Science.gov

Sample records for magnetic spectrometer project

  1. ISS Update: Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries interviews Trent Martin, Johnson Space Center project manager for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) aboard the International Space Station. Questions...

  2. Development of a Gas Filled Magnet spectrometer within the FIPPS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebboubi, A.; Kessedjian, G.; Faust, H.; Blanc, A.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Materna, T.; Méplan, O.; Sage, C.; Serot, O.

    2016-06-01

    The Fission Product Prompt γ -ray Spectrometer, FIPPS, is under development to enable prompt γ -ray spectroscopy correlated with fission fragment identification. This will open new possibilities in the study of fission and of nuclear structure of neutron rich nuclei. FIPPS will consist of an array of γ and neutron detectors coupled with a fission fragment filter. The chosen solution for the filter is a Gas Filled Magnet (GFM). Both experimental and modeling work was performed in order to extract the key parameters of such a device and design the future GFM of the FIPPS project. Experiments performed with a GFM behind the LOHENGRIN spectrometer demonstrated the capability of additional beam purification.

  3. Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Samuel

    2012-07-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a precision particle physics magnetic spectrometer designed to measure electrons, positrons, gamma rays and various nuclei and anti-nuclei from the cosmos up to TeV energy ranges. AMS weighs 7.5 tons and measures 5 meters by 4 meters by 3 meters. It contains 300,000 channels of electronics and 650 onboard microprocessors. It was delivered to the International Space Station onboard space shuttle Endeavour and installed on May 19, 2011. Since that time, more than 14 billion cosmic ray events have been collected. All the detectors function properly. At this moment, we are actively engaged in data analysis. AMS is an international collaboration involving 16 countries and 60 institutes. It took 16 years to construct and test. AMS is the only major physical science experiment on the International Space Station and will continue to collect data over the entire lifetime of the Space Station (10-20 years).

  4. Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Overview

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is flying to the station on STS-134. The AMS experiment is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector being operated by an international team composed of 60 ...

  5. Opportunities with the K600 Magnetic Spectrometer During Phase 1 of the iThemba LABS RIB Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveling, R.

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of hadronic scattering and reactions at zero degrees is highly sought after because of its selectivity to excitations with low angular momentum transfer. High energy resolution measurements of this nature can only be performed at a few facilities worldwide, including iThemba LABS. Such measurements present significant experimental challenges due to the small difference in magnetic rigidity between the projectiles and the particles of interest. Hence a substantial amount of time and effort is required to achieve suitably stable and clean beam conditions before any measurement can be attempted. This results in large inefficiencies in beam usage and data collection under the current beam schedule at iThemba LABS, severely limiting the scope of research that can be performed with this facility. However, it is foreseen that during the first phase of the radioactive-ion beam (RIB) project at iThemba LABS a significant amount of beam-time will become available for stable beam nuclear physics research. It is imperative to plan ahead to ensure optimum utilization of beam-time during this period while taking advantage of the existing unique facilities at iThemba LABS. Potential projects that can make use of the zero-degree capabilities of the K600 magnetic spectrometer are discussed.

  6. MICE Spectrometer Magnet System Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2007-08-27

    The first magnets for the muon ionization cooling experimentwill be the tracker solenoids that form the ends of the MICE coolingchannel. The primary purpose of the tracker solenoids is to provide auniform 4 T field (to better than +-0.3 percent over a volume that is 1meter long and 0.3 meters in diameter) spectrometer magnet field for thescintillating fiber detectors that are used to analyze the muons in thechannel before and after ionization cooling. A secondary purpose for thetracker magnet is the matching of the muon beam between the rest of theMICE cooling channel and the uniform field spectrometer magnet. Thetracker solenoid is powered by three 300 amp power supplies. Additionaltuning of the spectrometer is provided by a pair of 50 amp power suppliesacross the spectrometer magnet end coils. The tracker magnet will becooled using a pair of 4 K pulse tube coolers that each provide 1.5 W ofcooling at 4.2 K. Final design and construction of the tracker solenoidsbegan during the summer of 2006. This report describes the progress madeon the construction of the tracker solenoids.

  7. The wide-angle neutron spin echo spectrometer project WASP

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, Georg

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes design and optimization for the wide angle spin-echo spectrometer (WASP) presently being planned at the ILL. The spectrometer will be a replacement for the high intensity spectrometer IN11 and will enhance its signal by more than one order of magnitude while maintaining the resolution of the present spectrometer. The paper outlines the magnetic field calculations and the considerations about possible limitations. The projected performance has been verified carefully by Monte Carlo raytracing and Biot-Savart magnetic field calculations. The maximum momentum transfer of the new spectrometer is to be extended to 4 angstroms {sup -1}.

  8. Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

    2012-10-16

    Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: • For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. • The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. • The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. • The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the

  9. An improved nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Manatt, S. L.

    1967-01-01

    Cylindrical sample container provides a high degree of nuclear stabilization to a nuclear magnetic resonance /nmr/ spectrometer. It is placed coaxially about the nmr insert and contains reference sample that gives a signal suitable for locking the field and frequency of an nmr spectrometer with a simple audio modulation system.

  10. Superconducting magnetic spectrometer for cosmic ray nuclei.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. H.; Buffington, A.; Wahlig, M. A.; Dauber, P.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes the design, calibration, and operation of a magnetic spectrometer for particle astronomy. The spectrometer consists of a superconducting magnet, optical spark chambers, scintillation detectors, and associated electronics. The instrument has been flown in a balloon gondola to 4.8 g/sq cm residual atmosphere, where it was used to analyze the charge and differential rigidity spectra of primary nuclei from 5 to 100 GeV/c.

  11. MICE Spectrometer Solenoid Magnetic Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leonova, M.

    2013-09-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate ionization cooling in a muon beam. Its goal is to measure a 10% change in transverse emittance of a muon beam going through a prototype Neutrino Factory cooling channel section with an absolute measurement accuracy of 0.1%. To measure emittances, MICE uses two solenoidal spectrometers, with Solenoid magnets designed to have 4 T fields, uniform at 3 per mil level in the tracking volumes. Magnetic field measurements of the Spectrometer Solenoid magnet SS2, and analysis of coil parameters for input into magnet models will be discussed.

  12. High resolution magnetic spectrometer SHARAQ in RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoura, S.

    2007-05-22

    For a new spectroscopy of nuclei using intense RI beams at RIBF, we started the SHARAQ project where a high-resolution SHARAQ spectrometer is being constructed together with a high-resolution secondary beam line. Physics motivation and the specification of the spectrometer are presented.

  13. What Happened with Spectrometer Magnet 2B

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A

    2010-05-27

    The spectrometer solenoid is supposed to be the first magnets installed in MICE [1]-[4]. This report described what happened during the test of the MICE spectrometer solenoid 2B. First, the report describes the temperatures in the magnet, the cooler top plate and the shield during the run where the magnet quenched at 258 A. During this quench, a lead between the bottom of the HTS leads and the diode bank burned out causing the magnet to quench. Second, three methods for measuring the net heat flow into the cold mass are described. Third, there is a discussion of possible resistive heating in the HTS leads between liquid helium temperature and the copper plate, which is at about 50 K. Fourth, there is a discussion of the measured first stage heat loads in the magnet, when there is no current in the magnet. The first stage heat load calculations are based on knowing the first stage temperatures of the three two-stage pulse tube coolers and the single stage GM cooler. Fifth, the estimated heat load to the first stage when the magnet has current in it is discussed. Sixth, there is a comparison of the stage 1 heat loads in magnet 1A [5], magnet 2A [6], and magnet 2B [7]. Finally there is a discussion of recommended changes for improving the spectrometer solenoids so that the coolers can keep them cold.

  14. Superconducting magnets for space flight. [magnetic cosmic ray spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The operating principle and application of superconducting magnetic spectrometers for cosmic ray analysis are described. Magnetic spectrometer experiments are thought to be possible in the areas of charge composition and its possible energy dependence, isotopic separation up to several GeV/n, electrons and positrons energy spectra, galactic secondary antiprotons, searches for primordial antimatter, searches for substructure in energy spectra, and gamma ray astronomy. Operational problems associated with the magnets are discussed, and a possible shuttle payload is also described.

  15. A novel digital magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengmin; Zhao, Cong; Zhou, Heqin; Feng, Huanqing

    2006-01-01

    Spectrometer is the essential part of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. It controls the transmitting and receiving of signals. Many commercial spectrometers are now available. However, they are usually costly and complex. In this paper, a new digital spectrometer based on PCI extensions for instrumentation (PXI) architecture is presented. Radio frequency (RF) pulse is generated with the method of digital synthesis and its frequency and phase are continuously tunable. MR signal acquired by receiver coils is processed by digital quadrature detection and filtered to get the k-space data, which avoid the spectral distortion due to amplitude and phase errors between two channels of traditional detection. Compared to the conventional design, the presented spectrometer is built with general PXI platform and boards. This design works in a digital manner with features of low cost, high performance and accuracy. The experiments demonstrate its efficiency.

  16. Sample spinner for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stejskal, E.O.

    1984-05-01

    A sample spinner for a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer having improved operating characteristics is described comprising a rotor supported at both ends by support gas bearings and positioned by a thrust gas bearing. Improved support gas bearings are also described which result in a spinner exhibiting long-term stable operation characteristics.

  17. The GeoTASO airborne spectrometer project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitch, J. W.; Delker, T.; Good, W.; Ruppert, L.; Murcray, F.; Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Nowlan, C.; Janz, S. J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Pickering, K. E.; Kowalewski, M.; Wang, J.

    2014-10-01

    The NASA ESTO-funded Geostationary Trace gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization (GeoTASO) development project demonstrates a reconfigurable multi-order airborne spectrometer and tests the performance of spectra separation and filtering on the sensor spectral measurements and subsequent trace gas and aerosol retrievals. The activities support mission risk reduction for the UV-Visible air quality measurements from geostationary orbit for the TEMPO and GEMS missions1 . The project helps advance the retrieval algorithm readiness through retrieval performance tests using scene data taken with varying sensor parameters. We report initial results of the project.

  18. RBS with high depth resolution using small magnetic spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grötzschel, Rainer; Klein, Christoph; Mäder, Michael

    2004-06-01

    The increasing importance of ultra-thin layers for novel technologies demands quantitative analysis techniques with a depth resolution of atomic monolayers, which can be obtained for RBS and ERDA by magnetic spectrometers. We operate at the 3 MV Tandetron accelerator a magnetic spectrometer consisting of an UHV scattering chamber and a simple dipole magnet with circular field boundaries (Browne-Buechner spectrometer). Since in many cases of high resolution ion beam analysis the samples must be prepared in situ in UHV, the chamber with a base vacuum of 4 × 10 -10 mbar is equipped with an ion sputter gun and two low rate e-beam evaporators for in situ layer deposition. A RHEED system is used to check the surface reconstruction and monitor the layer growth. Samples are transferred, together with a BN heater, to the precision 5-axes channelling goniometer. The magnet with a mean radius of 0.65 m is mounted vertically and can be positioned either at 35.5° or 144.5°. The backward position offers the advantage of a high mass resolution, but the Rutherford cross sections are a factor of about 100 lower than at the forward angle, which is the preferred position if kinematically possible. At the 5 MV tandem accelerator a QQDS magnetic spectrometer is being installed. The facilities for in situ sample preparation in UHV are similar. These spectrometers are described in detail and recent applications are discussed.

  19. FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray spectrometer: Development of an instrumented gas-filled magnetic spectrometer at the ILL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, A.; Chebboubi, A.; Faust, H.; Jentschel, M.; Kessedjian, G.; Köster, U.; Materna, T.; Panebianco, S.; Sage, C.; Urban, W.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate thermal neutron-induced fission data are important for applications in reactor physics as well as for fundamental nuclear physics. FIPPS is the new FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray Spectrometer being developed at the Institut Laue Langevin for neutron-induced fission studies. FIPPS is based on the combination of a large Germanium detector array surrounding a fission target, a Time-Of-Flight detector and a Gas-Filled Magnet (GFM) to identify mass, nuclear charge and kinetic energy of one of the fission fragments. The GFM will be instrumented with a Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) for individual 3D tracking of the fragments. A conceptual design study of the new spectrometer is presented.

  20. A mobile magnetic sensor unit for the KATRIN main spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipowicz, A.; Seller, W.; Letnev, J.; Marte, P.; Müller, A.; Spengler, A.; Unru, A.

    2012-06-01

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) aims to measure the electron neutrino mass with an unprecedented sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c2, using β decay electrons from tritium decay. For the control of magnetic field in the main spectrometer area of the KATRIN experiment a mobile magnetic sensor unit is constructed and tested at the KATRIN main spectrometer site. The unit moves on inner rails of the support structures of the low field shaping coils which are arranged along the the main spectrometer. The unit propagates on a caterpillar drive and contains an electro motor, battery pack, board electronics, 2 triaxial flux gate sensors and 2 inclination senors. During operation all relevant data are stored on board and transmitted to the master station after the docking station is reached.

  1. POsitron Electron Magnet Spectrometer (POEMS) for the Eos Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, Paul; Wefel, John P.; Guzik, T. G.; Swordy, Simon; Streitmatter, Robert; Barbier, Louis; Ormes, Jonathan; Ramaty, Reuven; Reames, Donald; Salamon, Michael

    1990-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the POsitron Electron Magnet Spectrometer (POEMS) experiment are briefly reviewed. These include determining the origin of primary positrons and studying particle confinement in the Galaxy, solar modulation, solar flares, the geospace environment, and atmospheric physics and chemistry. The design of the POEMS instrument is summarized.

  2. Development of a Gas Filled Magnet spectrometer coupled with the Lohengrin spectrometer for fission study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessedjian, G.; Chebboubi, A.; Faust, H.; Köster, U.; Materna, T.; Sage, C.; Serot, O.

    2013-03-01

    The accurate knowledge of the fission of actinides is necessary for studies of innovative nuclear reactor concepts. The fission yields have a direct influence on the evaluation of the fuel inventory or the reactor residual power after shutdown. A collaboration between the ILL, LPSC and CEA has developed a measurement program on fission fragment distributions at ILL in order to measure the isotopic and isomeric yields. The method is illustrated using the 233U(n,f)98Y reaction. However, the extracted beam from the Lohengrin spectrometer is not isobaric ions which limits the low yield measurements. Presently, the coupling of the Lohengrin spectrometer with a Gas Filled Magnet (GFM) is studied at the ILL in order to define and validate the enhanced purification of the extracted beam. This work will present the results of the spectrometer characterisation, along with a comparison with a dedicated Monte Carlo simulation especially developed for this purpose.

  3. Imaging transmission grating spectrometer for magnetic fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojević, B.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H. W.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2003-03-01

    The Johns Hopkins Plasma Spectroscopy Group is developing a transmission grating based imaging spectrometer for the ultrasoft x-ray [(USXR), 10-300 Å] range. The spectrometer will be integrated into an impurity diagnostic package for magnetic fusion experiments, which provides time and space resolved information about radiation losses, Zeff profiles, and particle transport. The spectrometer has a simple layout, consisting of collimating and space resolving slits, a transmission grating, and a two-dimensional imaging USXR detector. We tested two types of detectors, a CsI coated multichannel plate and a phosphor P45 coated fiber optic plate, both with intensified charge-coupled-device image readout. The performance of the 5000 1/mm, 3:1 bar to open area ratio transmission grating has been evaluated in the laboratory using Kα lines from a Manson source and the emission from a Penning discharge. A prototype spectrometer equiped with the first type detector and optimized for 6 Å spectral resolution has been tested successfully on the CDX-U tokamak at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A spectrometer using the second detector version has been developed for the NSTX spherical torus at Princeton. Spatially resolved spectra have been recorded with 25-250 ms time integration with both spectrometers. In both experiments, spectra are dominated by low-Z impurities, C, N, and O.

  4. Calibration of a compact magnetic proton recoil neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfu; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xianpeng; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Guoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Qiu, Suizheng; Chen, Liang; Liu, Jinliang; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Yang, Shaohua

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer is considered as a powerful instrument to measure deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron spectrum, as it is currently used in inertial confinement fusion facilities and large Tokamak devices. The energy resolution (ER) and neutron detection efficiency (NDE) are the two most important parameters to characterize a neutron spectrometer. In this work, the ER calibration for the MPR spectrometer was performed by using the HI-13 tandem accelerator at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), and the NDE calibration was performed by using the neutron generator at CIAE. The specific calibration techniques used in this work and the associated accuracies were discussed in details in this paper. The calibration results were presented along with Monte Carlo simulation results.

  5. Performance of a short 'magnetic bottle' electron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Mucke, M.; Lischke, T.; Arion, T.; Foerstel, M.; Bradshaw, A. M.; Hergenhahn, U.

    2012-06-15

    In this article, a newly constructed electron spectrometer of the magnetic bottle type is described. The instrument is part of an apparatus for measuring the electron spectra of free clusters using synchrotron radiation. Argon and helium outer valence photoelectron spectra have been recorded in order to investigate the characteristic features of the spectrometer. The energy resolution (E/{Delta}E) has been found to be {approx}30. Using electrostatic retardation of the electrons, it can be increased to at least 110. The transmission as a function of kinetic energy is flat, and is not impaired much by retardation with up to 80% of the initial kinetic energy. We have measured a detection efficiency of most probably 0.6{sub -0.1}{sup +0.05}, but at least of 0.4. Results from testing the alignment of the magnet, and from trajectory simulations, are also discussed.

  6. A particle astrophysics magnet spectrometer facility for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, J. F.; Israel, M. H.; Mewaldt, R.; Wiedenbeck, M.

    1987-01-01

    Planning for and design tradeoff studies related to the particle astrophysics magnet spectrometer known as Astromag are presented. This facility is being planned for the Space Station Freedom and address questions regarding the origin and acceleration of cosmic rays, explore the synthesis of elements by making detailed measurements of cosmic ray isotopic composition, and search for evidence of antimatter and other cosmologically significant particles. This work was supported by an international study team which includes particle physicists and cosmic ray physicists.

  7. Inverse photoelectron spectrometer with magnetically focused electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.

    1991-01-01

    An inverse photoelectron spectrometer is described which is based on the design of a magnetically focused low energy electron gun. The magnetic lens extends its field over a relatively large segment of the electron trajectory, which could provide a better focusing effect on a high-current-density low-velocity electron beam, providing the magnetic field in the vicinity of the target is reduced sufficiently to preserve the collinearity of the beam. In order to prove the concept, ray tracing is conducted using the Herrmannsfeldt program for solving electron trajectories in electrostatic and magnetostatic focusing systems. The program allows the calculation of the angles of the electron trajectories with the z axis, at the target location. The results of the ray-tracing procedure conducted for this gun are discussed. Some of the advantages of the magnetic focusing are also discussed.

  8. Characterization of a turbomolecular-pumped magnetic sector mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Narinder K.

    1988-01-01

    A Perkin Elmer MGA-1200, turbomolecular-pumped, magnetic sector, multiple gas analyzer mass spectrometer with modified inlet for fast response was characterized for the analysis of hydrogen, helium, oxygen and argon in nitrogen and helium background gases. This instrument was specially modified for the Vanderberg AFB SLC-6 Hydrogen Disposal Test Program, as a part of the Hydrogen Sampling System (H2S2). Linearity, precision, drift, detection limits and accuracy among other analytical parameters for each of the background gas were studied to evaluate the performance of the instrument. The result demonstrates that H2S2 mass spectrometer is a stable instrument and can be utilized for the quantitative analytical determination of hydrogen, helium, oxygen and argon in nitrogen and helium background gases.

  9. A 4. pi. tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, G.; Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Van Dijk, J.H. ); Lindenbaum, S.J. City Coll., New York, NY ); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K. ); Biswas, N.; Kenney, P.; Piekarz, J. (Notre Dame Univ

    1990-01-01

    The primary physics objective of the 4{pi} TPC magnetic spectrometer proposal is to search for the Quark-Gluon Plasma. In previous workshops we have discussed what the possible hadronic signatures of such a state of matter would be. Succinctly, the QGP is a direct prediction of non-perturbative QCD. Therefore the question of the existence of this new state of matter bears directly on the validity of non-perturbative QCD. However, since non-perturbative QCD has never been established, it is apparent that what may await us is a host of new phenomena that will go beyond the standard model.

  10. Light nuclear charge measurement with Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basara, Laurent; Choutko, Vitaly; Li, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a high energy particle detector installed and operating on board of the International Space Station (ISS) since May 2011. So far more than 70 billion cosmic ray events have been recorded by AMS. In the present paper the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) detector of AMS is used to measure cosmic ray nuclear charge magnitudes up to Z=10. The obtained charge magnitude resolution is about 0.1 and 0.3 charge unit for Helium and Carbon, respectively. These measurements are important for an accurate determination of the interaction probabilities of various nuclei with the AMS materials. The ECAL charge calibration and measurement procedures are presented.

  11. Transmission Grating Imaging Spectrometer for Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojevic, B.; Stutman, D.; Vero, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H. W.

    2001-10-01

    The Johns Hopkins Plasma Spectroscopy Group is developing a transmission grating (TG) based imaging spectrometer for the soft and ultrasoft X-ray (USXR) ranges. The spectrometer will be integrated into a multi-purpose impurity diagnostic package for Magnetically Confined Fusion experiments, which will provide time and space resolved information about radiation losses, Zeff profiles and particle transport. The package will also include 2-D filtered USXR diode arrays and atomic physics and impurity transport computational capability. The spectrometer has a very simple layout, consisting of two collimating and space resolving slits, a TG and a 2-D imaging detector. As detector we are developing phosphor (P45) coated fiber optic plates with CCD and intensified CCD image readout. The performance of a test 5000 l/mm, 2:1 bar to open area ratio TG has been evaluated in the laboratory using a K-alpha Manson source and the emission from a Penning Discharge. The incident and diffracted photon flux was recorded in the 10-300 Å range with a gas flow proportional counter. The measurements show that spectral resolution and efficiency agree well with the predicted values. A device optimized for spectral resolution and higher order suppression will be tested on the CDX-U and NSTX tokamak at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Work supported by DoE grant No. DE-FG02-86ER52314ATDoE

  12. Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS). User`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Landron, C.O.; Baldwin, G.T.

    1994-04-01

    The Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS) is a radiation diagnostic designed to determine the time-integrated energy spectrum between 100 keV -- 2 MeV of flash x-ray sources. This guide is intended as a reference for the routine operator of the TPCS. Contents include a brief overview of the principle of operation, detailed component descriptions, detailed assembly and disassembly procedures, guide to routine operations, and troubleshooting flowcharts. Detailed principle of operation, signal analysis and spectrum unfold algorithms are beyond the scope of this guide; however, the guide makes reference to sources containing this information.

  13. APES: Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer -- A high time resolution monodirectional magnetic deflection electron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michell, R. G.; Samara, M.; Grubbs, G.; Ogasawara, K.; Miller, G.; Trevino, J. A.; Webster, J.; Stange, J.

    2016-06-01

    We present a description of the Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer (APES) that was designed and built for the Ground-to-Rocket Electron Electrodynamics Correlative Experiment (GREECE) auroral sounding rocket mission. The purpose was to measure the precipitating electron spectrum with high time resolution, on the order of milliseconds. The trade-off made in order to achieve high time resolution was to limit the aperture to only one look direction. The energy selection was done by using a permanent magnet to separate the incoming electrons, such that the different energies would fall onto different regions of the microchannel plate and therefore be detected by different anodes. A rectangular microchannel plate (MCP) was used (15 mm × 100 mm), and there was a total of 50 discrete anodes under the MCP, each one 15 mm × 1.5 mm, with a 0.5 mm spacing between anodes. The target energy range of APES was 200 eV to 30 keV.

  14. The magnetic genome project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic materials underpin a vast and diverse range of modern technologies, going from data storage to energy production and use. However, the choice of magnets for mainstream applications is limited to a few dozens and the development of a new high-performance magnetic compound is a long and often unpredictable process. Here we describe a systematic pathway to the discovery of novel magnetic materials for multiple applications, which demonstrates an unprecedented throughput and speed up in the discovery process. We have constructed a massive electronic structures library for Heusler alloys containing 236,856 materials. We have then extracted those magnetic compounds with specific electronic properties, such as half-metallicity and large magnetization density, and finally established whether these can be fabricated at thermodynamical equilibrium. Based on our analysis we have identified 249 stable new intermetallic Heuslers, including 21 new magnets. Our work paves the way for large scale design of novel magnetic materials at unprecedented speed.

  15. Small Explorer (SMEX) POsitron Electron Magnet Spectrometer (POEMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LHeureux, Jacques; Evenson, Paul A.; Aleman, R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This report covers the activities of Louisiana State University (LSU) under subcontract 26053-EX between LSU and the Bartol Research Institute (Bartol), which began January 1, 1994. The purpose of this subcontract was for LSU to participate in and support Bartol in the work to define the SMEX (Small Explorer)/POEMS (Positron Electron Magnet Spectrometer) spaceflight mission under NASA Contract NAS5-38098 between NASA and Bartol. The conclusions of this study were that for a 1998 launch into a 600km altitude, 98 degrees, approximately sun synchronous orbit, (a) the total radiation dose would be typically a few k-rad per year, certainly less than 20 k-rad per year for the anticipated shielding and potential solar flare environment, (b) detector counting rates would be dominated by the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) and the horns of the Van Allen belts, (c) the galactic electron and positron 'signal' can be extracted from the albedo background and the trapped populations by detailed evaluation of the geomagnetic transmission function (cut-off) for each event, (d) POEMS could make significant contributions to magnetospheric science if sufficient downlink capacity were provided and, (e) a fully functioning, cost efficient, data processing and analysis facility design was developed for the mission. Overall, POEMS was found to be a relatively simple experiment to manifest, operate and analyze and had potential for fundamental new discoveries in cosmic, heliospheric, solar and magnetospheric science.

  16. Toward the Direct Measurement of Coronal Magnetic Fields: An Airborne Infrared Spectrometer for Eclipse Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samra, J.; DeLuca, E. E.; Golub, L.; Cheimets, P.

    2014-12-01

    The solar magnetic field enables the heating of the corona and provides its underlying structure. Energy stored in coronal magnetic fields is released in flares and coronal mass ejections (CME) and provides the ultimate source of energy for space weather. Therefore, direct measurements of the coronal magnetic field have significant potential to enhance understanding of coronal dynamics and improve solar forecasting models. Of particular interest are observations of coronal field lines in the transitional region between closed and open flux systems, providing important information on the origin of the slow solar wind. While current instruments routinely observe only the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, a proposed airborne spectrometer will take a step toward the direct observation of coronal fields by measuring plasma emission in the infrared at high spatial and spectral resolution. The targeted lines are four forbidden magnetic dipole transitions between 2 and 4 μm. The airborne system will consist of a telescope, grating spectrometer, and pointing/stabilization system to be flown on the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) during the August 2017 total solar eclipse. The project incorporates several optical engineering challenges, centered around maintaining adequate spectral and spatial resolution in a compact and inexpensive package and on a moving platform. Design studies are currently underway to examine the tradeoffs between various optical geometries and control strategies for the pointing/stabilization system. The results will be presented and interpreted in terms of the consequences for the scientific questions. In addition, results from a laboratory prototype and simulations of the final system will be presented.

  17. Cosmic-Ray Studies with an Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS Detector) on the International Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Plyaskin, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    A brief description of the physics research program implemented with an alpha magnetic spectrometer (AMS detector) by a large-scale international collaboration on board the International Space Station is presented. The features of the experimental facility under construction are given, along with some results obtained during the test flight of the prototype spectrometer on board a space shuttle.

  18. Shielding design for the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) at OMEGA and the NIF using TART2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, D. T.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Haan, S.; Wilson, D. C.; Leeper, R.

    2005-10-01

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) is currently being developed, at both OMEGA and the NIF, for measurements of down-scattered neutrons from which ρR of cryogenic DT implosions can be inferred. As is the case for complementary methods to measure ρR,ootnotetextC. K. Li et al, Phys. Plasmas 8, 4902 (2001) minimizing the effect of the background is critical for successful implementation. The established minimum S/B of 20, folded with CR-39 neutron response, determines the tolerable neutron fluence. The transport code TART2002 was used to calculate the neutron fluence at the MRS detector and provided input for design of the shielding for the MRS. This poster will present the current status of this project. This work was supported in part by LLE, LLNL, the U.S. DoE, the Univ. of Rochester, and the N.Y. State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  19. Design and implementation of an integrated magnetic spectrometer for multiplexed biosensing.

    PubMed

    Sideris, Constantine; Hajimiri, Ali

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic spectroscopy allows for characterization of the magnetic susceptibility of magnetic beads across a broad frequency range. This enables differentiation and quantification of multiple beads of varying types concurrently present in the active volume of a sensor's surface. A magnetic spectrometer can be used for multi-probe tagging and identification akin to multi-color fluorescent bio-sensing. We propose a new sensing methodology to perform magnetic spectroscopy and analyze various important design parameters such as SNR and gain uniformity. We present a proof-of-concept design of a fully integrated CMOS magnetic spectrometer that can detect, quantify, and characterize magnetic materials in the 1.1 GHz to 3.3 GHz frequency range, where we demonstrate magnetic multiplexing capability using a mixture of two different kinds of magnetic beads. The sensor consumes less than 2 mW of DC power within the whole frequency range, requires no external biasing magnetic fields, is implemented in a standard CMOS process, and can be powered and operated completely from a USB interface. The magnetic spectrometer not only increases the throughput and multiplexing of biosensing experiments for a given sensor area, but also can enable additional applications, such as magnetic flow cytometry and signal-collocation assays of multiple probes. PMID:24473542

  20. The magnetic shielding for the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, Gertrud; Ayala Guardia, Fidel; Baeßler, Stefan; Borg, Michael; Glück, Ferenc; Heil, Werner; Hiebel, Stefan; Muñoz Horta, Raquel; Sobolev, Yury

    2014-12-01

    Many experiments in nuclear and neutron physics are confronted with the problem that they use a superconducting magnetic spectrometer which potentially affects other experiments by their stray magnetic field. The retardation spectrometer aSPECT consists, inter alia, of a superconducting magnet system that produces a strong longitudinal magnetic field of up to 6.2 T. In order not to disturb other experiments in the vicinity of aSPECT, we had to develop a magnetic field return yoke for the magnet system. While the return yoke must reduce the stray magnetic field, the internal magnetic field and its homogeneity should not be affected. As in many cases, the magnetic shielding for aSPECT must manage with limited space. In addition, we must ensure that the additional magnetic forces on the magnet coils are not destructive. In order to determine the most suitable geometry for the magnetic shielding for aSPECT, we simulated a variety of possible geometries and combinations of shielding materials of non-linear permeability. The results of our simulations were checked through magnetic field measurements both with Hall and nuclear magnetic resonance probes. The experimental data are in good agreement with the simulated values: the mean deviation from the simulated exterior magnetic field is (-1.7±4.8)%. However, in the two critical regions, the internal magnetic field deviates by 0.2% (decay volume) and < 1 ×10-4 (analyzing plane) from the simulated values.

  1. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-19

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

  2. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Non Q.; Clarke, John

    1993-01-01

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  3. Computer simulation of spectrometer magnets for some experimental installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhidkov, E. P.; Poljakova, R. V.; Voloshina, I. G.; Perepelkin, E. E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Shavrina, T. V.; Yudin, I. P.

    2009-03-01

    The significance of numerical simulation in the research of magnetic systems is determined by not only known advantages of the computing experiment, but also by the fact that the measurement of a magnetic field is a labour-consuming and expensive problem. Mathematical simulation allows one to investigate those parts of the magnet’s design where the measurements of the magnetic field are extremely complicated or even impossible. This work is aimed to generalize experience of the mathematical simulation of magnetic systems of various-type physical and electromechanical installations and to work out some recommendations of the optimal use of some software products for the numerical modeling of magnetostatic problems. This work also presents some results of a numerical analysis of the magnetic systems of the JINR’s physical installation MARUSYA with the purpose of studying an opportunity of designing magnetic systems with predetermined characteristics of the magnetic field.

  4. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jianfu Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xianpeng; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Guoguang; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun

    2015-12-15

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10{sup −7} at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons.

  5. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfu; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Guoguang; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xianpeng; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun

    2015-12-01

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10(-7) at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons.

  6. Development of a compact magnetic proton recoil spectrometer for measurement of deuterium-tritium neutrons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfu; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Qiu, Suizheng; Zhang, Guoguang; Ruan, Jinlu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xianpeng; Yang, Shaohua; Song, Jiwen; Liu, Linyue; Li, Hongyun

    2015-12-01

    A new compact magnetic proton recoil (MPR) neutron spectrometer has been designed for precise measurement of deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons. This design is presented emphasizing the magnetic analyzing system, which is based on a compact quadrupole-dipole (QD) electromagnet. The focal plane detector (FPD) is also discussed with respect to application for the next step. The characteristics of the MPR spectrometer were calculated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A preliminary experiment was performed to test the magnetic analyzing system and the proton images of the FPD. Since the QD electromagnet design allows for a larger foil thickness and solid angle to be utilized, the MPR spectrometer defined in this paper can achieve neutron detection efficiency more than 5 × 10(-7) at an energy resolution of 1.5% for measuring DT neutrons. PMID:26724081

  7. Assessment of Alphamagnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Upper Experiment Structural Configuration Shielding Effectiveness Associated with Change from Cryo-Cooled Magnet to Permanent Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In the spring of 2010, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 2 (AMS-02) underwent a series of system level electromagnetic interference control measurements, followed by thermal vacuum testing. Shortly after completion of the thermal vacuum testing, the project decided to remove the cryogenically cooled superconducting magnet, and replace it with the original permanent magnet design employed in the earlier AMS- 01 assembly. Doing so necessitated several structural changes, as well as removal or modification of numerous electronic and thermal control devices and systems. At this stage, the project was rapidly approaching key milestone dates for hardware completion and delivery for launch, and had little time for additional testing or assessment of any impact to the electromagnetic signature of the AMS-02. Therefore, an analytical assessment of the radiated emissions behavioural changes associated with the system changes was requested.

  8. Development of single-exposure, multidetector neutron spectrometers: the NESCOFI@BTF project.

    PubMed

    Bedogni, R; Gómez-Ros, J M; Bortot, D; Pola, A; Introini, M V; Esposito, A; Gentile, A; Mazzitelli, G; Buonomo, B

    2014-10-01

    NESCOFI@BTF is a 3-y project (2011-13) supported by the Scientific Commission 5 of INFN (Italy). The target is the development of neutron spectrometers similar to the Bonner spheres, in terms of response energy interval and accuracy, but able to determine the neutron spectrum in only one exposure. These devices embed multiple (10 to 30) thermal neutron detectors (TNDs) within a single moderator. Two prototypes, called SPherical SPectrometer (SP(2)) and cylindrical spectrometer (CYSP), have been set up. Whilst SP(2) has spherical geometry and nearly isotropic response, the CYSP has cylindrical geometry and is intended to be used as a directional spectrometer. Suitable active TNDs will be embedded in the final version of the devices. The resulting instruments could be used as real-time neutron spectrometers in neutron-producing facilities. This communication describes the design criteria, numerical analysis, experimental issues, state-of-the-art and future developments connected with the development of these instruments.

  9. What Caused the Lead burn-out in Spectrometer Magnet 2B

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A

    2010-11-29

    The spectrometer solenoids are supposed to be the first magnets installed in the MICE Cooling Channel. The results of the test of Spectrometer Magnet 2B are reported in a previous MICE Note. Magnet 2B was tested with all five coils connected in series. The magnet failed because a lead to coil M2 failed before it could be trained to its full design current of 275 A. First, this report describes the condition of the magnet when the lead failure occurred. The lead that failed was between the cold mass feed-through and the heavy lead that connected to coil M2 and the quench protection diodes. It is believed that the lead failed because the minimum propagation zone (MPZ) length was too short. The quench was probably triggered by lead motion in the field external to the magnet center coil. The effect of heat transfer on quench propagation and MPZ length is discussed. The MPZ length is compared for a number of cases that apply to the spectrometer solenoid 2B as built and as it has been repaired. The required heat transfer coefficient for cryogenic stability and the quench propagation velocity along the leads are compared for various parts of the Magnet leads inside the cold mass cryostat. The effect of the insulation on leads on heat transfer is and stability is discussed.

  10. Polarisation Analysis Neutron Spectrometer, POLANO, at J-PARC - Concept and Magnetic Field Optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohoyama, K.; Yokoo, T.; Itoh, S.; Nanbu, M.; Iwasa, K.; Ohkawara, M.; Kaneko, N.; Ino, T.; Hayashida, H.; Oku, T.; Kira, H.; Tasaki, S.; Takeda, M.; Kimura, H.; Sato, T. J.

    2016-04-01

    The status of the polarised neutron spectrometer constructed at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex through a collaboration between Tohoku University and KEK will be reported. In particular, the optimisation of magnetic fields to minimise neutron- beam depolarisation using the finite element method will be discussed on the basis of several simulations using the finite element method.

  11. Composition measurements of the topside ionosphere using a magnetic mass spectrometer, ion mass spectrometer on ISIS-2 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The ion mass spectrometer (IMS) on the ISIS-II satellite is described; it measures the composition and distribution of positive ions in the earth's ionosphere in the mass range of 1 to 64 atomic mass units. Significant data were received which show a wide variation in ion composition at night near the equator and in the daytime poleward of the plasmapause. It was found that these data enable further study of the polar wind and that the experiment produced timely data during the August, 1972 magnetic storm to show the development of a unique ionosphere above the plasmapause during the period of the storm. The scientific objectives and results of the experiment, the technical description of the instrument, a bibliography with sample papers attached, and a summary of recommendations for further study are presented.

  12. Development of a highly-sensitive Penning ionization electron spectrometer using the magnetic bottle effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Masahiro; Ishiguro, Yuki; Nakajima, Yutaro; Miyauchi, Naoya; Yamakita, Yoshihiro

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports on a highly-sensitive retarding-type electron spectrometer for a continuous source of electrons, in which the electron collection efficiency is increased by utilizing the magnetic bottle effect. This study demonstrates an application to Penning ionization electron spectroscopy using collisional ionization with metastable He*(23S) atoms. Technical details and performances of the instrument are presented. This spectrometer can be used for studies of functional molecules and assemblies, and exterior electron densities are expected to be selectively observed by the Penning ionization.

  13. Magnetic fusion and project ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    It has already been demonstrated that our economics and international relationship are impacted by an energy crisis. For the continuing prosperity of the human race, a new and viable energy source must be developed within the next century. It is evident that the cost will be high and will require a long term commitment to achieve this goal due to a high degree of technological and scientific knowledge. Energy from the controlled nuclear fusion is a safe, competitive, and environmentally attractive but has not yet been completely conquered. Magnetic fusion is one of the most difficult technological challenges. In modem magnetic fusion devices, temperatures that are significantly higher than the temperatures of the sun have been achieved routinely and the successful generation of tens of million watts as a result of scientific break-even is expected from the deuterium and tritium experiment within the next few years. For the practical future fusion reactor, we need to develop reactor relevant materials and technologies. The international project called International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)'' will fulfill this need and the success of this project will provide the most attractive long-term energy source for mankind.

  14. Magnetic fusion and project ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.K.

    1992-09-01

    It has already been demonstrated that our economics and international relationship are impacted by an energy crisis. For the continuing prosperity of the human race, a new and viable energy source must be developed within the next century. It is evident that the cost will be high and will require a long term commitment to achieve this goal due to a high degree of technological and scientific knowledge. Energy from the controlled nuclear fusion is a safe, competitive, and environmentally attractive but has not yet been completely conquered. Magnetic fusion is one of the most difficult technological challenges. In modem magnetic fusion devices, temperatures that are significantly higher than the temperatures of the sun have been achieved routinely and the successful generation of tens of million watts as a result of scientific break-even is expected from the deuterium and tritium experiment within the next few years. For the practical future fusion reactor, we need to develop reactor relevant materials and technologies. The international project called ``International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)`` will fulfill this need and the success of this project will provide the most attractive long-term energy source for mankind.

  15. Experiment definition and integration study for the accommodation of magnetic spectrometer payload on Spacelab/shuttle missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffington, A.

    1978-01-01

    A super-cooled magnetic spectrometer for a cosmic-ray experiment is considered for application in the high energy astronomical observatory which may be used on a space shuttle spacelab mission. New cryostat parameters are reported which are appropriate to shuttle mission weight and mission duration constraints. Since a super-conducting magnetic spectrometer has a magnetic fringe field, methods for shielding sensitive electronic and mechanical components on nearby experiments are described.

  16. Results on search for a QGP with a TPC magnetic spectrometer at AGS and plans for an approx 4. pi. TPC magnetic spectrometer at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J. City Univ. of New York, NY )

    1991-01-01

    In the first part of this paper a search for a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) with a TPC Magnetic Spectrometer at AGS by the BNL/CCNY/Johns Hopkins/Rice (E-810) Collaboration is discussed. At AGS energies the expected increase in baryon density is near maximum. If a QGP is formed even rarely this approach provides a sensitive method for its detection. We have found some interesting phenomena including strangeness enhancement, multi-{Lambda} and K{sub s}{sup 0} events and an increased slope for {pi}{sup {minus}} (corresponding to a reduced temperature) in the usual temperature plot for p{sub {perpendicular}} < 0.2 GeV/c. We plan to increase the statistics with the 14.5 GeV/c {times} A Si ions on targets from light to heavy and then to continue the program with incident Au ions. In Part 2 we discuss the BNL/CCNY/Notre Dame/Rice proposal for an {approx} 4{pi} TPC Magnetic Spectrometer for RHIC which we believe will be a sensitive probe for hadronic QGP signals, and also capable of observing departures from QCD should they occur. 8 refs., 12 figs.

  17. On the analysis of inhomogeneous magnetic field spectrometer for laser-driven ion acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, D.; Senje, L.; McCormack, O.; Dromey, B.; Zepf, M.; Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Letzring, S.; Gautier, D. C.; Fernandez, J. C.; Toncian, T.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2015-03-15

    We present a detailed study of the use of a non-parallel, inhomogeneous magnetic field spectrometer for the investigation of laser-accelerated ion beams. Employing a wedged yoke design, we demonstrate the feasibility of an in-situ self-calibration technique of the non-uniform magnetic field and show that high-precision measurements of ion energies are possible in a wide-angle configuration. We also discuss the implications of a stacked detector system for unambiguous identification of different ion species present in the ion beam and explore the feasibility of detection of high energy particles beyond 100 MeV/amu in radiation harsh environments.

  18. First measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J.; Casey, D.; Li, C.; Seguin, F.; Petrasso, R.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Eckart, M.; Haan, S.; Hatchett, S.; Khater, H.; Landen, O.; MacKinnon, A.; Moran, M.; Rygg, J.; Kilkenny, J.; Glebov, V.; Sangster, T.; Meyerhofer, D.; Magoon, J.; Fletcher, K.; Leeper, R.

    2010-11-01

    Proper assembly of capsule mass, as manifested through evolution of fuel areal density (ρR), is fundamentally important for achieving hot-spot ignition planned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental information about ρR and ρR asymmetries, Ti and yield is therefore essential for understanding how this assembly occurs. To obtain this information, a neutron spectrometer, called the Magnetic-Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been implemented on the NIF. Its primary objective is to measure the absolute neutron spectrum in the range 5 to 30 MeV, from which ρR, Ti and yield can be directly inferred for both low-yield tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) and high-yield DT implosions. In this talk, the results from the first measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum produced in exploding pusher and THD implosions will be presented. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, LLNL and LLE.

  19. Computer controlled [ital in] [ital situ] radiolysis electron spin resonance spectrometer incorporating magnetic field-microwave frequency locking

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, K.P.; McManus, H.J.D.; Fessenden, R.W. )

    1994-01-01

    A lab-built personal computer-based electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer is described which incorporates a wide range magnetic field/microwave frequency lock as part of its magnetic field control subsystem. Instrument operation is accomplished by keyboard commands, with important experimental variables logged automatically for reference during subsequent data analysis. The spectrometer features both narrowband field modulation and direct-detection time-resolved ESR modes. The data acquisition system and field/frequency lock operate such that spectrum recordings consisting of multiple magnetic field sweeps are undistorted by long-term klystron frequency drift. The spectrometer features low noise microwave preamplification, balanced mixer detection, automatic reference arm phase control, and a fast automatic frequency control system requiring no klystron frequency modulation. Natural abundance [sup 13]C and [sup 33]S studies of the terephthalic acid radical trianion and sulfite radical anion are presented as proof of spectrometer performance.

  20. Summary of Magnetic Holes Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic Holes in the solar wind are anomalous decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field as measured at a particular spacecraft. Such signatures have been observed in durations of several hours all the way down to the time resolution of the fastest magnetometer instruments, and with magnetic field decreases anywhere from a few percent to nearly full annihilation. It has been an objective of this study to implement a general strategy for detecting magnetic holes on all scales at which they can be found. Investigations into the properties of magnetic holes began with collections of events appearing distinct to the naked eye, perhaps biased by morphological characteristics or suggestive density and temperature fluctuations. More recent studies have taken the simple approach of cataloging any time period wherein the magnetic field is reduced by more than half. This investigation takes a statistical approach to the problem of identifying real magnetic hole events at all available scales.

  1. Periodic magnetic field as a polarized and focusing thermal neutron spectrometer and monochromator

    PubMed Central

    Cremer, J. T.; Williams, D. L.; Fuller, M. J.; Gary, C. K.; Piestrup, M. A.; Pantell, R. H.; Feinstein, J.; Flocchini, R. G.; Boussoufi, M.; Egbert, H. P.; Kloh, M. D.; Walker, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    A novel periodic magnetic field (PMF) optic is shown to act as a prism, lens, and polarizer for neutrons and particles with a magnetic dipole moment. The PMF has a two-dimensional field in the axial direction of neutron propagation. The PMF alternating magnetic field polarity provides strong gradients that cause separation of neutrons by wavelength axially and by spin state transversely. The spin-up neutrons exit the PMF with their magnetic spins aligned parallel to the PMF magnetic field, and are deflected upward and line focus at a fixed vertical height, proportional to the PMF period, at a downstream focal distance that increases with neutron energy. The PMF has no attenuation by absorption or scatter, as with material prisms or crystal monochromators. Embodiments of the PMF include neutron spectrometer or monochromator, and applications include neutron small angle scattering, crystallography, residual stress analysis, cross section measurements, and reflectometry. Presented are theory, experimental results, computer simulation, applications of the PMF, and comparison of its performance to Stern–Gerlach gradient devices and compound material and magnetic refractive prisms. PMID:20113108

  2. Periodic magnetic field as a polarized and focusing thermal neutron spectrometer and monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, J. T.; Williams, D. L.; Fuller, M. J.; Gary, C. K.; Piestrup, M. A.; Pantell, R. H.; Feinstein, J.; Flocchini, R. G.; Boussoufi, M.; Egbert, H. P.; Kloh, M. D.; Walker, R. B.

    2010-01-15

    A novel periodic magnetic field (PMF) optic is shown to act as a prism, lens, and polarizer for neutrons and particles with a magnetic dipole moment. The PMF has a two-dimensional field in the axial direction of neutron propagation. The PMF alternating magnetic field polarity provides strong gradients that cause separation of neutrons by wavelength axially and by spin state transversely. The spin-up neutrons exit the PMF with their magnetic spins aligned parallel to the PMF magnetic field, and are deflected upward and line focus at a fixed vertical height, proportional to the PMF period, at a downstream focal distance that increases with neutron energy. The PMF has no attenuation by absorption or scatter, as with material prisms or crystal monochromators. Embodiments of the PMF include neutron spectrometer or monochromator, and applications include neutron small angle scattering, crystallography, residual stress analysis, cross section measurements, and reflectometry. Presented are theory, experimental results, computer simulation, applications of the PMF, and comparison of its performance to Stern-Gerlach gradient devices and compound material and magnetic refractive prisms.

  3. Periodic magnetic field as a polarized and focusing thermal neutron spectrometer and monochromator.

    PubMed

    Cremer, J T; Williams, D L; Fuller, M J; Gary, C K; Piestrup, M A; Pantell, R H; Feinstein, J; Flocchini, R G; Boussoufi, M; Egbert, H P; Kloh, M D; Walker, R B

    2010-01-01

    A novel periodic magnetic field (PMF) optic is shown to act as a prism, lens, and polarizer for neutrons and particles with a magnetic dipole moment. The PMF has a two-dimensional field in the axial direction of neutron propagation. The PMF alternating magnetic field polarity provides strong gradients that cause separation of neutrons by wavelength axially and by spin state transversely. The spin-up neutrons exit the PMF with their magnetic spins aligned parallel to the PMF magnetic field, and are deflected upward and line focus at a fixed vertical height, proportional to the PMF period, at a downstream focal distance that increases with neutron energy. The PMF has no attenuation by absorption or scatter, as with material prisms or crystal monochromators. Embodiments of the PMF include neutron spectrometer or monochromator, and applications include neutron small angle scattering, crystallography, residual stress analysis, cross section measurements, and reflectometry. Presented are theory, experimental results, computer simulation, applications of the PMF, and comparison of its performance to Stern-Gerlach gradient devices and compound material and magnetic refractive prisms.

  4. Molecular Structure Laboratory. Fourier Transform Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FTNMR) Spectrometer and Ancillary Instrumentation at SUNY Geneseo

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, David K

    2015-12-31

    An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation.  The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns.  Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.

  5. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) experiment on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpat, Behcet

    2001-04-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a detector designed to operate in space to search for antimatter components in cosmic ray, the annihilation products of darkmatter and to study the antiprotons, positrons and light nuclei. A 'baseline' version of the experiment has successfully completed the precursor flight on Space Shuttle Discovery (June 2-12, 1998). The complete AMS is programmed for installation on International Space Station in year 2003 for an operational period of 3 years. In this contribution we report on the experimental configuration of AMS that will be installed on International Space Station.

  6. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source.

    PubMed

    Lord, J S; McKenzie, I; Baker, P J; Blundell, S J; Cottrell, S P; Giblin, S R; Good, J; Hillier, A D; Holsman, B H; King, P J C; Lancaster, T; Mitchell, R; Nightingale, J B; Owczarkowski, M; Poli, S; Pratt, F L; Rhodes, N J; Scheuermann, R; Salman, Z

    2011-07-01

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  7. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J. S.; McKenzie, I.; Baker, P. J.; Cottrell, S. P.; Giblin, S. R.; Hillier, A. D.; Holsman, B. H.; King, P. J. C.; Nightingale, J. B.; Pratt, F. L.; Rhodes, N. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Good, J.; Mitchell, R.; Owczarkowski, M.; Poli, S.; Scheuermann, R.; Salman, Z.

    2011-07-15

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  8. The lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeters for the magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Carlini, Roger D.; Tadevosyan, Vardan H.; Arrington, John Robert; Asaturyan, Arshak Razmik; Christy, Michael Eric; Dutta, Dipangkar; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard C.; Gaskell, David J.; Horn, Tanja; Jones, Mark K.; Keppel, Cynthia; Mack, David J.; Malace, Simona P.; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Seely, Charles Jason; Tvaskis, Vladas; Wood, Stephen A.; Zhamkochyan, Simon

    2013-08-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeters of the various magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab are presented. For the existing HMS and SOS spectrometers design considerations, relevant construction information, and comparisons of simulated and experimental results are included. The energy resolution of the HMS and SOS calorimeters is better than $\\sigma/E \\sim 6%/\\sqrt E $, and pion/electron ($\\pi/e$) separation of about 100:1 has been achieved in energy range 1 -- 5 GeV. Good agreement has been observed between the experimental and simulated energy resolutions, but simulations systematically exceed experimentally determined $\\pi^-$ suppression factors by close to a factor of two. For the SHMS spectrometer presently under construction details on the design and accompanying GEANT4 simulation efforts are given. The anticipated performance of the new calorimeter is predicted over the full momentum range of the SHMS. Good electron/hadron separation is anticipated by combining the energy deposited in an initial (preshower) calorimeter layer with the total energy deposited in the calorimeter.

  9. Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.E. |

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

  10. A high resolution electrostatic time-of-flight spectrometer with adiabatic magnetic collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, J.; Bornschein, L.; Degen, B.; Otten, E. W.; Weinheimer, Ch

    1999-01-01

    A new type of spectrometer for low energy charged particles is presented. It consists of an adiabatic magnetic collimation and two filters: an electrostatic retarding potential to set a lower limit (high pass) and a time-of-flight analysis to reject high energy charged particles (low pass). Both filters are only limited in their resolution by the efficiency of the adiabatic magnetic collimation. The proof of this principle is demonstrated by a pilot measurement on the K conversion line of 83mKr. Possible applications to pulsed and continuous electron sources are discussed with the emphasis on the investigation of the β spectrum of T 2 to deduce information on the mass of the electron antineutrino and possible anomalies in the β spectrum. In this context design parameters of a spectrometer with a resolving power of E/ ΔE=20 000 and a luminosity of A ΔΩ/4 π=4 cm2 for 20 keV electrons are given.

  11. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS Characteristics of the magnetic analysis system for a compact MPR-type spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jian-Min; Zhou, Lin; Jiang, Shi-Lun; Peng, Tai-Ping

    2010-12-01

    The magnetic proton recoil (MPR) spectrometer is a novel diagnostic instrument with high performance for measurements of neutron spectra in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments and high power fusion devices. A compact MPR-type spectrometer dedicated to the research of pulsed deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron spectroscopy of special experimental conditions is currently under design. Analyses of the main parameters and performance of the magnetic analysis system through 3-D particle transport calculations and MonteCarlo simulations and calibration of the system performance as a test using CR-39 solid track detector and α particle from 239Pu and 226Ra radioactive sources are presented in this paper. The results indicate that the magnetic analysis system will achieve a detection efficiency level of 10-5 -10-4 at an energy resolution of 1.5%-2.1%, and fulfills the design goals of the spectrometer.

  12. Quantitative two-dimensional HSQC experiment for high magnetic field NMR spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskela, Harri; Heikkilä, Outi; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Heikkinen, Sami

    2010-01-01

    The finite RF power available on carbon channel in proton-carbon correlation experiments leads to non-uniform cross peak intensity response across carbon chemical shift range. Several classes of broadband pulses are available that alleviate this problem. Adiabatic pulses provide an excellent magnetization inversion over a large bandwidth, and very recently, novel phase-modulated pulses have been proposed that perform 90° and 180° magnetization rotations with good offset tolerance. Here, we present a study how these broadband pulses (adiabatic and phase-modulated) can improve quantitative application of the heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) experiment on high magnetic field strength NMR spectrometers. Theoretical and experimental examinations of the quantitative, offset-compensated, CPMG-adjusted HSQC (Q-OCCAHSQC) experiment are presented. The proposed experiment offers a formidable improvement to the offset performance; 13C offset-dependent standard deviation of the peak intensity was below 6% in range of ±20 kHz. This covers the carbon chemical shift range of 150 ppm, which contains the protonated carbons excluding the aldehydes, for 22.3 T NMR magnets. A demonstration of the quantitative analysis of a fasting blood plasma sample obtained from a healthy volunteer is given.

  13. Commissioning of horizontal-bend superconducting magnet for Jefferson Lab's 11-GeV super high momentum spectrometer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Eric; Brindza, Paul D.; Lassiter, Steven R.; Fowler, Mike J.; Fenker, Howard C.; DeKamp, Jon C.

    2016-03-02

    Commissioning characteristics of the Superconducting High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) Horizontal Bend (HB) magnet was presented. Pre-commissioning peer review of the magnet uncovered issues with eddy currents in the thermal shield, resulting in additional testing and modeling of the magnet. A three-stage test plan was discussed. A solution of using a small dump resistor and a warm thermal shield was presented. Analyses illustrated that it was safe to run the magnet to full test current. As a result, the HB magnet was successfully cooled to 4 K and reached its maximum test current of 4000 A.

  14. Results of a search for deuterium at 25-50 GC/c using a magnetic spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, R. L.; Stephens, S. A.; Webber, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    A method is presented for separately identifying isotopes using a Cerenkov detector and a magnet spectrometer. Simulations of the method are given for separating deuterium from protons. The simulations are compared with data gathered from the 1979 flight of the New Mexico State University balloonborne magnet spectrometer. The simulation and the data show the same general characteristics lending credence to the technique. The data show an apparent deuteron signal which is (11 + or - 3)% of the total sample in the rigidity region 38.5 to 50 GV/c. Until further background analysis and subtraction is performed this should be regarded as an upper limit to the deuteron/(deuteron+proton) ratio.

  15. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J.; Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A.; McKernan, M. A.; Moran, M.; Rygg, J. R.; Yeoman, M. F.; Zacharias, R.; Leeper, R. J.; Fletcher, K.; Farrell, M.; Jasion, D.; Kilkenny, J.; Paguio, R.

    2013-04-18

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, iontemperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  16. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

    2012-05-03

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  17. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M Gatu; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Magoon, J; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M; Ulreich, J; Ashabranner, R C; Bionta, R M; Carpenter, A C; Felker, B; Khater, H Y; LePape, S; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Rygg, J R; Yeoman, M F; Zacharias, R; Leeper, R J; Fletcher, K; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Kilkenny, J; Paguio, R

    2013-04-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  18. The magnetic toroidal sector: a broad-band electron-positron pair spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, Siegbert; Hillenbrand, Pierre-Michel; Litvinov, Yuri; Spillmann, Uwe

    2016-05-01

    At the future relativistic storage-ring HESR at FAIR the study of electron-positron pairs from non-nuclear, atomic processes will be one of the goals of the experimental program with kinematically complete experiments focusing on momentum spectroscopy of coincident emission of electrons and positrons from free-free pairs and corresponding recoil ions. The underlying production mechanisms belong to central topics of QED in strong fields. We present first results on the electron-optical properties of a magnetic toroidal sector configuration enabling coincident detection of free-free electron-positron pairs; this spectrometer is suitable for implementation into a storage ring with a supersonic jet target and covering a wide range of lepton emission into the forward hemisphere. The simulation calculations are performed using the OPERA code.

  19. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J.; Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A.; and others

    2013-04-15

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  20. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; et al

    2013-04-18

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, iontemperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describesmore » ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.« less

  1. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J.; Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A.; McKernan, M. A.; Moran, M.; Rygg, J. R.; Yeoman, M. F.; Zacharias, R.; Leeper, R. J.; Fletcher, K.; Farrell, M.; Jasion, D.; Kilkenny, J.; Paguio, R.

    2013-04-01

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  2. New limits on dark matter annihilation from Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer cosmic ray positron data.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Lars; Bringmann, Torsten; Cholis, Ilias; Hooper, Dan; Weniger, Christoph

    2013-10-25

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment onboard the International Space Station has recently provided cosmic ray electron and positron data with unprecedented precision in the range from 0.5 to 350 GeV. The observed rise in the positron fraction at energies above 10 GeV remains unexplained, with proposed solutions ranging from local pulsars to TeV-scale dark matter. Here, we make use of this high quality data to place stringent limits on dark matter with masses below ~300 GeV, annihilating or decaying to leptonic final states, essentially independent of the origin of this rise. We significantly improve on existing constraints, in some cases by up to 2 orders of magnitude.

  3. Design of a magnetic shielding system for the time of flight enhanced diagnostics neutron spectrometer at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Z. Q.; Chen, Z. J.; Xie, X. F.; Peng, X. Y.; Hu, Z. M.; Du, T. F.; Ge, L. J.; Zhang, X.; Yuan, X.; Fan, T. S.; Chen, J. X.; Li, X. Q. E-mail: guohuizhang@pku.edu.cn; Zhang, G. H. E-mail: guohuizhang@pku.edu.cn; Xia, Z. W.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhong, G. Q.; Lin, S. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2014-11-15

    The novel neutron spectrometer TOFED (Time of Flight Enhanced Diagnostics), comprising 90 individual photomultiplier tubes coupled with 85 plastic scintillation detectors through light guides, has been constructed and installed at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. A dedicated magnetic shielding system has been constructed for TOFED, and is designed to guarantee the normal operation of photomultiplier tubes in the stray magnetic field leaking from the tokamak device. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations carried out employing the finite element method are combined to optimize the design of the magnetic shielding system. The system allows detectors to work properly in an external magnetic field of 200 G.

  4. Design of a magnetic shielding system for the time of flight enhanced diagnostics neutron spectrometer at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Cui, Z Q; Chen, Z J; Xie, X F; Peng, X Y; Hu, Z M; Du, T F; Ge, L J; Zhang, X; Yuan, X; Xia, Z W; Hu, L Q; Zhong, G Q; Lin, S Y; Wan, B N; Fan, T S; Chen, J X; Li, X Q; Zhang, G H

    2014-11-01

    The novel neutron spectrometer TOFED (Time of Flight Enhanced Diagnostics), comprising 90 individual photomultiplier tubes coupled with 85 plastic scintillation detectors through light guides, has been constructed and installed at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. A dedicated magnetic shielding system has been constructed for TOFED, and is designed to guarantee the normal operation of photomultiplier tubes in the stray magnetic field leaking from the tokamak device. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations carried out employing the finite element method are combined to optimize the design of the magnetic shielding system. The system allows detectors to work properly in an external magnetic field of 200 G.

  5. A broadband microwave Corbino spectrometer at ³He temperatures and high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Pan, LiDong; Armitage, N P

    2014-09-01

    We present the technical details of a broadband microwave spectrometer for measuring the complex conductance of thin films covering the range from 50 MHz up to 16 GHz in the temperature range 300 mK-6 K and at applied magnetic fields up to 8 T. We measure the complex reflection from a sample terminating a coaxial transmission line and calibrate the signals with three standards with known reflection coefficients. Thermal isolation of the heat load from the inner conductor is accomplished by including a section of NbTi superconducting cable (transition temperature around 8-9 K) and hermetic seal glass bead adapters. This enables us to stabilize the base temperature of the sample stage at 300 mK. However, the inclusion of this superconducting cable complicates the calibration procedure. We document the effects of the superconducting cable on our calibration procedure and the effects of applied magnetic fields and how we control the temperature with great repeatability for each measurement. We have successfully extracted reliable data in this frequency, temperature, and field range for thin superconducting films and highly resistive graphene samples. PMID:25273708

  6. A stretch/compress scheme for a high temporal resolution detector for the magnetic recoil spectrometer time (MRSt)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hilsabeck, T. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Hares, J. D.; Wink, C. W.

    2016-08-02

    Here we present a time-resolved detector concept for the magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the NIF neutron spectrum. The measurement is challenging due to the time spreading of the recoil protons (or deuterons) as they transit an energy dispersing magnet system. Ions arrive at the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer over an interval of tens of nanoseconds. We seek to measure the time-resolved neutron spectrum with 20 ps precision by manipulating an electron signal derived from the ions. A stretch-compress scheme is employed to remove transit time skewing while simultaneously reducing the bandwidth requirements for signal recording.more » Simulation results are presented along with design concepts for structures capable of establishing the required electromagnetic fields.« less

  7. A stretch/compress scheme for a high temporal resolution detector for the magnetic recoil spectrometer time (MRSt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilsabeck, T. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Hares, J. D.; Wink, C. W.

    2016-11-01

    A time-resolved detector concept for the magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the NIF neutron spectrum is presented. The measurement is challenging due to the time spreading of the recoil protons (or deuterons) as they transit an energy dispersing magnet system. Ions arrive at the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer over an interval of tens of nanoseconds. We seek to measure the time-resolved neutron spectrum with 20 ps precision by manipulating an electron signal derived from the ions. A stretch-compress scheme is employed to remove transit time skewing while simultaneously reducing the bandwidth requirements for signal recording. Simulation results are presented along with design concepts for structures capable of establishing the required electromagnetic fields.

  8. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices.

    PubMed

    Lizunov, A; Khilchenko, A; Khilchenko, V; Kvashnin, A; Zubarev, P

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D(α) or H(α) lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10(6) s(-1) per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D(α) light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented. PMID:26724090

  9. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices.

    PubMed

    Lizunov, A; Khilchenko, A; Khilchenko, V; Kvashnin, A; Zubarev, P

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D(α) or H(α) lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10(6) s(-1) per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D(α) light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  10. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-15

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D{sub α} or H{sub α} lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10{sup 6} s{sup −1} per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D{sub α} light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  11. Conceptual design of the gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. Herrmann, H. W.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Barlow, D. B.; Young, C. S.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Casey, D.; Clancy, T.; Hilsabeck, T.; Moy, K.

    2014-11-15

    The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) diagnostic is designed to measure the prompt γ-ray energy spectrum during high yield deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The prompt γ-ray spectrum will provide “burn-averaged” observables, including total DT fusion yield, total areal density (ρR), ablator ρR, and fuel ρR. These burn-averaged observables are unique because they are essentially averaged over 4π, providing a global reference for the line-of-sight-specific measurements typical of x-ray and neutron diagnostics. The GEMS conceptual design meets the physics-based requirements: ΔE/E = 3%–5% can be achieved in the range of 2–25 MeV γ-ray energy. Minimum DT neutron yields required for 15% measurement uncertainty at low-resolution mode are: 5 × 10{sup 14} DT-n for ablator ρR (at 0.2 g/cm{sup 2}); 2 × 10{sup 15} DT-n for total DT yield (at 4.2 × 10{sup −5} γ/n); and 1 × 10{sup 16} DT-n for fuel ρR (at 1 g/cm{sup 2})

  12. A full range detector for the HIRRBS high resolution RBS magnetic spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Skala, Wayne G.; Haberl, Arthur W.; Bakhru, Hassaram; Lanford, William

    2013-04-19

    The UAlbany HIRRBS (High Resolution RBS) system has been updated for better use in rapid analysis. The focal plane detector now covers the full range from U down to O using a linear stepper motor to translate the 1-cm detector across the 30-cm range. Input is implemented with zero-back-angle operation in all cases. The chamber has been modified to allow for quick swapping of sample holders, including a channeling goniometer. A fixed standard surface-barrier detector allows for normal RBS simultaneously with use of the magnetic spectrometer. The user can select a region on the standard spectrum or can select an element edge or an energy point for collection of the expanded spectrum portion. The best resolution currently obtained is about 2-to-3 keV, probably representing the energy width of the incoming beam. Calibration is maintained automatically for any spectrum portion and any beam energy from 1.0 to 3.5 MeV. Element resolving power, sensitivity and depth resolution are shown using several examples. Examples also show the value of simultaneous conventional RBS.

  13. Possibility of testing the light dark matter hypothesis with the alpha magnetic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Dan; Xue, Wei

    2013-01-25

    The spectrum and morphology of gamma rays from the Galactic center and the spectrum of synchrotron emission observed from the Milky Way's radio filaments have each been interpreted as possible signals of ∼ 7-10 GeV dark matter particles annihilating in the inner Galaxy. In dark matter models capable of producing these signals, the annihilations should also generate significant fluxes of ∼ 7-10 GeV positrons which can lead to a distinctive bumplike feature in a local cosmic ray positron spectrum. In this Letter, we show that while such a feature would be difficult to detect with PAMELA, it would likely be identifiable by the currently operating Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment. As no known astrophysical (i.e., nondark matter) sources or mechanisms are likely to produce such a sharp feature, the observation of a positron bump at around 7-10 GeV would significantly strengthen the case for a dark matter interpretation of the reported gamma-ray and radio anomalies.

  14. Conceptual design of the gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Herrmann, H W; Jorgenson, H J; Barlow, D B; Young, C S; Stoeffl, W; Casey, D; Clancy, T; Lopez, F E; Oertel, J A; Hilsabeck, T; Moy, K; Batha, S H

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) diagnostic is designed to measure the prompt γ-ray energy spectrum during high yield deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The prompt γ-ray spectrum will provide "burn-averaged" observables, including total DT fusion yield, total areal density (ρR), ablator ρR, and fuel ρR. These burn-averaged observables are unique because they are essentially averaged over 4π, providing a global reference for the line-of-sight-specific measurements typical of x-ray and neutron diagnostics. The GEMS conceptual design meets the physics-based requirements: ΔE/E = 3%-5% can be achieved in the range of 2-25 MeV γ-ray energy. Minimum DT neutron yields required for 15% measurement uncertainty at low-resolution mode are: 5 × 10(14) DT-n for ablator ρR (at 0.2 g/cm(2)); 2 × 10(15) DT-n for total DT yield (at 4.2 × 10(-5) γ/n); and 1 × 10(16) DT-n for fuel ρR (at 1 g/cm(2)).

  15. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of Dα or Hα lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ˜106 s-1 per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of Dα light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  16. Thermal conditions on the International Space Station: Effects of operations of the station Main Radiators on the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Min; Burger, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    A thermal model of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station (ISS) has been developed, and Thermal Desktop® (with RadCAD®) and SINDA/FLUINT software have been used to calculate the effects of the operations of the ISS Main Radiators on AMS temperatures. We find that the ISS Starboard Main Radiator has significant influence on temperatures on the port side of AMS. The simulation results are used in AMS thermal control operations.

  17. Projection x-space magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Patrick W; Konkle, Justin J; Zheng, Bo; Saritas, Emine U; Conolly, Steven M

    2012-05-01

    Projection magnetic particle imaging (MPI) can improve imaging speed by over 100-fold over traditional 3-D MPI. In this work, we derive the 2-D x-space signal equation, 2-D image equation, and introduce the concept of signal fading and resolution loss for a projection MPI imager. We then describe the design and construction of an x-space projection MPI scanner with a field gradient of 2.35 T/m across a 10 cm magnet free bore. The system has an expected resolution of 3.5 × 8.0 mm using Resovist tracer, and an experimental resolution of 3.8 × 8.4 mm resolution. The system images 2.5 cm × 5.0 cm partial field-of views (FOVs) at 10 frames/s, and acquires a full field-of-view of 10 cm × 5.0 cm in 4 s. We conclude by imaging a resolution phantom, a complex "Cal" phantom, mice injected with Resovist tracer, and experimentally confirm the theoretically predicted x-space spatial resolution.

  18. Superconducting magnetic levitation train project in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, K.

    1981-09-01

    The superconducting magnetic levitated train of Japanese National Railways at Miyazaki achieved its experimental target speed of 500 km/hr by reaching the world record of 517 km/hr in December 1979. The development project of high speed linear motor propulsion train levitated by superconducting magnet, Maglev, was started in 1970 by constructing a new mass-transportation system in the 1980's. The test track in Miyazaki was constructed in 1977 with an inverted T-shape guideway of about 7 km, and vehicles were tested. Now a part of the guideway was changed to a U shape in 1980 and experiments of a new vehicle of a 2 or 3 car make-up with on-board refrigerators and capacity of carrying 2 persons were undertaken. It is expected that these tests will be finalized with a demonstration track of 40 km in the near future. 3 refs.

  19. The low energy magnetic spectrometer on Ulysses and ACE response to near relativistic protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgado, Bruno; Filipe Maia, Dalmiro Jorge; Lanzerotti, Louis; Gonçalves, Patrícia; Patterson, J. Douglas

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We show that the Heliosphere Instrument for Spectra Composition and Anisotropy at Low Energies (HISCALE) on board the Ulysses spacecraft and the Electron Proton Alpha Monitor (EPAM) on board the Advance Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft can be used to measure properties for ion populations with kinetic energies in excess of 1 GeV. This previously unexplored source of information is valuable for understanding the origin of near relativistic ions of solar origin. Methods: We model the instrumental response from the low energy magnetic spectrometers from EPAM and HISCALE using a Monte Carlo approach implemented in the Geant4 toolkit to determine the response of different energy channels to energies up to 5 GeV. We compare model results with EPAM observations for 2012 May 17 ground level solar cosmic ray event, including directional fluxes. Results: For the 2012 May event, all the ion channels in EPAM show an onset more than one hour before ions with the highest nominal energy range (1.8 to 4.8 MeV) were expected to arrive. We show from Monte Carlo simulations that the timing at different channels, the ratio between counts at the different channels, and the directional fluxes within a given channel, are consistent with and can be explained by the arrival of particles with energies from 35 MeV to more than 1 GeV. Onset times for the EPAM penetrating protons are consistent with the rise seen in neutron monitor data, implying that EPAM and ground neutron monitors are seeing overlapping energy ranges and that both are consistent with GeV ions being released from the Sun at 10:38 UT.

  20. MASS SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    White, F.A.

    1960-08-23

    A mass spectrometer is designed with a first adjustable magnetic field for resolving an ion beam into beams of selected masses, a second adjustable magnetic field for further resolving the ion beam from the first field into beams of selected masses, a thin foil disposed in the path of the beam between the first and second magnets to dissociate molecular ions incident thereon, an electrostatic field for further resolving the ion beam from the second field into beams of selected masses, and a detector disposed adjacent to the electrostatic field to receive the ion beam.

  1. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frenje, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wink, C. W.; Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; et al

    2016-08-02

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with amore » time resolution of ~20 ps and energy resolution of ~100 keV for total neutron yields above ~1016. Lastly, at lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ~20 ps.« less

  2. The magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRSt) for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wink, C. W.; Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Cerjan, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2016-11-01

    The next-generation magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the neutron spectrum has been conceptually designed for the National Ignition Facility. This spectrometer, called MRSt, represents a paradigm shift in our thinking about neutron spectrometry for inertial confinement fusion applications, as it will provide simultaneously information about the burn history and time evolution of areal density (ρR), apparent ion temperature (Ti), yield (Yn), and macroscopic flows during burn. From this type of data, an assessment of the evolution of the fuel assembly, hotspot, and alpha heating can be made. According to simulations, the MRSt will provide accurate data with a time resolution of ˜20 ps and energy resolution of ˜100 keV for total neutron yields above ˜1016. At lower yields, the diagnostic will be operated at a higher-efficiency, lower-energy-resolution mode to provide a time resolution of ˜20 ps.

  3. The analysis and measurement of composite coil properties of Jefferson Lab's super high momentum spectrometer (SHMS) superconducting magnet coils

    SciTech Connect

    P. Brindza, E. Sun, S. Lassiter, M. Fowler, G. Dickson

    2010-04-01

    Jefferson Lab's 11 GeV/c Super High Momentum Spectrometer's superconducting cosine(2theta) quadrupole magnets and the cosine(theta) dipole use a Nb-Ti, 36-strand Rutherford style cable wave-solder to a copper extruded substrate as their conductor. These magnets will operate at 4.4 K. Accurate analysis of the mechanical performance of the magnets under Lorentz forces and thermal stresses requires that the composite coil's physical properties at cryogenic temperatures be known. The composite coil design details including the geometry, components, epoxy glass, and its electrical insulation will be presented. The derivation of the composite coil's calculated physical properties values, using a mixing rule and by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) modeling of a sample coil will be given. The calculated values will be compared to recent measured values of representative samples of the composite coils. Comparison of the composite built up coil sample, measurements and calculated values will be discussed

  4. The Superconducting Horizontal Bend Magnet for the Jefferson Lab's 11 GeV/c Super High Momentum Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    S. Chouhan, J. DeKamp, A. Zeller, P. Brindza, S. Lassiter, M. Fowler, E. Sun

    2010-06-01

    A collaboration between NSCL and Jlab has developed the reference design and coil winding for Jlab's Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) horizontal bend magnet. A warm iron ??C?? type superferric dipole magnet will bend the 12 GeV/c particles horizontally by 3?? to allow the SHMS to reach angles as low as 5.5??. This requires an integral field strength of up to 2.1 T.m. The major challenges are the tight geometry, high and unbalanced forces and a required low fringe field in primary beam path. A coil design based on flattened SSC Rutherford cable that provides a large current margin and commercially available fiberglass prepreg epoxy tape has been developed. A complete test coil has been wound and will be cold tested. This paper present the modified magnet design includes coil forces, coil restraint system and fringe field. In addition, coil properties, quench calculations and the full mechanical details are also presented.

  5. High-precision three-dimensional field mapping of a high resolution magnetic spectrometer for hypernuclear spectroscopy at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yuu; Hashimoto, Osamu; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Nakamura, Satoshi N.; Ohtani, Atsushi; Okayasu, Yuichi; Oyamada, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Kato, Seigo; Matsui, Jumei; Sako, Katsuhisa; Brindza, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The High Resolution Kaon Spectrometer (HKS), which consists of two quadrupole magnets and one dipole magnet, was designed and constructed for high-resolution spectroscopy of hypernuclei using the (e,e'K+) reaction in Hall C, Jefferson Lab (JLab). It was used to analyze momenta of around 1.2 GeV/c K^+ s with a resolution of 2 ×10^-4 (FWHM). To achieve the target resolution, a full three-dimensional magnetic field measurement of each magnet was successfully performed, and a full three-dimensional magnetic field map of the HKS magnets was reconstructed. Using the measured field map, the initial reconstruction function was generated. The target resolution would be achieved via careful tuning of the reconstruction function of HKS with the p(e,e'K+)Lambda,Sigma^0 and C-12 (e,e'K+)12_Lambda B_g.s. reactions. After tuning of the initial reconstruction function generated from the measured map, the estimated HKS momentum resolution was 2.2×10^-4 (FWHM).

  6. Improvements in Fabrication of Elastic Scattering Foils Used to Measure Neutron Yield by the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reynolds, H. G.; Schoff, M. E.; Farrell, M. P.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Bionta, R. M.; Frenje, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The magnetic recoil spectrometer uses a deuterated polyethylene polymer (CD2) foil to measure neutron yield in inertial confinement fusion experiments. Higher neutron yields in recent experiments have resulted in primary signal saturation in the detector CR-39 foils, necessitating the fabrication of thinner CD2 foils than established methods could provide. A novel method of fabricating deuterated polymer foils is described. The resulting foils are thinner, smoother, and more uniform in thickness than the foils produced by previous methods. Here, these new foils have successfully been deployed at the National Ignition Facility, enabling higher neutron yield measurements than previous foils, with nomore » primary signal saturation.« less

  7. Use of a high-Tc SQUID-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer in magnetically unshielded environments to discriminate tumors in rats, by characterizing the longitudinal relaxation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.-W.; Chen, H.-H.; Yang, H.-C.; Horng, H.-E.; Liao, S.-H.; Chieh, J.-J.; Yang, S. Y.

    2012-06-01

    This study uses a sensitive, high-Tc SQUID-detected nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer in magnetically unshielded environments to discriminate liver tumors in rats, by characterizing the longitudinal relaxation rate, T1-1. The high-Tc SQUID-based spectrometer has a spectral line width of 0.9Hz in low magnetic fields. It was found that relaxation rate for tumor tissues is (3.6 ± 0.02) s-1 and the relaxation rate for normal tissues is (7.7 ± 0.02) s-1. The difference in the longitudinal relaxation rates suggests that water structures around the DNA of cancer cells are different from those of normal tissues. The optimized detection sensitivity for the established system is 0.21 g at the present stage. It is concluded that T1-1 can be used to distinguish cancerous tissues from normal tissues. The high-Tc, SQUID-detected NMR and MRI in magnetically unshielded environments may also be useful for discriminating other tumors.

  8. Using an NMR Spectrometer to Do Magnetic Resonance Imaging: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Wayne E.; Maher, M. Cyrus

    2007-01-01

    A conventional Fourier-transform NMR spectrometer with a triple-axis gradient probe can function as a MRI imager. In this experiment students gain hands-on experience with MRI while they learn about important principles underlying the practice of NMR, such as gradients, multi-dimensional spectroscopy, and relaxation. Students image a biological…

  9. A High-Throughput, Arbitrary-Waveform, MPI Spectrometer and Relaxometer for Comprehensive Magnetic Particle Optimization and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Zhi Wei; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Hensley, Daniel W.; Taylor, Laura A.; Zheng, Bo; Conolly, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a promising new tracer modality with zero attenuation deep in tissue, high contrast and sensitivity, and an excellent safety profile. However, the spatial resolution of MPI is limited to around 1 mm currently and urgently needs to be improved for clinical applications such as angiography and brain perfusion. Although MPI resolution is highly dependent on tracer characteristics and the drive waveforms, optimization is limited to a small subset of possible excitation strategies by current MPI hardware that only does sinusoidal drive waveforms at very few frequencies. To enable a more comprehensive and rapid optimization of drive waveforms for multiple metrics like resolution and signal strength simultaneously, we demonstrate the first untuned MPI spectrometer/relaxometer with unprecedented 400 kHz excitation bandwidth and capable of high-throughput acquisition of harmonic spectra (100 different drive-field frequencies in only 500 ms). It is also capable of arbitrary drive-field waveforms which have not been experimentally evaluated in MPI to date. Its high-throughput capability, frequency-agility and tabletop size makes this Arbitrary Waveform Relaxometer/Spectrometer (AWR) a convenient yet powerfully flexible tool for nanoparticle experts seeking to characterize magnetic particles and optimize MPI drive waveforms for in vitro biosensing and in vivo imaging with MPI. PMID:27686629

  10. A High-Throughput, Arbitrary-Waveform, MPI Spectrometer and Relaxometer for Comprehensive Magnetic Particle Optimization and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, Zhi Wei; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Hensley, Daniel W.; Taylor, Laura A.; Zheng, Bo; Conolly, Steven M.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a promising new tracer modality with zero attenuation deep in tissue, high contrast and sensitivity, and an excellent safety profile. However, the spatial resolution of MPI is limited to around 1 mm currently and urgently needs to be improved for clinical applications such as angiography and brain perfusion. Although MPI resolution is highly dependent on tracer characteristics and the drive waveforms, optimization is limited to a small subset of possible excitation strategies by current MPI hardware that only does sinusoidal drive waveforms at very few frequencies. To enable a more comprehensive and rapid optimization of drive waveforms for multiple metrics like resolution and signal strength simultaneously, we demonstrate the first untuned MPI spectrometer/relaxometer with unprecedented 400 kHz excitation bandwidth and capable of high-throughput acquisition of harmonic spectra (100 different drive-field frequencies in only 500 ms). It is also capable of arbitrary drive-field waveforms which have not been experimentally evaluated in MPI to date. Its high-throughput capability, frequency-agility and tabletop size makes this Arbitrary Waveform Relaxometer/Spectrometer (AWR) a convenient yet powerfully flexible tool for nanoparticle experts seeking to characterize magnetic particles and optimize MPI drive waveforms for in vitro biosensing and in vivo imaging with MPI.

  11. Portable mass spectrometer with one or more mechanically adjustable electrostatic sectors and a mechanically adjustable magnetic sector all mounted in a vacuum chamber

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Eckels, Joel D.; Kimmons, James F.; Martin, Walter H.; Myers, David W.; Keville, Robert F.

    1992-01-01

    A portable mass spectrometer is described having one or more electrostatic focusing sectors and a magnetic focusing sector, all of which are positioned inside a vacuum chamber, and all of which may be adjusted via adjustment means accessible from outside the vacuum chamber. Mounting of the magnetic sector entirely within the vacuum chamber permits smaller magnets to be used, thus permitting reductions in both weight and bulk.

  12. Portable mass spectrometer with one or more mechanically adjustable electrostatic sectors and a mechanically adjustable magnetic sector all mounted in a vacuum chamber

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmons, J.F.; Martin, W.H.; Myers, D.W.; Keville, R.F.

    1992-10-06

    A portable mass spectrometer is described having one or more electrostatic focusing sectors and a magnetic focusing sector, all of which are positioned inside a vacuum chamber, and all of which may be adjusted via adjustment means accessible from outside the vacuum chamber. Mounting of the magnetic sector entirely within the vacuum chamber permits smaller magnets to be used, thus permitting reductions in both weight and bulk. 13 figs.

  13. Neutron Spectrometer Prospecting in the Mojave Volatiles Project Analog Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Heldmann, J. L.; Colaprete, A.; Hunt, D. R.; Deans, M. C.; Lim, D. S.; Foil, G.; Fong, T.

    2015-01-01

    We know that volatiles are sequestered at the poles of the Moon. While we have evidence of water ice and a number of other compounds based on remote sensing, the detailed distribution, and physical and chemical form are largely unknown. Additional orbital studies of lunar polar volatiles may yield further insights, but the most important next step is to use landed assets to fully characterize the volatile composition and distribution at scales of tens to hundreds of meters. To achieve this range of scales, mobility is needed. Because of the proximity of the Moon, near real-time operation of the surface assets is possible, with an associated reduction in risk and cost. This concept of operations is very different from that of rovers on Mars, and new operational approaches are required to carry out such real-time robotic exploration. The Mojave Volatiles Project (MVP) was a Moon-Mars Analog Mission Activities (MMAMA) program project aimed at (1) determining effective approaches to operating a real-time but short-duration lunar surface robotic mission, and (2) performing prospecting science in a natural setting, as a test of these approaches. Here we describe some results from the first such test, carried out in the Mojave Desert between 16 and 24 October, 2014. The test site was an alluvial fan just E of the Soda Mountains, SW of Baker, California. This site contains desert pavements, ranging from the late Pleistocene to early-Holocene in age. These pavements are undergoing dissection by the ongoing development of washes. A principal objective was to determine the hydration state of different types of desert pavement and bare ground features. The mobility element of the test was provided by the KREX-2 rover, designed and operated by the Intelligent Robotics Group at NASA Ames Research Center. The rover-borne neutron spectrometer measured the neutron albedo at both thermal and epithermal energies. Assuming uniform geochemistry and material bulk density, hydrogen as

  14. Dynamic stabilization of the magnetic field surrounding the neutron electric dipole moment spectrometer at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Afach, S.; Fertl, M.; Franke, B. E-mail: bernhard.lauss@psi.ch; Kirch, K.; Bison, G.; Burri, F.; Chowdhuri, Z.; Daum, M.; Henneck, R.; Lauss, B. E-mail: bernhard.lauss@psi.ch; Meier, M.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zsigmond, G.; Bodek, K.; Zejma, J.; Grujic, Z.; Kasprzak, M.; Weis, A.; Hélaine, V.; Koch, H.-C.; and others

    2014-08-28

    The Surrounding Field Compensation (SFC) system described in this work is installed around the four-layer Mu-metal magnetic shield of the neutron electric dipole moment spectrometer located at the Paul Scherrer Institute. The SFC system reduces the DC component of the external magnetic field by a factor of about 20. Within a control volume of approximately 2.5 m × 2.5 m × 3 m, disturbances of the magnetic field are attenuated by factors of 5–50 at a bandwidth from 10{sup −3} Hz up to 0.5 Hz, which corresponds to integration times longer than several hundreds of seconds and represent the important timescale for the neutron electric dipole moment measurement. These shielding factors apply to random environmental noise from arbitrary sources. This is achieved via a proportional-integral feedback stabilization system that includes a regularized pseudoinverse matrix of proportionality factors which correlates magnetic field changes at all sensor positions to current changes in the SFC coils.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance at millitesla fields using a zero-field spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tayler, Michael C D; Sjolander, Tobias F; Pines, Alexander; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-09-01

    We describe new analytical capabilities for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in which signal detection is performed with chemical resolution (via spin-spin J couplings) in the zero to ultra-low magnetic field region, below 1μT. Using magnetic fields in the 100μT to 1mT range, we demonstrate the implementation of conventional NMR pulse sequences with spin-species selectivity.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance at millitesla fields using a zero-field spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayler, Michael C. D.; Sjolander, Tobias F.; Pines, Alexander; Budker, Dmitry

    2016-09-01

    We describe new analytical capabilities for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in which signal detection is performed with chemical resolution (via spin-spin J couplings) in the zero to ultra-low magnetic field region, below 1 μT. Using magnetic fields in the 100 μT to 1 mT range, we demonstrate the implementation of conventional NMR pulse sequences with spin-species selectivity.

  17. Design and Fabrication of the Superconducting Horizontal Bend Magnet for the Super High Momentum Spectrometer at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Chouhan, Shailendra S.; DeKamp, Jon; Burkhart, E. E,; Bierwagen, J.; Song, H.; Zeller, Albert F.; Brindza, Paul D.; Lassiter, Steven R.; Fowler, Michael J.; Sun, Qiuli

    2015-06-01

    A collaboration exists between NSCL and JLab to design and build JLab's Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) horizontal bend magnet that allows the bending of the 12 GeV/c particles horizontally by 3° to allow SHMS to reach angles as low as 5.5°. Two full size coils have been wound and are cold tested for both magnetic and structural properties. Each coil is built from 90 layers of single-turn SSC outer conductor cable. An initial test coil with one third the turns was fabricated to demonstrate that the unique saddle shape with fully contoured ends could be wound with Rutherford superconducting cable. Learned lessons during the trial winding were integrated into the two complete full-scale coils that are now installed in the helium vessel. The fabrication of the iron yoke, cold mass, and thermal shield is complete, and assembly of the vacuum vessel is in progress. This paper presents the process and progress along with the modified magnet design to reduce the fringe field in the primary beam region and also includes the impact of the changes on coil forces and coil restraint system.

  18. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  19. Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Katz, J; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C; Bionta, R M; Bleuel, D L; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S; Hartouni, E; Hatchett, S P; Le Pape, S; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A; McKernan, M A; Moran, M; Moses, E; Park, H-S; Ralph, J; Remington, B A; Smalyuk, V; Yeamans, C B; Kline, J; Kyrala, G; Chandler, G A; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C L; Cooper, G W; Nelson, A J; Fletcher, K; Kilkenny, J; Farrell, M; Jasion, D; Paguio, R

    2012-10-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  20. Prognosis for a mid-infrared magnetic rotation spectrometer for the in situ detection of atmospheric free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Thomas A.; Chackerian, Charles, Jr.; Podolske, James R.

    1996-02-01

    Mid-infrared magnetic rotation spectroscopy (MRS) experiments on nitric oxide (NO) are quantitatively modeled by theoretical calculations. The verified theory is used to specify an instrument that can make in situ measurements on NO and NO2 in the Earth's atmosphere at a sensitivity level of a few parts in 1012 by volume per second. The prototype instrument used in the experiments has an extrapolated detection limit for NO of 30 parts in 109 for a 1-s integration time over a 12-cm path length. The detection limit is an extrapolation of experimental results to a signal-to-noise ratio of one, where the noise is considered to be one-half the peak-to-peak baseline noise. Also discussed are the various factors that can limit the sensitivity of a MRS spectrometer that uses liquid-nitrogen-cooled lead-salt diode lasers and photovoltaic detectors.

  1. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. PMID:25279617

  2. Thermal conditions on the International Space Station: Heat flux and temperature investigation of main radiators for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Min; Gao, Jianmin; Wu, Shaohua; Qin, Yukun

    2016-09-01

    The investigation on heat flux can clarify the thermal condition and explain temperature behavior on the main radiators of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS). In this paper, a detailed investigation of heat flux on the AMS main radiators is proposed. The heat transfer process of the AMS main radiators is theoretically analyzed. An updated thermal model of the AMS on the International Space Station (ISS) is developed to calculate the external heat flux density on the AMS main radiators. We conclude the ISS components and operations affect on the solar flux density of the AMS main radiators by reflecting or shading solar illumination. According to the energy conservation on the AMS main radiators, the temperature variation mainly depends on the solar flux change. The investigations are conducive to reference for the long-duration thermal control of the AMS, and knowledge for the thermal conditions on the ISS.

  3. High-efficiency cross-beam magnetic electron-impact source for improved miniature Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrometer performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjar, O.; Fowler, W. K.

    2012-06-15

    We describe a newly designed cross-beam magnetic electron-impact ion source (CBM-EI). We demonstrate its superiority in comparison with a conventional source (CB-EI) when used with a commercial miniature sector-field-type, non-scanning mass spectrometer featuring Mattauch-Herzog geometry (MH-MS) and a permanent sector-field magnet. This paper clearly shows the value of the CBM-EI for enhancing MH-MS sensitivity. Unlike secondary electron-multiplier type detectors, the pixelated detector (IonCCD Trade-Mark-Sign ) used in the commercial MH-MS has no gain. The MH-MS/IonCCD system is therefore challenged to compete with time-of-flight and quadrupole MS systems due to their higher ion transmissions and detector gains. Using the new CBM-EI, we demonstrate an instrument sensitivity increase of 20-fold to 100-fold relative to the CB-EI-equipped instrument. This remarkable signal increase by the simple addition of the magnet assembly arises from the magnet-induced gyromotion of the thermionic electrons, which vastly increases the effective path length of the electrons through the ionization region, and the collimated nature of the electron flux, which optimizes the ion transmission through the 100-{mu}m object slit of the MH-MS. Some or all of the realized sensitivity increase may be exchanged for an increase in resolution and/or mass range through the use of a narrower object slit, or for a reduction in ion-source pressure to limit quenching. The CBM-EI should facilitate development of a differentially pumped ion source to extend the lifetime of the filament, especially in otherwise intractable applications associated with oxidizing and corrosive samples.

  4. MEMS-Based Force-Detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (FDNMR) Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choonsup; Butler, Mark C.; Elgammal, Ramez A.; George, Thomas; Hunt, Brian; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows assignment of molecular structure by acquiring the energy spectrum of nuclear spins in a molecule, and by interpreting the symmetry and positions of resonance lines in the spectrum. As such, NMR has become one of the most versatile and ubiquitous spectroscopic methods. Despite these tremendous successes, NMR experiments suffer from inherent low sensitivity due to the relatively low energy of photons in the radio frequency (rt) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Here, we describe a high-resolution spectroscopy in samples with diameters in the micron range and below. We have reported design and fabrication of force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (FDNMR).

  5. Rapid scanning mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Leckey, J.H.; Boeckmann, M.D.

    1996-11-25

    Mass spectrometers and residual gas analyzers (RGA) are used in a variety of applications for analysis of volatile and semi-volatile materials. Analysis is performed by detecting fragments of gas molecules, based on their mass to charge ratio, which are generated in the mass spectrometer. When used as a detector for a gas chromatograph, they function as a means to quantitatively identify isolated volatile species which have been separated from other species via the gas chromatograph. Vacuum Technology, Inc., (VTI) produces a magnetic sector mass spectrometer/RGA which is used in many industrial and laboratory environments. In order to increase the utility of this instrument, it is desirable to increase the mass scanning speed, thereby increasing the number of applications for which it is suited. This project performed the following three upgrades on the computer interface. (1) A new electrometer was designed and built to process the signal from the detector. This new electrometer is more sensitive, over 10 times faster, and over 100 times more stable than the electrometer it will replace. (2) The controller EPROM was reprogrammed with new firmware. This firmware acts as an operating system for the interface and is used to shuttle communications between the PC and the AEROVAC mass spectrometer. (3) The voltage regulator which causes the ion selector voltage to ramp to allow ions of selected mass to be sequentially detected was redesigned and prototyped. The redesigned voltage regulator can be ramped up or down more than 100 times faster than the existing regulator. These changes were incorporated into a prototype unit and preliminary performance testing conducted. Results indicated that scanning speed was significantly increased over the unmodified version.

  6. MEMS-based force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer for in situ planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T.; Leskowitz, G.; Madsen, L.; Weitekamp, D.; Tang, W.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic resonance (NMR) is a well-known spectroscopic technique used by chemists and is especially powerful in detecting the presence of water and distinguishing between arbitrary physisorbed and chemisorbed states. This ability is of particular importance in the search for extra-terrestrial life on planets such as Mars.

  7. Project MAGNET High-level Vector Survey Data Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Rachel J.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1951, the U.S. Navy, under its Project MAGNET program, has been continuously collecting vector aeromagnetic survey data to support the U.S. Defense Mapping Agency's world magnetic and charting program. During this forty-year period, a variety of survey platforms and instrumentation configurations have been used. The current Project MAGNET survey platform is a Navy Orion RP-3D aircraft which has been specially modified and specially equipped with a redundant suite of navigational positioning, attitude, and magnetic sensors. A review of the survey data collection procedures and calibration and editing techniques applied to the data generated by this suite of instrumentation will be presented. Among the topics covered will be the determination of its parameters from the low-level calibration maneuvers flown over geomagnetic observatories.

  8. A range-based method to calibrate a magnetic spectrometer measuring the energy spectrum of the backward electron beam of a plasma focus.

    PubMed

    Ceccolini, E; Rocchi, F; Mostacci, D; Sumini, M; Tartari, A

    2011-08-01

    The electron beam emitted from the back of plasma focus devices is being studied as a radiation source for intraoperative radiation therapy applications. A plasma focus device is being developed for this purpose, and there is a need for characterizing its electron beam, particularly, insofar as the energy spectrum is concerned. The instrument used is a magnetic spectrometer. To calibrate this spectrometer, a procedure relying on the energy-range relation in Mylar® has been devised and applied. By measuring the transmission through increasing thicknesses of the material, electron energies could be assessed and compared to the spectrometer readings. Thus, the original calibration of the instrument has been extended to higher energies and also to better accuracy. Methods and results are presented. PMID:21895271

  9. A range-based method to calibrate a magnetic spectrometer measuring the energy spectrum of the backward electron beam of a plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccolini, E.; Mostacci, D.; Sumini, M.; Rocchi, F.; Tartari, A.

    2011-08-15

    The electron beam emitted from the back of plasma focus devices is being studied as a radiation source for intraoperative radiation therapy applications. A plasma focus device is being developed for this purpose, and there is a need for characterizing its electron beam, particularly, insofar as the energy spectrum is concerned. The instrument used is a magnetic spectrometer. To calibrate this spectrometer, a procedure relying on the energy-range relation in Mylar has been devised and applied. By measuring the transmission through increasing thicknesses of the material, electron energies could be assessed and compared to the spectrometer readings. Thus, the original calibration of the instrument has been extended to higher energies and also to better accuracy. Methods and results are presented.

  10. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gast, Henning

    2016-07-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ˜30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The results show, for the first time, that neither e+ nor e- can be described by a single power law above 27.2 and 52.3 GeV, respectively. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. The dependence of the electron and positron fluxes on time will also be discussed.

  11. Gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer (GEMS): An energy-resolved γ-ray diagnostic for the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Moy, K.; Stoeffl, W.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S.; Wu, W.; Barlow, D. B.; Schillig, J. B.; Sims, J. R.; Lopez, F. E.; Mares, D.; Oertel, J. A.; Hayes-Sterbenz, A. C.

    2012-10-01

    The gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer, having better than 5% energy resolution, is proposed to resolve γ-rays in the range of Eo ± 20% in single shot, where Eo is the central energy and is tunable from 2 to 25 MeV. Gamma-rays from inertial confinement fusion implosions interact with a thin Compton converter (e.g., beryllium) located at approximately 300 cm from the target chamber center (TCC). Scattered electrons out of the Compton converter enter an electromagnet placed outside the NIF chamber (approximately 600 cm from TCC) where energy selection takes place. The electromagnet provides tunable Eo over a broad range in a compact manner. Energy resolved electrons are measured by an array of quartz Cherenkov converters coupled to photomultipliers. Given 100 detectable electrons in the energy bins of interest, 3 × 1014 minimum deuterium/tritium (DT) neutrons will be required to measure the 4.44 MeV 12C γ-rays assuming 200 mg/cm2 plastic ablator areal density and 3 × 1015 minimum DT neutrons to measure the 16.75 MeV DT γ-ray line.

  12. Data acquisition and pulse generation system for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers on a single PC-ISA compatible board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosetti, R.; Ranieri, G. A.; Ricci, D.

    1998-08-01

    A data acquisition and pulse generation system for NMR spectrometers is described. It has been implemented on a single board for MS-DOS personal computers with an ISA standard bus interface and uses a simple architecture optimizing the integration of the hardware and software resources. The system, owing to its versatility and low cost, is particularly suitable to upgrade old pulsed NMR instruments with outdated data and control systems, for applications where expensive new cryomagnetic instruments would be inappropriate, such as in industrial control or as educational tools. The board provides two simultaneous data acquisition channels allowing 250 000 12-bit conversions per second per channel, including real-time signal averaging, and is able to produce essentially any pulse sequence on several output lines. The duration of each pulse can range from 0957-0233/9/8/024/img6s to 180 s with a minimum pulse separation of 0957-0233/9/8/024/img7s and with a resolution of 0957-0233/9/8/024/img6s. All classic NMR pulse sequences are allowed in addition to those required for self-diffusion coefficient measurements using pulsed magnetic field gradients. All functions of the system are managed by machine-language routines callable from within a VisualBASIC program. The cost of the hardware of this device is under US500.

  13. Gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer (GEMS): An energy-resolved {gamma}-ray diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S.; Barlow, D. B.; Schillig, J. B.; Sims, J. R. Jr.; Lopez, F. E.; Mares, D.; Oertel, J. A.; Hayes-Sterbenz, A. C.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wu, W.; Moy, K.; Stoeffl, W.

    2012-10-15

    The gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer, having better than 5% energy resolution, is proposed to resolve {gamma}-rays in the range of E{sub o}{+-} 20% in single shot, where E{sub o} is the central energy and is tunable from 2 to 25 MeV. Gamma-rays from inertial confinement fusion implosions interact with a thin Compton converter (e.g., beryllium) located at approximately 300 cm from the target chamber center (TCC). Scattered electrons out of the Compton converter enter an electromagnet placed outside the NIF chamber (approximately 600 cm from TCC) where energy selection takes place. The electromagnet provides tunable E{sub o} over a broad range in a compact manner. Energy resolved electrons are measured by an array of quartz Cherenkov converters coupled to photomultipliers. Given 100 detectable electrons in the energy bins of interest, 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} minimum deuterium/tritium (DT) neutrons will be required to measure the 4.44 MeV {sup 12}C {gamma}-rays assuming 200 mg/cm{sup 2} plastic ablator areal density and 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} minimum DT neutrons to measure the 16.75 MeV DT {gamma}-ray line.

  14. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaniol, Craig

    1993-01-01

    The West Virginia State College Community College Division NASA Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) study is described. During this contract period, the two most significant and professionally rewarding events were the presentation of the research activity at the Sir Isaac Newton Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the second Day of Discovery Conference, focusing on economic recovery in West Virginia. An active antenna concept utilizing a signal feedback principle similar to regenerative receivers used in early radio was studied. The device has potential for ELF research and other commercial applications for improved signal reception. Finally, work continues to progress on the development of a prototype monitoring station. Signal monitoring, data display, and data storage are major areas of activity. In addition, we plan to continue our dissemination of research activity through presentations at seminars and other universities.

  15. Electron-proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An electron-proton spectrometer was designed to measure the geomagnetically trapped radiation in a geostationary orbit at 6.6 earth radii in the outer radiation belt. This instrument is to be flown on the Applications Technology Satellite-F (ATS-F). The electron-proton spectrometer consists of two permanent magnet surface barrier detector arrays and associated electronics capable of selecting and detecting electrons in three energy ranges: (1) 30-50 keV, (2) 150-200 keV, and (3) 500 keV and protons in three energy ranges. The electron-proton spectrometer has the capability of measuring the fluxes of electrons and protons in various directions with respect to the magnetic field lines running through the satellite. One magnet detector array system is implemented to scan between EME north and south through west, sampling the directional flux in 15 steps. The other magnet-detector array system is fixed looking toward EME east.

  16. A 25 T dipole pulsed magnet to study the magnetic birefringence of vacuum: the BMV project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askenazy, S.; Billette, J.; Dupré, P.; Ganau, P.; Mackowski, J.; Marquez, J.; Pinard, L.; Portugall, O.; Ricard, D.; Rikken, G. L. J. A.; Rizzo, C.; Trenec, G.; Vigué, J.

    2001-04-01

    The existence of a magnetic birefringence of vacuum is one of the most important predictions of quantum electrodynamics, which has not yet been verified. In this contribution, we present a new project, the BMV (Biréfringence Magnétique du Vide) project, a collaboration between different Grenoble, Lyon and Toulouse institutes. The proposed experimental set-up, compared to previous attempts, should improve the signal level by about two orders of magnitude. Keystones of the proposed set-up are a very sensitive ellipsometer and a specially designed 1.5 m long 25 T pulsed magnet, which is under development in Toulouse, France.

  17. A high-field magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using an oven-controlled crystal oscillator as the local oscillator of its radio frequency transceiver.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao; Tang, Xin; Tang, Weinan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-09-01

    A home-made high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectrometer with multiple receiving channels is described. The radio frequency (RF) transceiver of the spectrometer consists of digital intermediate frequency (IF) circuits and corresponding mixing circuits. A direct digital synthesis device is employed to generate the IF pulse; the IF signal from a down-conversion circuit is sampled and followed by digital quadrature detection. Both the IF generation and the IF sampling use a 50 MHz clock. An oven-controlled crystal oscillator, which has outstanding spectral purity and a compact circuit, is used as the local oscillator of the RF transceiver. A digital signal processor works as the pulse programmer of the spectrometer, as a result, 32 control lines can be generated simultaneously while an event is triggered. Field programmable gate array devices are utilized as the auxiliary controllers of the IF generation, IF receiving, and gradient control. High performance, including 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, 1 MHz receiving bandwidth, and 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, is achieved. High-quality images on a 1.5 T MRI system using the spectrometer are obtained.

  18. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, S.; Egert, C.M.; Kahl, W.K.; Snyder, W.B. Jr.; Evans, B.M. III; Marlar, T.A.; Cunningham, J.P.

    1998-05-19

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays. 6 figs.

  19. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, Slobodan; Egert, Charles M.; Kahl, William K.; Snyder, Jr., William B.; Evans, III, Boyd M.; Marlar, Troy A.; Cunningham, Joseph P.

    1998-01-01

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays.

  20. A Simulation of the Front End Signal Digitization for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer thin RPC trigger upgrade project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangting; Chapman, John; Levin, Daniel; Dai, Tiesheng; Zhu, Junjie; Zhou, Bing; Um Atlas Group Team

    2016-03-01

    The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Phase-I (and Phase-II) upgrade includes the BIS78 muon trigger detector project: two sets of eight very thin Resistive Place Chambers (tRPCs) combined with small Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers in the pseudorapidity region 1<| η|<1.3. The tRPCs will be comprised of triplet readout layer in each of the eta and azimuthal phi coordinates, with about 400 readout strips per layer. The anticipated hit rate is 100-200 kHz per strip. Digitization of the strip signals will be done by 32-channel CERN HPTDC chips. The HPTDC is a highly configurable ASIC designed by the CERN Microelectronics group. It can work in both trigger and trigger-less modes, be readout in parallel or serially. For Phase-I operation, a stringent latency requirement of 43 bunch crossings (1075 ns) is imposed. The latency budget for the front end digitization must be kept to a minimal value, ideally less than 350 ns. We conducted detailed HPTDC latency simulations using the Behavioral Verilog code from the CERN group. We will report the results of these simulations run for the anticipated detector operating environment and for various HPTDC configurations.

  1. Neutron Spectrometer Prospecting During the Mojave Volatiles Project Analog Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Heldmann, J. L.; Colaprete, A.; Hunt, D. R.; Deans, M C.; Lim, D. S.; Foil, G.; Fong, T.

    2015-01-01

    We know there are volatiles sequestered at the poles of the Moon. While we have evidence of water ice and a number of other compounds based on remote sensing, the detailed distribution, and physical and chemical form are largely unknown. Additional orbital studies of lunar polar volatiles may yield further insights, but the most important next step is to use landed assets to fully characterize the volatile composition and distribution at scales of tens to hundreds of meters. To achieve this range of scales, mobility is needed. Because of the proximity of the Moon, near real-time operation of the surface assets is possible, with an associated reduction in risk and cost. This concept of operations is very different from that of rovers on Mars, and new operational approaches are required to carry out such real-time robotic exploration. The Mojave Volatiles Project (MVP) is a Moon- Mars Analog Mission Activities (MMAMA) program effort aimed at (1) determining effective approaches to operating a real-time but short-duration lunar surface robotic mission, and (2) performing prospecting science in a natural setting, as a test of these approaches. We know there are volatiles sequestered at the poles of the Moon. While we have evidence of water ice and a number of other compounds based on remote sensing, the detailed distribution, and physical and chemical form are largely unknown. Additional orbital studies of lunar polar volatiles may yield further insights, but the most important next step is to use landed assets to fully characterize the volatile composition and distribution at scales of tens to hundreds of meters. To achieve this range of scales, mobility is needed. Because of the proximity of the Moon, near real-time operation of the surface assets is possible, with an associated reduction in risk and cost. This concept of operations is very different from that of rovers on Mars, and new operational approaches are required to carry out such robotic exploration. The

  2. Internet Technology in Magnetic Resonance: A Common Gateway Interface Program for the World-Wide Web NMR Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buszko, Marian L.; Buszko, Dominik; Wang, Daniel C.

    1998-04-01

    A custom-written Common Gateway Interface (CGI) program for remote control of an NMR spectrometer using a World Wide Web browser has been described. The program, running on a UNIX workstation, uses multiple processes to handle concurrent tasks of interacting with the user and with the spectrometer. The program's parent process communicates with the browser and sends out commands to the spectrometer; the child process is mainly responsible for data acquisition. Communication between the processes is via the shared memory mechanism. The WWW pages that have been developed for the system make use of the frames feature of web browsers. The CGI program provides an intuitive user interface to the NMR spectrometer, making, in effect, a complex system an easy-to-use Web appliance.

  3. Fabrication, Testing and Modeling of the MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Trillaud, F.; Zisman, M.S.

    2010-05-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), an international collaboration sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of realistic cooling channel using a muon beam. A five-coil superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region at each end of the cooling channel. Scintillating fiber trackers within the 400 mm diameter magnet bore tubes measure the emittance of the beam as it enters and exits the cooling channel. Each of the identical 3-meter long magnets incorporates a three-coil spectrometer magnet section and a two-coil section to match the solenoid uniform field into the other magnets of the MICE cooling channel. The cold mass, radiation shield and leads are currently kept cold by means of three two-stage cryocoolers and one single-stage cryocooler. Liquid helium within the cold mass is maintained by means of a re-condensation technique. After incorporating several design changes to improve the magnet cooling and reliability, the fabrication and acceptance testing of the spectrometer solenoids have proceeded. The key features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets, the development of a thermal model, the results of the recently completed tests, and the current status of the project are presented.

  4. High-resolution measurements of the DT neutron spectrum using new CD foils in the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Eckart, M. J.; Farrell, M. P.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoppe, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Reynolds, H. G.; Sayre, D. B.; Schoff, M. E.; Séguin, F. H.; Skulina, K.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility measures the DT neutron spectrum from cryogenically layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. Yield, areal density, apparent ion temperature, and directional fluid flow are inferred from the MRS data. This paper describes recent advances in MRS measurements of the primary peak using new, thinner, reduced-area deuterated plastic (CD) conversion foils. The new foils allow operation of MRS at yields 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously possible, at a resolution down to ˜200 keV FWHM.

  5. High-resolution measurements of the DT neutron spectrum using new CD foils in the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Eckart, M. J.; Farrell, M. P.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoppe, M.; et al

    2016-08-09

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility measures the DT neutron spectrum from cryogenically layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. Yield, areal density, apparent ion temperature, and directional fluid flow are inferred from the MRS data. Here, this paper describes recent advances in MRS measurements of the primary peak using new, thinner, reduced-area deuterated plastic (CD) conversion foils. The new foils allow operation of MRS at yields 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously possible, at a resolution down to ~200 keV FWHM.

  6. Testing flight software on the ground: Introducing the hardware-in-the-loop simulation method to the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenhao; Cai, Xudong; Meng, Qiao

    2016-04-01

    Complex automatic protection functions are being added to the onboard software of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. A hardware-in-the-loop simulation method has been introduced to overcome the difficulties of ground testing that are brought by hardware and environmental limitations. We invented a time-saving approach by reusing the flight data as the data source of the simulation system instead of mathematical models. This is easy to implement and it works efficiently. This paper presents the system framework, implementation details and some application examples.

  7. Correlation spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Pfeifer, Kent B.; Flemming, Jeb H.; Jones, Gary D.; Tigges, Chris P.

    2010-04-13

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  8. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  9. Multidimensional spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Zanni, Martin Thomas; Damrauer, Niels H.

    2010-07-20

    A multidimensional spectrometer for the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and a method for making multidimensional spectroscopic measurements in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The multidimensional spectrometer facilitates measurements of inter- and intra-molecular interactions.

  10. Construction of a magnetic bottle spectrometer and its application to pulse duration measurement of X-ray laser using a pump-probe method

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, S.; Hasegawa, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Ishino, M.; Kawachi, T.

    2015-11-15

    To characterize the temporal evolution of ultrashort X-ray pulses emitted by laser plasmas using a pump-probe method, a magnetic bottle time-of-flight electron spectrometer is constructed. The design is determined by numerical calculations of a mirror magnetic field and of the electron trajectory in a flight tube. The performance of the spectrometer is characterized by measuring the electron spectra of xenon atoms irradiated with a laser-driven plasma X-ray pulse. In addition, two-color above-threshold ionization (ATI) experiment is conducted for measurement of the X-ray laser pulse duration, in which xenon atoms are simultaneously irradiated with an X-ray laser pump and an IR laser probe. The correlation in the intensity of the sideband spectra of the 4d inner-shell photoelectrons and in the time delay of the two laser pulses yields an X-ray pulse width of 5.7 ps, in good agreement with the value obtained using an X-ray streak camera.

  11. Construction of a magnetic bottle spectrometer and its application to pulse duration measurement of X-ray laser using a pump-probe method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namba, S.; Hasegawa, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Ishino, M.; Kawachi, T.

    2015-11-01

    To characterize the temporal evolution of ultrashort X-ray pulses emitted by laser plasmas using a pump-probe method, a magnetic bottle time-of-flight electron spectrometer is constructed. The design is determined by numerical calculations of a mirror magnetic field and of the electron trajectory in a flight tube. The performance of the spectrometer is characterized by measuring the electron spectra of xenon atoms irradiated with a laser-driven plasma X-ray pulse. In addition, two-color above-threshold ionization (ATI) experiment is conducted for measurement of the X-ray laser pulse duration, in which xenon atoms are simultaneously irradiated with an X-ray laser pump and an IR laser probe. The correlation in the intensity of the sideband spectra of the 4d inner-shell photoelectrons and in the time delay of the two laser pulses yields an X-ray pulse width of 5.7 ps, in good agreement with the value obtained using an X-ray streak camera.

  12. High performance compact magnetic spectrometers for energetic ion and electron measurement in ultra intense short pulse laser solid interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Link, A; van Maren, R; Patel, P; Shepherd, R; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-05-08

    Ultra intense short pulse lasers incident on solid targets can generate relativistic electrons that then accelerate energetic protons and ions. These fast electrons and ions can effectively heat the solid target, beyond the region of direct laser interaction, and are vital to realizing the fast ignition concept. To study these energetic ions and electrons produced from the laser-target interactions, we have developed a range of spectrometers that can cover a large energy range (from less than 0.1 MeV to above 100 MeV). They are physically compact and feature high performance and low cost. We will present the basic design of these spectrometers and their test results from recent laser experiments.

  13. SCINTILLATION SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Francis, J.E.

    1960-06-21

    A portable scintillation spectrometer is described which is especially useful in radio-biological studies for determining the uptake and distribution of gamma -emitting substances in tissue. The spectrometer includes a collimator having a plurality of apertures that are hexagonal in cross section. Two crystals are provided: one is activated to respond to incident rays from the collimator; the other is not activated and shields the first from external radiation.

  14. Cryostat design and analysis of the superconducting magnets for Jefferson Lab's 11-GEV/C super high momentum spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    P. Brindza, E. Sun, S. Lassiter, M. Fowler

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design and analysis of the cryostats for the two cos(2theta) quadrupoles and the cos(theta) dipole. All the magnets are currently being bid for commercial fabrication. The results of finite element analysis for the magnet cryostat helium vessels and outer vacuum chambers which investigate the mechanical integrity under maximum allowable internal working pressure, maximum allowable external working pressure, and cryogenic temperature are discussed. The allowable stress criterion is determined based on the allowable stress philosophy of the ASME codes. The computed cryogenic heat load of the magnets is compared with the allowable cryogenic consumption budget. The presented cool-down time of the magnets was studied under the conditions of a limited supply rate and a controlled temperature differential of 50 K in the magnets.

  15. HELIOS: A high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, T.E.; Broholm, C.; Fultz, B.

    1998-12-31

    A proposal to construct a high intensity chopper spectrometer at LANSCE as part of the SPSS upgrade project is discussed. HELIOS will be optimized for science requiring high sensitivity neutron spectroscopy. This includes studies of phonon density of states in small polycrystalline samples, magnetic excitations in quantum magnets and highly correlated electron systems, as well as parametric studies (as a function of pressure, temperature, or magnetic field) of S(Q,{omega}). By employing a compact design together with the use of supermirror guide in the incident flight path the neutron flux at HELIOS will be significantly higher than any other comparable instrument now operating.

  16. The Results of Tests of the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2009-10-19

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The spectrometer magnets are the largest magnets in both mass and surface area within the MICE ooling channel. Like all of the other magnets in MICE, the spectrometer solenoids are kept cold using 1.5 W (at 4.2 K) pulse tube coolers. The MICE spectrometer solenoid is quite possibly the largest magnet that has been cooled using small coolers. Two pectrometer magnets have been built and tested. This report discusses the results of current and cooler tests of both magnets.

  17. Measurements of ion temperature and flow of pulsed plasmas produced by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device using an ion Doppler spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    It is important to know surface damage characteristics of plasma-facing component materials during transient heat and particle loads such as type I ELMs. A magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device has been used as transient heat and particle source in ELM simulation experiments. Characteristics of pulsed plasmas produced by the MCPG device play an important role for the plasma material interaction. In this study, ion temperature and flow velocity of pulsed He plasmas were measured by an ion Doppler spectrometer (IDS). The IDS system consists of a light collection system including optical fibers, 1m-spectrometer and a 16 channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector. The IDS system measures the width and Doppler shift of HeII (468.58 nm) emission line with the time resolution of 1 μs. The Doppler broadened and shifted spectra were measured with 45 and 135 degree angles with respect to the plasmoid traveling direction. The observed emission line profile was represented by sum of two Gaussian components to determine the temperature and flow velocity. The minor component at around the wavelength of zero-velocity was produced by the stationary plasma. As the results, the ion velocity and temperature were 68 km/s and 19 eV, respectively. Thus, the He ion flow energy is 97 eV. The observed flow velocity agrees with that measured by a time of flight technique.

  18. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gatu Johnson, M. Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Caggiano, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Khater, H. Y.; Sayre, D. B.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-11-15

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4–20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80–140 mg/cm{sup 2} and CH-ablator ρR's of 400–680 mg/cm{sup 2} are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions.

  19. Measurements of fuel and ablator ρR in Symmetry-Capsule implosions with the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Gatu Johnson, M; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Bionta, R M; Casey, D T; Caggiano, J A; Hatarik, R; Khater, H Y; Sayre, D B; Knauer, J P; Sangster, T C; Herrmann, H W; Kilkenny, J D

    2014-11-01

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) measures the neutron spectrum in the energy range of 4-20 MeV. This paper describes MRS measurements of DT-fuel and CH-ablator ρR in DT gas-filled symmetry-capsule implosions at the NIF. DT-fuel ρR's of 80-140 mg/cm(2) and CH-ablator ρR's of 400-680 mg/cm(2) are inferred from MRS data. The measurements were facilitated by an improved correction of neutron-induced background in the low-energy part of the MRS spectrum. This work demonstrates the accurate utilization of the complete MRS-measured neutron spectrum for diagnosing NIF DT implosions. PMID:25430283

  20. Three-dimensional model of cosmic-ray lepton propagation reproduces data from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Gaggero, Daniele; Maccione, Luca; Di Bernardo, Giuseppe; Evoli, Carmelo; Grasso, Dario

    2013-07-12

    We study the compatibility of Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) data on the cosmic-ray (CR) positron fraction with data on the CR electron and positron spectra provided by PAMELA and Fermi LAT. We do that in terms of a novel propagation model in which sources are distributed in spiral arm patterns in agreement with astrophysical observations. While former interpretations assumed an unrealistically steep injection spectrum for astrophysical background electrons, the enhanced energy losses experienced by CR leptons due to the larger average source distance from Earth allow us to reproduce the data with harder injection spectra as expected in a shock acceleration scenario. Moreover, we show that in this approach, and accounting for AMS-02 results, the contribution of nearby accelerators to the fluxes at very high energy can be significantly reduced, thus avoiding any tension with anisotropy upper limits.

  1. The coincidence counting technique for orders of magnitude background reduction in data obtained with the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF.

    PubMed

    Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Li, C K; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H; Manuel, M J-E; Gatu Johnson, M; Schaeffer, J C; Frankel, R; Sinenian, N; Childs, R A; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Burke, M; Roberts, S

    2011-07-01

    A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been built and successfully used at OMEGA for measurements of down-scattered neutrons (DS-n), from which an areal density in both warm-capsule and cryogenic-DT implosions have been inferred. Another MRS is currently being commissioned on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for diagnosing low-yield tritium-hydrogen-deuterium implosions and high-yield DT implosions. As CR-39 detectors are used in the MRS, the principal sources of background are neutron-induced tracks and intrinsic tracks (defects in the CR-39). The coincidence counting technique was developed to reduce these types of background tracks to the required level for the DS-n measurements at OMEGA and the NIF. Using this technique, it has been demonstrated that the number of background tracks is reduced by a couple of orders of magnitude, which exceeds the requirement for the DS-n measurements at both facilities.

  2. Portland Magnet Project 1989-1991. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thacker, Peter

    In 1989, the Portland (Oregon) Public Schools received a grant to create an elementary arts magnet school and to enhance magnet programs at four other schools in Portland (Oregon). The Portland Magnet Program emphasized improvements in programing, marketing, and articulation between magnet programs, allowing the schools to purchase…

  3. Considerations for design of a Fourier transform mass spectrometer in the 4.2 K cold bore of a superconducting magnet.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Peter B

    2002-01-01

    An external source Fourier transform mass spectrometer (FTMS) constructed inside the vertical cold bore of a superconducting magnet will have dramatic advantages in effective magnetic field, noise figures, and base pressure over current commercially available external source FTMS systems. There are substantial, but solvable, difficulties in the design, primarily with regard to control of the helium boiloff rate to an acceptable level, as well as relatively minor design challenges with heat sinks, contraction of metallic ion optic elements in the extreme temperature, and tandem mass spectrometry experiments. However, the ability to construct the FTMS inside the narrow bore tube of existing, commercially available vertical bore NMR magnets will allow access to the upper magnetic field limit currently used by 900 MHz (21 Tesla) - 1 GHz (23.3 Tesla) NMR experiments. The vacuum system, simply by being held inside the cold bore at 4.2 K, will cryopump itself dropping base pressures substantially, and heat sinking the input resistor of the preamplifier to this cryogenically cooled vacuum chamber will allow reduction of the input Johnson noise by a factor of 8.4 with associated 8.4-fold improvement in signal/noise, sensitivity, and dynamic range. The simultaneous improvement of three fundamental limiting factors in the FTMS (field strength, base pressure, and Johnson noise figure) will clearly outweigh the concomitant increased helium boiloff rate particularly if this rate can be dropped to the estimated <5 L/day range. The additional use of modern cryorefrigerators will further reduce helium boiloff to zero except during MS(n) experiments and system cooldown.

  4. Spectrometer gun

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.; Umbarger, C.J.

    1981-11-03

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun is described that includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  5. Spectrometer gun

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, David A.; Wolf, Michael A.; Umbarger, C. John

    1985-01-01

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  6. HISS spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, D.E.

    1984-11-01

    This talk describes the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac. Three completed experiments and their results are illustrated. The second half of the talk is a detailed discussion of the response of drift chambers to heavy ions. The limitations of trajectory measurement over a large range in incident particle charge are presented.

  7. High voltage generator for the power supply of photomultipliers in the time of flight system of Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antone, I.; Lolli, M.; Zanotti, M.

    2002-03-01

    In this report, the behaviour of the first prototype high voltage generator (HVG) that might be used in the time of flight (TOF) system for the AMS-2 experiment is described. The system receives a positive continuous voltage about 100-120 V as input, and it provides a programmable negative continuous voltage from -1600 to -2400 V as output, versus a total load of 50 MΩ. The most important aspect is the absence of a transformer which usually is used in the step-up DC-DC converters. In the TOF system of alpha magnetic spectrometer (AMS)-2 experiment there is a big magnetic field, higher than 2 kG, that does not allow to use a transformer, therefore this prompted us to use the Cockroft-Walton system. The power consumption is about 300 mW and the peak-to-peak high frequency ripple is lower than 0.3% of the output high voltage. We also estimated the reliability of the HVG and we obtained a failure probability lower than 0.5% after three years of continuous functioning. Besides, in this report, much importance was given to the calculation of a simple model of the system to estimate the stability margins.

  8. Cryogenic system design of 11 GEV/C super high momentum spectrometer superconducting magnets at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Eric; Brindza, Paul; Lassister, Steven; Fowler, Mike

    2012-06-01

    The design of the cryogenic system for the 11 GeV/c Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) is presented. A description of the cryogenic control reservoir and the cryogenic transfer line is given. Details of the cryogenic control reservoirs, cryogenic transfer lines, and pressure piping are summarized. Code compliance is ensured through following the requirements of the ASME Pressure Vessel Code and Pressure Piping Code. An elastic-plastic-analysis-based combined safety factor approach is proposed to meet the low stress requirement of ASME 2007 Section VIII, Division 2 so that Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact testing can be avoided through analysis. Material toughness requirements in ASME 2007 Section VIII, Division 2 are adopted as CVN impact testing rules of stainless steel 304 piping at 4.2 K and 77 K. A formula-based combined safety factor approach for pressure piping is also proposed to check whether the impact testing can be avoided due to low stress. Analysis and calculation have shown that no CVN impact testing of base metal and heat affected zones is required for the helium reservoir, nitrogen reservoir, and their relevant piping. Total heat loads to liquid helium and liquid nitrogen are studied also. The total heat load to LHe for SHMS is estimated to be 137 W, and the total load to LN2 is calculated to be 420 W.

  9. Cryogenic system design of 11 GEV/C super high momentum spectrometer superconducting magnets at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Sun, Paul Brindza, Steven Lassister, Mike Fowler

    2012-07-01

    The design of the cryogenic system for the 11 GeV/c Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) is presented. A description of the cryogenic control reservoir and the cryogenic transfer line is given. Details of the cryogenic control reservoirs, cryogenic transfer lines, and pressure piping are summarized. Code compliance is ensured through following the requirements of the ASME Pressure Vessel Code and Pressure Piping Code. An elastic-plastic-analysis-based combined safety factor approach is proposed to meet the low stress requirement of ASME 2007 Section VIII, Division 2 so that Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact testing can be avoided through analysis. Material toughness requirements in ASME 2007 Section VIII, Division 2 are adopted as CVN impact testing rules of stainless steel 304 piping at 4.2 K and 77 K. A formula-based combined safety factor approach for pressure piping is also proposed to check whether the impact testing can be avoided due to low stress. Analysis and calculation have shown that no CVN impact testing of base metal and heat affected zones is required for the helium reservoir, nitrogen reservoir, and their relevant piping. Total heat loads to liquid helium and liquid nitrogen are studied also. The total heat load to LHe for SHMS is estimated to be 137 W, and the total load to LN2 is calculated to be 420 W.

  10. The Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2012-03-01

    In the fall of 1999 I was shown an Ocean Optics spectrometer-in-the-computer at St. Patricks College at Maynooth, Ireland, and thought that I had seen heaven. Of course, it could not resolve the sodium D-lines (I had done that many years before with a homemade wire diffraction grating ), and I began to realize that inside was some familiar old technology. In this paper I would like to discuss its ancestors.

  11. The Spectrometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In the fall of 1999 I was shown an Ocean Optics spectrometer-in-the-computer at St. Patricks College at Maynooth, Ireland, and thought that I had seen heaven. Of course, it could not resolve the sodium D-lines (I had done that many years before with a homemade wire diffraction grating), and I began to realize that inside was some familiar old…

  12. Coupled Transient Finite Element Simulation of Quench in Jefferson Lab's 11 GeV Super High Momentum Spectrometer Superconducting Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    E. Sun, P. Brindza, S. Lassiter, M. Fowler, E. Xu

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents coupled transient thermal and electromagnetic finite element analysis of quench in the Q2, Q3, and dipole superconducting magnets using Vector Fields Quench code. Detailed temperature distribution within coils and aluminum force collars were computed at each time step. Both normal (quench with dump resistor) and worst-case (quench without dump resistor) scenarios were simulated to investigate the maximum temperatures. Two simulation methods were utilized, and their algorithms, implementation, advantages, and disadvantages are discussed. The first method simulated the coil using nonlinear transient thermal analysis directly linked with the transient circuit analysis. It was faster because only the coil was meshed and no eddy current was modeled. The second method simulated the whole magnet including the coil, the force collar, and the iron yoke. It coupled thermal analysis with transient electromagnetic field analysis which modeled electromagnetic fields including eddy currents within the force collar. Since eddy currents and temperature in the force collars were calculated in various configurations, segmentation of the force collars was optimized under the condition of fast discharge.

  13. VEGAS: VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussa, Srikanth; VEGAS Development Team

    2012-01-01

    The National Science Foundation Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation (NSF-ATI) program is funding a new spectrometer backend for the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This spectrometer is being built by the CICADA collaboration - collaboration between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and the Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) at the University of California Berkeley.The backend is named as VErsatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) and will replace the capabilities of the existing spectrometers. This backend supports data processing from focal plane array systems. The spectrometer will be capable of processing up to 1.25 GHz bandwidth from 8 dual polarized beams or a bandwidth up to 10 GHz from a dual polarized beam.The spectrometer will be using 8-bit analog to digital converters (ADC), which gives a better dynamic range than existing GBT spectrometers. There will be 8 tunable digital sub-bands within the 1.25 GHz bandwidth, which will enhance the capability of simultaneous observation of multiple spectral transitions. The maximum spectral dump rate to disk will be about 0.5 msec. The vastly enhanced backend capabilities will support several science projects with the GBT. The projects include mapping temperature and density structure of molecular clouds; searches for organic molecules in the interstellar medium; determination of the fundamental constants of our evolving Universe; red-shifted spectral features from galaxies across cosmic time and survey for pulsars in the extreme gravitational environment of the Galactic Center.

  14. A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) for ρR_fuel and Ti measurements of warm, fizzle and ignited implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Deciantis, J. L.; Kurebayashi, S.; Rygg, J. R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Soures, J. M.; Hatchett, S. P.; Hann, S. W.; Schmid, G. J.; Landen, O. L.; Izumi, N.

    2003-10-01

    A method for determining ρR_fuel of cryogenic deuterium-tritium plasmas involves measurement of the energy spectrum of elastically-scattered, primary neutrons. A spectrometer has been designed for doing this at OMEGA and the NIF, using scattered neutrons in the energy range 7-10 MeV to determine ρR_fuel and primary neutrons to measure T_i. The instrument utilizes a magnet and a conversion foil for production of charged particles. A large dynamic range (>10^6) will allow operation at yields as low as 10^12. This will allow ρR_fuel and Ti measurements of warm and cryogenic DT targets at OMEGA, and fizzle and ignited cryogenic DT targets at the NIF. This work was supported in part by the US DoE (contract W-7405-ENG-48 with LLNL, grant DE-FG03-99DP00300 and Cooperative Agreement DE-FC03-92SF19460), LLE (subcontract P0410025G), and LLNL (subcontract B313975).

  15. Photophoretic spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, S.; Amani, Y.; Orenstein, A.

    1980-09-01

    An instrument is described which measures the spectral dependence of the radiometric (photophoretic) force on a micron-sized particle in a static configuration. This spectrometer consists of a servo-stabilized Millikan chamber which can be used as a photophoretic balance over the spectral range from 200 nm to 1000 nm. Spectra may be taken in a vacuum as small as 10/sup -4/ torr. The action spectrum of the photophoretic force on a crystallite of CdS is used as an example. The pressure dependence of the force at 500 nm is consistant with a radiometric mechanism.

  16. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalksy, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote earth field sensing magnetometer and servo control building; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils are 42-foot in diameter and a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils accommodates spacecraft access to the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions ground testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  17. RAPID EVOLUTION OF THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE OF A MICROFLARE OBSERVED WITH THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER ABOARD HINODE: HINTS OF CHROMOSPHERIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.

    2013-11-10

    We obtained rapid cadence (11.2 s) EUV stare spectra of a solar microflare with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer aboard Hinode. The intensities of lines formed at temperatures too cool to be found in the corona brightened by factors around 16 early during this event, indicating that we observed a site of energy deposition in the chromosphere. We derive the density evolution of the flare plasma at temperature around 2 MK from the intensity ratio of Fe XIV lines at 264.789 Å and 274.204 Å. From both lines we removed the bright pre-flare quiescent emission, and from 274.204 we removed the blended emission of Si VII λ274.180 based on the Si VII λ274.180/275.361 intensity ratio, which varies only slightly with density. In this way the flare electron density is derived with emission from only the flare plasma. The density increased by an order of magnitude from its pre-flare quiescent average of (3.43 ± 0.19) × 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3} to its maximum impulsive phase value of (3.04 ± 0.57) × 10{sup 10} cm{sup –3} in 2 minutes. The fact that this rapid increase in density is not accompanied by systematic, large upward velocities indicates that the density increase is not due to the filling of loops with evaporated chromospheric material, but rather due to material being directly heated in the chromosphere, likely by magnetic reconnection. The density increase may be due to a progression of reconnection sites to greater depths in the chromosphere, where it has access to larger densities, or it may be due to compression of 2 MK plasma by the 10 MK plasma as it attempts to expand against the high-density chromospheric plasma.

  18. Precision formed micro magnets: LDRD project summary report

    SciTech Connect

    CHRISTENSON,TODD R.; GARINO,TERRY J.; VENTURINI,EUGENE L.

    2000-02-01

    A microfabrication process is described that provides for the batch realization of miniature rare earth based permanent magnets. Prismatic geometry with features as small as 5 microns, thicknesses up through several hundred microns and with submicron tolerances may be accommodated. The processing is based on a molding technique using deep x-ray lithography as a means to generate high aspect-ratio precision molds from PMMA (poly methyl methacrylate) used as an x-ray photoresist. Subsequent molding of rare-earth permanent magnet (REPM) powder combined with a thermosetting plastic binder may take place directly in the PMMA mold. Further approaches generate an alumina form replicated from the PMMA mold that becomes an intermediate mold for pressing higher density REPM material and allows for higher process temperatures. Maximum energy products of 3--8 MGOe (Mega Gauss Oersted, 1 MGOe = 100/4{pi} kJ/m{sup 3}) are obtained for bonded isotropic forms of REPM with dimensions on the scale of 100 microns and up to 23 MGOe for more dense anisotropic REPM material using higher temperature processing. The utility of miniature precision REPMs is revealed by the demonstration of a miniature multipole brushless DC motor that possesses a pole-anisotropic rotor with dimensions that would otherwise prohibit multipole magnetization using a multipole magnetizing fixture at this scale. Subsequent multipole assembly also leads to miniaturized Halbach arrays, efficient magnetic microactuators, and mechanical spring-like elements which can offset miniaturized mechanical scaling behavior.

  19. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalksy, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote Earth field sensing magnetometer and servo controller; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils of the Braunbek system are 42-foot in diameter with a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils to accommodate spacecraft access into the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions, ground-testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  20. Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility Restoration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernier, Robert; Bonalosky, Todd; Slavin, James

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) was constructed in the 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field environments. The facility includes a three axis Braunbek coil system consisting of 12 loops, 4 loops on each of the three orthogonal axes; a remote Earth field sensing magnetometer and servo controller; and a remote power control and instrumentation building. The inner coils of the Braunbek system are 42-foot in diameter with a 10-foot by 10-foot opening through the outer coils to accommodate spacecraft access into the test volume. The physical size and precision of the facility are matched by only two other such facilities in the world. The facility was used extensively from the late 1960's until the early 1990's when the requirement for spacecraft level testing diminished. New NASA missions planned under the Living with a Star, Solar Terrestrial Probes, Explorer, and New Millennium Programs include precision, high-resolution magnetometers to obtain magnetic field data that is critical to fulfilling their scientific mission. It is highly likely that future Lunar and Martian exploration missions will also use precision magnetometers to conduct geophysical magnetic surveys. To ensure the success of these missions, ground testing using a magnetic test facility such as the GSFC SMTF will be required. This paper describes the history of the facility, the future mission requirements that have renewed the need for spacecraft level magnetic testing, and the plans for restoring the facility to be capable of performing to its original design specifications.

  1. The spectral database Specchio: Data management, data sharing and initial processing of field spectrometer data within the Dimensions of Biodiversity project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueni, A.; Schweiger, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Field spectrometry has substantially gained importance in vegetation ecology due to the increasing knowledge about causal ties between vegetation spectra and biochemical and structural plant traits. Additionally, worldwide databases enable the exchange of spectral and plant trait data and promote global research cooperation. This can be expected to further enhance the use of field spectrometers in ecological studies. However, the large amount of data collected during spectral field campaigns poses major challenges regarding data management, archiving and processing. The spectral database Specchio is designed to organize, manage, process and share spectral data and metadata. We provide an example for using Specchio based on leaf level spectra of prairie plant species collected during the 2015 field campaign of the Dimensions of Biodiversity research project, conducted at the Cedar Creek Long-Term Ecological Research site, in central Minnesota. We show how spectral data collections can be efficiently administered, organized and shared between distinct research groups and explore the capabilities of Specchio for data quality checks and initial processing steps.

  2. The Global Fracture Zone and Magnetic Lineation Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, P.; Müller, D.; Sandwell, D. T.; Cande, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    Plate kinematic models derive from the detailed identifications of conjugate magnetic isochron picks and fracture zones (FZ). These data form the foundation of relative marine plate tectonic reconstructions and codify our understanding of Earth’s surface evolution since the Mesozoic. Furthermore, FZ traces have extensive uses in other geophysical investigations such as studying the origins of transform fault offsets, identifying seamounts and isolating abyssal hill roughness within fracture zone provinces, examining predictions from competing thermal models of the lithosphere, and much more. Kinematic models also require temporal information and this dimension is provided by identification of key magnetic isochron boundaries from total field magnetic anomalies collected along ship tracks. The joint FZ and isochron pick data constitute the fundamental constraints on marine relative plate motion models. Much work has been performed in trying to determine globally consistent data sets of FZ and isochrons. Unfortunately, advances in data collection and processing tend to make specific “snap-shot” compilations obsolete, thus necessitating a new analysis following the addition of new data. A complete re-analysis can be a daunting task when a global reconstruction is one of the design goals. Effectively, such high barriers to undertaking exploratory research limit the progress that can be made in many fields of marine science and deprive us of serendipitous and curiosity-driven investigations which have proven so valuable throughout the history of plate tectonics. Here, we report progress of a pilot study to establish new infrastructure for users of FZ and magnetic isochron data. We are developing an open source, community-driven database where consistent and well-documented information on FZ and magnetic isochrons will be collected, accessible from a dedicated website. For fracture zones, we store mostly meta-data about each FZ and a few key locations along its

  3. Final Scientific/Technical Report for DOE/EERE project Advanced Magnetic Refrigerant Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Francis

    2014-06-30

    A team led by GE Global Research developed new magnetic refrigerant materials needed to enhance the commercialization potential of residential appliances such as refrigerators and air conditioners based on the magnetocaloric effect (a nonvapor compression cooling cycle). The new magnetic refrigerant materials have potentially better performance at lower cost than existing materials, increasing technology readiness level. The performance target of the new magnetocaloric material was to reduce the magnetic field needed to achieve 4 °C adiabatic temperature change from 1.5 Tesla to 0.75 Tesla. Such a reduction in field minimizes the cost of the magnet assembly needed for a magnetic refrigerator. Such a reduction in magnet assembly cost is crucial to achieving commercialization of magnetic refrigerator technology. This project was organized as an iterative alloy development effort with a parallel material modeling task being performed at George Washington University. Four families of novel magnetocaloric alloys were identified, screened, and assessed for their performance potential in a magnetic refrigeration cycle. Compositions from three of the alloy families were manufactured into regenerator components. At the beginning of the project a previously studied magnetocaloric alloy was selected for manufacturing into the first regenerator component. Each of the regenerators was tested in magnetic refrigerator prototypes at a subcontractor at at GE Appliances. The property targets for operating temperature range, operating temperature control, magnetic field sensitivity, and corrosion resistance were met. The targets for adiabatic temperature change and thermal hysteresis were not met. The high thermal hysteresis also prevented the regenerator components from displaying measurable cooling power when tested in prototype magnetic refrigerators. Magnetic refrigerant alloy compositions that were predicted to have low hysteresis were not attainable with conventional alloy

  4. A cometary ion mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, E. G.; Simpson, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The development of flight suitable analyzer units for that part of the GIOTTO Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) experiment designated the High Energy Range Spectrometer (HERS) is discussed. Topics covered include: design of the total ion-optical system for the HERS analyzer; the preparation of the design of analyzing magnet; the evaluation of microchannel plate detectors and associated two-dimensional anode arrays; and the fabrication and evaluation of two flight-suitable units of the complete ion-optical analyzer system including two-dimensional imaging detectors and associated image encoding electronics.

  5. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  6. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  7. Magnet School Continuation Project. Final Evaluation Report for 1988-89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Michael

    The Columbus (Ohio) 1988 Magnet Schools Continuation Project needs to encourage greater parent involvement by encouraging parent-teacher organizations and informing parents of their children's accomplishments. Major objectives were to enhance the core instructional program, to provide parents with an active partnership experience in their…

  8. Project MAGNETIC CONNECTIONS: Infusing Technology into California Lutheran University's Preservice Teacher Preparation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryde, Beverly R.; Mahler, James; Murray-Ward, Mildred; Gathercoal, Paul; Bartell, Carol

    California Lutheran University's (CLU's) School of Education created Project MAGNETIC CONNECTIONS to strengthen links between teacher preparation programs and K-12 schools through real-time connections and shared learning opportunities between partners. Three technology-rich schools became laboratories for learning for CLU students and faculty,…

  9. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (NASA-MEIRF Project)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During this current reporting period, the project has focused on completing Phase 1 of the field monitoring work and documenting research results. Highlights of these efforts include presentations of papers at the annual joint meeting of the American Physical Society/American Association of Physics Teachers, April 18-22, 1994, in Crystal City, Virginia, and at the International Space, Time, and Gravitation Conference and Etoiles de L'Ecole Polytechnique Symposium, May 23-28, 1994, in St. Petersburg, Russia. Field measurements of the background ultra low frequency (ULF) electromagnetic spectrum in the New Mexico and Texas regions show interesting differences. Included are papers entitled 'Triplet Solution of the Twin Paradox' and 'Classical Electron Mass and Fields, Part 3.'

  10. Development of a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon-based near-infrared interference spectrometer for measurement of the HeI 2³S-2³P spectral line shape in magnetically confined torus plasmas.

    PubMed

    Ogane, S; Shikama, T; Zushi, H; Hasuo, M

    2015-10-01

    In magnetically confined torus plasmas, the local emission intensity, temperature, and flow velocity of atoms in the inboard and outboard scrape-off layers can be separately measured by a passive emission spectroscopy assisted by observation of the Zeeman splitting in their spectral line shape. To utilize this technique, a near-infrared interference spectrometer optimized for the observation of the helium 2(3)S-2(3)P transition spectral line (wavelength 1083 nm) has been developed. The applicability of the technique to actual torus devices is elucidated by calculating the spectral line shapes expected to be observed in LHD and QUEST (Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak). In addition, the Zeeman effect on the spectral line shape is measured using a glow-discharge tube installed in a superconducting magnet. PMID:26520955

  11. Development of a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon-based near-infrared interference spectrometer for measurement of the HeI 2{sup 3}S-2{sup 3}P spectral line shape in magnetically confined torus plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ogane, S.; Shikama, T. Hasuo, M.; Zushi, H.

    2015-10-15

    In magnetically confined torus plasmas, the local emission intensity, temperature, and flow velocity of atoms in the inboard and outboard scrape-off layers can be separately measured by a passive emission spectroscopy assisted by observation of the Zeeman splitting in their spectral line shape. To utilize this technique, a near-infrared interference spectrometer optimized for the observation of the helium 2{sup 3}S–2{sup 3}P transition spectral line (wavelength 1083 nm) has been developed. The applicability of the technique to actual torus devices is elucidated by calculating the spectral line shapes expected to be observed in LHD and QUEST (Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak). In addition, the Zeeman effect on the spectral line shape is measured using a glow-discharge tube installed in a superconducting magnet.

  12. Development of a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon-based near-infrared interference spectrometer for measurement of the HeI 23S-23P spectral line shape in magnetically confined torus plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogane, S.; Shikama, T.; Zushi, H.; Hasuo, M.

    2015-10-01

    In magnetically confined torus plasmas, the local emission intensity, temperature, and flow velocity of atoms in the inboard and outboard scrape-off layers can be separately measured by a passive emission spectroscopy assisted by observation of the Zeeman splitting in their spectral line shape. To utilize this technique, a near-infrared interference spectrometer optimized for the observation of the helium 23S-23P transition spectral line (wavelength 1083 nm) has been developed. The applicability of the technique to actual torus devices is elucidated by calculating the spectral line shapes expected to be observed in LHD and QUEST (Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak). In addition, the Zeeman effect on the spectral line shape is measured using a glow-discharge tube installed in a superconducting magnet.

  13. Lessons Learned for the MICE Coupling Solenoid from the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, Xinglong; Li, S. Y.; Zheng, S. X.; Virostek, Steve P.; DeMello, Allen J.; Li, Derun; Trillaud, Frederick; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-05-30

    Tests of the spectrometer solenoids have taught us some important lessons. The spectrometer magnet lessons learned fall into two broad categories that involve the two stages of the coolers that are used to cool the magnets. On the first spectrometer magnet, the problems were centered on the connection of the cooler 2nd-stage to the magnet cold mass. On the first test of the second spectrometer magnet, the problems were centered on the cooler 1st-stage temperature and its effect on the operation of the HTS leads. The second time the second spectrometer magnet was tested; the cooling to the cold mass was still not adequate. The cryogenic designs of the MICE and MuCOOL coupling magnets are quite different, but the lessons learned from the tests of the spectrometer magnets have affected the design of the coupling magnets.

  14. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Airborne Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, T.; Beer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an instrument being developed for the NASA Earth Observing System Chemistry Platform. TES will measure the distribution of ozone and its precursors in the lower atmosphere. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) is an aircraft precursor to TES. Applicable descriptions are given of instrument design, technology challenges, implementation and operations for both.

  15. Mini-orange spectrometer at CIAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yun; Wu, Xiao-Guang; Li, Guang-Sheng; Li, Cong-Bo; He, Chuang-Ye; Chen, Qi-Ming; Zhong, Jian; Zhou, Wen-Kui; Deng, Li-Tao; Zhu, Bao-Ji

    2016-08-01

    A mini-orange spectrometer used for in-beam measurements of internal conversion electrons, consisting of a Si(Li) detector and different sets of SmO5 permanent magnets for filtering and transporting the conversion electrons to the Si(Li) detector, has been developed at the China Institute of Atomic Energy. The working principles and configuration of the mini-orange spectrometer are described. The performance of the setup is illustrated by measured singles conversion electron spectra using the mini-orange spectrometer. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305269, 11375267, 11475072, 11405274, 11205068, 11175259)

  16. Compact Infrared Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2009-01-01

    Concentric spectrometer forms are advantageous for constructing a variety of systems spanning the entire visible to infrared range. Spectrometer examples are given, including broadband or high resolution forms. Some issues associated with the Dyson catadioptric type are also discussed.

  17. Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkraus, J. M.; Wright, M. W.; Rheingans, B. E.; Steinkraus, D. E.; George, W. P.; Aljabri, A.; Hall, J. L.; Scott, D. C.

    2012-06-01

    One novel approach towards addressing the need for innovative instrumentation and investigation approaches is the integration of a suite of four spectrometer systems to form the Mars Airborne Prospecting Spectrometers (MAPS) for prospecting on Mars.

  18. Observation of magnetic field-induced contraction of fission yeast cells using optical projection microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Beckwith, A. W.

    2005-03-01

    The charges in live cells interact with or produce electric fields, which results in enormous dielectric responses, flexoelectricity, and related phenomena. Here we report on a contraction of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast) cells induced by magnetic fields, as observed using a phase-sensitive projection imaging technique. Unlike electric fields, magnetic fields only act on moving charges. The observed behavior is therefore quite remarkable, and may result from a contractile Lorentz force acting on diamagnetic screening currents. This would indicate extremely high intracellular charge mobilities. Besides, we observed a large electro-optic response from fission yeast cells.

  19. Observation of magnetic field-induced contraction of fission yeast cells using optical projection microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Beckwith, Andrew; Miller, John; Wood, Lowell

    2004-12-01

    The charges in live cells interact with or produce electric fields, which results in enormous dielectric responses, flexoelectricity, and related phenomena. Here we report on a contraction of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast) cells induced by magnetic fields, as observed using a phase-sensitive projection imaging technique. Unlike electric fields, magnetic fields only act on moving charges. The observed behavior is therefore quite remarkable, and may result from a contractile Lorentz force acting on diamagnetic screening currents. This would indicate extremely high intracellular charge mobilities. Besides, we observed a large electro-optic response from fission yeast cells.

  20. Forward fitting of experimental data from a NE213 neutron detector installed with the magnetic proton recoil upgraded spectrometer at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Binda, F. Ericsson, G.; Eriksson, J.; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Team

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we present the results obtained from the data analysis of neutron spectra measured with a NE213 liquid scintillator at JET. We calculated the neutron response matrix of the instrument combining MCNPX simulations, a generic proton light output function measured with another detector and the fit of data from ohmic pulses. For the analysis, we selected a set of pulses with neutral beam injection heating (NBI) only and we applied a forward fitting procedure of modeled spectral components to extract the fraction of thermal neutron emission. The results showed the same trend of the ones obtained with the dedicated spectrometer TOFOR, even though the values from the NE213 analysis were systematically higher. This discrepancy is probably due to the different lines of sight of the two spectrometers (tangential for the NE213, vertical for TOFOR). The uncertainties on the thermal fraction estimates were from 4 to 7 times higher than the ones from the TOFOR analysis.

  1. The MAGNEX spectrometer: Results and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.

    2016-06-01

    This review discusses the main achievements and future perspectives of the MAGNEX spectrometer at the INFN-LNS laboratory in Catania (Italy). MAGNEX is a large-acceptance magnetic spectrometer for the detection of the ions emitted in nuclear collisions below Fermi energy. In the first part of the paper an overview of the MAGNEX features is presented. The successful application to the precise reconstruction of the momentum vector, to the identification of the ion masses and to the determination of the transport efficiency is demonstrated by in-beam tests. In the second part, an overview of the most relevant scientific achievements is given. Results from nuclear elastic and inelastic scattering as well as from transfer and charge-exchange reactions in a wide range of masses of the colliding systems and incident energies are shown. The role of MAGNEX in solving old and new puzzles in nuclear structure and direct reaction mechanisms is emphasized. One example is the recently observed signature of the long searched Giant Pairing Vibration. Finally, the new challenging opportunities to use MAGNEX for future experiments are briefly reported. In particular, the use of double charge-exchange reactions toward the determination of the nuclear matrix elements entering in the expression of the half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. The new NUMEN project of INFN, aiming at these investigations, is introduced. The challenges connected to the major technical upgrade required by the project in order to investigate rare processes under high fluxes of detected heavy ions are outlined.

  2. Classification of Magnetic Nanoparticle Systems—Synthesis, Standardization and Analysis Methods in the NanoMag Project

    PubMed Central

    Bogren, Sara; Fornara, Andrea; Ludwig, Frank; del Puerto Morales, Maria; Steinhoff, Uwe; Fougt Hansen, Mikkel; Kazakova, Olga; Johansson, Christer

    2015-01-01

    This study presents classification of different magnetic single- and multi-core particle systems using their measured dynamic magnetic properties together with their nanocrystal and particle sizes. The dynamic magnetic properties are measured with AC (dynamical) susceptometry and magnetorelaxometry and the size parameters are determined from electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Using these methods, we also show that the nanocrystal size and particle morphology determines the dynamic magnetic properties for both single- and multi-core particles. The presented results are obtained from the four year EU NMP FP7 project, NanoMag, which is focused on standardization of analysis methods for magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:26343639

  3. Spherical grating spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoghue, Darragh; Clemens, J. Christopher

    2014-07-01

    We describe designs for spectrometers employing convex dispersers. The Offner spectrometer was the first such instrument; it has almost exclusively been employed on satellite platforms, and has had little impact on ground-based instruments. We have learned how to fabricate curved Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings and, in contrast to the planar gratings of traditional spectrometers, describe how such devices can be used in optical/infrared spectrometers designed specifically for curved diffraction gratings. Volume Phase Holographic gratings are highly efficient compared to conventional surface relief gratings; they have become the disperser of choice in optical / NIR spectrometers. The advantage of spectrometers with curved VPH dispersers is the very small number of optical elements used (the simplest comprising a grating and a spherical mirror), as well as illumination of mirrors off axis, resulting in greater efficiency and reduction in size. We describe a "Half Offner" spectrometer, an even simpler version of the Offner spectrometer. We present an entirely novel design, the Spherical Transmission Grating Spectrometer (STGS), and discuss exemplary applications, including a design for a double-beam spectrometer without any requirement for a dichroic. This paradigm change in spectrometer design offers an alternative to all-refractive astronomical spectrometer designs, using expensive, fragile lens elements fabricated from CaF2 or even more exotic materials. The unobscured mirror layout avoids a major drawback of the previous generation of catadioptric spectrometer designs. We describe laboratory measurements of the efficiency and image quality of a curved VPH grating in a STGS design, demonstrating, simultaneously, efficiency comparable to planar VPH gratings along with good image quality. The stage is now set for construction of a prototype instrument with impressive performance.

  4. First result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: precision measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-350 GeV.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Alberti, G; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Anderhub, H; Arruda, L; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Baret, B; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Basili, A; Batalha, L; Bates, J; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, R; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Biland, A; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bolmont, J; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Boudoul, G; Bourquin, M; Brun, P; Buénerd, M; Burger, J; Burger, W; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, C R; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chernoplyiokov, N; Chikanian, A; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Commichau, V; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Costado Dios, M T; Coste, B; Crespo, D; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirkoz, B; Dennett, P; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Diao, X H; Diago, A; Djambazov, L; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Dubois, J M; Duperay, R; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; van Es, J; Esser, H; Falvard, A; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Flood, K; Foglio, R; Fohey, M; Fopp, S; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Y; Gallilee, M; Gallin-Martel, L; Gallucci, G; García, B; García, J; García-López, R; García-Tabares, L; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gentile, S; Gervasi, M; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Girard, L; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy-Henningsen, C; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Grechko, A; Gross, A; Guerri, I; de la Guía, C; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Hauler, F; He, Z H; Heil, M; Heilig, J; Hermel, R; Hofer, H; Huang, Z C; Hungerford, W; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jacholkowska, A; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Jongmanns, M; Journet, L; Jungermann, L; Karpinski, W; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Koulemzine, A; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lauritzen, C; Lebedev, A; Lee, M W; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; León Vargas, H; Lepareur, V; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Lipari, P; Lin, C H; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, Y S; Lucidi, S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lustermann, W; Lv, S; Madsen, J; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masciocchi, F; Masi, N; Maurin, D; McInturff, A; McIntyre, P; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Menichelli, M; Mereu, I; Millinger, M; Mo, D C; Molina, M; Mott, P; Mujunen, A; Natale, S; Nemeth, P; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oh, S; Oliva, A; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Park, W H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, F; Pauw, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Perrin, E; Pessina, G; Pierschel, G; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pochon, J; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Porter, S; Pouxe, J; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ren, Z L; Ricol, J S; Riihonen, E; Rodríguez, I; Roeser, U; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sabellek, A; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Santos, B; Saouter, P; Sarchioni, M; Schael, S; Schinzel, D; Schmanau, M; Schwering, G; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Steuer, M; Stiff, K; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Sun, X H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tassan-Viol, J; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Titus, C; Tomassetti, N; Toral, F; Torsti, J; Tsai, J R; Tutt, J C; Ulbricht, J; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vargas Trevino, M; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Vergain, M; Verlaat, B; Vescovi, C; Vialle, J P; Viertel, G; Volpini, G; Wang, D; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Wallraff, W; Weng, Z L; Willenbrock, M; Wlochal, M; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Wu, Z S; Xiao, W J; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J G; Zhang, Z; Zhang, M M; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2013-04-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8 × 10(6) positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ∼ 250  GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron ratio shows no observable anisotropy. Together, these features show the existence of new physical phenomena. PMID:25166975

  5. First result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: precision measurement of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays of 0.5-350 GeV.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Alberti, G; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Anderhub, H; Arruda, L; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Baret, B; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Basili, A; Batalha, L; Bates, J; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, R; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Biland, A; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bolmont, J; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Boudoul, G; Bourquin, M; Brun, P; Buénerd, M; Burger, J; Burger, W; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, C R; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chernoplyiokov, N; Chikanian, A; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Commichau, V; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Costado Dios, M T; Coste, B; Crespo, D; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirkoz, B; Dennett, P; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Diao, X H; Diago, A; Djambazov, L; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Dubois, J M; Duperay, R; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; van Es, J; Esser, H; Falvard, A; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Flood, K; Foglio, R; Fohey, M; Fopp, S; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Y; Gallilee, M; Gallin-Martel, L; Gallucci, G; García, B; García, J; García-López, R; García-Tabares, L; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gentile, S; Gervasi, M; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Girard, L; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy-Henningsen, C; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Grechko, A; Gross, A; Guerri, I; de la Guía, C; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Hauler, F; He, Z H; Heil, M; Heilig, J; Hermel, R; Hofer, H; Huang, Z C; Hungerford, W; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jacholkowska, A; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Jongmanns, M; Journet, L; Jungermann, L; Karpinski, W; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Koulemzine, A; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lauritzen, C; Lebedev, A; Lee, M W; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; León Vargas, H; Lepareur, V; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Lipari, P; Lin, C H; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, Y S; Lucidi, S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lustermann, W; Lv, S; Madsen, J; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masciocchi, F; Masi, N; Maurin, D; McInturff, A; McIntyre, P; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Menichelli, M; Mereu, I; Millinger, M; Mo, D C; Molina, M; Mott, P; Mujunen, A; Natale, S; Nemeth, P; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oh, S; Oliva, A; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Park, W H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, F; Pauw, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Perrin, E; Pessina, G; Pierschel, G; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pochon, J; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Porter, S; Pouxe, J; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ren, Z L; Ricol, J S; Riihonen, E; Rodríguez, I; Roeser, U; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sabellek, A; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Santos, B; Saouter, P; Sarchioni, M; Schael, S; Schinzel, D; Schmanau, M; Schwering, G; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Siedling, R; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Steuer, M; Stiff, K; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Sun, X H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tassan-Viol, J; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Titus, C; Tomassetti, N; Toral, F; Torsti, J; Tsai, J R; Tutt, J C; Ulbricht, J; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vargas Trevino, M; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Vergain, M; Verlaat, B; Vescovi, C; Vialle, J P; Viertel, G; Volpini, G; Wang, D; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Wallraff, W; Weng, Z L; Willenbrock, M; Wlochal, M; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Wu, Z S; Xiao, W J; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J G; Zhang, Z; Zhang, M M; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2013-04-01

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8 × 10(6) positron and electron events is presented. The very accurate data show that the positron fraction is steadily increasing from 10 to ∼ 250  GeV, but, from 20 to 250 GeV, the slope decreases by an order of magnitude. The positron fraction spectrum shows no fine structure, and the positron to electron ratio shows no observable anisotropy. Together, these features show the existence of new physical phenomena.

  6. The hot plasma spectrometers on Freja

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, O.; Eliasson, L.

    1991-11-01

    The hot plasma instrumentation F3H on the Swedish-German Freja satellite due for launch in 1992 will consist of electron and ion spectrometers. The spectrometer Magnetic imaging Two dimensional Electron (MATE) will measure the two dimensional electron distribution in the spin plane in the energy range 0.1 to 120 keV. The ion mass spectrometer Three dimensional Ion Composition Spectrometer (TICS) measures a full three dimensional distribution in the energy range 0.5 to 15000 eV/q with high mass resolution. The instruments use a particle 'imaging' detector technique based on a large diameter microchannel plate with position sensitive anode. The topics to be studied with the Freja hot plasma spectrometers include auroral particle acceleration, heating and acceleration of ionospheric ions, and the dynamics of auroral arc systems. Of special importance to the scientific objectives is the high data rate from the Freja instrumentation, the MATE and TICS spectrometers will be sampled every 10 ms, corresponding to a spatial resolution better than 70 m at ionospheric heights. The design, simulation, and calibration of the spectrometers are discussed.

  7. The OPERA muon spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfagnini, A.; Bergnoli, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carrara, E.; Ciesielski, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Fanin, C.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L.; Cazes, A.; Cecchetti, A.; Di Troia, C.; Dulach, B.; Felici, G.; Mengucci, A.; Orecchini, D.; Paoloni, A.; Spinetti, M.; Terranova, F.; Ventura, M.; Votano, L.; Candela, A.; D'Incecco, M.; Gustavino, C.; Lindozzi, M.

    2007-03-01

    The OPERA experiment will study νμ to ντ oscillations through τ appearance on the 732 km long CERN to Gran Sasso baseline. The magnet yokes of the two muon spectrometers are instrumented with 48 planes of high resistivity bakelite Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) operated in streamer mode. Each plane covers about 70 m2. A general introduction to the system installation and commissioning will be given. Four RPC planes were instrumented and the first tests were performed confirming a good behavior of the installed RPCs in terms of intrinsic noise and operating currents. The measured noise maps agree with those obtained in the extensive quality test performed at surface. Counting rates are below 20 Hz/m2. Single and multiple cosmic muon tracks were also reconstructed. The estimated efficiency is close to the geometrical limit and the very first measurements of the absolute and differential muon flux are in agreement with the expectations. Finally, a description of the readout electronics and of the slow control system is given.

  8. The Results of Recent MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoid Test

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-10-15

    The MICE spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The MICE spectrometer solenoids may be the largest magnets that have been cooled using small two stage coolers. During the previous test of this magnet, the cooler first stage temperatures were too high. The causes of some of the extra first stage heat load has been identified and corrected. The rebuilt magnet had a single stage GM cooler in addition to the three pulse tube coolers. The added cooler reduces the temperature of the top of the HTS leads, the shield and of the first stage of the pulse tube coolers.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Project 35-26-7: A Cuban Case of Engineering Physics and Biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabal Mirabal, Carlos A.

    The Magnetic Resonance Project 35-26-7 started in December 1987, commissioned by the [then] Cuban Prime Minister, Fidel Castro, who—concerned about introducing technological advancement into the Cuban health [system]—had for some months taken an interest in the possibility of building magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment for medical diagnosis in Cuba (Zito M, Argüelles MM et al, Y sin embargo-: ciencia: hablan 30 investigadores cubanos. Editoria April, Habana, pp 56-66, 1999; Cabal, Biofísica Médica. In: Fidel Castro Dìas-Balart (eds) Cuba. Amanecer del Tercer Milenio. Ciencia, Sociedad y Tecnología: Biofísica Médica. Debate Editorial, Madrid, pp 31-48, 2002). Many of the companies producing MRI equipment were unable to deliver this technology to Cuba due to the bloqueo, the United States embargo against Cuba. Those who were later to advance the project's progress in scientific technology initially regarded the implementation of such a project in a developing country as unfeasible due to its complexity. But Fidel's belief and confidence and in turn the Cuban scientists' commitment to him and to Cuban science proved to be an undeniable factors for its success.

  10. A nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer concept for hermetically sealed magic angle spinning investigations on highly toxic, radiotoxic, or air sensitive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L.; Somers, J.; Berkmann, C.; Koepp, F.; Rothermel, A.; Pauvert, O.; Selfslag, C.; Farnan, I.

    2013-05-01

    A concept to integrate a commercial high-resolution, magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) probe capable of very rapid rotation rates (70 kHz) in a hermetically sealed enclosure for the study of highly radiotoxic materials has been developed and successfully demonstrated. The concept centres on a conventional wide bore (89 mm) solid-state NMR magnet operating with industry standard 54 mm diameter probes designed for narrow bore magnets. Rotor insertion and probe tuning take place within a hermetically enclosed glovebox, which extends into the bore of the magnet, in the space between the probe and the magnet shim system. Oxygen-17 MAS-NMR measurements demonstrate the possibility of obtaining high quality spectra from small sample masses (˜10 mg) of highly radiotoxic material and the need for high spinning speeds to improve the spectral resolution when working with actinides. The large paramagnetic susceptibility arising from actinide paramagnetism in (Th1-xUx)O2 solid solutions gives rise to extensive spinning sidebands and poor resolution at 15 kHz, which is dramatically improved at 55 kHz. The first 17O MAS-NMR measurements on NpO2+x samples spinning at 55 kHz are also reported. The glovebox approach developed here for radiotoxic materials can be easily adapted to work with other hazardous or even air sensitive materials.

  11. Double focusing ion mass spectrometer of cylindrical symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coplan, M. A.; Moore, J. H.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    A mass spectrometer consisting of an electric sector followed by a magnetic sector is described. The geometry is a cylindrically symmetric generalization of the Mattauch-Herzog spectrometer (1934). With its large annular entrance aperture and a position-sensitive detector, the instrument provides a large geometric factor and 100-percent duty factor, making it appropriate for spacecraft experiments.

  12. Advanced Laboratory NMR Spectrometer with Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biscegli, Clovis; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of an inexpensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for use in advanced laboratory courses. Applications to the nondestructive analysis of the oil content in corn seeds and in monitoring the crystallization of polymers are presented. (SK)

  13. Mesospheric aerosol sampling spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappmiller, Scott; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Horanyi, Mihaly; Kohnert, Rick

    . The Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer (MASS) instrument has been launched on two sounding rockets in August, 2007 from Andoya, Norway to detect charged sub-visible aerosol particles in the polar mesosphere. The MASS instrument is designed to collect charged aerosols, cluster ions, and electrons on four pairs of graphite electrodes, three of which are biased with increasing voltage. The design of the MASS instrument was complicated by the short mean free path in the mesosphere. The opening to MASS was deliberately built to increase the mean free path and to reduce the shock wave within the instrument. The design procedure began with aerodynamics simulations of the flow through the instrument using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) in 3-D. The electric fields within the instrument were calculated using a Laplace solver in 3-D. With the aerodynamic and electric field simulations completed, an algorithm was created to find the trajectories of charged aerosols including collisions within MASS. Using this algorithm the collection efficiencies for each electrode was calculated as a function of the charge to mass ratio of the incoming particle. The simulation results have been confirmed experimentally using an Argon RF ion beam. The data from the August launches have been analyzed and the initial results show the MASS instrument operated as expected. Additional studies are underway to determine if there were effects from payload charging or spurious charge generation within the instrument. This project is supported by NASA.

  14. Mass spectrometer and methods of increasing dispersion between ion beams

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Olson, John E.; Delmore, James E.

    2006-01-10

    A mass spectrometer includes a magnetic sector configured to separate a plurality of ion beams, and an electrostatic sector configured to receive the plurality of ion beams from the magnetic sector and increase separation between the ion beams, the electrostatic sector being used as a dispersive element following magnetic separation of the plurality of ion beams. Other apparatus and methods are provided.

  15. Recommendations for Guidelines for Environment-Specific Magnetic-Field Measurements, Rapid Program Engineering Project #2

    SciTech Connect

    Electric Research and Management, Inc.; IIT Research Institute; Magnetic Measurements; Survey Research Center, University of California; T. Dan Bracken, Inc.

    1997-03-11

    The purpose of this project was to document widely applicable methods for characterizing the magnetic fields in a given environment, recognizing the many sources co-existing within that space. The guidelines are designed to allow the reader to follow an efficient process to (1) plan the goals and requirements of a magnetic-field study, (2) develop a study structure and protocol, and (3) document and carry out the plan. These guidelines take the reader first through the process of developing a basic study strategy, then through planning and performing the data collection. Last, the critical factors of data management, analysis reporting, and quality assurance are discussed. The guidelines are structured to allow the researcher to develop a protocol that responds to specific site and project needs. The Research and Public Information Dissemination Program (RAPID) is based on exposure to magnetic fields and the potential health effects. Therefore, the most important focus for these magnetic-field measurement guidelines is relevance to exposure. The assumed objective of an environment-specific measurement is to characterize the environment (given a set of occupants and magnetic-field sources) so that information about the exposure of the occupants may be inferred. Ideally, the researcher seeks to obtain complete or "perfect" information about these magnetic fields, so that personal exposure might also be modeled perfectly. However, complete data collection is not feasible. In fact, it has been made more difficult as the research field has moved to expand the list of field parameters measured, increasing the cost and complexity of performing a measurement and analyzing the data. The guidelines address this issue by guiding the user to design a measurement protocol that will gather the most exposure-relevant information based on the locations of people in relation to the sources. We suggest that the "microenvironment" become the base unit of area in a study, with

  16. The Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheson, E.; Harris, T. J.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and operation of a quadrupole mass spectrometer for experiments in an advanced-teaching laboratory. Discusses the theory of operation of the spectrometer and the factors affecting the resolution. Some examples of mass spectra obtained with this instrument are presented and discussed. (LC)

  17. Microprocessor-Based Airborne Spectrometer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kates, John C.

    1980-08-01

    A system for airborne infrared spectral signature measurements has been developed using a Fourier transform spectrometer interfaced to a microprocessor data acquisition, control and display system. The microprocessor is a DEC LSI-ll with 20KW RAM, 4KW EPROM, DMA spectrometer interface, digital magnetic tape, and dot-matrix video graphic display. A real-time executive tailored to the requirements and resources available allows concurrent data acquisition, recording, reduction and display. Using multiple buffers, acquisition of spectrometer data via DMA is overlapped with magnetic tape output. A background task selects the most recent spectrometer data and processes it using an FFT into a raw spectrum. A reference background spectrum is subtracted to isolate the data component, then a reference instrument response function is applied to obtain a calibrated absolute irradiance spectrum. The irradiance spectrum is displayed on the video graphic display and mixed with boresight camera video to show the target spectrum superimposed on the target image. Extensive selftest facilities are incorporated for testing all system components and compatibility with data reduction systems. System calibration is supported by selection of reference blackbody temperatures, apertures, and distances. The instrument response curve obtained during calibration is displayed for verification of correct spectrometer operation or diagnosis of faults.

  18. Multi-projection magnetic resonance inverse imaging of the human visuomotor system

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Kevin Wen-Kai; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Witzel, Thomas; Chang, Wei-Tang; Kuo, Wen-Jui; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    Using highly parallel radiofrequency (RF) detection, magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) can achieve 100 ms temporal resolution with whole brain coverage. This is achieved by trading off partition encoding steps and thus spatial resolution for a higher acquisition rate. The reduced spatial information is estimated by solving under-determined inverse problems using RF coil sensitivity information. Here we propose multi projection inverse imaging (mInI) to combine different projection images to improve the spatial resolution of InI. Specifically, coronal, sagittal, and transverse projection images were acquired from different runs of the fMRI acquisitions using a 32-channel head coil array. Simulations show that mInI improves the quality of the instantaneous image reconstruction significantly. Going from one projection to three projections, the spatial resolution quantified by the full width at half maximum of the point-spread function (PSF) is improved from 2.6 pixels to 1.4 pixels (4 mm nominal resolution per pixel). Considering the shape of the PSF, the effective spatial resolution is improved from 16.9 pixels to 4.7 pixels. In vivo fMRI experiments using a two-choice reaction time tasks shows visual and sensorimotor cortical activity spatially consistent with typical EPI data, yet mInI offers 100 ms temporal resolution with the whole brain coverage. The mInI data with three projections revealed that the sensorimotor cortex was activated 700 ms after the visual cortex. mInI can be applied to BOLD-contrast fMRI experiments to characterize the dynamics of the activated brain areas with a high spatiotemporal resolution. PMID:22326985

  19. Collaborative Simulation and Testing of the Superconducting Dipole Prototype Magnet for the FAIR Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yinfeng; Zhu, Zhe; Xu, Houchang; Wu, Weiyue

    2012-08-01

    The superconducting dipole prototype magnet of the collector ring for the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is an international cooperation project. The collaborative simulation and testing of the developed prototype magnet is presented in this paper. To evaluate the mechanical strength of the coil case during quench, a 3-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic (EM) model was developed based on the solid97 magnetic vector element in the ANSYS commercial software, which includes the air region, coil and yoke. EM analysis was carried out with a peak operating current at 278 A. Then, the solid97 element was transferred into the solid185 element, the coupled analysis was switched from electromagnetic to structural, and the finite element model for the coil case and glass-fiber reinforced composite (G10) spacers was established by the ANSYS Parametric Design Language based on the 3D model from the CATIA V5 software. However, to simulate the friction characteristics inside the coil case, the conta173 surface-to-surface contact element was established. The results for the coil case and G10 spacers show that they are safe and have sufficient strength, on the basis of testing in discharge and quench scenarios.

  20. Automated mass spectrometer grows up

    SciTech Connect

    McInteer, B.B.; Montoya, J.G.; Stark, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    In 1980 we reported the development of an automated mass spectrometer for large scale batches of samples enriched in nitrogen-15 as ammonium salts. Since that time significant technical progress has been made in the instrument. Perhaps more significantly, administrative and institutional changes have permitted the entire effort to be transferred to the private sector from its original base at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This has ensured the continuance of a needed service to the international scientific community as revealed by a development project at a national laboratory, and is an excellent example of beneficial technology transfer to private industry.

  1. The SAGE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Sorri, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Greenlees, P. T.; Butler, P. A.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Cox, D. M.; Cresswell, J. R.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Konki, J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Letts, S. C.; Mistry, A.; Page, R. D.; Parr, E.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Rahkila, P.; Sampson, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Seddon, D. A.; Simpson, J.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.

    2014-03-01

    The SAGE spectrometer has been constructed for in-beam nuclear structure studies. SAGE combines a Ge-detector array and an electron spectrometer for detection of -rays and internal conversion electrons, respectively, and allows simultaneous observation of both electrons and -rays emitted from excited nuclei. SAGE is set up in the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä and works in conjunction with the RITU gas-filled recoil separator and the GREAT focal-plane spectrometer allowing the use of the recoil-decay tagging method.

  2. Imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.L.

    1993-09-13

    This invention is comprised of an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer having a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer providing a series of images to a focal plane array camera. The focal plane array camera is clocked to a multiple of zero crossing occurrences as caused by a moving mirror of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and as detected by a laser detector such that the frame capture rate of the focal plane array camera corresponds to a multiple of the zero crossing rate of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The images are transmitted to a computer for processing such that representations of the images as viewed in the light of an arbitrary spectral ``fingerprint`` pattern can be displayed on a monitor or otherwise stored and manipulated by the computer.

  3. Composite Spectrometer Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Page, N. A.; Rodgers, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Efficient linear dispersive element for spectrometer instruments achieved using several different glasses in multiple-element prism. Good results obtained in both two-and three-element prisms using variety of different glass materials.

  4. AUTOMATIC MASS SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, M.L.; Tabor, C.D. Jr.

    1961-12-01

    A mass spectrometer for analyzing the components of a gas is designed which is capable of continuous automatic operation such as analysis of samples of process gas from a continuous production system where the gas content may be changing. (AEC)

  5. A Simple Raman Spectrometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blond, J. P.; Boggett, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses some basic physical ideas about light scattering and describes a simple Raman spectrometer, a single prism monochromator and a multiplier detector. This discussion is intended for British undergraduate physics students. (HM)

  6. Fourier Transform Spectrometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) data acquisition system includes an FTS spectrometer that receives a spectral signal and a laser signal. The system further includes a wideband detector, which is in communication with the FTS spectrometer and receives the spectral signal and laser signal from the FTS spectrometer. The wideband detector produces a composite signal comprising the laser signal and the spectral signal. The system further comprises a converter in communication with the wideband detector to receive and digitize the composite signal. The system further includes a signal processing unit that receives the composite signal from the converter. The signal processing unit further filters the laser signal and the spectral signal from the composite signal and demodulates the laser signal, to produce velocity corrected spectral data.

  7. Replacement and Original Magnet Engineering Options (ROMEOs): A European Seventh Framework Project to Develop Advanced Permanent Magnets Without, or with Reduced Use of, Critical Raw Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcguiness, P.; Akdogan, O.; Asali, A.; Bance, S.; Bittner, F.; Coey, J. M. D.; Dempsey, N. M.; Fidler, J.; Givord, D.; Gutfleisch, O.; Katter, M.; Le Roy, D.; Sanvito, S.; Schrefl, T.; Schultz, L.; Schwöbl, C.; Soderžnik, M.; Šturm, S.; Tozman, P.; Üstüner, K.; Venkatesan, M.; Woodcock, T. G.; Žagar, K.; Kobe, S.

    2015-06-01

    The rare-earth crisis, which peaked in the summer of 2011 with the prices of both light and heavy rare earths soaring to unprecedented levels, brought about the widespread realization that the long-term availability and price stability of rare earths could not be guaranteed. This triggered a rapid response from manufacturers involved in rare earths, as well as governments and national and international funding agencies. In the case of rare-earth-containing permanent magnets, three possibilities were given quick and serious consideration: (I) increased recycling of devices containing rare earths; (II) the search for new, mineable, rare-earth resources beyond those in China; and (III) the development of high-energy-product permanent magnets with little or no rare-earth content used in their manufacture. The Replacement and Original Magnet Engineering Options (ROMEO) project addresses the latter challenge using a two-pronged approach. With its basis on work packages that include materials modeling and advanced characterization, the ROMEO project is an attempt to develop a new class of novel permanent magnets that are free of rare earths. Furthermore, the project aims to minimize rare-earth content, particularly heavy-rare-earth (HRE) content, as much as possible in Nd-Fe-B-type magnets. Success has been achieved on both fronts. In terms of new, rare-earth-free magnets, a Heusler alloy database of 236,945 compounds has been narrowed down to approximately 20 new compounds. Of these compounds, Co2MnTi is expected to be a ferromagnet with a high Curie temperature and a high magnetic moment. Regarding the reduction in the amount of rare earths, and more specifically HREs, major progress is seen in electrophoretic deposition as a method for accurately positioning the HRE on the surface prior to its diffusion into the microstructure. This locally increases the coercivity of the rather small Nd-Fe-B-type magnet, thereby substantially reducing the dependence on the HREs Dy and

  8. Inexpensive Raman Spectrometer for Undergraduate and Graduate Experiments and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Christian; Spencer, Claire L.; Hippler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We describe the construction and performance of an inexpensive modular Raman spectrometer that has been assembled in the framework of a fourth-year undergraduate project (costs below $5000). The spectrometer is based on a 4 mW 532 nm green laser pointer and a compact monochromator equipped with glass fiber optical connections, linear detector…

  9. Concept of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Rare Event Search in the LUMINEU Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loidl, M.; Rodrigues, M.; Navick, X.-F.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Enss, C.

    2014-09-01

    The project LUMINEU is mainly aiming at the search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of the candidate nuclide Mo using cryogenic ZnMoO detectors with simultaneous heat and scintillation light detection for radioactive background rejection. It also includes some development for dark matter search using cryogenic Ge detectors with simultaneous heat and ionization detection for background rejection. For both cases, metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are studied among several thermometer types. In double-beta decay search, the intrinsically fast response of MMCs reading out the light detector may allow for a very fast signal rise time and help to reduce the potential background due to pile-up of two-neutrino double beta decay events. In dark matter search, MMCs reading out the heat channel may improve the energy resolution with respect to the standard NTD Ge thermistor readout and hence the sensitivity of the detectors for low-mass WIMPs.

  10. The Pickup Ion Composition Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Jason A.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Battel, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Observations of newly ionized atoms that are picked up by the magnetic field in the expanding solar wind contain crucial information about the gas or dust compositions of their origins. The pickup ions (PUIs) are collected by plasma mass spectrometers and analyzed for their density, composition, and velocity distribution. In addition to measurements of PUIs from planetary sources, in situ measurements of interstellar gas have been made possible by spectrometers capable of differentiating between heavy ions of solar and interstellar origin. While important research has been done on these often singly charged ions, the instruments that have detected many of them were designed for the energy range and ionic charge states of the solar wind and energized particle populations, and not for pickup ions. An instrument optimized for the complete energy and time-of-flight characterization of pickup ions will unlock a wealth of data on these hitherto unobserved or unresolved PUI species. The Pickup Ion Composition Spectrometer (PICSpec) is one such instrument and can enable the next generation of pickup ion and isotopic mass composition measurements. By combining a large-gap time-of-flight-energy sensor with a -100 kV high-voltage power supply for ion acceleration, PUIs will not only be above the detection threshold of traditional solid-state energy detectors but also be resolved sufficiently in time of flight that isotopic composition can be determined. This technology will lead to a new generation of space composition instruments, optimized for measurements of both heliospheric and planetary pickup ions.

  11. Nuclear structure analysis using the Orange Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Regis, J.-M.; Pascovici, Gh.; Christen, S.; Meersschout, T.; Bernards, C.; Fransen, Ch.; Dewald, A.; Braun, N.; Heinze, S.; Thiel, S.; Jolie, J.; Materna, Th.

    2009-01-28

    Recently, an Orange spectrometer, a focusing iron-free magnetic spectrometer, has been installed at a beam line of the 10 MV Tandem accelerator of the IKP of the University of Cologne. The high efficiency of 15% of 4{pi} for the detection of conversion electrons and the energy resolution of 1% makes the Orange spectrometer a powerful instrument. From the conversion electron spectrum, transition multipolarities can be determined using the so called K to L ratio. In combination with an array of germanium and lanthanum bromide detectors, e{sup -}-{gamma}-coincidences can be performed to investigate the level scheme. Moreover, the very fast lanthanum bromide scintillator with an energy resolution of 3% allows e{sup -}-{gamma} lifetime measurements down to 0.3 ns. A second Orange spectrometer can be added to build the Double Orange Spectrometer for e{sup -}-e{sup -}-coincidences. It is indispensable for lifetime measurements of low intensity or nearby lying transitions as often occur in odd-A and odd-odd nuclei. The capabilities are illustrated with several examples.

  12. Ion mobility spectrometer / mass spectrometer (IMS-MS).

    SciTech Connect

    Hunka Deborah Elaine; Austin, Daniel E.

    2005-07-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400). Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS) is described. The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.

  13. Ion Mobility Spectrometer / Mass Spectrometer (IMS-MS).

    SciTech Connect

    Hunka, Deborah E; Austin, Daniel

    2005-10-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS)in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400).Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS)The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.3 AcronymsIMSion mobility spectrometryMAAMaterial Access AreaMSmass spectrometryoaTOForthogonal acceleration time

  14. A 4 π dilepton spectrometer: PEPSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buda, A.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bałanda, A.; van Klinken, J.; Sujkowski, Z.; van der Woude, A.

    1993-11-01

    A novel positron-electron pair spectroscopy instrument (PEPSI) was designed to measure transitions in the energy region 10-40 MeV. It consists of Nd 2Fe 14B permanent magnets forming a compact 4 π magnetic filter consisting of 12 positron and 20 electron mini-orange-like spectrometers. The response function of PEPSI has been measured with mono-energetic beams of electrons from 5 to 20 MeV. The PEPSI spectrometer was used for measuring the internal pair conversion coefficient ( απ) of the 15.1 MeV M1 transition from a Jπ = 1 + state to the ground state in 12C. Our experimental value of απ = (3.3 ± 0.5) × 10 -3 is in good agreement with theoretical estimates.

  15. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  16. The Apollo Alpha Spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoda, N.; Kubierschky, K.; Frank, R.; Carroll, J.

    1973-01-01

    Located in the Science Instrument Module of Apollo 15 and 16, the Alpha Particle Spectrometer was designed to detect and measure the energy of alpha particles emitted by the radon isotopes and their daughter products. The spectrometer sensor consisted of an array of totally depleted silicon surface barrier detectors. Biased amplifier and linear gate techniques were utilized to reduce resolution degradation, thereby permitting the use of a single 512 channel PHA. Sensor identification and in-flight radioactive calibration were incorporated to enhance data reduction.

  17. Comparison of imaging spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C

    2000-01-09

    Realistic signal to noise performance estimates for the various types of instruments being considered for NGST are compared, based on the point source detection values quoted in the available ISIM final reports. The corresponding sensitivity of the various types of spectrometers operating in a full field imaging mode, for both emission line objects and broad spectral distribution objects, is computed and displayed. For the purpose of seeing the earliest galaxies, or the faintest possible emission line sources, the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer emerges superior to all others, by orders of magnitude in speed.

  18. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goldman, Don S.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  19. Automated calibration of a flight particle spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torbert, Roy B.

    1986-01-01

    An automatic calibration system was designed for use in the vacuum facility at the Space Science Laboratory of the Marshall Space Flight Center. That system was developed and used in the intervening winter to calibrate the ion spectrometer that eventually flew in May 1986 aboard the NASA project, CRIT 1. During this summer, it is planned to implement the calibration of both an ion and electron spectrometer of a new design whose basic elements were conceived during the winter of 1985 to 1986. This spectrometer was completed in the summer and successfully mounted in the vacuum tank for calibration. However, the source gate valve malfunctioned, and, at the end of the summer, it still needed a replacement. During the inevitable delays in the experimental research, the numerical model of the Critical Velocity effect was completed and these results were presented.

  20. Preliminary Test Results for the MICE Spectrometer Superconducting Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, Steve P.; Green, Michael A; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, S.T.; Wahrer, R.; Taylor, Clyde; Lu, X.; Chen, J. Y.; Wang, Mimi; Juang, Tiki

    2008-08-02

    This report describes the MICE spectrometer solenoids as built. Each magnet consists of five superconducting coils. Two coils are used to tune the beam going from or to the MICE spectrometer from the rest of the MICE cooling channel. Three spectrometer coils (two end coils and a long center coil) are used to create a uniform 4 T field (to {+-}0.3 percent) over a length of 1.0 m within a diameter of 0.3 m. The three-coil spectrometer set is connected in series. The two end coils use small power supplies to tune the uniform field region where the scintillating fiber tracker is located. This paper will present the results of the preliminary testing of the first spectrometer solenoid.

  1. Mass Spectrometers in Space!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Exploration of our solar system over several decades has benefitted greatly from the sensitive chemical analyses offered by spaceflight mass spectrometers. When dealing with an unknown environment, the broadband detection capabilities of mass analyzers have proven extremely valuable in determining the composition and thereby the basic nature of space environments, including the outer reaches of Earth s atmosphere, interplanetary space, the Moon, and the planets and their satellites. Numerous mass analyzer types, including quadrupole, monopole, sector, ion trap, and time-of-flight have been incorporated in flight instruments and delivered robotically to a variety of planetary environments. All such instruments went through a rigorous process of application-specific development, often including significant miniaturization, testing, and qualification for the space environment. Upcoming missions to Mars and opportunities for missions to Venus, Europa, Saturn, Titan, asteroids, and comets provide new challenges for flight mass spectrometers that push to state of the art in fundamental analytical technique. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on the recently-launch Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission incorporates a quadrupole analyzer to support direct evolved gas as well as gas chromatograph-based analysis of martian rocks and atmosphere, seeking signs of a past or present habitable environment. A next-generation linear ion trap mass spectrometer, using both electron impact and laser ionization, is being incorporated into the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) instrument, which will be flown to Mars in 2018. These and other mass spectrometers and mission concepts at various stages of development will be described.

  2. Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the global atmospheric changes is difficult with today's current technology. However, with high resolution and nearly continuous observations from a satellite, it's possible to transform our understanding of the atmosphere. To enable the next generation of atmospheric science, a new class of orbiting atmospheric sensors is being developed. The foundation of this advanced concept is the Fourier Transform Spectrometer, or FTS.

  3. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  4. Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.L.; Carter, M.R.; Fields, D.J.; Hernandez, J.

    1993-04-14

    The operating principles of an Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of such instruments with respect to alternative imaging spectrometers are discussed. The primary advantages of the IFTS are the capacity to acquire more than an order of magnitude more spectral channels than alternative systems with more than an order of magnitude greater etendue than for alternative systems. The primary disadvantage of IFTS, or FTS in general, is the sensitivity to temporal fluctuations, either random or periodic. Data from the IRIFTS (ir IFTS) prototype instrument, sensitive in the infrared, are presented having a spectral sensitivity of 0.01 absorbance units, a spectral resolution of 6 cm{sup {minus}1} over the range 0 to 7899 cm{sup {minus}1}, and a spatial resolution of 2.5 mr.

  5. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Davis, F.J.; Hurst, G.S.; Reinhardt, P.W.

    1959-08-18

    An improved proton recoil spectrometer for determining the energy spectrum of a fast neutron beam is described. Instead of discriminating against and thereby"throwing away" the many recoil protons other than those traveling parallel to the neutron beam axis as do conventional spectrometers, this device utilizes protons scattered over a very wide solid angle. An ovoidal gas-filled recoil chamber is coated on the inside with a scintillator. The ovoidal shape of the sensitive portion of the wall defining the chamber conforms to the envelope of the range of the proton recoils from the radiator disposed within the chamber. A photomultiplier monitors the output of the scintillator, and a counter counts the pulses caused by protons of energy just sufficient to reach the scintillator.

  6. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  7. Miniaturized Ion Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, William J. (Inventor); Stimac, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    By utilizing the combination of a unique electronic ion injection control circuit in conjunction with a particularly designed drift cell construction, the instantly disclosed ion mobility spectrometer achieves increased levels of sensitivity, while achieving significant reductions in size and weight. The instant IMS is of a much simpler and easy to manufacture design, rugged and hermetically sealed, capable of operation at high temperatures to at least 250.degree. C., and is uniquely sensitive, particularly to explosive chemicals.

  8. Degradation Free Spectrometers for Solar EUV Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, D. L.; McMullin, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Solar EUV observations will be made using two new degradation-free EUV spectrometers on a sounding rocket flight scheduled for summer 2012. The two instruments, a rare gas photoionization-based Optics-Free Spectrometer (OFS) and a Dual Grating Spectrometer (DGS), are filter-free and optics-free. OFS can measure the solar EUV spectrum with a spectral resolution comparable to that of grating-based EUV spectrometers. The DGS selectable spectral bandwidth is designed to provide solar irradiance in a 10 nm band centered on the Lyman-alpha 121.6 nm line and a 4 nm band centered on the He-II 30.4 nm line to overlap EUV observations from the SDO/EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and the SOHO/Solar EUV Monitor (SEM). A clone of the SOHO/SEM flight instrument and a Rare Gas Ionization Cell (RGIC) absolute EUV detector will also be flown to provide additional measurements for inter-comparison. Program delays related to the sounding rocket flight termination system, which was no longer approved by the White Sands Missile Range prevented the previously scheduled summer 2011 launch of these instruments. During this delay several enhancements have been made to the sounding rocket versions of the DFS instruments, including a lighter, simplified vacuum housing and gas system for the OFS and an improved mounting for the DGS, which allows more accurate co-alignment of the optical axes of the DGS, OFS, and the SOHO/SEM clone. Details of these enhancements and results from additional lab testing of the instruments are reported here. The spectrometers are being developed and demonstrated as part of the Degradation Free Spectrometers (DFS) project under NASA's Low Cost Access to Space (LCAS) program and are supported by NASA Grant NNX08BA12G.

  9. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  10. Artificial intelligence for geologic mapping with imaging spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, F. A.

    1993-01-01

    This project was a three year study at the Center for the Study of Earth from Space (CSES) within the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES) at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The goal of this research was to develop an expert system to allow automated identification of geologic materials based on their spectral characteristics in imaging spectrometer data such as the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). This requirement was dictated by the volume of data produced by imaging spectrometers, which prohibits manual analysis. The research described is based on the development of automated techniques for analysis of imaging spectrometer data that emulate the analytical processes used by a human observer. The research tested the feasibility of such an approach, implemented an operational system, and tested the validity of the results for selected imaging spectrometer data sets.

  11. Measuring Flash X-Ray Spectra with a Compton Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda; Espy, Michelle; Haines, Todd; Hunter, James; King, Nick; Merrill, Frank; Sedillo, Robert; Urbaitis, Algis; Volegov, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The determination of the x-ray energy spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult due to the short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). Recently, a Compton spectrometer has been refurbished and investigated as a potential device for conducting these measurements. The spectrometer was originally designed and characterized by Morgan et al.. The spectrometer consists of a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet and measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. In this apparatus, the incoming x-rays are collimated into a narrow beam before encountering a converter foil. Compton electrons are ejected and collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the device. The position of the electrons on the magnet focal plane is a function of their energy, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent energy calibration measurements and the spectrum reconstruction of a Bremsstrahlung source will be presented. The determination of the x-ray energy spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult due to the short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). Recently, a Compton spectrometer has been refurbished and investigated as a potential device for conducting these measurements. The spectrometer was originally designed and characterized by Morgan et al.. The spectrometer consists of a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet and measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. In this apparatus, the incoming x-rays are collimated into a narrow beam before encountering a converter foil. Compton electrons are ejected and collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the device. The position of the electrons on the magnet focal plane is a function of their energy, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent energy calibration measurements and the spectrum reconstruction of a Bremsstrahlung source will be presented. LA-UR-14-23602.

  12. Mass spectrometers: instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooks, R. G.; Hoke, S. H., II; Morand, K. L.; Lammert, S. A.

    1992-09-01

    Developments in mass spectrometry instrumentation over the past three years are reviewed. The subject is characterized by an enormous diversity of designs, a high degree of competition between different laboratories working with either different or similar techniques and by extremely rapid progress in improving analytical performance. Instruments can be grouped into genealogical charts based on their physical and conceptual interrelationships. This is illustrated using mass analyzers of different types. The time course of development of particular instrumental concepts is illustrated in terms of the s-curves typical of cell growth. Examples are given of instruments which are at the exponential, linear and mature growth stages. The prime examples used are respectively: (i) hybrid instruments designed to study reactive collisions of ions with surfaces: (ii) the Paul ion trap; and (iii) the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the area of ion/surface collisions, reactive collisions such as hydrogen radical abstraction from the surface by the impinging ion are studied. They are shown to depend upon the chemical nature of the surface through the use of experiments which utilize self-assembled monolayers as surfaces. The internal energy deposited during surface-induced dissociation upon collision with different surfaces in a BEEQ instrument is also discussed. Attention is also given to a second area of emerging instrumentation, namely technology which allows mass spectrometers to be used for on-line monitoring of fluid streams. A summary of recent improvements in the performance of the rapidly developing quadrupole ion trap instrument illustrates this stage of instrument development. Improvements in resolution and mass range and their application to the characterization of biomolecules are described. The interaction of theory with experiment is illustrated through the role of simulations of ion motion in the ion trap. It is emphasized that mature instruments play a

  13. Progress at the Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer ``THe-Trap''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoecker, Martin; Eronen, Tommi; Ketter, Jochen; Streubel, Sebastian; Blaum, Klaus; van Dyck, Robert S.

    2012-03-01

    In 2008, the ``University of Washington Penning-Trap Mass Spectrometer'' (UW-PTMS), originally designed and built by the Van Dyck group, was moved to the Max-Planck-Insitute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. It was set up in a dedicated laboratory that meets both the radiation-safety requirements, and the environment-stabilization demands for a high-precision measurement of the tritium/helium-3 mass ratio. Our goal is to measure this mass ratio with a relative uncertainty of 10-11, which would be more than an order of magnitude better than the previous best measurement. It would decrease the uncertainty in the tritium beta decay Q-value (an important parameter in the ongoing search for the neutrino mass by experiments such as KATRIN) by the same factor. In order to emphasize the specialization of our experiment with regard to Tritium and ^3Helium, it was renamed to ``THe-Trap''. THe-Trap features a double Penning-trap for rapid ion exchange, an external ion source to minimize trap contamination, a novel Zener-based voltage source, and active as well as passive stabilization of temperature, pressure and the magnetic field of the superconducting magnet. An overview of the project and a report on the recent progress will be given.

  14. Real time Faraday spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Tommy E.; Struve, Kenneth W.; Colella, Nicholas J.

    1991-01-01

    This invention uses a dipole magnet to bend the path of a charged particle beam. As the deflected particles exit the magnet, they are spatially dispersed in the bend-plane of the magnet according to their respective momenta and pass to a plurality of chambers having Faraday probes positioned therein. Both the current and energy distribution of the particles is then determined by the non-intersecting Faraday probes located along the chambers. The Faraday probes are magnetically isolated from each other by thin metal walls of the chambers, effectively providing real time current-versus-energy particle measurements.

  15. High-resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollnik, Hermann

    2015-11-01

    Discussed are different types of high resolving mass spectrographs and spectrometers. In detail outlined are (1) magnetic and electric sector field mass spectrographs, which are the oldest systems, (2) Penning Trap mass spectrographs and spectrometers, which have achieved very high mass-resolving powers, but are technically demanding (3) time-of-flight mass spectrographs using high energy ions passing through accelerator rings, which have also achieved very high mass-resolving powers and are equally technically demanding, (4) linear time-of-flight mass spectrographs, which have become the most versatile mass analyzers for low energy ions, while the even higher performing multi-pass systems have only started to be used, (5) orbitraps, which also have achieved remarkably high mass-resolving powers for low energy ions.

  16. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1989-09-19

    A moving belt interface is described for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer. 8 figs.

  17. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    A moving belt interface for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer.

  18. A firmware-defined digital direct-sampling NMR spectrometer for condensed matter physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pikulski, M. Shiroka, T.; Ott, H.-R.; Mesot, J.

    2014-09-15

    We report on the design and implementation of a new digital, broad-band nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for probing condensed matter. The spectrometer uses direct sampling in both transmission and reception. It relies on a single, commercially-available signal processing device with a user-accessible field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Its functions are defined exclusively by the FPGA firmware and the application software. Besides allowing for fast replication, flexibility, and extensibility, our software-based solution preserves the option to reuse the components for other projects. The device operates up to 400 MHz without, and up to 800 MHz with undersampling, respectively. Digital down-conversion with ±10 MHz passband is provided on the receiver side. The system supports high repetition rates and has virtually no intrinsic dead time. We describe briefly how the spectrometer integrates into the experimental setup and present test data which demonstrates that its performance is competitive with that of conventional designs.

  19. MASS SPECTROMETER LEAK

    DOEpatents

    Shields, W.R.

    1960-10-18

    An improved valve is described for precisely regulating the flow of a sample fluid to be analyzed, such as in a mass spectrometer, where a gas sample is allowed to "leak" into an evacuated region at a very low, controlled rate. The flow regulating valve controls minute flow of gases by allowing the gas to diffuse between two mating surfaces. The structure of the valve is such as to prevent the corrosive feed gas from contacting the bellows which is employed in the operation of the valve, thus preventing deterioration of the bellows.

  20. Modular total absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karny, M.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Fijałkowska, A.; Rasco, B. C.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Goetz, K. C.; Miller, D.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-11-01

    The design and performance of the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer built and commissioned at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is presented. The active volume of the detector is approximately one ton of NaI(Tl), which results in very high full γ energy peak efficiency of 71% at 6 MeV and nearly flat efficiency of around 81.5% for low energy γ-rays between 300 keV and 1 MeV. In addition to the high peak efficiency, the modular construction of the detector permits the use of a γ-coincidence technique in data analysis as well as β-delayed neutron observation.

  1. Automated transportable mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echo, M. W.

    1981-09-01

    The need was identified for a mass spectrometer (MS) which can be conveniently transported among several facilities for rapid verification of the isotopic composition of special nuclear material. This requirement for a light weight, transportable MS for U and Pu mass analysis was met by deleting the gas chromograph (GC) portions of a Hewlett-Packard Model 5992 Quadrupole GCMS and substituting a vacuum lock sample entry system. A programmable power supply and vacuum gauge were added and circuitry modifications were made to enable use of the supplied software.

  2. Gas Chromatic Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chowen

    1995-01-01

    Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) used to measure and identify combustion species present in trace concentration. Advanced extractive diagnostic method measures to parts per billion (PPB), as well as differentiates between different types of hydrocarbons. Applicable for petrochemical, waste incinerator, diesel transporation, and electric utility companies in accurately monitoring types of hydrocarbon emissions generated by fuel combustion, in order to meet stricter environmental requirements. Other potential applications include manufacturing processes requiring precise detection of toxic gaseous chemicals, biomedical applications requiring precise identification of accumulative gaseous species, and gas utility operations requiring high-sensitivity leak detection.

  3. Progress on the Design and Fabircation of the MICE SpectrometerSolenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Lia, D.; Sizman, M.S.

    2007-06-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) willdemonstrate ionization cooling in a short section of a realistic coolingchannel using a muon beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in theUK. A five-coil, superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet at each endof the cooling channel will provide a 4 T uniform field region for thescintillating fiber tracker within the magnet bore tubes. The trackermodules are used to measure the muon beam emittance as it enters andexits the cooling channel. The cold mass for the 400 mm warm bore magnetconsists of two sections: a three-coil spectrometer magnet and a two-coilmatching section that matches the uniform field of the solenoid into theMICE cooling channel. The spectrometer solenoid detailed designandanalysis has been completed, and the fabrication of the magnets is wellunder way. The primary features of the spectrometer solenoid magnet andmechanical designs are presented along with a summary of key fabricationissues and photos of the construction.

  4. Final Technical Report for the project titled "Manganese Based Permanent Magnet with 40 MGOe at 200°C"

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jun

    2015-12-31

    The objective of project was to develop MnBi based permanent magnet for high temperature application (~150°C). This objective is derived based on MnBi’s unique positive temperature dependence of coercivity, which is doubled from ~1 T at RT to ~2.5 T at 200°C. Because of its limited magnetization (<0.9 T at RT), the MnBi magnet is best suited to fill in the gap between rare earth based NdFeB-Dy or SmCo magnet (20 MGOe) and the AlNiCo magnet (10 MGOe) at 150°C. It is expected that if successfully developed, MnBi will effectively mitigate the world’s demand on Dy. Before this project, the highest LTP content in MnBi powder is about 90% if the quantity of the powder is less than 5 gram (using melt-spin method); or 80% if the quantity is greater than 100 gram (using conventional powder metallurgical method such as arc melting and annealing). After this project, large quantities (5kg/batch) with high LPT phase content (>92 wt%) can be routinely synthesized. This achievement is made possible by the newly developed synthesis method based on conventional metallurgical processing technique involving arc melting, two-stage ingot annealing, grinding, sieving, and vacuum annealing. Before this project, the finest powder particle size is about 35 μm with overall powder composition maintaining at about 85% LTP phase. The reason why LTP phase content is listed along with particle size is because LTP MnBi is easy to decompose when exposed to temperature higher than 350 °C. As result, only low energy ball milling can be used to refine the particle size; moreover, the ball milling time cannot exceed 4 hrs, or else the decomposed LTP MnBi phase will exceed 10%. After this project, the finest powder size is reduced to 1~5 μm while maintain the 90% LTP MnBi phase content. This achievement is made possible by a newly developed cryogenic ball milling system, which provides -70 °C ambient for the rolling container. Before this project, it is not clear if MnBi will

  5. Active tensor magnetic gradiometer system final report for Project MM–1514

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, David V.; Phillips, Jeffrey D.; Hutton, S. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    An interactive computer simulation program, based on physical models of system sensors, platform geometry, Earth environment, and spheroidal magnetically-permeable targets, was developed to generate synthetic magnetic field data from a conceptual tensor magnetic gradiometer system equipped with an active primary field generator. The system sensors emulate the prototype tensor magnetic gradiometer system (TMGS) developed under a separate contract for unexploded ordnance (UXO) detection and classification. Time-series data from different simulation scenarios were analyzed to recover physical dimensions of the target source. Helbig-Euler simulations were run with rectangular and rod-like source bodies to determine whether such a system could separate the induced component of the magnetization from the remanent component for each target. This report concludes with an engineering assessment of a practical system design.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  7. Project EAGLE (Early Academic Gifted Learning Experience): A Program for Gifted and Talented Students (Grades K-3)--Animals 3; Magnets; Sight; Geoboards 3; Dinosaurs 3; and Groups 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merkoski, Kay

    Six thematic activity booklets are presented for implementing Project EAGLE, an enrichment program for gifted and talented primary-level children. "Animals 3" introduces endangered animals and locates their home areas on maps or globes, using nine learning activities involving science and creative writing. "Magnets" discusses what magnets are and…

  8. Photoelectron spectrometer for attosecond spectroscopy of liquids and gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, I.; Huppert, M.; Brown, M. A.; van Bokhoven, J. A.; Wörner, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    A new apparatus for attosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids and gases is described. It combines a liquid microjet source with a magnetic-bottle photoelectron spectrometer and an actively stabilized attosecond beamline. The photoelectron spectrometer permits venting and pumping of the interaction chamber without affecting the low pressure in the flight tube. This pressure separation has been realized through a sliding skimmer plate, which effectively seals the flight tube in its closed position and functions as a differential pumping stage in its open position. A high-harmonic photon spectrometer, attached to the photoelectron spectrometer, exit port is used to acquire photon spectra for calibration purposes. Attosecond pulse trains have been used to record photoelectron spectra of noble gases, water in the gas and liquid states as well as solvated species. RABBIT scans demonstrate the attosecond resolution of this setup.

  9. Photoelectron spectrometer for attosecond spectroscopy of liquids and gases.

    PubMed

    Jordan, I; Huppert, M; Brown, M A; van Bokhoven, J A; Wörner, H J

    2015-12-01

    A new apparatus for attosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids and gases is described. It combines a liquid microjet source with a magnetic-bottle photoelectron spectrometer and an actively stabilized attosecond beamline. The photoelectron spectrometer permits venting and pumping of the interaction chamber without affecting the low pressure in the flight tube. This pressure separation has been realized through a sliding skimmer plate, which effectively seals the flight tube in its closed position and functions as a differential pumping stage in its open position. A high-harmonic photon spectrometer, attached to the photoelectron spectrometer, exit port is used to acquire photon spectra for calibration purposes. Attosecond pulse trains have been used to record photoelectron spectra of noble gases, water in the gas and liquid states as well as solvated species. RABBIT scans demonstrate the attosecond resolution of this setup. PMID:26724045

  10. Photoelectron spectrometer for attosecond spectroscopy of liquids and gases

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, I.; Huppert, M.; Wörner, H. J.; Brown, M. A.; Bokhoven, J. A. van

    2015-12-15

    A new apparatus for attosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids and gases is described. It combines a liquid microjet source with a magnetic-bottle photoelectron spectrometer and an actively stabilized attosecond beamline. The photoelectron spectrometer permits venting and pumping of the interaction chamber without affecting the low pressure in the flight tube. This pressure separation has been realized through a sliding skimmer plate, which effectively seals the flight tube in its closed position and functions as a differential pumping stage in its open position. A high-harmonic photon spectrometer, attached to the photoelectron spectrometer, exit port is used to acquire photon spectra for calibration purposes. Attosecond pulse trains have been used to record photoelectron spectra of noble gases, water in the gas and liquid states as well as solvated species. RABBIT scans demonstrate the attosecond resolution of this setup.

  11. Photoelectron spectrometer for attosecond spectroscopy of liquids and gases.

    PubMed

    Jordan, I; Huppert, M; Brown, M A; van Bokhoven, J A; Wörner, H J

    2015-12-01

    A new apparatus for attosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of liquids and gases is described. It combines a liquid microjet source with a magnetic-bottle photoelectron spectrometer and an actively stabilized attosecond beamline. The photoelectron spectrometer permits venting and pumping of the interaction chamber without affecting the low pressure in the flight tube. This pressure separation has been realized through a sliding skimmer plate, which effectively seals the flight tube in its closed position and functions as a differential pumping stage in its open position. A high-harmonic photon spectrometer, attached to the photoelectron spectrometer, exit port is used to acquire photon spectra for calibration purposes. Attosecond pulse trains have been used to record photoelectron spectra of noble gases, water in the gas and liquid states as well as solvated species. RABBIT scans demonstrate the attosecond resolution of this setup.

  12. Optical fiber interferometric spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Li, Baosheng; Liu, Yan; Zhai, Yufeng; Wang, An

    2006-02-01

    We design an optical fiber spectrometer based on optical fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In optical fiber Fourier transform spectrometer spectra information is obtained by Fourier transform of interferogram, which recording intensity change vs. optical path difference. Optical path difference is generated by stretching one fiber arm which wound around fiber stretch drive by high power supply. Information from detector is linear with time rather than with optical path difference. In order to obtain high accuracy wavenumber, reference beam is used to control the optical path difference. Optical path difference is measured by reference laser interference fringe. Interferogram vs. optical path difference is resampled by Brault algorithm with information from reference beam and test beam. In the same condition, one-sided interferogram has higher resolution than that of two-sided interferogram. For one-sided interferogram, zero path difference position must be determined as accurately as possible, small shift will result in phase error. For practical experiment in laboratory, position shift is inevitable, so phase error correction must be considered. Zero order fringe is determined by curve fitting. Spectrum of light source is obtained from one-sided interferogram by Fourier cosine transform. A spectral resolution of about ~3.1 cm -1 is achieved. In practice, higher resolution is needed. This compact equipment will be used in emission spectra and absorption spectra, especially in infrared region.

  13. Resonant ultrasound spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert; Visscher, William M.; Fisk, Zachary

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasound resonant spectrometer determines the resonant frequency spectrum of a rectangular parallelepiped sample of a high dissipation material over an expected resonant response frequency range. A sample holder structure grips corners of the sample between piezoelectric drive and receive transducers. Each transducer is mounted on a membrane for only weakly coupling the transducer to the holder structure and operatively contacts a material effective to remove system resonant responses at the transducer from the expected response range. i.e., either a material such as diamond to move the response frequencies above the range or a damping powder to preclude response within the range. A square-law detector amplifier receives the response signal and retransmits the signal on an isolated shield of connecting cabling to remove cabling capacitive effects. The amplifier also provides a substantially frequency independently voltage divider with the receive transducer. The spectrometer is extremely sensitive to enable low amplitude resonance to be detected for use in calculating the elastic constants of the high dissipation sample.

  14. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  15. Separation of magnetic susceptibility components from magnetization curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosareva, L.; Nourgaliev, D.; Kuzina, D.; Spassov, S.; Fattakhov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Modern lake sediments are a unique source of information for climate changes, regionally and globally, because all environmental variations are recorded by these sediments with high resolution. The magnetic properties of Chernyshov Bay (Aral Sea) sediments we investigated from core number 4 (N45o57'04.2''; E59o17'14.3'') are taken at far water depth of 9.5 m. The length of the core is 4.16 m. Samples for measurements were taken to plastic sample boxes with internal dimensions 2x2x2 cm. Remanent magnetization curves were measured by coercivity spectrometer for the separate determination of the different contributions to the total bulk magnetic susceptibility. There was measured also magnetic susceptibility using MS2 susceptibility meter. Those operations were done for data comparison between 2 susceptibilities obtained from different equipment. Our goal is to decipher the magnetic susceptibility signal in lake sediments by decomposing the bulk susceptibility signal of a lake sediment sequence into ferromagnetic (χf), dia-/paramagnetic (χp) and superparamagnetic (χsp) components using data from remanent and indused magnetization curves Each of these component has a different origin: paramagnetic minerals are usually attributed to terrigenous sediment input, ferromagnetics are of biogenic origin, and superparamagnetic minerals may be of either biogenic or terrigenous origin. Comparison between susceptibility measurements of MS2-Bartington susceptometer and of the coercivity spectrometer has shown good correlation. The susceptibility values measured in two different equipment are fairly close and indicate thus the reliability the proposed method. In research also has shown water level changes in Aral Sea based on magnetic susceptibility. The work is performed according to the Russian Government Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University also by RFBR research projects No. 14-05-31376 - а, 14-05-00785- а.

  16. Operation of a 400MHz NMR magnet using a (RE:Rare Earth)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting coil: Towards an ultra-compact super-high field NMR spectrometer operated beyond 1GHz.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Y; Piao, R; Iguchi, S; Nakagome, H; Takao, T; Kominato, K; Hamada, M; Matsumoto, S; Suematsu, H; Jin, X; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2014-10-18

    High-temperature superconductors (HTS) are the key technology to achieve super-high magnetic field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers with an operating frequency far beyond 1GHz (23.5T). (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO, RE: rare earth) conductors have an advantage over Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x (Bi-2223) and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8-x (Bi-2212) conductors in that they have very high tensile strengths and tolerate strong electromagnetic hoop stress, thereby having the potential to act as an ultra-compact super-high field NMR magnet. As a first step, we developed the world's first NMR magnet comprising an inner REBCO coil and outer low-temperature superconducting (LTS) coils. The magnet was successfully charged without degradation and mainly operated at 400MHz (9.39T). Technical problems for the NMR magnet due to screening current in the REBCO coil were clarified and solved as follows: (i) A remarkable temporal drift of the central magnetic field was suppressed by a current sweep reversal method utilizing ∼10% of the peak current. (ii) A Z2 field error harmonic of the main coil cannot be compensated by an outer correction coil and therefore an additional ferromagnetic shim was used. (iii) Large tesseral harmonics emerged that could not be corrected by cryoshim coils. Due to those harmonics, the resolution and sensitivity of NMR spectra are ten-fold lower than those for a conventional LTS NMR magnet. As a result, a HSQC spectrum could be achieved for a protein sample, while a NOESY spectrum could not be obtained. An ultra-compact 1.2GHz NMR magnet could be realized if we effectively take advantage of REBCO conductors, although this will require further research to suppress the effect of the screening current. PMID:25462945

  17. Operation of a 400 MHz NMR magnet using a (RE:Rare Earth)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting coil: Towards an ultra-compact super-high field NMR spectrometer operated beyond 1 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Y.; Piao, R.; Iguchi, S.; Nakagome, H.; Takao, T.; Kominato, K.; Hamada, M.; Matsumoto, S.; Suematsu, H.; Jin, X.; Takahashi, M.; Yamazaki, T.; Maeda, H.

    2014-12-01

    High-temperature superconductors (HTS) are the key technology to achieve super-high magnetic field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers with an operating frequency far beyond 1 GHz (23.5 T). (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO, RE: rare earth) conductors have an advantage over Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x (Bi-2223) and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8-x (Bi-2212) conductors in that they have very high tensile strengths and tolerate strong electromagnetic hoop stress, thereby having the potential to act as an ultra-compact super-high field NMR magnet. As a first step, we developed the world's first NMR magnet comprising an inner REBCO coil and outer low-temperature superconducting (LTS) coils. The magnet was successfully charged without degradation and mainly operated at 400 MHz (9.39 T). Technical problems for the NMR magnet due to screening current in the REBCO coil were clarified and solved as follows: (i) A remarkable temporal drift of the central magnetic field was suppressed by a current sweep reversal method utilizing ∼10% of the peak current. (ii) A Z2 field error harmonic of the main coil cannot be compensated by an outer correction coil and therefore an additional ferromagnetic shim was used. (iii) Large tesseral harmonics emerged that could not be corrected by cryoshim coils. Due to those harmonics, the resolution and sensitivity of NMR spectra are ten-fold lower than those for a conventional LTS NMR magnet. As a result, a HSQC spectrum could be achieved for a protein sample, while a NOESY spectrum could not be obtained. An ultra-compact 1.2 GHz NMR magnet could be realized if we effectively take advantage of REBCO conductors, although this will require further research to suppress the effect of the screening current.

  18. Spectrometers for fast neutrons from solar flares.

    PubMed

    Slobodrian, R J; Potvin, L; Rioux, C

    1994-10-01

    Neutrons with energies exceeding 1 GeV are emitted in the course of solar flares. Suitable dedicated neutron spectrometers with directional characteristics are necessary for a systematic spectroscopy of solar neutrons. We report here a study of instruments based on the detection of proton recoils from hydrogenous media, with double scattering in order to provide directional information, and also a novel scheme based on the detection of radiation from the neutron magnetic dipole moment, permitting also directional detection of neutrons. Specific designs and detection systems are discussed.

  19. Effect of projection velocity and temperature on the reflection of ultracold atoms from a periodic one-dimensional corrugated magnetic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Mandip; Hannaford, Peter

    2010-07-15

    The spatial profile of ultracold atoms reflecting from an exponentially decaying magnetic potential depends on parameters such as the corrugation in the magnetic potential and the temperature of the atomic cloud. We report on experimental investigations of the effect of projection velocity which determines the strength of the interaction of the atom cloud with the magnetic potential and the effect of temperature of ultracold {sup 87}Rb atoms reflecting from a periodic one-dimensional corrugated magnetic potential. The magnetic potential is generated on an atom chip by a periodic permanent magnetic structure of period 10 {mu}m. The amplitude of the corrugation is controlled by applying a uniform external-bias magnetic field.

  20. Development of an advanced spacecraft tandem mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drew, Russell C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to apply current advanced technology in electronics and materials to the development of a miniaturized Tandem Mass Spectrometer that would have the potential for future development into a package suitable for spacecraft use. The mass spectrometer to be used as a basis for the tandem instrument would be a magnetic sector instrument, of Nier-Johnson configuration, as used on the Viking Mars Lander mission. This instrument configuration would then be matched with a suitable second stage MS to provide the benefits of tandem MS operation for rapid identification of unknown organic compounds. This tandem instrument is configured with a newly designed GC system to aid in separation of complex mixtures prior to MS analysis. A number of important results were achieved in the course of this project. Among them were the development of a miniaturized GC subsystem, with a unique desorber-injector, fully temperature feedback controlled oven with powered cooling for rapid reset to ambient conditions, a unique combination inlet system to the MS that provides for both membrane sampling and direct capillary column sample transfer, a compact and ruggedized alignment configuration for the MS, an improved ion source design for increased sensitivity, and a simple, rugged tandem MS configuration that is particularly adaptable to spacecraft use because of its low power and low vacuum pumping requirements. The potential applications of this research include use in manned spacecraft like the space station as a real-time detection and warning device for the presence of potentially harmful trace contaminants of the spacecraft atmosphere, use as an analytical device for evaluating samples collected on the Moon or a planetary surface, or even use in connection with monitoring potentially hazardous conditions that may exist in terrestrial locations such as launch pads, environmental test chambers or other sensitive areas. Commercial development of the technology

  1. Chapter 3: Circum-Arctic mapping project: New magnetic and gravity anomaly maps of the Arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaina, C.; Werner, S.C.; Saltus, R.; Maus, S.; Aaro, S.; Damaske, D.; Forsberg, R.; Glebovsky, V.; Johnson, K.; Jonberger, J.; Koren, T.; Korhonen, J.; Litvinova, T.; Oakey, G.; Olesen, O.; Petrov, O.; Pilkington, M.; Rasmussen, T.; Schreckenberger, B.; Smelror, M.

    2011-01-01

    New Circum-Arctic maps of magnetic and gravity anomalies have been produced by merging regional gridded data. Satellite magnetic and gravity data were used for quality control of the long wavelengths of the new compilations. The new Circum-Arctic digital compilations of magnetic, gravity and some of their derivatives have been analyzed together with other freely available regional and global data and models in order to provide a consistent view of the tectonically complex Arctic basins and surrounding continents. Sharp, linear contrasts between deeply buried basement blocks with different magnetic properties and densities that can be identified on these maps can be used, together with other geological and geophysical information, to refine the tectonic boundaries of the Arctic domain. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

  2. The Nagoya cosmic-ray muon spectrometer 3, part 2: Track detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibata, S.; Iijima, K.; Kamiya, Y.; Iida, S.

    1985-01-01

    The twelve wide gap spark chambers were utilized as the track detectors of the Nagoya cosmic-ray muon spectrometer not only to obtain the precise locations of particles, but also to get some information about the correspondences between segments of trajectories. The area of each chamber is 150 x 70 sq cm and the width of a gap is 5 cm. The gas used is He at the atmospheric pressure. Each three pairs of them are placed on both sides of the deflection magnet. All images of sparks for each event are projected through the mirror system and recorded by two cameras stereoscopically. The mean detection efficiency of each chamber is 95 + or - 2% and the spacial resolution (jitter and drift) obtained from the prototype-experiment is 0.12 mm. Maximum detectable momentum of the spectrometer is estimated at about 10 TeV/c taking into account these characteristics together with the effects of the energy loss and multiple Coulomb scattering of muons in the iron magnet.

  3. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1989-12-26

    A charged particle spectrometer is described for performing ultrasensitive quantitative analysis of selected atomic components removed from a sample. Significant improvements in performing energy and angular refocusing spectroscopy are accomplished by means of a two dimensional structure for generating predetermined electromagnetic field boundary conditions. Both resonance and non-resonance ionization of selected neutral atomic components allow accumulation of increased chemical information. A multiplexed operation between a SIMS mode and a neutral atomic component ionization mode with EARTOF analysis enables comparison of chemical information from secondary ions and neutral atomic components removed from the sample. An electronic system is described for switching high level signals, such as SIMS signals, directly to a transient recorder and through a charge amplifier to the transient recorder for a low level signal pulse counting mode, such as for a neutral atomic component ionization mode. 12 figs.

  4. Optical fiber smartphone spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2016-05-15

    An optical fiber-based smartphone spectrometer incorporating an endoscopic fiber bundle is demonstrated. The endoscope allows transmission of the smartphone camera LED light to a sample, removing complications from varying background illumination. The reflected spectra collected from a surface or interface is dispersed onto the camera CMOS using a reflecting diffraction grating. A spectral resolution as low as δλ∼2.0  nm over a bandwidth of Δλ∼250  nm is obtained using a slit width, ωslit=0.7  mm. The instrument has vast potential in a number of industrial applications including agricultural produce analysis. Spectral analysis of apples shows straightforward measurement of the pigments anthocyanins, carotenoid, and chlorophyll, all of which decrease with increasing storage time. PMID:27176971

  5. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Young, Charles E.; Pellin, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A charged particle spectrometer for performing ultrasensitive quantitative analysis of selected atomic components removed from a sample. Significant improvements in performing energy and angular refocusing spectroscopy are accomplished by means of a two dimensional structure for generating predetermined electromagnetic field boundary conditions. Both resonance and non-resonance ionization of selected neutral atomic components allow accumulation of increased chemical information. A multiplexed operation between a SIMS mode and a neutral atomic component ionization mode with EARTOF analysis enables comparison of chemical information from secondary ions and neutral atomic components removed from the sample. An electronic system is described for switching high level signals, such as SIMS signals, directly to a transient recorder and through a charge amplifier to the transient recorder for a low level signal pulse counting mode, such as for a neutral atomic component ionization mode.

  6. Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucey, Paul G.; Williams, Timothy; Horton, Keith A.

    2002-01-01

    The Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer (CRIS) is an airborne remote-sensing system designed specifically for research on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of coastal waters. The CRIS includes a visible-light hyperspectral imaging subsystem for measuring the color of water, which contains information on the biota, sediment, and nutrient contents of the water. The CRIS also includes an infrared imaging subsystem, which provides information on the temperature of the water. The combination of measurements enables investigation of biological effects of both natural and artificial flows of water from land into the ocean, including diffuse and point-source flows that may contain biological and/or chemical pollutants. Temperature is an important element of such measurements because temperature contrasts can often be used to distinguish among flows from different sources: for example, a sewage outflow could manifest itself in spectral images as a local high-temperature anomaly.

  7. The HARP Time Projection Chamber: Characteristics and physics performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammosov, V.; Bolshakova, A.; Boyko, I.; Chelkov, G.; Dedovitch, D.; Dydak, F.; Elagin, A.; Gapienko, V.; Gostkin, M.; Guskov, A.; Kroumchtein, Z.; Koreshev, V.; Linssen, L.; De Min, A.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nikolaev, K.; Semak, A.; Sviridov, Yu.; Usenko, E.; Wotschack, J.; Zaets, V.; Zhemchugov, A.

    2008-04-01

    The HARP spectrometer that took data at the CERN Proton Synchrotron in 2001 and 2002 had as large-angle detector system a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) surrounded by Resistive Plate Chambers. The design of the TPC, experience with its operation, and its good physics performance are described. The successful recovery from track distortions arising from inhomogeneities of the electric and magnetic fields in the TPC volume is discussed.

  8. Lunar orbital mass spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, W. P.

    1971-01-01

    The design, development, manufacture, test and calibration of five lunar orbital mass spectrometers with the four associated ground support equipment test sets are discussed. A mass spectrometer was installed in the Apollo 15 and one in the Apollo 16 Scientific Instrument Module within the Service Module. The Apollo 15 mass spectrometer was operated with collection of 38 hours of mass spectra data during lunar orbit and 50 hours of data were collected during transearth coast. The Apollo 16 mass spectrometer was operated with collection of 76 hours of mass spectra data during lunar orbit. However, the Apollo 16 mass spectrometer was ejected into lunar orbit upon malfunction of spacecraft boom system just prior to transearth insection and no transearth coast data was possible.

  9. Nb$_3$Sn High Field Magnets for the High Luminosity LHC Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN requires a new generation of high field superconducting magnets. High field large aperture quadrupoles (MQXF) are needed for the low-beta triplets close to the ATLAS and CMS detectors, and high field two-in-one dipoles (11 T dipoles) are needed to make room for additional collimation. The MQXF quadrupoles, with a field gradient of 140 T/m in 150 mm aperture, have a peak coil field of 12.1 T at nominal current. The 11 T dipoles, with an aperture of 60 mm, have a peak coil field of 11.6 T at nominal current. Both magnets require Nb3Sn conductor and are the first applications of this superconductor to actual accelerator magnets.

  10. The PNL high-transmission three-stage mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, J. J.; Ells, D. R.; Bond, L. A.; Freedman, P. A.; Tattersall, B. N.; Lagergren, C. R.

    1992-12-01

    We have constructed a three-stage isotope-ratio mass spectrometer of unique ion-optical design that achieves high ion transmission efficiency and high abundance sensitivity. The spectrometer has tandem 90 deg deflection magnets with boundaries 18 deg off normal. The magnet drift lengths are 1.48 times the 27-cm radius of deflection. This extended geometry gives a mass dispersion equivalent to a 40-cm-radius magnet with normal boundaries. The first magnet renders the ion beam parallel in the vertical plane and provides a focus in the horizontal plane of mass dispersion. The second magnet brings the beam to a stigmatic focus. This novel ion-optical design gives 100 percent transmission without the need for intermediate focusing lenses. It also provides a 16 percent increase in mass resolution over the traditional tandem geometry with normal magnet boundaries. Complete transmission of ions is maintained through a third-stage cylindrical electric sector of 38-cm radius, which provides increased isotope-abundance sensitivity. The isotope-abundance sensitivity of the new mass spectrometer is an order of magnitude better than similar instruments with normal magnet boundaries. This is because the vertical focusing of the ion beam prevents ion scattering from the top and bottom of the flight tube. The measured values of the isotope-abundance sensitivity one-half mass unit away from the rhenium ion peaks at masses 185 and 187 are M - 1/2 = (6.5 +/- 0.5)(10)(exp -10) and M + 1/2 = (3.1 +/- 0.8)(10)(exp -10). By extrapolation, the uranium isotope-abundance sensitivity is M - 1 = 1(10)(exp -10). Construction of the instrument was facilitated by using standard commercial mass spectrometer components.

  11. Design of a compact spectrometer for high-flux MeV gamma-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Corvan, D. J. Sarri, G.; Zepf, M.

    2014-06-15

    A novel design for a compact gamma-ray spectrometer is presented. The proposed system allows for spectroscopy of high-flux multi-MeV gamma-ray beams with MeV energy resolution in a compact design. In its basic configuration, the spectrometer exploits conversion of gamma-rays into electrons via Compton scattering in a low-Z material. The scattered electron population is then spectrally resolved using a magnetic spectrometer. The detector is shown to be effective for gamma-ray energies between 3 and 20 MeV. The main properties of the spectrometer are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. Design of a compact spectrometer for high-flux MeV gamma-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Corvan, D J; Sarri, G; Zepf, M

    2014-06-01

    A novel design for a compact gamma-ray spectrometer is presented. The proposed system allows for spectroscopy of high-flux multi-MeV gamma-ray beams with MeV energy resolution in a compact design. In its basic configuration, the spectrometer exploits conversion of gamma-rays into electrons via Compton scattering in a low-Z material. The scattered electron population is then spectrally resolved using a magnetic spectrometer. The detector is shown to be effective for gamma-ray energies between 3 and 20 MeV. The main properties of the spectrometer are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Fault-rock Magnetism from Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project (WFSD) Implies the Different Slip Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Li, H.; Lee, T. Q.; Sun, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake had caused great human and financial loss, and it had induced two major earthquake surface rupture zones, including the Yingxiu-Beichuan earthquake fault (Y-B F.) and Guanxian-Anxian earthquake fault (G-A F.) earthquake surface rupture zones. After main shock, the Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project (WFSD) was co-organized by the Ministry of Science and Technology, Ministry of Land and Resources and China Bureau of Seismology, and this project focused on earthquake fault mechanics, earthquake slip process, fault physical and chemical characteristics, mechanical behavior, fluid behavior, fracture energy, and so on. Fault-rocks magnetism is an effective method for the earthquake fault research, such as earthquake slip dynamics. In this study, the fault-rocks from the drilling-hole cores and close to the Wenchuan Earthquake surface rupture zone were used to do the rock-magnetism and discuss the earthquake slip dynamics. The measurement results of magnetic susceptibility (MS) show that the relative high or low MS values are corresponded to the fault-rocks from the Y-B F. and G-A F., respectively. Other rock-magnetism gives more evidence to the magnetic mineral assemblage of fault-rocks from the two earthquake fault zones. The relative high MS in the drilling-holes and trench along the Y-B F. was caused by the new-formed ferrimagnetic minerals during the high temperature and rapid speed earthquake slip process, such as magnetite and hematite, so the Y-B F. had experienced high temperature and rapid speed thermal pressurization earthquake slip mechanism. The relative low MS in the trench along the G-A F. was possible caused by high content of Fe-sulfides, and the G-A F. had possibly experienced the low temperature and slow speed mechanical lubrication earthquake slip mechanism. The different earthquake slip mechanism was possibly controlled by the deep structure of the two earthquake faults, such as the fault

  14. Evaluation Report of the Language Immersion Magnet Project, 1986-1987. Report No. 478.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciriza, Frank

    The Language Immersion Magnet (LIM) program was established in five San Diego (California) city schools to "immerse" students in a second language by providing a strong emphasis on basic academic skills taught in that language. The primary language--English--is introduced later (as late as grade 3). This study attempted to describe the program and…

  15. Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey, San Angelo National Topographic Map: Texas, West Texas Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The results of analyses of the airborne gamma radiation and total magnetic field survey flown for the region identified as the San Angelo National Topographic Map NH14-1 are presented. The airborne data gathered are reduced by ground computer facilities to yield profile plots of the basic uranium, thorium, and potassium equivalent gamma radiation intensities, ratios of these intensities, aircraft altitude above the earth's surface, total gamma ray and earth's magnetic field intensity, correlated as a function of geologic units. The distribution of data within each geologic unit, for all surveyed map lines and tie lines, has been calculated and is included. Two sets of profiled data for each line are included, with one set displaying the above-cited data. The second set includes only flight line magnetic field, temperature, pressure, altitude data plus magnetic field data as measured at a base station. A general description of the area, including descriptions of the various geologic units and the corresponding airborne data, is included.

  16. Tracer diffusion measurements in solid lithium: a test case for the comparison between NMR in static and pulsed magnetic field gradients after upgrading a standard solid state NMR spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Marion Fischer, D; Duwe, Peter; Indris, Sylvio; Heitjans, Paul

    2004-09-01

    This paper reports on the upgrading of a standard solid state NMR spectrometer, which has been used in combination with a field variable 7 T cryomagnet, to a low-cost combined SFG and PFG NMR spectrometer. Both methods are applied to solid lithium as a simple test case. The results show that under the given conditions SFG NMR and PFG NMR can provide tracer diffusion coefficients for 7 Li diffusion down to about 10(-14) and 10(-13) m2/s, respectively. SFG and PFG NMR are complementary methods. The paper demonstrates advantages and disadvantages of each method with a concrete example and why it is desirable to be able to apply both methods to the same sample.

  17. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1989-08-08

    A method and apparatus are described for extracting for quantitative analysis ions of selected atomic components of a sample. A lens system is configured to provide a slowly diminishing field region for a volume containing the selected atomic components, enabling accurate energy analysis of ions generated in the slowly diminishing field region. The lens system also enables focusing on a sample of a charged particle beam, such as an ion beam, along a path length perpendicular to the sample and extraction of the charged particles along a path length also perpendicular to the sample. Improvement of signal to noise ratio is achieved by laser excitation of ions to selected auto-ionization states before carrying out quantitative analysis. Accurate energy analysis of energetic charged particles is assured by using a preselected resistive thick film configuration disposed on an insulator substrate for generating predetermined electric field boundary conditions to achieve for analysis the required electric field potential. The spectrometer also is applicable in the fields of SIMS, ISS and electron spectroscopy. 8 figs.

  18. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  19. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Young, Charles E.; Pellin, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting for quantitative analysis ions of selected atomic components of a sample. A lens system is configured to provide a slowly diminishing field region for a volume containing the selected atomic components, enabling accurate energy analysis of ions generated in the slowly diminishing field region. The lens system also enables focusing on a sample of a charged particle beam, such as an ion beam, along a path length perpendicular to the sample and extraction of the charged particles along a path length also perpendicular to the sample. Improvement of signal to noise ratio is achieved by laser excitation of ions to selected autoionization states before carrying out quantitative analysis. Accurate energy analysis of energetic charged particles is assured by using a preselected resistive thick film configuration disposed on an insulator substrate for generating predetermined electric field boundary conditions to achieve for analysis the required electric field potential. The spectrometer also is applicable in the fields of SIMS, ISS and electron spectroscopy.

  20. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  1. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bonebrake, Eric; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, Victor A.; Haight, R. C.; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Weltz, Adam

    2012-06-07

    This report documents the progress that has been completed in the first half of FY2012 in the MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer project. Significant progress has been made on the algorithm development. We have an improve understanding of the experimental responses in LSDS for fuel-related material. The calibration of the ultra-depleted uranium foils was completed, but the results are inconsistent from measurement to measurement. Future work includes developing a conceptual model of an LSDS system to assay plutonium in used fuel, improving agreement between simulations and measurement, design of a thorium fission chamber, and evaluation of additional detector techniques.

  2. Water Mass Map from Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    December 8, 2003

    This map shows the estimated lower limit of the water content of the upper meter of Martian soil. The estimates are derived from the hydrogen abundance measured by the neutron spectrometer component of the gamma ray spectrometer suite on NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft.

    The highest water-mass fractions, exceeding 30 percent to well over 60 percent, are in the polar regions, beyond about 60 degrees latitude north or south. Farther from the poles, significant concentrations are in the area bound in longitude by minus 10 degrees to 50 degrees and in latitude by 30 degrees south to 40 degrees north, and in an area to the south and west of Olympus Mons (30 degrees to 0 degrees south latitude and minus 135 degrees to 110 degrees longitude).

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for the NASA Office of Space Science in Washington. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. The gamma-ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona in collaboration with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, which provided the high-energy neutron detector, and the Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico, which provided the neutron spectrometer. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL.

  3. Method for calibrating mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Brands, Michael D [Richland, WA; Bruce, James E [Schwenksville, PA; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2002-12-24

    A method whereby a mass spectra generated by a mass spectrometer is calibrated by shifting the parameters used by the spectrometer to assign masses to the spectra in a manner which reconciles the signal of ions within the spectra having equal mass but differing charge states, or by reconciling ions having known differences in mass to relative values consistent with those known differences. In this manner, the mass spectrometer is calibrated without the need for standards while allowing the generation of a highly accurate mass spectra by the instrument.

  4. Multiple order common path spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbury, Amy B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a dispersive spectrometer. The spectrometer allows detection of multiple orders of light on a single focal plane array by splitting the orders spatially using a dichroic assembly. A conventional dispersion mechanism such as a defraction grating disperses the light spectrally. As a result, multiple wavelength orders can be imaged on a single focal plane array of limited spectral extent, doubling (or more) the number of spectral channels as compared to a conventional spectrometer. In addition, this is achieved in a common path device.

  5. Gamma ray spectrometer for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Gin, D.; Chugunov, I.; Shevelev, A.; Khilkevitch, E.; Doinikov, D.; Naidenov, V.; Pasternak, A.; Polunovsky, I.; Kiptily, V.

    2014-08-21

    Gamma diagnostics is considered to be primary for the confined α-particles and runaway electrons measurements on ITER. The gamma spectrometer will be embedded into a neutron dump of the ITER Neutral Particle Analyzer diagnostic complex. It will supplement NPA measurements on the fuel isotope ratio and confined alphas/fast ions. In this paper an update on ITER gamma spectrometer developments is given. A new geometry of the system is described and detailed analysis of expected signals for the spectrometer is presented.

  6. Images of gravitational and magnetic phenomena derived from two-dimensional back-projection Doppler tomography of interacting binary stars

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Mercedes T.; Cocking, Alexander S.; Fisher, John G.; Conover, Marshall J. E-mail: asc5097@psu.edu

    2014-11-10

    We have used two-dimensional back-projection Doppler tomography as a tool to examine the influence of gravitational and magnetic phenomena in interacting binaries that undergo mass transfer from a magnetically active star onto a non-magnetic main-sequence star. This multitiered study of over 1300 time-resolved spectra of 13 Algol binaries involved calculations of the predicted dynamical behavior of the gravitational flow and the dynamics at the impact site, analysis of the velocity images constructed from tomography, and the influence on the tomograms of orbital inclination, systemic velocity, orbital coverage, and shadowing. The Hα tomograms revealed eight sources: chromospheric emission, a gas stream along the gravitational trajectory, a star-stream impact region, a bulge of absorption or emission around the mass-gaining star, a Keplerian accretion disk, an absorption zone associated with hotter gas, a disk-stream impact region, and a hot spot where the stream strikes the edge of a disk. We described several methods used to extract the physical properties of the emission sources directly from the velocity images, including S-wave analysis, the creation of simulated velocity tomograms from hydrodynamic simulations, and the use of synthetic spectra with tomography to sequentially extract the separate sources of emission from the velocity image. In summary, the tomography images have revealed results that cannot be explained solely by gravitational effects: chromospheric emission moving with the mass-losing star, a gas stream deflected from the gravitational trajectory, and alternating behavior between stream state and disk state. Our results demonstrate that magnetic effects cannot be ignored in these interacting binaries.

  7. Polarized-neutron spectrometer development and experiments at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Majkrzak, C.F.; Shirane, G.

    1982-09-01

    Recent work at Brookhaven has focussed on the development of polarized neutron spectrometers and reflects the resurgence of interest in polarization analysis. Both Heusler crystals and FeGe multilayers used in conjunction with pyrolytic graphite crystals have been tested as polarizing monochromators on a triple-axis instrument. The goal is to first obtain polarized beams of adequate intensity and then to evaluate various instrumental innovations which affect control of spectrometer resolution by utilizing the properties of polarized beams. Progress in these regards is reported. A recent study of the magnetic excitations in amorphous ferromagnets employing the instrumentation for polarization analysis developed thus far is also discussed.

  8. Testing Short Samples of ITER Conductors and Projection of Their Performance in ITER Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2007-08-20

    Qualification of the ITER conductor is absolutely necessary. Testing large scale conductors is expensive and time consuming. To test straight 3-4m long samples in a bore of a split solenoid is a relatively economical way in comparison with fabrication of a coil to be tested in a bore of a background field solenoid. However, testing short sample may give ambiguous results due to different constraints in current redistribution in the cable or other end effects which are not present in the large magnet. This paper discusses processes taking place in the ITER conductor, conditions when conductor performance could be distorted and possible signal processing to deduce behavior of ITER conductors in ITER magnets from the test data.

  9. The Stellar Imager (SI) Project: Resolving Stellar Surfaces, Interiors, and Magnetic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Schrijver, K.; Karovska, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Stellar Imager (SI) is a UV/Optical. Space-Based Interferometer designed to enable 0.1 milli-arcsec (mas) spectral imaging of stellar surfaces and, via asteroseismology, stellar interiors and of the Universe in general. The ultra-sharp images of SI will revolutionize our view of many dynamic astrophysical processes by transforming point sources into extended sources, and snapshots into evolving views. The science of SI focuses on the role of magnetism in the Universe, particularly on magnetic activity on the surfaces of stars like the Sun. Its prime goal is to enable long-term forecasting of solar activity and the space weather that it drives. SI will also revolutionize our understanding of the formation of planetary systems, of the habitability and climatology of distant planets, and of many magneto-hydrodynamically controlled processes in the Universe. In this paper we discuss the science goals, technology needs, and baseline design of the SI mission.

  10. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of trace amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples after magnetic solid-phase extraction by using projection pursuit regression.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Jahan B; Zolfonoun, E

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic solid-phase extraction based on coated nano-magnets Fe(3)O(4) was applied for the preconcentration of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; anthracene, phenanthrene, fluorine, and pyrene) in environmental water samples prior to simultaneous spectrophotometric determination using multivariate calibration method. Magnetic nanoparticles, carrying target metals, were easily separated from the aqueous solution by applying an external magnetic field so, no filtration or centrifugation was necessary. After elution of the adsorbed PAHs, the concentration of PAHs was determined spectrophotometrically with the aid of a new and efficient multivariate spectral analysis base on principal component analysis-projection pursuit regression, without separation of analytes. The obtained results revealed that using projection pursuit regression as a flexible modeling approach improves the predictive quality of the developed models compared with partial least squares and least squares support vector machine methods. The method was used to determine four PAHs in environmental water samples.

  11. Thermodynamic Properties of Fast Ramped Superconducting Accelerator Magnets for the Fair Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E.; Mierau, A.; Schnizer, P.; Bleile, A.; Gärtner, W.; Guymenuk, O.; Khodzhibagiyan, H.; Schroeder, C.; Sikler, G.; Stafiniak, A.

    2010-04-01

    The 100 Tm synchrotron SIS 100 is the core component of the international Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) to be built at GSI Darmstadt. The 108 bending magnets are 3 m long 2 T superferric dipoles providing a nominal ramp rate of 4 T/s within a usable aperture of 115 mmṡ60 mm. An intensive R&D period was conducted to minimise the AC losses to lower operation costs and to guarantee a safe thermal stability for long term continuous cycling with a maximum repetition frequency of 1 Hz. The latter requirement is strictly limited by the overall heat flow originated by eddy currents and hysteresis losses in iron yoke and coil as well as by its hydraulic resistance respective to the forced two phase helium cooling flow within the hollow superconducting cable. Recently three full size dipoles—and one quadrupole magnets were built and intensive tests have been started in the end of 2008 at the GSI cryogenic test facility. We present the measured thermodynamic parameters of the first tested dipole: AC losses depending on Bmax and dB/dt for various characteristic ramping modes and conclude for necessary optimisations toward the final design of the series magnets.

  12. Lessening the Effects of Projection for Line-of-Sight Magnetic Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, K. D.; Barnes, Graham; Wagner, Eric

    2016-05-01

    A method for treating line-of-sight magnetic field data (Blos) is developed for the goal of reconstructing the radially-directed component (Br) of the solar photospheric magnetic field. The latter is generally the desired quantity for use as a boundary for modeling efforts and observational interpretation of the surface field, but the two are only equivalent where the viewing angle is exactly zero (μ=1.0). A common approximation known as the "μ-correction", which assumes all photospheric field to be radial, is compared to a method which invokes a potential field constructed to match the observed Blos (Alissandrakis 1981; Sakurai 1982), from which the potential field radial field component (Brpot) is recovered.We compare this treatment of Blos data to the radial component derived from SDO/HMI full-disk vector magnetograms as the "ground truth", and discuss the implications for data analysis and modeling efforts. In regions that are truly dominated by radial field, the μ-correction performs acceptably if not better than the potential-field approach. However, for any solar structure which includes horizontal fields, i.e. active regions, the potential-field method better recovers magnetic neutral line location and the inferred strength of the radial field.This work was made possible through contracts with NASA, NSF, and NOAA/SBIR.

  13. Paleomagnetic and Mineral-Magnetic Results From the Lake Bosumtwi Drilling Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. W.; Heil, C. W.; Peck, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Lake Bosumtwi is an impact crater lake located at 6.5ºN and 1.5ºW in Ghana. The Bosumtwi impact event and the Ivory Coast tektite strewn field generated by the event have an age of 1.07 Myr. The lake contains an approximately 300m sedimentary section that provides a nearly continuous stratigraphy of this interval. In addition, the majority of the section is annually laminated. Advantages of magnetic studies of Lake Bosumtwi sediments include: (1) duplicate drill holes; (2) high sedimentation rates; (3) laminations allow assessmet of core disturbance; and (4) sediments record polarity transitions, excusions, and possibly paleointensity at a low-latitude site; and (5) Milankovitch and sub- Milankovitch scale paleoclimate variations. Challenges include: (1) low-latitude site location makes it difficult to recognize excursions and polarity transitions; (2) anoxia that produces annual laminations also causes some reductive diagenesis; and (3) some intervals are weakly magnetic and have noisy data. Overall, with respect to its magnetic record, Lake Bosumtwi is neither a "silk purse," nor a "sows ear." We will detail our efforts to maximize the former and minimize the latter.

  14. Analysis of quench in the NHMFL REBCO prototype coils for the 32 T Magnet Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breschi, M.; Cavallucci, L.; Ribani, P. L.; Gavrilin, A. V.; Weijers, H. W.

    2016-05-01

    A 32 T all-superconductive magnet with high field REBCO inner coils is under development at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, Florida, USA. As part of the development activity, two prototype coils with full scale radial dimensions and final design features, but with reduced axial length were constructed. The prototype coils consist of six dry-wound double pancakes modules with uninsulated conductor and insulated stainless steel cowind. Quench studies on one of the prototype coils at 4.2 K in self-field and in a background magnetic field of 15 T were performed by activating a set of quench protection heaters. In this paper, we present a numerical analysis of the experimental results of the quench tests of one of the prototype coils. The numerical analysis was carried out through a coupled electro-thermal FEM model developed at the University of Bologna. The model is based on the coupling with distributed contact resistances of the coil pancakes described as 2D elements. A homogenization procedure of the REBCO tape and other coil materials is presented, which allows reducing the number of degrees of freedom and the computational effort. The model is applied to the analysis of the current and voltage evolutions during the experimental quench tests on the prototype coil.

  15. Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer (CRIS) is an airborne remote-sensing system designed specifically for research on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of coastal waters. The CRIS includes a visible-light hyperspectral imaging subsystem for measuring the color of water, which contains information on the biota, sediment, and nutrient contents of the water. The CRIS also includes an infrared imaging subsystem, which provides information on the temperature of the water. The combination of measurements enables investigation of biological effects of both natural and artificial flows of water from land into the ocean, including diffuse and point-source flows that may contain biological and/or chemical pollutants. Temperature is an important element of such measurements because temperature contrasts can often be used to distinguish among flows from different sources: for example, a sewage outflow could manifest itself in spectral images as a local high-temperature anomaly.anomaly. Both the visible and infrared subsystems scan in "pushbroom" mode: that is, an aircraft carrying the system moves along a ground track, the system is aimed downward, and image data are acquired in acrosstrack linear arrays of pixels. Both subsystems operate at a frame rate of 30 Hz. The infrared and visible-light optics are adjusted so that both subsystems are aimed at the same moving swath, which has across-track angular width of 15. Data from the infrared and visible imaging subsystems are stored in the same file along with aircraft-position data acquired by a Global Positioning System receiver. The combination of the three sets of data is used to construct infrared and hyperspectral maps of scanned areas shown.

  16. The GRAVITY spectrometers: optical qualification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazici, Senol; Straubmeier, Christian; Wiest, Michael; Wank, Imke; Fischer, Sebastian; Horrobin, Matthew; Eisenhauer, Frank; Perrin, Guy; Perraut, Karine; Brandner, Wolfgang; Amorim, Antonio; Schöller, Markus; Eckart, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    GRAVITY1 is a 2nd generation Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) operated in the astronomical K-band. In the Beam Combiner Instrument2 (BCI) four Fiber Couplers3 (FC) will feed the light coming from each telescope into two fibers, a reference channel for the fringe tracking spectrometer4 (FT) and a science channel for the science spectrometer4 (SC). The differential Optical Path Difference (dOPD) between the two channels will be corrected using a novel metrology concept.5 The metrology laser will keep control of the dOPD of the two channels. It is injected into the spectrometers and detected at the telescope level. Piezo-actuated fiber stretchers correct the dOPD accordingly. Fiber-fed Integrated Optics6 (IO) combine coherently the light of all six baselines and feed both spectrometers. Assisted by Infrared Wavefront Sensors7 (IWS) at each Unit Telescope (UT) and correcting the path difference between the channels with an accuracy of up to 5 nm, GRAVITY will push the limits of astrometrical accuracy to the order of 10 μas and provide phase-referenced interferometric imaging with a resolution of 4 mas. The University of Cologne developed, constructed and tested both spectrometers of the camera system. Both units are designed for the near infrared (1.95 - 2.45 μm) and are operated in a cryogenic environment. The Fringe Tracker is optimized for highest transmission with fixed spectral resolution (R = 22) realized by a double-prism.8 The Science spectrometer is more diverse and allows to choose from three different spectral resolutions8 (R = [22, 500, 4000]), where the lowest resolution is achieved with a prism and the higher resolutions are realized with grisms. A Wollaston prism in each spectrometer allows for polarimetric splitting of the light. The goal for the spectrometers is to concentrate at least 90% of the ux in 2 × 2 pixel (36 × 36 μm2) for the Science channel and in 1 pixel (24 × 24 μm) in the Fringe Tracking channel. In Section 1, we present

  17. Drifting Continents and Magnetic Fields. Crustal Evolution Education Project. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoever, Edward C., Jr.

    Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) modules were designed to: (1) provide students with the methods and results of continuing investigations into the composition, history, and processes of the earth's crust and the application of this knowledge to man's activities and (2) to be used by teachers with little or no previous background in the…

  18. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-12-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  19. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  20. Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucey, Paul G.; Williams, Timothy; Horton, Keith A.

    2004-01-01

    The Coastal Research Imaging Spectrometer (CRIS) is an airborne remote sensing system designed specifically for research on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of coastal waters. The CRIS includes a visible-light hyperspectral imaging subsystem for measuring the color of water, which contains information on the biota, sediment, and nutrient contents of the water. The CRIS also includes an infrared imaging subsystem, which provides information on the temperature of the water. The combination of measurements enables investigation of biological effects of both natural and artificial flows of water from land into the ocean, including diffuse and point-source flows that may contain biological and/or chemical pollutants. Temperature is an important element of such measurements because temperature contrasts can often be used to distinguish among flows from different sources: for example, a sewage outflow could manifest itself in spectral images as a local high-temperature anomaly. Both the visible and infrared subsystems scan in pushbroom mode: that is, an aircraft carrying the system moves along a ground track, the system is aimed downward, and image data are acquired in across-track linear arrays of pixels. Both subsystems operate at a frame rate of 30 Hz. The infrared and visible-light optics are adjusted so that both subsystems are aimed at the same moving swath, which has across-track angular width of 15 . Data from the infrared and visible imaging subsystems are stored in the same file along with aircraft- position data acquired by a Global Positioning System receiver. The combination of the three sets of data is used to construct infrared and hyperspectral maps of scanned areas (see figure). The visible subsystem is based on a grating spectrograph and a rapid-readout charge-coupled-device camera. Images of the swatch are acquired in 256 spectral bands at wavelengths from 400 to 800 nm. The infrared subsystem, which is sensitive in a single

  1. Fast estimation of defect profiles from the magnetic flux leakage signal based on a multi-power affine projection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Han, Wenhua; Shen, Xiaohui; Xu, Jun; Wang, Ping; Tian, Guiyun; Wu, Zhengyang

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic flux leakage (MFL) inspection is one of the most important and sensitive nondestructive testing approaches. For online MFL inspection of a long-range railway track or oil pipeline, a fast and effective defect profile estimating method based on a multi-power affine projection algorithm (MAPA) is proposed, where the depth of a sampling point is related with not only the MFL signals before it, but also the ones after it, and all of the sampling points related to one point appear as serials or multi-power. Defect profile estimation has two steps: regulating a weight vector in an MAPA filter and estimating a defect profile with the MAPA filter. Both simulation and experimental data are used to test the performance of the proposed method. The results demonstrate that the proposed method exhibits high speed while maintaining the estimated profiles clearly close to the desired ones in a noisy environment, thereby meeting the demand of accurate online inspection. PMID:25192314

  2. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Project at the Medical University of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Eric R.

    2008-04-25

    Department of Energy funds were used to support the development of a Center for Marine Structural Biology at the Marine Resources Center at Ft. Johnson in Charleston, South Carolina. The Ft. Johnson site is home to five institutions in a unique state/federal/academic partnership whose member institutions include the National Ocean Service (NOS), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), the SC Department of Natural Resources, and the College of Charleston. The Center for Marine Structural Biology sits adjacent to the newly completed Hollings Marine Laboratory and houses a 700 and 800 MHz nuclear magnetic resource instruments. The completed center is operational and meets it goal to provide state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance capabilities to resolve the molecular structures of compounds that have direct relevance to human health, including marine-derived biotoxins that are tested against cancer cell lines through collaborative studies with researchers at the Hollings Cancer Center at MUSC. Funds from the DOE assisted, in part, with the purchase of NMR probes and ancillary equipment for the 800 MHz NMR instrument. In addition, developmental funds was used to support the visit of an Scientific Advisory Board and for the NMR Planning Team to visit currently operational high field NMR facilities to guide their choice of instrumentation and design of the building.

  3. Spectrometer Observations Near Mawrth Vallis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This targeted image from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) shows a region of heavily altered rock in Mars' ancient cratered highlands. The featured region is just south of Mawrth Vallis, a channel cut by floodwaters deep into the highlands.

    CRISM acquired the image at 1216 UTC (8:16 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 2, 2006, near 25.4 degrees north latitude, 340.7 degrees east longitude. It covers an area about 13 kilometers (8 miles) long and, at the narrowest point, about 9 kilometers (5.6 miles) wide. At the center of the image, the spatial resolution is as good as 35 meters (115 feet) per pixel. The image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers.

    This image includes four renderings of the data, all map-projected. At top left is an approximately true-color representation. At top right is false color showing brightness of the surface at selected infrared wavelengths. In the two bottom views, brightness of the surface at different infrared wavelengths has been compared to laboratory measurements of minerals, and regions that match different minerals have been colored. The bottom left image shows areas high in iron-rich clay, and the bottom right image shows areas high in aluminum-rich clay.

    Clay minerals are important to understanding the history of water on Mars because their formation requires that rocks were exposed to liquid water for a long time. Environments where they form include soils, cold springs, and hot springs. There are many clay minerals, and which ones form depends on the composition of the rock, and the temperature, acidity, and salt content of the water. CRISM's sister instrument on the Mars Express spacecraft, OMEGA, has spectrally mapped Mars at lower spatial resolution and found several regions rich in clay minerals. The Mawrth Vallis region, in particular, was found to contain iron-rich clay. CRISM is observing these regions at several tens of times higher spatial resolution, to correlate the

  4. Operation of a 500 MHz high temperature superconducting NMR: towards an NMR spectrometer operating beyond 1 GHz.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Y; Nakagome, H; Tennmei, K; Hamada, M; Yoshikawa, M; Otsuka, A; Hosono, M; Kiyoshi, T; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2010-04-01

    We have begun a project to develop an NMR spectrometer that operates at frequencies beyond 1 GHz (magnetic field strength in excess of 23.5 T) using a high temperature superconductor (HTS) innermost coil. As the first step, we developed a 500 MHz NMR with a Bi-2223 HTS innermost coil, which was operated in external current mode. The temporal magnetic field change of the NMR magnet after the coil charge was dominated by (i) the field fluctuation due to a DC power supply and (ii) relaxation in the screening current in the HTS tape conductor; effect (i) was stabilized by the 2H field-frequency lock system, while effect (ii) decreased with time due to relaxation of the screening current induced in the HTS coil and reached 10(-8)(0.01 ppm)/h on the 20th day after the coil charge, which was as small as the persistent current mode of the NMR magnet. The 1D (1)H NMR spectra obtained by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet were nearly equivalent to those obtained by the LTS NMR magnet. The 2D-NOESY, 3D-HNCO and 3D-HNCACB spectra were achieved for ubiquitin by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet; their quality was closely equivalent to that achieved by a conventional LTS NMR. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the effects of screening current-induced magnetic field changes are predicted to be harmless for the 1.03 GHz NMR magnet system.

  5. Operation of a 500 MHz high temperature superconducting NMR: towards an NMR spectrometer operating beyond 1 GHz.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Y; Nakagome, H; Tennmei, K; Hamada, M; Yoshikawa, M; Otsuka, A; Hosono, M; Kiyoshi, T; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2010-04-01

    We have begun a project to develop an NMR spectrometer that operates at frequencies beyond 1 GHz (magnetic field strength in excess of 23.5 T) using a high temperature superconductor (HTS) innermost coil. As the first step, we developed a 500 MHz NMR with a Bi-2223 HTS innermost coil, which was operated in external current mode. The temporal magnetic field change of the NMR magnet after the coil charge was dominated by (i) the field fluctuation due to a DC power supply and (ii) relaxation in the screening current in the HTS tape conductor; effect (i) was stabilized by the 2H field-frequency lock system, while effect (ii) decreased with time due to relaxation of the screening current induced in the HTS coil and reached 10(-8)(0.01 ppm)/h on the 20th day after the coil charge, which was as small as the persistent current mode of the NMR magnet. The 1D (1)H NMR spectra obtained by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet were nearly equivalent to those obtained by the LTS NMR magnet. The 2D-NOESY, 3D-HNCO and 3D-HNCACB spectra were achieved for ubiquitin by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet; their quality was closely equivalent to that achieved by a conventional LTS NMR. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the effects of screening current-induced magnetic field changes are predicted to be harmless for the 1.03 GHz NMR magnet system. PMID:20149698

  6. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Idaho Project, Nemo Detail Area, South Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    The Nemo Detail area covers 40 square miles in the eastern portion of the Black Hills Uplift. The region's geology is a combination of Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks, and overlying Early Paleozoic sediments and metasediments. The Paleozoics cover most of the eastern half of the area. A total of 7 groups of samples in uranium window constitute anomalies as defined in Volume I. These anomalies occur in locales of relatively high uranium and thorium with respect to the balance of the detail area. Magnetic data show a wide range of gradients; but fail to show a significant degree of correlation with available geologic interpretations or the radiometric data. Only one geochemical unit was defined on the basis of the radiometric criteria set forth in Volume I.

  7. Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) project. Semiannual progress report, September 1992-March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Spaniol, C.

    1993-06-01

    The West Virginia State College Community College Division NASA Magnetic Earth Ionosphere Resonant Frequencies (MEIRF) study is described. During this contract period, the two most significant and professionally rewarding events were the presentation of the research activity at the Sir Isaac Newton Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the second Day of Discovery Conference, focusing on economic recovery in West Virginia. An active antenna concept utilizing a signal feedback principle similar to regenerative receivers used in early radio was studied. The device has potential for ELF research and other commercial applications for improved signal reception. Finally, work continues to progress on the development of a prototype monitoring station. Signal monitoring, data display, and data storage are major areas of activity. In addition, the authors plan to continue their dissemination of research activity through presentations at seminars and other universities.

  8. Automatic algorithm for correcting motion artifacts in time-resolved two-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography using convex projections.

    PubMed

    Raj, Ashish; Zhang, Honglei; Prince, Martin R; Wang, Yi; Zabih, Ramin

    2006-03-01

    Time-resolved contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) may suffer from involuntary patient motion. It is noted that while MR signal change associated with motion is large in magnitude and has smooth phase variation in k-phase, signal change associated with vascular enhancement is small in magnitude and has rapid phase variation in k-space. Based upon this observation, a novel projection onto convex sets (POCS) algorithm is developed as an automatic iterative method to remove motion artifacts. The presented POCS algorithm consists of high-pass phase filtering and convex projections in both k-space and image space. Without input of detailed motion knowledge, motion effects are filtered out, while vasculature information is preserved. The proposed method can be effective for a large class of nonrigid motions, including through-plane motion. The algorithm is stable and converges quickly, usually within five iterations. A double-blind evaluation on a set of clinical MRA cases shows that a completely unsupervised version of the algorithm produces significantly better rank scores (P=0.038) when compared to angiograms produced manually by an experienced radiologist.

  9. Resolution-enhanced Mapping Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumer, J. B.; Aubrun, J. N.; Rosenberg, W. J.; Roche, A. E.

    1993-01-01

    A familiar mapping spectrometer implementation utilizes two dimensional detector arrays with spectral dispersion along one direction and spatial along the other. Spectral images are formed by spatially scanning across the scene (i.e., push-broom scanning). For imaging grating and prism spectrometers, the slit is perpendicular to the spatial scan direction. For spectrometers utilizing linearly variable focal-plane-mounted filters the spatial scan direction is perpendicular to the direction of spectral variation. These spectrometers share the common limitation that the number of spectral resolution elements is given by the number of pixels along the spectral (or dispersive) direction. Resolution enhancement by first passing the light input to the spectrometer through a scanned etalon or Michelson is discussed. Thus, while a detector element is scanned through a spatial resolution element of the scene, it is also temporally sampled. The analysis for all the pixels in the dispersive direction is addressed. Several specific examples are discussed. The alternate use of a Michelson for the same enhancement purpose is also discussed. Suitable for weight constrained deep space missions, hardware systems were developed including actuators, sensor, and electronics such that low-resolution etalons with performance required for implementation would weigh less than one pound.

  10. Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaney, Diana L.; Green, Robert; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Cable, Morgan; Ehlmann, Bethany; Haag, Justin; Lamborn, Andrew; McKinley, Ian; Rodriguez, Jose; van Gorp, Byron

    2016-10-01

    The Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) is a modular visible to short wavelength infrared imaging spectrometer architecture which could be adapted to a variety of mission concepts requiring low mass and low power. Imaging spectroscopy is an established technique to address complex questions of geologic evolution by mapping diagnostic absorption features due to minerals, organics, and volatiles throughout our solar system. At the core of UCIS is an Offner imaging spectrometer using M3 heritage and a miniature pulse tube cryo-cooler developed under the NASA Maturation of Instruments for Solar System Exploration (MatISSE) program to cool the focal plane array. The TRL 6 integrated spectrometer and cryo-cooler provide a basic imaging spectrometer capability that is used with a variety of fore optics to address lunar, mars, and small body science goals. Potential configurations include: remote sensing from small orbiters and flyby spacecraft; in situ panoramic imaging spectroscopy; and in situ micro-spectroscopy. A micro-spectroscopy front end is being developed using MatISSE funding with integration and testing planned this summer.

  11. ISIS Processing Tools for Thermal Emission Spectrometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, K.; Johnson, J. R.; Gaddis, L.

    2003-01-01

    The Integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers (ISIS) package is a widely used planetary data processing and cartography software system produced by the Astrogeology program of the USGS in Flagstaff, AZ. Recent additions to the ISIS system provide useful tools for extracting and projecting Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data for use with other ISIS programs to process, analyze, and visualize these data, particularly in comparison with other Mars data sets. A general overview of various programs and tools used for extracting and processing TES data are presented.

  12. The Super Separator Spectrometer S3 and the associated detection systems: SIRIUS & LEB-REGLIS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Déchery, F.; Savajols, H.; Authier, M.; Drouart, A.; Nolen, J.; Ackermann, D.; Amthor, A. M.; Bastin, B.; Berryhill, A.; Boutin, D.; Caceres, L.; Coffey, M.; Delferrière, O.; Dorvaux, O.; Gall, B.; Hauschild, K.; Hue, A.; Jacquot, B.; Karkour, N.; Laune, B.; Le Blanc, F.; Lecesne, N.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Lutton, F.; Manikonda, S.; Meinke, R.; Olivier, G.; Payet, J.; Piot, J.; Pochon, O.; Prince, V.; Souli, M.; Stelzer, G.; Stodel, C.; Stodel, M.-H.; Sulignano, B.; Traykov, E.; Uriot, D.

    2016-06-01

    The Super Separator Spectrometer (S3) facility is developed in the framework of the SPIRAL2 project [1]. S3 has been designed to extend the capability of the facility to perform experiments with extremely low cross sections, taking advantage of the very high intensity stable beams of the superconducting linear accelerator of SPIRAL2. It will mainly use fusion-evaporation reactions to reach extreme regions of the nuclear chart: new opportunities will be opened for super-heavy element studies and spectroscopy at and beyond the driplines. In addition to our previous article (Déchery et al. [2]) introducing the optical layout of the spectrometer and the expected performances, this article will present the current status of the main elements of the facility: the target station, the superconducting multipole, and the magnetic and electric dipoles, with a special emphasis on the status of the detection system SIRIUS and on the low-energy branch which includes the REGLIS3 system. S3 will also be a source of low energy radioactive isotopes for delivery to the DESIR facility.

  13. Pioneer Venus large probe neutral mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.; Hodges, R. R.; Duerksen, K. D.

    1979-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus large probe neutral mass spectrometer (LNMS) uses a single focusing magnetic sector field mass analyzer with mass range of 1-208 amu, resolution sufficient to separate the mercury isotopes, and sensitivity sufficient to detect minor constituents in the 1 ppm range relative to the CO2 in the Venus atmosphere. A combination of ion and chemical pumping is used to maintain a vacuum in the mass analyzer and to remove the atmosphere gases which enter the ion source chamber through a special leak. A microprocessor controls the operation of the instrument through a highly efficient peak stepping and data compression program, permitting acquisition of a complete mass spectrum roughly once each minute.

  14. Low-energy neutral-atom spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, D.E.; Cohen, S.A.

    1982-04-01

    The design, calibration, and performance of a low energy neutral atom spectrometer are described. Time-of-flight analysis is used to measure the energy spectrum of charge-exchange deuterium atoms emitted from the PLT tokamak plasma in the energy range from 20 to 1000 eV. The neutral outflux is gated on a 1 ..mu..sec time scale by a slotted rotating chopper disc, supported against gravity in vacuum by magnetic levitation, and is detected by secondary electron emission from a Cu-Be plate. The energy dependent detection efficiency has been measured in particle beam experiments and on the tokamak so that the diagnostic is absolutely calibrated, allowing quantitative particle fluxes to be determined with 200 ..mu..sec time resolution. In addition to its present application as a plasma diagnostic, the instrument is capable of making a wide variety of measurements relevant to atomic and surface physics.

  15. Miniature NMR spectrometer to analyse minerals at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    There are some equipments and apparatuses for the study of interesting astrobiological places as planet Mars and moons Europa, Titan and Enceladus. As for Mars, some robotic missions have already analyzed its atmosphere and surface, using equipment with resolution down to milimetric scale. The NASA's Opportunity and Spirit rovers used microscope to study the sub-surface of the red planet at milimetric depth in drilled holes on rocks. In 1996, a NASA team announced the finding of organic molecules and morphological structures at nanometric scale, inside a meteorite which came from Mars. These possibly could be derived from an ancient Martian signature of biochemical activity, hypothetically, a fossilized `Archae-type' microorgan-ism. . In order to be acquired better resolutions for the mineralogical study of samples of its surface, it is necessary the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers, with which one can obtain detailed astrobiological information below micrometer scale. NMR spectrome-ters are big equipment, but there are already miniature, lightweight, NMR spectrometers being developed which do not contain permanent magnets -they are designed to operate without applied magnetic fields; instead, they exploit the natural magnetic fields of the mineral phases (that contain iron) to be studied. These fields give rise to nuclear magnetic resonance of the isotope 57Fe at frequencies in the approximate range of 60 to 74 MHz. Such instrument has a mass of only 65 g (battery included) and consumes a power of only 0.2 W. It will be interesting the use of NMR spectroscopy at Mars. So, here in this paper, with the objective of the search for hypothetical extinct or extant life on Mars, I propose that in future robotic missions and a possible manned research at Mars, to be used miniature NMR spectrometers -rovers can have at the end of their robotic arms such those spectrometers and also astronauts can use those miniature NMR spectrometers to in-situ do very

  16. Development of an Accelerator Mass Spectrometer based on a Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dogyun; Bhang, Hyeongchan; Kim, Jongwon

    2011-12-13

    An accelerator mass spectrometer based on a cyclotron has been developed, and a prototype of the injection beam line has been constructed. Mass resolution of the cyclotron is designed to be over 4000. A sawtooth RF buncher in the beam line and a flat-topping RF system for the cyclotron were utilized to enhance beam transmission efficiency, which is a primary factor for improvement compared to previous cyclotron mass spectrometers. The injection beam line comprises an ion source, Einzel lens, RF buncher, 90 deg. dipole magnet and a slit box containing beam diagnostic devices. A carbon beam was measured at the location of the slit box, and beam phase spaces will be measured. The design of a cyclotron magnet was done, and orbit tracking was carried out using cyclotron optics codes. A scheme of radial injection was chosen to place a beam on the equilibrium orbit of the cyclotron. The injection scheme will be optimized after the beam measurements are completed.

  17. A Computer-based Tutorial on Double-Focusing Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbar, Richard R.; Browman, Andrew A.; Mead, William C.; Williams, Robert A.

    1998-10-01

    WhistleSoft is developing a set of computer-based, self-paced tutorials on particle accelerators that targets a broad audience, including undergraduate science majors and industrial technicians. (See http://www.whistlesoft.com/s~ilbar/.) We use multimedia techniques to enhance the student's rate of learning and retention of the material. The tutorials feature interactive On-Screen Laboratories and use hypertext, colored graphics, two- and three-dimensional animations, video, and sound. Parts of our Dipoles module deal with the double-focusing spectrometer and occur throughout the piece. Radial focusing occurs in the section on uniform magnets, while vertical focusing is in the non-uniform magnets section. The student can even understand the √2π bend angle on working through the (intermediate-level) discussion on the Kerst-Serber equations. This talk will present our discussion of this spectrometer, direct to you from the computer screen.

  18. OPENCORE NMR: Open-source core modules for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    A tool kit for implementing an integrated FPGA-based NMR spectrometer [K. Takeda, A highly integrated FPGA-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78 (2007) 033103], referred to as the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer, is open to public. The system is composed of an FPGA chip and several peripheral boards for USB communication, direct-digital synthesis (DDS), RF transmission, signal acquisition, etc. Inside the FPGA chip have been implemented a number of digital modules including three pulse programmers, the digital part of DDS, a digital quadrature demodulator, dual digital low-pass filters, and a PC interface. These FPGA core modules are written in VHDL, and their source codes are available on our website. This work aims at providing sufficient information with which one can, given some facility in circuit board manufacturing, reproduce the OPENCORE NMR spectrometer presented here. Also, the users are encouraged to modify the design of spectrometer according to their own specific needs. A home-built NMR spectrometer can serve complementary roles to a sophisticated commercial spectrometer, should one comes across such new ideas that require heavy modification to hardware inside the spectrometer. This work can lower the barrier of building a handmade NMR spectrometer in the laboratory, and promote novel and exciting NMR experiments.

  19. Multichannel Spectrometer of Time Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akindinova, E. V.; Babenko, A. G.; Vakhtel, V. M.; Evseev, N. A.; Rabotkin, V. A.; Kharitonova, D. D.

    2015-06-01

    For research and control of characteristics of radiation fluxes, radioactive sources in particular, for example, in paper [1], a spectrometer and methods of data measurement and processing based on the multichannel counter of time intervals of accident events appearance (impulses of particle detector) MC-2A (SPC "ASPECT") were created. The spectrometer has four independent channels of registration of time intervals of impulses appearance and correspondent amplitude and spectrometric channels for control along the energy spectra of the operation stationarity of paths of each of the channels from the detector to the amplifier. The registration of alpha-radiation is carried out by the semiconductor detectors with energy resolution of 16-30 keV. Using a spectrometer there have been taken measurements of oscillations of alpha-radiation 239-Pu flux intensity with a subsequent autocorrelative statistical analysis of the time series of readings.

  20. A two-dimensional angular-resolved proton spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Su; Yuan, Xiaohui; Fang, Yuan; Ge, Xulei; Deng, Yanqing; Wei, Wenqing; Gao, Jian; Fu, Feichao; Jiang, Tao; Liao, Guoqian; Liu, Feng; Chen, Min; Li, Yutong; Zhao, Li; Ma, Yanyun; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    We present a novel design of two-dimensional (2D) angular-resolved spectrometer for full beam characterization of ultrashort intense laser driven proton sources. A rotated 2D pinhole array was employed, as selective entrance before a pair of parallel permanent magnets, to sample the full proton beam into discrete beamlets. The proton beamlets are subsequently dispersed without overlapping onto a planar detector. Representative experimental result of protons generated from femtosecond intense laser interaction with thin foil target is presented.

  1. Realistic simulations of the AGATA Demonstrator+PRISMA Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ince, E.; Erduran, M. N.; Farnea, E.; Latina, A.

    2008-11-11

    The performance of the AGATA Demonstrator Array coupled to the PRISMA magnetic spectrometer have been evaluated in a consistent way using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the two devices. Results for the {sup 90}Zr+{sup 208}Pb at 560 MeV reaction are presented and discussed here, proving that the Doppler correction capabilities of the AGATA+PRISMA setup will be very close to the intrinsic energy resolution of the germanium detectors.

  2. Towed seabed gamma ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.G. )

    1994-08-01

    For more than 50 years, the measurement of radioactivity has been used for onshore geological surveys and in laboratories. The British Geological Survey (BGS) has extended the use of this type of equipment to the marine environment with the development of seabed gamma ray spectrometer systems. The present seabed gamma ray spectrometer, known as the Eel, has been successfully used for sediment and solid rock mapping, mineral exploration, and radioactive pollution studies. The range of applications for the system continues to expand. This paper examines the technological aspects of the Eel and some of the applications for which it has been used.

  3. JPL Fourier transform ultraviolet spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cageao, R. P.; Friedl, R. R.; Sander, Stanley P.; Yung, Y. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Fourier Transform Ultraviolet Spectrometer (FTUVS) is a new high resolution interferometric spectrometer for multiple-species detection in the UV, visible and near-IR. As an OH sensor, measurements can be carried out by remote sensing (limb emission and column absorption), or in-situ sensing (long-path absorption or laser-induced fluorescence). As a high resolution detector in a high repetition rate (greater than 10 kHz) LIF system, OH fluorescence can be discriminated against non-resonant background emission and laser scatter, permitting (0, 0) excitation.

  4. Portable smartphone optical fibre spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-09-01

    A low cost, optical fibre based spectrometer has been developed on a smartphone platform for field-portable spectral analysis. Light of visible wavelength is collected using a multimode optical fibre and diffracted by a low cost nanoimprinted diffraction grating. A measurement range over 300 nm span (λ = 400 to 700 nm) is obtained using the smartphone CMOS chip. The spectral resolution is Δλ ~ 0.42 nm/screen pixel. A customized Android application processed the spectra on the same platform and shares with other devices. The results compare well with commercially available spectrometer.

  5. The MARTE VNIR imaging spectrometer experiment: design and analysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adrian J; Sutter, Brad; Dunagan, Stephen

    2008-10-01

    We report on the design, operation, and data analysis methods employed on the VNIR imaging spectrometer instrument that was part of the Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE). The imaging spectrometer is a hyperspectral scanning pushbroom device sensitive to VNIR wavelengths from 400-1000 nm. During the MARTE project, the spectrometer was deployed to the Río Tinto region of Spain. We analyzed subsets of three cores from Río Tinto using a new band modeling technique. We found most of the MARTE drill cores to contain predominantly goethite, though spatially coherent areas of hematite were identified in Core 23. We also distinguished non Fe-bearing minerals that were subsequently analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and found to be primarily muscovite. We present drill core maps that include spectra of goethite, hematite, and non Fe-bearing minerals.

  6. The AGATA Spectrometer: next generation gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J.; AGATA Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) is a European project to develop and operate the next generation gamma-ray spectrometer. AGATA is based on the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented high-purity germanium crystals. The spectrometer will have an unparalleled level of detection power for electromagnetic nuclear radiation. The tracking technique requires the accurate determination of the energy, time and position of every interaction as a gamma ray deposits its energy within the detector volume. Reconstruction of the full interaction path results in a detector with very high efficiency and excellent spectral response. The realisation of gamma-ray tracking and AGATA is a result of many technical advances and the spectrometer is now operational. AGATA has been operated in a series of scientific campaigns at Legnaro National Laboratory in Italy and GSI in Germany and is presently being assembled at GANIL in France. The status of the instrument will be reviewed.

  7. The MARTE VNIR Imaging Spectrometer Experiment: Design and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Adrian J.; Sutter, Brad; Dunagan, Stephen

    2008-10-01

    We report on the design, operation, and data analysis methods employed on the VNIR imaging spectrometer instrument that was part of the Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE). The imaging spectrometer is a hyperspectral scanning pushbroom device sensitive to VNIR wavelengths from 400-1000 nm. During the MARTE project, the spectrometer was deployed to the Río Tinto region of Spain. We analyzed subsets of three cores from Río Tinto using a new band modeling technique. We found most of the MARTE drill cores to contain predominantly goethite, though spatially coherent areas of hematite were identified in Core 23. We also distinguished non Fe-bearing minerals that were subsequently analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and found to be primarily muscovite. We present drill core maps that include spectra of goethite, hematite, and non Fe-bearing minerals.

  8. A high-throughput neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampfl, Anton; Noakes, Terry; Bartsch, Friedl; Bertinshaw, Joel; Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica; Nateghi, Ebrahim; Raeside, Tyler; Yethiraj, Mohana; Danilkin, Sergey; Kearley, Gordon

    2010-03-01

    A cross-disciplinary high-throughput neutron spectrometer is currently under construction at OPAL, ANSTO's open pool light-water research reactor. The spectrometer is based on the design of a Be-filter spectrometer (FANS) that is operating at the National Institute of Standards research reactor in the USA. The ANSTO filter-spectrometer will be switched in and out with another neutron spectrometer, the triple-axis spectrometer, Taipan. Thus two distinct types of neutron spectrometers will be accessible: one specialised to perform phonon dispersion analysis and the other, the filter-spectrometer, designed specifically to measure vibrational density of states. A summary of the design will be given along with a detailed ray-tracing analysis. Some preliminary results will be presented from the spectrometer.

  9. Reviews Book: At Home: A Short History of Private Life Book: The Story of Mathematics Book: Time Travel: A Writer's Guide to the Real Science of Plausible Time Travel Equipment: Rotational Inertial Wands DVD: Planets Book: The Fallacy of Fine-Tuning Equipment: Scale with Dial Equipment: Infrared Thermometers Book: 300 Science and History Projects Book: The Nature of Light and Colour in the Open Air Equipment: Red Tide Spectrometer Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND The Story of Mathematics Book shows the link between maths and physics Time Travel: A Writer's Guide to the Real Science of Plausible Time Travel Book explains how to write good time-travelling science fiction Rotational Inertial Wands Wands can help explore the theory of inertia Infrared Thermometers Kit measures temperature differences Red Tide Spectrometer Spectrometer gives colour spectra WORTH A LOOK At Home: A Short History of Private Life Bryson explores the history of home life The Fallacy of Fine-Tuning Book wades into the science/religion debate Scale with Dial Cheap scales can be turned into Newton measuring scales 300 Science History Projects Fun science projects for kids to enjoy The Nature of Light and Colour in the Open Air Text looks at fascinating optical effects HANDLE WITH CARE Planets DVD takes a trip through the solar system WEB WATCH Websites offer representations of nuclear chain reactions

  10. A cryogenic scan mechanism for use in Fourier transform spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakun, Claef F.; Blumenstock, Kenneth A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the requirements, design, assembly and testing of the linear Scan Mechanism (SM) of the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) Instrument. The mechanism consists of an over constrained flexible structure, an innovative moving magnet actuator, passive eddy current dampers, a Differential Eddy Current (DEC) sensor, Optical Limit Sensors (OLS), and a launch lock. Although all the components of the mechanism are discussed, the flexible structure and the magnetic components are the primary focus. Several problems encountered and solutions implemented during the development of the scan mechanism are also described.

  11. Convex Diffraction Grating Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrisp, Michael P. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A 1:1 Offner mirror system for imaging off-axis objects is modified by replacing a concave spherical primary mirror that is concentric with a convex secondary mirror with two concave spherical mirrors M1 and M2 of the same or different radii positioned with their respective distances d1 and d2 from a concentric convex spherical diffraction grating having its grooves parallel to the entrance slit of the spectrometer which replaces the convex secondary mirror. By adjusting their distances d1 and d2 and their respective angles of reflection alpha and beta, defined as the respective angles between their incident and reflected rays, all aberrations are corrected without the need to increase the spectrometer size for a given entrance slit size to reduce astigmatism, thus allowing the imaging spectrometer volume to be less for a given application than would be possible with conventional imaging spectrometers and still give excellent spatial and spectral imaging of the slit image spectra over the focal plane.

  12. Acoustically-tuned optical spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sklar, E.

    1981-01-01

    Lens arrangement corrects for aberrations and gives resolution of 0.7 seconds of arc. In spectrometer, light from telescope is relayed by doublet lens to acoustically tuned optical filter. Selected wavelengths are relayed by triplet lens to charge coupled device camera. Intervening cylindrical lens, tilted at 12 degree angle, corrects for astigmatism and coma introduced by two element birefringent crystal in filter.

  13. IPNS-I chopper spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.L.; Carpenter, J.M.; Pelizzari, C.A.; Sinha, S.K.; Bresof, I.; Ostrowski, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    We briefly describe the layout and operation of the two chopper experiments at IPNS-I. The recent measurement on solid /sup 4/He by Hilleke et al. provides examples of time-of-flight data from the Low Resolution Chopper Spectrometer.

  14. Time of flight mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Ulbricht, Jr., William H.

    1984-01-01

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

  15. Mid infrared MEMS FTIR spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfan, Mazen; Sabry, Yasser M.; Mortada, Bassem; Sharaf, Khaled; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-03-01

    In this work we report, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, a bulk-micromachined wideband MEMS-based spectrometer covering both the NIR and the MIR ranges and working from 1200 nm to 4800 nm. The core engine of the spectrometer is a scanning Michelson interferometer micro-fabricated using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) technology. The spectrum is obtained using the Fourier Transform techniques that allows covering a very wide spectral range limited by the detector responsivity. The moving mirror of the interferometer is driven by a relatively large stroke electrostatic comb-drive actuator. Zirconium fluoride (ZrF4) multimode optical fibers are used to connect light between the white light source and the interferometer input, as well as the interferometer output to a PbSe photoconductive detector. The recorded signal-to-noise ratio is 25 dB at the wavelength of 3350 nm. The spectrometer is successfully used in measuring the absorption spectra of methylene chloride, quartz glass and polystyrene film. The presented solution provides a low cost method for producing miniaturized spectrometers in the near-/mid-infrared.

  16. Alpha proton x ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieder, Rudi; Waeke, H.; Economou, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will carry an alpha-proton x ray spectrometer (APX) for the determination of the elemental chemical composition of Martian rocks and soils. The instrument will measure the concentration of all major and some minor elements, including C, N, and O at levels above typically 1 percent.

  17. Progress on the Fabrication and Testing of the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, Steve; Green, M.A.; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael

    2009-05-19

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an international collaboration that will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of a realistic cooling channel using a muon beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. At each end of the cooling channel a spectrometer solenoid magnet consisting of five superconducting coils will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region. The scintillating fiber tracker within the magnet bore will measure the muon beam emittance as it enters and exits the cooling channel. The 400 mm diameter warm bore, 3 meter long magnets incorporate a cold mass consisting of two coil sections wound on a single aluminum mandrel: a three-coil spectrometer magnet and a two-coil section that matches the solenoid uniform field into the MICE cooling channel. The fabrication of the first of two spectrometer solenoids has been completed, and preliminary testing of the magnet is nearly complete. The key design features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets are presented along with a summary of the progress on the training and testing of the first magnet.

  18. Electron Positron Proton Spectrometer for use at Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, S L

    2010-04-07

    The Electron Positron Proton Spectrometer (EPPS) is mounted in a TIM (Ten-Inch Manipulator) system on the Omega-60 or Omega-EP laser facilities at the University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), when in use, see Fig. 1. The Spectrometer assembly, shown in Fig. 2, is constructed of a steel box containing magnets, surrounded by Lead 6% Antimony shielding with SS threaded insert, sitting on an Aluminum 6061-T6 plate.

  19. A millimeter wave radio spectrometer for material analysis below T<1 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertiy, A. A.; Ivanchenko, I. V.; Popenko, N. A.; Tarapov, S. I.; Shestopalov, V. P.

    1989-03-01

    A radio spectrometer set suggesting wide fuctional possibilities and operating in the shortwave part of the millimeter band at temperatures below 1 K is described. The set is intended for analyzing materials of polarized nuclear targets under the conditions close to actual operation, with the use of magnetic resonance methods. The potential of spectrometer allows employing it in semiconductor physics, physics of disordered media, biology, et.c.

  20. Future Development Trajectories for Imaging X-rays Spectrometers Based on Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Bandler, Simon R.

    2013-01-01

    Future development trajectories for imaging x-ray spectrometers based on microcalorimeters. Since their invention 30 years ago, the capability of X-ray microcalorimeters has increased steadily, with continual improvements in energy resolution, speed, and array size. Arrays of up to 1024 pixels have been produced, and resolution better than 1 eV at 1.5 keV has been achieved. These detectors can be optimized for the highest priority science, such as designing for the highest resolving power at low energies at the expense of dynamic range, or the greatest focal-plane coverage at the expense of speed. Three types of X-ray microcalorimeters presently dominate the field, each characterized by the thermometer technology. The first two types use temperature-sensitive resistors: semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a magnetically coupled thermometer, and is at an earlier stage of development than the other two. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2015, will use an array of silicon thermistors with HgTe X-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays. Kilopixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are being produced, and much larger arrays may require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetically coupled thermometers. I will project the development trajectories of these detectors and their read-out technologies and assess what their capabilities and limitations will be 10 - 20 years from now.

  1. Far-Infrared Heterodyne Spectrometer for Sofia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    The project goal was to evaluate the scientific capabilities and technical requirements for a far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer suitable for the SOFIA Airborne Observatory, which is now being developed by NASA under contract to the Universities Space Research Association (USRA). The conclusions detailed below include our specific recommendations for astronomical observations, as well as our intended technical approach for reaching these scientific goals. These conclusions were presented to USRA in the form of a proposal to build this instrument. USRA subsequently awarded the University of Colorado a 3-year grant to develop the proposed Hot-Electron micro-Bolometer (HEB) mixer concept for high frequencies above 3 THz, as well as other semiconductor mixer technologies suitable for high sensitivity receivers in the 2-6 THz frequency band.

  2. Far-Infrared Heterodyne Spectrometer for SOFIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes work done under NASA Grant NAG2-1062 awarded to the University of Colorado. The project goal was to evaluate the scientific capabilities and technical requirements for a far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer suitable for the SOFIA Airborne Observatory, which is now being developed by NASA under contract to the Universities Space Research Association (USRA). The conclusions detailed below include our specific recommendations for astronomical observations, as well as our intended technical approach for reaching these scientific goals. These conclusions were presented to USRA in the form of a proposal to build this instrument. USRA subsequently awarded the University of Colorado a 3-year grant (USRA 8500-98-010) to develop the proposed Hot-Electron micro-Bolometer (HEB) mixer concept for high frequencies above 3 THz, as well as other semiconductor mixer technologies suitable for high sensitivity receivers in the 2-6 THz frequency band.

  3. ORFEUS-SPAS - The Berkeley EUV spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, Stuart; Hurwitz, Mark

    1990-01-01

    The Berkeley EUV spectrometer of ORFEUS-SPAS, a joint project of NASA and the BMFT, incorporates a set of four novel spherically figured, varied line-space gratings used in a geometry that is similar to that of the classic Rowland mount to span an interval of 390 and 1200 A. Two spectral detector units containing curved microchannel plates and delay-line anodes encode the arriving photons in digital format for telemetry. An additional optic directs the image of the source in the entrance aperture onto a sealed FUV detector which is used to track the source as it drifts during an observation, enabling a postflight reconstruction of the spacecraft pointing vector. This in turn makes it possible to define with precision the wavelength of each recorded photon.

  4. An imaging spectrometer for microgravity application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wallace K.

    1995-01-01

    Flame structure is the result of complex interaction of mechanisms operating in both unwanted fires and controlled combustion systems. The scientific study of gas-jet diffusion flames in reduced-gravity environment is of interest because the effects of buoyancy on flow entrainment and acceleration are lessened. Measurements of flames have been restricted to cinematography, thermocouples, and radiometers. SSG, Inc. is developing an MWIR imaging spectrometer (MIS) for microgravity flame measurements. The device will be delivered to NASA Lewis at the end of this project to demonstrate flame measurements in the laboratory. With proper modifications, the MIS can be used to monitor a gas-jet flame under microgravity on a NASA Learjet or DC-9.

  5. A high-resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer for high energy density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Kerr, S; Magee, E; Nagel, S R; Park, J; Schneider, M B; Stone, G; Williams, G J; Beiersdorfer, P

    2014-11-01

    Adapting a concept developed for magnetic confinement fusion experiments, an imaging crystal spectrometer has been designed and tested for HED plasmas. The instrument uses a spherically bent quartz [211] crystal with radius of curvature of 490.8 mm. The instrument was tested at the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by irradiating titanium slabs with laser intensities of 10(19)-10(20) W/cm(2). He-like and Li-like Ti lines were recorded, from which the spectrometer performance was evaluated. This spectrometer provides very high spectral resolving power (E/dE > 7000) while acquiring a one-dimensional image of the source.

  6. A high-resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer for high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Magee, E.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Schneider, M. B.; Stone, G.; Williams, G. J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M. E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Hill, K. W.; Kerr, S.

    2014-11-15

    Adapting a concept developed for magnetic confinement fusion experiments, an imaging crystal spectrometer has been designed and tested for HED plasmas. The instrument uses a spherically bent quartz [211] crystal with radius of curvature of 490.8 mm. The instrument was tested at the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by irradiating titanium slabs with laser intensities of 10{sup 19}–10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. He-like and Li-like Ti lines were recorded, from which the spectrometer performance was evaluated. This spectrometer provides very high spectral resolving power (E/dE > 7000) while acquiring a one-dimensional image of the source.

  7. Calibration of an imaging crystal spectrometer for low x-ray energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.; Bitter, M.

    2008-01-15

    An x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer was designed for the Hanbit magnetic mirror device to observe spectra of heliumlike neon at 13.4474 A. The spectrometer consists of a spherically bent mica crystal and an x-ray sensitive vacuum charge coupled device camera. This spectrometer can provide spatially resolved spectra, making it possible to obtain profiles of the ion charge state distribution from line ratios and profiles of the plasma rotation velocity from Doppler shift measurements. The paper describes measurements of spectral resolution of this instrument for low x-ray energies.

  8. Calibration of the LLNL Imaging Proton Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmus, A. M.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Kuranz, C. C.; Klein, S.; Belancourt, P. X.; Fein, J. R.; MacDonald, M. J.; Drake, R. P.; Hazi, A. U.; Pollock, B. B.; Park, J.; Williams, G. J.; Chen, H.

    2014-10-01

    Ultra intense short pulse lasers incident on solid targets (e.g. Au foil) produce well collimated, broadband proton beams. These proton beams can be used to characterize magnetic fields in high-energy-density systems. The Imaging Proton Spectrometer (IPS) was previously designed and built (H. Chen 2010, RSI) for use with such laser produced proton beams. The IPS has an energy range of 50 keV-40 MeV with a resolving power (E/dE) of about 250 at 0.5 MeV and 350 at 2 MeV, as well as a single spatial imaging direction. In order to better characterize the imaging capability of this diagnostic, a 3D FEA solver has been used to calculate the magnetic field of the IPS. Particle trajectories are then obtained via numerical integration to calibrate the imaging axis of the IPS. Experiments using alpha sources will be used to verify the calculated calibration. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0001840. Work by LLNL was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. An Airborne Infrared Spectrometer for Solar Eclipse Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samra, Jenna; DeLuca, Edward E.; Golub, Leon; Cheimets, Peter; Philip, Judge

    2016-05-01

    The airborne infrared spectrometer (AIR-Spec) is an innovative solar spectrometer that will observe the 2017 solar eclipse from the NSF/NCAR High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER). AIR-Spec will image five infrared coronal emission lines to determine whether they may be useful probes of coronal magnetism.The solar magnetic field provides the free energy that controls coronal heating, structure, and dynamics. Energy stored in coronal magnetic fields is released in flares and coronal mass ejections and ultimately drives space weather. Therefore, direct coronal field measurements have significant potential to enhance understanding of coronal dynamics and improve solar forecasting models. Of particular interest are observations of field lines in the transitional region between closed and open flux systems, providing important information on the origin of the slow solar wind.While current instruments routinely observe only the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, AIR-Spec will take a step toward the direct observation of coronal fields by measuring plasma emission in the infrared at high spatial and spectral resolution. During the total solar eclipse of 2017, AIR-Spec will observe five magnetically sensitive coronal emission lines between 1.4 and 4 µm from the HIAPER Gulfstream V at an altitude above 14.9 km. The instrument will measure emission line intensity, width, and Doppler shift, map the spatial distribution of infrared emitting plasma, and search for waves in the emission line velocities.AIR-Spec consists of an optical system (feed telescope, grating spectrometer, and infrared detector) and an image stabilization system, which uses a fast steering mirror to correct the line-of-sight for platform perturbations. To ensure that the instrument meets its research goals, both systems are undergoing extensive performance modeling and testing. These results are shown with reference to the science requirements.

  10. R×B drift momentum spectrometer with high resolution and large phase space acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Konrad, G.; Abele, H.

    2013-02-01

    We propose a new type of momentum spectrometer, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse the charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, and measures the particles with large phase space acceptance and high resolution. This kind of R×B spectrometer is designed for the momentum analyses of the decay electrons and protons in the PERC (Proton and Electron Radiation Channel) beam station, which provides a strong magnetic field to guide the charged particles in the instrument. Instead of eliminating the guiding field, the R×B spectrometer evolves the field gradually to the analysing field, and the charged particles can be adiabatically transported during the dispersion and detection. The drifts of the particles have similar properties as their dispersion in the normal magnetic spectrometer. Besides, the R×B spectrometer is especially ideal for the measurements of particles with low momenta and large incident angles. We present a design of the R×B spectrometer, which can be used in PERC. For the particles with solid angle smaller than 88 msr, the maximum aberration is below 10-4. The resolution of the momentum spectra can reach 14.4 keV/c, if the particle position measurements have a resolution of 1 mm.

  11. R×B drift momentum spectrometer with high resolution and large phase space acceptance.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Konrad, G; Abele, H

    2013-02-11

    We propose a new type of momentum spectrometer, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse the charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, and measures the particles with large phase space acceptance and high resolution. This kind of R×B spectrometer is designed for the momentum analyses of the decay electrons and protons in the PERC (Proton and Electron Radiation Channel) beam station, which provides a strong magnetic field to guide the charged particles in the instrument. Instead of eliminating the guiding field, the R×B spectrometer evolves the field gradually to the analysing field, and the charged particles can be adiabatically transported during the dispersion and detection. The drifts of the particles have similar properties as their dispersion in the normal magnetic spectrometer. Besides, the R×B spectrometer is especially ideal for the measurements of particles with low momenta and large incident angles. We present a design of the R×B spectrometer, which can be used in PERC. For the particles with solid angle smaller than 88 msr, the maximum aberration is below 10(-4). The resolution of the momentum spectra can reach 14.4 keV/c, if the particle position measurements have a resolution of 1 mm.

  12. Electron/proton spectrometer certification documentation analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleeson, P.

    1972-01-01

    A compilation of analyses generated during the development of the electron-proton spectrometer for the Skylab program is presented. The data documents the analyses required by the electron-proton spectrometer verification plan. The verification plan was generated to satisfy the ancillary hardware requirements of the Apollo Applications program. The certification of the spectrometer requires that various tests, inspections, and analyses be documented, approved, and accepted by reliability and quality control personnel of the spectrometer development program.

  13. Sample rotating turntable kit for infrared spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, Joel Del; Klunder, Gregory L.

    2008-03-04

    An infrared spectrometer sample rotating turntable kit has a rotatable sample cup containing the sample. The infrared spectrometer has an infrared spectrometer probe for analyzing the sample and the rotatable sample cup is adapted to receive the infrared spectrometer probe. A reflectance standard is located in the rotatable sample cup. A sleeve is positioned proximate the sample cup and adapted to receive the probe. A rotator rotates the rotatable sample cup. A battery is connected to the rotator.

  14. Open-split interface for mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Diehl, John W.

    1991-01-01

    An open-split interface includes a connector body having four leg members projecting therefrom within a single plane, the first and third legs being coaxial and the second and fourth legs being coaxial. A tubular aperture extends through the first and third legs and a second tubular aperture extends through the second and fourth legs, connecting at a juncture within the center of the connector body. A fifth leg projects from the connector body and has a third tubular aperture extending therethrough to the juncture of the first and second tubular apertures. A capillary column extends from a gas chromatograph into the third leg with its end adjacent the juncture. A flow restrictor tube extends from a mass spectrometer through the first tubular aperture in the first and third legs and into the capillary columnm end, so as to project beyond the end of the third leg within the capillary column. An annular gap between the tube and column allows excess effluent to pass to the juncture. A pair of short capillary columns extend from separate detectors into the second tubular aperture in the second and fourth legs, and are oriented with their ends spaced slightly from the first capillary column end. A sweep flow tube is mounted in the fifth leg so as to supply a helium sweep flow to the juncture.

  15. Aerosol propellant interference with clinical mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Kharasch, E D; Sivarajan, M

    1991-04-01

    Metered dose inhalers containing halogenated propellants may interfere with mass spectrometer quantitation of halogenated inhalation anesthetics. We identify the propellant(s) in a commercially available metered dose inhaler that caused erroneous mass spectrometer readings. In addition, we identify the causes of different types of interference in different mass spectrometers. PMID:2072131

  16. Electron spectrometer for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1997-04-01

    An electron spectrometer for high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous samples using synchrotron radiation has been designed and constructed. The spectrometer consists of a gas cell, cylindrical electrostatic lens, spherical-sector electron energy analyzer, position-sensitive detector and associated power supplies, electronics and vacuum pumps. Details of the spectrometer design are presented together with some representative spectra.

  17. Commissioning of the vacuum system of the KATRIN Main Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, M.; Babutzka, M.; Bahr, M.; Barrett, J. P.; Bauer, S.; Beck, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behrens, J.; Bergmann, T.; Besserer, U.; Blümer, J.; Bodine, L. I.; Bokeloh, K.; Bonn, J.; Bornschein, B.; Bornschein, L.; Büsch, S.; Burritt, T. H.; Chilingaryan, S.; Corona, T. J.; De Viveiros, L.; Doe, P. J.; Dragoun, O.; Drexlin, G.; Dyba, S.; Ebenhöch, S.; Eitel, K.; Ellinger, E.; Enomoto, S.; Erhard, M.; Eversheim, D.; Fedkevych, M.; Felden, A.; Fischer, S.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fränkle, F.; Furse, D.; Ghilea, M.; Gil, W.; Glück, F.; Gonzalez Ureña, A.; Görhardt, S.; Groh, S.; Grohmann, S.; Grössle, R.; Gumbsheimer, R.; Hackenjos, M.; Hannen, V.; Harms, F.; Haußmann, N.; Heizmann, F.; Helbing, K.; Herz, W.; Hickford, S.; Hilk, D.; Hillen, B.; Höhn, T.; Holzapfel, B.; Hötzel, M.; Howe, M. A.; Huber, A.; Jansen, A.; Kernert, N.; Kippenbrock, L.; Kleesiek, M.; Klein, M.; Kopmann, A.; Kosmider, A.; Kovalík, A.; Krasch, B.; Kraus, M.; Krause, H.; Krause, M.; Kuckert, L.; Kuffner, B.; La Cascio, L.; Lebeda, O.; Leiber, B.; Letnev, J.; Lobashev, V. M.; Lokhov, A.; Malcherek, E.; Mark, M.; Martin, E. L.; Mertens, S.; Mirz, S.; Monreal, B.; Müller, K.; Neuberger, M.; Neumann, H.; Niemes, S.; Noe, M.; Oblath, N. S.; Off, A.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Osipowicz, A.; Otten, E.; Parno, D. S.; Plischke, P.; Poon, A. W. P.; Prall, M.; Priester, F.; Ranitzsch, P. C.-O.; Reich, J.; Rest, O.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Röllig, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, S.; Ryšavý, M.; Schlösser, K.; Schlösser, M.; Schönung, K.; Schrank, M.; Schwarz, J.; Seiler, W.; Seitz-Moskaliuk, H.; Sentkerestiová, J.; Skasyrskaya, A.; Slezák, M.; Špalek, A.; Steidl, M.; Steinbrink, N.; Sturm, M.; Suesser, M.; Telle, H. H.; Thümmler, T.; Titov, N.; Tkachev, I.; Trost, N.; Unru, A.; Valerius, K.; Vénos, D.; Vianden, R.; Vöcking, S.; Wall, B. L.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weber, M.; Weinheimer, C.; Weiss, C.; Welte, S.; Wendel, J.; Wierman, K. L.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Winzen, D.; Wolf, J.; Wüstling, S.; Zacher, M.; Zadoroghny, S.; Zbořil, M.

    2016-04-01

    The KATRIN experiment will probe the neutrino mass by measuring the β-electron energy spectrum near the endpoint of tritium β-decay. An integral energy analysis will be performed by an electro-static spectrometer (``Main Spectrometer''), an ultra-high vacuum vessel with a length of 23.2 m, a volume of 1240 m3, and a complex inner electrode system with about 120 000 individual parts. The strong magnetic field that guides the β-electrons is provided by super-conducting solenoids at both ends of the spectrometer. Its influence on turbo-molecular pumps and vacuum gauges had to be considered. A system consisting of 6 turbo-molecular pumps and 3 km of non-evaporable getter strips has been deployed and was tested during the commissioning of the spectrometer. In this paper the configuration, the commissioning with bake-out at 300 °C, and the performance of this system are presented in detail. The vacuum system has to maintain a pressure in the 10-11 mbar range. It is demonstrated that the performance of the system is already close to these stringent functional requirements for the KATRIN experiment, which will start at the end of 2016.

  18. LDRD Final Report - Investigations of the impact of the process integration of deposited magnetic films for magnetic memory technologies on radiation-hardened CMOS devices and circuits - LDRD Project (FY99)

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS,DAVID R.; JESSING,JEFFREY R.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.

    2000-01-01

    This project represented a coordinated LLNL-SNL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of developing radiation-hardened magnetic non-volatile memories using giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials. The intent of this limited-duration study was to investigate whether giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials similar to those used for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) were process compatible with functioning CMOS circuits. Sandia's work on this project demonstrated that deposition of GMR materials did not affect the operation nor the radiation hardness of Sandia's rad-hard CMOS technology, nor did the integration of GMR materials and exposure to ionizing radiation affect the magnetic properties of the GMR films. Thus, following deposition of GMR films on rad-hard integrated circuits, both the circuits and the films survived ionizing radiation levels consistent with DOE mission requirements. Furthermore, Sandia developed techniques to pattern deposited GMR films without degrading the completed integrated circuits upon which they were deposited. The present feasibility study demonstrated all the necessary processing elements to allow fabrication of the non-volatile memory elements onto an existing CMOS chip, and even allow the use of embedded (on-chip) non-volatile memories for system-on-a-chip applications, even in demanding radiation environments. However, funding agencies DTRA, AIM, and DARPA did not have any funds available to support the required follow-on technology development projects that would have been required to develop functioning prototype circuits, nor were such funds available from LDRD nor from other DOE program funds.

  19. Imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, P. A.; Jackson, J. W., Jr.; Alcorn, G. E.; Marshall, F. E. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An X-ray spectrometer for providing imaging and energy resolution of an X-ray source is described. This spectrometer is comprised of a thick silicon wafer having an embedded matrix or grid of aluminum completely through the wafer fabricated, for example, by thermal migration. The aluminum matrix defines the walls of a rectangular array of silicon X-ray detector cells or pixels. A thermally diffused aluminum electrode is also formed centrally through each of the silicon cells with biasing means being connected to the aluminum cell walls and causes lateral charge carrier depletion between the cell walls so that incident X-ray energy causes a photoelectric reaction within the silicon producing collectible charge carriers in the form of electrons which are collected and used for imaging.

  20. Exploiting a Transmission Grating Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald E. Bell

    2004-12-08

    The availability of compact transmission grating spectrometers now allows an attractive and economical alternative to the more familiar Czerny-Turner configuration for many high-temperature plasma applications. Higher throughput is obtained with short focal length refractive optics and stigmatic imaging. Many more spectra can be obtained with a single spectrometer since smaller, more densely packed optical input fibers can be used. Multiple input slits, along with a bandpass filter, can be used to maximize the number of spectra per detector, providing further economy. Curved slits can correct for the strong image curvature of the short focal length optics. Presented here are the governing grating equations for both standard and high-dispersion transmission gratings, defining dispersion, image curvature, and desired slit curvature, that can be used in the design of improved plasma diagnostics.

  1. Concerning the Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lenzner, Matthias; Diels, Jean -Claude

    2016-01-22

    A modified Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS) is used for measuring atomic emission spectra with high resolution. This device is basically a Fourier Transform Spectrometer, but the Fourier transform is taken in the directions perpendicular to the optical propagation and heterodyned around one preset wavelength. In recent descriptions of this device, one specific phenomenon - the tilt of the energy front of wave packets when diffracted from a grating - was neglected. This led to an overestimate of the resolving power of this spectrograph, especially in situations when the coherence length of the radiation under test is in the order ofmore » the effective aperture of the device. In conclusion, the limits of usability are shown here together with some measurements of known spectral lines.« less

  2. A simple ice nucleation spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Wharton, David A; Mutch, Jodi S; Wilson, Peter W; Marshall, Craig J; Lim, Miang

    2004-01-01

    The construction of a simple ice nucleation spectrometer is described. It uses 10 microliter droplets loaded into glass capillary tubes which are then inserted into an aluminium holder. Each holder takes six capillary tubes surrounding a central thermocouple. Four holders are placed into a cooling block, cooled by fluid from a programmable refrigerated circulator, and the thermocouples interfaced to a computer to record temperatures. Freezing of each sample is detected by an exotherm on the temperature recording, with 24 samples recorded per run. The spectrometer was tested using deionized water, an extract from a New Zealand alpine cockroach and an extract of lawn grass. The cockroach extract is estimated to contain about 10(3) more nucleators, active at -5 degrees C, than the grass extract. PMID:15618985

  3. Holographic Fabry-Perot spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Matos, O; Rodrigo, José A; Vaveliuk, P; Calvo, M L

    2011-02-15

    We propose a spectrum analyzer based on the properties of a hologram recorded with the field transmitted by a Fabry-Perot etalon. The spectral response of this holographic Fabry-Perot spectrometer (HFPS) is analytically investigated in the paraxial approximation and compared with a conventional Fabry-Perot etalon of similar characteristics. We demonstrate that the resolving power is twice increased and the free spectral range (FSR) is reduced to one-half. The proposed spectrometer could improve the operational performance of the etalon because it can exhibit high efficiency and it would be insensible to environmental conditions such as temperature and vibrations. Our analysis also extends to another variant of the HFPS based on holographic multiplexing of the transmitted field of a Fabry-Perot etalon. This device increases the FSR, keeping the same HFPS performance.

  4. On-chip plasmonic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tsur, Yuval; Arie, Ady

    2016-08-01

    We report a numerical and experimental study of an on-chip optical spectrometer, utilizing propagating surface plasmon polaritons in the telecom spectral range. The device is based on two holographic gratings, one for coupling, and the other for decoupling free-space radiation with the surface plasmons. This 800 μm×100 μm on-chip spectrometer resolves 17 channels spectrally separated by 3.1 nm, spanning a freely tunable spectral window, and is based on standard lithography fabrication technology. We propose two potential applications for this new device; the first employs the holographic control over the amplitude and phase of the input spectrum, for intrinsically filtering unwanted frequencies, like pump radiation in Raman spectroscopy. The second prospect utilizes the unique plasmonic field enhancement at the metal-dielectric boundary for the spectral analysis of very small samples (e.g., Mie scatterers) placed between the two gratings.

  5. On-chip plasmonic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tsur, Yuval; Arie, Ady

    2016-08-01

    We report a numerical and experimental study of an on-chip optical spectrometer, utilizing propagating surface plasmon polaritons in the telecom spectral range. The device is based on two holographic gratings, one for coupling, and the other for decoupling free-space radiation with the surface plasmons. This 800 μm×100 μm on-chip spectrometer resolves 17 channels spectrally separated by 3.1 nm, spanning a freely tunable spectral window, and is based on standard lithography fabrication technology. We propose two potential applications for this new device; the first employs the holographic control over the amplitude and phase of the input spectrum, for intrinsically filtering unwanted frequencies, like pump radiation in Raman spectroscopy. The second prospect utilizes the unique plasmonic field enhancement at the metal-dielectric boundary for the spectral analysis of very small samples (e.g., Mie scatterers) placed between the two gratings. PMID:27472609

  6. Concerning the Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Lenzner, Matthias; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-25

    A modified Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS) is used for measuring atomic emission spectra with high resolution. This device is basically a Fourier Transform Spectrometer, but the Fourier transform is taken in the directions perpendicular to the optical propagation and heterodyned around one preset wavelength. In recent descriptions of this device, one specific phenomenon - the tilt of the energy front of wave packets when diffracted from a grating - was neglected. This led to an overestimate of the resolving power of this spectrograph, especially in situations when the coherence length of the radiation under test is in the order of the effective aperture of the device. The limits of usability are shown here together with some measurements of known spectral lines. PMID:26832561

  7. The magnetization process: Hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsamel, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The magnetization process, hysteresis (the difference in the path of magnetization for an increasing and decreasing magnetic field), hysteresis loops, and hard magnetic materials are discussed. The fabrication of classroom projects for demonstrating hysteresis and the hysteresis of common magnetic materials is described in detail.

  8. High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Joseph M.; Herring, Mark; Norris, David D.

    1988-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS), related data system, orbit, and mission operations are described. The pushbroom instrument simultaneously images the terrestrial surface in 192 spectral bands from 0.4 to 2.5 microns. The swath width is 30 km and spatial resolution is 30 m. It is planned to be launched with the Earth Observing System aboard the Space Station Polar Platform in 1995. Array detectors allow concurrent integration of the signals at 192,000 detector elements.

  9. Spectrometer Optics Calibration for Jefferson Lab g2^p Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chao

    2013-04-01

    The proton spin-dependent structure function g2^p in the resonance region has been measured in a recent experiment at Jefferson Lab's Hall A. The goal of this experiment is to determine the g2^p structure function in the Q^2 region of 0.02-0.20 GeV^2 by using a transversely polarized NH3 target. The Hall A High Resolution Spectrometers (HRS) were used to provide an inclusive measurement of scattered electrons at 5.69^o. A pair of septum magnets were used to bend the 5.69^o scatted electrons into the 12.5^o spectrometers. A full optics calibration of the spectrometer is required to extract the kinematic quantities at the interaction vertex. However, the calibration procedure is challenging due to the complications from the strong transverse target field (2.5 T and 5.0 T) and the varied field configurations of the septum magnets. The details of the optics calibration and the progress will be described in this talk.

  10. Miniature mass spectrometer for chemical sensing in homeland defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Houseman, John

    2003-07-01

    A Miniature Mass Spectrometer (MMS) with an array detector has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The spectrometer has a focal plane geometry, and an array detector that can measure the intensities of different masses simultaneously after their separation along the focal plane. In the past, the large mass, size and the lack of an array detector with high gain (such as an electron multiplier) did not allow the application of focal plane mass spectrometer to the measurement that required high sensitivity and portability. In the JPL developed-MMS, miniaturization has been accomplished by using rare earth magnet material and novelties in the design of the magnetic and electric sectors. A new ion detector was developed for the measurement of the intensities of different mass ions. The array detector is based on the conversion sequence of ions into electrons into photons and their final measurement by a photon array detector. MMS possesses high sensitivity, specificity, and fast response time and can be used as a universal chemical analyzer. It will find application in a variety of Home Defense tasks. MMS is presently being applied for the detection of propellants (hydrazine and its derivatives). The instrument will have a mass of 1-2 kg and consume a power of 2-4 W for operation

  11. Physics Opportunities with the Neutral Particle Spectrometer in Hall C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Tanja; NPS Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The two-arm combination of neutral-particle detection and a high-resolution magnetic spectrometer offers unique scientific capabilities to push the energy scale for studies of the transverse spatial and momentum structure of the nucleon through reactions with neutral particles requiring precision and high luminosity. It enables precision measurements of the deeply-virtual Compton scattering cross section at different beam energies to extract the real part of the Compton form factor without any assumptions. It allows measurements to push the energy scale of real Compton scattering, the process of choice to explore factorization in a whole class of wide-angle processes, and its extension to neutral pion photo-production. It further makes possible measurements of the basic semi-inclusive neutral-pion cross section in a kinematic region where the QCD factorization scheme is expected to hold, which is crucial to validate the foundation of this cornerstone of 3D transverse momentum imaging. Adding the option of polarized targets to such a setup, allows for exploration of further scientific directions, e.g., timelike Compton scattering. We describe the unique science program as enabled by the Neutral-Particle Spectrometer and the magnetic spectrometer pair in Hall C at JLab. Supported in part by NSF Grants PHY-1530874 and PHY-1306227.

  12. Horizontal Ampoule Growth and Characterization of Mercuric Iodide at Controlled Gas Pressures for X-Ray and Gamma Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Ariesanti, Elsa; Corcoran, Bridget

    2004-04-30

    The project developed a new method for producing high quality mercuric iodide crystals of x-ray and gamma spectrometers. Included are characterization of mercuric iodide crystal properties as a function of growth environment and fabrication and demonstration of room-temperature-operated high-resolution mercuric iodide spectrometers.

  13. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOEpatents

    Tuszewski, Michel G.

    1997-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector.

  14. Cavity BPM System Tests for the ILC Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, M.

    2007-12-21

    The main physics program of the International Linear Collider (ILC) requires a measurement of the beam energy at the interaction point with an accuracy of 10{sup -4} or better. To achieve this goal a magnetic spectrometer using high resolution beam position monitors (BPMs) has been proposed. This paper reports on the cavity BPM system that was deployed to test this proposal. We demonstrate sub-micron resolution and micron level stability over 20 hours for a 1 m long BPM triplet. We find micron-level stability over 1 hour for 3 BPM stations distributed over a 30 m long baseline. The understanding of the behavior and response of the BPMs gained from this work has allowed full spectrometer tests to be carried out.

  15. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOEpatents

    Tuszewski, M.G.

    1997-07-22

    A mass spectrometer and methods are disclosed for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector. 7 figs.

  16. aCORN Beta Spectrometer and Electrostatic Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Md; aCORN Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    aCORN uses a high efficiency backscatter suppressed beta spectrometer to measure the electron-antineutrino correlation in neutron beta decay. We measure the correlation by counting protons and beta electrons in coincidence with precisely determined electron energy. There are 19 photomultiplier tubes arranged in a hexagonal array coupled to a single phosphor doped polystyrene scintillator. The magnetic field is shaped so that electrons that backscatter without depositing their full energy strike a tulip-shaped array of scintillator paddles and these events are vetoed. The detailed construction, performance and calibration of this beta spectrometer will be presented. I will also present the simulation, construction, and features of our novel electrostatic mirror. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation and the NIST Center for Neutron Research.

  17. The Green Bank Solar Radio Burst Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Bradley, R.; White, S.; Mastrantonio, E.

    2005-05-01

    The Solar Radio Burst Spectrometer (SRBS) is a project designed to 1) provide high quality radio dynamic spectra to the wider solar, heliospheric, and space weather communities; 2) serve as a development platform for ultra-wideband feeds and receivers. Dynamic spectroscopy is a powerful tool for observing radio bursts in the Sun's corona. These bursts are associated with solar flares and/or coronal mass ejections and result from coronal shocks (type II radio bursts), electron beams (type III radio bursts), and other forms of energy release in the corona. The community has been hampered by a lack of readily available dynamic spectra in the 12-24 hr UT time range, a shortcoming that has now been remedied. The instrument is located at the Green Bank Site of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in the National Radio Quiet Zone, where the effects of radio frequency interference are much reduced compared with unprotected sites. The spectrometer is composed of two swept-frequency systems that together support observations from 18 MHz to 2 GHz with a time resolution of approximately 1 sec. The low frequency system, operating from 18-70 MHz, is a standalone dipole antenna. The high frequency system is fed by an antenna mounted at the vertex of a 13.7 m telescope and operates from 70-300 MHz; a broadband feed at the prime focus of the telescope provides frequency coverage from 300-2500 MHz. The data are available daily through a web-based interface. Both raw and background-subtracted data are available in a variety of formats. Users are encouraged to view and download selected data for research or forecasting purposes.

  18. Miniature Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potember, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    Major advances must occur to protect astronauts from prolonged periods in near-zero gravity and high radiation associated with extended space travel. The dangers of living in space must be thoroughly understood and methods developed to reverse those effects that cannot be avoided. Six of the seven research teams established by the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) are studying biomedical factors for prolonged space travel to deliver effective countermeasures. To develop effective countermeasures, each of these teams require identification of and quantitation of complex pharmacological, hormonal, and growth factor compounds (biomarkers) in humans and in experimental animals to develop an in-depth knowledge of the physiological changes associated with space travel. At present, identification of each biomarker requires a separate protocol. Many of these procedures are complicated and the identification of each biomarker requires a separate protocol and associated laboratory equipment. To carry all of this equipment and chemicals on a spacecraft would require a complex clinical laboratory; and it would occupy much of the astronauts time. What is needed is a small, efficient, broadband medical diagnostic instrument to rapidly identify important biomarkers for human space exploration. The Miniature Time-Of- Flight Mass Spectrometer Project in the Technology Development Team is developing a small, high resolution, time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) to quantitatively measure biomarkers for human space exploration. Virtues of the JHU/APL TOFMS technologies reside in the promise for a small (less than one cubic ft), lightweight (less than 5 kg), low-power (less than 50 watts), rugged device that can be used continuously with advanced signal processing diagnostics. To date, the JHU/APL program has demonstrated mass capability from under 100 to beyond 10,000 atomic mass units (amu) in a very small, low power prototype for biological analysis. Further

  19. New Technology CZT Detectors for High-Energy Flare Spectroscopy: The Room Temperature Semiconductor Spectrometer for JAWSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestrand, W. Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The goal of our Room Temperature Semiconductor Spectrometer (RTeSS) project is to develop a small high-energy solar flare spectrometer employing semiconductor detectors that do not require significant cooling when used as high-energy solar flare spectrometers. Specifically, the goal is to test Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors with coplanar grid electrodes as x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers and to design an experiment that can be flown as a "piggy-back" payload on a satellite mission during the next solar maximum.

  20. Application of the BINS superheated drop detector spectrometer to the {sup 9}Be(p,xn) neutron energy spectrum determination

    SciTech Connect

    Di Fulvio, A.; Ciolini, R.; Mirzajani, N.; Romei, C.; D'Errico, F.; Bedogni, R.; Esposito, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Colautti, P.

    2013-07-18

    In the framework of TRASCO-BNCT project, a Bubble Interactive Neutron Spectrometer (BINS) device was applied to the characterization of the angle-and energy-differential neutron spectra generated by the {sup 9}Be(p,xn)reaction. The BINS spectrometer uses two superheated emulsion detectors, sequentially operated at different temperatures and thus provides a series of six sharp threshold responses, covering the 0.1-10 MeV neutron energy range. Spectrum unfolding of the data was performed by means of MAXED code. The obtained angle, energy-differential spectra were compared with those measured with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, a silicon telescope spectrometer and literature data.

  1. Application of the BINS superheated drop detector spectrometer to the 9Be(p,xn) neutron energy spectrum determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fulvio, A.; Ciolini, R.; Mirzajani, N.; Romei, C.; d'Errico, F.; Bedogni, R.; Esposito, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Colautti, P.

    2013-07-01

    In the framework of TRASCO-BNCT project, a Bubble Interactive Neutron Spectrometer (BINS) device was applied to the characterization of the angle-and energy-differential neutron spectra generated by the 9Be(p,xn)reaction. The BINS spectrometer uses two superheated emulsion detectors, sequentially operated at different temperatures and thus provides a series of six sharp threshold responses, covering the 0.1-10 MeV neutron energy range. Spectrum unfolding of the data was performed by means of MAXED code. The obtained angle, energy-differential spectra were compared with those measured with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, a silicon telescope spectrometer and literature data.

  2. Alpha-particle spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1972-01-01

    Mapping the radon emanation of the moon was studied to find potential areas of high activity by detection of radon isotopes and their daughter products. It was felt that based on observation of regions overflown by Apollo spacecraft and within the field of view of the alpha-particle spectrometer, a radon map could be constructed, identifying and locating lunar areas of outgassing. The basic theory of radon migration from natural concentrations of uranium and thorium is discussed in terms of radon decay and the production of alpha particles. The preliminary analysis of the results indicates no significant alpha emission.

  3. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, David A.; Erkkila, Bruce H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  4. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, D.A.; Erkkila, B.H.; Vasilik, D.G.

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  5. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jeff; Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    1990-01-01

    Earth resources observed in greater detail. High-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, undergoing development for use in NASA's Earth Observing System, measures reflectance of Earth's surface in visible and near-infrared wavelengths. From an orbit around Earth, instrument scans surface of Earth in 200 wavelength bands simultaneously. Produces images enabling identification of minerals in rocks and soils, important algal pigments in oceans and inland waters, changes in spectra associated with biochemistry of plant canopies, compositions of atmospheric aerosols, sizes of grains in snow, and contamination of snow by impurities that absorb visible light.

  6. Wide-range CCD spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Elena A.; Reyes Cortes, Santiago D.

    1996-08-01

    The utilization of wide range spectrometers is a very important feature for the design of optical diagnostics. This paper describes an innovative approach, based on charged coupled device, which allows to analyze different spectral intervals with the same diffraction grating. The spectral interval is varied by changing the position of the entrance slit when the grating is stationary. The optical system can also include a spherical mirror. In this case the geometric position of the mirror is calculated aiming at compensating the first order astigmatism and the meridional coma of the grating. This device is planned to be used in Thomson scattering diagnostic of the TOKAMAK of Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (ISTTOK).

  7. Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Fourier-transform spectrometer provides approximately hundredfold increase in luminosity at detector plane over that achievable with older instruments of this type. Used to analyze such weak sources as pollutants and other low-concentration substances in atmosphere. Interferometer creates fringe patterns on two distinct arrays of light detectors, which observe different wavelength bands. Objective lens focuses scene on image plane, which contains optical chopper. To make instrument less susceptible to variations in scene under observation, field and detector lenses focus entrance aperture, rather that image, onto detector array.

  8. Static Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Schardt, Michael; Murr, Patrik J; Rauscher, Markus S; Tremmel, Anton J; Wiesent, Benjamin R; Koch, Alexander W

    2016-04-01

    Fourier transform spectroscopy has established itself as the standard method for spectral analysis of infrared light. Here we present a robust and compact novel static Fourier transform spectrometer design without any moving parts. The design is well suited for measurements in the infrared as it works with extended light sources independent of their size. The design is experimentally evaluated in the mid-infrared wavelength region between 7.2 μm and 16 μm. Due to its large etendue, its low internal light loss, and its static design it enables high speed spectral analysis in the mid-infrared.

  9. Delta-Doped CCDs as Detector Arrays in Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Jones, Todd; Jewell, April; Sinha, Mahadeva

    2007-01-01

    In a conventional mass spectrometer, charged particles (ions) are dispersed through a magnetic sector onto an MCP at an output (focal) plane. In the MCP, the impinging charged particles excite electron cascades that afford signal gain. Electrons leaving the MCP can be read out by any of a variety of means; most commonly, they are post-accelerated onto a solid-state detector array, wherein the electron pulses are converted to photons, which, in turn, are converted to measurable electric-current pulses by photodetectors. Each step in the conversion from the impinging charged particles to the output 26 NASA Tech Briefs, February 2007 current pulses reduces spatial resolution and increases noise, thereby reducing the overall sensitivity and performance of the mass spectrometer. Hence, it would be preferable to make a direct measurement of the spatial distribution of charged particles impinging on the focal plane. The utility of delta-doped CCDs as detectors of charged particles was reported in two articles in NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 7 (July 1998): "Delta-Doped CCDs as Low-Energy-Particle Detectors" (NPO-20178) on page 48 and "Delta- Doped CCDs for Measuring Energies of Positive Ions" (NPO-20253) on page 50. In the present developmental miniature mass spectrometers, the above mentioned miniaturization and performance advantages contributed by the use of delta-doped CCDs are combined with the advantages afforded by the Mattauch-Herzog design. The Mattauch- Herzog design is a double-focusing spectrometer design involving an electric and a magnetic sector, where the ions of different masses are spatially separated along the focal plane of magnetic sector. A delta-doped CCD at the focal plane measures the signals of all the charged-particle species simultaneously at high sensitivity and high resolution, thereby nearly instantaneously providing a complete, high-quality mass spectrum. The simultaneous nature of the measurement of ions stands in contrast to that of a

  10. The EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer: a new, permanent user facility at the LLNL EBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, F S; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Doriese, W; Gygax, J; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; King, J; Irwin, K; Reintsema, C; Ullom, J

    2007-09-07

    The EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) is currently being completed and will be installed at the EBIT facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in October 2007. The ECS will replace the smaller XRS/EBIT microcalorimeter spectrometer that has been in almost continuous operation since 2000. The XRS/EBIT was based on a spare laboratory cryostat and an engineering model detector system from the Suzaku/XRS observatory program. The new ECS spectrometer was built to be a low maintenance, high performance implanted silicon microcalorimeter spectrometer with 4 eV resolution at 6 keV, 32 detector channels, 10 {micro}s event timing, and capable of uninterrupted acquisition sessions of over 60 hours at 50 mK. The XRS/EBIT program has been very successful, producing many results on topics such as laboratory astrophysics, atomic physics, nuclear physics, and calibration of the spectrometers for the National Ignition Facility. The ECS spectrometer will continue this work into the future with improved spectral resolution, integration times, and ease-of-use. We designed the ECS instrument with TES detectors in mind by using the same highly successful magnetic shielding as our laboratory TES cryostats. This design will lead to a future TES instrument at the LLNL EBIT. Here we discuss the legacy of the XRS/EBIT program, the performance of the new ECS spectrometer, and plans for a future TES instrument.

  11. The EUV Imaging Spectrometer for Hinode

    SciTech Connect

    Culhane,J.; Harra, L.; James, A.; Al-Janabi, K.; Bradley, L.; Chaudry, R.; Rees, K.; Tandy, J.; Thomas, P.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode will observe solar corona and upper transition region emission lines in the wavelength ranges 170?-?210 Angstroms and 250?-?290 Angstroms . The line centroid positions and profile widths will allow plasma velocities and turbulent or non-thermal line broadenings to be measured. We will derive local plasma temperatures and densities from the line intensities. The spectra will allow accurate determination of differential emission measure and element abundances within a variety of corona and transition region structures. These powerful spectroscopic diagnostics will allow identification and characterization of magnetic reconnection and wave propagation processes in the upper solar atmosphere. We will also directly study the detailed evolution and heating of coronal loops. The EIS instrument incorporates a unique two element, normal incidence design. The optics are coated with optimized multilayer coatings. We have selected highly efficient, backside-illuminated, thinned CCDs. These design features result in an instrument that has significantly greater effective area than previous orbiting EUV spectrographs with typical active region 2?-?5 s exposure times in the brightest lines. EIS can scan a field of 6x8.5 arc?min with spatial and velocity scales of 1 arc?sec and 25 km?s-1 per pixel. The instrument design, its absolute calibration, and performance are described in detail in this paper. EIS will be used along with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) and the X-ray Telescope (XRT) for a wide range of studies of the solar atmosphere.

  12. The CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecking, B. A.; Adams, G.; Ahmad, S.; Anciant, E.; Anghinolfi, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Asryan, G.; Audit, G.; Auger, T.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J. P.; Barbosa, F. J.; Barrow, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Beard, K.; Berman, B. L.; Bianchi, N.; Boiarinov, S.; Bonneau, P.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Carstens, T.; Cetina, C.; Christo, S. B.; Cole, P. L.; Coleman, A.; Connelly, J.; Cords, D.; Corvisiero, P.; Crabb, D.; Crannell, H.; Cuevas, R. C.; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Dennis, L.; DeSanctis, E.; DeVita, R.; Distelbrink, J.; Dodge, G. E.; Dodge, W.; Doolittle, G.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Duncan, W. S.; Dytman, S.; Egiyan, H.; Egiyan, K. S.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Ficenec, J.; Frolov, V.; Funsten, H.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Golovatch, E.; Gram, J.; Guidal, M.; Gyurjyan, V.; Heddle, D.; Hemler, P.; Hersman, F. W.; Hicks, K.; Hicks, R. S.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Insley, D.; Ito, M. M.; Jacobs, G.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Joyce, D.; Kashy, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Klusman, M.; Kossov, M.; Kramer, L.; Koubarovski, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lake, A.; Lawrence, D.; Longhi, A.; Lukashin, K.; Lachniet, J.; Magahiz, R. A.; Major, W.; Manak, J. J.; Marchand, C.; Martin, C.; Matthews, S. K.; McMullen, M.; McNabb, J. W. C.; Mestayer, M. D.; Minehart, R.; Mirazita, M.; Miskimen, R.; Muccifora, V.; Mueller, J.; Murphy, L. Y.; Mutchler, G. S.; Napolitano, J.; Niculescu, I.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Nozar, M.; O'Brien, J. T.; Opper, A. K.; O'Meara, J. E.; Pasyuk, E.; Philips, S. A.; Polli, E.; Price, J. W.; Pozdniakov, S.; Qin, L. M.; Raue, B. A.; Riccardi, G.; Ricco, G.; Riggs, C.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Robb, J.; Ronchetti, F.; Rossi, P.; Roudot, F.; Salgado, C.; Sapunenko, V.; Schumacher, R. A.; Serov, V. S.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, L. C.; Smith, T.; Sober, D. I.; Stavinsky, A.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, W. M.; Taylor, S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Thoma, U.; Thompson, R.; Tilles, D.; Todor, L.; Tung, T. Y.; Tuzel, W.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A. V.; Weinstein, L. B.; Welsh, R. E.; Weygand, D. P.; Wilkin, G. R.; Witkowski, M.; Wolin, E.; Yegneswaran, A.; Yergin, P.; Yun, J.

    2003-05-01

    The CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS) is used to study photo- and electro-induced nuclear and hadronic reactions by providing efficient detection of neutral and charged particles over a good fraction of the full solid angle. A collaboration of about 30 institutions has designed, assembled, and commissioned CLAS in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The CLAS detector is based on a novel six-coil toroidal magnet which provides a largely azimuthal field distribution. Trajectory reconstruction using drift chambers results in a momentum resolution of 0.5% at forward angles. Cherenkov counters, time-of-flight scintillators, and electromagnetic calorimeters provide good particle identification. Fast triggering and high data-acquisition rates allow operation at a luminosity of 10 34 nucleon cm -2 s-1. These capabilities are being used in a broad experimental program to study the structure and interactions of mesons, nucleons, and nuclei using polarized and unpolarized electron and photon beams and targets. This paper is a comprehensive and general description of the design, construction and performance of CLAS.

  13. Engine spectrometer probe and method of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, Sarkis (Inventor); Kittinger, Scott A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The engine spectrometer probe and method of using the same of the present invention provides a simple engine spectrometer probe which is both lightweight and rugged, allowing an exhaust plume monitoring system to be attached to a vehicle, such as the space shuttle. The engine spectrometer probe can be mounted to limit exposure to the heat and debris of the exhaust plume. The spectrometer probe 50 comprises a housing 52 having an aperture 55 and a fiber optic cable 60 having a fiber optic tip 65. The fiber optic tip 65 has an acceptance angle 87 and is coupled to the aperture 55 so that the acceptance angle 87 intersects the exhaust plume 30. The spectrometer probe can generate a spectrum signal from light in the acceptance angle 506 and the spectrum signal can be provided to a spectrometer 508.

  14. Imaging spectrometer/camera having convex grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reininger, Francis M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An imaging spectrometer has fore-optics coupled to a spectral resolving system with an entrance slit extending in a first direction at an imaging location of the fore-optics for receiving the image, a convex diffraction grating for separating the image into a plurality of spectra of predetermined wavelength ranges; a spectrometer array for detecting the spectra; and at least one concave sperical mirror concentric with the diffraction grating for relaying the image from the entrance slit to the diffraction grating and from the diffraction grating to the spectrometer array. In one embodiment, the spectrometer is configured in a lateral mode in which the entrance slit and the spectrometer array are displaced laterally on opposite sides of the diffraction grating in a second direction substantially perpendicular to the first direction. In another embodiment, the spectrometer is combined with a polychromatic imaging camera array disposed adjacent said entrance slit for recording said image.

  15. Lunar mass spectrometer test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torney, F. L.; Dobrott, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The procedures are described along with results obtained in a test program conducted to demonstrate the performance of a candidate lunar mass spectrometer. The instrument was designed to sample and measure gases believed to exist in the lunar atmosphere at the surface. The subject instrument consists of a cold cathode ion source, a small quadrupole mass analyzer and an off axis electron multiplier ion counting detector. The major program emphasis was placed on demonstrating instrument resolution, sensitivity and S/N ratio over the mass range 0-150 amu and over a partial pressure range from 10 to the minus 9th power to 10 to the minus 13th power torr. Ultrahigh vacuum tests were conducted and the minimum detectable partial pressure for neon, argon, krypton and xenon was successfully determined for the spectrometer using isotopes of these gases. With the exception of neon, the minimum detectable partial pressure is approximately 4 x 10 to the minus 14th power torr for the above gases.

  16. Miniature Ion-Array Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    A figure is shown that depicts a proposed miniature ion-mobility spectrometer that would share many features of design and operation of the instrument described in another article. The main differences between that instrument and this one would lie in the configuration and mode of operation of the filter and detector electrodes. A filter electrode and detector electrodes would be located along the sides of a drift tube downstream from the accelerator electrode. These electrodes would apply a combination of (1) a transverse AC electric field that would effect differential transverse dispersal of ions and (2) a transverse DC electric field that would drive the dispersed ions toward the detector electrodes at different distances along the drift tube. The electric current collected by each detector electrode would be a measure of the current, and thus of the abundance of the species of ions impinging on that electrode. The currents collected by all the detector electrodes could be measured simultaneously to obtain continuous readings of abundances of species. The downstream momentum of accelerated ions would be maintained through neutralization on the electrodes; the momentum of the resulting neutral atoms would serve to expel gases from spectrometer, without need for a pump.

  17. Neutron optics of the ILL high-flux polarized neutron three-axis spectrometer IN20B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulda, Jiri; Courtois, Pierre; Saroun, Jan; Thomas, Michel; Enderle, M.; Flores, P.

    2001-11-01

    The three-axis spectrometer IN20 has been upgraded to enhance significantly the data collection rate in experiments using polarized neutrons to study magnetic excitations in the (higher) thermal energy range. To increase the monochromatic polarized neutron flux, a new geometry of the primary spectrometer, optimized by detailed ray-tracing simulations, has been adopted. The main ingredients are a neutron source of a diameter increased from 100 mm to 170 mm and a large double focusing monochromator, illuminated through a heavy input slit (virtual source) of adjustable width. This geometry permits to keep the background at a possibly low level while maximizing the solid angle available for monochromatic focusing. The real challenge of the project has been the new Heusler monochromator. With its active surface of 230 x 150 mm2, consisting of 75 crystal plates mounted in 15 columns, it is the largest polarizing crystal assembly ever built. In combination with the horizontally focusing analyzer of a similar design, implemented in spring 2000, the data collection rate in the polarization analysis mode has increased by a factor 30 - 50 in April 2001 as compared to the original IN20, which up to now has provided world's highest polarized neutron flux in the thermal energy range.

  18. [Hadamard transform spectrometer mixed pixels' unmixing method].

    PubMed

    Yan, Peng; Hu, Bing-Liang; Liu, Xue-Bin; Sun, Wei; Li, Li-Bo; Feng, Yu-Tao; Liu, Yong-Zheng

    2011-10-01

    Hadamard transform imaging spectrometer is a multi-channel digital transform spectrometer detection technology, this paper based on digital micromirror array device (DMD) of the Hadamard transform spectrometer working principle and instrument structure, obtained by the imaging sensor mixed pixel were analyzed, theory derived the solution of pixel aliasing hybrid method, simulation results show that the method is simple and effective to improve the accuracy of mixed pixel spectrum more than 10% recovery. PMID:22250574

  19. Compact reflective imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings

    DOEpatents

    Chrisp, Michael P.

    2006-05-09

    A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, a first mirror that receives said light and reflects said light, an immersive diffraction grating that diffracts said light, a second mirror that focuses said light, and a detector array that receives said focused light. The compact imaging spectrometer can be utilized for remote sensing imaging spectrometers where size and weight are of primary importance.

  20. SIEMENS ADVANCED QUANTRA FTICR MASS SPECTROMETER FOR ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION AT LOW MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W; Laura Tovo, L

    2008-07-08

    The Siemens Advanced Quantra Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was evaluated as an alternative instrument to large double focusing mass spectrometers for gas analysis. High resolution mass spectrometers capable of resolving the common mass isomers of the hydrogen isotopes are used to provide data for accurate loading of reservoirs and to monitor separation of tritium, deuterium, and helium. Conventional double focusing magnetic sector instruments have a resolution that is limited to about 5000. The Siemens FTICR instrument achieves resolution beyond 400,000 and could possibly resolve the tritium ion from the helium-3 ion, which differ by the weight of an electron, 0.00549 amu. Working with Y-12 and LANL, SRNL requested Siemens to modify their commercial Quantra system for low mass analysis. To achieve the required performance, Siemens had to increase the available waveform operating frequency from 5 MHz to 40 MHz and completely redesign the control electronics and software. However, they were able to use the previous ion trap, magnet, passive pump, and piezo-electric pulsed inlet valve design. NNSA invested $1M in this project and acquired four systems, two for Y-12 and one each for SRNL and LANL. Siemens claimed a $10M investment in the Quantra systems. The new Siemens Advanced Quantra demonstrated phenomenal resolution in the low mass range. Resolution greater than 400,000 was achieved for mass 2. The new spectrometer had a useful working mass range to 500 Daltons. However, experiments found that a continuous single scan from low mass to high was not possible. Two useful working ranges were established covering masses 1 to 6 and masses 12 to 500 for our studies. A compromise performance condition enabled masses 1 to 45 to be surveyed. The instrument was found to have a dynamic range of about three orders of magnitude and quantitative analysis is expected to be limited to around 5 percent without using complex fitting algorithms

  1. Calibrating the DARHT Electron Spectrometer with Negative Ions

    SciTech Connect

    R. Trainham , A. P. Tipton , and R. R. Bartech

    2005-11-01

    Negative ions of hydrogen and oxygen have been used to calibrate the DARHT electron spectrometer over the momentum range of 2 to 20 MeV/c. The calibration was performed on September 1, 3, and 8, 2004, and it is good to 0.5% absolute, provided that instrument alignment is carefully controlled. The momentum in MeV/c as a function of magnetic field (B in Gauss) and position in the detector plane (X in mm) is: P = (B-6.28)/(108.404-0.1935*X)

  2. The Spin- and Angel-Resolved Photelectron Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Mankey, G J; Morton, S A; Tobin, J G; Yu, S W; Waddill, G D

    2007-05-08

    A spin- and angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectrometer for the study of magnetic materials will be discussed. It consists of a turntable with electron lenses connected to a large hemispherical analyzer. A mini-Mott spin detector is fitted to the output of the hemispherical analyzer. This system, when coupled to a synchrotron radiation source will allow determination of a complete set of quantum numbers of a photoelectron. This instrument will be used to study ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic and nonmagnetic materials. Some prototypical materials systems to be studied with this instrument system will be proposed.

  3. Characteristics and performance of several mass spectrometer residual gas analyzers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultzman, W. W.

    1974-01-01

    The operation and properties of various mass-spectrometer residual gas analyzers for use in vacuum measurements were analyzed in terms of efficiencies of ion extraction, ion separation and transmission, and ion collection. Types of instruments studied were magnetic sector, omegatron, quadrupole, and monopole. Experimental results presented include absolute sensitivity to argon, relative sensitivity to 10 gases, and cracking patterns for these gases. It is shown that the properties are strongly dependent on instrument range, resolution, and the particular voltages, currents, or field intensities used to control the instrument.

  4. Micromegas detectors for the muon spectrometer upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, M.

    2016-07-01

    Large area Micromegas (MM) detectors will be employed for the Muon Spectrometer upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. A total surface of about 150 m2of the forward regions of the Muon Spectrometer will be equipped with 8 layers of MM modules. Each module covers a surface area of approximately 2-3 m2 for a total active area of 1200 m2. Together with the small-strips Thin Gap Chambers, they will compose the two New Small Wheels, which will replace the innermost stations of the ATLAS Endcap Muon tracking system in the planned 2018/2019 shutdown. This upgrade will maintain a low pT threshold for single muons and provide excellent tracking capabilities for the HL-LHC phase. The New Small Wheel (NSW) project requires fully efficient MM chambers with spatial resolution down to 100 μm, at rate capability up to about 15 kHz/cm2 and operation in a moderate (highly inhomogeneous) magnetic field up to B=0.3 T. The required tracking capability is provided by the intrinsic spatial resolution combined with a challenging mechanical precision. The design, recent progress in the construction and results from the substantial R& D phase (with a focus on novel technical solutions) is presented. In the R& D phase, small and medium size single layer prototypes have been built, along with, more recently, the first two MM quadruplets in a configuration very close to the final one chosen for the NSW. Several tests have been performed on these prototypes at a high-energy test-beam at CERN, to demonstrate that the achieved performances fulfil the requirements. Recent tests applying various configuration and operating conditions are presented.

  5. Airborne astronomy with a 150 micrometer - 500 micrometer heterodyne spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A. L.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes work done under NASA Grant NAG2-254 awarded to the University of California. The project goal was to build a far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer for NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and to use this instrument to observe atomic and molecular spectral lines from the interstellar medium. This goal was successfully achieved; the spectrometer is now in routine use aboard the KAO. Detections of particular note have been the 370 micrometers line of neutral atomic carbon, the 158 micrometers transition of ionized carbon, many of the high-J rotational lines of 12CO and 13CO between J=9-8 and J=22-21, the 119 micron ground-state rotational line of OH, and the 219 micron ground-state rotational line of H2D(+). All of these lines were observed at spectral resolutions exceeding 1 part in 10(exp 6), thereby allowing accurate line shapes and Doppler velocities to be measured.

  6. Pioneer Venus Sounder Probe Neutral Gas Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Wright, W. W.; Blevins, V. A.; Duerksen, K. D.; Brooks, L. D.

    1980-01-01

    A neutral gas mass spectrometer was flown to Venus as part of the Pioneer Venus Multiprobe to measure the composition of its lower atmosphere. The instrument, mounted in the Sounder Probe, was activated after the probe entered the top of the atmosphere, and it obtained data during the descent from 62 km to the surface. Atmospheric gases were sampled through a pair of microleaks, the effluent from which was pumped by a combination of ion and getter pumping. A pneumatically operated valve, controlled by the ambient atmospheric pressure, maintained the ion source pressure at a nearly constant value during descent while the atmospheric pressure varied by three orders of magnitude. A single focusing magnetic sector field mass spectrometer with mass resolution sufficient to reasonably separate argon from C3H4 at 40 amu provided the mass analysis and relative abundance measurements. A microprocessor controlled the operation of the mass spectrometer through a highly efficient peak-tip stepping routine and data compression algorithm that effected a scan of the mass spectrum from 1 to 208 amu in 64 sec while requiring an information rate of only 40 bits/sec to return the data to earth. A subscale height altitude resolution was thus obtained. Weight, size, and power requirements were minimized to be consistent with interplanetary flight contraints.

  7. Field spectrometer (S191H) preprocessor tape quality test program design document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Program QA191H performs quality assurance tests on field spectrometer data recorded on 9-track magnetic tape. The quality testing involves the comparison of key housekeeping and data parameters with historic and predetermined tolerance limits. Samples of key parameters are processed during the calibration period and wavelength cal period, and the results are printed out and recorded on an historical file tape.

  8. Science in a Box. Magnets IV: Magnet Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blizard, Elizabeth B.

    1992-01-01

    Presents low-cost learning activities to help teach elementary students about the earth's magnetic field. One project has students make a model of the earth's magnetic field. Another has them experiment with magnetism. (SM)

  9. A compact versatile femtosecond spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, V.; Johnson, E.; Schellenberg, P.; Parson, W.; Windeler, R.

    2002-12-01

    A compact apparatus for femtosecond pump-probe experiments is described. The apparatus is based on a cavity-dumped titanium:sapphire laser. Probe pulses are generated by focusing weak (˜1 nJ) pulses into a microstructure fiber that produces broadband continuum pulses with high efficiency. With the pump pulses compressed and probe pulses uncompressed, the rise time of the pump-probe signals is <100 fs. The 830 nm pump pulses are also frequency doubled to generate light for excitation at 415 nm. The versatility of the spectrometer is demonstrated by exciting molecules at either 830 or 415 nm, and probing at wavelengths ranging from 500 to 950 nm. Some results on the green fluorescent protein are presented.

  10. Clementine RRELAX SRAM Particle Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M.; Soli, G.; Blaes, B.; Ratliff, J.; Garrett, H.

    1994-01-01

    The Clementine RRELAX radiation monitor chip consists of a p-FET total dose monitor and a 4-kbit SRAM particle spectrometer. Eight of these chips were included in the RRELAX and used to detect the passage of the Clementine (S/C) and the innerstage adapter (ISA) through the earth's radiation belts and the 21-Feb 1994 solar flare. This is the first space flight for this 1.2 micron rad-soft custom CMOS radiation monitor. This paper emphasizes results from the SRAM particle detector which showed that it a) has a detection range of five orders of magnitude relative to the 21-Feb solar flare, b) is not affected by electrons, and c) detected microflares occurring with a 26.5 day period.

  11. Fluorescence imaging spectrometer optical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taiti, A.; Coppo, P.; Battistelli, E.

    2015-09-01

    The optical design of the FLuORescence Imaging Spectrometer (FLORIS) studied for the Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission is discussed. FLEX is a candidate for the ESA's 8th Earth Explorer opportunity mission. FLORIS is a pushbroom hyperspectral imager foreseen to be embarked on board of a medium size satellite, flying in tandem with Sentinel-3 in a Sun synchronous orbit at a height of about 815 km. FLORIS will observe the vegetation fluorescence and reflectance within a spectral range between 500 and 780 nm. Multi-frames acquisitions on matrix detectors during the satellite movement will allow the production of 2D Earth scene images in two different spectral channels, called HR and LR with spectral resolution of 0.3 and 2 nm respectively. A common fore optics is foreseen to enhance by design the spatial co-registration between the two spectral channels, which have the same ground spatial sampling (300 m) and swath (150 km). An overlapped spectral range between the two channels is also introduced to simplify the spectral coregistration. A compact opto-mechanical solution with all spherical and plane optical elements is proposed, and the most significant design rationales are described. The instrument optical architecture foresees a dual Babinet scrambler, a dioptric telescope and two grating spectrometers (HR and LR), each consisting of a modified Offner configuration. The developed design is robust, stable vs temperature, easy to align, showing very high optical quality along the whole field of view. The system gives also excellent correction for transverse chromatic aberration and distortions (keystone and smile).

  12. The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, Richard; Sander, Stanley; Eldering, Annmarie; Miller, Charles; Frankenberg, Christian; Natra, Vijay; Rider, David; Blavier, Jean-Francois; Bekker, Dmitriy; Wu, Yen-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GeoFTS) is an imaging spectrometer designed for an earth science mission to measure key atmospheric trace gases and process tracers related to climate change and human activity. The GeoFTS instrument is a half meter cube size instrument designed to operate in geostationary orbit as a secondary "hosted" payload on a commercial geostationary satellite mission. The advantage of GEO is the ability to continuously stare at a region of the earth, enabling frequent sampling to capture the diurnal variability of biogenic fluxes and anthropogenic emissions from city to continental scales. The science goal is to obtain a process-based understanding of the carbon cycle from simultaneous high spatial resolution measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) many times per day in the near infrared spectral region to capture their spatial and temporal variations on diurnal, synoptic, seasonal and interannual time scales. The GeoFTS instrument is based on a Michelson interferometer design with a number of advanced features incorporated. Two of the most important advanced features are the focal plane arrays and the optical path difference mechanism. A breadboard GeoFTS instrument has demonstrated functionality for simultaneous measurements in the visible and IR in the laboratory and subsequently in the field at the California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS) observatory on Mt. Wilson overlooking the Los Angeles basin. A GeoFTS engineering model instrument is being developed which will make simultaneous visible and IR measurements under space flight like environmental conditions (thermal-vacuum at 180 K). This will demonstrate critical instrument capabilities such as optical alignment stability, interferometer modulation efficiency, and high throughput FPA signal processing. This will reduce flight instrument development risk and show that the Geo

  13. The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, Richard; Sander, Stanley; Eldering, Annmarie; Blavier, Jean-Francois; Bekker, Dmitriy; Manatt, Ken; Rider, David; Wu, Yen-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The Geostationary Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GeoFTS) is an imaging spectrometer designed for a geostationary orbit (GEO) earth science mission to measure key atmospheric trace gases and process tracers related to climate change and human activity. GEO allows GeoFTS to continuously stare at a region of the earth for frequent sampling to capture the variability of biogenic fluxes and anthropogenic emissions from city to continental spatial scales and temporal scales from diurnal, synoptic, seasonal to interannual. The measurement strategy provides a process based understanding of the carbon cycle from contiguous maps of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) collected many times per day at high spatial resolution (2.7kmx2.7km at nadir). The CO2/CH4/CO/CF measurement suite in the near infrared spectral region provides the information needed to disentangle natural and anthropogenic contributions to atmospheric carbon concentrations and to minimize uncertainties in the flow of carbon between the atmosphere and surface. The half meter cube size GeoFTS instrument is based on a Michelson interferometer design that uses all high TRL components in a modular configuration to reduce complexity and cost. It is self-contained and as independent of the spacecraft as possible with simple spacecraft interfaces, making it ideal to be a "hosted" payload on a commercial communications satellite mission. The hosted payload approach for measuring the major carbon-containing gases in the atmosphere from the geostationary vantage point will affordably advance the scientific understating of carbon cycle processes and climate change.

  14. Spin Spectrometer at the ALS and APS

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; University of Missouri-Rolla; Boyd Technologies; Morton, Simon A; Morton, Simon A; Tobin, James G; Yu, Sung Woo; Komesu, Takashi; Waddill, George D; Boyd, Peter

    2007-04-20

    A spin-resolving photoelectron spectrometer, the"Spin Spectrometer," has been designed and built. It has been utilized at both the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, CA, and the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne, IL. Technical details and an example of experimental results are presented here.

  15. A Mass Spectrometer Simulator in Your Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Introduced to study components of ionized gas, the mass spectrometer has evolved into a highly accurate device now used in many undergraduate and research laboratories. Unfortunately, despite their importance in the formation of future scientists, mass spectrometers remain beyond the financial reach of many high schools and colleges. As a result,…

  16. Compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A.S.; Kubalov, S.A.; Kuzik, V.F.; Yakushev, V.P.

    1986-02-01

    This paper describes a time-of-flight mass spectrometer developed for measuring the parameters of a pulsed hydrogen beam. The duration of an electron-beam current pulse in the ionizer of the mass spectrometer can be varied within 2-20 usec, the pulse electron current is 0.6 mA, and the electron energy is 250 eV. The time resolution of the mass spectrometer is determined by the repetition period of the electron-beam current pulses and is 40 usec. The mass spectrometer has 100% transmission in the direction of motion of molecular-beam particles. The dimension of the mass spectrometer is 7 cm in this direction. The mass resolution is sufficient for determination of the composition of the hydrogen beam.

  17. Development and Deployment of Retrofit PolarisQ Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for Isotope Ratio Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Whitten, William B.

    2015-11-01

    This report describes Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) FY15 progress in support of National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA) Portable Mass Spectrometer project. A retrofit PolarisQ ion trap mass spectrometer (RPMS) has been assembled from components of two PolarisQ ion trap mass spectrometers used in previous isotope ratio programs. The retrofit mass spectrometer includes a custom Hastelloy vacuum chamber which is about ¼ the size of the standard aluminum vacuum chamber and reduces the instrument weight from the original by nine pounds. In addition, the new vacuum chamber can be independently heated to reduce impurities such as water, which reacts with UF6 to produce HF in the vacuum chamber. The analyzer and all components requiring service are mounted on the chamber lid, facilitating quick and easy replacement of consumable components such as the filament and electron multiplier.

  18. Design and operational characteristics of a cast steel mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Blantocas, Gene Q.; Ramos, Henry J.; Wada, Motoi

    2004-09-01

    A cast steel magnetic sector mass analyzer is developed for studies of hydrogen and helium ion beams generated by a gas discharge compact ion source. The optimum induced magnetic flux density of 3500 G made it possible to scan the whole spectrum of hydrogen and helium ion species. Analysis of beam characteristics shows that the mass spectrometer sensitivity, and resolving power are approximately inversely proportional. The resolution is enhanced at higher pressures and lower current discharges. In contrast, the instrument sensitivity increased at higher current discharges and decreased at higher pressures. Calculations of the ultimate resolving power with reference to analyzer dimensions yield a numerical value of 30. System anomaly in the form of spherical aberrations was also analyzed using the paraxial beam envelope equation. Beam divergence is most significant at high discharge conditions where angular spread reaches an upper limit of 8.6 deg.

  19. A high-resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer for planetary spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Sinton, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The employment of a high-resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) is described for planetary and other astronomical spectroscopy in conjunction with the 88-inch telescope at Mauna Kea Observatory. The FTS system is designed for a broad range of uses, including double-beam laboratory spectroscopy, infrared gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The data system is well-suited to astronomical applications because of its great speed in acquiring and transforming data, and because of the enormous storage capability of the magnetic tape unit supplied with the system. The basic instrument is outlined 2nd some of the initial results from the first attempted use on the Mauna Kea 88-inch telescope are reported.

  20. Determining x-ray spectra of radiographic sources with a Compton spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda E.; Espy, Michelle A.; Haines, Todd J.; Hunter, James F.; King, Nick S. P.; Manard, Manuel J.; Merrill, Frank E.; Morgan, George L.; Sedillo, Robert; Trainham, Rusty; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Volegov, Petr

    2014-09-01

    Flash radiography is a diagnostic with many physics applications, and the characterization of the energy spectra of such sources is of interest. A Compton spectrometer has been proposed to conduct these measurements. Our Compton spectrometer is a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet constructed by Morgan et al1, and it is designed to measure spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV range. In this device, the x-rays from a radiographic source are collimated into a narrow beam directed on a converter foil. The forward-selected Compton electrons that are ejected from the foil enter the magnetic field region of the spectrometer. The electrons are imaged on a focal plane, with their position determined as a function of their energy. The x-ray spectrum is then reconstructed. Challenges in obtaining these measurements include limited dose of x-rays and the short pulse duration (about 50 ns) for time-resolved measurements. Here we present energy calibration measurements of the spectrometer using a negative ion source. The resolution of the spectrometer was measured in previous calibration experiments to be the greater of 1% or 0.1 MeV/c1. The reconstruction of spectra from a bremsstrahlung source and Co-60 source are also presented.

  1. University of Lodz an electron spectrometer—A new conversion-electron spectrometer for “in-beam” measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Perkowski, J. Andrzejewski, J.; Janiak, Ł.; Samorajczyk, J.; Abraham, T.; Hadyńska-Klęk, K.; Komorowska, M.; Napiorkowski, P.; Srebrny, J.; Stolarz, A.; Droste, Ch.; Grodner, E.; Kisieliński, M.; Kownacki, J.; Kowalczyk, M.; Mierzejewski, J.; Korman, A.; Zielińska, M.

    2014-04-15

    The designed and constructed at the University of Lodz an electron spectrometer is devoted to “in-beam” measurements. The apparatus is characterized by high efficiency up to 9%, good energy resolution (FWHM = 5 keV at 482 keV) and, what is very important good suppression of delta electrons, positrons, and photons emitted by the targets. This achievement was obtained using a combination of magnetic field in two different layouts: perpendicular and parallel to the axis of the spectrometer being orthogonal to the beamline. The conversion-electron spectrometer coupled to the EAGLE array was successfully tested in an “in-beam” measurement.

  2. Conceptual design of a polarized 3He neutron spin filter for polarized neutron spectrometer POLANO at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ino, T.; Ohoyama, K.; Yokoo, T.; Itoh, S.; Ohkawara, M.; Kira, H.; Hayashida, H.; Sakai, K.; Hiroi, K.; Oku, T.; Kakurai, K.; Chang, L. J.

    2016-04-01

    A 3He neutron spin filter (NSF) has been designed for a new polarized neutron chopper spectrometer called the Polarization Analysis Neutron Spectrometer with Correlation Method (POLANO) at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. It is designed to fit in a limited space on the spectrometer as an initial neutron beam polarizer and is polarized in situ by spin exchange optical pumping. This will be the first generation 3He NSF on POLANO, and a polarized neutron beam up to 100 meV with a diameter of 50 mm will be available for research on magnetism, hydrogen materials, and strongly correlated electron systems.

  3. Global model of longitude/UT variations in thermospheric composition and temperature based on mass spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Reber, C. A.; Spencer, N. W.; Brinton, H. C.; Kayser, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of N2, O, He, and Ar densities from neutral gas mass spectrometers on four satellites and inferred O2 and H densities from an ion mass spectrometer have been combined to produce a model of longitude/UT variations in thermospheric neutral composition and temperature. The longitude/UT model is an extension of the mass spectrometer-incoherent scatter thermospheric model (Hedin et al., 1977) and uses spherical harmonic terms dependent on geographic latitude, longitude, and UT. The combined longitude and UT variations reflect the influence of the geomagnetic field but indicate that the variations may not simply be represented in magnetic coordinates.

  4. Evaluation of neutron spectrometer techniques for ITER using synthetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson Sundén, E.; Ballabio, L.; Cecconello, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Gorini, G.; Hellesen, C.; Ognissanto, F.; Ronchi, E.; Sjöstrand, H.; Tardocchi, M.; Weiszflog, M.

    2013-02-01

    A neutron spectrometer at ITER is expected to provide estimates of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, Ti, fuel ion ratio, nt/nd, and Qthermal/Qtot, with 10-20% precision at a time resolution, Δt, of at least 100 ms. The present paper describes a method for evaluating different neutron spectroscopy techniques based on their instrumental response functions and synthetic measurement data. We include five different neutron spectrometric techniques with realistic response functions, based on simulations and measurements where available. The techniques are magnetic proton recoil, thin-foil proton recoil, gamma discriminating organic scintillator, diamond and time-of-flight. The reference position and line of sight of a high resolution neutron spectrometer on ITER are used in the study. ITER plasma conditions are simulated for realistic operating scenarios. The ITER conditions evaluated are beam and radio frequency heated and thermal deuterium-tritium plasmas. Results are given for each technique in terms of the estimated time resolution at which the parameter determination can be made within the required precision (here 10% for Ti and the relative intensities of NB and RF emission components). It is shown that under the assumptions made, the thin-foil techniques out-perform the other spectroscopy techniques in practically all measurement situations. For thermal conditions, the range of achieved Δt in the determination of Ti varies in time scales from ms (for the magnetic and thin-foil proton recoil) to s (for gamma discriminating organic scintillator).

  5. Miniature Ion-Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    The figure depicts a proposed miniature ion-mobility spectrometer that would be fabricated by micromachining. Unlike prior ion-mobility spectrometers, the proposed instrument would not be based on a time-of-flight principle and, consequently, would not have some of the disadvantageous characteristics of prior time-of-flight ion-mobility spectrometers. For example, one of these characteristics is the need for a bulky carrier-gas-feeding subsystem that includes a shutter gate to provide short pulses of gas in order to generate short pulses of ions. For another example, there is need for a complex device to generate pulses of ions from the pulses of gas and the device is capable of ionizing only a fraction of the incoming gas molecules; these characteristics preclude miniaturization. In contrast, the proposed instrument would not require a carrier-gas-feeding subsystem and would include a simple, highly compact device that would ionize all the molecules passing through it. The ionization device in the proposed instrument would be a 0.1-micron-thick dielectric membrane with metal electrodes on both sides. Small conical holes would be micromachined through the membrane and electrodes. An electric potential of the order of a volt applied between the membrane electrodes would give rise to an electric field of the order of several megavolts per meter in the submicron gap between the electrodes. An electric field of this magnitude would be sufficient to ionize all the molecules that enter the holes. Ionization (but not avalanche arcing) would occur because the distance between the ionizing electrodes would be less than the mean free path of gas molecules at the operating pressure of instrument. An accelerating grid would be located inside the instrument, downstream from the ionizing membrane. The electric potential applied to this grid would be negative relative to the potential on the inside electrode of the ionizing membrane and would be of a magnitude sufficient to

  6. Cryogenic Scan Mechanism for Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, John C.; Francis, John L.

    2011-01-01

    A compact and lightweight mechanism has been developed to accurately move a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) scan mirror (a cube corner) in a near-linear fashion with near constant speed at cryogenic temperatures. This innovation includes a slide mechanism to restrict motion to one dimension, an actuator to drive the motion, and a linear velocity transducer (LVT) to measure the speed. The cube corner mirror is double-passed in one arm of the FTS; double-passing is required to compensate for optical beam shear resulting from tilting of the moving cube corner. The slide, actuator, and LVT are off-the-shelf components that are capable of cryogenic vacuum operation. The actuator drives the slide for the required travel of 2.5 cm. The LVT measures translation speed. A proportional feedback loop compares the LVT voltage with the set voltage (speed) to derive an error signal to drive the actuator and achieve near constant speed. When the end of the scan is reached, a personal computer reverses the set voltage. The actuator and LVT have no moving parts in contact, and have magnetic properties consistent with cryogenic operation. The unlubricated slide restricts motion to linear travel, using crossed roller bearings consistent with 100-million- stroke operation. The mechanism tilts several arc seconds during transport of the FTS mirror, which would compromise optical fringe efficiency when using a flat mirror. Consequently, a cube corner mirror is used, which converts a tilt into a shear. The sheared beam strikes (at normal incidence) a flat mirror at the end of the FTS arm with the moving mechanism, thereby returning upon itself and compensating for the shear

  7. Axial field spectrometer at the CERN ISR

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, H.; Hogue, R.; Killian, T.

    1981-01-01

    The Axial Field Spectrometer (AFS) was recently brought into operation at the CERN ISR. It is being exploited in a wide-ranging program to study different aspects of those proton-proton or proton-antiproton collisions which are characterized by a large transverse momentum (p/sub T/). Examples include the measurement of inclusive distributions of identified high p/sub T/ hadrons, and the study of event structures characterized by a large transverse energy (E/sub T/) or the production of one or several high-p/sub T/ electrons or photons. The experimental approach to this program emphasizes integration of advanced magnetic spectroscopy with state-of-the-art calorimetry. These techniques are fully exploited to provide maximal information on all particles produced. In addition, information from these detectors is used in new ways for on-line event triggering and filtering; this allows even very rare events to be selected with high efficiency, an essential prerequisite for studies at a high-luminosity hadron collider, such as the ISR. Considerable modularity of the detectors was sought. Apart from clear advantages of construction, debugging, running, and servicing of such components, modularity provides ease for addition or reconfiguration of the system to emphasize the study of specific final states. At present, for example, a 1 sr Cerenkov detector system allows hadron identification up to p approx. = 12 GeV/c; liquid-argon electromagnetic calorimeters and a uranium-scintillator calorimeter (Hexagon) are used for a study of events containing direct photons.

  8. Ion Mass Spectrometer for Sporadic-E Rocket Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heelis, R. A.; Earle, G. D.; Pfaff, Robert

    2000-01-01

    NASA grant NAG5-5086 provided funding for the William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) to design, fabricate, calibrate, and ultimately fly two ion mass spectrometer instruments on a pair of sounding rocket payloads. Drs. R.A. Heelis and G.D. Earle from UTD were co-investigators on the project. The principal investigator for both rocket experiments was Dr. Robert Pfaff of the Goddard Space Flight Center. The overall project title was "Rocket/Radar Investigation of Lower Ionospheric Electrodynamics Associated with Intense Mid-Latitude Sporadic-E Layers". This report describes the overall objectives of the project, summarizes the instrument design and flight experiment details, and presents representative data obtained during the flights.

  9. An electron/ion spectrometer with the ability of low energy electron measurement for fast ignition experiments.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, T; Kojima, S; Arikawa, Y; Shiraga, H; Sakagami, H; Fujioka, S; Kato, R

    2014-11-01

    An electron energy spectrometer (ESM) is one of the most fundamental diagnostics in the fast ignition experiment. It is necessary to observe the spectra down to a low energy range in order to obtain the accurate deposition efficiency toward the core. Here, we realize the suitable ESM by using a ferrite magnet with a moderate magnetic field of 0.3 T and a rectangular magnetic circuit covered with a steel plate in the inlet side. PMID:25430292

  10. An electron/ion spectrometer with the ability of low energy electron measurement for fast ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, T.; Sakagami, H.; Kojima, S.; Arikawa, Y.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Kato, R.

    2014-11-15

    An electron energy spectrometer (ESM) is one of the most fundamental diagnostics in the fast ignition experiment. It is necessary to observe the spectra down to a low energy range in order to obtain the accurate deposition efficiency toward the core. Here, we realize the suitable ESM by using a ferrite magnet with a moderate magnetic field of 0.3 T and a rectangular magnetic circuit covered with a steel plate in the inlet side.

  11. The role of electron scattering from registration detector in the "Troitsk nu-mass" MAC-E type spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorieva, P. V.; Nozik, A. A.; Pantuev, V. S.; Skasyrskaya, A. K.

    2016-10-01

    There is a proposal to search for a sterile neutrino in a few keV mass range by the "Troitsk nu-mass" facility. In order to estimate sterile neutrino mixing one needs to make precision spectrum measurements well below the endpoint using the existing electrostatic spectrometer with a magnetic adiabatic collimation, or MAC-E filter. The expected signature will be a kink in the electron energy spectrum in tritium beta-decay. In this paper we consider the systematic effect of electron backscattering on the detector used in the spectrometer. For this purpose we provide a set of Monte-Carlo simulation results of electron backscattering on a silicon detector with a thin golden window with realistic electric and magnetic fields in the spectrometer. We have found that the probability of such an effect reaches up to 20-30%. The scattered electron could be reflected backwards to the detector by electrostatic field or by magnetic mirror. There is also a few percent probability to escape from the spectrometer through its entrance. A time delay between the scattering on the detector and the return of the reflected electron can reach a couple of microseconds in the Troitsk spectrometer. Such estimations are critical for the planning upgrades of the detector and the registration electronics. All considered effects are relevant to any MAC-E type spectrometer with solid detector.

  12. Detection of colorectal cancer using time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng; Kwek, Leong-Chuan; Chia, Teck-Chee; Lim, Chu-Sing; Tang, Choong-Leong; Ang, Wuan-Suan; Zhou, Miao-Chang; Loke, Po-Ling

    2006-04-01

    As we know Quantum mechanics is a mathematical theory that can describe the behavior of objects that are at microscopic level. Time-resolved autofluorescence spectrometer monitors events that occur during the lifetime of the excited state. This time ranges from a few picoseconds to hundreds of nanoseconds. That is an extremely important advance as it allows environmental parameters to be monitored in a spatially defined manner in the specimen under study. This technique is based on the application of Quantum Mechanics. This principle is applied in our project as we are trying to use different fluorescence spectra to detect biological molecules commonly found in cancerous colorectal tissue and thereby differentiate the cancerous and non-cancerous colorectal polyps more accurately and specifically. In this paper, we use Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer (Edinburgh Instruments FL920) to measure decay time of autofluorescence of colorectal cancerous and normal tissue sample. All specimens are from Department of Colorectal Surgery, Singapore General Hospital. The tissues are placed in the time-resolved autofluorescence instrument, which records and calculates the decay time of the autofluorescence in the tissue sample at the excitation and emission wavelengths pre-determined from a conventional spectrometer. By studying the decay time,τ, etc. for cancerous and normal tissue, we aim to present time-resolved autofluorescence as a feasible technique for earlier detection of malignant colorectal tissues. By using this concept, we try to contribute an algorithm even an application tool for real time early diagnosis of colorectal cancer for clinical services.

  13. Development of a Submillimeter-Wavelength Immersion Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, T. G.

    2001-01-01

    The broad goal of this project was to develop a broadband, moderate-resolution spectrometer for submillimeter wavelengths. Our original approach was to build an immersion grating spectrometer, and as such, the first step was to identify the best material (lowest loss, highest index) for the grating medium, and to characterize its properties at the foreseen optical-bench operating temperature of 1.5 K. To this end, we put our initial efforts into upgrading an existing laboratory submillimeter Fourier transform spectrometer, which allowed us to carry out the requisite materials measurements. The associated cryogenic detector dewar was also redesigned and rebuilt to carry out this work. This dewar houses the 1.5 K detector and the filter wheel used in the materials characterization. Our goal was to have the beam propagate through the samples as uniformly as possible, so the optics were redesigned to allow for the samples to be traversed by a well-defined collimated beam. The optics redesign also placed the samples at an image of the aperture stop located within the FTS. After the rebuild, we moved into the testing phase.

  14. Low Current Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Because Goddard Space Flight Center needed a way to cool sensors aboard the AXAF, a low current superconducting magnet was developed under contract by Cryomagnetics, Inc. The magnet, now commercially available, reduced the rate of helium consumption, extending the lifetime of the AXAF's x-ray spectrometer. On Earth, it offers a way to reduce operating costs through smaller, less expensive power supplies and reduced use of coolant. The magnet has particular advantages for MRI systems, as it is safer and has lower maintenance requirements.

  15. [The coding correction of slit diffraction in Hadamard transform spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Wang, Shu-Rong; Huang, Yu; Wang, Jun-Bo

    2013-08-01

    According to the principles of Hadamard transform spectrometer and the slit diffraction characteristics, the influence of spectrometer entrance slit diffraction of Hadamard transform spectrometer on the measurement result was analyzed, for the diffraction case, the Hadamard transform spectrometer instrument structure matrix was studied, and the Hadamard transform spectrometer encoding/decoding method was established. The analysis of incident spectral verified the correctness of the coding/ decoding. This method is very important for the high precision measurement of Hadamard transform spectrometer.

  16. Handheld spectrometers: the state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocombe, Richard A.

    2013-05-01

    "Small" spectrometers fall into three broad classes: small versions of laboratory instruments, providing data, subsequently processed on a PC; dedicated analyzers, providing actionable information to an individual operator; and process analyzers, providing quantitative or semi-quantitative information to a process controller. The emphasis of this paper is on handheld dedicated analyzers. Many spectrometers have historically been large, possible fragile, expensive and complicated to use. The challenge over the last dozen years, as instruments have moved into the field, has been to make spectrometers smaller, affordable, rugged, easy-to-use, but most of all capable of delivering actionable results. Actionable results can dramatically improve the efficiency of a testing process and transform the way business is done. There are several keys to this handheld spectrometer revolution. Consumer electronics has given us powerful mobile platforms, compact batteries, clearly visible displays, new user interfaces, etc., while telecomm has revolutionized miniature optics, sources and detectors. While these technologies enable miniature spectrometers themselves, actionable information has demanded the development of rugged algorithms for material confirmation, unknown identification, mixture analysis and detection of suspicious materials in unknown matrices. These algorithms are far more sophisticated than the `correlation' or `dot-product' methods commonly used in benchtop instruments. Finally, continuing consumer electronics advances now enable many more technologies to be incorporated into handheld spectrometers, including Bluetooth, wireless, WiFi, GPS, cameras and bar code readers, and the continued size shrinkage of spectrometer `engines' leads to the prospect of dual technology or `hyphenated' handheld instruments.

  17. Final LDRD Report for Projects # 52797 and # 93362: Rational Understanding and Control of the Magnetic Behavior of Nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. John

    2006-11-01

    This is the final LDRD report for projects # 52797 and # 93362 that funded a five year research program directed by Prof. Z. John Zhang at the Georgia Institute of Technology Chemistry Department. Prof. Zhang was awarded this funding after winning a Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (PECASE) in 2001 with Sandia as the DOE sponsoring lab. The project PI was Blake Simmons and the PM was Alfredo Morales. The page intentionally left blank

  18. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a minature quadrupole mass spectrometer array for the separation of ions, comprising a first pair of parallel, planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry, a second pair of planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry parallel to said first pair of rods and disposed such that a line perpendicular to each of said first axes of symmetry and a line perpendicular to each of said second axes of symmetry bisect each other and form a generally 90 degree angle. A nonconductive top positioning plate is positioned generally perpendicular to the first and second pairs of rods and has an aperture for ion entrance along an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, a nonconductive bottom positioning plate is generally parallel to the top positioning plate and has an aperture for ion exit centered on an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, means for maintaining a direct current voltage between the first and second pairs of rods, and means for applying a radio frequency voltage to the first and second pairs of rods.

  19. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor); Hecht, Michael H. (Inventor); Orient, Otto J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a minature quadrupole mass spectrometer array for the separation of ions, comprising a first pair of parallel, planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry, a second pair of planar, nonmagnetic conducting rods each having an axis of symmetry parallel to said first pair of rods and disposed such that a line perpendicular to each of said first axes of symmetry and a line perpendicular to each of said second axes of symmetry bisect each other and form a generally 90 degree angle. A nonconductive top positioning plate is positioned generally perpendicular to the first and second pairs of rods and has an aperture for ion entrance along an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, a nonconductive bottom positioning plate is generally parallel to the top positioning plate and has an aperture for ion exit centered on an axis equidistant from each axis of symmetry of each of the parallel rods, means for maintaining a direct current voltage between the first and second pairs of rods, and means for applying a radio frequency voltage to the first and second pairs of rods.

  20. Large Isotope Spectrometer for Astromag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Klarmann, J.; Israel, M. H.; Garrard, T. L.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Ormes, J. F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Rasmussen, I. L.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    The Large Isotope Spectrometer for Astromag (LISA) is an experiment designed to measure the isotopic composition and energy spectra of cosmic rays for elements extending from beryllium through zinc. The overall objectives of this investigation are to study the origin and evolution of galactic matter; the acceleration, transport, and time scales of cosmic rays in the galaxy; and search for heavy antinuclei in the cosmic radiation. To achieve these objectives, the LISA experiment will make the first identifications of individual heavy cosmic ray isotopes in the energy range from about 2.5 to 4 GeV/n where relativistic time dilation effects enhance the abundances of radioactive clocks and where the effects of solar modulation and cross-section variations are minimized. It will extend high resolution measurements of individual element abundances and their energy spectra to energies of nearly 1 TeV/n, and has the potential for discovering heavy anti-nuclei which could not have been formed except in extragalactic sources.

  1. Spectrometer design approaching the limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesenberg, Rainer; Wuttig, Andreas; Peschel, Thomas; Damm, Christoph; Dobschal, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-09-01

    The design limits of grating array spectral sensors are discussed. The limit of a grating spectrometer with respect to the resolution is given by the diffraction limit of the grating. To approach the limit for the visible spectral region the entrance slits should reach a width of 2 μm and larger depending on wavelength and numerical aperture. The detector pixel sizes should be in the same range, which is achieved virtually by the discussed double array arrangement with a transmissive, static slit array and detector array. A number of techniques are applied for optimizing the performance as well as for miniaturization. A sub-pixel imaging including a sub-pixel analysis based on the double array arrangement virtually reduces the detector pixel sizes down to about 20%. To avoid the imaging aberrations the spectra is imaged from different entrance positions by the entrance slit array. The throughput can be increased by using a two dimensional entrance slit array, which includes a multiplex pattern or a fixed adaptive pattern. The design example of a UV-Raman spectral sensor is presented including spectral measurements.

  2. Data processing assessment for the Lunar Geoscience Observer imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irigoyen, R. E.; Liaw, H. M.

    1988-01-01

    On the Lunar Geoscience Observer project, a Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer instrument has been proposed. This instrument will have science data input rates in the hundreds of kilobits per second (kbps) and an average telemetry output data rate of 4 kbps. Techniques that can be used to reduce the throughput of the instrument are editing, summing and averaging, data compression, data preprocessing, pattern recognition and snapshot data taking. Due to instrument limitations in the buffer memory size and processing speeds, a careful selection of the available techniques must be made.

  3. Modal survey test of the oriented scintillation spectrometer experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paule, David W.

    The modal survey test of the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) projected for the Space Shuttle, and the revision to the NASTRAN mathematical model of the (OSSE) primary structure, are discussed. The updated model is used to predict element loads for the calculation of margins of safety. Changes including alteration of the stiffness of the springs representing the rotational stiffnesses of the gearboxes, and lowering of the stiffnesses of the aft diagonal strut and the back plate, brought the frequencies of the first six modes of the NASTRAN model to within 4 percent of the test modes.

  4. A SINGLE-EXPOSURE, MULTIDETECTOR NEUTRON SPECTROMETER FOR WORKPLACE MONITORING.

    PubMed

    Bedogni, R; Bortot, D; Buonomo, B; Esposito, A; Gómez-Ros, J M; Introini, M V; Mazzitelli, G; Moraleda, M; Pola, A; Romero, A M

    2016-09-01

    This communication describes a recently developed single-exposure neutron spectrometer, based on multiple active thermal neutron detectors located within a moderating sphere, which have been developed jointly by CIEMAT (Spain), INFN (Italy) and Politecnico di Milano (Italy) in the framework of Italian and Spanish collaboration projects. The fabricated prototypes permit to achieve spectrometric resolution with nearly isotropic response for neutron with energies from thermal to 100-200 MeV, thus being able to characterise the complete neutron spectrum in only one exposure by unfolding the measured responses of the detectors. This makes it especially advantageous for characterising neutron fields and workplace monitoring purposes in neutron-producing facilities.

  5. The EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer: A New, Permanent User Facility at the LLNL EBIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, S.

    2007-01-01

    The EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) has recently been completed and is currently being installed at the EBIT facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The ECS will replace the smaller XRS/EBIT spectrometer that has been in almost continuous operation since 2000. The XRS/EBIT was based on a spare laboratory cryostat and an engineering model detector system from the Suzaku/XRS observatory. The new ECS spectrometer was built from the ground up to be a low maintenance, high performance microcalorimeter spectrometer with 4 eV resolution at 6 keV, 32 detector channels, 10 us event timing, and capable of uninterrupted acquisition sessions of over 70 hours at 50 mK. The XRSIEBIT program has been extremely successful, producing over two-dozen refereed publications on topics such as laboratory astrophysics, atomic physics, nuclear physics, and calibration of the spectrometers for the National Ignition Facility, with many more publications in preparation. The ECS spectrometer will continue this work into the future with improved spectral resolution, integration times, and ease-of-use. We designed the ECS instrument with TES detectors in mind by using the same highly successful magnetic shielding as our laboratory TES cryostats. This design will lead to a future TES instrument at the LLNL EBIT. This proposed future instrument would include a hybrid detector system with 0.8 eV resolution in the band from 0.1-1.0 keV, 2 eV from 0.1-10 keV, and 30 eV from 0.5-100 keV, with high quantum efficiency in each band. Here we discuss the legacy of the XRS/EBIT program, the performance of the new ECS spectrometer, and plans for a future TES spectrometer.

  6. Search for a QGP with a TPC spectrometer, and QGP signals predicted by new event generator

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1988-12-08

    The BNL/CCNY/Johns Hopkins/Rice Collaboration has developed and successfully tested a TPC Magnetic Spectrometer to search for OGP signals produced by ion beams at AGS. Test data with 14.5 GeV/c /times/ A Oxygen ions incident on a Pb target has been obtained. These include a 78-prong nuclear interaction in the MPS magnet which was pattern recognized with an efficiency approx.75%. A cascade and plasma event generator has also been developed, the predictions of which are used to illustrate how our technique can detect possible plasma signals at AGS and RHIC. A 4..pi.. tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer has been proposed for RHIC. The new event generator predicts striking central rapidity bump QGP signals at RHIC for p, /bar p/, ..pi../sup +-/, K/sup +-/, etc., produced by 100 GeV/c /times/ A Au on Au collisions and these are presented. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Ultralow field NMR spectrometer with an atomic magnetometer near room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guobin; Li, Xiaofeng; Sun, Xianping; Feng, Jiwen; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2013-12-01

    We present a Cs atomic magnetometer with a sensitivity of 150fT/Hz(1/2) operating near room temperature. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal of 125μL tap water was detected at an ultralow magnetic field down to 47nT, with the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the NMR signal approaching 50 after eight averages. Relaxivity experiments with a Gd(DTPA) contrast agent in zero field were performed, in order to show the magnetometer's ability to measure spin-lattice relaxation time with high accuracy. This demonstrates the feasibility of an ultralow field NMR spectrometer based on a Cs atomic magnetometer, which has a low working temperature, short data acquisition time and high sensitivity. This kind of NMR spectrometer has great potential in applications such as chemical analysis and magnetic relaxometry detection in ultralow or zero fields.

  8. Miniature thermal emission spectrometer for the Mars Exploration Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Steven; Peralta, Richard; Christensen, Phil; Mehall, Greg

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes results of the calibration of the miniature thermal emission spectrometer (Mini-TES) being built by Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS) under contract to Arizona State University (ASU). This paper also serves as an update to an earlier paper [R.J. Peralta, S. Silverman, D. Bates, Raytheon/Santa Barbara Remote Sensing, P. Christensen, G. Mehall, T. Tourville, R. Keehn, G. Cannon, Arizona State University, Miniature thermal emission spectrometer for the Mars Exploration Rover, Proceedings of the SPIE, vol. 4485-09, August 2001] for mission description and instrument design. Mini-TES is a single detector Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), covering the spectral range 5 29μm at 10cm spectral resolution. Launched in June 2003, one Mini-TES instrument will fly to Mars aboard each of the two missions of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Project (MER), named Spirit and Opportunity. Mini-TES is designed to provide a key minerological remote sensing component of the MER mission, which includes several other science instruments. The first Mini-TES unit was required to meet a two-year development schedule with proven, flight-tested instrumentation. Therefore, SBRS designed Mini-TES based on proven heritage from the successful Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) thermal emission spectrometer (TES), which was launched in 1996 and is still operational with over 500 million spectra collected to date. Mini-TES design, performance, integration onto the rovers, as well as details of the calibration are discussed. Full instrument and calibration details are the subject of an upcoming Journal of Geophysical Research Mini-TES paper by Christensen, et al.

  9. A Novel Compact Electron Spectrometer for Hot Electron Measurement in Pulsed Laser Solid Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Patel, P; Price, D F; Young, B K; Springer, P T; Berry, R; Booth, R; Bruns, C; Nelson, D

    2002-07-05

    Ultra-intense laser-matter interactions provide a unique source of temporally short, broad spectrum electrons, which may be utilized in many varied applications. One such, which we are pursuing, is as part of a novel diagnostic to trace magnetic field lines in a magnetically-confined fusion device. An essential aspect of this scheme is to have a detailed characterization of the electron angular and energy distribution. To this effect we designed and constructed a compact electron spectrometer that uses permanent magnets for electron energy dispersion and over 100 scintillating fibers coupled to a 1024 x 1024 pixel CCD as the detection system. This spectrometer has electron energy coverage from 10 keV to 2 MeV. We tested the spectrometer on a high intensity (10{sup 17} to 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse (< 100 fs) laser, JanUSP, at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory using various solid targets. The details of the spectrometer and the experimental results will be reported.

  10. Martian Magnets Under the Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired this microscopic imager view of its capture magnet on sol 92 (April 6, 2004). Both Spirit and the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity are equipped with a number of magnets. The capture magnet, as seen here, has a stronger charge than its sidekick, the filter magnet. The lower-powered filter magnet captures only the most magnetic airborne dust with the strongest charges, while the capture magnet picks up all magnetic airborne dust.

    The magnets' primary purpose is to collect the martian magnetic dust so that scientists can analyze it with the rovers' Moessbauer spectrometers. While there is plenty of dust on the surface of Mars, it is difficult to confirm where it came from, and when it was last airborne. Because scientists are interested in learning about the properties of the dust in the atmosphere, they devised this dust-collection experiment.

    The capture magnet is about 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter and is constructed with a central cylinder and three rings, each with alternating orientations of magnetization. Scientists have been monitoring the continual accumulation of dust since the beginning of the mission with panoramic camera and microscopic imager images. They had to wait until enough dust accumulated before they could get a Moessbauer spectrometer analysis. The results of that analysis, performed on sol 92, have not been sent back to Earth yet.

  11. Gas sampling system for a mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E; Ladner, Edward P

    2003-12-30

    The present invention relates generally to a gas sampling system, and specifically to a gas sampling system for transporting a hazardous process gas to a remotely located mass spectrometer. The gas sampling system includes a capillary tube having a predetermined capillary length and capillary diameter in communication with the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a flexible tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube intermediate the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a heat transfer tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube, and a heating device in communication the heat transfer tube for substantially preventing condensation of the process gas within the capillary tube.

  12. Spectrometer for cluster ion beam induced luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuto, H. Sakata, A.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H.; Musumeci, F.

    2015-02-15

    A spectrometer to detect the ultra-weak luminescence originated by the collision of cluster ions on the surfaces of solid materials was constructed. This spectrometer consists of 11 photomultipliers with band-pass interference filters that can detect the luminescence within the wavelength ranging from 300 to 700 nm and of a photomultiplier without filter. The calibration of the detection system was performed using the photons emitted from a strontium aluminate fluorescent tape and from a high temperature tungsten filament. Preliminary measurements show the ability of this spectrometer to detect the cluster ion beam induced luminescence.

  13. Acousto-optic tunable filter imaging spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Yu, Jeffrey; Reyes, George; Rider, David; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1991-01-01

    A remote sensing multispectral imaging instrument is being developed that uses a high resolution, fast programmable acoustooptic tunable filter (AOTF) as the spectral bandpass filter. A compact and fully computer controllable AOTF-based imaging spectrometer that operates in the visible wavelength range (0.5-0.8 microns) has been built and tested with success. A second imaging spectrometer operating in the near-infrared wavelength range (1.2-2.4 microns) is also under experimental investigation. The design criteria meeting various system issues, such as imaging quality, spectral response, and field of view (FOV), are discussed. An experiment using this AOTF imaging spectrometer breadboard is described.

  14. Study of the cross section determination with the PRISMA spectrometer: The 40Ar + 208Pb case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijatović, T.; Szilner, S.; Corradi, L.; Montanari, D.; Pollarolo, G.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Goasduff, A.; Jelavić Malenica, D.; Mărginean, N.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Soić, N.; Stefanini, A. M.; Ur, C. A.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    The PRISMA spectrometer's response function was successfully applied to match three angular and magnetic settings over a wide angular range for measurements of quasi-elastic reactions in 40Ar + 208Pb . The absolute scale of cross sections has been obtained by using the Rutherford cross section at the forward angles and the information from the energy distributions measured with the spectrometer without and with coincidences with the CLARA γ-array. The semi-classical model GRAZING has been used to test the unfolding procedure and for comparison with the corrected cross sections.

  15. Astrogam - A magnetic rigidity spectrometer for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Ahlen, S. P.; Beatty, J. J.; Barbier, L. M.; Ormes, J. F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Carlson, P.

    1990-01-01

    A novel concept is presented for a high-energy gamma-ray telescope with an extended energy range and excellent energy and angular resolution. The characteristics of Astrogam, a wide-field camera which makes an all-sky survey, are enumerated. Consideration is given to the instrument's unique features: wide energy range (four orders of magnitude and energy, which will bridge the gap between satellite and ground-based observations); excellent source location precision (multiple scattering error dominating nuclear recoil and measurement error below 20 GeV); and excellent energy resolution (1-percent energy resolution). Astrogam will make observations in the GTE energy range possible and could resolve complex source regions like the Crab pulsar/Nebular system, the Galactic center, and the Geminga region as well as discover the true nature of the sources.

  16. BRAHMS (Broad Range Hadron Magnetic Spectrometer) Figures and Data Archive

    DOE Data Explorer

    The BRAHMS experiment was designed to measure charged hadrons over a wide range of rapidity and transverse momentum to study the reaction mechanisms of the relativistic heavy ion reactions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the properties of the highly excited nuclear matter formed in these reactions. The experiment took its first data during the RHIC 2000 year run and completed data taking in June 2006. The BRAHMS archive makes publications available and also makes data and figures from those publications available as separate items. See also the complete list of publications, multimedia presentations, and related papers at http://www4.rcf.bnl.gov/brahms/WWW/publications.html

  17. A Project to Design and Build the Magnets for a New Test Beamline, the ATF2, at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Cherrill M.; Sugahara, Ryuhei; Masuzawa, Mika; Bolzon, Benoit; Jeremie, Andrea; /Annecy, LAPP

    2011-02-07

    In order to achieve the high luminosity required at the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), it is critical to focus the beams to nanometer size with the ILC Beam Delivery System, and to maintain the beams collisions with a nanometer-scale stability. To establish the technologies associated with this ultra-high precision beam handling, a special beamline has been designed and built as an extension of the existing extraction beamline of the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK, Japan. The ATF provides an adequate ultra-low emittance electron beam that is comparable to the ILC requirements; the ATF2 mimics the ILC final focus system to create a tightly focused, stable beam. There are 37 magnets in the ATF2, 29 quadrupoles, 5 sextupoles and 3 bends. These magnets had to be acquired in a short time and at minimum cost, which led to various acquisition strategies; but nevertheless they had to meet strict requirements on integrated strength, physical dimensions, compatibility with existing magnet movers and beam position monitors, mechanical stability and field stability and quality. This paper will describe how 2 styles of quadrupoles, 2 styles of sextupoles, one dipole style and their supports were designed, fabricated, refurbished or modified, measured and aligned by a small team of engineers from 3 continents.

  18. Imaging Spectrometer on a Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu; Pain, Bedabrata; Cunningham, Thomas; Zheng, Xinyu

    2007-01-01

    A proposed visible-light imaging spectrometer on a chip would be based on the concept of a heterostructure comprising multiple layers of silicon-based photodetectors interspersed with long-wavelength-pass optical filters. In a typical application, this heterostructure would be replicated in each pixel of an image-detecting integrated circuit of the active-pixel-sensor type (see figure). The design of the heterostructure would exploit the fact that within the visible portion of the spectrum, the characteristic depth of penetration of photons increases with wavelength. Proceeding from the front toward the back, each successive long-wavelength-pass filter would have a longer cutoff wavelength, and each successive photodetector would be made thicker to enable it to absorb a greater proportion of incident longer-wavelength photons. Incident light would pass through the first photodetector and encounter the first filter, which would reflect light having wavelengths shorter than its cutoff wavelength and pass light of longer wavelengths. A large portion of the incident and reflected shorter-wavelength light would be absorbed in the first photodetector. The light that had passed through the first photodetector/filter pair of layers would pass through the second photodetector and encounter the second filter, which would reflect light having wavelengths shorter than its cutoff wavelength while passing light of longer wavelengths. Thus, most of the light reflected by the second filter would lie in the wavelength band between the cutoff wavelengths of the first and second filters. Thus, further, most of the light absorbed in the second photodetector would lie in this wavelength band. In a similar manner, each successive photodetector would detect, predominantly, light in a successively longer wavelength band bounded by the shorter cutoff wavelength of the preceding filter and the longer cutoff wavelength of the following filter.

  19. Calibration of a photomultiplier array spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Steven A.; Wright, C. Wayne; Piazza, Charles R.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic approach to the calibration of a photomultiplier array spectrometer is presented. Through this approach, incident light radiance derivation is made by recognizing and tracing gain characteristics for each photomultiplier tube.

  20. Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2005-12-06

    Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

  1. Electro-optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2005-01-01

    JPL is developing an innovative compact, low mass, Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (E-O IFTS) for hyperspectral imaging applications. The spectral region of this spectrometer will be 1 - 2.5 micron (1000-4000/cm) to allow high-resolution, high-speed hyperspectral imaging applications. One application will be the remote sensing of the measurement of a large number of different atmospheric gases simultaneously in the same airmass. Due to the use of a combination of birefringent phase retarders and multiple achromatic phase switches to achieve phase delay, this spectrometer is capable of hyperspectral measurements similar to that of the conventional Fourier transform spectrometer but without any moving parts. In this paper, the principle of operations, system architecture and recent experimental progress will be presented.

  2. Electro-optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2005-01-01

    JPL is developing an innovative compact, low mass, Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (E-0IFTS) for hyperspectral imaging applications. The spectral region of this spectrometer will be 1 - 2.5 pm (1000 -4000 cm-') to allow high-resolution, high-speed hyperspectral imaging applications [l-51. One application will be theremote sensing of the measurement of a large number of different atmospheric gases simultaneously in the sameairmass. Due to the use of a combination of birefiingent phase retarders and multiple achromatic phase switches toachieve phase delay, this spectrometer is capable of hyperspectral measurements similar to that of the conventionalFourier transform spectrometer but without any moving parts. In this paper, the principle of operations, systemarchitecture and recent experimental progress will be presen.

  3. Electronically-Scanned Fourier-Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Ocallaghan, F. G.

    1984-01-01

    Instrument efficient, lightweight, and stable. Fourier-transform spectrometer configuration uses electronic, instead of mechanical, scanning. Configuration insensitive to vibration-induced sampling errors introduced into mechanically scanned systems.

  4. Long-Wave Infrared Dyson Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis Z.; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Hill, Cory J.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented for an ultra compact long-wave infrared slit spectrometer based on the dyson concentric design. The dyson spectrometer has been integrated in a dewar environment with a quantum well infrared photodetecor (QWIP), concave electron beam fabricated diffraction grating and ultra precision slit. The entire system is cooled to cryogenic temperatures to maximize signal to noise ratio performance, hence eliminating thermal signal from transmissive elements and internal stray light. All of this is done while maintaining QWIP thermal control. A general description is given of the spectrometer, alignment technique and predicated performance. The spectrometer has been designed for optimal performance with respect to smile and keystone distortion. A spectral calibration is performed with NIST traceable targets. A 2-point non-uniformity correction is performed with a precision blackbody source to provide radiometric accuracy. Preliminary laboratory results show excellent agreement with modeled noise equivalent delta temperature and detector linearity over a broad temperature range.

  5. Preliminary Analysis of the Multisphere Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhagen, P.; Kniss, T.; Wilson, J. W.; Singleterry, R. C.; Jones, I. W.; VanSteveninck, W.

    2003-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) Project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (thermal to greater than 10 GeV), total neutron fluence rate, and neutron effective dose and dose equivalent rates and their dependence on altitude and geomagnetic cutoff. The measured cosmic-ray neutron spectra have almost no thermal neutrons, a large "evaporation" peak near 1 MeV and a second broad peak near 100 MeV which contributes about 69% of the neutron effective dose. At high altitude, geomagnetic latitude has very little effect on the shape of the spectrum, but it is the dominant variable affecting neutron fluence rate, which was 8 times higher at the northernmost measurement location than it was at the southernmost. The shape of the spectrum varied only slightly with altitude from 21 km down to 12 km (56 - 201 grams per square centimeter atmospheric depth), but was significantly different on the ground. In all cases, ambient dose equivalent was greater than effective dose for cosmic-ray neutrons.

  6. Mass Spectrometer for Airborne Micro-Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Bacteria and other micro-organisms identified continously with aid of new technique for producing samples for mass spectrometer. Technique generates aerosol of organisms and feeds to spectrometer. Given species of organism produces characteristic set of peaks in mass spectrum and thereby identified. Technique useful for monitoring bacterial makeup in environmental studies and in places where cleanliness is essential, such as hospital operating rooms, breweries, and pharmaceutical plants.

  7. Ruggedized Spectrometers Are Built for Tough Jobs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Curiosity Chemistry and Camera instrument, or ChemCam, analyzes the elemental composition of materials on the Red Planet by using a spectrometer to measure the wavelengths of light they emit. Principal investigator Roger Wiens worked with Ocean Optics, out of Dunedin, Florida, to rework the company's spectrometer to operate in cold and rowdy conditions and also during the stresses of liftoff. Those improvements have been incorporated into the firm's commercial product line.

  8. 1987 calibration of the TFTR neutron spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Strachan, J.D.; Princeton Univ., NJ . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1989-12-01

    The {sup 3}He neutron spectrometer used for measuring ion temperatures and the NE213 proton recoil spectrometer used for triton burnup measurements were absolutely calibrated with DT and DD neutron generators placed inside the TFTR vacuum vessel. The details of the detector response and calibration are presented. Comparisons are made to the neutron source strengths measured from other calibrated systems. 23 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. SUB 1-Millimeter Size Fresnel Micro Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon; Koch, Laura; Song, Kyo D.; Park, Sangloon; King, Glen; Choi, Sang

    2010-01-01

    An ultra-small micro spectrometer with less than 1mm diameter was constructed using Fresnel diffraction. The fabricated spectrometer has a diameter of 750 nmicrometers and a focal length of 2.4 mm at 533nm wavelength. The micro spectrometer was built with a simple negative zone plate that has an opaque center with an ecliptic shadow to remove the zero-order direct beam to the aperture slit. Unlike conventional approaches, the detailed optical calculation indicates that the ideal spectral resolution and resolving power do not depend on the miniaturized size but only on the total number of rings. We calculated 2D and 3D photon distribution around the aperture slit and confirmed that improved micro-spectrometers below 1mm size can be built with Fresnel diffraction. The comparison between mathematical simulation and measured data demonstrates the theoretical resolution, measured performance, misalignment effect, and improvement for the sub-1mm Fresnel micro-spectrometer. We suggest the utilization of an array of micro spectrometers for tunable multi-spectral imaging in the ultra violet range.

  10. NIST Calibration of a Neutron Spectrometer ROSPEC.

    PubMed

    Heimbach, Craig

    2006-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer was acquired for use in the measurement of National Institute of Standards and Technology neutron fields. The spectrometer included options for the measurement of low and high energy neutrons, for a total measurement range from 0.01 eV up to 17 MeV. The spectrometer was evaluated in calibration fields and was used to determine the neutron spectrum of an Americium-Beryllium neutron source. The calibration fields used included bare and moderated (252)Cf, monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, and a thermal-neutron beam. Using the calibration values determined in this exercise, the spectrometer gives a good approximation of the neutron spectrum, and excellent values for neutron fluence, for all NIST calibration fields. The spectrometer also measured an Americium-Beryllium neutron field in a NIST exposure facility and determined the field quite well. The spectrometer measured scattering effects in neutron spectra which previously could be determined only by calculation or integral measurements.

  11. NIST Calibration of a Neutron Spectrometer ROSPEC

    PubMed Central

    Heimbach, Craig

    2006-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer was acquired for use in the measurement of National Institute of Standards and Technology neutron fields. The spectrometer included options for the measurement of low and high energy neutrons, for a total measurement range from 0.01 eV up to 17 MeV. The spectrometer was evaluated in calibration fields and was used to determine the neutron spectrum of an Americium-Beryllium neutron source. The calibration fields used included bare and moderated 252Cf, monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, and a thermal-neutron beam. Using the calibration values determined in this exercise, the spectrometer gives a good approximation of the neutron spectrum, and excellent values for neutron fluence, for all NIST calibration fields. The spectrometer also measured an Americium-Beryllium neutron field in a NIST exposure facility and determined the field quite well. The spectrometer measured scattering effects in neutron spectra which previously could be determined only by calculation or integral measurements. PMID:27274944

  12. Laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.W.; Martin, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometer DNA analyzer which can be broadly used for biomedical research. Tasks include: pulsed ion extraction to improve resolution; two-component matrices to enhance ionization; and solid phase DNA purification.

  13. User Guide to the PDS Dataset for the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Conor A.; Kaelberer, Monte S.; Gorius, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    This User Guide to the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has been written with two communities in mind. First and foremost, scientists external to the Cassini Project who seek to use the CIRS data as archived in the Planetary Data System (PDS). In addition, it is intended to be a comprehensive reference guide for those internal to the CIRS team.

  14. Time-of-flight electron spectrometer for a broad range of kinetic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, Alexander; Metje, Jan; Wilke, Martin; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Engel, Nicholas; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Richter, Clemens; Golnak, Ronny; Kiyan, Igor Yu.; Aziz, Emad F.

    2013-02-15

    A newly constructed time-of-flight electron spectrometer of the magnetic bottle type is characterized for electron detection in a broad range of kinetic energies. The instrument is designed to measure the energy spectra of electrons generated from liquids excited by strong laser fields and photons in the range of extreme ultra violet and soft X-rays. Argon inner shell electrons were recorded to calibrate the spectrometer and investigate its characteristics, such as energy resolution and collection efficiency. Its energy resolution {Delta}E/E of 1.6% allows resolving the Ar 2p spin orbit structure at kinetic energies higher than 100 eV. The collection efficiency is determined and compared to that of the spectrometer in its field-free configuration.

  15. First measurements with the Munich 2D-ACAR spectrometer on Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Leitner, Michael; Böni, Peter

    2013-06-01

    The Munich 2D-ACAR spectrometer at the Maier-Leibnitz accelerator laboratory in Garching has recently become operational. In the present implementation a 2D-ACAR spectrometer is set up, with a baseline of 16.5 m, a conventional 22Na positron source and two Anger-type gamma-cameras. The positrons are guided onto the sample by a magnetic field generated by a normal conducting electromagnet. The sample can be either cooled by a standard closed-cycle-cryostat to low temperatures or heated by a resistive filament to temperatures up to 500 K. We present the key features of this new 2D-ACAR spectrometer and, in addition, discuss first measurements on the pure metal system Cr. The 2D-ACAR measurements have been performed on Cr at different temperatures: at 5 K and at room temperature in the anti-ferromagnetic phase and at 318K slightly above the paramagnetic phase transition.

  16. Integrating the MANX 6-D Muon Cooling Experiment with the MICE Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, S.A.; Abrams, R.J.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Johnson, R.P.; Roberts, T.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The MANX experiment is to demonstrate the reduction of 6D muon phase space emittance using a continuous liquid absorber to provide ionization cooling in a helical solenoid magnetic channel. The experiment involves the construction of a short two-period long helical cooling channel (HCC) to reduce the muon invariant emittance by a factor of two. The HCC would replace the current cooling section of the MICE experiment now being setup at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The MANX experiment would use the existing MICE spectrometers and muon beam line. This paper shall consider the various approaches to integrate MANX into the RAL hall using the MICE spectrometers. This study shall discuss the matching schemes used to minimize losses and prevent emittance growth between the MICE spectrometers and the MANX HCC. Also the placement of additional detection planes in the matching region and the HCC to improve the resolution will be examined.

  17. Measuring the masses of the charged hadrons using a RICH as a precision velocity spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Peter S.; Engelfried, Jurgen; /San Luis Potosi U.

    2010-08-01

    The Selex experiment measured several billion charged hadron tracks with a high precision magnetic momentum spectrometer and high precision RICH velocity spectrometer. We have analyzed these data to simultaneously measure the masses of all the long lived charged hadrons and anti-hadrons from the {pi} to the {Omega} using the same detector and technique. The statistical precision achievable with this data sample is more than adequate for 0.1% mass measurements. We have used these measurements to develop and understand the systematic effects in using a RICH as a precision velocity spectrometer with the goal of measuring 10 masses with precision ranging from 100 KeV for the lightest to 1000 KeV for the heaviest. This requires controlling the radius measurement of RICH rings to the {approx} 10{sup -4} level. Progress in the mass measurements and the required RICH analysis techniques developed are discussed.

  18. An imaging proton spectrometer for short-pulse laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Hazi, A; van Maren, R; Chen, S; Fuchs, J; Gauthier, M; Pape, S L; Rygg, J R; Shepherd, R

    2010-05-11

    Ultra intense short pulse laser pulses incident on solid targets can generate energetic protons. In additions to their potentially important applications such as in cancer treatments and proton fast ignition, these protons are essential to understand the complex physics of intense laser plasma interaction. To better characterize these laser-produced protons, we designed and constructed a novel, spatially imaging proton spectrometer that will not only measure proton energy distribution with high resolution, but also provide its angular characteristics. The information obtained from this spectrometer compliments those from commonly used diagnostics including radiochromic film packs, CR39 nuclear track detectors, and non-imaging magnetic spectrometers. The basic characterizations and sample data from this instrument are presented.

  19. The DYNAMO Orbiter Project: High Resolution Mapping of Gravity/Magnetic Fields and In Situ Investigation of Mars Atmospheric Escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, S.; Chassefiere, E.; Forget, F.; Reme, H.; Mazelle, C.; Blelly, P. -L.; Acuna, M.; Connerney, J.; Purucker, M.; Lin, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamo is a small Mars orbiter planned to be launched in 2005 or 2007, in the frame of the NASA/CNES Mars exploration program. It is aimed at improving gravity and magnetic field resolution, in order to better understand the magnetic, geologic and thermal history of Mars, and at characterizing current atmospheric escape, which is still poorly constrained. These objectives are achieved by using a low periapsis orbit, similar to the one used by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft during its aerobraking phases. The proposed periapsis altitude for Dynamo of 120-130 km, coupled with the global distribution of periapses to be obtained during one Martian year of operation, through about 5000 low passes, will produce a magnetic/gravity field data set with approximately five times the spatial resolution of MGS. Low periapsis provides a unique opportunity to investigate the chemical and dynamical properties of the deep ionosphere, thermosphere, and the interaction between the atmosphere and the solar wind, therefore atmospheric escape, which may have played a crucial role in removing atmosphere, and water, from the planet. There is much room for debate on the importance of current atmosphere escape processes in the evolution of the Martian atmosphere, as early "exotic" processes including hydrodynamic escape and impact erosion are traditionally invoked to explain the apparent sparse inventory of present-day volatiles. Yet, the combination of low surface gravity and the absence of a substantial internally generated magnetic field have undeniable effects on what we observe today. In addition to the current losses in the forms of Jeans and photochemical escape of neutrals, there are solar wind interaction-related erosion mechanisms because the upper atmosphere is directly exposed to the solar wind. The solar wind related loss rates, while now comparable to those of a modest comet, nonetheless occur continuously, with the intriguing possibility of important cumulative and

  20. The JPL Field Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hook, Simon J.; Kahle, Anne B.

    1995-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Field Emission Spectrometer (FES) was built by Designs and Prototypes based on a set of functional requirements supplied by JPL. The instrument has a spectral resolution of 6 wavenumbers (wn) and can acquire spectra from either the Mid Infrared (3-5 mu m) or the Thermal Infrared (8-12 pm) depending on whether the InSb or HgCdTe detector is installed respectively. The instrument consists of an optical head system unit and battery. The optical head which is tripod mounted includes the interferometer and detector dewar assembly. Wavelength calibration of the interferometer is achieved using a Helium-Neon laser diode. The dewar needs replenishing with liquid Nitrogen approximately every four hours. The system unit includes the controls for operation and the computer used for acquiring viewing and processing spectra. Radiometric calibration is achieved with an external temperature-controlled blackbody that mounts on the fore-optics of the instrument. The blackbody can be set at 5 C increments between 10 and 55 C. The instrument is compact and weighs about 33 kg. Both the wavelength calibration and radiometric calibration of the instrument have been evaluated. The wavelength calibration was checked by comparison of the position of water features in a spectrum of the sky with their position in the output from a high resolution atmospheric model. The results indicatethat the features in the sky spectrum are within 6-8 wn of their position ill the model spectrum. The radiometric calibration was checked by first calibrating the instrument using the external blackbody supplied with the instrument and then measuring the radiance from another external blackbody at a series of temperatures. The temperatures of these radiance spectra were then recovered by inventing Planck's law and the recovered temperatures compared lo the measured blackbody temperature. These results indicate that radiometric calibration is good to 0.5 C over the range of