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Sample records for magnetic shields caracterizacion

  1. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  2. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  3. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  4. Charge shielding in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shaojie; Stroth, Ulrich; Van Oost, Guido

    2010-11-15

    The shielding of a charge sheet in a magnetized plasma is investigated by taking account of the diamagnetic drift start-up current in addition to the polarization current. For a charge sheet with an infinitesimal width, the shielding is the same as the conventional Debye shielding if the charge sheet is perpendicular to the magnetic field; the shielding length is {radical}(2) times larger than the conventional one if the charge sheet is parallel to the magnetic field. When the scale length of the charge sheet is comparable or smaller than the ion Larmor radius, the electric field is significantly enhanced within the charge sheet, while far away from the charge sheet, the electric field is shielded to the usual 1/{epsilon}{sub r} level (where {epsilon}{sub r} is the diamagnetic coefficient of the magnetized plasma).

  5. Accelerator magnet designs using superconducting magnetic shields

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.C.

    1990-10-01

    Superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles for existing accelerators have a coil surrounded by an iron shield. The shield limits the fringe field of the magnet while having minimal effect on the field shape and providing a small enhancement of the field strength. Shields using superconducting materials can be thinner and lighter and will not experience the potential of a large de-centering force. Boundary conditions for these materials, material properties, mechanical force considerations, cryostat considerations and some possible geometrical configurations for superconducting shields will be described. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Hybrid Shielding for Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, David; Royal, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Precision symmetry measurements such as the search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron require magnetic shielding rooms to reduce the ambient field to the pT scale. The massive mu-metal sheets and large separation between layers make these shield rooms bulky and expensive. Active field cancellation systems used to reduce the surrounding field are limited in uniformity of cancellation. A novel approach to reducing the space between shield layers and increasing the effectiveness of active cancellation is to combine the two systems into a hybrid system, with active and passive layers interspersed. We demonstrate this idea in a prototype with an active layer sandwiched between two passive layers of shielding.

  7. Magnetic shielding for superconducting RF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuzawa, M.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ueki, R.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic shielding is a key technology for superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. There are basically two approaches for shielding: (1) surround the cavity of interest with high permeability material and divert magnetic flux around it (passive shielding); and (2) create a magnetic field using coils that cancels the ambient magnetic field in the area of interest (active shielding). The choice of approach depends on the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field, residual magnetic field tolerance, shape of the magnetic shield, usage, cost, etc. However, passive shielding is more commonly used for superconducting RF cavities. The issue with passive shielding is that as the volume to be shielded increases, the size of the shielding material increases, thereby leading to cost increase. A recent trend is to place a magnetic shield in a cryogenic environment inside a cryostat, very close to the cavities, reducing the size and volume of the magnetic shield. In this case, the shielding effectiveness at cryogenic temperatures becomes important. We measured the permeabilities of various shielding materials at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (4 K) and studied shielding degradation at that cryogenic temperature.

  8. Demagnetization of magnetically shielded rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, F.; Schnabel, A.; Knappe-Grueneberg, S.; Stollfuss, D.; Burghoff, M.

    2007-03-15

    Magnetically shielded rooms for specific high resolution physiological measurements exploiting the magnetic field, e.g., of the brain (dc-magnetoencephalograpy), low-field NMR, or magnetic marker monitoring, need to be reproducibly demagnetized to achieve reliable measurement conditions. We propose a theoretical, experimental, and instrumental base whereupon the parameters which affect the quality of the demagnetization process are described and how they have to be handled. It is demonstrated how conventional demagnetization equipment could be improved to achieve reproducible conditions. The interrelations between the residual field and the variability at the end of the demagnetization process are explained on the basis of the physics of ferromagnetism and our theoretical predictions are evaluated experimentally.

  9. Active magnetic compensation composed of shielding panels.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Yamazaki, K; Sato, T; Haga, A; Okitsu, T; Muramatsu, K; Ueda, T; Kobayashi, K; Yoshizawa, M

    2004-11-30

    Magnetically shielded rooms (MSRs) with materials of high permeability and active shield systems have been used to shield magnetic noise for biomagnetic measurements up to now. However, these techniques have various disadvantages. Therefore, we have developed a new shielding system composed of shielding panels using an active compensation technique. In this study, we evaluated the shielding performance of several unit panels attached together. Numerical and experimental approaches indicated that the shielding factor of a cubic model composed of 24 panels was 17 for uniform fields, and 7 for disturbances due to car movement. Furthermore, the compensation space is larger than that of an ordinary active system using large coils rather than panels. Moreover, the new active compensation system has the important advantage that panels of any shape can be assembled for occasional use because the unit panels are small and light.

  10. SQUID holder with high magnetic shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, K. W.; Marek, D.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A SQUID holder designed for high magnetic shielding is discussed. It is shown how to estimate the attenuation of the magnetic field from the normal magnetic modes for an approximate geometry. The estimate agrees satisfactorily with the attenuation measured with a commercial RF SQUID installed in the holder. The holder attenuates external magnetic fields by more than 10 to the 9th at the SQUID input. With the SQUID input shorted, the response to external fields is 0.00001 Phi(0)/G.

  11. SQUID holder with high magnetic shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, K. W.; Marek, D.; Chui, T. C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A SQUID holder designed for high magnetic shielding is discussed. It is shown how to estimate the attenuation of the magnetic field from the normal magnetic modes for an approximate geometry. The estimate agrees satisfactorily with the attenuation measured with a commercial RF SQUID installed in the holder. The holder attenuates external magnetic fields by more than 10 to the 9th at the SQUID input. With the SQUID input shorted, the response to external fields is 0.00001 Phi(0)/G.

  12. Hysteresis prediction inside magnetic shields and application.

    PubMed

    Morić, Igor; De Graeve, Charles-Marie; Grosjean, Olivier; Laurent, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    We have developed a simple model that is able to describe and predict hysteresis behavior inside Mumetal magnetic shields, when the shields are submitted to ultra-low frequency (<0.01 Hz) magnetic perturbations with amplitudes lower than 60 μT. This predictive model has been implemented in a software to perform an active compensation system. With this compensation the attenuation of longitudinal magnetic fields is increased by two orders of magnitude. The system is now integrated in the cold atom space clock called PHARAO. The clock will fly onboard the International Space Station in the frame of the ACES space mission.

  13. Experimental realization of open magnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Chen, S.; Pang, T.; Qu, T.-M.

    2017-05-01

    The detection of extremely low magnetic fields has various applications in the area of fundamental research, medical diagnosis, and industry. Extracting the valuable signals from noises often requires magnetic shielding facilities. We demonstrated directly from Maxwell's equations that specifically designed superconductor coils can exactly shield the magnetic field to an extremely low value. We experimentally confirmed this effect in the frequency spectrum of 0.01-10 000 Hz and improved the electromagnetic environment in a hospital, a leading hospital in magnetocardiograph study in China.

  14. Hysteresis prediction inside magnetic shields and application

    SciTech Connect

    Morić, Igor; De Graeve, Charles-Marie; Grosjean, Olivier; Laurent, Philippe

    2014-07-15

    We have developed a simple model that is able to describe and predict hysteresis behavior inside Mumetal magnetic shields, when the shields are submitted to ultra-low frequency (<0.01 Hz) magnetic perturbations with amplitudes lower than 60 μT. This predictive model has been implemented in a software to perform an active compensation system. With this compensation the attenuation of longitudinal magnetic fields is increased by two orders of magnitude. The system is now integrated in the cold atom space clock called PHARAO. The clock will fly onboard the International Space Station in the frame of the ACES space mission.

  15. Undulator Beam Pipe Magnetic Shielding Effect Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Andrew; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2010-11-23

    The proposed stainless steel beampipe for the LCLS undulator has a measurable shielding effect on the magnetic field of the LCLS undulators. This note describes the tests used to determine the magnitude of the shielding effect, as well as deviations in the shielding effect caused by placing different phase shims in the undulator gap. The effect of the proposed Steel strongback which will be used to support the beam pipe, was also studied. A hall probe on a 3 axis movement system was set up to measure the main component of the magnetic field in the Prototype Undulator. To account for temperature variations of the magnetic field of the undulator for successive tests, a correction is applied which is described in this technical note. Using this method, we found the shielding effect, the amount which the field inside the gap was reduced due to the placement of the beampipe, to be {approx}10 Gauss. A series of tests was also performed to determine the effect of phase shims and X and Y correction shims on the shielding. The largest effect on shielding was found for the .3 mm phase shims. The effect of the .3 mm phase shims was to increase the shielding effect {approx}4 Gauss. The tolerance for the shielding effect of the phase shims is less than 1 gauss. The effect of the strongback was seen in its permanent magnetic field. It introduced a dipole field across the measured section of the undulator of {approx}3 gauss. This note documents the tests performed to determine these effects, as well as the results of those tests.

  16. Passive magnetic shielding in static gradient fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidinosti, C. P.; Martin, J. W.

    2014-04-01

    The effect of passive magnetic shielding on dc magnetic field gradients imposed by both external and internal sources is studied for two idealized shield models: concentric spherical and infinitely-long cylindrical shells of linear material. It is found that higher-order multipoles of an externally applied magnetic field are always shielded progressively better for either geometry by a factor related to the order of the multipole. In regard to the design of internal coil systems, we determine reaction factors for the general multipole field and provide examples of how one can take advantage of the coupling of the coils to the innermost shell to optimize the uniformity of the field. Furthermore, we provide formulae relevant to active magnetic compensation systems which attempt to stabilize the interior fields by sensing and cancelling the exterior fields close to the outermost shell. Overall this work provides a comprehensive framework that is useful for the analysis and optimization of dc magnetic shields, serving as a theoretical and conceptual design guide as well as a starting point and benchmark for finite-element analysis.

  17. Micromagnetics of side shielded perpendicular magnetic recording heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Kenichi; Liu, Yue; Liu, Kowang; Bai, Daniel Z.; Min, Tai; Wu, Yan; Dovek, Moris

    Micromagnetic models of side shielded perpendicular magnetic recording heads show detailed magnetization configuration of the trailing and side shield during the dynamic writing process. The calculation result indicates possible origins of three kinds. The leakage field at the side shield edge, the side shield saturation, and trailing and side shield domain switching. The side shield edge and the saturation induced fields are based on the geometric boundary and they are limited to just around the side shield edge. However the shield switching field can spread to far track position from the side shield to the trailing shield, and it originates from magnetic boundary of the domains and wall formed during the dynamic writing process. As a result, it produces bump field at far track positions in some trailing and side shields.

  18. A magnetic shield/dual purpose mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Seth; Albertelli, Jamil; Copeland, R. Braden; Correll, Eric; Dales, Chris; Davis, Dana; Davis, Nechole; Duck, Rob; Feaster, Sandi; Grant, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this work is to design, build, and fly a dual-purpose payload whose function is to produce a large volume, low intensity magnetic field and to test the concept of using such a magnetic field to protect manned spacecraft against particle radiation. An additional mission objective is to study the effect of this moving field on upper atmosphere plasmas. Both mission objectives appear to be capable of being tested using the same superconducting coil. The potential benefits of this magnetic shield concept apply directly to both earth-orbital and interplanetary missions. This payload would be a first step in assessing the true potential of large volume magnetic fields in the U.S. space program. Either converted launch systems or piggyback payload opportunities may be appropriate for this mission. The use of superconducting coils for magnetic shielding against solar flare radiation during manned interplanetary missions has long been contemplated and was considered in detail in the years preceding the Apollo mission. With the advent of new superconductors, it has now become realistic to reconsider this concept for a Mars mission. Even in near-earth orbits, large volume magnetic fields produced using conventional metallic superconductors allow novel plasma physics experiments to be contemplated. Both deployed field-coil and non-deployed field-coil shielding arrangements have been investigated, with the latter being most suitable for an initial test payload in a polar orbit.

  19. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, J.R.; Clem, J.R.

    1983-10-11

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped. 5 figs.

  20. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, J.R.

    1982-07-09

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

  1. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, John R.; Clem, John R.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

  2. Magnetic shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille M.; Reid, Clark; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    A superconducting RF cavity has to be shielded from magnetic fields present during cool down below the critical temperature to avoid freezing in the magnetic flux at localized impurities, thereby degrading the cavity intrinsic quality factor Q{sub 0}. The magnetic shielding designed for the Fermilab vertical cavity test facility (VCTF), a facility for CW RF vertical testing of bare ILC 1.3 GHz 9-cell SRF cavities, was recently completed. For the magnetic shielding design, we used two cylindrical layers: a room temperature 'outer' shield of Amumetal (80% Ni alloy), and a 2K 'inner' shield of Cryoperm 10. The magnetic and mechanical design of the magnetic shielding and measurement of the remanent magnetic field inside the shielding are described.

  3. Magnetic radiation shielding - An idea whose time has returned?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    One solution to the problem of shielding crew from particulate radiation in space is to use active electromagnetic shielding. Practical types of shield include the magnetic shield, in which a strong magnetic field diverts charged particles from the crew region, and the magnetic/electrostatic plasma shield, in which an electrostatic field shields the crew from positively charged particles, while a magnetic field confines electrons from the space plasma to provide charge neutrality. Advances in technology include high-strength composite materials, high-temperature superconductors, numerical computational solutions to particle transport in electromagnetic fields, and a technology base for construction and operation of large superconducting magnets. These advances make electromagnetic shielding a practical alternative for near-term future missions.

  4. Semicrystalline Polymer Composites for Magnetic Shielding Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadrakumari, S.; Predeep, P.

    2008-11-01

    To investigate a possible modification of mechanical strength of conventional ceramic superconductors for magnetic shielding and levitation applications, a series of flexible composites are fabricated by mixing high Tc YBCO superconductor with Linear Low Density Polyethylene (LLDPE). The structural investigation and magnetic studies of the composites are carried out by Raman Spectroscopy and A.C. Magnetic Susceptibility measurements. Raman spectra of pure YBCO sample and composite samples showed sharp bands, indicating the presence of characteristic structural units in the composites. The intensity of these bands is found to increase with increasing percentage of superconductor. The composites showed a large diamagnetic susceptibility that increases with increasing volume fraction of superconductor filler. Susceptibility measurements showed that the intrinsic diamagnetic properties of the superconducting materials are preserved in the composites and there is no change in the transition temperature of the superconductor.

  5. Magnetic shielding structure optimization design for wireless power transmission coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhongyu; Wang, Junhua; Long, Mengjiao; Huang, Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2017-09-01

    In order to improve the performance of the wireless power transmission (WPT) system, a novel design scheme with magnetic shielding structure on the WPT coil is presented in this paper. This new type of shielding structure has great advantages on magnetic flux leakage reduction and magnetic field concentration. On the basis of theoretical calculation of coil magnetic flux linkage and characteristic analysis as well as practical application feasibility consideration, a complete magnetic shielding structure was designed and the whole design procedure was represented in detail. The simulation results show that the coil with the designed shielding structure has the maximum energy transmission efficiency. Compared with the traditional shielding structure, the weight of the new design is significantly decreased by about 41%. Finally, according to the designed shielding structure, the corresponding experiment platform is built to verify the correctness and superiority of the proposed scheme.

  6. Magnetic Shield for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso C.; Haddad, Nicolas E.

    2013-01-01

    A new method was developed for creating a less expensive shield for ADRs using 1018 carbon steel. This shield has been designed to have similar performance to the expensive vanadium permendur shields, but the cost is 30 to 50% less. Also, these shields can be stocked in a variety of sizes, eliminating the need for special forgings, which also greatly reduces cost.

  7. MCG measurement in the environment of active magnetic shield.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, K; Kato, K; Kobayashi, K; Igarashi, A; Sato, T; Haga, A; Kasai, N

    2004-11-30

    MCG (Magnetocardiography) measurement by a SQUID gradiometer was attempted with only active magnetic shielding (active shielding). A three-axis-canceling-coil active shielding system, where three 16-10-16 turns-coil sets were put in the orthogonal directions, produces a homogeneous magnetic field in a considerable volume surrounding the center. Fluxgate sensors were used as the reference sensors of the system. The system can reduce environmental magnetic noise at low frequencies of less than a few Hz, at 50 Hz and at 150 Hz. Reducing such disturbances stabilizes biomagnetic measurement conditions for SQUIDs in the absence of magnetically shielded rooms (MSR). After filtering and averaging the measured MCG data by a first-order SQUID gradiometer with only the active shielding during the daytime, the QRS complex and T wave was clearly presented.

  8. Exploring Chemical Bonds through Variations in Magnetic Shielding.

    PubMed

    Karadakov, Peter B; Horner, Kate E

    2016-02-09

    Differences in nuclear isotropic magnetic shieldings give rise to the chemical shifts measured in NMR experiments. In contrast to existing NMR experimental techniques, quantum chemical methods are capable of calculating isotropic magnetic shieldings not just at nuclei, but also at any point in the space surrounding a molecule. Using s-trans-1,3-butadiene, ethane, ethene, and ethyne as examples, we show that the variations in isotropic magnetic shielding around a molecule, represented as isosurfaces and contour plots, provide an unexpectedly clear picture of chemical bonding, which is much more detailed than the traditional description in terms of the total electron density.

  9. High-Permeability Magnetic Polymer Additives for Lightweight Electromagnetic Shielding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    dopants in polymeric electromagnetic (EM) shielding materials. The research hypothesis was that ferromagnetic polymers can be realized via doping...structures of the general form MxLyClx+y. Such dopants can be introduced to polymeric materials either by entrapment inside the polymer matrix (physical...High-Permeability Magnetic Polymer Additives for Lightweight Electromagnetic Shielding by Kristen S Williams and B Christopher Rinderspacher

  10. Heavy-ion fusion final focus magnet shielding designs

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R

    2000-10-11

    At the Thirteenth International Symposium on Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion (HIF Symposium), we presented magnet shielding calculations for 72-, 128, 200, and 288-beam versions of the HYLIFE-II power plant design. In all cases, we found the radiation-limited lifetimes of the last set of final focusing magnets to be unacceptably short. Since that time, we have completed follow-on calculations to improve the lifetime of the 72-beam case. Using a self-consistent final focusing model, we vary parameters such as the shielding thicknesses and compositions, focusing length, angle-of-attack to the target, and the geometric representation of the flibe pocket, chamber, and blanket. By combining many of these shielding features, we are able to demonstrate a magnet shielding design that would enable the last set of final focusing magnets to survive for the lifetime of the power plant.

  11. Magnetic shielding tests for MFTF-B neutral beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J.; Fabyan, J.; Wood, R.; Koger, P.

    1983-11-16

    A test program to determine the effectiveness of various magnetic shielding designs for MFTF-B beamlines was established at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The proposed one-tenth-scale shielding-design models were tested in a uniform field produced by a Helmholtz coil pair. A similar technique was used for the MFTF source-injector assemblies, and the model test results were confirmed during the Technology Demonstration in 1982. The results of these tests on shielding designs for MFTF-B had an impact on the beamline design for MFTF-B. The iron-core magnet and finger assembly originally proposed were replaced by a simple, air-core, race-track-coil, bending magnet. Only the source injector needs to be magnetically shielded from the fields of approximately 400 gauss.

  12. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles; Chrul, Anna; Damianoglou, Dimitrios; Strychalski, Michał; Wright, Loren

    2014-01-29

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  13. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Chrul, Anna; Damianoglou, Dimitrios; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Strychalski, Michał; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles; Wright, Loren

    2014-01-01

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  14. Magnetic shielding of the cold atom space clock PHARAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moric, Igor; Laurent, Philippe; Chatard, Philippe; de Graeve, Charles-Marie; Thomin, Stephane; Christophe, Vincent; Grosjean, Olivier

    2014-09-01

    The space clock PHARAO is an atomic clock based on laser cooled cesium atoms. In order to attenuate magnetic field fluctuation in orbit, PHARAO clock uses three concentric Mumetal magnetic shields combined with several coils to improve the field homogeneity. We have characterized the attenuation and magnetic field homogeneity of the shields used to build the flight model. The average value of attenuation inside the three shields is around 18,000 when the external field is similar to the orbit field (30 μT) and the field homogeneity is lower than 10 nT. These values have not changed after vibrations and thermal tests for the space qualification. Permeability variation of the shields as a function of the intercepted flux has been analyzed.

  15. A novel self-shielding permanent-magnet rotor assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potenziani, E., II; Leupold, H. A.; Basarab, D. J.

    1988-11-01

    The use of permanent magnets in brushless motors and generators is highly desirable in that they have great potential for reducing weight and increasing efficiency. A self-shielding cylindrical permanent-magnet assembly has been designed and was found to produce high fields at the outer magnet surface and very little flux leakage into the interior rotor space. Construction of this assembly is simplified because it is composed of magnets of simple triangular cross sections, which have only four distinct orientations. The self-shielding nature of the design obviates any need for ferromagnetic material for flux shaping or shielding, thus simplifying greatly the mathematical analysis of the design and reducing its weight and bulk. Finite element methods are used to analyze a hypothetical permanent-magnet rotor assembly with regard to various design parameters.

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Shieldings of Stacked Aromatic and Antiaromatic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sundholm, Dage; Rauhalahti, Markus; Özcan, Nergiz; Mera-Adasme, Raúl; Kussmann, Jörg; Luenser, Arne; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2017-04-04

    Nuclear magnetic shieldings have been calculated at the density functional theory (DFT) level for stacks of benzene, hexadehydro[12]annulene, dodecadehydro[18]annulene, and hexabenzocoronene. The magnetic shieldings due to the ring currents in the adjacent molecules have been estimated by calculating nucleus independent molecular shieldings for the monomer in the atomic positions of neighbor molecules. The calculations show that the independent shielding model works reasonably well for the (1)H NMR shieldings of benzene and hexadehydro[12]annulene, whereas for the larger molecules and for the (13)C NMR shieldings the interaction between the molecules leads to shielding effects that are at least of the same size as the ring current contributions from the adjacent molecules. A better agreement is obtained when the nearest neighbors are also considered at full quantum mechanical (QM) level. The calculations suggest that the nearest solvent molecules must be included in the quantum mechanical system, at least when estimating solvent shifts at the molecular mechanics (MM) level. Current density calculations show that the stacking does not significantly affect the ring current strengths of the individual molecules, whereas the shape of the ring current for a single molecule differs from that of the stacked molecules.

  17. Magnetic shielding for a spaceborne adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Brent A.; Shirron, Peter J.; Castles, Stephen H.; Serlemitsos, Aristides T.

    1991-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center has studied magnetic shielding for an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Four types of shielding were studied: active coils, passive ferromagnetic shells, passive superconducting coils, and passive superconducting shells. The passive superconducting shells failed by allowing flux penetration. The other three methods were successful, singly or together. Experimental studies of passive ferromagnetic shielding are compared with calculations made using the Poisson Group of programs, distributed by the Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Agreement between calculation and experiment is good. The ferromagnetic material is a silicon iron alloy.

  18. Magnetic shielding for a spaceborne adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Brent A.; Shirron, Peter J.; Castles, Stephen H.; Serlemitsos, Aristides T.

    1991-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center has studied magnetic shielding for an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Four types of shielding were studied: active coils, passive ferromagnetic shells, passive superconducting coils, and passive superconducting shells. The passive superconducting shells failed by allowing flux penetration. The other three methods were successful, singly or together. Experimental studies of passive ferromagnetic shielding are compared with calculations made using the Poisson Group of programs, distributed by the Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Agreement between calculation and experiment is good. The ferromagnetic material is a silicon iron alloy.

  19. Superconducting and hybrid systems for magnetic field shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozzelino, L.; Gerbaldo, R.; Ghigo, G.; Laviano, F.; Truccato, M.; Agostino, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we investigate and compare the shielding properties of superconducting and hybrid superconducting/ferromagnetic systems, consisting of cylindrical cups with an aspect ratio of height/radius close to unity. First, we reproduced, by finite-element calculations, the induction magnetic field values measured along the symmetry axis in a superconducting (MgB2) and in a hybrid configuration (MgB2/Fe) as a function of the applied magnetic field and of the position. The calculations are carried out using the vector potential formalism, taking into account simultaneously the non-linear properties of both the superconducting and the ferromagnetic material. On the basis of the good agreement between the experimental and the computed data we apply the same model to study the influence of the geometric parameters of the ferromagnetic cup as well as of the thickness of the lateral gap between the two cups on the shielding properties of the superconducting cup. The results show that in the considered non-ideal geometry, where the edge effect in the flux penetration cannot be disregarded, the superconducting shield is always the most efficient solution at low magnetic fields. However, a partial recovery of the shielding capability of the hybrid configuration occurs if a mismatch in the open edges of the two cups is considered. In contrast, at high magnetic fields the hybrid configurations are always the most effective. In particular, the highest shielding factor was found for solutions with the ferromagnetic cup protruding over the superconducting one.

  20. Magnetic shielding and vacuum test for passive hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, D. U.; Wolf, S. A.; Jacoby, A. B.; Jones, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    Vibration tests on high permeability magnetic shields used in the SAO-NRL Advanced Development Model (ADM) hydrogen maser were made. Magnetic shielding factors were measured before and after vibration. Preliminary results indicate considerable (25%) degradation. Test results on the NRL designed vacuum pumping station for the ADM hydrogen maser are also discussed. This system employs sintered zirconium carbon getter pumps to pump hydrogen plus small ion pumps to pump the inert gases. In situ activation tests and pumping characteristics indicate that the system can meet design specifications.

  1. Active Magnetic Shielding for Long Duration Manned Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, R.; Burger, W. J.; Cavelli, V.; Musenich, R.; Datskov, V. I.; Della Torre, A.; Venditti, F.; Hovland, S.; Meinke, R. B.; Van Sciver, S.; Westover, S. C.; Spillantini, P.

    2013-09-01

    The radiation risk due to ionizing particles is a critical issue for long duration manned space missions. The ionization losses in the materials of the spacecraft provide passive shielding effectively stopping low energy particles. However, the estimates of the material required to obtain an acceptable level of radiation result in a prohibitive mass. Active electromagnetic shields, which deflect the charged particles, have been considered as an alternative solution. A study of active magnetic shielding based on high-temperature superconductors (HTS) was initiated in an ESA study, and continued in the context of the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) program. The aim of the effort was to provide a realistic evaluation of the possibilities based on the current technological level. The different configurations considered were assessed in terms of their technical feasibility and shielding efficiency.

  2. Magnetic Shielding Studies for Electric Dipole Moment Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Harvey; Feinberg, B.

    2014-09-01

    Electric dipole moment experiments are necessarily sensitive to magnetic fields and hence require effective magnetic shielding. In testing the shielding factor of single-layer Permalloy (Carpenter HyMu ``80'' ®) cylinders, we find time-dependent effects lasting tens of minutes to thousands of minutes when a static magnetic field is applied to a Permalloy cylinder that has been demagnetized in a region of near-zero field. A decrease in the magnetic field, measured at the center of the cylinder, of about 20 percent is observed for applied fields ranging from 0.5 A/m to 16 A/m. The latter applied field is comparable to the Earth's magnetic field. Effects that resemble these have been seen in other ferromagnetic materials.

  3. High frequency electromagnetic interference shielding magnetic polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingliang

    Electromagnetic interference is one of the most concerned pollution and problem right now since more and more electronic devices have been extensively utilized in our daily lives. Besides the interference, long time exposure to electromagnetic radiation may also result in severe damage to human body. In order to mitigate the undesirable part of the electromagnetic wave energy and maintain the long term sustainable development of our modern civilized society, new technology development based researches have been made to solve this problem. However, one of the major challenges facing to the electromagnetic interference shielding is the relatively low shielding efficiency and the high cost as well as the complicated shielding material manufacture. From the materials science point of view, the key solutions to these challenges are strongly depended on the breakthrough of the current limit of shielding material design and manufacture (such as hierarchical material design with controllable and predictable arrangement in nanoscale particle configuration via an easy in-situ manner). From the chemical engineering point of view, the upgrading of advanced material shielding performance and the enlarged production scale for shielding materials (for example, configure the effective components in the shielding material in order to lower their usage, eliminate the "rate-limiting" step to enlarge the production scale) are of great importance. In this dissertation, the design and preparation of morphology controlled magnetic nanoparticles and their reinforced polypropylene polymer nanocomposites will be covered first. Then, the functionalities of these polymer nanocomposites will be demonstrated. Based on the innovative materials design and synergistic effect on the performance advancement, the magnetic polypropylene polymer nanocomposites with desired multifunctionalities are designed and produced targeting to the electromagnetic interference shielding application. In addition

  4. Conducting wall Hall thrusters in magnetic shielding and standard configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaud, Lou; Mazouffre, Stéphane

    2017-07-01

    Traditional Hall thrusters are fitted with boron nitride dielectric discharge channels that confine the plasma discharge. Wall properties have significant effects on the performances and stability of the thrusters. In magnetically shielded thrusters, interactions between the plasma and the walls are greatly reduced, and the potential drop responsible for ion acceleration is situated outside the channel. This opens the way to the utilization of alternative materials for the discharge channel. In this work, graphite walls are compared to BN-SiO2 walls in the 200 W magnetically shielded ISCT200-MS and the unshielded ISCT200-US Hall thrusters. The magnetically shielded thruster shows no significant change in the discharge current mean value and oscillations, while the unshielded thruster's discharge current increases by 25% and becomes noticeably less stable. The electric field profile is also investigated through laser spectroscopy, and no significant difference is recorded between the ceramic and graphite cases for the shielded thruster. The unshielded thruster, on the other hand, has its acceleration region shifted 15% of the channel length downstream. Lastly, the plume profile is measured with planar probes fitted with guard rings. Once again the material wall has little influence on the plume characteristics in the shielded thruster, while the unshielded one is significantly affected.

  5. Test Bench for Coupling and Shielding Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, J.; Esteve, V.; Dede, E.; Sanchis, E.; Maset, E.; Ferreres, A.; Ejea, J. B.; Cases, C.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a test bench for training purposes, which uses a magnetic field generator to couple this magnetic field to a victim circuit. It can be very useful to test for magnetic susceptibility as well. The magnetic field generator consists of a board, which generates a variable current that flows into a printed circuit board with spiral tracks (noise generator). The victim circuit consists of a coaxial cable concentric with the spiral tracks and its generated magnetic field. The coaxial cable is part of a circuit which conducts a signal produced by a signal generator and a resistive load. In the paper three cases are studied. First, the transmitted signal from the signal generator uses the central conductor of the coaxial cable and the shield is floating. Second, the shield is short circuited at its ends (and thus forming a loop). Third, when connecting the shield in series with the inner conductor and therefore having the current flowing into the coax via the inner conductor and returning via the shield.

  6. Calculation of an optimized design of magnetic shields with integrated demagnetization coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Schnabel, A.; Burghoff, M.; Li, L.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic shielding made from permalloy is frequently used to provide a time-stable magnetic field environment. A low magnetic field and low field gradients inside the shield can be obtained by using demagnetization coils through the walls, encircling edges of the shield. We first introduce and test the computational models to calculate magnetic properties of large size shields with thin shielding walls. We then vary the size, location and shape of the openings for the demagnetization coils at the corners of a cubic shield. It turns out that the effect on the shielding factor and the expected influence on the residual magnetic field homogeneity in the vicinity of the center of the shield is negligible. Thus, a low-cost version for the openings can be chosen and their size could be enlarged to allow for additional cables and easier handling. A construction of a shield with beveled edges and open corners turned out to substantially improve the shielding factor.

  7. Induced Magnetic Field Due to Reaction Wheel Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudney, M. A.; Kapfunde, G.; Trougnou, L.

    2016-05-01

    In situ magnetic field measurements are of critical importance to unanswered questions on the inner heliosphere, such as: how the corona and solar wind are accelerated and heated; how the solar magnetic field evolves over a solar cycle; and how this field links into space. However, accurate spacecraft magnetometer measurements require reliable in-flight calibration. The magnetic interference caused by reaction wheels on magnetometer measurements in space is well known, and a common mitigation method is to use magnetic shielding. However, the presence of high-permeability material in-flight has the side-effect of distorting the true ambient field. We present a theoretical analysis of this distortion, and suggest a transfer function that can be used to recover the ambient field from the distorted dataset. Experimental measurements on a shield prototype for the Solar Orbiter mission agree with predictions to within an order of magnitude, demonstrating a distortion of approximately 1 part in 104.

  8. Active magnetic radiation shielding system analysis and key technologies.

    PubMed

    Washburn, S A; Blattnig, S R; Singleterry, R C; Westover, S C

    2015-01-01

    Many active magnetic shielding designs have been proposed in order to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on long duration, deep space missions. While these designs are promising, they pose significant engineering challenges. This work presents a survey of the major systems required for such unconfined magnetic field design, allowing the identification of key technologies for future development. Basic mass calculations are developed for each system and are used to determine the resulting galactic cosmic radiation exposure for a generic solenoid design, using a range of magnetic field strength and thickness values, allowing some of the basic characteristics of such a design to be observed. This study focuses on a solenoid shaped, active magnetic shield design; however, many of the principles discussed are applicable regardless of the exact design configuration, particularly the key technologies cited. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). All rights reserved.

  9. QED theory of the nuclear magnetic shielding in hydrogenlike ions.

    PubMed

    Yerokhin, V A; Pachucki, K; Harman, Z; Keitel, C H

    2011-07-22

    The shielding of the nuclear magnetic moment by the bound electron in hydrogenlike ions is calculated ab initio with inclusion of relativistic, nuclear, and quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects. The QED correction is evaluated to all orders in the nuclear binding strength parameter and, independently, to the first order in the expansion in this parameter. The results obtained lay the basis for the high-precision determination of nuclear magnetic dipole moments from measurements of the g factor of hydrogenlike ions.

  10. Method for expanding the uniformly shielded area in a short-length open-ended cylindrical magnetic shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshita, K.; Sasada, I.; Naka, H.; Paperno, E.

    1999-04-01

    A compensation method is proposed by which the uniformly shielded area of the axial magnetic field in a relatively short, open-structure axial magnetic shield can be extended. An open-ended cylindrical magnetic shield of 120 cm in length, 52 cm inner diameter, and a ˜0.5 mm total thickness of the shielding material is used to demonstrate the idea. The shield axis is oriented along the horizontal component (˜320 mG) of the Earth's magnetic field. A simple way to increase the axial shielding factor is to use a pair of compensating coaxial ring coils set at both open ends of the shield. This increases, however, the radial gradient of the shielded field since the axial compensation field is stronger towards the shield axis. In order to decrease the radial gradient, an additional ring coil is wound around the middle part of the outer surface of the shield. The compensating field generated by this central ring coil is stronger towards the inner surface of the shield, and it helps, therefore, to unify the axial resultant field over a wider area inside the shield. The axial shielding factor obtained with this compensation according to the proposed method is 128, in contrast to only 16.4 obtained with compensation by a set of two ring coils. The field gradients observed are 1.2 μG/cm along the length direction and 2.7 μG/cm along the radial direction, in contrast to the 14 μG/cm axial and 78 μG/cm radial gradients obtained with compensation by a set of two ring coils.

  11. Neutral shielding and cloaking of magnetic fields using isotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, Lars; Järrendahl, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    A method for designing magnetic shields that do not perturb applied multipole fields in the static regime is developed. Cylindrical core-shell structures with two layers characterized by homogeneous isotropic permeabilities are found to support neutral shielding of multipole fields and unique cloaking solutions of arbitrary multipole order. An extra degree of freedom is provided by every layer added to the structure which may be exploited with an effective design formula for cloaking of additional field terms. The theory is illustrated with numerical simulations.

  12. Concerning superconducting inertial guidance gyroscopes inside superconducting magnetic shields

    SciTech Connect

    Satterthwaite, J.C.; Gawlinski, E.T.

    1997-12-01

    Superconductors can in theory be used to detect rotation by Josephson interference or by detection of the London field, a magnetic induction that fills the interior of any rotating bulk superconductor. One might hope to use these properties of superconductors to build a practical inertial guidance gyroscope. A problem arises from the necessity of surrounding the device with superconducting magnetic shielding: the London field generated by a co-rotating shield eliminates the response of the superconducting device within the shield. The present article demonstrates this point more rigorously than has been done before, discussing solutions of Ampere`s law for rotating and nonrotating superconductors and paying careful attention to boundary conditions. Beginning with a supercurrent density derivable from either the Ginzburg-Landau or the London theory of superconductivity, the article shows: (1) that a superconducting device cannot distinguish between rotation and an applied magnetic field; (2) that a superconducting device surrounded by a co-rotating superconducting shield cannot detect rotation. The term `superconducting gyroscope` in this article refers only to a device whose working principle is the response of the superconductor itself to rotation, not to any device in which superconducting electronic components are used to detect some other effect. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Dynamic modeling of the behavior of permalloy for magnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Reisner, M.; Fierlinger, P.; Schnabel, A.; Stuiber, S.; Li, L.

    2016-05-01

    The minimization of the remanent magnetization of ferromagnetic materials is a prerequisite for a reproducible low magnetic field inside shields. To realistically describe this so-called magnetic equilibration procedure, this paper proposes two approaches for the calculation of time- and space-dependent fields in the presence of ferromagnetic materials like permalloy. The first method is based on the Jiles-Atherton model and also takes into account frequency dependent effects. The second method is the newly developed empirical phase shift model, tailored specially for the simulation of the equilibration procedure. Both approaches are compared to experimental tests and show good quantitative agreement.

  14. Mode Transitions in Magnetically Shielded Hall Effect Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Hofer, Richard R.; Jorns, Benjamin A.; Polk, James E.

    2014-01-01

    A mode transition study is conducted in magnetically shielded thrusters where the magnetic field magnitude is varied to induce mode transitions. Three different oscillatory modes are identified with the 20-kW NASA-300MS-2 and the 6-kW H6MS: Mode 1) global mode similar to unshielded thrusters at low magnetic fields, Mode 2) cathode oscillations at nominal magnetic fields, and Mode 3) combined spoke, cathode and breathing mode oscillations at high magnetic fields. Mode 1 exhibits large amplitude, low frequency (1-10 kHz), breathing mode type oscillations where discharge current mean value and oscillation amplitude peak. The mean discharge current is minimized while thrust-to-power and anode efficiency are maximized in Mode 2, where higher frequency (50-90 kHz), low amplitude, cathode oscillations dominate. Thrust is maximized in Mode 3 and decreases by 5-6% with decreasing magnetic field strength. The presence or absence of spokes and strong cathode oscillations do not affect each other or discharge current. Similar to unshielded thrusters, mode transitions and plasma oscillations affect magnetically shielded thruster performance and should be characterized during system development.

  15. Electrically shielded enclosure with magnetically retained removable cover

    DOEpatents

    Rivers, Craig J.; Lee, Roanne A.; Jones, Glenn E.

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is an electrically shielded enclosure having electrical components therein and a removable electrically shielded cover over an opening in the enclosure with a magnetic securement mechanism provided to removably secure the cover to the enclosure in a manner which will provide easy access, yet also provide an electrical seal between the cover and the enclosure capable of preventing the passage of electrical radiation through the joint between the cover and the enclosure. Magnets are provided on the enclosure peripherally around the opening and facing the cover, and a ferromagnetic surface is provided on the mating surface of the cover facing the magnets, with a continuous electrical seal provided between the magnets and the ferromagnetic surface on the cover to prevent the leakage of electromagnetic radiation therethrough. In one embodiment the electrical seal includes a flexible metal casing or surface, which is attached to the enclosure and positioned between the magnets and the ferromagnetic surface on the cover, and which is sufficiently flexible to be capable of conforming to the ferromagnetic surface to provide an electrical seal between the cover and the enclosure. In another embodiment, the electrical seal includes a metal mesh associated with the enclosure and positioned between the magnets on the enclosure and the ferromagnetic surface on the cover. The metal mesh is also capable of conforming to the surface of the ferromagnetic surface to thereby provide an electrical seal between the cover and the enclosure.

  16. Sensitivity of fields generated within magnetically shielded volumes to changes in magnetic permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andalib, T.; Martin, J. W.; Bidinosti, C. P.; Mammei, R. R.; Jamieson, B.; Lang, M.; Kikawa, T.

    2017-09-01

    Future experiments seeking to measure the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) require stable and homogeneous magnetic fields. Normally these experiments use a coil internal to a passively magnetically shielded volume to generate the magnetic field. The stability of the magnetic field generated by the coil within the magnetically shielded volume may be influenced by a number of factors. The factor studied here is the dependence of the internally generated field on the magnetic permeability μ of the shield material. We provide measurements of the temperature-dependence of the permeability of the material used in a set of prototype magnetic shields, using experimental parameters nearer to those of nEDM experiments than previously reported in the literature. Our measurements imply a range of 1/μ dμ/dT from 0-2.7%/K. Assuming typical nEDM experiment coil and shield parameters gives μ/B0 dB0/dμ = 0 . 01, resulting in a temperature dependence of the magnetic field in a typical nEDM experiment of dB0/dT = 0 - 270 pT/K for B0 = 1 μT. The results are useful for estimating the necessary level of temperature control in nEDM experiments.

  17. Magnetic shielding of Hall thrusters at high discharge voltages

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Ioannis G. Hofer, Richard R.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.

    2014-08-07

    A series of numerical simulations and experiments have been performed to assess the effectiveness of magnetic shielding in a Hall thruster operating in the discharge voltage range of 300–700 V (I{sub sp} ≈ 2000–2700 s) at 6 kW, and 800 V (I{sub sp} ≈ 3000) at 9 kW. At 6 kW, the magnetic field topology with which highly effective magnetic shielding was previously demonstrated at 300 V has been retained for all other discharge voltages; only the magnitude of the field has been changed to achieve optimum thruster performance. It is found that magnetic shielding remains highly effective for all discharge voltages studied. This is because the channel is long enough to allow hot electrons near the channel exit to cool significantly upon reaching the anode. Thus, despite the rise of the maximum electron temperature in the channel with discharge voltage, the electrons along the grazing lines of force remain cold enough to eliminate or reduce significantly parallel gradients of the plasma potential near the walls. Computed maximum erosion rates in the range of 300–700 V are found not to exceed 10{sup −2} mm/kh. Such rates are ∼3 orders of magnitude less than those observed in the unshielded version of the same thruster at 300 V. At 9 kW and 800 V, saturation of the magnetic circuit did not allow for precisely the same magnetic shielding topology as that employed during the 6-kW operation since this thruster was not designed to operate at this condition. Consequently, the maximum erosion rate at the inner wall is found to be ∼1 order of magnitude higher (∼10{sup −1} mm/kh) than that at 6 kW. At the outer wall, the ion energy is found to be below the sputtering yield threshold so no measurable erosion is expected.

  18. Anisotropic Pressure, Transport, and Shielding of Magnetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick and A.H. Boozer

    2008-05-23

    We compute the effect on a tokamak of applying a nonaxisymmetric magnetic perturbation δΒ. An equilibrium with scalar pressure p yields zero net radial current, and therefore zero torque. Thus, the usual approach, which assumes scalar pressure, is not self-consistent, and masks the close connection which exists between that radial current and the in-surface currents, which provide shielding or amplification of δΒ. Here, we analytically compute the pressure anisoptropy, anisoptropy, pll, p⊥ ≠ p, and from this, both the radial and in-surface currents. The surface-average of the radial current recovers earlier expressions for ripple transport, while the in-surface currents provide an expression for the amount of self-consistent shielding the plasma provides.

  19. Magnetic shielding of interplanetary spacecraft against solar flare radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, Franklin H.; Watkins, Seth

    1993-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this work is to design, build, and fly a dual-purpose, piggyback payload whose function is to produce a large volume, low intensity magnetic field and to test the concept of using such a magnetic field (1) to protect spacecraft against solar flare protons, (2) to produce a thrust of sufficient magnitude to stabilize low satellite orbits against orbital decay from atmospheric drag, and (3) to test the magsail concept. These all appear to be capable of being tested using the same deployed high temperature superconducting coil. In certain orbits, high temperature superconducting wire, which has now been developed to the point where silver-sheathed high T sub c wires one mm in diameter are commercially available, can be used to produce the magnetic moments required for shielding without requiring any mechanical cooling system. The potential benefits of this concept apply directly to both earth-orbital and interplanetary missions. The usefulness of a protective shield for manned missions needs scarcely to be emphasized. Similarly, the usefulness of increasing orbit perigee without expenditure of propellant is obvious. This payload would be a first step in assessing the true potential of large volume magnetic fields in the US space program. The objective of this design research is to develop an innovative, prototype deployed high temperature superconducting coil (DHTSC) system.

  20. Magnetic shielding of a laboratory Hall thruster. II. Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, Richard R. Goebel, Dan M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2014-01-28

    The physics of magnetic shielding in Hall thrusters were validated through laboratory experiments demonstrating essentially erosionless, high-performance operation. The magnetic field near the walls of a laboratory Hall thruster was modified to effectively eliminate wall erosion while maintaining the magnetic field topology away from the walls necessary to retain efficient operation. Plasma measurements at the walls validate our understanding of magnetic shielding as derived from the theory. The plasma potential was maintained very near the anode potential, the electron temperature was reduced by a factor of two to three, and the ion current density was reduced by at least a factor of two. Measurements of the carbon backsputter rate, wall geometry, and direct measurement of plasma properties at the wall indicate that the wall erosion rate was reduced by a factor of 1000 relative to the unshielded thruster. These changes effectively eliminate wall erosion as a life limitation in Hall thrusters, enabling a new class of deep-space missions that could not previously be attempted.

  1. [Magnetic shielded room to measure very low magnetic and electric fields].

    PubMed

    Mager, A

    1982-08-01

    An extraordinary magnetically shielded room was designed and constructed for the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Institut Berlin to measure extremely weak magnetic fields of the human body with SQUID-magnetometers. The inner and the outer dimensions of the cube-shaped room are 2.25 m and about 5 m. The shield has 6 magnetic shells of a high-permeability alloy and an inner shell welded of massive copper plates. The total weight of the magnetic alloy is about 10 t and about 5 t for the inner copper shell. The required shielding factor of 1000 for the very low frequencies was greatly surpassed by the real measured value of 10000 (measured without any compensating or idealizing method). With rising frequencies the shielding factor reaches higher values, at 50 Hz more than 100000 and a million for 1000 Hz. First measurements in the shielded room with high-resolution magnetocardiograms (HR MCG) and high-resolution electrocardiograms (HR ECG) showed new methods for non-invasive electrophysiological investigations in man.

  2. Experimental characterization of magnetic materials for the magnetic shielding of cryomodules in particle accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Sah, Sanjay; Myneni, Ganapati; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2015-10-26

    The magnetic properties of two important passive magnetic shielding materials (A4K and Amumetal) for accelerator applications, subjected to various processing and heat treatment conditions are studied comprehensively over a wide range of temperatures: from cryogenic to room temperature. Furthermore, we analyze the effect of processing on the extent of degradation of the magnetic properties of both materials and investigate the possibility of restoring these properties by re-annealing.

  3. Experimental characterization of magnetic materials for the magnetic shielding of cryomodules in particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sah, Sanjay; Myneni, Ganapati; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2015-10-26

    The magnetic properties of two important passive magnetic shielding materials (A4K and Amumetal) for accelerator applications, subjected to various processing and heat treatment conditions are studied comprehensively over a wide range of temperatures: from cryogenic to room temperature. Furthermore, we analyze the effect of processing on the extent of degradation of the magnetic properties of both materials and investigate the possibility of restoring these properties by re-annealing.

  4. Magnetocardiography of animals in magnetically shielded environment with active compensation.

    PubMed

    Horng, H E; Liao, S H; Hsu, S J; Yang, H C; Wu, J Y; Chen, C C; Wu, C H; Wu, C C

    2004-11-30

    A high-Tc 1st-order electronic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) gradiometer system is constructed to study the magnetocardiogram (MCG) of rabbits in a moderately magnetically shielded environment with active compensation. In the noisy hospital environment, the noise cannot be completely reduced with the 1st-order gradiometer, therefore, a reference SQUID with active compensation was used to further reduce the noise level leaking into the room. The MCG system was equipped with a x-y translation bed. We used a low-pass filter with the cut off frequency at 44 Hz, a high-pass filter with the cut off frequency at 0.1 Hz and the 60 Hz notch filter to reduce the power line interference. The noise level of the 1st order gradiometer MCG system in this moderately magnetically shielded room was about 1 pT/square root of Hz1/2 at 1 Hz. The MCG of a normal rabbits was measured with this system and a MCG contour map and a current density distribution was constructed.

  5. Magnetic shield for turbomolecular pump of the Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental device at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Subir; Chattopadhyay, Monobir; Pal, Rabindranath

    2011-01-01

    The turbo molecular pump of the Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental device is protected from damage by a magnetic shield. As the pump runs continuously in a magnetic field environment during a plasma physics experiment, it may get damaged owing to eddy current effect. For design and testing of the shield, first we simulate in details various aspects of magnetic shield layouts using a readily available field design code. The performance of the shield made from two half cylinders of soft iron material, is experimentally observed to agree very well with the simulation results.

  6. NMR shielding constants in PH3, absolute shielding scale, and the nuclear magnetic moment of 31P.

    PubMed

    Lantto, Perttu; Jackowski, Karol; Makulski, Włodzimierz; Olejniczak, Małgorzata; Jaszuński, Michał

    2011-09-29

    Ab initio values of the absolute shielding constants of phosphorus and hydrogen in PH(3) were determined, and their accuracy is discussed. In particular, we analyzed the relativistic corrections to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants, comparing the constants computed using the four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock approach, the four-component density functional theory (DFT), and the Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) with nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock or DFT reference functions. For the equilibrium geometry, we obtained σ(P) = 624.309 ppm and σ(H) = 29.761 ppm. Resonance frequencies of both nuclei were measured in gas-phase NMR experiments, and the results were extrapolated to zero density to provide the frequency ratio for an isolated PH(3) molecule. This ratio, together with the computed shielding constants, was used to determine a new value of the nuclear magnetic dipole moment of (31)P: μ(P) = 1.1309246(50) μ(N).

  7. Magnetic shielding in a low temperature torsion pendulum experiment. [superconducting cylinders for attenuation earth field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    A new type of ether drift experiment searches for anomalous torques on a permanent magnet. A torsion pendulum is used at liquid helium temperature, so that superconducting cylinders can be used to shield magnetic fields. Lead shields attenuate the earth's field, while Nb-Sn shields fastened to the pendulum contain the fields of the magnet. The paper describes the technique by which the earth's field can be reduced below 0.0001 G while simultaneously the moment of the magnet can be reduced by a factor 7 x 10 to the 4th.

  8. Physical design of magnetic shielding for LEReC cooling section

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, S.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Kayran, D.; Mahler, G.; Meng, W.; Thieberger, P.

    2016-04-05

    The goal of this note is to set basic parameters for the magnetic shielding of LEReC CS with required design attenuation. We considered physical design of magnetic shielding of LEReC cooling section. The schematic of this design along with the list of its basic parameters is shown. We are planning to use 2 layers of 1 mm thick cylindrical mu-metal shields with μ=11000. The radius of the first layer sitting on top of vacuum chamber is 63.5 mm. The second layer radius is 150 mm. Such shielding guarantees adequate transverse angles of electron beam trajectory in the CS.

  9. A 64-channel whole-head SQUID system in a superconducting magnetic shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, H.; Matsui, T.; Aono, M.; Uchikawa, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Tanabe, K.; Takeuchi, S.; Narasaki, K.; Tsunematsu, S.; Koyabu, Y.; Kamekawa, Y.; Nakayama, K.; Shimizu, T.; Koike, J.; Hoshino, K.; Kotaka, H.; Sudoh, E.; Takahara, H.; Yoshida, Y.; Shinada, K.; Takahata, M.; Yamada, Y.; Kamijo, K.

    1999-11-01

    A superconducting magnetic shield of high-Tc superconductor Bi(Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-Ox has been constructed whose diameter is 65 cm and length is 160 cm. We have successfully observed magnetic fields from somatosensory-evoked human brains in the superconducting magnetic shield by stimulating the median nerves of patients by current pulses. We made a 64-channel whole-head SQUID magnetometer of superconductor/normal metal/superconductor (SNS) junctions which do not show low-frequency telegraph noise. The sensitivities of the dc SQUID mesoscopic SNS junctions are around 5 fT Hz-1/2 even in rather unfavourable surroundings. The magnetic shield can reduce a magnetic field by around -80 dB or a factor of 10-4 even at as low a frequency as 0.05 Hz. Therefore SQUIDs of SNS junctions and a superconducting magnetic shield are a good combination.

  10. Multilayer film shields for the protection of PMT from constant magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Dmitrenko, V V; Besson, David; Nyunt, PhyoWai; Grabchikov, S S; Grachev, V M; Muraviev-Smirnov, C C; Ulin, S E; Uteshev, Z M; Vlasik, K F

    2015-01-01

    Photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are widely used in physical experiments as well as in applied devices. PMTs are sensitive to magnetic field, so creation of effective magnetic shields for their protection is very important. In this paper, the results of measurements of shielding effectiveness of multilayer film magnetic shields on PMT-85 are presented. Shields were formed by alternating layers of a material with high magnetic permeability (Ni-Fe) and high electric conductivity-Cu. The maximum number of bilayers reached 45. It is shown that in weak magnetic fields up to 0.5 mT, the output signal amplitude from PMT-85 does not change for all used multilayer shields. In strong magnetic field of 2-4 mT, the output signal amplitude decrease with 10%-40% depending from the number of layers in the shield. The Pulse distribution of PMT-85 in magnetic field 0.2-4 mT slightly changed in the range 1.1%-1.3% for the case when the number of layers do not exceed 10 and practically did not change for a shield with 45 double layers.

  11. Analytical-HZETRN model for rapid assessment of active magnetic radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, S. A.; Blattnig, S. R.; Singleterry, R. C.; Westover, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of active radiation shielding designs has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on deep-space missions at a significantly lower mass penalty than designs utilizing only passive shielding. Unfortunately, the determination of the radiation exposure inside these shielded environments often involves lengthy and computationally intensive Monte Carlo analysis. In order to evaluate the large trade space of design parameters associated with a magnetic radiation shield design, an analytical model was developed for the determination of flux inside a solenoid magnetic field due to the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) radiation environment. This analytical model was then coupled with NASA's radiation transport code, HZETRN, to account for the effects of passive/structural shielding mass. The resulting model can rapidly obtain results for a given configuration and can therefore be used to analyze an entire trade space of potential variables in less time than is required for even a single Monte Carlo run. Analyzing this trade space for a solenoid magnetic shield design indicates that active shield bending powers greater than ∼15 Tm and passive/structural shielding thicknesses greater than 40 g/cm2 have a limited impact on reducing dose equivalent values. Also, it is shown that higher magnetic field strengths are more effective than thicker magnetic fields at reducing dose equivalent.

  12. Analytical-HZETRN Model for Rapid Assessment of Active Magnetic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, S. A.; Blattnig, S. R.; Singleterry, R. C.; Westover, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of active radiation shielding designs has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on deep-space missions at a significantly lower mass penalty than designs utilizing only passive shielding. Unfortunately, the determination of the radiation exposure inside these shielded environments often involves lengthy and computationally intensive Monte Carlo analysis. In order to evaluate the large trade space of design parameters associated with a magnetic radiation shield design, an analytical model was developed for the determination of flux inside a solenoid magnetic field due to the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) radiation environment. This analytical model was then coupled with NASA's radiation transport code, HZETRN, to account for the effects of passive/structural shielding mass. The resulting model can rapidly obtain results for a given configuration and can therefore be used to analyze an entire trade space of potential variables in less time than is required for even a single Monte Carlo run. Analyzing this trade space for a solenoid magnetic shield design indicates that active shield bending powers greater than 15 Tm and passive/structural shielding thicknesses greater than 40 g/cm2 have a limited impact on reducing dose equivalent values. Also, it is shown that higher magnetic field strengths are more effective than thicker magnetic fields at reducing dose equivalent.

  13. Analytical-HZETRN Model for Rapid Assessment of Active Magnetic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, S. A.; Blattnig, S. R.; Singleterry, R. C.; Westover, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of active radiation shielding designs has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on deep-space missions at a significantly lower mass penalty than designs utilizing only passive shielding. Unfortunately, the determination of the radiation exposure inside these shielded environments often involves lengthy and computationally intensive Monte Carlo analysis. In order to evaluate the large trade space of design parameters associated with a magnetic radiation shield design, an analytical model was developed for the determination of flux inside a solenoid magnetic field due to the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) radiation environment. This analytical model was then coupled with NASA's radiation transport code, HZETRN, to account for the effects of passive/structural shielding mass. The resulting model can rapidly obtain results for a given configuration and can therefore be used to analyze an entire trade space of potential variables in less time than is required for even a single Monte Carlo run. Analyzing this trade space for a solenoid magnetic shield design indicates that active shield bending powers greater than 15 Tm and passive/structural shielding thicknesses greater than 40 g/cm2 have a limited impact on reducing dose equivalent values. Also, it is shown that higher magnetic field strengths are more effective than thicker magnetic fields at reducing dose equivalent.

  14. Four-component relativistic theory for nuclear magnetic shielding: magnetically balanced gauge-including atomic orbitals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lan; Xiao, Yunlong; Liu, Wenjian

    2009-12-28

    It is recognized only recently that the incorporation of the magnetic balance condition is absolutely essential for four-component relativistic theories of magnetic properties. Another important issue to be handled is the so-called gauge problem in calculations of, e.g., molecular magnetic shielding tensors with finite bases. It is shown here that the magnetic balance can be adapted to distributed gauge origins, leading to, e.g., magnetically balanced gauge-including atomic orbitals (MB-GIAOs) in which each magnetically balanced atomic orbital has its own local gauge origin placed on its center. Such a MB-GIAO scheme can be combined with any level of theory for electron correlation. The first implementation is done here at the coupled-perturbed Dirac-Kohn-Sham level. The calculated molecular magnetic shielding tensors are not only independent of the choice of gauge origin but also converge rapidly to the basis set limit. Close inspections reveal that (zeroth order) negative energy states are only important for the expansion of first order electronic core orbitals. Their contributions to the paramagnetism are therefore transferable from atoms to molecule and are essentially canceled out for chemical shifts. This allows for simplifications of the coupled-perturbed equations.

  15. Structural Design and Thermal Analysis for Thermal Shields of the MICE Coupling Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Pan, Heng; Liu, X. K.; Wang, Li; Wu, Hong; Chen, A. B.; Guo, X.L.

    2009-07-01

    A superconducting coupling magnet made from copper matrix NbTi conductors operating at 4 K will be used in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) to produce up to 2.6 T on the magnet centerline to keep the muon beam within the thin RF cavity indows. The coupling magnet is to be cooled by two cryocoolers with a total cooling capacity of 3 W at 4.2 K. In order to keep a certain operating temperature margin, the most important is to reduce the heat leakage imposed on cold surfaces of coil cold mass assembly. An ntermediate temperature shield system placed between the coupling coil and warm vacuum chamber is adopted. The shield system consists of upper neck shield, main shields, flexible connections and eight supports, which is to be cooled by the first stage cold heads of two ryocoolers with cooling capacity of 55 W at 60 K each. The maximum temperature difference on the shields should be less than 20 K, so the thermal analyses for the shields with different thicknesses, materials, flexible connections for shields' cooling and structure design for heir supports were carried out. 1100 Al is finally adopted and the maximum temperature difference is around 15 K with 4 mm shield thickness. The paper is to present detailed analyses on the shield system design.

  16. Structural Design and Thermal Analysis for Thermal Shields of the Mice Coupling Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, H.; Liu, X. K.; Wang, L.; Guo, X. L.; Wu, H.; Chen, A. B.; Green, M. A.

    2010-04-01

    A superconducting coupling magnet made from copper matrix NbTi conductors operating at 4 K will be used in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) to produce up to 2.6 T on the magnet centerline to keep the muon beam within the thin RF cavity windows. The coupling magnet is to be cooled by two cryocoolers with a total cooling capacity of 3 W at 4.2 K. In order to keep a certain operating temperature margin, the most important is to reduce the heat leakage imposed on cold surfaces of coil cold mass assembly. An intermediate temperature shield system placed between the coupling coil and warm vacuum chamber is adopted. The shield system consists of upper neck shield, main shields, flexible connections and eight supports, which is to be cooled by the first stage cold heads of two cryocoolers with cooling capacity of 55 W at 60 K each. The maximum temperature difference on the shields should be less than 20 K, so the thermal analyses for the shields with different thicknesses, materials, flexible connections for shields' cooling and structure design for their supports were carried out. 1100 Al is finally adopted and the maximum temperature difference is around 15 K with 4 mm shield thickness. The paper is to present detailed analyses on the shield system design.

  17. Cryogenic magnetic coil and superconducting magnetic shield for neutron electric dipole moment searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutsky, S.; Swank, C. M.; Biswas, A.; Carr, R.; Escribano, J.; Filippone, B. W.; Griffith, W. C.; Mendenhall, M.; Nouri, N.; Osthelder, C.; Pérez Galván, A.; Picker, R.; Plaster, B.

    2017-08-01

    A magnetic coil operated at cryogenic temperatures is used to produce spatial, relative field gradients below 6 ppm/cm, stable for several hours. The apparatus is a prototype of the magnetic components for a neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) search, which will take place at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using ultra-cold neutrons (UCN). That search requires a uniform magnetic field to mitigate systematic effects and obtain long polarization lifetimes for neutron spin precession measurements. This paper details upgrades to a previously described apparatus [1], particularly the introduction of super-conducting magnetic shielding and the associated cryogenic apparatus. The magnetic gradients observed are sufficiently low for the nEDM search at SNS.

  18. MAGNETIC SHIELDING OF EXOMOONS BEYOND THE CIRCUMPLANETARY HABITABLE EDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, René; Zuluaga, Jorge I. E-mail: jzuluaga@fisica.udea.edu.co

    2013-10-20

    With most planets and planetary candidates detected in the stellar habitable zone (HZ) being super-Earths and gas giants rather than Earth-like planets, we naturally wonder if their moons could be habitable. The first detection of such an exomoon has now become feasible, and due to observational biases it will be at least twice as massive as Mars. However, formation models predict that moons can hardly be as massive as Earth. Hence, a giant planet's magnetosphere could be the only possibility for such a moon to be shielded from cosmic and stellar high-energy radiation. Yet, the planetary radiation belt could also have detrimental effects on exomoon habitability. Here we synthesize models for the evolution of the magnetic environment of giant planets with thresholds from the runaway greenhouse (RG) effect to assess the habitability of exomoons. For modest eccentricities, we find that satellites around Neptune-sized planets in the center of the HZ around K dwarf stars will either be in an RG state and not be habitable, or they will be in wide orbits where they will not be affected by the planetary magnetosphere. Saturn-like planets have stronger fields, and Jupiter-like planets could coat close-in habitable moons soon after formation. Moons at distances between about 5 and 20 planetary radii from a giant planet can be habitable from an illumination and tidal heating point of view, but still the planetary magnetosphere would critically influence their habitability.

  19. Assessment of Pole Erosion in a Magnetically Shielded Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Ortega, Alejandro L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of a 6-kW laboratory Hall thruster called H6 have been performed to quantify the erosion rate at the inner pole. The assessments have been made in two versions of the thruster, namely the unshielded (H6US) and magnetically shielded (H6MS) configurations. The simulations have been performed with the 2-D axisymmetric code Hall2De which employs a new multi-fluid ion algorithm to capture the presence of low-energy ions in the vicinity of the poles. It is found that the maximum computed erosion rate at the inner pole of the H6MS exceeds the measured rate of back-sputtered deposits by 4.5 times. This explains only part of the surface roughening that was observed after a 150-h wear test, which covered most of the pole area exposed to the plasma. For the majority of the pole surface the computed erosion rates are found to be below the back-sputter rate and comparable to those in the H6US which exhibited little to no sputtering in previous tests. Possible explanations for the discrepancy are discussed.

  20. HZE particle shielding using confined magnetic fields. [high-energy heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    1983-01-01

    The great rigidities characteristic of high energy heavy ion (HZE) particles are judged to preclude near term use of confined magnetic fields of reasonable dimensions and strengths for small spacecraft shielding on long duration manned missions. It is noted that a Mars mission-class shield, although effective against solar protons, would be useless for HZE particles unless the mass and size of the shield are increased by several orders of magnitude (to yield a shield comparable to those contemplated for permanent space stations).

  1. HZE particle shielding using confined magnetic fields. [high-energy heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    1983-01-01

    The great rigidities characteristic of high energy heavy ion (HZE) particles are judged to preclude near term use of confined magnetic fields of reasonable dimensions and strengths for small spacecraft shielding on long duration manned missions. It is noted that a Mars mission-class shield, although effective against solar protons, would be useless for HZE particles unless the mass and size of the shield are increased by several orders of magnitude (to yield a shield comparable to those contemplated for permanent space stations).

  2. Evaluation of a method to shield a welding electron beam from magnetic interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    It is known that electron beams are easily deflected by magnetic and electrostatic fields. Therefore, to prevent weld defects, stray electromagnetic fields are avoided in electron beam welding chambers if at all possible. The successful results of tests conducted at MSFC to evaluate a simple magnetic shield made from steel tubing are reported. Tests indicate that this shield was up to 85 percent effective in reducing magnetic effects on the electron beam of a welding machine. In addition, residual magnetic fields within the shield were so nearly uniform that the net effect on the beam alignment was negligible. It is concluded that the shield, with the addition of a tungsten liner, could be used in production welding.

  3. Molecular based magnets comprising vanadium tetracyanoethylene complexes for shielding electromagnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Arthur J.; Morin, Brian G.

    1998-01-01

    The invention presents a vanadium tetracyanoethylene solvent complex for electromagnetic field shielding, and a method for blocking low frequency and magnetic fields using these vanadium tetracyanoethylene compositions. The compositions of the invention can be produced at ambient temperature and are light weight, low density and flexible. The materials of the present invention are useful as magnetic shields to block low frequency fields and static fields, and for use in cores in transformers and motors.

  4. Using Ferromagnetic Material to Extend and Shield the Magnetic Field of a Coil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-14

    ARL-MR-0954 ● Jun 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Using Ferromagnetic Material to Extend and Shield the Magnetic Field of a...longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-MR-0954 ● Jun 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Using Ferromagnetic Material ...to Extend and Shield the Magnetic Field of a Coil by W Casey Uhlig Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL

  5. Molecular based magnets comprising vanadium tetracyanoethylene complexes for shielding electromagnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, A.J.; Morin, B.G.

    1998-10-13

    The invention presents a vanadium tetracyanoethylene solvent complex for electromagnetic field shielding, and a method for blocking low frequency and magnetic fields using these vanadium tetracyanoethylene compositions. The compositions of the invention can be produced at ambient temperature and are light weight, low density and flexible. The materials of the present invention are useful as magnetic shields to block low frequency fields and static fields, and for use in cores in transformers and motors. 21 figs.

  6. Relativistic effects on the nuclear magnetic shielding in the MF (M=Cu, Ag, Au) series

    SciTech Connect

    David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2007-11-15

    Relativistic effects on the nuclear magnetic shielding {sigma}(M) of the series of diatomics MF (M=Cu, Ag, Au) are calculated and analyzed using the Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) method in the random phase approximation (RPA). Significant differences due to relativistic effects on the shielding constant {sigma}(M) are found in this series of atoms. The high electronegativity of the fluorine atom works in conjunction with the spin-orbit coupling to increase the calculated value for {sigma}(Au). An unusually large diamagnetic contribution to the shielding constant is observed. Nonrelativistic nuclear magnetic shielding [{sigma}{sup NR}(M)] shows very good linear correlation with the nuclear charge (Z) of the metal, while the relativistic shielding [{sigma}{sup rel}(M)] varies as Z{sup 2.26}.

  7. Eddy current-shielded x-space relaxometer for sensitive magnetic nanoparticle characterization.

    PubMed

    Bauer, L M; Hensley, D W; Zheng, B; Tay, Z W; Goodwill, P W; Griswold, M A; Conolly, S M

    2016-05-01

    The development of magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has created a need for optimized magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetic particle relaxometry is an excellent tool for characterizing potential tracers for MPI. In this paper, we describe the design and construction of a high-throughput tabletop relaxometer that is able to make sensitive measurements of MPI tracers without the need for a dedicated shield room.

  8. Effects of fluctuating magnetic fields on a superconducting bulk rotor shielded with superconducting rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, K.; Ogawa, J.; Tsukamoto, O.

    2014-05-01

    We study the effect of a fluctuating magnetic field, which is one of the technical problems for trapped magnetic fields in a bulk superconductor, to realize a practical bulk superconductor rotating machine. Previous research and other's research has shown that fluctuating magnetic fields reduce the strength of trapped magnetic fields in superconducting bulk modules [1, 2]. This deters development of applications of AC rotating machines because superconducting bulk modules are always exposed to a fluctuating magnetic field. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a method to control decrease of the trapped magnetic field. We propose a method to use the shielding ring of a superconducting wire to achieve this goal and the effects are confirmed experimentally [3]. We are now building test equipment for examining the performance of a shielding ring in a bulk rotating machine. This paper reports the test result for the shielding ring applied to the bulk superconducting rotor that is a part of the test equipment.

  9. Application of shielding current in bulk HTS to control magnetic field distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kii, T.

    2016-03-01

    Superconducting shielding current is excited when external field is applied to superconductor. In case for field cooling of bulk superconductor, shielding current is an origin of strong trapped field. When external field is changed to a properly arranged bulk HTS array, various magnetic field distribution can be formed by an excited shielding current in each bulk HTS. This paper presents a simple intuitively method to design magnetic field distribution using supercurrents in bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS) array. In this method, an ideal current path for intended field distribution is represented by shielding currents in bulk HTS array. Expected performance can be roughly estimated by using Biot-Savart law. As examples, Maxwell coil pair and helical field generator are designed. This method can be applied to design various magnet devices using bulk HTS array.

  10. Design of a three-axis magnetic field measurement system for the magnetic shield of the ring laser gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Chuiyu; Yao, Xu

    2015-10-01

    The magnetic field is one of the main causes of zero drift in a Ring Laser Gyroscope (RLG), which should be avoided by adopting a magnetic shielding system. The Gauss Meter is usually used to measure the magnetic shielding effectiveness. Generally, the traditional Gauss Meter has advantages of high measure range and high reliability, however, its drawbacks such as complex structure, high price and the PC client software cannot be customized at will, are also obvious. In this paper, aiming at a type of experimental magnetic shielding box of RLG, we design a new portable three-axis magnetic field measurement system. This system has both high modularity degree and reliability, with measuring range at ±48Gs, max resolution at 1.5mGs and can measure the magnetic field in x, y and z direction simultaneously. Besides, its PC client software can be easily customized to achieve the automatic DAQ, analysis, plotting and storage functions. The experiment shows that, this system can meet the measuring requirements of certain type of experimental magnetic shielding box for RLG, meanwhile, for the measurement of some other magnetic shielding effectiveness, this system is also applicable.

  11. Shorter Life Span of Microorganisms and Plants as a Consequence of Shielded Magnetic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrota, C.; Piso, I. M.; Bathory, D.

    The geomagnetic field is an essential environmental factor for life and health on this planet. In order to survey how magnetic fields affect the life span and the nitrogenase (an iron-sulphur enzyme) activity of Azotobacter chroococcum as well as the life span, the main organic synthesis and the water balance of plants (22 species), the biological tests were incubated under shielded magnetic field and also in normal geo-magnetic environment. The shielding level was about 10-6 of the terrestrial magnetic field.Life cycles of all organisms require the co-ordinated control of a complex set of interlocked physiological processes and metabolic pathways. Such processes are likely to be regulated by a large number of genes. Our researches suggest that the main point in biological structures, which seems to be affected by the low magnetic environment, is the water molecule. Magnetic field induces a molecular alignment. Under shielded conditions, unstructured water molecules with fewer hydrogen bonds, which are producing a more reactive environment, are occurring. As compared to control, the life span of both microorganisms and plants was shorter in shielded environment. A higher nitrogenase affinity for the substrate was recorded in normal geo-magnetic field compared to low magnetic field. The synthesis of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes was modified under experimental conditions. The stomatal conductance was higher between 158 and 300% in shielded environment indicating an important water loss from the plant cells.Our results support the idea that the shielded magnetic environment induces different reactions depending on the time of exposure and on the main metabolic pathways of the cells.

  12. Options for Shielding Tokamak Cooling Water Electrical Components against High Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, Kofi; Michael, Smith; Kim, Seokho H; Charles, Neumeyer

    2011-01-01

    The Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) Instrumentation and Control (I&C) components of ITER will be located in areas of relatively high magnetic fields. Previous tests on electrical and I&C components have indicated that shielding will be required to protect these components from such magnetic fields. To accomplish this, studies were performed by AREVA Federal Services (AFS) in support of the TCWS Design project with the intent of identifying an optimal solution for shielding I&C components. This report presents a summary of these studies and presents design options for providing magnetic shielding to ITER TCWS I&C components and electrical equipment that are susceptible to the magnetic fields present.

  13. Quasi-Static Magnetic Field Shielding Using Longitudinal Mu-Near-Zero Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipworth, Guy; Ensworth, Joshua; Seetharam, Kushal; Lee, Jae Seung; Schmalenberg, Paul; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Reynolds, Matthew S.; Smith, David R.; Urzhumov, Yaroslav

    2015-08-01

    The control of quasi-static magnetic fields is of considerable interest in applications including the reduction of electromagnetic interference (EMI), wireless power transfer (WPT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The shielding of static or quasi-static magnetic fields is typically accomplished through the use of inherently magnetic materials with large magnetic permeability, such as ferrites, used sometimes in combination with metallic sheets and/or active field cancellation. Ferrite materials, however, can be expensive, heavy and brittle. Inspired by recent demonstrations of epsilon-, mu- and index-near-zero metamaterials, here we show how a longitudinal mu-near-zero (LMNZ) layer can serve as a strong frequency-selective reflector of magnetic fields when operating in the near-field region of dipole-like sources. Experimental measurements with a fabricated LMNZ sheet constructed from an artificial magnetic conductor - formed from non-magnetic, conducting, metamaterial elements - confirm that the artificial structure provides significantly improved shielding as compared with a commercially available ferrite of the same size. Furthermore, we design a structure to shield simultaneously at the fundamental and first harmonic frequencies. Such frequency-selective behavior can be potentially useful for shielding electromagnetic sources that may also generate higher order harmonics, while leaving the transmission of other frequencies unaffected.

  14. Quasi-Static Magnetic Field Shielding Using Longitudinal Mu-Near-Zero Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Lipworth, Guy; Ensworth, Joshua; Seetharam, Kushal; Lee, Jae Seung; Schmalenberg, Paul; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Reynolds, Matthew S.; Smith, David R.; Urzhumov, Yaroslav

    2015-01-01

    The control of quasi-static magnetic fields is of considerable interest in applications including the reduction of electromagnetic interference (EMI), wireless power transfer (WPT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The shielding of static or quasi-static magnetic fields is typically accomplished through the use of inherently magnetic materials with large magnetic permeability, such as ferrites, used sometimes in combination with metallic sheets and/or active field cancellation. Ferrite materials, however, can be expensive, heavy and brittle. Inspired by recent demonstrations of epsilon-, mu- and index-near-zero metamaterials, here we show how a longitudinal mu-near-zero (LMNZ) layer can serve as a strong frequency-selective reflector of magnetic fields when operating in the near-field region of dipole-like sources. Experimental measurements with a fabricated LMNZ sheet constructed from an artificial magnetic conductor – formed from non-magnetic, conducting, metamaterial elements – confirm that the artificial structure provides significantly improved shielding as compared with a commercially available ferrite of the same size. Furthermore, we design a structure to shield simultaneously at the fundamental and first harmonic frequencies. Such frequency-selective behavior can be potentially useful for shielding electromagnetic sources that may also generate higher order harmonics, while leaving the transmission of other frequencies unaffected. PMID:26234929

  15. Quasi-Static Magnetic Field Shielding Using Longitudinal Mu-Near-Zero Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Guy; Ensworth, Joshua; Seetharam, Kushal; Lee, Jae Seung; Schmalenberg, Paul; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Reynolds, Matthew S; Smith, David R; Urzhumov, Yaroslav

    2015-08-03

    The control of quasi-static magnetic fields is of considerable interest in applications including the reduction of electromagnetic interference (EMI), wireless power transfer (WPT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The shielding of static or quasi-static magnetic fields is typically accomplished through the use of inherently magnetic materials with large magnetic permeability, such as ferrites, used sometimes in combination with metallic sheets and/or active field cancellation. Ferrite materials, however, can be expensive, heavy and brittle. Inspired by recent demonstrations of epsilon-, mu- and index-near-zero metamaterials, here we show how a longitudinal mu-near-zero (LMNZ) layer can serve as a strong frequency-selective reflector of magnetic fields when operating in the near-field region of dipole-like sources. Experimental measurements with a fabricated LMNZ sheet constructed from an artificial magnetic conductor - formed from non-magnetic, conducting, metamaterial elements - confirm that the artificial structure provides significantly improved shielding as compared with a commercially available ferrite of the same size. Furthermore, we design a structure to shield simultaneously at the fundamental and first harmonic frequencies. Such frequency-selective behavior can be potentially useful for shielding electromagnetic sources that may also generate higher order harmonics, while leaving the transmission of other frequencies unaffected.

  16. A large-scale magnetic shield with 10{sup 6} damping at millihertz frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Altarev, I.; Bales, M.; Fierlinger, K.; Fierlinger, P.; Kuchler, F.; Marino, M. G.; Niessen, B.; Petzoldt, G.; Singh, J. T.; Stoepler, R.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taubenheim, B.; Beck, D. H.; Chupp, T.; Lins, T.; Schläpfer, U.; Schnabel, A.; Voigt, J.

    2015-05-14

    We present a magnetically shielded environment with a damping factor larger than 1 × 10{sup 6} at the mHz frequency regime and an extremely low field and gradient over an extended volume. This extraordinary shielding performance represents an improvement of the state-of-the-art in the difficult regime of damping very low-frequency distortions by more than an order of magnitude. This technology enables a new generation of high-precision measurements in fundamental physics and metrology, including searches for new physics far beyond the reach of accelerator-based experiments. We discuss the technical realization of the shield with its improvements in design.

  17. Ion behavior in low-power magnetically shielded and unshielded Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaud, L.; Mazouffre, S.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetically shielded Hall thrusters achieve a longer lifespan than traditional Hall thrusters by reducing wall erosion. The lower erosion rate is attributed to a reduction of the high energy ion population impacting the walls. To investigate this phenomenon, the ion velocity distribution functions are measured with laser induced fluorescence at several points of interest in the magnetically shielded ISCT200-MS and the unshielded ISCT200-US Hall thrusters. The center of the discharge channel is probed to highlight the difference in plasma positioning between the shielded and unshielded thrusters. Erosion phenomena are investigated by taking measurements of the ion velocity distribution near the inner and outer wall as well as above the magnetic poles where some erosion is observed. The resulting distribution functions show a displacement of the acceleration region from inside the channel in the unshielded thruster to downstream of the exit plane in the ISCT200-MS. Near the walls, the unshielded thruster displays both a higher relative ion density as well as a significant fraction of the ions with velocities toward the walls compared to the shielded thruster. Higher proportions of high velocity ions are also observed. Those results are in accordance with the reduced erosion observed. Both shielded and unshielded thrusters have large populations of ions impacting the magnetic poles. The mechanism through which those ions are accelerated toward the magnetic poles has so far not been explained.

  18. Ab initio calculation of through-space magnetic shielding of linear polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (acenes): extent of aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ned H; Caldwell, Brian W; Carlson, Katie P; Teague, Matthew R

    2009-02-01

    GIAO-HF within Gaussian 03 was employed to compute the NMR isotropic shielding values of a diatomic hydrogen probe above a series of acenes (linear polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). Subtraction of the isotropic shielding of diatomic hydrogen by itself allowed the determination of computed through-space proton NMR shielding increment surfaces for these systems. Shielding was observed above the center of each aromatic ring, but the magnitude of calculated shielding above each ring center depends on the number of fused benzenoid rings. The computed shielding increments above each ring center were correlated to other measures of extent of aromaticity, including geometric, energetic, and magnetic measurements.

  19. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water: Insights from hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongsted, Jacob; Nielsen, Christian B.; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.; Christiansen, Ove; Ruud, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    We present a gauge-origin independent method for the calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of molecules in a structured and polarizable environment. The method is based on a combination of density functional theory (DFT) or Hartree-Fock wave functions with molecular mechanics. The method is unique in the sense that it includes three important properties that need to be fulfilled in accurate calculations of nuclear magnetic shielding constants: (i) the model includes electron correlation effects, (ii) the model uses gauge-including atomic orbitals to give gauge-origin independent results, and (iii) the effect of the environment is treated self-consistently using a discrete reaction-field methodology. The authors present sample calculations of the isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water based on a large number of solute-solvent configurations derived from molecular dynamics simulations employing potentials which treat solvent polarization either explicitly or implicitly. For both the O17 and H1 isotropic shielding constants the best predicted results compare fairly well with the experimental data, i.e., they reproduce the experimental solvent shifts to within 4ppm for the O17 shielding and 1ppm for the H1 shielding.

  20. Magnetic Shielding of an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator for TES Microcalorimeter Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishi, U.; Fujimoto, R.; Kunihisa, T.; Takakura, S.; Mitsude, T.; Kamiya, K.; Kotake, M.; Hoshino, A.; Shinozaki, K.

    2014-09-01

    We are developing a compact adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) dedicated for TES X-ray microcalorimeter operation. Ferric ammonium alum (FAA) was grown in a stainless-steel container in our laboratory. This salt pill was mounted together with a superconducting magnet and a conventional mechanical heat-switch in a dedicated helium cryostat. Using this system, we achieved mK and a hold time of h below 100 mK. Initially, we used a 3 mm thick silicon steel shield around the ADR magnet and a Nb/Cryoperm double shield around the detector. However, this silicon steel shield allowed a mT field at the detector position when a full field (3 T) was applied, and caused the Nb shield around the detector to trap a magnetic field. The observed transition curve of a TES was broad ( mK) compared to mK obtained in a dilution refrigerator. By increasing the shield thickness to 12 mm, transition width was improved to mK, which suggests that the shields work as expected. When we operated a TES microcalorimeter, energy resolution was eV (FWHM) at 5.9 keV.

  1. Optimization of infrared and magnetic shielding of superconducting TiN and Al coplanar microwave resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreikebaum, J. M.; Dove, A.; Livingston, W.; Kim, E.; Siddiqi, I.

    2016-10-01

    We present a systematic study of the effects of shielding on the internal quality factors ({Q}{{i}}) of Al and TiN microwave resonators designed for use in quantum coherent circuits. Measurements were performed in an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator, where typical magnetic fields of 200 μT are present at the unshielded sample stage. Radiation shielding consisted of 100 and 500 mK Cu cans coated with infrared absorbing epoxy. Magnetic shields consisted of Cryoperm 10 and Sn plating of the Cu cans. A 2.7 K radiation can and coaxial thermalization filters were present in all measurements. TiN samples with {Q}{{i}}=1.3 × {10}6 at 100 mK exhibited no significant variation in quality factor when tested with limited shielding. In contrast, Al resonators showed improved {Q}{{i}} with successive shielding, with the largest gains obtained from the addition of the first radiation and magnetic shields and saturating before the addition of Sn plating infrared absorbing epoxy.

  2. A model for the rapid evaluation of active magnetic shielding designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, Scott Allen

    The use of active magnetic radiation shielding designs has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on deep-space missions at a significantly lower mass penalty than designs that utilize only passive shielding. One of the common techniques for assessing the effectiveness of active or passive shielding designs is the use of Monte Carlo analysis to determine crew radiation exposure. Unfortunately, Monte Carlo analysis is a lengthy and computationally intensive process, and the associated time requirements to generate results make a broad analysis of the active magnetic shield design trade space impractical using this method. The ability to conduct a broad analysis of system design variables would allow the selection of configurations suited to specific mission goals, including mission radiation exposure limits, duration, and destination. Therefore, a rapid analysis method is required in order to effectively assess active shielding design parameters, and this body of work was developed in order to address this need. Any shielding analysis should also use complete representations of the radiation environment and detailed transport analyses to account for secondary particle production mechanisms. This body of work addresses both of these issues by utilizing the full Galactic Cosmic Radiation GCR flux spectrum and a detailed transport analysis to account for secondary particle effects due to mass interactions. Additionally, there is a complex relationship between the size and strength of an active shielding design and the amount and type of mass required to create it. This mass can significantly impact the resulting flux and radiation exposures inside the active shield, and any shielding analysis should not only include passive mass, but should attempt to provide a reasonable estimate of the actual mass associated with a given design. Therefore, a survey of active shielding systems is presented so that reasonable mass quantity and composition

  3. The Magnetic and Shielding Effects of Ring Current on Radiation Belt Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching

    2012-01-01

    The ring current plays many key roles in controlling magnetospheric dynamics. A well-known example is the magnetic depression produced by the ring current, which alters the drift paths of radiation belt electrons and may cause significant electron flux dropout. Little attention is paid to the ring current shielding effect on radiation belt dynamics. A recent simulation study that combines the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) with the Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model has revealed that the ring current-associated shielding field directly and/or indirectly weakens the relativistic electron flux increase during magnetic storms. In this talk, we will discuss how ring current magnetic field and electric shielding moderate the radiation belt enhancement.

  4. Magnet Architectures and Active Radiation Shielding Study - SR2S Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westover, Shane; Meinke, Rainer; Burger, William; Ilin, Andrew; Nerolich, Shaun; Washburn, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Analyze new coil configurations with maturing superconductor technology -Develop vehicle-level concept solutions and identify engineering challenges and risks -Shielding performance analysis Recent advances in superconducting magnet technology and manufacturing have opened the door for re-evaluating active shielding solutions as an alternative to mass prohibitive passive shielding.Publications on static magnetic field environments and its bio-effects were reviewed. Short-term exposure information is available suggesting long term exposure may be okay. Further research likely needed. center dotMagnetic field safety requirements exist for controlled work environments. The following effects have been noted with little noted adverse effects -Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects on ionized fluids (e.g. blood) creating an aortic voltage change -MHD interaction elevates blood pressure (BP) center dot5 Tesla equates to 5% BP elevation -Prosthetic devises and pacemakers are an issue (access limit of 5 gauss).

  5. A three-layer magnetic shielding for the MAIUS-1 mission on a sounding rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Kubelka-Lange, André Herrmann, Sven; Grosse, Jens; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Rasel, Ernst M.; Braxmaier, Claus

    2016-06-15

    Bose-Einstein-Condensates (BECs) can be used as a very sensitive tool for experiments on fundamental questions in physics like testing the equivalence principle using matter wave interferometry. Since the sensitivity of these experiments in ground-based environments is limited by the available free fall time, the QUANTUS project started to perform BEC interferometry experiments in micro-gravity. After successful campaigns in the drop tower, the next step is a space-borne experiment. The MAIUS-mission will be an atom-optical experiment that will show the feasibility of experiments with ultra-cold quantum gases in microgravity in a sounding rocket. The experiment will create a BEC of 10{sup 5} {sup 87}Rb-atoms in less than 5 s and will demonstrate application of basic atom interferometer techniques over a flight time of 6 min. The hardware is specifically designed to match the requirements of a sounding rocket mission. Special attention is thereby spent on the appropriate magnetic shielding from varying magnetic fields during the rocket flight, since the experiment procedures are very sensitive to external magnetic fields. A three-layer magnetic shielding provides a high shielding effectiveness factor of at least 1000 for an undisturbed operation of the experiment. The design of this magnetic shielding, the magnetic properties, simulations, and tests of its suitability for a sounding rocket flight are presented in this article.

  6. A three-layer magnetic shielding for the MAIUS-1 mission on a sounding rocket.

    PubMed

    Kubelka-Lange, André; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse, Jens; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Rasel, Ernst M; Braxmaier, Claus

    2016-06-01

    Bose-Einstein-Condensates (BECs) can be used as a very sensitive tool for experiments on fundamental questions in physics like testing the equivalence principle using matter wave interferometry. Since the sensitivity of these experiments in ground-based environments is limited by the available free fall time, the QUANTUS project started to perform BEC interferometry experiments in micro-gravity. After successful campaigns in the drop tower, the next step is a space-borne experiment. The MAIUS-mission will be an atom-optical experiment that will show the feasibility of experiments with ultra-cold quantum gases in microgravity in a sounding rocket. The experiment will create a BEC of 10(5) (87)Rb-atoms in less than 5 s and will demonstrate application of basic atom interferometer techniques over a flight time of 6 min. The hardware is specifically designed to match the requirements of a sounding rocket mission. Special attention is thereby spent on the appropriate magnetic shielding from varying magnetic fields during the rocket flight, since the experiment procedures are very sensitive to external magnetic fields. A three-layer magnetic shielding provides a high shielding effectiveness factor of at least 1000 for an undisturbed operation of the experiment. The design of this magnetic shielding, the magnetic properties, simulations, and tests of its suitability for a sounding rocket flight are presented in this article.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging receiver coil decoupling using circumferential shielding structures.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jhy-Neng Tasso; Fa-Hsuan Lin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a flexible phased-array design using circular coils with circumferential shielding structure to achieve robust decoupling between coil elements when the array is either bended or on a flat plane. Two types of circumferential shielding were tested through numerical simulation and imaging experiment. The results demonstrated that our arrays have good decoupling between coils when they are on a curved surface with S21 <; -16.72 dB. Both types perform higher SNR images than a commercially available 32-channel adult head coil array. Future work will empirically construct a multi-channel array with the number of channel matched to commercial phased array in order to validate the performance in vivo.

  8. Shielding, but not zeroing of the ambient magnetic field reduces stress-induced analgesia in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Choleris, E; Del Seppia, C; Thomas, A W; Luschi, P; Ghione, G; Moran, G R; Prato, F S

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic field exposure was consistently found to affect pain inhibition (i.e. analgesia). Recently, we showed that an extreme reduction of the ambient magnetic and electric environment, by mu-metal shielding, also affected stress-induced analgesia (SIA) in C57 mice. Using CD1 mice, we report here the same findings from replication studies performed independently in Pisa, Italy and London, ON, Canada. Also, neither selective vector nulling of the static component of the ambient magnetic field with Helmholtz coils, nor copper shielding of only the ambient electric field, affected SIA in mice. We further show that a pre-stress exposure to the mu-metal box is necessary for the anti-analgesic effects to occur. The differential effects of the two near-zero magnetic conditions may depend on the elimination (obtained only by mu-metal shielding) of the extremely weak time-varying component of the magnetic environment. This would provide the first direct and repeatable evidence for a behavioural and physiological effect of very weak time-varying magnetic fields, suggesting the existence of a very sensitive magnetic discrimination in the endogenous mechanisms that underlie SIA. This has important implications for other reported effects of exposures to very weak magnetic fields and for the theoretical work that considers the mechanisms underlying the biological detection of weak magnetic fields. PMID:11798436

  9. High field septum magnet using a superconducting shield for the Future Circular Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, Dániel

    2017-04-01

    A zero-field cooled superconducting shield is proposed to realize a high-field (3-4 T) septum magnet for the Future Circular Collider hadron-hadron (FCC-hh) ring. Three planned prototypes using different materials and technical solutions are presented, which will be used to evaluate the feasibility of this idea as a part of the FCC study. The numerical simulation methods are described to calculate the field patterns around such a shield. A specific excitation current configuration is presented that maintains a fairly homogeneous field outside of a rectangular shield in a wide range of field levels from 0 to 3 Tesla. It is shown that a massless septum configuration (with an opening in the shield) is also possible and gives satisfactory field quality with realistic superconducting material properties.

  10. Simulation of a conductive shield plate for the focalization of transcranial magnetic stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gasca, Fernando; Richter, Lars; Schweikard, Achim

    2010-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in the rat is a powerful tool for investigating brain function. However, the state-of-the-art experiments are considerably limited because the stimulation usually affects undesired anatomical structures. A simulation of a conductive shield plate placed between the coil stimulator and the rat brain during TMS is presented. The Finite Element (FE) method is used to obtain the 3D electric field distribution on a four-layer rat head model. The simulations show that the shield plate with a circular window can improve the focalization of stimulation, as quantitatively seen by computing the three-dimensional half power region (HPR). Focalization with the shield plate showed a clear compromise with the attenuation of the induced field. The results suggest that the shield plate can work as a helpful tool for conducting TMS rat experiments on specific targets.

  11. Passive shielding effect on space profile of magnetic field emissions for wireless power transfer to vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Batra, T. Schaltz, E.

    2015-05-07

    Magnetic fields emitted by wireless power transfer systems are of high importance with respect to human safety and health. Aluminum and ferrite are used in the system to reduce the fields and are termed as passive shielding. In this paper, the influence of these materials on the space profile has been investigated with the help of simulations on Comsol for the four possible geometries—no shielding, ferrite, aluminum, and full shielding. As the reflected impedance varies for the four geometries, the primary current is varied accordingly to maintain constant power transfer to the secondary side. Surrounding magnetic field plots in the vertical direction show that maxima's of the two coils for the no shielding geometry are centered at the respective coils and for the remaining three are displaced closer to each other. This closeness would lead to more effective addition of the two coil fields and an increase in the resultant field from space point of view. This closeness varies with distance in the horizontal direction and vertical gap between the coils and is explained in the paper. This paper provides a better understanding of effect of the passive shielding materials on the space nature of magnetic fields for wireless power transfer for vehicle applications.

  12. NMR absolute shielding scale and nuclear magnetic dipole moment of (207)Pb.

    PubMed

    Adrjan, Bożena; Makulski, Włodzimierz; Jackowski, Karol; Demissie, Taye B; Ruud, Kenneth; Antušek, Andrej; Jaszuński, Michał

    2016-06-28

    An absolute shielding scale is proposed for (207)Pb nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. It is based on ab initio calculations performed on an isolated tetramethyllead Pb(CH3)4 molecule and the assignment of the experimental resonance frequency from the gas-phase NMR spectra of Pb(CH3)4, extrapolated to zero density of the buffer gas to obtain the result for an isolated molecule. The computed (207)Pb shielding constant is 10 790 ppm for the isolated molecule, leading to a shielding of 10799.7 ppm for liquid Pb(CH3)4 which is the accepted reference standard for (207)Pb NMR spectra. The new experimental and theoretical data are used to determine μ((207)Pb), the nuclear magnetic dipole moment of (207)Pb, by applying the standard relationship between NMR frequencies, shielding constants and nuclear moments of two nuclei in the same external magnetic field. Using the gas-phase (207)Pb and (reference) proton results and the theoretical value of the Pb shielding in Pb(CH3)4, we find μ((207)Pb) = 0.59064 μN. The analysis of new experimental and theoretical data obtained for the Pb(2+) ion in water solutions provides similar values of μ((207)Pb), in the range of 0.59000-0.59131 μN.

  13. The Effectiveness of Magnetic Shielding in High-Isp Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Hofer, Richard R.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations and experiments have been performed to assess the effectiveness of magnetic shielding in a Hall thruster operating in the discharge voltage range of 300-700 V (Isp 2000-2700 s) at 6 kW, and 800 V (Isp 3000) at 9 kW. In this paper we report on the simulation results and their validation with experimental measurements. At 6 kW the magnetic field topology with which we recently demonstrated highly effective magnetic shielding at 300 V was retained for all other discharge voltages; only the magnitude of the field was changed to achieve optimum thruster performance. It is found that magnetic shielding remains highly effective for all discharge voltages studied. Maximum erosion rates that remain fairly constant across the range of 300-700 V are computed, with values not exceeding 10-2 mm/kh. Such rates are 3 orders of magnitude less than those observed in the unshielded version of the same thruster at 300 V. At 9 kW and 800 V, saturation of the magnetic circuit did not permit us to attain precisely the same magnetic shielding topology as that employed during the 6-kW operation since this thruster was not designed to operate at this condition. Consequently, the maximum erosion rate at the inner wall is found to be 1 order of magnitude higher (10-1 mm/kh) than that at the 6-kW level. At the outer wall the ion energy is below the sputtering yield threshold so no measurable erosion is expected. The reasons behind the effectiveness of magnetic shielding at higher discharge voltages are discussed.

  14. Magnetic Response of Aromatic Rings Under Rotation: Aromatic Shielding Cone of Benzene Upon Different Orientations of the Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, A G; Charistos, N D; Muñoz-Castro, A

    2017-06-20

    The induced shielding cone is one of the most characteristic aspects of aromatic species. Herein, we explore its behavior under different orientations of the applied magnetic field by evaluating the overall and dissected π- and σ-electron contributions. Our results shed light onto the orientation dependence behavior of the shielding cone, unraveling a characteristic pattern upon rotation of the aromatic ring. This pattern decreases the long range of the magnetic response, such that it resembles the behavior under constant molecular tumbling in solution. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Magnetic Anomalies of the Fennoscandian Shield on a 2km resolution grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Juha V.; Aaro, Sven; Reidar Skilbrei, Jan; All, Tarmo

    2010-05-01

    Joint magnetic anomaly grid of the Fennoscandian Shield was released 2002, smoothed and used as data for the WDMAM2007. In comparison with MF5 this grid showed superior characteristics to other sets. The data will be released as a 2 km resolution grid for the WDMAM2011 with eventual updates of anomaly levels.

  16. Characteristics of magnetic shields for protection PMT in the LHCb hadron calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrenko, V. V.; Vlasik, K. F.; Grachev, V. M.; Muravyev-Smirnov, S. S.; Novikov, A. S.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Shustov, A. E.; Petrenko, D. V.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Lobova, E. I.; Nepochataya, O. E.

    2017-01-01

    CERN is preparing the new experiment aimed at the detection of weakly interacting massive long-lived particles. The experiment was called SHiP. The instrumental and technological solutions successfully used in experimental setups ATLAS, LHCb and others will be applied in experimental setup SHiP. One of these units is a hadrons calorimeter. It uses several thousands photomultiplier tubes (PMT) placed in protective magnetic shields because PMTs are located near strong permanent magnets. Taking into account that since the creation of the experimental setup LHCb has been passed more than 10 years and there are new manufacturing techniques of magnetic screens appeared, we investigate the characteristics of shielding screens used in the LHCb, and proposed the recommendations to magnetic screens’ designs for SHiP experiment.

  17. Magnetic Shielding of the Acceleration Channel Walls in a Long-Life Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.; de Grys, Kristi; Mathers, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In a Qualification Life Test (QLT) of the BPT-4000 Hall thruster that recently accumulated greater than 10,000 h it was found that the erosion of the acceleration channel practically stopped after approximately 5,600 h. Numerical simulations of this thruster using a 2-D axisymmetric, magnetic field-aligned-mesh (MFAM) plasma solver reveal that the process that led to this significant reduction of the erosion was multifaceted. It is found that when the channel receded from its early-in-life geometry to its steady-state configuration several changes in the near-wall plasma and sheath were induced by the magnetic field that, collectively, constituted an effective shielding of the walls from any significant ion bombardment. Because all such changes in the behavior of the ionized gas near the eroding surfaces were caused by the topology of the magnetic field there, we term this process "magnetic shielding."

  18. Magnetic Shielding of the Acceleration Channel Walls in a Long-Life Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.; de Grys, Kristi; Mathers, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In a Qualification Life Test (QLT) of the BPT-4000 Hall thruster that recently accumulated greater than 10,000 h it was found that the erosion of the acceleration channel practically stopped after approximately 5,600 h. Numerical simulations of this thruster using a 2-D axisymmetric, magnetic field-aligned-mesh (MFAM) plasma solver reveal that the process that led to this significant reduction of the erosion was multifaceted. It is found that when the channel receded from its early-in-life geometry to its steady-state configuration several changes in the near-wall plasma and sheath were induced by the magnetic field that, collectively, constituted an effective shielding of the walls from any significant ion bombardment. Because all such changes in the behavior of the ionized gas near the eroding surfaces were caused by the topology of the magnetic field there, we term this process "magnetic shielding."

  19. Kinetic shielding of magnetic islands in 3-D equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegna, C. C.

    2010-11-01

    Kinetic theory is employed to calculate corrections to analytic predictions of saturated magnetic islands due to pressure gradients in 3-D magnetic configurations. The theory calculates the dominant trapped particle response to 3-D field induced net bounce averaged radial drifts. The associated kinetic response describes plasma currents that flow within magnetic surfaces. In general, these currents have a component that resonates with the helical angle of the magnetic island and affect saturated island sizes through the parallel currents generated to satisfy quasineutrality. The resulting kinetic response generally opposes the effects of singular Pfirsch-Schlüter currents that arise at the rational surfaces of general 3-D MHD equilibria. Accounting for both the MHD and kinetic responses, self-consistent magnetic island widths are calculated using Ampere's law. The kinetic effect is largest at lowest collisionality suggesting high-β stellarators are more resilient to retaining flux surface integrity at high-temperatures than predictions from conventional MHD based theory would imply.

  20. Double-layer rotor magnetic shield performance analysis in high temperature superconducting synchronous generators under short circuit fault conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hekmati, Arsalan; Aliahmadi, Mehdi

    2016-12-01

    High temperature superconducting, HTS, synchronous machines benefit from a rotor magnetic shield in order to protect superconducting coils against asynchronous magnetic fields. This magnetic shield, however, suffers from exerted Lorentz forces generated in light of induced eddy currents during transient conditions, e.g. stator windings short-circuit fault. In addition, to the exerted electromagnetic forces, eddy current losses and the associated effects on the cryogenic system are the other consequences of shielding HTS coils. This study aims at investigating the Rotor Magnetic Shield, RMS, performance in HTS synchronous generators under stator winding short-circuit fault conditions. The induced eddy currents in different circumferential positions of the rotor magnetic shield along with associated Joule heating losses would be studied using 2-D time-stepping Finite Element Analysis, FEA. The investigation of Lorentz forces exerted on the magnetic shield during transient conditions has also been performed in this paper. The obtained results show that double line-to-ground fault is of the most importance among different types of short-circuit faults. It was revealed that when it comes to the design of the rotor magnetic shields, in addition to the eddy current distribution and the associated ohmic losses, two phase-to-ground fault should be taken into account since the produced electromagnetic forces in the time of fault conditions are more severe during double line-to-ground fault.

  1. Shielding of longitudinal magnetic fields with thin, closely, spaced concentric cylindrical shells with applications to atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, S. A.; Gubser, D. U.; Cox, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    A general formula is given for the longitudinal shielding effectiveness of N closed concentric cylinders. The use of these equations is demonstrated by application to the design of magnetic shields for hydrogen maser atomic clocks. Examples of design tradeoffs such as size, weight, and material thickness are discussed. Experimental results on three sets of shields fabricated by three manufacturers are presented. Two of the sets were designed employing the techniques described. Agreement between the experimental results and the design calculations is then demonstrated.

  2. Fusion energy in an inertial electrostatic confinement device using a magnetically shielded grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedditch, John; Bowden-Reid, Richard; Khachan, Joe

    2015-10-01

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented, which shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales. The proposed device has the unusual property that it can avoid both the cusp losses of traditional magnetic fusion systems and the grid losses of traditional IEC configurations.

  3. Design of Magnetic Shielding and Field Coils for a TES X-Ray Microcalorimeter Test Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miniussi, Antoine R.; Adams, Joseph S.; Bandler, Simon R.; Chervenak, James A.; Datesman, Aaron M.; Doriese, William B.; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The performance of Transition-Edge Sensors (TES) and their SQUID multiplexed read-outs are very sensitive to the ambient magnetic field from Earth and fluctuations that can arise due to fluctuating magnetic fields outside of the focal plane assembly from the Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR).Thus, the experimental platform we are building to test the FPA of the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) of the Athena mission needs to include a series of shields and a coil in order to meet the following requirement of magnetic field density and uniformity.

  4. UCSD High Energy X-ray Timing Experiment magnetic shield design and test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Richard E.; Pelling, Michael R.; Hink, Paul L.

    1991-01-01

    Results are reported from an effort to define a passive magnetic field concept for the High Energy X-ray Timing Experiment (HEXTE), in the interest of reducing the detector-gain variations due to 0.5-1.0-sec timescale magnetic field variations. This will allow a sensitivity of the order of 1 percent of the HEXTE background. While aperture modulation and automatic gain control will minimize effects on timescales of tens of seconds and longer, passive magnetic shielding of the photomultiplier tubes will address 1-sec timescale variations due to aperture motions.

  5. Fusion energy in an inertial electrostatic confinement device using a magnetically shielded grid

    SciTech Connect

    Hedditch, John Bowden-Reid, Richard Khachan, Joe

    2015-10-15

    Theory for a gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion system is presented, which shows a net energy gain is possible if the grid is magnetically shielded from ion impact. A simplified grid geometry is studied, consisting of two negatively biased coaxial current-carrying rings, oriented such that their opposing magnetic fields produce a spindle cusp. Our analysis indicates that better than break-even performance is possible even in a deuterium-deuterium system at bench-top scales. The proposed device has the unusual property that it can avoid both the cusp losses of traditional magnetic fusion systems and the grid losses of traditional IEC configurations.

  6. A Monte Carlo-based radiation safety assessment for astronauts in an environment with confined magnetic field shielding.

    PubMed

    Geng, Changran; Tang, Xiaobin; Gong, Chunhui; Guan, Fada; Johns, Jesse; Shu, Diyun; Chen, Da

    2015-12-01

    The active shielding technique has great potential for radiation protection in space exploration because it has the advantage of a significant mass saving compared with the passive shielding technique. This paper demonstrates a Monte Carlo-based approach to evaluating the shielding effectiveness of the active shielding technique using confined magnetic fields (CMFs). The International Commission on Radiological Protection reference anthropomorphic phantom, as well as the toroidal CMF, was modeled using the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4. The penetrating primary particle fluence, organ-specific dose equivalent, and male effective dose were calculated for particles in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and solar particle events (SPEs). Results show that the SPE protons can be easily shielded against, even almost completely deflected, by the toroidal magnetic field. GCR particles can also be more effectively shielded against by increasing the magnetic field strength. Our results also show that the introduction of a structural Al wall in the CMF did not provide additional shielding for GCR; in fact it can weaken the total shielding effect of the CMF. This study demonstrated the feasibility of accurately determining the radiation field inside the environment and evaluating the organ dose equivalents for astronauts under active shielding using the CMF.

  7. Thermo-electromagnetic properties of a magnetically shielded superconductor strip: theoretical foundations and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, G. T.; Rauh, H.

    2013-10-01

    Numerical simulations of thermo-electromagnetic properties of a thin type-II superconductor strip surrounded by open cavity soft-magnetic shields and exposed to an oscillating transverse magnetic field are performed by resorting to the quasistatic approximation of a vector potential approach in conjunction with the classical description of conduction of heat. The underlying definition of the superconducting constituent makes use of an extended ‘smoothed’ Bean model of the critical state, which includes the field and temperature dependence of the induced supercurrent as well. The delineation of the magnetic shields exploits the reversible-paramagnet approximation in the Langevin form, as appropriate for magnetizations with narrow Z-type loops, and considers induced eddy currents too. The coolant is envisaged as acting like a bath that instantly takes away surplus heat. Based on the Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov approach and the backward Euler scheme, the numerical analysis at hand is tailored to the problem of a high width/thickness aspect ratio of the superconductor strip. Assigning representative materials characteristics and conditions of the applied magnetic field, the main findings for a practically relevant magnet configuration include: (i) an overall rise of the maximum temperature of the superconductor strip tending to saturation in a superconducting thermo-electromagnetic steady state above the operating temperature, magnetic shielding lending increased stability and smoothing the temperature profile along the width of the superconductor strip; (ii) a washing out of the profile of the magnetic induction and a lowering of its strength, a relaxation of the profile of the supercurrent density and an increase of its strength, a tightening of the power loss density and a reduction of its strength, all inside the superconductor strip. The hysteretic ac loss suffered by the superconductor strip is seen to be cut back or, at most, to converge on that of an

  8. Vorticity and magnetic shielding in a type-II superconductor.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Marco; Bicudo, Pedro; Sacramento, Pedro D

    2006-09-20

    We study in detail, solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations, the magnetic field, supercurrent and order parameter profiles originated by a solenoid or magnetic whisker inserted in a type-II superconductor. We consider solutions of different vorticities, n, in the various cases. The results confirm the connection between the vorticity, the internal currents and the boundstates in a self-consistent way. The number of boundstates is given by the vorticity of the phase of the gap function as in the case with no external solenoid. In the limiting case of an infinitely thin solenoid, like a Dirac string, the solution is qualitatively different. The quasiparticle spectrum and wavefunctions are a function of n-n(ext), where n(ext) is the vorticity of the solenoid. The flux is in all cases determined by the vorticity of the gap function.

  9. Use of a radio frequency shield during 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: experimental evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Favazza, Christopher P; King, Deirdre M; Edmonson, Heidi A; Felmlee, Joel P; Rossman, Phillip J; Hangiandreou, Nicholas J; Watson, Robert E; Gorny, Krzysztof R

    2014-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) shields have been recently developed for the purpose of shielding portions of the patient’s body during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. We present an experimental evaluation of a commercially available RF shield in the MRI environment. All tests were performed on 1.5 T and 3.0 T clinical MRI scanners. The tests were repeated with and without the RF shield present in the bore, for comparison. Effects of the shield, placed within the scanner bore, on the RF fields generated by the scanner were measured directly using tuned pick-up coils. Attenuation, by as much as 35 dB, of RF field power was found inside the RF shield. These results were supported by temperature measurements of metallic leads placed inside the shield, in which no measurable RF heating was found. In addition, there was a small, simultaneous detectable increase (∼1 dB) of RF power just outside the edges of the shield. For these particular scanners, the autocalibrated RF power levels were reduced for scan locations prescribed just outside the edges of the shield, which corresponded with estimations based on the pick-up coil measurements. Additionally, no significant heating during MRI scanning was observed on the shield surface. The impact of the RF shield on the RF fields inside the magnet bore is likely to be dependent on the particular model of the RF shield or the MRI scanner. These results suggest that the RF shield could be a valuable tool for clinical MRI practices. PMID:25378957

  10. Atom interferometry in space: thermal management and magnetic shielding.

    PubMed

    Milke, Alexander; Kubelka-Lange, André; Gürlebeck, Norman; Rievers, Benny; Herrmann, Sven; Schuldt, Thilo; Braxmaier, Claus

    2014-08-01

    Atom interferometry is an exciting tool to probe fundamental physics. It is considered especially apt to test the universality of free fall by using two different sorts of atoms. The increasing sensitivity required for this kind of experiment sets severe requirements on its environments, instrument control, and systematic effects. This can partially be mitigated by going to space as was proposed, for example, in the Spacetime Explorer and Quantum Equivalence Principle Space Test (STE-QUEST) mission. However, the requirements on the instrument are still very challenging. For example, the specifications of the STE-QUEST mission imply that the Feshbach coils of the atom interferometer are allowed to change their radius only by about 260 nm or 2.6 × 10(-4) % due to thermal expansion although they consume an average power of 22 W. Also Earth's magnetic field has to be suppressed by a factor of 10(5). We show in this article that with the right design such thermal and magnetic requirements can indeed be met and that these are not an impediment for the exciting physics possible with atom interferometers in space.

  11. Atom interferometry in space: Thermal management and magnetic shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Milke, Alexander; Kubelka-Lange, André; Gürlebeck, Norman Rievers, Benny; Herrmann, Sven; Schuldt, Thilo; Braxmaier, Claus

    2014-08-15

    Atom interferometry is an exciting tool to probe fundamental physics. It is considered especially apt to test the universality of free fall by using two different sorts of atoms. The increasing sensitivity required for this kind of experiment sets severe requirements on its environments, instrument control, and systematic effects. This can partially be mitigated by going to space as was proposed, for example, in the Spacetime Explorer and Quantum Equivalence Principle Space Test (STE-QUEST) mission. However, the requirements on the instrument are still very challenging. For example, the specifications of the STE-QUEST mission imply that the Feshbach coils of the atom interferometer are allowed to change their radius only by about 260 nm or 2.6 × 10{sup −4} % due to thermal expansion although they consume an average power of 22 W. Also Earth's magnetic field has to be suppressed by a factor of 10{sup 5}. We show in this article that with the right design such thermal and magnetic requirements can indeed be met and that these are not an impediment for the exciting physics possible with atom interferometers in space.

  12. Engineering Nanostructures by Decorating Magnetic Nanoparticles onto Graphene Oxide Sheets to Shield Electromagnetic Radiations.

    PubMed

    Mural, Prasanna Kumar S; Pawar, Shital Patangrao; Jayanthi, Swetha; Madras, Giridhar; Sood, Ajay K; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2015-08-05

    In this study, a minimum reflection loss of -70 dB was achieved for a 6 mm thick shield (at 17.1 GHz frequency) employing a unique approach. This was accomplished by engineering nanostructures through decoration of magnetic nanoparticles (nickel, Ni) onto graphene oxide (GO) sheets. Enhanced electromagnetic (EM) shielding was derived by selectively localizing the nanoscopic particles in a specific phase of polyethylene (PE)/poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) blends. By introduction of a conducting inclusion (like multiwall carbon nanotubes, MWNTs) together with the engineered nanostructures (nickel-decorated GO, GO-Ni), the shielding efficiency can be enhanced significantly in contrast to physically mixing the particles in the blends. For instance, the composites showed a shielding efficiency >25 dB for a combination of MWNTs (3 wt %) and Ni nanoparticles (52 wt %) in PE/PEO blends. However, similar shielding effectiveness could be achieved for a combination of MWNTs (3 wt %) and 10 vol % of GO-Ni where in the effective concentration of Ni was only 19 wt %. The GO-Ni sheets facilitated in an efficient charge transfer as manifested from high electrical conductivity in the blends besides enhancing the permeability in the blends. It is envisioned that GO is simultaneously reduced in the process of synthesizing GO-Ni, and this facilitated in efficient charge transfer between the neighboring CNTs. More interestingly, the blends with MWNTs/GO-Ni attenuated the incoming EM radiation mostly by absorption. This study opens new avenues in designing polyolefin-based lightweight shielding materials by engineering nanostructures for numerous applications.

  13. Conductive shield for ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging: Theory and measurements of eddy currents

    PubMed Central

    Zevenhoven, Koos C. J.; Busch, Sarah; Hatridge, Michael; Öisjöen, Fredrik; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Clarke, John

    2014-01-01

    Eddy currents induced by applied magnetic-field pulses have been a common issue in ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging. In particular, a relatively large prepolarizing field—applied before each signal acquisition sequence to increase the signal—induces currents in the walls of the surrounding conductive shielded room. The magnetic-field transient generated by the eddy currents may cause severe image distortions and signal loss, especially with the large prepolarizing coils designed for in vivo imaging. We derive a theory of eddy currents in thin conducting structures and enclosures to provide intuitive understanding and efficient computations. We present detailed measurements of the eddy-current patterns and their time evolution in a previous-generation shielded room. The analysis led to the design and construction of a new shielded room with symmetrically placed 1.6-mm-thick aluminum sheets that were weakly coupled electrically. The currents flowing around the entire room were heavily damped, resulting in a decay time constant of about 6 ms for both the measured and computed field transients. The measured eddy-current vector maps were in excellent agreement with predictions based on the theory, suggesting that both the experimental methods and the theory were successful and could be applied to a wide variety of thin conducting structures. PMID:24753629

  14. Low Frequency Plasma Oscillations in a 6-kW Magnetically Shielded Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorns, Benjamin A.; Hofery, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    The oscillations from 0-100 kHz in a 6-kW magnetically shielded thruster are experimen- tally characterized. Changes in plasma parameters that result from the magnetic shielding of Hall thrusters have the potential to significantly alter thruster transients. A detailed investigation of the resulting oscillations is necessary both for the purpose of determin- ing the underlying physical processes governing time-dependent behavior in magnetically shielded thrusters as well as for improving thruster models. In this investigation, a high speed camera and a translating ion saturation probe are employed to examine the spatial extent and nature of oscillations from 0-100 kHz in the H6MS thruster. Two modes are identified at 8 kHz and 75-90 kHz. The low frequency mode is azimuthally uniform across the thruster face while the high frequency oscillation is concentrated close to the thruster centerline with an m = 1 azimuthal dependence. These experimental results are discussed in the context of wave theory as well as published observations from an unshielded variant of the H6MS thruster.

  15. Leading-order relativistic effects on nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Pekka; Ruud, Kenneth; Lantto, Perttu; Vaara, Juha

    2005-03-15

    We present perturbational ab initio calculations of the nuclear-spin-dependent relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors that constitute, together with the other relativistic terms reported by us earlier, the full leading-order perturbational set of results for the one-electron relativistic contributions to this observable, based on the (Breit-)Pauli Hamiltonian. These contributions are considered for the H(2)X (X = O,S,Se,Te,Po) and HX (X = F,Cl,Br,I,At) molecules, as well as the noble gas (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn) atoms. The corrections are evaluated using the relativistic and magnetic operators as perturbations on an equal footing, calculated using analytical linear and quadratic response theory applied on top of a nonrelativistic reference state provided by self-consistent field calculations. The (1)H and heavy-atom nuclear magnetic shielding tensors are compared with four component, nearly basis-set-limit Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations that include positronic excitations, as well as available literature data. Besides the easy interpretability of the different contributions in terms of familiar nonrelativistic concepts, the accuracy of the present perturbational scheme is striking for the isotropic part of the shielding tensor, for systems including elements up to Xe.

  16. Aluminum/vacuum multilayer configuration for spatial high-energy electron shielding via electron return effects induced by magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tuo; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Ni, Minxuan; Huang, Hai; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Da

    2017-06-26

    Radiation shielding of high-energy electrons is critical for successful space missions. However, conventional passive shielding systems exhibit several limitations, such as heavy configuration, poor shielding ability, and strong secondary bremsstrahlung radiation. In this work, an aluminum/vacuum multilayer structure was proposed based on the electron return effects induced by magnetic field. The shielding property of several configurations was evaluated by using the Monte Carlo method. Results showed that multilayer systems presented improved shielding ability to electrons, and less secondary x-ray transmissions than those of conventional systems. Moreover, the influences of magnetic flux density and number of layers on the shielding property of multilayer systems were investigated using a female Chinese hybrid reference phantom based on cumulative dose. In the case of two aluminum layers, the cumulative dose in a phantom gradually decreased with increasing magnetic flux density. The maximum decline rate was found within 0.4-1 Tesla. With increasing layers of configuration, the cumulative dose decreased and the shielding ability improved. This research provides effective shielding measures for future space radiation protection in high-energy electron environments.

  17. Experimental characterization of the hydride 1H shielding tensors for HIrX2(PR3)2 and HRhCl2(PR3)2: extremely shielded hydride protons with unusually large magnetic shielding anisotropies.

    PubMed

    Garbacz, Piotr; Terskikh, Victor V; Ferguson, Michael J; Bernard, Guy M; Kędziorek, Mariusz; Wasylishen, Roderick E

    2014-02-20

    The hydride proton magnetic shielding tensors for a series of iridium(III) and rhodium(III) complexes are determined. Although it has long been known that hydridic protons for transition-metal hydrides are often extremely shielded, this is the first experimental determination of the shielding tensors for such complexes. Isolating the (1)H NMR signal for a hydride proton requires careful experimental strategies because the spectra are generally dominated by ligand (1)H signals. We show that this can be accomplished for complexes containing as many as 66 ligand protons by substituting the latter with deuterium and by using hyperbolic secant pulses to selectively irradiate the hydride proton signal. We also demonstrate that the quality of the results is improved by performing experiments at the highest practical magnetic field (21.14 T for the work presented here). The hydride protons for iridium hydride complexes HIrX2(PR3)2 (X = Cl, Br, or I; R = isopropyl, cyclohexyl) are highly shielded with isotropic chemical shifts of approximately -50 ppm and are also highly anisotropic, with spans (=δ11 - δ33) ranging from 85.1 to 110.7 ppm. The hydridic protons for related rhodium complexes HRhCl2(PR3)2 also have unusual magnetic shielding properties with chemical shifts and spans of approximately -32 and 85 ppm, respectively. Relativistic density functional theory computations were performed to determine the orientation of the principal components of the hydride proton shielding tensors and to provide insights into the origin of these highly anisotropic shielding tensors. The results of our computations agree well with experiment, and our conclusions concerning the importance of relativistic effects support those recently reported by Kaupp and co-workers.

  18. Structural Analysis of Thermal Shields During a Quench of a Torus Magnet for the 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor, Orlando; Willard, Thomas; Ghoshal, Probir K.; Kashy, David H.; Wiseman, Mark A.; Kashikhin, V.; Young, Glenn R.; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Rode, Claus H.

    2015-06-01

    A toroidal magnet system consisting of six superconducting coils is being built for the Jefferson Lab 12- GeV accelerator upgrade project. This paper details the analysis of eddy current effects during a quench event on the aluminum thermal shield. The shield has been analyzed for mechanical stresses induced as a result of a coil quench as well as a fast discharge of the complete magnet system. The shield has been designed to reduce the eddy current effects and result in stresses within allowable limits.

  19. Evaluation of Superconducting Magnet Shield Configurations for Long Duration Manned Space Missions.

    PubMed

    Ambroglini, Filippo; Battiston, Roberto; Burger, William J

    2016-01-01

    A manned mission to Mars would present an important long-term health risk to the crew members due to the prolonged exposure to the ionizing radiation of galactic cosmic-rays. The radiation levels would largely exceed those encountered in the Apollo missions. An increase in the passive shielding provided by the spacecraft implies a significant increase of the mass. The advent of superconducting magnets in the early 1960s was considered an attractive alternative. The technology allows to generate magnetic fields capable to deflect the cosmic-rays in a manner analogous to the reduction of the particle fluxes in the upper atmosphere due to the Earth's dipole magnetic field. A series of the three studies have been conducted over the last 5 years, funded successively by European Space Agency (ESA), the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) program, and the Union European's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7). The shielding configurations studied are based on high-temperature superconductors, which eliminate the need to operate with liquid helium. The mass estimates of the coils and supporting structure of the engineering designs are based on the current and expected near-future performance of the superconducting materials. In each case, the shield performance, in terms of dose reduction, is provided by a 3-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation, which treats in detail the electromagnetic and hadronic interactions of the galactic-cosmic rays, and the secondary particles they produce in the materials of the shield and spacecraft. A summary of the results of the studies, representing one of the most detailed and comprehensive efforts made in the field, is presented.

  20. Evaluation of Superconducting Magnet Shield Configurations for Long Duration Manned Space Missions

    PubMed Central

    Ambroglini, Filippo; Battiston, Roberto; Burger, William J.

    2016-01-01

    A manned mission to Mars would present an important long-term health risk to the crew members due to the prolonged exposure to the ionizing radiation of galactic cosmic-rays. The radiation levels would largely exceed those encountered in the Apollo missions. An increase in the passive shielding provided by the spacecraft implies a significant increase of the mass. The advent of superconducting magnets in the early 1960s was considered an attractive alternative. The technology allows to generate magnetic fields capable to deflect the cosmic-rays in a manner analogous to the reduction of the particle fluxes in the upper atmosphere due to the Earth’s dipole magnetic field. A series of the three studies have been conducted over the last 5 years, funded successively by European Space Agency (ESA), the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) program, and the Union European’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7). The shielding configurations studied are based on high-temperature superconductors, which eliminate the need to operate with liquid helium. The mass estimates of the coils and supporting structure of the engineering designs are based on the current and expected near-future performance of the superconducting materials. In each case, the shield performance, in terms of dose reduction, is provided by a 3-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation, which treats in detail the electromagnetic and hadronic interactions of the galactic-cosmic rays, and the secondary particles they produce in the materials of the shield and spacecraft. A summary of the results of the studies, representing one of the most detailed and comprehensive efforts made in the field, is presented. PMID:27376023

  1. Four-component relativistic theory for nuclear magnetic shielding constants: critical assessments of different approaches.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yunlong; Liu, Wenjian; Cheng, Lan; Peng, Daoling

    2007-06-07

    Both formal and numerical analyses have been carried out on various exact and approximate variants of the four-component relativistic theory for nuclear magnetic shielding constants. These include the standard linear response theory (LRT), the full or external field-dependent unitary transformations of the Dirac operator, as well as the orbital decomposition approach. In contrast with LRT, the latter schemes take explicitly into account both the kinetic and magnetic balances between the large and small components of the Dirac spinors, and are therefore much less demanding on the basis sets. In addition, the diamagnetic contributions, which are otherwise "missing" in LRT, appear naturally in the latter schemes. Nevertheless, the definitions of paramagnetic and diamagnetic terms are not the same in the different schemes, but the difference is only of O(c(-2)) and thus vanishes in the nonrelativistic limit. It is shown that, as an operator theory, the full field-dependent unitary transformation approach cannot be applied to singular magnetic fields such as that due to the magnetic point dipole moment of a nucleus. However, the inherent singularities can be avoided by the corresponding matrix formulation (with a partial closed summation). All the schemes are combined with the Dirac-Kohn-Sham ansatz for ground state calculations, and by using virtually complete basis sets a new and more accurate set of absolute nuclear magnetic resonance shielding scales for the rare gases He-Rn have been established.

  2. Lithospheric sources of magnetic anomalies of the Aldan shield and Alpha Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinova, Tamara; Petrova, Alevtina

    2013-04-01

    Regional anomaly Aldan Shield is dated to ancient greenstone belt of the earth's crust. Belt is characterized by high depth forming sequences. Rocks of the upper and middle part of the section contain ferruginous quartzite. Geomagnetic and density sections allowed to estimate the power density and magnetic crustal heterogeneities. The methodology of constructing the cuts is the spectral-spatial representation of the fields, convertible into the underlying magnetic and density cuts. According to satellite data confirms the presence of regional anomalies within the Aldan shield, at an altitude of 100 km, it is about 100 nT. The presence of the Central Aldan crast-mantle fault depth of 50-80 km defines metallogenic situation of the region. The structure of the Aldan Shield detects rotational structure. Regional magnetic anomalies arc tangent frame Central Aldan region. May suggest that such behavior of anomalies is caused by of the ancient (Pre-Cambrian) fireplace mantle (the nucleus). Studies have shown that lithospheric sources Aldan shield on satellite magnetic anomalies and magnetic anomalies (ΔT) a Russia are located at depths of 30 to 35 and 40 to 70 km. They are confined to vertical zone deconsolidated at depths of about 30 and 40 - 70 km. By magnetic anomalies (ΔT) a Russian in the crust of the Aldan shield a depth of 15 - 17 km and 25 - 30 km depth revealed magnetite zone, the formation of which is due to the processes of regional metamorphism of ancient crust. Studies have shown the limits of the depth distribution of magnetite zones, mosaic developed within the crust of the Aldan shield after repeated activation of the processes of regional metamorphism.Alpha Ridge in the Arctic Ocean is one of the largest igneous provinces in the world. Tectonic history of the Arctic while not significantly deciphered. Deep structure of the Earth's crust are poorly understood Linearly elongated magnetic anomalies Alpha Ridge clearly seen at the height of the satellite

  3. Design of a magnetic shielding system for the time of flight enhanced diagnostics neutron spectrometer at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Cui, Z Q; Chen, Z J; Xie, X F; Peng, X Y; Hu, Z M; Du, T F; Ge, L J; Zhang, X; Yuan, X; Xia, Z W; Hu, L Q; Zhong, G Q; Lin, S Y; Wan, B N; Fan, T S; Chen, J X; Li, X Q; Zhang, G H

    2014-11-01

    The novel neutron spectrometer TOFED (Time of Flight Enhanced Diagnostics), comprising 90 individual photomultiplier tubes coupled with 85 plastic scintillation detectors through light guides, has been constructed and installed at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. A dedicated magnetic shielding system has been constructed for TOFED, and is designed to guarantee the normal operation of photomultiplier tubes in the stray magnetic field leaking from the tokamak device. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations carried out employing the finite element method are combined to optimize the design of the magnetic shielding system. The system allows detectors to work properly in an external magnetic field of 200 G.

  4. On the magnetic shielding anisotropy at the lithium sites of zeolite Li4Na8A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimiczek, B.; Greth, R.; Boddenberg, B.

    6Li NMR spectra under static and magic angle spinning conditions of a 33% lithium exchanged zeolite NaA were investigated. The asymmetric shape of the static spectra is due to the combined action of axially symmetric lectric field gradient and magnetic shielding tensors with a common principal axis coordinate frame. The anisotropy of the shielding tensor is evaluated to be Δσ=-21 ppm. The unusually large modulus of Δσ can be reproduced approximately with a model which considers the atoms surrounding the reference 6Li cations as spherical charge distributions. It is concluded that the lithium cations are located on the threefold symmetry axes normal to the six-ring planes in the near neighbourhood of the six oxygen atoms. This conclusion is corroborated by the agreement the calculated and experimentally determined dipolar linewidths.

  5. Nuclear relaxation in an electric field enables the determination of isotropic magnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that in contrast to the case of nuclear relaxation in a magnetic field B, simultaneous application of the magnetic field B and an additional electric field E causes transverse relaxation of a spin-1/2 nucleus with the rate proportional to the square of the isotropic part of the magnetic shielding tensor. This effect can contribute noticeably to the transverse relaxation rate of heavy nuclei in molecules that possess permanent electric dipole moments. Relativistic quantum mechanical computations indicate that for 205Tl nucleus in a Pt-Tl bonded complex, Pt(CN)5Tl, the transverse relaxation rate induced by the electric field is of the order of 1 s-1 at E = 5 kV/mm and B = 10 T.

  6. A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Altarev, I.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Kuchler, F.; Lins, T.; Marino, M.; McAndrew, J.; Niessen, B.; Paul, S.; Petzoldt, G.; Singh, J.; Stoepler, R.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taubenheim, B.; Babcock, E.; Beck, D.; Sharma, S.; Burghoff, M.; Fan, I.; and others

    2014-07-15

    A versatile and portable magnetically shielded room with a field of (700 ± 200) pT within a central volume of 1 m × 1 m × 1 m and a field gradient less than 300 pT/m, achieved without any external field stabilization or compensation, is described. This performance represents more than a hundredfold improvement of the state of the art for a two-layer magnetic shield and provides an environment suitable for a next generation of precision experiments in fundamental physics at low energies; in particular, searches for electric dipole moments of fundamental systems and tests of Lorentz-invariance based on spin-precession experiments. Studies of the residual fields and their sources enable improved design of future ultra-low gradient environments and experimental apparatus. This has implications for developments of magnetometry beyond the femto-Tesla scale in, for example, biomagnetism, geosciences, and security applications and in general low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements.

  7. Magnetic Shielding of the Channel Walls in a Hall Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.; deGrys, Kristi; Mathers, Alex

    2011-01-01

    In a qualification life test of a Hall thruster it was found that the erosion of the acceleration channel practically stopped after approx 5,600 h. Numerical simulations using a two-dimensional axisymmetric plasma solver with a magnetic field-aligned mesh reveal that when the channel receded from its early-in-life to its steady-state configuration the following changes occurred near the wall: (1) reduction of the electric field parallel to the wall that prohibited ions from acquiring significant impact kinetic energy before entering the sheath, (2) reduction of the potential fall in the sheath that further diminished the total energy ions gained before striking the material, and (3) reduction of the ion number density that decreased the flux of ions to the wall. All these changes, found to have been induced by the magnetic field, constituted collectively an effective shielding of the walls from any significant ion bombardment. Thus, we term this process in Hall thrusters "magnetic shielding."

  8. A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altarev, I.; Babcock, E.; Beck, D.; Burghoff, M.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Chupp, T.; Degenkolb, S.; Fan, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Frei, A.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Kuchler, F.; Lauer, T.; Link, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M.; McAndrew, J.; Niessen, B.; Paul, S.; Petzoldt, G.; Schläpfer, U.; Schnabel, A.; Sharma, S.; Singh, J.; Stoepler, R.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taubenheim, B.; Trahms, L.; Voigt, J.; Zechlau, T.

    2014-07-01

    A versatile and portable magnetically shielded room with a field of (700 ± 200) pT within a central volume of 1 m × 1 m × 1 m and a field gradient less than 300 pT/m, achieved without any external field stabilization or compensation, is described. This performance represents more than a hundredfold improvement of the state of the art for a two-layer magnetic shield and provides an environment suitable for a next generation of precision experiments in fundamental physics at low energies; in particular, searches for electric dipole moments of fundamental systems and tests of Lorentz-invariance based on spin-precession experiments. Studies of the residual fields and their sources enable improved design of future ultra-low gradient environments and experimental apparatus. This has implications for developments of magnetometry beyond the femto-Tesla scale in, for example, biomagnetism, geosciences, and security applications and in general low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements.

  9. A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient.

    PubMed

    Altarev, I; Babcock, E; Beck, D; Burghoff, M; Chesnevskaya, S; Chupp, T; Degenkolb, S; Fan, I; Fierlinger, P; Frei, A; Gutsmiedl, E; Knappe-Grüneberg, S; Kuchler, F; Lauer, T; Link, P; Lins, T; Marino, M; McAndrew, J; Niessen, B; Paul, S; Petzoldt, G; Schläpfer, U; Schnabel, A; Sharma, S; Singh, J; Stoepler, R; Stuiber, S; Sturm, M; Taubenheim, B; Trahms, L; Voigt, J; Zechlau, T

    2014-07-01

    A versatile and portable magnetically shielded room with a field of (700 ± 200) pT within a central volume of 1 m × 1 m × 1 m and a field gradient less than 300 pT/m, achieved without any external field stabilization or compensation, is described. This performance represents more than a hundredfold improvement of the state of the art for a two-layer magnetic shield and provides an environment suitable for a next generation of precision experiments in fundamental physics at low energies; in particular, searches for electric dipole moments of fundamental systems and tests of Lorentz-invariance based on spin-precession experiments. Studies of the residual fields and their sources enable improved design of future ultra-low gradient environments and experimental apparatus. This has implications for developments of magnetometry beyond the femto-Tesla scale in, for example, biomagnetism, geosciences, and security applications and in general low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements.

  10. Magnetic Shielding of the Channel Walls in a Hall Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.; deGrys, Kristi; Mathers, Alex

    2011-01-01

    In a qualification life test of a Hall thruster it was found that the erosion of the acceleration channel practically stopped after approx 5,600 h. Numerical simulations using a two-dimensional axisymmetric plasma solver with a magnetic field-aligned mesh reveal that when the channel receded from its early-in-life to its steady-state configuration the following changes occurred near the wall: (1) reduction of the electric field parallel to the wall that prohibited ions from acquiring significant impact kinetic energy before entering the sheath, (2) reduction of the potential fall in the sheath that further diminished the total energy ions gained before striking the material, and (3) reduction of the ion number density that decreased the flux of ions to the wall. All these changes, found to have been induced by the magnetic field, constituted collectively an effective shielding of the walls from any significant ion bombardment. Thus, we term this process in Hall thrusters "magnetic shielding."

  11. Design of a Laboratory Hall Thruster with Magnetically Shielded Channel Walls, Phase I: Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.

    2011-01-01

    In a proof-of-principle effort to demonstrate the feasibility of magnetically shielded (MS) Hall thrusters, an existing laboratory thruster has been modified with the guidance of physics-based numerical simulation. When operated at a discharge power of 6-kilowatts the modified thruster has been designed to reduce the total energy and flux of ions to the channel insulators by greater than 1 and greater than 3 orders of magnitude, respectively. The erosion rates in this MS thruster configuration are predicted to be at least 2-4 orders of magnitude lower than those in the baseline (BL) configuration. At such rates no detectable erosion is expected to occur.

  12. Relativistic, QED, and nuclear mass effects in the magnetic shielding of 3He.

    PubMed

    Rudziński, Adam; Puchalski, Mariusz; Pachucki, Krzysztof

    2009-06-28

    The magnetic shielding sigma of (3)He is studied. The complete relativistic corrections of order O(alpha(2)), leading QED corrections of order O(alpha(3) ln alpha), and finite nuclear mass effects of order O(m/m(N)) are calculated with high numerical precision. The resulting theoretical predictions for sigma = 59.967 43(10)x10(-6) are the most accurate to date among all elements and support the use of (3)He as a NMR standard.

  13. Converging Nuclear Magnetic Shielding Calculations with Respect to Basis and System Size in Protein Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Joshua D.; Neubauer, Thomas J.; Caulkins, Bethany G.; Mueller, Leonard J.; Beran, Gregory J. O.

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio chemical shielding calculations greatly facilitate the interpretation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts in biological systems, but the large sizes of these systems requires approximations in the chemical models used to represent them. Achieving good convergence in the predicted chemical shieldings is necessary before one can unravel how other complex structural and dynamical factors affect the NMR measurements. Here, we investigate how to balance trade-offs between using a better basis set or a larger cluster model for predicting the chemical shieldings of the substrates in two representative examples of protein-substrate systems involving different domains in tryptophan synthase: the N-(4′-trifluoromethoxybenzoyl)-2-aminoethyl phosphate (F9) ligand which binds in the α active site, and the 2-aminophenol (2AP) quinonoid intermediate formed in the β active site. We first demonstrate that a chemically intuitive three-layer, locally dense basis model that uses a large basis on the substrate, a medium triple-zeta basis to describe its hydrogen-bonding partners and/or surrounding van derWaals cavity, and a crude basis set for more distant atoms provides chemical shieldings in good agreement with much more expensive large basis calculations. Second, long-range quantum mechanical interactions are important, and one can accurately estimate them as a small-basis correction to larger-basis calculations on a smaller cluster. The combination of these approaches enables one to perform density functional theory NMR chemical shift calculations in protein systems that are well-converged with respect to both basis set and cluster size. PMID:25993979

  14. Analysis of the bond-valence method for calculating (29) Si and (31) P magnetic shielding in covalent network solids.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Sean T; Alkan, Fahri; Iuliucci, Robbie J; Mueller, Karl T; Dybowski, Cecil

    2016-07-05

    (29) Si and (31) P magnetic-shielding tensors in covalent network solids have been evaluated using periodic and cluster-based calculations. The cluster-based computational methodology employs pseudoatoms to reduce the net charge (resulting from missing co-ordination on the terminal atoms) through valence modification of terminal atoms using bond-valence theory (VMTA/BV). The magnetic-shielding tensors computed with the VMTA/BV method are compared to magnetic-shielding tensors determined with the periodic GIPAW approach. The cluster-based all-electron calculations agree with experiment better than the GIPAW calculations, particularly for predicting absolute magnetic shielding and for predicting chemical shifts. The performance of the DFT functionals CA-PZ, PW91, PBE, rPBE, PBEsol, WC, and PBE0 are assessed for the prediction of (29) Si and (31) P magnetic-shielding constants. Calculations using the hybrid functional PBE0, in combination with the VMTA/BV approach, result in excellent agreement with experiment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Thermal protection performance of magnetohydrodynamic heat shield system based on multipolar magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Li; Jun, Liu; Weiqiang, Liu

    2017-07-01

    In order to cover the shortage of dipole magnetic field in the magnetohydrodynamic(MHD) heat shield system, physical model of a multipolar magnetic field with central and peripheral solenoids is constructed. By employing the governing equations of three dimensional thermochemical nonequilibrium flow with electromagnetic source terms based on the low magneto-Reynolds assumption, the flow control performance of the dipole and multipolar magnetic fields are numerically simulated. To make the results comparable, two groups of cases are designed by first assuming equal stagnation magnetic induction strength and secondly assuming equal ampere-turns. Results show that, the five-magnet system, whose central polar orientation is the same with the peripheral ones, have stronger work capability and better shock control and thermal protection performance. Moreover, the five-solenoid systems are the best when the ampere-turns of the central solenoid are twice and fourth of the peripheral ones under those two circumstances respectively. Compared with the dipole magnetic field, the stagnation non-catalytic heat fluxes are decreased by a factor of 47.5% and 34.0% respectively.

  16. Light alters nociceptive effects of magnetic field shielding in mice: intensity and wavelength considerations

    PubMed Central

    Prato, Frank S; Desjardins-Holmes, Dawn; Keenliside, Lynn D; McKay, Julia C; Robertson, John A; Thomas, Alex W

    2008-01-01

    Previous experiments with mice have shown that repeated 1 hour daily exposure to an ambient magnetic field-shielded environment induces analgesia (antinociception). The exposures were carried out in the dark (less than 2.0×1016 photons s−1 m−2) during the mid-light phase of the diurnal cycle. However, if the mice were exposed in the presence of visible light (2.0×1018 photons s−1 m−2, 400–750 nm), then the analgesic effects of shielding were eliminated. Here, we show that this effect of light is intensity and wavelength dependent. Introduction of red light (peak at 635 nm) had little or no effect, presumably because mice do not have photoreceptors sensitive to red light above 600 nm in their eyes. By contrast, introduction of ultraviolet light (peak at 405 nm) abolished the effect, presumably because mice do have ultraviolet A receptors. Blue light exposures (peak at 465 nm) of different intensities demonstrate that the effect has an intensity threshold of approximately 12% of the blue light in the housing facility, corresponding to 5×1016 photons s−1 m−2 (integral). This intensity is similar to that associated with photoreceptor-based magnetoreception in birds and in mice stimulates photopic/cone vision. Could the detection mechanism that senses ambient magnetic fields in mice be similar to that in bird navigation? PMID:18583276

  17. Shielding of External Magnetic Perturbations By Torque In Rotating Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Boozer, Allen H.; Menard, Jonathan E.; Gerhardt, Stefan P.; Sabbagh, Steve A.

    2009-08-24

    The imposition of a nonaxisymmetric magnetic perturbation on a rotating tokamak plasma requires energy and toroidal torque. Fundamental electrodynamics implies that the torque is essentially limited and must be consistent with the external response of a plasma equilibrium ƒ = j x B. Here magnetic measurements on National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) device are used to derive the energy and the torque, and these empirical evaluations are compared with theoretical calculations based on perturbed scalar pressure equilibria ƒ = ∇p coupled with the theory of nonambipolar transport. The measurement and the theory are consistent within acceptable uncertainties, but can be largely inconsistent when the torque is comparable to the energy. This is expected since the currents associated with the torque are ignored in scalar pressure equilibria, but these currents tend to shield the perturbation.

  18. An Actively Shielded 1.5T MgB2 MRI Magnet Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Michael; Baig, Tanvir; Cara, Mihai; Brown, Robert; Doll, David; Tomsic, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Superconducting magnets for MRI are often constructed with NbTi wire cooled below 4.2K using liquid helium. As helium costs have more than tripled in the last decade, there is a need for a cryogen-free conduction-cooled alternative. A key reason for pursuing MgB2 superconductor wire in the design of MRI magnets is its superior critical current compared to NbTi over a temperature range of 10-15K. We present a 1.5T whole body actively shielded main magnet design assuming second-generation multifilament MgB2 wire using an improved functional approach. The design exhibits 4 pairs of primary bundles and 1 pair of shielding bundles with an inner (outer) diameter of 1.1 (1.89)m and a length of 1.54m. The imaging volume is 45cm with a maximum of 9ppm inhomogeneity. The wire dimension is assumed to be 1mm2 and the wire current is 135A. The maximum field on a wire is found to be 4.1T well below the critical field value of approximately 6T at 10K for the second-generation wire. The 5-Gauss footprint for the new magnet is found to be 2.7 (3.7)m in the radial (axial) direction. The maximum hoop stress and axial force on a bundle, respectively, are 82.9MPa and 2680.2kN. Trade-offs for the reduction of any given parameter are analyzed. Support from the Ohio Third Frontier and NIH Contract No. 5R44CA144415-03

  19. The break of shielding current at pulsed field magnetization of a superconducting annulus (experiment and model simulation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkov, V. S.; Krasnoperov, E. P.; Kartamyshev, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    During the pulsed field magnetization of a high-T c annulus in liquid nitrogen the shielding current drops abruptly, providing rapid penetration of the magnetic flux into the hole of the superconductor. After the break of current the trapped field in the hole is small and negative although the body of the annulus remains highly magnetized. In the present work the current breaking effect is investigated both experimentally and numerically. The influence of the pulse parameter on the shielding current evolution during the break is researched. A simple model for the qualitative description of this process is proposed. The model shows the development of heating localized on the inhomogeneity of the high-temperature superconductor annulus providing the formation of a high resistive channel with temperature near to T c. The appearance of this hot channel leads to the rapid reduction of the shielding current and presents a new scenario of flux jump at high temperature.

  20. Treatment of scalar-relativistic effects on nuclear magnetic shieldings using a spin-free exact-two-component approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lan; Gauss, Jürgen; Stanton, John F.

    2013-08-01

    A cost-effective treatment of scalar-relativistic effects on nuclear magnetic shieldings based on the spin-free exact-two-component theory in its one-electron variant (SFX2C-1e) is presented. The SFX2C-1e scheme gains its computational efficiency, in comparison to the four-component approach, from a focus on spin-free contributions and from the elimination of the small component. For the calculation of nuclear magnetic shieldings, the separation of spin-free and spin-dependent terms in the parent four-component theory is carried out here for the matrix representation of the Dirac equation in terms of a restricted-magnetically balanced gauge-including atomic orbital basis. The resulting spin-free four-component matrix elements required to calculate nuclear magnetic shieldings are then used to construct the corresponding SFX2C-1e Hamiltonian and its perturbed counterpart in the context of SFX2C-1e analytic derivative theory. To demonstrate the applicability of the approach, we report coupled-cluster calculations for prototypical problems such as the 17O shieldings of transition-metal oxo complexes (MO_4^{2-}, M = Cr, Mo, and W) and the 129Xe shieldings of xenon fluorides (XeF2, XeF4, and XeF6).

  1. Third-Scale Prototype of a Shielded Magnet for Measurement of the Electric Dipole Moment of the Neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Aritra

    2015-10-01

    Discovery of an electric dipole moment in neutrons (nEDM) would be a novel instance of CP violation, with implications for extending the Standard Model and potentially helping explain matter-antimatter asymmetry. Experiments using shifts in polarized neutron spin-precession frequency to measure the nEDM are prone to a geometric phase (GP) effect, caused by gradients of the magnetic field, that can create a false signal. Preventing the GP effect requires precise engineering to create a space-uniform magnetic field. We present a third-scale prototype of a shielded magnet suitable for a more precise nEDM measurement, with improvements over earlier models. The field is produced by a cosθ coil wound with superconducting (SC) wire. Two cylindrical shields made of ferromagnetic Metglas and SC lead surround the magnet; the lead shield is closed on top and bottom with SC lead endcaps. An aluminum shell surrounds these components and serves as a vacuum chamber, cooling its interior to 4 K such that the coil wire and lead shield become SC. A cavity in this shell serves as a warm bore, allowing a magnetic probe to explore the field around fiducial volumes which will be used to measure the nEDM in the full-scale experiment. The magnetic field profile of this prototype is presented.

  2. Design and validation of a large-format transition edge sensor array magnetic shielding system for space application.

    PubMed

    Bergen, A; van Weers, H J; Bruineman, C; Dhallé, M M J; Krooshoop, H J G; Ter Brake, H J M; Ravensberg, K; Jackson, B D; Wafelbakker, C K

    2016-10-01

    The paper describes the development and the experimental validation of a cryogenic magnetic shielding system for transition edge sensor based space detector arrays. The system consists of an outer mu-metal shield and an inner superconducting niobium shield. First, a basic comparison is made between thin-walled mu-metal and superconducting shields, giving an off-axis expression for the field inside a cup-shaped superconductor as a function of the transverse external field. Starting from these preliminary analytical considerations, the design of an adequate and realistic shielding configuration for future space flight applications (either X-IFU [D. Barret et al., e-print arXiv:1308.6784 [astro-ph.IM] (2013)] or SAFARI [B. Jackson et al., IEEE Trans. Terahertz Sci. Technol. 2, 12 (2012)]) is described in more detail. The numerical design and verification tools (static and dynamic finite element method (FEM) models) are discussed together with their required input, i.e., the magnetic-field dependent permeability data. Next, the actual manufacturing of the shields is described, including a method to create a superconducting joint between the two superconducting shield elements that avoid flux penetration through the seam. The final part of the paper presents the experimental verification of the model predictions and the validation of the shield's performance. The shields were cooled through the superconducting transition temperature of niobium in zero applied magnetic field (<10 nT) or in a DC field with magnitude ∼100 μT, applied either along the system's symmetry axis or perpendicular to it. After cool-down, DC trapped flux profiles were measured along the shield axis with a flux-gate magnetometer and the attenuation of externally applied AC fields (100 μT, 0.1 Hz, both axial and transverse) was verified along this axis with superconducting quantum interference device magnetometers. The system's measured on-axis shielding factor is greater than 10(6), well

  3. Design and validation of a large-format transition edge sensor array magnetic shielding system for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergen, A.; van Weers, H. J.; Bruineman, C.; Dhallé, M. M. J.; Krooshoop, H. J. G.; ter Brake, H. J. M.; Ravensberg, K.; Jackson, B. D.; Wafelbakker, C. K.

    2016-10-01

    The paper describes the development and the experimental validation of a cryogenic magnetic shielding system for transition edge sensor based space detector arrays. The system consists of an outer mu-metal shield and an inner superconducting niobium shield. First, a basic comparison is made between thin-walled mu-metal and superconducting shields, giving an off-axis expression for the field inside a cup-shaped superconductor as a function of the transverse external field. Starting from these preliminary analytical considerations, the design of an adequate and realistic shielding configuration for future space flight applications (either X-IFU [D. Barret et al., e-print arXiv:1308.6784 [astro-ph.IM] (2013)] or SAFARI [B. Jackson et al., IEEE Trans. Terahertz Sci. Technol. 2, 12 (2012)]) is described in more detail. The numerical design and verification tools (static and dynamic finite element method (FEM) models) are discussed together with their required input, i.e., the magnetic-field dependent permeability data. Next, the actual manufacturing of the shields is described, including a method to create a superconducting joint between the two superconducting shield elements that avoid flux penetration through the seam. The final part of the paper presents the experimental verification of the model predictions and the validation of the shield's performance. The shields were cooled through the superconducting transition temperature of niobium in zero applied magnetic field (<10 nT) or in a DC field with magnitude ˜100 μT, applied either along the system's symmetry axis or perpendicular to it. After cool-down, DC trapped flux profiles were measured along the shield axis with a flux-gate magnetometer and the attenuation of externally applied AC fields (100 μT, 0.1 Hz, both axial and transverse) was verified along this axis with superconducting quantum interference device magnetometers. The system's measured on-axis shielding factor is greater than 106, well exceeding

  4. Magnetic Shielding Studies of C2 and C2 H2 Support Higher than Triple Bond Multiplicity in C2.

    PubMed

    Karadakov, Peter B; Kirsopp, Josh

    2017-07-17

    The carbon-carbon bonds in the ground states of C2 and C2 H2 , at their equilibrium geometries, are compared by analysing the changes in the off-nucleus magnetic shielding tensor within the space surrounding each of these molecules. A wide range of quantum-chemical approaches, including full-valence CASSCF-GIAO, CCSD(T)-GIAO and CCSDT-GIAO, all with the cc-pVQZ basis set, as well as HF-GIAO and MP2-GIAO, with the cc-pVQZ, cc-pV5Z and cc-pV6Z basis sets, show that the surroundings of the carbon-carbon bond in C2 are more shielded than those of the carbon-carbon bond in C2 H2 . The additional shielding of the carbon-carbon bond in C2 is found to be due to a larger paramagnetic contribution to the component of the shielding tensor which is perpendicular to the molecular axis. The analysis of the off-nucleus shielding data indicates that the carbon-carbon bond in C2 is "bulkier" and, therefore, of a higher multiplicity, but weaker than the corresponding bond in C2 H2 . According to the results of the shielding calculations, the carbon nuclei in C2 should be much more shielded than those in C2 H2 , with (13) C isotropic magnetic shieldings in the ranges of around 224-227 ppm and around 123-125 ppm for C2 and C2 H2 , respectively. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A miniature continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator with compact shielded superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, Jean-Marc; Cain, Benjamin M.; Timbie, Peter T.

    2004-10-01

    Cryogenic detectors for astrophysics depend on cryocoolers capable of achieving temperatures below ~ 100 mK. In order to provide continuous cooling at 50 mK for space or laboratory applications, we are designing a miniature adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (MADR) anchored at a reservoir at 5 K. Continuous cooling is obtained by the use of several paramagnetic pills placed in series with heat switches. All operations are fully electronic and this technology can be adapted fairly easily for a wide range of temperatures and cooling powers. We are focusing on reducing the size and mass of the cooler. For that purpose we have developed and tested magnetoresistive heat switches based on single crystals of tungsten. Several superconducting magnets are required for this cooler and we have designed and manufactured compact magnets. A special focus has been put on the reduction of parasitic magnetic fields in the cold stage, while minimizing the mass of the shields. A prototype continuous MADR, using magnetoresistive heat switches, small paramagnetic pills and compact magnets has been tested. A design of MADR that will provide ~ 5 uW of continuous cooling down to 50 mK is described.

  6. Design and fabrication of liquid nitrogen thermal shields for the MFTF yin-yang magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.L.; Chang, Y.; VanSant, J.H.

    1981-10-12

    This paper documents the design and fabrication of thin liquid nitrogen-cooled panels installed on the 340-ton MFTF yin-yang superconducting magnet system. The 344 panels are made of polished 316-L stainless steel with the pillowed fluid channels formed by inflation with a high pressure gas. Strict leak-rate limits required the manufacturer to thermal shock the panels with LN/sub 2/ and then vacuum leak check them with He. The thin-walled panel supports are made from an epoxy base, fiberglass composite which is reliable at cryogenic vacuum conditions. Quick and reliable welding of the manifold system was assured using a pair of automated tube welders on the more than 4000 feet of tubing and 1000 butt-weld fittings. To assure sufficient flow for single-phase LN/sub 2/ flow conditions, we performed a hydraulic network flow analysis. This allowed for some optimization of shield-inlet-flow conditions and manifold design. To verify operating fluid pressure and temperature, special pressure transducers and platinum resistance thermometers capable of operation at cryogenic conditions in a vacuum, high magnetic field, and long-term neutron bombardment were installed. Final assembly is complete. The final installation on the magnet was difficult due to the orientation of the magnet assembly and the restricted access to some installation surfaces.

  7. Theoretical gas to liquid shift of (15)N isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding in nitromethane using ab initio molecular dynamics and GIAO/GIPAW calculations.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Iann C; Jolibois, Franck

    2015-05-14

    Chemical shift requires the knowledge of both the sample and a reference magnetic shielding. In few cases as nitrogen (15N), the standard experimental reference corresponds to its liquid phase. Theoretical estimate of NMR magnetic shielding parameters of compounds in their liquid phase is then mandatory but usually replaced by an easily-get gas phase value, forbidding direct comparisons with experiments. We propose here to combine ab initio molecular dynamic simulations with the calculations of magnetic shielding using GIAO approach on extracted cluster's structures from MD. Using several computational strategies, we manage to accurately calculate 15N magnetic shielding of nitromethane in its liquid phase. Theoretical comparison between liquid and gas phase allows us to extrapolate an experimental value for the 15N magnetic shielding of nitromethane in gas phase between -121.8 and -120.8 ppm.

  8. Magnetic shielding of a laboratory Hall thruster. I. Theory and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Ioannis G. Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2014-01-28

    We demonstrate a technique by which erosion of the acceleration channel in Hall thrusters can be reduced by at least a few orders of magnitude. The first principles of the technique, now known as “magnetic shielding,” have been derived based on the findings of 2-D numerical simulations. The simulations, in turn, guided the modification of an existing 6-kW laboratory Hall thruster to test the theory and are the main subject of this Part I article. Part II expands on the results of the experiments. Near the walls of the magnetically shielded (MS) thruster theory and experiment agree that (1) the plasma potential has been sustained at values near the discharge voltage, and (2) the electron temperature has been lowered compared to the unshielded thruster. Erosion rates deduced directly from the wall probes show reductions of at least ∼3 orders of magnitude at the MS inner wall when an ion energy threshold of 30.5 V is used in the sputtering yield model of the channel material. At the outer wall the probes reveal that the ion energy was below the assumed threshold. Using a threshold of 25 V, the simulations predict a minimum reduction of ∼600 at the MS inner wall. At the MS outer wall ion energies are found to be below 25 V. When a 50-V threshold is used the computed ion energies are below the threshold at both sides of the channel. Uncertainties, sensitivities, and differences between theory and experiment are also discussed. The elimination of wall erosion in Hall thrusters solves a problem that has remained unsettled for more than five decades.

  9. A three-axis atomic magnetometer for temperature-dependence measurements of fields in a magnetically shielded environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wenfeng; Liu, Gang; Li, Rujie; Quan, Wei; Jiang, Liwei; Duan, Lihong

    2017-09-01

    High performance spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) gyroscopes require stable and homogeneous magnetic fields. These fields are usually sensitive to temperature. In this paper, a three-axis atomic magnetometer to measure the temperature dependence of fields inside the magnetic shields for a SERF gyroscope prototype is constructed and tested. Based on a three-beam configuration, three-axis vector capability is obtained by a cross-modulation scheme of the magnetic field components along orthogonal axes and subsequent demodulation of the relevant probe signals. The relative temperature dependence of magnetic fields inside the prototype shields is measured to be 0.03 -0.12~K-1 . The results are useful for estimating the necessary precision of temperature control in both a SERF gyroscope and its fundamental physics applications.

  10. Mechanism analysis of Magnetohydrodynamic heat shield system and optimization of externally applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai; Liu, Jun; Liu, Weiqiang

    2017-04-01

    As a novel thermal protection technique for hypersonic vehicles, Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) heat shield system has been proved to be of great intrinsic value in the hypersonic field. In order to analyze the thermal protection mechanisms of such a system, a physical model is constructed for analyzing the effect of the Lorentz force components in the counter and normal directions. With a series of numerical simulations, the dominating Lorentz force components are analyzed for the MHD heat flux mitigation in different regions of a typical reentry vehicle. Then, a novel magnetic field with variable included angle between magnetic induction line and streamline is designed, which significantly improves the performance of MHD thermal protection in the stagnation and shoulder areas. After that, the relationships between MHD shock control and MHD thermal protection are investigated, based on which the magnetic field above is secondarily optimized obtaining better performances of both shock control and thermal protection. Results show that the MHD thermal protection is mainly determined by the Lorentz force's effect on the boundary layer. From the stagnation to the shoulder region, the flow deceleration effect of the counter-flow component is weakened while the flow deflection effect of the normal component is enhanced. Moreover, there is no obviously positive correlation between the MHD shock control and thermal protection. But once a good Lorentz force's effect on the boundary layer is guaranteed, the thermal protection performance can be further improved with an enlarged shock stand-off distance by strengthening the counter-flow Lorentz force right after shock.

  11. Improved ferrous shielding for flat cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drechsler, R. J.

    1969-01-01

    To improve shielding of flat multicore cables, a thin, seamless ferrous shield around all cores optimizes low frequency magnetic shielding. Such shielding is covered with an ultrathin seamless coat of highly conductive nonferrous material.

  12. Structural setting and magnetic properties of pseudotachylyte in a deep crustal shear zone, western Canadian shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini, O. F.; Mahan, K. H.; Brown, L. L.; Regan, S.; Williams, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic slip commonly produces pseudotachylytes, a glassy vein-filling substance that is typically interpreted as either a frictional melt or an ultra-triturated cataclasite. In either form, pseudotachylytes are commonly magnetite enriched, even in magnetite-free host rocks, and therefore are potentially useful as high fidelity recorders of natural magnetic fields at the time of slip in a wide array of lithologies. Pseudotachylytes generally have high magnetic susceptibility and thus should preserve the dominant field present as the material passes the Curie temperatures of magnetic minerals, primarily magnetite. Two potential sources have been proposed for the dominant magnetic field recorded: the earth's magnetic field at the time of slip or the temporary and orders of magnitude more intense field created by the presence of coseismic currents along the failure plane. Pseudotachylytes of the Cora Lake shear zone (CLsz) in the Athabasca Granulite Terrain, western Canadian shield, are consistently hosted in high strain ultramylonitic orthogneiss. Sinistral and extensional oblique-slip in the CLsz occurred at high-pressure granulite-grade conditions of ~1.0 GPa and >800°C and may have persisted to somewhat lower P-T conditions (~0.8 GPa, 700 °C) during ductile deformation. Pseudotachylyte-bearing slip surfaces have sinistral offset, matching the larger shear zone, and clasts of wall rock in the more brecciated veins display field evidence for ductile shear along the same plane prior to brittle failure. The presence of undeformed pseudotachylyte in kinematically compatible fracture arrays localized in ultramylonite indicates that brittle failure may have occurred in the waning stages of shear zone activity and at similar deep crustal conditions. Field-documented occurrences of pseudotachylyte include 2 cm-thick veins that run subparallel to mylonitic foliation and contain small flow-aligned clasts and large, heavily brecciated foliation-crosscutting zones up to

  13. Magnetic field dependence of shielding current density in Y-Ba-Cu-O rings at 77 K

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, M.; Majoros, M.; Hanic, F.; Pitel, J.; Kedrova, M.; Kottman, P.; Talapa, J.; Vencel, L. )

    1989-06-01

    A method for contactless measurement of the shielding critical current density and its dependence on the external magnetic field is described and analyzed. The obtained values are compared with those measured resistively on two different samples. It is shown that the shielding critical current density J{sub cs} and the intergranular transport current density J{sub ct} are identical if the measurement conditions are similar. A degradation of J{sub cs} measured in the external field with AC ripple has been observed.

  14. A high-Tc SQUID micro-detector with a high performance magnetic shield for contaminant detection in industrial products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Fujita, H.; Hatsukade, Y.; Otani, T.; Suzuki, S.; Nagaishi, T.

    2007-11-01

    A high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) system for the detection of magnetic foreign matter in industrial products was developed. There is a possibility that ultra-small metallic foreign matter has been accidentally mixed with industrial products such as lithium ion batteries. Metallic particles with outer dimensions less than 100 µm cannot be detected by conventional x-ray imaging. Therefore we developed a detection system based on a high-Tc SQUID microscope with a high performance magnetic shield. The use of SQUID microscopes with a 0.5 mm thick vacuum window was proposed. This design enables the SQUID to approach the object to be measured as close as 1 mm and enhances the sensitivity. A new magnetic shield with sleeves was carefully designed and built. As a result, we could successfully measure small particles sized 100 µm. This detection level was hard to achieve using a conventional x-ray detection method.

  15. Modified carbon fiber/magnetic graphene/epoxy composites with synergistic effect for electromagnetic interference shielding over broad frequency band.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiaming; Ye, Zhengmao; Ge, Heyi; Chen, Juan; Liu, Wenxiu; Liu, Zhifang

    2017-11-15

    The study on electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials is a long-standing project in civil and military areas. In this work, a novel kind of shielding material was fabricated and the shielding effectiveness (SE) over broad frequency was investigated. The epoxy (EP) resin was reinforced by reduced graphene oxide coated carbon fiber (rGO-CF, GCF) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles deposited rGO nanohybrids (magnetic graphene, MG). With only 0.5wt% of GCF and 9wt% of MG, the GCF/MG3/EP exhibited excellent SE (>30dB over 8.2-26.5GHz) and a maximum value of 51.1dB at 26.5GHz, which had a 31.7% increase than that of GCF/EP. The 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modified MG (NMG) gained better dispersion in resin and could further increased absorbing property of composites. The synergistic effect between GCF and MG raised by 3D interpenetration structure of the ternary nanocomposite was favorable for high efficient shielding in wide frequency range. This composites show promise in lightweight and high-efficiency EMI shielding field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A simple scheme for magnetic balance in four-component relativistic Kohn-Sham calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants in a Gaussian basis.

    PubMed

    Olejniczak, Małgorzata; Bast, Radovan; Saue, Trond; Pecul, Magdalena

    2012-01-07

    We report the implementation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensors within the four-component relativistic Kohn-Sham density functional theory including non-collinear spin magnetization and employing London atomic orbitals to ensure gauge origin independent results, together with a new and efficient scheme for assuring correct balance between the large and small components of a molecular four-component spinor in the presence of an external magnetic field (simple magnetic balance). To test our formalism we have carried out calculations of NMR shielding tensors for the HX series (X = F, Cl, Br, I, At), the Xe atom, and the Xe dimer. The advantage of simple magnetic balance scheme combined with the use of London atomic orbitals is the fast convergence of results (when compared with restricted kinetic balance) and elimination of linear dependencies in the basis set (when compared to unrestricted kinetic balance). The effect of including spin magnetization in the description of NMR shielding tensor has been found important for hydrogen atoms in heavy HX molecules, causing an increase of isotropic values of 10%, but negligible for heavy atoms.

  17. Chelatoaromaticity--existing: yes or no? An answer given by spatial magnetic properties (through space NMR shieldings--TSNMRS).

    PubMed

    Kleinpeter, Erich; Koch, Andreas

    2011-12-14

    The spatial magnetic properties (through space NMR shieldings--TSNMRS) of metal complexes (with ligands such as acetylacetone, 3-hydroxy-pyran(4)one) and "metallobenzenes" have been calculated by the GIAO perturbation method and visualized as Iso-Chemical-Shielding Surfaces (ICSS) of various sizes and directions. The TSNMRS values, thus obtained, can be successfully employed to quantify and visualize partial aromaticity of the metallocyclic ring by comparison with the spatial magnetic properties of the corresponding non-complexed ligands in comparable structural and electronic situations, and benzene, respectively. Because anisotropy/ring current effects in (1)H NMR spectra proved to be the molecular response property of TSNMRS, the results obtained concerning partial "chelatoaromaticity" are experimentally ensured.

  18. Plasma oscillations in a 6-kW magnetically shielded Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Jorns, Benjamin A. Hofer, Richard R.

    2014-05-15

    Plasma oscillations from 0–100 kHz in a 6-kW magnetically shielded Hall thruster are experimentally characterized with a high-speed, optical camera. Two modes are identified at 7–12 kHz and 70–90 kHz. The low frequency mode is found to be azimuthally uniform across the thruster face, while the high frequency oscillation is peaked close to the centerline-mounted cathode with an m = 1 azimuthal dependence. An analysis of these results in the context of wave-based theory suggests that the low frequency wave is the breathing mode oscillation, while the higher frequency mode is gradient-driven. The effect of these oscillations on thruster operation is examined through an analysis of thruster discharge current and a comparison with published observations from an unshielded variant of the thruster. Most notably, it is found that although the oscillation spectra of the two thrusters are different, they exhibit nearly identical steady-state behavior.

  19. Transient Weakening of Earth's Magnetic Shield Probed by a Cosmic Ray Burst.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, P K; Arunbabu, K P; Aziz, T; Dugad, S R; Gupta, S K; Hariharan, B; Jagadeesan, P; Jain, A; Morris, S D; Rao, B S; Hayashi, Y; Kawakami, S; Oshima, A; Shibata, S; Raha, S; Subramanian, P; Kojima, H

    2016-10-21

    The GRAPES-3 tracking muon telescope in Ooty, India measures muon intensity at high cutoff rigidities (15-24 GV) along nine independent directions covering 2.3 sr. The arrival of a coronal mass ejection on 22 June 2015 18:40 UT had triggered a severe G4-class geomagnetic storm (storm). Starting 19:00 UT, the GRAPES-3 muon telescope recorded a 2 h high-energy (∼20  GeV) burst of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) that was strongly correlated with a 40 nT surge in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Simulations have shown that a large (17×) compression of the IMF to 680 nT, followed by reconnection with the geomagnetic field (GMF) leading to lower cutoff rigidities could generate this burst. Here, 680 nT represents a short-term change in GMF around Earth, averaged over 7 times its volume. The GCRs, due to lowering of cutoff rigidities, were deflected from Earth's day side by ∼210° in longitude, offering a natural explanation of its night-time detection by the GRAPES-3. The simultaneous occurrence of the burst in all nine directions suggests its origin close to Earth. It also indicates a transient weakening of Earth's magnetic shield, and may hold clues for a better understanding of future superstorms that could cripple modern technological infrastructure on Earth, and endanger the lives of the astronauts in space.

  20. Closed bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: active magnetic shielding of x-ray tubes.

    PubMed

    Bracken, John A; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J A

    2009-05-01

    Hybrid closed bore x-ray/MRI systems are being developed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures by harnessing the complementary strengths of the x-ray and MRI modalities in a single interventional suite without requiring patient transfer between two rooms. These systems are composed of an x-ray C-arm in close proximity (approximately 1 m) to an MRI scanner. The MRI magnetic fringe field can cause the electron beam in the x-ray tube to deflect. The deflection causes the x-ray field of view to shift position on the detector receptacle. This could result in unnecessary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Therefore, the electron beam deflection must be corrected. The authors developed an active magnetic shielding system that can correct for electron beam deflection to within an accuracy of 5% without truncating the field of view or increasing exposure to the patient. This system was able to automatically adjust to different field strengths as the external magnetic field acting on the x-ray tube was changed. Although a small torque was observed on the shielding coils of the active shielding system when they were placed in a magnetic field, this torque will not impact their performance if they are securely mounted on the x-ray tube and the C-arm. The heating of the coils of the shielding system for use in the clinic caused by electric current was found to be slow enough not to require a dedicated cooling system for one percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedure. However, a cooling system will be required if multiple procedures are performed in one session.

  1. Closed bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: Active magnetic shielding of x-ray tubes

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, John A.; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Hybrid closed bore x-ray∕MRI systems are being developed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures by harnessing the complementary strengths of the x-ray and MRI modalities in a single interventional suite without requiring patient transfer between two rooms. These systems are composed of an x-ray C-arm in close proximity (≈1 m) to an MRI scanner. The MRI magnetic fringe field can cause the electron beam in the x-ray tube to deflect. The deflection causes the x-ray field of view to shift position on the detector receptacle. This could result in unnecessary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Therefore, the electron beam deflection must be corrected. The authors developed an active magnetic shielding system that can correct for electron beam deflection to within an accuracy of 5% without truncating the field of view or increasing exposure to the patient. This system was able to automatically adjust to different field strengths as the external magnetic field acting on the x-ray tube was changed. Although a small torque was observed on the shielding coils of the active shielding system when they were placed in a magnetic field, this torque will not impact their performance if they are securely mounted on the x-ray tube and the C-arm. The heating of the coils of the shielding system for use in the clinic caused by electric current was found to be slow enough not to require a dedicated cooling system for one percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedure. However, a cooling system will be required if multiple procedures are performed in one session. PMID:19544789

  2. Closed bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: Active magnetic shielding of x-ray tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bracken, John A.; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J. A.

    2009-05-15

    Hybrid closed bore x-ray/MRI systems are being developed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures by harnessing the complementary strengths of the x-ray and MRI modalities in a single interventional suite without requiring patient transfer between two rooms. These systems are composed of an x-ray C-arm in close proximity ({approx_equal}1 m) to an MRI scanner. The MRI magnetic fringe field can cause the electron beam in the x-ray tube to deflect. The deflection causes the x-ray field of view to shift position on the detector receptacle. This could result in unnecessary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Therefore, the electron beam deflection must be corrected. The authors developed an active magnetic shielding system that can correct for electron beam deflection to within an accuracy of 5% without truncating the field of view or increasing exposure to the patient. This system was able to automatically adjust to different field strengths as the external magnetic field acting on the x-ray tube was changed. Although a small torque was observed on the shielding coils of the active shielding system when they were placed in a magnetic field, this torque will not impact their performance if they are securely mounted on the x-ray tube and the C-arm. The heating of the coils of the shielding system for use in the clinic caused by electric current was found to be slow enough not to require a dedicated cooling system for one percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedure. However, a cooling system will be required if multiple procedures are performed in one session.

  3. Critical Analysis of Cluster Models and Exchange-Correlation Functionals for Calculating Magnetic Shielding in Molecular Solids.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Sean T; Iuliucci, Robbie J; Mueller, Karl T; Dybowski, Cecil

    2015-11-10

    Calculations of the principal components of magnetic-shielding tensors in crystalline solids require the inclusion of the effects of lattice structure on the local electronic environment to obtain significant agreement with experimental NMR measurements. We assess periodic (GIPAW) and GIAO/symmetry-adapted cluster (SAC) models for computing magnetic-shielding tensors by calculations on a test set containing 72 insulating molecular solids, with a total of 393 principal components of chemical-shift tensors from 13C, 15N, 19F, and 31P sites. When clusters are carefully designed to represent the local solid-state environment and when periodic calculations include sufficient variability, both methods predict magnetic-shielding tensors that agree well with experimental chemical-shift values, demonstrating the correspondence of the two computational techniques. At the basis-set limit, we find that the small differences in the computed values have no statistical significance for three of the four nuclides considered. Subsequently, we explore the effects of additional DFT methods available only with the GIAO/cluster approach, particularly the use of hybrid-GGA functionals, meta-GGA functionals, and hybrid meta-GGA functionals that demonstrate improved agreement in calculations on symmetry-adapted clusters. We demonstrate that meta-GGA functionals improve computed NMR parameters over those obtained by GGA functionals in all cases, and that hybrid functionals improve computed results over the respective pure DFT functional for all nuclides except 15N.

  4. Calculations of atomic magnetic nuclear shielding constants based on the two-component normalized elimination of the small component method.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Terutaka; Zou, Wenli; Cremer, Dieter

    2017-04-07

    A new method for calculating nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants of relativistic atoms based on the two-component (2c), spin-orbit coupling including Dirac-exact NESC (Normalized Elimination of the Small Component) approach is developed where each term of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic contribution to the isotropic shielding constant σiso is expressed in terms of analytical energy derivatives with regard to the magnetic field B and the nuclear magnetic moment . The picture change caused by renormalization of the wave function is correctly described. 2c-NESC/HF (Hartree-Fock) results for the σiso values of 13 atoms with a closed shell ground state reveal a deviation from 4c-DHF (Dirac-HF) values by 0.01%-0.76%. Since the 2-electron part is effectively calculated using a modified screened nuclear shielding approach, the calculation is efficient and based on a series of matrix manipulations scaling with (2M)(3) (M: number of basis functions).

  5. Calculations of atomic magnetic nuclear shielding constants based on the two-component normalized elimination of the small component method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Terutaka; Zou, Wenli; Cremer, Dieter

    2017-04-01

    A new method for calculating nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants of relativistic atoms based on the two-component (2c), spin-orbit coupling including Dirac-exact NESC (Normalized Elimination of the Small Component) approach is developed where each term of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic contribution to the isotropic shielding constant σi s o is expressed in terms of analytical energy derivatives with regard to the magnetic field B and the nuclear magnetic moment 𝝁 . The picture change caused by renormalization of the wave function is correctly described. 2c-NESC/HF (Hartree-Fock) results for the σiso values of 13 atoms with a closed shell ground state reveal a deviation from 4c-DHF (Dirac-HF) values by 0.01%-0.76%. Since the 2-electron part is effectively calculated using a modified screened nuclear shielding approach, the calculation is efficient and based on a series of matrix manipulations scaling with (2M)3 (M: number of basis functions).

  6. Magnetic shielding investigation for a 6 MV in-line linac within the parallel configuration of a linac-MR system.

    PubMed

    Santos, D M; St Aubin, J; Fallone, B G; Steciw, S

    2012-02-01

    In our current linac-magnetic resonance (MR) design, a 6 MV in-line linac is placed along the central axis of the MR's magnet where the MR's fringe magnetic fields are parallel to the overall electron trajectories in the linac waveguide. Our previous study of this configuration comprising a linac-MR SAD of 100 cm and a 0.5 T superconducting (open, split) MR imager. It showed the presence of longitudinal magnetic fields of 0.011 T at the electron gun, which caused a reduction in target current to 84% of nominal. In this study, passive and active magnetic shielding was investigated to recover the linac output losses caused by magnetic deflections of electron trajectories in the linac within a parallel linac-MR configuration. Magnetic materials and complex shield structures were used in a 3D finite element method (FEM) magnetic field model, which emulated the fringe magnetic fields of the MR imagers. The effects of passive magnetic shielding was studied by surrounding the electron gun and its casing with a series of capped steel cylinders of various inner lengths (26.5-306.5 mm) and thicknesses (0.75-15 mm) in the presence of the fringe magnetic fields from a commercial MR imager. In addition, the effects of a shield of fixed length (146.5 mm) with varying thicknesses were studied against a series of larger homogeneous magnetic fields (0-0.2 T). The effects of active magnetic shielding were studied by adding current loops around the electron gun and its casing. The loop currents, separation, and location were optimized to minimize the 0.011 T longitudinal magnetic fields in the electron gun. The magnetic field solutions from the FEM model were added to a validated linac simulation, consisting of a 3D electron gun (using OPERA-3d/scala) and 3D waveguide (using comsol Multiphysics and PARMELA) simulations. PARMELA's target current and output phase-space were analyzed to study the linac's output performance within the magnetic shields. The FEM model above agreed within 1

  7. 33S hyperfine interactions in H2S and SO2 and revision of the sulfur nuclear magnetic shielding scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helgaker, Trygve; Gauss, Jürgen; Cazzoli, Gabriele; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2013-12-01

    Using the Lamb-dip technique, the hyperfine structure in the rotational spectra of H233S and 33SO2 has been resolved and the corresponding parameters—that is, the sulfur quadrupole-coupling and spin-rotation tensors—were determined. The experimental parameters are in good agreement with results from high-level coupled-cluster calculations, provided that up to quadruple excitations are considered in the cluster operator, sufficiently large basis sets are used, and vibrational corrections are accounted for. The 33S spin-rotation tensor for H2S has been used to establish a new sulfur nuclear magnetic shielding scale, combining the paramagnetic part of the shielding as obtained from the spin-rotation tensor with a calculated value for the diamagnetic part as well as computed vibrational and temperature corrections. The value of 716(5) ppm obtained in this way for the sulfur shielding of H2S is in good agreement with results from high-accuracy quantum-chemical calculations but leads to a shielding scale that is about 28 ppm lower than the one suggested previously in the literature, based on the 33S spin-rotation constant of OCS.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants in XH4 group XIV hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszuński, Michał; Ruud, Kenneth

    2006-07-01

    Self-consistent field and multiconfigurational self-consistent field wave functions are used to analyse NMR shielding constants in the XH4 hydrides, X = C, Si, Ge, Sn and Pb. All relativistic corrections to order α4, where α is the fine structure constant, are included in the evaluation of the perturbation corrections to the non-relativistic shielding constants. Each of the relativistic corrections is compared to the results obtained for group XVI and XVII hydrides and noble-gas atoms. For the heavy nuclei, the computed relativistic corrections can be used to improve the absolute shielding scale.

  9. Improved field localization in transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain with the utilization of a conductive shield plate in the stimulator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hun; Georghiou, George E; Won, Chulho

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, a carefully designed conductive shield plate is presented, which helps to improve localization of the electric field distribution induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation for neuron stimulation. The shield plate is introduced between a figure-of-eight coil and the head. In order to accurately predict the field distribution inside the brain and to examine the effects of the shield plate, a realistic head model is constructed from magnetic resonance image data with the help of image processing tools and the finite-element method in three dimensions is employed. Finally, to show the improvements obtained, the results are compared with two conventional coil designs. It is found that an incorporation of the shield plate into the coil, effectively improves the induced field localization by more than 50%, and prevents other parts of the brain from exposure to high pulsed magnetic fields.

  10. WE-G-17A-09: Novel Magnetic Shielding Design for Inline and Perpendicular Integrated 6 MV Linac and 1.0 T MRI Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X; Ma, B; Kuang, Y; Diao, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The influence of fringe magnetic fields delivered by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the beam generation and transportation in Linac is still a major challenge for the integration of linear accelerator and MRI (Linac-MRI). In this study, we investigated an optimal magnetic shielding design for Linac-MRI and further characterized the beam trajectory in electron gun. Methods: Both inline and perpendicular configurations were analyzed in this study. The configurations, comprising a Linac-MRI with a 100cm SAD and an open 1.0 T superconductive magnet, were simulated by the 3D finite element method (FEM). The steel shielding around the Linac was included in the 3D model, the thickness of which was varied from 1mm to 20mm, and magnetic field maps were acquired with and without additional shielding. The treatment beam trajectory in electron gun was evaluated using OPERA 3d SCALA with and without shielding cases. Results: When Linac was not shielded, the uniformity of diameter sphere volume (DSV) (30cm) was about 5 parts per million (ppm) and the fringe magnetic fields in electron gun were more than 0.3 T. With shielding, the magnetic fields in electron gun were reduced to less than 0.01 T. For the inline configuration, the radial magnetic fields in the Linac were about 0.02T. A cylinder steel shield used (5mm thick) altered the uniformity of DSV to 1000 ppm. For the perpendicular configuration, the Linac transverse magnetic fields were more than 0.3T, which altered the beam trajectory significantly. A 8mm-thick cylinder steel shield surrounding the Linac was used to compensate the output losses of Linac, which shifted the magnetic fields' uniformity of DSV to 400 ppm. Conclusion: For both configurations, the Linac shielding was used to ensure normal operation of the Linac. The effect of magnetic fields on the uniformity of DSV could be modulated by the shimming technique of the MRI magnet. NIH/NIGMS grant U54 GM104944, Lincy Endowed Assistant Professorship.

  11. Influence of particle size on the magnetic spectrum of NiCuZn ferrites for electromagnetic shielding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohan; Yan, Shuoqing; Liu, Weihu; Feng, Zekun; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of ferrite particle size on the magnetic spectra (1 MHz to 1 GHz) of NiCuZn polycrystalline ferrites doped with Co2O3 and Bi2O3 were systematically investigated. The experiments indicate that the ferrite particle size tailored by grinding time and corresponding sintering temperatures is crucial to achieving high permeability, high Q-factor and low magnetic loss, at 13.56 MHz for electromagnetic shielding applications especially in the near field communication (NFC) field. It is evident that high-performance NiZnCu ferrite materials are strongly tailored by morphology and microstructure. It is conclusive that fine ferrite particles and relatively low sintering temperatures are favorable to lowering magnetic loss and enhancing permeability. This work has built a foundation for improvement of the ferrite slurry used for fabrication of large area tape-casting ferrite sheets.

  12. A deployable high temperature superconducting coil (DHTSC) - A novel concept for producing magnetic shields against both solar flare and Galactic radiation during manned interplanetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, F. Hadley

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of materials which are superconducting above 100 K makes possible the use of superconducting coils deployed beyong the hull of an interplanetary spacecraft to produce a magnetic shield capable of giving protection not only against solar flare radiation, but also even against Galactic radiation. Such deployed coils can be of very large size and can thus achieve the great magnetic moments required using only relatively low currents. Deployable high-temperature-superconducting coil magnetic shields appear to offer very substantial reductions in mass and energy compared to other concepts and could readily provide the radiation protection needed for a Mars mission or space colonies.

  13. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. II. Consideration of perturbations in the metric operator.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Ootani, Y; Fukui, H

    2007-05-07

    A previous relativistic shielding calculation theory based on the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component approach is improved by the inclusion of the magnetic interaction term contained in the metric operator. In order to consider effects of the metric perturbation, the self-consistent perturbation theory is used for the case of perturbation-dependent overlap integrals. The calculation results show that the second-order regular approximation results obtained for the isotropic shielding constants of halogen nuclei are well improved by the inclusion of the metric perturbation to reproduce the fully relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock results. However, it is shown that the metric perturbation hardly or does not affect the anisotropy of the halogen shielding tensors and the proton magnetic shieldings.

  14. Solvent effects on zero-point vibrational corrections to optical rotations and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongsted, Jacob; Ruud, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    We present a study of solvent effects on the zero-point vibrational corrections (ZPVC) to optical rotations and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants of solvated molecules. The model used to calculate vibrational corrections rely on an expansion of the potential and property surfaces around an effective molecular geometry and includes both harmonic and anharmonic corrections. Numerical examples are presented for ( S)-propylene oxide in various solvents as well as for acetone and the three diazene molecules. We find that solvent effects on the ZPVCs may be significant and in some cases crucial to accurately predict solvent shifts on molecular properties.

  15. Ab initio study of NMR shielding of alkali earth metal ions in water complexes and magnetic moments of alkali earth metal nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antušek, Andrej; Rodziewicz, Pawel; Keḑziera, Dariusz; Kaczmarek-Keḑziera, Anna; Jaszuński, Michał

    2013-11-01

    Ab initio calculations of NMR shielding constants of alkali earth metal ions in the series of water clusters are presented. The shielding constants for systems modeling the structure of the solvation layer of these ions are determined by adding to the coupled cluster singles-and-doubles (CCSD) results the calculated relativistic corrections. The relative magnitude of the dynamical effects, estimated for a typical solvated ion from Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics, is very small. The computed shielding constants are used next to obtain new values of the nuclear magnetic dipole moments of alkali earth metal nuclei.

  16. Development of a vector-tensor system to measure the absolute magnetic flux density and its gradient in magnetically shielded rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, J.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Gutkelch, D.; Neuber, S.; Schnabel, A.; Burghoff, M.; Haueisen, J.

    2015-05-15

    Several experiments in fundamental physics demand an environment of very low, homogeneous, and stable magnetic fields. For the magnetic characterization of such environments, we present a portable SQUID system that measures the absolute magnetic flux density vector and the gradient tensor. This vector-tensor system contains 13 integrated low-critical temperature (LTc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) inside a small cylindrical liquid helium Dewar with a height of 31 cm and 37 cm in diameter. The achievable resolution depends on the flux density of the field under investigation and its temporal drift. Inside a seven-layer mu-metal shield, an accuracy better than ±23 pT for the components of the static magnetic field vector and ±2 pT/cm for each of the nine components of the gradient tensor is reached by using the shifting method.

  17. Dynamical cancellation of pulse-induced transients in a metallic shielded room for ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zevenhoven, Koos C. J. Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Dong, Hui; Clarke, John

    2015-01-19

    Pulse-induced transients such as eddy currents can cause problems in measurement techniques where a signal is acquired after an applied preparatory pulse. In ultra-low-field magnetic resonance imaging, performed in magnetic fields typically of the order of 100 μT, the signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced in part by prepolarizing the proton spins with a pulse of much larger magnetic field and in part by detecting the signal with a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID). The pulse turn-off, however, can induce large eddy currents in the shielded room, producing an inhomogeneous magnetic-field transient that both seriously distorts the spin dynamics and exceeds the range of the SQUID readout. It is essential to reduce this transient substantially before image acquisition. We introduce dynamical cancellation (DynaCan), a technique in which a precisely designed current waveform is applied to a separate coil during the later part and turn off of the polarizing pulse. This waveform, which bears no resemblance to the polarizing pulse, is designed to drive the eddy currents to zero at the precise moment that the polarizing field becomes zero. We present the theory used to optimize the waveform using a detailed computational model with corrections from measured magnetic-field transients. SQUID-based measurements with DynaCan demonstrate a cancellation of 99%. Dynamical cancellation has the great advantage that, for a given system, the cancellation accuracy can be optimized in software. This technique can be applied to both metal and high-permeability alloy shielded rooms, and even to transients other than eddy currents.

  18. Influence of demagnetization coil configuration on residual field in an extremely magnetically shielded room: Model and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappe-Grueneberg, Silvia; Schnabel, Allard; Wuebbeler, Gerd; Burghoff, Martin

    2008-04-01

    The Berlin magnetically shielded room 2 (BMSR-2) features a magnetic residual field below 500pT and a field gradient level less than 0.5pT/mm, which are needed for very sensitive human biomagnetic recordings or low field NMR. Nevertheless, below 15Hz, signals are compromised by an additional noise contribution due to vibration forced sensor movements in the field gradient. Due to extreme shielding, the residual field and its homogeneity are determined mainly by the demagnetization results of the mumetal shells. Eight different demagnetization coil configurations can be realized, each results in a characteristic field pattern. The spatial dc flux density inside BMSR-2 is measured with a movable superconducting quantum interference device system with an accuracy better than 50pT. Residual field and field distribution of the current-driven coils fit well to an air-core coil model, if the high permeable core and the return lines outside of the shells are neglected. Finally, we homogenize the residual field by selecting a proper coil configuration.

  19. Quasirelativistic theory for the magnetic shielding constant. III. Quasirelativistic second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and its application to tellurium compounds.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ryoichi; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2005-07-22

    The quasirelativistic (QR) generalized unrestricted Hartree-Fock method for the magnetic shielding constant [R. Fukuda, M. Hada, and H. Nakatsuji, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 1015 (2003); R. Fukuda, M. Hada, and H. Nakatsuji, J. Chem. Phys.118, 1027 (2003)] has been extended to include the electron correlation effect in the level of the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). We have implemented the energy gradient and finite-perturbation methods to calculate the magnetic shielding constant at the QR MP2 level and applied to the magnetic shielding constants and the NMR chemical shifts of 125Te nucleus in various tellurium compounds. The calculated magnetic shielding constants and NMR chemical shifts well reproduced the experimental values. The relations of the chemical shifts with the natures of ligands, and the tellurium oxidation states were investigated. The chemical shifts in different valence states were explained by the paramagnetic shielding and spin-orbit terms. The tellurium 5p electrons are the dominant origin of the chemical shifts in the Te I and Te II compounds and the chemical shifts were explained by the p-hole mechanism. The tellurium d electrons also play an important role in the chemical shifts of the hypervalent compounds.

  20. Design of a Laboratory Hall Thruster with Magnetically Shielded Channel Walls, Phase III: Comparison of Theory with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    A proof-of-principle effort to demonstrate a technique by which erosion of the acceleration channel in Hall thrusters of the magnetic-layer type can be eliminated has been completed. The first principles of the technique, now known as "magnetic shielding," were derived based on the findings of numerical simulations in 2-D axisymmetric geometry. The simulations, in turn, guided the modification of an existing 6-kW laboratory Hall thruster. This magnetically shielded (MS) thruster was then built and tested. Because neither theory nor experiment alone can validate fully the first principles of the technique, the objective of the 2-yr effort was twofold: (1) to demonstrate in the laboratory that the erosion rates can be reduced by >order of magnitude, and (2) to demonstrate that the near-wall plasma properties can be altered according to the theoretical predictions. This paper concludes the demonstration of magnetic shielding by reporting on a wide range of comparisons between results from numerical simulations and laboratory diagnostics. Collectively, we find that the comparisons validate the theory. Near the walls of the MS thruster, theory and experiment agree: (1) the plasma potential has been sustained at values near the discharge voltage, and (2) the electron temperature has been lowered by at least 2.5-3 times compared to the unshielded (US) thruster. Also, based on carbon deposition measurements, the erosion rates at the inner and outer walls of the MS thruster are found to be lower by at least 2300 and 1875 times, respectively. Erosion was so low along these walls that the rates were below the resolution of the profilometer. Using a sputtering yield model with an energy threshold of 25 V, the simulations predict a reduction of 600 at the MS inner wall. At the outer wall ion energies are computed to be below 25 V, for which case we set the erosion to zero in the simulations. When a 50-V threshold is used the computed ion energies are below the threshold at both

  1. Design of a Laboratory Hall Thruster with Magnetically Shielded Channel Walls, Phase III: Comparison of Theory with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    A proof-of-principle effort to demonstrate a technique by which erosion of the acceleration channel in Hall thrusters of the magnetic-layer type can be eliminated has been completed. The first principles of the technique, now known as "magnetic shielding," were derived based on the findings of numerical simulations in 2-D axisymmetric geometry. The simulations, in turn, guided the modification of an existing 6-kW laboratory Hall thruster. This magnetically shielded (MS) thruster was then built and tested. Because neither theory nor experiment alone can validate fully the first principles of the technique, the objective of the 2-yr effort was twofold: (1) to demonstrate in the laboratory that the erosion rates can be reduced by >order of magnitude, and (2) to demonstrate that the near-wall plasma properties can be altered according to the theoretical predictions. This paper concludes the demonstration of magnetic shielding by reporting on a wide range of comparisons between results from numerical simulations and laboratory diagnostics. Collectively, we find that the comparisons validate the theory. Near the walls of the MS thruster, theory and experiment agree: (1) the plasma potential has been sustained at values near the discharge voltage, and (2) the electron temperature has been lowered by at least 2.5-3 times compared to the unshielded (US) thruster. Also, based on carbon deposition measurements, the erosion rates at the inner and outer walls of the MS thruster are found to be lower by at least 2300 and 1875 times, respectively. Erosion was so low along these walls that the rates were below the resolution of the profilometer. Using a sputtering yield model with an energy threshold of 25 V, the simulations predict a reduction of 600 at the MS inner wall. At the outer wall ion energies are computed to be below 25 V, for which case we set the erosion to zero in the simulations. When a 50-V threshold is used the computed ion energies are below the threshold at both

  2. Calculation of binary magnetic properties and potential energy curve in xenon dimer: second virial coefficient of (129)Xe nuclear shielding.

    PubMed

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Runeberg, Nino; Jokisaari, Jukka; Vaara, Juha

    2004-09-22

    Quantum chemical calculations of the nuclear shielding tensor, the nuclear quadrupole coupling tensor, and the spin-rotation tensor are reported for the Xe dimer using ab initio quantum chemical methods. The binary chemical shift delta, the anisotropy of the shielding tensor Delta sigma, the nuclear quadrupole coupling tensor component along the internuclear axis chi( parallel ), and the spin-rotation constant C( perpendicular ) are presented as a function of internuclear distance. The basis set superposition error is approximately corrected for by using the counterpoise correction (CP) method. Electron correlation effects are systematically studied via the Hartree-Fock, complete active space self-consistent field, second-order Møller-Plesset many-body perturbation, and coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) theories, the last one without and with noniterative triples, at the nonrelativistic all-electron level. We also report a high-quality theoretical interatomic potential for the Xe dimer, gained using the relativistic effective potential/core polarization potential scheme. These calculations used valence basis set of cc-pVQZ quality supplemented with a set of midbond functions. The second virial coefficient of Xe nuclear shielding, which is probably the experimentally best-characterized intermolecular interaction effect in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, is computed as a function of temperature, and compared to experiment and earlier theoretical results. The best results for the second virial coefficient, obtained using the CCSD(CP) binary chemical shift curve and either our best theoretical potential or the empirical potentials from the literature, are in good agreement with experiment. Zero-point vibrational corrections of delta, Delta sigma, chi (parallel), and C (perpendicular) in the nu=0, J=0 rovibrational ground state of the xenon dimer are also reported.

  3. Estimation of isotropic nuclear magnetic shieldings in the CCSD(T) and MP2 complete basis set limit using affordable correlation calculations.

    PubMed

    Kupka, Teobald; Stachów, Michał; Kaminsky, Jakub; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2013-08-01

    A linear correlation between isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constants for seven model molecules (CH2 O, H2 O, HF, F2 , HCN, SiH4 and H2 S) calculated with 37 methods (34 density functionals, RHF, MP2 and CCSD(T)), with affordable pcS-2 basis set and corresponding complete basis set results, estimated from calculations with the family of polarization-consistent pcS-n basis sets is reported. This dependence was also supported by inspection of profiles of deviation between CBS estimated nuclear shieldings and shieldings obtained with the significantly smaller basis sets pcS-2 and aug-cc-pVTZ-J for the selected set of 37 calculation methods. It was possible to formulate a practical approach of estimating the values of isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constants at the CCSD(T)/CBS and MP2/CBS levels from affordable CCSD(T)/pcS-2, MP2/pcS-2 and DFT/CBS calculations with pcS-n basis sets. The proposed method leads to a fairly accurate estimation of nuclear magnetic shieldings and considerable saving of computational efforts.

  4. Performance and Facility Background Pressure Characterization Tests of NASAs 12.5-kW Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Shastry, Rohit; Thomas, Robert; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Williams, George; Myers, James; Hofer, Richard; hide

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission (SEP/TDM) project is funding the development of a 12.5-kW Hall thruster system to support future NASA missions. The thruster designated Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) is a 12.5-kW Hall thruster with magnetic shielding incorporating a centrally mounted cathode. HERMeS was designed and modeled by a NASA GRC and JPL team and was fabricated and tested in vacuum facility 5 (VF5) at NASA GRC. Tests at NASA GRC were performed with the Technology Development Unit 1 (TDU1) thruster. TDU1's magnetic shielding topology was confirmed by measurement of anode potential and low electron temperature along the discharge chamber walls. Thermal characterization tests indicated that during full power thruster operation at peak magnetic field strength, the various thruster component temperatures were below prescribed maximum allowable limits. Performance characterization tests demonstrated the thruster's wide throttling range and found that the thruster can achieve a peak thruster efficiency of 63% at 12.5 kW 500 V and can attain a specific impulse of 3,000 s at 12.5 kW and a discharge voltage of 800 V. Facility background pressure variation tests revealed that the performance, operational characteristics, and magnetic shielding effectiveness of the TDU1 design were mostly insensitive to increases in background pressure.

  5. Evaluations of Space Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, Norris F.; Shen, S. P.; Heyda, J. F.

    1962-01-01

    A general method of evaluating the efficiency of space vehicle shielding is developed and used to compare various active and passive systems for protection against ionizing radiation. Available permanent magnets are found useless for active shielding, and combined active-passive systems in general are determined to be inefficient. On the other hand, evaluations show that active electrostatic shielding may have possibilities for weight savings if electrical conditions (presently unknown) are favorable therefor in space. Further, a positive potential improvement is calculated for an active shielding system which utilizes superconducting Nb3Sn to provide a confined magnetic flux to deflect incident charged particles; this potential points toward substantial reductions in shield weight for the protection of large vehicles from highly energetic particles. Recommendations are made for further research, particularly for flight experiments to measure directionality of solar flare protons.

  6. Negative ion beam injection apparatus with magnetic shield and electron removal means

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.; Chan, Chun F.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1994-01-01

    A negative ion source is constructed to produce H.sup.- ions without using Cesium. A high percentage of secondary electrons that typically accompany the extracted H.sup.- are trapped and eliminated from the beam by permanent magnets in the initial stage of acceleration. Penetration of the magnetic field from the permanent magnets into the ion source is minimized. This reduces the destructive effect the magnetic field could have on negative ion production and extraction from the source. A beam expansion section in the extractor results in a strongly converged final beam.

  7. Discriminating Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Rats Using a High-Tc SQUID Detected Nuclear Resonance Spectrometer in a Magnetic Shielding Box

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Yang, Hong-Chang; Horng, Herng-Er; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Yang, Shieh Yueh; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Wang, Li-Ming

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report the spin-lattice relaxation rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and normal liver tissue in rats using a high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer. The resonance spectrometer used for discriminating liver tumors in rats via the difference in longitudinal relaxation time in low magnetic fields was set up in a compact and portable magnetic shielding box. The frequency-domain NMR signals of HCC tissues and normal liver tissues were analyzed to study their respective longitudinal relaxation rate T1−1. The T1−1 of liver tissues for ten normal rats and ten cancerous rats were investigated respectively. The averaged T1−1 value of normal liver tissue was (6.41±0.66) s−1, and the averaged T1−1 value of cancerous tissue was (3.38±0.15) s−1. The ratio of T1−1 for normal liver tissues and cancerous liver tissues of the rats investigated is estimated to be 1.9. Since this significant statistical difference, the T1−1 value can be used to distinguish the HCC tissues from normal liver tissues. This method of examining liver and tumor tissues has the advantages of being convenient, easy to operate, and stable. PMID:23071710

  8. Discriminating hepatocellular carcinoma in rats using a high-Tc SQUID detected nuclear resonance spectrometer in a magnetic shielding box.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Yang, Hong-Chang; Horng, Herng-Er; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Yang, Shieh Yueh; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Wang, Li-Ming

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report the spin-lattice relaxation rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and normal liver tissue in rats using a high-T(c) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer. The resonance spectrometer used for discriminating liver tumors in rats via the difference in longitudinal relaxation time in low magnetic fields was set up in a compact and portable magnetic shielding box. The frequency-domain NMR signals of HCC tissues and normal liver tissues were analyzed to study their respective longitudinal relaxation rate T(1) (-1). The T(1) (-1) of liver tissues for ten normal rats and ten cancerous rats were investigated respectively. The averaged T(1) (-1) value of normal liver tissue was (6.41±0.66) s(-1), and the averaged T(1) (-1) value of cancerous tissue was (3.38±0.15) s(-1). The ratio of T(1) (-1) for normal liver tissues and cancerous liver tissues of the rats investigated is estimated to be 1.9. Since this significant statistical difference, the T(1) (-1) value can be used to distinguish the HCC tissues from normal liver tissues. This method of examining liver and tumor tissues has the advantages of being convenient, easy to operate, and stable.

  9. Cryogenic Design of a Large Superconducting Magnet for Astro-particle Shielding on Deep Space Travel Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, Romain; Baudouy, Bertrand

    The Space Radiation Superconducting Shield (SR2S) European project aims at studying a large superconducting toroid magnet to protect the human habitat from the ionizing radiations coming from Galactic Cosmic Ray during long term missions in deep space. Titanium clad MgB2 conductor is used to afford a bending power greater than 5 T.m at 10 K. A specific cryogenic design is needed to cool down this 10 m long and 12.8 m in diameter magnet. A passive cooling system, using a V-groove sunshield, is considered to reduce the heat flux coming from the Sun or Mars. An active configuration, using pulse tube cryocoolers, will be linked to the 80 K thermal screen intercepting most of the heat fluxes coming from the human habitat. The toroid magnet will be connected also to cryocoolers to absorb the few watts reaching its surface. Two kinds of thermal link are being considered to absorb the heat on the 80 K thermal screen. The first one is active, with a pump circulating helium gas in a network of exchange tubes. The second one is passive using long cryogenic pulse heat pipe (PHP) with the evaporator on the surface of the thermal screen and the condenser attached to the pulse tube.

  10. Isotropic magnetic shielding constants of retinal derivatives in aprotic and protic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colherinhas, G.; Fonseca, T. L.; Castro, M. A.; Coutinho, K.; Canuto, S.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the nuclear isotropic shielding constants σ(13C) and σ(17O) of isomers of retinoic acid and retinal in gas-phase and in chloroform, acetonitrile, methanol, and water solutions via Monte Carlo simulation and quantum mechanics calculations using the GIAO-B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) approach. Electronic solute polarization effects due to protic and aprotic solvents are included iteratively and play an important role in the quantitative determination of oxygen shielding constants. Our MP2/6-31G+(d) results show substantial increases of the dipole moment of both retinal derivatives in solution as compared with the gas-phase results (between 22% and 26% in chloroform and between 55% and 99% in water). For the oxygen atoms the influence of the solute polarization is mild for σ(17O) of hydroxyl group, even in protic solvents, but it is particularly important for σ(17O) of carbonyl group. For the latter, there is a sizable increase in the magnitude with increasing solvent polarity. For the carbon atoms, the solvent effects on the σ(13C) values are in general small, being more appreciable in carbon atoms of the polyene chain than in the carbon atoms of the β-ionone ring and methyl groups. The results also show that isomeric changes on the backbones of the polyene chains have marked influence on the 13C chemical shifts of carbon atoms near to the structural distortions, in good agreement with the experimental results measured in solution.

  11. On the confinement of passing alpha particles in a tokamak-reactor with resonant magnetic field perturbations shielded by plasma currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyn, M. F.; Ivanov, I. B.; Kasilov, S. V.; Kernbichler, W.; Loarte, A.; Nemov, V. V.; Runov, A. M.

    2012-05-01

    Alpha-particle losses due to the resonant magnetic field perturbations (RMPs) created by the coil system for edge-localized mode mitigation in ITER are studied numerically. If shielding of RMPs by the plasma is not taken into account, passing α-particles are the main loss channel which, together with the trapped particle contribution leads to a loss of more than 5% of fusion alpha particle power. Shielding of RMPs practically eliminates this channel so that the overall losses are reduced to about 1%.

  12. Use of Second Generation Coated Conductors for Efficient Shielding of dc Magnetic Fields (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-15

    Similar to Ref. 15, along the center line of each 150 mm long section a 1 mm wide, 124 mm long slit was milled leaving a superconducting film in the form of...layer of superconducting film, can attenuate an external magnetic field of up to 5 mT by more than an order of magnitude. For comparison purposes...appears to be especially promising for the realization of large scale high-Tc superconducting screens. 15. SUBJECT TERMS magnetic screens, current

  13. Possible cryptic tectono-magnetic fabrics in `post-tectonic' granitoid plutons of the Canadian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.; Kehlenbeck, Manfred M.

    1996-01-01

    Two late Archean granitic plutons forcefully intruded and thermally metamorphosed Archean schists. Feldspar magacrysts aligned concentrically with the margins during inflation. Substantial tectonic deformation never affected the plutons. Nevertheless, both plutons show the same, consistently oriented, cryptic magnetic fabric revealed by anisotropy of low field susceptibility (AMS) from 134 samples. They have an NE-SW vertical magnetic foliation and a magnetic lineation trending 060/15. Eigenvalues of the orientation distribution of principal susceptibilities show that the magnetic fabrics have almost identical strengths, orientations and symmetry in both plutons. We propose a post-magmatic reactivation of the earlier regional tectonic shortening. This imparted a 'cryptic tectonic' magnetic fabric on the plutons that overprinted the magmatic AMS fabric in most outcrops. The plutons' AMS fabrics are subparallel to the much older schistosity of the country rocks. Because multidomain magnetite provides > 99% of the low field susceptibility of the rocks, it controls the AMS. However, we see no alignment of the magnetite grains. Thus, magnetic anisotropy may be due to stress alignment of intragranular domain walls and not controlled by grain shape, as usually assumed for magnetite.

  14. Flexible magnetic membranes based on bacterial cellulose and its evaluation as electromagnetic interference shielding material.

    PubMed

    Marins, Jéssica A; Soares, Bluma G; Barud, Hernane S; Ribeiro, Sidney J L

    2013-10-01

    Flexible magnetic membranes with high proportion of magnetite were successfully prepared by previous impregnation of the never dried bacterial cellulose pellicles with ferric chloride followed by reduction with sodium bisulfite and alkaline treatment for magnetite precipitation. Membranes were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating magnetometer, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) and impedance spectroscopy. Microwave properties of these membranes were investigated in the X-band (8.2 to 12.4 GHz). FEG-SEM micrographs show an effective coverage of the BC nanofibers by Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Membranes with up to 75% in weight of particles have been prepared after 60 min of reaction. Magnetite nanoparticles in the form of aggregates well adhered to the BC fibers were observed by SEM. The average crystal sizes of the magnetic particles were in the range of 10±1 to 13±1 nm (estimated by XRD). The magnetic particles in the BC pellicles presented superparamagnetic behavior with a saturation magnetization in the range of 60 emu g(-1) and coercive force around 15 Oe. These magnetic pellicles also displayed high electrical permittivity and a potential application as microwave absorber materials.

  15. Optimized shielding design for the time-resolved Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRSt) on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, C.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Hilsabeck, T.; Bionta, R.; Khater, H.

    2016-10-01

    To meet the goals for the MRSt to measure the neutron spectrum at the NIF with a time resolution of 20 ps and an accuracy of 5%, a S/B >5 for the down-scattered neutron measurement is required. As the MRSt-detector design consists of a pulse-dilation drift tube with a CsI photocathode positioned at the focal plane of the spectrometer and a microchannel plate (MCP) for signal gain, the S/B requirement can be met if the number of secondary electrons (SE) produced by neutron and γ-ray background in these components is reduced 50-100 times. It has been shown in ref. that the SE generated by the neutron and γ-ray background in the CsI is insignificant and won't affect the MRSt measurement. However, the MCP poses a greater S/B challenge due to higher background sensitivities. In this paper, we discuss an MRSt SE generation model, which includes the CsI photocathode and MCP, and the MRSt shielding design required to reduce the MCP background to the required level for a down-scattered neutron measurement. This work was supported in part by DOE (NNSA, NLUF) and LLNL.

  16. Magnetic flux shielding for the precision muon g-2 storage ring superconducting inflector

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.T.; Meng, W.; Sampson, W.B.; Woodle, K.

    1994-07-01

    A muon g-2 experiment (E821) at the AGS requires knowledge of the magnetic field over muon orbits at the level of 0.1 ppm. The superconducting inflector involves a double cosine theta winding; this design approximately cancels its fringe field. Nevertheless its residual field would effect the homogeneity of the storage ring magnetic field. A method of using a superconducting sheet surrounding the inflector to further reduce the fringe field was proposed by one of the authors, W. Meng. An experimental program to explore this technique is described. Part of the test results are presented.

  17. Magnetic flux shielding for the precision muon g-2 storage ring superconducting inflector

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.T.; Meng, W.; Sampson, W.B.; Woodle, K.

    1993-12-31

    A muon g-2 experiment (E821) at the AGS requires knowledge of the magnetic field over muon orbits at the level of 0.1 ppM. The superconducting inflector involves a double cosine theta winding; this design approximately cancels its fringe field. Nevertheless its residual field would effect the homogeneity of the storage ring magnetic field. A method of using a superconducting sheet surrounding the inflector to further reduce the fringe field was proposed by one of the authors, W. Meng. An experimental program to explore this technique is described. Part of the test results are presented.

  18. Magnetic flux shielding for the precision muon g-2 storage ring superconducting inflector

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, W.; Sampson, W.B.; Suenaga, M.

    1993-06-01

    The muon g-2 experiment (E821) at the AGS requires a precision in the magnetic field over muon orbit at the level of 0.1 ppM. Injection is done with a superconducting inflector involving a double cosine theta winding approximately cancels its fringe field. Nevertheless its residual field would effect the homogeneity of the storage ring magnetic field. A method of using a superconducting sheet surrounding the inflector to further reduce the fringe is being investigated. The experimental program to explore this technique is described and some test results are presented.

  19. Magsat investigation. [Canadian shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    A computer program was prepared for modeling segments of the Earth's crust allowing for heterogeneity in magnetization in calculating the Earth's field at Magsat heights. This permits investigation of a large number of possible models in assessing the magnetic signatures of subprovinces of the Canadian shield. The fit between the model field and observed fields is optimized in a semi-automatic procedure.

  20. Rockmagnetism in relation to magnetic mineralogy of anorthosites in the southern granulite region of the Indian shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumya, G. S.; Asanulla, R. Mohamed; Radhakrishna, T.

    2017-06-01

    Anorthosite occurrences in the south Indian shield are well known. Recent studies obtained Neoproterozoic age for many of them, yet their petrological and mineralogical data are very limited. This paper presents first comprehensive report of the physical attributes of petrography and rockmagnetism of two prominent anorthosite occurrences, one from the Oddanchatram and the other from the Kadavur in the southern granulite terrain of India. Petrography highlights the occurrence of exsolution lamellae of magnetite in plagioclase with clouding appearance in the Oddanchatram anorthosite (ODAN). The Kadavur anorthosite (KDAN) contains magnetite in the form of discrete grains. The distinctions are sharply reflected in the rockmagnetic attributes also. The Oddanchatram occurrence is characterized by high Koenigsberger ratios (Q value mostly >10), median destructive field (MDF > 50 mT) and coercivity of remanence (Hcr; 45-86 mT), dominance of remanence magnetism over induced magnetism, harder natural remanence over saturation isothermal remanence, Curie temperatures of 570-580 °C and high ratio of saturation remanence magnetization to saturation magnetization (Mrs/Ms: 0.08-0.35) with low ratio of Hcr to coercive force (Hcr/Hc:1.78-2.27) as determined from hysteresis loops indicating single (SD)/pseudo-single-domain (PSD) magnetite as the chief magnetic carrier. In contrast, the Kadavur occurrence is characterized by lower Q value (mostly <1), MDF (<10 mT) and Hcr (23-65 mT), dominance of induced magnetism over remanence, harder saturation isothermal remanence over natural remanence, Curie temperatures of 580-600 °C and low Mrs/Ms (0.02-0.04) with high Hcr/Hc (2.61-3.76) indicating presence of a dominant multidomain magnetite along with small quantities of canted antiferromagnetic mineral (haemo-ilmenites). These differences in physical attributes are explained in terms of crustal depths of their emplacement. The ODAN possessing SD/PSD exsolved magnetite lamellae in

  1. Magnetic shielding of walls from the unmagnetized ion beam in a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2013-01-14

    We demonstrate by numerical simulations and experiments that the unmagnetized ion beam formed in a Hall thruster can be controlled by an applied magnetic field in a manner that reduces by 2-3 orders of magnitude deleterious ion bombardment of the containing walls. The suppression of wall erosion in Hall thrusters to such low levels has remained elusive for decades.

  2. Construction of three-dimensional graphene interfaces into carbon fiber textiles for increasing deposition of nickel nanoparticles: flexible hierarchical magnetic textile composites for strong electromagnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xing-Ming; Liu, Lin; Li, Hai-Bing; Wang, Chan-Yuan; Xie, Qing; Zhao, Quan-Liang; Bi, Song; Hou, Zhi-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Since manipulating electromagnetic waves with electromagnetic active materials for environmental and electric engineering is a significant task, here a novel prototype is reported by introducing reduced graphene oxide (RGO) interfaces in carbon fiber (CF) networks for a hierarchical carbon fiber/reduced graphene oxide/nickel (CF-RGO-Ni) composite textile. Upon charaterizations of the microscopic morphologies, electrical and magnetic properties, the presence of three-dimensional RGO interfaces and bifunctional nickel nanoparticles substantially influences the related physical properties in the resulting hierarchical composite textiles. Eletromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding performance suggests that the hierarchical composite textiles hold a strong shielding effectiveness greater than 61 dB, showing greater advantages than conventional polymeric and foamy shielding composites. As a polymer-free lightweight structure, flexible CF-RGO-Ni composites of all electromagnetic active components offer unique understanding of the multi-scale and multiple mechanisms in electromagnetic energy consumption. Such a novel prototype of shielding structures along with convenient technology highlight a strategy to achieve high-performance EMI shielding, coupled with a universal approach for preparing advanced lightweight composites with graphene interfaces.

  3. Construction of three-dimensional graphene interfaces into carbon fiber textiles for increasing deposition of nickel nanoparticles: flexible hierarchical magnetic textile composites for strong electromagnetic shielding.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xing-Ming; Liu, Lin; Li, Hai-Bing; Wang, Chan-Yuan; Xie, Qing; Zhao, Quan-Liang; Bi, Song; Hou, Zhi-Ling

    2017-01-27

    Since manipulating electromagnetic waves with electromagnetic active materials for environmental and electric engineering is a significant task, here a novel prototype is reported by introducing reduced graphene oxide (RGO) interfaces in carbon fiber (CF) networks for a hierarchical carbon fiber/reduced graphene oxide/nickel (CF-RGO-Ni) composite textile. Upon charaterizations of the microscopic morphologies, electrical and magnetic properties, the presence of three-dimensional RGO interfaces and bifunctional nickel nanoparticles substantially influences the related physical properties in the resulting hierarchical composite textiles. Eletromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding performance suggests that the hierarchical composite textiles hold a strong shielding effectiveness greater than 61 dB, showing greater advantages than conventional polymeric and foamy shielding composites. As a polymer-free lightweight structure, flexible CF-RGO-Ni composites of all electromagnetic active components offer unique understanding of the multi-scale and multiple mechanisms in electromagnetic energy consumption. Such a novel prototype of shielding structures along with convenient technology highlight a strategy to achieve high-performance EMI shielding, coupled with a universal approach for preparing advanced lightweight composites with graphene interfaces.

  4. Angular dependence of direct current decay in a closed YBCO double-pancake coil under external AC magnetic field and reduction by magnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, J.; Zhang, H.; Li, C.; Zhang, X.; Shen, B.; Coombs, T. A.

    2017-03-01

    High T c superconducting (HTS) coils are ideal candidates in the use of high field magnets. HTS coils carrying a direct current, however, suffer a non-negligible loss when they are exposed to an external AC magnetic field. Although this phenomenon is well known, no study concerning AC magnetic field angular dependence of direct current decay has ever been shown. In this work, we experimentally investigate the direct current decay characteristics in a closed double pancake coil made of a YBCO coated conductor under external AC field. AC field of different angles with respect to the coil plane is applied. Results show that the current decay rate presents a strong angular dependence. The fastest decay occurs when the field is parallel to the coil plane, in which case the surface of the tape in the outermost layer experiences most flux variation. To reduce the decay rate, we propose wrapping superconducting tapes around the outermost layer of the coil to shield external AC field. This method significantly reduces direct current decay rate under parallel field, without affecting the perpendicular self-field of the coil.

  5. Radiation Storm vs. The Magnetic Shield: Superheroes of Magnetism & Space Weather Education - A Model for Teacher Professional Development Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, R. M.; Johnson, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic and electric fields and phenomena play important roles in various situations in astronomy, planetary science, and Earth science. Students often lack an intuitive sense of electromagnetic phenomena, and therefore struggle with the complexities of planetary and stellar magnetic fields. Hands-on magnetism activities can provide students with an intuitive grasp of the basics of magnetism, preparing them for more challenging conceptual studies of magnetic phenomena. For the past six years, we have been presenting a professional development workshop for teachers covering the topics of magnetism and space weather. The workshop, which has been conducted more than 20 times for a range of audiences, blends together several simple hands-on activities, background information on space weather and geomagnetism, a collection of images, animations, and interactives that illustrate important concepts, and guidance about specific links between these topics and national science education standards. These workshops have been very well-received, and have consistently been rated highly by participants in surveys. We believe the methods used in these workshops can be applied to other topics in science education and to astronomy and Earth science education specifically. In this presentation, we will describe our magnetism and space weather workshop, including some of the hands-on activities. We will describe successful aspects of the workshop and comment on ways we think this approach could be replicated for other topics. We will also display some of the interactives, graphics, and animations shown during the workshops. Resources have been added to the workshop over the years in response to recurring questions from teachers; we will comment on this process and how it might be applied to other topics. The activities and extensive background content used or referenced in the workshop are available for free on the Windows to the Universe web site (www.windows2universe.org). Hands on

  6. Archean uplift of a subprovince boundary in the Canadian Shield, revealed by magnetic fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.; Stewart, R. Alex; Werner, Tomasz

    1993-11-01

    A high strain zone, reported elsewhere as a subprovince or tectonic-terrane boundary, shows evidence of uplift during a penetrative D 1 event. Some outcrops reveal this by conventional L-S petrofabric observations. However, all outcrops permit measurements of the anisotropy of low field magnetic susceptibility (AMS) which here records the preferred crystallographic orientation of chlorite, biotite and amphibole. Furthermore, anisotropy of anhysteretic magnetic remanence (AARM) reflects the preferred orientation of ferromagnetic grains (magnetite and pyrrhotite). All three types of fabric show that the rocks were shortened in a north-south direction, perpendicular to the terrane boundary, and stretched upwards in a nearly coaxial strain history. A few anomalous magnetic fabrics may indicate some late D 1 subhorizontal E-W extension, compatible with transpression along the boundary. We conclude that this boundary is a zone of high strain associated with the uplift of the high-grade plutonic rocks of the Winnipeg River subprovince, with only slight evidence of minor components of late transpression during the penetrative D 1 fabrics.

  7. Micromagnetic modeling of the shielding properties of nanoscale ferromagnetic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskandarova, I. M.; Knizhnik, A. A.; Popkov, A. F.; Potapkin, B. V.; Stainer, Q.; Lombard, L.; Mackay, K.

    2016-09-01

    Ferromagnetic shields are widely used to concentrate magnetic fields in a target region of space. Such shields are also used in spintronic nanodevices such as magnetic random access memory and magnetic logic devices. However, the shielding properties of nanostructured shields can differ considerably from those of macroscopic samples. In this work, we investigate the shielding properties of nanostructured NiFe layers around a current line using a finite element micromagnetic model. We find that thin ferromagnetic layers demonstrate saturation of magnetization under an external magnetic field, which reduces the shielding efficiency. Moreover, we show that the shielding properties of nanoscale ferromagnetic layers strongly depend on the uniformity of the layer thickness. Magnetic anisotropy in ultrathin ferromagnetic layers can also influence their shielding efficiency. In addition, we show that domain walls in nanoscale ferromagnetic shields can induce large increases and decreases in the generated magnetic field. Therefore, ferromagnetic shields for spintronic nanodevices require careful design and precise fabrication.

  8. Role of Spin-Dependent Terms in the Relationship among Nuclear Spin-Rotation and NMR Magnetic Shielding Tensors.

    PubMed

    Aucar, I Agustín; Gomez, Sergio S; Giribet, Claudia G; Aucar, Gustavo A

    2016-12-15

    The broadly accepted procedure to obtain the experimental absolute scale of NMR magnetic shieldings, σ, is well-known for nonheavy atom-containing molecules. It was uncovered more than 40 years ago by the works of Ramsey and Flygare. They found a quite accurate relationship among σ and the nuclear spin-rotation constants. Its relativistic extension was very recently proposed, although it has an intrinsic weakness because a new SO-S two-component term needs to be considered. We show how to overcome this problem. We found that (νY(S) - νY(atom,S)) generalizes the SO-S term, where νY(S) = ⟨⟨[((r - rY) × α)/(|r - rY|(3))]; S((4))⟩⟩, r - rY is the electron position with respect to the position of nucleus Y, and S((4)) is the four-component total electron spin. When including this new term, one finds that the best of our relativistic Flygare-like models fits quite well with the results of the most accurate method available at the moment. We also show that the difference among the parallel component of σ(Xe) in XeF2 and σ(Xe) of the free atom is almost completely described by that new term.

  9. Simulation of Dust Charging and Shielding in the Presence of a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtl, Chris; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2006-10-01

    We explore the charging of a dust particle immersed in a plasma in the presence of a magnetic field. The dust particle charges due to the flowing electrons and ions within the plasma and is allowed to emit electrons via thermionic emission and photoemission. Several parameters are obtained and compared with basic simulations without the magnetic field using the 2-D, 3-V DEMOCRITUS code developed at LANL. Next we look at the effect of this dust particle charging in the presence of another dust particle. Delzanno, et al. [1] showed that for a thermionically emitting particle immersed in a plasma, an attractive potential well can form. This leads to the attraction of particles with like charges, such as another dust grain. We explore the attractive forces between two particles as a function of their separation. If the attractive potential well is deep enough, the two particles will combine, thereby creating macro-particles. We study this in an astrophysical sense, looking at this phenomenon as a possible source of galactic formation. [1] G.L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, and M. Rosenberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 (3), 035002 (2004)

  10. Performance, Facility Pressure Effects, and Stability Characterization Tests of NASA's Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Williams, George; Gilland, James; Peterson, Peter; Hofer, Richard; Mikellides, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    NASAs Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) 12.5 kW Technology Demonstration Unit-1 (TDU-1) Hall thruster has been the subject of extensive technology maturation in preparation for flight system development. Part of the technology maturation effort included experimental evaluation of the TDU-1 thruster with conducting and dielectric front pole cover materials in two different electrical configurations. A graphite front pole cover thruster configuration with the thruster body electrically tied to cathode and an alumina front pole cover thruster configuration with the thruster body floating were evaluated. Both configurations were also evaluated at different facility background pressure conditions to evaluate background pressure effects on thruster operation. Performance characterization tests found that higher thruster performance was attained with the graphite front pole cover configuration with the thruster electrically tied to cathode. A total thrust efficiency of 68 and a total specific impulse of 2,820 s was demonstrated at a discharge voltage of 600 V and a discharge power of 12.5 kW. Thruster stability regimes were characterized with respect to the thruster discharge current oscillations and with maps of the current-voltage-magnetic field (IVB). Analysis of TDU-1 discharge current waveforms found that lower normalized discharge current peak-to-peak and root mean square magnitudes were attained when the thruster was electrically floated with alumina front pole covers. Background pressure effects characterization tests indicated that the thruster performance and stability was mostly invariant to changes in the facility background pressure for vacuum chamber pressure below 110-5 Torr-Xe (for thruster flow rate above 8 mgs). Power spectral density analysis of the discharge current waveform showed that increasing the vacuum chamber background pressure resulted in a higher discharge current dominant frequency. Finally the IVB maps of the TDU-1

  11. Performance, Facility Pressure Effects, and Stability Characterization Tests of NASA's Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Peterson, Peter Y.; Williams, George J.; Gilland, James; Hofer, Richard; Mikellides, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) 12.5 kW Technology Demonstration Unit-1 (TDU-1) has been the subject of extensive technology maturation in preparation for flight system development. Part of the technology maturation effort included experimental evaluation of the TDU-1 thruster with conducting and dielectric front pole cover materials in two different electrical configurations. A graphite front magnetic pole cover thruster configuration with the thruster body electrically tied to cathode, and an alumina front pole cover thruster configuration with the thruster body floating were evaluated. Both configurations were also evaluated at different facility background pressure conditions to evaluate background pressure effects on thruster operation. Performance characterization tests found that higher thruster performance was attained with the graphite front pole cover configuration with the thruster electrically tied to cathode. A total thrust efficiency of 68% and a total specific impulse of 2,820 s was demonstrated at a discharge voltage of 600 V and a discharge power of 12.5 kW. Thruster stability regimes were characterized with respect to the thruster discharge current oscillations and with maps of the discharge current-voltage-magnetic field (IVB). Analysis of TDU-1 discharge current waveforms found that lower normalized discharge current peak-to-peak and root mean square magnitudes were attained when the thruster was electrically floated with alumina front pole covers. Background pressure effects characterization tests indicated that the thruster performance and stability were mostly invariant to changes in the facility background pressure for vacuum chamber pressure below 1×10-5 Torr-Xe (for thruster flow rates of 20.5 mg/s). Power spectral density analysis of the discharge current waveforms showed that increasing the vacuum chamber background pressure resulted in a higher discharge current dominant breathing mode frequency. Finally, IVB

  12. {sup 33}S hyperfine interactions in H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} and revision of the sulfur nuclear magnetic shielding scale

    SciTech Connect

    Helgaker, Trygve; Gauss, Jürgen; Cazzoli, Gabriele Puzzarini, Cristina

    2013-12-28

    Using the Lamb-dip technique, the hyperfine structure in the rotational spectra of H{sub 2}{sup 33}S and {sup 33}SO{sub 2} has been resolved and the corresponding parameters—that is, the sulfur quadrupole-coupling and spin–rotation tensors—were determined. The experimental parameters are in good agreement with results from high-level coupled-cluster calculations, provided that up to quadruple excitations are considered in the cluster operator, sufficiently large basis sets are used, and vibrational corrections are accounted for. The {sup 33}S spin-rotation tensor for H{sub 2}S has been used to establish a new sulfur nuclear magnetic shielding scale, combining the paramagnetic part of the shielding as obtained from the spin–rotation tensor with a calculated value for the diamagnetic part as well as computed vibrational and temperature corrections. The value of 716(5) ppm obtained in this way for the sulfur shielding of H{sub 2}S is in good agreement with results from high-accuracy quantum-chemical calculations but leads to a shielding scale that is about 28 ppm lower than the one suggested previously in the literature, based on the {sup 33}S spin-rotation constant of OCS.

  13. Automated Fragmentation Polarizable Embedding Density Functional Theory (PE-DFT) Calculations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Shielding Constants of Proteins with Application to Chemical Shift Predictions.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Casper; Bratholm, Lars Andersen; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Kongsted, Jacob

    2017-02-14

    Full-protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants based on ab initio calculations are desirable, because they can assist in elucidating protein structures from NMR experiments. In this work, we present NMR shielding constants computed using a new automated fragmentation (J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 10380-10388) approach in the framework of polarizable embedding density functional theory. We extend our previous work to give both basis set recommendations and comment on how large the quantum mechanical region should be to successfully compute (13)C NMR shielding constants that are comparable with experiment. The introduction of a probabilistic linear regression model allows us to substantially reduce the number of snapshots that are needed to make comparisons with experiment. This approach is further improved by augmenting snapshot selection with chemical shift predictions by which we can obtain a representative subset of snapshots that gives the smallest predicted error, compared to experiment. Finally, we use this subset of snapshots to calculate the NMR shielding constants at the PE-KT3/pcSseg-2 level of theory for all atoms in the protein GB3.

  14. The magnetic shielding of the /sup 19/F nuclei in crystals of ZnF/sub 2/. 4H/sub 2/O and ZnFOH

    SciTech Connect

    Avkhutskii, L.M.; Kinchakov, V.S.; Petrenko, A.N.

    1982-03-01

    Results of the calculations of the magnetic shielding of flouride in the structure of ZnF/sub 2/ . 4H/sub 2/O and ZnFOH are discussed. It is shown that the magnetic shielding constraints are equal for the nonequivalent positions of the atoms F/sub 1/ and F/sub 2/, since their chemical environments are identical. By comparison, it is shown that orthogonalization of the atomic basis is comparatively unimportant for the diamagnetic component of the shielding, and increases the absolute magnitude of the paramagmetic component by a factor of approximately 1.5. An interesting feature is that allowance in the calculation for the hydrogen bonds between flourine and neighboring ''molecules'' in the crystal produces practically no change in the paramagnetic component and increases the diamagnetic component by approximately 130 units. The diagonal components of the shieding tensor, determined in the system of crystallographic axes, for the cluster ZnF/sub 2/ . 10H/sub 2/O are sigma/sub xx/=364.15, sigma/sub yy/=430.36, sigma/sub zz/=464.25 ppm. A noteworthy feature is that the magnetic shielding constants of fluorine in the structures of ZnFOH and ZnF/sub 2/ . 4H/sub 2/O are identical, and this is not due to an identical chemical environment for the fluorine nuclei in these crystals. The immediate environment is tetrahedral in both compounds, but in ZnF/sub 2/ . 4H/sub 2/O the coordination sphere also contains three hydrogen bonds, whereas in ZnFOH it contains three zinc atoms and one hydrogen bond.

  15. The UKB prescription and the heavy atom effects on the nuclear magnetic shielding of vicinal heavy atoms.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A

    2009-07-21

    Fully relativistic calculations of NMR magnetic shielding on XYH3 (X = C, Si, Ge and Sn; Y = Br, I), XHn (n = 1-4) molecular systems and noble gases performed with a fully relativistic polarization propagator formalism at the RPA level of approach are presented. The rate of convergence (size of basis set and time involved) for calculations with both kinetic balance prescriptions, RKB and UKB, were investigated. Calculations with UKB makes it feasible to obtain reliable results for two or more heavy-atom-containing molecules. For such XYH3 systems, the influence of heavy vicinal halogen atoms on sigma(X) is such that heavy atom effects on heavy atoms (vicinal plus their own effects or HAVHA + HAHA effects) amount to 30.50% for X = Sn and Y = I; being the HAHA effect of the order of 25%. So the vicinal effect alone is of the order of 5.5%. The vicinal heavy atom effect on light atoms (HALA effect) is of the order of 28% for X = C and Y = I. A similar behaviour, but of opposite sign, is observed for sigma(Y) for which sigmaR-NR (I; X = C) (HAHA effect) is around 27% and sigmaR-NR(I; X = Sn) (HAVHA + HAHA effects) is close to 21%. Its electronic origin is paramagnetic for halogen atoms but both dia- and paramagnetic for central atoms. The effect on two bond distant hydrogen atoms is such that the largest variation of sigma(H) within the same family of XYH3 molecules appears for X = Si and Y = I: around 20%. In this case sigma(H; X = Sn, Y = I) = 33.45 ppm and sigma(H; X = Sn, Y = H) = 27.82 ppm.

  16. Theoretical prediction of nuclear magnetic shieldings and indirect spin-spin coupling constants in 1,1-, cis-, and trans-1,2-difluoroethylenes

    SciTech Connect

    Nozirov, Farhod E-mail: farhod.nozirov@gmail.com; Stachów, Michał; Kupka, Teobald E-mail: farhod.nozirov@gmail.com

    2014-04-14

    A theoretical prediction of nuclear magnetic shieldings and indirect spin-spin coupling constants in 1,1-, cis- and trans-1,2-difluoroethylenes is reported. The results obtained using density functional theory (DFT) combined with large basis sets and gauge-independent atomic orbital calculations were critically compared with experiment and conventional, higher level correlated electronic structure methods. Accurate structural, vibrational, and NMR parameters of difluoroethylenes were obtained using several density functionals combined with dedicated basis sets. B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) optimized structures of difluoroethylenes closely reproduced experimental geometries and earlier reported benchmark coupled cluster results, while BLYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) produced accurate harmonic vibrational frequencies. The most accurate vibrations were obtained using B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) with correction for anharmonicity. Becke half and half (BHandH) density functional predicted more accurate {sup 19}F isotropic shieldings and van Voorhis and Scuseria's τ-dependent gradient-corrected correlation functional yielded better carbon shieldings than B3LYP. A surprisingly good performance of Hartree-Fock (HF) method in predicting nuclear shieldings in these molecules was observed. Inclusion of zero-point vibrational correction markedly improved agreement with experiment for nuclear shieldings calculated by HF, MP2, CCSD, and CCSD(T) methods but worsened the DFT results. The threefold improvement in accuracy when predicting {sup 2}J(FF) in 1,1-difluoroethylene for BHandH density functional compared to B3LYP was observed (the deviations from experiment were −46 vs. −115 Hz)

  17. THEMIS discovers holes in Earth's solar shield

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation shows the latest findings from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission. Earth's magnetic field; which shields our planet from severe ...

  18. Modular shield

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Keith W.

    2002-01-01

    A modular system for containing projectiles has a sheet of material including at least a polycarbonate layer held by a metal frame having a straight frame member corresponding to each straight edge of the sheet. Each frame member has a U-shaped shield channel covering and holding a straight edge of the sheet and an adjacent U-shaped clamp channel rigidly held against the shield channel. A flexible gasket separates each sheet edge from its respective shield channel; and each frame member is fastened to each adjacent frame member only by clamps extending between adjacent clamp channels.

  19. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  20. The hyperfine structure in the rotational spectra of D2(17)O and HD(17)O: Confirmation of the absolute nuclear magnetic shielding scale for oxygen.

    PubMed

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; Harding, Michael E; Vázquez, Juana; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-03-28

    Guided by theoretical predictions, the hyperfine structures of the rotational spectra of mono- and bideuterated-water containing (17)O have been experimentally investigated. To reach sub-Doppler resolution, required to resolve the hyperfine structure due to deuterium quadrupole coupling as well as to spin-rotation (SR) and dipolar spin-spin couplings, the Lamb-dip technique has been employed. The experimental investigation and in particular, the spectral analysis have been supported by high-level quantum-chemical computations employing coupled-cluster techniques and, for the first time, a complete experimental determination of the hyperfine parameters involved was possible. The experimentally determined (17)O spin-rotation constants of D2 (17)O and HD(17)O were used to derive the paramagnetic part of the corresponding nuclear magnetic shielding constants. Together with the computed diamagnetic contributions as well as the vibrational and temperature corrections, the latter constants have been employed to confirm the oxygen nuclear magnetic shielding scale, recently established on the basis of spin-rotation data for H2 (17)O [Puzzarini et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 234304 (2009)].

  1. Absolute shielding scales for Al, Ga, and In and revised nuclear magnetic dipole moments of {sup 27}Al, {sup 69}Ga, {sup 71}Ga, {sup 113}In, and {sup 115}In nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Antušek, A. Holka, F.

    2015-08-21

    We present coupled cluster calculations of NMR shielding constants of aluminum, gallium, and indium in water-ion clusters. In addition, relativistic and dynamical corrections and the influence of the second solvation shell are evaluated. The final NMR shielding constants define new absolute shielding scales, 600.0 ± 4.1 ppm, 2044.4 ± 31.4 ppm, and 4507.7 ± 63.7 ppm for aluminum, gallium, and indium, respectively. The nuclear magnetic dipole moments for {sup 27}Al, {sup 69}Ga, {sup 71}Ga, {sup 113}In, and {sup 115}In isotopes are corrected by combining the computed shielding constants with experimental NMR frequencies. The absolute magnitude of the correction increases along the series and for indium isotopes it reaches approximately −8.0 × 10{sup −3} of the nuclear magneton.

  2. Thermocouple shield

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2009-11-24

    A thermocouple shield for use in radio frequency fields. In some embodiments the shield includes an electrically conductive tube that houses a standard thermocouple having a thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube protects the thermocouple from damage by an RF (including microwave) field and mitigates erroneous temperature readings due to the microwave or RF field. The thermocouple may be surrounded by a ceramic sheath to further protect the thermocouple. The ceramic sheath is generally formed from a material that is transparent to the wavelength of the microwave or RF energy. The microwave transparency property precludes heating of the ceramic sheath due to microwave coupling, which could affect the accuracy of temperature measurements. The ceramic sheath material is typically an electrically insulating material. The electrically insulative properties of the ceramic sheath help avert electrical arcing, which could damage the thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube is generally disposed around the thermocouple junction and disposed around at least a portion of the ceramic sheath. The concepts of the thermocouple shield may be incorporated into an integrated shielded thermocouple assembly.

  3. Shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations via transmission line analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Campione, Salvatore; Basilio, Lorena I.; Warne, Larry Kevin; ...

    2016-06-25

    Our paper reports on a transmission-line model for calculating the shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations. Since the shields are not perfect conductors and apertures in the shields permit external magnetic and electric fields to penetrate into the interior regions of the cable, we use this model to estimate the effects of the outer shield current and voltage (associated with the external excitation and boundary conditions associated with the external conductor) on the inner conductor current and voltage. It is commonly believed that increasing the number of shields of a cable will improve the shielding performance. But thismore » is not always the case, and a cable with multiple shields may perform similar to or worse than a cable with a single shield. Furthermore, we want to shed more light on these situations, which represent the main focus of this paper.« less

  4. Shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations via transmission line analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Campione, Salvatore; Basilio, Lorena I.; Warne, Larry Kevin; Hudson, Howard Gerald; Langston, William L.

    2016-06-25

    Our paper reports on a transmission-line model for calculating the shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations. Since the shields are not perfect conductors and apertures in the shields permit external magnetic and electric fields to penetrate into the interior regions of the cable, we use this model to estimate the effects of the outer shield current and voltage (associated with the external excitation and boundary conditions associated with the external conductor) on the inner conductor current and voltage. It is commonly believed that increasing the number of shields of a cable will improve the shielding performance. But this is not always the case, and a cable with multiple shields may perform similar to or worse than a cable with a single shield. Furthermore, we want to shed more light on these situations, which represent the main focus of this paper.

  5. Shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations via transmission line analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Campione, Salvatore; Basilio, Lorena I.; Warne, Larry Kevin; Hudson, Howard Gerald; Langston, William L.

    2016-06-25

    Our paper reports on a transmission-line model for calculating the shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations. Since the shields are not perfect conductors and apertures in the shields permit external magnetic and electric fields to penetrate into the interior regions of the cable, we use this model to estimate the effects of the outer shield current and voltage (associated with the external excitation and boundary conditions associated with the external conductor) on the inner conductor current and voltage. It is commonly believed that increasing the number of shields of a cable will improve the shielding performance. But this is not always the case, and a cable with multiple shields may perform similar to or worse than a cable with a single shield. Furthermore, we want to shed more light on these situations, which represent the main focus of this paper.

  6. Experimental analysis of the magnetic field shielding and trapping properties of bulk melt-processed YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. H.; Astill, D. M.; Lo, W.; Cardwell, D. A.; Coombs, T. A.; Campbell, A. M.; Larsen, J. G.

    1995-02-01

    A scanning Hall probe has been used to map the distributions of magnetic field in melt-processed YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ (YBCO) discs prepared by seeded and controlled molten-zone techniques. Both shielded and trapped fields were studied as a function of applied magnetic field for each speciment. A clear four-fold symmetry has been observed in the field distribution of the seeded melt-processed sample, suggesting that there are two planes in the disc which exhibit a weak response to an applied field. Similar magnetic properties were observed for the molten-zone processed sample and attributed to the presence of cracks in the specimen. It was found that the applied field required to saturate each sample was much higher than the maximum observed trapped field, in contradiction to the Bean model for a slab geometry. This effect, which is probably due to the plate geometry of the specimens and the variation of critical current density with magnetic field, has implications for practical applications of bulk melt-processed YBCO.

  7. Paleoproterozoic structural frame of the Yetti domain (Eglab shield, Algeria): Emplacement conditions of the Tinguicht late pluton from magnetic fabric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merabet, Nacer-eddine; Mahdjoub, Yamina; Henry, Bernard; Abtout, Abdeslam; Maouche, Said; Kahoui, Mohamed; Lamali, Atmane; Ayache, Mohamed

    2016-02-01

    The Tinguicht pluton is part of the ˜2.07 Ga post-collisional magmatic suites that intruded the Yetti Paleoproterozoic volcano-sedimentary series of the western part of the Eglab Shield (West African Craton). It represents one of the most recent units of these suites. This pluton, with a NW-SE elliptic shape, is unfoliated, and its deformational structures are practically restricted to fracturing and faulting. New structural, microstructural and aeromagnetic data are presented in order to analyze in particular the relationship between the Tinguicht pluton emplacement and the related NNW-SSE major mega-shear zone, separating the Yetti and Eglab domains. To constrain the context of the regional post-collisional evolution of the Eglab shield, a structural analysis was performed by mapping the magnetic structures (foliation and lineation) using AMS. The combination of the results of all the used approaches leads to a new and enriched image of this granitic pluton and of its tectonic emplacement context. The elliptic shape of the granitic body and the AMS strain pattern are consistent with the presence of a NNW-SSE major structure. NNW-SSE is also one of the major directions highlighted by the aeromagnetic data. This study thus evidences the role of the pre-existing major shear zones in controlling emplacement of post-collisional Paleoproterozoic plutons like Tinguicht, as shown for Drissa pluton in the Eglab domain earlier.

  8. Are lithium and sodium salts of N-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-salicylaldimine aromatic metalla-hetero[10]annulenes? An answer given by spatial magnetic properties (through space NMR shieldings-TSNMRS).

    PubMed

    Kleinpeter, Erich; Koch, Andreas

    2012-06-28

    The spatial magnetic properties (through space NMR shieldings-TSNMRS) of the enol tautomer of N-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-salicylaldimine, the lithium and sodium salts in comparison with cyclodecapentaene and pyrano[2,3-b]pyrrole were studied to answer this question.

  9. Inhomogeneous Shearing Around Major Shear Zone: Evidence From the Magnetic Fabric of Late-Panafrican Plutons in the Tuareg Shield (Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, B.; Derder, M. E.; Bayou, B.; Guemache, M.; Nouar, O.; Ouabadi, A.; Djellit, H.; Amenna, M.; Hemmi, A.

    2007-05-01

    Teg Orak and Tihaliouine are Late-Panafrican granitic intrusions situated in the Tuareg shield, northwest of Tamanrasset. Both plutons are located close to the 4°50 accident, one of the N-S major shear zone cutting the Hoggar. They are constituted of several granitic facies, indicating differentiation and multiphase intrusion. They show only very locally preferred visible orientation of their minerals. Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) was determined on samples collected along cross-sections in the Teg Orak (349 samples for 43 sites) and Tihaliouine (160 samples for 21 sites) plutons. At Tihaliouine, the AMS presents relatively scattered directions, with magnetic foliation having often strike similar to that of the plutons border. At Teg Orak, samples collected in the north-western part of the pluton present also AMS rather in relation with orientation of the pluton border. For all the other samples, including those from an aplitic dyke crossing the granite and whatever the facies of the granite, the fabric is very coherent. Magnetic lineation is subhorizontal, striking NW-SE. Magnetic foliation plunges to the NE on the north-eastern part of the plutons, has a weak dip in the central part and plunges to the SW in the south-western part. This disposition indicates deformation of the eastern part of the granite during late magmatic stages in relation with dextral strike-slip movement along the shear zone. Tihaliouine and western Teg Orak (mainly with fabric related with magma flow) intruded within older granite while eastern part of Teg Orak (with fabric related to deformation) is located within diorites and metamorphic rocks. In the Teg Orak - Tihaliouine area, granitic host-rocks acted therefore as a rigid block, protecting the studied plutons from the effect of regional deformation, while metamorphic and more basic plutonic rocks had a more deformable behavior and allowed intrusion strain.

  10. Changing and shielded magnetic fields suppress c-Fos expression in the navigation circuit: input from the magnetosensory system contributes to the internal representation of space in a subterranean rodent.

    PubMed

    Burger, Tomás; Lucová, Marcela; Moritz, Regina E; Oelschläger, Helmut H A; Druga, Rastislav; Burda, Hynek; Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Wiltschko, Roswitha; Nemec, Pavel

    2010-09-06

    The neural substrate subserving magnetoreception and magnetic orientation in mammals is largely unknown. Previous experiments have demonstrated that the processing of magnetic sensory information takes place in the superior colliculus. Here, the effects of magnetic field conditions on neuronal activity in the rodent navigation circuit were assessed by quantifying c-Fos expression. Ansell's mole-rats (Fukomys anselli), a mammalian model to study the mechanisms of magnetic compass orientation, were subjected to natural, periodically changing, and shielded magnetic fields while exploring an unfamiliar circular arena. In the undisturbed local geomagnetic field, the exploration of the novel environment and/or nesting behaviour induced c-Fos expression throughout the head direction system and the entorhinal-hippocampal spatial representation system. This induction was significantly suppressed by exposure to periodically changing and/or shielded magnetic fields; discrete decreases in c-Fos were seen in the dorsal tegmental nucleus, the anterodorsal and the laterodorsal thalamic nuclei, the postsubiculum, the retrosplenial and entorhinal cortices, and the hippocampus. Moreover, in inactive animals, magnetic field intensity manipulation suppressed c-Fos expression in the CA1 and CA3 fields of the hippocampus and the dorsal subiculum, but induced expression in the polymorph layer of the dentate gyrus. These findings suggest that key constituents of the rodent navigation circuit contain populations of neurons responsive to magnetic stimuli. Thus, magnetic information may be integrated with multimodal sensory and motor information into a common spatial representation of allocentric space within this circuit.

  11. Changing and shielded magnetic fields suppress c-Fos expression in the navigation circuit: input from the magnetosensory system contributes to the internal representation of space in a subterranean rodent

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Tomáš; Lucová, Marcela; Moritz, Regina E.; Oelschläger, Helmut H. A.; Druga, Rastislav; Burda, Hynek; Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Wiltschko, Roswitha; Němec, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    The neural substrate subserving magnetoreception and magnetic orientation in mammals is largely unknown. Previous experiments have demonstrated that the processing of magnetic sensory information takes place in the superior colliculus. Here, the effects of magnetic field conditions on neuronal activity in the rodent navigation circuit were assessed by quantifying c-Fos expression. Ansell's mole-rats (Fukomys anselli), a mammalian model to study the mechanisms of magnetic compass orientation, were subjected to natural, periodically changing, and shielded magnetic fields while exploring an unfamiliar circular arena. In the undisturbed local geomagnetic field, the exploration of the novel environment and/or nesting behaviour induced c-Fos expression throughout the head direction system and the entorhinal–hippocampal spatial representation system. This induction was significantly suppressed by exposure to periodically changing and/or shielded magnetic fields; discrete decreases in c-Fos were seen in the dorsal tegmental nucleus, the anterodorsal and the laterodorsal thalamic nuclei, the postsubiculum, the retrosplenial and entorhinal cortices, and the hippocampus. Moreover, in inactive animals, magnetic field intensity manipulation suppressed c-Fos expression in the CA1 and CA3 fields of the hippocampus and the dorsal subiculum, but induced expression in the polymorph layer of the dentate gyrus. These findings suggest that key constituents of the rodent navigation circuit contain populations of neurons responsive to magnetic stimuli. Thus, magnetic information may be integrated with multimodal sensory and motor information into a common spatial representation of allocentric space within this circuit. PMID:20219838

  12. Relativistic effects on the nuclear magnetic resonance shielding of FX (X = F, Cl, Br, I, and At) molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Sergio S; Aucar, Gustavo A

    2011-05-28

    We present ab inito full four-component and spin-free calculations of the NMR shielding parameter, σ, in the FX (X = F, Cl, Br, I and At) molecular systems. A different expression that overcomes the traditional non-relativistic (NR) approximation used to calculate the relationship between spin-rotation constants and the paramagnetic terms of σ(p) are given. Large deviations from NR results are obtained for σ(X; X = I and At) and for σ(F; FAt). σ(∥)(p)(I; FI) is zero within the NR approach but -447.4 parts per million from our calculations. The electronic origin of relativistic corrections are analyzed. All passive SO contributions are obtained as a difference between full four-component calculations and spin-free ones. Considering relativistic effects on the anisotropy, we obtain a deviation of 10% for I and 25% for At. σ(∥)(SO)(X) is always negative and σ(∥)(SF)(X) is always positive; the passive SO becomes larger than the SF one for X = Br, I, and At. Both σ(∥)(SO)(X) and σ(⊥)(SO)(X) have a functional dependence such as a Z(X)(b) being the exponent 3.5 and 3.65, respectively. The passive SO contribution to the anisotropy has a similar functional dependence with an exponent of 3.60, meaning that its perpendicular component is larger than its corresponding parallel component. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  13. Initial progress in the first wall, blanket, and shield Engineering Test Program for magnetically confined fusion-power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, H.; Baker, C.C.; Maroni, V.A.

    1981-10-01

    The first wall/blanket/shield (FW/B/S) Engineering Test Program (ETP) progressed from the planning stage into implementation during July, 1981. The program, generic in nature, comprises four Test Program Elements (TPE's), the emphasis of which is on defining the performance parameters for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) and the major fusion device to follow FED. These elements are: (1) nonnuclear thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing of first wall and component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads and heat transient (i.e., plasma disruption) effects; (2) nonnuclear and nuclear testing of FW/B/S components and assemblies with emphasis on bulk (nuclear) heating effects, integrated FW/B/S hydraulics and mechanics, blanket coolant system transients, and nuclear benchmarks; (3) FW/B/S electromagnetic and eddy current effects testing, including pulsed field penetration, torque and force restraint, electromagnetic materials, liquid metal MHD effects and the like; and (4) FW/B/S Assembly, Maintenance and Repair (AMR) studies focusing on generic AMR criteria, with the objective of preparing an AMR designers guidebook; also, development of rapid remote assembly/disassembly joint system technology, leak detection and remote handling methods.

  14. Parity nonconservation contribution to the nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants of chiral molecules: a four-component relativistic study.

    PubMed

    Bast, Radovan; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Saue, Trond

    2006-08-14

    A systematic four-component relativistic study of the parity nonconservation (PNC) contribution to the (isotropic) NMR shielding constants of chiral molecules is presented for the P enantiomers of the series H(2)X(2) (X=(17)O,(33)S,(77)Se,(125)Te,(209)Po). The PNC contributions are obtained within a linear response approach at the Hartree-Fock level. A careful design of the basis sets is necessary. The four-component relativistic results based on the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian are compared with the nonrelativistic Levy-Leblond results and those obtained by the spin-free modified Dirac Hamiltonian. The calculations confirm the nonrelativistic scaling law Z(2.4) of the PNC contribution with respect to nuclear charge Z. However, the calculations also show that the overall scaling is significantly modified by relativistic effects. The scalar relativistic effect scales as Z(4.7) for the selected set of molecules, whereas the spin-orbit effect, of opposite sign, scales better than Z(6) and completely dominates the PNC contribution for the heaviest elements. This opens up the intriguing possibility of the experimental observation of PNC effects on NMR parameters of molecules containing heavy atoms. The presented formalism is expected to be valuable in assisting the search for suitable candidate molecules.

  15. Read/write head having a GMR sensor biased by permanent magnets located between the GMR and the pole shields

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Samuel W.; Rottmayer, Robert Earl; Carey, Matthew J.

    1999-01-01

    A compact read/write head having a biased giant magnetoresistive sensor. Permanent magnet films are placed adjacent to the giant magnetoresistive sensor operating in the current-perpendicular-to the-plane (Cpp) mode and spaced with respect to the sensor by conducting films. These permanent magnet films provide a magnetic bias. The bias field is substantial and fairly uniform across sensor height. Biasing of the giant magnetoresistive sensor provides distinguishable response to the rising and falling edges of a recorded pulse on an adjacent recording medium, improves the linearity of the response, and helps to reduce noise. This read/write head is much simpler to fabricate and pattern and provides an enhanced uniformity of the bias field throughout the sensor.

  16. Corium shield

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Douglas B.; Buchholz, Carol E.

    1994-01-01

    A shield for restricting molten corium from flowing into a water sump disposed in a floor of a containment vessel includes upper and lower walls which extend vertically upwardly and downwardly from the floor for laterally bounding the sump. The upper wall includes a plurality of laterally spaced apart flow channels extending horizontally therethrough, with each channel having a bottom disposed coextensively with the floor for channeling water therefrom into the sump. Each channel has a height and a length predeterminedly selected for allowing heat from the molten corium to dissipate through the upper and lower walls as it flows therethrough for solidifying the molten corium therein to prevent accumulation thereof in the sump.

  17. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions must contend with a harsh radiation environment Impacts to crew and electronics. Need to invest in multifunctionality for spacecraft optimization. MMOD shield. Goals: Increase radiation mitigation potential. Retain overall MMOD shielding performance.

  18. Synchrotron radiation shielding estimates for the ALS super bend beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.J.; Heinzelman, K.M.

    2000-06-06

    The Advanced Light Source is proposing to replace 3 of it's bending magnets with superconducting magnets. This will substantially increase the required radiation shielding for these magnet's beamlines. In this report we outline the radiation shielding requirements for these 'superbend' beamlines.

  19. Structural characterization, solvent effects on nuclear magnetic shielding tensors, experimental and theoretical DFT studies on the vibrational and NMR spectra of 3-(acrylamido)phenylboronic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Özgür; Kaya, Mehmet Fatih; Dikmen, Gökhan

    2015-12-01

    Structural elucidation of 3-(acrylamido)phenylboronic acid (C9H10BNO3) was carried out with 1H, 13C and HETCOR NMR techniques. Solvent effects on nuclear magnetic shielding tensors were examined with deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide, acetone, methanol and water solvents. The correct order of appearance of carbon and hydrogen atoms on NMR scale from highest magnetic field region to the lowest one were investigated using different types of theoretical levels and the details of the levels were presented in this study. Stable structural conformers and vibrational band analysis of the title molecule (C9H10BNO3) were studied both experimental and theoretical viewpoints using FT-IR, Raman spectroscopic methods and density functional theory (DFT). FT-IR and Raman spectra were obtained in the region of 4000-400 cm-1, and 3700-10 cm-1, respectively. Becke-3-Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) hybrid density functional theory method with 6-31++G(d, p) basis set was included in the search for optimized structures and vibrational wavenumbers. Experimental and theoretical results show that after application of a suitable scaling factor density functional B3LYP method resulted in acceptable results for predicting vibrational wavenumbers except OH and NH stretching modes which is most likely arising from increasing unharmonicity in the high wave number region and possible intra and inter molecular interaction at OH edges those of which are not fully taken into consideration in theoretical processes. To make a more quantitative vibrational assignments, potential energy distribution (PED) values were calculated using VEDA 4 (Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis) program.

  20. Radiation shielding of astronauts in interplanetary flights: the CREAM surveyor to Mars and the magnetic lens system for a spaceship.

    PubMed

    Spillantini, P; Taccetti, F; Papini, P; Rossi, L; Casolino, M

    2001-01-01

    The radiation absorbed by astronauts during interplanetary flights is mainly due to cosmic rays of solar origin (SCR). In the most powerful solar flares the dose absorbed in few hours can exceed that cumulated in one year of exposition to the galactic component of cosmic rays (GCR). At energies above the minimum one needed to cross the walls of the spaceship there are extrapolations and guesses, but no data, on the angular distribution of SCR's, an information that is necessary for establishing whatever defence strategy. It was therefore proposed of sending to Mars a measurement device, that should continuously collect data during the travel, and possibly also in the orbit around Mars and on the Mars surface. The device should identify the particle and privilege the completeness in the measurement of its parameters. In fact the high energy electrons travel at speed of the light and could be used in the and future dangerous proton component. Also the much less abundant but individually more dangerous ions should be identified. The device should indeed include a magnetic spectrometer and a high granularity range telescope, and a good time of flight measurement. ASI is supporting an assessment study of a possible mission of such a device on board of the 2005 probe to Mars. A parallel technical study is also in progress to define the workable techniques and the possible configurations of a system of magnetic lenses for protecting the crew of a spaceship.

  1. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2011-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). By increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate concept MLI blankets for MMOD shields. In conjunction, these MLI blankets and the subsequent MMOD shields were also evaluated for their radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. These concepts were evaluated against the ISS MLI blankets and the ISS MMOD shield, which acted as the baseline. These radiation shielding assessments were performed using the high charge and energy transport software (HZETRN). This software is based on a one-dimensional formula of the Boltzmann transport equation with a straight-ahead approximation. Each configuration was evaluated against the following environments to provide a diverse view of radiation shielding effectiveness in most space environments within the heliosphere: August 1972 solar particle event, October 1989 solar particle event, 1982 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar maximum), 1987 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar minimum), and a low earth orbit environment in 1970 that corresponded to an altitude of 400 km and inclination of 51.6 . Both the absorbed dose and the dose equivalent were analyzed, but the focus of the discussion was on the dose equivalent since the data is most concerned with radiation shielding of the crew. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for

  2. Effective shielding to measure beam current from an ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bayle, H.; Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Marroncle, J.; Senée, F.; Simon, C.; Tuske, O.

    2014-02-15

    To avoid saturation, beam current transformers must be shielded from solenoid, quad, and RFQ high stray fields. Good understanding of field distribution, shielding materials, and techniques is required. Space availability imposes compact shields along the beam pipe. This paper describes compact effective concatenated magnetic shields for IFMIF-EVEDA LIPAc LEBT and MEBT and for FAIR Proton Linac injector. They protect the ACCT Current Transformers beyond 37 mT radial external fields. Measurements made at Saclay on the SILHI source are presented.

  3. Space reactor shielding fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of space reactor neutron shielding by a melting and casting process utilizing lithium hydride is described. The first neutron shield fabricated is a large pancake shape 86 inches in diameter, containing about 1700 pounds of lithium hydride. This shield, fabricated by the unique melting and casting process, is the largest lithium hydride shield ever built.

  4. Assessment of Alphamagnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Upper Experiment Structural Configuration Shielding Effectiveness Associated with Change from Cryo-Cooled Magnet to Permanent Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In the spring of 2010, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 2 (AMS-02) underwent a series of system level electromagnetic interference control measurements, followed by thermal vacuum testing. Shortly after completion of the thermal vacuum testing, the project decided to remove the cryogenically cooled superconducting magnet, and replace it with the original permanent magnet design employed in the earlier AMS- 01 assembly. Doing so necessitated several structural changes, as well as removal or modification of numerous electronic and thermal control devices and systems. At this stage, the project was rapidly approaching key milestone dates for hardware completion and delivery for launch, and had little time for additional testing or assessment of any impact to the electromagnetic signature of the AMS-02. Therefore, an analytical assessment of the radiated emissions behavioural changes associated with the system changes was requested.

  5. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). Increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate a concept MLI blanket for an MMOD shield. In conjunction, this MLI blanket and the subsequent MMOD shield was also evaluated for its radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. The overall MMOD shielding system using the concept MLI blanket proved to only have a marginal increase in the radiation mitigating properties. Therefore, subsequent analysis was performed on various conceptual MMOD shields to determine the combination of materials that may prove superior for radiation mitigating purposes. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for radiation shielding effectiveness.

  6. Shielding effectiveness of superconductive particles in plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Pienkowski, T.; Kincaid, J.; Lanagan, M.T.; Poeppel, R.B.; Dusek, J.T.; Shi, D.; Goretta, K.C.

    1988-09-01

    The ability to cool superconductors with liquid nitrogen instead of liquid helium has opened the door to a wide range of research. The well known Meissner effect, which states superconductors are perfectly diamagnetic, suggests shielding applications. One of the drawbacks to the new ceramic superconductors is the brittleness of the finished material. Because of this drawback, any application which required flexibility (e.g., wire and cable) would be impractical. Therefore, this paper presents the results of a preliminary investigation into the shielding effectiveness of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/ both as a composite and as a monolithic material. Shielding effectiveness was measured using two separate test methods. One tested the magnetic (near field) shielding, and the other tested the electromagnetic (far field) shielding. No shielding was seen in the near field measurements on the composite samples, and only one heavily loaded sample showed some shielding in the far field. The monolithic samples showed a large amount of magnetic shielding. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  7. The rotational spectra, potential function, Born-Oppenheimer breakdown, and magnetic shielding of SnSe and SnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, Luca; Giuliano, Barbara M.; Hess, Mareike; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2007-03-01

    The pure rotational spectra of 27 isotopic species of SnSe and SnTe have been measured in the frequency range of 5-24GHz using a Fabry-Pérot-type resonator pulsed-jet Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer. Gaseous samples of both chalcogenides were prepared by laser ablation of suitable target rods and were stabilized in supersonic jets of Ar. Global multi-isotopolog analyses of all available high-resolution data produced spectroscopic Dunham parameters Y01, Y11, Y21, Y31, Y02, and Y12 for both species, as well as Born-Oppenheimer breakdown (BOB) coefficients δ01 for Sn, Se, and Te. A direct fit of the same data sets to an appropriate radial Hamiltonian yielded analytic potential energy functions and BOB radial functions for the XΣ+1 electronic state of both SnSe and SnTe. Additionally, the magnetic hyperfine interaction produced by the dipolar nuclei Sn119, Sn117, Se77, and Te125 was observed, yielding first determinations of the corresponding spin-rotation coupling constants.

  8. Rotational spectra, potential function, Born Oppenheimer breakdown and magnetic shielding of SiSe and SiTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Barbara M.; Bizzocchi, Luca; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2008-09-01

    The pure rotational spectra of 18 isotopic species of SiSe (8) and SiTe (10) have been measured in their X1Σ + electronic state with a pulsed-jet resonator Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The molecules were prepared by a combined DC discharge/laser ablation technique and stabilised in a supersonic jet of Ar. Global multi-isotopologue analyses yielded spectroscopic Dunham parameters Y01, Y11, Y21, Y31 and Y02 for both species, as well as effective Born-Oppenheimer breakdown (BOB) coefficients δ01 for Si, Se and Te. A direct fit of the same data sets to an appropriate radial Hamiltonian yielded analytic potential energy functions and BOB radial functions for the X1Σ + electronic state of both SiSe and SiTe. Additionally, the magnetic hyperfine interactions produced by the uneven mass number A nuclei 29Si, 77Se and 125Te were observed, yielding first determinations of the corresponding nuclear spin-rotation coupling constants.

  9. The rotational spectra, potential function, Born-Oppenheimer breakdown, and magnetic shielding of SnSe and SnTe.

    PubMed

    Bizzocchi, Luca; Giuliano, Barbara M; Hess, Mareike; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2007-03-21

    The pure rotational spectra of 27 isotopic species of SnSe and SnTe have been measured in the frequency range of 5-24 GHz using a Fabry-Perot-type resonator pulsed-jet Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer. Gaseous samples of both chalcogenides were prepared by laser ablation of suitable target rods and were stabilized in supersonic jets of Ar. Global multi-isotopolog analyses of all available high-resolution data produced spectroscopic Dunham parameters Y01, Y11, Y21, Y31, Y02, and Y12 for both species, as well as Born-Oppenheimer breakdown (BOB) coefficients delta01 for Sn, Se, and Te. A direct fit of the same data sets to an appropriate radial Hamiltonian yielded analytic potential energy functions and BOB radial functions for the X 1Sigma+ electronic state of both SnSe and SnTe. Additionally, the magnetic hyperfine interaction produced by the dipolar nuclei 119Sn, 117Sn, 77Se, and 125Te was observed, yielding first determinations of the corresponding spin-rotation coupling constants.

  10. Meteoroid/Debris Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides innovative, low-weight shielding solutions for spacecraft and the ballistic limit equations that define the shield's performance in the meteoroid/debris environment. Analyses and hypervelocity impact testing results are described that have been used in developing the shields and equations. Spacecraft shielding design and operational practices described in this report are used to provide effective spacecraft protection from meteoroid and debris impacts. Specific shield applications for the International Space Station (ISS), Space Shuttle Orbiter and the CONTOUR (Comet Nucleus Tour) space probe are provided. Whipple, Multi-Shock and Stuffed Whipple shield applications are described.

  11. Electric field effects on nuclear magnetic shielding of the 1:1 and 2:1 (homo and heterochiral) complexes of XOOX' (X, X' = H, CH3) with lithium cation and their chiral discrimination.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Provasi, Patricio F; Pagola, Gabriel I; Ferraro, Marta B

    2011-09-14

    The set of 1:1 and 2:1 complexes of XOOX' (X, X' = H, CH(3)) with lithium cation has been studied to determine if they are suitable candidates for chiral discrimination in an isotropic medium via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Conventional nuclear magnetic resonance is unable to distinguish between enantiomers in the absence of a chiral solvent. The criterion for experimental detection is valuated by the isotropic part of nuclear shielding polarisability tensors, related to a pseudoscalar of opposite sign for two enantiomers. The study includes calculations at coupled Hartree-Fock and density functional theory schemes for (17)O nucleus in each compound. Additional calculations for (1)H are also included for some compounds. A huge static homogeneous electric field, perpendicular to the magnetic field of the spectromer, as big as ≈1.7 × 10(8) V m(-1) should be applied to observe a shift of ≈1 ppm for (17)O magnetic shielding in the proposed set of complexes. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  12. Testing the bioelectric shield.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Susan J; Rose, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    A pendant was claimed to provide numerous health benefits, including reduced stress, increased strength, and protection from electromagnetic radiation from computers and mobile phones. Three experiments tested the effectiveness of this pendant's effect as a bioelectric shield. In the first experiment, 12 subjects who work with computers wore shields (6 real, 6 sham) for several weeks and were regularly tested for hand strength and mood changes. Both types of shield increased calmness, but the real shields did not have any greater effect. In 2 further studies (in each N=40) hand strength was measured at baseline, with mobile phone, and with mobile phone and bioelectric or sham shield. The shields did not differ in their effects. Both studies showed a significant correlation between the change in strength with and without the shield and subjects'scores on a questionnaire concerning their belief in and use of alternative therapies. The shields appear to produce a measurable placebo effect but are otherwise ineffective.

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.

    1957-09-24

    The reactor radiation shield material is comprised of alternate layers of iron-containing material and compressed cellulosic material, such as masonite. The shielding material may be prefabricated in the form of blocks, which can be stacked together in ary desired fashion to form an effective shield.

  14. Enhanced Whipple Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor); Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Williamsen, Joel E. (Inventor); Robinson, Jennifer R. (Inventor); Nolen, Angela M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact (HVI) Whipple Shield and a method for shielding a wall from penetration by high velocity particle impacts where the Whipple Shield is comprised of spaced apart inner and outer metal sheets or walls with an intermediate cloth barrier arrangement comprised of ceramic cloth and high strength cloth which are interrelated by ballistic formulae.

  15. Magnetic Shielding for High Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    nonlinear and eminently non-dispersive switching networks (such as banks of fast diodes ) have large bandwidths. Because of this simulation we believe...function of the form f z c t( )+ 0 . Here c0 and η0 correspond to speed of light and impedance in free space. In view of this, Taylor expansion of the...for space applications, added weight rarely has a high cost penalty and a light material with very good SE must meet these cost constraints. The

  16. Molecular orbital analysis of the inverse halogen dependence of nuclear magnetic shielding in LaX₃, X = F, Cl, Br, I.

    PubMed

    Moncho, Salvador; Autschbach, Jochen

    2010-12-01

    The NMR nuclear shielding tensors for the series LaX(3), with X = F, Cl, Br and I, have been computed using two-component relativistic density functional theory based on the zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA). A detailed analysis of the inverse halogen dependence (IHD) of the La shielding was performed via decomposition of the shielding tensor elements into contributions from localized and delocalized molecular orbitals. Both spin-orbit and paramagnetic shielding terms are important, with the paramagnetic terms being dominant. Major contributions to the IHD can be attributed to the La-X bonding orbitals, as well as to trends associated with the La core and halogen lone pair orbitals, the latter being related to X-La π donation. An 'orbital rotation' model for the in-plane π acceptor f orbital of La helps to rationalize the significant magnitude of deshielding associated with the in-plane π donation. The IHD goes along with a large increase in the shielding tensor anisotropy as X becomes heavier, which can be associated with trends for the covalency of the La-X bonds, with a particularly effective transfer of spin-orbit coupling induced spin density from iodine to La in LaI(3). Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  18. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  19. The role of the exchange-correlation response kernel and scaling corrections in relativistic density functional nuclear magnetic shielding calculations with the zeroth-order regular approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autschbach, Jochen

    2013-09-01

    The relativistic NMR module of the Amsterdam Density Functional (ADF) package, which is frequently utilised in studies of heavy atom NMR chemical shifts, is extended to calculate a hitherto neglected term from the response of the exchange-correlation (XC) potential. The term vanishes in the absence of spin-orbit coupling. Further, corrections to the shielding arising from scaling factors in the zeroth-order regular approximation (zora) relativistic framework are investigated. The XC response markedly improves calculated proton chemical shifts for hydrogen halides. Mercury chemical shifts for mercury dihalides are also noticeably altered. Contributions from density-gradient dependent terms in the response kernel contribute about 30-40%. New fully relativistic density functional theory (DFT) benchmark data are compared with zora and literature reference values. In line with previous work, it is found that absolute shielding constants for Hg are not accurately predicted with zora. However, chemical shifts agree well with fully relativistic calculations. The application of 'scaled-zora' scaling factors deteriorates the shielding constants and is therefore not recommended. The scaling hardly affects chemical shifts. zora calculations are not suitable for absolute shielding of heavy atoms but they can be used safely for chemical shifts in most application scenarios.

  20. Electromagnetic and Stress Analyses of the ITER Equatorial Thermal Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Mingzhun; Song, Yuntao; Wang, Songke; Wang, Xianwei

    2013-08-01

    The ITER equatorial thermal shield is located inside the cryostat and outside the vacuum vessel, and its purpose is to provide a thermal shield from hot components to the superconducting magnets. Electromagnetic analysis of the equatorial thermal shield was performed using the ANSYS code, because electromagnetic load was one of the main loads. The 40° sector finite element model was established including the vacuum vessel, equatorial thermal shield, and superconducting magnets. The main purpose of this analysis was to investigate the eddy current and electromagnetic force in the equatorial thermal shield during plasma disruption. Stress analysis was implemented under the electromagnetic load. The results show that the equatorial thermal shield can accommodate the calculated electromagnetic loads.

  1. Predictions for Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) is a serious hazard to humans and electronic instruments during space travel, particularly on prolonged missions outside the Earth s magnetic fields. Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is composed of approx. 98% nucleons and approx. 2% electrons and positrons. Although cosmic ray heavy ions are 1-2% of the fluence, these energetic heavy nuclei (HZE) contribute 50% of the long-term dose. These unusually high specific ionizations pose a significant health hazard acting as carcinogens and also causing microelectronics damage inside spacecraft and high-flying aircraft. These HZE ions are of concern for radiation protection and radiation shielding technology, because gross rearrangements and mutations and deletions in DNA are expected. Calculations have shown that HZE particles have a strong preference for interaction with light nuclei. The best shield for this radiation would be liquid hydrogen, which is totally impractical. For this reason, hydrogen-containing polymers make the most effective practical shields. Shielding is required during missions in Earth orbit and possibly for frequent flying at high altitude because of the broad GCR spectrum and during a passage into deep space and LunarMars habitation because of the protracted exposure encountered on a long space mission. An additional hazard comes from solar particle events (SPEs) which are mostly energetic protons that can produce heavy ion secondaries as well as neutrons in materials. These events occur at unpredictable times and can deliver a potentially lethal dose within several hours to an unshielded human. Radiation protection for humans requires safety in short-term missions and maintaining career exposure limits within acceptable levels on future long-term exploration missions. The selection of shield materials can alter the protection of humans by an order of magnitude. If improperly selected, shielding materials can actually

  2. Cable shield connecting device

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    A cable shield connecting device for installation on a high voltage cable of the type having a metallic shield, the device including a relatively conformable, looped metal bar for placement around a bared portion of the metallic shield to extend circumferentially around a major portion of the circumference of the metallic shield while being spaced radially therefrom, a plurality of relatively flexible metallic fingers affixed to the bar, projecting from the bar in an axial direction and spaced circumferentially along the bar, each finger being attached to the metallic shield at a portion located remote from the bar to make electrical contact with the metallic shield, and a connecting conductor integral with the bar.

  3. The hyperfine structure in the rotational spectra of D{sub 2}{sup 17}O and HD{sup 17}O: Confirmation of the absolute nuclear magnetic shielding scale for oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Puzzarini, Cristina Cazzoli, Gabriele; Harding, Michael E.; Vázquez, Juana; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-03-28

    Guided by theoretical predictions, the hyperfine structures of the rotational spectra of mono- and bideuterated-water containing {sup 17}O have been experimentally investigated. To reach sub-Doppler resolution, required to resolve the hyperfine structure due to deuterium quadrupole coupling as well as to spin-rotation (SR) and dipolar spin-spin couplings, the Lamb-dip technique has been employed. The experimental investigation and in particular, the spectral analysis have been supported by high-level quantum-chemical computations employing coupled-cluster techniques and, for the first time, a complete experimental determination of the hyperfine parameters involved was possible. The experimentally determined {sup 17}O spin-rotation constants of D{sub 2}{sup 17}O and HD{sup 17}O were used to derive the paramagnetic part of the corresponding nuclear magnetic shielding constants. Together with the computed diamagnetic contributions as well as the vibrational and temperature corrections, the latter constants have been employed to confirm the oxygen nuclear magnetic shielding scale, recently established on the basis of spin-rotation data for H{sub 2}{sup 17}O [Puzzarini et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 234304 (2009)].

  4. RADIATION SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-23

    ABS>A radiation shield that is suitable for the protection of personnel from both gamma rays and nentrons is described. The shield is comprised of a hollow wall and an aggregate consisting of iron and water in approximately equal amounts by volume substantially filling the wall. A means is provided to circulate the water through the wall to cool the shield when in use.

  5. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaya, S.; Maeda, H.; Funaki, M.; Fukui, H.

    2008-12-01

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Δσ =σ∥-σ⊥, for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator σ⃗ṡπ⃗U/2c, in which π⃗=p⃗+A⃗, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c ≅137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A⃗ (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c-2 and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c-4. It is shown that the small Δσ for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  6. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model.

    PubMed

    Hamaya, S; Maeda, H; Funaki, M; Fukui, H

    2008-12-14

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Delta sigma = sigma(parallel) - sigma(perpendicular), for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator sigma x piU/2c, in which pi = p + A, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c approximately = 137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c(-2) and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c(-4). It is shown that the small Delta sigma for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  7. INTOR radiation shielding for personnel access

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Abdou, M.

    1981-01-01

    The INTOR reactor shield system consists of the blanket, bulk shield, penetration shield, component shield, and biological shield. The bulk shield consists of two parts: (a) the inboard shield; and (b) the outboard shield. The distinction between the different components of the shield system is essential to satisfy the different design constraints and achieve various objectives.

  8. A Launch Requirements Trade Study for Active Space Radiation Shielding for Long Duration Human Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Bollweg, Ken; Martin, Trent; Westover, Shayne; Battiston, Roberto; Burger, William J.; Meinke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    A trade study for an active shielding concept based on magnetic fields in a solenoid configuration versus mass based shielding was developed. Monte Carlo simulations were used to estimate the radiation exposure for two values of the magnetic field strength and the mass of the magnetic shield configuration. For each field strength, results were reported for the magnetic region shielding (end caps ignored) and total region shielding (end caps included but no magnetic field protection) configurations. A value of 15 cSv was chosen to be the maximum exposure for an astronaut. The radiation dose estimate over the total shield region configuration cannot be used at this time without a better understanding of the material and mass present in the end cap regions through a detailed vehicle design. The magnetic shield region configuration, assuming the end cap regions contribute zero exposure, can be launched on a single Space Launch System rocket and up to a two year mission can be supported. The magnetic shield region configuration results in two versus nine launches for a comparable mass based shielding configuration. The active shielding approach is clearly more mass efficient because of the reduced number of launches than the mass based shielding for long duration missions.

  9. From CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ-J to CCSD(T) complete basis set limit isotropic nuclear magnetic shieldings via affordable DFT/CBS calculations.

    PubMed

    Kupka, Teobald; Stachów, Michał; Nieradka, Marzena; Kaminsky, Jakub; Pluta, Tadeusz; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2011-05-01

    It is shown that a linear correlation exists between nuclear shielding constants for nine small inorganic and organic molecules (N(2), CO, CO(2), NH(3), CH(4), C(2)H(2), C(2)H(4), C(2)H(6) and C(6)H(6)) calculated with 47 methods (42 DFT methods, RHF, MP2, SOPPA, SOPPA(CCSD), CCSD(T)) and the aug-cc-pVTZ-J basis set and corresponding complete basis set results, estimated from calculations with the family of polarization-consistent pcS-n basis sets. This implies that the remaining basis set error of the aug-cc-pVTZ-J basis set is very similar in DFT and CCSD(T) calculations. As the aug-cc-pVTZ-J basis set is significantly smaller, CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ-J calculations allow in combination with affordable DFT/pcS-n complete basis set calculations the prediction of nuclear shieldings at the CCSD(T) level of nearly similar accuracy as those, obtained by fitting results obtained from computationally demanding pcS-n calculations at the CCSD(T) limit. A significant saving of computational efforts can thus be achieved by scaling inexpensive CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ-J calculations of nuclear isotropic shieldings with affordable DFT complete basis set limit corrections. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELDING

    DOEpatents

    Borst, L.B.

    1961-07-11

    A special hydrogenous concrete shielding for reactors is described. In addition to Portland cement and water, the concrete essentially comprises 30 to 60% by weight barytes aggregate for enhanced attenuation of fast neutrons. The biological shields of AEC's Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor are particular embodiments.

  11. RF shielded connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, A.; Clatterbuck, C.

    1974-01-01

    Gap, where cable joins connector housing, is shielded effectively by composite RF shielding made from suitable potting resin material (fumed silica, thixotropic prepolymer composition), conductive coating (silver-filled, flexible, polyurethane resin), and protective jacket (wax coated housing formed around another wax form having contours shaped to match configuration).

  12. Shielding for thermal neutrons.

    PubMed

    McCall, R C

    1997-01-01

    The problem of calculating the neutron capture gamma-ray dose rate due to thermal neutron capture in a boron or cadmium rectangular shield is considered. An example is given for shielding for a door at the exit of medical accelerator room maze in order to determine the optimum location of lead relative to the borated polyethylene.

  13. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  14. Orion Heat Shield

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-06

    ENGINEERS FROM AMES RESEARCH CENTER AND MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER REMOVE AVCOAT SEGMENTS FROM THE SURFACE OF THE ORION HEAT SHIELD, THE PROTECTIVE SHELL DESIGNED TO HELP THE NEXT GENERATION CREW MODULE WITHSTAND THE HEAT OF ATMOSPHERIC REENTRY. THE HEAT SHIELD FLEW TO SPACE DURING THE EFT-1 FULL SCALL FLIGHT TEST OF ORION IN DECEMBER 2014

  15. Orion Heat Shield

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-06

    OVERSEEING ORION HEAT SHIELD WORK IN MARSHALL'S SEVEN-AXIS MILLING AND MACHINING FACILITY ARE, FROM LEFT, JOHN KOWAL, MANAGER OF ORION'S THERMAL PROTECTION SYSTEM AT JOHNSON SPACE CENTER; NICHOLAS CROWLEY, AN AMES ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN; AND ROB KORNIENKO, AMES ENGINEERING BRANCH CHIEF. THE HEAT SHIELD FLEW TO SPACE DURING THE EFT-1 FULL SCALE FLIGHT TEST OF ORION IN DECEMBER, 2014

  16. TFCX shielding optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Design analyses and tradeoff studies for the bulk shield of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) were performed. Several shielding options were considered to lower the capital cost of the shielding system. Optimization analyses were carried out to reduce the nuclear responses in the TF coils and the dose equivalent in the reactor hall one day after shutdown. Two TFCX designs with different toroidal field (TF) coil configurations were considered during this work. The materials for the shield were selected based upon tradeoff studies and the results from the previous design studies. The main shielding materials are water, concrete, and steel balls (Fe1422 or Nitronic 33). Small amounts of boron carbide and lead are employed to reduce activation, nuclear heating in the TF coils, and dose equivalent after shutdown.

  17. Heat Shield in Pieces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the remains of the rover's heat shield, broken into two key pieces, the main piece on the left side and a broken-off flank piece near the middle of the image. The heat shield impact site is identified by the circle of red dust on the right side of the picture. In this view, Opportunity is approximately 20 meters (66 feet) away from the heat shield, which protected it while hurtling through the martian atmosphere.

    In the far left of the image, a meteorite called 'Heat Shield Rock,' sits nearby, The Sun is reflecting off the silver-colored underside of the internal thermal blankets of the heat shield.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact.

    This is an approximately true-color rendering of the scene acquired around 1:22 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity sol 324 (Dec. 21, 2004) in an image mosaic using panoramic filters at wavelengths of 750, 530, and 430 nanometers.

  18. Shielding against galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Nealy, J. E.; Thibeault, S. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Shinn, J. L.; Kim, M.; Kiefer, R.

    1996-01-01

    Ions of galactic origin are modified but not attenuated by the presence of shielding materials. Indeed, the number of particles and the absorbed energy behind most shield materials increases as a function of shield thickness. The modification of the galactic cosmic ray composition upon interaction with shielding is the only effective means of providing astronaut protection. This modification is intimately conntected with the shield transport porperties and is a strong function of shield composition. The systematic behavior of the shield properites in terms of microscopic energy absorption events will be discussed. The shield effectiveness is examined with respect to convectional protection practice and in terms of a biological endpoint: the efficiency for reduction of the probability of transformation of shielded C3H1OT1/2 mouse cells. The relative advantage of developing new shielding technologies is discussed in terms of a shield performance as related to biological effect and the resulting uncertainty in estimating astronaut risk.

  19. MEANS FOR SHIELDING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Garrison, W.M.; McClinton, L.T.; Burton, M.

    1959-03-10

    A reactor of the heterageneous, heavy water moderated type is described. The reactor is comprised of a plurality of vertically disposed fuel element tubes extending through a tank of heavy water moderator and adapted to accommodate a flow of coolant water in contact with the fuel elements. A tank containing outgoing coolant water is disposed above the core to function is a radiation shield. Unsaturated liquid hydrocarbon is floated on top of the water in the shield tank to reduce to a minimum the possibility of the occurrence of explosive gaseous mixtures resulting from the neutron bombardment of the water in the shield tank.

  20. Scalar Relativistic Computations of Nuclear Magnetic Shielding and g-Shifts with the Zeroth-Order Regular Approximation and Range-Separated Hybrid Density Functionals.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Fredy; Govind, Niranjan; Autschbach, Jochen

    2011-10-11

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of NMR chemical shifts and molecular g tensors with Gaussian-type orbitals are implemented via second-order energy derivatives within the scalar relativistic zeroth order regular approximation (ZORA) framework. Nonhybrid functionals, standard (global) hybrids, and range-separated (Coulomb-attenuated, long-range corrected) hybrid functionals are tested. Origin invariance of the results is ensured by use of gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO) basis functions. The new implementation in the NWChem quantum chemistry package is verified by calculations of nuclear shielding constants for the heavy atoms in HX (X = F, Cl, Br, I, At) and H2X (X = O, S, Se, Te, Po) and (125)Te chemical shifts in a number of tellurium compounds. The basis set and functional dependence of g-shifts is investigated for 14 radicals with light and heavy atoms. The problem of accurately predicting (19)F NMR shielding in UF6-nCln, n = 1-6, is revisited. The results are sensitive to approximations in the density functionals, indicating a delicate balance of DFT self-interaction vs correlation. For the uranium halides, the range-separated functionals are not clearly superior to global hybrids.

  1. iSHIELD - A Line Source Application of SHIELD11

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Rokni, S.H.; /SLAC

    2006-04-27

    iSHIELD11 performs a line-source numerical integration of radiation source terms that are defined by the iSHIELD11 computer code[1] . An example is provided to demonstrate how one can use iSHIELD11 to perform a shielding analysis for a 250 GeV electron linear accelerator.

  2. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  3. What Is Radiation Shielding?

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Kerry Lee, NASA Orion radiation system manager, explains how radiation shielding is used to block harmful particles coming into the spacecraft without producing secondary particles that can cause e...

  4. Crash-Resistant Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bixler, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    Impact-resistant shield designed to consist of aluminum honeycomb structure sandwiched between inner and outer aluminum skins. Intended to protect radioisotope thermoelectric generator of spacecraft from impact with ground or water after free fall from upper atmosphere. Designed to absorb impact energy by buckling, while inner and outer skins designed to protect against shrapnel, overpressure, and impact loads. Concept of shield applicable to crashproof compartments for ground vehicles and aircraft.

  5. Crash-Resistant Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bixler, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    Impact-resistant shield designed to consist of aluminum honeycomb structure sandwiched between inner and outer aluminum skins. Intended to protect radioisotope thermoelectric generator of spacecraft from impact with ground or water after free fall from upper atmosphere. Designed to absorb impact energy by buckling, while inner and outer skins designed to protect against shrapnel, overpressure, and impact loads. Concept of shield applicable to crashproof compartments for ground vehicles and aircraft.

  6. Fabrication And Performance Of Cylindrical Iron Shields For MRI Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, M. J.; Ewing, J.; Froelich, J.; Issa, C.; Vavrek, B.

    1985-09-01

    Using analytic and experimental methods, we have investigated the design, fabrication, and performance of axially symmetric shields which minimize the field perturbation within the central bore of an MR magnet. Magnetic resonance shields have been built for 1.9 tesla/60 cm bore and 1.5 tesla/100 cm bore superconducting magnets. The 1.9 T system is enclosed by a simple cylindrical shield having a weight of 49,000 pounds. The 1.5 T system shield is a 100,000 pound tapered thickness cylinder with conic ends. The shields are constructed from cold rolled steel sections which are welded in place at the magnet site. A low carbon, specially annealed steel with particularly desireable properties of induced magnetism has been employed. The 5 gauss line is constrained to a point 4.0 meters to the side of the 1.9 T magnet, 3.0 meters to the side of the 1.5 T magnet and 7.0 meters off the end of both magnets.

  7. Electrostatic space radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R.; Wilson, J. W.; Youngquist, R. C.

    For the success of NASA s new vision for space exploration to Moon Mars and beyond exposures from the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space long duration missions is a must solve problem The payload penalty demands a very stringent requirement on the design of the spacecrafts for human deep space missions The exploration beyond low Earth orbit LEO to enable routine access of space will require protection from the hazards of the accumulated exposures of space radiation Galactic Cosmic Rays GCR and Solar Particle Events SPE and minimizing the production of secondary radiation is a great advantage There is a need to look to new horizons for newer technologies The present investigation revisits electrostatic active radiation shielding and explores the feasibility of using the electrostatic shielding in concert with the state-of-the-art materials shielding and protection technologies The full space radiation environment has been used for the first time to explore the feasibility of electrostatic shielding The goal is to repel enough positive charge ions so that they miss the spacecraft without attracting thermal electrons Conclusions will be drawn should the electrostatic shielding be successful for the future directions of space radiation protection

  8. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  9. Shields-1, A SmallSat Radiation Shielding Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, D. Laurence, III; Kim, Wousik; Cutler, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Shields CubeSat initiative is to develop a configurable platform that would allow lower cost access to Space for materials durability experiments, and to foster a pathway for both emerging and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation shielding technologies to gain spaceflight heritage in a relevant environment. The Shields-1 will be Langleys' first CubeSat platform to carry out this mission. Radiation shielding tests on Shields-1 are planned for the expected severe radiation environment in a geotransfer orbit (GTO), where advertised commercial rideshare opportunities and CubeSat missions exist, such as Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). To meet this objective, atomic number (Z) graded radiation shields (Zshields) have been developed. The Z-shield properties have been estimated, using the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) radiation shielding computational modeling, to have 30% increased shielding effectiveness of electrons, at half the thickness of a corresponding single layer of aluminum. The Shields-1 research payload will be made with the Z-graded radiation shields of varying thicknesses to create dose-depth curves to be compared with baseline materials. Additionally, Shields-1 demonstrates an engineered Z-grade radiation shielding vault protecting the systems' electronic boards. The radiation shielding materials' performances will be characterized using total ionizing dose sensors. Completion of these experiments is expected to raise the technology readiness levels (TRLs) of the tested atomic number (Z) graded materials. The most significant contribution of the Z-shields for the SmallSat community will be that it enables cost effective shielding for small satellite systems, with significant volume constraints, while increasing the operational lifetime of ionizing radiation sensitive components. These results are anticipated to increase the development of CubeSat hardware design for increased mission lifetimes, and enable

  10. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  11. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2000-12-26

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  12. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  13. Shielded, Automated Umbilical Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barron, Daniel R.; Morrill, Brion F.; Jasulaitis, Vytas

    1995-01-01

    Umbilical mechanism automatically connects and disconnects various fluid couplings and/or electrical contacts while shielding mating parts from debris. Reacts mating and demating loads internally, without additional supporting structures. All functions - extension of plug, mating, and movement of debris shields - actuated by single motor. If mechanism jams or fails at any point in sequence, override feature in drive train allows manual operation. Designed for service in outer space, where its shields protect against micrometeoroids, debris, ultraviolet radiation, and atomic oxygen. Used on Earth to connect or disconnect fluid or electrical utilities in harsh environments like those of nuclear powerplants or undersea construction sites, or in presence of radioactive, chemical, or biological hazards, for example.

  14. Opportunity's Heat Shield Scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity reveals the scene of the rover's heat shield impact. In this view, Opportunity is approximately 130 meters (427 feet) away from the device that protected it while hurtling through the martian atmosphere.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact.

    This is the panoramic camera team's best current attempt at generating a true-color view of what this scene would look like if viewed by a human on Mars. It was generated from a mathematical combination of six calibrated, left-eye panoramic camera images acquired around 1:50 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 322 (Dec. 19, 2004) using filters ranging in wavelengths from 430 to 750 nanometers.

  15. Space station MMOD shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Nagy, Kornel; Lear, Dana M.; Prior, Thomas G.

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes the International Space Station (ISS) micro-meteoroid orbital debris (MMOD) impact shielding including the requirements for protection as well as technical approaches to meeting the requirements. Current activities in providing MMOD protection for ISS are described, including efforts to augment MMOD protection by adding shields on-orbit. Another activity is to observe MMOD impact damage on ISS elements and returned hardware, and to compare the observed damage with predicted damage using Bumper code risk assessment software. A conclusion of this paper is that ISS will be protected adequately from MMOD impact after completing augmentation of ISS shielding for service module, and after improving MMOD protection for Soyuz and Progress vehicles. Another conclusion is that impact damage observed to the ISS mini-pressurized logistics module matches the distribution of impacts predicted by Bumper code.

  16. Shielding Structures for Interplanetary Human Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracino, Emanuele; Lobascio, Cesare

    2012-07-01

    Since the end of Apollo missions, human spaceflight has been limited to the Low Earth Orbit (LEO), inside the protective magnetic field of the Earth, because astronauts are, to the largest degree, protected from the harsh radiation environment of the interplanetary space. However, this situation will change when space exploration missions beyond LEO will become the real challenge of the human exploration program. The feasibility of these missions in the solar system is thus strongly connected to the capability to mitigate the radiation-induced biological effects on the crew during the journey and the permanence on the intended planet surface. Inside the International Space Station (ISS), the volumes in which the crew spends most of the time, namely the crew quarters are the only parts that implement dedicated additional radiation shielding made of polyethylene tiles designed for mitigating SPE effects. Furthermore, specific radiation shielding materials are often added to the described configuration to shield crew quarters or the entire habitat example of these materials are polyethylene, liquid hydrogen, etc. but, increasing the size of the exploration vehicles to bring humans beyond LEO, and without the magnetosphere protection, such approach is unsustainable because the mass involved is a huge limiting factor with the actual launcher engine technology. Moreover, shielding against GCR with materials that have a low probability of nuclear interactions and in parallel a high ionizing energy loss is not always the best solution. In particular there is the risk to increase the LET of ions arriving at the spacecraft shell, increasing their Radio-Biological Effectiveness. Besides, the production of secondary nuclei by projectile and target fragmentation is an important issue when performing an engineering assessment of materials to be used for radiation shielding. The goal of this work is to analyze different shielding solutions to increase as much as possible the

  17. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  18. ADEPT Heat Shield Testing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-16

    NASA is developing the next generation of heat shield to enable astronauts to go to Mars and other deep space destinations. Called the Adaptive Deployable Entry and Placement Technology or ADEPT, the heat shield is mechanically deployable and uses a flexible woven carbon fabric as its skin. Recently, engineers successfully completed a series of tests in the Ames Arc Jet facility. Other tests conducted in wind tunnels at Ames demonstrated that the ADEPT materials and system perform well under planetary re-entry conditions.

  19. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Hoenes, Glenn R.

    1981-01-01

    According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  20. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  1. Glove box shield

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    1981-02-17

    According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box. 2 figs.

  2. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of enclosures using UWB pulses inside an open TEM waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlemann, H.; Koch, M.

    2007-06-01

    Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE) for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005). Numerical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, a measurement procedure is introduced using ultra wideband (UWB) electromagnetic field pulses. The procedure provides a quick way to determine the transient shielding effectiveness of an enclosure without performing time consuming frequency domain measurements. For demonstration, a cylindrical enclosure made of conductive textile is examined. The field pulses are generated inside an open TEM-waveguide. From the measurement of the transient electric and magnetic fields with and without the shield in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness of the shielding material as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are derived.

  3. Spallation Neutron Source Radiation Shielding Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.; Barnes, J.M.; Drischler, J.D.; Johnston, J.O.; Lillie, R.A.; McNeilly, G.S.; Santoro, R.T.

    1999-11-14

    This paper summarizes results of Spallation Neutron Source calculations to estimate radiation hazards and shielding requirements for activated Mercury, target components, target cooling water, and {sup 7}Be plateout. Dose rates in the accelerator tunnel from activation of magnets and concrete were investigated. The impact of gaps and other streaming paths on the radiation environment inside the test cell during operation and after shutdown were also assessed.

  4. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  5. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  6. Hinged Shields for Machine Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallande, J. B.; Poland, W. W.; Tull, S.

    1985-01-01

    Flaps guard against flying chips, but fold away for tool setup. Clear plastic shield in position to intercept flying chips from machine tool and retracted to give operator access to workpiece. Machine shops readily make such shields for own use.

  7. Curiosity Heat Shield in Detail

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-08

    This color full-resolution image showing the heat shield of NASA Curiosity rover was obtained during descent to the surface of Mars. This image shows the inside surface of the heat shield, with its protective multi-layered insulation.

  8. Efficacy of Cosmic Ray Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    This research involved testing various types of shielding with a self-constructed Berkeley style cosmic ray detector, in order to evaluate the materials of each type of shielding's effectiveness at blocking cosmic rays and the cost- and size-efficiency of the shields as well. The detector was constructed, then tested for functionality and reliability. Following confirmation, the detector was then used at three different locations to observe it altitude or atmospheric conditions had any effect on the effectiveness of certain shields. Multiple types of shielding were tested with the detector, including combinations of several shields, primarily aluminum, high-iron steel, polyethylene plastic, water, lead, and a lead-alternative radiation shield utilized in radiology. These tests regarding both the base effectiveness and the overall efficiency of shields is designed to support future space exploratory missions where the risk of exposure to possibly lethal amounts of cosmic rays for crew and the damage caused to unshielded electronics are of serious concern.

  9. Hinged Shields for Machine Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallande, J. B.; Poland, W. W.; Tull, S.

    1985-01-01

    Flaps guard against flying chips, but fold away for tool setup. Clear plastic shield in position to intercept flying chips from machine tool and retracted to give operator access to workpiece. Machine shops readily make such shields for own use.

  10. Wake Shield Facility (WSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Wake Shield Facility (WSF) is a free-flying research and development facility that is designed to use the pure vacuum of space to conduct scientific research in the development of new materials. The thin film materials technology developed by the WSF could some day lead to applications such as faster electronics components for computers.

  11. Lightweight blast shield

    DOEpatents

    Mixon, Larry C.; Snyder, George W.; Hill, Scott D.; Johnson, Gregory L.; Wlodarski, J. Frank; von Spakovsky, Alexis P.; Emerson, John D.; Cole, James M.; Tipton, John P.

    1991-01-01

    A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

  12. Shield against radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Grifoni, S.

    1988-02-23

    This patent describes a shield against ionizing radiations that comprises at least one layer of an aggregate-containing cement-based conglomerate or an aggregate-containing cement-based mortar wherein the aggregate consists essentially of floated galena or mixtures thereof which at least one boron mineral.

  13. Shield For Flexible Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Williford, Clifford B.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical shield designed to fit around flexible pipe to protect nearby workers from injury and equipment from damage if pipe ruptures. Designed as pressure-relief device. Absorbs impact of debris ejected radially from broken flexible pipe. Also redirects flow of pressurized fluid escaping from broken pipe onto flow path allowing for relief of pressure while minimizing potential for harm.

  14. Orion Heat Shield

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-09

    THE ORION HEAT SHIELD THAT SUCCESSFULLY SURVIVED A HIGH-VELOCITY REENTRY DURING ITS DEC. 5 FLIGHT TEST, IS CONTINUING ITS JOURNEY, NOW AT MARSHALL. IT ARRIVED ON MONDAY, MARCH 9 AND WILL BE INSTALLED IN THE BUILDING 4705 7-AXIS MILLING AND MACHINING CENTER.

  15. Electrostatic space radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Wilson, John W.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2008-09-01

    For the success of NASA’s new vision for space exploration to Moon, Mars and beyond, exposures from the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space long duration missions is ‘a must solve’ problem. The payload penalty demands a very stringent requirement on the design of the spacecrafts for human deep space missions. The exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) to enable routine access of space will require protection from the hazards of the accumulated exposures of space radiation, Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE), and minimizing the production of secondary radiation is a great advantage. There is a need to look to new horizons for newer technologies. The present investigation revisits electrostatic active radiation shielding and explores the feasibility of using the electrostatic shielding in concert with the state-of-the-art materials shielding and protection technologies. The full space radiation environment has been used, for the first time, to explore the feasibility of electrostatic shielding. The goal is to repel enough positive charge ions so that they miss the spacecraft without attracting thermal electrons. Conclusions are drawn for the future directions of space radiation protection.

  16. Flexible Multi-Shock Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Flexible multi-shock shield system and method are disclosed for defending against hypervelocity particles. The flexible multi-shock shield system and method may include a number of flexible bumpers or shield layers spaced apart by one or more resilient support layers, all of which may be encapsulated in a protective cover. Fasteners associated with the protective cover allow the flexible multi-shock shield to be secured to the surface of a structure to be protected.

  17. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  18. SSC environmental radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    The environmental radiation shielding requirements of the SSC have been evaluated using currently available computational tools that incorporate the well known processes of energy loss and degradation of high energy particles into Monte Carlo computer codes. These tools permit determination of isodose contours in the matter surrounding a source point and therefore the specification of minimum thicknesses or extents of shielding in order to assure annual dose equivalents less than some specified design amount. For the general public the annual dose equivalent specified in the design is 10 millirem, small compared to the dose from naturally occurring radiation. The types of radiation fall into two classes for the purposes of shielding determinations-hadrons and muons. The sources of radiation at the SSC of concern for the surrounding environment are the interaction regions, the specially designed beam dumps into which the beams are dumped from time to time, and beam clean-up regions where stops remove the beam halo in order to reduce experimental backgrounds. A final, unlikely source of radiation considered is the accidental loss of the full beam at some point around the ring. Conservative choices of a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and a beam current three times design have been made in calculating the required shielding and boundaries of the facility. In addition to determination of minimum distances for the annual dose equivalents, the question of possible radioactivity produced in nearby wells or in municipal water supplies is addressed. The designed shielding distances and beam dumps are such that the induced radioactivity in ground water is safely smaller than the levels permitted by EPA and international agencies.

  19. Shielding of substations against direct lightning strokes by shield wires

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhuri, P. )

    1994-01-01

    A new analysis for shielding outdoor substations against direct lightning strokes by shield wires is proposed. The basic assumption of this proposed method is that any lightning stroke which penetrates the shields will cause damage. The second assumption is that a certain level of risk of failure must be accepted, such as one or two failures per 100 years. The proposed method, using electrogeometric model, was applied to design shield wires for two outdoor substations: (1) 161-kV/69-kV station, and (2) 500-kV/161-kV station. The results of the proposed method were also compared with the shielding data of two other substations.

  20. Noise modeling from high-permeability shields using Kirchhoff equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sandin, Henrik J; Volegov, Petr L; Espy, Michelle A; Matlashov, Andrei N; Savukov, Igor M; Schultz, Larry J

    2010-01-01

    Progress in the development of high-sensitivity magnetic-field measurements has stimulated interest in understanding magnetic noise of conductive materials, especially of magnetic shields (DC or rf) based on high-permeability materials and/or high-conductivity materials. For example, SQUIDs and atomic magnetometers have been used in many experiments with mu-metal shields, and additionally SQUID systems frequently have rf shielding based on thin conductive materials. Typical existing approaches to modeling noise only work with simple shield and sensor geometries while common experimental setups today consist of multiple sensor systems arbitrary shapes and complex shield geometries. With complex sensor arrays used in, for example, MEG and Ultra Low Field MRI studies the knowledge of the noise correlation between sensors is as important as the knowledge of the noise itself. This is crucial for incorporating efficient noise cancelation schemes for the system. We developed an approach that allows us to calculate the Johnson noise for any geometrically shaped shield and multiple sensor systems. The approach uses a fraction of the processing power of other approaches and with a multiple sensor system our approach not only calculates the noise for each sensor but it also calculates the noise correlation matrix between sensors. Here we will show the algorithm and examples where it can be implemented.

  1. Review of active radiation shielding developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, Roberto

    The radiation risk due to ionizing particles is a critical issue for long duration manned space missions. The ionization losses in the materials of the spacecraft provide passive shielding effectively stopping low energy particles. However, the estimates of the material required to obtain an acceptable level of radiation result in a prohibitive mass. Active electromagnetic shields, which deflect the charged particles, have been considered as an alternative solution. During the last 10 years the interest in this area has grown. A study of active magnetic shielding based on high-temperature superconductors (HTS) was initiated in an ESA study in 2010, continued in the context of the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) programs (2011-2014) as well as within a dedicated FP7 EU program, SR2S (2013-2015). The aim of these effort was to provide a realistic evaluation of the possibilities based on current technology levels as well extrapolating to reasonable technology advances expected during the next decade. The different configurations considered were assessed in terms of their technical feasibility and shielding efficiency. We present here a status report of the ongoing work and some preliminary results.

  2. Roof Shield for Advance and Retreat Mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Shield sections change their configuration to suit mining mode. Articulation cylinders raise rear shield to advance position, and locking cylinders hold it there. To change to retreat position articulation cylinders lower shield. Locking pins at edge of outermost shield plate latch shield to chock base. Shield accommodates roof heights ranging from 36 to 60 inches (0.9 to 1.52 meters).

  3. Low eddy current RF shielding enclosure designs for 3T MR applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian J; Watkins, Ronald D; Chang, Chen-Ming; Levin, Craig S

    2017-06-06

    Magnetic resonance-compatible medical devices operate within the MR environment while benefitting from the superior anatomic information of MRI. Avoiding electromagnetic interference between such instrumentation and the MR system is crucial. In this work, various shielding configurations for positron emission tomography (PET) detectors were studied and analyzed regarding radiofrequency (RF) shielding effectiveness and gradient-induced eddy current performances. However, the results of this work apply to shielding considerations for any MR-compatible devices. Six shielding enclosure configurations with various thicknesses, patterns, and materials were designed: solid and segmented copper, phosphor bronze mesh (PBM), and carbon fiber composite (CFC). A series of tests was performed on RF shielding effectiveness and the gradient-induced eddy current. For the shielding effectiveness, the solid copper with various thickness and PBM configurations yield significantly better shielding effectiveness (>15 dB) compared with CFC and segmented configurations. For the gradient-induced eddy current performance, the solid copper shielding configurations with different thicknesses showed significantly worse results, up to a factor of 3.89 dB, compared with the segmented copper, PBM, and the CFC configurations. We evaluated the RF shielding effectiveness and the gradient-induced eddy current artifacts of several shielding designs, and only the PBM showed positive outcomes for both aspects. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Clinical uses of collagen shields.

    PubMed

    Poland, D E; Kaufman, H E

    1988-09-01

    Collagen shields immersed in tobramycin solution for one minute were applied to one eye each of 60 patients who had had cataract extraction, penetrating keratoplasty, or epikeratophakia or who had nonsurgical epithelial healing problems. The shields were well tolerated; one patient had the shield removed and one patient lost the shield in the early postoperative period. The surgical patients showed more rapid healing of epithelial defects after surgery with the use of the collagen shield. Patients with acute nonsurgical epithelial problems, such as contact lens abrasions and recurrent erosion, responded to the use of the collagen shield with improved healing. Patients with chronic epithelial defects responded poorly, presumably because underlying abnormalities in Bowman's layer prevented epithelial growth in the area of the defect. No infections were noted in any of the patients. The collagen shields appear to promote enhanced healing in patients with postsurgical and acute epithelial defects and to provide adequate antibiotic prophylaxis against infection in these vulnerable eyes.

  5. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1985-12-31

    An apparatus is disclosed for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area. 3 figs.

  6. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-08-02

    A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

  7. Multilayer radiation shield

    SciTech Connect

    Urbahn, John Arthur; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon

    2009-06-16

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  8. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  9. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, Daniel

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  10. ITER shielding blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Strebkov, Y.; Blinov, Y.; Avsjannikov, A.

    1994-12-31

    A version of ITER shielding blanket design is presented. Main features of this proposal are: Cu based alloy as structure material of the first wall - integrated in the blanket segment box structure and 316L SS as material of both back/side walls of the box and the shield structure elements; water of medium pressure (up to 4 MPa) as coolant with toroidal direction of flow; two variants of beryllium protection tiles joining (either permanent joints by mince of solid diffusion bonding or demountable attachment with compliant layer; for last versions designs options of tiles attachment units are given). Problems of manufacturing of such blanket segment including its assembly sequence are considered in details. Results of stress problem analysis for thermal, pressure, and electromagnetic loads will be given in this report also.

  11. Project BioShield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-10

    to Congress. Expedited Peer Review . The Project BioShield Act of 2004 authorizes the HHS Secretary to use an expedited award process, rather than the...normal peer review process, for grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements related to biomedical countermeasure R&D activity, if the Secretary... peer review process will reduce the quality of the research.6 Peer review is designed to maximize the chances that only proposals with the greatest

  12. Project BioShield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-27

    Expedited Peer Review . The Project BioShield Act of 2004 authorizes the HHS Secretary to use an expedited award process, rather than the normal peer ...such awards, or to many, will depend on what needs the Secretary deems pressing. Some scientists have expressed concerns that an expedited peer review process...will reduce the quality of the research.6 Peer review is designed to maximize the chances that only proposals with the greatest scientific

  13. Crumpled Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this image of the spacecraft's crumpled heat shield on Sept. 16, 2008, the 111th Martian day of the mission.

    The 2-1/2 meter (about 8-1/2 feet) heat shield landed southeast of Phoenix, about halfway between the spacecraft and its backshell/parachute. The backshell/parachute touched ground 300 meters (1,000 ft) to the south of the lander.

    The dark area to the right of the heat shield is the 'bounce mark' it made on impact with the Red Planet. This image is the highest-resolution image that will likely be taken by the lander, and is part of the 1,500-image 'Happily Ever After' panorama.

    The Phoenix mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Skylab Solar Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A sail like sunshade for possible use as a sunscreen for the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) is shown being fabricated in the GE Building across the street from Johnson Space Center, Houston Texas. Three people help the steamstress feed the material through the sewing machine. The three-layered sunshade will be composed of a top layer of aluminized mylar, a middle layer of laminated nylon ripstop, and a bottom layer of thin nylon. Working on the sunshade are from left to right: Dale Gentry, Elizabeth Gauldin, Alyene Baker, and James H. Barnett Jr. Mrs. Baker, a GE employee, operates the double needle Singer sewing machine. Barnett is head of the Crew Equipment Development Section of JSC Crew Systems Division. Mrs. Gauldin is also with the Crew Systems Division. Gentry works for GE. The work shown here is part of the crash program underway to prepare a sunshield for Skylab to replace the orginal shield which was lost when Skylab 1 was launched on May 14, 1973. The improvised solar shield selected to be used will be carried to Earth orbit by the Skylab 2 crewman who will then deploy the reflective parasol to shade part of the OWS from the hot rays of the sun. Loss of the orginal sun shield has caused an overheating problem. in the Orbital Work Shop.

  15. The Effect of Direct Lightning Shielding Rod on Lightning Electromagnetic Fields Aboveground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ya-Peng; Gao, Cheng; Yang, Bo

    2017-09-01

    A practical new type direct lightning shielding rod is designed to reduce the electromagnetic radiation produced by lightning stroking to Franklin lightning rod in the paper. The Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method is adopted for analyzing. It is the shielding layer that affects the electromagnetic fields and the insulating medium make no difference. All the electromagnetic fields amplitude obtained decrease for the shielding layer existing, regardless of any condition, but the extent is different. That is, the effect on the horizontal electric field is most noticeable, the vertical electric field comes second, minimum the azimuthal magnetic field. All the field components are affected by shielding layer height and the distance between shielding layer and lightning channel, but not significantly by the shielding layer grounding depth. The shielding effect is more obvious with lower ground conductivity, but the ground relative permittivity makes no difference.

  16. Pure rotational spectra of PbSe and PbTe: potential function, Born-Oppenheimer breakdown, field shift effect and magnetic shielding.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Barbara M; Bizzocchi, Luca; Cooke, Stephen; Banser, Deike; Hess, Mareike; Fritzsche, Juliane; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2008-04-21

    The pure rotational spectra of 41 isotopic species of PbSe and PbTe have been measured in their X 1Sigma+ electronic state with a resonator pulsed-jet Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The molecules were prepared by laser ablation of suitable target rods and stabilised in supersonic jets of noble gas. Global multi-isotopologue analyses yielded spectroscopic Dunham parameters Y01, Y11, Y21, Y31, Y02, and Y12 for both species, as well as effective Born-Oppenheimer breakdown (BOB) coefficients delta01 for Pb, Se and Te. Unusual large values of the BOB parameters for Pb have been rationalized in terms of finite nuclear size (field shift) effect. A direct fit of the same data sets to an appropriate radial Hamiltonian yielded analytic potential energy functions and BOB radial functions for the X 1Sigma+ electronic state of both PbSe and PbTe. Additionally, the magnetic hyperfine interactions produced by the uneven mass number A nuclei 207Pb, 77Se, 123Te, and 125Te were observed, yielding first determinations of the corresponding nuclear spin-rotation coupling constants.

  17. Overview of active methods for shielding spacecraft from energetic space radiation.

    PubMed

    Townsend, L W

    2001-01-01

    During the 1960's and into the early 1970's, investigations were conducted related to the feasibility of using active radiation shielding methods, such as afforded by electromagnetic fields, as alternatives to passive, bulk material shielding to attenuate space radiations. These active concepts fall into four categories: (1) electrostatic fields; (2) plasma shields; (3) confined magnetic fields; and (4) unconfined magnetic fields. In nearly all of these investigations, consideration was given only to shielding against protons or electrons, or both. During the 1980's and 1990's there were additional studies related to proton shielding and some new studies regarding the efficacy of using active methods to shield from the high energy heavy ion (HZE particle) component of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum. In this overview, each concept category is reviewed and its applicability and limitations for the various types of space radiations are described. Recommendations for future research on this topic are made.

  18. Overview of active methods for shielding spacecraft from energetic space radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    During the 1960's and into the early 1970's, investigations were conducted related to the feasibility of using active radiation shielding methods, such as afforded by electromagnetic fields, as alternatives to passive, bulk material shielding to attenuate space radiations. These active concepts fall into four categories: (1) electrostatic fields; (2) plasma shields; (3) confined magnetic fields; and (4) unconfined magnetic fields. In nearly all of these investigations, consideration was given only to shielding against protons or electrons, or both. During the 1980's and 1990's there were additional studies related to proton shielding and some new studies regarding the efficacy of using active methods to shield from the high energy heavy ion (HZE particle) component of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum. In this overview, each concept category is reviewed and its applicability and limitations for the various types of space radiations are described. Recommendations for future research on this topic are made.

  19. Justification for Shielded Receiver Tube Additional Lead Shielding

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-04-11

    In order to reduce high radiation dose rates encountered when core sampling some radioactive waste tanks the addition of 240 lbs. of lead shielding is being considered to the shielded receiver tube on core sample trucks No.1, No.3 and No.4. The lead shielding is 4 inch diameter x 1/2 inch thick half rounds that have been installed around the SR tube over its' full length. Using three unreleased but independently reviewed structural analyses HNF-6018 justifies the addition of the lead shielding.

  20. Space mapping method for the design of passive shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, Peter; Dupré, Luc; Melkebeek, Jan

    2006-04-01

    The aim of the paper is to find the optimal geometry of a passive shield for the reduction of the magnetic stray field of an axisymmetric induction heater. For the optimization, a space mapping algorithm is used that requires two models. The first is an accurate model with a high computational effort as it contains finite element models. The second is less accurate, but it has a low computational effort as it uses an analytical model: the shield is replaced by a number of mutually coupled coils. The currents in the shield are found by solving an electrical circuit. Space mapping combines both models to obtain the optimal passive shield fast and accurately. The presented optimization technique is compared with gradient, simplex, and genetic algorithms.

  1. Radiation shielding quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Dallsun

    For the radiation shielding quality assurance, the validity and reliability of the neutron transport code MCNP, which is now one of the most widely used radiation shielding analysis codes, were checked with lot of benchmark experiments. And also as a practical example, follows were performed in this thesis. One integral neutron transport experiment to measure the effect of neutron streaming in iron and void was performed with Dog-Legged Void Assembly in Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in 1991. Neutron flux was measured six different places with the methane detectors and a BF-3 detector. The main purpose of the measurements was to provide benchmark against which various neutron transport calculation tools could be compared. Those data were used in verification of Monte Carlo Neutron & Photon Transport Code, MCNP, with the modeling for that. Experimental results and calculation results were compared in both ways, as the total integrated value of neutron fluxes along neutron energy range from 10 KeV to 2 MeV and as the neutron spectrum along with neutron energy range. Both results are well matched with the statistical error +/-20%. MCNP results were also compared with those of TORT, a three dimensional discrete ordinates code which was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. MCNP results are superior to the TORT results at all detector places except one. This means that MCNP is proved as a very powerful tool for the analysis of neutron transport through iron & air and further it could be used as a powerful tool for the radiation shielding analysis. For one application of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) to neutron and gamma transport problems, uncertainties for the calculated values of critical K were evaluated as in the ANOVA on statistical data.

  2. Balloonlike Shields Against Fast Projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    1993-01-01

    Report proposes use of flexible gas-filled or liquid-filled pouches to shield spacecraft against impacts by small meteoroids and orbiting debris traveling at speeds approximately greater than 2 km/s. Shields made in various forms reminiscent of balloons, pillows, air mattresses, or sealed-air-bubble packing material. Serve as lightweight, easily installed alternatives to heavier, rigid shields made of space aluminum sheets custom-designed and attached to spacecraft only with great difficulty and expense.

  3. Balloonlike Shields Against Fast Projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    1993-01-01

    Report proposes use of flexible gas-filled or liquid-filled pouches to shield spacecraft against impacts by small meteoroids and orbiting debris traveling at speeds approximately greater than 2 km/s. Shields made in various forms reminiscent of balloons, pillows, air mattresses, or sealed-air-bubble packing material. Serve as lightweight, easily installed alternatives to heavier, rigid shields made of space aluminum sheets custom-designed and attached to spacecraft only with great difficulty and expense.

  4. Desert Shield/Storm Logistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    Wc This document may not be retee for open publiarion until it has bm deaed by the Vproprnite military service or gmeanen agency. DESERT SHIELD /STORM...capture what had occurred during Operations DESERT SHIELD and STORM, the commanders of the Division Support Command of the 24th Infantry Division...Mechanized) held a ful. day of discussion centering on what occurted during Operation DESERT STORM and its preceding operation, DESERT SHIELD . The entire

  5. Watching a disappearing shield

    SciTech Connect

    Stolarski, R.S.

    1988-10-01

    The remote-sensing techniques used to monitor atmospheric ozone levels are reviewed, and recent results are discussed. The importance of the ozone layer as a shield for UV radiation is stressed, and the impact of human activities generating ozone-destroying compounds is considered. Ground-based, airborne, balloon-borne, and satellite remote-sensing methods are shown to complement each other to provide both global coverage and detailed structural information. Data obtained with the Nimbus-7 TOMS and solar-backscatter UV instruments are presented in graphs and briefly characterized.

  6. Spacecraft ceramic protective shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larriva, Rene F. (Inventor); Nelson, Anne (M.); Czechanski, James G. (Inventor); Poff, Ray E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A low areal density protective shield apparatus, and method for making same, for protecting spacecraft structures from impact with hypervelocity objects, including a bumper member comprising a bumper ceramic layer, a bumper shock attenuator layer, and a bumper confining layer. The bumper ceramic layer can be SiC or B.sub.4 C; the bumper shock attenuator layer can be zirconia felt; and the bumper confining layer can be aluminum. A base armor member can be spaced from the bumper member and a ceramic fiber-based curtain can be positioned between the bumper and base armor members.

  7. Orion Heat Shield Testing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-28

    THE ORION HEAT SHIELD, WHICH WAS AT NASA’S MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER FROM MARCH-MAY 2015 FOR ENGINEERING AND ANALYSIS, IS READIED FOR DEPARTURE AT THE END OF ITS STAY. THE HEAT SHIELD’S ABLATED SURFACE MATERIAL WAS REMOVED AT MARSHALL FOR ANALYSIS, USING THE CENTER’S STATE-OF-THE-ART SEVEN-AXIS MILLING MACHINE. IT NEXT WILL GO TO NASA’S LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER FOR WATER-IMPACT TESTING. NASA’S JOHNSON SPACE CENTER LEADS THE ORION PROGRAM FOR NASA.

  8. Orion Heat Shield Testing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-26

    THE ORION HEAT SHIELD, WHICH WAS AT NASA’S MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER FROM MARCH-MAY 2015 FOR ENGINEERING AND ANALYSIS, IS READIED FOR DEPARTURE AT THE END OF ITS STAY. THE HEAT SHIELD’S ABLATED SURFACE MATERIAL WAS REMOVED AT MARSHALL FOR ANALYSIS, USING THE CENTER’S STATE-OF-THE-ART SEVEN-AXIS MILLING MACHINE. IT NEXT WILL GO TO NASA’S LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER FOR WATER-IMPACT TESTING. NASA’S JOHNSON SPACE CENTER LEADS THE ORION PROGRAM FOR NASA.

  9. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Cork, Christopher P.; Becker, John A.; Knapp, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  10. EXAMPLES OF RADIATION SHIELDING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Willison, J

    2006-07-27

    The attached pictures are examples of shielding models used by WSMS. The models were used in shielding evaluations for Tank 50 pump replacement. They show the relative location of shielding to radiation sources for pumps and pipes. None of the calculations that were associated with these models involved UCNI. The last page contains two pictures from a shielding calculation for the saltstone area. The upper picture is a conceptual drawing. The lower picture is an image copied from the website of a supplier for the project.

  11. Hypervelocity impact shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, Burton G. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne Lee (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact shield and method for protecting a wall structure, such as a spacecraft wall, from impact with particles of debris having densities of about 2.7 g/cu cm and impact velocities up to 16 km/s are disclosed. The shield comprises a stack of ultra thin sheets of impactor disrupting material supported and arranged by support means in spaced relationship to one another and mounted to cover the wall in a position for intercepting the particles. The sheets are of a number and spacing such that the impacting particle and the resulting particulates of the impacting particle and sheet material are successively impact-shocked to a thermal state of total melt and/or vaporization to a degree as precludes perforation of the wall. The ratio of individual sheet thickness to the theoretical diameter of particles of debris which may be of spherical form is in the range of 0.03 to 0.05. The spacing between adjacent sheets is such that the debris cloud plume of liquid and vapor resulting from an impacting particle penetrating a sheet does not puncture the next adjacent sheet prior to the arrival thereat of fragment particulates of sheet material and the debris particle produced by a previous impact.

  12. PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of stepped penetrations and brick layout scheme for valve stem extension sleeve. Aerojet Nuclear Company. Date: May 1976. INEEL index no. 761-0620-00-400-195280 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-03-29

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  14. Reflective Shields for Artificial Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    Report proposes reflective shield that protects spacecraft from radiant energy. Also gives some protection against particle beams and cosmic rays. Conceptual shield essentially advanced version of decorative multifaceted mirror balls often hung over dance floors. Mirror facets disperse radiant energy in many directions.

  15. Reflective Shields for Artificial Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    Report proposes reflective shield that protects spacecraft from radiant energy. Also gives some protection against particle beams and cosmic rays. Conceptual shield essentially advanced version of decorative multifaceted mirror balls often hung over dance floors. Mirror facets disperse radiant energy in many directions.

  16. Radiation Shielding Optimization on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Mertens, Chris J.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions to Mars will require radiation shielding to be optimized for deep space transit and an extended stay on the surface. In deep space, increased shielding levels and material optimization will reduce the exposure from most solar particle events (SPE) but are less effective at shielding against galactic cosmic rays (GCR). On the surface, the shielding provided by the Martian atmosphere greatly reduces the exposure from most SPE, and long-term GCR exposure is a primary concern. Previous work has shown that in deep space, additional shielding of common materials such as aluminum or polyethylene does not significantly reduce the GCR exposure. In this work, it is shown that on the Martian surface, almost any amount of aluminum shielding increases exposure levels for humans. The increased exposure levels are attributed to neutron production in the shield and Martian regolith as well as the electromagnetic cascade induced in the Martian atmosphere. This result is significant for optimization of vehicle and shield designs intended for the surface of Mars.

  17. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  18. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  19. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Shawn; Lipinksi, Ronald; McAlpine, William

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear reactor system could provide power to support a long term human exploration to the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR) system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency (Wright, 2003). The goals of the shielding studies were to provide optimal material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX code, a Monte Carlo transport code.

  20. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    DOEpatents

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  1. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Shawn; Lipinksi, Ronald; McAlpine, William

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear reactor system could provide power to support a long term human exploration to the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR) system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency (Wright, 2003). The goals of the shielding studies were to provide optimal material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX code, a Monte Carlo transport code.

  2. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  3. The role of electrostatic interactions and solvent polarity on the 15N NMR shielding of azines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto-Costa, Lucas; Gester, Rodrigo M.; Manzoni, Vinícius

    2017-10-01

    The nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance (15N NMR) shielding of azines is very sensitive to the chemical environment. Theoretically, specific interactions are important on the calculation of their spectroscopic properties. However, the choice of the solvent model for the description of NMR shielding constants is still a subject of discussion. In this context, we analyse the role of electrostatic interactions on 15N NMR shielding as function of solvent polarity using the sequential-Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics approach methodology. Excellent agreement with experimental data of the NMR shielding was obtained without the inclusion of explicit solvent molecules either for polar or non polar solvents.

  4. NEUTRON SHIELDING STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1962-09-25

    A lightweight neutron shielding structure comprises a honeycomb core which is filled with a neutron absorbing powder. The honeycomb core is faced with parallel planar facing sheets to form a lightweight rigid unit. Suitable absorber powders are selected from among the following: B, B/sub 4/C, B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, CaB/sub 6/, Li/sub 2/CO3, LiOH, LiBO/sub 2/, Li/s ub 2/O. The facing sheets are constructed of a neutron moderating material, so that fast neutrons will be moderated while traversing the facing sheets, and ultimately be absorbed by the absorber powder in the honeycomb. Beryllium is a preferred moderator material for use in the facing sheets. The advantage of the structure is that it combines the rigidity and light weight of a honeycomb construction with the neutron absorption properties of boron and lithium. (AEC)

  5. Silica heat shield sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebbesmeyer, L. H.; Christensen, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    The sensitivity of silica heat shield requirements to gap width, tile edge radius, and heat transfer distribution within tile gaps was investigated. A two-dimensional thermal model was modified and used to determine the effect of two dimensional heat transfer distributions at high temperature reusable surface insulation edges on shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) requirements. The sensitivity of TPS requirements to coating thickness, emissivity, substructure thickness, and changes in gap heating for several locations on shuttle was also studied. An inverse solution technique was applied to temperature data obtained in the Ames 20 MW turbulent duct in order to examine the effect of tile edge radius on TPS requirements. The derived heating values were then used to predict TPS requirements. Results show that increasing tile radius reduces TPS requirements.

  6. Rocket nozzle shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollersen, Carl A.; Anderson, Thomas W.; Brown, Wayne M.; Pratt, Lozelle L.

    1991-12-01

    A shield for the nozzle of an underwater launched missile can be formed from a rigid plate. The plate is separated from the end of the nozzle by a gap that is at least equal to the throat area of the nozzle. The gap reduces overpressure of the missile during launch while keeping water out of the nozzle by being directed perpendicular to the water flow direction. Important advantages of the invention are its simplicity and low cost. A further advantage is its strength and the ability to absorb a blow from a water jar. Another advantage is the ability to block the flow of water from behind the rocket without blocking the flow of gas.

  7. The theory of sternheimer shielding in molecules in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, P. W.; Lazzeretti, P.; Steiner, E.; Zanasi, R.

    1989-05-01

    A series of tensors is defined to describe the response to external electric and magnetic fields of the electric field gradient at a nucleus in a molecule. Perturbation expressions, symmetry relations and exact results for the hydrogen atom are given. The new tensors are related to derivatives of electric field shieldings with respect to motion of a test point through an electron distribution.

  8. Performance of solar shields. [Skylab 1 micrometeoroid shield difficulties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The loss of the micrometeoroid shield from the Orbital Workshop section of Skylab 1 about 63 seconds after lift-off, was the catalyst for a prodigious effort to develop a substitute for the passive portion of the thermal control system. An intensive effort is described in which numerous potential thermal shield materials were assessed, and during which period ten specific shield designs were developed and carried through various stages of development and test. Thermal shield materials data are discussed, including optical, strength, fatigue, outgassing, tackiness, ultraviolet radiation, and material memory properties. Specifically addressed are thermal shield materials selection criteria and the design, development, and test requirements associated with the successful development of Skylab thermal shields, and specifically the two thermal shields subsequently deployed over the exposed gold foil skin of the Orbital Workshop. Also considered are the general performance and thermal improvements provided by both the parasol design deployed by the Skylab 1 crew, and the sail design deployed by the Skylab 2 crew.

  9. Grounding, Bonding, Shielding, and Lightning Bibliography 1972 to 1979

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    Multicoaxial Cable System," Wire, Journal, ,iol. 6, ito. 1, January 1973, pp. 45-51. This is the first of a two part article. A buried multicoaxia’. cable is...coupling through the, transfer impedance into coaxial cables having single, double, and triple outer condutors and the use of magnetic . materials...treated and re- suits of cross talk attenuation measurements are shown. Finally,, the screening performance of magnetic shielded coaxial cables under heavy

  10. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shawn; McAlpine, William; Lipinski, Ronald

    2006-01-20

    A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable.

  11. Optimized Shielding and Fabrication Techniques for TiN and Al Microwave Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreikebaum, John Mark; Kim, Eunseong; Livingston, William; Dove, Allison; Calusine, Gregory; Hover, David; Rosenberg, Danna; Oliver, William; Siddiqi, Irfan

    We present a systematic study of the effects of shielding and packaging on the internal quality factor (Qi) of Al and TiN microwave resonators designed for use in qubit readout. Surprisingly, Qi =1.3x106 TiN samples investigated at 100 mK exhibited no significant changes in linewidth when operated without magnetic shielding and in an open cryo-package. In contrast, Al resonators showed systematic improvement in Qi with each successive shield. Measurements were performed in an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator, where typical ambient fields of 0.2 mT are present at the sample stage. We discuss the effect of 100 mK and 500 mK Cu radiation shields and cryoperm magnetic shielding on resonator Q as a function of temperature and input power in samples prepared with a variety of surface treatments, fabrication recipes, and embedding circuits. This research was supported by the ARO and IARPA.

  12. NEUTRON ABSORPTION AND SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-06-21

    A neutron absorption and shielding device is described which is adapted for mounting in a radiation shielding wall surrounding a radioactive area through which instrumentation leads and the like may safely pass without permitting gamma or neutron radiation to pass to the exterior. The shielding device comprises a container having at least one nonrectilinear tube or passageway means extending therethrough, which is adapted to contain instrumentation leads or the like, a layer of a substance capable of absorbing gamma rays, and a solid resinous composition adapted to attenuate fast-moving neutrons and capture slow- moving or thermal neutrons.

  13. New Materials for EMI Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Graphite fibers intercalated with bromine or similar mixed halogen compounds have substantially lower resistivity than their pristine counterparts, and thus should exhibit higher shielding effectiveness against electromagnetic interference. The mechanical and thermal properties are nearly unaffected, and the shielding of high energy x-rays and gamma rays is substantially increased. Characterization of the resistivity of the composite materials is subtle, but it is clear that the composite resistivity is substantially lowered. Shielding effectiveness calculations utilizing a simple rule of mixtures model yields results that are consistent with available data on these materials.

  14. Flexible Cable Providing EMI Shielding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-07

    shielding the electronic 25 equipment by enclosing it in shielded rooms and cabinets, filling 1 any gaps therein with conductive gaskets, and also by...are found in U.S. 15 Patent Nos. 4,948,922 and 4,93 7,128 which disclose conductive 16 elastic gaskets used to fill gaps between openings in shielded...matrix binder which is filled with 5 particles of a high permeability iron-based alloy. The 6 conductive property of the matrix binder provides

  15. X-band frequency response and electromagnetic interference shielding in multiferroic BiFeO3 nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshi, Hilal Ahmad; Singh, Avanish Pratap; Pillai, Shreeja; Para, Touseef Ahmad; Dhawan, S. K.; Shelke, Vilas

    2016-10-01

    The presence of electric dipoles, magnetic dipoles and mobile charges is a prerequisite for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials. Here, we demonstrate that multiferroic compound with incipient ensemble of electric and magnetic dipoles can perform as an EMI shielding material. We synthesized single phase BiFeO3 nanomaterial and studied complex electromagnetic properties in an X-band frequency region. A shielding effectiveness up to 11 dB with a major contribution from absorption was observed in the BiFeO3 nanomaterials. An auxiliary functionality of radiation shielding is revealed in the multiferroic BiFeO3 compound.

  16. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-08-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  17. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    DOE PAGES

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-04-26

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons producedmore » in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. Here, this shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.« less

  18. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-04-26

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. Here, this shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  19. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-04-26

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. Here, this shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  20. Nuclear shieldings with the SSB-D functional.

    PubMed

    Armangué, Lluís; Solà, Miquel; Swart, Marcel

    2011-02-24

    The recently reported SSB-D functional [J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 131, 094103] is used to check the performance for obtaining nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants. Four different databases were studied, which contain a diversity of molecules and nuclear shielding constants. The SSB-D functional is compared with its "parent" functionals (PBE, OPBE), the KT2 functional that was designed specially for NMR applications and the coupled cluster CCSD(T) method. The best performance for the experimentally most-used elements ((1)H, (13)C) is obtained for the SSB-D and KT2 functionals.

  1. Shielding against debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, Burton G.; Avans, Sherman L.

    1988-01-01

    The damage to spacecraft caused by debris and design of the Space Station to minimize damage from debris are discussed. Although current estimates of the debris environment show that fragments bigger than 2 cm are not likely to hit the Space Station, orbital debris from about 0.5 mm to 2 cm will pose a hazard, especially on brittle surfaces, such as glass. Spacesuits are being designed to reduce debris caused dangers to astronauts during EVA. About 5 cm of high-strength aluminum are needed to prevent penetration by a 1 cm piece of aluminum with a mass near 1.5 g colliding at 10 km/sec. Because aluminum bumpers have the drawback of metallic debris ejected outward after a hypervelocity collision, the use of nonmetallic materials for bumpers is being studied. Methods of reducing the weight and volume of the shield for the Space Station are also being researched. A space station habitation module using bumpers has a 99.6 percent chance of avoiding penetration during its lifetime.

  2. Wake Shield Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Wake Shield Facility is a free-flying research and development facility that is designed to use the pure vacuum of space to conduct scientific research in the development of new materials. The thin film materials technology developed by the WSF could some day lead to applications such as faster electronics components for computers. The WSF Free-Flyer is a 12-foot-diameter stainless steel disk that, while traveling in orbit at approximately 18,000 mph, leaves in its wake a vacuum 1,000 to 10,000 times better than the best vacuums currently achieved on Earth. While it is carried into orbit by the Space Shuttle, the WSF is a fully equipped spacecraft in its own right, with cold gas propulsion for separation from the orbiter and a momentum bias attitude control system. All WSF functions are undertaken by a spacecraft computer with the WSF remotely controlled from the ground. The ultra vacuum, nearly empty of all molecules, is then used to conduct a series of thin film growths by a process called epitaxy which produces exceptionally pure and atomically ordered thin films of semiconductor compounds such as gallium arsenide. Using this process, the WSF offers the potential of producing thin film materials, and the devices they will make possible.

  3. Structural/Radiation-Shielding Epoxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G.; Hinkley, Jeffrey; Blattnig, Steve; Delozier, Donavon M.; Watson, Kent A.; Ghose, Sayata

    2009-01-01

    A development effort was directed toward formulating epoxy resins that are useful both as structural materials and as shielding against heavy-ion radiation. Hydrogen is recognized as the best element for absorbing heavy-ion radiation, and high-hydrogen-content polymers are now in use as shielding materials. However, high-hydrogen-content polymers (e.g. polyethylene) are typically not good structural materials. In contrast, aromatic polymers, which contain smaller amounts of hydrogen, often have the strength necessary for structural materials. Accordingly, the present development effort is based on the concept that an ideal structural/ heavy-ion-radiation-shielding material would be a polymer that contains sufficient hydrogen (e.g., in the form of aliphatic molecular groups) for radiation shielding and has sufficient aromatic content for structural integrity.

  4. Heat-Shield Gap Filler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, D. B.; Stewart, D. A.; Smith, M.; Estrella, C.; Goldstein, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    Ceramic cloth strips provide flexible, easily replaceable insulating filler. Filler prevents hot gas from flowing between heat-shield tiles while allowing space for thermal expansion and contraction. Strips easily replaced when necessary.

  5. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions.

  6. Heat Shield Flank Close Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity features an up-close view of the flank piece of the rover's broken heat shield.

    The rover spent 36 sols investigating how the severe heating during entry through the atmosphere affected the heat shield. The most obvious is the fact that the heat shield inverted upon impact. Overall, engineers were interested in evaluating the performance of the heat shield's thermal protection system.

    This is the the panormamic camera team's best current attempt at generating a 'true color' view of what this scene would look like if viewed by a human on Mars. It was generated from a mathematical combination of six calibrated, left-eye panoramic camera images acquired around 3:07 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 331 (Dec. 28, 2004) using filters ranging in wavelengths from 430 to 750 nanometers.

  7. Shield Yourself from 'Swimmer's Ear'

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_167094.html Shield Yourself From 'Swimmer's Ear' Water left behind after a swim can give ... season for the painful infection known as swimmer's ear, but it shouldn't spoil your fun if ...

  8. Composite Aerogel Multifoil Protective Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies are needed to survive the temperatures, radiation, and hypervelocity particles that exploration spacecraft encounter. Multilayer insulations (MLIs) have been used on many spacecraft as thermal insulation. Other materials and composites have been used as micrometeorite shielding or radiation shielding. However, no material composite has been developed and employed as a combined thermal insulation, micrometeorite, and radiation shielding. By replacing the scrims that have been used to separate the foil layers in MLIs with various aerogels, and by using a variety of different metal foils, the overall protective performance of MLIs can be greatly expanded to act as thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and hypervelocity particle shielding. Aerogels are highly porous, low-density solids that are produced by the gelation of metal alkoxides and supercritical drying. Aerogels have been flown in NASA missions as a hypervelocity particle capture medium (Stardust) and as thermal insulation (2003 MER). Composite aerogel multifoil protective shielding would be used to provide thermal insulation, while also shielding spacecraft or components from radiation and hypervelocity particle impacts. Multiple layers of foil separated by aerogel would act as a thermal barrier by preventing the transport of heat energy through the composite. The silica aerogel would act as a convective and conductive thermal barrier, while the titania powder and metal foils would absorb and reflect the radiative heat. It would also capture small hypervelocity particles, such as micrometeorites, since it would be a stuffed, multi-shock Whipple shield. The metal foil layers would slow and break up the impacting particles, while the aerogel layers would convert the kinetic energy of the particles to thermal and mechanical energy and stop the particles.

  9. Integral Face Shield Concept for Firefighter's Helmet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeles, F.; Hansberry, E.; Himel, V.

    1982-01-01

    Stowable face shield could be made integral part of helmet worn by firefighters. Shield, made from same tough clear plastic as removable face shields presently used, would be pivoted at temples to slide up inside helmet when not needed. Stowable face shield, being stored in helmet, is always available, ready for use, and is protected when not being used.

  10. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, Bert Clayton; Brindza, Paul Daniel

    2014-03-04

    A thermal neutron shield comprising boron shielding panels with a high percentage of the element Boron. The panel is least 46% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of boron shielding panels which includes enriching the pre-cursor mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  11. Shielding requirements in helical tomotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baechler, S.; Bochud, F. O.; Verellen, D.; Moeckli, R.

    2007-08-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for which room shielding has to be reassessed for the following reasons. The beam-on-time needed to deliver a given target dose is increased and leads to a weekly workload of typically one order of magnitude higher than that for conventional radiation therapy. The special configuration of tomotherapy units does not allow the use of standard shielding calculation methods. A conventional linear accelerator must be shielded for primary, leakage and scatter photon radiations. For tomotherapy, primary radiation is no longer the main shielding issue since a beam stop is mounted on the gantry directly opposite the source. On the other hand, due to the longer irradiation time, the accelerator head leakage becomes a major concern. An analytical model based on geometric considerations has been developed to determine leakage radiation levels throughout the room for continuous gantry rotation. Compared to leakage radiation, scatter radiation is a minor contribution. Since tomotherapy units operate at a nominal energy of 6 MV, neutron production is negligible. This work proposes a synthetic and conservative model for calculating shielding requirements for the Hi-Art II TomoTherapy unit. Finally, the required concrete shielding thickness is given for different positions of interest.

  12. Shielding requirements in helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baechler, S; Bochud, F O; Verellen, D; Moeckli, R

    2007-08-21

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for which room shielding has to be reassessed for the following reasons. The beam-on-time needed to deliver a given target dose is increased and leads to a weekly workload of typically one order of magnitude higher than that for conventional radiation therapy. The special configuration of tomotherapy units does not allow the use of standard shielding calculation methods. A conventional linear accelerator must be shielded for primary, leakage and scatter photon radiations. For tomotherapy, primary radiation is no longer the main shielding issue since a beam stop is mounted on the gantry directly opposite the source. On the other hand, due to the longer irradiation time, the accelerator head leakage becomes a major concern. An analytical model based on geometric considerations has been developed to determine leakage radiation levels throughout the room for continuous gantry rotation. Compared to leakage radiation, scatter radiation is a minor contribution. Since tomotherapy units operate at a nominal energy of 6 MV, neutron production is negligible. This work proposes a synthetic and conservative model for calculating shielding requirements for the Hi-Art II TomoTherapy unit. Finally, the required concrete shielding thickness is given for different positions of interest.

  13. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir; Semones, Edward; Ewert, Michael; Broyan, James; Walker, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  14. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, Paul E.

    1976-06-15

    1. The combination with a plurality of parallel horizontal members arranged in horizontal and vertical rows, the spacing of the members in all horizontal rows being equal throughout, the spacing of the members in all vertical rows being equal throughout; of a shield for a nuclear reactor comprising two layers of rectangular blocks through which the members pass generally perpendicularly to the layers, each block in each layer having for one of the members an opening equally spaced from vertical sides of the block and located closer to the top of the block than the bottom thereof, whereby gravity tends to make each block rotate about the associated member to a position in which the vertical sides of the block are truly vertical, the openings in all the blocks of one layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, the openings in all the blocks of the other layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, which spacing is different from the corresponding spacing in the said one layer, all the blocks of both layers having the same vertical dimension or length, the blocks of both layers consisting of relatively wide blocks and relatively narrow blocks, all the narrow blocks having the same horizontal dimension or width which is less than the horizontal dimension or width of the wide blocks, which is the same throughout, each layer consisting of vertical rows of narrow blocks and wide blocks alternating with one another, each vertical row of narrow blocks of each layer being covered by a vertical row of wide blocks of the other layer which wide blocks receive the same vertical row of members as the said each vertical row of narrow blocks, whereby the rectangular perimeters of each block of each layer is completely out of register with that of each block in the other layer.

  15. An assessment of the lifetime of Faraday shield elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, J. B. O., II; Ruzic, D. N.; Hoffman, D. J.; Langley, R. A.; Lewis, M. B.; Ryan, P. M.

    The interaction of plasma with RF fields from an ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antenna has been studied to estimate the amount of Faraday shield erosion expected in normal ICRF heating operation. Plasma parameters and ion energies have been measured in the near field of an antenna and used in a model to estimate the erosion rate of the Faraday shield surface. Experiments were conducted on the RF Test Facility, a magnetic mirror device at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, using a single-strap resonant loop antenna with a two-tier Faraday shield. The outer tier, facing the plasma, was layered with graphite tiles. The antenna was operated at currents and voltages within 50 percent of those expected in tokamaks. The time-varying floating potential was measured with a capacitively coupled probe, and the time-averaged floating potential, electron temperature, and electron density were measured with a Langmuir probe. Ion energies were measured with a gridded energy analyzer located below the antenna, and samples of silicon were placed on the Faraday shield surface to estimate the incident ion energy. The capacitive probe measurements show that the RF floating potential follows the magnetic field pattern of the antenna, indicating that the electromagnetic fields are responsible for the potential formation. Plasma parameters and ion energies have been correlated with the antenna current and used in a computational model of the plasma sheath to predict the amount of erosion expected from the Faraday shield elements exposed to plasma. Predictions of light ion sputtering of candidate Faraday shield materials are presented.

  16. An assessment of the lifetime of Faraday shield elements

    SciTech Connect

    Caughman, J.B.O. II; Ruzic, D.N. ); Hoffman, D.J.; Langley, R.A.; Lewis, M.B.; Ryan, P.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The interaction of plasma with rf fields from an ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antenna has been studied to estimate the amount of Faraday shield erosion expected in normal ICRF heating operation. Plasma parameters and ion energies have been measured in the near field of an antenna and used in a model to estimate the erosion rate of the Faraday shield surface. Experiments were conducted on the RF Test Facility, a magnetic mirror device at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, using a single-strap resonant loop antenna with a two-tier Faraday shield. The outer tier, facing the plasma, was layered with graphite tiles. The antenna was operated at currents and voltages within 50% of those expected in tokamaks. The time-varying floating potential was measured with a capacitively coupled probe, and the time-averaged floating potential, electron temperature, and electron density were measured with a Langmuir probe. Ion energies were measured with a gridded energy analyser located below the antenna, and samples of silicon were placed on the Faraday shield surface to estimate the incident ion energy. The capacitive probe measurements show that the rf floating potential follows the magnetic field pattern of the antenna, indicating that the electromagnetic fields are responsible for the potential formation. Plasma parameters and ion energies have been correlated with the antenna current and used in a computational model of the plasma sheath to predict the amount of erosion expected from the Faraday shield elements exposed to plasma. Predictions of light ion sputtering of candidate Faraday shield materials are presented.

  17. Modelling and Optimization of Four-Segment Shielding Coils of Current Transformers

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yucheng; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Qing; Qu, Kaifeng; Li, He; Shao, Haiming; Huang, Songling

    2017-01-01

    Applying shielding coils is a practical way to protect current transformers (CTs) for large-capacity generators from the intensive magnetic interference produced by adjacent bus-bars. The aim of this study is to build a simple analytical model for the shielding coils, from which the optimization of the shielding coils can be calculated effectively. Based on an existing stray flux model, a new analytical model for the leakage flux of partial coils is presented, and finite element method-based simulations are carried out to develop empirical equations for the core-pickup factors of the models. Using the flux models, a model of the common four-segment shielding coils is derived. Furthermore, a theoretical analysis is carried out on the optimal performance of the four-segment shielding coils in a typical six-bus-bars scenario. It turns out that the “all parallel” shielding coils with a 45° starting position have the best shielding performance, whereas the “separated loop” shielding coils with a 0° starting position feature the lowest heating value. Physical experiments were performed, which verified all the models and the conclusions proposed in the paper. In addition, for shielding coils with other than the four-segment configuration, the analysis process will generally be the same. PMID:28587137

  18. Modelling and Optimization of Four-Segment Shielding Coils of Current Transformers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yucheng; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Qing; Qu, Kaifeng; Li, He; Shao, Haiming; Huang, Songling

    2017-05-26

    Applying shielding coils is a practical way to protect current transformers (CTs) for large-capacity generators from the intensive magnetic interference produced by adjacent bus-bars. The aim of this study is to build a simple analytical model for the shielding coils, from which the optimization of the shielding coils can be calculated effectively. Based on an existing stray flux model, a new analytical model for the leakage flux of partial coils is presented, and finite element method-based simulations are carried out to develop empirical equations for the core-pickup factors of the models. Using the flux models, a model of the common four-segment shielding coils is derived. Furthermore, a theoretical analysis is carried out on the optimal performance of the four-segment shielding coils in a typical six-bus-bars scenario. It turns out that the "all parallel" shielding coils with a 45° starting position have the best shielding performance, whereas the "separated loop" shielding coils with a 0° starting position feature the lowest heating value. Physical experiments were performed, which verified all the models and the conclusions proposed in the paper. In addition, for shielding coils with other than the four-segment configuration, the analysis process will generally be the same.

  19. Accelerator-based validation of shielding codes

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, Cary; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Miller, Jack; Wilson, John W.

    2002-08-12

    The space radiation environment poses risks to astronaut health from a diverse set of sources, ranging from low-energy protons and electrons to highly-charged, high-energy atomic nuclei and their associated fragmentation products, including neutrons. The low-energy protons and electrons are the source of most of the radiation dose to Shuttle and ISS crews, while the more energetic particles that comprise the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (protons, He, and heavier nuclei up to Fe) will be the dominant source for crews on long-duration missions outside the earth's magnetic field. Because of this diversity of sources, a broad ground-based experimental effort is required to validate the transport and shielding calculations used to predict doses and dose-equivalents under various mission scenarios. The experimental program of the LBNL group, described here, focuses principally on measurements of charged particle and neutron production in high-energy heavy-ion fragmentation. Other aspects of the program include measurements of the shielding provided by candidate spacesuit materials against low-energy protons (particularly relevant to extra-vehicular activities in low-earth orbit), and the depth-dose relations in tissue for higher-energy protons. The heavy-ion experiments are performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron and the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba in Japan. Proton experiments are performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88'' Cyclotron with a 55 MeV beam, and at the Loma Linda University Proton Facility with 100 to 250 MeV beam energies. The experimental results are an important component of the overall shielding program, as they allow for simple, well-controlled tests of the models developed to handle the more complex radiation environment in space.

  20. Spin-rotation and NMR shielding constants in HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszuński, Michał; Repisky, Michal; Demissie, Taye B.; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Malkin, Elena; Ruud, Kenneth; Garbacz, Piotr; Jackowski, Karol; Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2013-12-01

    The spin-rotation and nuclear magnetic shielding constants are analysed for both nuclei in the HCl molecule. Nonrelativistic ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T) level of approximation show that it is essential to include relativistic effects to obtain spin-rotation constants consistent with accurate experimental data. Our best estimates for the spin-rotation constants of 1H35Cl are CCl = -53.914 kHz and CH = 42.672 kHz (for the lowest rovibrational level). For the chlorine shielding constant, the ab initio value computed including the relativistic corrections, σ(Cl) = 976.202 ppm, provides a new absolute shielding scale; for hydrogen we find σ(H) = 31.403 ppm (both at 300 K). Combining the theoretical results with our new gas-phase NMR experimental data allows us to improve the accuracy of the magnetic dipole moments of both chlorine isotopes. For the hydrogen shielding constant, including relativistic effects yields better agreement between experimental and computed values.

  1. Spin-rotation and NMR shielding constants in HCl

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszuński, Michał; Repisky, Michal; Demissie, Taye B.; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Malkin, Elena; Ruud, Kenneth; Garbacz, Piotr; Jackowski, Karol; Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2013-12-21

    The spin-rotation and nuclear magnetic shielding constants are analysed for both nuclei in the HCl molecule. Nonrelativistic ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T) level of approximation show that it is essential to include relativistic effects to obtain spin-rotation constants consistent with accurate experimental data. Our best estimates for the spin-rotation constants of {sup 1}H{sup 35}Cl are C{sub Cl}  = −53.914 kHz and C{sub H}  = 42.672 kHz (for the lowest rovibrational level). For the chlorine shielding constant, the ab initio value computed including the relativistic corrections, σ(Cl) = 976.202 ppm, provides a new absolute shielding scale; for hydrogen we find σ(H) = 31.403 ppm (both at 300 K). Combining the theoretical results with our new gas-phase NMR experimental data allows us to improve the accuracy of the magnetic dipole moments of both chlorine isotopes. For the hydrogen shielding constant, including relativistic effects yields better agreement between experimental and computed values.

  2. Shielding in biology and biophysics: Methodology, dosimetry, interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirsky, B. M.; Temuryants, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    An interdisciplinary review of the publications on the shielding of organisms by different materials is presented. The authors show that some discrepancies between the results of different researchers might be attributed to methodological reasons, including purely biological (neglect of rhythms) and technical (specific features of the design or material of the screen) ones. In some cases, an important factor is the instability of control indices due to the variations in space weather. According to the modern concept of biological exposure to microdoses, any isolation of a biological object by any material necessarily leads to several simultaneous changes in environmental parameters, and this undermines the principle of "all other conditions being equal" in the classical differential scheme of an experiment. The shielding effects of water solution are universally recognized and their influence is to be observed for all organisms. Data on the exposure of living organisms to weak combined magnetic fields and on the influence of space weather enabled the development of theoretical models generally explaining the effect of shielding for bioorganisms. Ferromagnetic shielding results in changes of both the static magnetic field and the field of radio waves within the area protected by the screen. When screens are nonmagnetic, changes are due to the isolation from the radio waves. In both cases, some contribution to the fluctuations of measured parameters can be made by variations in the level of ionizing radiation.

  3. Radiation shielding materials and containers incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound ("PYRUC") shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  4. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    DOEpatents

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  5. Trailer shield assembly for a welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates generally to trailer shields for gas shielded arc welding torches, and more particularly to a trailer shield assembly provided with a shield gas manifold for providing an even dispersion of shield gas to the interior of the shield assembly, which generally encloses a joint being welded and a welding trailing portion of hot welded metal. The novelty of the invention lies in providing trailer shield with a manifold tube having a plurality of openings from which shield gas is distributed. A gas manifold region ahead of the torch is also provided with shield gas from a tube to protect metal preheated by the torch. Further novelty lies in constructing portions of sides and housing and portions of side walls of the guide of stainless steel screen having a tight mesh.

  6. Final focus shielding designs for modern heavy-ion fusion power plant designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latkowski, J. F.; Meier, W. R.

    2001-05-01

    Recent work in heavy-ion fusion accelerators and final focusing systems shows a trend towards less current per beam, and thus, a greater number of beams. Final focusing magnets are susceptible to nuclear heating, radiation damage, and neutron activation. The trend towards more beams, however, means that there can be less shielding for each magnet. Excessive levels of nuclear heating may lead to magnet quench or to an intolerable recirculating power for magnet cooling. High levels of radiation damage may result in short magnet lifetimes and low reliability. Finally, neutron activation of the magnet components may lead to difficulties in maintenance, recycling, and waste disposal. The present work expands upon previous, three-dimensional magnet shielding calculations for a modified version of the HYLIFE-II IFE power plant design. We present key magnet results as a function of the number of beams.

  7. Final Focus Shielding Designs for Modern Heavy-Ion Fusion Power Plant Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R

    2000-07-05

    Recent work in heavy-ion fusion accelerators and final focusing systems shows a trend towards less current per beam, and thus, a greater number of beams. Final focusing magnets are susceptible to nuclear heating, radiation damage, and neutron activation. The trend towards more beams, however, means that there can be less shielding for each magnet, Excessive levels of nuclear heating may lead to magnet quench or an intolerable recirculating power for magnet cooling. High levels of radiation damage may result in short magnet lifetimes and low reliability. Finally, neutron activation of the magnet components may lead to difficulties in maintenance, recycling, and waste disposal. The present work expands upon previous, three-dimensional magnet shielding calculations for a modified version of the HYLIFE-I1 IFE power plant design. We present key magnet results as a function of the number of beams.

  8. Improved Final Focus Shielding Designs for Modern Heavy-Ion Fusion Power Plant Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J.F.; Meier, W.R.

    2000-03-01

    Recent work in heavy-ion fusion accelerators and final focusing systems shows a trend towards less current per beam, and thus, a significantly greater number of beams. Final focusing magnets are susceptible to nuclear heating, radiation damage, and neutron activation. The trend towards more beams, however, means that there can be less shielding for each magnet. Excessive levels of nuclear heating may lead to magnet quench or an intolerable recirculating power for magnet cooling. High levels of radiation damage may result in short magnet lifetimes and low reliability. Finally, neutron activation of the magnet components may lead to difficulties in maintenance, recycling, and waste disposal. The present work expands upon previous, three-dimensional magnet shielding calculations for a modified version of the HYLIFE-II IFE power plant design. We present key magnet results as a function of the number of beams.

  9. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  10. Evaluating passively shielded gradient coil configurations for optimal eddy current compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Lopez, Hector; Poole, Michael; Crozier, Stuart

    2010-05-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging, rapidly switching magnetic fields are used to spatially encode the signal. The temporal change of these fields induces eddy currents in nearby conducting structures of the scanner. These eddy currents, in turn, generate a secondary magnetic field that opposes and distorts the desired gradient field. Eddy current compensation methods are generally applied assuming that the primary and secondary magnetic field gradients possess similar spatial characteristics in the imaging volume (field matching). In this work an optimization method is used to deform the shape of the coil support and/or a highly conductive passive shield in order to improve the field matching and reduce the inductive coupling between the gradient coil and the passive shield. Using the residual field after eddy current compensation as the objective function, the coil support and/or conducting surfaces were deformed to obtain passively shielded x- and z-gradient coils with improved field matching and eddy current compensation. Assuming a single frequency, quasi-static simulation, it was demonstrated that the residual field was reduced up to 24 times by reshaping the coil and passive shield surfaces due to the improved field matching. However, using transient analyses we showed that in the case of the passively shielded x-gradient coil the residual field may only be reduced by five times from a cylindrical coil configuration. A bulge shape is created in the conducting surface as a mechanism of matching the field and at the same time reducing the mutual inductive coupling between the coil and the passive shield. An actively shielded coil with control over the magnetic field produced by the induced current was used as a reference coil that produces the minimal residual field. The actively shielded gradient coil produces minimal residual field for short and long pulses in the transient analyses.

  11. Unusually large shielding fields in single-grain YBa2Cu3O7 - delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, L.; Xue, Y. Y.; Meng, R. L.; Chu, C. W.; Hannahs, S.; Thang, V.; Rubin, L.

    1994-08-01

    Magnetic field trapping and shielding by several unirradiated single-grain YBa2Cu3O7-δ disks have been investigated between 4.2 and 71 K up to 20 T. Flux avalanches due to thermal instabilities limited the trapping field to ˜5 T below 45 K and often caused microcracks in the disks. However, a shielding field greater than 19 T was detected at 4.2 K in the same sample assembly even after it was damaged by flux avalanches. This violates the expected symmetry between shielding and trapping fields. The shielding field of ≳19 T exceeds the total quench field of 10 T predicted by the Swartz-Bean model. The observations suggest that thermomechanical properties play an important role in field shielding and trapping and mechanical stress may be effectively used to enhance the field trapped by disks of high temperature superconductors.

  12. Preliminary shielding assessment for the 100 MeV proton linac (KOMAC).

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Ouk; Cho, Y S; Chang, J

    2005-01-01

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project is building the Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex facilities from 2002 to 2012, which consists of a high-current 100 MeV proton linear accelerator and various beam-lines. This paper provides a preliminary estimate of the shielding required for the 20 mA proton linac and the beam-dump. For an accurate information on secondary neutron production from the guiding magnet and primary heat sink of the beam dump, proton-induced 63Cu and 65Cu cross section data were evaluated and applied to shielding calculations. The required thickness of the concrete was assessed by a simple line-of-sight model for the lateral shielding of the beam-line and the full shielding of the beam dump. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed using the MCNPX code to obtain the source term and attenuation coefficients for the three-dimensional lateral shielding model of the beam-line.

  13. U.S ITER : electromagnetic analysis of transient forces due to disrupted plasma currents on the ITER shield modules.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Pasik, Michael Francis

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes the electromagnetic analysis that has been completed using the OPERA-3d product to characterize the forces on the ITER shield modules as part of the conceptual design. These forces exist due to the interaction of the eddy currents induced in the shield modules and the large magnetic fields present in the tokamak.

  14. Monte Carlo simulations for the space radiation superconducting shield project (SR2S).

    PubMed

    Vuolo, M; Giraudo, M; Musenich, R; Calvelli, V; Ambroglini, F; Burger, W J; Battiston, R

    2016-02-01

    Astronauts on deep-space long-duration missions will be exposed for long time to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE). The exposure to space radiation could lead to both acute and late effects in the crew members and well defined countermeasures do not exist nowadays. The simplest solution given by optimized passive shielding is not able to reduce the dose deposited by GCRs below the actual dose limits, therefore other solutions, such as active shielding employing superconducting magnetic fields, are under study. In the framework of the EU FP7 SR2S Project - Space Radiation Superconducting Shield--a toroidal magnetic system based on MgB2 superconductors has been analyzed through detailed Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 interface GRAS. Spacecraft and magnets were modeled together with a simplified mechanical structure supporting the coils. Radiation transport through magnetic fields and materials was simulated for a deep-space mission scenario, considering for the first time the effect of secondary particles produced in the passage of space radiation through the active shielding and spacecraft structures. When modeling the structures supporting the active shielding systems and the habitat, the radiation protection efficiency of the magnetic field is severely decreasing compared to the one reported in previous studies, when only the magnetic field was modeled around the crew. This is due to the large production of secondary radiation taking place in the material surrounding the habitat.

  15. Monte Carlo simulations for the space radiation superconducting shield project (SR2S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuolo, M.; Giraudo, M.; Musenich, R.; Calvelli, V.; Ambroglini, F.; Burger, W. J.; Battiston, R.

    2016-02-01

    Astronauts on deep-space long-duration missions will be exposed for long time to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE). The exposure to space radiation could lead to both acute and late effects in the crew members and well defined countermeasures do not exist nowadays. The simplest solution given by optimized passive shielding is not able to reduce the dose deposited by GCRs below the actual dose limits, therefore other solutions, such as active shielding employing superconducting magnetic fields, are under study. In the framework of the EU FP7 SR2S Project - Space Radiation Superconducting Shield - a toroidal magnetic system based on MgB2 superconductors has been analyzed through detailed Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 interface GRAS. Spacecraft and magnets were modeled together with a simplified mechanical structure supporting the coils. Radiation transport through magnetic fields and materials was simulated for a deep-space mission scenario, considering for the first time the effect of secondary particles produced in the passage of space radiation through the active shielding and spacecraft structures. When modeling the structures supporting the active shielding systems and the habitat, the radiation protection efficiency of the magnetic field is severely decreasing compared to the one reported in previous studies, when only the magnetic field was modeled around the crew. This is due to the large production of secondary radiation taking place in the material surrounding the habitat.

  16. Deployment of "Parasol" solar shield

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-05-26

    S73-26773 (26 May 1973) --- The deployment of the ?parasol? solar shield, a sunshade to help cool the overheated Orbital Workshop of the Skylab 1 space station cluster in Earth orbit, can be seen in the reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the space station. The camera is in the Command Module; and the view is looking through the truss of the Apollo Telescope Mount. The sunshade is only partially deployed in this picture. The solar shield was pushed up through the OWS solar scientific airlock. The canopy of the ?parasol? measures 24 feet by 22 feet. Photo credit: NASA

  17. Fan-fold shielded electrical leads

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, R.R.; Cowan, T.E.

    1996-06-11

    Disclosed are fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate. 3 figs.

  18. Fan-fold shielded electrical leads

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Rajeev R.; Cowan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    Fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate.

  19. Freely oriented portable superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Schmierer, Eric N.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.

    2010-01-12

    A freely oriented portable superconducting magnet is disclosed. Coolant is supplied to the superconducting magnet from a repository separate from the magnet, enabling portability of the magnet. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the magnet within a thermal shield. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the thermal shield within a vacuum vessel. The support assemblies restrain movement of the magnet resulting from energizing and cooldown, as well as from changes in orientation, enabling the magnet to be freely orientable.

  20. Active-passive gradient shielding for MRI acoustic noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, William A; Kidane, Tesfaye K; Taracila, Victor; Baig, Tanvir N; Eagan, Timothy P; Cheng, Yu-Chung N; Brown, Robert W; Mallick, John A

    2005-05-01

    An important source of MRI acoustic noise-magnet cryostat warm-bore vibrations caused by eddy-current-induced forces-can be mitigated by a passive metal shield mounted on the outside of a vibration-isolated, vacuum-enclosed shielded gradient set. Finite-element (FE) calculations for a z-gradient indicate that a 2-mm-thick Cu layer wrapped on the gradient assembly can decrease mechanical power deposition in the warm bore and reduce warm-bore acoustic noise production by about 25 dB. Eliminating the conducting warm bore and other magnet parts as significant acoustic noise sources could lead to the development of truly quiet, fully functioning MRI systems with noise levels below 70 dB.

  1. NMR shielding and spin-rotation constants in XCO (X = Ni, Pd, Pt) molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Taye B.; Jaszuński, Michał; Malkin, Elena; Komorovský, Stanislav; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Ab initio nonrelativistic and four-component relativistic DFT (density functional theory) methods are combined to study the spin-rotation and absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants of group 10 transition metal monocarbonyls. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated and available experimental data for the spin-rotation constants and shielding spans for PdCO and PtCO. These data allow us to determine accurate absolute chemical shielding constants for all the nuclei, as well as for the unknown spin-rotation constants. We compare the four-component shielding constants with those obtained from the spin-orbit zeroth-order regular approximation, together with an assessment of the performance of different basis sets. For the first time, relativistically optimised basis sets for the heavy atoms used in the four-component calculations are shown to give converged results for both magnetic properties studied. We dedicate this article to the memory of Professor Nicholas C. Handy.

  2. Shielding analysis for a heavy ion beam chamber with plasma channels for ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Sawan, M.E.; Peterson, R.R.; Yu, S.

    2000-06-28

    Neutronics analysis has been performed to assess the shielding requirements for the insulators and final focusing magnets in a modified HYLIFE-II target chamber that utilizes pre-formed plasma channels for heavy ion beam transport. Using 65 cm thick Flibe jet assemblies provides adequate shielding for the electrical insulator units. Additional shielding is needed in front of the final focusing superconducting quadrupole magnets. A shield with a thickness varying between 45 and 90 cm needs to be provided in front of the quadrupole unit. The final laser mirrors located along the channel axis are in the direct line-of-sight of source neutrons. Neutronics calculations were performed to determine the constraints on the placement of these mirrors to be lifetime components.

  3. Active shielding to reduce low frequency disturbances in direct current near biomagnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzek, D.; Nowak, H.; Giessler, F.; Röther, J.; Eiselt, M.

    1999-05-01

    Measurements of dc near biomagnetic fields are disturbed by low frequency noise that is not reduced sufficiently by most of the magnetically shielded rooms or gradiometers. For this reason an active shielding system has been developed at the Biomagnetic Center of the University of Jena. This work describes the principle of the active shielding system and demonstrates its properties concerning the attenuation of disturbing fields, frequency range, and some applications in biomedical measurements. We achieved a reduction of external low frequency magnetic fields by more than 50 dB and an attenuation of the field gradient by about 25 dB. This active shielding enables measurements of near dc biomagnetic fields in investigations of periinfarct depolarizations after ischemic stroke and spreading depression in migraine patients.

  4. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Muon Shield Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stredde, Herman J.; /Fermilab

    1996-05-14

    The nominal overall dimensions are 71-inch high x 71-inch wide x 144-inch long and has a 25-inch square hole throughout. The shield consists of three different materials, steel (inner most section), polycarbonate (central section) and lead (outer most section). The material thicknesses are, steel=15-inch, poly=6-inch and lead=2-inch. The estimated weight is {approx}69 tons. The shield is centered about the Tev beam line and the 25-inch square hole provides clearance to the low Beta quad, which is nominally 20-inch square. During beamline operation, the shield is in contact with Samus magnet core at the detector end and with the Main Ring shield wall on the MR side (with some small clearance {approx}2-inch-3-inch). The need for the clearance will be discussed later. The shield support structure consists steel structural members appropriately sized for loads encountered in the design. The structure must not only support the shield but, must be designed for rolling the entire assembly into position in the collision hall. It must provide for cylinders to lift the assembly, Hilman rollers and also connections for moving the entire assembly. The movement is considered to be similar to that with which the calorimeters were moved from the clean room to the sidewalk staging area, i.e. hydraulic cylinder and chain (see dwg. 3740.000-ME294017,3 sheets). This method will be used for the East to West motion and a hydraulic scheme will be used for any North-South motion. Since the shield is 144-inch long and the sidewalk structural support is {approx}96-inch, there is a section of the shield that is cantilevered (48-inch). Further, the EF toroid must open {approx}40+ inch for access to the detector during operations and this requires that the shield or some part of it must also move. This conceptual design suggests that the shield be designed in two pieces axially. These two pieces are identical in cross section but, the lengths are divided into 48-inch nearest EF and 96-inch

  5. An outboard shield design for TIBER-II with potential for tritium self-sufficiency: Appendix A-1

    SciTech Connect

    Sawan, M.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1987-01-01

    The outboard breeding shield design for TIBER-II is described. The design allows for tritium self-sufficiency without compromising magnet protection, design simplicity, and the testing mission of the device. The shield consists of a beryllium pebble front zone backed by a steel pebble zone. The shield is cooled by an aqueous solution containing 16 g LiNO/sub 3/ per 100 cm/sup 3/. A double first wall is used to insure uniform cooling and minimize pressure. The design pressure for the outboard shield is 0.19 MPa and the coolant temperature is less than 75/sup 0/C. 6 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Rotary stripper for shielded and unshielded FCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angele, W.; Chambers, C. M.

    1971-01-01

    Rotary stripper removes narrow strips of insulation and shielding to any desired depth. Unshielded cables are stripped on both sides with one stroke, shielded cables are stripped in steps of different depths.

  7. Large Heat Shield for Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-10

    This image shows NASA Mars Science Laboratory heat shield, and a spacecraft worker at Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver. It is the largest heat shield ever built for descending through the atmosphere of any planet.

  8. Preparing Mars Science Laboratory Heat Shield

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-05-13

    Technicians at Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, prepare the heat shield for NASA Mars Science Laboratory. With a diameter of 4.5 meters nearly 15 feet, this heat shield is the largest ever built for a planetary mission.

  9. Reliability-Based Electronics Shielding Design Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; O'Neill, P. J.; Zang, T. A.; Pandolf, J. E.; Tripathi, R. K.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2007-01-01

    Shielding design on large human-rated systems allows minimization of radiation impact on electronic systems. Shielding design tools require adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and adequate follow-up on final design evaluation.

  10. Heat shield reduces water loss.

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, C W; Korones, S B

    1984-01-01

    A heat shield covered by polyvinyl chloride film greatly reduced insensible water loss and radiant energy requirements in 12 preterm infants on a radiant cradle. Measured transmittance of radiant energy emitted by the radiant heater was impeded minimally by various thin film plastics but was blocked significantly by Perspex. Images Figure PMID:6486866

  11. Stand-off shields for hypervelocity particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Stand-off hypervelocity particle shields offer potential weight savings of an order of magnitude or more over conventional homogeneous armors. Based on an earlier complete model for the design and optimization of a stand-of shield system, a more restricted model appropriate for retrofit shields is described. Procedures to minimize the shield mass are provided, and scaling laws for many of the important parameter relationships are illustrated. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Tank Car Head Shield Fatigue Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    shields and to record measurements which reflect the dynamic response of the head shield (and its attachments) and then to devise a method for...areas were instrumented for measuring strains. Other positions were also instrumented to obtain a breader understanding of the response of the shield ...center sill of four feet six inches, measured in a straight line between extreme edges; (ii) A minimum width at the top of shield of nine feet

  13. Analysis and Evaluation of Suppressive Shields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    resistance of the shield to fragment penetration, and 7. attenuation of thermal effects by the shield . Other aspects of the design include problems of entry...propellant, 2. methods to predict the thermal environment outside of a suppressive shield , 3. comparisons between measured and predicted pressures... SHIELDS by P. A. Co- x P. S. Westine CD J. J. Kulesz L.LJ E. D. Espurza c-.- January 1978 SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE Post Office Drawer 28510, 6220

  14. Shielding and grounding in large detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Radeka, V.

    1998-09-01

    Prevention of electromagnetic interference (EMI), or ``noise pickup,`` is an important design aspect in large detectors in accelerator environments. Shielding effectiveness as a function of shield thickness and conductivity vs the type and frequency of the interference field is described. Noise induced in transmission lines by ground loop driven currents in the shield is evaluated and the importance of low shield resistance is emphasized. Some measures for prevention of ground loops and isolation of detector-readout systems are discussed.

  15. Vibration isolation of superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Minas, C.; Herd, K.G.; Laskaris, E.T.

    1992-07-14

    This patent describes a vibration isolation system for a superconducting magnet having a first magnet and a thermal shield. It comprises: a cryocooler means having first and second stages and located substantially adjacent to the thermal shield; a cyrostat means located substantially adjacent the cryocooler means; and resilient vibration isolator means connected between the first magnet and the cryocooler means and also, between the cryocooler means and cyrostat means.

  16. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect the nipple of a nursing woman. This generic device does not include nursing pads intended solely to...

  17. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect the nipple of a nursing woman. This generic device does not include nursing pads intended solely to...

  18. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect the nipple of a nursing woman. This generic device does not include nursing pads intended solely to...

  19. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect the nipple of a nursing woman. This generic device does not include nursing pads intended solely to...

  20. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect the nipple of a nursing woman. This generic device does not include nursing pads intended solely to...

  1. WAVS radiation shielding references and assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, Adam

    2015-10-07

    At ITER, the confluence of a high radiation environment and the requirement for high performance imaging for plasma and plasma-facing surface diagnosis will necessitate extensive application of radiation shielding. Recommended here is a dual-layer shield design composed of lead for gamma attenuation, surrounded by a fire-resistant polyehtylene doped with a thermal neutron absorber for neutron shielding.

  2. Shielded resistive electromagnets of arbitrary surface geometry using the boundary element method and a minimum energy constraint.

    PubMed

    Harris, Chad T; Haw, Dustin W; Handler, William B; Chronik, Blaine A

    2013-09-01

    Eddy currents are generated in MR by the use of rapidly switched electromagnets, resulting in time varying and spatially varying magnetic fields that must be either minimized or corrected. This problem is further complicated when non-cylindrical insert magnets are used for specialized applications. Interruption of the coupling between an insert coil and the MR system is typically accomplished using active magnetic shielding. A new method of actively shielding insert gradient and shim coils of any surface geometry by use of the boundary element method for coil design with a minimum energy constraint is presented. This method was applied to shield x- and z-gradient coils for two separate cases: a traditional cylindrical primary gradient with cylindrical shield and, to demonstrate its versatility in surface geometry, the same cylindrical primary gradients with a rectangular box-shaped shield. For the cylindrical case this method produced shields that agreed with analytic solutions. For the second case, the rectangular box-shaped shields demonstrated very good shielding characteristics despite having a different geometry than the primary coils.

  3. Shielding techniques tackle EMI excesses. V - EMI shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, P.

    1982-10-01

    The utilization of shielding gaskets in EMI design is presented in terms of seam design, gasket design, groove design, and fastener spacing. The main function of seam design is to minimize the coupling efficiency of a seam, and for effective shielding, seam design should include mating surfaces which are as flat as possible, and a flange width at least five times the maximum anticipated separation between mating surfaces. Seam surface contact with a gasket should be firm, continuous, and uniform. Gasket height, closure pressure, and compression set as a function of the applied pressure parameters are determined using compression/deflection curves. Environmental seal requirements are given and the most common materials used are neoprene, silicone, butadiene-acrylonitrile, and natural rubber. Groove design is also discussed, considering gasket heights and cross-sectional areas. Finally, fastener spacing is considered, by examining deflection as a percentage of gasket height.

  4. The Third Flight Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGhee, R. Wayne

    1998-01-01

    A self-shielded superconducting magnet was designed for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator Program. This is the third magnet built from this design. The magnets utilize Cryomagnetics' patented ultra-low current technology. The magnetic system is capable of reaching a central field of two tesla at slightly under two amperes and has a total inductance of 1068 henries. This final report details the requirements of the magnet, the specifications of the resulting magnet, the test procedures and test result data for the third magnet (Serial # C-654-M), and recommended precautions for use of the magnet.

  5. Designing of conducting polymer composites for shielding of microwave radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Parveen; Barala, Sunil Kumar; Arora, Manju; Kotnala, R. K.

    2013-06-01

    Nanocomposites (NCs) possessing moderate conductivity and dielectric/magnetic properties were prepared by in-situ incorporation of different fillers [BaTiO3 (BT) and γ-Fe2O3 (FO) nanoparticles (NPs)] within polyaniline (PANI) matrix. Several compositions were prepared by keeping PANI:filler ratio as 2:1 and varying the FO:BT ratio of the NCs. The X-Ray diffraction patterns confirmed the formation of electrically conducting PANI and proper incorporation of BT or FO NPs. Similarly, HRTEM images and EDX elemental analysis confirm the formation of NCs and phase preservation of incorporated FO or BT NPS. The magnetization measurements revealed that incorporation of γ-Fe2O3 resulted in improvement in magnetic properties with saturation magnetization value of 12.8 emu/g. The microwave shielding studies in the 12.4-18.0 GHz frequency range (P-band) revealed that the among various NCs, refelction loss was minimum (-4.6 dB) for composition having BT:FO ratio of 1:1 (i.e. PBF3) probably due to better matching of input impedance. Further, the incorporation of BT and FO NPs leads to reduction of skin depth and additional dielectric/magnetic losses resulting in absorption loss of -20.2 dB. The total attenuation (T) of -24.8 dB (i.e. >99 % attenuation) demonstrate the potential of these NCs for making futuristic microwave shields.

  6. Thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr. (Inventor); Miller, Andre E. (Inventor); Lawson, Bobby E. (Inventor); Cobb, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft is provided utilizing a plurality of lattice panels stowable generally against the craft and deployable to some fixed distance from the craft. The lattice panels are formed from replaceable shield panels affixed to lattice structures. The lattice panels generally encircle the craft providing 360 degree coverage therearound. Actuation means are provided from translating the shield radially outward from the craft and thermally isolating the shield from the craft. The lattice panels are relatively flexible, allowing the shield to deploy to variable diameters while retaining uniform curvature thereof. Restraining means are provided for holding the shield relatively tight in its stowed configuration. Close-out assemblies provide light sealing and protection of the annular spaces between the deployed shield and the crafts end structure.

  7. US INTOR radiation-shield design

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.; Abdou, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The US analysis for the INTOR radiation-shield design focused on three areas. First, a careful optimization process for the inboard shield composition and material arrangement within the allowable radial shield thickness was performed to minimize the radiation effects in the toroidal field (TF) coils. The TF coils are designed to last the lifetime of the reactor without change in performance. Second, the outboard bulk shield composition and material arrangement were optimized to achieve a dose equivalent outside the bulk shield of less than or equal to 2.5 mrem/h within one day after shutdown to permit personnel access to the reactor hall. Third, the penetration shields were designed to satisfy the same requirements as the outboard bulk shield.

  8. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  9. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  10. SETTABLE NEUTRON RADIATION SHIELDING MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-11-22

    A settable, viscous, putty-like shielding composition is described. It consists of an intimate admixture of a major proportion of a compound having a ratio of hydrogen atoms to all other atoms therein within the range of from 0.5: 1 to 2:l. from 0.5 to 10% by weight of boron, and a fluid resinous carrier This composition when cured is adapted to attenuate fast moving neutrons and capture slow moving neutrons.

  11. Light shield for solar concentrators

    DOEpatents

    Plesniak, Adam P.; Martins, Guy L.

    2014-08-26

    A solar receiver unit including a housing defining a recess, a cell assembly received in the recess, the cell assembly including a solar cell, and a light shield received in the recess and including a body and at least two tabs, the body defining a window therein, the tabs extending outward from the body and being engaged with the recess, wherein the window is aligned with the solar cell.

  12. S8DR shield examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, D. G.; Mccurnin, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The SNAP 8 developmental reactor lithium hydride shield was examined after being irradiated for over 7000 hours at relatively low temperature. A crack was located in the seam weld of the containment vessel, probably the result of hot short cracking under thermal stress. The LiH was visually examined at two locations and its appearance was typical of low temperature irradiated LiH. The adherence of the chrome oxide emittance coating was found to be excellent.

  13. Nuclei-selected NMR shielding calculations: a sublinear-scaling quantum-chemical method.

    PubMed

    Beer, Matthias; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2011-02-21

    An ab initio method for the direct calculation of NMR shieldings for selected nuclei at the Hartree-Fock and density-functional theory level is presented. Our method shows a computational effort scaling only sublinearly with molecular size, as it is motivated by the physical consideration that the chemical shielding is dominated by its local environment. The key feature of our method is to avoid the conventionally performed calculation of all NMR shieldings but instead to solve directly for specific nuclear shieldings. This has important implications not only for the study of large molecules, but also for the simulation of solvent effects and molecular dynamics, since often just a few shieldings are of interest. Our theory relies on two major aspects both necessary to provide a sublinear scaling behavior: First, an alternative expression for the shielding tensor is derived, which involves the response density matrix with respect to the nuclear magnetic moment instead of the response to the external magnetic field. Second, as unphysical long-range contributions occur within the description of distributed gauge origin methods that do not influence the final expectation value, we present a screening procedure to truncate the B-field dependent basis set, which is crucial in order to ensure an early onset of the sublinear scaling. The screening is in line with the r(-2) distance decay of Biot-Savarts law for induced magnetic fields. Our present truncation relies on the introduced concept of "individual gauge shielding contributions" applied to a reformulated shielding tensor, the latter consisting of gauge-invariant terms. The presented method is generally applicable and shows typical speed-ups of about one order of magnitude; moreover, due to the reduced scaling behavior of O(1) as compared to O(N), the wins become larger with increasing system size. We illustrate the validity of our method for several test systems, including ring-current dominated systems and

  14. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) Shielding Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    Photonic Bandgap (PBG) shielding technology is a new approach to designing electromagnetic shielding materials for mitigating Electromagnetic Interference (EM!) with small, light-weight shielding materials. It focuses on ground planes of printed wiring boards (PWBs), rather than on components. Modem PSG materials also are emerging based on planar materials, in place of earlier, bulkier, 3-dimensional PBG structures. Planar PBG designs especially show great promise in mitigating and suppressing EMI and crosstalk for aerospace designs, such as needed for NASA's Constellation Program, for returning humans to the moon and for use by our first human visitors traveling to and from Mars. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) materials are also known as artificial dielectrics, meta-materials, and photonic crystals. General PBG materials are fundamentally periodic slow-wave structures in I, 2, or 3 dimensions. By adjusting the choice of structure periodicities in terms of size and recurring structure spacings, multiple scatterings of surface waves can be created that act as a forbidden energy gap (i.e., a range of frequencies) over which nominally-conductive metallic conductors cease to be a conductor and become dielectrics. Equivalently, PBG materials can be regarded as giving rise to forbidden energy gaps in metals without chemical doping, analogous to electron bandgap properties that previously gave rise to the modem semiconductor industry 60 years ago. Electromagnetic waves cannot propagate over bandgap regions that are created with PBG materials, that is, over frequencies for which a bandgap is artificially created through introducing periodic defects

  15. Application Prospects of Multilayer Film Shields for Space Research Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyunt, P. W.; Vlasik, K. F.; Grachev, V. M.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Novikov, A. S.; Petrenko, D. V.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Chernysheva, I. V.; Shustov, A. E.

    We have studied the magnetic properties of multilayer film cylindrical configuration shields (MFS) based on NiFe / Cu. The studied samples were prepared by electrode position. MFS were constituted by alternating layers of NiFe and Cu, deposited on an aluminum cylinder with diameter of 4 cm, length of 13 cm and 0.5 cm thickness. The thickness of each ferromagnetic layer varied from 10 to 150 μm, and the thickness of Cu layers was 5 μm. Five-samples in which the number of ferromagnetic layers varied from 3 to 45 and copper - from 2 to 44 were tested. The best shielding efficiency was achieved at the maximum number of layers and comprised about 102. Permalloy multilayer foil shield at the same total thickness has several times less efficiency in comparison with MFS. The description of a prototype of the charged particles telescope for space application is presented. Results of its testing regarding sensitivity to the constant magnetic field are described.

  16. Synchrotron radiation shielding design and ICRP radiological protection quantities.

    PubMed

    Bassey, Bassey; Moreno, Beatriz; Chapman, Dean

    2015-06-01

    Protection and operational quantities as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) are the two sets of quantities recommended for use in radiological protection for external radiation. Since the '80s, the protection quantities have evolved from the concept of dose equivalent to effective dose equivalent to effective dose, and the associated conversion coefficients have undergone changes. In this work, the influence of three different versions of ICRP photon dose conversion coefficients in the synchrotron radiation shielding calculations of an experimental enclosure has been examined. The versions are effective dose equivalent (ICRP Publication 51), effective dose (ICRP Publication 74), and effective dose (ICRP Publication 116) conversion coefficients. The sources of the synchrotron radiation white beam into the enclosure were a bending magnet, an undulator and a wiggler. The ranges of photons energy from these sources were 10-200 keV for the bending magnet and undulator, and 10-500 keV for the wiggler. The design criterion aimed a radiation leakage less than 0.5 µSv h(-1) from the enclosure. As expected, larger conversion coefficients in ICRP Publication 51 lead to higher calculated dose rates. However, the percentage differences among the calculated dose rates get smaller once shielding is added, and the choice of conversion coefficients set did not affect the final shielding decision.

  17. Superferric magnets for fast levitated trains

    SciTech Connect

    Huson, F.R.; MacKay, W.W.; Miao, Y.; Pissanetzky, S. ); Xiang, Y. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on the development of a technology for high-speed maglev transportation. The technology is based on self-shielded superferric magnets which provide guidance and levitation above 50 mph. A linear motor is used for propulsion. The levitation and guidance superconducting magnets are distributed along the entire length of the cars. The superferric magnet shields the fringe field within the car to less than 5 Gauss. Magnetic details and initial calculations of dynamics are presented.

  18. Flexible Shields for Protecting Spacecraft Against Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Crews, Jeanne Lee

    2004-01-01

    A report presents the concept of Flexshield a class of versatile, lightweight, flexible shields for protecting spacecraft against impacts by small meteors and orbiting debris. The Flexshield concept incorporates elements of, but goes beyond, prior spacecraft-shielding concepts, including those of Whipple shields and, more recently, multi-shock shields and multi-shock blankets. A shield of the Flexshield type includes multiple outer layers (called bumpers in the art) made, variously, of advanced ceramic and/or polymeric fibers spaced apart from each other by a lightweight foam. As in prior such shields, the bumpers serve to shock an impinging hypervelocity particle, causing it to disintegrate vaporize, and spread out over a larger area so that it can be stopped by an innermost layer (back sheet). The flexibility of the fabric layers and compressibility of the foam make it possible to compress and fold the shield for transport, then deploy the shield for use. The shield can be attached to a spacecraft by use of snaps, hook-and-pile patches, or other devices. The shield can also contain multilayer insulation material, so that it provides some thermal protection in addition to mechanical protection.

  19. Heat-shield design for glovebox applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Frigo, A. A.

    1998-07-10

    Heat shields can often be used in place of insulation materials as an effective means of insulating glovebox furnace vessels. If used properly, shields can accomplish two important objectives: thermal insulation of the vessel to maintain a desired process temperature and protection of the glovebox, equipment, and user. A heat-shield assembly can be described as an arrangement of thin, properly-spaced, metal sheets that reduce radiation heat transfer. The main problem encountered in the design of a heat shield assembly is choosing the number of shields. In determining the heat transfer characteristics of a heat-shield assembly, a number of factors must be taken into consideration. The glovebox or outside environment, material properties, geometry, and operating temperature all have varying effects on the expected results. A simple method, for planar-horizontal and cylindrical-vertical shields, allowing the approximation of the outermost shield temperature, the practical number of shields, and the net heat-transfer rate will be presented. Methods used in the fabrication of heat-shield assemblies will also be discussed.

  20. EMI Shields made from intercalated graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Terry, Jennifer

    1995-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding typically makes up about twenty percent of the mass of a spacecraft power system. Graphite fiber/polymer composites have significantly lower densities and higher strengths than aluminum, the present material of choice for EMI shields, but they lack the electrical conductivity that enables acceptable shielding effectiveness. Bromine intercalated pitch-based graphite/epoxy composites have conductivities fifty times higher than conventional structural graphite fibers. Calculations are presented which indicate that EMI shields made from such composites can have sufficient shielding at less than 20% of the mass of conventional aluminum shields. EMI shields provide many functions other than EMI shielding including physical protection, thermal management, and shielding from ionizing radiation. Intercalated graphite composites perform well in these areas also. Mechanically, they have much higher specific strength and modulus than aluminum. They also have shorter half thicknesses for x-rays and gamma radiation than aluminum. Thermally, they distribute infra-red radiation by absorbing and re-radiating it rather than concentrating it by reflection as aluminum does. The prospects for intercalated graphite fiber/polymer composites for EMI shielding are encouraging.

  1. The Feasibility of Multipole Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Although passive shielding appears to be the only workable solution for galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), active shielding may play an important augmenting role to control the dose from solar particle events (SPEs). It has been noted that, to meet the guidelines of NCRP Report No. 98 through the six SPEs of 1989, a crew member would need roughly double the passive shielding that is necessary to control the GCR dose . This would dramatically increase spacecraft mass, and so it has been proposed that a small but more heavily shielded storm shelter may be used to protect the crew during SPEs. Since a gradual SPE may last 5 or more days, staying in a storm shelter may be psychologically and physiologically distressing to the crew. Storm shelters do not provide shielding for the spacecraft itself against the SPE radiation, and radiation damage to critical electronics may result in loss of mission and life. Single-event effects during the radiation storm may require quick crew response to maintain the integrity of the spacecraft, and confining the crew to a storm shelter prohibits their attending to the spacecraft at the precise time when that attention is needed the most. Active shielding cannot protect against GCR because the particle energies are too high. Although lower energy particles are easier to stop in a passive shield, such shielding is more satisfactory against GCR than against SPE radiation because of the tremendous difference in their initial fluences. Even a small fraction of the SPE fluence penetrating the passive shielding may result in an unacceptably high dose. Active shielding is more effective than passive shielding against SPE radiation because it offers 100% shielding effectiveness up to the cutoff energy, and significant shielding effectiveness beyond the cutoff as well.

  2. Exploratory Environmental Tests of Several Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, George P.; Betts, John, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    Exploratory tests have been conducted with several conceptual radiative heat shields of composite construction. Measured transient temperature distributions were obtained for a graphite heat shield without insulation and with three types of insulating materials, and for a metal multipost heat shield, at surface temperatures of approximately 2,000 F and 1,450 F, respectively, by use of a radiant-heat facility. The graphite configurations suffered loss of surface material under repeated irradiation. Temperature distribution calculated for the metal heat shield by a numerical procedure was in good agreement with measured data. Environmental survival tests of the graphite heat shield without insulation, an insulated multipost heat shield, and a stainless-steel-tile heat shield were made at temperatures of 2,000 F and dynamic pressures of approximately 6,000 lb/sq ft, provided by an ethylene-heated jet operating at a Mach number of 2.0 and sea-level conditions. The graphite heat shield survived the simulated aerodynamic heating and pressure loading. A problem area exists in the design and materials for heat-resistant fasteners between the graphite shield and the base structure. The insulated multipost heat shield was found to be superior to the stainless-steel-tile heat shield in retarding heat flow. Over-lapped face-plate joints and surface smoothness of the insulated multi- post heat shield were not adversely affected by the test environment. The graphite heat shield without insulation survived tests made in the acoustic environment of a large air jet. This acoustic environment is random in frequency and has an overall noise level of 160 decibels.

  3. Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

    2006-04-04

    A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.

  4. The active muon shield in the SHiP experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akmete, A.; Alexandrov, A.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Atkin, E.; Azorskiy, N.; Back, J. J.; Bagulya, A.; Baranov, A.; Barker, G. J.; Bay, A.; Bayliss, V.; Bencivenni, G.; Berdnikov, A. Y.; Berdnikov, Y. A.; Bertani, M.; Betancourt, C.; Bezshyiko, I.; Bezshyyko, O.; Bick, D.; Bieschke, S.; Blanco, A.; Boehm, J.; Bogomilov, M.; Bondarenko, K.; Bonivento, W. M.; Boyarsky, A.; Brenner, R.; Breton, D.; Brundler, R.; Bruschi, M.; Büscher, V.; Buonaura, A.; Buontempo, S.; Cadeddu, S.; Calcaterra, A.; Campanelli, M.; Chauveau, J.; Chepurnov, A.; Chernyavsky, M.; Choi, K.-Y.; Chumakov, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Dallavalle, G. M.; D'Ambrosio, N.; D'Appollonio, G.; De Lellis, G.; De Roeck, A.; De Serio, M.; Dedenko, L.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Dib, C.; Dijkstra, H.; Dmitrenko, V.; Domenici, D.; Donskov, S.; Dubreuil, A.; Ebert, J.; Enik, T.; Etenko, A.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Fedin, O.; Fedorova, G.; Felici, G.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Fini, R. A.; Fonte, P.; Franco, C.; Fukuda, T.; Galati, G.; Gavrilov, G.; Gerlach, S.; Golinka-Bezshyyko, L.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gorbunov, D.; Gorbunov, S.; Gorkavenko, V.; Gornushkin, Y.; Gorshenkov, M.; Grachev, V.; Graverini, E.; Grichine, V.; Guler, A. M.; Guz, Yu.; Hagner, C.; Hakobyan, H.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hollnagel, A.; Hosseini, B.; Hushchyn, M.; Iaselli, G.; Iuliano, A.; Jacobsson, R.; Jonker, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kamiscioglu, C.; Kamiscioglu, M.; Khabibullin, M.; Khaustov, G.; Khotyantsev, A.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, V.; Kim, Y. G.; Kitagawa, N.; Ko, J.-W.; Kodama, K.; Kolesnikov, A.; Kolev, D. I.; Kolosov, V.; Komatsu, M.; Konovalova, N.; Korkmaz, M. A.; Korol, I.; Korol'ko, I.; Korzenev, A.; Kovalenko, S.; Krasilnikova, I.; Krivova, K.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurochka, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lacker, H. M.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lantwin, O.; Lauria, A.; Lebbolo, H.; Lee, K. Y.; Lévy, J.-M.; Lopes, L.; Lyubovitskij, V.; Maalmi, J.; Magnan, A.; Maleev, V.; Malinin, A.; Mefodev, A.; Mermod, P.; Mikado, S.; Mikhaylov, Yu.; Milstead, D. A.; Mineev, O.; Montanari, A.; Montesi, M. C.; Morishima, K.; Movchan, S.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Novikov, A.; Obinyakov, B.; Ogawa, S.; Okateva, N.; Owen, P. H.; Paoloni, A.; Park, B. D.; Paparella, L.; Pastore, A.; Patel, M.; Pereyma, D.; Petrenko, D.; Petridis, K.; Podgrudkov, D.; Poliakov, V.; Polukhina, N.; Prokudin, M.; Prota, A.; Rademakers, A.; Ratnikov, F.; Rawlings, T.; Razeti, M.; Redi, F.; Ricciardi, S.; Roganova, T.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Rokujo, H.; Rosa, G.; Rovelli, T.; Ruchayskiy, O.; Ruf, T.; Samoylenko, V.; Saputi, A.; Sato, O.; Savchenko, E. S.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Serra, N.; Shakin, A.; Shaposhnikov, M.; Shatalov, P.; Shchedrina, T.; Shchutska, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibuya, H.; Shustov, A.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simone, S.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, S.; Sohn, J. Y.; Sokolenko, A.; Starkov, N.; Storaci, B.; Strolin, P.; Takahashi, S.; Timiryasov, I.; Tioukov, V.; Tosi, N.; Treille, D.; Tsenov, R.; Ulin, S.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uteshev, Z.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Vannucci, F.; Venkova, P.; Vilchinski, S.; Villa, M.; Vlasik, K.; Volkov, A.; Voronkov, R.; Wanke, R.; Woo, J.-K.; Wurm, M.; Xella, S.; Yilmaz, D.; Yilmazer, A. U.; Yoon, C. S.; Zaytsev, Yu.

    2017-05-01

    The SHiP experiment is designed to search for very weakly interacting particles beyond the Standard Model which are produced in a 400 GeV/c proton beam dump at the CERN SPS. An essential task for the experiment is to keep the Standard Model background level to less than 0.1 event after 2× 1020 protons on target. In the beam dump, around 1011 muons will be produced per second. The muon rate in the spectrometer has to be reduced by at least four orders of magnitude to avoid muon-induced combinatorial background. A novel active muon shield is used to magnetically deflect the muons out of the acceptance of the spectrometer. This paper describes the basic principle of such a shield, its optimization and its performance.

  5. Radiation shielding of spacecraft in manned interplanetary flights.

    PubMed

    Spillantini, P; Taccetti, F; Papini, P; Rossi, L

    2000-04-01

    During the interplanetary flights the crewmembers will be exposed to cosmic ray radiation with great risk for their health. The absorbed dose due to CR depends on the galactic (GCR) or solar (SCR) origin. GCRs are isotropic and relatively high in energy and deliver a dose nearly constant with time that can be reduced only by means of "heavy" passive protection. The outer walls of the spacecraft usually shield the SCRs up to a few tens of MeV, but during some exceptional solar bursts, a great number of particles, mainly protons, are ejected at higher energies. In this case the dose delivered in a few hours by a solar burst can easily exceed 1 year cumulated dose by GCRS. The high-energy component of SCRs is quasi-directional so that a shielding system based on a superconductive magnetic lens can reduce the daily dose of SCRs to the level delivered by GCRS.

  6. A converse approach to the calculation of NMR shielding tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonhauser, Timo

    2008-03-01

    We propose an alternative approach for computing the NMR response in periodic solids that is based on a recently developed theory of orbital magnetization [1]. Instead of obtaining the shielding tensor from the response to an external magnetic field, we derive it directly from the orbital magnetization appearing in response to a microscopic magnetic dipole [2]. Our new approach is very general, and it can be applied to either isolated or periodic systems. The converse procedure has an established parallel in the case of electric fields, where Born effective charges are often obtained from the polarization induced by a sublattice displacement instead of the force induced by an electric field. Our novel approach is simple and straightforward to implement since all complexities concerning the choice of the gauge origin are avoided and the need for a linear-response implementation is circumvented. We have demonstrated its correctness and viability by calculating chemical shieldings in simple molecular systems, finding excellent agreement with previous theoretical and experimental results. Applications to more complex systems are currently in progress. *[(1)] T. Thonhauser, D. Ceresoli, D. Vanderbilt, and R. Resta, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 137205 (2005). *[(2)] T. Thonhauser, Arash A. Mostofi, Nicola Marzari, R. Resta, David Vanderbilt, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. (2007), arXiv:0709.4429v1.

  7. Characteristics of magnetic force microscopy magnetics on high moment perpendicular magnetic recording writers with high coercivity probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Li, Shaoping; Bai, Daniel; Wang, James; Li, Zhanjie; Han, Dehua; Pan, Tao; Mao, Sining

    2012-04-01

    High resolution magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging with high coercivity probes on perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) writers directly characterizes magnetic field contour for the writer main pole as well as its shields' magnetic state. Evolution of write bubble and return field was analyzed by MFM imaging in dynamic phase detection scheme. Different write field components and their out of plane second order derivatives were calculated via finite element modeling. The MFM imaged write field distribution correlates well with the PMR writer out of plane write field component. Magnetic responses of the PMR writer main pole, trailing and side shields are quantified. The trailing and side shields exhibit complicated magnetic saturation behaviors comparing with the PMR writer pole. The side shield's magnetic response is dependent upon its initial equilibrium state.

  8. Magnetostriction measurement of a giant magnetoresistance film on a practical substrate covered by a shield layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Kazuhiko; Ishiyama, Kazushi; Miura, Hideo

    2012-04-01

    Magnetostriction constant of a magnetic thin film is conventionally measured by detecting the deformation of a coupon sample that consists of the magnetic film deposited on a thin glass substrate (e.g., cover glass of size 10 mm × 25 mm) under an applied field using a laser beam [A. C. Tam and H. Schroeder, J. Appl. Phys. 64, 5422 (1988)]. This method, however, cannot be applied to films deposited on actual large-size substrates (wafers) with diameter from 3 to 6 in. or more. In a previous paper [Okita et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 200, 112008 (2010)], the authors presented a method for measuring magnetostriction of a magnetic thin film deposited on an actual substrate by detecting the change of magnetic anisotropy field, Hk, under mechanical bending of the substrate. It was validated that the method is very effective for measuring the magnetostriction constant of a free layer on the actual substrate. However, since a Ni-Fe shield layer usually covers a magnetic head used for a hard disk drive, this shield layer disturbs the effective measurement of R-H curve under minor loop. Therefore, a high magnetic field that can saturate the magnetic material in the shield layer should be applied to the head in order to measure the magnetostriction constant of a pinned layer under the shield layer. In this paper, this method was applied to the measurement of the magnetostriction constant of a pinned layer under the shield layer by using a high magnetic field up to 320 kA/m (4 kOe).

  9. Study of the shielding performances of different materials regarding Electromagnetic Field Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conecici, L. M.; Munteanu, C.; Purcar, I. M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a computer-aided comparison of some of the most used electromagnetic shielding materials. Computer-aided design (CAD) model and the computer aided engineering (CAE) simulation technologies are used for the analysis of the electromagnetic field shielding performances of each material individually and a comparison will be established. The main topic of this comparison is to establish a proper shielding material for ElectroMagnetic Interference (EMI) sources. A three-dimensional (CAD) model of the circuit breaker coil designed in PTC Creo Elements v.18.1 environment was analyzed in Ansoft Maxwell v.15 environment in order to compute the electromagnetic field distribution. The residual (EMI) values are compared to one another and the best shielding material will be presented for this circumstances.

  10. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  11. Optimation of cooled shields in insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, J. C.; Khodadadi, J. M.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.

    1984-01-01

    A method to optimize the location, temperature, and heat dissipation rate of each cooled shield inside an insulation layer was developed. The method is based on the minimization of the entropy production rate which is proportional to the heat leak across the insulation. It is shown that the maximum number of shields to be used in most practical applications is three. However, cooled shields are useful only at low values of the overall, cold wall to hot wall absolute temperature ratio. The performance of the insulation system is relatively insensitive to deviations from the optimum values of the temperature and location of the cooling shields. Design curves for rapid estimates of the locations and temperatures of cooling shields in various types of insulations, and an equation for calculating the cooling loads for the shields are presented.

  12. Investigation of Lightning Rod Shielding Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayel, Mohamed

    This paper studies those parameters affecting the shielding angle of the lightning rod (Franklin Rod) above very tall buildings. It was recommended that the shielding angle of the lightning rod is about 45°∼60°. The downward lightning leader is modeled by using discrete line charges to consider the exponential distribution of charges through the downward leader. The voltage condition used by Rizk is used to investigate the inception of the upward lightning leader. Different air conditions (relative air density and air humidity) are considered for more practical simulation. The influences of lightning parameters and lightning rod height on the shielding angle are studied. The results shows that, lightning leader parameters, lightning rod height and ground slope have series effects on the lightning rod shielding angle. Based on the results, a lightning rod shielding angle for shielding design is recommended to decrease the lightning stroke to the lightning rod.

  13. Heat flow from the West African shield

    SciTech Connect

    Brigaud, F.; Lucazeau, F.; Ly, S.; Sauvage, J.F.

    1985-09-01

    The heat flow over Precambrian shields is generally lower than over other continental provinces. Previous observations at 9 sites of the West African shield have shown that heat flow ranges from 20 mW m/sup -2/ in Niger to 38-42 mW m/sup -2/ in Liberia, Ghana and Nigeria. Since some of these values are lower than expected for Precambrian shields, it is important to find out whether or not they are representative of the entire shield before trying to derive its thermal structure. In this paper, we present new heat flow determinations from seven sites of the West African shield. These indicate that the surface heat flow is comparable with that of other Precambrian shields in the world.

  14. Miniature, shielded electrical connector with strain relief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diep, Chuong H. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An electrical connector assembly includes a wire bundle having at least one wire with a metal shield surrounding at least a portion of the wire. The shield has an end portion and provides electromagnetic interference protection to the wire. A backshell includes a body and a cover secured to the body together defining an internal cavity with the wire at least partially arranged within the cavity. The backshell provides EMI protection for the portion of the wire bundle not covered by the shield. The backshell includes a hole in a wall of either the body or the cover with the end portion of the shield extending through the hole. The clamp is secured about the body and the cover with the end portion of the shield arranged between the clamp and the backshell grounding the shield to the backshell. The clamp forces the backshell into engagement with the wire bundle to provide strain relief for the wire bundle.

  15. Radiation shielding concrete made of Basalt aggregates.

    PubMed

    Alhajali, S; Yousef, S; Kanbour, M; Naoum, B

    2013-04-01

    In spite of the fact that Basalt is a widespread type of rock, there is very little available information on using it as aggregates for concrete radiation shielding. This paper investigates the possibility of using Basalt for the aforementioned purpose. The results have shown that Basalt could be used successfully for preparing radiation shielding concrete, but some attention should be paid to the choice of the suitable types of Basalt and for the neutron activation problem that could arise in the concrete shield.

  16. Investigation of Shielded and Unshielded Cables.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-11

    increase the yield strength of cables. Table 2 lists the required and measured strengths of the test cables. Both shielded and unshielded Size 2 cables do...selected for evaluation, five shielded and five unshielded, and were examined, dissected and the internal components measured . A list of the cables and...components were measured following the testing parameters shown in Table 17. All complete cables, cables less jacket and cables less jacket and shield

  17. VAPOR SHIELD FOR INDUCTION FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Reese, S.L.; Samoriga, S.A.

    1958-03-11

    This patent relates to a water-cooled vapor shield for an inductlon furnace that will condense metallic vapors arising from the crucible and thus prevent their condensation on or near the induction coils, thereby eliminating possible corrosion or shorting out of the coils. This is accomplished by placing, about the top, of the crucible a disk, apron, and cooling jacket that separates the area of the coils from the interior of the cruclbIe and provides a cooled surface upon whlch the vapors may condense.

  18. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  19. Deployment of "Parasol" solar shield

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-05-26

    S73-26775 (26 May 1973) --- The deployment of the "parasol" solar shield, a sunshade to help cool the overheated Orbital Workshop of the Skylab 1 space station cluster in Earth orbit, can be seen in the reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the space station. The camera is in the Command Module; and the view is looking through the truss of the Apollo Telescope Mount. The sunshade is only partially deployed in this picture. Photo credit: NASA

  20. Studying the Heat Shield's Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity highlights the seal on the rover's protective heat shield. Engineers evaluated the performance of the protective shell's seal during a 36-sol investigation.

    After viewing these images, engineers were pleased with how the seal performed.

    This is an approximately true-color rendering of the scene acquired around 1:07 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 339 (Jan. 6, 2005) in an image mosaic using panoramic camera filters at wavelengths of 750, 530, and 430 nanometers.