised and completed the theoretical model to use in this project. Over the next year, our focus will be on completing the first phase of the experimental work where the form and distribution of the iron in the sands in varied.

  1. Infected aortoiliofemoral grafts: magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Justich, E; Amparo, E G; Hricak, H; Higgins, C B

    1985-01-01

    Three patients with proved infected aortoiliofemoral grafts were examined by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using a spin echo technique. MR clearly identified the perigraft abscess, the involvement of adjacent structures, and the longitudinal extent of the process in all patients. The MR findings were: Abscesses create a high signal intensity, somewhat less than fat. The perigraft abscess has a great contrast with the signal void of flowing blood in the graft. Inflammatory changes cause an inhomogeneous intermediate signal, slightly more intense than muscle. Both abscesses and edematous areas increase their signal intensity with long repetition rates and long echo delays. Areas of gas appear black. They cannot be distinguished from calcified plaques. Additional information is gained about the graft patency. Although the specificity has to be proved, MR imaging is sensitive in the detection of infected grafts and for defining the longitudinal extent of the perigraft abscess.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in medicine

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry, C S

    1986-01-01

    Using the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, MR, MRI), the first images displaying pathology in humans were published in 1980.1 Since then, there has been a rapid extension in the use of the technique, with an estimated 225 machines in use in the USA at the end of 1985.2 Considerable enthusiasm has been expressed for this new imaging technique,3 although awareness of its high cost in the present economic climate has led to reservations being expressed in other quarters.2 The aim of this article is to give an outline of the present state of NMR, and indicate some possible future developments. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3(a)Fig 3 (b)Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7 (a)Fig 7 (b)Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10 PMID:3811023

  3. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging: challenges of implementation.

    PubMed

    Loch, Ronald; Fowler, Kathryn; Schmidt, Ryan; Ippolito, Joseph; Siegel, Cary; Narra, Vamsi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is among the most common causes of cancer and cancer deaths in men. Screening methods and optimal treatments have become controversial in recent years. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is gaining popularity as a tool to assist diagnosis, risk assessment, and staging. However, implementation into clinical practice can be difficult, with many challenges associated with image acquisition, postprocessing, interpretation, reporting, and radiologic-pathologic correlation. Although state-of-the-art technology is available at select sites for targeting tissue biopsy and interpreting multiparametric prostate MRI, many institutions struggle with adapting this new technology into an efficient multidisciplinary model of patient care. This article reviews several of the challenges that radiologists should be aware of when integrating prostate MRI into their clinical practice.

  4. Fetal Cerebral Magnetic Resonance Imaging Beyond Morphology.

    PubMed

    Jakab, András; Pogledic, Ivana; Schwartz, Ernst; Gruber, Gerlinde; Mitter, Christian; Brugger, Peter C; Langs, Georg; Schöpf, Veronika; Kasprian, Gregor; Prayer, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The recent technological advancement of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences allowed the inclusion of diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, and proton MR spectroscopy in prenatal imaging protocols. These methods provide information beyond morphology and hold the key to improving several fields of human neuroscience and clinical diagnostics. Our review introduces the fundamental works that enabled these imaging techniques, and also highlights the most recent contributions to this emerging field of prenatal diagnostics, such as the structural and functional connectomic approach. We introduce the advanced image processing approaches that are extensively used to tackle fetal or maternal movement-related image artifacts, and which are necessary for the optimal interpretation of such imaging data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of language.

    PubMed

    Small, Steven L; Burton, Martha W

    2002-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging of language builds on almost 150 years of study in neurology, psychology, linguistics, anatomy, and physiology. In recent years, there has been an explosion of research using functional imaging technology, especially positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to understand the relationship between brain mechanisms and language processing. These methods combine high-resolution anatomic images with measures of language-specific brain activity to reveal neural correlates of language processing. This article reviews some of what has been learned about the neuroanatomy of language from these imaging techniques. We first discuss the normal case, organizing the presentation according to the levels of language, encompassing words (lexicon), sound structure (phonemes), and sentences (syntax and semantics). Next, we delve into some unusual language processing circumstances, including second languages and sign languages. Finally, we discuss abnormal language processing, including developmental and acquired dyslexia and aphasia.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging after exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Adrian

    1993-01-01

    A number of physiological changes were demonstrated in bone, muscle, and blood from exposure of humans and animals to microgravity. Determining mechanisms and the development of effective countermeasures for long-duration space missions is an important NASA goal. Historically, NASA has had to rely on tape measures, x-ray, and metabolic balance studies with collection of excreta and blood specimens to obtain this information. The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the possibility of greatly extending these early studies in ways not previously possible; MRI is also non-invasive and safe; i.e., no radiation exposure. MRI provides both superb anatomical images for volume measurements of individual structures and quantification of chemical/physical changes induced in the examined tissues. This investigation will apply MRI technology to measure muscle, intervertebral disc, and bone marrow changes resulting from exposure to microgravity.

  7. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: patient safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Giroletti, Elio; Corbucci, Giorgio

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is widely used in medicine. In cardiology, it is used to assess congenital or acquired diseases of the heat: and large vessels. Unless proper precautions are taken, it is generally advisable to avoid using this technique in patients with implanted electronic stimulators, such as pacemakers and defibrillators, on account of the potential risk of inducing electrical currents on the endocardial catheters, since these currents might stimulate the heart at a high frequency, thereby triggering dangerous arrhythmias. In addition to providing some basic information on pacemakers, defibrillators and MRI, and on the possible physical phenomena that may produce harmful effects, the present review examines the indications given in the literature, with particular reference to coronary stents, artificial heart valves and implantable cardiac stimulators.

  8. Characterization of magnetic nanoparticles as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging using high-Tc superconducting quantum interference devices in microtesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Shu-Hsien; Yang, Hong-Chang; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, S. Y.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we characterize the spin-lattice relaxation T1, spin-spin relaxation T2, and effective relaxation rate ΓMF of magnetic fluids for magnetic resonance imaging using a high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in microtesla magnetic fields. When the magnetic susceptibility of the magnetic fluid was increased, a broadening of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and a growing spin-lattice relaxation T1 as well as spin-spin relaxation T2 were observed. The effective relaxation rate ΓMF increased monotonically from 0 to 13 s-1 when the magnetic susceptibility of the magnetic fluids, relative to tap water, was increased from 0 to 0.0015 emu g-1. We demonstrate the magnetic fluid as an image contrast via a high-Tc SQUID in microtesla magnetic fields.

  9. Burn injury by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Eising, Ernst G; Hughes, Justin; Nolte, Frank; Jentzen, Walter; Bockisch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging has become a standard diagnostic procedure in clinical medicine and is well known to have hazards for patients with pacemaker or metallic foreign bodies. Compared to CT, the frequency of MRI examinations is increasing due to the missing exposure of the patients by X-rays. Furthermore, high-field magnetic resonance tomograph (MRT) with 3 T has entered clinical practice, and 7-T systems are installed in multiple scientific institutions. On the other hand, the possibility of burn injuries has been reported only in very few cases. Based on a clinical finding of a burn injury in a 31-year-old male patient during a routine MRI of the lumbar spine with standard protocol, the MR scanner was checked and the examination was simulated in an animal model. The patient received a third-degree burn injury of the skin of the right hand and pelvis in a small region of skin contact. The subsequent control of the MRI scanner indicated no abnormal values for radiofrequency (RF) and power. In the subsequent animal experiment, comparable injuries could only be obtained by high RF power in a microwave stove. It is concluded that 'tissue loops' resulting from a contact between hand and pelvis must be avoided. With regard to forensic aspects, the need to inform patients of such a minimal risk can be avoided if the patients are adequately positioned using an isolating material between the hands and pelvis. These facts must be emphasized more in the future, if high-field MRI with stronger RF gradients is available in routine imaging. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Energy Storage Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez Reina, Rafael

    In today's society there is high demand to have access to energy for portable devices in different forms. Capacitors with high performance in small package to achieve high charge/discharge rates, and batteries with their ability to store electricity and make energy mobile are part of this demand. The types of internal dielectric material strongly affect the characteristics of a capacitor, and its applications. In a battery, the choice of the electrolyte plays an important role in the Solid Electrolyte Interphase (SEI) formation, and the cathode material for high output voltage. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are research techniques that exploit the magnetic properties of the electron and certain atomic nuclei to determine physical and chemical properties of the atoms or molecules in which they are contained. Both EPR and NMR spectroscopy technique can yield meaningful structural and dynamic information. Three different projects are discussed in this dissertation. First, High energy density capacitors where EPR measurements described herein provide an insight into structural and chemical differences in the dielectric material of a capacitor. Next, as the second project, Electrolyte solutions where an oxygen-17 NMR study has been employed to assess the degree of preferential solvation of Li+ ions in binary mixtures of EC (ethylene carbonate) and DMC (dimethyl carbonate) containing LiPF6 (lithium hexafluo-rophosphate) which may be ultimately related to the SEI formation mechanism. The third project was to study Bismuth fluoride as cathode material for rechargeable batteries. The objective was to study 19F and 7Li MAS NMR of some nanocomposite cathode materials as a conversion reaction occurring during lithiation and delithation of the BiF3/C nanocomposite.

  11. Could magnetic resonance provide in vivo histology?

    PubMed

    Dominietto, Marco; Rudin, Markus

    2014-01-13

    THE DIAGNOSIS OF A SUSPECTED TUMOR LESION FACES TWO BASIC PROBLEMS: detection and identification of the specific type of tumor. Radiological techniques are commonly used for the detection and localization of solid tumors. Prerequisite is a high intrinsic or enhanced contrast between normal and neoplastic tissue. Identification of the tumor type is still based on histological analysis. The result depends critically on the sampling sites, which given the inherent heterogeneity of tumors, constitutes a major limitation. Non-invasive in vivo imaging might overcome this limitation providing comprehensive three-dimensional morphological, physiological, and metabolic information as well as the possibility for longitudinal studies. In this context, magnetic resonance based techniques are quite attractive since offer at the same time high spatial resolution, unique soft tissue contrast, good temporal resolution to study dynamic processes and high chemical specificity. The goal of this paper is to review the role of magnetic resonance techniques in characterizing tumor tissue in vivo both at morphological and physiological levels. The first part of this review covers methods, which provide information on specific aspects of tumor phenotypes, considered as indicators of malignancy. These comprise measurements of the inflammatory status, neo-vascular physiology, acidosis, tumor oxygenation, and metabolism together with tissue morphology. Even if the spatial resolution is not sufficient to characterize the tumor phenotype at a cellular level, this multiparametric information might potentially be used for classification of tumors. The second part discusses mathematical tools, which allow characterizing tissue based on the acquired three-dimensional data set. In particular, methods addressing tumor heterogeneity will be highlighted. Finally, we address the potential and limitation of using MRI as a tool to provide in vivo tissue characterization.

  12. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  13. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings in lipoid pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Bréchot, J M; Buy, J N; Laaban, J P; Rochemaure, J

    1991-01-01

    A case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia was documented by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Although strongly suggesting the presence of fat on T1 weighted images, magnetic resonance does not produce images specific for this condition. Computed tomography is the best imaging modality for its diagnosis. Images PMID:1750024

  14. Geometric Computation of Human Gyrification Indexes from Magnetic Resonance Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    GEOMETRIC COMPUTATION OF HUMAN GYRIFICATION INDEXES FROM MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGES By Shu Su Tonya White Marcus Schmidt Chiu-Yen Kao and Guillermo...00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Geometric Computation of Human Gyrification Indexes from Magnetic Resonance Images 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... Geometric Computation of Gyrification Indexes Chiu-Yen Kao 1 Geometric Computation of Human Gyrification

  15. Magnetic resonance advection imaging of cerebrovascular pulse dynamics.

    PubMed

    Voss, Henning U; Dyke, Jonathan P; Tabelow, Karsten; Schiff, Nicholas D; Ballon, Douglas J

    2017-04-01

    We analyze the pulsatile signal component of dynamic echo planar imaging data from the brain by modeling the dependence between local temporal and spatial signal variability. The resulting magnetic resonance advection imaging maps depict the location of major arteries. Color direction maps allow for visualization of the direction of blood vessels. The potential significance of magnetic resonance advection imaging maps is demonstrated on a functional magnetic resonance imaging data set of 19 healthy subjects. A comparison with the here introduced pulse coherence maps, in which the echo planar imaging signal is correlated with a cardiac pulse signal, shows that the magnetic resonance advection imaging approach results in a better spatial definition without the need for a pulse reference. In addition, it is shown that magnetic resonance advection imaging velocities can be estimates of pulse wave velocities if certain requirements are met, which are specified. Although for this application magnetic resonance advection imaging velocities are not quantitative estimates of pulse wave velocities, they clearly depict local pulsatile dynamics. Magnetic resonance advection imaging can be applied to existing dynamic echo planar imaging data sets with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution. It is discussed whether magnetic resonance advection imaging might have the potential to evolve into a biomarker for the health of the cerebrovascular system.

  16. Compact electrically detected magnetic resonance setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Michael; Behrends, Jan; Münter, Detlef; Harneit, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a commonly used technique for the study of spin-dependent transport processes in semiconductor materials and electro-optical devices. Here, we present the design and implementation of a compact setup to measure EDMR, which is based on a commercially available benchtop electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. The electrical detection part uses mostly off-the-shelf electrical components and is thus highly customizable. We present a characterization and calibration procedure for the instrument that allowed us to quantitatively reproduce results obtained on a silicon-based reference sample with a "large-scale" state-of-the-art instrument. This shows that EDMR can be used in novel contexts relevant for semiconductor device fabrication like clean room environments and even glove boxes. As an application example, we present data on a class of environment-sensitive objects new to EDMR, semiconducting organic microcrystals, and discuss similarities and differences to data obtained for thin-film devices of the same molecule.

  17. Compact electrically detected magnetic resonance setup

    SciTech Connect

    Eckardt, Michael Harneit, Wolfgang; Behrends, Jan; Münter, Detlef

    2015-04-15

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a commonly used technique for the study of spin-dependent transport processes in semiconductor materials and electro-optical devices. Here, we present the design and implementation of a compact setup to measure EDMR, which is based on a commercially available benchtop electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. The electrical detection part uses mostly off-the-shelf electrical components and is thus highly customizable. We present a characterization and calibration procedure for the instrument that allowed us to quantitatively reproduce results obtained on a silicon-based reference sample with a “large-scale” state-of-the-art instrument. This shows that EDMR can be used in novel contexts relevant for semiconductor device fabrication like clean room environments and even glove boxes. As an application example, we present data on a class of environment-sensitive objects new to EDMR, semiconducting organic microcrystals, and discuss similarities and differences to data obtained for thin-film devices of the same molecule.

  18. Magnetic resonance characterization of silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanciulli, Marco; Belli, Matteo; Vellei, Antonio; Canevali, Carmen; Rotta, Davide; Paleari, Stefano; Basini, Martina

    2012-02-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have been extensively investigated in the last decades. The interest in these nanostructures stems from both fundamental and applied research motivations. The functional properties of one- and zero-dimensional silicon structures are significantly different, at least below a certain critical dimension, from those well known in the bulk. The key and peculiar functional properties of SiNWs find applications in nanoelectronics, classical and quantum information processing and storage, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, thermoelectric, battery technology, nano-biotechnology, and neuroelectronics. We report our work on the characterization by continuous wave (CW) and pulse electron spin resonance (CW, FT-EPR) and electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) measurements of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) produced by different top-down processes. SiNWs were fabricated starting from SOI wafers using standard e-beam lithography and anisotropic wet etching or by metal-assisted chemical etching. Further oxidation was used to reduce the wire cross section. Different EDMR implementations were used to address the electronic wave function of donors (P, As) and to characterize point defects at the SiNWs/SiO2 interface.

  19. Magnetic tuning of electrically resonant metamaterial with inclusion of ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Lei; Zhao, Qian; Zhao, Hongjie; Zhou, Ji

    2008-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a magnetic tuning of electrically resonant metamaterial (EMM) at microwave frequencies by introducing microwave ferrite rods into the periodic array of electrically resonant element. Different from those based on controlling the capacitance of equivalent LC circuit, this tunability arises from a mechanism of magnetically tuning the inductance of resonant element via the active ambient effective permeability. For magnetic fields from 0 to 5000 Oe, resonance frequency of the EMM can be continuously and reversibly tuned in a range of about 800 MHz. The active effective permittivity has also been investigated through the simulated scattering parameters.

  20. Methotrexate-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles for thermochemotherapy and magnetic resonance imaging of tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fuping; Yan, Zixing; Zhou, Jing; Cai, Yuanyuan; Tang, Jintian

    2012-10-01

    There is significant interest in recent years in developing magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) having multifunctional characteristics with complimentary roles. In this study, methotrexate (MTX) was conjugated on the iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles surface via a poly(ethyleneimine) self-assembled monolayer (MTX-MNPs). The novel platform combined cancer chemotherapy, hyperthermia and potential monitoring of the progression of disease through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The conjugation of MTX on the magnetite surface was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and change of zeta potential. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) showed that MTX-MNPs were morphologically spherical. The average diameter of MTX-MNPs was 30.1 ± 5.2 nm determined by dynamic light scattering. Magnetic measurements revealed that the saturation magnetization of MTX-MNPs reached 68.8 emu/g and the nanoparticles were superparamagnetic. The MTX-MNPs had good heating properties in an alternating magnetic field. TEM results showed that a larger number of MTX-MNPs were internalized into the MCF-7 cellular cytoplasm compared with the MNPs. The MTX-MNPs demonstrated highly synergistic antiproliferative effects of simultaneous chemotherapy and hyperthermia in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. A significant negative contrast enhancement was observed with magnetic resonance phantom imaging for MCF-7 cells over L929cells, when both were cultured with the nanoconjugate. The MTX-MNPs with combined characteristics of thermochemotherapy and MRI could be of high clinical significance in the treatment of tumor.

  1. The electrically detected magnetic resonance microscope: Combining conductive atomic force microscopy with electrically detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Konrad; Hauer, Benedikt; Stoib, Benedikt; Trautwein, Markus; Matich, Sonja; Huebl, Hans; Astakhov, Oleksandr; Finger, Friedhelm; Bittl, Robert; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S.

    2013-10-01

    We present the design and implementation of a scanning probe microscope, which combines electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) and (photo-)conductive atomic force microscopy ((p)cAFM). The integration of a 3-loop 2-gap X-band microwave resonator into an AFM allows the use of conductive AFM tips as a movable contact for EDMR experiments. The optical readout of the AFM cantilever is based on an infrared laser to avoid disturbances of current measurements by absorption of straylight of the detection laser. Using amorphous silicon thin film samples with varying defect densities, the capability to detect a spatial EDMR contrast is demonstrated. Resonant current changes as low as 20 fA can be detected, allowing the method to realize a spin sensitivity of 8 × 10^6spins/sqrtHz at room temperature.

  2. The electrically detected magnetic resonance microscope: combining conductive atomic force microscopy with electrically detected magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Klein, Konrad; Hauer, Benedikt; Stoib, Benedikt; Trautwein, Markus; Matich, Sonja; Huebl, Hans; Astakhov, Oleksandr; Finger, Friedhelm; Bittl, Robert; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S

    2013-10-01

    We present the design and implementation of a scanning probe microscope, which combines electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) and (photo-)conductive atomic force microscopy ((p)cAFM). The integration of a 3-loop 2-gap X-band microwave resonator into an AFM allows the use of conductive AFM tips as a movable contact for EDMR experiments. The optical readout of the AFM cantilever is based on an infrared laser to avoid disturbances of current measurements by absorption of straylight of the detection laser. Using amorphous silicon thin film samples with varying defect densities, the capability to detect a spatial EDMR contrast is demonstrated. Resonant current changes as low as 20 fA can be detected, allowing the method to realize a spin sensitivity of 8×10(6)spins/√Hz at room temperature.

  3. [The benefit of magnetic resonance for diagnosing cardiomyopathy and myocarditis].

    PubMed

    Fikrle, Michal; Kuchynka, Petr; Mašek, Martin; Podzimková, Jana; Kuchař, Jan; Linhart, Aleš; Paleček, Tomáš

    Magnetic resonance is becoming an increasingly used examination in cardiology, since it greatly improves the accuracy of diagnosing of many heart diseases. At present magnetic resonance is the gold standard in assessing the volumes of the heart chambers and the systolic function of both ventricles. The possibility of detecting tissue characteristics to refine the diagnostics of different types of myocardial pathology is of essential importance. The authors summarize in the article the present knowledge about the use of magnetic resonance of the heart in the field of myocardial disease, i.e. cardiomyopathy and myocarditis. The first part of the review gives a general introduction into the topic of magnetic resonance examination of myocardial diseases, which is followed by a detailed descrip-tion of the benefits of this imaging method in dilated cardiomyopathy and myocarditis,in hypertrophic cardio-myopathy, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.Key words: fibrosis - cardiomyopathy - magnetic resonance - myocarditis - late contrast agent saturation.

  4. Correlation between Clinical Features and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Lumbar Disc Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Thapa, S S; Lakhey, R B; Sharma, P; Pokhrel, R K

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is routinely done for diagnosis of lumbar disc prolapse. Many abnormalities of disc are observed even in asymptomatic patient.This study was conducted tocorrelate these abnormalities observed on Magnetic resonance imaging and clinical features of lumbar disc prolapse. A This prospective analytical study includes 57 cases of lumbar disc prolapse presenting to Department of Orthopedics, Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital from March 2011 to August 2012. All patientshad Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spine and the findings regarding type, level and position of lumbar disc prolapse, any neural canal or foraminal compromise was recorded. These imaging findings were then correlated with clinical signs and symptoms. Chi-square test was used to find out p-value for correlation between clinical features and Magnetic resonance imaging findings using SPSS 17.0. This study included 57 patients, with mean age 36.8 years. Of them 41(71.9%) patients had radicular leg pain along specific dermatome. Magnetic resonance imaging showed 104 lumbar disc prolapselevel. Disc prolapse at L4-L5 and L5-S1 level constituted 85.5%.Magnetic resonance imaging findings of neural foramina compromise and nerve root compression were fairly correlated withclinical findings of radicular pain and neurological deficit. Clinical features and Magnetic resonance imaging findings of lumbar discprolasehad faircorrelation, but all imaging abnormalities do not have a clinical significance.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques in medicine.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, E M; Radda, G K; Allen, P S

    1983-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are now finding exciting new noninvasive applications in medicine. There are two major approaches. The first is as an analytical technique using 31P NMR spectroscopy for the identification and quantitation of the more abundant phosphate metabolites in various tissues. Changes in the levels of these metabolites and in intracellular cytoplasmic pH can be followed in various ischemic and hypoxic conditions to monitor metabolic response to stress situations and to diagnose inborn errors of metabolism. The second major approach is an entirely different application of NMR techniques and uses 1H, the nucleus most abundant in biological tissues, largely in water and fats, to produce NMR images of any section of the body. By applying non-uniform magnetic fields across a section of the body, hydrogen nuclei in different elemental volumes in the section are tagged with different frequencies and their signals can be processed to give an image of the section. In contrast to computed tomographic scanning, NMR has particularly powerful application in the imaging of soft tissues.

  6. Safety planning for intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Maureen; Kilfoyle, Marguerite

    2013-11-01

    An intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suite (ie, a type of hybrid OR) is a high-risk zone that requires well-defined safety procedures to avoid adverse events related to magnetic forces. At one facility, the opening of an MRI suite necessitated the creation of a safety plan to establish guidelines, procedures, education, and nursing care specific to the use of MRI technology in the operative environment. Formation of a steering committee enabled a multidisciplinary approach to planning and implementation. The addition of two new perioperative nursing roles (ie, MRI control room monitor, MRI safety nurse) addressed staffing challenges related to strictly enforcing MRI safety procedures and delineating duties different from those of the RN circulator. Benefits of a safe approach to an MRI-integrated operative setting included the elimination of an entire surgical experience for patients who underwent additional resection of the tumor during their initial surgical procedure instead of postoperatively or during a subsequent return to the OR. Copyright © 2013 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Interpreting the behavior of a quarter-wave transmission line resonator in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gogna, G. S. Turner, M. M.; Karkari, S. K.

    2014-12-15

    The quarter wave resonator immersed in a strongly magnetized plasma displays two possible resonances occurring either below or above its resonance frequency in vacuum, f{sub o}. This fact was demonstrated in our recent articles [G. S. Gogna and S. K. Karkari, Appl. Phys. Lett. 96, 151503 (2010); S. K. Karkari, G. S. Gogna, D. Boilson, M. M. Turner, and A. Simonin, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 50(9), 903 (2010)], where the experiments were carried out over a limited range of magnetic fields at a constant electron density, n{sub e}. In this paper, we present the observation of dual resonances occurring over the frequency scan and find that n{sub e} calculated by considering the lower resonance frequency is 25%–30% smaller than that calculated using the upper resonance frequency with respect to f{sub o}. At a given magnetic field strength, the resonances tend to shift away from f{sub o} as the background density is increased. The lower resonance tends to saturate when its value approaches electron cyclotron frequency, f{sub ce}. Interpretation of these resonance conditions are revisited by examining the behavior of the resonance frequency response as a function of n{sub e}. A qualitative discussion is presented which highlights the practical application of the hairpin resonator for interpreting n{sub e} in a strongly magnetized plasma.

  8. Vulnerability to cavitation differs between current-year and older xylem: non-destructive observation with a compact magnetic resonance imaging system of two deciduous diffuse-porous species.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Kenji; Kawaguchi, Daichi; Aihara, Tomo; Ogasa, Mayumi Y; Miki, Naoko H; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Umebayashi, Toshihiro

    2015-12-01

    Development of xylem embolism during water stress in two diffuse-porous hardwoods, Katsura (Cercidiphyllum japonicum) and Japanese white birch (Betula platyphylla var. japonica), was observed non-destructively under a compact magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system in addition to conventional quantitation of hydraulic vulnerability to cavitation from excised stem segments. Distribution of white and dark areas in MR images corresponded well to the distribution of water-filled/embolized vessels observed by cryo-scanning electron microscopy in both species. Water-filled vessels were observed in MR images as white areas in Katsura and as white dots in Japanese white birch, respectively, and embolisms could be detected as a change to dark areas. The increase in the relative embolized area (REA: %) in the cross-sectional area of total xylem during water stress, which was estimated from the binarized MR images, was consistent with the hydraulic vulnerability curves of these species. From the non-destructive MRI observations, cavitation induced by water stress was shown to develop earlier in 1- or 2-year-old xylem than in the current-year xylem in both species; that is, the vulnerability to cavitation differs between vessels in the current-year xylem and those in older annual rings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Salameh, Najat; Sarracanie, Mathieu; Armstrong, Brandon D; Rosen, Matthew S; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a powerful technique to assess the mechanical properties of living tissue. However, it suffers from reduced sensitivity in regions with short T2 and T2 * such as in tissue with high concentrations of paramagnetic iron, or in regions surrounding implanted devices. In this work, we exploit the longer T2 * attainable at ultra-low magnetic fields in combination with Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enable rapid MRE at 0.0065 T. A 3D balanced steady-state free precession based MRE sequence with undersampling and fractional encoding was implemented on a 0.0065 T MRI scanner. A custom-built RF coil for DNP and a programmable vibration system for elastography were developed. Displacement fields and stiffness maps were reconstructed from data recorded in a polyvinyl alcohol gel phantom loaded with stable nitroxide radicals. A DNP enhancement of 25 was achieved during the MRE sequence, allowing the acquisition of 3D Overhauser-enhanced MRE (OMRE) images with (1.5 × 2.7 × 9) mm(3) resolution over eight temporal steps and 11 slices in 6 minutes. In conclusion, OMRE at ultra-low magnetic field can be used to detect mechanical waves over short acquisition times. This new modality shows promise to broaden the scope of conventional MRE applications, and may extend the utility of low-cost, portable MRI systems to detect elasticity changes in patients with implanted devices or iron overload. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Phantom Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) uses strong magnetic fields and radiofrequency pulses to produce images of proton locations and properties. Image contrast reflects relative density of excited water protons, differences in relaxation times of water protons due to surrounding structure, and the sequence of RF pulses used to excite the water protons. MRI can be used to quantitatively measure longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) spin relaxation times, measure tissue volumes, track motion of water molecules (flow/diffusion), measure temperature, assess susceptibility differences, create maps of tissue electrical properties, etc. This talk will focus on quantitative measurement of relaxation times, diffusion and electrical properties. Diffusion MRI varies the homogeneous magnetic field using an initial gradient, followed by a refocusing gradient with the same magnitude with opposite direction: protons begin to precess at different rates, depending on the applied gradient, and will disperse. The refocusing gradient cannot refocus spins that have moved between gradient pulses, and the apparent proton diffusion can be calculated from the signal attenuation. Typically, gradient pulses are applied in three orthogonal directions to calculate a bulk diffusion coefficient. Tissue electrical properties can be mapped by measuring the complex RF transmit and receive fields (B1 +, B1-). New methods estimate local electrical conductivity from in vivo B1 + phase measurements based on the homogeneous Helmholtz equation. Quantitative relaxation measurements, diffusion and electrical properties can distinguish healthy tissue from malignant tumor from benign tumor or identify the time of a particular event, e.g. a stroke. In this talk, I will describe how the NIST system, diffusion, and breast phantoms help validate these important measurements.

  11. Feshbach molecule formation through an oscillating magnetic field: subharmonic resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouard, S.; Plata, J.

    2015-03-01

    The conversion of ultracold atoms to molecules via a magnetic Feshbach resonance with a sinusoidal modulation of the field is studied. Different practical realizations of this method in Bose atomic gases are analyzed. Our model incorporates many-body effects through an effective reduction of the complete microscopic dynamics. Moreover, we simulate the experimental conditions corresponding to the preparation of the system as a thermal gas and as a condensate. Some of the experimental findings are clarified. The origin of the observed dependence of the production efficiency on the frequency, amplitude, and application time of the magnetic modulation is elucidated. Our results uncover also the role of the atomic density in the dynamics, specifically, in the observed saturation of the atom-molecule conversion process.

  12. Controlling interactions between highly magnetic atoms with Feshbach resonances.

    PubMed

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews current experimental and theoretical progress in the study of dipolar quantum gases of ground and meta-stable atoms with a large magnetic moment. We emphasize the anisotropic nature of Feshbach resonances due to coupling to fast-rotating resonant molecular states in ultracold s-wave collisions between magnetic atoms in external magnetic fields. The dramatic differences in the distribution of resonances of magnetic (7)S3 chromium and magnetic lanthanide atoms with a submerged 4f shell and non-zero electron angular momentum is analyzed. We focus on dysprosium and erbium as important experimental advances have been recently made to cool and create quantum-degenerate gases for these atoms. Finally, we describe progress in locating resonances in collisions of meta-stable magnetic atoms in electronic P-states with ground-state atoms, where an interplay between collisional anisotropies and spin-orbit coupling exists.

  13. Multipolar optically induced electric and magnetic resonances in the ellipsoidal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reena; Devi, Inder; Kalra, Yogita; Sinha, R. K.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, electric and magnetic resonances induced in the ellipsoidal dielectric nanoparticles in the optical range have been analyzed. Circular displacement currents excited inside the elliptical nano-particles by the incident light result in magnetic dipolar resonance in the dielectric nanoparticles. Kerker's type scattering is observed due to the mutual interference of electric and magnetic resonances. The effect on the resonance conditions with the variation in the relative permittivity from Er= 5 to Er= 20 of the ellipsoidal nanoparticle has been observed. It has been analyzed that peaks of electric and magnetic resonances come closer by decreasing the electric permittivity of the nanoparticle, which leads to the increase in the directionality in the forward direction, as verified using Generalized Kerker's condition. Further, far field scattering patterns have been obtained using the finite element method. Here, the electric and magnetic resonances have been optically induced up to quadrupolar modes. There is enhancement of the directionality in the forward direction when electric and magnetic resonances are in phase. Further, the effect of size of the linear array of ellipsoidal nanoparticles on the directionality has been analyzed. It has been observed that there is increase in the directivity by increasing the chain of the nanoparticles. Thus, the ellipsoidal nanoparticles can lead to the design of low loss and highly directional optical nanoantennas.

  14. Stacked-and-drawn metamaterials with magnetic resonances in the terahertz range.

    PubMed

    Tuniz, Alessandro; Lwin, Richard; Argyros, Alexander; Fleming, Simon C; Pogson, Elise M; Constable, Evan; Lewis, Roger A; Kuhlmey, Boris T

    2011-08-15

    We present a novel method for producing drawn metamaterials containing slotted metallic cylinder resonators, possessing strong magnetic resonances in the terahertz range. The resulting structures are either spooled to produce a 2-dimensional metamaterial monolayer, or stacked to produce three-dimensional multi-layered metamaterials. We experimentally investigate the effects of the resonator size and number of metamaterial layers on transmittance, observing magnetic resonances between 0.1 and 0.4 THz, in good agreement with simulations. Such fibers promise future applications in mass-produced stacked or woven metamaterials. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  15. Laboratory Observations of Whistler Wave Resonances*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amatucci, W. E.; Blackwell, D. D.; Tejero, E. M.; Cothran, C. D.; Rudakov, L.; Ganguli, G.; Walker, D. N.

    2010-12-01

    Standing whistler wave patterns have been investigated in the Naval Research Laboratory's Space Physics Simulation Chamber. In the original experimental configuration, partial reflection of the antenna-launched whistler waves from the chamber end boundaries occurs, setting up a combination of standing and traveling waves. By controlling the axial magnetic field strength profile, cyclotron absorption of the whistler waves can be induced before reflection occurs, leaving only the forward propagating waves. By comparing standing wave amplitudes to that when the wave is prevented from reflecting, cavity Q's in excess of 30 have been observed. Under uniform axial magnetic field conditions, the addition of planar conducting grids across the vacuum chamber cross-section at the ends of the plasma column provides improved reflecting surfaces and corresponding increases in the value of Q. *Work sponsored by the Office of Naval Research and DARPA.

  16. Observation of Wakefields and Resonances in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, B. E.; Bergstrom, J. C.; Baribeau, C.; Batten, T.; Dallin, L.; May, T. E.; Vogt, J. M.; Wurtz, W. A.; Warnock, R.; Bizzozero, D. A.; Kramer, S.

    2015-05-01

    We report on high resolution measurements of resonances in the spectrum of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). The resonances permeate the spectrum at wave number intervals of 0.074 cm-1 , and are highly stable under changes in the machine setup (energy, bucket filling pattern, CSR in bursting or continuous mode). Analogous resonances were predicted long ago in an idealized theory as eigenmodes of a smooth toroidal vacuum chamber driven by a bunched beam moving on a circular orbit. A corollary of peaks in the spectrum is the presence of pulses in the wakefield of the bunch at well-defined spatial intervals. Through experiments and further calculations we elucidate the resonance and wakefield mechanisms in the CLS vacuum chamber, which has a fluted form much different from a smooth torus. The wakefield is observed directly in the 30-110 GHz range by rf diodes, and indirectly by an interferometer in the THz range. The wake pulse sequence found by diodes is less regular than in the toroidal model, and depends on the point of observation, but is accounted for in a simulation of fields in the fluted chamber. Attention is paid to polarization of the observed fields, and possible coherence of fields produced in adjacent bending magnets. Low frequency wakefield production appears to be mainly local in a single bend, but multibend effects cannot be excluded entirely, and could play a role in high frequency resonances. New simulation techniques have been developed, which should be invaluable in further work.

  17. Observation of the Auger resonant Raman effect

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.S.; Chen, M.H.; Crasemann, B.; Ice, G.E.

    1980-11-01

    Monochromatized synchrotron radiation near the photoionization threshold was used to produce the (2p/sub 3/2/) vacancy state in atomic Xe. Deexcitation of the state through L/sub 3/-M/sub 4/M/sub 5/(/sup 1/G/sub 4/) Auger-electron emission was measured. The 5d spectator-electron Auger satellite was observed. The satellite energy exhibits linear dispersion. The observed width of the /sup 1/G diagram line decreases by approx. 40% when the exciting photon energy reaches the vicinity of the Xe L/sub 3/ binding energy. This radiationless process can thus be construed as the Auger analog of the x-ray resonant Raman effect. The /sup 1/G diagram line is shifted by -+3 eV due to post-collision interaction; this shift varies with excitation energy.

  18. Magnetism and nuclear magnetic resonance of hectorite and montmorillonite layered silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. M.; Hou, S.-S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2004-11-01

    The temperature and magnetic-field (H) dependencies of the bulk dc magnetization (M) and the M /H ratio of montmorillonite (MMT), hectorite (HCT), and synthetic mica-montmorillonite (SMMT) clays have been measured and compared with the signal intensity of H1 and Si29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. MMT exhibits Langevin paramagnetism with an effective magnetic moment of 5.5±0.1μB per Fe ion whereas SMMT has diamagnetic properties. At 300K, M /H of HCT measured in a magnetic field of H ⩽1kOe is larger than that of MMT, whereas in a field of 50kOe, the inverse situation is observed. The difference arises because the magnetization of HCT is dominated by a contribution from ferromagneticlike impurities. The H1 and Si29 NMR signals of MMT are broadened beyond detectability due to the paramagnetic effect. Although HCT contains ferromagneticlike components that result in a large M /H in low field, it yields H1 and Si29 NMR spectra with signal intensities similar to those of diamagnetic SMMT. Our data highlight that the quality of the NMR spectra is not related to the low-field magnetic susceptibility but to the bulk magnetization in the high magnetic field used for NMR.

  19. Spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance in arbitrarily magnetized thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklenar, Joseph

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) in non-magnetic metals can be used to generate spin-transfer-torque (STT), subsequently inducing ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in magnetic thin films; this experimental method is termed spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR). Most ST-FMR experiments that are reported have an applied magnetic field in the plane of the sample and the research focuses on material combinations that have large and efficient STT. The most common way ST-FMR signals are detected is through an anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) rectification process. In this work we will present ST-FMR results in thin films where the magnetization has both an in-plane and out-of-plane component. The arbitrary magnetization direction is achieved by tipping the applied magnetic field out of the sample plane. We find that when the material system is a permalloy/Pt bilayer, ST-FMR signals are not mirror-symmetric upon magnetic field reversal . This is because the combination of both a STT from the bulk SHE and the Oersted field-like torque from the device do not drive the dynamics in the same manner when the field is reversed. We interpret our results in the Py/Pt experiment by extending an already established ST-FMR lineshape model to describe the general case of arbitrarily magnetized films. We compare and contrast our Py/Pt experiment with another system we measured, a Py/MoS2 bilayer. For the Py/MoS2 system, in-plane experiments suggest that a large STT is present and are comparable to what is observed for the more traditional Py/Pt system . On the other hand, the out-of-plane experiment for the Py/MoS2 system is qualitatively very different from Py/Pt. Our results suggest that ST-FMR experiments for arbitrarily magnetized magnetic films are useful in characterizing STT generated from interface rather than bulk effects. Work at Northwestern was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division under grant

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of convection in laser-polarized xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Tseng, C. H.; Wong, G. P.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the flow and diffusion of laser-polarized xenon (129Xe) gas undergoing convection above evaporating laser-polarized liquid xenon. The large xenon NMR signal provided by the laser-polarization technique allows more rapid imaging than one can achieve with thermally polarized gas-liquid systems, permitting shorter time-scale events such as rapid gas flow and gas-liquid dynamics to be observed. Two-dimensional velocity-encoded imaging shows convective gas flow above the evaporating liquid xenon, and also permits the measurement of enhanced gas diffusion near regions of large velocity variation.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of convection in laser-polarized xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mair, R. W.; Tseng, C. H.; Wong, G. P.; Cory, D. G.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging of the flow and diffusion of laser-polarized xenon (129Xe) gas undergoing convection above evaporating laser-polarized liquid xenon. The large xenon NMR signal provided by the laser-polarization technique allows more rapid imaging than one can achieve with thermally polarized gas-liquid systems, permitting shorter time-scale events such as rapid gas flow and gas-liquid dynamics to be observed. Two-dimensional velocity-encoded imaging shows convective gas flow above the evaporating liquid xenon, and also permits the measurement of enhanced gas diffusion near regions of large velocity variation.

  2. Chiral discrimination in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lazzeretti, Paolo

    2017-08-08

    Chirality is a fundamental property of molecules whose spatial symmetry is characterized by the absence of improper rotations, making them not superimposable to their mirror image. Chiral molecules constitute the elementary building blocks of living species and one enantiomer is in general favoured (e.g., L-aminoacids and D-sugars pervade terrestrial homochiral biochemistry), because most chemical reactions producing natural substances are enantioselective. Since the effect of chiral chemicals and drugs on living beings can be markedly different between enantiomers, the quest for practical spectroscopical methods to scrutinize chirality is an issue of great importance and interest. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a topmost analytical technique, but spectrometers currently used are ``blind'' to chirality, i.e., %%In fact, spectrometers presently used in NMR are unable to discriminate the two mirror-image forms of a chiral molecule, because, in the absence of a chiral solvent, the spectral parameters, chemical shifts and spin-spin coupling constants, are identical for enantiomers. Therefore, the development of new procedures for routine chiral recognition would offer basic support to scientists. However, in the presence of magnetic fields, a distinction between {\\em true} and {\\em false} chirality is mandatory. The former epitomizes natural optical activity, which is rationalized by a time-even pseudoscalar, i.e., the trace of a second-rank tensor, the mixed electric dipole/mag\\-net\\-ic dipole polarizability. The Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism and magnetic optical activity are instead related to a time-odd axial vector. The present review summarizes recent theoretical and experimental efforts to discriminate enantiomers via NMR spectroscopy, with the focus on the deep connection between chirality

  3. Quantifying mixing using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Emilio J; McCarthy, Kathryn L; Bacca, Lori A; Hartt, William H; McCarthy, Michael J

    2012-01-25

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media (1, 2). The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile (1)H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  4. Quantifying Mixing using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tozzi, Emilio J.; McCarthy, Kathryn L.; Bacca, Lori A.; Hartt, William H.; McCarthy, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Mixing is a unit operation that combines two or more components into a homogeneous mixture. This work involves mixing two viscous liquid streams using an in-line static mixer. The mixer is a split-and-recombine design that employs shear and extensional flow to increase the interfacial contact between the components. A prototype split-and-recombine (SAR) mixer was constructed by aligning a series of thin laser-cut Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates held in place in a PVC pipe. Mixing in this device is illustrated in the photograph in Fig. 1. Red dye was added to a portion of the test fluid and used as the minor component being mixed into the major (undyed) component. At the inlet of the mixer, the injected layer of tracer fluid is split into two layers as it flows through the mixing section. On each subsequent mixing section, the number of horizontal layers is duplicated. Ultimately, the single stream of dye is uniformly dispersed throughout the cross section of the device. Using a non-Newtonian test fluid of 0.2% Carbopol and a doped tracer fluid of similar composition, mixing in the unit is visualized using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is a very powerful experimental probe of molecular chemical and physical environment as well as sample structure on the length scales from microns to centimeters. This sensitivity has resulted in broad application of these techniques to characterize physical, chemical and/or biological properties of materials ranging from humans to foods to porous media 1, 2. The equipment and conditions used here are suitable for imaging liquids containing substantial amounts of NMR mobile 1H such as ordinary water and organic liquids including oils. Traditionally MRI has utilized super conducting magnets which are not suitable for industrial environments and not portable within a laboratory (Fig. 2). Recent advances in magnet technology have permitted the construction of large volume industrially compatible magnets suitable for

  5. Magnetic Field Gradient Waveform Monitoring for Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hui

    Linear magnetic field gradients have played a central role in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) since Fourier Transform MRI was proposed three decades ago. Their primary function is to encode spatial information into MR signals. Magnetic field gradients are also used to sensitize the image contrast to coherent and/or incoherent motion, to selectively enhance an MR signal, and to minimize image artifacts. Modern MR imaging techniques increasingly rely on the implementation of complex gradient waveforms for the manipulation of spin dynamics. However, gradient system infidelities caused by eddy currents, gradient amplifier imperfections and group delays, often result in image artifacts and other errors (e.g., phase and intensity errors). This remains a critical problem for a wide range of MRI techniques on modern commercial systems, but is of particular concern for advanced MRI pulse sequences. Measuring the real magnetic field gradients, i.e., characterizing eddy currents, is critical to addressing and remedying this problem. Gradient measurement and eddy current calibration are therefore a general topic of importance to the science of MRI. The Magnetic Field Gradient Monitor (MFGM) idea was proposed and developed specifically to meet these challenges. The MFGM method is the heart of this thesis. MFGM methods permit a variety of magnetic field gradient problems to be investigated and systematically remedied. Eddy current effects associated with MR compatible metallic pressure vessels were analyzed, simulated, measured and corrected. The appropriate correction of eddy currents may enable most MR/MRI applications with metallic pressure vessels. Quantitative imaging (1D/2D) with model pressure vessels was successfully achieved by combining image reconstruction with MFGM determined gradient waveform behaviour. Other categories of MR applications with metallic vessels, including diffusion measurement and spin echo SPI T2 mapping, cannot be realized solely by MFGM guided

  6. Production of cold molecules via magnetically tunable Feshbach resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Thorsten; Goral, Krzysztof; Julienne, Paul S.

    2006-10-15

    Magnetically tunable Feshbach resonances were employed to associate cold diatomic molecules in a series of experiments involving both atomic Bose and two-spin-component Fermi gases. This review illustrates theoretical concepts of both the particular nature of the highly excited Feshbach molecules produced and the techniques for their association from unbound atom pairs. Coupled-channels theory provides a rigorous formulation of the microscopic physics of Feshbach resonances in cold gases. Concepts of dressed versus bare energy states, universal properties of Feshbach molecules, and the classification in terms of entrance- and closed-channel-dominated resonances are introduced on the basis of practical two-channel approaches. Their significance is illustrated for several experimental observations, such as binding energies and lifetimes with respect to collisional relaxation. Molecular association and dissociation are discussed in the context of techniques involving linear magnetic-field sweeps in cold Bose and Fermi gases and pulse sequences leading to Ramsey-type interference fringes. Their descriptions in terms of Landau-Zener, two-level mean-field, as well as beyond mean-field approaches are reviewed in detail, including the associated ranges of validity.

  7. 73Ge-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance/Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Investigation of Magnetic Properties of URhGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotegawa, Hisashi; Fukumoto, Kenta; Toyama, Toshihiro; Tou, Hideki; Harima, Hisatomo; Harada, Atsushi; Kitaoka, Yoshio; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Itoh, Kohei M.; Haller, Eugene E.

    2015-05-01

    We report on the 73Ge-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)/nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) results for the ferromagnetic (FM) superconductor URhGe. The magnitude and direction of the internal field, Hint, and the parameters of the electric field gradient at the Ge site were determined experimentally. By using powdered polycrystalline samples oriented by different methods, the field dependences of NMR shift and nuclear spin relaxation rates for H0 || c (easy axis) and H0 || b were obtained. From the NMR shifts for H0 || b, we confirmed a gradual suppression of the Curie temperature and observed a phase separation near the spin reorientation. The observation of the phase separation gives microscopic evidence that the spin reorientation under H0 || b is of first order at low temperatures. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 indicates that the magnetic fluctuations are suppressed for H0 || c, whereas the fluctuations remain strongly for H0 || b. The enhancements of both 1/T1T and the nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate 1/T2 for H0 || b toward the spin reorientation field suggest that the field-induced superconductivity in URhGe emerges under the magnetic fluctuations along the b- and c-axes.

  8. Oxidation-Responsive, EuII/III-Based, Multimodal Contrast Agent for Magnetic Resonance and Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We report, for the first time, a multimodal, oxidation-responsive contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging and photoacoustic imaging that uses the differences in the properties between Eu in the +2 and +3 oxidation states. The enhancement of contrast in T1-weighted magnetic resonance and photoacoustic imaging was observed in the +2 but not in the +3 oxidation state, and the complex is a known chemical exchange saturation transfer agent for magnetic resonance imaging in the +3 oxidation state. PMID:28393130

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance for cultural heritage.

    PubMed

    Brai, Maria; Camaiti, Mara; Casieri, Cinzia; De Luca, Francesco; Fantazzini, Paola

    2007-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) portable devices are now being used for nondestructive in situ analysis of water content, pore space structure and protective treatment performance in porous media in the field of cultural heritage. It is a standard procedure to invert T(1) and T(2) relaxation data of fully water-saturated samples to get "pore size" distributions, but the use of T(2) requires great caution. It is well known that dephasing effects due to water molecule diffusion in a magnetic field gradient can affect transverse relaxation data, even if the smallest experimentally available half echo time tau is used in Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill experiments. When a portable single-sided NMR apparatus is used, large field gradients due to the instrument, at the scale of the sample, are thought to be the dominant dephasing cause. In this paper, T(1) and T(2) (at different tau values) distributions were measured in natural (Lecce stone) and artificial (brick samples coming from the Greek-Roman Theatre of Taormina) porous media of interest for cultural heritage by a standard laboratory instrument and a portable device. While T(1) distributions do not show any appreciable effect from inhomogeneous fields, T(2) distributions can show strong effects, and a procedure is presented based on the dependence of 1/T(2) on tau to separate pore-scale gradient effects from sample-scale gradient effects. Unexpectedly, the gradient at the pore scale can be, in some cases, strong enough to make negligible the effects of gradients at the sample scale of the single-sided device.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in cardiac amyloidosis

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, J.K.; Go, R.T.; Bott-Silverman, C.; Feiglin, D.H.; Salcedo, E.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Primary amyloidosis (AL) involves the myocardium in 90% of cases and may present as apparent ischemia, vascular disease, or congestive heart failure. Two-dimensional echocardiography (echo) has proven useful in the diagnosis, particularly in differentiating AL from constrictive pericarditis. The findings of thickened RV and LV myocardium, normal LV cavity dimension, and a diffuse hyperrefractile ''granular sparkling'' appearance are virtually diagnostic. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may improve the resolution of anatomic changes seen in cardiac AL and has the potential to provide more specific information based on biochemical tissue alterations. In this preliminary study, the authors obtained both MR and echo images in six patients with AL and biopsy-proven myocardial involvement. 5/6 patients also had Tc-99 PYP myocardial studies including emission tomography (SPECT). MR studies utilized a 0.6 Tesla superconductive magnet. End diastolic gated images were obtained with TE=30msec and TR=R-R interval on the ECG. 6/6 pts. showed LV wall thickening which was concentric and included the septum. Papillary muscles were identified in all and were enlarged in 3/6. 4/6 pts. showed RV wall thickening but to a lesser degree than LV. Pericardial effusions were present in 4 cases. These findings correlated well with the results of echo although MR gave better RV free wall resolution. PYP scans were positive in 3 pts. but there was no correlation with degree of LV thickening. The authors conclude that there are no identifiable MR findings in patients with cardiac AL which encourage further attempts to characterize myocardial involvement by measurement of MR relaxation times in vivo.

  11. Ferromagnetic resonance in soft-magnetic metallic glass nanowire and microwire

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Koji S. Tsukimoto, Susumu; Chiba, Tomoaki; Shima, Toshiyuki; Yabukami, Shin; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko

    2014-11-17

    We report the magneto-impedance measurements in soft-magnetic Co{sub 36}Fe{sub 36}B{sub 19}Si{sub 5}Nb{sub 4} metallic glass nano/micro wires produced by gas atomization. The wire impedance varies with external magnetic fields and the impedance peak position depends on the frequency, indicating ferromagnetic resonance. The postulation of anisotropy directions in ferromagnetic resonance allows to the determination of magnetic anisotropies in the wire. By decreasing the wire diameter, the reduction of magnetic anisotropy is observed.

  12. Growing Region Segmentation Software (GRES) for quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of multiple sclerosis: intra- and inter-observer agreement variability: a comparison with manual contouring method.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Roberto C; Sardanelli, Francesco; Renzetti, Paolo; Rosso, Elisabetta; Losacco, Caterina; Ferrari, Alessandra; Levrero, Fabrizio; Pilot, Alberto; Inglese, Matilde; Mancardi, Giovanni L

    2002-04-01

    Lesion area measurement in multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the key points in evaluating the natural history and in monitoring the efficacy of treatments. This study was performed to check the intra- and inter-observer agreement variability of a locally developed Growing Region Segmentation Software (GRES), comparing them to those obtained using manual contouring (MC). From routine 1.5-T MRI study of clinically definite multiple sclerosis patients, 36 lesions seen on proton-density-weighted images (PDWI) and 36 enhancing lesion on Gd-DTPA-BMA-enhanced T1-weighted images (Gd-T1WI) were randomly chosen and were evaluated by three observers. The mean range of lesion size was 9.9-536.0 mm(2) on PDWI and 3.6-57.2 mm(2) on Gd-T1WI. The median intra- and inter-observer agreement were, respectively, 97.1 and 90.0% using GRES on PDWI, 81.0 and 70.0% using MC on PDWI, 88.8 and 80.0% using GRES on Gd-T1WI, and 85.8 and 70.0% using MC on Gd-T1WI. The intra- and inter-observer agreements were significantly greater for GRES compared with MC ( P<0.0001 and P=0.0023, respectively) for PDWI, while no difference was found between GRES an MC for Gd-T1WI. The intra-observer variability for GRES was significantly lower on both PDWI ( P=0.0001) and Gd-T1WI ( P=0.0067), whereas for MC the same result was found only for PDWI ( P=0.0147). These data indicate that GRES reduces both the intra- and the inter-observer variability in assessing the area of MS lesions on PDWI and may prove useful in multicentre studies.

  13. Electrically Detected Magnetic Resonance of Neutral Donors Interacting with a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C. C.; Lang, V.; George, R. E.; Morton, J. J. L.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Lyon, A.; Bokor, J.; Schenkel, T.

    2011-04-20

    We have measured the electrically detected magnetic resonance of donor-doped silicon field-effect transistors in resonant X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) microwave cavities. The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) resonance signal increases by two orders of magnitude from X- to W-band, while the donor resonance signals are enhanced by over one order of magnitude. Bolometric effects and spin-dependent scattering are inconsistent with the observations. We propose that polarization transfer from the donor to the 2DEG is the main mechanism giving rise to the spin resonance signals.

  14. Magnetic Nature of the 500 meV peak in La2−xSrxCuO4 Observed with Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering at the Cu K-edge

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.P.; Ellis, D.S.; Kim, J.; Wakimoto, S.; Birgeneau, R.J.; Shvyd’ko, Y.; Casa, D.; Gog, T.; Ishii, K.; Ikeuchi, K.; Paramekanti, A.; Kim, Y.-J.

    2010-02-15

    We present a comprehensive study of the temperature and doping dependence of the 500 meV peak observed at q = ({pi},0) in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments on La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. The intensity of this peak persists above the Neel temperature (T{sub N} = 320 K), but decreases gradually with increasing temperature, reaching zero at around T = 500 K. The peak energy decreases with temperature in close quantitative accord with the behavior of the two-magnon B{sub 1g} Raman peak in La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and, with suitable rescaling, agrees with the Raman peak shifts in EuBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6} and K{sub 2}NiF{sub 4}. The overall dispersion of this excitation in the Brillouin zone is found to be in agreement with theoretical calculations for a two-magnon excitation. Upon doping, the peak intensity decreases analogous to the Raman mode intensity and appears to track the doping dependence of the spin-correlation length. Taken together, these observations strongly suggest that the 500 meV mode is magnetic in character and is likely a two-magnon excitation.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Guneyli, Serkan; Ward, Emily; Thomas, Stephen; Yousuf, Ambereen Nehal; Trilisky, Igor; Peng, Yahui; Antic, Tatjana; Oto, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition in middle-aged and older men and negatively affects the quality of life. An ultrasound classification for BPH based on a previous pathologic classification was reported, and the types of BPH were classified according to different enlargement locations in the prostate. Afterwards, this classification was demonstrated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The classification of BPH is important, as patients with different types of BPH can have different symptoms and treatment options. BPH types on MRI are as follows: type 0, an equal to or less than 25 cm3 prostate showing little or no zonal enlargements; type 1, bilateral transition zone (TZ) enlargement; type 2, retrourethral enlargement; type 3, bilateral TZ and retrourethral enlargement; type 4, pedunculated enlargement; type 5, pedunculated with bilateral TZ and/or retrourethral enlargement; type 6, subtrigonal or ectopic enlargement; type 7, other combinations of enlargements. We retrospectively evaluated MRI images of BPH patients who were histologically diagnosed and presented the different types of BPH on MRI. MRI, with its advantage of multiplanar imaging and superior soft tissue contrast resolution, can be used in BPH patients for differentiation of BPH from prostate cancer, estimation of zonal and entire prostatic volumes, determination of the stromal/glandular ratio, detection of the enlargement locations, and classification of BPH types which may be potentially helpful in choosing the optimal treatment.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Guneyli, Serkan; Ward, Emily; Thomas, Stephen; Yousuf, Ambereen Nehal; Trilisky, Igor; Peng, Yahui; Antic, Tatjana; Oto, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition in middle-aged and older men and negatively affects the quality of life. An ultrasound classification for BPH based on a previous pathologic classification was reported, and the types of BPH were classified according to different enlargement locations in the prostate. Afterwards, this classification was demonstrated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The classification of BPH is important, as patients with different types of BPH can have different symptoms and treatment options. BPH types on MRI are as follows: type 0, an equal to or less than 25 cm3 prostate showing little or no zonal enlargements; type 1, bilateral transition zone (TZ) enlargement; type 2, retrourethral enlargement; type 3, bilateral TZ and retrourethral enlargement; type 4, pedunculated enlargement; type 5, pedunculated with bilateral TZ and/or retrourethral enlargement; type 6, subtrigonal or ectopic enlargement; type 7, other combinations of enlargements. We retrospectively evaluated MRI images of BPH patients who were histologically diagnosed and presented the different types of BPH on MRI. MRI, with its advantage of multiplanar imaging and superior soft tissue contrast resolution, can be used in BPH patients for differentiation of BPH from prostate cancer, estimation of zonal and entire prostatic volumes, determination of the stromal/glandular ratio, detection of the enlargement locations, and classification of BPH types which may be potentially helpful in choosing the optimal treatment. PMID:27015442

  17. Progesterone-Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Determination of progesterone receptor (PR) status in hormone-dependent diseases is essential in ascertaining disease prognosis and monitoring treatment response. The development of a noninvasive means of monitoring these processes would have significant impact on early detection, cost, repeated measurements, and personalized treatment options. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely recognized as a technique that can produce longitudinal studies, and PR-targeted MR probes may address a clinical problem by providing contrast enhancement that reports on PR status without biopsy. Commercially available MR contrast agents are typically delivered via intravenous injection, whereas steroids are administered subcutaneously. Whether the route of delivery is important for tissue accumulation of steroid-modified MRI contrast agents to PR-rich tissues is not known. To address this question, modification of the chemistry linking progesterone with the gadolinium chelate led to MR probes with increased water solubility and lower cellular toxicity and enabled administration through the blood. This attribute came at a cost through lower affinity for PR and decreased ability to cross the cell membrane, and ultimately it did not improve delivery of the PR-targeted MR probe to PR-rich tissues or tumors in vivo. Overall, these studies are important, as they demonstrate that targeted contrast agents require optimization of delivery and receptor binding of the steroid and the gadolinium chelate for optimal translation in vivo. PMID:25019183

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Méndez Fernández, R; Barrera Ortega, J

    Endometriosis is common in women of reproductive age; it can cause pelvic pain and infertility. It is important to diagnose endometriosis and to thoroughly evaluate its extension, especially when surgical treatment is being considered. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with careful examination technique and interpretation enables more accurate and complete diagnosis and staging than ultrasonography, especially in cases of deep pelvic endometriosis. Furthermore, MRI can identify implants in sites that can be difficult to access in endoscopic or laparoscopic explorations. In this article, we describe the appropriate MRI protocol for the study of pelvic endometriosis and the MRI signs of pelvic organ involvement. It is necessary to know the subtle findings and to look for them so we can ensure that they are not overlooked. We describe clinical grading systems for endometriosis and review the diagnostic efficacy of MRI in comparison with other imaging techniques and surgery. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Segmentation of neuroanatomy in magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Andrew; Arridge, Simon R.; Barker, G. J.; Tofts, Paul S.

    1992-06-01

    Segmentation in neurological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is necessary for feature extraction, volume measurement and for the three-dimensional display of neuroanatomy. Automated and semi-automated methods offer considerable advantages over manual methods because of their lack of subjectivity, their data reduction capabilities, and the time savings they give. We have used dual echo multi-slice spin-echo data sets which take advantage of the intrinsically multispectral nature of MRI. As a pre-processing step, a rf non-uniformity correction is applied and if the data is noisy the images are smoothed using a non-isotropic blurring method. Edge-based processing is used to identify the skin (the major outer contour) and the eyes. Edge-focusing has been used to significantly simplify edge images and thus allow simple postprocessing to pick out the brain contour in each slice of the data set. Edge- focusing is a technique which locates significant edges using a high degree of smoothing at a coarse level and tracks these edges to a fine level where the edges can be determined with high positional accuracy. Both 2-D and 3-D edge-detection methods have been compared. Once isolated, the brain is further processed to identify CSF, and, depending upon the MR pulse sequence used, the brain itself may be sub-divided into gray matter and white matter using semi-automatic contrast enhancement and clustering methods.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of musculoskeletal brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Bozgeyik, Zulkif; Aglamis, Serpil; Bozdag, Pinar Gundogan; Denk, Affan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of patients with musculoskeletal brucellosis. Sixty-eight among 304 patients with musculoskeletal brucellosis, aged 12-82 years (average, 50.2 years), were included in the study. Patients were diagnosed based on clinical findings, Brucella agglutination tests, and MRI findings. MRI was performed to all of the patients with sacroiliitis, spondylitis-spondylodiscitis, and peripheral arthritis. Brucella serum agglutination test was >1/160 in all cases and blood cultures were positive in twelve cases. The most commonly affected site was the spine (57.3%), wherein lumbar vertebrae were found to be most commonly affected. The second most common affected site was sacroiliac joint (26.4%), whereas peripheral joints were affected in 11 cases (16.1%). Brucellosis may affect various sites in musculoskeletal system. The spine was the most frequently affected site in our study. Sacroiliac joints and the other peripheral joints were less commonly involved sites. Brucellosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of a patient with arthralgia or symptoms of musculoskeletal system disorders especially in endemic areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging: importance of radiography.

    PubMed

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Hunter, Tim B; Fitzpatrick, Kimberly A; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Pope, Thomas L

    2003-07-01

    To determine the usefulness of radiography for interpretation of musculoskeletal (MSK) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. DESIGNS AND PATIENTS: In a 1-year period, 1,030 MSK MRI studies were performed in 1,002 patients in our institution. For each study, the interpreting radiologist completed a questionnaire regarding the availability and utility of radiographs, radiological reports and clinical information for the interpretation of the MRI study. Radiographs were essential, very important or added information in 61-75% of all MSK MRI cases. Radiographs were judged as essential for reading of MRI studies more often for trauma, infection/inflammation and tumors than for degenerative and miscellaneous/normal diagnoses (chi(2)=60.95, df=16, P<0.0001). The clinical information was rated as "essential" or "useful" significantly more often than not (chi(2)=93.07, df=16, P<0.0001). The clinical and MRI diagnoses were the same or partially concordant significantly more often for tumors than for trauma, infection/inflammation and degenerative conditions, while in the miscellaneous/normal group they were different in 64% of cases. When the diagnoses were different, there were more instances in which radiographs were not available. Radiographs are an important, and sometimes essential, initial complementary study for reading of MSK MRI examinations. It is highly recommended that radiographs are available when MSK MRI studies are interpreted.

  2. Adaptive fuzzy segmentation of magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Pham, D L; Prince, J L

    1999-09-01

    An algorithm is presented for the fuzzy segmentation of two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) multispectral magnetic resonance (MR) images that have been corrupted by intensity inhomogeneities, also known as shading artifacts. The algorithm is an extension of the 2-D adaptive fuzzy C-means algorithm (2-D AFCM) presented in previous work by the authors. This algorithm models the intensity inhomogeneities as a gain field that causes image intensities to smoothly and slowly vary through the image space. It iteratively adapts to the intensity inhomogeneities and is completely automated. In this paper, we fully generalize 2-D AFCM to three-dimensional (3-D) multispectral images. Because of the potential size of 3-D image data, we also describe a new faster multigrid-based algorithm for its implementation. We show, using simulated MR data, that 3-D AFCM yields lower error rates than both the standard fuzzy C-means (FCM) algorithm and two other competing methods, when segmenting corrupted images. Its efficacy is further demonstrated using real 3-D scalar and multispectral MR brain images.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Damon, Bruce M; Li, Ke; Bryant, Nathan D

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular diseases often exhibit a temporally varying, spatially heterogeneous, and multifaceted pathology. The goals of this chapter are to describe and evaluate the use of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods to characterize muscle pathology. The following criteria are used for this evaluation: objective measurement of continuously distributed variables; clear and well-understood relationship to the pathology of interest; sensitivity to improvement or worsening of clinical status; and the measurement properties of accuracy and precision. Two major classes of MRI methods meet all of these criteria: (1) MRI methods for measuring muscle contractile volume or cross-sectional area by combining structural MRI and quantitative fat-water MRI; and (2) an MRI method for characterizing the edema caused by inflammation, the measurement of the transverse relaxation time constant (T2). These methods are evaluated with respect to the four criteria listed above and examples from neuromuscular disorders are provided. Finally, these methods are summarized and synthesized and recommendations for additional quantitative MRI developments are made.

  4. Compression-sensitive magnetic resonance elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Sebastian; Beyer, Frauke; Guo, Jing; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Tzschaetzsch, Heiko; Braun, Juergen; Sack, Ingolf

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) quantifies the shear modulus of biological tissue to detect disease. Complementary to the shear elastic properties of tissue, the compression modulus may be a clinically useful biomarker because it is sensitive to tissue pressure and poromechanical interactions. In this work, we analyze the capability of MRE to measure volumetric strain and the dynamic bulk modulus (P-wave modulus) at a harmonic drive frequency commonly used in shear-wave-based MRE. Gel phantoms with various densities were created by introducing CO2-filled cavities to establish a compressible effective medium. The dependence of the effective medium's bulk modulus on phantom density was investigated via static compression tests, which confirmed theoretical predictions. The P-wave modulus of three compressible phantoms was calculated from volumetric strain measured by 3D wave-field MRE at 50 Hz drive frequency. The results demonstrate the MRE-derived volumetric strain and P-wave modulus to be sensitive to the compression properties of effective media. Since the reconstruction of the P-wave modulus requires third-order derivatives, noise remains critical, and P-wave moduli are systematically underestimated. Focusing on relative changes in the effective bulk modulus of tissue, compression-sensitive MRE may be useful for the noninvasive detection of diseases involving pathological pressure alterations such as hepatic hypertension or hydrocephalus.

  5. Vibration safety limits for magnetic resonance elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehman, E. C.; Rossman, P. J.; Kruse, S. A.; Sahakian, A. V.; Glaser, K. J.

    2008-02-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been demonstrated to have potential as a clinical tool for assessing the stiffness of tissue in vivo. An essential step in MRE is the generation of acoustic mechanical waves within a tissue via a coupled mechanical driver. Motivated by an increasing volume of human imaging trials using MRE, the objectives of this study were to audit the vibration amplitude of exposure for our IRB-approved human MRE studies, to compare these values to a conservative regulatory standard for vibrational exposure and to evaluate the applicability and implications of this standard for MRE. MRE displacement data were examined from 29 MRE exams, including the liver, brain, kidney, breast and skeletal muscle. Vibrational acceleration limits from a European Union directive limiting occupational exposure to whole-body and extremity vibrations (EU 2002/44/EC) were adjusted for time and frequency of exposure, converted to maximum displacement values and compared to the measured in vivo displacements. The results indicate that the vibrational amplitudes used in MRE studies are below the EU whole-body vibration limit, and the EU guidelines represent a useful standard that could be readily accepted by Institutional Review Boards to define standards for vibrational exposures for MRE studies in humans.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging structured reporting in infertility.

    PubMed

    Montoliu-Fornas, Guillermina; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Our objective was to define and propose a standardized magnetic resonance (MR) imaging structured report in patients with infertility to have clinical completeness on possible diagnosis and severity. Patients should be studied preferable on 3T equipment with a surface coil. Standard MR protocol should include high-resolution fast spin-echo T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted images and gradient-echo T1-weighted fat suppression images. The report should include ovaries (polycystic, endometrioma, tumor), oviduct (hydrosalpinx, hematosalpinx, pyosalpinx, peritubal anomalies), uterus (agenesia, hypoplasia, unicornuate, uterus didelphys, bicornuate, septate uterus), myometrium (leiomyomas, adenomyosis), endometrium (polyps, synechia, atrophy, neoplasia), cervix and vagina (isthmoceles, mucosal-parietal irregularity, stenosis, neoplasia), peritoneum (deep endometriosis), and urinary system-associated abnormalities. To be clinically useful, radiology reports must be structured, use standardized terminology, and convey actionable information. The structured report must comprise complete, comprehensive, and accurate information, allowing radiologists to continuously interact with patients and referring physicians to confirm that the information is used properly to affect the decision making process.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in glenohumeral instability

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Manisha; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2011-01-01

    The glenohumeral joint is the most commonly dislocated joint of the body and anterior instability is the most common type of shoulder instability. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and more recently, MR arthrography, have become the essential investigation modalities of glenohumeral instability, especially for pre-procedure evaluation before arthroscopic surgery. Injuries associated with glenohumeral instability are variable, and can involve the bones, the labor-ligamentous components, or the rotator cuff. Anterior instability is associated with injuries of the anterior labrum and the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament, in the form of Bankart lesion and its variants; whereas posterior instability is associated with reverse Bankart and reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. Multidirectional instability often has no labral pathology on imaging but shows specific osseous changes such as increased chondrolabral retroversion. This article reviews the relevant anatomy in brief, the MR imaging technique and the arthrographic technique, and describes the MR findings in each type of instability as well as common imaging pitfalls. PMID:22007285

  8. Wernicke encephalopathy with atypical magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liou, Kuang-Chung; Kuo, Shu-Fan; Chen, Lu-An

    2012-11-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a medical emergency caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Typical clinical manifestations are mental change, ataxia, and ocular abnormalities. Wernicke encephalopathy is an important differential diagnosis in all patients with acute mental change. However, the disorder is greatly underdiagnosed. Clinical suspicion, detailed history taking, and neurologic evaluations are important for early diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently considered the diagnostic method of choice. Typical MRI findings of WE are symmetrical involvement of medial thalamus, mammillary body, and periaqueductal gray matter. Prompt thiamine supplement is important in avoiding unfavorable outcomes. Here, we report a case of alcoholic WE with typical clinical presentation but with atypical MRI. Axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images showing symmetrical hyperintensity lesions in dentate nuclei of cerebellum, olivary bodies, and dorsal pons. Although atypical MRI findings are more common in nonalcoholic WE, it can also occur in alcoholic WE. This article is aimed to highlight the potential pitfalls in diagnosing acute mental change, the importance of clinical suspicion, and early treatment in WE.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging at ultrahigh fields.

    PubMed

    Ugurbil, Kamil

    2014-05-01

    Since the introduction of 4 T human systems in three academic laboratories circa 1990, rapid progress in imaging and spectroscopy studies in humans at 4 T and animal model systems at 9.4 T have led to the introduction of 7 T and higher magnetic fields for human investigation at about the turn of the century. Work conducted on these platforms has demonstrated the existence of significant advantages in SNR and biological information content at these ultrahigh fields, as well as the presence of numerous challenges. Primary difference from lower fields is the deviation from the near field regime; at the frequencies corresponding to hydrogen resonance conditions at ultrahigh fields, the RF is characterized by attenuated traveling waves in the human body, which leads to image nonuniformities for a given sample-coil configuration because of interferences. These nonuniformities were considered detrimental to the progress of imaging at high field strengths. However, they are advantageous for parallel imaging for signal reception and parallel transmission, two critical technologies that account, to a large extend, for the success of ultrahigh fields. With these technologies, and improvements in instrumentation and imaging methods, ultrahigh fields have provided unprecedented gains in imaging of brain function and anatomy, and started to make inroads into investigation of the human torso and extremities. As extensive as they are, these gains still constitute a prelude to what is to come given the increasingly larger effort committed to ultrahigh field research and development of ever better instrumentation and techniques.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Ultrahigh Fields

    PubMed Central

    Uğurbil, Kamil

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of 4 T human systems in three academic laboratories circa 1990, rapid progress in imaging and spectroscopy studies in humans at 4 T and animal model systems at 9.4 T have led to the introduction of 7 T and higher magnetic fields for human investigation at about the turn of the century. Work conducted on these platforms has demonstrated the existence of significant advantages in SNR and biological information content at these ultrahigh fields, as well as the presence of numerous challenges. Primary difference from lower fields is the deviation from the near field regime; at the frequencies corresponding to hydrogen resonance conditions at ultrahigh fields, the RF is characterized by attenuated traveling waves in the human body, which leads to image nonuniformities for a given sample-coil configuration because of interferences. These nonuniformities were considered detrimental to the progress of imaging at high field strengths. However, they are advantageous for parallel imaging for signal reception and parallel transmission, two critical technologies that account, to a large extend, for the success of ultrahigh fields. With these technologies, and improvements in instrumentation and imaging methods, ultra-high fields have provided unprecedented gains in imaging of brain function and anatomy, and started to make inroads into investigation of the human torso and extremities. As extensive as they are, these gains still constitute a prelude to what is to come given the increasingly larger effort committed to ultrahigh field research and development of ever better instrumentation and techniques. PMID:24686229

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: Endovascular interventional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, L. W.; Bakker, C. J. G.

    2003-07-01

    Minimally invasive interventional radiological procedures, such as balloon angioplasty, stent placement or coiling of aneurysms, play an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients suffering from vascular disease. The non-destructive nature of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), its ability to combine the acquisition of high quality anatomical images and functional information, such as blood flow velocities, perfusion and diffusion, together with its inherent three dimensionality and tomographic imaging capacities, have been advocated as advantages of using the MRI technique for guidance of endovascular radiological interventions. Within this light, endovascular interventional MRI has emerged as an interesting and promising new branch of interventional radiology. In this review article, the authors will give an overview of the most important issues related to this field. In this context, we will focus on the prerequisites for endovascular interventional MRI to come to maturity. In particular, the various approaches for device tracking that were proposed will be discussed and categorized. Furthermore, dedicated MRI systems, safety and compatibility issues and promising applications that could become clinical practice in the future will be discussed.

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in pericardial diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bogaert, Jan; Francone, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The pericardium and pericardial diseases in particular have received, in contrast to other topics in the field of cardiology, relatively limited interest. Today, despite improved knowledge of pathophysiology of pericardial diseases and the availability of a wide spectrum of diagnostic tools, the diagnostic challenge remains. Not only the clinical presentation may be atypical, mimicking other cardiac, pulmonary or pleural diseases; in developed countries a shift for instance in the epidemiology of constrictive pericarditis has been noted. Accurate decision making is crucial taking into account the significant morbidity and mortality caused by complicated pericardial diseases, and the potential benefit of therapeutic interventions. Imaging herein has an important role, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is definitely one of the most versatile modalities to study the pericardium. It fuses excellent anatomic detail and tissue characterization with accurate evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of the haemodynamic consequences of pericardial constraint on cardiac filling. This review focuses on the current state of knowledge how CMR can be used to study the most common pericardial diseases. PMID:19413898

  13. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in wet beriberi.

    PubMed

    Essa, Essa; Velez, Michael R; Smith, Sakima; Giri, Shivraman; Raman, Subha V; Gumina, Richard J

    2011-08-12

    The clinical presentation of beriberi can be quite varied. In the extreme form, profound cardiovascular involvement leads to circulatory collapse and death. This case report is of a 72 year-old male who was admitted to the Neurology inpatient ward with progressive bilateral lower extremity weakness and parasthesia. He subsequently developed pulmonary edema and high output cardiac failure requiring intubation and blood pressure support. With the constellation of peripheral neuropathy, encephalopathy, ophthalmoplegia, unexplained heart failure, and lactic acidosis, thiamine deficiency was suspected. He was empirically initiated on thiamine replacement therapy and his thiamine level pre-therapy was found to be 23 nmol/L (Normal: 80-150 nmol/L), consistent with the diagnosis of beriberi. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) showed severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction, markedly increased myocardial T2, and minimal late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). After 5 days of daily 100 mg IV thiamine and supportive care, the hypotension resolved and the patient was extubated and was released from the hospital 3 weeks later. Our case shows via CMR profound myocardial edema associated with wet beriberi.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of fetal developmental anomalies.

    PubMed

    Girard, Nadine J

    2011-02-01

    Fetal developmental anomalies consist of central nervous system malformations, brain injury, and tumors. Overlap is often seen especially between malformation and injury because malformation may be genetically determined or related to external causative agent, whereas brain injury may be, on one hand, caused by malformation as with intracranial vascular malformation and, on another, can cause brain malformation when cerebral insult occurs during organogenesis and histogenesis. The goal of this review was not to describe by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) all fetal developmental anomalies encountered in utero; it is most likely to focus on fetal brain anomalies that either are most commonly seen in fetal tertiary care facility or are extremely challenging for MRI. Consequently, the potential of advanced MR techniques such as proton MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging is also described especially when a challenge is highlighted. This review is therefore organized in subchapters as follows. The first section gives the place of MRI in prenatal development and cites the standard protocol and the advanced techniques. The rules of fetal brain MRI, the challenge and pitfalls, and the selection of MRI cases follow as 3 subchapters. Also, abnormalities are described as 3 separate subchapters entitled ventriculomegalies (hydrocephalus), malformations, and brain injury.

  15. Vibration safety limits for magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Ehman, E C; Rossman, P J; Kruse, S A; Sahakian, A V; Glaser, K J

    2008-02-21

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been demonstrated to have potential as a clinical tool for assessing the stiffness of tissue in vivo. An essential step in MRE is the generation of acoustic mechanical waves within a tissue via a coupled mechanical driver. Motivated by an increasing volume of human imaging trials using MRE, the objectives of this study were to audit the vibration amplitude of exposure for our IRB-approved human MRE studies, to compare these values to a conservative regulatory standard for vibrational exposure and to evaluate the applicability and implications of this standard for MRE. MRE displacement data were examined from 29 MRE exams, including the liver, brain, kidney, breast and skeletal muscle. Vibrational acceleration limits from a European Union directive limiting occupational exposure to whole-body and extremity vibrations (EU 2002/44/EC) were adjusted for time and frequency of exposure, converted to maximum displacement values and compared to the measured in vivo displacements. The results indicate that the vibrational amplitudes used in MRE studies are below the EU whole-body vibration limit, and the EU guidelines represent a useful standard that could be readily accepted by Institutional Review Boards to define standards for vibrational exposures for MRE studies in humans.

  16. Quantitative cardiovascular magnetic resonance for molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Winter, Patrick M; Caruthers, Shelton D; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2010-11-03

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) molecular imaging aims to identify and map the expression of important biomarkers on a cellular scale utilizing contrast agents that are specifically targeted to the biochemical signatures of disease and are capable of generating sufficient image contrast. In some cases, the contrast agents may be designed to carry a drug payload or to be sensitive to important physiological factors, such as pH, temperature or oxygenation. In this review, examples will be presented that utilize a number of different molecular imaging quantification techniques, including measuring signal changes, calculating the area of contrast enhancement, mapping relaxation time changes or direct detection of contrast agents through multi-nuclear imaging or spectroscopy. The clinical application of CMR molecular imaging could offer far reaching benefits to patient populations, including early detection of therapeutic response, localizing ruptured atherosclerotic plaques, stratifying patients based on biochemical disease markers, tissue-specific drug delivery, confirmation and quantification of end-organ drug uptake, and noninvasive monitoring of disease recurrence. Eventually, such agents may play a leading role in reducing the human burden of cardiovascular disease, by providing early diagnosis, noninvasive monitoring and effective therapy with reduced side effects.

  17. Magnetic resonance urography in pediatric urology.

    PubMed

    Cerwinka, Wolfgang H; Kirsch, Andrew J

    2010-07-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) has evolved into an effective imaging tool for the evaluation of the urinary tract in children. The goal of this article is to describe current techniques and applications of MRU and to review recent advances. MRU is most commonly applied to the evaluation of hydronephrosis and provides valuable insight into a wide range of obstructive uropathies. MRU was shown to be superior to renal scintigraphy for the diagnosis of pyelonephritis and renal scarring. The use of MRU for the assessment of urolithiasis, vesicoureteral reflux, renal trauma, and fetal urinary tract abnormalities is limited and technical refinements are required. Judicious use of gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients at risk for nephrogenic systemic fibrosis was recently shown to avoid new occurrences. Potential future applications include virtual endoscopy and MRU-guided procedures. MRU has the potential to revolutionize imaging of the urinary tract in children. It integrates exquisite anatomical information with a variety of functional data and avoids ionizing radiation. MRU is increasingly employed as a problem solver when conventional imaging studies remain inconclusive and its growing application will likely improve availability and cost in the future.

  18. Magnetic resonance urography in pediatric urology.

    PubMed

    Cerwinka, Wolfgang H; Damien Grattan-Smith, J; Kirsch, Andrew J

    2008-02-01

    Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) has emerged as a powerful diagnostic tool in the evaluation of the pediatric genitourinary tract. The purpose of this review is to familiarize the reader with the basic techniques, strengths and limitations, as well as the current and potential future applications of MRU in pediatric urology. MRU can provide detailed anatomical information and assess renal function and drainage in a single study. MRU does not employ ionizing radiation and may be utilized in patients with iodine-based contrast allergy or impaired renal function. MRU has been most often applied to the evaluation of hydronephrosis and provides valuable insight into a wide range of obstructive uropathies. MRU was shown to be superior to renal scintigraphy for the diagnosis of pyelonephritis and renal scarring. The use of MRU for the assessment of urolithiasis and vesicoureteral reflux is limited and technical refinements are required. Potential future applications include fetal MRU, virtual endoscopy, and MRU-guided procedures. The development of new contrast agents and new image-processing software will further enhance the diagnostic potential of MRU in pediatric urology. MRU is currently thought of as a problem-solving tool to define anatomy and function when conventional methods fall short. This technique is likely to emerge as the imaging modality of choice for children with complex genitourinary pathology.

  19. Magnetic resonance urography in pediatric urology.

    PubMed

    Wille, Sebastian; von Knobloch, Rolf; Klose, Klaus Jochen; Heidenreich, Axel; Hofmann, Rainer

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of magnetic resonance urography (MRU) in pediatric urology. We report retrospectively on 12 children who underwent MRU between January 1999 and November 2001. MRU was performed to accurately evaluate the entire urinary tract because of megaureter, ectopic ureter, vesicoureteral reflux, Y-inverted duplication and hydronephrosis because of pyeloureteral stenosis. T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained in the coronal, sagittal and axial planes. The mean age of the children (8 females, 4 males) investigated was 36 months (range 2-140 months). An accurate anatomical picture of the entire urinary tract could be obtained in all children. The obstructive nature of megaureter could be differentiated. The distal orifice of ectopic ureter could be identified in the vagina. Vesicoureteral reflux into the blind-ending ureteral bud of a duplicated system was accurately identified. Hydronephrosis was demonstrated to be the result of pyeloureteral stenosis. The location of stenoses was easily identified in the sagittal and coronal planes. MRU is an excellent imaging modality for accurately depicting the urinary tract. MRU is superior to conventional intravenous urography because it does not use ionizing radiation, the gadolinium contrast medium used is not nephrotoxic and the imaging quality is excellent, reproducible and not interfered with by gas superposition. Considering the high costs and diagnostic benefit of MRU compared to intravenous urography, MRU should be performed in patients with impaired renal function, in those with an allergy to contrast medium and if anatomic relationships are not clear prior to reconstructive surgery.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of navicular bursa adhesions.

    PubMed

    Holowinski, Maureen E; Solano, Mauricio; Maranda, Louise; García-López, José M

    2012-01-01

    Adhesions occur in the navicular bursa between the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT) and other structures. Our objectives were to describe the appearance of navicular bursa adhesions on high-field magnetic resonance (MR) images, to compare these findings to findings at navicular bursoscopy, and to determine the prevalence of lesions in the remainder of the podotrochlear apparatus. Sixteen forelimbs from 14 horses that underwent MR imaging and navicular bursoscopy were evaluated. Adhesions were considered type 1 when characterized by a discontinuity in the navicular bursa fluid signal between two structures, type 2 when the navicular bursa fluid signal was disrupted and ill-defined tissue was present between two structures, and type 3 when the fluid signal was disrupted and well-defined tissue was present between two structures. Twenty-six adhesions were suspected on MR images and nineteen were visualized at surgery. The positive predictive value was 50% for type 1 adhesions, 67% for type 2 adhesions, and 100% for type 3 adhesions. Additional lesions were detected in the navicular bursa in 15 limbs, the DDFT in 13, the navicular bone in 15, the collateral sesamoidean ligaments in 9, and the distal sesamoidean impar ligament in 8. A discontinuity in the navicular bursa fluid signal with well-defined tissue between two structures detected on high-field MR images is diagnostic for a navicular bursa adhesion. Additional lesions in the podotrochlear apparatus are common in horses with navicular bursa adhesions. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.