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Sample records for magnetic x-point oscillatory

  1. A discharge with a magnetic X-point as a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsankov, Tsanko; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2011-09-26

    The study presents first results from investigations of a novel low-pressure plasma source, intended for a negative hydrogen ion production. The source utilizes a dc magnetic field, shaped to form a cusp with a magnetic null-point (X-point). Beside the common role of filtering out the high energy electrons, this magnetic field configuration ensures in the present case also an interesting mechanism of coupling the RF power to the plasma. Investigations performed using radio frequency modulation spectroscopy (RFMOS) reveal that the main power coupling to the electrons is confined in the region on one side of the X-point. The modulation of the light intensity indicates also the presence of a strong dc drift close to the plane of the X-point. Several hypothesises for its explanation are raised: an azimuthal diamagnetic drift due to strong axial gradients of the electron energy, the excitation of a standing helicon wave, which couples to the radial magnetic field in the plane of the X-point, or a Trivelpiece-Gould wave which is resonantly absorbed near the plane of the X-point.

  2. The effect of guide-field and boundary conditions on collisionless magnetic reconnection in a stressed X-point collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-01-15

    Works of Tsiklauri and Haruki [Phys. Plasmas 15, 102902 (2008); 14, 112905 (2007)] are extended by inclusion of the out-of-plane magnetic (guide) field. In particular, magnetic reconnection during collisionless, stressed X-point collapse for varying out-of-plane guide-fields is studied using a kinetic, 2.5D, fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle-in-cell numerical code. For zero guide-field, cases for both open and closed boundary conditions are investigated, where magnetic flux and particles are lost and conserved, respectively. It is found that reconnection rates, out-of-plane currents and density in the X-point increase more rapidly and peak sooner in the closed boundary case, but higher values are reached in the open boundary case. The normalized reconnection rate is fast: 0.10-0.25. In the open boundary case it is shown that an increase of guide-field yields later onsets in the reconnection peak rates, while in the closed boundary case initial peak rates occur sooner but are suppressed. The reconnection current changes similarly with increasing guide-field; however for low guide-fields the reconnection current increases, giving an optimal value for the guide-field between 0.1 and 0.2 times the in-plane field in both cases. Also, in the open boundary case, it is found that for guide-fields of the order of the in-plane magnetic field, the generation of electron vortices occurs. Possible causes of the vortex generation, based on the flow of decoupled particles in the diffusion region and localized plasma heating, are discussed. Before peak reconnection onset, oscillations in the out-of-plane electric field at the X-point are found, ranging in frequency from approximately 1 to 2 ω{sub pe} and coinciding with oscillatory reconnection. These oscillations are found to be part of a larger wave pattern in the simulation domain. Mapping the out-of-plane electric field along the central lines of the domain over time and applying a 2D Fourier transform reveal that

  3. Octupolar out-of-plane magnetic field structure generation during collisionless magnetic reconnection in a stressed X-point collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-06-15

    The out-of-plane magnetic field, generated by fast magnetic reconnection, during collisionless, stressed X-point collapse, was studied with a kinetic, 2.5D, fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle-in-cell numerical code, using both closed (flux conserving) and open boundary conditions on a square grid. It was discovered that the well known quadrupolar structure in the out-of-plane magnetic field gains four additional regions of opposite magnetic polarity, emerging near the corners of the simulation box, moving towards the X-point. The emerging, outer, magnetic field structure has opposite polarity to the inner quadrupolar structure, leading to an overall octupolar structure. Using Ampere's law and integrating electron and ion currents, defined at grid cells, over the simulation domain, contributions to the out-of-plane magnetic field from electron and ion currents were determined. The emerging regions of opposite magnetic polarity were shown to be the result of ion currents. Magnetic octupolar structure is found to be a signature of X-point collapse, rather than tearing mode, and factors relating to potential discoveries in experimental scenarios or space-craft observations are discussed.

  4. Electron temperature difference between the o-point and x-point of a magnetic island

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jinhong; Zhu Sizheng; Yu Qingquan; Zhuang, G.

    2009-09-15

    The electron temperature difference between the o-point and the x-point of a magnetic island is studied numerically by solving the two-dimensional energy transport equation. It is found that, even without a localized radio-frequency heating at the island's o-point, there is usually a temperature difference between these two points. This difference depends on the radial profile of the heating power deposition, the ratio between the parallel and the perpendicular heat conductivity and the island width, and it takes a minimum when the island width is about twice the local heat diffusion layer width. The effect of the temperature difference on the island growth is further studied, and the peaked heating power density profile at magnetic axis is found be destabilizing.

  5. Prompt particle acceleration around moving X-point magnetic field during impulsive phase of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakai, Jun-Ichi

    1992-01-01

    We present a model for high-energy solar flares to explain prompt proton and electron acceleration, which occurs around moving X-point magnetic field during the implosion phase of the current sheet. We derive the electromagnetic fields during the strong implosion phase of the current sheets, which is driven by the converging flow derived from the magnetohydrodynamic equations. It is shown that both protons and electrons can be promptly (within 1 second) accelerated to approximately 70 MeV and approximately 200 MeV, respectively. This acceleration mechanism can be applicable for the impulsive phase of the gradual gamma ray and proton flares (gradual GR/P flare), which have been called two-ribbon flares.

  6. Magnetic field dependent electric conductivity of the magnetorheological fluids: the influence of oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Xiaohui; Wang, Yu; Xuan, Shouhu; Gong, Xinglong

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the influence of oscillatory shear on the magnetic field dependent electric conductivity of the magnetorheological fluid (MRF) was reported. Upon applying a 0.96 T magnetic field, the electric conductivity could increase about 1500 times larger than the one without magnetic field. By increasing the volume fraction of carbonyl iron particles in the MRF from 5% to 30%, the electric conductivity increased about 565 times. Under applying an oscillatory shear, the resistance of the MRF decreased and it oscillated synchronously with the oscillatory shear. Interestingly, the larger shear strain led to larger oscillatory amplitude of the resistance. A particle–particle resistance model and a semi-empirical formula were proposed to investigate the influence of the oscillatory shear on the electric conductivity. The fitting results matched the experimental results very well. At last, a possible mechanism was proposed to explain the changes of resistance.

  7. How fluctuations continue through an X point

    SciTech Connect

    Mattor, N.; Cohen, R.H.

    1995-11-01

    The structure of waves around a magnetic X point is analyzed. A paradox is noted, in which theory implies that waves cannot propagate along the field past an X point, but experiment shows that they do anyway. The paradox may arise from the theoretical ``eikonal in the perpendicular direction`` ansatz, in which waves follow field lines to lowest order. This paper demonstrates that waves can encounter a boundary layer in which this ansatz is violated. Such waves can propagate {ital around} the X-point region, thus avoiding the large wave number increase from magnetic shear, allowing them to correlate through such a region. This result has some unexpected implications concerning mode structure in the edge and scrape-off layer of a diverted tokamak, and possibly for the core as well. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  8. Time-dependent Suppression of Oscillatory Power in Evolving Solar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Prasad, S.; Jess, D. B.; Jain, R.; Keys, P. H.

    2016-05-01

    Oscillation amplitudes are generally smaller within magnetically active regions like sunspots and plage when compared to their surroundings. Such magnetic features, when viewed in spatially resolved power maps, appear as regions of suppressed power due to reductions in the oscillation amplitudes. Employing high spatial- and temporal-resolution observations from the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) in New Mexico, we study the power suppression in a region of evolving magnetic fields adjacent to a pore. By utilizing wavelet analysis, we study for the first time how the oscillatory properties in this region change as the magnetic field evolves with time. Image sequences taken in the blue continuum, G-band, Ca ii K, and Hα filters were used in this study. It is observed that the suppression found in the chromosphere occupies a relatively larger area, confirming previous findings. Also, the suppression is extended to structures directly connected to the magnetic region, and is found to get enhanced as the magnetic field strength increased with time. The dependence of the suppression on the magnetic field strength is greater at longer periods and higher formation heights. Furthermore, the dominant periodicity in the chromosphere was found to be anti-correlated with increases in the magnetic field strength.

  9. Oscillatory Noncollinear Magnetism Induced by Interfacial Charge Transfer in Superlattices Composed of Metallic Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Jason D.; Kirby, Brian J.; Kwon, Jihwan; Fabbris, Gilberto; Meyers, D.; Freeland, John W.; Martin, Ivar; Heinonen, Olle G.; Steadman, Paul; Zhou, Hua; Schlepütz, Christian M.; Dean, Mark P. M.; te Velthuis, Suzanne G. E.; Zuo, Jian-Min; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-10-01

    Interfaces between correlated complex oxides are promising avenues to realize new forms of magnetism that arise as a result of charge transfer, proximity effects, and locally broken symmetries. We report on the discovery of a noncollinear magnetic structure in superlattices of the ferromagnetic metallic oxide La2 /3Sr1 /3MnO3 (LSMO) and the correlated metal LaNiO3 (LNO). The exchange interaction between LSMO layers is mediated by the intervening LNO, such that the angle between the magnetization of neighboring LSMO layers varies in an oscillatory manner with the thickness of the LNO layer. The magnetic field, temperature, and spacer thickness dependence of the noncollinear structure are inconsistent with the bilinear and biquadratic interactions that are used to model the magnetic structure in conventional metallic multilayers. A model that couples the LSMO layers to a helical spin state within the LNO fits the observed behavior. We propose that the spin-helix results from the interaction between a spatially varying spin susceptibility within the LNO and interfacial charge transfer that creates localized Ni2 + states. Our work suggests a new approach to engineering noncollinear spin textures in metallic oxide heterostructures.

  10. Exploring Cortical Plasticity and Oscillatory Brain Dynamics via Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Resting-State Electroencephalogram

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Nor Azila

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive, non-pharmacological technique that is able to modulate cortical activity beyond the stimulation period. The residual aftereffects are akin to the plasticity mechanism of the brain and suggest the potential use of TMS for therapy. For years, TMS has been shown to transiently improve symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders, but the underlying neural correlates remain elusive. Recently, there is evidence that altered connectivity of brain network dynamics is the mechanism underlying symptoms of various neuropsychiatric illnesses. By combining TMS and electroencephalography (EEG), the functional connectivity patterns among brain regions, and the causal link between function or behaviour and a specific brain region can be determined. Nonetheless, the brain network connectivity are highly complex and involve the dynamics interplay among multitude of brain regions. In this review article, we present previous TMS-EEG co-registration studies, which explore the functional connectivity patterns of human cerebral cortex. We argue the possibilities of neural correlates of long-term potentiation/depression (LTP−/LTD)-like mechanisms of synaptic plasticity that drive the TMS aftereffects as shown by the dissociation between EEG and motor evoked potentials (MEP) cortical output. Here, we also explore alternative explanations that drive the EEG oscillatory modulations post TMS. The precise knowledge of the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying TMS will help characterise disturbances in oscillatory patterns, and the altered functional connectivity in neuropsychiatric illnesses. PMID:27660540

  11. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces oscillatory power changes in chronic tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Schecklmann, Martin; Lehner, Astrid; Gollmitzer, Judith; Schmidt, Eldrid; Schlee, Winfried; Langguth, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is associated with neuroplastic changes in auditory and non-auditory cortical areas. About 10 years ago, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of auditory and prefrontal cortex was introduced as potential treatment for tinnitus. The resulting changes in tinnitus loudness are interpreted in the context of rTMS induced activity changes (neuroplasticity). Here, we investigate the effect of single rTMS sessions on oscillatory power to probe the capacity of rTMS to interfere with tinnitus-specific cortical plasticity. We measured 20 patients with bilateral chronic tinnitus and 20 healthy controls comparable for age, sex, handedness, and hearing level with a 63-channel electroencephalography (EEG) system. Educational level, intelligence, depressivity and hyperacusis were controlled for by analysis of covariance. Different rTMS protocols were tested: Left and right temporal and left and right prefrontal cortices were each stimulated with 200 pulses at 1 Hz and with an intensity of 60% stimulator output. Stimulation of central parietal cortex with 6-fold reduced intensity (inverted passive-cooled coil) served as sham condition. Before and after each rTMS protocol 5 min of resting state EEG were recorded. The order of rTMS protocols was randomized over two sessions with 1 week interval in between. Analyses on electrode level showed that people with and without tinnitus differed in their response to left temporal and right frontal stimulation. In tinnitus patients left temporal rTMS decreased frontal theta and delta and increased beta2 power, whereas right frontal rTMS decreased right temporal beta3 and gamma power. No changes or increases were observed in the control group. Only non-systematic changes in tinnitus loudness were induced by single sessions of rTMS. This is the first study to show tinnitus-related alterations of neuroplasticity that were specific to stimulation site and oscillatory frequency. The observed effects can be

  12. The relationship between brain oscillatory activity and therapeutic effectiveness of transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Leuchter, Andrew F.; Cook, Ian A.; Jin, Yi; Phillips, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is marked by disturbances in brain functional connectivity. This connectivity is modulated by rhythmic oscillations of brain electrical activity, which enable coordinated functions across brain regions. Oscillatory activity plays a central role in regulating thinking and memory, mood, cerebral blood flow, and neurotransmitter levels, and restoration of normal oscillatory patterns is associated with effective treatment of MDD. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a robust treatment for MDD, but the mechanism of action (MOA) of its benefits for mood disorders remains incompletely understood. Benefits of rTMS have been tied to enhanced neuroplasticity in specific brain pathways. We summarize here the evidence that rTMS entrains and resets thalamocortical oscillators, normalizes regulation and facilitates reemergence of intrinsic cerebral rhythms, and through this mechanism restores normal brain function. This entrainment and resetting may be a critical step in engendering neuroplastic changes and the antidepressant effects of rTMS. It may be possible to modify the method of rTMS administration to enhance this MOA and achieve better antidepressant effectiveness. We propose that rTMS can be administered: (1) synchronized to a patient's individual alpha frequency (IAF), or synchronized rTMS (sTMS); (2) as a low magnetic field strength sinusoidal waveform; and, (3) broadly to multiple brain areas simultaneously. We present here the theory and evidence indicating that these modifications could enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of rTMS for the treatment of MDD. PMID:23550274

  13. The electronic state of underdoped YBCO at high magnetic fields and low temperatures: evidence from quantum oscillatory phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonzarich, Gil

    2012-02-01

    Quantum oscillations in bulk and transport properties have been observed in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x via a range of techniques and by independent researchers in applied magnetic fields above 20T and temperatures below 10K. The consensus is that the oscillations are periodic in the reciprocal of the magnetic field and consist of a number of components with frequencies (fundamental or otherwise) of below 2kT, nearly an order of magnitude lower than that observed in the overdoped state of Tl2Ba2CuO6+x. Moreover, the temperature dependence of the amplitude of the strongest oscillatory components that can be measured accurately follows closely that expected for elementary excitations of fermionic character. I will discuss a model of the Fermi surface that can potentially account for each of the periodic components observed, and that appears to be consistent with a number of other known properties in the high-field low-temperature state.

  14. Alfv{acute e}n waves and wave-induced transport near an X point

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J.R.; DIppolito, D.A.

    1998-03-01

    The behavior of Alfv{acute e}n waves and the corresponding variation of the wave-induced transport coefficients along a field line including the divertor X-point region are examined. It is shown that several competing effects exist and can be quantified using a quasilinear diffusion model that takes the magnetic geometry of the X point into account. To address the issue of mode behavior and the validity of the eikonal approximation near the X point, an exact analytical solution of an equation describing Alfv{acute e}n waves in the X-point region is obtained. The results suggest that the X-point region can only dominate Alfv{acute e}n wave-induced transport on flux surfaces that are very close to the separatrix. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Dynamical phenomena in sunspots. I - Observing procedures and oscillatory phenomena. II - A moving magnetic feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. H.; Cram, L. E.; Nye, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    High resolution spectra consisting of at least 1 hr periods were obtained of the sunpost atmosphere. The Ca II H and K lines were scanned to characterize umbral oscillations and flashes. The former displayed peaks lasting 150-197 sec, while penumbral oscillations peaked in the 197-300 sec range. Quiet sun oscillations exhibited no peaks under 300 sec. The Ca II K line umbral flashes were ubiquitous for all observational periods and were associated with light bridges in the umbra. Magnetic field, vertical velocity, and chromospheric intensity measurements taken during the 1 hr scans covered moving magnetic features (MMF), which traversed the moats around sunspots. MMF areas increased while the magnetic field intensity decreased with MMF movement away from a sunspot. Bright Ca II K line wings were apparent in the MMFs, but cores of the lines were not observed, suggesting that flux loops generating the line are low in the photosphere.

  16. Bifurcation analysis in a vortex flow generated by an oscillatory magnetic obstacle.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Alberto; Ramos, Eduardo; Cuevas, Sergio; Brøns, Morten

    2010-03-01

    A numerical simulation and a theoretical model of the two-dimensional flow produced by the harmonic oscillation of a localized magnetic field (magnetic obstacle) in a quiescent viscous, electrically conducting fluid are presented. Nonuniform Lorentz forces produced by induced currents interacting with the oscillating magnetic field create periodic laminar flow patterns that can be characterized by three parameters: the oscillation Reynolds number, Reomega, the Hartmann number, Ha, and the dimensionless amplitude of the magnetic obstacle oscillation, D. The analysis is restricted to oscillations of small amplitude and Ha=100. The resulting flow patterns are described and interpreted in terms of position and evolution of the critical points of the instantaneous streamlines. It is found that in most of the cycle, the flow is dominated by a pair of counter rotating vortices that switch their direction of rotation twice per cycle. The transformation of the flow field present in the first part of the cycle into the pattern displayed in the second half occurs via the generation of hyperbolic and elliptic critical points. The numerical solution of the flow indicates that for low frequencies (v.e. Reomega=1), two elliptic and two hyperbolic points are generated, while for high frequencies (v.e. Reomega=100), a more complex topology involving four elliptic and two hyperbolic points appear. The bifurcation map for critical points of the instantaneous streamline is obtained numerically and a theoretical model based on a local analysis that predicts most of the qualitative properties calculated numerically is proposed.

  17. Evidence of electron acceleration around the reconnection X-point in a solar flare

    SciTech Connect

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Shimojo, Masumi; Sakao, Taro

    2014-06-01

    Particle acceleration is one of the most significant features that are ubiquitous among space and cosmic plasmas. It is most prominent during flares in the case of the Sun, with which huge amounts of electromagnetic radiation and high-energy particles are expelled into the interplanetary space through acceleration of plasma particles in the corona. Though it has been well understood that energies of flares are supplied by the mechanism called magnetic reconnection based on the observations in X-rays and EUV with space telescopes, where and how in the flaring magnetic field plasmas are accelerated has remained unknown due to the low plasma density in the flaring corona. We here report the first observational identification of the energetic non-thermal electrons around the point of the ongoing magnetic reconnection (X-point), with the location of the X-point identified by soft X-ray imagery and the localized presence of non-thermal electrons identified from imaging-spectroscopic data at two microwave frequencies. Considering the existence of the reconnection outflows that carries both plasma particles and magnetic fields out from the X-point, our identified non-thermal microwave emissions around the X-point indicate that the electrons are accelerated around the reconnection X-point. Additionally, the plasma around the X-point was also thermally heated up to 10 MK. The estimated reconnection rate of this event is ∼0.017.

  18. Evidence of Electron Acceleration around the Reconnection X-point in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Shimojo, Masumi; Sakao, Taro

    2016-05-01

    Particle acceleration is one of the most significant features that are ubiquitous among space and cosmic plasmas. It is most prominent during flares in the case of the Sun, with which huge amounts of electromagnetic radiation and high-energy particles are expelled into the interplanetary space through acceleration of plasma particles in the corona. Though it has been well understood that energies of flares are supplied by the mechanism called magnetic reconnection based on the observations in X-rays and EUV with space telescopes, where and how in the flaring magnetic field plasmas are accelerated has remained unknown due to the low plasma density in the flaring corona. We here report the first observational identification of the energetic non-thermal electrons around the point of the ongoing magnetic reconnection (X-point), with the location of the X-point identified by soft X-ray imagery and the localized presence of non-thermal electrons identified from imaging-spectroscopic data at two microwave frequencies. Considering the existence of the reconnection outflows that carries both plasma particles and magnetic fields out from the X-point, our identified non-thermal microwave emissions around the X-point indicate that the electrons are accelerated around the reconnection X-point.

  19. Oscillatory flow braking: inner magnetosphere observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, E. V.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2013-12-01

    We search for damped oscillatory flow braking events observed by THEMIS/ARTEMIS in the near-Earth plasma sheet when their counterpart in the inner magnetosphere was observed. By comparing the particle and magnetic field data in the two locations we analyze the feedback of the inner magnetosphere to plasma sheet oscillatory flow braking. We discuss the possible role of the oscillatory flow events for plasma injection into the inner magnetosphere.

  20. Effects of arterial blood flow on walls of the abdominal aorta: distributions of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index determined by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Shimamura, Yoshiaki; Tezuka, Chie; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liu, Hao; Okumura, Kenichiro; Masuda, Yoshitada; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2016-07-01

    Although abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) occur mostly inferior to the renal artery, the mechanism of the development of AAA in relation to its specific location is not yet clearly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that even healthy volunteers may manifest specific flow characteristics of blood flow and alter wall shear or oscillatory shear stress in the areas where AAAs commonly develop. Eight healthy male volunteers were enrolled in this prospective study, aged from 24 to 27. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed with electrocardiographic triggering. Flow-sensitive four-dimensional MR imaging of the abdominal aorta, with three-directional velocity encoding, including simple morphological image acquisition, was performed. Information on specific locations on the aortic wall was applied to the flow encodes to calculate wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI). While time-framed WSS showed the highest peak of 1.14 ± 0.25 Pa in the juxtaposition of the renal artery, the WSS plateaued to 0.61 Pa at the anterior wall of the abdominal aorta. The OSI peaked distal to the renal arteries at the posterior wall of the abdominal aorta of 0.249 ± 0.148, and was constantly elevated in the whole abdominal aorta at more than 0.14. All subjects were found to have elevated OSI in regions where AAAs commonly occur. These findings indicate that areas of constant peaked oscillatory shear stress in the infra-renal aorta may be one of the factors that lead to morphological changes over time, even in healthy individuals.

  1. The flux-coordinate independent approach applied to X-point geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Hariri, F. Hill, P.; Ottaviani, M.; Sarazin, Y.

    2014-08-15

    A Flux-Coordinate Independent (FCI) approach for anisotropic systems, not based on magnetic flux coordinates, has been introduced in Hariri and Ottaviani [Comput. Phys. Commun. 184, 2419 (2013)]. In this paper, we show that the approach can tackle magnetic configurations including X-points. Using the code FENICIA, an equilibrium with a magnetic island has been used to show the robustness of the FCI approach to cases in which a magnetic separatrix is present in the system, either by design or as a consequence of instabilities. Numerical results are in good agreement with the analytic solutions of the sound-wave propagation problem. Conservation properties are verified. Finally, the critical gain of the FCI approach in situations including the magnetic separatrix with an X-point is demonstrated by a fast convergence of the code with the numerical resolution in the direction of symmetry. The results highlighted in this paper show that the FCI approach can efficiently deal with X-point geometries.

  2. Oscillatory behavior of the tunnel magnetoresistance due to thickness variations in Ta|CoFe|MgO magnetic tunnel junctions: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, K.; Swerts, J.; Couet, S.; Stokbro, K.; Pourtois, G.

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the impact of both the CoFe ferromagnetic layer thickness and the capping paramagnetic layer on the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR), we performed first-principles simulations on epitaxial magnetic tunnel junctions contacted with either CoFe or Ta paramagnetic capping layers. We observed a strong oscillation of the TMR amplitude with respect to the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer. The TMR is found to be amplified whenever the MgO spin tunnel barrier is thickened. Quantization of the electronic structure of the ferromagnetic layers is found to be at the origin of this oscillatory behavior. Metals such as Ta contacting the magnetic layer are found to enhance the amplitude of the oscillations due to the occurrence of an interface dipole. The latter drives the band alignment and tunes the nature of the spin channels that are active during the tunneling process. Subsequently, the regular transmission spin channels are modulated in the magnetic tunnel junction stack and other complex ones are being activated.

  3. Fast Imaging of Filaments in the X-Point Region of Alcator C-MOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, J. L.; Ballinger, S.; Brunner, D.; Labombard, B.; White, A. E.; Zweben, S. J.

    2016-10-01

    A rich variety of field-aligned fluctuations has been revealed using fast imaging of Dα emission from Alcator C-Mod's lower X-point region. Field-aligned filamentary fluctuations are observed along the inner divertor leg, within the Private-Flux-Zone (PFZ), in the Scrape-Off Layer outside the outer divertor leg, and, under some conditions, at or above the X-point. The locations and dynamics of the filaments in these regions are strikingly complex in C-Mod. Changes in the filaments' generation appear to be ordered by plasma density and magnetic configuration. In a Lower Single Null with 0.12 < n /nGreenwald <0.45 and Bx ∇B directed down, filaments typically move up the inner divertor leg toward the X-point. Reversing the field direction results in the appearance of filaments outside of the outer divertor leg. With the divertor targets ``detached'', filaments inside the LCFS are seen. These studies were motivated by observations of filaments in the X-point and PFZ regions in MAST, and comparisons with those observations will be made. Supported by USDoE Awards DE-FC02-99ER54512 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  4. Fast imaging of filaments in the X-point region of Alcator C-Mod

    DOE PAGES

    Terry, J. L.; Ballinger, S.; Brunner, D.; ...

    2017-01-27

    A rich variety of field-aligned fluctuations has been revealed using fast imaging of Dα emission from Alcator C-Mod's lower X-point region. Field-aligned filamentary fluctuations are observed along the inner divertor leg, within the Private-Flux-Zone (PFZ), in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) outside the outer divertor leg, and, under some conditions, at or above the X-point. The locations and dynamics of the filaments in these regions are strikingly complex in C-Mod. Changes in the filaments’ generation appear to be ordered by plasma density and magnetic configuration. Filaments are not observed for plasmas with n/nGreenwald ≲ 0.12 nor are they observed in Uppermore » Single Null configurations. In a Lower Single Null with 0.12 ≲ n/nGreenwald ≲ 0.45 and Bx∇B directed down, filaments typically move up the inner divertor leg toward the X-point. Reversing the field direction results in the appearance of filaments outside of the outer divertor leg. With the divertor targets “detached”, filaments inside the LCFS are seen. Lastly, these studies were motivated by observations of filaments in the X-point and PFZ regions in MAST, and comparisons with those observations are made.« less

  5. Effect of a Static Magnetic Field (1.5T) on Brain Oscillatory Activities in Resting State Condition.

    PubMed

    Formaggio, E; Avesani, M; Storti, S F; Milanese, F; Gasparini, A; Acler, M; Cerini, R; Pozzi Mucelli, R; Fiaschi, A; Manganotti, P

    2008-12-17

    The aim of the present study was to compare the EEG signal recorded outside and inside a 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. The EEG was recorded in eyes open and eyes closed conditions using a digital recording MR-compatible system. To characterize how a static magnetic field induces changes in EEG signal, EEG data were analyzed using FFT frequency analysis. No significant difference between the alpha powers recorded outside and inside the magnetic field was observed in eyes closed conditions. However, in eyes open condition there was a significant increase in alpha power inside the magnet in comparison to the outside position. The changes in alpha power according to the eyes open/closed conditions could be inversely correlated to a subject's state of wakefulness and due to some physiological changes, rather than an effect of the magnetic field. This experiment suggests that subjects' state of wakefulness is of prime concern when performing functional MRI.

  6. Oscillatory behavior of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Pt/Co/Al(Ox) films as a function of Al thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmane, Y.; Arm, C.; Auffret, S.; Ebels, U.; Rodmacq, B.; Dieny, B.

    2009-11-01

    The evolution of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of Pt/Co/AlOx structures has been followed by extraordinary Hall Effect measurements as a function of both Al thickness and annealing treatment. A nonmonotonous evolution of the magnetic anisotropy is observed with increasing aluminum thickness, with a maximum around 1.4 nm attributed to the formation of quantum well states in the remaining metallic Al layer. This maximum gradually disappears after annealing. High resolution electron microscopy images indicate that the vanishing of this maximum is associated with homogenization of oxygen throughout the whole Al layer.

  7. Global Machine Design and Double X-point Equilibrium Configurations for Ignitor*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, A.; Parodi, B.; Coppi, B.

    2008-11-01

    The detailed design of the Ignitor machine has been carried out by considering extended limiter plasma configurations that are up-down symmetric and whose outer magnetic surfaces follow closely the cavity of the toroidal magnet over most of the vertical cross section. This provision minimizes the out-of- plane forces produced by the plasma current and acting on the toroidal magnet. When, instead, the adopted plasma equilibrium configuration is of the double X-point type the out-of-plane forces increase, and a complete structural analysis to take this increase into account becomes appropriate. The reference maximum plasma current Ip, in order to maintain an acceptable magnetic safety factor, is reduced from 11 MA in the extended limiter to 9 MA in the double X-point configuration while the magnetic field on axis (R01.32 m) is maintained at BT13 T. The reduced scenario involving Ip6 MA and BT9 T does not present a problem. Both 3D and 2D drawings of each individual machine component are produced using the Dassault Systems CATIA-V software. After their integration into a single 3D CATIA model of the Core (Load Assembly), the electro-fluidic and fluidic lines which supply electrical currents and helium cooling gas to the coils are included and mechanically connected to the main machine components.^*Sponsored in part by ENEA of Italy and by the U.S. D.O.E.

  8. ExB CIRCULATION AT THE TOKAMAK DIVERTOR X-POINT

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. SCHAFFER; B.D. BRAY; J.A.BOEDO; T.N. CARLSTROM; R.J.COLCHIN; J.G. WATKINS

    2000-11-01

    Detailed measurements in two dimensions by probes and Thomson scattering reveal unexpected local electric potential and electron pressure (p{sub e}) maxima near the divertor X-point in L-mode plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak [J.L. Luxon and L.G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)]. The potential drives E x B circulation about the X-point, thereby exchanging plasma between closed and open magnetic surfaces at rates that can be comparable to the total cross-separatrix transport. The potential is consistent with the classical parallel Ohm's law. A simple model is proposed to explain the pressure and potential hills in low power, nearly detached plasmas. Recent two-dimensional edge transport modeling with plasma drifts also shows X-point pressure and potential hills but by a different mechanism. These experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that low power tokamak plasmas can be far from poloidal uniformity in a boundary layer just inside the separatrix. Additional data, though preliminary and incomplete, suggest that E x B circulation across the separatrix might be a common feature of low confinement behavior.

  9. Binary Oscillatory Crossflow Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molloy, Richard F.; Gallagher, Christopher T.; Leighton, David T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    We present preliminary results of our implementation of a novel electrophoresis separation technique: Binary Oscillatory Cross flow Electrophoresis (BOCE). The technique utilizes the interaction of two driving forces, an oscillatory electric field and an oscillatory shear flow, to create an active binary filter for the separation of charged species. Analytical and numerical studies have indicated that this technique is capable of separating proteins with electrophoretic mobilities differing by less than 10%. With an experimental device containing a separation chamber 20 cm long, 5 cm wide, and 1 mm thick, an order of magnitude increase in throughput over commercially available electrophoresis devices is theoretically possible.

  10. Role of electron inertia and reconnection dynamics in a stressed X-point collapse with a guide-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: In previous simulations of collisionless 2D magnetic reconnection it was consistently found that the term in the generalised Ohm's law that breaks the frozen-in condition is the divergence of the electron pressure tensor's non-gyrotropic components. The motivation for this study is to investigate the effect of the variation of the guide-field on the reconnection mechanism in simulations of X-point collapse, and the related changes in reconnection dynamics. Methods: A fully relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) code was used to model X-point collapse with a guide-field in two and three spatial dimensions. Results: We show that in a 2D X-point collapse with a guide-field close to the strength of the in-plane field, the increased induced shear flows along the diffusion region lead to a new reconnection regime in which electron inertial terms play a dominant role at the X-point. This transition is marked by the emergence of a magnetic island - and hence a second reconnection site - as well as electron flow vortices moving along the current sheet. The reconnection electric field at the X-point is shown to exceed all lower guide-field cases for a brief period, indicating a strong burst in reconnection. By extending the simulation to three spatial dimensions it is shown that the locations of vortices along the current sheet (visualised by their Q-value) vary in the out-of-plane direction, producing tilted vortex tubes. The vortex tubes on opposite sides of the diffusion region are tilted in opposite directions, similarly to bifurcated current sheets in oblique tearing-mode reconnection. The tilt angles of vortex tubes were compared to a theoretical estimation and were found to be a good match. Particle velocity distribution functions for different guide-field runs, for 2.5D and 3D simulations, are analysed and compared.

  11. REMOTE OSCILLATORY RESPONSES TO A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Andic, A.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2013-07-20

    The processes governing energy storage and release in the Sun are both related to the solar magnetic field. We demonstrate the existence of a magnetic connection between the energy released by a flare and increased oscillatory power in the lower solar atmosphere. The oscillatory power in active regions tends to increase in response to explosive events at other locations, but not in the active region itself. We carry out timing studies and show that this effect is probably caused by a large-scale magnetic connection between the regions, instead of a globally-propagating wave. We show that oscillations tend to exist in longer-lived wave trains with short periods (P < 200 s) at the time of a flare. These wave trains may be mechanisms by which flare energy can be redistributed throughout the solar atmosphere.

  12. Binary Oscillatory Crossflow Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molloy, Richard F.; Gallagher, Christopher T.; Leighton, David T., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Electrophoresis has long been recognized as an effective analytic technique for the separation of proteins and other charged species, however attempts at scaling up to accommodate commercial volumes have met with limited success. In this report we describe a novel electrophoretic separation technique - Binary Oscillatory Crossflow Electrophoresis (BOCE). Numerical simulations indicate that the technique has the potential for preparative scale throughputs with high resolution, while simultaneously avoiding many problems common to conventional electrophoresis. The technique utilizes the interaction of an oscillatory electric field and a transverse oscillatory shear flow to create an active binary filter for the separation of charged protein species. An oscillatory electric field is applied across the narrow gap of a rectangular channel inducing a periodic motion of charged protein species. The amplitude of this motion depends on the dimensionless electrophoretic mobility, alpha = E(sub o)mu/(omega)d, where E(sub o) is the amplitude of the electric field oscillations, mu is the dimensional mobility, omega is the angular frequency of oscillation and d is the channel gap width. An oscillatory shear flow is induced along the length of the channel resulting in the separation of species with different mobilities. We present a model that predicts the oscillatory behavior of charged species and allows estimation of both the magnitude of the induced convective velocity and the effective diffusivity as a function of a in infinitely long channels. Numerical results indicate that in addition to the mobility dependence, the steady state behavior of solute species may be strongly affected by oscillating fluid into and out of the active electric field region at the ends of the cell. The effect is most pronounced using time dependent shear flows of the same frequency (cos((omega)t)) flow mode) as the electric field oscillations. Under such conditions, experiments indicate that

  13. A microwave dielectric resonant oscillatory circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigov, A. S.; Shvartsburg, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Bias currents in a thin dielectric nonconducting torus are investigated, and the resonant mode of excitation of these currents is established. The similarity of the frequency spectrum of such a dielectric element to the spectra of a classical Thomson oscillatory circuit and a metamaterial with negative permittivity is demonstrated. The resonant frequency of electromagnetic oscillations of the ring dielectric circuit and magnetic and electric fields of such a circuit under resonant excitation are determined.

  14. Physics of collisionless reconnection in a stressed X-point collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiklauri, D.; Haruki, T.

    2008-10-15

    Recently, magnetic reconnection during collisionless, stressed, X-point collapse was studied using kinetic, 2.5-dimensional, fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle-in-cell numerical code [D. Tsiklauri and T. Haruki, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112905 (2007)]. Here we finalize the investigation of this topic by addressing key outstanding physical questions: (i) Which term in the generalized Ohm's law is responsible for the generation of the reconnection electric field? (ii) How does the time evolution of the reconnected flux vary with the ion-electron mass ratio? (iii) What is the exact energy budget of the reconnection process; i.e., in which proportion initial (mostly magnetic) energy is converted into other forms of energy? (iv) Are there any anisotropies in the velocity distribution of the accelerated particles? The following points have been established. (i) A reconnection electric field is generated by the electron pressure tensor off-diagonal terms, resembling to the case of tearing unstable Harris current sheet studied by the GEM reconnection challenge. (ii) For m{sub i}/m{sub e}>>1, the time evolution of the reconnected flux is independent of ion-electron mass ratio. In addition, in the case of m{sub i}/m{sub e}=1, we show that reconnection proceeds slowly as the Hall term is zero; when m{sub i}/m{sub e}>>1 (i.e., the Hall term is nonzero) reconnection is fast and we conjecture that this is due to magnetic field being frozen into electron fluid, which moves significantly faster than ion fluid. (iii) Within one Alfven time, somewhat less than half ({approx}40%) of the initial total (roughly magnetic) energy is converted into the kinetic energy of electrons, and somewhat more than half ({approx}60%) into kinetic energy of ions (similar to solar flare observations). (iv) In the strongly stressed X-point case, in about one Alfven time, a full isotropy in all three spatial directions of the velocity distribution is seen for superthermal electrons (also commensurate

  15. Oscillatory Serotonin Function in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Ronald M.; Cowan, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Oscillations in brain activities with periods of minutes to hours may be critical for normal mood behaviors. Ultradian (faster than circadian) rhythms of mood behaviors and associated central nervous system activities are altered in depression. Recent data suggest that ultradian rhythms in serotonin (5HT) function also change in depression. In two separate studies, 5HT metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured every 10 m for 24 h before and after chronic antidepressant treatment. Antidepressant treatments were associated with enhanced ultradian amplitudes of CSF metabolite levels. Another study used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)to measure amplitudes of dorsal raphé activation cycles following sham or active dietary depletions of the 5HT precursor (tryptophan). During depletion, amplitudes of dorsal raphé activation cycles increased with rapid 6 s periods (about 0.18 Hz)while functional connectivity weakened between dorsal raphé and thalamus at slower periods of 20 s (0.05 Hz). A third approach studied MDMA (ecstasy) users because of their chronically diminished 5HT function compared to non-MDMA polysubstance users (Karageorgiou et al., 2009). Compared to a non-MDMA using cohort, MDMA users showed diminished fMRI intra-regional coherence in motor regions along with altered functional connectivity, again suggesting effects of altered 5HT oscillatory function. These data support a hypothesis that qualities of ultradian oscillations in 5HT function may critically influence moods and behaviors. Dysfunctional 5HT rhythms in depression may be a common endpoint and biomarker for depression, linking dysfunction of slow brain network oscillators to 5HT mechanisms affected by commonly available treatments. 5HT oscillatory dysfunction may define illness subtypes and predict responses to serotonergic agents. Further studies of 5HT oscillations in depression are indicated. PMID:23592367

  16. Optimal Phase Oscillatory Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follmann, Rosangela

    2013-03-01

    Important topics as preventive detection of epidemics, collective self-organization, information flow and systemic robustness in clusters are typical examples of processes that can be studied in the context of the theory of complex networks. It is an emerging theory in a field, which has recently attracted much interest, involving the synchronization of dynamical systems associated to nodes, or vertices, of the network. Studies have shown that synchronization in oscillatory networks depends not only on the individual dynamics of each element, but also on the combination of the topology of the connections as well as on the properties of the interactions of these elements. Moreover, the response of the network to small damages, caused at strategic points, can enhance the global performance of the whole network. In this presentation we explore an optimal phase oscillatory network altered by an additional term in the coupling function. The application to associative-memory network shows improvement on the correct information retrieval as well as increase of the storage capacity. The inclusion of some small deviations on the nodes, when solutions are attracted to a false state, results in additional enhancement of the performance of the associative-memory network. Supported by FAPESP - Sao Paulo Research Foundation, grant number 2012/12555-4

  17. Oscillatory counter-centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shujing; Nadim, Ali

    2016-02-01

    In ordinary centrifugation, a suspended particle that is heavier than the displaced fluid migrates away from the rotation axis when the fluid-filled container rotates steadily about that axis. In contrast a particle that is lighter than the displaced fluid (e.g., a bubble) migrates toward the rotation axis in a centrifuge. In this paper, we show theoretically that if a fluid-filled container rotates in an oscillatory manner as a rigid body about an axis, at high enough oscillation frequencies, the sense of migration of suspended particles is reversed. That is, in that case particles denser than the fluid migrate inward, while those that are lighter than the fluid move outward. We term this unusual phenomenon "Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation" or OCC, for short. Through application of the method of averaging to the equations of motion, we derive a simple criterion to predict the occurrence of OCC. The analysis also reveals that the time-average of the Coriolis force in the radial direction is the term that is responsible for this effect. In addition, we analyze the effects of the Basset history force and the Rubinow-Keller lift force on particle trajectories and find that OCC persists even when these forces are active. The phenomenon awaits experimental verification.

  18. Strobes: an oscillatory combustion.

    PubMed

    Corbel, Justine M L; Lingen, Joost N J; Zevenbergen, John F; Gijzeman, Onno L J; Meijerink, Andries

    2012-04-26

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the beginning of the 20th century. However, the chemical and physical processes involved in this curious oscillatory combustion remain unknown. Several theories have been proposed: One claims that two different reactions occur: one during the slow dark phase and another during the fast flash phase. The alternation between the phases is ascribed to heat variations. Other theories suggest that the formation of intermediate species during the dark phase and the change of phase are caused by variations in their concentration. A ternary strobe composition with ammonium perchlorate, magnalium, and barium sulfate is analyzed. The role of barium sulfate is studied by replacing it by other metal sulfates that have different physical properties (melting points), and the burning of the compositions is recorded with a high-speed camera and a spectrometer coupled with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Experimental results show noticeable differences in the physical and chemical processes involved in the strobe reactions.

  19. Drift-based scrape-off particle width in X-point geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, D.; Eich, T.

    2017-04-01

    The Goldston heuristic estimate of the scrape-off layer width (Goldston 2012 Nucl. Fusion 52 013009) is reconsidered using a fluid description for the plasma dynamics. The basic ingredient is the inclusion of a compressible diamagnetic drift for the particle cross field transport. Instead of testing the heuristic model in a sophisticated numerical simulation including several physical mechanisms working together, the purpose of this work is to point out basic consequences for a drift-dominated cross field transport using a reduced fluid model. To evaluate the model equations and prepare them for subsequent numerical solution a specific analytical model for 2D magnetic field configurations with X-points is employed. In a first step parameter scans in high-resolution grids for isothermal plasmas are done to assess the basic formulas of the heuristic model with respect to the functional dependence of the scrape-off width on the poloidal magnetic field and plasma temperature. Particular features in the 2D-fluid calculations—especially the appearance of supersonic parallel flows and shock wave like bifurcational jumps—are discussed and can be understood partly in the framework of a reduced 1D model. The resulting semi-analytical findings might give hints for experimental proof and implementation in more elaborated fluid simulations.

  20. Oscillatory Threshold Logic

    PubMed Central

    Borresen, Jon; Lynch, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the 1940s, the first generation of modern computers used vacuum tube oscillators as their principle components, however, with the development of the transistor, such oscillator based computers quickly became obsolete. As the demand for faster and lower power computers continues, transistors are themselves approaching their theoretical limit and emerging technologies must eventually supersede them. With the development of optical oscillators and Josephson junction technology, we are again presented with the possibility of using oscillators as the basic components of computers, and it is possible that the next generation of computers will be composed almost entirely of oscillatory devices. Here, we demonstrate how coupled threshold oscillators may be used to perform binary logic in a manner entirely consistent with modern computer architectures. We describe a variety of computational circuitry and demonstrate working oscillator models of both computation and memory. PMID:23173034

  1. Oscillatory spin transport in spin Hall multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsukov, Igor; Gonçalves, A. M.; Soledade, P.; Passos, C. A. C.; Costa, M.; Souza-Neto, N. M.; Garcia, F.; Lee, H. K.; Smith, A.; Tretiakov, O.; Krivorotov, I. N.; Sampaio, L. C.

    We study multilayers of sputtered Pt/(d)Cu/Py as a function of the Cu thickness d using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). The FMR linewidth reveals a linear dependence on the frequency with negligible inhomogeneous contribution. The Gilbert damping falls smoothly with increasing d, but presents a strong superimposed oscillation with a period of ~1.5nm. We attribute this behavior to RKKY-like spin transport in the confinement of the Cu layer. The induced perpendicular anisotropy due to the proximity effect shows a similar behavior. We evaluate the induced magnetic moment on Pt using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and find that it decreases with increasing Cu thickness smoothly. Again, we see oscillations of the magnetic moment and show that the oscillatory spin transport affects proximity induced magnetism in Pt. We extend our study to multilayer systems with increased oxidation levels and with out-of-plane crystal texture, in order to investigate the effects of disorder and electron's k-vectors that are responsible for the oscillatory spin transport.

  2. Field-Guided Proton Acceleration at Reconnecting x-Points in Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, B.; McCLEMENTS, K. G.; Fletcher, L.; Thyagaraja, A.

    2003-06-01

    An explicitly energy-conserving full orbit code CUEBIT, developed originally to describe energetic particle effects in laboratory fusion experiments, has been applied to the problem of proton acceleration in solar flares. The model fields are obtained from solutions of the linearised MHD equations for reconnecting modes at an X-type neutral point, with the additional ingredient of a longitudinal magnetic field component. To accelerate protons to the highest observed energies on flare timescales, it is necessary to invoke anomalous resistivity in the MHD solution. It is shown that the addition of a longitudinal field component greatly increases the efficiency of ion acceleration, essentially because it greatly reduces the magnitude of drift motions away from the vicinity of the X-point, where the accelerating component of the electric field is largest. Using plasma parameters consistent with flare observations, we obtain proton distributions extending up to γ-ray-emitting energies (>1 MeV). In some cases the energy distributions exhibit a bump-on-tail in the MeV range. In general, the shape of the distribution is sensitive to the model parameters.

  3. Colloidal polycrystalline monolayers under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttinoni, Ivo; Steinacher, Mathias; Spanke, Hendrik Th.; Pokki, Juho; Bahmann, Severin; Nelson, Bradley; Foffi, Giuseppe; Isa, Lucio

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we probe the structural response to oscillatory shear deformations of polycrystalline monolayers of soft repulsive colloids with varying area fraction over a broad range of frequencies and amplitudes. The particles are confined at a fluid interface, sheared using a magnetic microdisk, and imaged through optical microscopy. The structural and mechanical response of soft materials is highly dependent on their microstructure. If crystals are well understood and deform through the creation and mobilization of specific defects, the situation is much more complex for disordered jammed materials, where identifying structural motifs defining plastically rearranging regions remains an elusive task. Our materials fall between these two classes and allow the identification of clear pathways for structural evolution. In particular, we demonstrate that large enough strains are able to fluidize the system, identifying critical strains that fulfill a local Lindemann criterion. Conversely, smaller strains lead to localized and erratic irreversible particle rearrangements due to the motion of structural defects. In this regime, oscillatory shear promotes defect annealing and leads to the growth of large crystalline domains. Numerical simulations help identify the population of rearranging particles with those exhibiting the largest deviatoric stresses and indicate that structural evolution proceeds towards the minimization of the stress stored in the system. The particles showing high deviatoric stresses are localized around grain boundaries and defects, providing a simple criterion to spot regions likely to rearrange plastically under oscillatory shear.

  4. Oscillatory growth for twisting crystals.

    PubMed

    Ibaraki, Shunsuke; Ise, Ryuta; Ishimori, Koichiro; Oaki, Yuya; Sazaki, Gen; Yokoyama, Etsuro; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Imai, Hiroaki

    2015-05-18

    We demonstrate the oscillatory phenomenon for the twisting growth of a triclinic crystal through in situ observation of the concentration field around the growing tip of a needle by high-resolution phase-shift interferometry.

  5. X-point position dependence of edge intrinsic toroidal rotation on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Karpushov, A. N.; Sauter, O.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Reimerdes, H.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Camenen, Y.

    2015-05-15

    Recent theoretical work predicts intrinsic toroidal rotation in the tokamak edge to depend strongly on the normalized major radial position of the X-point. With this motivation, we conducted a series of Ohmic L-mode shots on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable, moving the X-point from the inboard to the outboard edge of the last closed flux surface in both lower and upper single null configurations. The edge toroidal rotation evolved from strongly co-current for an inboard X-point to either vanishing or counter-current for an outboard X-point, in agreement with the theoretical expectations. The whole rotation profile shifted roughly rigidly with the edge rotation, resulting in variation of the peak core rotation by more than a factor of two. Core rotation reversals had little effect on the edge rotation. Edge rotation was slightly more counter-current for unfavorable than favorable ∇B drift discharges.

  6. Oscillatory magnetic anisotropy and spin-reorientation induced by heavy-metal cap in Cu/FeCo/M (M =Hf or Ta): A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, P. V.; Kioussis, Nicholas; Amiri, P. Khalili; Wang, K. L.

    2016-11-01

    Using ab initio electronic structure calculations we have investigated the effect of the thickness of a heavy-metal (HM) cap on the magnetic anisotropy of the Cu /FeCo /HM (n ) thin film where HM = Hf and Ta with thicknesses of n =0 -10 monolayers (MLs). We find that the Hf cap results in a large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), which exhibits quasiperiodic oscillation with a period of two MLs. In contrast, the Ta-capped heterostructure exhibits a spin reorientation from out-of-plane to in-plane magnetization orientation at two MLs of Ta. Moreover, the MA remains negative and depends weakly on the Ta-cap thickness beyond the critical thickness. The underlying mechanism of the PMA oscillation is the periodic change in spin-flip spin-orbit coupling between the minority-spin Fe d (x z ,y z ) and majority Fe d (z2) at Γ ¯, which is induced by the hybridization with Hf at the FeCo/Hf interface. Our results help resolve the contradictory experiments regarding the role of the FeCo/Ta interface on the PMA of the MgO/FeCo/Ta junction. The calculations reveal that the ferromagnet/Hf is promising for spintronic applications and that the capping material and thickness are additional parameters for optimizing the functional properties of spintronic devices.

  7. Transport-driven scrape-off layer flows and the x-point dependence of the L-H power threshold in Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBombard, B.; Rice, J. E.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Greenwald, M.; Granetz, R. S.; Irby, J. H.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Marmar, E. S.; Marr, K.; Mossessian, D.; Parker, R.; Rowan, W.; Smick, N.; Snipes, J. A.; Terry, J. L.; Wolfe, S. M.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    Factor of ˜2 higher power thresholds for low- to high-confinement mode transitions (L-H) with unfavorable x-point topologies in Alcator C-Mod [Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] are linked to flow boundary conditions imposed by the scrape-off layer (SOL). Ballooning-like transport drives flow along magnetic field lines from low- to high-field regions with toroidal direction dependent on upper/lower x-point balance; the toroidal rotation of the confined plasma responds, exhibiting a strong counter-current rotation when B ×∇B points away from the x point. Increased auxiliary heating power (rf, no momentum input) leads to an L-H transition at approximately twice the edge electron pressure gradient when B ×∇B points away. As gradients rise prior to the transition, toroidal rotation ramps toward the co-current direction; the H mode is seen when the counter-current rotation imposed by the SOL flow becomes compensated. Remarkably, L-H thresholds in lower-limited discharges are identical to lower x-point discharges; SOL flows are also found similar, suggesting a connection.

  8. Oscillatory integration windows in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nitin; Singh, Swikriti Saran; Stopfer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory synchrony among neurons occurs in many species and brain areas, and has been proposed to help neural circuits process information. One hypothesis states that oscillatory input creates cyclic integration windows: specific times in each oscillatory cycle when postsynaptic neurons become especially responsive to inputs. With paired local field potential (LFP) and intracellular recordings and controlled stimulus manipulations we directly test this idea in the locust olfactory system. We find that inputs arriving in Kenyon cells (KCs) sum most effectively in a preferred window of the oscillation cycle. With a computational model, we show that the non-uniform structure of noise in the membrane potential helps mediate this process. Further experiments performed in vivo demonstrate that integration windows can form in the absence of inhibition and at a broad range of oscillation frequencies. Our results reveal how a fundamental coincidence-detection mechanism in a neural circuit functions to decode temporally organized spiking. PMID:27976720

  9. Oscillatory integration windows in neurons.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nitin; Singh, Swikriti Saran; Stopfer, Mark

    2016-12-15

    Oscillatory synchrony among neurons occurs in many species and brain areas, and has been proposed to help neural circuits process information. One hypothesis states that oscillatory input creates cyclic integration windows: specific times in each oscillatory cycle when postsynaptic neurons become especially responsive to inputs. With paired local field potential (LFP) and intracellular recordings and controlled stimulus manipulations we directly test this idea in the locust olfactory system. We find that inputs arriving in Kenyon cells (KCs) sum most effectively in a preferred window of the oscillation cycle. With a computational model, we show that the non-uniform structure of noise in the membrane potential helps mediate this process. Further experiments performed in vivo demonstrate that integration windows can form in the absence of inhibition and at a broad range of oscillation frequencies. Our results reveal how a fundamental coincidence-detection mechanism in a neural circuit functions to decode temporally organized spiking.

  10. Method of neutral density determination near the X-point in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Colchin, R.J.; Maingi, R.; Isler, R.C.; Owen, L.W.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Carlstrom, T.N.

    1998-07-01

    A new method for determining the density of neutrals near the X-point of a diverted plasma is described. Code calculations have predicted that the neutral density peaks poloidally near the X-piont and there is evidence that neutrals play a role in the L-H transition and in damping the plasma rotation. The new method uses D{sub {alpha}} data from a tangentially-viewing video camera calibrated by a vertically-viewing photomultiplier. These data, combined with electron temperature and density measurements from the divertor Thomson scattering (DTS) system, provide sufficient informatino to determine the neutral density in the X-point region of DIII-D. Preliminary results show neutral densities above the X-point are order 10{sup 10}--10{sup 11} atomscm{sup 3}. The diagnostics used to determine these neutral densities, the data analysis method, and preliminary results are described in this paper.

  11. Robustness of oscillatory α2 dynamos in spherical wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, E.; Brandenburg, A.; Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Large-scale dynamo simulations are sometimes confined to spherical wedge geometries by imposing artificial boundary conditions at high latitudes. This may lead to spatio-temporal behaviours that are not representative of those in full spherical shells. Aims: We study the connection between spherical wedge and full spherical shell geometries using simple mean-field dynamos. Methods: We solve the equations for one-dimensional time-dependent α2 and α2Ω mean-field dynamos with only latitudinal extent to examine the effects of varying the polar angle θ0 between the latitudinal boundaries and the poles in spherical coordinates. Results: In the case of constant α and ηt profiles, we find oscillatory solutions only with the commonly used perfect conductor boundary condition in a wedge geometry, while for full spheres all boundary conditions produce stationary solutions, indicating that perfect conductor conditions lead to unphysical solutions in such a wedge setup. To search for configurations in which this problem can be alleviated we choose a profile of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity that decreases toward the poles, corresponding to high conductivity there. Oscillatory solutions are now achieved with models extending to the poles, but the magnetic field is strongly concentrated near the poles and the oscillation period is very long. By changing both the turbulent magnetic diffusivity and α profiles so that both effects are more concentrated toward the equator, we see oscillatory dynamos with equatorward drift, shorter cycles, and magnetic fields distributed over a wider range of latitudes. Those profiles thus remove the sensitive and unphysical dependence on θ0. When introducing radial shear, we again see oscillatory dynamos, and the direction of drift follows the Parker-Yoshimura rule. Conclusions: A reduced α effect near the poles with a turbulent diffusivity concentrated toward the equator yields oscillatory dynamos with equatorward migration and

  12. X-Point-Position-Dependent Intrinsic Toroidal Rotation in the Edge of the TCV Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Stoltzfus-Dueck, T; Karpushov, A N; Sauter, O; Duval, B P; Labit, B; Reimerdes, H; Vijvers, W A J; Camenen, Y

    2015-06-19

    Edge intrinsic rotation was investigated in Ohmic L-mode discharges on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable, scanning the major radial position of the X point, R(X). Edge rotation decreased linearly with increasing R(X), vanishing or becoming countercurrent for an outboard X point, in agreement with theoretical expectations. The core rotation profile shifted fairly rigidly with the edge rotation, changing the central rotation speed by more than a factor of two. Core rotation reversals had little effect on the edge rotation velocity. Edge rotation was modestly more countercurrent in unfavorable than favorable ∇B shots.

  13. Dynamics of an Isolated Blob in the Presence of the X-Point

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R H; Ryutov, D D

    2005-10-10

    The interplay of X-point shearing and axial plasma redistribution along a moving flux tube is discussed. Blobs limited to the main scrape-off-layer and the blobs entirely confined in the divertor region are identified. A strong effect of the radial tilt of the divertor plate on ''divertor'' blobs is found.

  14. Stimulus Presentation at Specific Neuronal Oscillatory Phases Experimentally Controlled with tACS: Implementation and Applications

    PubMed Central

    ten Oever, Sanne; de Graaf, Tom A.; Bonnemayer, Charlie; Ronner, Jacco; Sack, Alexander T.; Riecke, Lars

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that both the power and phase of oscillatory brain activity can influence the processing and perception of sensory stimuli. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) can phase-align and amplify endogenous brain oscillations and has often been used to control and thereby study oscillatory power. Causal investigation of oscillatory phase is more difficult, as it requires precise real-time temporal control over both oscillatory phase and sensory stimulation. Here, we present hardware and software solutions allowing temporally precise presentation of sensory stimuli during tACS at desired tACS phases, enabling causal investigations of oscillatory phase. We developed freely available and easy to use software, which can be coupled with standard commercially available hardware to allow flexible and multi-modal stimulus presentation (visual, auditory, magnetic stimuli, etc.) at pre-determined tACS-phases, opening up a range of new research opportunities. We validate that stimulus presentation at tACS phase in our setup is accurate to the sub-millisecond level with high inter-trial consistency. Conventional methods investigating the role of oscillatory phase such as magneto-/electroencephalography can only provide correlational evidence. Using brain stimulation with the described methodology enables investigations of the causal role of oscillatory phase. This setup turns oscillatory phase into an independent variable, allowing innovative, and systematic studies of its functional impact on perception and cognition. PMID:27803651

  15. Microscale mapping of oscillatory flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedev, Spas; Carretero-Palacios, S.; Kirchner, S. R.; Jäckel, F.; Feldmann, J.

    2014-10-01

    We present an optofluidic method that allows the two-dimensional vectorial near-field mapping of oscillatory flows with micron-scale resolution. An oscillatory flow created by a microsource (an optically trapped silica particle set to oscillate in a dipole-type mode) is detected by another twin silica particle independently trapped and located in the vicinity of the source. Fourier analysis of the motion of the detecting particle at different points in space and time renders the vectorial velocity map around the oscillating microsphere. The method introduced here paves the way for in-situ characterization of fast mixing microscale devices and for new detection methods able to provide location and recognition (due to the field pattern) of moving sources that may be applied to both artificial and living microobjects, including macromolecules, cells, and microorganisms.

  16. Oscillatory phase shapes syllable perception

    PubMed Central

    ten Oever, Sanne; Sack, Alexander T.

    2015-01-01

    The role of oscillatory phase for perceptual and cognitive processes is being increasingly acknowledged. To date, little is known about the direct role of phase in categorical perception. Here we show in two separate experiments that the identification of ambiguous syllables that can either be perceived as /da/ or /ga/ is biased by the underlying oscillatory phase as measured with EEG and sensory entrainment to rhythmic stimuli. The measured phase difference in which perception is biased toward /da/ or /ga/ exactly matched the different temporal onset delays in natural audiovisual speech between mouth movements and speech sounds, which last 80 ms longer for /ga/ than for /da/. These results indicate the functional relationship between prestimulus phase and syllable identification, and signify that the origin of this phase relationship could lie in exposure and subsequent learning of unique audiovisual temporal onset differences. PMID:26668393

  17. Regulation of yeast oscillatory dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Douglas B.; Beckmann, Manfred; Kitano, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    When yeast cells are grown continuously at high cell density, a respiratory oscillation percolates throughout the population. Many essential cellular functions have been shown to be separated temporally during each cycle; however, the regulatory mechanisms involved in oscillatory dynamics remain to be elucidated. Through GC-MS analysis we found that the majority of metabolites show oscillatory dynamics, with 70% of the identified metabolite concentrations peaking in conjunction with NAD(P)H. Through statistical analyses of microarray data, we identified that biosynthetic events have a defined order, and this program is initiated when respiration rates are increasing. We then combined metabolic, transcriptional data and statistical analyses of transcription factor activity, identified the top oscillatory parameters, and filtered a large-scale yeast interaction network according to these parameters. The analyses and controlled experimental perturbation provided evidence that a transcriptional complex formed part of the timing circuit for biosynthetic, reductive, and cell cycle programs in the cell. This circuitry does not act in isolation because both have strong translational, proteomic, and metabolic regulatory mechanisms. Our data lead us to conclude that the regulation of the respiratory oscillation revolves around coupled subgraphs containing large numbers of proteins and metabolites, with a potential to oscillate, and no definable hierarchy, i.e., heterarchical control. PMID:17284613

  18. Oscillatory Phenomena in a Solar Network Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, K.; Tsiropoula, G.; Schwartz, P.; Heinzel, P.

    2008-09-01

    Multi-wavelength, multi-instrument observations, obtained during a coordinated observing campaign on October 2005 by the ground-based Dutch Open Telescope (DOT), and by instruments on the spacecraft Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO) and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE), are used to study oscillatory phenomena in a solar network region. Temporal variations of the intensities and velocities in a region of the quiet Sun containing several dark mottles and in a region with several bright points defining the network boundaries (NB) are investigated with the aim of finding similarities and/or differences in the oscillatory phenomena observed in these two regions and in different spectral lines formed from the chromosphere to the transition region, as well as propagation characteristics of waves. A wavelet, phase difference and coherence analyses were performed indicating a periodicity around 5 min in all considered lines for both regions. V-V phase differences in the NB region point to an upward propagation of, most probably, acoustic waves, while in the region of mottles they indicate a non vertical propagation of waves, due to the presence of several inclined mottles along the line-of-sight. In mottles, for periods of 250-400 s the phase difference is mainly negative suggesting that propagating waves encounter a boundary and are refracted and reflected. However, limitations arising from the complex topology of the magnetic field, the formation conditions and heights of the examined spectral lines and the low spatial resolution of the space instruments influence the exact interpretation of the phase differences.

  19. Heteroclinic contours in oscillatory ensembles.

    PubMed

    Komarov, M A; Osipov, G V; Zhou, C S

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we study the onset of sequential activity in ensembles of neuronlike oscillators with inhibitorylike coupling between them. The winnerless competition (WLC) principle is a dynamical concept underlying sequential activity generation. According to the WLC principle, stable heteroclinic sequences in the phase space of a network model represent sequential metastable dynamics. We show that stable heteroclinic sequences and stable heteroclinic channels, connecting saddle limit cycles, can appear in oscillatory models of neural activity. We find the key bifurcations which lead to the occurrence of sequential activity as well as heteroclinic sequences and channels.

  20. Oscillatory Flow Testing in a Sandbox - Towards Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Lim, D.; Cupola, F.; Cardiff, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed knowledge of subsurface hydraulic properties is important for predicting groundwater flow and contaminant transport. The spatial variation of hydraulic properties in the shallow subsurface has been extensively studied in the past two decades. A recent approach to characterize subsurface properties is hydraulic tomography, in which pressure data from multiple constant-rate pumping tests is inverted using a numerical model. Many laboratory sandbox studies have explored the performance of hydraulic tomography under different controlled conditions and shown that detailed heterogeneity information can be extracted (Liu et al., 2002, Illman et al., 2007, 2008, 2010a, 2010b, Liu et al., 2007, 2008, Xiang et al., 2009, Yin and Illman, 2009, Liu and Kitanidis, 2011, Berg and Illman, 2011a). Recently, Cardiff et al. (2013) proposed a modified approach of Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography (OHT) - in which periodic pumping signals of different frequencies are used for aquifer stimulation - to characterize aquifer properties. The potential advantages of OHT over traditional hydraulic tomography include: 1) no net injection or extraction of water; 2) little movement of existing contamination; 3) minimal impact of model boundary conditions; and 4) robust extraction of oscillatory signals from noisy data. To evaluate the premise of OHT, we built a highly-instrumented 2-D laboratory sandbox and record pressure responses to periodic pumping tests. In our setup, the laboratory sandbox is filled with sand of known hydraulic properties, and we measure aquifer responses at a variety of testing frequencies. The signals recorded are processed using Fourier-domain analysis, and compared against expected results under linear (Darcian) theory. The responses are analyzed using analytical and numerical models, which provide key insights as to: 1) how "effective" hydraulic properties estimated using homogeneous models are associated with aquifer heterogeneity; and 2) how OHT is able to

  1. Collective phase description of oscillatory convection

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Yoji; Nakao, Hiroya

    2013-12-15

    We formulate a theory for the collective phase description of oscillatory convection in Hele-Shaw cells. It enables us to describe the dynamics of the oscillatory convection by a single degree of freedom which we call the collective phase. The theory can be considered as a phase reduction method for limit-cycle solutions in infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, namely, stable time-periodic solutions to partial differential equations, representing the oscillatory convection. We derive the phase sensitivity function, which quantifies the phase response of the oscillatory convection to weak perturbations applied at each spatial point, and analyze the phase synchronization between two weakly coupled Hele-Shaw cells exhibiting oscillatory convection on the basis of the derived phase equations.

  2. Intrinsic instabilities in X-point geometry: A tool to understand and predict the Scrape Off Layer transport in standard and advanced divertors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Militello, F.; Liu, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Intrinsic Scrape Off Layer (SOL) instabilities are studied using flute approximation and incorporating the appropriate sheath boundary conditions at the target. The linear growth rate and the structure of the modes are obtained. The associated diffusion is estimated using a γ / k⊥2 approach for the fastest growing modes. The model used includes curvature and sheath drives, finite Larmor radius effects and partial line tying at the target. The magnetic geometry is obtained using current carrying wires, representing the plasma current and the divertor coils, and naturally generates X-point geometry and magnetic shear effects. The calculation is performed for ITER relevant parameters and scans in SOL width and distance from the separatrix are presented. In addition to a standard Lower Single Null, Super-X and Snowflake configurations are examined in order to assess the importance of the geometry on the stability of the boundary plasma.

  3. Rhythmic TMS Causes Local Entrainment of Natural Oscillatory Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Thut, Gregor; Veniero, Domenica; Romei, Vincenzo; Miniussi, Carlo; Schyns, Philippe; Gross, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Neuronal elements underlying perception, cognition, and action exhibit distinct oscillatory phenomena, measured in humans by electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). So far, the correlative or causal nature of the link between brain oscillations and functions has remained elusive. A compelling demonstration of causality would primarily generate oscillatory signatures that are known to correlate with particular cognitive functions and then assess the behavioral consequences. Here, we provide the first direct evidence for causal entrainment of brain oscillations by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) using concurrent EEG. Results We used rhythmic TMS bursts to directly interact with an MEG-identified parietal α-oscillator, activated by attention and linked to perception. With TMS bursts tuned to its preferred α-frequency (α-TMS), we confirmed the three main predictions of entrainment of a natural oscillator: (1) that α-oscillations are induced during α-TMS (reproducing an oscillatory signature of the stimulated parietal cortex), (2) that there is progressive enhancement of this α-activity (synchronizing the targeted, α-generator to the α-TMS train), and (3) that this depends on the pre-TMS phase of the background α-rhythm (entrainment of natural, ongoing α-oscillations). Control conditions testing different TMS burst profiles and TMS-EEG in a phantom head confirmed specificity of α-boosting to the case of synchronization between TMS train and neural oscillator. Conclusions The periodic electromagnetic force that is generated during rhythmic TMS can cause local entrainment of natural brain oscillations, emulating oscillatory signatures activated by cognitive tasks. This reveals a new mechanism of online TMS action on brain activity and can account for frequency-specific behavioral TMS effects at the level of biologically relevant rhythms. PMID:21723129

  4. Control of the Oscillatory Interlayer Exchange Interaction with Terahertz Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Uta; Haack, Géraldine; Groth, Christoph; Waintal, Xavier

    2017-03-01

    The oscillatory interlayer exchange interaction between two magnetic layers separated by a metallic spacer is one of the few coherent quantum phenomena that persists at room temperature. Here, we show that this interaction can be controlled dynamically by illuminating the sample (e.g., a spin valve) with radiation in the 10-100 THz range. We predict that the exchange interaction can be changed from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic (and vice versa) by tuning the amplitude and/or the frequency of the radiation. Our chief theoretical result is an expression that relates the dynamical exchange interaction to the static one that has already been extensively measured.

  5. Control of oscillatory thermocapillary convection in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neitzel, G. Paul

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory and numerical experiments are underway to generate, and subsequently suppress, oscillatory thermocapillary convection in thin layer of silicone oil. The laboratory experiments have succeeded in characterizing the flow state in a limited range of Bond number-Marangoni number space of interest, identifying states of: (1) steady, unicellular, thermocapillary convection; (2) steady, multicellular, thermocapillary convection; and (3) oscillatory thermocapillary convection. Comparisons between experimental results and stability computations for a related basic state will be made.

  6. Studies of oscillatory combustion and fuel vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borman, G. L.; Myers, P. S.; Uyehara, O. A.

    1972-01-01

    Research projects involving oscillatory combustion and fuel vaporization are reported. Comparisons of experimental and theoretical droplet vaporization histories under ambient conditions such that the droplet may approach its thermodynamic critical point are presented. Experimental data on instantaneous heat transfer from a gas to a solid surface under conditions of oscillatory pressure with comparisons to an unsteady one-dimensional model are analyzed. Droplet size and velocity distribution in a spray as obtained by use of a double flash fluorescent method were investigated.

  7. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarfe, Alison Lamp; Chokani, Ndaona

    2000-01-01

    The near-zero net mass oscillatory blowing control of a subsonic cavity flow has been experimentally investigated. An actuator was designed and fabricated to provide both steady and oscillatory blowing over a range of blowing amplitudes and forcing frequencies. The blowing was applied just upstream of the cavity front Wall through interchangeable plate configurations These configurations enabled the effects of hole size, hole shape, and blowing angle to be examined. A significant finding is that in terms of the blowing amplitude, the near zero net mass oscillatory blowing is much more effective than steady blowing; momentum coefficients Lip two orders of magnitude smaller than those required for steady blowing are sufficient to accomplish the same control of cavity resonance. The detailed measurements obtained in the experiment include fluctuating pressure data within the cavity wall, and hot-wire measurements of the cavity shear layer. Spectral and wavelet analysis techniques are applied to understand the dynamics and mechanisms of the cavity flow with control. The oscillatory blowing, is effective in enhancing the mixing in the cavity shear layer and thus modifying the feedback loop associated with the cavity resonance. The nonlinear interactions in the cavity flow are no longer driven by the resonant cavity modes but by the forcing associated with the oscillatory blowing. The oscillatory blowing does not suppress the mode switching behavior of the cavity flow, but the amplitude modulation is reduced.

  8. Advantages of Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanidis, P. K.; Bakhos, T.; Cardiff, M. A.; Barrash, W.

    2012-12-01

    Characterizing the subsurface is significant for most hydrogeologic studies, such as those involving site remediation and groundwater resource explo¬ration. A variety of hydraulic and geophysical methods have been developed to estimate hydraulic conductivity and specific storage. Hydraulic methods based on the analysis of conventional pumping tests allow the estimation of conductivity and storage without need for approximate petrophysical relations, which is an advantage over most geophysical methods that first estimate other properties and then infer values of hydraulic parameters. However, hydraulic methods have the disadvantage that the head-change signal decays with distance from the pumping well and thus becomes difficult to separate from noise except in close proximity to the source. Oscillatory hydraulic tomography (OHT) is an emerging technology to im¬age the subsurface. This method utilizes the idea of imposing sinusoidally varying pressure or discharge signals at several points, collecting head observations at several other points, and then processing these data in a tomographic fashion to estimate conductivity and storage coefficients. After an overview of the methodology, including a description of the most important potential advantages and challenges associated with this approach, two key promising features of the approach will be discussed. First, the signal at an observation point is orthogonal to and thus can be separated from nuisance inputs like head fluctuation from production wells, evapotranspiration, irrigation, and changes in the level of adjacent streams. Second, although the signal amplitude may be weak, one can extract the phase and amplitude of the os¬cillatory signal by collecting measurements over a longer time, thus compensating for the effect of large distance through longer sampling period.

  9. Shear and loading in channels: Oscillatory shearing and edge currents of superconducting vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wambaugh, J. F.; Marchesoni, F.; Nori, Franco

    2003-04-01

    Via computer simulations we study the motion of quantized magnetic flux-lines, or vortices, confined to a straight pin-free channel in a strong-pinning superconducting sample. We find that, when a constant current is applied across this system, a very unusual oscillatory shearing appears, in which the vortices moving at the edges of the channel periodically trail behind and then suddenly leapfrog past the vortices moving in the inner rows. For small enough driving forces, this oscillatory shearing dynamic phase is replaced by a continuous shearing phase in which the distance between initially-nearby vortices grows in time, quickly destroying the order of the lattice. An animation of this novel “oscillatory leapfrogging shear” effect of the vortex edge currents appears in http://www-personal.engin.umich.edu/˜nori/channel/

  10. Cortico-pallidal oscillatory connectivity in patients with dystonia.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Wolf-Julian; Jha, Ashwani; Bock, Antje; Huebl, Julius; Horn, Andreas; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Sander, Tillmann H; Litvak, Vladimir; Kühn, Andrea A

    2015-07-01

    Primary dystonia has been associated with an underlying dysfunction of a wide network of brain regions including the motor cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord. Dystonia can be effectively treated by pallidal deep brain stimulation although the mechanism of this effect is not well understood. Here, we sought to characterize cortico-basal ganglia functional connectivity using a frequency-specific measure of connectivity-coherence. We recorded direct local field potentials from the human pallidum simultaneously with whole head magnetoencephalography to characterize functional connectivity in the cortico-pallidal oscillatory network in nine patients with idiopathic dystonia. Three-dimensional cortico-pallidal coherence images were compared to surrogate images of phase shuffled data across patients to reveal clusters of significant coherence (family-wise error P < 0.01, voxel extent 1000). Three frequency-specific, spatially-distinct cortico-pallidal networks have been identified: a pallido-temporal source of theta band (4-8 Hz) coherence, a pallido-cerebellar source of alpha band (7-13 Hz) coherence and a cortico-pallidal source of beta band (13-30 Hz) coherence over sensorimotor areas. Granger-based directionality analysis revealed directional coupling with the pallidal local field potentials leading in the theta and alpha band and the magnetoencephalographic cortical source leading in the beta band. The degree of pallido-cerebellar coupling showed an inverse correlation with dystonic symptom severity. Our data extend previous findings in patients with Parkinson's disease describing motor cortex-basal ganglia oscillatory connectivity in the beta band to patients with dystonia. Source coherence analysis revealed two additional frequency-specific networks involving the temporal cortex and the cerebellum. Pallido-cerebellar oscillatory connectivity and its association with dystonic symptoms provides further confirmation of cerebellar involvement

  11. Computer-Assisted Experiments with Oscillatory Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandes, J. C.; Ferraz, A.; Rogalski, M. S.

    2010-01-01

    A basic setup for data acquisition and analysis from an oscillatory circuit is described, with focus on its application as either low-pass, high-pass, band-pass or band-reject frequency filter. A homemade board containing the "RLC" elements allows for the interchange of some of them, in particular, for the easy change of the "R" value, and this…

  12. Spectral analysis of oscillatory neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Miller, W L; Sigvardt, K A

    1998-04-30

    Oscillatory dynamics are found at all levels of the nervous system. The goal of our current research on the control of rhythmic motor output by the lamprey spinal cord is to determine the features of neuronal coupling that lead to stable oscillatory activity and precisely-controlled intersegmental phase. Since our experimental manipulations can greatly increase the variability of the ventral root bursting pattern, it is important for us to employ a data analysis method which remains valid independent of this variability. Traditional analysis approaches which rely on identification of burst event times do not generally satisfy this requirement. In this paper, we illustrate the application of a straightforward statistically-based method for determining important parameters of oscillatory motor circuits using Fourier spectral analysis of spike trains. The frequency, phase, and their variabilities can be quantified; and the relative strength of coupling between different parts of the circuit can be tested for statistical significance. The approach we adopt is highly convenient for neuroscientists who study oscillatory systems as it operates directly on trains of action potentials stored as lists of event times (point-processes). Basic concepts and practical issues concerning use of Fourier analysis are discussed.

  13. Acoustic oscillatory pressure control for ramjet

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.S.; Dunlap, R.

    1988-08-02

    A method for controlling the acoustic oscillatory pressures generated by gas flow at the combustor inlet to a ramjet engine, the inlet including a sudden geometry expansion is described characterized by; restricting the inlet at the sudden expansion geometry such that the gas flow separates upstream and has a vena contracta downstream of the restricted inlet.

  14. Oscillatory flow around discs and through orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debernardinis, B.; Graham, J. M. R.; Parker, K. H.

    1980-11-01

    Examples of unsteady, axisymmetric, separated flows are modeled, including unbounded oscillatory flow around a disk and bounded oscillatory flow through a sharp-edged orifice. Calculations are made, assuming that the flow is inviscid and that the shed vortex sheets can be represented by sequences of discrete vortex rings. The solid bodies, i.e., the disk or the orifice and bounding tube, are also represented by a distribution of bound discrete vortex rings whose strenghts are chosen to satisfy the Neumann or zero normal velocity boundary condition. The results of flow visualization experiments and, for the orifice, pressure drop measurements are reported. In general, the gross properties of the flows are predicted accurately.

  15. Differential oscillatory encoding of foreign speech.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Alejandro; Carreiras, Manuel; Gillon Dowens, Margaret; Duñabeitia, Jon Andoni

    2015-08-01

    Neuronal oscillations play a key role in auditory perception of verbal input, with the oscillatory rhythms of the brain showing synchronization with specific frequencies of speech. Here we investigated the neural oscillatory patterns associated with perceiving native, foreign, and unknown speech. Spectral power and phase synchronization were compared to those of a silent context. Power synchronization to native speech was found in frequency ranges corresponding to the theta band, while no synchronization patterns were found for the foreign speech context and the unknown language context. For phase synchrony, the native and unknown languages showed higher synchronization in the theta-band than the foreign language when compared to the silent condition. These results suggest that neural synchronization patterns are markedly different for native and foreign languages.

  16. Oscillatory phenomena in a solar network region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiropoula, Georgia; Tziotziou, Kostas; Schwartz, Pavol; Heinzel, Petr

    2009-03-01

    We examine oscillatory phenomena in a solar network region from multi-wavelength, observations obtained by the ground-based Dutch Open Telescope (DOT), and by instruments on the spacecraft Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO). The observations were obtained during a coordinated observing campaign on October 14, 2005. The temporal variations of the intensities and velocities in two distinct regions of the quiet Sun were investigated: one containing several dark mottles and the other several bright points defining the network boundaries (NB). The aim is to find similarities and/or differences in the oscillatory phenomena observed in these two regions and in different spectral lines formed from the chromosphere to the transition region, as well as propagation characteristics of waves.

  17. Large Amplitude Oscillatory Shear near Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tighe, Brian; Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Somfai, Ellak; van Hecke, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Jammed solids such as foams and emulsions can be driven with oscillatory shear at finite strain amplitude and frequency. On a macro scale, this induces nonlinearities such as strain softening and shear thinning. On the micro scale one observes the onset of irreversibility, caging, and long-time diffusion. Using simulations of soft viscous spheres, we systematically vary the distance to the jamming transition. We correlate crossovers in the microscopic and macroscopic response, and construct scaling arguments to explain their relationships.

  18. Phase Waves in Oscillatory Chemical Reactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    number of waves emitted from a center of heterogeneous catalysis , the rate of wave emission. the lifetime of each wave, the asymptotic wave pattern, the...A theory is presented for the effect of heterogeneity on an oscillatory chemically reactive system in a stable limit cycle such as in heterogeneous ... catalysis . A perturbation technique is developed free of secular behavior for the solution of the non-linear partial differential equations. The

  19. Oscillatory dynamics of investment and capacity utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenblatt, R. E.

    2017-01-01

    Capitalist economic systems display a wide variety of oscillatory phenomena whose underlying causes are often not well understood. In this paper, I consider a very simple model of the reciprocal interaction between investment, capacity utilization, and their time derivatives. The model, which gives rise periodic oscillations, predicts qualitatively the phase relations between these variables. These predictions are observed to be consistent in a statistical sense with econometric data from the US economy.

  20. [High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates].

    PubMed

    2002-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may be considered as an alternative in the management of severe neonatal respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. In patients with diffuse pulmonary disease, HFOV can applied as a rescue therapy with a high lung volume strategy to obtain adequate alveolar recruitment. We review the mechanisms of gas exchange, as well as the indications, monitoring and special features of the use HVOF in the neonatal period.

  1. Modeling Stromatolite Growth Under Oscillatory Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, H. J.; Gong, J.; Tice, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Stromatolite growth models based on diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) has been fairly successful at producing features commonly recognized in stromatolitic structures in the rock record. These models generally require slow mixing of solutes at time scales comparable to the growth of organisms and largely ignore fluid erosions. Recent research on microbial mats suggests that fluid flow might have a dominant control on the formation, deformation and erosion of surface microbial structures, raising the possibility that different styles of fluid flow may influence the morphology of stromatolites. Many stromatolites formed in relatively high energy, shallow water environments under oscillatory currents driven by wind-induced waves. In order to investigate the potential role of oscillatory flows in shaping stromatolites, we are constructing a numerical model of stromatolite growth parameterized by flume experiments with cyanobacterial biofilms. The model explicitly incorporates reaction-diffusion processes, surface deformation and erosion, biomass growth, sedimentation and mineral precipitation. A Lattice-Boltzmann numerical scheme was applied to the reaction-diffusion equations in order to boost computational efficiency. A basic finite element method was employed to compute surface deformation and erosion. Growth of biomass, sedimentation and carbonate precipitation was based on a modified discrete cellular automata scheme. This model will be used to test an alternative hypothesis for the formation of stromatolites in higher energy, shallow and oscillatory flow environments.

  2. Rhythms and blues: modulation of oscillatory synchrony and the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments

    PubMed Central

    Leuchter, Andrew F.; Hunter, Aimee M.; Krantz, David E.; Cook, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD) act at different hierarchical levels of biological complexity, ranging from the individual synapse to the brain as a whole. Theories of antidepressant medication action traditionally have focused on the level of cell-to-cell interaction and synaptic neurotransmission. However, recent evidence suggests that modulation of synchronized electrical activity in neuronal networks is a common effect of antidepressant treatments, including not only medications, but also neuromodulatory treatments such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Synchronization of oscillatory network activity in particular frequency bands has been proposed to underlie neurodevelopmental and learning processes, and also may be important in the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments. Here, we review current research on the relationship between neuroplasticity and oscillatory synchrony, which suggests that oscillatory synchrony may help mediate neuroplastic changes related to neurodevelopment, learning, and memory, as well as medication and neuromodulatory treatment for MDD. We hypothesize that medication and neuromodulation treatments may have related effects on the rate and pattern of neuronal firing, and that these effects underlie antidepressant efficacy. Elucidating the mechanisms through which oscillatory synchrony may be related to neuroplasticity could lead to enhanced treatment strategies for MDD. PMID:25809789

  3. Rhythms and blues: modulation of oscillatory synchrony and the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments.

    PubMed

    Leuchter, Andrew F; Hunter, Aimee M; Krantz, David E; Cook, Ian A

    2015-05-01

    Treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD) act at different hierarchical levels of biological complexity, ranging from the individual synapse to the brain as a whole. Theories of antidepressant medication action traditionally have focused on the level of cell-to-cell interaction and synaptic neurotransmission. However, recent evidence suggests that modulation of synchronized electrical activity in neuronal networks is a common effect of antidepressant treatments, including not only medications, but also neuromodulatory treatments such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Synchronization of oscillatory network activity in particular frequency bands has been proposed to underlie neurodevelopmental and learning processes, and also may be important in the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments. Here, we review current research on the relationship between neuroplasticity and oscillatory synchrony, which suggests that oscillatory synchrony may help mediate neuroplastic changes related to neurodevelopment, learning, and memory, as well as medication and neuromodulatory treatment for MDD. We hypothesize that medication and neuromodulation treatments may have related effects on the rate and pattern of neuronal firing, and that these effects underlie antidepressant efficacy. Elucidating the mechanisms through which oscillatory synchrony may be related to neuroplasticity could lead to enhanced treatment strategies for MDD.

  4. Resistive reduced MHD modeling of multi-edge-localized-mode cycles in Tokamak X-point plasmas.

    PubMed

    Orain, F; Bécoulet, M; Huijsmans, G T A; Dif-Pradalier, G; Hoelzl, M; Morales, J; Garbet, X; Nardon, E; Pamela, S; Passeron, C; Latu, G; Fil, A; Cahyna, P

    2015-01-23

    The full dynamics of a multi-edge-localized-mode (ELM) cycle is modeled for the first time in realistic tokamak X-point geometry with the nonlinear reduced MHD code jorek. The diamagnetic rotation is found to be instrumental to stabilize the plasma after an ELM crash and to model the cyclic reconstruction and collapse of the plasma pressure profile. ELM relaxations are cyclically initiated each time the pedestal gradient crosses a triggering threshold. Diamagnetic drifts are also found to yield a near-symmetric ELM power deposition on the inner and outer divertor target plates, consistent with experimental measurements.

  5. Coupled coils, magnets and Lenz's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Frank

    2010-03-01

    Great scientists in the past have experimented with coils and magnets. Here we have a variation where coupling occurs between two coils and the oscillatory motion of two magnets to give somewhat surprising results.

  6. Coupled Coils, Magnets and Lenz's Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Great scientists in the past have experimented with coils and magnets. Here we have a variation where coupling occurs between two coils and the oscillatory motion of two magnets to give somewhat surprising results. (Contains 6 figures and 1 footnote.)

  7. Oscillatory Extinction Of Spherical Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, C. K.; Yoo, S. W.; Christianson, E. W.

    2003-01-01

    Since extinction has been observed in an oscillatory manner in Le greater than 1 premixed flames, it is not unreasonable to expect that extinction could occur in an unsteady manner for diffusion flames. Indeed, near-limit oscillations have been observed experimentally under microgravity conditions for both candle flames and droplet flames. Furthermore, the analysis of Cheatham and Matalon on the unsteady behavior of diffusion flames with heat loss, identified an oscillatory regime which could be triggered by either a sufficiently large Lewis number (even without heat loss) or an appreciable heat loss (even for Le=1). In light of these recent understanding, the present investigation aims to provide a well-controlled experiment that can unambiguously demonstrate the oscillation of diffusion flames near both the transport- and radiation-induced limits. That is, since candle and jet flames are stabilized through flame segments that are fundamentally premixed in nature, and since premixed flames are prone to oscillate, there is the possibility that the observed oscillation of these bulk diffusion flames could be triggered and sustained by the oscillation of the premixed flame segments. Concerning the observed oscillatory droplet extinction, it is well-known that gas-phase oscillation in heterogeneous burning can be induced by and is thereby coupled with condensed-phase unsteadiness. Consequently, a convincing experiment on diffusion flame oscillation must exclude any ingredients of premixed flames and other sources that may either oscillate themselves or promote the oscillation of the diffusion flame. The present experiment on burner-generated spherical flames with a constant reactant supply endeavored to accomplish this goal. The results are further compared with those from computational simulation for further understanding and quantification of the flame dynamics and extinction.

  8. Oscillatory Instability in a Two-Fluid Benard Problem.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    1963-A ( MRC Technical Summary Report #2681 OSCILLATORY INSTABILITY IN Ar TWO-FLUID BENARD PROBLEM CV Yuriko Renardy and Daniel D. Joseph 4.o...MATHEMATICS RESEARCH CENTER OSCILLATORY INSTABILITY IN A TWO-FLUID BENARD PROBLEM Yuriko Renardy I and Daniel D. Joseph * ’ 2 Technical Summary Report #2681...C. ° * .* * .* • * . -t . . . . .. . . . " -".- ." . o ,- OSCILLATORY INSTABILITY IN A WO-FLUID BENARD PROBLEM Yuriko RenardyI and Daniel D

  9. A procedure for oscillatory parameter identification

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, D.J.; Donnelly, M.K.; Hauer, J.F.

    1994-02-01

    A procedure is proposed where a power system is excited with a low-level pseduo-random probing signal and the frequency, damping, magnitude, and shape of oscillatory modes are identified using spectral density estimation and frequency-domain transfer-function identification. Attention is focussed on identifying system modes in the presence of noise. Two examples cases are studied: identification of electromechanical oscillation modes in a 16-machine power system; and turbine-generator shaft modes of a 3-machine power plant feeding a series-compensated 500-kV network.

  10. Dynamics of macroautophagy: Modeling and oscillatory behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kyungreem; Kwon, Hyun Woong; Kang, Hyuk; Kim, Jinwoong; Lee, Myung-Shik; Choi, M. Y.

    2012-02-01

    We propose a model for macroautophagy and study the resulting dynamics of autophagy in a system isolated from its extra-cellular environment. It is found that the intracellular concentrations of autophagosomes and autolysosomes display oscillations with their own natural frequencies. Such oscillatory behaviors, which are interrelated to the dynamics of intracellular ATP, amino acids, and proteins, are consistent with the very recent biological observations. Implications of this theoretical study of autophagy are discussed, with regard to the possibility of guiding molecular studies of autophagy.

  11. Enhancing Rotational Diffusion Using Oscillatory Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Brian D.; Cheng, Xiang; Ong, Desmond C.; Liddell-Watson, Chekesha; Cohen, Itai

    2013-05-01

    Taylor dispersion—shear-induced enhancement of translational diffusion—is an important phenomenon with applications ranging from pharmacology to geology. Through experiments and simulations, we show that rotational diffusion is also enhanced for anisotropic particles in oscillatory shear. This enhancement arises from variations in the particle’s rotation (Jeffery orbit) and depends on the strain amplitude, rate, and particle aspect ratio in a manner that is distinct from the translational diffusion. This separate tunability of translational and rotational diffusion opens the door to new techniques for controlling positions and orientations of suspended anisotropic colloids.

  12. Magnetorheology of core-shell carbonyl iron/ZnO rod-like particle silicone oil suspensions under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrlik, M.; Machovsky, M.; Pavlinek, V.; Kuritka, I.

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is a preparation and application of inorganic coating on the surface of carbonyl iron particles. The two step solvothermal synthesis provides core-shell CI/ZnO rod-like morphology. Compact coating of particles has a slightly negative impact on their magnetic properties (measured for magnetic field strength in the range from 0 to 213 mT); however, there is a suitable magnetorheological performance investigated under oscillatory shear, suitable to be applied in real applications.

  13. Feedback control of subcritical oscillatory instabilities.

    PubMed

    Golovin, A A; Nepomnyashchy, A A

    2006-04-01

    Feedback control of a subcritical oscillatory instability is investigated in the framework of a globally-controlled complex Ginzburg-Landau equation that describes the nonlinear dynamics near the instability threshold. The control is based on a feedback loop between the system linear growth rate and the maximum of the amplitude of the emerging pattern. It is shown that such control can suppress the blow up and result in the formation of spatially localized pulses similar to oscillons. In the one-dimensional case, depending on the values of the linear and nonlinear dispersion coefficients, several types of the pulse dynamics are possible in which the computational domain contains: (i) a single stationary pulse; (ii) several coexisting stationary pulses; (iii) competing pulses that appear one after another at random locations so that at each moment of time there is only one pulse in the domain; (iv) spatiotemporally chaotic system of short pulses; (v) spatially-synchronized pulses. Similar dynamic behavior is found also in the two-dimensional case. The effect of the feedback delay is also studied. It is shown that the increase of the delay leads to an oscillatory instability of the pulses and the formation of pulses with oscillating amplitude.

  14. Passive swimming in viscous oscillatory flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Ikhee; Huang, Yangyang; Zimmermann, Walter; Kanso, Eva

    2016-12-01

    Fluid-based locomotion at low Reynolds number is subject to the constraints of Purcell's scallop theorem: reciprocal shape kinematics identical under a time-reversal symmetry cannot cause locomotion. In particular, a single degree-of-freedom scallop undergoing opening and closing motions cannot swim. Most strategies for symmetry breaking and locomotion rely on direct control of the swimmer's shape kinematics. Less is known about indirect control via actuation of the fluid medium. To address how such indirect actuation strategies can lead to locomotion, we analyze a Λ -shaped model system analogous to Purcell's scallop but able to deform passively in oscillatory flows. Neutrally buoyant scallops undergo no net locomotion. We show that dense, elastic scallops can exhibit passive locomotion in zero-mean oscillatory flows. We examine the efficiency of swimming parallel to the background flow and analyze the stability of these motions. We observe transitions from stable to unstable swimming, including ordered transitions from fluttering to chaoticlike motions and tumbling. Our results demonstrate that flow oscillations can be used to passively actuate and control the motion of microswimmers, which may be relevant to applications such as surgical robots and cell sorting and manipulation in microfluidic devices.

  15. Oscillatory vortex formation behind a movable plat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukicevic, Marija; Pedrizzetti, Gianni

    2010-11-01

    INTRODUCTION: A wide spectra of application, from industrial to environmental and biological, involve fluid-structure interaction (FSI) at a fundamental level. We investigate a 2D FSI problem for a rigid structure hinged on a wall, freely rotating by the action of an oscillatory fluid flow. METHODS: The Navier-Stokes equations are solved simultaneously with the body dynamics. An accurate numerical solution is developed on the conformal map of the time-varying physical domain. RESULTS: The FSI is primarily influenced by the vortex formation process and by the interaction between vortices generated during the sequential flow oscillations. The emerging bodies can be arranged into a three main groups. The first, made of heavy bodies, terminates the motion during the first few oscillations with the impact of the body on the wall. On the other extreme, the third group made of relatively light bodies presents a flow-driven motion that oscillates periodically in time. In a wide intermediate range, the body oscillates in time presenting non periodic features. CONCLUSIONS: The process of oscillatory vortex formation in presence of fluid-structure interaction shows the emergence of various phenomena that were analyzed in details. In this specific application the results demonstrate that the FSI range from linear to chaotic interaction and finite-time collapse.

  16. Ripple morphology under oscillatory flow: 2. Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedocchi, F.; GarcíA, M. H.

    2009-12-01

    Recent large-scale laboratory experiments on the formation of ripples under oscillatory flow are presented. The experiments were performed in the Large Oscillatory Water-Sediment Tunnel (LOWST) at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, using 250 μm silica sand as sediment. The dimensions of the ripples formed under a wide range of flow conditions are compared with some of the existing predictors and with a new predictor presented in a companion paper. For a given near-bed water excursion the size of the ripples is observed to initially decrease with the increase of the maximum orbital velocity, as has been suggested before. However, an abrupt change of the ripple size and the transition to large round-crested ripples is observed when the maximum orbital velocity becomes larger than 0.5 m/s. Above this value the size of these round-crested ripples continuously increased with the increase of the maximum orbital velocity. Additionally, anorbital ripples were never formed despite the long water excursions used in several of our experiments, confirming that anorbital ripples are only formed in fine sands. Finally, the performance of the existing planform geometry predictors and a newly proposed predictor is evaluated using our new experimental data. The results confirm that the bed planform geometry is controlled by the wave Reynolds number and the particle size. The comparison or the new data with previous results from narrow facilities shows that the facility width can restrict the development of bed form three-dimensionality.

  17. Amyloid fibril networks nucleated under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzli, Kiersten; Love, Brian

    2013-03-01

    The process of amyloid fibril formation is of interest due to the link between these self-aggregating proteins and the progression of neurodegenerative disease. More recently, research has been directed at the exploitation of self-assembly properties of amyloid proteins for use as templates for nanowires and fibrillar networks. Insulin is an ideal protein for these purposes due to the ease of aggregation, as well as the large aspect ratio and high chemical stability of the produced fibrils. Insulin in pH 2 solution quickly forms aggregates in the presence of 65 °C heat. We have investigated the effect of oscillatory shear on the nucleation and growth of amyloid fibrillar networks using rheology and TEM to characterize the mechanical properties and structure of the network respectively. We contrast networks nucleated under oscillatory shear with networks nucleated in static and agitated conditions, and discuss network properties in the context of use in templating nanostructures. We find that the structural characteristics of the formed networks, including the density of fibrils, are affected by shear during the nucleation phase of amyloid growth.

  18. Visualization of inert gas wash-out during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation using fluorine-19 MRI.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Ursula; Scholz, Alexander; Terekhov, Maxim; Koebrich, Rainer; David, Matthias; Schreiber, Laura Maria

    2010-11-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation is looked upon as a lung-protective ventilation strategy. For a further clarification of the physical processes promoting gas transport, a visualization of gas flow and the distribution of ventilation are of considerable interest. Therefore, fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging of the imaging gas octafluorocyclobutane (C(4) F(8) ) during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation was performed in five healthy pigs. For that, a mutually compatible ventilation-imaging system was set up and transverse images were acquired every 5 sec using FLASH sequences on a 1.5 T scanner. Despite a drop in signal-to-noise ratio after the onset of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, for each pig, the four experiments could be analyzed. A mean wash-out time (τ) at 5 Hz of 52.7 ± 18 sec and 125.9 ± 39 sec at 10 Hz, respectively, were found for regions of interest including the whole lung. This is in agreement with the clinical findings, in that wash-out of respiratory gases is significantly prolonged for increased high-frequency oscillatory ventilation frequencies. Our study could be a good starting-point for a further optimization of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation.

  19. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Steady and Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamp, Alison M.; Chokani, Ndaona

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study to investigate the effect of steady and oscillatory (with zero net mass flux) blowing on cavity resonance is undertaken. The objective is to study the basic mechanisms of the control of cavity resonance. An actuator is designed and calibrated to generate either steady blowing or oscillatory blowing with A zero net mass flux. The results of the experiment show that both steady and oscillatory blowing are effective, and reduce the amplitude of the dominant resonant mode by 1OdB. The oscillatory blowing is however found to be more superior in that the same effectiveness could be accomplished with a momentum coefficient an order of magnitude smaller than for steady blowing. The experiment also confirms the results of previous computations that suggest the forcing frequency for oscillatory blowing must not be at harmonic frequencies of the cavity resonant modes.

  20. Oscillatory high hydrostatic pressure inactivation of Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Palou, E; López-Malo, A; Barbosa-Cánovas, G V; Welti-Chanes, J; Swanson, B G

    1998-09-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii inactivation was evaluated in oscillatory high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatments at sublethal pressures (207, 241, or 276 MPa) and compared with continuous HHP treatments in laboratory model systems with a water activity (aw) of 0.98 and pH 3.5. The yeast was inoculated into laboratory model systems and subjected to HHP in sterile bags. Two HHP treatments were conducted: continuous (holding times of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60, or 90 min) and oscillatory (two, three, or four cycles with holding times of 5 min and two cycles with holding times of 10 min). Oscillatory pressure treatments increased the effectiveness of HHP processing. For equal holding times, Z. bailii counts decreased as the number of cycles increased. Holding times of 20 min in HHP oscillatory treatments at 276 MPa assured inactivation (< 10 CFU/ml) of Z. bailii initial inoculum. Oscillatory pressurization could be useful to decrease Z. bailii inactivation time.

  1. Laser velocimeter application to oscillatory liquid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    A laser velocimeter technique was used to measure the mean velocity and the frequency characteristics of an oscillatory flow component generated with a rotating flapper in liquid flow system at Reynolds numbers approximating 93,000. The velocity information was processed in the frequency domain using a tracker whose output was used to determine the flow spectrum. This was accomplished with the use of an autocorrelator/Fourier transform analyzer and a spectrum averaging analyzer where induced flow oscillations up to 40 Hz were detected. Tests were conducted at a mean flow velocity of approximately 2 m/s. The experimental results show that the laser velocimeter can provide quantitative information such as liquid flow velocity and frequency spectrum with a possible application to cryogenic fluid flows.

  2. Automatic control of oscillatory penetration apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lucon, Peter A

    2015-01-06

    A system and method for controlling an oscillatory penetration apparatus. An embodiment is a system and method for controlling a sonic drill having a displacement and an operating range and operating at a phase difference, said sonic drill comprising a push-pull piston and eccentrics, said method comprising: operating the push-pull piston at an initial push-pull force while the eccentrics are operated at a plurality of different operating frequencies within the operating range of the sonic drill and measuring the displacement at each operating frequency; determining an efficient operating frequency for the material being drilled and operating the eccentrics at said efficient operating frequency; determining the phase difference at which the sonic drill is operating; and if the phase difference is not substantially equal to minus ninety degrees, operating the push-pull piston at another push-pull force.

  3. Oscillatory patterns in a rotating aqueous suspension.

    PubMed

    Breu, A P J; Kruelle, C A; Rehberg, I

    2004-02-01

    Suspensions of granular material in glycerin-water mixtures agitated in horizontally aligned rotating tubes show a whole variety of patterns. The stationary pattern of a homogeneous distribution and a chain of rings have been investigated before. Here we report on two types of oscillatory states in the same system. For a certain range of the rotation frequency and sufficiently high viscosity traveling waves propagate with constant velocity back and forth along the tube in an almost homogeneous distribution of sedimenting particles. The transition from a stationary to the traveling-wave state is found to be an imperfect supercritical bifurcation. The dependence of the wave length and speed on the tube's rotation frequency and the dynamic viscosity of the fluid are determined. Experiments with low viscosities show no traveling waves but low-frequency oscillations, when the previously known chain of rings undergoes a secondary instability.

  4. Vortex generation in oscillatory canopy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisalberti, Marco; Schlosser, Tamara

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time the generation of coherent vortices at the top of a canopy in oscillatory (i.e., wave-dominated) flow. Through a series of flow visualization experiments, vortex formation is shown to occur when two conditions described by the Keulegan-Carpenter (KC) and Reynolds (Re) numbers are met. First, the wave period must be sufficiently long to allow the generation of the shear-driven instability at the top of the canopy; this occurs when KC ≳ 5. Second, the vortex instability must be able to overcome the stabilizing effects of viscosity; this occurs when Re ≳ 1000. The vortices greatly increase the rate of vertical mixing within the canopy, such that any prediction of residence time in a coastal canopy requires an understanding of whether vortex generation is occurring.

  5. Phase Slips in Oscillatory Hair Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-04-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production.

  6. Essentially Non-Oscillatory and Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Schemes for Hyperbolic Conservation Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Chi-Wang

    1997-01-01

    In these lecture notes we describe the construction, analysis, and application of ENO (Essentially Non-Oscillatory) and WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory) schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws and related Hamilton- Jacobi equations. ENO and WENO schemes are high order accurate finite difference schemes designed for problems with piecewise smooth solutions containing discontinuities. The key idea lies at the approximation level, where a nonlinear adaptive procedure is used to automatically choose the locally smoothest stencil, hence avoiding crossing discontinuities in the interpolation procedure as much as possible. ENO and WENO schemes have been quite successful in applications, especially for problems containing both shocks and complicated smooth solution structures, such as compressible turbulence simulations and aeroacoustics. These lecture notes are basically self-contained. It is our hope that with these notes and with the help of the quoted references, the reader can understand the algorithms and code them up for applications.

  7. Oscillatory coupling in writing and writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Butz, Markus; Timmermann, Lars; Gross, Joachim; Pollok, Bettina; Dirks, Martin; Hefter, Harald; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2006-01-01

    Writing is a highly skilled and overlearned movement. In patients suffering from writer's cramp, a focal task-induced dystonia, writing is impaired or even impossible due to involuntary muscle contractions and abnormal posture, which occur as soon as the person picks up a pen or within writing a few words. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of this movement disorder are not fully understood up to now. The aim of the present study was to unravel the oscillatory network underlying physiological writing in healthy subjects and dystonic writing in writer's cramp patients. Using whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) and the analysis tool dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) we studied oscillatory neural coupling during writing in eleven healthy subjects and eight patients suffering from writer's cramp. Simultaneous recording of brain activity with MEG and activity of forearm and hand muscles with surface electromyography (EMG) was performed while subjects were writing for five minutes with their dominant right hand. Applying DICS sources of strongest cerebro-muscular coherence and cerebro-cerebral coherence during writing were identified, which consistently included six brain areas in both, the control subjects and the patients: contralateral and ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex, ipsilateral cerebellum, contralateral thalamus, contralateral premotor and posterior parietal cortex. Coherence between cortical sources and muscles appeared primarily in the frequency of writing movements (3-7 Hz) while coherence between cerebral sources occurred primarily around 10 Hz (8-13 Hz). Interestingly, consistent coupling between both sensorimotor cortices was observed in patients only, whereas coupling between ipsilateral cerebellum and the contralateral posterior parietal cortex was found in control subjects only. These results are consistent with the often described bilateral pathophysiology and impaired sensorimotor integration in writer's cramp patients.

  8. Multiphase patterns in periodically forced oscillatory systems

    SciTech Connect

    Elphick, C.; Hagberg, A.; Meron, E.

    1999-05-01

    Periodic forcing of an oscillatory system produces frequency locking bands within which the system frequency is rationally related to the forcing frequency. We study extended oscillatory systems that respond to uniform periodic forcing at one quarter of the forcing frequency (the 4:1 resonance). These systems possess four coexisting stable states, corresponding to uniform oscillations with successive phase shifts of {pi}/2. Using an amplitude equation approach near a Hopf bifurcation to uniform oscillations, we study front solutions connecting different phase states. These solutions divide into two groups: {pi} fronts separating states with a phase shift of {pi} and {pi}/2 fronts separating states with a phase shift of {pi}/2. We find a type of front instability where a stationary {pi} front {open_quotes}decomposes{close_quotes} into a pair of traveling {pi}/2 fronts as the forcing strength is decreased. The instability is degenerate for an amplitude equation with cubic nonlinearities. At the instability point a continuous family of pair solutions exists, consisting of {pi}/2 fronts separated by distances ranging from zero to infinity. Quintic nonlinearities lift the degeneracy at the instability point but do not change the basic nature of the instability. We conjecture the existence of similar instabilities in higher 2n:1 resonances (n=3,4,{hor_ellipsis}) where stationary {pi} fronts decompose into {ital n} traveling {pi}/n fronts. The instabilities designate transitions from stationary two-phase patterns to traveling 2n-phase patterns. As an example, we demonstrate with a numerical solution the collapse of a four-phase spiral wave into a stationary two-phase pattern as the forcing strength within the 4:1 resonance is increased. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Droplet migration characteristics in confined oscillatory microflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Kaustav; Mandal, Shubhadeep; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the migration characteristics of a droplet in an oscillatory flow field in a parallel plate microconfinement. Using phase field formalism, we capture the dynamical evolution of the droplet over a wide range of the frequency of the imposed oscillation in the flow field, drop size relative to the channel gap, and the capillary number. The latter two factors imply the contribution of droplet deformability, commonly considered in the study of droplet migration under steady shear flow conditions. We show that the imposed oscillation brings an additional time complexity in the droplet movement, realized through temporally varying drop shape, flow direction, and the inertial response of the droplet. As a consequence, we observe a spatially complicated pathway of the droplet along the transverse direction, in sharp contrast to the smooth migration under a similar yet steady shear flow condition. Intuitively, the longitudinal component of the droplet movement is in tandem with the flow continuity and evolves with time at the same frequency as that of the imposed oscillation, although with an amplitude decreasing with the frequency. The time complexity of the transverse component of the movement pattern, however, cannot be rationalized through such intuitive arguments. Towards bringing out the underlying physics, we further endeavor in a reciprocal identity based analysis. Following this approach, we unveil the time complexities of the droplet movement, which appear to be sufficient to rationalize the complex movement patterns observed through the comprehensive simulation studies. These results can be of profound importance in designing droplet based microfluidic systems in an oscillatory flow environment.

  10. Newly developed ventricular assist device with linear oscillatory actuator.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Kazuyoshi; Funakubo, Akio; Fukui, Yasuhiro

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a new direct electromagnetic left ventricular assist device (DEM-LVAD) with a linear oscillatory actuator (LOA). The DEM-LVAD is a pulsatile pump with a pusher plate. The pusher plate is driven directly by the mover of the LOA. The LOA provides reciprocating motion without using any movement converter such as a roller screw or a hydraulic system. It consists of a stator with a single winding excitation coil and a mover with two permanent magnets. The simple structure of the LOA is based on fewer parts to bring about high reliability and smaller size. The mover moves back and forth when forward and backward electric current is supplied to the excitation coil. The pump housings have been designed using three-dimensional computer aided design software and fabricated with the aid of computer aided manufacturing technology. Monostrut valves (Bjork-Shiley #21) were used for the prototype. The DEM-LVAD dimension is 96 mm in diameter and 50 mm thick with a mass of 0.62 kg and a volume of 280 ml. An in vitro test (afterload 100 mm Hg; preload 10 mm Hg; input power 10 W) demonstrated more than 6 L/minute maximum output and 15% maximum efficiency at 130 beats per minute (bpm). Dynamic stroke volume ranged between 40 and 60 ml. The feasibility of the DEM-LVAD was confirmed.

  11. EEG oscillatory phase-dependent markers of corticospinal excitability in the resting brain.

    PubMed

    Berger, Barbara; Minarik, Tamas; Liuzzi, Gianpiero; Hummel, Friedhelm C; Sauseng, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Functional meaning of oscillatory brain activity in various frequency bands in the human electroencephalogram (EEG) is increasingly researched. While most research focuses on event-related changes of brain activity in response to external events there is also increasing interest in internal brain states influencing information processing. Several studies suggest amplitude changes of EEG oscillatory activity selectively influencing cortical excitability, and more recently it was shown that phase of EEG activity (instantaneous phase) conveys additional meaning. Here we review this field with many conflicting findings and further investigate whether corticospinal excitability in the resting brain is dependent on a specific spontaneously occurring brain state reflected by amplitude and instantaneous phase of EEG oscillations. We applied single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the left sensorimotor cortex, while simultaneously recording ongoing oscillatory activity with EEG. Results indicate that brain oscillations reflect rapid, spontaneous fluctuations of cortical excitability. Instantaneous phase but not amplitude of oscillations at various frequency bands at stimulation site at the time of TMS-pulse is indicative for brain states associated with different levels of excitability (defined by size of the elicited motor evoked potential). These results are further evidence that ongoing brain oscillations directly influence neural excitability which puts further emphasis on their role in orchestrating neuronal firing in the brain.

  12. Dependence of the L-H transition on X-point geometry and divertor recycling on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, D. J.; Chang, C. S.; Kaye, S. M.; Kim, K.; Ku, S.; Maingi, R.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Menard, J.; Podesta, M.; the NSTX Team

    2013-11-01

    The edge electron (Te) and ion temperature (Ti) at the time of the L-H transition increase when the X-point radius (RX) is reduced to a high-triangularity shape while maintaining constant edge density. Consequently the L-H power threshold (PLH) is larger for the high-triangularity shape. This supports the prediction that a single-particle loss hole, whose properties are strongly linked to RX and Ti, influences the edge radial electric field (Er) and Er × B flow-shearing rate available for turbulence suppression. Simulations using XGC0, a full-f drift-kinetic neoclassical code, indicate that maintaining a constant Er × B flow-shearing rate does require a larger heat flux and edge Ti as RX decreases. NSTX also observes a decrease in PLH when the divertor recycling is decreased using lithium coatings. However, the edge Te and Ti at the L-H transition appear independent of the divertor recycling for a constant shape. XGC0 calculations demonstrate that more heat flux is needed to maintain the edge Ti and the Er × B flow-shearing rate as the contribution of divertor recycling to the overall neutral fuelling rate increases.

  13. Resonant alignment of microswimmer trajectories in oscillatory shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hope, Alexander; Croze, Ottavio A.; Poon, Wilson C. K.; Bees, Martin A.; Haw, Mark D.

    2016-09-01

    Oscillatory flows are commonly experienced by swimming micro-organisms in the environment, industrial applications, and rheological investigations. We characterize experimentally the response of the alga Dunaliella salina to oscillatory shear flows and report the surprising discovery that algal swimming trajectories orient perpendicular to the flow-shear plane. The ordering has the characteristics of a resonance in the driving parameter space. The behavior is qualitatively reproduced by a simple model and simulations accounting for helical swimming, suggesting a mechanism for ordering and criteria for the resonant amplitude and frequency. The implications of this work for active oscillatory rheology and industrial algal processing are discussed.

  14. Oscillations of Magnetic Fluid Column in Strong Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polunin, V. M.; Storozhenko, A. M.; Platonov, V. B.; Lobova, O. V.; Ryapolov, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper considers the results of measuring the elastic parameters (ponderomotive elasticity coefficient, oscillation frequency, attenuation coefficient) of the oscillatory system with an inertial element that is a magnetic fluid column retained in a tube due to magnetic levitation in a strong magnetic field. Elasticity is provided by the ponderomotive force which affects the upper and lower thin layers of the fluid column. Measurement results of vibration parameters of the oscillatory system can be useful for the investigations of magnetophoresis and aggregation of nanoparticles in magnetic fluids.

  15. Control of Oscillatory Thermocapillary Convection in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, Ray

    1998-01-01

    This project focused on the generation and suppression of oscillatory thermocapillary convection in a thin liquid layer. The bulk of the research was experimental in nature, some theoretical work was also done. ne first phase of this research generated, for the first time, the hydrothermal-wave instability predicted by Smith and Davis in 1983. In addition, the behavior of the fluid layer under a number of conditions was investigated and catalogued. A transition map for the instability of buoyancy-thermocapillary convection was prepared which presented results in terms of apparatus-dependent and apparatus-independent parameters, for ease of comparison with theoretical results. The second phase of this research demonstrated the suppression of these hydrothermal waves through an active, feed-forward control strategy employing a CO2 laser to selectively heat lines of negative disturbance temperature on the free surface of the liquid layer. An initial attempt at this control was only partially successful, employing a thermocouple inserted slightly below the free surface of the liquid to generate the control scheme. Subsequent efforts, however, were completely successful in suppressing oscillations in a portion of the layer by utilizing data from an infrared image of the free surface to compute hydrothermal-wave phase speeds and, using these, to tailor the control scheme to each passing wave.

  16. Plant shoots exhibit synchronized oscillatory motions

    PubMed Central

    Ciszak, Marzena; Masi, Elisa; Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In animals, the ability to move has evolved as an important means of protection from predators and for enhancing nutrient uptake. In the animal kingdom, an individual's movements may become coordinated with those of other individuals that belong to the same group, which leads, for example, to the beautiful collective patterns that are observed in flocks of birds and schools of fish or in animal migration. Land plants, however, are fixed to the ground, which limits their movement and, apparently, their interactions and collective behaviors. We show that emergent maize plants grown in a group exhibit synchronized oscillatory motions that may be in-phase or anti-phase. These oscillations occur in short bursts and appear when the leaves rupture from the coleoptile tip. The appearance of these oscillations indicates an abrupt increase in the plant growth rate, which may be associated with a sudden change in the energy uptake for photosynthesis. Our results suggest that plant shoots behave as a complex network of biological oscillators, interacting through biophysical links, e.g. chemical substances or electric signals. PMID:27829981

  17. Autocatalytic Reaction Front Propagation in Oscillatory Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leconte, Marc; Martin, Jerome; Rakotomalala, Nicole; Salin, Dominique

    2003-11-01

    Laboratoire Fluides Automatique et Systèmes Thermiques, Universités P. et M. Curie and Paris Sud, C.N.R.S. (UMR 7608) Bâtiment 502, Campus Universitaire, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France. Autocatalytic reaction front between two reacting species is able to propagate as a solitary wave that is at a constant velocity and with a stationary concentration profile resulting from a balance between molecular diffusion and chemical reaction. On the other hand, in laminar flow the association of molecular diffusion and convection leads to an overall diffusion effect, the so-called Taylor dispersion, with a flow dependent enhanced dispersion coefficient. Previous experiments have demonstrated the dissymmetry between supportive and adverse advection flows compared to the reaction front propagation without flow. We analyze experimentally the effect of laminar oscillatory flow on the propagation and on the shape of the fronts in the Iodate-Arsenous Acid autocatalytic reaction in micro Hele-Shaw cells. We observe new solitary waves whose velocity and shape depend on the relative importance of advection, diffusion and reaction. The results are in reasonable with our lattice 3D BGK simulations.

  18. Computer-assisted experiments with oscillatory circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, J. C.; Ferraz, A.; Rogalski, M. S.

    2010-03-01

    A basic setup for data acquisition and analysis from an oscillatory circuit is described, with focus on its application as either low-pass, high-pass, band-pass or band-reject frequency filter. A homemade board containing the RLC elements allows for the interchange of some of them, in particular, for the easy change of the R value, and this makes apparent for the student its influence on the damping factor. The function generator operates in the swap frequency mode over a suitable frequency range and all the circuit parameters are chosen to provide a reasonable set of data for all the electronic filters studied. The output data are acquired through a commercially available DAQ board and data analysis is performed using a graphing and fitting workspace. The main objective is to develop a methodology of teaching the laboratory material through a computer-based environment devised to help students to appreciate how the governing equations work and to visualize their practical applications.

  19. Processing oscillatory signals by incoherent feedforward loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Carolyn; Wu, Feilun; Tsoi, Ryan; Shats, Igor; You, Lingchong

    From the timing of amoeba development to the maintenance of stem cell pluripotency,many biological signaling pathways exhibit the ability to differentiate between pulsatile and sustained signals in the regulation of downstream gene expression.While networks underlying this signal decoding are diverse,many are built around a common motif, the incoherent feedforward loop (IFFL),where an input simultaneously activates an output and an inhibitor of the output.With appropriate parameters,this motif can generate temporal adaptation,where the system is desensitized to a sustained input.This property serves as the foundation for distinguishing signals with varying temporal profiles.Here,we use quantitative modeling to examine another property of IFFLs,the ability to process oscillatory signals.Our results indicate that the system's ability to translate pulsatile dynamics is limited by two constraints.The kinetics of IFFL components dictate the input range for which the network can decode pulsatile dynamics.In addition,a match between the network parameters and signal characteristics is required for optimal ``counting''.We elucidate one potential mechanism by which information processing occurs in natural networks with implications in the design of synthetic gene circuits for this purpose. This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (CZ).

  20. Plant shoots exhibit synchronized oscillatory motions.

    PubMed

    Ciszak, Marzena; Masi, Elisa; Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    In animals, the ability to move has evolved as an important means of protection from predators and for enhancing nutrient uptake. In the animal kingdom, an individual's movements may become coordinated with those of other individuals that belong to the same group, which leads, for example, to the beautiful collective patterns that are observed in flocks of birds and schools of fish or in animal migration. Land plants, however, are fixed to the ground, which limits their movement and, apparently, their interactions and collective behaviors. We show that emergent maize plants grown in a group exhibit synchronized oscillatory motions that may be in-phase or anti-phase. These oscillations occur in short bursts and appear when the leaves rupture from the coleoptile tip. The appearance of these oscillations indicates an abrupt increase in the plant growth rate, which may be associated with a sudden change in the energy uptake for photosynthesis. Our results suggest that plant shoots behave as a complex network of biological oscillators, interacting through biophysical links, e.g. chemical substances or electric signals.

  1. Exercise oscillatory ventilation: Mechanisms and prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Bishnu P; Lewis, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Alteration in breathing patterns characterized by cyclic variation of ventilation during rest and during exercise has been recognized in patients with advanced heart failure (HF) for nearly two centuries. Periodic breathing (PB) during exercise is known as exercise oscillatory ventilation (EOV) and is characterized by the periods of hyperpnea and hypopnea without interposed apnea. EOV is a non-invasive parameter detected during submaximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Presence of EOV during exercise in HF patients indicates significant impairment in resting and exercise hemodynamic parameters. EOV is also an independent risk factor for poor prognosis in HF patients both with reduced and preserved ejection fraction irrespective of other gas exchange variables. Circulatory delay, increased chemosensitivity, pulmonary congestion and increased ergoreflex signaling have been proposed as the mechanisms underlying the generation of EOV in HF patients. There is no proven treatment of EOV but its reversal has been noted with phosphodiesterase inhibitors, exercise training and acetazolamide in relatively small studies. In this review, we discuss the mechanistic basis of PB during exercise and the clinical implications of recognizing PB patterns in patients with HF. PMID:27022457

  2. Oscillatory Mechanisms in Catalytic CO Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, C. D.; Yamamoto, S. Y.; Surko, C. M.; Maple, M. B.

    1996-03-01

    For nearly twenty years, temporal reaction-rate oscillations in catalytic reactions on metal surfaces have been observed. The most thoroughly studied of these is the oxidation of carbon monoxide on platinum catalysts, both at atmospheric pressure and under UHV conditions. While the oscillations observed under UHV conditions have been shown to be due to a restructuring of the catalyst by adsorbed carbon monoxide, no mechanism has been conclusively shown to be responsible for the oscillations observed under atmospheric conditions. We have developed a system in which oscillations on carefully prepared thin-film catalysts in a continuous flow reactor are highly reproducible, thereby allowing us to study the possible oscillatory mechanisms. footnote S.Y. Yamamoto, C.M. Surko, M.B. Maple, and R.K. Pina, J. Chem. Phys. 102, 8614 (1995). We have been able to discriminate between current theoretical models through a series of reactant gas pretreatments, and we find that the oscillations we observe are consistent with a slow oxidation and reduction of the catalyst surface. [6pt] This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  3. A Statistical Study on Oscillatory Protein Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shiwei

    Motivated by the experiments on the dynamics of a common network motif, p53 and Mdm2 feedback loop, by Lahav et al. [Nat. Genet 36, 147(2004)] in individual cells and Lev Bar-or et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97, 11250(2000)] at the population of cells, we propose a statistical signal-response model with aiming to describe the different oscillatory behaviors for the activities of p53 and Mdm2 proteins both in individual and in population of cells in a unified way. At the cellular level, the activities of p53 and Mdm2 proteins are described by a group of nonlinear dynamical equations where the damage-derived signal is assumed to have the form with abrupt transition (”on” leftrightarrow ”off”) as soon as signal strength passes forth and back across a threshold. Each cell responses to the damage with different time duration within which the oscillations persist. For the case of population of cells, the activities of p53 and Mdm2 proteins will be the population average of the individual cells, which results damped oscillations, due to the averaging over the cell population with the different response time.

  4. Oscillatory traveling wave solutions to an attractive chemotaxis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tong; Liu, Hailiang; Wang, Lihe

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates oscillatory traveling wave solutions to an attractive chemotaxis system. The convective part of this system changes its type when crossing a parabola in the phase space. The oscillatory nature of the traveling wave comes from the fact that one far-field state is in the elliptic region and another in the hyperbolic region. Such traveling wave solutions are shown to be linearly unstable. Detailed construction of some traveling wave solutions is presented.

  5. The slowed brain: cortical oscillatory activity in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Butz, Markus; May, Elisabeth S; Häussinger, Dieter; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2013-08-15

    Oscillatory activity of the human brain has received growing interest as a key mechanism of large-scale integration across different brain regions. Besides a crucial role of oscillatory activity in the emergence of other neurological and psychiatric diseases, recent evidence indicates a key role in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). This review summarizes the current knowledge on pathological alterations of oscillatory brain activity in association with liver dysfunction and HE in the context of spontaneous brain activity, motor symptoms, sensory processing, and attention. The existing literature demonstrates a prominent slowing of the frequency of oscillatory activity as shown for spontaneous brain activity at rest, with respect to deficits of motor behavior and motor symptoms, and in the context of visual attention processes. The observed slowing extends across different subsystems of the brain and has been confirmed across different frequency bands, providing evidence for ubiquitous changes of oscillatory activity in HE. For example, the frequency of cortico-muscular coherence in HE patients appears at the frequency of the mini-asterixis (⩽12Hz), while cirrhotics without overt signs of HE show coherence similar to healthy subjects, i.e. at 13-30Hz. Interestingly, the so-called critical flicker frequency (CFF) as a measure of the processing of an oscillating visual stimulus has emerged as a useful tool to quantify HE disease severity, correlating with behavioral and neurophysiological alterations. Moreover, the CFF reliably distinguishes patients with manifest HE from cirrhotics without any signs of HE and healthy controls using a cut-off frequency of 39Hz. In conclusion, oscillatory activity is globally slowed in HE in close association with HE symptoms and disease severity. Although the underlying causal mechanisms are not yet understood, these results indicate that pathological changes of oscillatory activity play an important role in the

  6. Robust Concentration and Frequency Control in Oscillatory Homeostats

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, Kristian; Agafonov, Oleg; Selstø, Christina H.; Jolma, Ingunn W.; Ni, Xiao Y.; Drengstig, Tormod; Ruoff, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Homeostatic and adaptive control mechanisms are essential for keeping organisms structurally and functionally stable. Integral feedback is a control theoretic concept which has long been known to keep a controlled variable robustly (i.e. perturbation-independent) at a given set-point by feeding the integrated error back into the process that generates . The classical concept of homeostasis as robust regulation within narrow limits is often considered as unsatisfactory and even incompatible with many biological systems which show sustained oscillations, such as circadian rhythms and oscillatory calcium signaling. Nevertheless, there are many similarities between the biological processes which participate in oscillatory mechanisms and classical homeostatic (non-oscillatory) mechanisms. We have investigated whether biological oscillators can show robust homeostatic and adaptive behaviors, and this paper is an attempt to extend the homeostatic concept to include oscillatory conditions. Based on our previously published kinetic conditions on how to generate biochemical models with robust homeostasis we found two properties, which appear to be of general interest concerning oscillatory and homeostatic controlled biological systems. The first one is the ability of these oscillators (“oscillatory homeostats”) to keep the average level of a controlled variable at a defined set-point by involving compensatory changes in frequency and/or amplitude. The second property is the ability to keep the period/frequency of the oscillator tuned within a certain well-defined range. In this paper we highlight mechanisms that lead to these two properties. The biological applications of these findings are discussed using three examples, the homeostatic aspects during oscillatory calcium and p53 signaling, and the involvement of circadian rhythms in homeostatic regulation. PMID:25238410

  7. Brain oscillatory signatures of motor tasks.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Birbaumer, Niels

    2015-06-01

    Noninvasive brain-computer-interfaces (BCI) coupled with prosthetic devices were recently introduced in the rehabilitation of chronic stroke and other disorders of the motor system. These BCI systems and motor rehabilitation in general involve several motor tasks for training. This study investigates the neurophysiological bases of an EEG-oscillation-driven BCI combined with a neuroprosthetic device to define the specific oscillatory signature of the BCI task. Controlling movements of a hand robotic orthosis with motor imagery of the same movement generates sensorimotor rhythm oscillation changes and involves three elements of tasks also used in stroke motor rehabilitation: passive and active movement, motor imagery, and motor intention. We recorded EEG while nine healthy participants performed five different motor tasks consisting of closing and opening of the hand as follows: 1) motor imagery without any external feedback and without overt hand movement, 2) motor imagery that moves the orthosis proportional to the produced brain oscillation change with online proprioceptive and visual feedback of the hand moving through a neuroprosthetic device (BCI condition), 3) passive and 4) active movement of the hand with feedback (seeing and feeling the hand moving), and 5) rest. During the BCI condition, participants received contingent online feedback of the decrease of power of the sensorimotor rhythm, which induced orthosis movement and therefore proprioceptive and visual information from the moving hand. We analyzed brain activity during the five conditions using time-frequency domain bootstrap-based statistical comparisons and Morlet transforms. Activity during rest was used as a reference. Significant contralateral and ipsilateral event-related desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythm was present during all motor tasks, largest in contralateral-postcentral, medio-central, and ipsilateral-precentral areas identifying the ipsilateral precentral cortex as an integral

  8. Synchronization of oscillatory chemiluminescence with pulsed light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Shunsuke; Okano, Kunihiko; Asakura, Kouichi

    2013-01-01

    A chemical oscillator, the H2O2-KSCN-CuSO4-NaOH system, generates an oscillatory chemiluminescence when luminol is added to this system. Attempts were made to synchronize the oscillatory chemiluminescence with pulsed light irradiation. A period of the chemical oscillation became shorter by the irradiation of white and blue color light, while the oscillatory behavior was scarcely influenced by the irradiation of red light. Pulsed red and white or blue lights were irradiated on either the non-luminol or luminol-added H2O2-KSCN-CuSO4-NaOH system. Synchronization of the chemical oscillation was achieved for 25-30 min in the luminol-added system.

  9. Effects of End-Wall Vibration on Oscillatory Thermocapillary Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhowmick, J.; Kou, Q.; Anilkumar, A.; Grugel, R.; Wang, T.

    2000-01-01

    Our previous float zone experiments 1,2 with NaNO3 revealed that steady thermocapillary flow (TC flow) can be balanced/offset by the controlled surface streaming flow (CSS flow), induced by end-wall vibration. In the current experiments, we are examining the effects of surface streaming flow on steadying/stabilizing oscillatory thermocapillary flow. To this effect, we have set up a controlled NaNO3 half-zone experiment, where the processing parameters like zone dimensions and temperature gradients scan be easily varied to achieve oscillatory TC flow. In the present paper, we discuss the thermal signature of the TC flow, and how it is affected by imposition of CSS flow. The results will also include a comparison of the microstructure of a NaNO3- BaNO3 eutectic, processed under oscillatory TC conditions, with and without imposed CSS flow.

  10. Linked and knotted chimera filaments in oscillatory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Hon Wai; Davidsen, Jörn

    2016-07-01

    While the existence of stable knotted and linked vortex lines has been established in many experimental and theoretical systems, their existence in oscillatory systems and systems with nonlocal coupling has remained elusive. Here, we present strong numerical evidence that stable knots and links such as trefoils and Hopf links do exist in simple, complex, and chaotic oscillatory systems if the coupling between the oscillators is neither too short ranged nor too long ranged. In this case, effective repulsive forces between vortex lines in knotted and linked structures stabilize curvature-driven shrinkage observed for single vortex rings. In contrast to real fluids and excitable media, the vortex lines correspond to scroll wave chimeras [synchronized scroll waves with spatially extended (tubelike) unsynchronized filaments], a prime example of spontaneous synchrony breaking in systems of identical oscillators. In the case of complex oscillatory systems, this leads to a topological superstructure combining knotted filaments and synchronization defect sheets.

  11. Oscillatory localization of quantum walks analyzed by classical electric circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambainis, Andris; PrÅ«sis, Krišjānis; Vihrovs, JevgÄ`nijs; Wong, Thomas G.

    2016-12-01

    We examine an unexplored quantum phenomenon we call oscillatory localization, where a discrete-time quantum walk with Grover's diffusion coin jumps back and forth between two vertices. We then connect it to the power dissipation of a related electric network. Namely, we show that there are only two kinds of oscillating states, called uniform states and flip states, and that the projection of an arbitrary state onto a flip state is bounded by the power dissipation of an electric circuit. By applying this framework to states along a single edge of a graph, we show that low effective resistance implies oscillatory localization of the quantum walk. This reveals that oscillatory localization occurs on a large variety of regular graphs, including edge-transitive, expander, and high-degree graphs. As a corollary, high edge connectivity also implies localization of these states, since it is closely related to electric resistance.

  12. Linked and knotted chimera filaments in oscillatory systems.

    PubMed

    Lau, Hon Wai; Davidsen, Jörn

    2016-07-01

    While the existence of stable knotted and linked vortex lines has been established in many experimental and theoretical systems, their existence in oscillatory systems and systems with nonlocal coupling has remained elusive. Here, we present strong numerical evidence that stable knots and links such as trefoils and Hopf links do exist in simple, complex, and chaotic oscillatory systems if the coupling between the oscillators is neither too short ranged nor too long ranged. In this case, effective repulsive forces between vortex lines in knotted and linked structures stabilize curvature-driven shrinkage observed for single vortex rings. In contrast to real fluids and excitable media, the vortex lines correspond to scroll wave chimeras [synchronized scroll waves with spatially extended (tubelike) unsynchronized filaments], a prime example of spontaneous synchrony breaking in systems of identical oscillators. In the case of complex oscillatory systems, this leads to a topological superstructure combining knotted filaments and synchronization defect sheets.

  13. Spatial structure of scrape-off-layer filaments near the midplane and X-point regions of Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J L; Zweben, S J; Umansky, M V; Cziegler, I; Grulke, O; LaBombard, B; Stotler, D P

    2008-05-22

    Movies of edge turbulence at both the outboard midplane and the region outboard of the typical lower X-point location in C-Mod have been obtained using Gas-Puff-Imaging together with fast-framing cameras. Intermittent turbulent structures, typically referred to as blobs or filaments, are observed in both locations. Near the midplane the filaments are roughly circular in cross-section, while in the X-point region they are highly elongated. Filament velocities in this region are {approx}3x faster than the radial velocities at the midplane, in a direction roughly normal to the local flux surfaces. The observations are consistent with the picture that the filaments arise in outboard region and, as a consequence of the rapid parallel diffusion of the potential perturbations, map along field lines. A simulation using the 3D BOUT turbulence code has been made, with the result that reproduces many of the spatial features observed in the experiment.

  14. Strobes: pyrotechnic compositions that show a curious oscillatory combustion.

    PubMed

    Corbel, Justine M L; van Lingen, Joost N J; Zevenbergen, John F; Gijzeman, Onno L J; Meijerink, Andries

    2013-01-02

    Strobes are pyrotechnic compositions which show an oscillatory combustion; a dark phase and a flash phase alternate periodically. The strobe effect has applications in various fields, most notably in the fireworks industry and in the military area. All strobe compositions mentioned in the literature were discovered by trial and error methods and the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Many oscillatory systems such as Belousov-Zhabotinsky reactions, cool flames, self-propagating high-temperature synthesis have been observed and theories developed to elucidate their unstable behavior based on chemical interactions or based on physical processes. These systems are compared to experimental observations made on strobe mixtures.

  15. Oscillatory Positive Expiratory Pressure in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Svenningsen, Sarah; Paulin, Gregory A; Sheikh, Khadija; Guo, Fumin; Hasany, Aasim; Kirby, Miranda; Rezai, Roya Etemad; McCormack, David G; Parraga, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based guidance for the use of airway clearance techniques (ACT) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is lacking in-part because well-established measurements of pulmonary function such as the forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1) are relatively insensitive to ACT. The objective of this crossover study was to evaluate daily use of an oscillatory positive expiratory pressure (oPEP) device for 21-28 days in COPD patients who were self-identified as sputum-producers or non-sputum-producers. COPD volunteers provided written informed consent to daily oPEP use in a randomized crossover fashion. Participants completed baseline, crossover and study-end pulmonary function tests, St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), Patient Evaluation Questionnaire (PEQ), Six-Minute Walk Test and (3)He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the measurement of ventilation abnormalities using the ventilation defect percent (VDP). Fourteen COPD patients, self-identified as sputum-producers and 13 COPD-non-sputum-producers completed the study. Post-oPEP, the PEQ-ease-bringing-up-sputum was improved for sputum-producers (p = 0.005) and non-sputum-producers (p = 0.04), the magnitude of which was greater for sputum-producers (p = 0.03). There were significant post-oPEP improvements for sputum-producers only for FVC (p = 0.01), 6MWD (p = 0.04), SGRQ total score (p = 0.01) as well as PEQ-patient-global-assessment (p = 0.02). Clinically relevant post-oPEP improvements for PEQ-ease-bringing-up-sputum/PEQ-patient-global-assessment/SGRQ/VDP were observed in 8/7/9/6 of 14 sputum-producers and 2/0/3/3 of 13 non-sputum-producers. The post-oPEP change in (3)He MRI VDP was related to the change in PEQ-ease-bringing-up-sputum (r = 0.65, p = 0.0004) and FEV1 (r = -0.50, p = 0.009). In COPD patients with chronic sputum production, PEQ and SGRQ scores, FVC and 6MWD improved post-oPEP. FEV1 and PEQ-ease-bringing-up-sputum improvements were related to improved ventilation providing

  16. Magnetorheological fluid behavior in high-frequency oscillatory squeeze mode: Experimental tests and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Bai, Xian-Xu; Qian, Li-Jun

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the behavior of magnetorheological (MR) fluids in high-frequency oscillatory squeeze mode and proposes a mathematical model to reveal the MR mechanism. A specific MR squeeze structure avoiding the cavitation effect is designed for the experimental tests. The magnetic field- and gap distance-dependent damping force of the MR squeeze structure is presented and compared with the dramatically large damping force under quasi-static excitations, a moderate damping force is observed at high frequencies. Subsequently, in order to interpret the behavior of MR fluids at high frequencies, employing the continuum media theory, a mathematical model is established with consideration of the fluid inertia and hysteresis property. The damping force comparison between the model and experimental tests indicates that in high-frequency oscillatory squeeze mode, the squeeze-strengthen effect does not work and the shear yield stress can be applied well to characterize the flow property of MR fluids. In addition, the hysteresis property has a significant influence on the damping performance.

  17. Brain oscillatory activity during motor imagery in EEG-fMRI coregistration.

    PubMed

    Formaggio, Emanuela; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Cerini, Roberto; Fiaschi, Antonio; Manganotti, Paolo

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the present work was to investigate the correlation between topographical changes in brain oscillatory activity and the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal during a motor imagery (MI) task using electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) coregistration. EEG was recorded in 7 healthy subjects inside a 1.5 T MR scanner during the imagination of the kinesthetic experience of movement. A Fast Fourier Transform was applied to EEG signal in the rest and active conditions. We used the event-related-synchronization (ERS)/desynchronization (ERD) approach to characterize where the imagination of movement produces a decrease in alpha and beta power. The mean alpha map showed ERD decrease localized over the contralateral sensory motor area (SM1c) and a light desynchronization in the ipsilateral sensory motor area (SM1i); whereas the mean beta map showed ERD decrease over the supplementary motor area (SMA). fMRI showed significant activation in SMA, SM1c, SM1i. The correlation is negative in the contralateral side and positive in the ipsilateral side. Using combined EEG-fMRI signals we obtained useful new information on the description of the changes in oscillatory activity in alpha and beta bands during MI and on the investigation of the sites of BOLD activity as possible sources in generating these rhythms. By correlating BOLD and ERD/ERS we may identify more accurately which regions contribute to changes of the electrical response.

  18. On oscillatory microstructure during cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn–36at.%Ni peritectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie

    2016-04-01

    An oscillatory microstructure has been observed during deep-cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn–36at.%Ni hyperperitectic alloy containing intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range. This oscillatory microstructure with a dimension of tens of micrometers has been observed for the first time. The morphology of this wave-like oscillatory structure is similar to secondary dendrite arms, and can be observed only in some local positions of the sample. Through analysis such as successive sectioning of the sample, it can be concluded that this oscillatory microstructure is caused by oscillatory convection of the mushy zone during solidification. And the influence of convection on this oscillatory microstructure was characterized through comparison between experimental and calculations results on the wavelength. Besides, the change in morphology of this oscillatory microstructure has been proved to be caused by peritectic transformation during solidification. Furthermore, the melt concentration increases continuously during solidification of intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range, which helps formation of this oscillatory microstructure.

  19. Oscillatory Dynamics Related to the Unagreement Pattern in Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Alejandro; Molinaro, Nicola; Mancini, Simona; Barraza, Paulo; Carreiras, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Unagreement patterns consist in a person feature mismatch between subject and verb that is nonetheless grammatical in Spanish. The processing of this type of construction gives new insights into the understanding of agreement processes during language comprehension. Here, we contrasted oscillatory brain activity triggered by Unagreement in…

  20. Airflow synchronous with oscillatory acceleration reflects involuntary respiratory muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard E; Lee, Hsueh-Tze; Loring, Stephen H

    2004-06-25

    To explore mechanisms causing involuntary airflow synchronous with oscillatory axial whole body acceleration (oscillatory axial acceleration, OAA) such as that during locomotion, we monitored airflow, acceleration, and electromyograms (EMGs) of the rib cage and abdominal muscles in standing subjects undergoing OAA at 3, 6, and 9 Hz at accelerations of 0.1-0.95 g. Subjects relaxed or performed static respiratory maneuvers at constant lung volume with glottis open. Oscillatory airflows (0.01-3.01 s(-1)) synchronous with OAA were not consistent with expectations for a passive respiratory system, and were larger during active respiratory efforts than during relaxation. Peak inspiratory airflow usually preceded peak upward acceleration by 90-180 degrees. In 80% of runs with respiratory muscles voluntarily activated or relaxed, EMGs showed activity synchronous with OAA. Changes in periodic muscle activity coincided with changes in oscillatory airflow. We conclude that periodic muscle activity, probably a reflex response to body wall deformation during OAA, strongly influences the involuntary airflow synchronous with OAA.

  1. Resting-State Oscillatory Activity in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornew, Lauren; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Blaskey, Lisa; Edgar, J. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Neural oscillatory anomalies in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggest an excitatory/inhibitory imbalance; however, the nature and clinical relevance of these anomalies are unclear. Whole-cortex magnetoencephalography data were collected while 50 children (27 with ASD, 23 controls) underwent an eyes-closed resting-state exam. A Fast Fourier…

  2. Heisenberg uncertainty principles for an oscillatory integral operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, L. P.; Guerra, R. C.; Tuan, N. M.

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of this work is to obtain Heisenberg uncertainty principles for a specific oscillatory integral operator which representatively exhibits different parameters on their sine and cosine phase components. Additionally, invertibility theorems, Parseval type identities and Plancherel type theorems are also obtained.

  3. Bed Morphology and Sediment Transport under Oscillatory Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedocchi Miljan, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Recent laboratory and field experiments have shown the inability of existing oscillatory flow ripple predictors to accurately predict both ripple size and planform geometry. However, at this time, only partial adaptations of these predictors have been proposed in the literature to account for the observed discrepancies with experimental data…

  4. Geometrical Series and Phase Space in a Finite Oscillatory Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mareco, H. R. Olmedo

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses some interesting physical properties of oscillatory motion of a particle on two joined inclined planes. The geometrical series demonstrates that the particle will oscillate during a finite time. Another detail is the converging path to the origin of the phase space. Due to its simplicity, this motion may be used as a…

  5. Frontal Oscillatory Dynamics Predict Feedback Learning and Action Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Vijver, Irene; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Cohen, Michael X.

    2011-01-01

    Frontal oscillatory dynamics in the theta (4-8 Hz) and beta (20-30 Hz) frequency bands have been implicated in cognitive control processes. Here we investigated the changes in coordinated activity within and between frontal brain areas during feedback-based response learning. In a time estimation task, participants learned to press a button after…

  6. Unstable oscillatory Pierce modes of neutralized electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, J.R.; Lemons, D.S.

    1982-04-01

    Oscillatory modes of the Pierce system have been calculated. These modes are found to have growth rates comparable to the previously investigated purely growing modes. When these modes are included, it is found that the Pierce system is unstable for most values of ..omega../sub p/ L/V/sub 0/>..pi...

  7. Experimental investigation of time-dependent cavita-tion in an oscillatory squeeze film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoyang; Sun, Meili; Wang, Wen; Sun, C. D.; Zhang, Zhiming; Wang, Xiaojing

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of time-dependent cavitation and tensile stress in an oscillatory oil squeeze film were investigated experimentally. The test apparatus was a simple thrust bearing consisting of two parallel circular plates separated by a thin viscous oil film. During the test, one plate was at rest while the other (transparent) oscillated in a direction normal to its surface. This test configuration was chosen to avoid the rotational motion and complicated geometry of a squeeze film journal bearing. The frequency of oscillation was in the range of 5 to 50 Hz and was controlled by an electro-magnetic exciter. The process of cavity formation and its subsequent development was recorded by a high-speed video camera. Concomitant pressure in the oil film was measured both within and without the cavitation region. It was found that both tensile stress and cavities existed in a squeeze film under certain working conditions.

  8. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  9. Lasting EEG/MEG Aftereffects of Rhythmic Transcranial Brain Stimulation: Level of Control Over Oscillatory Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Veniero, Domenica; Vossen, Alexandra; Gross, Joachim; Thut, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    A number of rhythmic protocols have emerged for non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) in humans, including transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation (otDCS), and repetitive (also called rhythmic) transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). With these techniques, it is possible to match the frequency of the externally applied electromagnetic fields to the intrinsic frequency of oscillatory neural population activity (“frequency-tuning”). Mounting evidence suggests that by this means tACS, otDCS, and rTMS can entrain brain oscillations and promote associated functions in a frequency-specific manner, in particular during (i.e., online to) stimulation. Here, we focus instead on the changes in oscillatory brain activity that persist after the end of stimulation. Understanding such aftereffects in healthy participants is an important step for developing these techniques into potentially useful clinical tools for the treatment of specific patient groups. Reviewing the electrophysiological evidence in healthy participants, we find aftereffects on brain oscillations to be a common outcome following tACS/otDCS and rTMS. However, we did not find a consistent, predictable pattern of aftereffects across studies, which is in contrast to the relative homogeneity of reported online effects. This indicates that aftereffects are partially dissociated from online, frequency-specific (entrainment) effects during tACS/otDCS and rTMS. We outline possible accounts and future directions for a better understanding of the link between online entrainment and offline aftereffects, which will be key for developing more targeted interventions into oscillatory brain activity. PMID:26696834

  10. Free oscillations of magnetic fluid in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polunin, V. M.; Ryapolov, P. A.; Platonov, V. B.; Kuz'ko, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents the esults of measuring the elastic parameters of an oscillatory system (coefficient of pondermotive elasticity, damping factor, and oscillation frequency) whose viscous inertial element is represented by a magnetic fluid confined in a tube by magnetic levitation in a strong magnetic field. The role of elasticity is played by the pondermotive force acting on thin layers at the upper and lower ends of the fluid column. It is shown that, by measuring the elastic oscillation frequencies of the magnetic fluid column, it is possible to develop a fundamentally new absolute method for determining the saturation magnetization of a magnetic colloid.

  11. Oscillatory motion of sheared nanorods beyond the nematic phase.

    PubMed

    Strehober, David A; Engel, Harald; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2013-07-01

    We study the role of the control parameter triggering nematic order (temperature or concentration) on the dynamical behavior of a system of nanorods under shear. Our study is based on a set of mesoscopic equations of motion for the components of the tensorial orientational order parameter. We investigate these equations via a systematic bifurcation analysis based on a numerical continuation technique, focusing on spatially homogeneous states. Exploring a wide range of parameters we find, unexpectedly, that states with oscillatory motion can exist even under conditions where the equilibrium system is isotropic. These oscillatory states are characterized by a wagging motion of the paranematic director, and they occur if the tumbling parameter is sufficiently small. We also present full nonequilibrium phase diagrams in the plane spanned by the concentration and the shear rate.

  12. Oscillatory motion of a viscous fluid in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siraev, R. R.

    2015-08-01

    An oscillatory flow of an incompressible fluid in a saturated porous medium in the presence of a solid inclusion has been theoretically studied. Unsteady filtration has been described by the Brinkman-Forchheimer equation, where inertial effects and terms with acceleration characteristic of high filtration rates and the presence of pulsations are taken into account. The convective part of the acceleration is responsible for nonlinear effects near macroinhomogeneities. These effects can play a noticeable role in unsteady flows in the porous medium, as is shown for the problem of a solid ball streamed by an oscillatory flow having a given velocity at infinity. The results indicate that a secondary averaged flow appears in the case of high frequencies and cannot be described by Darcy's or Forchheimer's filtration laws.

  13. Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation: Effects of History and Lift Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadim, Ali

    2014-11-01

    This work is co-authored with my doctoral student Shujing Xu and is dedicated to the memory of my doctoral advisor Howard Brenner who enjoyed thought experiments related to rotating systems. Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation refers to our theoretical discovery that within a liquid-filled container that rotates in an oscillatory manner about a fixed axis as a rigid body, a suspended particle can be made to migrate on average in the direction opposite to that of ordinary centrifugation. That is, a heavy (or light) particle can move toward (or away from) the rotation axis, when the frequency of oscillations is high enough. In this work we analyze the effects of the Basset history force and the Saffman lift force on particle trajectories and find that the counter-centrifugation phenomenon persists even when these forces are active.

  14. Oscillatory multiphase flow strategy for chemistry and biology.

    PubMed

    Abolhasani, Milad; Jensen, Klavs F

    2016-07-19

    Continuous multiphase flow strategies are commonly employed for high-throughput parameter screening of physical, chemical, and biological processes as well as continuous preparation of a wide range of fine chemicals and micro/nano particles with processing times up to 10 min. The inter-dependency of mixing and residence times, and their direct correlation with reactor length have limited the adaptation of multiphase flow strategies for studies of processes with relatively long processing times (0.5-24 h). In this frontier article, we describe an oscillatory multiphase flow strategy to decouple mixing and residence times and enable investigation of longer timescale experiments than typically feasible with conventional continuous multiphase flow approaches. We review current oscillatory multiphase flow technologies, provide an overview of the advancements of this relatively new strategy in chemistry and biology, and close with a perspective on future opportunities.

  15. Flow Loading Induces Oscillatory Trajectories in a Bloodstream Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Uppaluri, Sravanti; Heddergott, Niko; Stellamanns, Eric; Herminghaus, Stephan; Zöttl, Andreas; Stark, Holger; Engstler, Markus; Pfohl, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of isolated microswimmers are studied in bounded flow using the African trypanosome, a unicellular parasite, as the model organism. With the help of a microfluidics platform, cells are subjected to flow and found to follow an oscillatory path that is well fit by a sine wave. The frequency and amplitudes of the oscillatory trajectories are dependent on the flow velocity and cell orientation. When traveling in such a manner, trypanosomes orient upstream while downstream-facing cells tumble within the same streamline. A comparison with immotile trypanosomes demonstrates that self-propulsion is essential to the trajectories of trypanosomes even at flow velocities up to ∼40 times higher than their own swimming speed. These studies reveal important swimming dynamics that may be generally pertinent to the transport of microswimmers in flow and may be relevant to microbial pathogenesis. PMID:22995488

  16. Uniformly high order accurate essentially non-oscillatory schemes 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harten, A.; Engquist, B.; Osher, S.; Chakravarthy, S. R.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper (a third in a series) the construction and the analysis of essentially non-oscillatory shock capturing methods for the approximation of hyperbolic conservation laws are presented. Also presented is a hierarchy of high order accurate schemes which generalizes Godunov's scheme and its second order accurate MUSCL extension to arbitrary order of accuracy. The design involves an essentially non-oscillatory piecewise polynomial reconstruction of the solution from its cell averages, time evolution through an approximate solution of the resulting initial value problem, and averaging of this approximate solution over each cell. The reconstruction algorithm is derived from a new interpolation technique that when applied to piecewise smooth data gives high-order accuracy whenever the function is smooth but avoids a Gibbs phenomenon at discontinuities. Unlike standard finite difference methods this procedure uses an adaptive stencil of grid points and consequently the resulting schemes are highly nonlinear.

  17. Status asthmaticus treated by high-frequency oscillatory ventilation.

    PubMed

    Duval, E L; van Vught, A J

    2000-10-01

    We present a 2.5-year-old girl in severe asthma crisis who clinically deteriorated on conventional mechanical ventilation, but was successfully ventilated with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). Although HFOV is accepted as a technique for managing pediatric respiratory failure, its use in obstructive airway disease is generally thought to be contraindicated because of the risk of dynamic air-trapping. However, we suggest that obstructive airway disease can safely be managed with HFOV, provided certain conditions are met. These include the application of sufficiently high mean airway pressures to open and stent the airways ("an open airway strategy"), lower frequencies to overcome the greater attenuation of the oscillatory waves in the narrowed airways, permissive hypercapnia to enable reducing pressure swings as much as possible, longer expiratory times, and muscle paralysis to avoid spontaneous breathing.

  18. Information-Optimal Transcriptional Response to Oscillatory Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugler, Andrew; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Wiggins, Chris H.

    2010-07-01

    Intracellular transmission of information via chemical and transcriptional networks is thwarted by a physical limitation: The finite copy number of the constituent chemical species introduces unavoidable intrinsic noise. Here we solve for the complete probabilistic description of the intrinsically noisy response to an oscillatory driving signal. We derive and numerically verify a number of simple scaling laws. Unlike in the case of measuring a static quantity, response to an oscillatory signal can exhibit a resonant frequency which maximizes information transmission. Furthermore, we show that the optimal regulatory design is dependent on biophysical constraints (i.e., the allowed copy number and response time). The resulting phase diagram illustrates under what conditions threshold regulation outperforms linear regulation.

  19. Light scattering studies of an electrorheological fluid in oscillatory shear

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.E.; Odinek, J.

    1995-12-31

    We have conducted a real time, two-dimensional light scattering study of the nonlinear dynamics of field-induced structures in an electrorheological fluid subjected to oscillatory shear. We have developed a kinetic chain model of the observed dynamics by considering the response of a fragmenting/aggregating particle chain to the prevailing hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces. This structural theory is then used to describe the nonlinear rheology of ER fluids.

  20. Characterizing Oscillatory Bursts in Single-Trial EEG Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, K. H.; Shah, A. S.; Lakatos, P.; Schroeder, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Oscillatory bursts in numerous bands ranging from low (theta) to high frequencies (e.g., gamma) undoubtedly play an important role in cortical dynamics. Largely because of the inadequacy of existing analytic techniques. however, oscillatory bursts and their role in cortical processing remains poorly understood. To study oscillatory bursts effectively one must be able to isolate them and characterize them in the single trial. We describe a series of straightforward analysis techniques that produce useful indices of burst characteristics. First, stimulus-evoked responses are estimated using Differentially Variable Component Analysis (dVCA), and are subtracted from the single-trial. The single-trial characteristics of the evoked responses are stored to identify possible correlations with burst activity. Time-frequency (T-F), or wavelet, analyses are then applied to the single trial residuals. While T-F plots have been used in recent studies to identify and isolate bursts, we go further by fitting each burst in the T-F plot with a two-dimensional Gaussian. This provides a set of burst characteristics, such as, center time. burst duration, center frequency. frequency dispersion. and amplitude, all of which contribute to the accurate characterization of the individual burst. The burst phase can also be estimated. Burst characteristics can be quantified with several standard techniques (e.g.. histogramming and clustering), as well as Bayesian techniques (e.g., blocking) to allow a more parametric description analysis of the characteristics of oscillatory bursts, and the relationships of specific parameters to cortical excitability and stimulus integration.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann method for linear oscillatory noncontinuum flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yong; Yap, Ying Wan; Sader, John E.

    2014-03-01

    Oscillatory gas flows are commonly generated by micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems. Due to their small size and high operating frequencies, these devices often produce noncontinuum gas flows. Theoretical analysis of such flows requires solution of the unsteady Boltzmann equation, which can present a formidable challenge. In this article, we explore the applicability of the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method to such linear oscillatory noncontinuum flows; this method is derived from the linearized Boltzmann Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) equation. We formulate four linearized LB models in the frequency domain, based on Gaussian-Hermite quadratures of different algebraic precision (AP). The performance of each model is assessed by comparison to high-accuracy numerical solutions to the linearized Boltzmann-BGK equation for oscillatory Couette flow. The numerical results demonstrate that high even-order LB models provide superior performance over the greatest noncontinuum range. Our results also highlight intrinsic deficiencies in the current LB framework, which is incapable of capturing noncontinuum behavior at high oscillation frequencies, regardless of quadrature AP and the Knudsen number.

  2. Diffusional Scaling Laws in Oscillatory Systems with Stochastic Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J. B.; Tung, Wen-wen

    2003-08-01

    Rhythmic motions are ubiquitous in nature and in man-made systems, such as in low Reynolds number wake flows, breathing, and pathological tremors including essential and Parkinsonian. Due to the presence of external noise, those sinusoidal movements are typically only approximately rhythmic, or aperiodic, thus may be interpreted as chaotic. Although existing tests developed for the analysis of chaotic systems may be able to tell some qualitative differences between these stochastically driven oscillatory motions from true chaotic motions, those differences are often not very instructive, because in the study of chaos, one often monitors the motion on fairly short time scales, to be consistent with the one of the key features of chaos—short-term predictability. In this paper, we report a diffusional scaling law for stochastically driven oscillatory motions. By studying a number of measured data such as the fluctuating velocity signals in the near wake of a circular cylinder and pathological tremor data as well as numerically generated data, we shall show that the time scale range for the diffusional scaling law to be valid starts from about one to several tens of the mean oscillation period. Furthermore, we classify the diffusional oscillatory motions into three categories, depending on whether the diffusional exponent less than, equal to, or large than 0.5, and consider the mechanism for each category. It is found that the case with the exponent larger than 0.5 is an anomalous diffusion and is a pre-cursor for noise to induce chaos.

  3. Analytic solution of an oscillatory migratory α2 stellar dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Analytic solutions of the mean-field induction equation predict a nonoscillatory dynamo for homogeneous helical turbulence or constant α effect in unbounded or periodic domains. Oscillatory dynamos are generally thought impossible for constant α. Aims: We present an analytic solution for a one-dimensional bounded domain resulting in oscillatory solutions for constant α, but different (Dirichlet and von Neumann or perfect conductor and vacuum) boundary conditions on the two boundaries. Methods: We solve a second order complex equation and superimpose two independent solutions to obey both boundary conditions. Results: The solution has time-independent energy density. On one end where the function value vanishes, the second derivative is finite, which would not be correctly reproduced with sine-like expansion functions where a node coincides with an inflection point. The field always migrates away from the perfect conductor boundary toward the vacuum boundary, independently of the sign of α. Conclusions: The obtained solution may serve as a benchmark for numerical dynamo experiments and as a pedagogical illustration that oscillatory migratory dynamos are possible with constant α.

  4. Oscillatory/Chaotic Thermocapillary Flow Induced by Radiant Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth J.

    1998-01-01

    There is a continuing need to understand the fluid physics occurring under low gravity conditions in processes such as crystal growth, materials processing, and the movement of bubbles or droplets. The fluid flow in such situations is often caused by a gradient in interfacial tension. If a temperature gradient is created due to a heat source, the resulting flow is called thermocapillary flow, a special case of Marangoni Convection. In this study, an experimental investigation was conducted using silicone oil in cylindrical containers with a laser heat source at the free surface. It was desired to determine the conditions under which steady, axisymmetrical thermocapillary flow becomes unstable and oscillatory three-dimensional flow states develop. The critical Marangoni number for each observed oscillatory state was measured as a function of the container aspect ratio and the dynamic Bond number, a measure of buoyant force versus ii thermocapillary force. Various oscillatory modes were observed during three- dimensional convection, and chaotic flow was reached in one test condition. The critical Marangoni numbers are compared with those measured in previous studies, and the power spectra and phase trajectories of the instantaneous surface temperature distributions are used to characterize the routes of transitions to the chaotic flow state. Results show that only superharmonic modes appear in the routes to chaos while infinite number of subharmonic modes occur in flow transitions for pure Rayleigh convection.

  5. A generalized locomotion CPG architecture based on oscillatory building blocks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhijun; França, Felipe M G

    2003-07-01

    Neural oscillation is one of the most extensively investigated topics of artificial neural networks. Scientific approaches to the functionalities of both natural and artificial intelligences are strongly related to mechanisms underlying oscillatory activities. This paper concerns itself with the assumption of the existence of central pattern generators (CPGs), which are the plausible neural architectures with oscillatory capabilities, and presents a discrete and generalized approach to the functionality of locomotor CPGs of legged animals. Based on scheduling by multiple edge reversal (SMER), a primitive and deterministic distributed algorithm, it is shown how oscillatory building block (OBB) modules can be created and, hence, how OBB-based networks can be formulated as asymmetric Hopfield-like neural networks for the generation of complex coordinated rhythmic patterns observed among pairs of biological motor neurons working during different gait patterns. It is also shown that the resulting Hopfield-like network possesses the property of reproducing the whole spectrum of different gaits intrinsic to the target locomotor CPGs. Although the new approach is not restricted to the understanding of the neurolocomotor system of any particular animal, hexapodal and quadrupedal gait patterns are chosen as illustrations given the wide interest expressed by the ongoing research in the area.

  6. [Recent results in research on oscillatory chemical reactions].

    PubMed

    Poros, Eszter; Kurin-Csörgei, Krisztina

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of the complicated periodical phenomenas in the nature (e.g. hearth beat, sleep cycle, circadian rhythms, etc) could be understood with using the laws of nonlinear chemical systems. In this article the newest result in the research of the subfield of nonlinear chemical dynamics aimed at constructing oscillatory chemical reactions, which are novel either in composition or in configuration, are presented. In the introductory part the concept of chemical periodicity is defined, then the forms as it can appear in time and space and the methods of their study are discussed. Detailed description of the experimental work that has resulted in two significant discoveries is provided. A method was developed to design pH-oscillators which are capable of operating under close conditions. The batch pH-oscillators are more convenient to use in some proposed applications than the equivalent CSTR variant. A redox oscillator that is new in composition was found. The permanganate oxidation of some amino acids was shown to take place according to oscillatory kinetics in a narrow range of the experimental parameters. The KMnO4 - glycine - Na2HPO4 system represents the first example in the family of manganese based oscillators where amino acids is involved. In the conclusion formal analogies between the simple chemical and some more complicated biological oscillatory phenomena are mentioned and the possibility of modeling periodic processes with the use of information gained from the studies of chemical oscillations is pointed out.

  7. Single polymer dynamics under large amplitude oscillatory extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuecheng; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the conformational dynamics of polymers in time-dependent flows is of key importance for controlling materials properties during processing. Despite this importance, however, it has been challenging to study polymer dynamics in controlled time-dependent or oscillatory extensional flows. In this work, we study the dynamics of single polymers in large-amplitude oscillatory extension (LAOE) using a combination of experiments and Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations. Two-dimensional LAOE flow is generated using a feedback-controlled stagnation point device known as the Stokes trap, thereby generating an oscillatory planar extensional flow with alternating principal axes of extension and compression. Our results show that polymers experience periodic cycles of compression, reorientation, and extension in LAOE, and dynamics are generally governed by a dimensionless flow strength (Weissenberg number Wi) and dimensionless frequency (Deborah number De). Single molecule experiments are compared to BD simulations with and without intramolecular hydrodynamic interactions (HI) and excluded volume (EV) interactions, and good agreement is obtained across a range of parameters. Moreover, transient bulk stress in LAOE is determined from simulations using the Kramers relation, which reveals interesting and unique rheological signatures for this time-dependent flow. We further construct a series of single polymer stretch-flow rate curves (defined as single molecule Lissajous curves) as a function of Wi and De, and we observe qualitatively different dynamic signatures (butterfly, bow tie, arch, and line shapes) across the two-dimensional Pipkin space defined by Wi and De. Finally, polymer dynamics spanning from the linear to nonlinear response regimes are interpreted in the context of accumulated fluid strain in LAOE.

  8. Point spread function of the optical needle super-oscillatory lens

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Tapashree; Rogers, Edward T. F.; Yuan, Guanghui; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2014-06-09

    Super-oscillatory optical lenses are known to achieve sub-wavelength focusing. In this paper, we analyse the imaging capabilities of a super-oscillatory lens by studying its point spread function. We experimentally demonstrate that a super-oscillatory lens can generate a point spread function 24% smaller than that dictated by the diffraction limit and has an effective numerical aperture of 1.31 in air. The object-image linear displacement property of these lenses is also investigated.

  9. Adaptive wavelet-based recognition of oscillatory patterns on electroencephalograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazimov, Alexey I.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Hramov, Alexander E.; Grubov, Vadim V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Sitnikova, Evgenija Y.

    2013-02-01

    The problem of automatic recognition of specific oscillatory patterns on electroencephalograms (EEG) is addressed using the continuous wavelet-transform (CWT). A possibility of improving the quality of recognition by optimizing the choice of CWT parameters is discussed. An adaptive approach is proposed to identify sleep spindles (SS) and spike wave discharges (SWD) that assumes automatic selection of CWT-parameters reflecting the most informative features of the analyzed time-frequency structures. Advantages of the proposed technique over the standard wavelet-based approaches are considered.

  10. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J.-M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guérin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-10-01

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in microgravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed us to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 min. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (i.e., low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exists, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is observed in both

  11. About the oscillatory possibilities of the dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, R.; Pi, F.; Rius, J.; Orriols, G.

    2012-08-01

    This paper may be ultimately described as an attempt to make feasible the evolutionary emergence of novelty in a supposedly deterministic world whose behavior is associated with that of the mathematical dynamical systems. It means philosophical implications that the paper needs to address, subsidiarily at least. The work was motivated by the observation of complex oscillatory behaviors in a family of physical devices and related mathematical models, for which there is no known explanation in the mainstream of nonlinear dynamics. The paper begins by describing a nonlinear mechanism of oscillatory mode mixing explaining such behaviors and, through its generalization to richer nonlinear vector fields, establishes a generic dynamical scenario with extraordinary oscillatory possibilities, including expansive growing scalability toward high dimensionalities and through nonlinear multiplicities. The scenario is then used to tentatively explain complex oscillatory behaviors observed in nature like those of turbulent fluids and living brains. Finally, by considering the scenario as a dynamic substrate underlying generic aspects of both the functioning and the genesis of complex behaviors in a supposedly deterministic world, a theoretical framework covering the evolutionary development of structural transformations in the time evolution of that world is built up. The analysis includes attempts to clarify the roles of items often invoked apropos of pathways to complexity like chaos, pattern formation, externally-driven bifurcations, hysteresis, irreversibility, and order through random fluctuations. Thermodynamics, as the exclusive field of physics in providing generic evolutionary criteria, is briefly and synthetically considered from the dynamical systems point of view by trying to elucidate its explanatory possibilities concerning the emergence of complexity. Quantum mechanics gets involved in two different ways: the lack of a dynamical systems perspective in the currently

  12. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    DOE PAGES

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; ...

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelatedmore » at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global

  13. Parametric oscillatory instability in a signal-recycled LIGO interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Vyatchanin, S P; Strigin, S E

    2007-12-31

    The undesirable effect of parametric oscillatory instability in a LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) laser gravitational-wave antenna with a signal-recirculation mirror is analysed in detail. The instability is manifested in excitation of the Stokes optical mode and elastic mechanical mode of the mirror. It is shown that, if the eigenfrequencies of Fabry-Perot resonators in the interferometer arms are different, the parametric instability is quite small due to a small passband band width. (fifth seminar in memory of d.n. klyshko)

  14. Regulation of oscillatory contraction in insect flight muscle by troponin.

    PubMed

    Krzic, Uros; Rybin, Vladimir; Leonard, Kevin R; Linke, Wolfgang A; Bullard, Belinda

    2010-03-19

    Insect indirect flight muscle is activated by sinusoidal length change, which enables the muscle to work at high frequencies, and contracts isometrically in response to Ca(2+). Indirect flight muscle has two TnC isoforms: F1 binding a single Ca(2+) in the C-domain, and F2 binding Ca(2+) in the N- and C-domains. Fibres substituted with F1 produce delayed force in response to a single rapid stretch, and those with F2 produce isometric force in response to Ca(2+). We have studied the effect of TnC isoforms on oscillatory work. In native Lethocerus indicus fibres, oscillatory work was superimposed on a level of isometric force that depended on Ca(2+) concentration. Maximum work was produced at pCa 6.1; at higher concentrations, work decreased as isometric force increased. In fibres substituted with F1 alone, work continued to rise as Ca(2+) was increased up to pCa 4.7. Fibres substituted with various F1:F2 ratios produced maximal work at a ratio of 100:1 or 50:1; a higher proportion of F2 increased isometric force at the expense of oscillatory work. The F1:F2 ratio was 9.8:1 in native fibres, as measured by immunofluorescence, using isoform-specific antibodies. The small amount of F2 needed to restore work to levels obtained for the native fibre is likely to be due to the relative affinity of F1 and F2 for TnH, the Lethocerus homologue of TnI. Affinity of TnC isoforms for a TnI fragment of TnH was measured by isothermal titration calorimetry. The K(d) was 1.01 muM for F1 binding and 22.7 nM for F2. The higher affinity of F2 can be attributed to two TnH binding sites on F2 and a single site on F1. Stretch may be sensed by an extended C-terminal domain of TnH, resulting in reversible dissociation of the inhibitory sequence from actin during the oscillatory cycle.

  15. Oscillatory behavior in a lattice prey-predator system.

    PubMed

    Lipowski, A

    1999-11-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations we study a lattice model of a prey-predator system. We show that in the three-dimensional model populations of preys and predators exhibit coherent periodic oscillations but such a behavior is absent in lower-dimensional models. Finite-size analysis indicate that amplitude of these oscillations is finite even in the thermodynamic limit. This is an example of a microscopic model with stochastic dynamics which exhibits oscillatory behavior without any external driving force. We suggest that oscillations in our model are induced by some kind of stochastic resonance.

  16. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guerin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is

  17. Symmetric and symplectic ERKN methods for oscillatory Hamiltonian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaoxia; You, Xiong; Shi, Wei; Liu, Zhongli

    2012-01-01

    The ERKN methods proposed by H. Yang et al. [Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 1777] are an important improvement of J.M. Franco's ARKN methods for perturbed oscillators [J.M. Franco, Comput. Phys. Comm. 147 (2002) 770]. This paper focuses on the symmetry and symplecticity conditions for ERKN methods solving oscillatory Hamiltonian systems. Two examples of symmetric and symplectic ERKN (SSERKN) methods of orders two and four respectively are constructed. The phase and stability properties of the new methods are analyzed. The results of numerical experiments show the robustness and competence of the SSERKN methods compared with some well-known methods in the literature.

  18. Oscillatory tank-treading motion of erythrocytes in shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, W. R., III; Dimitrakopoulos, P.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the oscillatory dynamics of the tank-treading motion of healthy human erythrocytes in shear flows with capillary number Ca=O(1) and small to moderate viscosity ratios 0.01⩽⩽1.5. These conditions correspond to a wide range of surrounding medium viscosities (4-600 m Pa s) and shear flow rates (2-560s-1), and match those used in ektacytometry systems. For a given viscosity ratio, as the flow rate increases, the steady-state erythrocyte length L (in the shear plane) increases logarithmically while its depth W (normal to the shear plane) decreases logarithmically. In addition, the flow rate increase dampens the oscillatory erythrocyte inclination but not its length oscillations (which show relative variations of about 5-8%). For a given flow rate, as the viscosity ratio increases, the erythrocyte length L contracts while its depth W increases (i.e., the cell becomes less deformed) with a small decrease in the length variations. The average orientation angle of the erythrocyte shows a significant decrease with the viscosity ratio as does the angle oscillation while the oscillation period increases. These trends continue in higher viscosity ratios resulting eventually in the transition from a (weakly oscillatory) tank-treading motion to a tumbling motion. Our computations show that the erythrocyte width S, which exists in the shear plane, is practically invariant in time, capillary number, and viscosity ratio, and corresponds to a real cell thickness of about 2.5μm. Comparison of our computational results with the predictions of (low degree-of-freedom) theoretical models and experimental findings, suggests that the energy dissipation due to the shape-memory effects is more significant than the energy dissipation due to the membrane viscosity. Our work shows that the oscillatory tank-treading motion can account for more than 50% of the variations found in ektacytometry systems; thus, researchers who wish to study inherent differences

  19. Interhemispheric Synchronization of Oscillatory Neuronal Responses in Cat Visual Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Andreas K.; Konig, Peter; Kreiter, Andreas K.; Singer, Wolf

    1991-05-01

    Neurons in area 17 of cat visual cortex display oscillatory responses that can synchronize across spatially separate columns in a stimulus-specific way. Response synchronization has now been shown to occur also between neurons in area 17 of the right and left cerebral hemispheres. This synchronization was abolished by section of the corpus callosum. Thus, the response synchronization is mediated by corticocortical connections. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that temporal synchrony of neuronal discharges serves to bind features within and between the visual hemifields.

  20. Oscillatory nonhmic current drive for maintaining a plasma current

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method of the invention maintain a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

  1. Oscillatory nonohomic current drive for maintaining a plasma current

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, N.J.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are described for maintaining a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

  2. Oscillatory dynamics in nanocavities with noninstantaneous Kerr response

    SciTech Connect

    Armaroli, Andrea; Malaguti, Stefania; Bellanca, Gaetano; Trillo, Stefano; Rossi, Alfredo de; Combrie, Sylvain

    2011-11-15

    We investigate the impact of a finite response time of Kerr nonlinearities over the onset of spontaneous oscillations (self-pulsing) occurring in a nanocavity. The complete characterization of the underlying Hopf bifurcation in the full parameter space allows us to show the existence of a critical value of the response time and to envisage different regimes of competition with bistability. The transition from a stable oscillatory state to chaos is found to occur only in cavities which are detuned far off-resonance, which turns out to be mutually exclusive with the region where the cavity can operate as a bistable switch.

  3. Translation invariance in a network of oscillatory units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. Ravishankar; Cecchi, Guillermo A.; Peck, Charles C.; Kozloski, James R.

    2006-02-01

    One of the important features of the human visual system is that it is able to recognize objects in a scale and translational invariant manner. However, achieving this desirable behavior through biologically realistic networks is a challenge. The synchronization of neuronal firing patterns has been suggested as a possible solution to the binding problem (where a biological mechanism is sought to explain how features that represent an object can be scattered across a network, and yet be unified). This observation has led to neurons being modeled as oscillatory dynamical units. It is possible for a network of these dynamical units to exhibit synchronized oscillations under the right conditions. These network models have been applied to solve signal deconvolution or blind source separation problems. However, the use of the same network to achieve properties that the visual sytem exhibits, such as scale and translational invariance have not been fully explored. Some approaches investigated in the literature (Wallis, 1996) involve the use of non-oscillatory elements that are arranged in a hierarchy of layers. The objects presented are allowed to move, and the network utilizes a trace learning rule, where a time averaged output value is used to perform Hebbian learning with respect to the input value. This is a modification of the standard Hebbian learning rule, which typically uses instantaneous values of the input and output. In this paper we present a network of oscillatory amplitude-phase units connected in two layers. The types of connections include feedforward, feedback and lateral. The network consists of amplitude-phase units that can exhibit synchronized oscillations. We have previously shown that such a network can segment the components of each input object that most contribute to its classification. Learning is unsupervised and based on a Hebbian update, and the architecture is very simple. We extend the ability of this network to address the problem of

  4. EEG and FMRI coregistration to investigate the cortical oscillatory activities during finger movement.

    PubMed

    Formaggio, Emanuela; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Avesani, Mirko; Cerini, Roberto; Milanese, Franco; Gasparini, Anna; Acler, Michele; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto; Fiaschi, Antonio; Manganotti, Paolo

    2008-12-01

    Electroencephalography combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (EEG-fMRI) may be used to identify blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal changes associated with physiological and pathological EEG event. In this study we used EEG-fMRI to determine the possible correlation between topographical movement-related EEG changes in brain oscillatory activity recorded from EEG electrodes over the scalp and fMRI-BOLD cortical responses in motor areas during finger movement. Thirty-two channels of EEG were recorded in 9 subjects during eyes-open condition inside a 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner using a MR-compatible EEG recording system. Off-line MRI artifact subtraction software was applied to obtain continuous EEG data during fMRI acquisition. For EEG data analysis we used the event-related-synchronization/desynchronization (ERS/ERD) approach to investigate where movement-related decreases in alpha and beta power are located. For image statistical analysis we used a general linear model (GLM) approach. There was a significant correlation between the positive-negative ratio of BOLD signal peaks and ERD values in the electrodes over the region of activation. We conclude that combined EEG-fMRI may be used to investigate movement-related oscillations of the human brain inside an MRI scanner and the movement-related changes in the EMG or EEG signals are useful to identify the brain activation sources responsible for BOLD-signal changes.

  5. From simple to complex patterns of oscillatory behavior in a model for the mammalian cell cycle containing multiple oscillatory circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Claude; Goldbeter, Albert

    2010-12-01

    We previously proposed an integrated computational model for the network of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) that controls the dynamics of the mammalian cell cycle [C. Gérard and A. Goldbeter, "Temporal self-organization of the cyclin/Cdk network driving the mammalian cell cycle," Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 21643 (2009)]. The model contains four Cdk modules regulated by reversible phosphorylation, Cdk inhibitors, protein synthesis or degradation, and the balance between antagonistic effects of the tumor suppressor pRB and the transcription factor E2F. Increasing the level of a growth factor above a critical threshold triggers the transition from a quiescent, stable steady state to self-sustained oscillations in the Cdk network. These oscillations correspond to the repetitive, transient activation of cyclin D/Cdk4-6 in G1, cyclin E/Cdk2 at the G1/S transition, cyclin A/Cdk2 in S and at the S/G2 transition, and cyclin B/Cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This periodic, ordered activation of the various cyclin/Cdk complexes can be associated with cell proliferation. The multiplicity of feedback loops within the Cdk network is such that it contains at least four distinct circuits capable of producing oscillations. The tight coupling of these oscillatory circuits generally results in simple periodic behavior associated with repetitive cycles of mitosis or with endoreplication. The latter corresponds to multiple passages through the phase of DNA replication without mitosis. We show here that, as a result of the interaction between the multiple oscillatory circuits, particularly when attenuating the strength of the oscillatory module involving cyclin B/Cdk1, the model for the Cdk network can also produce complex periodic oscillations, quasiperiodic oscillations, and chaos. Numerical simulations based on limited explorations in parameter space nevertheless suggest that these complex modes of oscillatory behavior remain less common than the evolution to simple periodic

  6. From simple to complex patterns of oscillatory behavior in a model for the mammalian cell cycle containing multiple oscillatory circuits.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Claude; Goldbeter, Albert

    2010-12-01

    We previously proposed an integrated computational model for the network of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) that controls the dynamics of the mammalian cell cycle [C. Gérard and A. Goldbeter, "Temporal self-organization of the cyclin/Cdk network driving the mammalian cell cycle," Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 21643 (2009)]. The model contains four Cdk modules regulated by reversible phosphorylation, Cdk inhibitors, protein synthesis or degradation, and the balance between antagonistic effects of the tumor suppressor pRB and the transcription factor E2F. Increasing the level of a growth factor above a critical threshold triggers the transition from a quiescent, stable steady state to self-sustained oscillations in the Cdk network. These oscillations correspond to the repetitive, transient activation of cyclin D/Cdk4-6 in G1, cyclin E/Cdk2 at the G1/S transition, cyclin A/Cdk2 in S and at the S/G2 transition, and cyclin B/Cdk1 at the G2/M transition. This periodic, ordered activation of the various cyclin/Cdk complexes can be associated with cell proliferation. The multiplicity of feedback loops within the Cdk network is such that it contains at least four distinct circuits capable of producing oscillations. The tight coupling of these oscillatory circuits generally results in simple periodic behavior associated with repetitive cycles of mitosis or with endoreplication. The latter corresponds to multiple passages through the phase of DNA replication without mitosis. We show here that, as a result of the interaction between the multiple oscillatory circuits, particularly when attenuating the strength of the oscillatory module involving cyclin B/Cdk1, the model for the Cdk network can also produce complex periodic oscillations, quasiperiodic oscillations, and chaos. Numerical simulations based on limited explorations in parameter space nevertheless suggest that these complex modes of oscillatory behavior remain less common than the evolution to simple periodic

  7. Frequency-dependent oscillatory neural profiles during imitation.

    PubMed

    Sugata, Hisato; Hirata, Masayuki; Tamura, Yuichi; Onishi, Hisao; Goto, Tetsu; Araki, Toshihiko; Yorifuji, Shiro

    2017-04-10

    Imitation is a complex process that includes higher-order cognitive and motor function. This process requires an observation-execution matching system that transforms an observed action into an identical movement. Although the low-gamma band is thought to reflect higher cognitive processes, no studies have focused on it. Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine the neural oscillatory changes including the low-gamma band during imitation. Twelve healthy, right-handed participants performed a finger task consisting of four conditions (imitation, execution, observation, and rest). During the imitation and execution conditions, significant event-related desynchronizations (ERDs) were observed at the left frontal, central, and parietal MEG sensors in the alpha, beta, and low-gamma bands. Functional connectivity analysis at the sensor level revealed an imitation-related connectivity between a group of frontal sensors and a group of parietal sensors in the low-gamma band. Furthermore, source reconstruction with synthetic aperture magnetometry showed significant ERDs in the low-gamma band in the left sensorimotor area and the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) during the imitation condition when compared with the other three conditions. Our results suggest that the oscillatory neural activities of the low-gamma band at the sensorimotor area and MFG play an important role in the observation-execution matching system related to imitation.

  8. Oscillatory shearing behavior of rocket leaves powder incorporated dough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almusallam, Abdulwahab Salem; Ahmed, Jasim; Nahar, Shamsun; Chacko, Siby

    2016-05-01

    Dough blended with rocket leaves powder was subjected to small and large amplitude oscillatory shears. Small amplitude oscillatory shear data were fitted to a discrete relaxation model of elastic solids and to a critical gel model. The small amplitude relaxation spectrum was thereafter used to calculate the LAOS predictions of various large deformation models. The LAOS theoretical calculations using the Phan-Thien model showed good agreement with the first harmonic stress data, and only qualitative agreement with the third and the fifth harmonic stress values. Lissajous curves showed dissimilarity in shape between the experimental data and Phan-Thien model. The network model of Sim et al. (2003). Did not have the butterfly shape displayed in the Phan-Thien model, but it provided a worse fit to stress harmonics than the Phan-Thien model. An improved damage function was proposed, where time effect on network damage was taken into consideration, and fits to stress harmonics and to Lissajous stress-strain curves were significantly improved.

  9. Emergence of self-organised oscillatory domains in fungal mycelia.

    PubMed

    Tlalka, M; Bebber, D P; Darrah, P R; Watkinson, S C; Fricker, M D

    2007-11-01

    Fungi play a central role in the nutrient cycles of boreal and temperate forests. In these biomes, the saprotrophic wood-decay fungi are the only organisms that can completely decompose woody plant litter. In particular, cord-forming basidiomycete fungi form extensive mycelial networks that scavenge scarce mineral nutrients and translocate them over long distances to exploit new food resources. Despite the importance of resource allocation, there is limited information on nutrient dynamics in these networks, particularly for nitrogen, as there is no suitable radioisotope available. We have mapped N-translocation using photon-counting scintillation imaging of the non-metabolised amino acid analogue, (14)C-aminoisobutyrate. We describe a number of novel phenomena, including rapid, preferential N-resource allocation to C-rich sinks, induction of simultaneous bi-directional N-transport, abrupt switching between different pre-existing transport routes, and emergence of locally synchronised, oscillatory phase domains. It is possible that such self-organised oscillatory behaviour is a mechanism to achieve global co-ordination in the mycelium.

  10. Oscillatory neural networks for robotic yo-yo control.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hui-Liang; Zacksenhouse, M

    2003-01-01

    Different networks of coupled oscillators were developed for open-loop control of periodic motion. However, some tasks, like yo-yo playing, are open-loop unstable and require proper phase locking to stabilize. Given the phase-locking property of coupled oscillators, we investigate their application to closed-loop control of open-loop unstable systems, concentrating on the challenging task of yo-yo control. In particular, we focus on pulse-coupling, where the yo-yo sends a feedback upon reaching the bottom of the string and the onset of the oscillatory cycle is used to trigger the movement. Four networks involving either a stand-alone or a circuit level oscillator with either excitatory or inhibitory couplings are considered. Working curve analysis indicates that three of the networks cannot stabilize the yo-yo. The fourth network, which is based on a circuit-level oscillator, is analyzed using the return map and the region of stability is determined and verified by simulations. The resulting pulse-coupled oscillatory control provides a model-free control strategy that operates with an easy-to-measure low-rate feedback.

  11. In silico evolution of oscillatory dynamics in biochemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Md Zulfikar; Wingreen, Ned S.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2015-03-01

    We are studying in silico evolution of complex, oscillatory network dynamics within the framework of a minimal mutational model of protein-protein interactions. In our model we consider two different types of proteins, kinase (activator) and phosphatase(inhibitor). In our model. each protein can either be phosphorylated(active) or unphospphorylated (inactive), represented by binary strings. Active proteins can modify their target based on the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of chemical equation. Reaction rate constants are directly related to sequence dependent protein-protein interaction energies. This model can be stuided for non-trivial behavior e.g. oscillations, chaos, multiple stable states. We focus here on biochemical oscillators; some questions we will address within our framework include how the oscillatory dynamics depends on number of protein species, connectivity of the network, whether evolution can readily converge on a stable oscillator if we start with random intitial parameters, neutral evolution with additional protein components and general questions of robustness and evolavability.

  12. Bistable flapping of flexible flyers in oscillatory flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yangyang; Kanso, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Biological and bio-inspired flyers move by shape actuation. The direct control of shape variables for locomotory purposes is well studied. Less is known about indirect shape actuation via the fluid medium. Here, we consider a flexible Λ-flyer in oscillatory flow that is free to flap and rotate around its fixed apex. We study its motion in the context of the inviscid vortex sheet model. We first analyze symmetric flapping about the vertical axis of gravity. We find that there is a finite value of the flexibility that maximizes both the flapping amplitude and elastic energy storage. Our results show that rather than resonance, the flyer relies on fluidic effects to optimize these two quantities. We then perturb the flyer away from the vertical and analyze its stability. Four distinct types of rolling behavior are identified: mono-stable, bistable, bistable oscillatory rotations and chaotic dynamics. We categorize these types of behavior in terms of the flyer's and flow parameters. In particular, the transition from mono-stable to bistable behavior occurs at a constant value of the product of the flow amplitude and acceleration. This product can be interpreted as the ratio of fluidic drag to gravity, confirming the fluid role in this transition.

  13. Oscillatory characteristics of metallic nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Ansari, Reza; Darvizeh, Mansour

    2015-12-01

    This study is concerned with the oscillatory behavior of metallic nanoparticles, and in particular silver and gold nanoparticles, inside lipid nanotubes (LNTs) using the continuum approximation along with the 6-12 Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function. The nanoparticle is modeled as a dense sphere and the LNT is assumed to be comprised of six layers including two head groups, two intermediate layers and two tail groups. To evaluate van der Waals (vdW) interactions, analytical expressions are first derived through undertaking surface and volume integrals which are then validated by a fully numerical scheme based on the differential quadrature (DQ) technique. Using the actual force distribution between the two interacting molecules, the equation of motion is directly solved utilizing the Runge-Kutta numerical integration scheme to arrive at the time history of displacement and velocity of the inner core. Also, a semi-analytical expression incorporating both geometrical parameters and initial conditions is introduced for the precise evaluation of oscillation frequency. A comprehensive study is conducted to gain an insight into the influences of nanoparticle radius, LNT length, head and tail group thicknesses and initial conditions on the oscillatory behavior of the metallic nanoparticles inside LNTs. It is found that the escape velocity and oscillation frequency of silver nanoparticles are higher than those of gold ones. It is further shown that the oscillation frequency is less affected by the tail group thickness when compared to the head group thickness.

  14. Frequency-dependent oscillatory neural profiles during imitation

    PubMed Central

    Sugata, Hisato; Hirata, Masayuki; Tamura, Yuichi; Onishi, Hisao; Goto, Tetsu; Araki, Toshihiko; Yorifuji, Shiro

    2017-01-01

    Imitation is a complex process that includes higher-order cognitive and motor function. This process requires an observation-execution matching system that transforms an observed action into an identical movement. Although the low-gamma band is thought to reflect higher cognitive processes, no studies have focused on it. Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine the neural oscillatory changes including the low-gamma band during imitation. Twelve healthy, right-handed participants performed a finger task consisting of four conditions (imitation, execution, observation, and rest). During the imitation and execution conditions, significant event-related desynchronizations (ERDs) were observed at the left frontal, central, and parietal MEG sensors in the alpha, beta, and low-gamma bands. Functional connectivity analysis at the sensor level revealed an imitation-related connectivity between a group of frontal sensors and a group of parietal sensors in the low-gamma band. Furthermore, source reconstruction with synthetic aperture magnetometry showed significant ERDs in the low-gamma band in the left sensorimotor area and the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) during the imitation condition when compared with the other three conditions. Our results suggest that the oscillatory neural activities of the low-gamma band at the sensorimotor area and MFG play an important role in the observation-execution matching system related to imitation. PMID:28393878

  15. Modulation instability of space-periodic oscillatory patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepomnyashchy, Alexander; Shklyaev, Sergey; Oron, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    Pattern selection and stability of regular (periodic in space) regimes is a classical problem with a number of applications in fluid dynamics. For steady bifurcations both competition of perfect periodic patterns and their stability with respect to slow modulations in space (e.g. Eckhaus or zigzag instabilities) are well studied. In contrast, in the case of Hopf bifurcation, usually only selection of patterns that possess a certain symmetry was analyzed (Silber & Knobloch, Nonlinearity, 1991; Roberts et al, Contemp. Math, 1986), whereas the set of Ginzburg-Landau equations was studied only in the one-dimensional case (rolls). Dealing with a wide class of problems, where the longwave oscillatory instability takes place, we consider a stability of regular oscillatory patterns that belong to either square or hexagonal lattices with respect to spatial modulations. By means of the multiple scale expansion, we derive instability criteria valid near the stability threshold. Useful classification of possible perturbations of a regular structure is introduced. As an example, the theory is applied to Marangoni convection in a layer of a binary mixture with the Soret effect. Domains of stability of space-periodic patterns are obtained.

  16. Enhanced Gamma Oscillatory Activity in Rats with Chronic Inflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Jing; Xing, Guo-Gang; Li, Xiaoli; Wan, You

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that oscillatory gamma activity participates in brief acute pain and tonic ongoing pain. It is of great interest to determine whether the gamma activity is involved in chronic pain since chronic pain is a more severe pathological condition characterized by pain persistency. To investigate the oscillatory gamma activity in chronic pain, in the present study, we recorded spontaneous electrocorticogram (ECoG) signals during chronic pain development in rats with chronic inflammatory pain induced by monoarthritis. Power spectrum analysis of ECoG data showed that gamma power increased significantly at the late stage of chronic inflammatory pain. The increased gamma activity occurred mainly at electrodes over primary somatosensory cortices. In rats with chronic pain, the gamma power was positively correlated with the hyperalgesia measured by laser energy that elicited hindpaw withdrawal response. Furthermore, an increased coupling between the amplitude of gamma power and the phase of theta oscillations was observed in chronic inflammatory pain condition. These results indicate an enhanced spontaneous gamma activity in chronic pain and suggest a potential biomarker for the severity of chronic pain. PMID:27847461

  17. Oscillatory fluid flow influences primary cilia and microtubule mechanics.

    PubMed

    Espinha, Lina C; Hoey, David A; Fernandes, Paulo R; Rodrigues, Hélder C; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Many tissues are sensitive to mechanical stimuli; however, the mechanotransduction mechanism used by cells remains unknown in many cases. The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile microtubule-based extension present on nearly every mammalian cell which extends from the basal body. The cilium is a mechanosensitive organelle and has been shown to transduce fluid flow-induced shear stress in tissues, such as the kidney and bone. The majority of microtubules assemble from the mother centriole (basal body), contributing significantly to the anchoring of the primary cilium. Several studies have attempted to quantify the number of microtubules emanating from the basal body and the results vary depending on the cell type. It has also been shown that cellular response to shear stress depends on microtubular integrity. This study hypothesizes that changing the microtubule attachment of primary cilia in response to a mechanical stimulus could change primary cilia mechanics and, possibly, mechanosensitivity. Oscillatory fluid flow was applied to two different cell types and the microtubule attachment to the ciliary base was quantified. For the first time, an increase in microtubules around primary cilia both with time and shear rate in response to oscillatory fluid flow stimulation was demonstrated. Moreover, it is presented that the primary cilium is required for this loading-induced cellular response. This study has demonstrated a new role for the cilium in regulating alterations in the cytoplasmic microtubule network in response to mechanical stimulation, and therefore provides a new insight into how cilia may regulate its mechanics and thus the cells mechanosensitivity.

  18. Closed-loop Separation Control Using Oscillatory Flow Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Raney, David L.; Seifert, Avi; Pack, latunia G.; Brown, Donald E.

    2000-01-01

    Design and implementation of a digital feedback controller for a flow control experiment was performed. The experiment was conducted in a cryogenic pressurized wind tunnel on a generic separated configuration at a chord Reynolds number of 16 million and a Mach number of 0.25. The model simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick airfoil at zero angle-of-attack. A moderate favorable pressure gradient, up to 55% of the chord, is followed by a severe adverse pressure gradient which is relaxed towards the trailing edge. The turbulent separation bubble, behind the adverse pressure gradient, is then reduced by introducing oscillatory flow excitation just upstream of the point of flow separation. The degree of reduction in the separation region can be controlled by the amplitude of the oscillatory excitation. A feedback controller was designed to track a given trajectory for the desired degree of flow reattachment and to improve the transient behavior of the flow system. Closed-loop experiments demonstrated that the feedback controller was able to track step input commands and improve the transient behavior of the open-loop response.

  19. Propulsion of micro-structures in Oscillatory Stokes Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Ikhee; Huang, Yangyang; Zimmerman, Walter; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Drug delivery often necessitates specific site-targeting within the human body. The use of micro and/or nano devices swimming through the bloodstream provides an attractive mechanism for targeted drug targeting, however the design and practical implementation of such devices remain very challenging. Inspired by flapping wings, we construct a two-dimensional wedge-like device, consisting of two links connected by a linear torsional spring and released in an oscillatory Stokes flow. We vary the stiffness and rest angle of the linear spring and the oscillation amplitude and frequency of the background flow to explore the behavior of the device. We find that the device achieves a net displacement, or propulsion, in oscillatory flows even when no elastic energy is stored initially, thus breaking Purcell's scallop's theorem. More importantly, the vehicle tends to align with the background flow under perturbations. We conclude by commenting on how to control the parameters of the device and the fluid to achieve desired behavior of the device. These findings may have significant implications on the design of micro devices in viscous fluids.

  20. Order restricted inference for oscillatory systems for detecting rhythmic signals

    PubMed Central

    Larriba, Yolanda; Rueda, Cristina; Fernández, Miguel A.; Peddada, Shyamal D.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Many biological processes, such as cell cycle, circadian clock, menstrual cycles, are governed by oscillatory systems consisting of numerous components that exhibit rhythmic patterns over time. It is not always easy to identify such rhythmic components. For example, it is a challenging problem to identify circadian genes in a given tissue using time-course gene expression data. There is a great potential for misclassifying non-rhythmic as rhythmic genes and vice versa. This has been a problem of considerable interest in recent years. In this article we develop a constrained inference based methodology called Order Restricted Inference for Oscillatory Systems (ORIOS) to detect rhythmic signals. Instead of using mathematical functions (e.g. sinusoidal) to describe shape of rhythmic signals, ORIOS uses mathematical inequalities. Consequently, it is robust and not limited by the biologist's choice of the mathematical model. We studied the performance of ORIOS using simulated as well as real data obtained from mouse liver, pituitary gland and data from NIH3T3, U2OS cell lines. Our results suggest that, for a broad collection of patterns of gene expression, ORIOS has substantially higher power to detect true rhythmic genes in comparison to some popular methods, while also declaring substantially fewer non-rhythmic genes as rhythmic. Availability and Implementation: A user friendly code implemented in R language can be downloaded from http://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/atniehs/labs/bb/staff/peddada/index.cfm. Contact: peddada@niehs.nih.gov PMID:27596593

  1. Oscillatory correlates of moral decision-making: Effect of personality.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, Gennady G; Savostyanov, Alexander N; Bocharov, Andrey V; Dorosheva, Elena A; Tamozhnikov, Sergey S; Saprigyn, Alexander E

    2016-01-01

    The role of emotion in moral decision-making is still a matter of debate. Greene, Sommerville, Nystrom, Darley, and Cohen (2001) argue that 'personal' moral judgments are driven by emotional responses, while 'impersonal' judgments are largely driven by cognitive processes. In this study, oscillatory correlates of decision-making were compared in moral personal, moral impersonal, and nonmoral conditions, as well as in trials associated with utilitarian (i.e., favoring the 'greater good' over individual rights) and non-utilitarian choices. Event-related synchronization in delta and theta bands was greater in the right temporal lobe in personal than in both nonmoral and impersonal moral condition. Graph-theoretical analysis of connectivity patterns showed the prominent role of the orbitofrontal and cingulate cortices in personal moral decision-making, implying greater emotional and self-processing. Higher conscientiousness and intellect and lower behavioral activation were associated with greater difference in oscillatory responses between utilitarian and non-utilitarian choices in personal than in impersonal condition, indicating that sensitivity to moral issues and the ability to grasp the nuances of moral situation are essential for understanding the implications of utilitarian choices in personal and impersonal conditions.

  2. Constitutive sensitivity of the oscillatory behaviour of hyperelastic cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda-Iglesias, D.; Vadillo, G.; Rodríguez-Martínez, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Free and forced nonlinear radial oscillations of a thick-walled cylindrical shell are investigated. The shell material is taken to be incompressible and isotropic within the framework of finite nonlinear elasticity. In comparison with previous seminal works dealing with the dynamic behaviour of hyperelastic cylindrical tubes, in this paper we have developed a broader analysis on the constitutive sensitivity of the oscillatory response of the shell. In this regard, our investigation is inspired by the recent works of Bucchi and Hearn (2013) [28,29], who carried out a constitutive sensitivity analysis of similar problem with hyperelastic cylindrical membranes subjected to static inflation. In the present paper we consider two different Helmholtz free-energy functions to describe the material behaviour: Mooney-Rivlin and Yeoh constitutive models. We carry out a systematic comparison of the results obtained by application of both constitutive models, paying specific attention to the critical initial and loading conditions which preclude the oscillatory response of the cylindrical tube. It has been found that these critical conditions are strongly dependent on the specific constitutive model selected, even though both Helmholtz free-energy functions were calibrated using the same experimental data.

  3. VINETA II: A linear magnetic reconnection experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, H. Von Stechow, A.; Rahbarnia, K.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.

    2014-02-15

    A linear experiment dedicated to the study of driven magnetic reconnection is presented. The new device (VINETA II) is suitable for investigating both collisional and near collisionless reconnection. Reconnection is achieved by externally driving magnetic field lines towards an X-point, inducing a current in the background plasma which consequently modifies the magnetic field topology. Owing to the open field line configuration of the experiment, the current is limited by the axial sheath boundary conditions. A plasma gun is used as an additional electron source in order to counterbalance the charge separation effects and supply the required current. Two drive methods are used in the device. First, an oscillating current through two parallel conductors drive the reconnection. Second, a stationary X-point topology is formed by the parallel conductors, and the drive is achieved by an oscillating current through a third conductor. In the first setup, the magnetic field of the axial plasma current dominates the field topology near the X-point throughout most of the drive. The second setup allows for the amplitude of the plasma current as well as the motion of the flux to be set independently of the X-point topology of the parallel conductors.

  4. Quasi-oscillatory dynamics observed in ascending phase of the flare on March 6, 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philishvili, E.; Shergelashvili, B. M.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Kukhianidze, V.; Ramishvili, G.; Khodachenko, M.; Poedts, S.; De Causmaecker, P.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The dynamics of the flaring loops in active region (AR) 11429 are studied. The observed dynamics consist of several evolution stages of the flaring loop system during both the ascending and descending phases of the registered M-class flare. The dynamical properties can also be classified by different types of magnetic reconnection, related plasma ejection and aperiodic flows, quasi-periodic oscillatory motions, and rapid temperature and density changes, among others. The focus of the present paper is on a specific time interval during the ascending (pre-flare) phase. Aims: The goal is to understand the quasi-periodic behavior in both space and time of the magnetic loop structures during the considered time interval. Methods: We have studied the characteristic location, motion, and periodicity properties of the flaring loops by examining space-time diagrams and intensity variation analysis along the coronal magnetic loops using AIA intensity and HMI magnetogram images (from the Solar Dynamics Observatory). Results: We detected bright plasma blobs along the coronal loop during the ascending phase of the solar flare, the intensity variations of which clearly show quasi-periodic behavior. We also determined the periods of these oscillations. Conclusions: Two different interpretations are presented for the observed dynamics. Firstly, the oscillations are interpreted as the manifestation of non-fundamental harmonics of longitudinal standing acoustic oscillations driven by the thermodynamically non-equilibrium background (with time variable density and temperature). The second possible interpretation we provide is that the observed bright blobs could be a signature of a strongly twisted coronal loop that is kink unstable.

  5. Amplitude sorting of oscillatory burst signals by sampling

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas J.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for amplitude sorting of oscillatory burst signals is described in which the burst signal is detected to produce a burst envelope signal and an intermediate or midportion of such envelope signal is sampled to provide a sample pulse output. The height of the sample pulse is proportional to the amplitude of the envelope signal and to the maximum burst signal amplitude. The sample pulses are fed to a pulse height analyzer for sorting. The present invention is used in an acoustic emission testing system to convert the amplitude of the acoustic emission burst signals into sample pulse heights which are measured by a pulse height analyzer for sorting the pulses in groups according to their height in order to identify the material anomalies in the test material which emit the acoustic signals.

  6. Collective Decision-Making and Oscillatory Behaviors in Cell Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Koichi; Sawai, Satoshi

    2013-12-01

    Many examples of oscillations are known in multicellular dynamics, however how properties of individual cells can account for the collective rhythmic behaviors at the tissue level remain elusive. Recently, studies in chemical reactions, synthetic gene circuits, yeast and social amoeba Dictyostelium have greatly enhanced our understanding of collective oscillations in cell populations. From these relatively simple systems, a unified view of how excitable and oscillatory regulations could be tuned and coupled to give rise to tissue-level oscillations is emerging. This chapter reviews recent progress in these and other experimental systems and highlight similarities and differences. We will show how group-level information can be encoded in the oscillations depending on degree of autonomy of single cells and discuss some of their possible biological roles.

  7. Oscillatory athermal quasistatic deformation of a model glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiocco, Davide; Foffi, Giuseppe; Sastry, Srikanth

    2013-08-01

    We report computer simulations of oscillatory athermal quasistatic shear deformation of dense amorphous samples of a three-dimensional model glass former. A dynamical transition is observed as the amplitude of the deformation is varied: For large values of the amplitude the system exhibits diffusive behavior and loss of memory of the initial conditions, whereas localization is observed for small amplitudes. Our results suggest that the same kind of transition found in driven colloidal systems is present in the case of amorphous solids (e.g., metallic glasses). The onset of the transition is shown to be related to the onset of energy dissipation. Shear banding is observed for large system sizes, without, however, affecting qualitative aspects of the transition.

  8. Mathematical Frameworks for Oscillatory Network Dynamics in Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Ashwin, Peter; Coombes, Stephen; Nicks, Rachel

    2016-12-01

    The tools of weakly coupled phase oscillator theory have had a profound impact on the neuroscience community, providing insight into a variety of network behaviours ranging from central pattern generation to synchronisation, as well as predicting novel network states such as chimeras. However, there are many instances where this theory is expected to break down, say in the presence of strong coupling, or must be carefully interpreted, as in the presence of stochastic forcing. There are also surprises in the dynamical complexity of the attractors that can robustly appear-for example, heteroclinic network attractors. In this review we present a set of mathematical tools that are suitable for addressing the dynamics of oscillatory neural networks, broadening from a standard phase oscillator perspective to provide a practical framework for further successful applications of mathematics to understanding network dynamics in neuroscience.

  9. The yielding transition in amorphous solids under oscillatory shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leishangthem, Premkumar; Parmar, Anshul D. S.; Sastry, Srikanth

    2017-03-01

    Amorphous solids are ubiquitous among natural and man-made materials. Often used as structural materials for their attractive mechanical properties, their utility depends critically on their response to applied stresses. Processes underlying such mechanical response, and in particular the yielding behaviour of amorphous solids, are not satisfactorily understood. Although studied extensively, observed yielding behaviour can be gradual and depend significantly on conditions of study, making it difficult to convincingly validate existing theoretical descriptions of a sharp yielding transition. Here we employ oscillatory deformation as a reliable probe of the yielding transition. Through extensive computer simulations for a wide range of system sizes, we demonstrate that cyclically deformed model glasses exhibit a sharply defined yielding transition with characteristics that are independent of preparation history. In contrast to prevailing expectations, the statistics of avalanches reveals no signature of the impending transition, but exhibit dramatic, qualitative, changes in character across the transition.

  10. Quantum oscillatory exciton migration in photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramavicius, Darius; Mukamel, Shaul

    2010-08-01

    The harvesting of solar energy and its conversion to chemical energy is essential for all forms of life. The primary photon absorption, transport, and charge separation events, which trigger a chain of chemical reactions, take place in membrane-bound photosynthetic complexes. Whether quantum effects, stemming from entanglement of chromophores, persist in the energy transport at room temperature, despite the rapid decoherence effects caused by environment fluctuations, is under current active debate. If confirmed, these may explain the high efficiency of light harvesting and open up numerous applications to quantum computing and information processing. We present simulations of the photosynthetic reaction center of photosystem II that clearly establish oscillatory energy transport at room temperature originating from interference of quantum pathways. These signatures of quantum transport may be observed by two dimensional coherent optical spectroscopy.

  11. Minimum energy paths for optimal oscillatory movements of PUMA arm

    SciTech Connect

    Olgac, N.; Zhou, S.

    1988-08-01

    This paper employs a geometric approach in reducing the number of time-consuming iterations necessary for the numerical solution of an optimal energy consumption problem for small amplitude oscillatory motions of robot manipulators. A general objective function in joint space is given for the energy needs in the drives, and specific applications for a commercially available manipulator, Unimation-PUMA 560, are carried out by separating the manipulator motions into two parallel segments: arm and wrist. This process, in general, leads to a highly nonlinear and transcendental optimization problem. The geometric study is presented, and the shortened numerical optimization is carried out. For any given point in the workspace, optimal directions of oscillations and their corresponding energy levels are found. This information is translated into a map of minimum energy levels across the workspace. The map will comprise a section of an intelligent control mechanism of larger scope which is conceived for ultimate use in space and subsea robotic operations. 6 references.

  12. Reversible plastic events during oscillatory deformation of amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Priezjev, Nikolai V

    2016-01-01

    The effect of oscillatory shear strain on nonaffine rearrangements of individual particles in a three-dimensional binary glass is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The amorphous material is represented by the Kob-Andersen mixture at the temperature well below the glass transition. We find that during periodic shear deformation of the material, some particles undergo reversible nonaffine displacements with amplitudes that are approximately power-law distributed. Our simulations show that particles with large amplitudes of nonaffine displacement exhibit a collective behavior; namely, they tend to aggregate into relatively compact clusters that become comparable with the system size near the yield strain. Along with reversible displacements there exist a number of irreversible ones. With increasing strain amplitude, the probability of irreversible displacements during one cycle increases, which leads to permanent structural relaxation of the material.

  13. The yielding transition in amorphous solids under oscillatory shear deformation

    PubMed Central

    Leishangthem, Premkumar; Parmar, Anshul D. S.; Sastry, Srikanth

    2017-01-01

    Amorphous solids are ubiquitous among natural and man-made materials. Often used as structural materials for their attractive mechanical properties, their utility depends critically on their response to applied stresses. Processes underlying such mechanical response, and in particular the yielding behaviour of amorphous solids, are not satisfactorily understood. Although studied extensively, observed yielding behaviour can be gradual and depend significantly on conditions of study, making it difficult to convincingly validate existing theoretical descriptions of a sharp yielding transition. Here we employ oscillatory deformation as a reliable probe of the yielding transition. Through extensive computer simulations for a wide range of system sizes, we demonstrate that cyclically deformed model glasses exhibit a sharply defined yielding transition with characteristics that are independent of preparation history. In contrast to prevailing expectations, the statistics of avalanches reveals no signature of the impending transition, but exhibit dramatic, qualitative, changes in character across the transition. PMID:28248289

  14. Oscillatory enzyme reactions and Michaelis-Menten kinetics.

    PubMed

    Goldbeter, Albert

    2013-09-02

    Oscillations occur in a number of enzymatic systems as a result of feedback regulation. How Michaelis-Menten kinetics influences oscillatory behavior in enzyme systems is investigated in models for oscillations in the activity of phosphofructokinase (PFK) in glycolysis and of cyclin-dependent kinases in the cell cycle. The model for the PFK reaction is based on a product-activated allosteric enzyme reaction coupled to enzymatic degradation of the reaction product. The Michaelian nature of the product decay term markedly influences the period, amplitude and waveform of the oscillations. Likewise, a model for oscillations of Cdc2 kinase in embryonic cell cycles based on Michaelis-Menten phosphorylation-dephosphorylation kinetics shows that the occurrence and amplitude of the oscillations strongly depend on the ultrasensitivity of the enzymatic cascade that controls the activity of the cyclin-dependent kinase.

  15. Cellular-based modeling of oscillatory dynamics in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Frances K

    2012-08-01

    Oscillatory, population activities have long been known to occur in our brains during different behavioral states. We know that many different cell types exist and that they contribute in distinct ways to the generation of these activities. I review recent papers that involve cellular-based models of brain networks, most of which include theta, gamma and sharp wave-ripple activities. To help organize the modeling work, I present it from a perspective of three different types of cellular-based modeling: 'Generic', 'Biophysical' and 'Linking'. Cellular-based modeling is taken to encompass the four features of experiment, model development, theory/analyses, and model usage/computation. The three modeling types are shown to include these features and interactions in different ways.

  16. Quantum oscillatory exciton migration in photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Abramavicius, Darius; Mukamel, Shaul

    2010-08-14

    The harvesting of solar energy and its conversion to chemical energy is essential for all forms of life. The primary photon absorption, transport, and charge separation events, which trigger a chain of chemical reactions, take place in membrane-bound photosynthetic complexes. Whether quantum effects, stemming from entanglement of chromophores, persist in the energy transport at room temperature, despite the rapid decoherence effects caused by environment fluctuations, is under current active debate. If confirmed, these may explain the high efficiency of light harvesting and open up numerous applications to quantum computing and information processing. We present simulations of the photosynthetic reaction center of photosystem II that clearly establish oscillatory energy transport at room temperature originating from interference of quantum pathways. These signatures of quantum transport may be observed by two dimensional coherent optical spectroscopy.

  17. Multigrid methods for differential equations with highly oscillatory coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engquist, Bjorn; Luo, Erding

    1993-01-01

    New coarse grid multigrid operators for problems with highly oscillatory coefficients are developed. These types of operators are necessary when the characters of the differential equations on coarser grids or longer wavelengths are different from that on the fine grid. Elliptic problems for composite materials and different classes of hyperbolic problems are practical examples. The new coarse grid operators can be constructed directly based on the homogenized differential operators or hierarchically computed from the finest grid. Convergence analysis based on the homogenization theory is given for elliptic problems with periodic coefficients and some hyperbolic problems. These are classes of equations for which there exists a fairly complete theory for the interaction between shorter and longer wavelengths in the problems. Numerical examples are presented.

  18. Waves spontaneously generated by heterogeneity in oscillatory media

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaohua; Huang, Xiaodong; Hu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Wave propagation is an important characteristic for pattern formation and pattern dynamics. To date, various waves in homogeneous media have been investigated extensively and have been understood to a great extent. However, the wave behaviors in heterogeneous media have been studied and understood much less. In this work, we investigate waves that are spontaneously generated in one-dimensional heterogeneous oscillatory media governed by complex Ginzburg-Landau equations; the heterogeneity is modeled by multiple interacting homogeneous media with different system control parameters. Rich behaviors can be observed by varying the control parameters of the systems, whereas the behavior is incomparably simple in the homogeneous cases. These diverse behaviors can be fully understood and physically explained well based on three aspects: dispersion relation curves, driving-response relations, and wave competition rules in homogeneous systems. Possible applications of heterogeneity-generated waves are anticipated. PMID:27142730

  19. Oscillatory Flows Induced by Swimming Microorganisms in Two-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Johnson, Karl A.; Gollub, J. P.

    2010-11-01

    We present the first time-resolved measurements of the oscillatory velocity field induced by swimming unicellular microorganisms. Confinement of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in stabilized thin liquid films allows simultaneous tracking of cells and tracer particles. The phase-resolved velocity field reveals complex time-dependent flow structures, which evolve throughout the beat cycle of the organism, and the fluid velocity scales inversely with distance. The instantaneous mechanical power generated by the cells is measured from the velocity fields via the viscous dissipation and scales with the square of the swimmer speed. The peak power is about 15 fW, and the dissipation per cycle is more than four times what steady swimming would require. These observations carry important implications for the interpretation and modeling of transport processes, locomotion, and flagellar mechanics.

  20. Effectiveness of oscillatory gutter brushes in removing street sweeping waste.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Useche, Libardo V; Abdel-Wahab, Magd M; Parker, Graham A

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the novel concept of oscillatory gutter brushes of road sweepers is studied experimentally. Their effectiveness in removing different debris types is studied by means of a brushing test rig. The debris types dealt with are medium-size gravel, small and fine particles, wet thin debris, and compacted debris. The performance of two types of brushes, cutting and F128, under diverse operating conditions is investigated. The purpose of the tests is to ascertain whether brush oscillations superimposed onto brush rotation improve sweeping effectiveness. According to the results, brush oscillations seem to be useful for increasing brushing effectiveness in the case of bonded particles and wet thin debris, especially for bonded debris, but they seem to be of no value for other loosed debris. Also, appropriate values of brush penetration, sweeper speed, brush angle of attack, rotational speed, and frequency of brush speed oscillations, for the debris types studied are provided.

  1. Carreau model for oscillatory blood flow in a tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakova, S.; Nikolova, E.; Radev, St.

    2014-11-01

    The analysis of the blood flow dynamics (hemodynamics) in tubes is crucial when investigating the rupture of different types of aneurysms. The blood viscosity nonlinear dependence on the flow shear rate creates complicated manifestations of the blood pulsations. Although a great number of studies exists, experimental and numerical, this phenomenon is still not very well understood. The aim of the present work is to propose a numerical model of the oscillatory blood flow in a tube on the basis of the Carreau model of the blood viscosity (nonlinear model with respect to the shear rate). The obtained results for the flow velocity and tangential stress on the tube wall are compared well with other authors' results.

  2. Oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    T'Ien, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis has been performed for oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag. The gaseous flame is assumed to be premixed and laminar with a one-step overall chemical reaction. The propellant is assumed to decompose according to the Arrenhius Law, with no condensed phase reaction. With this model, strong gas phase resonance has been found in certain cases at the characteristic gas-phase frequencies, but the peaking of the acoustic admittance is in the direction favoring the damping of pressure waves. At still higher frequencies, moderate wave-amplifying ability was found. The limit of low frequency response obtained previously by Denison and Baum was recovered, and the limitations of the quasi-steady theory were investigated.

  3. Extracting Independent Local Oscillatory Geophysical Signals by Geodetic Tropospheric Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botai, O. J.; Combrinck, L.; Sivakumar, V.; Schuh, H.; Bohm, J.

    2010-01-01

    Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) due to water vapor derived from space geodetic techniques and numerical weather prediction simulated-reanalysis data exhibits non-linear and non-stationary properties akin to those in the crucial geophysical signals of interest to the research community. These time series, once decomposed into additive (and stochastic) components, have information about the long term global change (the trend) and other interpretable (quasi-) periodic components such as seasonal cycles and noise. Such stochastic component(s) could be a function that exhibits at most one extremum within a data span or a monotonic function within a certain temporal span. In this contribution, we examine the use of the combined Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA): the EEMD-ICA algorithm to extract the independent local oscillatory stochastic components in the tropospheric delay derived from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) over six geodetic sites (HartRAO, Hobart26, Wettzell, Gilcreek, Westford, and Tsukub32). The proposed methodology allows independent geophysical processes to be extracted and assessed. Analysis of the quality index of the Independent Components (ICs) derived for each cluster of local oscillatory components (also called the Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs)) for all the geodetic stations considered in the study demonstrate that they are strongly site dependent. Such strong dependency seems to suggest that the localized geophysical signals embedded in the ZTD over the geodetic sites are not correlated. Further, from the viewpoint of non-linear dynamical systems, four geophysical signals the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) index derived from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis, the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) anomaly from NCEP, the SIDC monthly Sun Spot Number (SSN), and the Length of Day (LoD) are linked to the extracted signal components from ZTD. Results from the synchronization

  4. Bicycling and Walking are Associated with Different Cortical Oscillatory Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Storzer, Lena; Butz, Markus; Hirschmann, Jan; Abbasi, Omid; Gratkowski, Maciej; Saupe, Dietmar; Schnitzler, Alfons; Dalal, Sarang S.

    2016-01-01

    Although bicycling and walking involve similar complex coordinated movements, surprisingly Parkinson’s patients with freezing of gait typically remain able to bicycle despite severe difficulties in walking. This observation suggests functional differences in the motor networks subserving bicycling and walking. However, a direct comparison of brain activity related to bicycling and walking has never been performed, neither in healthy participants nor in patients. Such a comparison could potentially help elucidating the cortical involvement in motor control and the mechanisms through which bicycling ability may be preserved in patients with freezing of gait. The aim of this study was to contrast the cortical oscillatory dynamics involved in bicycling and walking in healthy participants. To this end, EEG and EMG data of 14 healthy participants were analyzed, who cycled on a stationary bicycle at a slow cadence of 40 revolutions per minute (rpm) and walked at 40 strides per minute (spm), respectively. Relative to walking, bicycling was associated with a stronger power decrease in the high beta band (23–35 Hz) during movement initiation and execution, followed by a stronger beta power increase after movement termination. Walking, on the other hand, was characterized by a stronger and persisting alpha power (8–12 Hz) decrease. Both bicycling and walking exhibited movement cycle-dependent power modulation in the 24–40 Hz range that was correlated with EMG activity. This modulation was significantly stronger in walking. The present findings reveal differential cortical oscillatory dynamics in motor control for two types of complex coordinated motor behavior, i.e., bicycling and walking. Bicycling was associated with a stronger sustained cortical activation as indicated by the stronger high beta power decrease during movement execution and less cortical motor control within the movement cycle. We speculate this to be due to the more continuous nature of bicycling

  5. Oscillatory Flow in Curved and Straight Tubes: Transport and Transition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckmann, David Matthew

    Transport of soluble material is analyzed for volume-cycled oscillatory flow in a curved tube. The Navier -Stokes equations of motion are solved using a regular perturbation method for small ratio of tube radius to radius of curvature and order unity amplitude over a range of the Womersley parameter. A stream function definition of the lateral velocities is defined to satisfy the conservation of mass equation exactly. A pressure-gradient amplitude is specified to satisfy the fluid volume-cycling constraint imposed. Axial velocity profiles and cross-sectional steady streaming velocity profiles are compared to previous theories and experiments. The convection-diffusion transport equation is similarly solved by a regular perturbation scheme where uniform steady end concentrations and no wall flux are assumed. The time-average axial transport, consisting of the diffusive and convective flux of solute is calculated. There is substantial modification of transport compared to the straight tube case and the results are interpreted with respect to pulmonary gas exchange. A Laser Doppler Anemometer is used to analyze volume-cycled oscillatory flow of a Newtonian viscous fluid in a straight circular tube. The working fluid is chosen to match index of refraction with the Plexiglas test section. The axial velocity is measured at radial positions across the diameter of the tube for a wide range of amplitude A = stroke distance/tube radius (2.4 <=q A <=q 21.6) and Womersley parameter (9 < alpha < 33). Transition to turbulence is detected during the decelerating phase of fluid motion for 500 < R_delta < 875, where R_delta = alphaAsurd2 is the Reynolds number based on Stokes layer thickness. This instability is confined to the viscous boundary layer and does not appear in the inviscid core as reported by previous investigators, unless a source of vorticity such as a hot -wire anemometer probe is resident in the flow.

  6. Oscillatory Fluid Flow Influences Primary Cilia and Microtubule Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Espinha, Lina C.; Hoey, David A.; Fernandes, Paulo R.; Rodrigues, Hélder C.; Jacobs, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    Many tissues are sensitive to mechanical stimuli; however, the mechanotransduction mechanism used by cells remains unknown in many cases. The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile microtubule-based extension present on nearly every mammalian cell which extends from the basal body. The cilium is a mechanosensitive organelle and has been shown to transduce fluid flow-induced shear stress in tissues such as the kidney and bone. The majority of microtubules assemble from the mother centriole (basal body), contributing significantly to the anchoring of the primary cilium. Several studies have attempted to quantify the number of microtubules emanating from the basal body and the results vary depending on the cell type. It has also been shown that cellular response to shear stress depends on microtubular integrity. This study hypothesizes that changing the microtubule attachment of primary cilia in response to a mechanical stimulus could change primary cilia mechanics and, possibly, mechanosensitivity. Oscillatory fluid flow was applied to two different cell types and the microtubule attachment to the ciliary base was quantified. For the first time, an increase in microtubules around primary cilia both with time and shear rate in response to oscillatory fluid flow stimulation was demonstrated. Moreover, it is presented that the primary cilium is required for this loading-induced cellular response. This study has demonstrated a new role for the cilium in regulating alterations in the cytoplasmic microtubule network in response to mechanical stimulation, and therefore provides a new insight into how cilia may regulate its mechanics and thus the cells mechanosensitivity. PMID:25044764

  7. Planar super-oscillatory lens for sub-diffraction optical needles at violet wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guanghui; Rogers, Edward T. F.; Roy, Tapashree; Adamo, Giorgio; Shen, Zexiang; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2014-01-01

    Planar optical lenses are fundamental elements of miniaturized photonic devices. However, conventional planar optical lenses are constrained by the diffraction limit in the optical far-field due to the band-limited wavevectors supported by free-space and loss of high-spatial-frequency evanescent components. As inspired by Einstein's radiation ‘needle stick', electromagnetic energy can be delivered into an arbitrarily small solid angle. Such sub-diffraction optical needles have been numerically investigated using diffractive optical elements (DOEs) together with specially polarized optical beams, but experimental demonstration is extremely difficult due to the bulky size of DOEs and the required alignment precision. Planar super-oscillatory lenses (SOLs) were proposed to overcome these constraints and demonstrated that sub-diffraction focal spots can actually be formed without any evanescent waves, making far-field, label-free super-resolution imaging possible. Here we extend the super-oscillation concept into the vectorial-field regime to work with circularly polarized light, and experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a circularly polarized optical needle with sub-diffraction transverse spot size (0.45λ) and axial long depth of focus (DOF) of 15λ using a planar SOL at a violet wavelength of 405 nm. This sub-diffraction circularly polarized optical needle has potential applications in circular dichroism spectroscopy, super-resolution imaging, high-density optical storage, heat-assisted magnetic recording, nano-manufacturing and nano-metrology. PMID:25208611

  8. Dopaminergic modulation and rod contribution in the generation of oscillatory potentials in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Perry, B; George, J S

    2007-02-01

    The roles of rod and cone input and of dopamine in the generation of oscillatory potentials were studied in tiger salamander retina. Under scotopic conditions, oscillations were elicited with a green, but not a red stimulus. With mesopic background illumination, both stimuli caused oscillations. Addition of quinpirole to a mesopic retina eliminated oscillations while SKF-38393 had no effect. Similarly, addition of sulpiride to a light-adapted retina elicited oscillatory activity, but SCH 22390 had no effect. These results suggest that oscillatory potentials are elicited through activation of the rod pathway and are modulated by dopamine through D2-receptors.

  9. Dynamic Characteristics Analysis of Two-DOF Oscillatory Actuator and Experimental Verification of Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamichi, Yoshimoto; Hirata, Katsuhiro; Asai, Yasuyoshi; Ueyama, Kenji; Hashimoto, Eiichiro; Takagi, Takahiro

    Recently, linear oscillatory actuators have been used in a wide range of applications. In particular, small linear oscillatory actuators are expected to be applied to haptic devices by extension to multi-degree-of-freedom motion with an arbitrary acceleration. In this paper, we propose a compact two-DOF oscillatory actuator that can move in various directions on the plane. The static and dynamic characteristics of the actuator are determined by the 3-D finite element method. The effectiveness of this method is shown through a comparison of the obtained results with the experimental results of a prototype.

  10. Thermal oscillatory behavior analysis and dynamic modulation of refractive index in microspherical resonator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanlong; Wang, Yue; Guo, Zhen; Wu, Junfeng; Wu, Yihui

    2015-04-01

    The thermal nonlinear effects in whispering-gallery-mode resonators are characterized by oscillatory behavior in the transmission spectrum. Although the thermal linewidth broadening is proven to be practical in mode-locking and dynamic control of the optical path, the oscillatory behavior always leads to instability of mode-locking and influences the control accuracy. We theoretically and experimentally illustrate the thermal oscillatory behavior using a model that combines slow and fast thermal relaxation processes of the microsphere and fluctuations of the pump wavelength. We also report dynamic modulation of the refractive index based on the fast thermal relaxation process.

  11. Tuning PID controllers for higher-order oscillatory systems with improved performance.

    PubMed

    Malwatkar, G M; Sonawane, S H; Waghmare, L M

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, model based design of PID controllers is proposed for higher-order oscillatory systems. The proposed method has no limitations regarding systems order, time delays and oscillatory behavior. The reduced model is achieved based on third-order modeling and selection of coefficients through the use of frequency responses. The tuning of the PID parameters are obtained from a reduced third-order model; the procedure seems to be simple and effective, and improved performance of the overall system can be achieved. Three simulation examples and one real-time experiment are included to demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed method to systems with oscillatory behavior.

  12. Localized electron heating by strong guide-field magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuehan; Inomoto, Michiaki; Sugawara, Takumichi; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ushiki, Tomohiko; Ono, Yasushi

    2015-10-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in the University of Tokyo Spherical Tokamak experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system is documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. Shape of the high electron temperature area does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et.jt . If we include a guide-field effect term Bt/(Bp+αBt) for Et.jt , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point.

  13. Early History of Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, N. F.

    1999-06-01

    The early history of magnetic resonance to around 1950 is discussed from the point of view of a participant in it. I. I. Rabi's theory of space quantization in a gyrating magnetic field and his molecular beam experiments in the 1930s laid the foundation of the magnetic resonance method, which he and his associates subsequently pursued and developed further at Columbia University, leading eventually to the development of NMR after World War II and the invention of the separated oscillatory fields method in 1950.

  14. Positive expiratory pressure and oscillatory positive expiratory pressure therapies.

    PubMed

    Myers, Timothy R

    2007-10-01

    Airway clearance techniques, historically referred to as chest physical therapy, have traditionally consisted of a variety of breathing maneuvers or exercises and manual percussion and postural drainage. The methods and types of airway clearance techniques and devices have rapidly increased in an effort to find a more efficacious strategy that allows for self-therapy, better patient adherence and compliance, and more efficient durations of care. Mechanically applied pressure devices have migrated from European countries over the last several decades to clinical practice in the United States. I conducted a comprehensive MEDLINE search of two such devices: positive expiratory pressure (PEP) and oscillatory positive expiratory pressure (OPEP) and their role in airway clearance strategies. This was followed by a comprehensive search for cross-references in an attempt to identify additional studies. The results of that search are contained and reported in this review. From a methods standpoint, most of the studies of PEP and OPEP for airway clearance are limited by crossover designs and small sample sizes. While PEP and OPEP do not definitively prove superiority to other methods of airway clearance strategies, there is no clear evidence that they are inferior. Ultimately, the correct choice may be an airway clearance strategy that is clinically and cost effective, and is preferred by the patient so that adherence and compliance can be at the very least supported.

  15. Non-exponential and oscillatory decays in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Peshkin, Murray; Volya, Alexander; Zelevinsky, Vladimir

    2014-08-07

    The quantum-mechanical theory of the decay of unstable states is revisited. We show that the decay is non-exponential both in the short-time and long-time limits using a more physical definition of the decay rate than the one usually used. We report results of numerical studies based on Winter's model that may elucidate qualitative features of exponential and non-exponential decay more generally. The main exponential stage is related to the formation of a radiating state that maintains the shape of its wave function with exponentially diminishing normalization. We discuss situations where the radioactive decay displays several exponents. The transient stages between different regimes are typically accompanied by interference of various contributions and resulting oscillations in the decay curve. The decay curve can be fully oscillatory in a two-flavor generalization of Winter's model with some values of the parameters. We consider the implications of that result for models of the oscillations reported by GSI.

  16. A fundamental oscillatory state of isolated rodent hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chiping; Shen, Hui; Luk, Wah Ping; Zhang, Liang

    2002-04-15

    Population neuronal rhythms of various frequencies are observed in the rodent hippocampus during distinct behavioural states. However, the question of whether the hippocampus exhibits properties of spontaneous rhythms and population synchrony in isolation has not been definitively answered. To address this, we developed a novel preparation for studying neuronal rhythms in a relatively large hippocampal tissue in vitro. We isolated the whole hippocampus from mice up to 28 days postnatal age, removing the dentate gyrus while preserving the functional CA3-to-CA1 connections. Placing the hippocampal isolate in a perfusion chamber for electrophysiological assessment extracellular recordings from the CA1 revealed rhythmic field potential of 0.5 to oscillatory state of the hippocampal circuitry isolated from extra-hippocampal inputs.

  17. Dopamine depresses cholinergic oscillatory network activity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Torsten; Veh, Rüdiger W; Heinemann, Uwe

    2003-11-01

    The dopaminergic neuronal system is implicated in cognitive processes in a variety of brain regions including the mesolimbic system. We have investigated whether dopamine also affects synchronized network activity in the hippocampus, which has been ascribed to play a pivotal role in memory formation. Gamma frequency (20-80 Hz) oscillations were induced by the cholinergic agonist carbachol. Oscillatory activity was examined in area CA3 of Wistar rat hippocampal slices, employing field potential and intracellular recordings. Application of carbachol initiated synchronized population activity in the gamma band at 40 Hz. Induced gamma activity persisted over hours and required GABAA receptors. Dopamine reversibly decreased the integrated gamma band power of the carbachol rhythm by 62%, while its frequency was not changed. By contrast, individual pyramidal cells recorded during carbachol-induced field gamma activity exhibited theta frequency (5-15 Hz) membrane potential oscillations that were not altered by dopamine. The dopamine effect on the field gamma activity was mimicked by the D1 receptor agonist SKF-383393 and partially antagonized by the D1 antagonist SCH-23390. Conversely, the D2 receptor agonist quinpirole failed to depress the oscillations, and the D2 antagonist sulpiride did not prevent the suppressive dopamine effect. The data indicate that dopamine strongly depresses cholinergic gamma oscillations in area CA3 of rat hippocampus by activation of D1-like dopamine receptors and that this effect is most likely mediated via impairment of interneurons involved in generation and maintenance of the carbachol-induced network rhythm.

  18. Peripheral sensory coding through oscillatory synchrony in weakly electric fish

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christa A; Huck, Kevin R; Carlson, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    Adaptations to an organism's environment often involve sensory system modifications. In this study, we address how evolutionary divergence in sensory perception relates to the physiological coding of stimuli. Mormyrid fishes that can detect subtle variations in electric communication signals encode signal waveform into spike-timing differences between sensory receptors. In contrast, the receptors of species insensitive to waveform variation produce spontaneously oscillating potentials. We found that oscillating receptors respond to electric pulses by resetting their phase, resulting in transient synchrony among receptors that encodes signal timing and location, but not waveform. These receptors were most sensitive to frequencies found only in the collective signals of groups of conspecifics, and this was correlated with increased behavioral responses to these frequencies. Thus, different perceptual capabilities correspond to different receptor physiologies. We hypothesize that these divergent mechanisms represent adaptations for different social environments. Our findings provide the first evidence for sensory coding through oscillatory synchrony. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08163.001 PMID:26238277

  19. Enhancing Hebbian Learning to Control Brain Oscillatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Soekadar, Surjo R; Witkowski, Matthias; Birbaumer, Niels; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2015-09-01

    Sensorimotor rhythms (SMR, 8-15 Hz) are brain oscillations associated with successful motor performance, imagery, and imitation. Voluntary modulation of SMR can be used to control brain-machine interfaces (BMI) in the absence of any physical movements. The mechanisms underlying acquisition of such skill are unknown. Here, we provide evidence for a causal link between function of the primary motor cortex (M1), active during motor skill learning and retention, and successful acquisition of abstract skills such as control over SMR. Thirty healthy participants were trained on 5 consecutive days to control SMR oscillations. Each participant was randomly assigned to one of 3 groups that received either 20 min of anodal, cathodal, or sham transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over M1. Learning SMR control across training days was superior in the anodal tDCS group relative to the other 2. Cathodal tDCS blocked the beneficial effects of training, as evidenced with sham tDCS. One month later, the newly acquired skill remained superior in the anodal tDCS group. Thus, application of weak electric currents of opposite polarities over M1 differentially modulates learning SMR control, pointing to this primary cortical region as a common substrate for acquisition of physical motor skills and learning to control brain oscillatory activity.

  20. Computational heat transfer analysis for oscillatory channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Kannapareddy, Mohan

    1993-01-01

    An accurate finite-difference scheme has been utilized to investigate oscillatory, laminar and incompressible flow between two-parallel-plates and in circular tubes. The two-parallel-plates simulate the regenerator of a free-piston Stirling engine (foil type regenerator) and the channel wall was included in the analysis (conjugate heat transfer problem). The circular tubes simulate the cooler and heater of the engine with an isothermal wall. The study conducted covered a wide range for the maximum Reynolds number (from 75 to 60,000), Valensi number (from 2.5 to 700), and relative amplitude of fluid displacement (0.714 and 1.34). The computational results indicate a complex nature of the heat flux distribution with time and axial location in the channel. At the channel mid-plane we observed two thermal cycles (out of phase with the flow) per each flow cycle. At this axial location the wall heat flux mean value, amplitude and phase shift with the flow are dependent upon the maximum Reynolds number, Valensi number and relative amplitude of fluid displacement. At other axial locations, the wall heat flux distribution is more complex.

  1. Biological processing in oscillatory baffled reactors: operation, advantages and potential

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, M. S. R.; Harvey, A. P.; Perez, G. Valente; Theodorou, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    The development of efficient and commercially viable bioprocesses is essential for reducing the need for fossil-derived products. Increasingly, pharmaceuticals, fuel, health products and precursor compounds for plastics are being synthesized using bioprocessing routes as opposed to more traditional chemical technologies. Production vessels or reactors are required for synthesis of crude product before downstream processing for extraction and purification. Reactors are operated either in discrete batches or, preferably, continuously in order to reduce waste, cost and energy. This review describes the oscillatory baffled reactor (OBR), which, generally, has a niche application in performing ‘long’ processes in plug flow conditions, and so should be suitable for various bioprocesses. We report findings to suggest that OBRs could increase reaction rates for specific bioprocesses owing to low shear, good global mixing and enhanced mass transfer compared with conventional reactors. By maintaining geometrical and dynamic conditions, the technology has been proved to be easily scaled up and operated continuously, allowing laboratory-scale results to be easily transferred to industrial-sized processes. This is the first comprehensive review of bioprocessing using OBRs. The barriers facing industrial adoption of the technology are discussed alongside some suggested strategies to overcome these barriers. OBR technology could prove to be a major aid in the development of commercially viable and sustainable bioprocesses, essential for moving towards a greener future. PMID:24427509

  2. A fundamental oscillatory state of isolated rodent hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chiping; Shen, Hui; Luk, Wah Ping; Zhang, Liang

    2002-01-01

    Population neuronal rhythms of various frequencies are observed in the rodent hippocampus during distinct behavioural states. However, the question of whether the hippocampus exhibits properties of spontaneous rhythms and population synchrony in isolation has not been definitively answered. To address this, we developed a novel preparation for studying neuronal rhythms in a relatively large hippocampal tissue in vitro. We isolated the whole hippocampus from mice up to 28 days postnatal age, removing the dentate gyrus while preserving the functional CA3-to-CA1 connections. Placing the hippocampal isolate in a perfusion chamber for electrophysiological assessment extracellular recordings from the CA1 revealed rhythmic field potential of 0.5 to ≤ 4 Hz that occurred spontaneously and propagated along the ventro-dorsal hippocampal axis. We provide convergent evidence, via measurements of extracellular pH and K+, recordings of synaptic and intracellular activities and morphological assessments, verifying that these rhythms were not the consequence of hypoxia. Data obtained via simultaneous extracellular and patch clamp recordings suggest that the spontaneous rhythms represent a summation of GABAergic IPSPs originating from pyramidal neurons, which result from synchronous discharges of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons. Similar spontaneous field rhythms were also observed in the hippocampal isolate prepared from young gerbils and rats. Based on these data, we postulate that the spontaneous rhythms represent a fundamental oscillatory state of the hippocampal circuitry isolated from extra-hippocampal inputs. PMID:11956340

  3. Biological processing in oscillatory baffled reactors: operation, advantages and potential.

    PubMed

    Abbott, M S R; Harvey, A P; Perez, G Valente; Theodorou, M K

    2013-02-06

    The development of efficient and commercially viable bioprocesses is essential for reducing the need for fossil-derived products. Increasingly, pharmaceuticals, fuel, health products and precursor compounds for plastics are being synthesized using bioprocessing routes as opposed to more traditional chemical technologies. Production vessels or reactors are required for synthesis of crude product before downstream processing for extraction and purification. Reactors are operated either in discrete batches or, preferably, continuously in order to reduce waste, cost and energy. This review describes the oscillatory baffled reactor (OBR), which, generally, has a niche application in performing 'long' processes in plug flow conditions, and so should be suitable for various bioprocesses. We report findings to suggest that OBRs could increase reaction rates for specific bioprocesses owing to low shear, good global mixing and enhanced mass transfer compared with conventional reactors. By maintaining geometrical and dynamic conditions, the technology has been proved to be easily scaled up and operated continuously, allowing laboratory-scale results to be easily transferred to industrial-sized processes. This is the first comprehensive review of bioprocessing using OBRs. The barriers facing industrial adoption of the technology are discussed alongside some suggested strategies to overcome these barriers. OBR technology could prove to be a major aid in the development of commercially viable and sustainable bioprocesses, essential for moving towards a greener future.

  4. An analytical model of capped turbulent oscillatory bottom boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kenji

    2010-03-01

    An analytical model of capped turbulent oscillatory bottom boundary layers (BBLs) is proposed using eddy viscosity of a quadratic form. The common definition of friction velocity based on maximum bottom shear stress is found unsatisfactory for BBLs under rotating flows, and a possible extension based on turbulent kinetic energy balance is proposed. The model solutions show that the flow may slip at the top of the boundary layer due to capping by the water surface or stratification, reducing the bottom shear stress, and that the Earth's rotation induces current and bottom shear stress components perpendicular to the interior flow with a phase lag (or lead). Comparisons with field and numerical experiments indicate that the model predicts the essential characteristics of the velocity profiles, although the agreement is rather qualitative due to assumptions of quadratic eddy viscosity with time-independent friction velocity and a well-mixed boundary layer. On the other hand, the predicted linear friction coefficients, phase lead, and veering angle at the bottom agreed with available data with an error of 3%-10%, 5°-10°, and 5°-10°, respectively. As an application of the model, the friction coefficients are used to calculate e-folding decay distances of progressive internal waves with a semidiurnal frequency.

  5. Oscillatory EEG dynamics underlying automatic chunking during sentence processing.

    PubMed

    Bonhage, Corinna E; Meyer, Lars; Gruber, Thomas; Friederici, Angela D; Mueller, Jutta L

    2017-03-10

    Sentences are easier to remember than random word sequences, likely because linguistic regularities facilitate chunking of words into meaningful groups. The present electroencephalography study investigated the neural oscillations modulated by this so-called sentence superiority effect during the encoding and maintenance of sentence fragments versus word lists. We hypothesized a chunking-related modulation of neural processing during the encoding and retention of sentence fragments as compared to word lists. Time-frequency analysis revealed a two-fold oscillatory pattern for the memorization of sentences: Sentence encoding was accompanied by higher delta amplitude (4Hz), originating both from regions processing syntax as well as semantics (bilateral superior/middle temporal regions and fusiform gyrus). Subsequent sentence retention was reflected in decreased theta (6Hz) and beta/gamma (27-32Hz) amplitude instead. Notably, whether participants simply read or properly memorized the sentences did not impact chunking-related activity during encoding. Therefore, we argue that the sentence superiority effect is grounded in highly automatized language processing mechanisms, which generate meaningful memory chunks irrespective of task demands.

  6. [Emotional intelligence and oscillatory responses on the emotional facial expressions].

    PubMed

    Kniazev, G G; Mitrofanova, L G; Bocharov, A V

    2013-01-01

    Emotional intelligence-related differences in oscillatory responses to emotional facial expressions were investigated in 48 subjects (26 men and 22 women) in age 18-30 years. Participants were instructed to evaluate emotional expression (angry, happy and neutral) of each presented face on an analog scale ranging from -100 (very hostile) to + 100 (very friendly). High emotional intelligence (EI) participants were found to be more sensitive to the emotional content of the stimuli. It showed up both in their subjective evaluation of the stimuli and in a stronger EEG theta synchronization at an earlier (between 100 and 500 ms after face presentation) processing stage. Source localization using sLORETA showed that this effect was localized in the fusiform gyrus upon the presentation of angry faces and in the posterior cingulate gyrus upon the presentation of happy faces. At a later processing stage (500-870 ms) event-related theta synchronization in high emotional intelligence subject was higher in the left prefrontal cortex upon the presentation of happy faces, but it was lower in the anterior cingulate cortex upon presentation of angry faces. This suggests the existence of a mechanism that can be selectively increase the positive emotions and reduce negative emotions.

  7. Robust regulation of oscillatory Min-protein patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2012-02-01

    Robust spatial patterning was crucial just from the beginning of cellular evolution, and is key to the development of multicellular organisms. In E. Coli, the oscillatory pole-to-pole dynamics of MinCDE proteins functionality prevent improper cell divisions apart from midcell. Min-oscillations are characterized by the remarkable robustness with which spatial patterns dynamically adapt to variations of cell geometry. Moreover, adaption, and therefore proper cell division, is independent of temperature. These observations raise fundamental questions about the underlying core mechanisms, and about the role of spatial cues. With a conceptually novel and universal approach to cellular geometries, we introduce a robust model based on experimental data, consistently explaining the mechanisms underlying pole-to-pole, striped and circular patterns, as well as the observed temperature-dependence. Contrary to prior conjectures, the model predicts that MinD and cardiolipin domains are not colocalized. The key mechanisms are transient sequestration of MinE, and highly canalized transfer of MinD between polar zones. MinD channeling enhances midcell localization and facilitates stripe formation, revealing the potential optimization process from which robust Min-oscillations originally arose.

  8. Oscillatory jet flow in electrospinning of polymer nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripatanasuwan, Sureeporn; Reneker, Darrell

    2008-03-01

    The flow of polymer solution into an electrospinning jet can be controlled by the pressure applied to the fluid, and the flow out can be controlled by the electrical potential of the fluid. When the average flow rate of solution carried away by the jet was smaller than the rate at which the liquid was forced through the orifice into the jet, the solution flow rate and the electrical current both oscillated in time. The amount of fluid near the orifice grew larger and caused the flow out of that region to increase, and the amount of fluid near the orifice decreased. Then the cycle repeated. The oscillatory phenomena were demonstrated using a jet of polyethylene oxide in water (Molecular weight, 400k, concentration about 5%) flowing through a tube with a diameter of 0.7 mm. The pressure was 500 to 2500 Pascals, and the applied potential was around 5 kV. The frequency of oscillation (about 0.5 Hertz) was affected by the resistivity of the polymer solution (around 4500 ohm-meters).

  9. Increased oscillatory theta activation evoked by violent digital game events.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Mikko; Ravaja, Niklas

    2008-04-11

    The authors examined electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillatory responses to two violent events, the player character wounding and killing an opponent character with a gun, in the digital game James Bond 007: NightFire. EEG was recorded from 25 (16 male) right-handed healthy young adults. EEG data were segmented into one 1-s baseline epoch before each event and two 1-s epochs after event onset. Power estimates (microV(2)) were derived with the fast Fourier transform (FFT) for each artefact free event. Both of the studied events evoked increased occipital theta (4-6Hz) responses as compared to the pre-event baseline. The wounding event evoked also increased occipital high theta (6-8Hz) response and the killing event evoked low alpha (8-10Hz) asymmetry over the central electrodes, both relative to the pre-event baseline. The results are discussed in light of facial electromyographic and electrodermal activity responses evoked by these same events, and it is suggested that the reported EEG responses may be attributable to affective processes related to these violent game events.

  10. Oscillatory dynamics in rock-paper-scissors games with mutations.

    PubMed

    Mobilia, Mauro

    2010-05-07

    We study the oscillatory dynamics in the generic three-species rock-paper-scissors games with mutations. In the mean-field limit, different behaviors are found: (a) for high mutation rate, there is a stable interior fixed point with coexistence of all species; (b) for low mutation rates, there is a region of the parameter space characterized by a limit cycle resulting from a Hopf bifurcation; (c) in the absence of mutations, there is a region where heteroclinic cycles yield oscillations of large amplitude (not robust against noise). After a discussion on the main properties of the mean-field dynamics, we investigate the stochastic version of the model within an individual-based formulation. Demographic fluctuations are therefore naturally accounted and their effects are studied using a diffusion theory complemented by numerical simulations. It is thus shown that persistent erratic oscillations (quasi-cycles) of large amplitude emerge from a noise-induced resonance phenomenon. We also analytically and numerically compute the average escape time necessary to reach a (quasi-)cycle on which the system oscillates at a given amplitude.

  11. The mechanism of spontaneous oscillatory contractions in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Smith, D A; Stephenson, D G

    2009-05-06

    Most striated muscles generate steady contractile tension when activated, but some preparations, notably cardiac myocytes and slow-twitch fibers, may show spontaneous oscillatory contractions (SPOC) at low levels of activation. We have provided what we believe is new evidence that SPOC is a property of the contractile system at low actin-myosin affinity, whether caused by a thin-filament regulatory system or by other means. We present a quantitative single-sarcomere model for isotonic SPOC in skeletal muscle with three basic ingredients: i), actin and myosin filaments initially in partial overlap, ii), stretch activation by length-dependent changes in the lattice spacing, and iii), viscoelastic passive tension. Modeling examples are given for slow-twitch and fast-twitch fibers, with periods of 10 s and 4 s respectively. Isotonic SPOC occurs in a narrow domain of parameter values, with small minimum and maximum values for actin-myosin affinity, a minimum amount of passive tension, and a maximum transient response rate that explains why SPOC is favored in slow-twitch fibers. The model also predicts the contractile, relaxed and SPOC phases as a function of phosphate and ADP levels. The single-sarcomere model can also be applied to a whole fiber under auxotonic and fixed-end conditions if the remaining sarcomeres are treated as a viscoelastic load. Here the model predicts an upper limit for the load stiffness that leads to SPOC; this limit lies above the equivalent loads expected from the rest of the fiber.

  12. Oscillatory Brain Activity Reveals Linguistic Prints in the Quantity Code

    PubMed Central

    Salillas, Elena; Barraza, Paulo; Carreiras, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Number representations change through education, although it is currently unclear whether and how language could impact the magnitude representation that we share with other species. The most prominent view is that language does not play any role in modulating the core numeric representation involved in the contrast of quantities. Nevertheless, possible cultural hints on the numerical magnitude representation are currently on discussion focus. In fact, the acquisition of number words provides linguistic input that the quantity system may not ignore. Bilingualism offers a window to the study of this question, especially in bilinguals where the two number wording systems imply also two different numerical systems, such as in Basque-Spanish bilinguals. The present study evidences linguistic prints in the core number representational system through the analysis of EEG oscillatory activity during a simple number comparison task. Gamma band synchronization appears when Basque-Spanish bilinguals compare pairs of Arabic numbers linked through the Basque base-20 wording system, but it does not if the pairs are related through the base-10 system. Crucially, this gamma activity, originated in a left fronto-parietal network, only appears in bilinguals who learned math in Basque and not in equivalent proficiency bilinguals who learned math in Spanish. Thus, this neural index reflected in gamma band synchrony appears to be triggered by early learning experience with the base-20 numerical associations in Basque number words. PMID:25875210

  13. Frontal oscillatory dynamics predict feedback learning and action adjustment.

    PubMed

    van de Vijver, Irene; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Cohen, Michael X

    2011-12-01

    Frontal oscillatory dynamics in the theta (4-8 Hz) and beta (20-30 Hz) frequency bands have been implicated in cognitive control processes. Here we investigated the changes in coordinated activity within and between frontal brain areas during feedback-based response learning. In a time estimation task, participants learned to press a button after specific, randomly selected time intervals (300-2000 msec) using the feedback after each button press (correct, too fast, too slow). Consistent with previous findings, theta-band activity over medial frontal scalp sites (presumably reflecting medial frontal cortex activity) was stronger after negative feedback, whereas beta-band activity was stronger after positive feedback. Theta-band power predicted learning only after negative feedback, and beta-band power predicted learning after positive and negative feedback. Furthermore, negative feedback increased theta-band intersite phase synchrony (a millisecond resolution measure of functional connectivity) among right lateral prefrontal, medial frontal, and sensorimotor sites. These results demonstrate the importance of frontal theta- and beta-band oscillations and intersite communication in the realization of reinforcement learning.

  14. Particle and Blood Cell Dynamics in Oscillatory Flows Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Juan M. Restrepo

    2008-09-01

    Our aim has been to uncover fundamental aspects of the suspension and dislodgement of particles in wall-bounded oscillatory flows, in flows characterized by Reynolds numbers en- compassing the situation found in rivers and near shores (and perhaps in some industrial processes). Our research tools are computational and our coverage of parameter space fairly broad. Computational means circumvent many complications that make the measurement of the dynamics of particles in a laboratory setting an impractical task, especially on the broad range of parameter space we plan to report upon. The impact of this work on the geophysical problem of sedimentation is boosted considerably by the fact that the proposed calculations can be considered ab-initio, in the sense that little to no modeling is done in generating dynamics of the particles and of the moving fluid: we use a three-dimensional Navier Stokes solver along with straightforward boundry conditions. Hence, to the extent that Navier Stokes is a model for an ideal incompressible isotropic Newtonian fluid, the calculations yield benchmark values for such things as the drag, buoyancy, and lift of particles, in a highly controlled environment. Our approach will be to make measurements of the lift, drag, and buoyancy of particles, by considering progressively more complex physical configurations and physics.

  15. Shear bands in concentrated bacterial suspensions under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiang; Samanta, Devranjan; Xu, Xinliang

    2016-11-01

    Bacterial suspensions show interesting rheological behaviors such as a remarkable "superfluidic" state with vanishing viscosity. Although the bulk rheology of bacterial suspensions has been experimentally studied, shear profiles within bacterial suspensions have not been systematically explored so far. Here, by combining confocal rheometry with PIV, we investigated the flow behaviors of concentrated E. coli suspensions under planar oscillatory shear. We found that concentrated bacterial suspensions exhibit strong non-homogeneous flow profiles at low shear rates, where shear rates vanish away from the moving shear plate. We characterized the shape of the nonlinear shear profiles at different applied shear rates and bacterial concentrations and activities. The shear profiles follow a simple scaling relation with the applied shear rates and the enstrophy of suspensions, unexpected from the current hydrodynamic models of active fluids. We demonstrated that this scaling relation can be quantitatively understood by considering the power output of bacteria at different orientations with respect to shear flows. Our experiments reveal a profound influence of shear flows on the locomotion of bacteria and provide new insights into the dynamics of active fluids. The research is funded by ACS Petroleum Research Fund (54168-DNI9) and by the David & Lucile Packard Foundation. X. X. acknowledges support by the National Natural Science Foundation of China No. 11575020.

  16. Alpha oscillatory correlates of motor inhibition in the aged brain

    PubMed Central

    Bönstrup, Marlene; Hagemann, Julian; Gerloff, Christian; Sauseng, Paul; Hummel, Friedhelm C.

    2015-01-01

    Exerting inhibitory control is a cognitive ability mediated by functions known to decline with age. The goal of this study is to add to the mechanistic understanding of cortical inhibition during motor control in aged brains. Based on behavioral findings of impaired inhibitory control with age we hypothesized that elderly will show a reduced or a lack of EEG alpha-power increase during tasks that require motor inhibition. Since inhibitory control over movements has been shown to rely on prior motor memory formation, we investigated cortical inhibitory processes at two points in time—early after learning and after an overnight consolidation phase and hypothesized an overnight increase of inhibitory capacities. Young and elderly participants acquired a complex finger movement sequence and in each experimental session brain activity during execution and inhibition of the sequence was recorded with multi-channel EEG. We assessed cortical processes of sustained inhibition by means of task-induced changes of alpha oscillatory power. During inhibition of the learned movement, young participants showed a significant alpha power increase at the sensorimotor cortices whereas elderly did not. Interestingly, for both groups, the overnight consolidation phase improved up-regulation of alpha power during sustained inhibition. This points to deficits in the generation and enhancement of local inhibitory mechanisms at the sensorimotor cortices in aged brains. However, the alpha power increase in both groups implies neuroplastic changes that strengthen the network of alpha power generation over time in young as well as elderly brains. PMID:26528179

  17. Phenomenological approach to describe oscillatory growth or decay in different dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Dibyendu; Poria, Swarup; Patra, Sankar Narayan

    2016-12-01

    The approach of the phenomenological universalities of growth is considered to describe the behaviour of a system showing an oscillatory growth. Two phenomenological classes are proposed to consider the oscillatory behaviour of a system. One of them is showing oscillatory nature with constant amplitude and the other represents oscillatory nature with a change in amplitude. The term responsible for decay (or growth) in amplitude in the proposed class is also been identified. The variations in the nature of oscillation with the dependent parameters are studied in this communication. In this connection, the variation of a specific growth rate is also been considered. The significance of the presence and the absence of each term involved in the phenomenological description are also taken into consideration. These proposed classes might be useful for the experimentalists to extract a characteristic feature from the data set and to develop a suitable model consistent with their data set.

  18. Influence of edge additions on the synchronizability of oscillatory power networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Xiao-jun

    2016-12-01

    The influence of edge-adding number and edge-adding distance on synchronization of oscillatory power network is investigated. Here we study how the addition of new links impacts the emergence of synchrony in oscillatory power network, focusing on ring, and tree-like topologies. Numerical simulations show that the impact of distance of adding edges whether homogeneous (generators to generators or consumers to consumers) or heterogeneous (generators to consumer nodes and vice versa) edges is not obvious on the synchronizability of oscillatory power network. However, for the edge-adding number, it is observed that the bigger heterogeneous edge-adding number, the stronger synchronizability of power network will be. Furthermore, the homogeneous edge-adding number does not affect the synchronizability of oscillatory power network.

  19. Dispersal-induced destabilization of metapopulations and oscillatory Turing patterns in ecological networks

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Shigefumi; Nakao, Hiroya; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    As shown by Alan Turing in 1952, differential diffusion may destabilize uniform distributions of reacting species and lead to emergence of patterns. While stationary Turing patterns are broadly known, the oscillatory instability, leading to traveling waves in continuous media and sometimes called the wave bifurcation, remains less investigated. Here, we extend the original analysis by Turing to networks and apply it to ecological metapopulations with dispersal connections between habitats. Remarkably, the oscillatory Turing instability does not lead to wave patterns in networks, but to spontaneous development of heterogeneous oscillations and possible extinction of species. We find such oscillatory instabilities for all possible food webs with three predator or prey species, under various assumptions about the mobility of individual species and nonlinear interactions between them. Hence, the oscillatory Turing instability should be generic and must play a fundamental role in metapopulation dynamics, providing a common mechanism for dispersal-induced destabilization of ecosystems. PMID:24394959

  20. More than spikes: Common oscillatory mechanisms for content specific neural representations during perception and memory

    PubMed Central

    Watrous, Andrew J.; Fell, Juergen; Ekstrom, Arne D.; Axmacher, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    Although previous research into the mechanisms underlying sensory and episodic representations has primarily focused on changes in neural firing rate, more recent evidence suggests that neural oscillations also contribute to these representations. Here, we argue that multiplexed oscillatory power and phase contribute to neural representations at the mesoscopic scale, complementary to neuronal firing. Reviewing recent studies which used oscillatory activity to decipher content-specific neural representations, we identify oscillatory mechanisms common to both sensory and episodic memory representations and incorporate these into a model of episodic encoding and retrieval. This model advances the idea that oscillations provide a reference frame for phase-coded item representations during memory encoding and that shifts in oscillatory frequency and phase coordinate ensemble activity during memory retrieval. PMID:25129044

  1. Dispersal-induced destabilization of metapopulations and oscillatory Turing patterns in ecological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Shigefumi; Nakao, Hiroya; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    As shown by Alan Turing in 1952, differential diffusion may destabilize uniform distributions of reacting species and lead to emergence of patterns. While stationary Turing patterns are broadly known, the oscillatory instability, leading to traveling waves in continuous media and sometimes called the wave bifurcation, remains less investigated. Here, we extend the original analysis by Turing to networks and apply it to ecological metapopulations with dispersal connections between habitats. Remarkably, the oscillatory Turing instability does not lead to wave patterns in networks, but to spontaneous development of heterogeneous oscillations and possible extinction of species. We find such oscillatory instabilities for all possible food webs with three predator or prey species, under various assumptions about the mobility of individual species and nonlinear interactions between them. Hence, the oscillatory Turing instability should be generic and must play a fundamental role in metapopulation dynamics, providing a common mechanism for dispersal-induced destabilization of ecosystems.

  2. A NON-OSCILLATORY SCHEME FOR OPEN CHANNEL FLOWS. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In modeling shocks in open channel flows, the traditional finite difference schemes become inefficient and warrant special numerical treatment for smooth computations. This paper provides a general introduction to the non-oscillatory high-resolution methodology, coupled with the ...

  3. Strategies for avoiding errors and ambiguities in the analysis of oscillatory pumping tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardiff, Michael; Sayler, Claire

    2016-09-01

    Oscillatory pumping tests have recently seen a resurgence in interest as a strategy for aquifer characterization. In a cross-well pumping test, measured responses to oscillatory pumping tests consist of the amplitude and phase delay of pressure changes at an observation well. This information can be used to obtain estimates of effective aquifer parameters (conductivity and storage coefficients), by fitting field data with an analytical model through parameter estimation. Alternately, multiple pumping tests can be fit simultaneously through tomographic analyses. However, in both cases, analysis of obtained test results may be ambiguous if "phase wrapping" occurs, i.e. if signals are delayed by more than one period. In this work, we demonstrate scenarios under which phase wrapping can make analysis of oscillatory testing difficult, and present guidelines for avoiding ambiguity in oscillatory testing results.

  4. Detection and integration of oscillatory differential equations with initial stepsize, order and method selection

    SciTech Connect

    Gallivan, K. A.

    1980-12-01

    Within any general class of problems there typically exist subclasses possessed of characteristics that can be exploited to create techniques more efficient than general methods applied to these subclasses. Two such subclasses of initial-value problems in ordinary differential equations are stiff and oscillatory problems. Indeed, the subclass of oscillatory problems can be further refined into stiff and nonstiff oscillatory problems. This refinement is discussed in detail. The problem of developing a method of detection for nonstiff and stiff oscillatory behavior in initial-value problems is addressed. For this method of detection a control structure is proposed upon which a production code could be based. An experimental code using this control structure is described, and results of numerical tests are presented. 3 figures.

  5. Oscillatory modes in the flow between two horizontal corotating cylinders with a partially filled gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutabazi, I.; Normand, C.; Peerhossaini, H.; Wesfreid, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    The linear stability of viscous flow between two rotating coaxial horizontal cylinders with a partially filled gap is investigated. It is shown that, for a range of values of the rotation ratio μ, the stability diagram for stationary modes consists of two separate curves connected by an oscillatory branch. For 0.26<μ<0.61 the critical point is on the oscillatory branch. Therefore it can be expected that, at onset, the instability will set in as an oscillatory mode. We have established the existence of codimension-2 points for two particular values of the rotation ratio μ=0.26 and 0.61, where the onset of instability for stationary as well as oscillatory modes occurs for the same value of the Taylor number.

  6. On Essentially Non-Oscillatory Schemes on Unstructured Meshes: Analysis and Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    is to use a Lagrange type interpolation with an adapted stencil: when a discontinuity is detected, the procedure looks for the region around this...be introduced for unstructured meshes. We first recall how to interpolate data in an essentially non-oscillatory Lagrange fashion, and then how this...is used to reconstruct 1D data. Essentially non-oscillatory interpolation . This relies on two well known properties of divided differences. Let {yo

  7. Effects of Oscillatory Flow on Fertilization in the Green Sea Urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis

    PubMed Central

    Kregting, Louise T.; Bass, Anna L.; Guadayol, Òscar; Yund, Philip O.; Thomas, Florence I. M.

    2013-01-01

    Broadcast spawning invertebrates that live in shallow, high-energy coastal habitats are subjected to oscillatory water motion that creates unsteady flow fields above the surface of animals. The frequency of the oscillatory fluctuations is driven by the wave period, which will influence the stability of local flow structures and may affect fertilization processes. Using an oscillatory water tunnel, we quantified the percentage of eggs fertilized on or near spawning green sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. Eggs were sampled in the water column, wake eddy, substratum and aboral surface under a range of different periods (T = 4.5 – 12.7 s) and velocities of oscillatory flow. The root-mean-square wave velocity (rms(uw)) was a good predictor of fertilization in oscillatory flow, although the root-mean-square of total velocity (rms(u)), which incorporates all the components of flow (current, wave and turbulence), also provided significant predictions. The percentage of eggs fertilized varied between 50 – 85% at low flows (rms(uw) <0.02 m s−1), depending on the location sampled, but declined to below 10% for most locations at higher rms(uw). The water column was an important location for fertilization with a relative contribution greater than that of the aboral surface, especially at medium and high rms(uw) categories. We conclude that gametes can be successfully fertilized on or near the parent under a range of oscillatory flow conditions. PMID:24098766

  8. Inhibitory feedback required for network oscillatory responses to communication but not prey stimuli.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Brent; Chacron, Maurice J; Maler, Leonard; Longtin, André; Bastian, Joseph

    2003-01-30

    Stimulus-induced oscillations occur in visual, olfactory and somatosensory systems. Several experimental and theoretical studies have shown how such oscillations can be generated by inhibitory connections between neurons. But the effects of realistic spatiotemporal sensory input on oscillatory network dynamics and the overall functional roles of such oscillations in sensory processing are poorly understood. Weakly electric fish must detect electric field modulations produced by both prey (spatially localized) and communication (spatially diffuse) signals. Here we show, through in vivo recordings, that sensory pyramidal neurons in these animals produce an oscillatory response to communication-like stimuli, but not to prey-like stimuli. On the basis of well-characterized circuitry, we construct a network model of pyramidal neurons that predicts that diffuse delayed inhibitory feedback is required to achieve oscillatory behaviour only in response to communication-like stimuli. This prediction is experimentally verified by reversible blockade of feedback inhibition that removes oscillatory behaviour in the presence of communication-like stimuli. Our results show that a sensory system can use inhibitory feedback as a mechanism to 'toggle' between oscillatory and non-oscillatory firing states, each associated with a naturalistic stimulus.

  9. Coherent oscillatory activity in monkey area v4 predicts successful allocation of attention.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K; Mandon, S; Freiwald, W A; Kreiter, A K

    2005-09-01

    Attention serves to select objects from often complex scenes for enhanced processing and perception. In particular, the perception of shape depends critically on attention for integrating the various parts of the selected object into a coherent representation of object shape. To study whether oscillatory neuronal synchrony may serve as a mechanism of attention in shape perception, we introduced a novel shape-tracking task requiring sustained attention to a morphing shape. Attention was found to strongly increase oscillatory currents underlying the recorded field potentials in the gamma-frequency range, thus indicating enhanced neuronal synchrony within the population of V4 neurons representing the attended stimulus. Errors indicating a misdirection of attention to the distracter instead of the target were preceded by a corresponding shift of oscillatory activity from the target's neuronal representation to that of the distracter. No such effect was observed for errors unrelated to attention. Modulations of the attention-dependent enhancement of oscillatory activity occurred in correspondence with changing attentional demands during the course of a trial. The specificity of the effect of attentional errors together with the close coupling between attentional demand and oscillatory activity support the hypothesis that oscillatory neuronal synchrony serves as a mechanism of attention.

  10. Advective velocity and energy dissipation rate in an oscillatory flow.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ziaul; Hondzo, Miki; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2005-07-01

    Characterizing the transport processes at the sediment-water interface along sloping boundaries in lakes and reservoirs is of fundamental interest in lake and reservoir water quality management. The turbulent bottom boundary layer (TBBL) along a slope, induced by the breaking of internal waves in a linearly stratified fluid, was investigated through laboratory measurements. Fast response micro-scale conductivity and temperature probes in conjunction with laser-Doppler velocimetry were used to measure the time series of salinity, temperature, and velocity along a sloping boundary. Turbulent energy spectra were computed from the velocity data using a time-dependent advective velocity and Taylor's hypothesis. The energy spectra were used to estimate the energy dissipation rate at different positions in the TBBL. The advective velocity in this near-zero mean shear flow is based on an integral time scale (T(int)). The integral time scale is related to the average frequency of the spectral energy density of the flow velocity. The energy dissipation rate estimated from the variable advective velocity with an averaging time window equal to the integral time scale (T=T(int)) was 43% higher than the energy dissipation rate estimated from a constant advective velocity. The estimated dissipation rates with T=T(int) were comparable to values obtained by curve-fitting a theoretical Batchelor spectrum for the temperature gradient spectra. This study proposes the integral time scale to be used for the oscillatory flows as (a) a time-averaging window to estimate the advective velocity and associated energy dissipation level, and (b) a normalizing parameter in the energy spectrum.

  11. The Mechanism of Spontaneous Oscillatory Contractions in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D.A.; Stephenson, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Most striated muscles generate steady contractile tension when activated, but some preparations, notably cardiac myocytes and slow-twitch fibers, may show spontaneous oscillatory contractions (SPOC) at low levels of activation. We have provided what we believe is new evidence that SPOC is a property of the contractile system at low actin-myosin affinity, whether caused by a thin-filament regulatory system or by other means. We present a quantitative single-sarcomere model for isotonic SPOC in skeletal muscle with three basic ingredients: i), actin and myosin filaments initially in partial overlap, ii), stretch activation by length-dependent changes in the lattice spacing, and iii), viscoelastic passive tension. Modeling examples are given for slow-twitch and fast-twitch fibers, with periods of 10 s and 4 s respectively. Isotonic SPOC occurs in a narrow domain of parameter values, with small minimum and maximum values for actin-myosin affinity, a minimum amount of passive tension, and a maximum transient response rate that explains why SPOC is favored in slow–twitch fibers. The model also predicts the contractile, relaxed and SPOC phases as a function of phosphate and ADP levels. The single-sarcomere model can also be applied to a whole fiber under auxotonic and fixed-end conditions if the remaining sarcomeres are treated as a viscoelastic load. Here the model predicts an upper limit for the load stiffness that leads to SPOC; this limit lies above the equivalent loads expected from the rest of the fiber. PMID:19413973

  12. Grid cells and theta as oscillatory interference: theory and predictions.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Neil

    2008-01-01

    The oscillatory interference model [Burgess et al. (2007) Hippocampus 17:801-802] of grid cell firing is reviewed as an algorithmic level description of path integration and as an implementation level description of grid cells and their inputs. New analyses concern the relationships between the variables in the model and the theta rhythm, running speed, and the intrinsic firing frequencies of grid cells. New simulations concern the implementation of velocity-controlled oscillators (VCOs) with different preferred directions in different neurons. To summarize the model, the distance traveled along a specific direction is encoded by the phase of a VCO relative to a baseline frequency. Each VCO is an intrinsic membrane potential oscillation whose frequency increases from baseline as a result of depolarization by synaptic input from speed modulated head-direction cells. Grid cell firing is driven by the VCOs whose preferred directions match the current direction of motion. VCOs are phase-reset by location-specific input from place cells to prevent accumulation of error. The baseline frequency is identified with the local average of VCO frequencies, while EEG theta frequency is identified with the global average VCO frequency and comprises two components: the frequency at zero speed and a linear response to running speed. Quantitative predictions are given for the inter-relationships between a grid cell's intrinsic firing frequency and grid scale, the two components of theta frequency, and the running speed of the animal. Qualitative predictions are given for the properties of the VCOs, and the relationship between environmental novelty, the two components of theta, grid scale and place cell remapping.

  13. An oscillatory interference model of grid cell firing.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Neil; Barry, Caswell; O'Keefe, John

    2007-01-01

    We expand upon our proposal that the oscillatory interference mechanism proposed for the phase precession effect in place cells underlies the grid-like firing pattern of dorsomedial entorhinal grid cells (O'Keefe and Burgess (2005) Hippocampus 15:853-866). The original one-dimensional interference model is generalized to an appropriate two-dimensional mechanism. Specifically, dendritic subunits of layer II medial entorhinal stellate cells provide multiple linear interference patterns along different directions, with their product determining the firing of the cell. Connection of appropriate speed- and direction-dependent inputs onto dendritic subunits could result from an unsupervised learning rule which maximizes postsynaptic firing (e.g. competitive learning). These inputs cause the intrinsic oscillation of subunit membrane potential to increase above theta frequency by an amount proportional to the animal's speed of running in the "preferred" direction. The phase difference between this oscillation and a somatic input at theta-frequency essentially integrates velocity so that the interference of the two oscillations reflects distance traveled in the preferred direction. The overall grid pattern is maintained in environmental location by phase reset of the grid cell by place cells receiving sensory input from the environment, and environmental boundaries in particular. We also outline possible variations on the basic model, including the generation of grid-like firing via the interaction of multiple cells rather than via multiple dendritic subunits. Predictions of the interference model are given for the frequency composition of EEG power spectra and temporal autocorrelograms of grid cell firing as functions of the speed and direction of running and the novelty of the environment.

  14. Rheological changes of polyamide 12 under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielicki, C.; Gronhoff, B.; Wortberg, J.

    2014-05-01

    Changes in material properties as well as process deviation prevent Laser Sintering (LS) technology from manufacturing of quality assured parts in a series production. In this context, the viscosity of Polyamide 12 (PA12) is assumed to possess the most significant influence, as it determines the sintering velocity, the resistance towards melt formation and the bonding strength of sintered layers. Moreover, the viscosity is directly related to the structure of the molten polymer. In particular, it has been recently reported that LS process conditions lead to structural changes of PA12 affecting viscosity and coalescence of adjacent polymer particles, i.e. melt formation significantly. Structural change of PA12 was understood as a post condensation. Its influence on viscosity was described by a time and temperature depending rheological model whereas time dependence was considered by a novel structural change shift factor which was derived from melt volume rate data. In combination with process data that was recorded using online thermal imaging, the model is suitable to control the viscosity (processability of the material) as result of material and process properties. However, as soon as laser energy is exposed to the powder bed PA12 undergoes a phase transition from solid to molten state. Above the melting point, structural change is expected to occur faster due to a higher kinetic energy and free volume of the molten polymer. Oscillatory shear results were used to study the influence of aging time and for validation of the novel structural change shift factor and its model parameters which were calibrated based on LS processing condition.

  15. Autocatalytic, bistable, oscillatory networks of biologically relevant organic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Sergey N.; Kraft, Lewis J.; Ainla, Alar; Zhao, Mengxia; Baghbanzadeh, Mostafa; Campbell, Victoria E.; Kang, Kyungtae; Fox, Jerome M.; Whitesides, George M.

    2016-09-01

    Networks of organic chemical reactions are important in life and probably played a central part in its origin. Network dynamics regulate cell division, circadian rhythms, nerve impulses and chemotaxis, and guide the development of organisms. Although out-of-equilibrium networks of chemical reactions have the potential to display emergent network dynamics such as spontaneous pattern formation, bistability and periodic oscillations, the principles that enable networks of organic reactions to develop complex behaviours are incompletely understood. Here we describe a network of biologically relevant organic reactions (amide formation, thiolate-thioester exchange, thiolate-disulfide interchange and conjugate addition) that displays bistability and oscillations in the concentrations of organic thiols and amides. Oscillations arise from the interaction between three subcomponents of the network: an autocatalytic cycle that generates thiols and amides from thioesters and dialkyl disulfides; a trigger that controls autocatalytic growth; and inhibitory processes that remove activating thiol species that are produced during the autocatalytic cycle. In contrast to previous studies that have demonstrated oscillations and bistability using highly evolved biomolecules (enzymes and DNA) or inorganic molecules of questionable biochemical relevance (for example, those used in Belousov-Zhabotinskii-type reactions), the organic molecules we use are relevant to metabolism and similar to those that might have existed on the early Earth. By using small organic molecules to build a network of organic reactions with autocatalytic, bistable and oscillatory behaviour, we identify principles that explain the ways in which dynamic networks relevant to life could have developed. Modifications of this network will clarify the influence of molecular structure on the dynamics of reaction networks, and may enable the design of biomimetic networks and of synthetic self-regulating and evolving

  16. An oscillatory interference model of grid cell firing

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, N; Barry, C; O'Keefe, J

    2009-01-01

    We expand upon our proposal that the oscillatory interference mechanism proposed for the phase precession effect in place cells underlies the grid-like firing pattern of dorsomedial entorhinal grid cells (O'Keefe & Burgess, 2005). The original 1-dimensional interference model is generalized to an appropriate 2-dimensional mechanism. Specifically, dendritic subunits of layer II medial entorhinal stellate cells provide multiple linear interference patterns along different directions, with their product determining the firing of the cell. Connection of appropriate speed- and direction- dependent inputs onto dendritic subunits could result from an unsupervised learning rule which maximizes post-synaptic firing (e.g. competitive learning). These inputs cause the intrinsic oscillation of subunit membrane potential to increase above theta frequency by an amount proportional to the animal's speed of running in the ‘preferred’ direction. The phase difference between this oscillation and a somatic input at theta-frequency essentially integrates velocity so that the interference of the two oscillations reflects distance traveled in the preferred direction. The overall grid pattern is maintained in environmental location by phase reset of the grid cell by place cells receiving sensory input from the environment, and environmental boundaries in particular. We also outline possible variations on the basic model, including the generation of grid-like firing via the interaction of multiple cells rather than via multiple dendritic subunits. Predictions of the interference model are given for the frequency composition of EEG power spectra and temporal autocorrelograms of grid cell firing as functions of the speed and direction of running and the novelty of the environment. PMID:17598147

  17. Oscillatory phase coupling coordinates anatomically dispersed functional cell assemblies.

    PubMed

    Canolty, Ryan T; Ganguly, Karunesh; Kennerley, Steven W; Cadieu, Charles F; Koepsell, Kilian; Wallis, Jonathan D; Carmena, Jose M

    2010-10-05

    Hebb proposed that neuronal cell assemblies are critical for effective perception, cognition, and action. However, evidence for brain mechanisms that coordinate multiple coactive assemblies remains lacking. Neuronal oscillations have been suggested as one possible mechanism for cell assembly coordination. Prior studies have shown that spike timing depends upon local field potential (LFP) phase proximal to the cell body, but few studies have examined the dependence of spiking on distal LFP phases in other brain areas far from the neuron or the influence of LFP-LFP phase coupling between distal areas on spiking. We investigated these interactions by recording LFPs and single-unit activity using multiple microelectrode arrays in several brain areas and then used a unique probabilistic multivariate phase distribution to model the dependence of spike timing on the full pattern of proximal LFP phases, distal LFP phases, and LFP-LFP phase coupling between electrodes. Here we show that spiking activity in single neurons and neuronal ensembles depends on dynamic patterns of oscillatory phase coupling between multiple brain areas, in addition to the effects of proximal LFP phase. Neurons that prefer similar patterns of phase coupling exhibit similar changes in spike rates, whereas neurons with different preferences show divergent responses, providing a basic mechanism to bind different neurons together into coordinated cell assemblies. Surprisingly, phase-coupling-based rate correlations are independent of interneuron distance. Phase-coupling preferences correlate with behavior and neural function and remain stable over multiple days. These findings suggest that neuronal oscillations enable selective and dynamic control of distributed functional cell assemblies.

  18. Jacobi elliptic functions: A review of nonlinear oscillatory application problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacic, Ivana; Cveticanin, Livija; Zukovic, Miodrag; Rakaric, Zvonko

    2016-10-01

    This review paper is concerned with the applications of Jacobi elliptic functions to nonlinear oscillators whose restoring force has a monomial or binomial form that involves cubic and/or quadratic nonlinearity. First, geometric interpretations of three basic Jacobi elliptic functions are given and their characteristics are discussed. It is shown then how their different forms can be utilized to express exact solutions for the response of certain free conservative oscillators. These forms are subsequently used as a starting point for a presentation of different quantitative techniques for obtaining an approximate response for free perturbed nonlinear oscillators. An illustrative example is provided. Further, two types of externally forced nonlinear oscillators are reviewed: (i) those that are excited by elliptic-type excitations with different exact and approximate solutions; (ii) those that are damped and excited by harmonic excitations, but their approximate response is expressed in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. Characteristics of the steady-state response are discussed and certain qualitative differences with respect to the classical Duffing oscillator excited harmonically are pointed out. Parametric oscillations of the oscillators excited by an elliptic-type forcing are considered as well, and the differences with respect to the stability chart of the classical Mathieu equation are emphasized. The adjustment of the Melnikov method to derive the general condition for the onset of homoclinic bifurcations in a system parametrically excited by an elliptic-type forcing is provided and compared with those corresponding to harmonic excitations. Advantages and disadvantages of the use of Jacobi elliptic functions in nonlinear oscillatory application problems are discussed and some suggestions for future work are given.

  19. Numerical simulation of flow separation control by oscillatory fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resendiz Rosas, Celerino

    2005-07-01

    In this work, numerical simulations of flow separation control are performed. The separation control technique studied is called "synthetic jet actuation". The developed code employs a cell centered finite volume scheme which handles viscous, steady and unsteady compressible turbulent flows. The pulsating zero mass jet flow is simulated by imposing a harmonically varying transpiration boundary condition on the airfoil's surface. Turbulence is modeled with the algebraic model of Baldwin and Lomax. The application of synthetic jet actuators is based in their ability to energize the boundary layer, thereby providing significant increase in the lift coefficient. This has been corroborated experimentally and it is corroborated numerically in this research. The performed numerical simulation investigates the flow over a NACA0015 airfoil. For this flow Re = 9 x 105 and the reduced frequency and momentum coefficient are F + = 1.1 and Cmu = 0.04 respectively. The oscillatory injection takes place at 12.27% chord from the leading edge. A maximum increase in the mean lift coefficient of 93% is predicted by the code. A discrepancy of approximately 10% is observed with corresponding experimental data from the literature. The general trend is, however, well captured. The discrepancy is attributed to the modeling of the injection boundary condition and to the turbulence model. A sensitivity analysis of the lift coefficient to different values of the oscillation parameters is performed. It is concluded that tangential injection, F+ ≈ O(1) and the utilized grid resolution around the site of injection are optimal. Streamline fields obtained for different angles of injection are analyzed. Flow separation and attachment as functions of the injection angle and of the velocity of injection can be observed. It is finally concluded that a reliable numerical tool has been developed which can be utilized as a support tool in the optimization of the synthetic jet operation and in the

  20. High temperature steady shear and oscillatory rheometry of basaltic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petford, N.; English, R.; Williams, R.; Rogers, N.

    2012-04-01

    There is a paucity of linear viscoelastic data on low viscosity (basaltic) silicate melts. We report here the initial results of a rheometrical characterisation (steady rotation, small angle oscillation) study on a geochemically well constrained aphyric basalt from Ethiopia (SiO2 48.51 wt.%, Mg# 0.44), in the temperature range 1200-1400 Celsius. Experiments were done using a recently developed commercial instrument (Anton Paar FRS 1600) and a wide gap Couette geometry. To the best of our knowledge these are the first reported silicate melt viscosity data obtained using small amplitude oscillatory shear and a rheometer with a high performance electrically commutated actuator. Results show that in the temperature range the system was very fluid, with the measured shear viscosity falling to ~ 2.3 Pa s at T = 1400 C. The melt exhibited a linear (Newtonian) response, with the shear viscosity remaining constant across two decades of deformation rate. As expected for a Newtonian fluid, the phase angle was 90 degrees across the entire range of angular frequencies studied. Correspondingly, the storage modulus (G') was zero and the loss modulus finite exhibiting a linear increase with frequency. The complex viscosity (oscillation) and shear viscosity (steady rotation) were equal in magnitude ('Cox-Merz' equivalence). These data are best interpreted in terms of a system with relatively low 'connectivity'/polymeric character and rapid relaxation dynamics, consistent with the mafic composition of the melt. As detailed compositional data are available the experimentally determined shear viscosity values are compared with those predicted from multicomponent chemical models in the literature. Discrepancies between the experimental and theoretical values are discussed.

  1. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1: Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re(sub max), Re(sub w), and A(sub R), embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. Volume 1 contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  2. Autocatalytic, bistable, oscillatory networks of biologically relevant organic reactions.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Sergey N; Kraft, Lewis J; Ainla, Alar; Zhao, Mengxia; Baghbanzadeh, Mostafa; Campbell, Victoria E; Kang, Kyungtae; Fox, Jerome M; Whitesides, George M

    2016-09-29

    Networks of organic chemical reactions are important in life and probably played a central part in its origin. Network dynamics regulate cell division, circadian rhythms, nerve impulses and chemotaxis, and guide the development of organisms. Although out-of-equilibrium networks of chemical reactions have the potential to display emergent network dynamics such as spontaneous pattern formation, bistability and periodic oscillations, the principles that enable networks of organic reactions to develop complex behaviours are incompletely understood. Here we describe a network of biologically relevant organic reactions (amide formation, thiolate-thioester exchange, thiolate-disulfide interchange and conjugate addition) that displays bistability and oscillations in the concentrations of organic thiols and amides. Oscillations arise from the interaction between three subcomponents of the network: an autocatalytic cycle that generates thiols and amides from thioesters and dialkyl disulfides; a trigger that controls autocatalytic growth; and inhibitory processes that remove activating thiol species that are produced during the autocatalytic cycle. In contrast to previous studies that have demonstrated oscillations and bistability using highly evolved biomolecules (enzymes and DNA) or inorganic molecules of questionable biochemical relevance (for example, those used in Belousov-Zhabotinskii-type reactions), the organic molecules we use are relevant to metabolism and similar to those that might have existed on the early Earth. By using small organic molecules to build a network of organic reactions with autocatalytic, bistable and oscillatory behaviour, we identify principles that explain the ways in which dynamic networks relevant to life could have developed. Modifications of this network will clarify the influence of molecular structure on the dynamics of reaction networks, and may enable the design of biomimetic networks and of synthetic self-regulating and evolving

  3. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T.W.

    1992-03-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program is oscillating flow within a circular duct are present. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re{sub max}, Re{sub W}, and A{sub R}, embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA`s Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radical components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and in reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. The following is presented in two-volumes. Volume I contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume II contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  4. Surface Instability of Liquid Propellant under Vertical Oscillatory Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; Peugeot, John

    2011-01-01

    Fluid motion in a fuel tank produced during thrust oscillations can circulate sub-cooled hydrogen near the liquid-vapor interface resulting in increased condensation and ullage pressure collapse. The first objective of this study is to validate the capabilities of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool, CFD-ACE+, in modeling the fundamental interface transition physics occurring at the propellant surface. The second objective is to use the tool to assess the effects of thrust oscillations on surface dynamics. Our technical approach is to first verify the CFD code against known theoretical solutions, and then validate against existing experiments for small scale tanks and a range of transition regimes. A 2D axisymmetric, multi-phase model of gases, liquids, and solids is used to verify that CFD-ACE+ is capable of modeling fluid-structure interaction and system resonance in a typical thrust oscillation environment. Then, the 3D mode is studied with an assumed oscillatory body force to simulate the thrust oscillating effect. The study showed that CFD modeling can capture all of the transition physics from solid body motion to standing surface wave and to droplet ejection from liquid-gas interface. Unlike the analytical solutions established during the 1960 s, CFD modeling is not limited to the small amplitude regime. It can extend solutions to the nonlinear regime to determine the amplitude of surface waves after the onset of instability. The present simulation also demonstrated consistent trends from numerical experiments through variation of physical properties from low viscous fluid to high viscous fluids, and through variation of geometry and input forcing functions. A comparison of surface wave patterns under various forcing frequencies and amplitudes showed good agreement with experimental observations. It is concluded that thrust oscillations can cause droplet formation at the interface, which results in increased surface area and enhanced heat transfer

  5. Analytical and Semi-Analytical Tools for the Design of Oscillatory Pumping Tests.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Michael; Barrash, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Oscillatory pumping tests-in which flow is varied in a periodic fashion-provide a method for understanding aquifer heterogeneity that is complementary to strategies such as slug testing and constant-rate pumping tests. During oscillatory testing, pressure data collected at non-pumping wells can be processed to extract metrics, such as signal amplitude and phase lag, from a time series. These metrics are robust against common sensor problems (including drift and noise) and have been shown to provide information about aquifer heterogeneity. Field implementations of oscillatory pumping tests for characterization, however, are not common and thus there are few guidelines for their design and implementation. Here, we use available analytical solutions from the literature to develop design guidelines for oscillatory pumping tests, while considering practical field constraints. We present two key analytical results for design and analysis of oscillatory pumping tests. First, we provide methods for choosing testing frequencies and flow rates which maximize the signal amplitude that can be expected at a distance from an oscillating pumping well, given design constraints such as maximum/minimum oscillator frequency and maximum volume cycled. Preliminary data from field testing helps to validate the methodology. Second, we develop a semi-analytical method for computing the sensitivity of oscillatory signals to spatially distributed aquifer flow parameters. This method can be quickly applied to understand the "sensed" extent of an aquifer at a given testing frequency. Both results can be applied given only bulk aquifer parameter estimates, and can help to optimize design of oscillatory pumping test campaigns.

  6. Dynamics of an unconstrained oscillatory flicking brush for road sweeping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanegas Useche, L. V.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Parker, G. A.

    2007-11-01

    This article studies the dynamics of a freely rotating flicking brush by means of a mathematical model. The bristles are treated as cantilever prismatic beams subjected to small deflections. A solution of the equation of motion for their forced transverse vibration is obtained through the normal-mode method. A novel oscillatory motion is superimposed onto the rotary motion of the brush. Two functions of oscillation are investigated: a sinusoidal angular velocity and a novel function, named after the authors 'VAP' (Vanegas Useche, Abdel Wahab, Parker), developed to provide small shaft accelerations. The VAP function may be a square wave, a triangle wave, or a smooth wave between them, depending on the value of a smoothness parameter, b. The results indicate that the maximum bending moment, stress, and deflection are independent of the mean angular velocity, are proportional to its alternating component, and increase linearly with the mount radius and the sine of the mount angle. In addition, the behaviour of the brush is strongly affected by the frequency of oscillation, the type of function, the value of b, and bristle wear, amongst other parameters. For the sinusoidal and VAP function, resonance occurs at the bristle natural frequencies. Moreover, the VAP function tends to produce a condition similar to resonance also at odd fractions of the natural frequencies. This phenomenon may be accentuated or reduced, by adjusting the value of b, and be expedited or impeded, by the selection of the frequency. The results of this work may also be applied to the case of a small-deflection cantilever beam, when the transverse external force is a sinusoidal, square, or triangle wave or when it is given by the new VAP function. Finally, the VAP wave may enable to excite a condition similar to resonance not only at the natural frequencies of the beam, but also at odd fractions of them. Small frequencies may be required to achieve a resonant behaviour of a high-frequency mode

  7. Quantitative analysis of numerical solvers for oscillatory biomolecular system models

    PubMed Central

    Quo, Chang F; Wang, May D

    2008-01-01

    Background This article provides guidelines for selecting optimal numerical solvers for biomolecular system models. Because various parameters of the same system could have drastically different ranges from 10-15 to 1010, the ODEs can be stiff and ill-conditioned, resulting in non-unique, non-existing, or non-reproducible modeling solutions. Previous studies have not examined in depth how to best select numerical solvers for biomolecular system models, which makes it difficult to experimentally validate the modeling results. To address this problem, we have chosen one of the well-known stiff initial value problems with limit cycle behavior as a test-bed system model. Solving this model, we have illustrated that different answers may result from different numerical solvers. We use MATLAB numerical solvers because they are optimized and widely used by the modeling community. We have also conducted a systematic study of numerical solver performances by using qualitative and quantitative measures such as convergence, accuracy, and computational cost (i.e. in terms of function evaluation, partial derivative, LU decomposition, and "take-off" points). The results show that the modeling solutions can be drastically different using different numerical solvers. Thus, it is important to intelligently select numerical solvers when solving biomolecular system models. Results The classic Belousov-Zhabotinskii (BZ) reaction is described by the Oregonator model and is used as a case study. We report two guidelines in selecting optimal numerical solver(s) for stiff, complex oscillatory systems: (i) for problems with unknown parameters, ode45 is the optimal choice regardless of the relative error tolerance; (ii) for known stiff problems, both ode113 and ode15s are good choices under strict relative tolerance conditions. Conclusions For any given biomolecular model, by building a library of numerical solvers with quantitative performance assessment metric, we show that it is possible

  8. The cerebral oscillatory network of parkinsonian resting tremor.

    PubMed

    Timmermann, Lars; Gross, Joachim; Dirks, Martin; Volkmann, Jens; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2003-01-01

    analysis and the calculation of phase shifts revealed a strong bidirectional coupling between the EMG and diencephalic activity and a direct afferent coupling between the EMG and SII and the PPC. In contrast, the cerebellum, SMA/CMA and PM show little evidence for direct coupling with the peripheral EMG but seem to be connected with the periphery via other cerebral areas (e.g. M1). In summary, our results demonstrate tremor-related oscillatory activity within a cerebral network, with abnormal coupling in a cerebello-diencephalic-cortical loop and cortical motor (M1, SMA/CMA, PM) and sensory (SII, PPC) areas contralateral to the tremor hand. The main frequency of cerebro-cerebral coupling corresponds to double the tremor frequency.

  9. Fluctuations of Prestimulus Oscillatory Power Predict Subjective Perception of Tactile Simultaneity

    PubMed Central

    Halacz, Johanna; van Dijk, Hanneke; Kahlbrock, Nina; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2012-01-01

    Oscillatory activity is modulated by sensory stimulation but can also fluctuate in the absence of sensory input. Recent studies have demonstrated that such fluctuations of oscillatory activity can have substantial influence on the perception of subsequent stimuli. In the present study, we employed a simultaneity task in the somatosensory domain to study the role of prestimulus oscillatory activity on the temporal perception of 2 events. Subjects received electrical stimulations of the left and right index finger with varying stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) and reported their subjective perception of simultaneity, while brain activity was recorded with magnetoencephalography. With intermediate SOAs (30 and 45 ms), subjects frequently misperceived the stimulation as simultaneously. We compared neuronal oscillatory power in these conditions and found that power in the high beta band (∼20 to 40 Hz) in primary and secondary somatosensory cortex prior to the electrical stimulation predicted subjects' reports of simultaneity. Additionally, prestimulus alpha-band power influenced perception in the condition SOA 45 ms. Our results indicate that fluctuations of ongoing oscillatory activity in the beta and alpha bands shape subjective perception of physically identical stimulation. PMID:22114082

  10. Fluctuations of prestimulus oscillatory power predict subjective perception of tactile simultaneity.

    PubMed

    Lange, Joachim; Halacz, Johanna; van Dijk, Hanneke; Kahlbrock, Nina; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2012-11-01

    Oscillatory activity is modulated by sensory stimulation but can also fluctuate in the absence of sensory input. Recent studies have demonstrated that such fluctuations of oscillatory activity can have substantial influence on the perception of subsequent stimuli. In the present study, we employed a simultaneity task in the somatosensory domain to study the role of prestimulus oscillatory activity on the temporal perception of 2 events. Subjects received electrical stimulations of the left and right index finger with varying stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) and reported their subjective perception of simultaneity, while brain activity was recorded with magnetoencephalography. With intermediate SOAs (30 and 45 ms), subjects frequently misperceived the stimulation as simultaneously. We compared neuronal oscillatory power in these conditions and found that power in the high beta band (∼20 to 40 Hz) in primary and secondary somatosensory cortex prior to the electrical stimulation predicted subjects' reports of simultaneity. Additionally, prestimulus alpha-band power influenced perception in the condition SOA 45 ms. Our results indicate that fluctuations of ongoing oscillatory activity in the beta and alpha bands shape subjective perception of physically identical stimulation.

  11. How brain oscillations form memories--a processing based perspective on oscillatory subsequent memory effects.

    PubMed

    Hanslmayr, Simon; Staudigl, Tobias

    2014-01-15

    Brain oscillations are increasingly recognized by memory researchers as a useful tool to unravel the neural mechanisms underlying the formation of a memory trace. However, the increasing numbers of published studies paint a rather complex picture of the relation between brain oscillations and memory formation. Concerning oscillatory amplitude, for instance, increases as well as decreases in various frequency bands (theta, alpha, beta and gamma) were associated with memory formation. These results cast doubt on frameworks putting forward the idea of an oscillatory signature that is uniquely related to memory formation. In an attempt to clarify this issue we here provide an alternative perspective, derived from classic cognitive frameworks/principles of memory. On the basis of Craik's levels of processing framework and Tulving's encoding specificity principle we hypothesize that brain oscillations during encoding might primarily reflect the perceptual and cognitive processes engaged by the encoding task. These processes may then lead to later successful retrieval depending on their overlap with the processes engaged by the memory test. As a consequence, brain oscillatory correlates of memory formation could vary dramatically depending on how the memory is encoded, and on how it is being tested later. Focusing on oscillatory amplitude changes and on theta-to-gamma cross-frequency coupling, we here review recent evidence showing how brain oscillatory subsequent memory effects can be modulated, and sometimes even be reversed, by varying encoding tasks, and the contextual overlap between encoding and retrieval.

  12. Ca2+ Effects on ATP Production and Consumption Have Regulatory Roles on Oscillatory Islet Activity.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Joseph P; Ha, Joon; Merrins, Matthew J; Satin, Leslie S; Sherman, Arthur; Bertram, Richard

    2016-02-02

    Pancreatic islets respond to elevated blood glucose by secreting pulses of insulin that parallel oscillations in β-cell metabolism, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, and bursting electrical activity. The mechanisms that maintain an oscillatory response are not fully understood, yet several models have been proposed. Only some can account for experiments supporting that metabolism is intrinsically oscillatory in β-cells. The dual oscillator model (DOM) implicates glycolysis as the source of oscillatory metabolism. In the companion article, we use recently developed biosensors to confirm that glycolysis is oscillatory and further elucidate the coordination of metabolic and electrical signals in the insulin secretory pathway. In this report, we modify the DOM by incorporating an established link between metabolism and intracellular Ca(2+) to reconcile model predictions with experimental observations from the companion article. With modification, we maintain the distinguishing feature of the DOM, oscillatory glycolysis, but introduce the ability of Ca(2+) influx to reshape glycolytic oscillations by promoting glycolytic efflux. We use the modified model to explain measurements from the companion article and from previously published experiments with islets.

  13. Separating Fractal and Oscillatory Components in the Power Spectrum of Neurophysiological Signal

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Haiguang; Liu, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    Neurophysiological field-potential signals consist of both arrhythmic and rhythmic patterns indicative of the fractal and oscillatory dynamics arising from likely distinct mechanisms. Here, we present a new method, namely the Irregular-Resampling Auto-Spectral Analysis (IRASA), to separate fractal and oscillatory components in the power spectrum of neurophysiological signal according to their distinct temporal and spectral characteristics. In this method, we irregularly resampled the neural signal by a set of non-integer factors, and statistically summarized the auto-power spectra of the resampled signals to separate the fractal component from the oscillatory component in the frequency domain. We tested this method on simulated data and demonstrated that IRASA could robustly separate the fractal component from the oscillatory component. In addition, applications of IRASA to macaque electrocorticography (ECoG) and human magnetoencephalography (MEG) data revealed a greater power-law exponent of fractal dynamics during sleep compared to wakefulness. The temporal fluctuation in the broadband power of the fractal component revealed characteristic dynamics within and across the eyes-closed, eyes-open and sleep states. These results demonstrate the efficacy and potential applications of this method in analyzing electrophysiological signatures of large-scale neural circuit activity. We expect that the proposed method or its future variations would potentially allow for more specific characterization of the differential contributions of oscillatory and fractal dynamics to distributed neural processes underlying various brain functions. PMID:26318848

  14. Synchronization phenomena in mixed media of passive, excitable, and oscillatory cells.

    PubMed

    Kryukov, A K; Petrov, V S; Averyanova, L S; Osipov, G V; Chen, W; Drugova, O; Chan, C K

    2008-09-01

    We study collective phenomena in highly heterogeneous cardiac cell culture and its models. A cardiac culture is a mixture of passive (fibroblasts), oscillatory (pacemakers), and excitable (myocytes) cells. There is also heterogeneity within each type of cell as well. Results of in vitro experiments are modelled by Luo-Rudy and FitzHugh-Nagumo systems. For oscillatory and excitable media, we focus on the transitions from fully incoherent behavior to partially coherent behavior and then to global synchronization as the coupling strength is increased. These regimes are characterized qualitatively by spatiotemporal diagrams and quantitatively by profiles of dependence of individual frequencies on coupling. We find that synchronization clusters are determined by concentric and spiral waves. These waves arising due to the heterogeneity of medium push covered cells to oscillate in synchrony. We are also interested in the influence of passive and excitable elements on the oscillatory characteristics of low- and high-dimensional ensembles of cardiac cells. The mixture of initially silent excitable and passive cells shows the transitions to oscillatory behavior. In the media of oscillatory and passive or excitable cells, the effect of oscillation death is observed.

  15. Oscillatory pallidal local field potential activity inversely correlates with limb dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Paul; Oliviero, Antonio; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Insola, Angelo; Mazzone, Paolo; Brown, Peter

    2005-08-01

    Levodopa induced dyskinesias (LIDs) are poorly understood and yet are a major cause of disability in Parkinson's disease (PD). The activity of neurons in the basal ganglia of patients with PD tends to be strongly synchronized at frequencies under 30 Hz, leading to oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs). As dopaminergic therapy acutely suppresses this synchronization, we investigated whether this suppression may contribute to LIDs. Accordingly, we sought an inverse correlation between oscillatory synchronization and dyskinesia activity across time. To this end, we recorded pallidal LFPs in two Parkinsonian subjects exhibiting LIDs following surgery for deep brain stimulation. We correlated LFP power with simultaneously recorded EMG from the dyskinetic contralateral upper limb. We found highly significant inverse correlations between the oscillatory LFP activity under 30 Hz and dyskinetic EMG (maximum r = -0.65, P < 0.001 and r = -0.33, P < 0.001 for activities over 13-30 Hz in each subject). The inverse relationship between oscillatory pallidal LFP activity and dyskinetic EMG was maintained over time periods of a few seconds and was focal. This observation links the suppression of oscillatory synchronization in the pallidum with dyskinetic muscle activity in PD.

  16. Separating Fractal and Oscillatory Components in the Power Spectrum of Neurophysiological Signal.

    PubMed

    Wen, Haiguang; Liu, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    Neurophysiological field-potential signals consist of both arrhythmic and rhythmic patterns indicative of the fractal and oscillatory dynamics arising from likely distinct mechanisms. Here, we present a new method, namely the irregular-resampling auto-spectral analysis (IRASA), to separate fractal and oscillatory components in the power spectrum of neurophysiological signal according to their distinct temporal and spectral characteristics. In this method, we irregularly resampled the neural signal by a set of non-integer factors, and statistically summarized the auto-power spectra of the resampled signals to separate the fractal component from the oscillatory component in the frequency domain. We tested this method on simulated data and demonstrated that IRASA could robustly separate the fractal component from the oscillatory component. In addition, applications of IRASA to macaque electrocorticography and human magnetoencephalography data revealed a greater power-law exponent of fractal dynamics during sleep compared to wakefulness. The temporal fluctuation in the broadband power of the fractal component revealed characteristic dynamics within and across the eyes-closed, eyes-open and sleep states. These results demonstrate the efficacy and potential applications of this method in analyzing electrophysiological signatures of large-scale neural circuit activity. We expect that the proposed method or its future variations would potentially allow for more specific characterization of the differential contributions of oscillatory and fractal dynamics to distributed neural processes underlying various brain functions.

  17. Decision-making ability of Physarum polycephalum enhanced by its coordinated spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics.

    PubMed

    Iwayama, Koji; Zhu, Liping; Hirata, Yoshito; Aono, Masashi; Hara, Masahiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-04-12

    An amoeboid unicellular organism, a plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum, exhibits complex spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics and sophisticated information processing capabilities while deforming its amorphous body. We previously devised an 'amoeba-based computer (ABC),' that implemented optical feedback control to lead this amoeboid organism to search for a solution to the traveling salesman problem (TSP). In the ABC, the shortest TSP route (the optimal solution) is represented by the shape of the organism in which the body area (nutrient absorption) is maximized while the risk of being exposed to aversive light stimuli is minimized. The shortness of the TSP route found by ABC, therefore, serves as a quantitative measure of the optimality of the decision made by the organism. However, it remains unclear how the decision-making ability of the organism originates from the oscillatory dynamics of the organism. We investigated the number of coexisting traveling waves in the spatiotemporal patterns of the oscillatory dynamics of the organism. We show that a shorter TSP route can be found when the organism exhibits a lower number of traveling waves. The results imply that the oscillatory dynamics are highly coordinated throughout the global body. Based on the results, we discuss the fact that the decision-making ability of the organism can be enhanced not by uncorrelated random fluctuations, but by its highly coordinated oscillatory dynamics.

  18. Localized Electron Heating by Strong Guide-Field Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuehan; Sugawara, Takumichi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ono, Yasushi; UTST Team

    2015-11-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field (typically Bt 15Bp) using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in Univ. Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. The region of high electron temperature, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field, was found to have a round shape with radius of 2 [cm]. Also, it was localized around the X-point and does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et .jt . When we include a guide-field effect term Bt / (Bp + αBt) for Et .jt where α =√{ (vin2 +vout2) /v∥2 } , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus,'' a Grant-in-Aid from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 15J03758.

  19. Determination of Temporal Order among the Components of an Oscillatory System

    PubMed Central

    Barragán, Sandra; Rueda, Cristina; Fernández, Miguel A.; Peddada, Shyamal D.

    2015-01-01

    Oscillatory systems in biology are tightly regulated process where the individual components (e.g. genes) express in an orderly manner by virtue of their functions. The temporal order among the components of an oscillatory system may potentially be disrupted for various reasons (e.g. environmental factors). As a result some components of the system may go out of order or even cease to participate in the oscillatory process. In this article, we develop a novel framework to evaluate whether the temporal order is unchanged in different populations (or experimental conditions). We also develop methodology to estimate the order among the components with a suitable notion of “confidence.” Using publicly available data on S. pombe, S. cerevisiae and Homo sapiens we discover that the temporal order among the genes cdc18; mik1; hhf1; hta2; fkh2 and klp5 is evolutionarily conserved from yeast to humans. PMID:26151635

  20. Pseudo-inverse Jacobian control with grey relational analysis for robot manipulators mounted on oscillatory bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Lin, C. C.; Lo, H.-S.

    2009-10-01

    Interest in complex robotic systems is growing in new application areas. An example of such a robotic system is a dexterous manipulator mounted on an oscillatory base. In literature, such systems are known as macro/micro systems. This work proposes pseudo-inverse Jacobian feedback control laws and applies grey relational analysis for tuning outer-loop PID control parameters of Cartesian computed-torque control law for robotic manipulators mounted on oscillatory bases. The priority when modifying controller parameters should be the top ranking importance among parameters. Grey relational grade is utilized to investigate the sensitivity of tuning the auxiliary signal PID of the Cartesian computed-torque law to achieve desired performance. Results of this study can be feasible to numerous mechanical systems, such as mobile robots, gantry cranes, underwater robots, and other dynamic systems mounted on oscillatory bases, for moving the end-effector to a desired Cartesian position.

  1. Not so different after all: The same oscillatory processes support different types of attention.

    PubMed

    Frey, Julia Natascha; Ruhnau, Philipp; Weisz, Nathan

    2015-11-11

    Scientific research from the last two decades has provided a vast amount of evidence that brain oscillations reflect physiological activity enabling diverse cognitive processes. The goal of this review is to give a broad empirical and conceptual overview of how ongoing oscillatory activity may support attention processes. Keeping in mind that definitions of cognitive constructs like attention are prone to being blurry and ambiguous, the present review focuses mainly on the neural correlates of 'top-down' attention deployment. In particular, we will discuss modulations of (ongoing) oscillatory activity during spatial, temporal, selective, and internal attention. Across these seemingly distinct attentional domains, we will summarize studies showing the involvement of two oscillatory processes observed during attention deployment: power modulations mainly in the alpha band, and phase modulations in lower frequency bands. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Prediction and Attention.

  2. Non-oscillatory spectral element Chebyshev method for shock wave calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sidilkover, D.; Karniadakis, G.E.

    1993-07-01

    A new algorithm based on spectral element discretization and non-oscillatory ideas is developed for the solution of hyperbolic partial differential equations. A conservative formulation is proposed based on cell averaging and reconstruction procedures, that employs a staggered grid of Gauss-Chebyshev and Gauss-Lobatto-Chebyshev discretizations. The non-oscillatory reconstruction procedure is based on ideas similar to those proposed by Cai et al. but employs a modified technique which is more robust and simpler in terms of determining the location and strength of a discontinuity. It is demonstrated through model problems of linear advection, inviscid Burgers equation, and one-dimensional Euler system that the proposed algorithm leads to stable, non-oscillatory accurate results. Exponential accuracy away from the discontinuity is realized for the inviscid Burgers equation example. 20 refs., 10 figs.

  3. A comparative analysis on different nanofluid models for the oscillatory stagnation point flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Khan, A. U.; Saleem, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this study we have presented the comparative analysis of the oscillatory stagnation point flow of nanofluids. Both the phase flow model and Buongiorno model are discussed for oscillatory stagnation point flows and a comparison between experimental model and theoretical model is presented. The resulting partial differential equations for oscillatory two-dimensional flows are simplified in a fixed frame and a moving frame of reference subject to the assumed form of solutions. The homotopy analysis method is used to solve the reduced system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The consequences are examined through graphs and tables. It is also found that comparatively both the Boungiorno nanofluid model and phase flow model are of compatible order for a special set of parameters but generally such results do not hold.

  4. Oscillatory Notch-pathway activity in a delay model of neuronal differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momiji, Hiroshi; Monk, Nicholas A. M.

    2009-08-01

    Lateral inhibition resulting from a double-negative feedback loop underlies the assignment of different fates to cells in many developmental processes. Previous studies have shown that the presence of time delays in models of lateral inhibition can result in significant oscillatory transients before patterned steady states are reached. We study the impact of local feedback loops in a model of lateral inhibition based on the Notch signaling pathway, elucidating the roles of intracellular and intercellular delays in controlling the overall system behavior. The model exhibits both in-phase and out-of-phase oscillatory modes and oscillation death. Interactions between oscillatory modes can generate complex behaviors such as intermittent oscillations. Our results provide a framework for exploring the recent observation of transient Notch-pathway oscillations during fate assignment in vertebrate neurogenesis.

  5. Visual study of the effect of grazing flow on the oscillatory flow in a resonator orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Rice, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    Grazing flow and oscillatory flow in an orifice were studied in a plexiglass flow channel with a single side branch Helmholtz resonator using water as the fluid medium. An oscillatory flow was applied to the resonatory cavity, and color dyes were injected in both the orifice and the grazing flow field to record the motion of the fluid. The flow regimes associated with linear and nonlinear (high sound pressure level) impedances with and without grazing flows were recorded by a high-speed motion-picture camera. Appreciable differences in the oscillatory flow field were seen in the various flow regimes. With high grazing flows, the outflow and inflow from the resonator cavity are found to be asymmetric. The visual study confirms that jet energy loss during flow into a resonator cavity is much larger than the loss for ejection from the cavity into the grazing flow. For inflow into the resonator cavity, the effective orifice area was significantly reduced.

  6. Thermocapillary oscillatory convection in half-zone liquid bridge and hydrothermal wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ze Mei

    It is now generally accepted that thermocapillary convection in half-zone liquid bridge of large Prandtl number fluid transfers from axis-symmetric convection to oscillatory convection directly with the increasing temperature difference, and it may be excited by the hydrothermal wave. In present study, thermocapillary oscillatory convection in a half-zone liquid bridge has been simulated for large Prandtl number fluid (10 cSt silicon oil) in the gravity level 1x10-4 g0 . The direct numerical simulation shows that for half-zone of large Prandtl fluid, the steady axissymmetric thermocapillary convection transfers to oscillatory convection via a 3-D steady state flow with azimuthal wave number m = 2 for some parameters, for example, L/d = 0.4 and V/Vo = 0.985, as the Marangoni number is increased. It is also of interest that the flow on the free surface at the z-constant cross section is from the cold spots towards the hot spots, which is similar to the results obtained in half-zone liquid bridge of Pr = 0.01 by Levenstam et al. Moreover, the present study reports the numerical results for hydrothermal wave in a liquid layer in the gravity level 1x10-4 g0 . The amplitudes of oscillatory velocity and temperature in the liquid layer are compared with those in the half-zone liquid bridge, which show that the amplitude of hydrothermal wave in the liquid layer is much smaller than that in the liquid bridge. The information about the existence of the steady state flow m = 2 prior to the oscillatory convection in half-zone liquid bridge and the very small amplitude of hydrothermal wave in a liquid layer are useful for understanding the mechanism for transition to oscillatory convection in the half zone.

  7. Complex oscillatory redox dynamics with signaling potential at the edge between normal and pathological mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Kembro, Jackelyn M.; Cortassa, Sonia; Aon, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    The time-keeping properties bestowed by oscillatory behavior on functional rhythms represent an evolutionarily conserved trait in living systems. Mitochondrial networks function as timekeepers maximizing energetic output while tuning reactive oxygen species (ROS) within physiological levels compatible with signaling. In this work, we explore the potential for timekeeping functions dependent on mitochondrial dynamics with the validated two-compartment mitochondrial energetic-redox (ME-R) computational model, that takes into account (a) four main redox couples [NADH, NADPH, GSH, Trx(SH)2], (b) scavenging systems (glutathione, thioredoxin, SOD, catalase) distributed in matrix and extra-matrix compartments, and (c) transport of ROS species between them. Herein, we describe that the ME-R model can exhibit highly complex oscillatory dynamics in energetic/redox variables and ROS species, consisting of at least five frequencies with modulated amplitudes and period according to power spectral analysis. By stability analysis we describe that the extent of steady state—as against complex oscillatory behavior—was dependent upon the abundance of Mn and Cu, Zn SODs, and their interplay with ROS production in the respiratory chain. Large parametric regions corresponding to oscillatory dynamics of increasingly complex waveforms were obtained at low Cu, Zn SOD concentration as a function of Mn SOD. This oscillatory domain was greatly reduced at higher levels of Cu, Zn SOD. Interestingly, the realm of complex oscillations was located at the edge between normal and pathological mitochondrial energetic behavior, and was characterized by oxidative stress. We conclude that complex oscillatory dynamics could represent a frequency- and amplitude-modulated H2O2 signaling mechanism that arises under intense oxidative stress. By modulating SOD, cells could have evolved an adaptive compromise between relative constancy and the flexibility required under stressful redox

  8. Oscillatory magnetoresistance in La 0.67Ca 0.33MnO 3/YBa 2Cu 4O 8/La 0.67Ca 0.33MnO 3 sandwiches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Wong, H. K.

    2004-06-01

    Transport properties of La 0.67Ca 0.33MnO 3 (LCMO)/YBa 2Cu 4O 8 (YBCO)/LCMO sandwiches were studied. An oscillatory resistance occurs with a period 30 nm in the series of LCMO (50 nm)/YBCO/LCMO (50 nm) films when the thickness of the YBCO layer is less than 60 nm. In contrast to that for LCMO films, the metal-semiconductor transition temperature for LCMO/YBCO/LCMO films is enhanced and strongly depends on the thickness of the YBCO layer. The magnetoresistance ratio also shows a non-monotonic behavior and a long oscillatory period (80 nm) is found for LCMO (100 nm)/YBCO/LCMO (100 nm) films. These results imply that the magnetic spin interaction between the two LCMO layers may exist through the normal-conductive YBCO layer.

  9. On essentially non-oscillatory schemes on unstructured meshes: Analysis and implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abgrall, R.

    1992-01-01

    A few years ago, the class of Essentially Non-Oscillatory Schemes for the numerical simulation of hyperbolic equations and systems was constructed. Since then, some extensions have been made to multidimensional simulations of compressible flows, mainly in the context of very regular structured meshes. In this paper, we first recall and improve the results of an earlier paper about non-oscillatory reconstruction on unstructured meshes, emphasizing the effective calculation of the reconstruction. Then we describe a class of numerical schemes on unstructured meshes and give some applications for its third order version. This demonstrates that a higher order of accuracy is indeed obtained, even on very irregular meshes.

  10. Extrapolation methods for divergent oscillatory infinite integrals that are defined in the sense of summability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidi, Avram

    1987-01-01

    In a recent work by the author an extrapolation method, the W-transformation, was developed, by which a large class of oscillatory infinite integrals can be computed very efficiently. The results of this work are extended to a class of divergent oscillatory infinite integrals in the present paper. It is shown in particular that these divergent integrals exist in the sense of Abel summability and that the W-transformation can be applied to them without any modifications. Convergence results are stated and numerical examples given.

  11. Dynamic behavior of the bray-liebhafsky oscillatory reaction controlled by sulfuric acid and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejić, N.; Vujković, M.; Maksimović, J.; Ivanović, A.; Anić, S.; Čupić, Ž.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.

    2011-12-01

    The non-periodic, periodic and chaotic regimes in the Bray-Liebhafsky (BL) oscillatory reaction observed in a continuously fed well stirred tank reactor (CSTR) under isothermal conditions at various inflow concentrations of the sulfuric acid were experimentally studied. In each series (at any fixed temperature), termination of oscillatory behavior via saddle loop infinite period bifurcation (SNIPER) as well as some kind of the Andronov-Hopf bifurcation is presented. In addition, it was found that an increase of temperature, in different series of experiments resulted in the shift of bifurcation point towards higher values of sulfuric acid concentration.

  12. Essentially non-oscillatory shock capturing methods applied to turbulence amplification in shock wave calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osher, Stanley; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1988-01-01

    ENO (essentially non-oscillatory) schemes can provide uniformly high order accuracy right up to discontinuities while keeping sharp, essentially non-oscillatory shock transitions. Recently, an efficient implementation of ENO schemes was obtained based on fluxes and TVD Runge-Kutta time discretizations. The resulting code is very simple to program for multi-dimensions. ENO schemes are especially suitable for computing problems with both discontinuities and fine structures in smooth regions, such as shock interaction with turbulence, for which results for 1-D and 2-D Euler equations are presented. Much better resolution is observed by using third order ENO schemes than by using second order TVD schemes for such problems.

  13. Evaluation of write error rate for voltage-driven dynamic magnetization switching in magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiota, Yoichi; Nozaki, Takayuki; Tamaru, Shingo; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Suzuki, Yoshishige

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the write error rate (WER) for voltage-driven dynamic switching in magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetization. We observed a clear oscillatory behavior of the switching probability with respect to the duration of pulse voltage, which reveals the precessional motion of magnetization during voltage application. We experimentally demonstrated WER as low as 4 × 10-3 at the pulse duration corresponding to a half precession period (˜1 ns). The comparison between the results of the experiment and simulation based on a macrospin model shows a possibility of ultralow WER (<10-15) under optimum conditions. This study provides a guideline for developing practical voltage-driven spintronic devices.

  14. EXPLICT CALULATIONS OF HOMOCLINIC TANGLES SURROUNDING MAGNETIC ISLANDS IN TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect

    ROEDER, R.K.W.; RAPOPORT, B.I.; EVANS, T.E.

    2002-06-01

    We present explicit calculations of the complicated geometric objects known as homoclinic tangles that surround magnetic islands in the Poincare mapping of a tokamak's magnetic field. These tangles are shown to exist generically in the magnetic field of all toroidal confinement systems. The geometry of these tangles provides an explanation for the stochasticity known to occur near the X-points of the Poincare mapping. Furthermore, the intersection of homoclinic tangles from different resonances provides an explicit mechanism for the non-diffusive transport of magnetic field lines between these resonance layers.

  15. Determination of the Neutron Magnetic Moment

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Greene, G. L.; Ramsey, N. F.; Mampe, W.; Pendlebury, J. M.; Smith, K.; Dress, W. B.; Miller, P. D.; Perrin, P.

    1981-06-01

    The neutron magnetic moment has been measured with an improvement of a factor of 100 over the previous best measurement. Using a magnetic resonance spectrometer of the separated oscillatory field type capable of determining a resonance signal for both neutrons and protons (in flowing H{sub 2}O), we find ..mu..{sub n}/..mu..{sub p} = 0.68497935(17) (0.25 ppM). The neutron magnetic moment can also be expressed without loss of accuracy in a variety of other units.

  16. Oscillatory Critical Amplitudes in Hierarchical Models and the Harris Function of Branching Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, Ovidiu; Giacomin, Giambattista

    2013-02-01

    Oscillatory critical amplitudes have been repeatedly observed in hierarchical models and, in the cases that have been taken into consideration, these oscillations are so small to be hardly detectable. Hierarchical models are tightly related to iteration of maps and, in fact, very similar phenomena have been repeatedly reported in many fields of mathematics, like combinatorial evaluations and discrete branching processes. It is precisely in the context of branching processes with bounded off-spring that T. Harris, in 1948, first set forth the possibility that the logarithm of the moment generating function of the rescaled population size, in the super-critical regime, does not grow near infinity as a power, but it has an oscillatory prefactor (the Harris function). These oscillations have been observed numerically only much later and, while the origin is clearly tied to the discrete character of the iteration, the amplitude size is not so well understood. The purpose of this note is to reconsider the issue for hierarchical models and in what is arguably the most elementary setting—the pinning model—that actually just boils down to iteration of polynomial maps (and, notably, quadratic maps). In this note we show that the oscillatory critical amplitude for pinning models and the Harris function coincide. Moreover we make explicit the link between these oscillatory functions and the geometry of the Julia set of the map, making thus rigorous and quantitative some ideas set forth in Derrida et al. (Commun. Math. Phys. 94:115-132, 1984).

  17. Analysis of Wind Tunnel Longitudinal Static and Oscillatory Data of the F-16XL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Murphy, Patrick C.; Curry, Timothy J.; Brandon, Jay M.

    1997-01-01

    Static and oscillatory wind tunnel data are presented for a 10-percent-scale model of an F-16XL aircraft. Static data include the effect of angle of attack, sideslip angle, and control surface deflections on aerodynamic coefficients. Dynamic data from small-amplitude oscillatory tests are presented at nominal values of angle of attack between 20 and 60 degrees. Model oscillations were performed at five frequencies from 0.6 to 2.9 Hz and one amplitude of 5 degrees. A simple harmonic analysis of the oscillatory data provided Fourier coefficients associated with the in-phase and out-of-phase components of the aerodynamic coefficients. A strong dependence of the oscillatory data on frequency led to the development of models with unsteady terms in the form of indicial functions. Two models expressing the variation of the in-phase and out-of-phase components with angle of attack and frequency were proposed and their parameters estimated from measured data.

  18. On oscillatory convection with the Cattaneo-Christov hyperbolic heat-flow model.

    PubMed

    Bissell, J J

    2015-03-08

    Adoption of the hyperbolic Cattaneo-Christov heat-flow model in place of the more usual parabolic Fourier law is shown to raise the possibility of oscillatory convection in the classic Bénard problem of a Boussinesq fluid heated from below. By comparing the critical Rayleigh numbers for stationary and oscillatory convection, Rc and RS respectively, oscillatory convection is found to represent the preferred form of instability whenever the Cattaneo number C exceeds a threshold value CT≥8/27π(2)≈0.03. In the case of free boundaries, analytical approaches permit direct treatment of the role played by the Prandtl number [Formula: see text], which-in contrast to the classical stationary scenario-can impact on oscillatory modes significantly owing to the non-zero frequency of convection. Numerical investigation indicates that the behaviour found analytically for free boundaries applies in a qualitatively similar fashion for fixed boundaries, while the threshold Cattaneo number CT is computed as a function of [Formula: see text] for both boundary regimes.

  19. An Extended Motor Network Generates Beta and Gamma Oscillatory Perturbations during Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Tony W.; Slason, Erin; Asherin, Ryan; Kronberg, Eugene; Reite, Martin L.; Teale, Peter D.; Rojas, Donald C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the time course and neural generators of oscillatory beta and gamma motor responses in typically-developing children. Participants completed a unilateral flexion-extension task using each index finger as whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) data were acquired. These MEG data were imaged in the frequency-domain using spatial…

  20. Oscillatory flow accelerates autocrine signaling due to nonlinear effect of convection on receptor-related actions.

    PubMed

    Nebyla, Marek; Přibyl, Michal; Schreiber, Igor

    2013-08-06

    We study effects of oscillatory convective flow in extracellular space on the velocity of chemical signal propagation having a form of a front wave above a cellular layer. We found that the time-averaged propagation velocity under oscillatory flow for a particular Péclet number amplitude is slower than the velocity under steady laminar flow regime for the same value of the Péclet number, but significantly faster than under no-flow conditions. We derive asymptotic values of the propagation velocity and asymptotic characteristics of the corresponding concentration fronts in high- and low-frequency regimes and show that the reason for the observed velocity increase under the oscillatory flow stems from a nonlinear dependence of the propagation velocity on the Péclet number, particularly from the convex character of the dependence. Our findings suggest that the specific responses of cellular cultures to different flow conditions in the extracellular space (for example, expression of atherosclerosis protective genes under steady laminar flow but not under oscillatory flow) is a consequence of a nonlinear coupling between the extracellular transport and complex intracellular reaction cascades forming a positive feedback loop of the autocrine signaling. This mechanism can operate independently of, or in conjunction with, a direct stress-sensing due to mechanotransduction.

  1. A modified seventh order two step hybrid method for the numerical integration of oscillatory problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogiratou, Z.; Monovasilis, Th.; Simos, T. E.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we consider trigonometrically fitted two step hybrid methods for the numerical solution of second-order initial value problems. We follow the approach of Simos and derive trigonometrically fitting conditions for methods with five stages. As an example we modify a seventh order method and apply to three well known oscillatory problems.

  2. Study of Repetitive Movements Induced Oscillatory Activities in Healthy Subjects and Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Lee, Wai-Keung; Shyu, Kuo-Kai; Chang, Hsiao-Huang; Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Hsu, Hao-Teng; Chang, Chun-Yen; Lan, Gong-Yau; Lee, Po-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive movements at a constant rate require the integration of internal time counting and motor neural networks. Previous studies have proved that humans can follow short durations automatically (automatic timing) but require more cognitive efforts to track or estimate long durations. In this study, we studied sensorimotor oscillatory activities in healthy subjects and chronic stroke patients when subjects were performing repetitive finger movements. We found the movement-modulated changes in alpha and beta oscillatory activities were decreased with the increase of movement rates in finger lifting of healthy subjects and the non-paretic hands in stroke patients, whereas no difference was found in the paretic-hand movements at different movement rates in stroke patients. The significant difference in oscillatory activities between movements of non-paretic hands and paretic hands could imply the requirement of higher cognitive efforts to perform fast repetitive movements in paretic hands. The sensorimotor oscillatory response in fast repetitive movements could be a possible indicator to probe the recovery of motor function in stroke patients. PMID:27976723

  3. Oscillatory behaviors and hierarchical assembly of contractile structures in intercalating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Zallen, Jennifer A.

    2011-08-01

    Fluctuations in the size of the apical cell surface have been associated with apical constriction and tissue invagination. However, it is currently not known if apical oscillatory behaviors are a unique property of constricting cells or if they constitute a universal feature of the force balance between cells in multicellular tissues. Here, we set out to determine whether oscillatory cell behaviors occur in parallel with cell intercalation during the morphogenetic process of axis elongation in the Drosophila embryo. We applied multi-color, time-lapse imaging of living embryos and SIESTA, an integrated tool for automated and semi-automated cell segmentation, tracking, and analysis of image sequences. Using SIESTA, we identified cycles of contraction and expansion of the apical surface in intercalating cells and characterized them at the molecular, cellular, and tissue scales. We demonstrate that apical oscillations are anisotropic, and this anisotropy depends on the presence of intact cell-cell junctions and spatial cues provided by the anterior-posterior patterning system. Oscillatory cell behaviors during axis elongation are associated with the hierarchical assembly and disassembly of contractile actomyosin structures at the medial cortex of the cell, with actin localization preceding myosin II and with the localization of both proteins preceding changes in cell shape. We discuss models to explain how the architecture of cytoskeletal networks regulates their contractile behavior and the mechanisms that give rise to oscillatory cell behaviors in intercalating cells.

  4. Shadows of Music-Language Interaction on Low Frequency Brain Oscillatory Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrus, Elisa; Koelsch, Stefan; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2011-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies investigating similarities between music and language perception have relied exclusively on the signal averaging technique, which does not adequately represent oscillatory aspects of electrical brain activity that are relevant for higher cognition. The current study investigated the patterns of brain oscillations…

  5. Spontaneous Oscillatory Rhythms in the Degenerating Mouse Retina Modulate Retinal Ganglion Cell Responses to Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Yong Sook; Park, Dae Jin; Ahn, Jung Ryul; Senok, Solomon S.

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of the electrical activity of the retina in the animal models of retinal degeneration has been carried out in part to understand the progression of retinal degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP), but also to determine optimum stimulus paradigms for use with retinal prosthetic devices. The models most studied in this regard have been the two lines of mice deficient in the β-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice), where the degenerating retinas exhibit characteristic spontaneous hyperactivity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs). Additionally, there is a robust ~10 Hz rhythmic burst of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spikes on the trough of the oscillatory LFP. In rd1 mice, the rhythmic burst of RGC spikes is always phase-locked with the oscillatory LFP and this phase-locking property is preserved regardless of postnatal ages. However, in rd10 mice, the frequency of the oscillatory rhythm changes according to postnatal age, suggesting that this rhythm might be a marker of the stage of degeneration. Furthermore when a biphasic current stimulus is applied to rd10 mice degenerate retina, distinct RGC response patterns that correlate with the stage of degeneration emerge. This review also considers the significance of these response properties. PMID:26793063

  6. Brain Oscillatory Activity during Spatial Navigation: Theta and Gamma Activity Link Medial Temporal and Parietal Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, David J.; Congedo, Marco; Ciorciari, Joseph; Silberstein, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    Brain oscillatory correlates of spatial navigation were investigated using blind source separation (BSS) and standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) analyses of 62-channel EEG recordings. Twenty-five participants were instructed to navigate to distinct landmark buildings in a previously learned virtual reality town…

  7. Effect of a cardiac rehabilitation program on exercise oscillatory ventilation in Japanese patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Fumitake; Adachi, Hitoshi; Tomono, Jun-Ichi; Toyoda, Shigeru; Iwamatsu, Koichi; Sakuma, Masashi; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Oshima, Shigeru; Inoue, Teruo

    2016-10-01

    Although exercise oscillatory ventilation has emerged as a potent independent risk factor for adverse prognosis in heart failure, it is not well known whether cardiac rehabilitation can improve oscillatory ventilation. In this study, we investigated the magnitude of oscillations in ventilation before and after cardiac rehabilitation in chronic heart failure patients with exercise oscillatory ventilation. Cardiac rehabilitation (5-month program) was performed in 26 patients with chronic heart failure who showed an oscillatory ventilation pattern during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX). After the 5-month rehabilitation program was completed, the patients again underwent CPX. To determine the magnitude of oscillations in ventilation, the amplitude and cycle length of the oscillations were calculated and compared with several other parameters, including biomarkers that have established prognostic value in heart failure. At baseline before cardiac rehabilitation, both oscillation amplitude (R = 0.625, P < 0.01) and cycle length (R = 0.469, P < 0.05) were positively correlated with the slope of minute ventilation vs. carbon dioxide production. Plasma BNP levels were positively correlated with amplitude (R = 0.615, P < 0.01) but not cycle length (R = 0.371). Cardiac rehabilitation decreased oscillation amplitude (P < 0.01) but failed to change cycle length. The change in amplitude was positively correlated with the change in BNP levels (R = 0.760, P < 0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed that only the change in amplitude was an independent predictor of the change in BNP levels (R = 0.717, P < 0.01). A 5-month cardiac rehabilitation program improves exercise oscillatory ventilation in chronic heart failure patients by reducing the oscillation amplitude. This effect is associated with a reduction of plasma BNP levels, potentially contributing to an improvement of heart failure.

  8. Observation of parallel-antiparallel magnetic coupling in ultrathin CoFeB-MgO based structures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chih-Wei; Shiue, C. H.; Cheng, Tsung-I.; Chern, G.

    2012-08-01

    A series of MgO/CoFeB/Ta(x)/CoFeB/MgO multilayered structures is fabricated by sputtering. Magnetic parallel-antiparallel oscillatory behavior is observed as a function of Ta thickness, while perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) also exists due to the MgO stabilization. The oscillatory period is ˜1.3 nm with a maximum interlayer exchange coupling (IEC) of ˜0.02 erg/cm2. The Ta spacer can be replaced by a layer of other metals to form a general perpendicular synthetic antiferromagnetic structure. The tuning of IEC and PMA by insertion of Ru is discussed.

  9. Quantum Well States in Magnetic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Z. Q.

    2000-03-01

    Quantum Well (QW) states in magnetic nanostructures play an important role in many phenomena such as the oscillatory interlayer coupling in giant magnetoresistance (GMR) multilayers. Photoemission provides the most direct measurement of QW states in k-space. In this talk, I will report our recent results on QW states obtained at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The high brightness and fine spot size of photon beam at beamline 7 of ALS allow the performance of photoemission experiment on double wedged samples. First, the nature of QW states in metallic thin films will be discussed. Using one monolayer Ni as a probe, we show that the amplitude of the QW wavefunction is described by an envelope function. Second, quantum interference between two QWs will be discussed. Finally, we demonstrate the interconnection between the QW states and the oscillatory interlayer coupling in magnetic multilayers.

  10. Micromechanical measurement of beating patterns in the quantum oscillatory chemical potential of InGaAs quantum wells due to spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Florian Wilde, Marc A.; Heyn, Christian; Hardtdegen, Hilde; Schäpers, Thomas; Grundler, Dirk

    2015-08-31

    The quantum oscillatory magnetization M(B) and chemical potential μ(B) of a two-dimensional (2D) electron system provide important and complementary information about its ground state energy at low temperature T. We developed a technique that provides both quantities in the same cool-down process via a decoupled static operation and resonant excitation of a micromechanical cantilever. On InGaAs/InP heterostructures, we observed beating patterns in both M(B) and μ(B) attributed to spin-orbit interaction. A significantly enhanced sensitivity in μ enabled us to extract Rashba and Dresselhaus parameters with high accuracy. The technique is powerful for detailed investigations on the electronic properties of 2D materials.

  11. Deviation of tracheal pressure from airway opening pressure during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in a porcine lung model.

    PubMed

    Johannes, Amélie; Zollhoefer, Bernd; Eujen, Ulrike; Kredel, Markus; Rauch, Stefan; Roewer, Norbert; Muellenbach, Ralf M

    2013-04-01

    Oxygenation during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation is secured by a high level of mean airway pressure. Our objective was to identify a pressure difference between the airway opening of the respiratory circuit and the trachea during application of different oscillatory frequencies. Six female Pietrain pigs (57.1 ± 3.6 kg) were first ventilated in a conventional mechanical ventilation mode. Subsequently, the animals were switched to high-frequency oscillatory ventilation by setting mean airway opening pressure 5 cmH(2)O above the one measured during controlled mechanical ventilation. Measurements at the airway opening and at tracheal levels were performed in healthy lungs and after induction of acute lung injury by surfactant depletion. During high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, the airway opening pressure was set at a constant level. The pressure amplitude was fixed at 90 cmH(2)O. Starting from an oscillatory frequency of 3 Hz, the frequency was increased in steps of 3 Hz to 15 Hz and then decreased accordingly. At each frequency, measurements were performed in the trachea through a side-lumen of the endotracheal tube and the airway opening pressure was recorded. The pressure difference was calculated. At every oscillatory frequency, a pressure loss towards the trachea could be shown. This pressure difference increased with higher oscillatory frequencies (3 Hz 2.2 ± 2.1 cmH(2)O vs. 15 Hz 7.5 ± 1.8 cmH(2)O). The results for healthy and injured lungs were similar. Tracheal pressures decreased with higher oscillatory frequencies. This may lead to pulmonary derecruitment. This has to be taken into consideration when increasing oscillatory frequencies and differentiated pressure settings are mandatory.

  12. Dynamic Characteristics Analysis of a Small-Sized Linear Oscillatory Actuator Employing the 3-D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Noritaka; Hirata, Katsuhiro; Ueyama, Kenji; Hashimoto, Eiichiro; Takagi, Takahiro

    Recently, linear oscillatory actuators have been used in a wide range of applications because of their advantages, such as high efficiency, simple structure, and easy control. Small linear oscillatory actuators are expected to be used in haptic devices and the vibration system of mobile phones. In this paper, we propose a new structure of a small linear oscillatory actuator. The static and dynamic characteristics of the actuator are calculated by the 3-D finite element method. The effectiveness of this method is shown by the comparison of the calculated results with the experimental results.

  13. Non-collinear magnetization configuration in interlayer exchange coupled magnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Min, B.-C.; Kim, J.-Y.; Park, B.-G.; Park, J. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Shin, K.-H.

    2011-09-01

    Element specific magnetic hysteresis loops of the interlayer exchange coupled CoFeB/Ru/[Co/Ni]4 structure were measured utilizing x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. It was found that the Co/Ni multilayer and the CoFeB layer have Ru thickness dependent oscillatory interlayer coupling. Due to its interlayer coupling with the perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni multilayer, the CoFeB magnetization direction is slightly tilted out-of-plane from its in-plane magnetic easy axis. Quantitative measurements show that the tilting angle is small (<12°) and that a small in-plane magnetic field (˜50 Oe) applied to this structure will result in a completely in-plane CoFeB magnetization.

  14. Hydrodynamic parameters of micro porous media for steady and oscillatory flow: Application to cryocooler regenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jeesung Jeff

    Pulse Tube Cryocoolers (PTC) are a class of rugged and high-endurance refrigeration systems that operate without a moving part at their low temperature ends, and are capable of easily reaching 120°K. These devices can also be configured in multiple stages to reach temperatures below 10 °K. PTCs are particularly suitable for applications in space, missile guiding systems, cryosurgery, medicine preservation, superconducting electronics, magnetic resonance imaging, weather observation, and liquefaction of nitrogen. Although various designs of PTCs have been in use for a few decades, they represent a dynamic and developmental field. PTCs ruggedness comes at the price of relatively low efficiency, however, and thus far they have been primarily used in high-end applications. They have the potential of extensive use in consumer products, however, should sufficiently higher efficiencies be achieved. Intense research competition is underway worldwide, and newer designs are continuously introduced. Some of the fundamental processes that are responsible for their performance are at best not fully understood, however, and consequently systematic modeling of PTC systems is difficult. Among the challenges facing the PTC research community, besides improvement in terms of system efficiency, is the possible miniaturization (total fluid volume of few cubic centimeters (cc)) of these systems. The operating characteristics of a PTC are significantly different from the conventional refrigeration cycles. A PTC implements the theory of oscillatory compression and expansion of the gas within a closed volume to achieve desired refrigeration. Regenerators and pulse tubes are often viewed as the two most complex and essential components in cryocoolers. An important deficiency with respect to the state of art models dealing with PTCs is the essentially total lack of understanding about the directional hydrodynamic and thermal transport parameters associated with periodic flow in

  15. Memory effects in schematic models of glasses subjected to oscillatory deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiocco, Davide; Foffi, Giuseppe; Sastry, Srikanth

    2015-05-01

    We consider two schematic models of glasses subjected to oscillatory shear deformation, motivated by the observations, in computer simulations of a model glass, of a nonequilibrium transition from a localized to a diffusive regime as the shear amplitude is increased, and of persistent memory effects in the localized regime. The first of these schematic models is the NK model, a spin model with disordered multi-spin interactions previously studied as a model for sheared amorphous solids. The second model, a transition matrix model, is an abstract formulation of the manner in which occupancy of local energy minima evolves under oscillatory deformation cycles. In both of these models, we find a behavior similar to that of an atomic model glass studied earlier. We discuss possible further extensions of the approaches outlined.

  16. Pattern-forming instabilities in nematic liquid crystals under oscillatory Couette flow.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, O S; Krekhov, A P; Kramer, L

    2005-09-01

    We consider instabilities, either homogeneous or periodic in space, which develop in a nematic liquid crystal layer under rectilinear oscillatory Couette flow for planar surface alignment of the director perpendicular to the flow plane. On the basis of a numerical and analytical linear stability analysis we determine the critical amplitude of the oscillatory flow, the wave number, and the symmetry of the destabilizing mode and present a comprehensive phase diagram of the flow instabilities. In particular it is found that by varying the frequency of the Couette flow the instability changes its temporal symmetry. This transition is shown to be related to the inertia effects of the nematic fluid, which become more important with increasing flow frequency. We also show that an electric field applied perpendicularly to the nematic layer can induce an exchange of instabilities with different spatial and temporal symmetries. The theoretical results are compared with experiments, when available.

  17. Weakly pulse-coupled oscillators, FM interactions, synchronization, and oscillatory associative memory.

    PubMed

    Izhikevich, E M

    1999-01-01

    We study pulse-coupled neural networks that satisfy only two assumptions: each isolated neuron fires periodically, and the neurons are weakly connected. Each such network can be transformed by a piece-wise continuous change of variables into a phase model, whose synchronization behavior and oscillatory associative properties are easier to analyze and understand. Using the phase model, we can predict whether a given pulse-coupled network has oscillatory associative memory, or what minimal adjustments should be made so that it can acquire memory. In the search for such minimal adjustments we obtain a large class of simple pulse-coupled neural networks that can memorize and reproduce synchronized temporal patterns the same way a Hopfield network does with static patterns. The learning occurs via modification of synaptic weights and/or synaptic transmission delays.

  18. Numerical algorithms for highly oscillatory dynamic system based on commutator-free method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wencheng; Deng, Zichen; Zhang, Suying

    2007-04-01

    In the present paper, an efficiently improved modified Magnus integrator algorithm based on commutator-free method is proposed for the second-order dynamic systems with time-dependent high frequencies. Firstly, the second-order dynamic systems are transferred to the frame of reference by introducing new variable so that highly oscillatory behaviour inherited from the entries. Then the modified Magnus integrator method based on local linearization is appropriately designed for solving the above new form. And some optimized strategies for reducing the number of function evaluations and matrix operations are also suggested. Finally, several numerical examples for highly oscillatory dynamic systems, such as Airy equation, Bessel equation, Mathieu equation, are presented to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Spatial and Temporal Variation of Turbulence during Oscillatory Flow in Realistic Model Human Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Gaku; Hatori, Akihiro; Takano, Ryosuke

    Turbulence in the oscillatory flow in realistic model human central airways was measured by particle image velocimetry (PIV) to reveal the nature of turbulence in a lung. The transparent silicone model of multi-branching airways was fabricated from X-ray CT images by rapid prototyping. The multi-branching airways comprise trachea, and right and left bronchi, with airway diameters ranging from 14 to 2 mm, respectively. Experiments were performed for a Reynolds number from 1200 to 2200 and a Womersley number from 1.9 to 2.3 in the trachea. Results showed that spatial and temporal variations of turbulent intensity strongly depends on the airway geometry and on the phase of oscillatory flow, and that expiratory flow generates strong turbulence which explosively occurs in the entire cross-section especially in the right bronchi, whereas inspiratory flow generates relatively weak turbulence near the airway wall.

  20. Cooperative behavior between oscillatory and excitable units: the peculiar role of positive coupling-frequency correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenschein, Bernard; Peron, Thomas K. DM.; Rodrigues, Francisco A.; Kurths, Jürgen; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2014-08-01

    We study the collective dynamics of noise-driven excitable elements, so-called active rotators. Crucially here, the natural frequencies and the individual coupling strengths are drawn from some joint probability distribution. Combining a mean-field treatment with a Gaussian approximation allows us to find examples where the infinite-dimensional system is reduced to a few ordinary differential equations. Our focus lies in the cooperative behavior in a population consisting of two parts, where one is composed of excitable elements, while the other one contains only self-oscillatory units. Surprisingly, excitable behavior in the whole system sets in only if the excitable elements have a smaller coupling strength than the self-oscillating units. In this way positive local correlations between natural frequencies and couplings shape the global behavior of mixed populations of excitable and oscillatory elements.

  1. Oscillatory instabilities of gap solitons in a repulsive Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizin, P. P.; Zezyulin, D. A.; Alfimov, G. L.

    2016-12-01

    The paper is devoted to numerical study of stability of nonlinear localized modes ("gap solitons") for the spatially one-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation (1D GPE) with periodic potential and repulsive interparticle interactions. We use the Evans function approach combined with the exterior algebra formulation in order to detect and describe weak oscillatory instabilities. We show that the simplest ("fundamental") gap solitons in the first and in the second spectral gap undergo oscillatory instabilities for certain values of the frequency parameter (i.e., the chemical potential). The number of unstable eigenvalues and the associated instability rates are described. Several stable and unstable more complex (non-fundamental) gap solitons are also discussed. The results obtained from the Evans function approach are independently confirmed using the direct numerical integration of the GPE.

  2. A New Linear Oscillatory Actuator with Variable Characteristics Using Two Sets of Coils

    PubMed Central

    Kitayama, Fumiya; Hirata, Katsuhiro; Niguchi, Noboru; Kobayashi, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, electromagnetic linear oscillatory actuators are used as vibration control devices because of their high controllability. However, there is a problem that thrust and vibration are small at a wide drive frequency range. In order to improve this problem, we propose a new linear oscillatory actuator that can easily change its own characteristics by using two sets of coils. Through finite element analysis, large vibration was observed at 100 Hz in a series connection, and large vibration and high thrust were observed at 70 Hz and 140 Hz in a parallel connection. From these results, we verified that the actuator had two different characteristics due to switchable connections, and could generate high thrust and large vibration by smaller currents at a wide drive frequency range. PMID:26999136

  3. Lower mass limit of an evolving interstellar cloud and chemistry in an evolving oscillatory cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarafdar, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous solution of the equation of motion, equation of state and energy equation including heating and cooling processes for interstellar medium gives for a collapsing cloud a lower mass limit which is significantly smaller than the Jeans mass for the same initial density. The clouds with higher mass than this limiting mass collapse whereas clouds with smaller than critical mass pass through a maximum central density giving apparently similar clouds (i.e., same Av, size and central density) at two different phases of its evolution (i.e., with different life time). Preliminary results of chemistry in such an evolving oscillatory cloud show significant difference in abundances of some of the molecules in two physically similar clouds with different life times. The problems of depletion and short life time of evolving clouds appear to be less severe in such an oscillatory cloud.

  4. A New Linear Oscillatory Actuator with Variable Characteristics Using Two Sets of Coils.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Fumiya; Hirata, Katsuhiro; Niguchi, Noboru; Kobayashi, Masashi

    2016-03-15

    Nowadays, electromagnetic linear oscillatory actuators are used as vibration control devices because of their high controllability. However, there is a problem that thrust and vibration are small at a wide drive frequency range. In order to improve this problem, we propose a new linear oscillatory actuator that can easily change its own characteristics by using two sets of coils. Through finite element analysis, large vibration was observed at 100 Hz in a series connection, and large vibration and high thrust were observed at 70 Hz and 140 Hz in a parallel connection. From these results, we verified that the actuator had two different characteristics due to switchable connections, and could generate high thrust and large vibration by smaller currents at a wide drive frequency range.

  5. Emotional arousal modulates oscillatory correlates of targeted memory reactivation during NREM, but not REM sleep

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Mick; Schreiner, Thomas; Seifritz, Erich; Rasch, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is considered to preferentially reprocess emotionally arousing memories. We tested this hypothesis by cueing emotional vs. neutral memories during REM and NREM sleep and wakefulness by presenting associated verbal memory cues after learning. Here we show that cueing during NREM sleep significantly improved memory for emotional pictures, while no cueing benefit was observed during REM sleep. On the oscillatory level, successful memory cueing during NREM sleep resulted in significant increases in theta and spindle oscillations with stronger responses for emotional than neutral memories. In contrast during REM sleep, solely cueing of neutral (but not emotional) memories was associated with increases in theta activity. Our results do not support a preferential role of REM sleep for emotional memories, but rather suggest that emotional arousal modulates memory replay and consolidation processes and their oscillatory correlates during NREM sleep. PMID:27982120

  6. Oscillatory entrainment of subthalamic nucleus neurons and behavioural consequences in rodents and primates.

    PubMed

    Syed, E C J; Benazzouz, A; Taillade, M; Baufreton, J; Champeaux, K; Falgairolle, M; Bioulac, B; Gross, C E; Boraud, T

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the functional role of oscillatory activity in the local field potential (LFP) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). It has been postulated that beta (15-30 Hz) oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia induces PD motor symptoms. To assess this hypothesis, an LFP showing significant power in the beta frequency range (23 Hz) was used as a stimulus both in vitro and in vivo. We first demonstrated in rat brain slices that STN neuronal activity was driven by the LFP stimulation. We then applied beta stimulation to the STN of 16 rats and two monkeys while quantifying motor behaviour. Although stimulation-induced behavioural effects were observed, stimulation of the STN at 23 Hz induced no significant decrease in motor performance in either rodents or primates. This study is the first to show LFP-induced behaviour in both rats and primates, and highlights the complex relationship between beta power and parkinsonian symptoms.

  7. Probing meaningfulness of oscillatory EEG components with bootstrapping, label noise and reduced training sets.

    PubMed

    Castaño-Candamil, Sebastián; Meinel, Andreas; Dähne, Sven; Tangermann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    As oscillatory components of the Electroencephalogram (EEG) and other electrophysiological signals may co-modulate in power with a target variable of interest (e.g. reaction time), data-driven supervised methods have been developed to automatically identify such components based on labeled example trials. Under conditions of challenging signal-to-noise ratio, high-dimensional data and small training sets, however, these methods may overfit to meaningless solutions. Examples are spatial filtering methods like Common Spatial Patterns (CSP) and Source Power Comodulation (SPoC). It is difficult for the practitioner to tell apart meaningful from arbitrary, random components. We propose three approaches to probe the robustness of extracted oscillatory components and show their application to both, simulated and EEG data recorded during a visually cued hand motor reaction time task.

  8. Different routes towards oscillatory zoning in the growth of solid solutions.

    PubMed

    Lubashevsky, Ihor; Mues, Tanja; Heuer, Andreas

    2008-10-01

    Oscillatory zoning, i.e., self-formation of spatial quasiperiodic oscillations in the composition of solid growing from aqueous solution, is analyzed theoretically. Keeping in mind systems like (Ba,Sr)SO4 , we propose a one-dimensional model that takes into account the nonideality of the solid solution and the system asymmetry, in particular, reflecting itself in different solubilities for such systems. Based on a linear stability analysis, different parameter regions can be identified. Even an ideal solution with a sufficiently large asymmetry can display oscillatory zoning. Numerical simulations complement the linear stability analysis as well as the qualitative consideration of the instability development and reveal the nature of the limit cycles.

  9. Elongation and migration of single DNA molecules in microchannels using oscillatory shear flows.

    PubMed

    Jo, Kyubong; Chen, Yeng-Long; de Pablo, Juan J; Schwartz, David C

    2009-08-21

    Much of modern biology relies on the strategic manipulation of molecules for creating ordered arrays prior to high throughput molecular analysis. Normally, DNA arrays involve deposition on surfaces, or confinement in nanochannels; however, we show that microfluidic devices can present stretched molecules within a controlled flow in ways complementing surface modalities, or extreme confinement conditions. Here we utilize pressure-driven oscillatory shear flows generated in microchannels as a new way of stretching DNA molecules for imaging "arrays" of individual DNA molecules. Fluid shear effects both stretch DNA molecules and cause them to migrate away from the walls becoming focused in the centerline of a channel. We show experimental findings confirming simulations using Brownian dynamics accounting for hydrodynamic interactions between molecules and channel-flow boundary conditions. Our findings characterize DNA elongation and migration phenomena as a function of molecular size, shear rate, oscillatory frequency with comparisons to computer simulation studies.

  10. Emotional arousal modulates oscillatory correlates of targeted memory reactivation during NREM, but not REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Mick; Schreiner, Thomas; Seifritz, Erich; Rasch, Björn

    2016-12-16

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is considered to preferentially reprocess emotionally arousing memories. We tested this hypothesis by cueing emotional vs. neutral memories during REM and NREM sleep and wakefulness by presenting associated verbal memory cues after learning. Here we show that cueing during NREM sleep significantly improved memory for emotional pictures, while no cueing benefit was observed during REM sleep. On the oscillatory level, successful memory cueing during NREM sleep resulted in significant increases in theta and spindle oscillations with stronger responses for emotional than neutral memories. In contrast during REM sleep, solely cueing of neutral (but not emotional) memories was associated with increases in theta activity. Our results do not support a preferential role of REM sleep for emotional memories, but rather suggest that emotional arousal modulates memory replay and consolidation processes and their oscillatory correlates during NREM sleep.

  11. Influence of nonlinear chemical reactions on the transport coefficients in oscillatory Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Swarup; Dalal, D. C.

    2016-10-01

    A multiple-scale method of averaging is applied to the study of transport of a chemical species in oscillatory Couette flow where the species may undergoes a reversible phase exchange with the boundary wall and nonlinear chemical reactions both within the fluid and at the boundary wall. Analytical expressions are obtained for transport coefficients. The results shows how the transport coefficients are influenced by the reversible phase exchange reaction kinetics and the rate and degree of the nonlinear decay chemical reaction.

  12. An asymptotic expansion of the Kontorovich-Lebedev transform of damped oscillatory functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, D.

    2002-08-01

    An asymptotic expansion valid for large positive values of s is constructed for the integral transformwhere Kis(x) denotes the modified Bessel function of the third kind of purely imaginary order. The expansion applies to functions f(x) that are analytic in the sector arg(x)[less-than-or-equals, slant][pi]/4 and that are exponentially damped and oscillatory as x-->[infinity] in this sector.

  13. Free vibrations and buckling analysis of laminated plates by oscillatory radial basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, A. M. A.; Ferreira, A. J. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the free vibrations and buckling analysis of laminated plates is performed using a global meshless method. A refined version of Kant's theorie which accounts for transverse normal stress and through-the-thickness deformation is used. The innovation is the use of oscillatory radial basis functions. Numerical examples are performed and results are presented and compared to available references. Such functions proved to be an alternative to the tradicional nonoscillatory radial basis functions.

  14. Oscope identifies oscillatory genes in unsynchronized single-cell RNA-seq experiments.

    PubMed

    Leng, Ning; Chu, Li-Fang; Barry, Chris; Li, Yuan; Choi, Jeea; Li, Xiaomao; Jiang, Peng; Stewart, Ron M; Thomson, James A; Kendziorski, Christina

    2015-10-01

    Oscillatory gene expression is fundamental to development, but technologies for monitoring expression oscillations are limited. We have developed a statistical approach called Oscope to identify and characterize the transcriptional dynamics of oscillating genes in single-cell RNA-seq data from an unsynchronized cell population. Applying Oscope to a number of data sets, we demonstrated its utility and also identified a potential artifact in the Fluidigm C1 platform.

  15. Chimeras in globally coupled oscillatory systems: From ensembles of oscillators to spatially continuous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Lennart; Krischer, Katharina

    2015-06-01

    We study an oscillatory medium with a nonlinear global coupling that gives rise to a harmonic mean-field oscillation with constant amplitude and frequency. Two types of cluster states are found, each undergoing a symmetry-breaking transition towards a related chimera state. We demonstrate that the diffusional coupling is non-essential for these complex dynamics. Furthermore, we investigate localized turbulence and discuss whether it can be categorized as a chimera state.

  16. Aggregation, Fragmentation, and the Nonlinear Dynamics of Electrorheological Fluids in Oscillatory Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James E.; Odinek, Judy

    1995-10-01

    We have conducted a time-resolved, two-dimensional light scattering study of the nonlinear dynamics of field-induced structures in an electrorheological fluid subjected to oscillatory shear. We have developed a theoretical description of the observed dynamics by considering the response of a fragmenting and aggregating particle chain to the prevailing hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces. This structural theory is then used to describe the nonlinear rheology of electrorheological fluids.

  17. Velocity and shear rate estimates of some non-Newtonian oscillatory flows in tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutev, N.; Tabakova, S.; Radev, S.

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional Newtonian and non-Newtonian (Carreau viscosity model used) oscillatory flows in straight tubes are studied theoretically and numerically. The corresponding analytical solution of the Newtonian flow and the numerical solution of the Carreau viscosity model flow show differences in velocity and shear rate. Some estimates for the velocity and shear rate differences are theoretically proved. As numerical examples the blood flow in different type of arteries and the polymer flow in pipes are considered.

  18. Oscillatory pressure wave transmission from the upper airway to the carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Howitt, Lauren; Kairaitis, Kristina; Kirkness, Jason P; Garlick, Sarah R; Wheatley, John R; Byth, Karen; Amis, Terence C

    2007-11-01

    Snoring-associated vibration energy transmission from the upper airway to the carotid artery has been hypothesized as a potential atherosclerotic plaque initiating/rupturing event that may provide a pathogenic mechanism linking snoring and embolic stroke. We examined transmission of oscillatory pressure waves from the pharyngeal lumen to the common carotid artery wall and lumen in seven male, anesthetized, spontaneously breathing New Zealand White rabbits. Airflow was monitored via a pneumotachograph inserted in series in the intact trachea. Fifteen 20-s runs of, separately, 40-, 60-, and 90-Hz oscillatory pressure waves [pressure amplitude in the trachea (Ptr(amp)), amplitude 2-20 cmH(2)O] were generated by a loudspeaker driven by a sine wave generator and amplifier and superimposed on tidal breathing via the cranial tracheal connector. Pressure transducer-tipped catheters measured pressure amplitudes in the tissues adjacent to the common carotid artery bifurcation (Pcti(amp)) and within the lumen (carotid sinus; Pcs(amp)). Data were analyzed using power spectrum analysis and linear mixed-effects statistical modeling. Both the frequency (f) and amplitude of the injected pressure wave influenced Pcti(amp) and Pcs(amp), in that ln Pcti(amp) = 1.2(Ptr(amp)) + 0.02(f) - 5.2, and ln Pcs(amp) = 0.6(Ptr(amp)) + 0.02(f) - 4.9 (both P < 0.05). Across all frequencies tested, transfer of oscillatory pressure across the carotid artery wall was associated with an amplitude gain, as expressed by a Pcs(amp)-to-Pcti(amp) ratio of 1.8 +/- 0.3 (n = 6). Our findings confirm transmission of oscillatory pressure waves from the upper airway lumen to the peripharyngeal tissues and across the carotid artery wall to the lumen. Further studies are required to establish the role of this incident energy in the pathogenesis of carotid artery vascular disease.

  19. Dynamics of viscous liquid bridges inside microchannels subject to external oscillatory flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadlouydarab, Majid; Azaiez, Jalel; Chen, Zhangxin

    2015-02-01

    We report on two-dimensional simulations of liquid bridges' dynamics inside microchannels of uniform wettability and subject to an external oscillatory flow rate. The oscillatory flow results in a zero net flow rate and its effects are compared to those of a stationary system. To handle the three phase contact lines motion, Cahn-Hilliard diffuse-interface formulation was used and the flow equations were solved using the finite element method with adaptively refined unstructured grids. The results indicate that the liquid bridge responds in three different ways depending on the substrate wettability properties and the frequency of the oscillatory flow. In particular below a critical frequency, the liquid bridge will rupture when the channel walls are philic or detach from the surface when they are phobic. However, at high frequencies, the liquid bridge shows a perpetual periodic oscillatory motion for both philic and phobic surfaces. Furthermore, an increase in the frequency of the flow velocity results in stabilization effects and a behavior approaching that of the stationary system where no rupture or detachment can be observed. This stable behavior is the direct result of less deformation of the liquid bridge due to the fast flow direction change and motion of contact lines on the solid substrate. Moreover, it was found that the flow velocity is out of phase with the footprint and throat lengths and that the latter two also show a phase difference. These differences were explained in terms of the motion of the two contact lines on the solid substrates and the deformation of the two fluid-fluid interfaces.

  20. Dynamics of viscous liquid bridges inside microchannels subject to external oscillatory flow.

    PubMed

    Ahmadlouydarab, Majid; Azaiez, Jalel; Chen, Zhangxin

    2015-02-01

    We report on two-dimensional simulations of liquid bridges' dynamics inside microchannels of uniform wettability and subject to an external oscillatory flow rate. The oscillatory flow results in a zero net flow rate and its effects are compared to those of a stationary system. To handle the three phase contact lines motion, Cahn-Hilliard diffuse-interface formulation was used and the flow equations were solved using the finite element method with adaptively refined unstructured grids. The results indicate that the liquid bridge responds in three different ways depending on the substrate wettability properties and the frequency of the oscillatory flow. In particular below a critical frequency, the liquid bridge will rupture when the channel walls are philic or detach from the surface when they are phobic. However, at high frequencies, the liquid bridge shows a perpetual periodic oscillatory motion for both philic and phobic surfaces. Furthermore, an increase in the frequency of the flow velocity results in stabilization effects and a behavior approaching that of the stationary system where no rupture or detachment can be observed. This stable behavior is the direct result of less deformation of the liquid bridge due to the fast flow direction change and motion of contact lines on the solid substrate. Moreover, it was found that the flow velocity is out of phase with the footprint and throat lengths and that the latter two also show a phase difference. These differences were explained in terms of the motion of the two contact lines on the solid substrates and the deformation of the two fluid-fluid interfaces.

  1. Low-frequency acoustic atomization with oscillatory flow around micropillars in a microfluidic device

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Yin Nee E-mail: mtnwong@ntu.edu.sg; Wong, Teck Neng E-mail: mtnwong@ntu.edu.sg; Nguyen, Nam Trung

    2014-10-06

    This letter reports a low frequency acoustic atomization technique with oscillatory extensional flow around micropillars. Large droplets passing through two micropillars are elongated. Small droplets are then produced through the pinch-off process at the spindle-shape ends. As the actuation frequency increases, the droplet size decreases with increasing monodispersity. This method is suitable for in-situ mass production of fine droplets in a multi-phase environment without external pumping. Small particles encapsulation was demonstrated with the current technique.

  2. Calcium Response in Osteocytic Networks under Steady and Oscillatory Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Lu, X. Lucas; Huo, Bo; Park, Miri; Guo, X. Edward

    2012-01-01

    The fluid flow in the lacunar-canalicular system of bone is an essential mechanical stimulation on the osteocyte networks. Due to the complexity of human physical activities, the fluid shear stress on osteocyte bodies and processes consists of both steady and oscillatory components. In this study, we investigated and compared the intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) responses of osteocytic networks under steady and oscillatory fluid flows. An in vitro osteocytic network was built with MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells using micro-patterning techniques to simulate the in vivo orderly organization of osteocyte networks. Sinusoidal oscillating fluid flow or unidirectional steady flow was applied on the cell surface with 20 dyne/cm2 peak shear stress. It was found that the osteocytic networks were significantly more responsive to steady flow than to oscillatory flow. The osteocytes can release more calcium peaks with higher magnitudes at a faster speed under steady flow stimulation. The [Ca2+]i signaling transients under the steady and oscillatory flows have significantly different spatiotemporal characters, but a similar responsive percentage of cells. Further signaling pathway studies using inhibitors showed that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium store, extracellular calcium source, ATP, PGE2 and NO related pathways play similar roles in the [Ca2+]i signaling of osteocytes under either steady or oscillating flow. The spatiotemporal characteristics of [Ca2+]i transients under oscillating fluid flow are affected more profoundly by pharmacological treatments than under the steady flow. Our findings support the hypothesis that the [Ca2+]i responses of osteocytic networks are significantly dependent on the profiles of fluid flow. PMID:22750013

  3. LES-based characterization of a suction and oscillatory blowing fluidic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeonglae; Moin, Parviz

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a novel fluidic actuator using steady suction and oscillatory blowing was developed for control of turbulent flows. The suction and oscillatory blowing (SaOB) actuator combines steady suction and pulsed oscillatory blowing into a single device. The actuation is based upon a self-sustained mechanism of confined jets and does not require any moving parts. The control output is determined by a pressure source and the geometric details, and no additional input is needed. While its basic mechanisms have been investigated to some extent, detailed characteristics of internal turbulent flows are not well understood. In this study, internal flows of the SaOB actuator are simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES). Flow characteristics within the actuator are described in detail for a better understanding of the physical mechanisms and improving the actuator design. LES predicts the self-sustained oscillations of the turbulent jet. Switching frequency, maximum velocity at the actuator outlets, and wall pressure distribution are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The computational results are used to develop simplified boundary conditions for numerical experiments of active flow control. Supported by the Boeing company.

  4. Loss of regular oscillatory insulin secretion in islet cell antibody positive non-diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Bingley, P J; Matthews, D R; Williams, A J; Bottazzo, G F; Gale, E A

    1992-01-01

    Basal insulin secretion was compared in nine islet-cell antibody positive, non-diabetic first-degree relatives of children with Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus and nine normal control subjects matched for age, sex and weight. Acute insulin responses to a 25 g intravenous glucose tolerance test were similar in the two groups (243 (198-229) vs 329 (285-380) mU.l-1 x 10 min-1, mean (+/- SE), p = 0.25). Fasting plasma insulin was assayed in venous samples taken at one min intervals for 2 h. Time series analysis was used to demonstrate oscillatory patterns in plasma insulin. Autocorrelation showed that regular oscillatory activity was generally absent in the islet-cell antibody-positive group, whereas a regular 13 min cycle was shown in control subjects (p less than 0.0001). Fourier transformation did, however, show a 13 min spectral peak in the islet-cell antibody positive group, consistent with intermittent pulsatility. We conclude that overall oscillatory patterns of basal insulin secretion are altered in islet-cell antibody positive subjects even when the acute insulin response is within the normal range.

  5. Macromolecular Origins of Harmonics Higher than the Third in Large-Amplitude Oscillatory Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomin, Alan; Jbara, Layal; Gilbert, Peter; Chemical Engineering Department Team

    2016-11-01

    In 1935, Andrew Gemant conceived of the complex viscosity, a rheological material function measured by "jiggling" an elastic liquid in oscillatory shear. This test reveals information about both the viscous and elastic properties of the liquid, and about how these properties depend on frequency. The test gained popularity with chemists when John Ferry perfected instruments for measuring both the real and imaginary parts of the complex viscosity. In 1958, Cox and Merz discovered that the steady shear viscosity curve was easily deduced from the magnitude of the complex viscosity, and today oscillatory shear is the single most popular rheological property measurement. With oscillatory shear, we can control two things: the frequency (Deborah number) and the shear rate amplitude (Weissenberg number). When the Weissenberg number is large, the elastic liquids respond with a shear stress over a series of odd-multiples of the test frequency. In this lecture we will explore recent attempts to deepen our understand of the physics of these higher harmonics, including especially harmonics higher than the third. Canada Research Chairs program of the Government of Canada for the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Rheology.

  6. Reversibility and hysteresis of the sharp yielding transition of a colloidal glass under oscillatory shear.

    PubMed

    Dang, M T; Denisov, D; Struth, B; Zaccone, A; Schall, P

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical response of glasses remains challenging to understand. Recent results indicate that the oscillatory rheology of soft glasses is accompanied by a sharp non-equilibrium transition in the microscopic dynamics. Here, we use simultaneous x-ray scattering and rheology to investigate the reversibility and hysteresis of the sharp symmetry change from anisotropic solid to isotropic liquid dynamics observed in the oscillatory shear of colloidal glasses (D. Denisov, M.T. Dang, B. Struth, A. Zaccone, P. Schall, Sci. Rep. 5 14359 (2015)). We use strain sweeps with increasing and decreasing strain amplitude to show that, in analogy with equilibrium transitions, this sharp symmetry change is reversible and exhibits systematic frequency-dependent hysteresis. Using the non-affine response formalism of amorphous solids, we show that these hysteresis effects arise from frequency-dependent non-affine structural cage rearrangements at large strain. These results consolidate the first-order-like nature of the oscillatory shear transition and quantify related hysteresis effects both via measurements and theoretical modelling.

  7. An active damping control of robot manipulators with oscillatory bases by singular perturbation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Huang, Z. Z.; Huang, P. H.

    2007-07-01

    This paper deals with active damping control problems of robot manipulators with oscillatory bases. A first investigation of two-time scale fuzzy logic controller with vibration stabilizer for such structures has been proposed, where the dynamics of a robotic system is strongly affected by disturbances due to the base oscillation. Under the assumption of two-time scale, its stability and design procedures are presented for a multiple link manipulator with multiple dimension oscillation. The fast-subsystem controller will damp out the vibration of the oscillatory bases using a PD control method. Hence, the slow-subsystem fuzzy logic controller dominates the trajectory tracking. It can be guaranteed the stability of the internal dynamics by adding a boundary-layer correction based on singular perturbations approach. Experimental results have shown that the proposed control model offers several implementation advantages such as reduced effect of overshoot and chattering, smaller steady state error, and a fast convergent rate. The results of this study can be feasible to various mechanical systems, such as mobile robot, gantry cranes, underwater robot, and other dynamic systems mounted on oscillatory bases.

  8. Shaken, and stirred: oscillatory segmented flow for controlled size-evolution of colloidal nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Abolhasani, Milad; Oskooei, Ali; Klinkova, Anna; Kumacheva, Eugenia; Günther, Axel

    2014-07-07

    We introduce oscillatory segmented flow as a compact microfluidic format that accommodates slow chemical reactions for the solution-phase processing of colloidal nanomaterials. The strategy allows the reaction progress to be monitored at a dynamic range of up to 80 decibels (i.e., residence times of up to one day, equivalent to 720-14,400 times the mixing time) from only one sensing location. A train of alternating gas bubbles and liquid reaction compartments (segmented flow) was initially formed, stopped and then subjected to a consistent back-and-forth motion. The oscillatory segmented flow was obtained by periodically manipulating the pressures at the device inlet and outlet via square wave signals generated by non-wetted solenoid valves. The readily implementable format significantly reduced the device footprint as compared with continuous segmented flow. We investigated mixing enhancement for varying liquid segment lengths, oscillation amplitudes and oscillation frequencies. The etching of gold nanorods served as a case study to illustrate the utility of the approach for dynamic characterization and precise control of colloidal nanomaterial size and shape for 5 h. Oscillatory segmented flows will be beneficial for a broad range of lab-on-a-chip applications that require long processing times.

  9. Grid cells and theta as oscillatory interference: electrophysiological data from freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Jeewajee, A; Barry, C; O'Keefe, J; Burgess, N

    2008-01-01

    The oscillatory interference model (Burgess et al. (2007) Hippocampus 17:801-812) explains the generation of spatially stable, regular firing patterns by medial entorhinal cortical (mEC) grid cells in terms of the interference between velocity-controlled oscillators (VCOs) with different preferred directions. This model predicts specific relationships between the intrinsic firing frequency and spatial scale of grid cell firing, the EEG theta frequency, and running speed (Burgess,2008). Here, we use spectral analyses of EEG and of spike autocorrelograms to estimate the intrinsic firing frequency of grid cells, and the concurrent theta frequency, in mEC Layer II in freely moving rats. The intrinsic firing frequency of grid cells increased with running speed and decreased with grid scale, according to the quantitative prediction of the model. Similarly, theta frequency increased with running speed, which was also predicted by the model. An alternative Moiré interference model (Blair et al.,2007) predicts a direction-dependent variation in intrinsic firing frequency, which was not found. Our results suggest that interference between VCOs generates the spatial firing patterns of entorhinal grid cells according to the oscillatory interference model. They also provide specific constraints on this model of grid cell firing and have more general implications for viewing neuronal processing in terms of interfering oscillatory processes.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Oscillatory Flow Pressure and Pressure Drop Through Complex Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Wang, Meng; Gedeon, David

    2005-01-01

    A series of experiments have been performed to investigate the oscillatory flow pressure and pressure drop through complex geometries. These experiments were conducted at the CSU-SLRE facility which is a horizontally opposed, two-piston, single-acting engine with a split crankshaft driving mechanism. Flow through a rectangular duct, with no insert (obstruction), was studied first. Then four different inserts were examined: Abrupt, Manifold, Diverging Short and Diverging Long. The inserts were mounted in the center of the rectangular duct to represent different type of geometries that could be encountered in Stirling machines. The pressure and pressure drop of the oscillating flow was studied for: 1) different inserts, 2) different phase angle between the two pistons of the engine (zero, 90 lead, 180, and 90 lag), and 3) for different piston frequencies (5, 10, 15, and 20 Hz). It was found that the pressure drop of the oscillatory flow increases with increasing Reynolds number. The pressure drop was shown to be mainly due to the gas inertia for the case of oscillatory flow through a rectangular duct with no insert. On the other hand, for the cases with different inserts into the rectangular duct, the pressure drop has three sources: inertia, friction, and local losses. The friction pressure drop is only a small fraction of the total pressure drop. It was also shown that the dimensionless pressure drop decreases with increasing kinetic Reynolds number.

  11. Characterization of Oscillatory Boundary Layer Over a Closely Packed Bed of Sediment Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skitka, Joseph; Apte, Sourabh

    2012-11-01

    Lack of accurate criteria for onset of incipient motion and sediment pickup function remain two of the biggest hurdles in developing better predictive models for sediment transport. To study pickup and transport of sediment, it is necessary to have a detailed knowledge of the small amplitude oscillatory flow over the sediment layer near the sea bed. Fully resolved direct numerical simulations are performed using fictitious domain approach (Apte et al., JCP 2009) to investigate the effect of a sinusoidally oscillating flow field over a rough wall made of regular hexagonal pack of spherical particles. The flow arrangement is similar to the experimental data of Keiller & Sleath (JFM 1976). Transitional and turbulent flows at Reδ = 50 , 100 , 150 , 200 (based on the Stokes layer thickness, delta) are explored over a range of non-dimensional sphere sizes. The coherent vortex structures, turbulent cross-correlations and lift forces on the roughness elements are characterized for these flow conditions and compared against available data of Keiller & Sleath (JFM 1976) and Sleath (JFM 1986). The dynamics of the oscillatory flow over the sediment bed is used to understand the mechanism of sediment pick-up. Funding: NSF project #1133363, Sediment-Bed-Turbulence Coupling in Oscillatory Flows: Fully Resolved Numerical Experiments and Modeling.

  12. Accelerating oscillatory fronts in a nonlinear sonic vacuum with strong nonlocal effects.

    PubMed

    Gendelman, O V; Zolotarevskiy, V; Savin, A V; Bergman, L A; Vakakis, A F

    2016-03-01

    We describe and explore accelerating oscillatory fronts in sonic vacua with nonlocal interactions. As an example, a chain of particles oscillating in the plane and coupled by linear springs, with fixed ends, is considered. When one end of this system is harmonically excited in the transverse direction, one observes accelerated propagation of the excitation front, accompanied by an almost monochromatic oscillatory tail. Position of the front obeys the scaling law l(t) ∼ t(4/3). The frequency of the oscillatory tail remains constant, and the wavelength scales as λ ∼ t(1/3). These scaling laws result from the nonlocal effects; we derive them analytically (including the scaling coefficients) from a continuum approximation. Moreover, a certain threshold excitation amplitude is required in order to initiate the front propagation. The initiation threshold is evaluated on the basis of a simplified discrete model, further reduced to a completely integrable nonlinear system. Given their simplicity, nonlinear sonic vacua of the type considered herein should be common in periodic lattices.

  13. Accelerating oscillatory fronts in a nonlinear sonic vacuum with strong nonlocal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendelman, O. V.; Zolotarevskiy, V.; Savin, A. V.; Bergman, L. A.; Vakakis, A. F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe and explore accelerating oscillatory fronts in sonic vacua with nonlocal interactions. As an example, a chain of particles oscillating in the plane and coupled by linear springs, with fixed ends, is considered. When one end of this system is harmonically excited in the transverse direction, one observes accelerated propagation of the excitation front, accompanied by an almost monochromatic oscillatory tail. Position of the front obeys the scaling law l (t ) ˜t4 /3 . The frequency of the oscillatory tail remains constant, and the wavelength scales as λ ˜t1 /3 . These scaling laws result from the nonlocal effects; we derive them analytically (including the scaling coefficients) from a continuum approximation. Moreover, a certain threshold excitation amplitude is required in order to initiate the front propagation. The initiation threshold is evaluated on the basis of a simplified discrete model, further reduced to a completely integrable nonlinear system. Given their simplicity, nonlinear sonic vacua of the type considered herein should be common in periodic lattices.

  14. EEG Oscillatory States: Universality, Uniqueness and Specificity across Healthy-Normal, Altered and Pathological Brain Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fingelkurts, Alexander A.; Fingelkurts, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    For the first time the dynamic repertoires and oscillatory types of local EEG states in 13 diverse conditions (examined over 9 studies) that covered healthy-normal, altered and pathological brain states were quantified within the same methodological and conceptual framework. EEG oscillatory states were assessed by the probability-classification analysis of short-term EEG spectral patterns. The results demonstrated that brain activity consists of a limited repertoire of local EEG states in any of the examined conditions. The size of the state repertoires was associated with changes in cognition and vigilance or neuropsychopathologic conditions. Additionally universal, optional and unique EEG states across 13 diverse conditions were observed. It was demonstrated also that EEG oscillations which constituted EEG states were characteristic for different groups of conditions in accordance to oscillations’ functional significance. The results suggested that (a) there is a limit in the number of local states available to the cortex and many ways in which these local states can rearrange themselves and still produce the same global state and (b) EEG individuality is determined by varying proportions of universal, optional and unique oscillatory states. The results enriched our understanding about dynamic microstructure of EEG-signal. PMID:24505292

  15. Aquifer Characterization of the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site using 3-D Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhos, T.; Cardiff, M. A.; Hochstetler, D. L.; Zhou, Y.; Barrash, W.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic Tomography is a method of aquifer characterization that estimates hydraulic parameters related to the subsurface, such as hydraulic conductivity and storage, from measurements of hydraulic heads at numerous observation locations during a series of hydrologic tests, commonly pumping tests. Characterizing the subsurface is important for many hydrogeologic projects such as site remediation and groundwater resource exploration. Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography (OHT) is a method of imaging that uses a tomographic analysis of periodic signals. These signals are generated at distinct locations by oscillatory pumping tests in which fluid is extracted for half a period then re-injected. The transmitted effects of these signals are recorded at observation wells. The resulting measurements can be used to reconstruct the spatial variation of hydraulic parameters by solving a nonlinear inverse problem, which we solve using the geostatistical approach. Oscillatory pumping test data were collected in the summer of 2013 in an extensive field campaign at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS), a moderately heterogeneous unconfined aquifer. We present results of OHT applied to the BHRS.

  16. Incorporating Volumetric Displacement Effects In Euler-Lagrange Simulations of Particle-Laden Oscillatory Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apte, Sourabh; Finn, Justin; Cihonski, Andrew

    2013-11-01

    Recent Euler-Lagrange discrete element modeling of a few microbubbles entrained in a traveling vortex ring (Cihonski et al., JFM, 2013) has shown that extension of the point-particle method to include local volume displacement effects is critical for capturing vortex distortion effects due to microbubbles, even in a very dilute suspension. We extend this approach to investigate particle-laden oscillatory boundary layers representative of coastal sediment environments. A wall bounded, doubly periodic domain is considered laden with a layer of sediment particles in laminar as well as turbulent oscillatory boundary layers corresponding to the experiments of Keiller and Sleath (1987) and Jensen et al. (1987). Inter-particle and particle-wall collisions are modeled using a soft-sphere model which uses a nested collision grid to minimize computational effort. The effects of fluid mass displaced by the particles on the flow statistics are quantified by comparing a standard two-way coupling approach (without volume displacement effects) with volume displacement effects to show that the latter models are important for low cases with low particle-fluid density ratios. NSF project #1133363, Sediment-Bed-Turbulence Coupling in Oscillatory Flows. EPSRC Project # EP/J00507X/1, EP/J005541/1 Sand Transport under Irregular and Breaking Waves Conditions (SINBAD).

  17. Volumetric Displacement Effects In Euler-Lagrange Simulations of Sediment-Laden Oscillatory Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apte, S.; Finn, J. R.; Cihonski, A.

    2013-12-01

    An improved, three-dimensional approach for Euler-Lagrange simulation of sediment-laden oscillatory turbulent flows is developed. In this approach, the sediment particles are unresolved and subgrid similar to a discrete element model (DEM), however, the fluid volume (mass) displaced by the particle is accounted for in the conservation equations. Recent Euler-Lagrange modeling of a few microbubbles entrained in a traveling vortex ring (Cihonski et al., JFM, 2013) has shown that extension of the standard point-particle DEM method to include local volume displacement effects is critical in capturing vortex distortion effects due to microbubbles, even in a very dilute suspension. We extend this approach to investigate particle-laden oscillatory boundary layers representative of coastal sediment environments. A wall bounded, doubly periodic domain is considered laden with a layer of sediment particles in laminar as well as turbulent oscillatory boundary layers corresponding to the experiments of Keiller and Sleath (1987) and Jensen et al. (1987). Inter-particle and particle-wall collisions are modeled using a soft-sphere model which uses a nested collision grid to minimize computational effort. The effects of fluid mass displaced by the particles on the flow statistics are quantified by comparing a standard two-way coupling approach (without volume displacement effects) with volume displacement effects to show that the latter models are important for cases with low specific gravity.

  18. The Effects of High Frequency Oscillatory Flow on Particles' Deposition in Upper Human Lung Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, Jeremy; Rahai, Hamid; Taherian, Shahab

    2016-11-01

    The effects of oscillatory inspiration on particles' deposition in upper airways of a human lung during inhalation/exhalation have been numerically investigated and results of flow characteristics, and particles' deposition pattern have been compared with the corresponding results without oscillation. The objective of the investigation was to develop an improved method for drug delivery for Asthma and COPD patients. Previous clinical investigations of using oral airway oscillations have shown enhanced expectoration in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, when the frequency of oscillation was at 8 Hz with 9:1 inspiratory/expiratory (I:E) ratio. Other investigations on oscillatory ventilation had frequency range of 0.5 Hz to 2.5 Hz. In the present investigations, the frequency of oscillation was changed between 2 Hz to 10 Hz. The particles were injected at the inlet and particle velocity was equal to the inlet air velocity. One-way coupling of air and particles was assumed. Lagrangian phase model was used for transport and depositions of solid 2.5 micron diameter round particles with 1200 kg/m3 density. Preliminary results have shown enhanced PM deposition with oscillatory flow with lower frequency having a higher deposition rate Graduate Assistant.

  19. Laboratory Observations of Sand Ripple Evolution in a Small Oscillatory Flow Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calantoni, J.; Palmsten, M. L.; Chu, J.; Landry, B. J.; Penko, A.

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of sand ripples are vital to understanding numerous coastal processes such as sediment transport, wave attenuation, boundary layer development, and seafloor acoustic properties. Experimental work was conducted in a small oscillatory flow tunnel at the Sediment Dynamics Laboratory at the Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center. Six different monochromatic oscillatory forcings, three with velocity asymmetry and three without, were used to investigate sand ripple dynamics using a unimodal grain size distribution with D50=0.65 mm. The experiments represent an extension of previous work using bimodal grain size distributions. A DSLR camera with a 180-degree fisheye lens collected images of the sediment bed profile every 2 seconds to resolve changes in ripple geometries and migration rates resulting from the different flow conditions for over 127 hours (229,388 images). Matlab © algorithms undistorted the fisheye images and quantified the ripple geometries, wavelengths, heights, and migration rates as a function of flow forcing. The mobility number was kept nearly constant by increasing and decreasing the semi-excursion amplitude and the wave frequency, respectively. We observed distinct changes in ripple geometry and migration rate for the pair of oscillatory forcings having nearly identical mobility numbers. The results suggested that the commonly used mobility number might not be appropriate to characterize ripple geometry or migration rates.

  20. Oscillatory network with self-organized dynamical connections for synchronization-based image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Margarita; Manykin, Eduard; Surina, Irina

    2004-01-01

    An oscillatory network of columnar architecture located in 3D spatial lattice was recently designed by the authors as oscillatory model of the brain visual cortex. Single network oscillator is a relaxational neural oscillator with internal dynamics tunable by visual image characteristics - local brightness and elementary bar orientation. It is able to demonstrate either activity state (stable undamped oscillations) or "silence" (quickly damped oscillations). Self-organized nonlocal dynamical connections of oscillators depend on oscillator activity levels and orientations of cortical receptive fields. Network performance consists in transfer into a state of clusterized synchronization. At current stage grey-level image segmentation tasks are carried out by 2D oscillatory network, obtained as a limit version of the source model. Due to supplemented network coupling strength control the 2D reduced network provides synchronization-based image segmentation. New results on segmentation of brightness and texture images presented in the paper demonstrate accurate network performance and informative visualization of segmentation results, inherent in the model.

  1. Beta and gamma oscillatory activities associated with olfactory memory tasks: different rhythms for different functional networks?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Claire; Ravel, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory processing in behaving animals, even at early stages, is inextricable from top down influences associated with odor perception. The anatomy of the olfactory network (olfactory bulb, piriform, and entorhinal cortices) and its unique direct access to the limbic system makes it particularly attractive to study how sensory processing could be modulated by learning and memory. Moreover, olfactory structures have been early reported to exhibit oscillatory population activities easy to capture through local field potential recordings. An attractive hypothesis is that neuronal oscillations would serve to “bind” distant structures to reach a unified and coherent perception. In relation to this hypothesis, we will assess the functional relevance of different types of oscillatory activity observed in the olfactory system of behaving animals. This review will focus primarily on two types of oscillatory activities: beta (15–40 Hz) and gamma (60–100 Hz). While gamma oscillations are dominant in the olfactory system in the absence of odorant, both beta and gamma rhythms have been reported to be modulated depending on the nature of the olfactory task. Studies from the authors of the present review and other groups brought evidence for a link between these oscillations and behavioral changes induced by olfactory learning. However, differences in studies led to divergent interpretations concerning the respective role of these oscillations in olfactory processing. Based on a critical reexamination of those data, we propose hypotheses on the functional involvement of beta and gamma oscillations for odor perception and memory. PMID:25002840

  2. Role of xanthine oxidoreductase and NAD(P)H oxidase in endothelial superoxide production in response to oscillatory shear stress.

    PubMed

    McNally, J Scott; Davis, Michael E; Giddens, Don P; Saha, Aniket; Hwang, Jinah; Dikalov, Sergey; Jo, Hanjoong; Harrison, David G

    2003-12-01

    Oscillatory shear stress occurs at sites of the circulation that are vulnerable to atherosclerosis. Because oxidative stress contributes to atherosclerosis, we sought to determine whether oscillatory shear stress increases endothelial production of reactive oxygen species and to define the enzymes responsible for this phenomenon. Bovine aortic endothelial cells were exposed to static, laminar (15 dyn/cm2), and oscillatory shear stress (+/-15 dyn/cm2). Oscillatory shear increased superoxide (O2.-) production by more than threefold over static and laminar conditions as detected using electron spin resonance (ESR). This increase in O2*- was inhibited by oxypurinol and culture of endothelial cells with tungsten but not by inhibitors of other enzymatic sources. Oxypurinol also prevented H2O2 production in response to oscillatory shear stress as measured by dichlorofluorescin diacetate and Amplex Red fluorescence. Xanthine-dependent O2*- production was increased in homogenates of endothelial cells exposed to oscillatory shear stress. This was associated with decreased xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) protein levels and enzymatic activity resulting in an elevated ratio of xanthine oxidase (XO) to XDH. We also studied endothelial cells lacking the p47phox subunit of the NAD(P)H oxidase. These cells exhibited dramatically depressed O2*- production and had minimal XO protein and activity. Transfection of these cells with p47phox restored XO protein levels. Finally, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, prolonged inhibition of the NAD(P)H oxidase with apocynin decreased XO protein levels and prevented endothelial cell stimulation of O2*- production in response to oscillatory shear stress. These data suggest that the NAD(P)H oxidase maintains endothelial cell XO levels and that XO is responsible for increased reactive oxygen species production in response to oscillatory shear stress.

  3. Role of xanthine oxidoreductase and NAD(P)H oxidase in endothelial superoxide production in response to oscillatory shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNally, J. Scott; Davis, Michael E.; Giddens, Don P.; Saha, Aniket; Hwang, Jinah; Dikalov, Sergey; Jo, Hanjoong; Harrison, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Oscillatory shear stress occurs at sites of the circulation that are vulnerable to atherosclerosis. Because oxidative stress contributes to atherosclerosis, we sought to determine whether oscillatory shear stress increases endothelial production of reactive oxygen species and to define the enzymes responsible for this phenomenon. Bovine aortic endothelial cells were exposed to static, laminar (15 dyn/cm2), and oscillatory shear stress (+/-15 dyn/cm2). Oscillatory shear increased superoxide (O2.-) production by more than threefold over static and laminar conditions as detected using electron spin resonance (ESR). This increase in O2*- was inhibited by oxypurinol and culture of endothelial cells with tungsten but not by inhibitors of other enzymatic sources. Oxypurinol also prevented H2O2 production in response to oscillatory shear stress as measured by dichlorofluorescin diacetate and Amplex Red fluorescence. Xanthine-dependent O2*- production was increased in homogenates of endothelial cells exposed to oscillatory shear stress. This was associated with decreased xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) protein levels and enzymatic activity resulting in an elevated ratio of xanthine oxidase (XO) to XDH. We also studied endothelial cells lacking the p47phox subunit of the NAD(P)H oxidase. These cells exhibited dramatically depressed O2*- production and had minimal XO protein and activity. Transfection of these cells with p47phox restored XO protein levels. Finally, in bovine aortic endothelial cells, prolonged inhibition of the NAD(P)H oxidase with apocynin decreased XO protein levels and prevented endothelial cell stimulation of O2*- production in response to oscillatory shear stress. These data suggest that the NAD(P)H oxidase maintains endothelial cell XO levels and that XO is responsible for increased reactive oxygen species production in response to oscillatory shear stress.

  4. Oscillatory MHD Convective Flow of Second Order Fluid Through Porous Medium in a Vertical Rotating Channel in Slip-Flow Regime with Heat Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, B. P.; Singh, K. D.; Bansal, A. K.

    2015-02-01

    An analysis of an oscillatory magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) convective flow of a second order (viscoelastic), incompressible, and electrically conducting fluid through a porous medium bounded by two infinite vertical parallel porous plates is presented. The two porous plates with slip-flow condition and the no-slip condition are subjected respectively to a constant injection and suction velocity. The pressure gradient in the channel varies periodically with time. A magnetic field of uniform strength is applied in the direction perpendicular to the planes of the plates. The induced magnetic field is neglected due to the assumption of a small magnetic Reynolds number. The temperature of the plate with no-slip condition is non-uniform and oscillates periodically with time and the temperature difference of the two plates is assumed high enough to induce heat radiation. The entire system rotates in unison about the axis perpendicular to the planes of the plates. Adopting complex variable notations, a closed form solution of the problem is obtained. The analytical results are evaluated numerically and then presented graphically to discuss in detail the effects of different parameters of the problem. The velocity, temperature and the skin-friction in terms of its amplitude and phase angle have been shown graphically to observe the effects of the viscoelastic parameter γ, rotation parameter Ω, suction parameter λ , Grashof number Gr, Hartmann number M, the pressure A, Prandtl number Pr, radiation parameter N and the frequency of oscillation ω .

  5. Quantitative assessment of oscillatory components in blood circulation: classification of the effect of aging, diabetes, and acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernjak, Alan; Stefanovska, Aneta; Urbancic-Rovan, Vilma; Azman-Juvan, Katja

    2005-04-01

    The human cardiovascular system is a complex system with the pumping activity of the heart as the main generator of oscillations. Besides the heartbeat there are several other oscillatory components which determine its dynamics. Their nonlinear nature and a weak coupling between them both require special treatment while studying this system. A particular characteristic of the oscillatory components is their frequency fluctuations in time. Consequently, their interactions also fluctuate in time. Therefore the wavelet transform is applied to trace the oscillatory components in time, and specific quantitative measures are introduced to quantify the contribution of each of the oscillatory components involved on the time scale of up to three minutes. Oscillatory components are then analysed from signals obtained by simultaneous measurements of blood flow in the microcirculation, ECG, respiration and blood pressure. Based on quantitative evaluation of the oscillatory components related to (I) the heart beat (0.6-2Hz), (II) respiration (0.145-0.6Hz), (III) intrinsic myogenic activity (0.052-0.145Hz), (IV) sympathetic activity (0.021-0.052Hz), (V, VI) endothelial related activity (0.0095-0.021Hz, 0.005 - 0.0095 Hz), 30-minutes recording taken on 109 healthy subjects, 75 patients with diabetes, and 82 patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were analysed. Classification of the effect of ageing, diabetes and AMI from blood flow signals simultaneously recorded in the skin of four extremities, the heart rate and heart rate variability from R-R intervals will be presented and discussed.

  6. The dynamics of magnetic flux rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, E. E.; Fisher, G. H.; Patten, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of magnetic fields in the presence of turbulent convection is examined using results of numerical simulations of closed magnetic flux tubes embedded in a steady 'ABC' flow field, which approximate some of the important characteristics of a turbulent convecting flow field. Three different evolutionary scenarios were found: expansion to a steady deformed ring; collapse to a compact fat flux ring, separated from the expansion type of behavior by a critical length scale; and, occasionally, evolution toward an advecting, oscillatory state. The work suggests that small-scale flows will not have a strong effect on large-scale, strong fields.

  7. Reduction of satellite magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slud, E. V.; Smith, P. J.; Langel, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of global magnetic anomaly maps derived from satellite data is facilitated by inversion to the equivalent magnetization in a constant thickness magnetic crust or, equivalently, by reduction to the pole. Previous inversions have proven unstable near the geomagnetic equator. The instability results from magnetic moment distributions which are admissible in the inversion solution but which make only small contribution to the computed values of anomaly field. Their admissibility in the solution could result from noisy or incomplete data or from small poorly resolved anomalies. The resulting magnetic moments are unrealistically large and oscillatory. Application of the method of principal components (e.g. eigenvalue decomposition and selective elimination of less significant eigenvectors) is proposed as a way of overcoming the instability and the method is demonstrated by applying it to the region around the Bangui anomaly in Central Africa.

  8. OSCILLATORY PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, N.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to a pump suitable fur pumping highly corrosive gases wherein no lubricant is needed in the pumping chamber thus eliminating possible contamination sources. The chamber contains a gas inlet and outlet in each side, with a paddle like piston suspended by a sylphon seal between these pcrts. An external arrangement causes the paddle to oscillate rapidly between the ports, alternately compressing and exhausting the gas trapped on each side of the paddle. Since the paddle does nnt touch the chamber sides at any point, no lubricant is required. This pump is useful for pumping large quantities of uranium hexafluorine.

  9. On the Distribution of Particle Acceleration Sites in Plasmoid-dominated Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Cerutti, Benoît; Werner, Gregory R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the distribution of particle acceleration sites, independently of the actual acceleration mechanism, during plasmoid-dominated, relativistic collisionless magnetic reconnection by analyzing the results of a particle-in-cell numerical simulation. The simulation is initiated with Harris-type current layers in pair plasma with no guide magnetic field, negligible radiative losses, no initial perturbation, and using periodic boundary conditions. We find that the plasmoids develop a robust internal structure, with colder dense cores and hotter outer shells, that is recovered after each plasmoid merger on a dynamical timescale. We use spacetime diagrams of the reconnection layers to probe the evolution of plasmoids, and in this context we investigate the individual particle histories for a representative sample of energetic electrons. We distinguish three classes of particle acceleration sites associated with (1) magnetic X-points, (2) regions between merging plasmoids, and (3) the trailing edges of accelerating plasmoids. We evaluate the contribution of each class of acceleration sites to the final energy distribution of energetic electrons: magnetic X-points dominate at moderate energies, and the regions between merging plasmoids dominate at higher energies. We also identify the dominant acceleration scenarios, in order of decreasing importance: (1) single acceleration between merging plasmoids, (2) single acceleration at a magnetic X-point, and (3) acceleration at a magnetic X-point followed by acceleration in a plasmoid. Particle acceleration is absent only in the vicinity of stationary plasmoids. The effect of magnetic mirrors due to plasmoid contraction does not appear to be significant in relativistic reconnection.

  10. ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF PARTICLE ACCELERATION SITES IN PLASMOID-DOMINATED RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Cerutti, Benoit; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2015-12-20

    We investigate the distribution of particle acceleration sites, independently of the actual acceleration mechanism, during plasmoid-dominated, relativistic collisionless magnetic reconnection by analyzing the results of a particle-in-cell numerical simulation. The simulation is initiated with Harris-type current layers in pair plasma with no guide magnetic field, negligible radiative losses, no initial perturbation, and using periodic boundary conditions. We find that the plasmoids develop a robust internal structure, with colder dense cores and hotter outer shells, that is recovered after each plasmoid merger on a dynamical timescale. We use spacetime diagrams of the reconnection layers to probe the evolution of plasmoids, and in this context we investigate the individual particle histories for a representative sample of energetic electrons. We distinguish three classes of particle acceleration sites associated with (1) magnetic X-points, (2) regions between merging plasmoids, and (3) the trailing edges of accelerating plasmoids. We evaluate the contribution of each class of acceleration sites to the final energy distribution of energetic electrons: magnetic X-points dominate at moderate energies, and the regions between merging plasmoids dominate at higher energies. We also identify the dominant acceleration scenarios, in order of decreasing importance: (1) single acceleration between merging plasmoids, (2) single acceleration at a magnetic X-point, and (3) acceleration at a magnetic X-point followed by acceleration in a plasmoid. Particle acceleration is absent only in the vicinity of stationary plasmoids. The effect of magnetic mirrors due to plasmoid contraction does not appear to be significant in relativistic reconnection.

  11. Oscillatory lower body negative pressure impairs task related functional hyperemia in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Julian M; Balakrishnan, Keshawadhana; Visintainer, Paul; Del Pozzi, Andrew T; Messer, Zachary R; Terilli, Courtney; Medow, Marvin S

    2016-03-15

    Neurovascular coupling refers to the link between an increase in neural activity in response to a task and an increase in cerebral blood flow denoted "functional hyperemia." Recent work on postural tachycardia syndrome indicated that increased oscillatory cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) was associated with reduced functional hyperemia. We hypothesized that a reduction in functional hyperemia could be causally produced in healthy volunteers by using oscillations in lower body negative pressure (OLBNP) to force oscillations in CBFv. CBFv was measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound of the left middle cerebral artery. We used passive arm flexion applied during eight periodic 60-s flexion/60-s relaxation epochs to produce 120-s periodic changes in functional hyperemia (at 0.0083 Hz). We used -30 mmHg of OLBNP at 0.03, 0.05, and 0.10 Hz, the range for cerebral autoregulation, and measured spectral power of CBFv at all frequencies. Arm flexion power performed without OLBNP was compared with arm flexion power during OLBNP. OLBNP power performed in isolation was compared with power during OLBNP plus arm flexion. Cerebral flow velocity oscillations at 0.05 Hz reduced and at 0.10 Hz eliminated functional hyperemia, while 0.03 Hz did not reach significance. In contrast, arm flexion reduced OLBNP-induced oscillatory power at all frequencies. The interactions between OLBNP-driven CBFv oscillations and arm flexion-driven CBFv oscillations are reciprocal. Thus induced cerebral blood flow oscillations suppress functional hyperemia, and functional hyperemia suppresses cerebral blood flow oscillations. We conclude that oscillatory cerebral blood flow produces a causal reduction of functional hyperemia.

  12. One central oscillatory drive is compatible with experimental motor unit behaviour in essential and Parkinsonian tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dideriksen, Jakob L.; Gallego, Juan A.; Holobar, Ales; Rocon, Eduardo; Pons, Jose L.; Farina, Dario

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Pathological tremors are symptomatic to several neurological disorders that are difficult to differentiate and the way by which central oscillatory networks entrain tremorogenic contractions is unknown. We considered the alternative hypotheses that tremor arises from one oscillator (at the tremor frequency) or, as suggested by recent findings from the superimposition of two separate inputs (at the tremor frequency and twice that frequency). Approach. Assuming one central oscillatory network we estimated analytically the relative amplitude of the harmonics of the tremor frequency in the motor neuron output for different temporal behaviors of the oscillator. Next, we analyzed the bias in the relative harmonics amplitude introduced by superimposing oscillations at twice the tremor frequency. These findings were validated using experimental measurements of wrist angular velocity and surface electromyography (EMG) from 22 patients (11 essential tremor, 11 Parkinson’s disease). The ensemble motor unit action potential trains identified from the EMG represented the neural drive to the muscles. Main results. The analytical results showed that the relative power of the tremor harmonics in the analytical models of the neural drive was determined by the variability and duration of the tremor bursts and the presence of the second oscillator biased this power towards higher values. The experimental findings accurately matched the analytical model assuming one oscillator, indicating a negligible functional role of secondary oscillatory inputs. Furthermore, a significant difference in the relative power of harmonics in the neural drive was found across the patient groups, suggesting a diagnostic value of this measure (classification accuracy: 86%). This diagnostic power decreased substantially when estimated from limb acceleration or the EMG. Signficance. The results indicate that the neural drive in pathological tremor is compatible with one central network

  13. Potential energy, force distribution and oscillatory motion of chloride ion inside electrically charged carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, F.; Ansari, R.; Darvizeh, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this research, a continuum-based model is presented to explore potential energy, force distribution and oscillatory motion of ions, and in particular chloride ion, inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs) decorated by functional groups at two ends. To perform this, van der Waals (vdW) interactions between ion and nanotube are modeled by the 6-12 Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential, whereas the electrostatic interactions between ion and functional groups are modeled by the Coulomb potential and the total interactions are analytically derived by summing the vdW and electrostatic interactions. Making the assumption that carbon atoms and charge of functional groups are all uniformly distributed over the nanotube surface and the two ends of nanotube, respectively, a continuum approach is utilized to evaluate the related interactions. Based on the actual force distribution, the equation of motion is also solved numerically to arrive at the time history of displacement and velocity of inner core. With respect to the proposed formulations, comprehensive studies on the variations of potential energy and force distribution are carried out by varying functional group charge and nanotube length. Moreover, the effects of these parameters together with initial conditions on the oscillatory behavior of system are studied and discussed in detail. It is found out that chloride ion escapes more easily from negatively charged CNTs which is followed by uncharged and positively charged ones. It is further shown that the presence of functional groups leads to enhancing the operating frequency of such oscillatory systems especially when the electric charges of ion and functional groups have different signs.

  14. Oscillatory neuronal dynamics associated with manual acupuncture: a magnetoencephalography study using beamforming analysis

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Aziz U. R.; Johnson, Robyn L.; Woods, William; Green, Gary G. R.; Lewith, George; MacPherson, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) enables non-invasive recording of neuronal activity, with reconstruction methods providing estimates of underlying brain source locations and oscillatory dynamics from externally recorded neuromagnetic fields. The aim of our study was to use MEG to determine the effect of manual acupuncture on neuronal oscillatory dynamics. A major problem in MEG investigations of manual acupuncture is the absence of onset times for each needle manipulation. Given that beamforming (spatial filtering) analysis is not dependent upon stimulus-driven responses being phase-locked to stimulus onset, we postulated that beamforming could reveal source locations and induced changes in neuronal activity during manual acupuncture. In a beamformer analysis, a two-minute period of manual acupuncture needle manipulation delivered to the ipsilateral right LI-4 (Hegu) acupoint was contrasted with a two-minute baseline period. We considered oscillatory power changes in the theta (4–8 Hz), alpha (8–13 Hz), beta (13–30 Hz), and gamma (30–100 Hz) frequency bands. We found significant decreases in beta band power in the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex and superior frontal gyrus (SFG). In the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere, we found significant power decreases in beta and gamma frequency bands in only the SFG. No significant power modulations were found in theta and alpha bands. Our results indicate that beamforming is a useful analytical tool to reconstruct underlying neuronal activity associated with manual acupuncture. Our main finding was of beta power decreases in primary somatosensory cortex and SFG, which opens up a line of future investigation regarding whether this contributes toward an underlying mechanism of acupuncture. PMID:23248594

  15. The impact of the perception of rhythmic music on self-paced oscillatory movements.

    PubMed

    Peckel, Mathieu; Pozzo, Thierry; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by theories of perception-action coupling and embodied music cognition, we investigated how rhythmic music perception impacts self-paced oscillatory movements. In a pilot study, we examined the kinematic parameters of self-paced oscillatory movements, walking and finger tapping using optical motion capture. In accordance with biomechanical constraints accounts of motion, we found that movements followed a hierarchical organization depending on the proximal/distal characteristic of the limb used. Based on these findings, we were interested in knowing how and when the perception of rhythmic music could resonate with the motor system in the context of these constrained oscillatory movements. In order to test this, we conducted an experiment where participants performed four different effector-specific movements (lower leg, whole arm and forearm oscillation and finger tapping) while rhythmic music was playing in the background. Musical stimuli consisted of computer-generated MIDI musical pieces with a 4/4 metrical structure. The musical tempo of each song increased from 60 BPM to 120 BPM by 6 BPM increments. A specific tempo was maintained for 20 s before a 2 s transition to the higher tempo. The task of the participant was to maintain a comfortable pace for the four movements (self-paced) while not paying attention to the music. No instruction on whether to synchronize with the music was given. Results showed that participants were distinctively influenced by the background music depending on the movement used with the tapping task being consistently the most influenced. Furthermore, eight strategies put in place by participants to cope with the task were unveiled. Despite not instructed to do so, participants also occasionally synchronized with music. Results are discussed in terms of the link between perception and action (i.e., motor/perceptual resonance). In general, our results give support to the notion that rhythmic music is processed in a motoric

  16. Oscillatory neuronal dynamics associated with manual acupuncture: a magnetoencephalography study using beamforming analysis.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Aziz U R; Johnson, Robyn L; Woods, William; Green, Gary G R; Lewith, George; Macpherson, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) enables non-invasive recording of neuronal activity, with reconstruction methods providing estimates of underlying brain source locations and oscillatory dynamics from externally recorded neuromagnetic fields. The aim of our study was to use MEG to determine the effect of manual acupuncture on neuronal oscillatory dynamics. A major problem in MEG investigations of manual acupuncture is the absence of onset times for each needle manipulation. Given that beamforming (spatial filtering) analysis is not dependent upon stimulus-driven responses being phase-locked to stimulus onset, we postulated that beamforming could reveal source locations and induced changes in neuronal activity during manual acupuncture. In a beamformer analysis, a two-minute period of manual acupuncture needle manipulation delivered to the ipsilateral right LI-4 (Hegu) acupoint was contrasted with a two-minute baseline period. We considered oscillatory power changes in the theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-13 Hz), beta (13-30 Hz), and gamma (30-100 Hz) frequency bands. We found significant decreases in beta band power in the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex and superior frontal gyrus (SFG). In the ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere, we found significant power decreases in beta and gamma frequency bands in only the SFG. No significant power modulations were found in theta and alpha bands. Our results indicate that beamforming is a useful analytical tool to reconstruct underlying neuronal activity associated with manual acupuncture. Our main finding was of beta power decreases in primary somatosensory cortex and SFG, which opens up a line of future investigation regarding whether this contributes toward an underlying mechanism of acupuncture.

  17. Spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics during the encoding and maintenance phases of a visual working memory task.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Wilson, Tony W

    2015-08-01

    Many electrophysiology studies have examined neural oscillatory activity during the encoding, maintenance, and/or retrieval phases of various working memory tasks. Together, these studies have helped illuminate the underlying neural dynamics, although much remains to be discovered and some findings have not replicated in subsequent work. In this study, we examined the oscillatory dynamics that serve visual working memory operations using high-density magnetoencephalography (MEG) and advanced time-frequency and beamforming methodology. Specifically, we recorded healthy adults while they performed a high-load, Sternberg-type working memory task, and focused on the encoding and maintenance phases. We found significant 9-16 Hz desynchronizations in the bilateral occipital cortices, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and left superior temporal areas throughout the encoding phase. Our analysis of the dynamics showed that the left DLPFC and superior temporal desynchronization became stronger as a function of time during the encoding period, and was sustained throughout most of the maintenance phase until sharply decreasing in the milliseconds preceding retrieval. In contrast, desynchronization in occipital areas became weaker as a function of time during encoding and eventually evolved into a strong synchronization during the maintenance period, consistent with previous studies. These results provide clear evidence of dynamic network-level processes during the encoding and maintenance phases of working memory, and support the notion of a dynamic pattern of functionally-discrete subprocesses within each working memory phase. The presence of such dynamic oscillatory networks may be a potential source of inconsistent findings in this literature, as neural activity within these networks changes dramatically with time.

  18. Intramedullary Pressure and Matrix Strain Induced by Oscillatory Skeletal Muscle Stimulation and its Potential in Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yi-Xian; Lam, Hoyan

    2010-01-01

    Intramedullary pressure (ImP) and low-level bone strain induced by oscillatory muscle stimulation (MS) has the potential to mitigate bone loss induced by disuse osteopenia, i.e., hindlimb suspension (HLS). To test this hypothesis, we evaluated a) MS induced ImP and bone strain as function of stimulation frequency, and b) the adaptive responses to functional disuse, and disuse plus 1Hz and 20Hz stimulation in vivo. Femoral ImP and bone strain generated by MS were measured in the frequencies of 1Hz-100Hz in four rats. Forty retired breeder rats were used for the in vivo HLS study. The quadriceps muscle was stimulated at frequencies of 1 Hz and 20 Hz, 10min/d for 4 weeks. The metaphyseal trabecular bone quantity and microstructure at the distal femur were evaluated using μCT, while bone formation indices were analyzed using histomorphometric techniques. Oscillatory MS generated a maximum ImP of 45±9 mmHg at 20 Hz and produced a maximum matrix strain of 128±19 με at 10 Hz. Our analyses from the in vivo study showed that MS at 20 Hz was able to attenuate trabecular bone loss and partially maintain the microstructure induced by HLS. Conversely, there was no evidence of an adaptive effect of stimulation at 1 Hz on disused skeleton. The results suggested that oscillatory MS regulates fluid dynamics and mechanical strain in bone, which serves as a critical mediator of adaptation. These results clearly demonstrated the ability of MS in attenuating bone loss from the disuse osteopenia and could hold potential in mitigating skeletal degradation imposed by conditions of disuse, which may serve as a biomechanical intervention in clinic application. PMID:19081096

  19. Kinetic insights over a PEMFC operating on stationary and oscillatory states.

    PubMed

    Mota, Andressa; Gonzalez, Ernesto R; Eiswirth, Markus

    2011-12-01

    Kinetic investigations in the oscillatory state have been carried out in order to shed light on the interplay between the complex kinetics exhibited by a proton exchange membrane fuel cell fed with poisoned H(2) (108 ppm of CO) and the other in serie process. The apparent activation energy (E(a)) in the stationary state was investigated in order to clarify the E(a) observed in the oscillatory state. The apparent activation energy in the stationary state, under potentiostatic control, rendered (a) E(a) ≈ 50-60 kJ mol(-1) over 0.8 V < E < 0.6 V and (b) E(a) ≈ 10 kJ mol(-1) at E = 0.3 V. The former is related to the H(2) adsorption in the vacancies of the surface poisoned by CO and the latter is correlated to the process of proton conductivity in the membrane. The dependence of the period-one oscillations on the temperature yielded a genuine Arrhenius dependence with two E(a) values: (a) E(a) around 70 kJ mol(-1), at high temperatures, and (b) E(a) around 10-15 kJ mol(-1), at lower temperatures. The latter E(a) indicates the presence of protonic mass transport coupled to the essential oscillatory mechanism. These insights point in the right direction to predict spatial couplings between anode and cathode as having the highest strength as well as to speculate the most likely candidates to promote spatial inhomogeneities.

  20. Fourier decomposition of polymer orientation in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow

    DOE PAGES

    Giacomin, A. J.; Gilbert, P. H.; Schmalzer, A. M.

    2015-03-19

    In our previous work, we explored the dynamics of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells as a model for polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow, a flow experiment that has gained a significant following in recent years. We chose rigid dumbbells since these are the simplest molecular model to give higher harmonics in the components of the stress response. We derived the expression for the dumbbell orientation distribution, and then we used this function to calculate the shear stress response, and normal stress difference responses in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. In this paper, we deepen our understanding of themore » polymer motion underlying large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow by decomposing the orientation distribution function into its first five Fourier components (the zeroth, first, second, third, and fourth harmonics). We use three-dimensional images to explore each harmonic of the polymer motion. Our analysis includes the three most important cases: (i) nonlinear steady shear flow (where the Deborah number λω is zero and the Weissenberg number λγ 0 is above unity), (ii) nonlinear viscoelasticity (where both λω and λγ 0 exceed unity), and (iii) linear viscoelasticity (where λω exceeds unity and where λγ 0 approaches zero). We learn that the polymer orientation distribution is spherical in the linear viscoelastic regime, and otherwise tilted and peanut-shaped. We find that the peanut-shaping is mainly caused by the zeroth harmonic, and the tilting, by the second. The first, third, and fourth harmonics of the orientation distribution make only slight contributions to the overall polymer motion.« less

  1. Fourier decomposition of polymer orientation in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomin, A. J.; Gilbert, P. H.; Schmalzer, A. M.

    2015-03-19

    In our previous work, we explored the dynamics of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells as a model for polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow, a flow experiment that has gained a significant following in recent years. We chose rigid dumbbells since these are the simplest molecular model to give higher harmonics in the components of the stress response. We derived the expression for the dumbbell orientation distribution, and then we used this function to calculate the shear stress response, and normal stress difference responses in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. In this paper, we deepen our understanding of the polymer motion underlying large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow by decomposing the orientation distribution function into its first five Fourier components (the zeroth, first, second, third, and fourth harmonics). We use three-dimensional images to explore each harmonic of the polymer motion. Our analysis includes the three most important cases: (i) nonlinear steady shear flow (where the Deborah number λω is zero and the Weissenberg number λγ 0 is above unity), (ii) nonlinear viscoelasticity (where both λω and λγ 0 exceed unity), and (iii) linear viscoelasticity (where λω exceeds unity and where λγ 0 approaches zero). We learn that the polymer orientation distribution is spherical in the linear viscoelastic regime, and otherwise tilted and peanut-shaped. We find that the peanut-shaping is mainly caused by the zeroth harmonic, and the tilting, by the second. The first, third, and fourth harmonics of the orientation distribution make only slight contributions to the overall polymer motion.

  2. Fast fMRI can detect oscillatory neural activity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Laura D.; Setsompop, Kawin; Rosen, Bruce R.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory neural dynamics play an important role in the coordination of large-scale brain networks. High-level cognitive processes depend on dynamics evolving over hundreds of milliseconds, so measuring neural activity in this frequency range is important for cognitive neuroscience. However, current noninvasive neuroimaging methods are not able to precisely localize oscillatory neural activity above 0.2 Hz. Electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography have limited spatial resolution, whereas fMRI has limited temporal resolution because it measures vascular responses rather than directly recording neural activity. We hypothesized that the recent development of fast fMRI techniques, combined with the extra sensitivity afforded by ultra-high-field systems, could enable precise localization of neural oscillations. We tested whether fMRI can detect neural oscillations using human visual cortex as a model system. We detected small oscillatory fMRI signals in response to stimuli oscillating at up to 0.75 Hz within single scan sessions, and these responses were an order of magnitude larger than predicted by canonical linear models. Simultaneous EEG–fMRI and simulations based on a biophysical model of the hemodynamic response to neuronal activity suggested that the blood oxygen level-dependent response becomes faster for rapidly varying stimuli, enabling the detection of higher frequencies than expected. Accounting for phase delays across voxels further improved detection, demonstrating that identifying vascular delays will be of increasing importance with higher-frequency activity. These results challenge the assumption that the hemodynamic response is slow, and demonstrate that fMRI has the potential to map neural oscillations directly throughout the brain. PMID:27729529

  3. Aberrant Oscillatory Activity during Simple Movement in Task-Specific Focal Hand Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Hinkley, Leighton B N; Dolberg, Rebecca; Honma, Susanne; Findlay, Anne; Byl, Nancy N; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2012-01-01

    In task-specific focal hand dystonia (tspFHD), the temporal dynamics of cortical activity in the motor system and how these processes are related to impairments in sensory and motor function are poorly understood. Here, we use time-frequency reconstructions of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data to elaborate the temporal and spatial characteristics of cortical activity during movement. A self-paced finger tapping task during MEG recording was performed by 11 patients with tspFHD and 11 matched healthy controls. In both groups robust changes in beta (12-30 Hz) and high gamma (65-90 Hz) oscillatory activity were identified over sensory and motor cortices during button press. A significant decrease [p < 0.05, 1% False Discovery Rate (FDR) corrected] in high gamma power during movements of the affected hand was identified over ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex in the period prior to (-575 ms) and following (725 ms) button press. Furthermore, an increase (p < 0.05, 1% FDR corrected) in beta power suppression following movement of the affected hand was identified over visual cortex in patients with tspFHD. For movements of the unaffected hand, a significant (p < 0.05, 1% FDR corrected) increase in beta power suppression was identified over secondary somatosensory cortex (S2) in the period following button press in patients with tspFHD. Oscillatory activity within in the tspFHD group was however not correlated with clinical measures. Understanding these aberrant oscillatory dynamics can provide the groundwork for interventions that focus on modulating the timing of this activity.

  4. Neuro-oscillatory phase alignment drives speeded multisensory response times: an electro-corticographic investigation.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Manuel R; Molholm, Sophie; Fiebelkorn, Ian C; Butler, John S; Schwartz, Theodore H; Foxe, John J

    2015-06-03

    Even simple tasks rely on information exchange between functionally distinct and often relatively distant neuronal ensembles. Considerable work indicates oscillatory synchronization through phase alignment is a major agent of inter-regional communication. In the brain, different oscillatory phases correspond to low- and high-excitability states. Optimally aligned phases (or high-excitability states) promote inter-regional communication. Studies have also shown that sensory stimulation can modulate or reset the phase of ongoing cortical oscillations. For example, auditory stimuli can reset the phase of oscillations in visual cortex, influencing processing of a simultaneous visual stimulus. Such cross-regional phase reset represents a candidate mechanism for aligning oscillatory phase for inter-regional communication. Here, we explored the role of local and inter-regional phase alignment in driving a well established behavioral correlate of multisensory integration: the redundant target effect (RTE), which refers to the fact that responses to multisensory inputs are substantially faster than to unisensory stimuli. In a speeded detection task, human epileptic patients (N = 3) responded to unisensory (auditory or visual) and multisensory (audiovisual) stimuli with a button press, while electrocorticography was recorded over auditory and motor regions. Visual stimulation significantly modulated auditory activity via phase reset in the delta and theta bands. During the period between stimulation and subsequent motor response, transient synchronization between auditory and motor regions was observed. Phase synchrony to multisensory inputs was faster than to unisensory stimulation. This sensorimotor phase alignment correlated with behavior such that stronger synchrony was associated with faster responses, linking the commonly observed RTE with phase alignment across a sensorimotor network.

  5. Effects of biaxial oscillatory shear stress on endothelial cell proliferation and morphology.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Amlan; Chakraborty, Sutirtha; Jala, Venkatakrishna R; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Sharp, M Keith; Berson, R Eric

    2012-03-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) on anchored cells affects their responses, including cell proliferation and morphology. In this study, the effects of the directionality of pulsatile WSS on endothelial cell proliferation and morphology were investigated for cells grown in a Petri dish orbiting on a shaker platform. Time and location dependent WSS was determined by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). At low orbital speed (50 rpm), WSS was shown to be uniform (0-1 dyne/cm(2)) across the bottom of the dish, while at higher orbital speed (100 and 150 rpm), WSS remained fairly uniform near the center and fluctuated significantly (0-9 dyne/cm(2)) near the side walls of the dish. Since WSS on the bottom of the dish is two-dimensional, a new directional oscillatory shear index (DOSI) was developed to quantify the directionality of oscillating shear. DOSI approached zero for biaxial oscillatory shear of equal magnitudes near the center and approached one for uniaxial pulsatile shear near the wall, where large tangential WSS dominated a much smaller radial component. Near the center (low DOSI), more, smaller and less elongated cells grew, whereas larger cells with greater elongation were observed in the more uniaxial oscillatory shear (high DOSI) near the periphery of the dish. Further, cells aligned with the direction of the largest component of shear but were randomly oriented in low magnitude biaxial shear. Statistical analyses of the individual and interacting effects of multiple factors (DOSI, shear magnitudes and orbital speeds) showed that DOSI significantly affected all the responses, indicating that directionality is an important determinant of cellular responses.

  6. Cosine Directional Tuning of Theta Cell Burst Frequencies: Evidence for Spatial Coding by Oscillatory Interference

    PubMed Central

    Welday, Adam C.; Shlifer, I. Gary; Bloom, Matthew L.; Zhang, Kechen

    2011-01-01

    The rodent septohippocampal system contains “theta cells,” which burst rhythmically at 4–12 Hz, but the functional significance of this rhythm remains poorly understood (Buzsáki, 2006). Theta rhythm commonly modulates the spike trains of spatially tuned neurons such as place (O'Keefe and Dostrovsky, 1971), head direction (Tsanov et al., 2011a), grid (Hafting et al., 2005), and border cells (Savelli et al., 2008; Solstad et al., 2008). An “oscillatory interference” theory has hypothesized that some of these spatially tuned neurons may derive their positional firing from phase interference among theta oscillations with frequencies that are modulated by the speed and direction of translational movements (Burgess et al., 2005, 2007). This theory is supported by studies reporting modulation of theta frequency by movement speed (Rivas et al., 1996; Geisler et al., 2007; Jeewajee et al., 2008a), but modulation of theta frequency by movement direction has never been observed. Here we recorded theta cells from hippocampus, medial septum, and anterior thalamus of freely behaving rats. Theta cell burst frequencies varied as the cosine of the rat's movement direction, and this directional tuning was influenced by landmark cues, in agreement with predictions of the oscillatory interference theory. Computer simulations and mathematical analysis demonstrated how a postsynaptic neuron can detect location-dependent synchrony among inputs from such theta cells, and thereby mimic the spatial tuning properties of place, grid, or border cells. These results suggest that theta cells may serve a high-level computational function by encoding a basis set of oscillatory signals that interfere with one another to synthesize spatial memory representations. PMID:22072668

  7. Oscillatory multiplexing of population codes for selective communication in the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Akam, Thomas; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian brains exhibit population oscillations whose structures vary in time and space according to behavioural state. A proposed function of these oscillations is to control the flow of signals among anatomically connected networks. However, the nature of neural coding that may support oscillatory selective communication has received relatively little attention. Here we consider the role of multiplexing, whereby multiple information streams share a common neural substrate. We suggest that multiplexing implemented through periodic modulation of firing rate population codes enables flexible reconfiguration of effective connectivity among brain areas. PMID:24434912

  8. On the stable hovering of an asymmetric body in oscillatory airflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Weathers, Annie; Childress, Stephen; Zhang, Jun

    2010-03-01

    A free rigid body, built with up-down asymmetry can hover in a vertical oscillatory airflow if the airflow amplitude and frequency exceed certain thresholds. The key to free hovering lies in the difference in drag coefficients as the airflow passes the object in two opposite directions. The hovering motion is surprisingly stable and robust, lasting for thousands of oscillation periods. We describe a series of flow visualizations of vortex shedding by the hovering object, which show how correcting moments restore its orientation, leading to stable hovering. This study may shed light on the stability of the hovering flight of insects.

  9. Coexistence of synchrony and incoherence in oscillatory media under nonlinear global coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Lennart; García-Morales, Vladimir; Schönleber, Konrad; Krischer, Katharina

    2014-03-15

    We report a novel mechanism for the formation of chimera states, a peculiar spatiotemporal pattern with coexisting synchronized and incoherent domains found in ensembles of identical oscillators. Considering Stuart-Landau oscillators, we demonstrate that a nonlinear global coupling can induce this symmetry breaking. We find chimera states also in a spatially extended system, a modified complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. This theoretical prediction is validated with an oscillatory electrochemical system, the electro-oxidation of silicon, where the spontaneous formation of chimeras is observed without any external feedback control.

  10. Multi-physics modelling approach for oscillatory microengines: application for a microStirling generator design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formosa, F.; Fréchette, L. G.

    2015-12-01

    An electrical circuit equivalent (ECE) approach has been set up allowing elementary oscillatory microengine components to be modelled. They cover gas channel/chamber thermodynamics, viscosity and thermal effects, mechanical structure and electromechanical transducers. The proposed tool has been validated on a centimeter scale Free Piston membrane Stirling engine [1]. We propose here new developments taking into account scaling effects to establish models suitable for any microengines. They are based on simplifications derived from the comparison of the hydraulic radius with respect to the viscous and thermal penetration depths respectively).

  11. Slowing of oscillatory brain activity is a stable characteristic of Parkinson's disease without dementia.

    PubMed

    Stoffers, D; Bosboom, J L W; Deijen, J B; Wolters, E C; Berendse, H W; Stam, C J

    2007-07-01

    Extensive changes in resting-state oscillatory brain activity have recently been demonstrated using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in moderately advanced, non-demented Parkinson's disease patients relative to age-matched controls. The aim of the present study was to determine the onset and evolution of these changes over the disease course and their relationship with clinical parameters. In addition, we evaluated the effects of dopaminomimetics on resting-state oscillatory brain activity in levodopa-treated patients. MEG background oscillatory activity was studied in a group of 70 Parkinson's disease patients with varying disease duration and severity (including 18 de novo patients) as well as in 21 controls that were age-matched to the de novo patients. Whole head 151-channel MEG recordings were obtained in an eyes-closed resting-state condition. Levodopa-treated patients (N = 37) were examined both in a practically defined 'OFF' as well as in the 'ON' state. Relative spectral power was calculated for delta, theta, low alpha, high alpha, beta and gamma frequency bands and averaged for 10 cortical regions of interest (ROIs). Additionally, extensive clinical and neuropsychological testing was performed in all subjects. De novo Parkinson's disease patients showed widespread slowing of background MEG activity relative to controls. Changes included a widespread increase in theta and low alpha power, as well as a loss of beta power over all but the frontal ROIs and a loss of gamma power over all but the right occipital ROI. Neuropsychological assessment revealed abnormal perseveration in de novo patients, which was associated with increased low alpha power in centroparietal ROIs. In the whole group of Parkinson's disease patients, longer disease duration was associated with reduced low alpha power in the right temporal and right occipital ROI, but not with any other spectral power measure. No association was found between spectral power and disease stage, disease severity

  12. A comparison of two formulations for high-order accurate essentially non-oscillatory schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Jay; Shu, Chi-Wang; Atkins, H. L.

    1993-01-01

    The finite-volume and finite-difference implementations of high-order accurate essentially non-oscillatory shock-capturing schemes are discussed and compared. Results obtained with fourth-order accurate algorithms based on both formulations are examined for accuracy, sensitivity to grid irregularities, resolution of waves that are oblique to the mesh, and computational efficiency. Some algorithm modifications that may be required for a given application are suggested. Conclusions that pertain to the relative merits of both formulations are drawn, and some circumstances for which each might be useful are noted.

  13. Effect of Prandtl number and computational schemes on the oscillatory natural convection in an enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Tagawa, Toshio; Ozoe, Hiroyuki

    1996-08-23

    Numerical calculations were carried out for natural convection of low-Prandtl-number fluid. These calculations include the inertial terms that were approximated by six kinds of schemes, i.e., upwind scheme, hybrid scheme, second-order central difference method, Kawamura-Kuwahara scheme, Utopia scheme, and fourth-order central difference method. The average Nusselt number depended significantly on the schemes. The occurrence of oscillatory flow also depended on the schemes for inertial terms. Higher order up-winding approximations for inertial terms appear to be required to calculate natural convection of low-Prandtl-number fluids like liquid metal, even if the Rayleigh number is not large enough.

  14. Oscillatory motion of a camphor grain in a one-dimensional finite region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyano, Yuki; Sakurai, Tatsunari; Kitahata, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    The motion of a self-propelled particle is affected by its surroundings, such as boundaries or external fields. In this paper, we investigated the bifurcation of the motion of a camphor grain, as a simple actual self-propelled system, confined in a one-dimensional finite region. A camphor grain exhibits oscillatory motion or remains at rest around the center position in a one-dimensional finite water channel, depending on the length of the water channel and the resistance coefficient. A mathematical model including the boundary effect is analytically reduced to an ordinary differential equation. Linear stability analysis reveals that the Hopf bifurcation occurs, reflecting the symmetry of the system.

  15. Numerical investigation of oscillatory multiphase flow in porous medium with chemically active skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyukhov, A. V.; Zavialov, I. N.

    2016-11-01

    Self-oscillating mode of reaction front propagation in multiphase flow in the porous medium with chemically active skeleton is investigated numerically. The considered flow represents an immiscible displacement process, such that the displacing fluid and the skeleton of the porous medium have chemically active components which react with production of gaseous phase. The calculations have demonstrated strong influence of the reaction kinetics on stability of the reactive flow. The presence of a time delay between the change of concentration of the reactants and the change of the reaction rate is shown to stimulate transition of the reaction front propagation to the oscillatory mode.

  16. An exact solution for a rotating selfgravitating gas mass with oscillatory density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, F.; Ebert, R.

    1986-01-01

    An oscillatory solution of the equations of structure of isothermal selfgravitating gas masses with stationary differential rotation is given. Both the density and the rotational velocity show oscillations. The solution is an axially symmetric analogue to a solution found by Schmid-Burgk (1967) which shows a periodic structure depending on two cartesian coordinates. It falls into two families with distinct density structures but a common rotation law. The physical meaning of the solutions is discussed. In order to draw conclusions about other configurations with differential rotation the authors consider the influence of an applied external gravitational field.

  17. Oscillatory instability in slow crack propagation in rubber under large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Daiki; Sato, Katsuhiko; Hayakawa, Yoshinori

    2012-07-01

    We performed experiments to investigate slow fracture in thin rubber films under uniaxial tension using high-viscosity oils. In this system we observed an oscillating instability in slowly propagating cracks for small applied strains. The transition between oscillatory and straight patterns occurred near the characteristic strain at which rubber exhibits a nonlinear stress-strain relation. This suggests that nonlinear elasticity plays an important role in the formation of the observed pattern. This was confirmed by numerical simulation for neo-Hookean and linear elasticity models.

  18. Diffusion-induced periodic transition between oscillatory modes in amplitude-modulated patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaodong; He, Yuxiu; Wang, Shaorong; Gao, Qingyu; Epstein, Irving R.; Wang, Qun

    2014-06-15

    We study amplitude-modulated waves, e.g., wave packets in one dimension, overtarget spirals and superspirals in two dimensions, under mixed-mode oscillatory conditions in a three-variable reaction-diffusion model. New transition zones, not seen in the homogeneous system, are found, in which periodic transitions occur between local 1{sup N−1} and 1{sup N} oscillations. Amplitude-modulated complex patterns result from periodic transition between (N − 1)-armed and N-armed waves. Spatial recurrence rates provide a useful guide to the stability of these modulated patterns.

  19. Estimates for a class of oscillatory integrals and decay rates for wave-type equations.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Anton; Kim, Jinmyong; Yao, Xiaohua

    2012-10-01

    This paper investigates higher order wave-type equations of the form [Formula: see text], where the symbol [Formula: see text] is a real, non-degenerate elliptic polynomial of the order [Formula: see text] on [Formula: see text]. Using methods from harmonic analysis, we first establish global pointwise time-space estimates for a class of oscillatory integrals that appear as the fundamental solutions to the Cauchy problem of such wave equations. These estimates are then used to establish (pointwise-in-time) [Formula: see text] estimates on the wave solution in terms of the initial conditions.

  20. Estimates for a class of oscillatory integrals and decay rates for wave-type equations☆

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Anton; Kim, JinMyong; Yao, Xiaohua

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates higher order wave-type equations of the form ∂ttu+P(Dx)u=0, where the symbol P(ξ) is a real, non-degenerate elliptic polynomial of the order m≥4 on Rn. Using methods from harmonic analysis, we first establish global pointwise time–space estimates for a class of oscillatory integrals that appear as the fundamental solutions to the Cauchy problem of such wave equations. These estimates are then used to establish (pointwise-in-time) Lp−Lq estimates on the wave solution in terms of the initial conditions. PMID:23576817

  1. Respiratory mechanics during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation: a physical model and preterm infant study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rachana; Courtney, Sherry E; Weisner, Michael D; Habib, Robert H

    2012-04-01

    Accurate mechanics measurements during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) facilitate optimizing ventilator support settings. Yet, these are influenced substantially by endotracheal tube (ETT) contributions, which may dominate when leaks around uncuffed ETT are present. We hypothesized that 1) the effective removal of ETT leaks may be confirmed via direct comparison of measured vs. model-predicted mean intratracheal pressure [mPtr (meas) vs. mPtr (pred)], and 2) reproducible respiratory system resistance (Rrs) and compliance (Crs) may be derived from no-leak oscillatory Ptr and proximal flow. With the use of ETT test-lung models, proximal airway opening (Pao) and distal (Ptr) pressures and flows were measured during slow-cuff inflations until leaks are removed. These were repeated for combinations of HFOV settings [frequency, mean airway pressure (Paw), oscillation amplitudes (ΔP), and inspiratory time (%t(I))] and varying test-lung Crs. Results showed that leaks around the ETT will 1) systematically reduce the effective distending pressures and lung-delivered oscillatory volumes, and 2) derived mechanical properties are increasingly nonphysiologic as leaks worsen. Mean pressures were systematically reduced along the ventilator circuit and ETT (Paw > Pao > Ptr), even for no-leak conditions. ETT size-specific regression models were then derived for predicting mPtr based on mean Pao (mPao), ΔP, %t(I), and frequency. Next, in 10 of 11 studied preterm infants (0.77 ± 0.24 kg), no-to-minimal leak was confirmed based on excellent agreement between mPtr (meas) and mPtr (pred), and consequently, their oscillatory respiratory mechanics were evaluated. Infant resistance at the proximal ETT (R(ETT); resistance airway opening = R(ETT) + Rrs; P < 0.001) and ETT inertance (P = 0.014) increased significantly with increasing ΔP (50%, 100%, and 150% baseline), whereas Rrs showed a modest, nonsignificant increase (P = 0.14), and Crs was essentially unchanged (P = 0

  2. Boundary-reaction-diffusion model for oscillatory zoning in binary crystals grown from solution.

    PubMed

    Kalischewski, Felix; Lubashevsky, Ihor; Heuer, Andreas

    2007-02-01

    Oscillatory Zoning (OZ) is a phenomenon exhibited by many geologically formed crystals. It is characterized by quasiperiodic oscillations in the composition of a solid solution, caused by self-organization. We present a model for OZ. The growth mechanism applied includes species diffusion through the solution bulk, particle adsorption, surface diffusion, and subsequently desorption or incorporation into the crystal. This mechanism, in particular, can provide the synchronization effects necessary to reproduce the layered structure of experimentally obtained crystals, lacking in other models. We conduct a linear stability analysis combined with numerical simulations. Our results reproduce the experimental findings with respect to the patterns formed and a critical supersaturation necessary for OZ to occur.

  3. Compact-reconstruction weighted essentially non-oscillatory schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debojyoti

    A new class of non-linear compact interpolation schemes is introduced in this dissertation that have a high spectral resolution and are non-oscillatory across discontinuities. The Compact-Reconstruction Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (CRWENO) schemes use a solution-dependent combination of lower-order compact schemes to yield a high-order accurate, non-oscillatory scheme. Fifth-order accurate CRWENO schemes are constructed and their numerical properties are analyzed. These schemes have lower absolute errors and higher spectral resolution than the WENO scheme of the same order. The schemes are applied to scalar conservation laws and the Euler equations of fluid dynamics. The order of convergence and the higher accuracy of the CRWENO schemes are verified for smooth solutions. Significant improvements are observed in the resolution of discontinuities and extrema as well as the preservation of flow features over large convection distances. The computational cost of the CRWENO schemes is assessed and the reduced error in the solution outweighs the additional expense of the implicit scheme, thus resulting in higher numerical efficiency. This conclusion extends to the reconstruction of conserved and primitive variables for the Euler equations, but not to the characteristic-based reconstruction. Further improvements are observed in the accuracy and resolution of the schemes with alternative formulations for the non-linear weights. The CRWENO schemes are integrated into a structured, finite-volume Navier-Stokes solver and applied to problems of practical relevance. Steady and unsteady flows around airfoils are solved to validate the scheme for curvi-linear grids, as well as overset grids with relative motion. The steady flow around a three-dimensional wing and the unsteady flow around a full-scale rotor are solved. It is observed that though lower-order schemes suffice for the accurate prediction of aerodynamic forces, the CRWENO scheme yields improved resolution of

  4. Spectral characteristics of sign-alternating self-oscillatory endoplasm mobility in a myxomycete plasmodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avsievich, T. I.; Frolov, S. V.; Proskurin, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    The results of a short time Fourier transform of the time dependences of the self-oscillatory endoplasm velocity in an isolated strand of the Physarum polycephalum plasmodium recorded using a sign-sensitive laser Doppler microscope are described. Unlike the mode recording an absolute velocity, a sign-sensitive mode makes it possible to detect the pairs of equidistant harmonic components in the time dependence spectra of endoplasm movement. The resulting frequency and amplitude values are used to construct a model adequately describing the alternating endoplasm mobility.

  5. The Modeling of Fuzzy Systems Based on Lee-Oscillatory Chaotic Fuzzy Model (LoCFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Max H. Y.; Liu, James N. K.; Shum, Dennis T. F.; Lee, Raymond S. T.

    This paper introduces a new fuzzy membership function — LEE-oscillatory Chaotic Fuzzy Model (LoCFM). The development of this model is based on fuzzy logic and the incorporation of chaos theory — LEE Oscillator. Prototype systems are being developed for handling imprecise problems, typically involving linguistic expression and fuzzy semantic meaning. In addition, the paper also examines the mechanism of the LEE Oscillator through analyzing its structure and neural dynamics. It demonstrates the potential application of the model in future development.

  6. Oscillatory neural networks with self-organized segmentation of overlapping patterns.

    PubMed

    Burwick, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Temporal coding is considered with an oscillatory network model that generalizes the Cohen-Grossberg-Hopfield model. It is assumed that the frequency of oscillating units increases with stronger and more coherent input. We refer to this mechanism as acceleration. In the context of Hebbian memory, synchronization and acceleration take complementary roles, and their combined effect on the storage of patterns is profound. Acceleration implies the desynchronization that is needed for self-organized segmention of two overlapping patterns. The superposition problem is thereby solved even without including competition couplings. With respect to brain dynamics, we point to analogies with oscillation spindles in the gamma range and responses to perceptual rivalries.

  7. Study of fluid flow behavior in smooth and rough nanochannels through oscillatory wall by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmatipour, Hamed; Azimian, Ahmad-Reza; Atlaschian, Omid

    2017-01-01

    The method of molecular dynamics simulation is applied in order to study the behavior of liquid Argon flow within oscillatory Couette flows, in both smooth and rough nanochannels. To accomplish this study, the fluid velocity and the fluid slip in oscillatory Couette flows were used to assess the effects of: oscillatory velocity amplitude, speed frequency rate, channel height, wall density, and the amount of interaction between fluid and wall particles. Both smooth and rough walls were modelled in order to investigate the effect on the fluid patterns as well. Rectangular and triangular wall roughnesses in different dimensions were used to study this effect. The results indicate that an increase in the velocity amplitude increases the fluid slip, and decreases the fluid velocity fluctuations near the walls. Similar to the steady-state Couette flow, in oscillatory flow we observe a decrease in fluid slip by reducing the wall density. Moreover, by reducing the energy parameter between the fluid and wall, the fluid slip increases, and by reducing the length parameter the fluid slip decreases. Implementing the rectangular and triangular roughness to the bottom wall in the oscillatory flow results in a decrease in fluid slip, which is also similar to the usual non-oscillating flows.

  8. Identification of oscillatory genes in somitogenesis from functional genomic analysis of a human mesenchymal stem cell model.

    PubMed

    William, Dilusha A; Saitta, Biagio; Gibson, Joshua D; Traas, Jeremy; Markov, Vladimir; Gonzalez, Dorian M; Sewell, William; Anderson, Douglas M; Pratt, Stephen C; Rappaport, Eric F; Kusumi, Kenro

    2007-05-01

    During somitogenesis, oscillatory expression of genes in the notch and wnt signaling pathways plays a key role in regulating segmentation. These oscillations in expression levels are elements of a species-specific developmental mechanism. To date, the periodicity and components of the human clock remain unstudied. Here we show that a human mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) model can be induced to display oscillatory gene expression. We observed that the known cycling gene HES1 oscillated with a 5 h period consistent with available data on the rate of somitogenesis in humans. We also observed cycling of Hes1 expression in mouse C2C12 myoblasts with a period of 2 h, consistent with previous in vitro and embryonic studies. Furthermore, we used microarray and quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) analysis to identify additional genes that display oscillatory expression both in vitro and in mouse embryos. We confirmed oscillatory expression of the notch pathway gene Maml3 and the wnt pathway gene Nkd2 by whole mount in situ hybridization analysis and Q-PCR. Expression patterns of these genes were disrupted in Wnt3a(tm1Amc) mutants but not in Dll3(pu) mutants. Our results demonstrate that human and mouse in vitro models can recapitulate oscillatory expression observed in embryo and that a number of genes in multiple developmental pathways display dynamic expression in vitro.

  9. Oscillatory synchrony in the monkey temporal lobe correlates with performance in a visual short-term memory task.

    PubMed

    Tallon-Baudry, Catherine; Mandon, Sunita; Freiwald, Winrich A; Kreiter, Andreas K

    2004-07-01

    Oscillatory synchrony has been proposed to dynamically coordinate distributed neural ensembles, but whether this mechanism is effectively used in neural processing remains controversial. We trained two monkeys to perform a delayed matching-to-sample task using new visual shapes at each trial. Measures of population-activity patterns (cortical field potentials) were obtained from a chronically implanted array of electrodes placed over area V4 and posterior infero-temporal cortex. In correct trials, oscillatory phase synchrony in the beta range (15-20 Hz) was observed between two focal sites in the inferior temporal cortex while holding the sample in short-term memory. Error trials were characterized by an absence of oscillatory synchrony during memory maintenance. Errors did not seem to be due to an impaired stimulus encoding, since various parameters of neural activity in sensory area V4 did not differ in correct and incorrect trials during sample presentation. Our findings suggest that the successful performance of a visual short-term memory task depends on the strength of oscillatory synchrony during the maintenance of the object in short-term memory. The strength of oscillatory synchrony thus seems to be a relevant parameter of the neural population dynamics that matches behavioral performance.

  10. In vitro Neurons in Mammalian Cortical Layer 4 Exhibit Intrinsic Oscillatory Activity in the 10- to 50-Hz Frequency Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinas, Rodolfo R.; Grace, Anthony A.; Yarom, Yosef

    1991-02-01

    We report here the presence of fast subthreshold oscillatory potentials recorded in vitro from neurons within layer 4 of the guinea pig frontal cortex. Two types of oscillatory neurons were recorded: (i) One type exhibited subthreshold oscillations whose frequency increased with membrane depolarization and encompassed a range of 10-45 Hz. Action potentials in this type of neuron demonstrated clear after-hyperpolarizations. (ii) The second type of neuron was characterized by narrow-frequency oscillations near 35-50 Hz. These oscillations often outlasted the initiating depolarizing stimulus. No calcium component could be identified in their action potential. In both types of cell the subthreshold oscillations were tetrodotoxin-sensitive, indicating that the depolarizing phase of the oscillation was generated by a voltage-dependent sodium conductance. The initial depolarizing phase was followed by a potassium conductance responsible for the falling phase of the oscillatory wave. In both types of cell, the subthreshold oscillation could trigger spikes at the oscillatory frequency, if the membrane was sufficiently depolarized. Combining intracellular recordings with Lucifer yellow staining showed that the narrow-frequency oscillatory activity was produced by a sparsely spinous interneuron located in layer 4 of the cortex. This neuron has extensive local axonal collaterals that ramify in layers 3 and 4 such that they may contribute to the columnar synchronization of activity in the 40- to 50-Hz range. Cortical activity in this frequency range has been proposed as the basis for the "conjunctive properties" of central nervous system networks.

  11. Numerical investigation of oscillatory thermocapillary flows under zero gravity in a circular liquid film with concave free surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Takagi, Y.; Okano, Y.; Dost, S.

    2016-03-01

    NASA astronaut Pettit has conducted thermocapillary flow experiments in water films suspended in a solid ring onboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2003 and 2011. In one of these experiments, an oscillatory thermocapillary flow was observed. The developed flow broke its symmetry along the centerline of the film. To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies on such oscillatory thermocapillary flows in thin films, and the flow-mechanism giving rise to such oscillatory flows is also not well understood. In order to shed light on the subject, we have carried out a numerical simulation study. The simulation results have shown that the water film geometry (film surface shape; being concave) is an important parameter and give rise to three oscillatory flow structures in the film, namely, a hydrothermal wave developing near the heated section, a symmetric oscillatory flow due to temperature variations, and a symmetry breaking flow due to the hydrodynamic instability along the free boundary layer (mixing layer) and the development of the hydrothermal waves. Simulation results show that the symmetry-breaking phenomenon observed in the thin film experiment on the ISS can be explained by the hydrodynamic instability and the development of hydrothermal waves.

  12. Modified Debye screening potential in a magnetized quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimullah, M.; Hussain, A.; Sara, I.; Murtaza, G.; Shah, H. A.

    2009-07-01

    The effects of quantum mechanical influence and uniform static magnetic field on the Shukla-Nambu-Salimullah potential in an ultracold homogeneous electron-ion Fermi plasma have been examined in detail. It is noticed that the strong quantum effect arising through the Bohm potential and the ion polarization effect can give rise to a new oscillatory behavior of the screening potential beyond the shielding cloud which could explain a new type of possible robust ordered structure formation in the quantum magnetoplasma. However, the magnetic field enhances the Debye length perpendicular to the magnetic field in the weak quantum limit of the quantum plasma.

  13. Acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2015-07-16

    The presentation begins with colorful depictions of solar x-ray flares and references to pulsar phenomena. Plasma reconnection is complex, could be x-point dominated or turbulent, field lines could break due to either resistivity or non-ideal effects, such as electron pressure anisotropy. Electron acceleration is sometimes observed, and sometimes not. One way to study this complex problem is to have many examples of the process (reconnection) and compare them; the other way is to simplify and come to something robust. Ideal MHD (E=0) turbulence driven by magnetic energy is assumed, and the first-order acceleration is sought. It is found that dissipation in big (length >100 ion skin depths) current sheets is universal and independent on microscopic resistivity and the mean imposed field; particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. One example of such flow is spontaneous reconnection. This explains hot electrons with a power-law tail in solar flares, as well as ultrashort time variability in some astrophysical sources.

  14. Frequency dependent hydraulic properties estimated from oscillatory pumping tests in an unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Avinoam; Barrash, Warren; Cardiff, Michael; Hochstetler, David L.; Bakhos, Tania; Dagan, Gedeon; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2015-12-01

    Oscillatory pumping tests were conducted at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site. A periodic pressure signal is generated by pumping and injecting water into the aquifer consecutively and the pressure response is recorded at many points around the source. We present and analyze the data from the field test after applying Fourier analysis. We then match the data with a recently derived analytical solution for homogeneous formations to estimate the equivalent aquifer properties: conductivity K, specific storage Ss and specific yield Sy . The estimated values are shown to be in agreement with previous estimates conducted at this site. We observe variations in the estimated parameters with different oscillation periods of pumping. The trend of the parameters with changing period is discussed and compared to predictions by existing theory and laboratory experiments dealing with dynamic effective properties. It is shown that the results are qualitatively consistent with recent works on effective properties of formations of spatially variable properties in oscillatory flow. To grasp the impact of heterogeneity, a simple configuration is proposed, helping explain the observed increase in effective conductivity with decreasing period.

  15. Nanofluid bioconvection in water-based suspensions containing nanoparticles and oxytactic microorganisms: oscillatory instability.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V

    2011-01-25

    The aim of this article is to propose a novel type of a nanofluid that contains both nanoparticles and motile (oxytactic) microorganisms. The benefits of adding motile microorganisms to the suspension include enhanced mass transfer, microscale mixing, and anticipated improved stability of the nanofluid. In order to understand the behavior of such a suspension at the fundamental level, this article investigates its stability when it occupies a shallow horizontal layer. The oscillatory mode of nanofluid bioconvection may be induced by the interaction of three competing agencies: oxytactic microorganisms, heating or cooling from the bottom, and top or bottom-heavy nanoparticle distribution. The model includes equations expressing conservation of total mass, momentum, thermal energy, nanoparticles, microorganisms, and oxygen. Physical mechanisms responsible for the slip velocity between the nanoparticles and the base fluid, such as Brownian motion and thermophoresis, are accounted for in the model. An approximate analytical solution of the eigenvalue problem is obtained using the Galerkin method. The obtained solution provides important physical insights into the behavior of this system; it also explains when the oscillatory mode of instability is possible in such system.

  16. PIV experiments in rough-wall, laminar-to-turbulent, oscillatory boundary-layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Mier, Jose M.; Christensen, Kenneth T.; Bateman, Allen; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory measurements of oscillatory boundary layers were conducted over a smooth and two different rough beds spanning the laminar, transitional and turbulent flow regimes using a multi-camera 2D-PIV system in a small oscillatory-flow tunnel (Admiraal et al. in J Hydraul Res 44(4):437-450, 2006). Results show how the phase lag between bed shear stress and free-stream velocity is better defined when the integral of the momentum equation is used to estimate the bed shear stress. Observed differences in bed shear stress and phase lag between bed shear stress and free-stream velocity are highly sensitive to the definition of the bed position ( y = b). The underestimation of turbulent stresses close to the wall is found to explain such differences when using the addition of Reynolds and viscous stresses to define both the bed shear stress and the phase lag. Regardless of the flow regime, in all experiments, boundary-layer thickness reached its maximum value at a phase near the flow reversal at the wall. Friction factors in smooth walls are better estimated using a theoretical equation first proposed by Batchelor (An introduction to fluid dynamics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1967) while the more recent empirical predictor of Pedocchi and Garcia (J Hydraul Res 47(4):438-444, 2009a) was found to be appropriate for estimating friction coefficients in the laminar-to-turbulent transition regime.

  17. EEG neural oscillatory dynamics reveal semantic and response conflict at difference levels of conflict awareness.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Qinglin; Van Gaal, Simon

    2015-07-14

    Although previous work has shown that conflict can be detected in the absence of awareness, it is unknown how different sources of conflict (i.e., semantic, response) are processed in the human brain and whether these processes are differently modulated by conflict awareness. To explore this issue, we extracted oscillatory power dynamics from electroencephalographic (EEG) data recorded while human participants performed a modified version of the Stroop task. Crucially, in this task conflict awareness was manipulated by masking a conflict-inducing color word preceding a color patch target. We isolated semantic from response conflict by introducing four color words/patches, of which two were matched to the same response. We observed that both semantic as well as response conflict were associated with mid-frontal theta-band and parietal alpha-band power modulations, irrespective of the level of conflict awareness (high vs. low), although awareness of conflict increased these conflict-related power dynamics. These results show that both semantic and response conflict can be processed in the human brain and suggest that the neural oscillatory mechanisms in EEG reflect mainly "domain general" conflict processing mechanisms, instead of conflict source specific effects.

  18. Oscillatory activity in auditory cortex reflects the perceptual level of audio-tactile integration

    PubMed Central

    Plöchl, Michael; Gaston, Jeremy; Mermagen, Tim; König, Peter; Hairston, W. David

    2016-01-01

    Cross-modal interactions between sensory channels have been shown to depend on both the spatial disparity and the perceptual similarity between the presented stimuli. Here we investigate the behavioral and neural integration of auditory and tactile stimulus pairs at different levels of spatial disparity. Additionally, we modulated the amplitudes of both stimuli in either a coherent or non-coherent manner. We found that both auditory and tactile localization performance was biased towards the stimulus in the respective other modality. This bias linearly increases with stimulus disparity and is more pronounced for coherently modulated stimulus pairs. Analyses of electroencephalographic (EEG) activity at temporal–cortical sources revealed enhanced event-related potentials (ERPs) as well as decreased alpha and beta power during bimodal as compared to unimodal stimulation. However, while the observed ERP differences are similar for all stimulus combinations, the extent of oscillatory desynchronization varies with stimulus disparity. Moreover, when both stimuli were subjectively perceived as originating from the same direction, the reduction in alpha and beta power was significantly stronger. These observations suggest that in the EEG the level of perceptual integration is mainly reflected by changes in ongoing oscillatory activity. PMID:27647158

  19. Auditory cortical delta-entrainment interacts with oscillatory power in multiple fronto-parietal networks.

    PubMed

    Keitel, Anne; Ince, Robin A A; Gross, Joachim; Kayser, Christoph

    2017-02-15

    The timing of slow auditory cortical activity aligns to the rhythmic fluctuations in speech. This entrainment is considered to be a marker of the prosodic and syllabic encoding of speech, and has been shown to correlate with intelligibility. Yet, whether and how auditory cortical entrainment is influenced by the activity in other speech-relevant areas remains unknown. Using source-localized MEG data, we quantified the dependency of auditory entrainment on the state of oscillatory activity in fronto-parietal regions. We found that delta band entrainment interacted with the oscillatory activity in three distinct networks. First, entrainment in the left anterior superior temporal gyrus (STG) was modulated by beta power in orbitofrontal areas, possibly reflecting predictive top-down modulations of auditory encoding. Second, entrainment in the left Heschl's Gyrus and anterior STG was dependent on alpha power in central areas, in line with the importance of motor structures for phonological analysis. And third, entrainment in the right posterior STG modulated theta power in parietal areas, consistent with the engagement of semantic memory. These results illustrate the topographical network interactions of auditory delta entrainment and reveal distinct cross-frequency mechanisms by which entrainment can interact with different cognitive processes underlying speech perception.

  20. Oscillatory activity in the subthalamic nucleus during arm reaching in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Joundi, Raed A; Brittain, John-Stuart; Green, Alex L; Aziz, Tipu Z; Brown, Peter; Jenkinson, Ned

    2012-08-01

    Oscillatory activities in the brain within the beta (15-30 Hz) and gamma (70-90 Hz) ranges have been implicated in the generation of voluntary movement. However, their roles remain unclear. Here, we record local field potential activity from the region of the subthalamic nucleus during movement of the contralateral limb in 11 patients with Parkinson's disease. Patients were on their normal dopaminergic medication and were cued to perform arm-reaching movements after a delay period at three different speeds: 'slow', 'normal', and 'fast'. Beta activity desynchronized earlier in response to the cue indicating an upcoming fast reach than to the cues for slow or normal speed movement. There was no difference in the degree of beta desynchronization between reaching speeds and beta desynchronization was established prior to movement onset in all cases. In contrast, synchronization in the gamma range developed during the reaching movement, and was especially pronounced during fast reaching. Thus the timing of suppression in the beta band depended on task demands, whereas the degree of increase in gamma oscillations depended on movement speed. These findings point to functionally segregated roles for different oscillatory frequencies in motor preparation and performance.

  1. Oscillatory Brain Dynamics during Sentence Reading: A Fixation-Related Spectral Perturbation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vignali, Lorenzo; Himmelstoss, Nicole A.; Hawelka, Stefan; Richlan, Fabio; Hutzler, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated oscillatory brain dynamics during self-paced sentence-level processing. Participants read fully correct sentences, sentences containing a semantic violation and “sentences” in which the order of the words was randomized. At the target word level, fixations on semantically unrelated words elicited a lower-beta band (13–18 Hz) desynchronization. At the sentence level, gamma power (31–55 Hz) increased linearly for syntactically correct sentences, but not when the order of the words was randomized. In the 300–900 ms time window after sentence onsets, theta power (4–7 Hz) was greater for syntactically correct sentences as compared to sentences where no syntactic structure was preserved (random words condition). We interpret our results as conforming with a recently formulated predictive-coding framework for oscillatory neural dynamics during sentence-level language comprehension. Additionally, we discuss how our results relate to previous findings with serial visual presentation vs. self-paced reading. PMID:27199713

  2. Oscillatory Behavior of Neutrophils under Opposing Chemoattractant Gradients Supports a Winner-Take-All Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Ashish; He, Yuan; Mattam, Kewin S.; Hasan, Katherine M.; Olson, Luke N.; Wang, Fei; Kenis, Paul J. A.; Rao, Christopher V.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils constitute the largest class of white blood cells and are the first responders in the innate immune response. They are able to sense and migrate up concentration gradients of chemoattractants in search of primary sites of infection and inflammation through a process known as chemotaxis. These chemoattractants include formylated peptides and various chemokines. While much is known about chemotaxis to individual chemoattractants, far less is known about chemotaxis towards many. Previous studies have shown that in opposing gradients of intermediate chemoattractants (interleukin-8 and leukotriene B4), neutrophils preferentially migrate toward the more distant source. In this work, we investigated neutrophil chemotaxis in opposing gradients of chemoattractants using a microfluidic platform. We found that primary neutrophils exhibit oscillatory motion in opposing gradients of intermediate chemoattractants. To understand this behavior, we constructed a mathematical model of neutrophil chemotaxis. Our results suggest that sensory adaptation alone cannot explain the observed oscillatory motion. Rather, our model suggests that neutrophils employ a winner-take-all mechanism that enables them to transiently lock onto sensed targets and continuously switch between the intermediate attractant sources as they are encountered. These findings uncover a previously unseen behavior of neutrophils in opposing gradients of chemoattractants that will further aid in our understanding of neutrophil chemotaxis and the innate immune response. In addition, we propose a winner-take-all mechanism allows the cells to avoid stagnation near local chemical maxima when migrating through a network of chemoattractant sources. PMID:24465668

  3. Frequency Dependent Hydraulic Properties Estimated from Oscillatory Pumping Tests in an Unconfined Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, A.; Barrash, W.; Cardiff, M. A.; Hochstetler, D. L.; Bakhos, T.; Dagan, G.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    Oscillatory pumping tests were conducted at the Boise Hydrological Research Site. A periodic pressure signal is generated by pumping and injecting water into the aquifer consecutively and the pressure response is recorded at many points around the source. We present and analyze the data from the field test after applying Fourier analysis. We then match the data with a recently derived analytical solution for homogeneous formations to estimate the equivalent aquifer properties: conductivity K, specific storage Ss and specific yield Sy. The estimated values are shown to be in agreement with previous estimates conducted at this site. We observe variations in the estimated parameters with different oscillation periods of pumping. The trend of the parameters with changing period is discussed and compared to predictions by existing theory and laboratory experiments dealing with dynamic effective properties. It is shown that the results are qualitatively consistent with recent works on effective properties of formations of spatially variable properties in oscillatory flow. To grasp the impact of heterogeneity, a simple configuration is proposed, helping explain the observed increase in effective conductivity with decreasing period.

  4. Characterization of Oscillatory Boundary Layer Over a Closely Packed Bed of Sediment Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apte, S. V.; Skitka, J.

    2012-12-01

    Lack of accurate criteria for onset of incipient motion and sediment pickup function remain two of the biggest hurdles in developing better predictive models for sediment transport. To study pickup and transport of sediment, it is necessary to have a detailed knowledge of the small amplitude oscillatory flow over the sediment layer near the sea bed. Fully resolved direct numerical simulations are performed using fictitious domain approach (Apte et al., JCP 2009) to investigate the effect of a sinusoidally oscillating flow field over a rough wall made of regular hexagonal pack of spherical particles. The flow arrangement is similar to the experimental data of Keiller & Sleath (JFM 1976). Transitional and turbulent flows at Reδ = 50,100,150,200 (based on the Stokes layer thickness, delta) are explored over a range of non-dimensional sphere sizes. The coherent vortex structures, turbulent cross-correlations and lift forces on the roughness elements are characterized for these flow conditions and compared against available data of Keiller & Sleath (JFM 1976) and Sleath (JFM 1986). The dynamics of the oscillatory flow over the sediment bed is used to understand the mechanism of sediment pick-up.

  5. Reduced Sensory Oscillatory Activity during Rapid Auditory Processing as a Correlate of Language-Learning Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Sabine; Friedman, Jennifer Thomas; Keil, Andreas; Benasich, April A.

    2010-01-01

    Successful language acquisition has been hypothesized to involve the ability to integrate rapidly presented, brief acoustic cues in sensory cortex. A body of work has suggested that this ability is compromised in language-learning impairment (LLI). The present research aimed to examine sensory integration during rapid auditory processing by means of electrophysiological measures of oscillatory brain activity using data from a larger longitudinal study. Twenty-nine children with LLI and control participants with typical language development (n=18) listened to tone doublets presented at a temporal interval that is essential for accurate speech processing (70-ms interstimulus interval). The children performed a deviant (pitch change of second tone) detection task, or listened passively. The electroencephalogram was recorded from 64 electrodes. Data were source-projected to the auditory cortices and submitted to wavelet analysis, resulting in time-frequency representations of electrocortical activity. Results show significantly reduced amplitude and phase-locking of early (45–75 ms) oscillations in the gamma-band range (29–52 Hz), specifically in the LLI group, for the second stimulus of the tone doublet. This suggests altered temporal organization of sensory oscillatory activity in LLI when processing rapid sequences. PMID:21822356

  6. Nanoscopic Terraces, Mesas, and Ridges in Freely Standing Thin Films Sculpted by Supramolecular Oscillatory Surface Forces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiran; Yilixiati, Subinuer; Pearsall, Collin; Sharma, Vivek

    2016-04-26

    Freely standing thin liquid films containing supramolecular structures including micelles, nanoparticles, polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes, and smectic liquid crystals undergo drainage via stratification. The layer-by-layer removal of these supramolecular structures manifests as stepwise thinning over time and a coexistence of domains and nanostructures of discretely different thickness. The layering of supramolecular structures in confined thin films contributes additional non-DLVO, supramolecular oscillatory surface forces to disjoining pressure, thus influencing both drainage kinetics and stability of thin films. Understanding and characterizing the spontaneous creation and evolution of nanoscopic topography of stratifying, freely standing thin liquid films have been long-standing challenges due to the absence of experimental techniques with the requisite spatial (thickness <10 nm) and temporal resolution (<1 ms). Using Interferometry Digital Imaging Optical Microscopy (IDIOM) protocols developed herein, we visualize and characterize size, shape, and evolution kinetics of nanoscopic mesas, terraces, and ridges. The exquisite thickness maps created using IDIOM protocols provide much needed and unprecedented insights into the role of supramolecular oscillatory surface forces in driving growth of such nanostructures as well as in controlling properties and stability of freely standing thin films and, more generally, of colloidal dispersions like foams.

  7. Shadows of music-language interaction on low frequency brain oscillatory patterns.

    PubMed

    Carrus, Elisa; Koelsch, Stefan; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2011-10-01

    Electrophysiological studies investigating similarities between music and language perception have relied exclusively on the signal averaging technique, which does not adequately represent oscillatory aspects of electrical brain activity that are relevant for higher cognition. The current study investigated the patterns of brain oscillations during simultaneous processing of music and language using visually presented sentences and auditorily presented chord sequences. Music-syntactically regular or irregular chord functions were presented in sync with syntactically or semantically correct or incorrect words. Irregular chord functions (presented simultaneously with a syntactically correct word) produced an early (150-250 ms) spectral power decrease over anterior frontal regions in the theta band (5-7 Hz) and a late (350-700 ms) power increase in both the delta and the theta band (2-7 Hz) over parietal regions. Syntactically incorrect words (presented simultaneously with a regular chord) elicited a similar late power increase in delta-theta band over parietal sites, but no early effect. Interestingly, the late effect was significantly diminished when the language-syntactic and music-syntactic irregularities occurred at the same time. Further, the presence of a semantic violation occurring simultaneously with regular chords produced a significant increase in later delta-theta power at posterior regions; this effect was marginally decreased when the identical semantic violation occurred simultaneously with a music syntactical violation. Altogether, these results show that low frequency oscillatory networks get activated during the syntactic processing of both music and language, and further, these networks may possibly be shared.

  8. The pre-states, the time precision and the response pattern of oscillatory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Xing

    1998-03-01

    Rate and temporal codes are two main strategies for encoding neural information. The temporal code contains more information but requires substantial timing precision of the spike discharges. Cortical neurons can respond to stimulation with good time precision. However, action potential responses depend not only upon the stimulus but also upon the history of a neuron. We have studied this problem with an oscillatory system: the primary afferent cells that innervate the ampullary electroreceptors in the paddlefish. The endogenous discharges represent a noisy oscillator. We demonstrate how the pre-state of a neuron affects the response timing precision to an applied stimulus, by re-ordering the data according to the time between the last endogenous spike and the delivery of the stimulus. Raster plots of discharges show clear striped patterns for the re-ordered data. In contrast, plots of the original data show random distributions or broadened stripes. We confirm this phenomenon by numerical simulation using a noisy Hodgkin-Huxley model with and without an endogenous oscillator. This technique can also be applied to other systems, e.g. cortical neurons, where oscillations are thought to be important. Oscillatory neurons demonstrate that the pre-state of the system is crucial in determining the post stimulus spike timing and precision.

  9. Birth of oscillation in coupled non-oscillatory Rayleigh-Duffing oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guin, A.; Dandapathak, M.; Sarkar, S.; Sarkar, B. C.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the dynamics of two bilaterally-coupled non-oscillatory Rayleigh-Duffing oscillators (RDOs). With the increase of coupling factor (CF) between RDOs, birth of periodic oscillations observed. For increased values of CF, dynamics becomes chaotic through a quasi-periodicroute but for even higher CF, synchronized stable periodic oscillations in RDOs are found. Taking direct and anti-diffusive coupling cases into consideration, we derive conditions for periodic bifurcation in parameter space analytically and verified them through numerical solution of system equations. Numerical simulation is also used to predict system states in two parameter space involving CF and linear damping parameter of RDOs. It indicates non-oscillatory, periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic zones of system dynamics. Qualitative explanation of the simulated dynamics is given using homoclinic perturbation theory. Hardware experiment is performed on analog circuits simulating RDO model and obtained results confirm the predictions regarding birth of periodic oscillation and other features of system dynamics. Experimental results examining onset of oscillations in two under-biased bi-laterally coupled X-band Gunn oscillators (which are modelled as RDOs) is presented in support of the analysis.

  10. Dynamics of liquid bridges inside microchannels subject to pure oscillatory flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadlouydarab, Majid; Azaiez, Jalel; Chen, Zhangxin

    2014-11-01

    We report on 2D simulations of liquid bridges' dynamics in microchannels of uniform wettability and subject to external oscillatory flows. The flow equations were solved using the Cahn-Hilliard diffuse-interface formulation and the finite element method with unstructured grid. It was found that regardless of the wettability properties of the microchannel walls, there is a critical frequency above which the bridge shows perpetual periodic oscillatory motion. Below that critical frequency, the liquid bridge ruptures when the channel walls are philic and detaches from the surface when they are phobic. This critical frequency depends on the viscosity ratio, oscillation amplitude and geometric aspect ratio of the bridge. It was also found that the flow velocity is out of phase with the footprint/throat lengths and that the latter two show a phase difference. These differences were explained in terms of the motion of the two contact lines on the substrates and the deformation of the fluid-fluid interfaces. To characterize the behavior of the liquid bridge, two quantitative parameters; the liquid bridge-solid interfacial length and the length of the throat of the liquid bridge were used. Variations of the interfacial morphology development of the bridge were analyzed to understand the bridge response.

  11. Rotationally-driven axisymmetric oscillatory convection in a semitransparent Czochralski melt model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiez, Reza; Rezaei, Yazdan

    2017-01-01

    A numerical study was carried out to investigate the effect of surface tension-driven convection on the transition of flow modes in an axisymmetric Czochralski oxide melt model. Computational results were obtained over a reasonably wide range of the crystal dummy rotation rate for the cases with and without Marangoni effect. The transition of the flow from steady-state to an axisymmetric oscillatory one was found to be occurred at a threshold value of the ratio between buoyancy and the rotationally-driven forces, which is considerably smaller in the presence of the Marangoni flow. This was shown that, in the presence of thermocapillary forces, the descending cold plume has a larger impact on the thermal field if compared to the case in which the Marangoni effect was ignored. Depending on the circumstances, each of the two different mechanisms, i.e., the rotating Rayleigh-Benard instability and the baroclinic instability, may play a dominant role in the steady-oscillatory flow transition. Thermocapillary effect on the mechanism of instability giving rise to the transition of the convective flow was studied.

  12. Oscillatory behavior of the surface reduction process of multilayer graphene oxide at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voylov, Dmitry; Ivanov, Ilia; Bykov, Valerii; Tsybenova, Svetlana; Merkulov, Igor; Kurochkin, Sergei; Holt, Adam; Kisliuk, Alexandr

    The graphene oxide (GO) is one of 2D materials which continues to be studied intensively since it is thought can be used as a precursor of graphene. Recently, it was found that the chemical composition of multilayer GO is metastable on the time scale of one month even at room temperature. The observed changes in chemical composition were attributed to a reduction process controlled by the in-plane diffusion of functional groups which progresses through radical reactions. Here we report the observation of oscillatory oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions on the surface of multilayer GO films at room temperature. The redox reactions exhibited dampened oscillatory behavior with a period of about 5 days and found to be dependent on the time elapsed from GO deposition. The kinetic behavior of the processes and observed metastability of the surface functional groups are adequately described by two models involving reactions between functional groups of GO and reactant diffusion. US team acknowledges partial financial support from the Division of Materials Science and Engineering, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  13. The effect of a turbulent jet on gas transport during oscillatory flow.

    PubMed

    Kamm, R D; Bullister, E T; Keramidas, C

    1986-08-01

    Axial mass transport due to the combined effects of flow oscillation and a turbulent jet was studied both experimentally and with a simple theoretical model. The experiments show that the distance over which turbulence enhances transport is greatly increased by flow oscillation, and is particularly sensitive to tidal volume. The jet flow rate and jet configuration are relatively less important. To analyze the results, the region influenced by the jet is divided into two zones: a near field in which the time-mean flow velocities are larger than the turbulent fluctuations, and a far field where the time-mean flow is essentially zero. In the far field, axial mass transport is increased due to the turbulence which decays in strength away from the jet. When oscillatory flow is superimposed upon the steady jet flow, the turbulence in the far field interacts with the flow oscillations to augment the transport of turbulence energy and of mass. This transport enhancement is modeled by introducing an effective axial diffusivity analogous to that used in laminar oscillatory flow.

  14. Oscillatory Structure of Elastic Precursor in Shocked Crystalline Solids: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zybin, Sergey; Zhakhovskii, Vasilii; Elert, Mark; White, Carter T.

    2003-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the structure of elastic precursors of shock waves propagating through crystalline solids in different directions. Both rare gas and diamond crystals were studied using Lennard-Jones and reactive empirical bond order potentials respectively. Elastic precursors were found to exhibit an oscillatory profile for various directions and different shock strengths ranging from a pure elastic wave to an elastic-plastic shock splitting to a shock wave with melting. These oscillations originate from collisions of atomic planes in the shock direction bouncing against each other as in one-dimensional chain. After the oscillations fade, and the shear stress achieves its sustained maximum value, plastic deformation develops. These effects are strongly influenced by the orientation dependence of shear stress under high strain rate at the shock front. Our simulations also show that a stationary combination of elastic precursor with plastic wave could exist in moderate and even melting shock waves. The oscillatory structure of the elastic precursor might play an important role in the initiation of shock-induced chemical reactions in crystalline solids.

  15. Continuum study on the oscillatory characteristics of carbon nanocones inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Sadeghi, F.; Darvizeh, M.

    2016-02-01

    This article aims to present a comprehensive study on the oscillatory behavior of concentric carbon nanocones (CNCs) inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using a continuum approach. To this end, the optimum radius of nanotube for which the nanocone lies on the tube axis is determined based on the distribution of suction energy. Using the Runge-Kutta numerical integration scheme, the equation of motion is solved numerically to attain the time history of displacement and velocity of nanocone. It is observed that the oscillation of nanocone occurs with respect to its axial equilibrium distance which moves further away from the middle axis of nanotube as the number of pentagons increases. A novel semi-analytical expression as a function of geometrical parameters, initial conditions and cone vertex direction is also proposed for the precise evaluation of oscillation frequency. With respect to the proposed frequency expression, a detailed parametric study is conducted to get an insight into the effects of number of pentagons, cone vertex direction and initial conditions on the oscillatory behavior of CNC-CNT oscillators. It is found that nanocones with more pentagons generate greater maximum frequencies inside nanotubes. Furthermore, it is shown that higher maximum frequencies can be achieved if the nanocone enters the nanotube from base.

  16. Magnetized stratified rotating shear waves.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Lehner, T; Godeferd, F; Cambon, C

    2012-02-01

    stability of the solution at infinite vertical wavelength (k(3) = 0): There is an oscillatory behavior for τ > 1+|K(2)/k(1)|, where τ = St is a dimensionless time and K(2) is the radial component of the wave vector at τ = 0. The model is suitable to describe instabilities leading to turbulence by the bypass mechanism that can be relevant for the analysis of magnetized stratified Keplerian disks with a purely azimuthal field. For initial isotropic conditions, the time evolution of the spectral density of total energy (kinetic + magnetic + potential) is considered. At k(3) = 0, the vertical motion is purely oscillatory, and the sum of the vertical (kinetic + magnetic) energy plus the potential energy does not evolve with time and remains equal to its initial value. The horizontal motion can induce a rapid transient growth provided K(2)/k(1)>1. This rapid growth is due to the aperiodic velocity vortex mode that behaves like K(h)/k(h) where k(h)(τ)=[k(1)(2) + (K(2) - k(1)τ)(2)](1/2) and K(h) =k(h)(0). After the leading phase (τ > K(2)/k(1)>1), the horizontal magnetic energy and the horizontal kinetic energy exhibit a similar (oscillatory) behavior yielding a high level of total energy. The contribution to energies coming from the modes k(1) = 0 and k(3) = 0 is addressed by investigating the one-dimensional spectra for an initial Gaussian dense spectrum. For a magnetized Keplerian disk with a purely vertical field, it is found that an important contribution to magnetic and kinetic energies comes from the region near k(1) = 0. The limit at k(1) = 0 of the streamwise one-dimensional spectra of energies, or equivalently, the streamwise two-dimensional (2D) energy, is then computed. The comparison of the ratios of these 2D quantities with their three-dimensional counterparts provided by previous direct numerical simulations shows a quantitative agreement.

  17. Solitary and shock waves in magnetized electron-positron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ding; Li, Zi-Liang; Abdukerim, Nuriman; Xie, Bai-Song

    2014-02-15

    An Ohm's law for electron-positron (EP) plasma is obtained. In the framework of EP magnetohydrodynamics, we investigate nonrelativistic nonlinear waves' solutions in a magnetized EP plasma. In the collisionless limit, quasistationary propagating solitary wave structures for the magnetic field and the plasma density are obtained. It is found that the wave amplitude increases with the Mach number and the Alfvén speed. However, the dependence on the plasma temperature is just the opposite. Moreover, for a cold EP plasma, the existence range of the solitary waves depends only on the Alfvén speed. For a hot EP plasma, the existence range depends on the Alfvén speed as well as the plasma temperature. In the presence of collision, the electromagnetic fields and the plasma density can appear as oscillatory shock structures because of the dissipation caused by the collisions. As the collision frequency increases, the oscillatory shock structure becomes more and more monotonic.

  18. Nonlinear oscillatory rheology and structure of wormlike micellar solutions and colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnon, Amanda Kate

    The complex, nonlinear flow behavior of soft materials transcends industrial applications, smart material design and non-equilibrium thermodynamics. A long-standing, fundamental challenge in soft-matter science is establishing a quantitative connection between the deformation field, local microstructure and macroscopic dynamic flow properties i.e., the rheology. Soft materials are widely used in consumer products and industrial processes including energy recovery, surfactants for personal healthcare (e.g. soap and shampoo), coatings, plastics, drug delivery, medical devices and therapeutics. Oftentimes, these materials are processed by, used during, or exposed to non-equilibrium conditions for which the transient response of the complex fluid is critical. As such, designing new dynamic experiments is imperative to testing these materials and further developing micromechanical models to predict their transient response. Two of the most common classes of these soft materials stand as the focus of the present research; they are: solutions of polymer-like micelles (PLM or also known as wormlike micelles, WLM) and concentrated colloidal suspensions. In addition to their varied applications these two different classes of soft materials are also governed by different physics. In contrast, to the shear thinning behavior of the WLMs at high shear rates, the near hard-sphere colloidal suspensions are known to display increases, sometimes quite substantial, in viscosity (known as shear thickening). The stress response of these complex fluids derive from the shear-induced microstructure, thus measurements of the microstructure under flow are critical for understanding the mechanisms underlying the complex, nonlinear rheology of these complex fluids. A popular micromechanical model is reframed from its original derivation for predicting steady shear rheology of polymers and WLMs to be applicable to weakly nonlinear oscillatory shear flow. The validity, utility and limits of

  19. INTERDISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Multi-mode Spiral Wave in a Coupled Oscillatory Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qun; Gao, Qing-Yu; Lü, Hua-Ping; Zheng, Zhi-Gang

    2010-05-01

    Multi-mode spiral wave and its breakup in 1-d and 2-d coupled oscillatory media is studied here by theoretic analysis and numerical simulations. The analysis in 1-d system shows that the dispersion relation curve could be non-monotonic depending on the coupling strength. It may also lead to the coexistence of different wave numbers within one system. Direct numerical observations in 1-d and 2-d systems conform to the prediction of dispersion relation analysis. Our findings indicate that the wave grouping can also be observed in oscillatory media without tip meandering and waves with negative group velocity can occur without inhomogeneity.

  20. Structures of diffusion regions in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, Takayuki; Togano, Kentaro; Ogino, Tatsuki

    2010-05-15

    Detailed structures of diffusion regions in two-dimensional collisionless magnetic reconnection are studied by using an electromagnetic Vlasov simulation. It has been well known that plasma number density decreases near the X-point of the reconnection. However, numerical thermal fluctuations exist in particle-in-cell simulations, and there is a possibility that detailed structures near the X-point diffuse numerically when the number of particles per cell is not enough. In the present study, a high-resolution two-dimensional Vlasov simulation is performed. It is found that electron number density in the electron diffusion region decreases to a hundredth of the initial value. Structures of electron diffusion region are determined by the local electron inertial length.

  1. Effects of Magnetic Measurement Uncertainty on Tokamak Equilibrium Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, A. L.; Lao, L. L.; Strait, E. J.; Taylor, T. S.

    2006-10-01

    Reconstruction of the magnetic topology and current density profile from external magnetic diagnostics is vital to the study of tokamak plasmas. It has long been suspected that external magnetic measurements may contain information about the current density near the edge of a shaped plasma. To better reconstruct this feature, the sensitivity of the reconstruction to uncertainty in magnetic measurements must be determined. This is done by analyzing existing DIII-D data for the effect of measurement uncertainty on the edge current density and the location of the separatrix. The new magnetic uncertainty matrix recently added to EFIT provides a basis for this numerical analysis, and these calculations are compared with simple analytical models. This study begins with examination of measurement error in the tokamak with no plasma, and continues to the more complicated plasma scenario. The relative importance of the various measurements can be determined, with the divertor X-point likely to be the most sensitive to the edge current density.

  2. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Reveals Intrinsic Perceptual and Attentional Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Dugué, Laura; VanRullen, Rufin

    2017-01-01

    Oscillatory brain activity has functional relevance for perceptual and cognitive processes, as proven by numerous electrophysiology studies accumulating over the years. However, only within the past two decades have researchers been able to study the causal role of such oscillations using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technology. Two complementary approaches exist. A majority of research employs rhythmic TMS (rTMS) to entrain oscillatory activity and investigate its effect on targeted brain functions. On the other hand, single pulses of TMS (spTMS) that can be delivered with a high spatio-temporal resolution, can be used to precisely probe the state of the system. In this mini-review, we concentrate on this second approach. We argue that, with no a priori hypothesis on the oscillatory frequency of the targeted cortical regions, spTMS can help establish causal links between spontaneous oscillatory activity and perceptual and cognitive functions. Notably, this approach helped to demonstrate that the occipital cortex is periodically involved during specific attentional tasks at the theta (~5 Hz) frequency. We propose that this frequency reflects periodic inter-areal communication for attentional exploration and selection. In the future, clever combination of non-invasive recording and stimulation with well-controlled psychophysics protocols will allow us to further our understanding of the role of brain oscillations for human brain functions.

  3. Beaming of Particles and Synchrotron Radiation in Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Daniel; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-08-01

    Relativistic reconnection has been invoked as a mechanism for particle acceleration in numerous astrophysical systems. According to idealized analytical models, reconnection produces a bulk relativistic outflow emerging from the reconnection sites (X-points). The resulting radiation is therefore highly beamed. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate particle and radiation beaming, finding a very different picture. Instead of having a relativistic average bulk motion with an isotropic electron velocity distribution in its rest frame, we find that the bulk motion of the particles in X-points is similar to their Lorentz factor γ, and the particles are beamed within ˜ 5/γ . On the way from the X-point to the magnetic islands, particles turn in the magnetic field, forming a fan confined to the current sheet. Once they reach the islands they isotropize after completing a full Larmor gyration and their radiation is no longer strongly beamed. The radiation pattern at a given frequency depends on where the corresponding emitting electrons radiate their energy. Lower-energy particles that cool slowly spend most of their time in the islands and their radiation is not highly beamed. Only particles that quickly cool at the edge of the X-points generate a highly beamed fan-like radiation pattern. The radiation emerging from these fast cooling particles is above the burn-off limit (˜100 MeV in the overall rest frame of the reconnecting plasma). This has significant implications for models of gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei that invoke beaming in that frame at much lower energies.

  4. Altered oscillatory cerebral blood flow velocity and autoregulation in postural tachycardia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Medow, Marvin S.; Del Pozzi, Andrew T.; Messer, Zachary R.; Terilli, Courtney; Stewart, Julian M.

    2014-01-01

    Decreased upright cerebral blood flow (CBF) with hyperpnea and hypocapnia is seen in a minority of patients with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). More often, CBF is not decreased despite upright neurocognitive dysfunction. This may result from time-dependent changes in CBF. We hypothesized that increased oscillations in CBF occurs in POTS (N = 12) compared to healthy controls (N = 9), and tested by measuring CBF velocity (CBFv) by transcranial Doppler ultrasound of the middle cerebral artery, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and related parameters, supine and during 70° upright tilt. Autospectra for mean CBFv and MAP, and transfer function analysis were obtained over the frequency range of 0.0078–0.4 Hz. Upright HR was increased in POTS (125 ± 8 vs. 86 ± 2 bpm), as was diastolic BP (74 ± 3 vs. 65 ± 3 mmHg) compared to control, while peripheral resistance, cardiac output, and mean CBFv increased similarly with tilt. Upright BP variability (BPV), low frequency (LF) power (0.04–0.13 Hz), and peak frequency of BPV were increased in POTS (24.3 ± 4.1, and 18.4 ± 4.1 mmHg2/Hz at 0.091 Hz vs. 11.8 ± 3.3, and 8.8 ± 2 mmHg2/Hz c at 0.071 Hz), as was upright overall CBFv variability, low frequency power and peak frequency of CBFv variability (29.3 ± 4.7, and 22.1 ± 2.7 [cm/s]2/Hz at.092 Hz vs. 14.7 ± 2.6, and 6.7 ± 1.2 [cm/s]2/Hz at 0.077Hz). Autospectra were sharply peaked in POTS. LF phase was decreased in POTS (-14 ± 4 vs. -25 ± 10 degrees) while upright. LF gain was increased (1.51 ± 0.09 vs. 0.86 ± 0.12 [cm/s]/ mmHg) while coherence was increased (0.96 ± 0.01 vs. 0.80 ± 0.04). Increased oscillatory BP in upright POTS patients is closely coupled to oscillatory CBFv over a narrow bandwidth corresponding to the Mayer wave frequency. Therefore combined increased oscillatory BP and increased LF gain markedly increases CBFv oscillations in a narrow bandwidth. This close coupling of CBF to MAP indicates impaired cerebral autoregulation that may underlie

  5. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation modulates motor cortex oscillatory activity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Devos, D; Labyt, E; Derambure, P; Bourriez, J L; Cassim, F; Reyns, N; Blond, S; Guieu, J D; Destée, A; Defebvre, L

    2004-02-01

    In Parkinson's disease, impaired motor preparation has been related to an increased latency in the appearance of movement-related desynchronization (MRD) throughout the contralateral primary sensorimotor (PSM) cortex. Internal globus pallidus (GPi) stimulation improved movement desynchronization over the PSM cortex during movement execution but failed to improve impaired motor preparation. PET studies indicate that subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation partly reverses the abnormal premotor pattern of brain activation during movement. By monitoring MRD, we aimed to assess changes in premotor and PSM cortex oscillatory activity induced by bilateral STN stimulation and to compare these changes with those induced by l-dopa. Ten Parkinson's disease patients and a group of healthy, age-matched controls performed self-paced wrist flexions in each of four conditions: without either stimulation or l-dopa (the 'off' condition), with stimulation and without l-dopa (On Stim), with l-dopa and without stimulation ('on drug'), and with both stimulation and l-dopa (On Both). Compared with the Off condition, in both the On Stim and the On Drug condition the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) III score decreased by about 60% and in the On Both condition it decreased by 80%. The desynchronization latency over central regions contralateral to movement and the movement desynchronization over bilateral central regions were significantly increased by stimulation and by l-dopa, with a maximal effect when the two were associated. Furthermore, desynchronization latency significantly decreased over bilateral frontocentral regions in the three treatment conditions compared with the Off condition. In Parkinson's disease, STN stimulation may induce a change in abnormal cortical oscillatory activity patterns (similar to that produced by l-dopa) by decreasing the abnormal spreading of desynchronization over frontocentral regions and increasing PSM cortex activity during movement

  6. Instability of oscillatory flow in ducts and applications to solid-propellant rocket aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yongho

    2002-09-01

    Prior research has shown that oscillatory or modulated flows can achieve a significant increase in heat transfer relative to the corresponding steady flow, providing that a critical or threshold amplitude is achieved. The threshold condition is associated with the production of near-surface turbulence by the oscillatory motion. A similar process is hypothesized as a mechanism of high-amplitude acoustic instability in solid propellant rockets, wherein finite amplitude acoustic motions can produce near-surface turbulence and lead to an enhanced propellant burning rate that couples with the chamber acoustics. Prediction of the threshold acoustic amplitude of propellant response requires prediction of the conditions leading to turbulent transition from near-laminar to a turbulent flow in the vicinity of the propellant surface as a prerequisite condition, and is thus a problem of hydrodynamic instability. In the present approach, linear stability theory together with pseudo spectral method is used to obtain unstable flow regimes for ducted flows with injection and acoustic oscillations. Results are first obtained for benchmark problems involving steady injection-induced flow, and oscillatory and modulated noninjected duct flows. The present results compare favorably with prior theoretical and experimental results for the benchmark flows. For simulated solid rocket chamber flows, a periodic burst behavior is noted near the surface as in the purely oscillating flow, with flow disturbances capable of resonance with longitudinal acoustic modes. The key parameters affecting the unsteady laminar motion and the stability results have been identified through an approximate analysis and are calculated at the conditions of several pulsed instability experiments. The most critical modes typically occur within a thickness characterized by the first maximum of axial velocity in the acoustic boundary layer. For higher chamber pressures, this thickness decreases appreciably, leading

  7. ERKN integrators for systems of oscillatory second-order differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xinyuan; You, Xiong; Shi, Wei; Wang, Bin

    2010-11-01

    For systems of oscillatory second-order differential equations y+My=f with M∈R, a symmetric positive semi-definite matrix, X. Wu et al. have proposed the multidimensional ARKN methods [X. Wu, X. You, J. Xia, Order conditions for ARKN methods solving oscillatory systems, Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 2250-2257], which are an essential generalization of J.M. Franco's ARKN methods for one-dimensional problems or for systems with a diagonal matrix M=wI [J.M. Franco, Runge-Kutta-Nyström methods adapted to the numerical integration of perturbed oscillators, Comput. Phys. Comm. 147 (2002) 770-787]. One of the merits of these methods is that they integrate exactly the unperturbed oscillators y+My=0. Regretfully, even for the unperturbed oscillators the internal stages Y of an ARKN method fail to equal the values of the exact solution y(t) at t+ch, respectively. Recently H. Yang et al. proposed the ERKN methods to overcome this drawback [H.L. Yang, X.Y. Wu, Xiong You, Yonglei Fang, Extended RKN-type methods for numerical integration of perturbed oscillators, Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 1777-1794]. However, the ERKN methods in that paper are only considered for the special case where M is a diagonal matrix with nonnegative entries. The purpose of this paper is to extend the ERKN methods to the general case with M∈R, and the perturbing function f depends only on y. Numerical experiments accompanied demonstrates that the ERKN methods are more efficient than the existing methods for the computation of oscillatory systems. In particular, if M∈R is a symmetric positive semi-definite matrix, it is highly important for the new ERKN integrators to show the energy conservation in the numerical experiments for problems with Hamiltonian H(p,q)=1/2 >pp+1/2 >qMq+V(q) in comparison with the well-known methods in the scientific literature. Those so called separable Hamiltonians arise in many areas of physical sciences, e.g., macromolecular dynamics, astronomy, and classical

  8. Rheometrical Studies of Blood Clot Formation by Oscillatory Shear, Thromboelastography, Sonoclot Analysis and Free Oscillation Rheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. Adrian; Hawkins, Karl M.; Lawrence, Matthew J.; Williams, P. Rhodri; Williams, Rhodri L.

    2008-07-01

    We report studies of the coagulation of samples of whole human blood by oscillatory shear techniques, including Fourier Transform Mechanical Spectroscopy (FTMS). These techniques are used herein to identify the Gel Point of coagulating blood in terms of the Chambon-Winter Gel Point criterion which provides a rheometrical basis for detecting the establishment of an incipient clot. A comparison of the results of FTMS with those obtained from measurements involving a Thromboelastograph (TEG), a Sonoclot Analyzer and a Free Oscillation Rheometer (FOR) indicate that the latter techniques are not capable of detecting the incipient clot, whose establishment occurs several minutes prior to TEG or FOR-based assessments of clot formation time. The results of the present study suggest that FTMS is a useful tool in blood clotting research, being capable of providing a global coagulation profile in addition to detecting the instant of incipient clot formation.

  9. Irreducible representations of oscillatory and swirling flows in active soft matter.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Somdeb; Adhikari, R

    2014-03-21

    Recent experiments imaging fluid flow around swimming microorganisms have revealed complex time-dependent velocity fields that differ qualitatively from the stresslet flow commonly employed in theoretical descriptions of active matter. Here we obtain the most general flow around a finite sized active particle by expanding the surface stress in irreducible Cartesian tensors. This expansion, whose first term is the stresslet, must include, respectively, third-rank polar and axial tensors to minimally capture crucial features of the active oscillatory flow around translating Chlamydomonas and the active swirling flow around rotating Volvox. The representation provides explicit expressions for the irreducible symmetric, antisymmetric, and isotropic parts of the continuum active stress. Antisymmetric active stresses do not conserve orbital angular momentum and our work thus shows that spin angular momentum is necessary to restore angular momentum conservation in continuum hydrodynamic descriptions of active soft matter.

  10. Irreducible Representations of Oscillatory and Swirling Flows in Active Soft Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Somdeb; Adhikari, R.

    2014-03-01

    Recent experiments imaging fluid flow around swimming microorganisms have revealed complex time-dependent velocity fields that differ qualitatively from the stresslet flow commonly employed in theoretical descriptions of active matter. Here we obtain the most general flow around a finite sized active particle by expanding the surface stress in irreducible Cartesian tensors. This expansion, whose first term is the stresslet, must include, respectively, third-rank polar and axial tensors to minimally capture crucial features of the active oscillatory flow around translating Chlamydomonas and the active swirling flow around rotating Volvox. The representation provides explicit expressions for the irreducible symmetric, antisymmetric, and isotropic parts of the continuum active stress. Antisymmetric active stresses do not conserve orbital angular momentum and our work thus shows that spin angular momentum is necessary to restore angular momentum conservation in continuum hydrodynamic descriptions of active soft matter.

  11. Oscillatory penetration of near-fields in plasmonic excitation at metal-dielectric interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. C.; Kang, J. H.; Park, Q-H.; Krishna, S.; Brueck, S. R. J.

    2016-01-01

    The electric field immediately below an illuminated metal-film that is perforated with a hole array on a dielectric consists of direct transmission and scattering of the incident light through the holes and evanescent near-field from plasmonic excitations. Depending on the size and shape of the hole apertures, it exhibits an oscillatory decay in the propagation direction. This unusual field penetration is explained by the interference between these contributions, and is experimentally confirmed through an aperture which is engineered with four arms stretched out from a simple circle to manipulate a specific plasmonic excitation available in the metal film. A numerical simulation quantitatively supports the experiment. This fundamental characteristic will impact plasmonics with the near-fields designed by aperture engineering for practical applications. PMID:27090841

  12. Local entrainment of oscillatory activity induced by direct brain stimulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Amengual, Julià L.; Vernet, Marine; Adam, Claude; Valero-Cabré, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    In a quest for direct evidence of oscillation entrainment, we analyzed intracerebral electroencephalographic recordings obtained during intracranial electrical stimulation in a cohort of three medication-resistant epilepsy patients tested pre-surgically. Spectral analyses of non-epileptogenic cerebral sites stimulated directly with high frequency electrical bursts yielded episodic local enhancements of frequency-specific rhythmic activity, phase-locked to each individual pulse. These outcomes reveal an entrainment of physiological oscillatory activity within a frequency band dictated by the rhythm of the stimulation source. Our results support future uses of rhythmic stimulation to elucidate the causal contributions of synchrony to specific aspects of human cognition and to further develop the therapeutic manipulation of dysfunctional rhythmic activity subtending the symptoms of some neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:28256510

  13. Modeling of a stacked-screen regenerator in an oscillatory flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shu Han; Biwa, Tetsushi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we model tortuous flow channels of a stacked-screen regenerator as a bundle of cylindrical tubes to analyze and design thermoacoustic Stirling engines. The oscillatory flow resistance of stacked-screen regenerators is measured and compared with those obtained using empirical equations to verify the applicability of those empirical equations to oscillating flows of pressurized Ar and He gases. It is then converted to an effective radius parameterized by Re h and r 0/δν, where Re h represents the Reynolds number based on velocity oscillation amplitude, r 0 is Ueda’s effective radius ( = \\sqrt{d\\text{h}D} /2, where d h is the hydraulic diameter and D is the mesh wire diameter), and δν denotes the viscous penetration depth. The applicability of the proposed effective radius is demonstrated experimentally when the axial temperature gradient is imposed on the regenerator.

  14. Using sensor habituation in mobile robots to reduce oscillatory movements in narrow corridors.

    PubMed

    Chang, Carolina

    2005-11-01

    Habituation is a form of nonassociative learning observed in a variety of species of animals. Arguably, it is the simplest form of learning. Nonetheless, the ability to habituate to certain stimuli implies plastic neural systems and adaptive behaviors. This paper describes how computational models of habituation can be applied to real robots. In particular, we discuss the problem of the oscillatory movements observed when a Khepera robot navigates through narrow hallways using a biologically inspired neurocontroller. Results show that habituation to the proximity of the walls can lead to smoother navigation. Habituation to sensory stimulation to the sides of the robot does not interfere with the robot's ability to turn at dead ends and to avoid obstacles outside the hallway. This paper shows that simple biological mechanisms of learning can be adapted to achieve better performance in real mobile robots.

  15. Spiral waves with superstructures in a mixed-mode oscillatory medium.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaodong; Gao, Qingyu; Gong, Shirui; Zhao, Yuemin; Epstein, Irving R

    2012-12-07

    Diverse spatiotemporal patterns are generated in a three-variable reaction-diffusion model that supports 1(1) mixed-mode oscillations. Diffusion-induced instability results in spatiotemporal patterns such as amplitude-modulated overtargets (circular super-waves superimposed on spiral waves) and superspirals. The types of superstructure waves are determined by the ratio of diffusion coefficients, which controls the interaction and competition between two local oscillatory modes, one of which is the original homogeneous 1(1) mixed-mode oscillation, resulting in periodic amplitude modulation in space. Variation of the control parameter can reverse the chirality and radial propagation direction (outward or inward rotation) of a superspiral pattern. These amplitude-modulated patterns may provide insight into mechanisms of pattern development in some living systems.

  16. Preparation of Pickering emulsions stabilized by metal organic frameworks using oscillatory woven metal micro-screen.

    PubMed

    Sabouni, R; Gomaa, H G

    2015-06-14

    Uniform Pickering emulsions stabilized by metal organic frameworks (MOFs) MIL-101 and ZIF-8 nanoparticles (NPs) were successfully prepared using an oscillatory woven metal microscreen (WMMS) emulsification system in the presence and the absence of surfactants. The effects of operating and system parameters including the frequency and amplitude of oscillation, the type of nano-particle and/or surfactant on the droplet size and coefficient of variance of the prepared emulsions are investigated. The results showed that both the hydrodynamics of the system and the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of the NP influenced the interfacial properties of the oil-water interface during droplet formation and after detachment, which in turn affected the final droplet size and distribution. Comparison between the measured and predicted droplet size using a simple torque balance (TB) model is discussed.

  17. Age effects on the asymmetry of the motor system: evidence from cortical oscillatory activity.

    PubMed

    Vallesi, Antonino; McIntosh, Anthony R; Kovacevic, Natasa; Chan, Sam C C; Stuss, Donald T

    2010-10-01

    Functional hemispheric asymmetry can be lost with aging. In this electroencephalographic study, we assessed hemispheric asymmetries in regulating motor responses by analyzing oscillatory brain activity during a go/nogo task in younger and older right-handed participants. Three conditions were embedded in the task: go, high-conflict and low-conflict nogo. The hand used to respond to go stimuli was varied block-wise. Independently of the go/nogo conditions and responding hand, young participants showed asymmetric desynchronizations in the mu (10 Hz) and beta (18-22 Hz) frequency bands that was stronger in the scalp sensorimotor region contralateral to the hand used for the go responses, while older adults showed a more symmetric pattern of desynchronization. These findings indicate that a loss of hemispheric asymmetry is a hallmark of the aging motor system, consistent with a decline of inter-hemispheric motor inhibition in normal aging.

  18. Neural oscillatory evidence of the difference between emotional and conceptual processing in language comprehension.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuhai; Yuan, Jiajin; Guo, Jingjing; You, Yuqun

    2013-10-11

    Despite ample study of conceptual and emotional information processing in language, it remains unclear whether these two types of processing rely on different neural mechanisms. In the present study, the processing of semantic and emotional information was directly compared in 24 participants undergoing electroencephalograms (EEGs). Participants read 120 scenarios ending in three ways (affectively and semantically congruent, affectively incongruent, and semantically incongruent) and were asked to judge the appropriateness of the last word within the context. The data were analyzed using both event-related potentials (ERPs) and event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP) analysis. In addition to the similar N400 effects evoked by both emotional and conceptual incongruity, conceptual incongruity elicited a larger theta power increase, while emotional incongruity induced a gamma band power increase, compared with the congruent condition. The different oscillatory patterns suggest that emotional and conceptual information in language processing may rely on different neural mechanisms, even though both types of processing produced a similar N400 effect.

  19. Understanding the benefits of musical training: effects on oscillatory brain activity.

    PubMed

    Trainor, Laurel J; Shahin, Antoine J; Roberts, Larry E

    2009-07-01

    A number of studies suggest that musical training has benefits for other cognitive domains, such as language and mathematics, and studies of children and adults indicate structural as well as functional differences between the brains of musicians and nonmusicians. The induced gamma-band response has been associated with attentional, expectation, memory retrieval, and integration of top-down, bottom-up, and multisensory processes. Here we report data indicating that the induced gamma-band response to musical sounds is larger in adult musicians than in nonmusicians and that it develops in children after 1 year of musical training beginning at age 4.5 years, but not in children of this age who are not engaged in musical lessons. We conclude that musical training affects oscillatory networks in the brain associated with executive functions, and that superior executive functioning could enhance learning and performance in many cognitive domains.

  20. Revisiting Taylor Dispersion: Differential enhancement of rotational and translational diffusion under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Brian; Ong, Desmond; Cheng, Xiang; Cohen, Itai

    2013-03-01

    The idea of Taylor dispersion - enhancement of translational diffusion under shear - has found applications in fields from pharmacology to chemical engineering. Here, in a combination of experiment and simulations, we study the translational and rotational diffusion of colloidal dimers under triangle-wave oscillatory shear. We find that the rotational diffusion is enhanced, in addition to the enhanced translational diffusion. This ``rotational Taylor dispersion'' depends strongly on the strain rate (Peclet number), aspect ratio, and the shear strain, in contradistinction to translational Taylor dispersion in a shear flow, which depends only weakly on strain rate and aspect ratio. This separate tunability of translations and orientations promises important applications in mixing and self-assembly of solutions of anisometric colloids. We discuss the corresponding effect on the structure and rheology of denser suspensions of rod-like particles. B. L. acknowledges supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  1. Synthesis of PHBV block copolymers driven by an oscillatory genetic network.

    PubMed

    Iadevaia, Sergio; Mantzaris, Nikos V

    2007-02-20

    Artificial genetic networks constitute a powerful tool to achieve various biotechnological objectives. In this work, we propose the modification of an oscillatory genetic network, known as the repressilator, to drive synthesis of poly(3hydroxybutyrate-co-3hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) block copolymer chains in recombinant Escherichia coli cells. To study the feasibility of this idea, we developed a detailed mathematical model describing the dynamics of the genetic network, which drive the formation of monomer units that are subsequently incorporated into actively growing block copolymer chains. Extensive simulation studies have shown that appropriate choice of the molecular characteristics of the network and manipulation of extracelllular conditions lead to tight control of both the micro- and macro-structures of the resulting block copolymer chains. Thus, the model can guide network design aiming at producing block copolymer structures with desirable characteristics.

  2. Critical and oscillatory behavior of a system of smart preys and predators

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenfeld, Alejandro F.; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2001-06-01

    It is shown that a system of smart preys and predators exhibits irreversible phase transitions between a regime of prey-predator coexistence and an state where predator extinction is observed. Within the coexistence regime, the system exhibits a transition between a regime where the densities of species remain constant and another with self-sustained oscillations, respectively. This transition is located by means of a combined treatment involving finite-size scaling and Fourier transforms. Furthermore, it is shown that the transition can be rationalized in terms of the standard percolation theory. The existence of an oscillatory regime in the thermodynamic limit, which is in contrast to previous findings of Boccara [Phys. Rev. E >50, 4531 (1994)], may be due to subtle differences between the studied models.

  3. Experimental results for oscillatory water flow in 10-ppi metal foam at low-frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bağcı, Ö.; Arbak, A.; De Paepe, M.; Dukhan, N.

    2016-09-01

    This experimental study presents results and interpretation of oscillatory water flow in open-cell metal foam. The tested foam had 10 pores per inch and a porosity of 88%. At relatively low frequencies, three flow displacements were employed in the experiment. The influence of frequency and displacement on pressure loss and friction factor is discussed. A correlation of friction factor as a function of the kinetic Reynolds number was determined. Porous media parameters, permeability and drag coefficient, were also found for the same foam via steady-state flow experiments in the Darcy and Forchheimer regimes. The friction factor of oscillating flow was found to be higher than that of steady state. The findings of this study are considered important for oscillating heat transfer in metal foam.

  4. Modeling the phase separation in binary lipid membrane under externally imposed oscillatory shear flow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Bo; Niu, Li-Sha; Shi, Hui-Ji

    2008-09-01

    By adding external velocity terms, the two-dimensional time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) equations are modified. Based on this, the phase separation in binary lipid membrane under externally imposed oscillatory shear flow is numerically modeled employing the Cell Dynamical System (CDS) approach. Considering shear flows with different frequencies and amplitudes, several aspects of such a phase evolving process are studied. Firstly, visualized results are shown via snapshot figures of the membrane shape. And then, the simulated scattering patterns at typical moments are presented. Furthermore, in order to more quantitatively discuss this phase-separation process, the time growth laws of the characteristic domain sizes in both directions parallel and perpendicular to the flow are investigated for each case. Finally, the peculiar rheological properties of such binary lipid membrane system have been discussed, mainly the normal stress difference and the viscoelastic complex shear moduli.

  5. Fast oscillatory dynamics during language comprehension: Unification versus maintenance and prediction?

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ashley Glen; Wang, Lin; Bastiaansen, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    The role of neuronal oscillations during language comprehension is not yet well understood. In this paper we review and reinterpret the functional roles of beta- and gamma-band oscillatory activity during language comprehension at the sentence and discourse level. We discuss the evidence in favor of a role for beta and gamma in unification (the unification hypothesis), and in light of mounting evidence that cannot be accounted for under this hypothesis, we explore an alternative proposal linking beta and gamma oscillations to maintenance and prediction (respectively) during language comprehension. Our maintenance/prediction hypothesis is able to account for most of the findings that are currently available relating beta and gamma oscillations to language comprehension, and is in good agreement with other proposals about the roles of beta and gamma in domain-general cognitive processing. In conclusion we discuss proposals for further testing and comparing the prediction and unification hypotheses.

  6. Oscillatory brain dynamics associated with the automatic processing of emotion in words.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Bastiaansen, Marcel

    2014-10-01

    This study examines the automaticity of processing the emotional aspects of words, and characterizes the oscillatory brain dynamics that accompany this automatic processing. Participants read emotionally negative, neutral and positive nouns while performing a color detection task in which only perceptual-level analysis was required. Event-related potentials and time frequency representations were computed from the concurrently measured EEG. Negative words elicited a larger P2 and a larger late positivity than positive and neutral words, indicating deeper semantic/evaluative processing of negative words. In addition, sustained alpha power suppressions were found for the emotional compared to neutral words, in the time range from 500 to 1000ms post-stimulus. These results suggest that sustained attention was allocated to the emotional words, whereas the attention allocated to the neutral words was released after an initial analysis. This seems to hold even when the emotional content of the words is task-irrelevant.

  7. Non-periodic oscillatory deformation of an actomyosin microdroplet encapsulated within a lipid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishigami, Yukinori; Ito, Hiroaki; Sonobe, Seiji; Ichikawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Active force generation in living organisms, which is mainly involved in actin cytoskeleton and myosin molecular motors, plays a crucial role in various biological processes. Although the contractile properties of actomyosin have been extensively investigated, their dynamic contribution to a deformable membrane remains unclear because of the cellular complexities and the difficulties associated with in vitro reconstitution. Here, by overcoming these experimental difficulties, we demonstrate the dynamic deformation of a reconstituted lipid interface coupled with self-organized structure of contractile actomyosin. Therein, the lipid interface repeatedly oscillates without any remarkable periods. The oscillatory deformation of the interface is caused by the aster-like three-dimensional hierarchical structure of actomyosin inside the droplet, which is revealed that the oscillation occurs stochastically as a Poisson process.

  8. Interpretation of oscillatory water levels in observation wells during aquifer tests in fractured rock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Oscillatory water levels are predicted by the equations coupling the fluid movement in the observation well and the fluid movement in the surrounding formation. The equivalent-porous medium and dual-porosity models of fractured rock are two models considered in this analysis; however, other conceptual models of fractured media can also be coupled with the model presented here for fluid movement in the observation well. Type curves for the response of water levels in observation wells due to pumping in another well are generated by numerical inversion of the Laplace transform solution to the governing equations. Overdamped conditions, where inertial effects are insignificant, and underdamped conditions, where oscillations arise, are predicted by the solution to the governing equations. By matching water level measurements with the appropriate type curve, a conceptual model of the formation can be identified, and aquifer properties can be estimated. -from Author

  9. Boundary Closures for Fourth-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Finite Difference Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.; Yamaleev, Nail K.; Frankel, Steven H.

    2009-01-01

    A general strategy exists for constructing Energy Stable Weighted Essentially Non Oscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference schemes up to eighth-order on periodic domains. These ESWENO schemes satisfy an energy norm stability proof for both continuous and discontinuous solutions of systems of linear hyperbolic equations. Herein, boundary closures are developed for the fourth-order ESWENO scheme that maintain wherever possible the WENO stencil biasing properties, while satisfying the summation-by-parts (SBP) operator convention, thereby ensuring stability in an L2 norm. Second-order, and third-order boundary closures are developed that achieve stability in diagonal and block norms, respectively. The global accuracy for the second-order closures is three, and for the third-order closures is four. A novel set of non-uniform flux interpolation points is necessary near the boundaries to simultaneously achieve 1) accuracy, 2) the SBP convention, and 3) WENO stencil biasing mechanics.

  10. Non-periodic oscillatory deformation of an actomyosin microdroplet encapsulated within a lipid interface

    PubMed Central

    Nishigami, Yukinori; Ito, Hiroaki; Sonobe, Seiji; Ichikawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Active force generation in living organisms, which is mainly involved in actin cytoskeleton and myosin molecular motors, plays a crucial role in various biological processes. Although the contractile properties of actomyosin have been extensively investigated, their dynamic contribution to a deformable membrane remains unclear because of the cellular complexities and the difficulties associated with in vitro reconstitution. Here, by overcoming these experimental difficulties, we demonstrate the dynamic deformation of a reconstituted lipid interface coupled with self-organized structure of contractile actomyosin. Therein, the lipid interface repeatedly oscillates without any remarkable periods. The oscillatory deformation of the interface is caused by the aster-like three-dimensional hierarchical structure of actomyosin inside the droplet, which is revealed that the oscillation occurs stochastically as a Poisson process. PMID:26754862

  11. Model of oscillatory zoning in two dimensions: simulation and mode analysis.

    PubMed

    Mues, Tanja; Heuer, Andreas; Burger, Martin; Lubashevsky, Ihor

    2010-05-01

    Oscillatory zoning (OZ) occurs in all major classes of minerals and also in a wide range of geological environments. It is caused by self-organization and describes fluctuations of the spatial chemical composition profile of the crystal. We present here a two-dimensional model of OZ based on our previous one-dimensional (1D) analysis and investigate whether the results of the 1D stability analysis remain valid. With the additional second dimension we were able to study the origin of the spatially homogeneous layer formation by linear stability analysis. Numerical solutions of the model are presented and the results of a Fourier analysis delivers a detailed understanding of the crystal growth behavior as well as the limits of the model. Effects beyond linear stability analysis are important to finally understand the final structure formation.

  12. Multi-dimensional high order essentially non-oscillatory finite difference methods in generalized coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Chi-Wang

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear stability of compact schemes for shock calculations is investigated. In recent years compact schemes were used in various numerical simulations including direct numerical simulation of turbulence. However to apply them to problems containing shocks, one has to resolve the problem of spurious numerical oscillation and nonlinear instability. A framework to apply nonlinear limiting to a local mean is introduced. The resulting scheme can be proven total variation (1D) or maximum norm (multi D) stable and produces nice numerical results in the test cases. The result is summarized in the preprint entitled 'Nonlinearly Stable Compact Schemes for Shock Calculations', which was submitted to SIAM Journal on Numerical Analysis. Research was continued on issues related to two and three dimensional essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) schemes. The main research topics include: parallel implementation of ENO schemes on Connection Machines; boundary conditions; shock interaction with hydrogen bubbles, a preparation for the full combustion simulation; and direct numerical simulation of compressible sheared turbulence.

  13. Oscillatory instability development in extraction system of a negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Barminova, H. Y.; Chikhachev, A. S.

    2016-02-15

    Conditions of oscillatory instability development in the extraction system of a negative hydrogen ion source based on a volume-produced plasma are studied. Such an ion source is characterized by the presence of the parent gas in the extraction system due to the leakage from the gas-discharge chamber. The secondary electrons in the area of the ion-optical system become the reason of oscillation appearance and possible beam current modulation. Analytically the range of the stable beam propagation is found. The instability increment is shown to be rather small. Maximum increment of the oscillations corresponds to the beam velocity equal to the thermal velocity of plasma electrons. The group velocity of the oscillations is close to the beam velocity so the oscillations are convective. Simulation of the low energy beam propagation is performed in COMSOL Multiphysics, the beam current modulation being observed.

  14. Efficient implementation of essentially non-oscillatory shock capturing schemes, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Chi-Wang; Osher, Stanley

    1988-01-01

    Earlier work on the efficient implementation of ENO (essentially non-oscillatory) shock capturing schemes is continued. A new simplified expression is provided for the ENO construction procedure based again on numerical fluxes rather than cell averages. Also considered are two improvements which are labeled ENO-LLF (local Lax-Friedrichs) and ENO-Roe, which yield sharper shock transitions, improved overall efficiency, and lower computational cost than previous implementation of the ENO schemes. Two methods of sharpening contact discontinuities, i.e., the subcell resolution idea of Harten and the artificial compression idea of Yang, which those authors used originally in the cell-average framework, are supplied to the current ENO schemes using numerical fluxes and TVD Runge-Kutta time discretizations. The implementation for nonlinear systems and multi-dimensions is given. Finally, many numerical examples, including a compressible shock turbulence interaction flow calculation, are given.

  15. Oscillatory penetration of near-fields in plasmonic excitation at metal-dielectric interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. C.; Kang, J. H.; Park, Q.-H.; Krishna, S.; Brueck, S. R. J.

    2016-04-01

    The electric field immediately below an illuminated metal-film that is perforated with a hole array on a dielectric consists of direct transmission and scattering of the incident light through the holes and evanescent near-field from plasmonic excitations. Depending on the size and shape of the hole apertures, it exhibits an oscillatory decay in the propagation direction. This unusual field penetration is explained by the interference between these contributions, and is experimentally confirmed through an aperture which is engineered with four arms stretched out from a simple circle to manipulate a specific plasmonic excitation available in the metal film. A numerical simulation quantitatively supports the experiment. This fundamental characteristic will impact plasmonics with the near-fields designed by aperture engineering for practical applications.

  16. Fresnel integrals and irreversible energy transfer in an oscillatory system with time-dependent parameters.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Agnessa; Manevitch, Leonid I; Kosevich, Yuriy A

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate that in significant limiting cases the problem of irreversible energy transfer in an oscillatory system with time-dependent parameters can be efficiently solved in terms of the Fresnel integrals. For definiteness, we consider a system of two weakly coupled linear oscillators in which the first oscillator with constant parameters is excited by an initial impulse, whereas the coupled oscillator with a slowly varying frequency is initially at rest but then acts as an energy trap. We show that the evolution equations of the slow passage through resonance are identical to the equations of the Landau-Zener tunneling problem, and therefore, the suggested asymptotic solution of the classical problem provides a simple analytic description of the quantum Landau-Zener tunneling with arbitrary initial conditions over a finite time interval. A correctness of approximations is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  17. Oscillatory pulses and wave trains in a bistable reaction-diffusion system with cross diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemskov, Evgeny P.; Tsyganov, Mikhail A.; Horsthemke, Werner

    2017-01-01

    We study waves with exponentially decaying oscillatory tails in a reaction-diffusion system with linear cross diffusion. To be specific, we consider a piecewise linear approximation of the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, also known as the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol model. We focus on two types of traveling waves, namely solitary pulses that correspond to a homoclinic solution, and sequences of pulses or wave trains, i.e., a periodic solution. The effect of cross diffusion on wave profiles and speed of propagation is analyzed. We find the intriguing result that both pulses and wave trains occur in the bistable cross-diffusive FitzHugh-Nagumo system, whereas only fronts exist in the standard bistable system without cross diffusion.

  18. Dynamical properties of the brain tissue under oscillatory shear stresses at large strain range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjema, F.; Khelidj, B.; Lounis, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this experimental work, we study the viscoelastic behaviour of in vitro brain tissue, particularly the white matter, under oscillatory shear strain. The selective vulnerability of this tissue is the anisotropic mechanical properties of theirs different regions lead to a sensitivity to the angular shear rate and magnitude of strain. For this aim, shear storage modulus (G‧) and loss modulus (G″) were measured over a range of frequencies (1 to 100 Hz), for different levels of strain (1 %, to 50 %). The mechanical responses of the brain matter samples showed a viscoelastic behaviour that depend on the correlated strain level and frequency range and old age sample. The samples have been showed evolution behaviour by increasing then decreasing the strain level. Also, the stiffness anisotropy of brain matter was showed between regions and species.

  19. Experimental Characterization of the Time-Averaged and Oscillatory Behavior of a Hall Plasma Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Gascon, Nicolas; Cappelli, Mark

    2014-10-01

    An extensive experimental campaign characterizes a 70 mm diameter stationary plasma thruster operating on xenon in the 200--500 W power range. This study resolves both time-averaged properties and oscillatory phenomena in the plasma discharge. Specifically, we explore the time variation of the plume ion velocity field referenced to periodic discharge current oscillations using time-synchronized laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements. This LIF scheme relies on a triggered signal acquisition gate locked at a given phase of the current oscillation period. The laser is modulated at a characteristic frequency and homodyne detection through a lock-in amplifier extracts the induced fluorescence signal out of the bright background emission. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research with Dr. Mitat Birkan as program manager. CVY acknowledges support from the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under Contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  20. Oscillatory Activity in the Infant Brain and the Representation of Small Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Sumie; Mareschal, Denis; Rowsell, Renee; Simpson, David; Iaria, Leon; Grbic, Amanda; Kaufman, Jordy

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-band oscillatory activity (GBA) is an established neural signature of sustained occluded object representation in infants and adults. However, it is not yet known whether the magnitude of GBA in the infant brain reflects the quantity of occluded items held in memory. To examine this, we compared GBA of 6–8 month-old infants during occlusion periods after the representation of two objects vs. that of one object. We found that maintaining a representation of two objects during occlusion resulted in significantly greater GBA relative to maintaining a single object. Further, this enhancement was located in the right occipital region, which is consistent with previous object representation research in adults and infants. We conclude that enhanced GBA reflects neural processes underlying infants’ representation of small numbers. PMID:26903821