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Sample records for magnetically induced transfer

  1. Magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic thin films induced by spin-orbit interaction with Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jia

    2014-10-07

    We theoretically investigate the dynamics of magnetization in ferromagnetic thin films induced by spin-orbit interaction with Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque. We reproduce the experimental results of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy films by micromagnetic simulation. Due to the spin-orbit interaction, the magnetization can be switched by changing the direction of the current with the assistant of magnetic field. By increasing the current amplitude, wider range of switching events can be achieved. Time evolution of magnetization has provided us a clear view of the process, and explained the role of minimum external field. Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque modifies the magnetization when current is present. The magnitude of the minimum external field is determined by the strength of the Slonczewski-like spin transfer torque. The investigations may provide potential applications in magnetic memories.

  2. Simulation of electric-field and spin-transfer-torque induced magnetization switching in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiangli; Zhang, Zongzhi; Liu, Yaowen; Jin, Q. Y.

    2015-05-07

    Macrospin simulations are performed to model the magnetization switching driven by the combined action of electric-field and spin-polarized electric current (spin-transfer torque; STT) in MgO/CoFeB based magnetic tunnel junctions with interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The results indicate that at low current case, the free layer magnetization shows a fast toggle-like switching, the final parallel or antiparallel magnetization state is determined by the electric-field effect, and the STT just helps or resists it to reach the final state depending on the current direction. However, with the increase of current strength, the contribution of STT effect gradually increases, which eventually achieves a deterministic magnetization switching state. Simulations further demonstrate that by appropriately tuning the parameters of applied electric-field and current the power consumption can be easily reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  3. Oscillatory Noncollinear Magnetism Induced by Interfacial Charge Transfer in Superlattices Composed of Metallic Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Jason D.; Kirby, Brian J.; Kwon, Jihwan; Fabbris, Gilberto; Meyers, D.; Freeland, John W.; Martin, Ivar; Heinonen, Olle G.; Steadman, Paul; Zhou, Hua; Schlepütz, Christian M.; Dean, Mark P. M.; te Velthuis, Suzanne G. E.; Zuo, Jian-Min; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-10-01

    Interfaces between correlated complex oxides are promising avenues to realize new forms of magnetism that arise as a result of charge transfer, proximity effects, and locally broken symmetries. We report on the discovery of a noncollinear magnetic structure in superlattices of the ferromagnetic metallic oxide La2 /3Sr1 /3MnO3 (LSMO) and the correlated metal LaNiO3 (LNO). The exchange interaction between LSMO layers is mediated by the intervening LNO, such that the angle between the magnetization of neighboring LSMO layers varies in an oscillatory manner with the thickness of the LNO layer. The magnetic field, temperature, and spacer thickness dependence of the noncollinear structure are inconsistent with the bilinear and biquadratic interactions that are used to model the magnetic structure in conventional metallic multilayers. A model that couples the LSMO layers to a helical spin state within the LNO fits the observed behavior. We propose that the spin-helix results from the interaction between a spatially varying spin susceptibility within the LNO and interfacial charge transfer that creates localized Ni2 + states. Our work suggests a new approach to engineering noncollinear spin textures in metallic oxide heterostructures.

  4. Current-induced switching of magnetic tunnel junctions: Effects of field-like spin-transfer torque, pinned-layer magnetization orientation, and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, R. K.; Jhon, M. H.; Ng, N.; Gan, C. K.; Srolovitz, D. J.

    2014-01-13

    We study current-induced switching in magnetic tunnel junctions in the presence of a field-like spin-transfer torque and titled pinned-layer magnetization in the high current limit at finite temperature. We consider both the Slonczewski and field-like torques with coefficients a{sub J} and b{sub J}, respectively. At finite temperatures, σ=b{sub J}/a{sub J}=±1 leads to a smaller mean switching time compared that with σ=0. The reduction of switching time in the presence of the field-like term is due to the alignment effect (for σ>0) and the initial torque effect.

  5. Hybridization-controlled charge transfer and induced magnetism at correlated oxide interfaces.

    PubMed

    Grisolia, M N; Varignon, J; Sanchez-Santolino, G; Arora, A; Valencia, S; Varela, M; Abrudan, R; Weschke, E; Schierle, E; Rault, J E; Rueff, J-P; Barthélémy, A; Santamaria, J; Bibes, M

    2016-05-01

    At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are classically controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from strong Coulomb interactions between transition metal and oxygen ions. Such electronic correlations offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignment picture remains an open question. Here we show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metal-oxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we probe charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3. X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate, exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Further, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence.

  6. Hybridization-controlled charge transfer and induced magnetism at correlated oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisolia, M. N.; Varignon, J.; Sanchez-Santolino, G.; Arora, A.; Valencia, S.; Varela, M.; Abrudan, R.; Weschke, E.; Schierle, E.; Rault, J. E.; Rueff, J.-P.; Barthélémy, A.; Santamaria, J.; Bibes, M.

    2016-05-01

    At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are classically controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from strong Coulomb interactions at and between transition metal and oxygen ions. Such electronic correlations offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignment picture remains an open question. Here we show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metal-oxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we probe charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3. X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate, exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Further, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence.

  7. Hybridization-controlled charge transfer and induced magnetism at correlated oxide interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Grisolia, M.N.; Arora, A.; Valencia, S.; Varela, M.; Abrudan, R.; Weschke, E.; Schierle, E.; Rault, J.E.; Rueff, J.-P.; Barthélémy, A.; Santamaria, J.; Bibes, M.

    2015-01-01

    At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are classically controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from strong Coulomb interactions between transition metal and oxygen ions. Such electronic correlations offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignment picture remains an open question. Here we show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metal-oxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we probe charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3. X-ray absorption spectroscopy shows that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate, exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Further, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence. PMID:27158255

  8. Interfaces between strongly correlated oxides: controlling charge transfer and induced magnetism by hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibes, Manuel

    At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from correlations between transition metal and oxygen ions. Strong correlations thus offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignment picture remains an open question. In this talk we will show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metal-oxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we have probed charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3 using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We show that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate (observed by XMCD), exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Further, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence. Work supported by ERC CoG MINT #615759.

  9. Wireless power transfer magnetic couplers

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Hunter; Gilchrist, Aaron; Sealy, Kylee

    2016-01-19

    A magnetic coupler is disclosed for wireless power transfer systems. A ferrimagnetic component is capable of guiding a magnetic field. A wire coil is wrapped around at least a portion of the ferrimagnetic component. A screen is capable of blocking leakage magnetic fields. The screen may be positioned to cover at least one side of the ferrimagnetic component and the coil. A distance across the screen may be at least six times an air gap distance between the ferrimagnetic component and a receiving magnetic coupler.

  10. Steady MHD free convection heat and mass transfer flow about a vertical porous surface with thermal diffusion and induced magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touhid Hossain, M. M.; Afruz-Zaman, Md.; Rahman, Fouzia; Hossain, M. Arif

    2013-09-01

    In this study the thermal diffusion effect on the steady laminar free convection flow and heat transfer of viscous incompressible MHD electrically conducting fluid above a vertical porous surface is considered under the influence of an induced magnetic field. The governing non-dimensional equations relevant to the problem, containing the partial differential equations, are transformed by usual similarity transformations into a system of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations and will be solved analytically by using the perturbation technique. On introducing the non-dimensional concept and applying Boussinesq's approximation, the solutions for velocity field, temperature distribution and induced magnetic field to the second order approximations are obtained for large suction with different selected values of the established dimensionless parameters. The influences of these various establish parameters on the velocity and temperature fields and on the induced magnetic fields are exhibited under certain assumptions and are studied graphically in the present analysis. It is observed that the effects of thermal-diffusion and large suction have great importance on the velocity, temperature and induced magnetic fields and mass concentration for several fluids considered, so that their effects should be taken into account with other useful parameters associated. It is also found that the dimensionless Prandtl number, Grashof number, Modified Grashof number and magnetic parameter have an appreciable influence on the concerned independent variables.

  11. Charge transfer-induced magnetic exchange bias and electron localization in (111)- and (001)-oriented LaNiO3/LaMnO3 superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Haoming; Barzola-Quiquia, Jose Luis; Yang, Chang; Patzig, Christian; Höche, Thomas; Esquinazi, Pablo; Grundmann, Marius; Lorenz, Michael

    2017-03-01

    High-quality lattice-matched LaNiO3/LaMnO3 superlattices with monolayer terrace structure have been grown on both (111)- and (001)-oriented SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition. In contrast to the previously reported experiments, a magnetic exchange bias is observed that reproducibly occurs in both (111)- and (001)-oriented superlattices with the thin single layers of 5 and 7 unit cells, respectively. The exchange bias is theoretically explained by charge transfer-induced magnetic moments at Ni atoms. Furthermore, magnetization data at low temperature suggest two magnetic phases in the superlattices, with Néel temperature around 10 K. Electrical transport measurements reveal a metal-insulator transition with strong localization of electrons in the superlattices with the thin LaNiO3 layers of 4 unit cells, in which the electrical transport is dominated by two-dimensional variable range hopping.

  12. Magnetic induced heating of nanoparticle solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, S. Hunyadi; Brown, M.; Coopersmith, K.; Fulmer, S.; Sessions, H.; Ali, M.

    2016-12-02

    Magnetic induced heating of nanoparticles (NP) provides a useful advantage for many energy transfer applications. This study aims to gain an understanding of the key parameters responsible for maximizing the energy transfer leading to nanoparticle heating through the use of simulations and experimental results. It was found that magnetic field strength, NP concentration, NP composition, and coil size can be controlled to generate accurate temperature profiles in NP aqueous solutions.

  13. Spin transfer torque effects in magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tingyong

    Spin transfer torque (STT) effects have been studied using a point-contact spin injection technique in (1) magnetic trilayers, (2) a single exchange-biased ferromagnetic layer, and (3) magnetic granular solids. In the point-contact spin injection, a sharp metallic tip is in contact with a thin film structure. The high current density (e.g. 10 8 A/cm²) required for the STT effects is achieved by concentrating a current of a few milli-amperes into a point contact with a cross section less than 100 nanometers. Spin (polarized electrons) is injected into the contact region via a spin polarizer, a ferromagnetic film underneath the film structure. Resistance and differential resistance of the contact as a function of the current in the contact are measured at the same time using a lock-in technique. Steps in the resistance and spikes in the differential resistance indicate non-collinear spin structures are induced by the STT effect. The non-collinear spin structures are verified by the magnetoresistance of the contact with a small current without causing any STT effect. The experiments are carried out at cryogenic temperatures obtained by a liquid helium dewar and in magnetic fields up to 9 Tesla provided by a superconductor magnet. In magnetic trilayers such as Co/Cu/Co film where the STT effect is an inverse effect of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect, a magnetic bit can be reversibly written by a spin polarized current injected through a point contact into the continuous film. The magnetic states written depend on the polarity of the injection currents, and remain stable at room temperature. The reversible writing can be achieved for a wide range of contact resistances with a well-defined voltage for the reversal. With the assistance of the exchange coupling of an antiferromagnetic CoO layer, a nanodomain has been created and manipulated by the inhomogeneous current density within a ferromagnetic Co layer, showing hysteretic switching loops at low fields. At

  14. Transfer matrices for magnetized CMB anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2006-05-15

    Large-scale magnetic fields can affect scalar cosmological perturbations whose evolution is described in the conformally Newtonian gauge and within the tight coupling approximation. The magnetized curvature perturbations present after matter-radiation equality (and prior to decoupling) are computed in terms of an appropriate transfer matrix allowing a general estimate of the Sachs-Wolfe plateau. From the observation that CMB initial conditions should be (predominantly) adiabatic, the contribution of the magnetic field intensity can be constrained.

  15. Magnetic field transfer device and method

    DOEpatents

    Wipf, S.L.

    1990-02-13

    A magnetic field transfer device includes a pair of oppositely wound inner coils which each include at least one winding around an inner coil axis, and an outer coil which includes at least one winding around an outer coil axis. The windings may be formed of superconductors. The axes of the two inner coils are parallel and laterally spaced from each other so that the inner coils are positioned in side-by-side relation. The outer coil is outwardly positioned from the inner coils and rotatable relative to the inner coils about a rotational axis substantially perpendicular to the inner coil axes to generate a hypothetical surface which substantially encloses the inner coils. The outer coil rotates relative to the inner coils between a first position in which the outer coil axis is substantially parallel to the inner coil axes and the outer coil augments the magnetic field formed in one of the inner coils, and a second position 180[degree] from the first position, in which the augmented magnetic field is transferred into the other inner coil and reoriented 180[degree] from the original magnetic field. The magnetic field transfer device allows a magnetic field to be transferred between volumes with negligible work being required to rotate the outer coil with respect to the inner coils. 16 figs.

  16. Magnetic field transfer device and method

    DOEpatents

    Wipf, Stefan L.

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field transfer device includes a pair of oppositely wound inner coils which each include at least one winding around an inner coil axis, and an outer coil which includes at least one winding around an outer coil axis. The windings may be formed of superconductors. The axes of the two inner coils are parallel and laterally spaced from each other so that the inner coils are positioned in side-by-side relation. The outer coil is outwardly positioned from the inner coils and rotatable relative to the inner coils about a rotational axis substantially perpendicular to the inner coil axes to generate a hypothetical surface which substantially encloses the inner coils. The outer coil rotates relative to the inner coils between a first position in which the outer coil axis is substantially parallel to the inner coil axes and the outer coil augments the magnetic field formed in one of the inner coils, and a second position 180.degree. from the first position, in which the augmented magnetic field is transferred into the other inner coil and reoriented 180.degree. from the original magnetic field. The magnetic field transfer device allows a magnetic field to be transferred between volumes with negligible work being required to rotate the outer coil with respect to the inner coils.

  17. Thermal spin-transfer torques on magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhe; Wang, Shuai; Xia, Ke

    2010-04-01

    We studied the spin-transfer torques acting on magnetic domain walls in the presence of a nonequilibrium thermal distribution using a generalized Landauer-Büttiker formalism, where the energy flow is described on the same footing as the electric current. First-principles transport calculations have been performed in Ni and Co domain walls as typical examples. The temperature difference between two sides of the domain wall can induce remarkable spin- transfer torques, which are comparable with the current-induced torques required for the domain wall motion.

  18. Current-induced spin torque resonance of a magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Michael; Chiba, Takahiro; Niedermayr, Arthur; Lotze, Johannes; Huebl, Hans; Geprägs, Stephan; Takahashi, Saburo; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2015-10-01

    We report the observation of current-induced spin torque resonance in yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers. An alternating charge current at GHz frequencies in the platinum gives rise to dc spin pumping and spin Hall magnetoresistance rectification voltages, induced by the Oersted fields of the ac current and the spin Hall effect-mediated spin transfer torque. In ultrathin yttrium iron garnet films, we observe spin transfer torque actuated magnetization dynamics which are significantly larger than those generated by the ac Oersted field. Spin transfer torques thus efficiently couple charge currents and magnetization dynamics also in magnetic insulators, enabling charge current-based interfacing of magnetic insulators with microwave devices.

  19. EDITORIAL: Spin-transfer-torque-induced phenomena Spin-transfer-torque-induced phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirohata, Atsufumi

    2011-09-01

    This cluster, consisting of five invited articles on spin-transfer torque, offers the very first review covering both magnetization reversal and domain-wall displacement induced by a spin-polarized current. Since the first theoretical proposal on spin-transfer torque—reported by Berger and Slonczewski independently—spin-transfer torque has been experimentally demonstrated in both vertical magnetoresistive nano-pillars and lateral ferromagnetic nano-wires. In the former structures, an electrical current flowing vertically in the nano-pillar exerts spin torque onto the thinner ferromagnetic layer and reverses its magnetization, i.e., current-induced magnetization switching. In the latter structures, an electrical current flowing laterally in the nano-wire exerts torque onto a domain wall and moves its position by rotating local magnetic moments within the wall, i.e., domain wall displacement. Even though both phenomena are induced by spin-transfer torque, each phenomenon has been investigated separately. In order to understand the physical meaning of spin torque in a broader context, this cluster overviews both cases from theoretical modellings to experimental demonstrations. The earlier articles in this cluster focus on current-induced magnetization switching. The magnetization dynamics during the reversal has been calculated by Kim et al using the conventional Landau--Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, adding a spin-torque term. This model can explain the dynamics in both spin-valves and magnetic tunnel junctions in a nano-pillar form. This phenomenon has been experimentally measured in these junctions consisting of conventional ferromagnets. In the following experimental part, the nano-pillar junctions with perpendicularly magnetized FePt and half-metallic Heusler alloys are discussed from the viewpoint of efficient magnetization reversal due to a high degree of spin polarization of the current induced by the intrinsic nature of these alloys. Such switching can

  20. Magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfers at the top of the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguet, Ludovic; Amit, Hagay; Alboussière, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    We develop the theory for the magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfer between different spherical harmonic degrees due to the interaction of fluid flow and radial magnetic field at the top of the Earth's core. We show that non-zero secular variation of the total magnetic energy could be significant and may provide evidence for the existence of stretching secular variation, which suggests the existence of radial motions at the top of the Earth's core-whole core convection or MAC waves. However, the uncertainties of the small scales of the geomagnetic field prevent a definite conclusion. Combining core field and flow models we calculate the detailed magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfer matrices. The magnetic to magnetic energy transfer shows a complex behaviour with local and non-local transfers. The spectra of magnetic to magnetic energy transfers show clear maxima and minima, suggesting an energy cascade. The kinetic to magnetic energy transfers, which are much weaker due to the weak poloidal flow, are either local or non-local between degree one and higher degrees. The patterns observed in the matrices resemble energy transfer patterns that are typically found in 3-D MHD numerical simulations.

  1. Giant Spin Hall Effect and Switching Induced by Spin-Transfer Torque in a W /Co40Fe40B20/MgO Structure with Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Qiang; Xiao, Gang

    2015-03-01

    We obtain robust perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in a β -W /Co40Fe40B20/MgO structure without the need of any insertion layer between W and Co40Fe40B20 . This is achieved within a broad range of W thicknesses (3.0-9.0 nm), using a simple fabrication technique. We determine the spin Hall angle (0.40) and spin-diffusion length for the bulk β form of tungsten with a large spin-orbit coupling. As a result of the giant spin Hall effect in β -W and careful magnetic annealing, we significantly reduce the critical current density for the spin-transfer-torque-induced magnetic switching in Co40Fe40B20 . The elemental β -W is a superior candidate for magnetic memory and spin-logic applications.

  2. Fermi Level shifting, Charge Transfer and Induced Magnetic Coupling at La0.7Ca0.3MnO3/LaNiO3 Interface

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xingkun; Wang, Zhanjie; Zhang, Zhidong

    2015-01-01

    A large magnetic coupling has been observed at the La0.7Ca0.3MnO3/LaNiO3 (LCMO/LNO) interface. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study results show that Fermi level continuously shifted across the LCMO/LNO interface in the interface region. In addition, the charge transfer between Mn and Ni ions of the type Mn3+ − Ni3+ → Mn4+ − Ni2+ with the oxygen vacancies are observed in the interface region. The intrinsic interfacial charge transfer can give rise to itinerant electrons, which results in a “shoulder feature” observed at the low binding energy in the Mn 2p core level spectra. Meanwhile, the orbital reconstruction can be mapped according to the Fermi level position and the charge transfer mode. It can be considered that the ferromagnetic interaction between Ni2+ and Mn4+ gives rise to magnetic regions that pin the ferromagnetic LCMO and cause magnetic coupling at the LCMO/LNO interface. PMID:25676088

  3. ON THE THEORY OF POLARIZATION TRANSFER IN INHOMOGENEOUS MAGNETIZED PLASMAS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PLASMA MEDIUM, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION ), (* ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , POLARIZATION), TRANSFER FUNCTIONS, ASTROPHYSICS, WAVE FUNCTIONS, MAGNETIC FIELDS, MAGNETOOPTICS, PHASE SHIFT CIRCUITS, DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

  4. Laser-induced magnetization curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayoshi, Shintaro; Sato, Masahiro; Oka, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    We propose an all optical ultrafast method to highly magnetize general quantum magnets using a circularly polarized terahertz laser. The key idea is to utilize a circularly polarized laser and its chirping. Through this method, one can obtain magnetization curves of a broad class of quantum magnets as a function of time even without any static magnetic field. We numerically demonstrate the laser-induced magnetization process in realistic quantum spin models and find a condition for the realization. The onset of magnetization can be described by a many-body version of Landau-Zener mechanism. In a particular model, we show that a plateau state with topological properties can be realized dynamically.

  5. Spin-transfer torque induced spin waves in antiferromagnetic insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Matthew W.; Guo, Wei; Stocks, George Malcolm; Xiao, Di; Xiao, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility of exciting spin waves in insulating antiferromagnetic films by injecting spin current at the surface. We analyze both magnetically compensated and uncompensated interfaces. We find that the spin current induced spin-transfer torque can excite spin waves in insulating antiferromagnetic materials and that the chirality of the excited spin wave is determined by the polarization of the injected spin current. Furthermore, the presence of magnetic surface anisotropy can greatly increase the accessibility of these excitations.

  6. Modulation of spin transfer torque amplitude in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Clément, P.-Y.; Baraduc, C. Chshiev, M.; Diény, B.; Ducruet, C.; Vila, L.

    2015-09-07

    Magnetization switching induced by spin transfer torque is used to write magnetic memories (Magnetic Random Access Memory, MRAM) but can be detrimental to the reading process. It would be quite convenient therefore to modulate the efficiency of spin transfer torque. A solution is adding an extra degree of freedom by using double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with two spin-polarizers, with controllable relative magnetic alignment. We demonstrate, for these structures, that the amplitude of in-plane spin transfer torque on the middle free layer can be efficiently tuned via the magnetic configuration of the electrodes. Using the proposed design could thus pave the way towards more reliable read/write schemes for MRAM. Moreover, our results suggest an intriguing effect associated with the out-of-plane (field-like) spin transfer torque, which has to be further investigated.

  7. Weyl semimetals: Magnetically induced

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai

    2016-11-01

    The half-Heusler GdPtBi is found to show transport and calorimetric signatures of the existence of Weyl fermions under the application of a magnetic field. The half-Heusler alloys form a big family of tunable compounds that may substantially enlarge the number of Weyl semimetals known.

  8. Effect of the magnetic field direction on forced convection heat transfer enhancements in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherief, Wahid; Avenas, Yvan; Ferrouillat, Sébastien; Kedous-Lebouc, Afef; Jossic, Laurent; Berard, Jean; Petit, Mickael

    2015-07-01

    Applying a magnetic field on a ferrofluid flow induces a large increase of the convective heat transfer coefficient. In this paper, the thermal-hydraulic behaviors of two commercial ferrofluids are compared. The variations of both the pressure drop and the heat transfer coefficient due to the magnetic field are measured in the following conditions: square duct, laminar flow and uniform wall heat flux. The square section with two insulated walls allows for the characterization of the effect of the magnetic field direction. The experimental results show that the heat transfer is better enhanced when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the heat flux. In the best case, the local heat transfer coefficient increase is about 75%. On the contrary, another experimental setup shows no enhancement of thermal conductivity when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the heat flux. Contribution to the topical issue "Electrical Engineering Symposium (SGE 2014) - Elected submissions", edited by Adel Razek

  9. Uniform magnetization transfer in chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Parasoglou, Prodromos; Xia, Ding; Jerschow, Alexej; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2013-04-01

    The development of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) has led to the establishment of new contrast mechanisms in magnetic resonance imaging, which serve as enablers for advanced molecular imaging strategies. Macromolecules in tissues and organs often give rise to broad and asymmetric exchange effects, called magnetization transfer (MT) effects, which can mask the CEST contrast of interest. We show here that the saturation of these macromolecular pools simultaneously at two distinct frequencies can level out the asymmetric MT effects, thus allowing one to isolate the CEST effects in vivo. For the first time, clean CEST contrast for glycosaminoglycans (gagCEST) in cartilage in the human knee joint is presented. In addition, the method allows one to clearly demarcate glycosaminoglycan measurements from cartilage and synovial fluid regions. This uniform-MT CEST methodology has wide applicability in in vivo molecular imaging (such as brain, skeletal muscle, etc).

  10. Current-Induced Magnetization Dynamics in Magnetic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Peng

    This thesis deals with the study of current-induced magnetization dynamics for both macrospins and magnetic domain walls, driven by the so-called spin transfer torque effect. It consists of three distinct components: (1) a study of spin transfer torque enhancement in dual spin valves in the ballistic regime, (2) a proposal of domain wall propagation due to the synchronization with circularly polarized microwaves, which can be mapped to uniform spin current driven case, and (3) a derivation of an optimal temporally and spatially varying spin current pattern for fast domain wall propagation along nanowires. The spin transfer torque in all-metal dual spin valves, in which two antiparallelly aligned pinned ferromagnetic layers are on the two sides of a free ferromagnetic layer with two thin normal metal spacers in between, is studied in the ballistic regime. It is argued that, similar to the results in the diffusive regime, the spin transfer torque is dramatically enhanced in comparison to that in a conventional spin valve in the ballistic regime. Within the Slonczewski approach, an analytical expression of the torque on the free magnetic layer is obtained, which may serve as a theoretical model for the micromagnetic simulation of the spin dynamics in dual spin valve. Depending on the orientation of free layer and the degree of electron polarization, the spin transfer torque enhancement could be tens of times. The general cases when transmission and reflection probabilities of free layer are different from zero or one are also numerically calculated. Finding a new control parameter for magnetic domain wall motion is important in general and in particular for the spintronics applications. Here, we show that a circularly polarized magnetic field (CPMF) at gigahertz frequency (microwave) can efficiently drive a domain wall to propagate along a magnetic nanowire. Two motion modes are identified: rigid-domain wall propagation at low frequency and oscillatory propagation at

  11. Transfer-induced fission of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Zubov, A. S.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Scheid, W.

    2010-07-15

    Possibilities of transfer-induced fission of new isotopes of superheavy nuclei with charge numbers 103-108 are studied for the first time in the reactions {sup 48}Ca+{sup 244,246,248}Cm at energies near the corresponding Coulomb barriers. The predicted cross sections are found to be measurable with the detection of three-body final states.

  12. Electron transfer induced fragmentation of acetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira da Silva, F.; Meneses, G.; Almeida, D.; Limão-Vieira, P.

    2014-04-01

    We present negative ion formation driven by electron transfer in atom (K) molecule (acetic acid) collisions. Acetic acid has been found in the interstellar medium, is also considered a biological related compound and as such studying low energy electron interactions will bring new insights as far as induced chemistry is concerned.

  13. Laser-Induced Transfer of Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.; Koch, Jürgen; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2010-10-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of metallic micro- and nanostructures based on femtosecond laser-induced transfer of metallic nanodroplets is developed. The size of the transferred droplets depends on the volume of laser-molten metal and can be varied by changing the laser beam focus on the sample surface and the metal film thickness. Controllable fabrication of high quality spherical gold micro- and nanoparticles with sizes between 170 nm and 1500 nm is realized. Fabrication of miscellaneous structures consisting of gold particles as elementary building blocks is demonstrated.

  14. Photo-induced electron transfer method

    DOEpatents

    Wohlgemuth, R.; Calvin, M.

    1984-01-24

    The efficiency of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is increased and the back transfer of electrons in such reactions is greatly reduced when a photo-sensitizer zinc porphyrin-surfactant and an electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant are admixed into phospholipid membranes. The phospholipids comprising said membranes are selected from phospholipids whose head portions are negatively charged. Said membranes are contacted with an aqueous medium in which an essentially neutral viologen electron acceptor is admixed. Catalysts capable of transferring electrons from reduced viologen electron acceptor to hydrogen to produce elemental hydrogen are also included in the aqueous medium. An oxidizable olefin is also admixed in the phospholipid for the purpose of combining with oxygen that coordinates with oxidized electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant.

  15. Photo-induced electron transfer method

    DOEpatents

    Wohlgemuth, Roland; Calvin, Melvin

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is increased and the back transfer of electrons in such reactions is greatly reduced when a photo-sensitizer zinc porphyrin-surfactant and an electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant are admixed into phospho-lipid membranes. The phospholipids comprising said membranes are selected from phospholipids whose head portions are negatively charged. Said membranes are contacted with an aqueous medium in which an essentially neutral viologen electron acceptor is admixed. Catalysts capable of transfering electrons from reduced viologen electron acceptor to hydrogen to produce elemental hydrogen are also included in the aqueous medium. An oxidizable olefin is also admixed in the phospholipid for the purpose of combining with oxygen that coordinates with oxidized electron donor manganese porphyrin-surfactant.

  16. Dynamics of magnetization in ferromagnet with spin-transfer torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zai-Dong; He, Peng-Bin; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2014-11-01

    We review our recent works on dynamics of magnetization in ferromagnet with spin-transfer torque. Driven by constant spin-polarized current, the spin-transfer torque counteracts both the precession driven by the effective field and the Gilbert damping term different from the common understanding. When the spin current exceeds the critical value, the conjunctive action of Gilbert damping and spin-transfer torque leads naturally the novel screw-pitch effect characterized by the temporal oscillation of domain wall velocity and width. Driven by space- and time-dependent spin-polarized current and magnetic field, we expatiate the formation of domain wall velocity in ferromagnetic nanowire. We discuss the properties of dynamic magnetic soliton in uniaxial anisotropic ferromagnetic nanowire driven by spin-transfer torque, and analyze the modulation instability and dark soliton on the spin wave background, which shows the characteristic breather behavior of the soliton as it propagates along the ferromagnetic nanowire. With stronger breather character, we get the novel magnetic rogue wave and clarify its formation mechanism. The generation of magnetic rogue wave mainly arises from the accumulation of energy and magnons toward to its central part. We also observe that the spin-polarized current can control the exchange rate of magnons between the envelope soliton and the background, and the critical current condition is obtained analytically. At last, we have theoretically investigated the current-excited and frequency-adjusted ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic trilayers. A particular case of the perpendicular analyzer reveals that the ferromagnetic resonance curves, including the resonant location and the resonant linewidth, can be adjusted by changing the pinned magnetization direction and the direct current. Under the control of the current and external magnetic field, several magnetic states, such as quasi-parallel and quasi-antiparallel stable states, out

  17. Microscopic calculation of thermally induced spin-transfer torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Yuuki; Hatami, Moosa; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2016-09-01

    Spin-transfer torques, both reactive and dissipative, induced by temperature gradients in conducting ferromagnets are calculated microscopically for smooth magnetization textures. Temperature gradients are treated à la Luttinger by introducing a fictitious gravitational field that couples to the energy density. The thermal torque coefficients obtained by the Kubo formula contain unphysical terms that diverge towards zero temperature. Such terms are caused by equilibrium components and should be subtracted before applying the Einstein-Luttinger relation. Only by following this procedure a familiar Mott-like formula is obtained for the dissipative spin-transfer torque. The result indicates that a fictitious field that couples to the entropy rather than energy would solve the issue from the outset.

  18. Characterization of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions For Spin Transfer Torque Magnetic Random Access Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Joshua Luchay

    This thesis details two experimental methods for quantifying magnetic tunnel junction behavior, namely write error rates and field modulated spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance. The former examines how reliably an applied spin-transfer torque can excite magnetization dynamics that lead to a reversal of magnetization direction while the latter studies steady state dynamics provided by an oscillating spin-transfer torque. These characterization techniques reveal write error rate behavior for a particular composition magnetic tunnel junction that qualitatively deviates from theoretical predictions. Possible origins of this phenomenon are also investigated with the field modulated spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance technique. By understanding the dynamics of magnetic moments predicted by theory, one can experimentally confirm or disprove these theories in order to accurately model and predict tunnel junction behavior. By having a better model for what factors are important in magnetization dynamics, one can optimize these factors in terms of improving magnetic tunnel junctions for their use as computer memory.

  19. Magnetization reversal induced by in-plane current in Ta/CoFeB/MgO structures with perpendicular magnetic easy axis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Yamanouchi, M. Ikeda, S.; Sato, H.; Fukami, S.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-07

    We investigate in-plane current-induced magnetization reversal under an in-plane magnetic field in Hall bar shaped devices composed of Ta/CoFeB/MgO structures with perpendicular magnetic easy axis. The observed relationship between the directions of current and magnetization switching and Ta thickness dependence of magnetization switching current are accordance with those for magnetization reversal by spin transfer torque originated from the spin Hall effect in the Ta layer.

  20. Magnetic nanoparticles stimulation to enhance liquid-liquid two-phase mass transfer under static and rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi, Neda; Rahimi, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Rotating magnetic field (RMF) was applied on a micromixer to break the laminar flow and induce chaotic flow to enhance mass transfer between two-immiscible organic and aqueous phases. The results of RMF were compared to those of static magnetic field (SMF). For this purpose, experiments were carried out in a T-micromixer at equal volumetric flow rates of organic and aqueous phases. Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation technique and they were dissolved in organic phase. Results obtained from RMF and SMF were compared in terms of overall volumetric mass transfer coefficient (KLa) and extraction efficiency (E) at various Reynolds numbers. Generally, RMF showed higher effect in mass transfer characteristics enhancement compared with SMF. The influence of rotational speeds of magnets (ω) in RMF was investigated, and measurable enhancements of KLa and E were observed. In RMF, the effect of magnetic field induction (B) was investigated. The results reveal that at constant concentration of nanoparticles, by increasing of B, mass transfer characteristics will be enhanced. The effect of various nanoparticles concentrations (ϕ) within 0.002-0.01 (w/v) on KLa and E at maximum induction of RMF (B=76 mT) was evaluated. Maximum values of KLa (2.1±0.001) and E (0.884±0.001) were achieved for the layout of RMF (B=76 mT), ω=16 rad/s and MNPs concentration of 0.008-0.01 (w/v).

  1. Observation of temperature-gradient-induced magnetization

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dazhi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Iguchi, R.; Sato, K.; Vehstedt, E. K.; Uchida, K.; Bauer, G. E. W.; Saitoh, E.

    2016-01-01

    Applying magnetic fields has been the method of choice to magnetize non-magnetic materials, but they are difficult to focus. The magneto-electric effect and voltage-induced magnetization generate magnetization by applied electric fields, but only in special compounds or heterostructures. Here we demonstrate that a simple metal such as gold can be magnetized by a temperature gradient or magnetic resonance when in contact with a magnetic insulator by observing an anomalous Hall-like effect, which directly proves the breakdown of time-reversal symmetry. Such Hall measurements give experimental access to the spectral spin Hall conductance of the host metal, which is closely related to other spin caloritronics phenomena such as the spin Nernst effect and serves as a reference for theoretical calculation. PMID:27457185

  2. Serial Magnetization Transfer Imaging in Acute Optic Neuritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickman, S. J.; Toosy, A. T.; Jones, S. J.; Altmann, D. R.; Miszkiel, K. A.; MacManus, D. G.; Barker, G. J.; Plant, G. T.; Thompson, A. J.; Miller, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    In serial studies of multiple sclerosis lesions, reductions in magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) are thought to be due to demyelination and axonal loss, with later rises due to remyelination. This study followed serial changes in MTR in acute optic neuritis in combination with clinical and electrophysiological measurements to determine if the MTR…

  3. Switching current density reduction in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy spin transfer torque magnetic tunneling junctions

    SciTech Connect

    You, Chun-Yeol

    2014-01-28

    We investigate the switching current density reduction of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy spin transfer torque magnetic tunneling junctions using micromagnetic simulations. We find that the switching current density can be reduced with elongated lateral shapes of the magnetic tunnel junctions, and additional reduction can be achieved by using a noncollinear polarizer layer. The reduction is closely related to the details of spin configurations during switching processes with the additional in-plane anisotropy.

  4. Thermal spin-transfer torque in magnetic tunnel junctions (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Heiliger, Christian Franz, C.; Czerner, Michael

    2014-05-07

    The thermal spin-transfer torque (TSTT) is an effect to switch the magnetic free layer in a magnetic tunnel junction by a temperature gradient only. We present ab initio calculations of the TSTT. In particular, we discuss the influence of magnetic layer composition by considering Fe{sub x}Co{sub 1–x} alloys. Further, we compare the TSTT to the bias voltage driven STT and discuss the requirements for a possible thermal switching. For example, only for very thin barriers of 3 monolayers MgO, a thermal switching is imaginable. However, even for such a thin barrier, the TSTT is still too small for switching at the moment and further optimization is needed. In particular, the TSTT strongly depends on the composition of the ferromagnetic layer. In our current study, it turns out that at the chosen thickness of the ferromagnetic layer, pure Fe gives the highest thermal spin-transfer torque.

  5. How does relativity affect magnetically induced currents?

    PubMed

    Berger, R J F; Repisky, M; Komorovsky, S

    2015-09-21

    Magnetically induced probability currents in molecules are studied in relativistic theory. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) enhances the curvature and gives rise to a previously unobserved current cusp in AuH or small bulge-like distortions in HgH2 at the proton positions. The origin of this curvature is magnetically induced spin-density arising from SOC in the relativistic description.

  6. Torsion-induced effects in magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Yershov, Kostiantyn V.; Gaididei, Yuri

    2015-08-01

    A magnetic helix wire is one of the simplest magnetic systems which manifests properties of both curvature and torsion. Possible equilibrium magnetization states in the helix wire with different anisotropy directions are studied theoretically. There exist two equilibrium states in the helix wire with easy-tangential anisotropy: a quasitangential magnetization distribution in the case of relatively small curvatures and torsions, and an onion state in the opposite case. The curvature and torsion also essentially influence the spin-wave dynamics in the helix wire, acting as an effective magnetic field. Originated from a geometry-induced effective Dzyaloshinskii interaction, this magnetic field leads to a coupling between the helix chirality and the magnetochirality and breaks mirror symmetry in the spin-wave spectrum: the modification of magnon dispersion relation is linear with respect to the torsion and quadratic with respect to the curvature. All analytical predictions on magnetization statics and dynamics are well confirmed by direct spin-lattice simulations.

  7. Strain-assisted current-induced magnetization reversal in magnetic tunnel junctions: A micromagnetic study with phase-field microelasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H. B.; Hu, J. M.; Yang, T. N.; Chen, L. Q.; Ma, X. Q.

    2014-09-22

    Effect of substrate misfit strain on current-induced in-plane magnetization reversal in CoFeB-MgO based magnetic tunnel junctions is investigated by combining micromagnetic simulations with phase-field microelasticity theory. It is found that the critical current density for in-plane magnetization reversal decreases dramatically with an increasing substrate strain, since the effective elastic field can drag the magnetization to one of the four in-plane diagonal directions. A potential strain-assisted multilevel bit spin transfer magnetization switching device using substrate misfit strain is also proposed.

  8. Voltage-induced magnetization dynamics in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Katsuya; Yabuuchi, Shin; Yamada, Masaki; Ichimura, Masahiko; Rana, Bivas; Ogawa, Susumu; Takahashi, Hiromasa; Fukuma, Yasuhiro; Otani, Yoshichika

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a perpendicular easy axis consisting of CoFeB and MgO stacking structures has shown that magnetization dynamics are induced due to voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA), which will potentially lead to future low-power-consumption information technology. For manipulating magnetizations in MTJs by applying voltage, it is necessary to understand the coupled magnetization motion of two magnetic (recording and reference) layers. In this report, we focus on the magnetization motion of two magnetic layers in MTJs consisting of top layers with an in-plane easy axis and bottom layers with a perpendicular easy axis, both having perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. According to rectified voltage (Vrec) measurements, the amplitude of the magnetization motion depends on the initial angles of the magnetizations with respect to the VCMA direction. Our numerical simulations involving the micromagnetic method based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation of motion indicate that the magnetization motion in both layers is induced by a combination of VCMA and transferred angular momentum, even though the magnetic easy axes of the two layers are different. Our study will lead to the development of voltage-controlled MTJs having perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by controlling the initial angle between magnetizations and VCMA directions. PMID:28209976

  9. Voltage-induced magnetization dynamics in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Katsuya; Yabuuchi, Shin; Yamada, Masaki; Ichimura, Masahiko; Rana, Bivas; Ogawa, Susumu; Takahashi, Hiromasa; Fukuma, Yasuhiro; Otani, Yoshichika

    2017-02-01

    Recent progress in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a perpendicular easy axis consisting of CoFeB and MgO stacking structures has shown that magnetization dynamics are induced due to voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA), which will potentially lead to future low-power-consumption information technology. For manipulating magnetizations in MTJs by applying voltage, it is necessary to understand the coupled magnetization motion of two magnetic (recording and reference) layers. In this report, we focus on the magnetization motion of two magnetic layers in MTJs consisting of top layers with an in-plane easy axis and bottom layers with a perpendicular easy axis, both having perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. According to rectified voltage (Vrec) measurements, the amplitude of the magnetization motion depends on the initial angles of the magnetizations with respect to the VCMA direction. Our numerical simulations involving the micromagnetic method based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation of motion indicate that the magnetization motion in both layers is induced by a combination of VCMA and transferred angular momentum, even though the magnetic easy axes of the two layers are different. Our study will lead to the development of voltage-controlled MTJs having perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by controlling the initial angle between magnetizations and VCMA directions.

  10. Voltage-induced magnetization dynamics in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Miura, Katsuya; Yabuuchi, Shin; Yamada, Masaki; Ichimura, Masahiko; Rana, Bivas; Ogawa, Susumu; Takahashi, Hiromasa; Fukuma, Yasuhiro; Otani, Yoshichika

    2017-02-17

    Recent progress in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with a perpendicular easy axis consisting of CoFeB and MgO stacking structures has shown that magnetization dynamics are induced due to voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA), which will potentially lead to future low-power-consumption information technology. For manipulating magnetizations in MTJs by applying voltage, it is necessary to understand the coupled magnetization motion of two magnetic (recording and reference) layers. In this report, we focus on the magnetization motion of two magnetic layers in MTJs consisting of top layers with an in-plane easy axis and bottom layers with a perpendicular easy axis, both having perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. According to rectified voltage (Vrec) measurements, the amplitude of the magnetization motion depends on the initial angles of the magnetizations with respect to the VCMA direction. Our numerical simulations involving the micromagnetic method based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation of motion indicate that the magnetization motion in both layers is induced by a combination of VCMA and transferred angular momentum, even though the magnetic easy axes of the two layers are different. Our study will lead to the development of voltage-controlled MTJs having perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by controlling the initial angle between magnetizations and VCMA directions.

  11. Magnetic-field induced critical endpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechenberger, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    The phase diagram of strong interaction matter is analyzed utilizing the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Special emphasis is placed on its dependence on an external magnetic field and isospin chemical potential. Using flavor mixing induced by instanton effects the influence of isospin breaking due to the magnetic field and the isospin chemical potential is compared. It is found that at low temperatures and large quark chemical potential the magnetic field, depending on its strength, induces a new critical endpoint or a triple point.

  12. The influence of the magnetic field on the heat transfer rate in rotating spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabello, Ares; Avila, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    Studies of the relationship between natural convection and magnetic field generation in spherical annular geometries with rotation are essential to understand the internal dynamics of the terrestrial planets. In such studies it is important to calculate and analyze the heat transfer rate at the inner and the outer spheres that confine the spherical gap. Previous investigations indicate that the magnetic field has a stabilizing effect on the onset of the natural convection, reduces the intensity of convection and modifies the flow patterns. However so far it is still unclear how the magnetic field change the heat transfer rate behaviour. We investigate the heat transfer rate (Nu) in a rotating spherical gap with a self gravity field varying linearly with radius, and its relation with the intensity of the magnetic field induced by the geodynamo effect. The Boussinesq fluid equations are solved by using a spectral element method (SEM). To avoid the singularity at the poles, the cubed-sphere algorithm is used to generate the spherical mesh. Several cases are simulated in which the Rayleigh number, the magnetic Reynolds number and the Taylor number are the variable parameters. The flow patterns, the temperature distribution and the Nusselt numbers at both spheres are calculated. Special thanks to DGAPA-UNAM Project PAPIIT IN11731, sponsor of this investigation.

  13. Controlling the column spacing in isothermal magnetic advection to enable tunable heat and mass transfer.

    DOE PAGES

    Solis, Kyle Jameson; Martin, James E.

    2012-11-01

    Isothermal magnetic advection is a recently discovered method of inducing highly organized, non-contact flow lattices in suspensions of magnetic particles, using only uniform ac magnetic fields of modest strength. The initiation of these vigorous flows requires neither a thermal gradient nor a gravitational field and so can be used to transfer heat and mass in circumstances where natural convection does not occur. These advection lattices are comprised of a square lattice of antiparallel flow columns. If the column spacing is sufficiently large compared to the column length, and the flow rate within the columns is sufficiently large, then one wouldmore » expect efficient transfer of both heat and mass. Otherwise, the flow lattice could act as a countercurrent heat exchanger and only mass will be efficiently transferred. Although this latter case might be useful for feeding a reaction front without extracting heat, it is likely that most interest will be focused on using IMA for heat transfer. In this paper we explore the various experimental parameters of IMA to determine which of these can be used to control the column spacing. These parameters include the field frequency, strength, and phase relation between the two field components, the liquid viscosity and particle volume fraction. We find that the column spacing can easily be tuned over a wide range, to enable the careful control of heat and mass transfer.« less

  14. Controlling the column spacing in isothermal magnetic advection to enable tunable heat and mass transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Solis, Kyle Jameson; Martin, James E.

    2012-11-01

    Isothermal magnetic advection is a recently discovered method of inducing highly organized, non-contact flow lattices in suspensions of magnetic particles, using only uniform ac magnetic fields of modest strength. The initiation of these vigorous flows requires neither a thermal gradient nor a gravitational field and so can be used to transfer heat and mass in circumstances where natural convection does not occur. These advection lattices are comprised of a square lattice of antiparallel flow columns. If the column spacing is sufficiently large compared to the column length, and the flow rate within the columns is sufficiently large, then one would expect efficient transfer of both heat and mass. Otherwise, the flow lattice could act as a countercurrent heat exchanger and only mass will be efficiently transferred. Although this latter case might be useful for feeding a reaction front without extracting heat, it is likely that most interest will be focused on using IMA for heat transfer. In this paper we explore the various experimental parameters of IMA to determine which of these can be used to control the column spacing. These parameters include the field frequency, strength, and phase relation between the two field components, the liquid viscosity and particle volume fraction. We find that the column spacing can easily be tuned over a wide range, to enable the careful control of heat and mass transfer.

  15. Nonadiabatic spin transfer torque in high anisotropy magnetic nanowires with narrow domain walls.

    PubMed

    Boulle, O; Kimling, J; Warnicke, P; Kläui, M; Rüdiger, U; Malinowski, G; Swagten, H J M; Koopmans, B; Ulysse, C; Faini, G

    2008-11-21

    Current induced domain wall (DW) depinning of a narrow DW in out-of-plane magnetized (Pt/Co)_{3}/Pt multilayer elements is studied by magnetotransport. We find that for conventional measurements Joule heating effects conceal the real spin torque efficiency and so we use a measurement scheme at a constant sample temperature to unambiguously extract the spin torque contribution. From the variation of the depinning magnetic field with the current pulse amplitude we directly deduce the large nonadiabaticity factor in this material and we find that its amplitude is consistent with a momentum transfer mechanism.

  16. Magnetic Metamaterial Superlens for Increased Range Wireless Power Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipworth, Guy; Ensworth, Joshua; Seetharam, Kushal; da Huang; Lee, Jae Seung; Schmalenberg, Paul; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Reynolds, Matthew S.; Smith, David R.; Urzhumov, Yaroslav

    2014-01-01

    The ability to wirelessly power electrical devices is becoming of greater urgency as a component of energy conservation and sustainability efforts. Due to health and safety concerns, most wireless power transfer (WPT) schemes utilize very low frequency, quasi-static, magnetic fields; power transfer occurs via magneto-inductive (MI) coupling between conducting loops serving as transmitter and receiver. At the ``long range'' regime - referring to distances larger than the diameter of the largest loop - WPT efficiency in free space falls off as (1/d)6; power loss quickly approaches 100% and limits practical implementations of WPT to relatively tight distances between power source and device. A ``superlens'', however, can concentrate the magnetic near fields of a source. Here, we demonstrate the impact of a magnetic metamaterial (MM) superlens on long-range near-field WPT, quantitatively confirming in simulation and measurement at 13-16 MHz the conditions under which the superlens can enhance power transfer efficiency compared to the lens-less free-space system.

  17. Magnetic Metamaterial Superlens for Increased Range Wireless Power Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lipworth, Guy; Ensworth, Joshua; Seetharam, Kushal; Da Huang; Lee, Jae Seung; Schmalenberg, Paul; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Reynolds, Matthew S.; Smith, David R.; Urzhumov, Yaroslav

    2014-01-01

    The ability to wirelessly power electrical devices is becoming of greater urgency as a component of energy conservation and sustainability efforts. Due to health and safety concerns, most wireless power transfer (WPT) schemes utilize very low frequency, quasi-static, magnetic fields; power transfer occurs via magneto-inductive (MI) coupling between conducting loops serving as transmitter and receiver. At the “long range” regime – referring to distances larger than the diameter of the largest loop – WPT efficiency in free space falls off as (1/d)6; power loss quickly approaches 100% and limits practical implementations of WPT to relatively tight distances between power source and device. A “superlens”, however, can concentrate the magnetic near fields of a source. Here, we demonstrate the impact of a magnetic metamaterial (MM) superlens on long-range near-field WPT, quantitatively confirming in simulation and measurement at 13–16 MHz the conditions under which the superlens can enhance power transfer efficiency compared to the lens-less free-space system. PMID:24407490

  18. Magnetic metamaterial superlens for increased range wireless power transfer.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Guy; Ensworth, Joshua; Seetharam, Kushal; Huang, Da; Lee, Jae Seung; Schmalenberg, Paul; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Reynolds, Matthew S; Smith, David R; Urzhumov, Yaroslav

    2014-01-10

    The ability to wirelessly power electrical devices is becoming of greater urgency as a component of energy conservation and sustainability efforts. Due to health and safety concerns, most wireless power transfer (WPT) schemes utilize very low frequency, quasi-static, magnetic fields; power transfer occurs via magneto-inductive (MI) coupling between conducting loops serving as transmitter and receiver. At the "long range" regime - referring to distances larger than the diameter of the largest loop - WPT efficiency in free space falls off as (1/d)(6); power loss quickly approaches 100% and limits practical implementations of WPT to relatively tight distances between power source and device. A "superlens", however, can concentrate the magnetic near fields of a source. Here, we demonstrate the impact of a magnetic metamaterial (MM) superlens on long-range near-field WPT, quantitatively confirming in simulation and measurement at 13-16 MHz the conditions under which the superlens can enhance power transfer efficiency compared to the lens-less free-space system.

  19. Optimal control laws for heliocentric transfers with a magnetic sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarta, Alessandro A.; Mengali, Giovanni; Aliasi, Generoso

    2013-08-01

    A magnetic sail is an advanced propellantless propulsion system that uses the interaction between the solar wind and an artificial magnetic field generated by the spacecraft, to produce a propulsive thrust in interplanetary space. The aim of this paper is to collect the available experimental data, and the simulation results, to develop a simplified mathematical model that describes the propulsive acceleration of a magnetic sail, in an analytical form, for mission analysis purposes. Such a mathematical model is then used for estimating the performance of a magnetic sail-based spacecraft in a two-dimensional, minimum time, deep space mission scenario. In particular, optimal and locally optimal steering laws are derived using an indirect approach. The obtained results are then applied to a mission analysis involving both an optimal Earth-Venus (circle-to-circle) interplanetary transfer, and a locally optimal Solar System escape trajectory. For example, assuming a characteristic acceleration of 1 mm/s2, an optimal Earth-Venus transfer may be completed within about 380 days.

  20. Plasma-induced magnetic responses during nonlinear dynamics of magnetic islands due to resonant magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2014-12-15

    Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) produce magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas. Self-healing (annihilation) of RMP-induced magnetic islands has been observed in helical systems, where a possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by plasma flows, which is well known in tokamaks. Thus, fundamental physics of RMP shielding is commonly investigated in both tokamaks and helical systems. In order to check this mechanism, detailed informations of magnetic island phases are necessary. In experiments, measurement of radial magnetic responses is relatively easy. In this study, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands, behavior of radial magnetic fields during the self-healing is investigated. It is confirmed that flips of radial magnetic fields are typically observed during the self-healing. Such behavior of radial magnetic responses is also observed in LHD experiments.

  1. Spin transfer torque generated magnetic droplet solitons (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.; Mohseni, S. M.; Sani, S. R.; Iacocca, E.; Dumas, R. K.; Pogoryelov, Ye.; Anh Nguyen, T. N.; Muduli, P. K.; Eklund, A.; Hoefer, M.; Åkerman, J.

    2014-05-07

    We present recent experimental and numerical advancements in the understanding of spin transfer torque generated magnetic droplet solitons. The experimental work focuses on nano-contact spin torque oscillators (NC-STOs) based on orthogonal (pseudo) spin valves where the Co fixed layer has an easy-plane anisotropy, and the [Co/Ni] free layer has a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The NC-STO resistance and microwave signal generation are measured simultaneously as a function of drive current and applied perpendicular magnetic field. Both exhibit dramatic transitions at a certain current dependent critical field value, where the microwave frequency drops 10 GHz, modulation sidebands appear, and the resistance exhibits a jump, while the magnetoresistance changes sign. We interpret these observations as the nucleation of a magnetic droplet soliton with a large fraction of its magnetization processing with an angle greater than 90°, i.e., around a direction opposite that of the applied field. This interpretation is corroborated by numerical simulations. When the field is further increased, we find that the droplet eventually collapses under the pressure from the Zeeman energy.

  2. Thermomagnonic spin transfer and Peltier effects in insulating magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Alexey A.

    2012-02-01

    The recent discovery of the spin Seebeck effect [1] in metals, insulators and semiconductors stimulated development of spincaloritronics [2]. The possibility of measuring the Onsager reciprocal spin Peltier effect has been investigated recently as well. In our theoretical work [3], we study the fictitious electromagnetic fields induced by magnetic textures which may offer an alternative route for observing the spin Peltier effect. Particularly, in an insulating ferromagnet a moving magnetic texture should effectively drive the spin (wave) current which in turn should lead to the heat current by the spin Peltier effect. We further study the coupled magnon energy transport and collective magnetization dynamics in ferromagnets with magnetic textures. We conclude that the analogy between the fictitious electromagnetic fields and real fields should lead to magnonic counterparts of such effects as the Hall effect, the Ettingshausen effect, the Nernst effect, and the Righi-Leduc effect. By constructing a phenomenological theory based on irreversible thermodynamics, we describe motion of domain walls by thermal gradients and generation of heat flows by magnetization dynamics. From microscopic description based on magnon kinetics, we estimate the transport coefficients and analyze the feasibility of energy-related applications (e.g. nanoscale heat pumps [4]) in insulating ferromagnets, such as yttrium iron garnet and europium oxide. Our estimates show that the viscous coupling effects between magnetization dynamics and magnon flows can be strong in materials with low spin densities (e.g. dilute magnetic systems) and narrow domain walls, which can allow the magnonic manipulation of magnetization dynamics and heat pumping.[4pt] [1] K. Uchida et al. Nature 455, 778 (2008).[0pt] [2] G. E. W. Bauer, A. H. MacDonald, S. Maekawa, Solid State Commun. 150, 459 (2010).[0pt] [3] A. A. Kovalev and Y. Tserkovnayk, arXiv:1106.3135.[0pt] [4] A. A. Kovalev and Y. Tserkovnyak, Solid State

  3. Magnetic field aberration induced by cycle stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, Yang; luming, Li; Xing, Chen

    2007-05-01

    Magneto-mechanical effect has been causing people's growing interest because of its relevance to several technology problems. One of them is the variation of surface magnetic field induced by stress concentration under the geomagnetic field. It can be used as an innovative, simple and convenient potential NDE method, called as magnetic memory method. However, whether and how this can be used as a quantitative measurement method, is still a virginal research field where nobody sets foot in. In this paper, circle tensile stress within the elastic region was applied to ferromagnetic sample under geomagnetic field. Experiment results on the relation between surface magnetic field and elastic stress were presented, and a simple model was derived. Simulation of the model was reconciled with the experimental results. This can be of great importance for it provides a brighter future for the promising Magnetic Memory NDE method—the potential possibility of quantitative measurement.

  4. Fluctuating magnetic field induced resonant activation

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Shrabani; Das, Sudip; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2014-12-14

    In this paper, we have studied the properties of a Brownian particle at stationary state in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field. Time dependence of the field makes the system thermodynamically open. As a signature of that the steady state distribution function becomes function of damping strength, intensity of fluctuations and constant parts of the applied magnetic field. It also depends on the correlation time of the fluctuating magnetic field. Our another observation is that the random magnetic field can induce the resonant activation phenomenon. Here correlation time is increased under the fixed variance of the fluctuating field. But if the correlation time (τ) increases under the fixed field strength then the mean first passage time rapidly grows at low τ and it almost converges at other limit. This is sharp contrast to the usual colored noise driven open system case where the mean first passage time diverges exponentially. We have also observed that a giant enhancement of barrier crossing rate occurs particularly at large strength of constant parts of the applied magnetic field even for very weak fluctuating magnetic field. Finally, break down of the Arrhenius result and disappearance of the Kramers’ turn over phenomenon may occur in the presence of a fluctuating magnetic field.

  5. Spin-transfer torque switched magnetic tunnel junctions in magnetic random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jonathan Z.

    2016-10-01

    Spin-transfer torque (or spin-torque, or STT) based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) is at the heart of a new generation of magnetism-based solid-state memory, the so-called spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory, or STT-MRAM. Over the past decades, STT-based switchable magnetic tunnel junction has seen progress on many fronts, including the discovery of (001) MgO as the most favored tunnel barrier, which together with (bcc) Fe or FeCo alloy are yielding best demonstrated tunnel magneto-resistance (TMR); the development of perpendicularly magnetized ultrathin CoFeB-type of thin films sufficient to support high density memories with junction sizes demonstrated down to 11nm in diameter; and record-low spin-torque switching threshold current, giving best reported switching efficiency over 5 kBT/μA. Here we review the basic device properties focusing on the perpendicularly magnetized MTJs, both in terms of switching efficiency as measured by sub-threshold, quasi-static methods, and of switching speed at super-threshold, forced switching. We focus on device behaviors important for memory applications that are rooted in fundamental device physics, which highlights the trade-off of device parameters for best suitable system integration.

  6. Energy transfer and dual cascade in kinetic magnetized plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Plunk, G G; Tatsuno, T

    2011-04-22

    The question of how nonlinear interactions redistribute the energy of fluctuations across available degrees of freedom is of fundamental importance in the study of turbulence and transport in magnetized weakly collisional plasmas, ranging from space settings to fusion devices. In this Letter, we present a theory for the dual cascade found in such plasmas, which predicts a range of new behavior that distinguishes this cascade from that of neutral fluid turbulence. These phenomena are explained in terms of the constrained nature of spectral transfer in nonlinear gyrokinetics. Accompanying this theory are the first observations of these phenomena, obtained via direct numerical simulations using the gyrokinetic code AstroGK. The basic mechanisms that are found provide a framework for understanding the turbulent energy transfer that couples scales both locally and nonlocally.

  7. 49 CFR 225.37 - Magnetic media transfer and electronic submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Magnetic media transfer and electronic submission..., AND INVESTIGATIONS § 225.37 Magnetic media transfer and electronic submission. (a) A railroad has the option of submitting the following reports, updates, and amendments by way of magnetic media...

  8. Magnetic superlens-enhanced inductive coupling for wireless power transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Da; Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Smith, David R.; Hoo Teo, Koon; Zhang, Jinyun

    2012-03-01

    We investigate numerically the use of a negative-permeability "perfect lens" for enhancing wireless power transfer between two current carrying coils. The negative permeability slab serves to focus the flux generated in the source coil to the receiver coil, thereby increasing the mutual inductive coupling between the coils. The numerical model is compared with an analytical theory that treats the coils as point dipoles separated by an infinite planar layer of magnetic material [Urzhumov et al., Phys. Rev. B 19, 8312 (2011)]. In the limit of vanishingly small radius of the coils, and large width of the metamaterial slab, the numerical simulations are in excellent agreement with the analytical model. Both the idealized analytical and realistic numerical models predict similar trends with respect to metamaterial loss and anisotropy. Applying the numerical models, we further analyze the impact of finite coil size and finite width of the slab. We find that, even for these less idealized geometries, the presence of the magnetic slab greatly enhances the coupling between the two coils, including cases where significant loss is present in the slab. We therefore conclude that the integration of a metamaterial slab into a wireless power transfer system holds promise for increasing the overall system performance.

  9. Magnetization transfer imaging of suicidal patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziqi; Zhang, Huawei; Jia, Zhiyun; Zhong, Jingjie; Huang, Xiaoqi; Du, Mingying; Chen, Lizhou; Kuang, Weihong; Sweeney, John A; Gong, Qiyong

    2015-04-08

    Magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) provides a quantitative measure of the macromolecular structural integrity of brain tissue, as represented by magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). In this study, we utilized MTI to identify biophysical alterations in MDD patients with a history of suicide attempts relative to MDD patients without such history. The participants were 36 medication-free MDD patients, with (N = 17) and without (N = 19) a history of a suicide attempt, and 28 healthy controls matched for age and gender. Whole brain voxel-based analysis was used to compare MTR across three groups and to analyze correlations with symptom severity and illness duration. We identified decreased MTR in left inferior parietal lobule and right superior parietal lobule in suicide attempters relative to both non-attempters and controls. Non-attempters also showed significantly reduced MTR in left inferior parietal lobule relative to controls, as well as an MTR reduction in left cerebellum. These abnormalities were not correlated with symptom severity or illness duration. Depressed patients with a history of suicide attempt showed bilateral abnormalities in parietal cortex compared to nonsuicidal depressed patients and healthy controls. Parietal lobe abnormalities might cause attentional dysfunction and impaired decision making to increase risk for suicidal behavior in MDD.

  10. On Electromagnetic Modulation of Flow Instabilities, Mixing and Heat Transfer in Conducting and Magnetized Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenjeres, S.

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper we give a concise review of some recent highlights of our research dealing with electromagnetic control of flow, mixing and heat transfer of electrically conductive or magnetized fluids. We apply a combination of state-of-art numerical (DNS and LES) and experimental (PIV and LIF) techniques to provide fundamental insights into the complex phenomena of interactions between imposed (or induced) electromagnetic fields and underlying fluid flow. Our analysis covers an extensive range of working fluids, i.e. weakly- and highly-electrically-conductive, as well as magnetized fluids. These interactions are defined through the presence of different types of body forces acting per volume of fluid. A fully closed system of governing equations containing an extended set of the Navier-Stokes and a simplified set of the Maxwell equations is presented. The four characteristic examples are selected: the electromagnetic control of self-sustained jet oscillations, the electromagnetic enhancement of heat transfer in thermal convection, the wake interactions behind magnetic obstacles and finally, the thermo-magnetic convection in differentially heated cubical enclosure. The comparative assessment between experimental and numerical results is presented. It is concluded that generally good agreement between simulations and experiments is obtained for all cases considered, proving the concept of electromagnetic modulation, which can be used in numerous technological applications.

  11. Mass transfer and magnetic braking in Sco X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovskii, K.; Ivanova, N.

    2016-02-01

    Sco X-1 is a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) that has one of the most precisely determined set of binary parameters such as the mass accretion rate, companions mass ratio and the orbital period. For this system, as well as for a large fraction of other well-studied LMXBs, the observationally-inferred mass accretion rate is known to strongly exceed the theoretically expected mass transfer (MT) rate. We suggest that this discrepancy can be solved by applying a modified magnetic braking prescription, which accounts for increased wind mass-loss in evolved stars compared to main sequence stars. Using our MT framework based on MESA, we explore a large range of binaries at the onset of the MT. We identify the subset of binaries for which the MT tracks cross the Sco X-1 values for the mass ratio and the orbital period. We confirm that no solution can be found for which the standard magnetic braking can provide the observed accretion rates, while wind-boosted magnetic braking can provide the observed accretion rates for many progenitor binaries that evolve to the observed orbital period and mass ratio.

  12. Improved power transfer to wearable systems through stretchable magnetic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, N.; Bedair, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    The use of wireless power transfer is common in stretchable electronics since physical wiring can be easily destroyed as the system is stretched. This work presents the first demonstration of improved inductive power coupling to a stretchable system through the addition of a thin layer of ferroelastomeric material. A ferroelastomer, an elastomeric polymer loaded with magnetic particulates, has a permeability greater than one while retaining the ability to survive significant mechanical strains. A recently developed ferroelastomer composite based on sendust platelets within a soft silicone elastomer was incorporated into liquid metal stretchable inductors based on the liquid metal galinstan in fluidic channels. For a single-turn inductor, the maximum power transfer efficiency rises from 71 % with no backplane, to 81 % for a rigid ferrite backplane on the transmitter side alone, to 86 % with a ferroelastomer backplane on the receiver side as well. The coupling between a commercial wireless power transmitter coil with ferrite backplane to a five-turn liquid metal inductor was also investigated, finding an improvement in power transfer efficiency from 81 % with only a rigid backplane to 90 % with the addition of the ferroelastomer backplane. Both the single and multi-turn inductors were demonstrated surviving up to 50 % uniaxial applied strain.

  13. Mixing Dynamics Induced by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Mazuruk, Konstantin; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Microstructural and compositional homogeneity in metals and alloys can only be achieved if the initial melt is homogeneous prior to the onset of solidification processing. Naturally induced convection may initially facilitate this requirement but upon the onset of solidification significant compositional variations generally arise leading to undesired segregation. Application of alternating magnetic fields to promote a uniform bulk liquid concentration during solidification processing has been suggested. To investigate such possibilities an initial study of using traveling magnetic fields (TMF) to promote melt homogenization is reported in this work. Theoretically, the effect of TMF-induced convection on mixing phenomena is studied in the laminar regime of flow. Experimentally, with and without applied fields, both 1) mixing dynamics by optically monitoring the spreading of an initially localized dye in transparent fluids and, 2) compositional variations in metal alloys have been investigated.

  14. Streaming potential and heat transfer of nanofluids in microchannels in the presence of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangpu; Jian, Yongjun; Li, Fengqin

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we investigate the heat transfer characteristics of thermally developed nanofluid flow through a parallel plate microchannel under the combined influences of externally applied axial pressure gradient and transverse magnetic fields. The analytical solutions for electromagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) flow in microchannels are obtained under the Debye-Hückel linearization. The classical boundary condition of uniform wall heat flux is considered in the analysis, and the effect of viscous dissipation as well as Joule heating is also taken into account. In addition, in virtue of the velocity field and temperature field, the Nusselt number variations are induced. The results for pertinent dimensionless parameters are presented graphically and discussed in briefly.

  15. Saturated pool-boiling heat transfer of toluene-solvent magnetic fluid on a horizontal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Minoru; Inoue, Akiro; Matsuzaki, Mitsuo; Ohkawa, Riichiro . Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors)

    1994-07-01

    Saturated pool-boiling heat transfer of a toluene-solvent magnetic fluid containing magnetite particles of 0--36.5 wt% was investigated on a horizontal surface in a vertical magnetic field at pressures of 0.021--0.061 MPa. In the absence of a magnetic field gradient, the heat transfer was enhanced significantly using a magnetic fluid with dilute magnetite particles, while it was reduced for the case of dense particles. As the magnetic field gradient was increased up to 3.9 [times] 10[sup 5] A/m[sup 2], the heat transfer of the dense magnetic fluid was enhanced significantly in the heat flux region, although it slowly began to show a reduced heat-transfer curve again at a certain transition heat flux. The transition heat flux increased as the magnetic field gradient became larger, the magnetic concentration, lower, and the pressure, higher.

  16. Importance of polarization transfer in reaction products for interpreting and analyzing CIDNP at low magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Ivanov, Konstantin L; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2015-05-01

    The magnetic field dependence of Chemically Induced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (CIDNP) was studied for the amino acids N-acetyl histidine, N-acetyl tryptophan and N-acetyl tyrosine. It is demonstrated that at low field CIDNP is strongly affected by polarization redistribution in the diamagnetic molecules. Such a polarization transfer is of coherent nature and is due to spin coherences formed together with non-equilibrium population of the spin states. These coherences clearly manifest themselves in an oscillatory time dependence of polarization. Polarization transfer effects are most pronounced at nuclear spin Level Anti-Crossings (LACs), which also result in sharp features in the CIDNP field dependence. Thus, polarization transfer is an important factor, which has to be taken into account in order to interpret low-field CIDNP data on both qualitative and quantitative level. Possible applications of polarization transfer phenomena are also discussed in the paper. In particular, the role of LACs in spin order transfer is highlighted: LACs provide a new tool for precise manipulation of spin hyperpolarization and NMR enhancement of selected target spins.

  17. Catalytic Transfer of Magnetism using a Neutral Iridium Phenoxide Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ruddlesden, Amy J.; Mewis, Ryan E.; Green, Gary G. R.; Whitwood, Adrian C.; Duckett, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    A novel neutral iridium carbene complex Ir(κC,O-L1)(COD) (1) [where COD = cyclooctadiene and L1 = 3-(2-methylene-4-nitrophenolate)-1-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl) imidazolylidene] with a pendant alkoxide ligand has been prepared and characterized. It contains a strong Ir-O bond and X-ray analysis reveals a distorted square planar structure. NMR spectroscopy reveals dynamic solution state behavior commensurate with rapid seven-membered ring flipping. In CD2Cl2 solution, under hydrogen at low temperature, this complex dominates although it exists in equilibrium with a reactive iridium dihydride cyclooctadiene complex. 1 reacts with pyridine and H2 to form neutral Ir(H)2(κC,O-L1)(py)2 which also exists in two conformers that differ according to the orientation of the seven-membered metallocycle and whilst its Ir-O bond remains intact, the complex undergoes both pyridine and H2 exchange. As a consequence, when placed under parahydrogen, efficient polarization transfer catalysis (PTC) is observed via the Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) approach. Due to the neutral character of this catalyst, good hyperpolarization activity is shown in a wide range of solvents for a number of substrates. These observations reflect a dramatic improvement in solvent tolerance of SABRE over that reported for the best PTC precursor IrCl(IMes)(COD). For THF, the associated 1H NMR signal enhancement for the ortho proton signal of pyridine shows an increase of 600-fold at 298 K. The level of signal enhancement can be increased further through warming or varying the magnetic field experienced by the sample at the point of catalytic magnetization transfer.

  18. Momentum transfer to rotating magnetized plasma from gun plasma injection

    SciTech Connect

    Shamim, Imran; Hassam, A. B.; Ellis, R. F.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Phillips, M. W.

    2006-11-15

    Numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the penetration and momentum coupling of a gun-injected plasma slug into a rotating magnetized plasma. An experiment along these lines is envisioned for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) [R. F. Ellis et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2057 (2001)] using a coaxial plasma accelerator gun developed by HyperV Technologies Corp. [F. D. Witherspoon et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, LP1 87 (2005)]. The plasma gun would be located in the axial midplane and fired off-axis into the rotating MCX plasma annulus. The numerical simulation is set up so that the initial momentum in the injected plasma slug is of the order of the initial momentum of the target plasma. Several numerical firings are done into the cylindrical rotating plasma. Axial symmetry is assumed. The slug is seen to penetrate readily and deform into a mushroom, characteristic of interchange deformations. It is found that up to 25% of the momentum in the slug can be transferred to the background plasma in one pass across a cylindrical chord. For the same initial momentum, a high-speed low density slug gives more momentum transfer than a low-speed high density slug. Details of the numerical simulations and a scaling study are presented.

  19. Magnetization transfer imaging reveals geniculocalcarine and striate area degeneration in primary glaucoma: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Liang, Wenwen; Wu, Guijun; Zhang, Xuelin

    2016-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease that affects both the retina and central visual pathway. Magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) is a sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that can detect degenerative changes in the brain. Purpose To investigate the geniculocalcarine (GCT) and striate areas in primary glaucoma patients using region of interest (ROI) analysis of magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). Material and Methods Twenty patients with primary glaucoma in both eyes were compared with 31 healthy control patients. All of the participants were examined on a 3.0 T scanner using a three-dimensional T1-weighted spoiled gradient recalled acquisition (SPGR) with and without a MT saturation pulse. A two-sample t-test was used to evaluate the MTR difference between the groups. P < 0.05 was used to determine statistical significance. Results The MTR of the glaucoma group was lower than the healthy controls in both the bilateral GCT (t = 3.781, P = 0.001) and striate areas (t = 4.177, P = 0.000). Conclusion The MTR reductions in the bilateral GCT and striate areas suggest that there is GCT demyelination and striate area degeneration in primary glaucoma. These neurodegenerative effects may be induced as a direct effect of retrograde axonal degeneration along with the indirect effect of anterograde trans-synaptic degeneration. PMID:27651931

  20. Magnetic nanoparticle heating and heat transfer on a microscale: Basic principles, realities and physical limitations of hyperthermia for tumour therapy.

    PubMed

    Dutz, Silvio; Hergt, Rudolf

    2013-12-01

    In this review article we present basic principles of magnetically induced heat generation of magnetic nanoparticles for application in magnetic particle hyperthermia. After explanation of heating mechanisms, the role of particle-particle as well as particle-tissue interactions is discussed with respect to achievable heating power of the particles inside the tumour. On the basis of heat transfer theory at the micro-scale, the balance between generated and dissipated heat inside the tumour and the resulting damaging effects for biological tissue is examined. The heating behaviour as a function of tumour size is examined in combination with feasible field strength and frequency. Numerical calculations and experimental investigations are used to show the lower tumour size limit for tumour heating to therapeutically suitable temperatures. In summary, this article illuminates practical aspects, limitations, and the state of the art for the application of magnetic heating in magnetic particle hyperthermia as thermal treatment of small tumours.

  1. Interferon Induced Transfer of Viral Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    interferon induction (27). Reaction kinetics plus the falure of soluble factors in the medium to induce interferon suggested that the inducing factor...staining. Only NDV infected lymphocytes stained with the anti-ACTHa (1-13) or anti-Y-endorphin sera. The staining reaction of the anti-ACTHa (1-13) sera was...reasons. First, a cross reaction between human immunoglobulin class IgGl, and O-endorphin and ACTH has been reported (46). It seems that this is not the

  2. Induced remanent magnetization of social insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wajnberg, E.; Cernicchiaro, G.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; El-Jaick, L. J.; Esquivel, D. M. S.

    2001-05-01

    The induced remanent magnetization (IRM) of honeybees Apis mellifera and ants as Pachycondyla marginata, a migratory species, and Solenopsis sp., a fire ant, was obtained using a SQUID magnetometer from 10 to 300 K. An anomalous sharp change of the remanent magnetization is observed at 67±0.2 K for migratory ants. The IRM at room temperature indicates the presence of at least 10 times lower concentration of magnetic material in the whole fire ant as compared to the migratory ant abdomen (0.22±0.33×10 -6 emu/ant, and 2.8±1.2×10 -6 emu/abdomen, respectively). Our results in honeybee abdomen (4.6±0.9×10 -6 emu/abdomen) agree with other reported values. IRM at room temperature in ants and honeybees indicates the presence of single domain (SD) or aggregates of magnetite nanoparticles. The loss of remanence from 77 to 300 K can be related to the stable-superparamagnetic (SPM) transition of small particles (less than ca. 30 nm). From these values and considering their estimated volumes an upper limit 10 10 SPM and 10 9 SD or aggregate particles are obtained in these insects.

  3. Interferon Induced Transfer of Viral Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Cell contact is required between inducer cells and effector lymphocytes for interferon induction (27). Reaction kinetics plus the falure of soluble...endorphin sera. The staining reaction of the anti-ACTHa (1-13) sera was blocked by absorption with porcine ACTH (1-39) but not with NOV or noninfected...endorphin sera at 18 hr post infection is important for a number of reasons. First, a cross reaction between human immunoglobulin class IgGl, and a-endorphin

  4. The effect of magnetic field on nanofluids heat transfer through a uniformly heated horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatami, N.; Kazemnejad Banari, A.; Malekzadeh, A.; Pouranfard, A. R.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the effects of magnetic field on forced convection heat transfer of Fe3O4-water nanofluid with laminar flow regime in a horizontal pipe under constant heat flux conditions were studied, experimentally. The convective heat transfer of magnetic fluid flow inside the heated pipe with uniform magnetic field was measured. Fe3O4 nanoparticles with diameters less than 100 nm dispersed in water with various volume concentrations are used as the test fluid. The effect of the external magnetic field (Ha = 33.4 ×10-4 to 136.6 ×10-4) and nanoparticle concentrations (φ = 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1%) on heat transfer characteristics were investigated. Results showed that by the presence of a magnetic field, increase in nanoparticle concentration caused reduction of convection heat transfer coefficient. In this condition, heat transfer decreased up to 25%. Where, in the absence of an external magnetic field, adding magnetic nanoparticles increased convection heat transfer more than 60%. It was observed that the Nusselt number decreased by increasing the Hartmann number at a specified concentration of magnetic nanofluids, that reduction about 25% in heat transfer rate could be found.

  5. Voltage-driven spin-transfer torque in a magnetic particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartland, P.; Davidović, D.

    2015-10-01

    We discuss a spin-transfer torque device, where the role of the soft ferromagnetic layer is played by a magnetic particle or a magnetic molecule, in weak tunnel contact with two spin polarized leads. We investigate if the magnetization of the particle can be manipulated electronically, in the regime where the critical current for magnetization switching is negligibly weak, which could be due to the reduced particle dimensions. Using master equation simulations to evaluate the effects of spin-orbit anisotropy energy fluctuations on spin-transfer, we obtain reliable reading and writing of the magnetization state of such magnetic particle, and find that the device relies on a critical voltage rather than a critical current. The critical voltage is governed by the spin-orbit energy shifts of discrete levels in the particle. This finding opens a possibility to significantly reduce the power dissipation involved in spin-transfer torque switching, by using very small magnetic particles or molecules.

  6. Voltage-driven spin-transfer torque in a magnetic particle

    SciTech Connect

    Gartland, P. Davidović, D.

    2015-10-26

    We discuss a spin-transfer torque device, where the role of the soft ferromagnetic layer is played by a magnetic particle or a magnetic molecule, in weak tunnel contact with two spin polarized leads. We investigate if the magnetization of the particle can be manipulated electronically, in the regime where the critical current for magnetization switching is negligibly weak, which could be due to the reduced particle dimensions. Using master equation simulations to evaluate the effects of spin-orbit anisotropy energy fluctuations on spin-transfer, we obtain reliable reading and writing of the magnetization state of such magnetic particle, and find that the device relies on a critical voltage rather than a critical current. The critical voltage is governed by the spin-orbit energy shifts of discrete levels in the particle. This finding opens a possibility to significantly reduce the power dissipation involved in spin-transfer torque switching, by using very small magnetic particles or molecules.

  7. Ultrafast thermally induced magnetic switching in synthetic ferrimagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Richard F. L. Ostler, Thomas A.; Chantrell, Roy W.; Radu, Ilie; Rasing, Theo

    2014-02-24

    Synthetic ferrimagnets are composite magnetic structures formed from two or more anti-ferromagnetically coupled magnetic sublattices with different magnetic moments. Here, we report on atomistic spin simulations of the laser-induced magnetization dynamics on such synthetic ferrimagnets and demonstrate that the application of ultrashort laser pulses leads to sub-picosecond magnetization dynamics and all-optical switching in a similar manner as in ferrimagnetic alloys. Moreover, we present the essential material properties for successful laser-induced switching, demonstrating the feasibility of using a synthetic ferrimagnet as a high density magnetic storage element without the need of a write field.

  8. Magnetization Transfer and Amide Proton Transfer MRI of Neonatal Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yang; Wang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Xuna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study aims to evaluate the process of brain development in neonates using combined amide proton transfer (APT) imaging and conventional magnetization transfer (MT) imaging. Materials and Methods. Case data were reviewed for all patients hospitalized in our institution's neonatal ward. Patients underwent APT and MT imaging (a single protocol) immediately following the routine MR examination. Single-slice APT/MT axial imaging was performed at the level of the basal ganglia. APT and MT ratio (MTR) measurements were performed in multiple brain regions of interest (ROIs). Data was statistically analyzed in order to assess for significant differences between the different regions of the brain or correlation with patient gestational age. Results. A total of 38 neonates were included in the study, with ages ranging from 27 to 41 weeks' corrected gestational age. There were statistically significant differences in both APT and MTR measurements between the frontal lobes, basal ganglia, and occipital lobes (APT: frontal lobe versus occipital lobe P = 0.031 and other groups P = 0.00; MTR: frontal lobe versus occipital lobe P = 0.034 and other groups P = 0.00). Furthermore, APT and MTR in above brain regions exhibited positive linear correlations with patient gestational age. Conclusions. APT/MT imaging can provide valuable information about the process of the neonatal brain development at the molecular level.

  9. Magnetization Transfer and Amide Proton Transfer MRI of Neonatal Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study aims to evaluate the process of brain development in neonates using combined amide proton transfer (APT) imaging and conventional magnetization transfer (MT) imaging. Materials and Methods. Case data were reviewed for all patients hospitalized in our institution's neonatal ward. Patients underwent APT and MT imaging (a single protocol) immediately following the routine MR examination. Single-slice APT/MT axial imaging was performed at the level of the basal ganglia. APT and MT ratio (MTR) measurements were performed in multiple brain regions of interest (ROIs). Data was statistically analyzed in order to assess for significant differences between the different regions of the brain or correlation with patient gestational age. Results. A total of 38 neonates were included in the study, with ages ranging from 27 to 41 weeks' corrected gestational age. There were statistically significant differences in both APT and MTR measurements between the frontal lobes, basal ganglia, and occipital lobes (APT: frontal lobe versus occipital lobe P = 0.031 and other groups P = 0.00; MTR: frontal lobe versus occipital lobe P = 0.034 and other groups P = 0.00). Furthermore, APT and MTR in above brain regions exhibited positive linear correlations with patient gestational age. Conclusions. APT/MT imaging can provide valuable information about the process of the neonatal brain development at the molecular level. PMID:27885356

  10. Plasmon-induced resonance energy transfer for solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangtian; Cushing, Scott K.; Meng, Fanke; Senty, Tess R.; Bristow, Alan D.; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-09-01

    In Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), energy non-radiatively transfers from a blue-shifted emitter to a red-shifted absorber by dipole-dipole coupling. This study shows that plasmonics enables the opposite transfer direction, transferring the plasmonic energy towards the short-wavelength direction to induce charge separation in a semiconductor. Plasmon-induced resonance energy transfer (PIRET) differs from FRET because of the lack of a Stoke's shift, non-local absorption effects and a strong dependence on the plasmon's dephasing rate and dipole moment. PIRET non-radiatively transfers energy through an insulating spacer layer, which prevents interfacial charge recombination losses and dephasing of the plasmon from hot-electron transfer. The distance dependence of dipole-dipole coupling is mapped out for a range of detuning across the plasmon resonance. PIRET can efficiently harvest visible and near-infrared sunlight with energy below the semiconductor band edge to help overcome the constraints of band-edge energetics for single semiconductors in photoelectrochemical cells, photocatalysts and photovoltaics.

  11. A combined analytical solution for Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer and semi-solid Magnetization Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Zaiss, Moritz; Zu, Zhongliang; Xu, Junzhong; Schuenke, Patrick; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Gore, John C.; Ladd, Mark E.; Bachert, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Off-resonant radiofrequency irradiation in tissue indirectly lowers the water signal by saturation transfer processes: On the one hand, there are selective chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) effects originating from exchanging endogenous protons resonating a few ppm from water; on the other hand, there is the broad semi-solid magnetization transfer (MT) originating from immobile protons associated with the tissue matrix with kHz line-widths. Recently it was shown that endogenous CEST contrasts can be strongly affected by the MT background so that corrections are needed to derive accurate estimates of CEST effects. Herein we show that a full analytical solution of the underlying Bloch-McConnell equations for both MT and CEST provides insights into their interaction and suggests a simple means to isolate their effects. The presented analytical solution, based on the eigenspace solution of the Bloch-McConnell equations, extends previous treatments by allowing arbitrary line-shapes for the semi-solid MT effects and simultaneously describing multiple CEST pools in the presence of a large MT pool for arbitrary irradiation. The structure of the model indicates that semi-solid MT and CEST effects basically add up inversely in determining the steady-state Z-spectrum, as previously shown for direct saturation and CEST effects. Implications for existing previous CEST analyses in the presence of a semi-solid MT are studied and discussed. It turns out that to accurately quantify CEST contrast, a good reference Z-value, the observed longitudinal relaxation rate of water, and the semi-solid MT pool size fraction, must all be known. PMID:25504828

  12. MR of intracranial tumors: Combined use of gadolinium and magnetization transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kurki, T.; Niemi, P.; Valtonen, S.

    1994-10-01

    To study the potential combined application of gadolinium and magnetization transfer in the MR imaging of intracranial tumors. Twenty-two patients were imaged at low field strength (0.1 T). Corresponding gradient-echo partial saturation images without and with magnetization transfer pulse were produced. Images with intermediate repetition times were obtained in 18 cases; five different sequences were produced in 4 cases. Gadopentetate dimeglumine was used at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg. Magnetization transfer effect increased the contrast between enhancing lesion and normal brain and the contrast between edema and normal brain; the contrast between enhancing lesion and edema was not significantly changed. On intermediate-repetition-time magnetization transfer images the contrast between enhancing tumor and normal brain and the contrast between edema and normal brain were superior to short-repetition-time magnetization transfer images, but the differentiation between enhancing tumor and edema was poorer. Magnetization transfer can be used to improve contrast in Gd-enhanced MR imaging. Combining magnetization transfer with an intermediate-repetition-time image provides the possibility for displaying both enhancing and nonehancing lesions on a single MR image. 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Optimization of on-resonant magnetization transfer contrast in coronary vein MRI.

    PubMed

    Stoeck, Christian T; Hu, Peng; Peters, Dana C; Kissinger, Kraig V; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Ngo, Long; Manning, Warren J; Kozerke, Sebastian; Nezafat, Reza

    2010-12-01

    Magnetization transfer contrast has been used commonly for endogenous tissue contrast improvements in angiography, brain, body, and cardiac imaging. Both off-resonant and on-resonant RF pulses can be used to generate magnetization transfer based contrast. In this study, on-resonant magnetization transfer preparation using binomial pulses were optimized and compared with off-resonant magnetization transfer for imaging of coronary veins. Three parameters were studied with simulations and in vivo measurements: flip angle, pulse repetitions, and binomial pulse order. Subsequently, first or second order binomial on-resonant magnetization transfer pulses with eight repetitions of 720° and 240° flip angle were used for coronary vein MRI. Flip angles of 720° yielded contrast enhancement of 115% (P < 0.0006) for first order on-resonant and 95% (P < 0.0006) for off-resonant magnetization transfer. There was no statistically significance difference between off-resonant and on-resonant first order binomial Magnetization transfer at 720°. However, for off-resonance pulses, much more preparation time is needed when compared with the binomials but with considerably reduced specific absorption rate.

  14. Transfer matrix of a Glaser magnet to study the dynamics of non-axisymmetric beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V. S.

    2012-06-01

    A Glaser magnet, having bell-shaped distribution of axial field, is often used to focus charged particle beams in the low energy section of accelerators and in many other devices. The transfer matrix of a Glaser magnet available in the literature is only for a rotationally axisymmetric beam. The objective of this paper is to obtain the 4D transfer matrix of a Glaser magnet for a non-axisymmetric beam having different emittances in the two transverse planes. Starting from the Hamiltonian of a single particle motion we have obtained the 4×4 linear transfer matrix of the Glaser magnet in symplectic form. The matrix so derived has been used to estimate the beam envelope through a Glaser magnet using the well known sigma matrix method. We have also studied the emittance growth that results from the coupling between the two transverse planes as the beam passes through the Glaser magnet.

  15. Using frequency-labeled exchange transfer to separate out conventional magnetization transfer effects from exchange transfer effects when detecting ParaCEST agents.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Yuan; Yadav, Nirbhay N; Friedman, Joshua I; Ratnakar, James; Sherry, A Dean; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2012-04-01

    Paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer agents combine the benefits of a large chemical shift difference and a fast exchange rate for sensitive MRI detection. However, the in vivo detection of these agents is hampered by the need for high B(1) fields to allow sufficiently fast saturation before exchange occurs, thus causing interference of large magnetization transfer effects from semisolid macromolecules. A recently developed approach named frequency-labeled exchange transfer utilizes excitation pulses instead of saturation pulses for detecting the exchanging protons. Using solutions and gel phantoms containing the europium (III) complex of DOTA tetraglycinate (EuDOTA-(gly)(-) (4) ), it is shown that frequency-labeled exchange transfer allows the separation of chemical exchange effects and magnetization transfer (MT) effects in the time domain, therefore allowing the study of the individual resonance of rapidly exchanging water molecules (k(ex) >10(4) s(-1) ) without interference from conventional broad-band MT.

  16. Photo-induced electron-transfer reactions in heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. M.

    1981-11-01

    The conversion of solar energy into chemical energy was pursued by two approaches. One is the photo-induced electron transfer reactions in heterogeneous media, and the other is the photo-decomposition of water with liquid-junction solar cells. Photo-induced electron-transfer reactions in heterogeneous media with colloidal silica or poly-acrylate were studied by flash photolysis. In an effort to illustrate that small band-gap semiconductors can be protected from photo-corrosion through surface modification, the surface of polycrystalline ZnO was chemically coated with zinc phthalocyanine and the electron-transfer process across the coated ZnO-electrolyte interface was studied by photo-electrochemical techniques.

  17. Magnetic routing of light-induced waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izdebskaya, Yana; Shvedov, Vladlen; Assanto, Gaetano; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2017-02-01

    Among photofunctional materials that can be employed to control the propagation of light by modifying their properties, soft dielectrics such as nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) stand out for their large all-optical response. Through reorientation, the molecular distribution of NLCs can be modified by the electric field of light, permitting functional operations and supporting self-localized light beams or spatial optical solitons. To date, the generation and routing of such solitons have been limited by the boundary conditions employed to tailor the properties of NLCs in planar cells or capillaries. Here we report on spatial solitons in bulk NLCs with no lateral anchoring, where the application of an external magnetic field effectively controls the direction of propagation and the angular steering of the self-trapped wavepackets. Our results entail a completely new approach to the routing of self-localized beams and light-induced waveguides in three dimensions, without the usual limitations imposed by transverse boundary conditions.

  18. Magnetic routing of light-induced waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Izdebskaya, Yana; Shvedov, Vladlen; Assanto, Gaetano; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2017-01-01

    Among photofunctional materials that can be employed to control the propagation of light by modifying their properties, soft dielectrics such as nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) stand out for their large all-optical response. Through reorientation, the molecular distribution of NLCs can be modified by the electric field of light, permitting functional operations and supporting self-localized light beams or spatial optical solitons. To date, the generation and routing of such solitons have been limited by the boundary conditions employed to tailor the properties of NLCs in planar cells or capillaries. Here we report on spatial solitons in bulk NLCs with no lateral anchoring, where the application of an external magnetic field effectively controls the direction of propagation and the angular steering of the self-trapped wavepackets. Our results entail a completely new approach to the routing of self-localized beams and light-induced waveguides in three dimensions, without the usual limitations imposed by transverse boundary conditions. PMID:28198374

  19. Experimental investigation on heat transfer characteristics of magnetic fluid flow around a fine wire under the influence of an external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiang; Xuan, Yimin

    2009-04-15

    Experimental investigation is conducted to get insight into convective heat transfer features of the aqueous magnetic fluid flow over a fine wire under the influence of an external magnetic field. The convective heat transfer coefficient of the aqueous magnetic fluid flow around the heated wire is measured in both the uniform magnetic field and the magnetic field gradient. The effects of the external magnetic field strength and its orientation on the thermal behaviors of the magnetic fluids are analyzed. The experimental results show that the external magnetic field is a vital factor that affects the convective heat transfer performances of the magnetic fluids and the control of heat transfer processes of a magnetic fluid flow can be possible by applying an external magnetic field. (author)

  20. Printing biological solutions through laser-induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duocastella, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Domínguez, J.; Serra, P.; Morenza, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique adequate for the high-resolution printing of a wide range of materials, including biological molecules. In this article, the preparation through LIFT of microarrays of droplets from a solution containing rabbit antibody immunoglobulin G (IgG) is presented. The microarrays were prepared at different laser pulse energy conditions, obtaining microdroplets with a circular and well-defined contour. The transfer process has a double threshold: a minimum energy density required to generate an impulsion on the liquid film, and a minimum pulse energy, which corresponds to the onset for material ejection. In addition, it was demonstrated that the transfer process can be correctly described through a simple model which relates the energy density threshold with the amount of released material. Finally, a fluorescence assay was carried out in which the preservation of the activity of the transferred biomolecules was demonstrated.

  1. Laser transfer of diamond nanopowder induced by metal film blistering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Alloncle, P.; Konov, V. I.; Sentis, M.

    2009-03-01

    Blister-based laser induced forward transfer (BB-LIFT) is a promising technique to produce surface microstructures of various advanced materials including inorganic and organic micro/nanopowders, suspensions and biological micro-objects embedded in life sustaining medium. The transferred material is spread over a thin metal film irradiated from the far side by single laser pulses through a transparent support. Interaction of the laser pulse with the metal-support interface under optimized conditions causes formation of a quickly expanding blister. Fast movement of the free metal surface provides efficient material transfer, which has been investigated for the case of diamond nanopowder and diamond-containing suspension. The unique features of the given technique are universality, simplicity and efficient isolation of the transferred material from the ablation products and laser heating.

  2. ac current generation in chiral magnetic insulators and Skyrmion motion induced by the spin Seebeck effect.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Batista, Cristian D; Reichhardt, Charles; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-05-09

    We show that a temperature gradient induces an ac electric current in multiferroic insulators when the sample is embedded in a circuit. We also show that a thermal gradient can be used to move magnetic Skyrmions in insulating chiral magnets: the induced magnon flow from the hot to the cold region drives the Skyrmions in the opposite direction via a magnonic spin transfer torque. Both results are combined to compute the effect of Skyrmion motion on the ac current generation and demonstrate that Skyrmions in insulators are a promising route for spin caloritronics applications.

  3. Magnetic Vortex Induced by Nonmagnetic Impurity in Frustrated Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Hayami, Satoru; Batista, Cristian D.

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of a nonmagnetic impurity inserted in a two-dimensional frustrated ferromagnet above its saturation magnetic field Hsat for arbitrary spin S . We demonstrate that the ground state includes a magnetic vortex that is nucleated around the impurity over a finite range of magnetic field Hsat≤H ≤HsatI. Upon approaching the quantum critical point at H =Hsat, the radius of the magnetic vortex diverges as the magnetic correlation length: ξ ∝1 /√{H -Hsat }. These results are derived both for the lattice and in the continuum limit.

  4. Evaluation of diamagnetic nanofluid ability to heat transfer in the strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roszko, A.; Fornalik-Wajs, E.

    2016-09-01

    The main goal of this paper was to analyze the strong magnetic field influence on the diamagnetic fluids. The experimental analysis of thermo-magnetic convection of silver nanofluid and distilled water were presented. The effect of various magnetic induction values and various temperature differences on the transport processes were checked. Estimation of the heat transfer was able due to the thermoelement signal analysis. The results revealed changes in the convection due to the nanoparticles addition in some ranges stronger, in other weaker, under applied conditions. It was proven, that heat transfer of diamagnetic fluid (single and two- phase) could be influenced by the strong magnetic field application.

  5. Rapid laser induced energy transfer in atomic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies of the rapid transfer of stored populations from metastable states to selected target states of a different species are reported. Both laser-induced or laser-switched collision and laser-induced two-photon spontaneous emission are described. It is shown that the laser-induced collision method is particularly useful in the visible and UV spectral regions. It has applications in photochemistry, gas-phase kinetics, and in high-power, high-energy gas-phase lasers. The anti-Stokes source is useful in the VUV and soft X-ray spectral regions.

  6. Heat transfer enhancement with actuation of magnetic nanoparticles suspended in a base fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şeşen, Muhsincan; Tekşen, Yiǧit; Şendur, Kürşat; Pınar Mengüç, M.; Öztürk, Hande; Yaǧcı Acar, H. F.; Koşar, Ali

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we have experimentally demonstrated that heat transfer can be substantially increased by actuating magnetic nanoparticles inside a nanofluid. In order to materialize this, we have utilized a miniature heat transfer enhancement system based on the actuation of magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a base fluid (water). This compact system consists of a pool filled with a nanofluid containing ferromagnetic nanoparticles, a heater, and two magnetic stirrers. The ferromagnetic particles within the pool were actuated with the magnetic stirrers. Single-phase heat transfer characteristics of the system were investigated at various fixed heat fluxes and were compared to those of stationary nanofluid (without magnetic stirring). The heat transfer enhancement realized by the circulation of ferromagnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a nanofluid was studied using the experimental setup. The temperatures were recorded from the readings of thin thermocouples, which were integrated to the heater surface. The surface temperatures were monitored against the input heat flux and data were processed to compare the heat transfer results of the configuration with magnetic stirrers to the heat transfer of the configuration without the magnetic stirrers.

  7. Quench of superconducting magnet induced by mechanical disturbance using impact hammer

    SciTech Connect

    Ninomiya, A.; Inada, T.; Akiba, K.; Kanda, Y.; Uriu, Y.; Ishigohka, T.

    1996-07-01

    In an epoxy-impregnated superconducting magnet, triggers of quench are considered to be conductor motion or epoxy cracking which succeed the temperature rise of the conductor induced by friction between conductor and epoxy or conductor and conductor. A more direct method which makes a quench would be hitting the magnet with mechanical hammer. To the authors` knowledge, there are very few papers which treat this type of quench. So they have carried out a quench experiment triggered by mechanical impact induced by dropping a weight. They have investigated the relation between magnitude of the mechanical disturbance and the behavior of the superconducting magnet. They have also investigated the relation between the impact energy and the structural change of superconducting magnet using an ultrasonic transfer function which they have already proposed as a quench detection method.

  8. An abnormal periventricular magnetization transfer ratio gradient occurs early in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, J William L; Pardini, Matteo; Brownlee, Wallace J; Fernando, Kryshani; Samson, Rebecca S; Prados Carrasco, Ferran; Ourselin, Sebastien; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Miller, David H; Chard, Declan T

    2017-02-01

    In established multiple sclerosis, tissue abnormality-as assessed using magnetization transfer ratio-increases close to the lateral ventricles. We aimed to determine whether or not (i) these changes are present from the earliest clinical stages of multiple sclerosis; (ii) they occur independent of white matter lesions; and (iii) they are associated with subsequent conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis and disability. Seventy-one subjects had MRI scanning a median of 4.6 months after a clinically isolated optic neuritis (49 females, mean age 33.5 years) and were followed up clinically 2 and 5 years later. Thirty-seven healthy controls (25 females, mean age 34.4 years) were also scanned. In normal-appearing white matter, magnetization transfer ratio gradients were measured 1-5 mm and 6-10 mm from the lateral ventricles. In control subjects, magnetization transfer ratio was highest adjacent to the ventricles and decreased with distance from them; in optic neuritis, normal-appearing white matter magnetization transfer ratio was lowest adjacent to the ventricles, increased over the first 5 mm, and then paralleled control values. The magnetization transfer ratio gradient over 1-5 mm differed significantly between the optic neuritis and control groups [+0.059 percentage units/mm (pu/mm) versus -0.033 pu/mm, P = 0.010], and was significantly steeper in those developing clinically definite multiple sclerosis within 2 years compared to those who did not (0.132 pu/mm versus 0.016 pu/mm, P = 0.020). In multivariate binary logistic regression the magnetization transfer ratio gradient was independently associated with the development of clinically definite multiple sclerosis within 2 years (magnetization transfer ratio gradient odds ratio 61.708, P = 0.023; presence of T2 lesions odds ratio 8.500, P = 0.071). At 5 years, lesional measures overtook magnetization transfer ratio gradients as significant predictors of conversion to multiple sclerosis. The

  9. Laser-induced ultrafast demagnetization in the presence of a nanoscale magnetic domain network.

    PubMed

    Vodungbo, Boris; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Sardinha, Anna Barszczak; Lozano, Magali; Sebban, Stéphane; Ducousso, Mathieu; Boutu, Willem; Li, Kaigong; Tudu, Bharati; Tortarolo, Marina; Hawaldar, Ranjit; Delaunay, Renaud; López-Flores, Victor; Arabski, Jacek; Boeglin, Christine; Merdji, Hamed; Zeitoun, Philippe; Lüning, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Femtosecond magnetization phenomena have been challenging our understanding for over a decade. Most experiments have relied on infrared femtosecond lasers, limiting the spatial resolution to a few micrometres. With the advent of femtosecond X-ray sources, nanometric resolution can now be reached, which matches key length scales in femtomagnetism such as the travelling length of excited 'hot' electrons on a femtosecond timescale. Here we study laser-induced ultrafast demagnetization in [Co/Pd](30) multilayer films, which, for the first time, achieves a spatial resolution better than 100 nm by using femtosecond soft X-ray pulses. This allows us to follow the femtosecond demagnetization process in a magnetic system consisting of alternating nanometric domains of opposite magnetization. No modification of the magnetic structure is observed, but, in comparison with uniformly magnetized systems of similar composition, we find a significantly faster demagnetization time. We argue that this may be caused by direct transfer of spin angular momentum between neighbouring domains.

  10. Dynamo magnetic field-induced angular momentum transport in protostellar nebulae - The 'minimum mass' protosolar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Levy, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic torques can produce angular momentum redistribution in protostellar nebulas. Dynamo magnetic fields can be generated in differentially rotating and turbulent nebulas and can be the source of magnetic torques that transfer angular momentum from a protostar to a disk, as well as redistribute angular momentum within a disk. A magnetic field strength of 100-1000 G is needed to transport the major part of a protostar's angular momentum into a surrounding disk in a time characteristic of star formation, thus allowing formation of a solar-system size protoplanetary nebula in the usual 'minimum-mass' model of the protosolar nebula. This paper examines the possibility that a dynamo magnetic field could have induced the needed angular momentum transport from the proto-Sun to the protoplanetary nebula.

  11. Voltage-controlled magnetization switching in MRAMs in conjunction with spin-transfer torque and applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munira, Kamaram; Pandey, Sumeet C.; Kula, Witold; Sandhu, Gurtej S.

    2016-11-01

    Voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect has attracted a significant amount of attention in recent years because of its low cell power consumption during the anisotropy modulation of a thin ferromagnetic film. However, the applied voltage or electric field alone is not enough to completely and reliably reverse the magnetization of the free layer of a magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cell from anti-parallel to parallel configuration or vice versa. An additional symmetry-breaking mechanism needs to be employed to ensure the deterministic writing process. Combinations of voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy together with spin-transfer torque (STT) and with an applied magnetic field (Happ) were evaluated for switching reliability, time taken to switch with low error rate, and energy consumption during the switching process. In order to get a low write error rate in the MRAM cell with VCMA switching mechanism, a spin-transfer torque current or an applied magnetic field comparable to the critical current and field of the free layer is necessary. In the hybrid processes, the VCMA effect lowers the duration during which the higher power hungry secondary mechanism is in place. Therefore, the total energy consumed during the hybrid writing processes, VCMA + STT or VCMA + Happ, is less than the energy consumed during pure spin-transfer torque or applied magnetic field switching.

  12. Thermomagnonic spin transfer and Peltier effects in insulating magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Alexey A.; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2012-03-01

    We study the coupled magnon energy transport and collective magnetization dynamics in ferromagnets with magnetic textures. By constructing a phenomenological theory based on irreversible thermodynamics, we describe the motion of domain walls by thermal gradients and the generation of heat flows by magnetization dynamics. From a microscopic description based on magnon kinetics, we estimate the transport coefficients and analyze the feasibility of energy-related applications in insulating ferromagnets, such as yttrium iron garnet and europium oxide.

  13. In-plane magnetization-induced quantum anomalous Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Hsu, Hsiu-Chuan; Liu, Chao-Xing

    2013-08-23

    The quantum Hall effect can only be induced by an out-of-plane magnetic field for two-dimensional electron gases, and similarly, the quantum anomalous Hall effect has also usually been considered for systems with only out-of-plane magnetization. In the present work, we predict that the quantum anomalous Hall effect can be induced by in-plane magnetization that is not accompanied by any out-of-plane magnetic field. Two realistic two-dimensional systems, Bi2Te3 thin film with magnetic doping and HgMnTe quantum wells with shear strains, are presented and the general condition for the in-plane magnetization-induced quantum anomalous Hall effect is discussed based on the symmetry analysis. Nonetheless, an experimental setup is proposed to confirm this effect, the observation of which will pave the way to search for the quantum anomalous Hall effect in a wider range of materials.

  14. The dynamic transfer function for a cavitating inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennen, C.; Acosta, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Knowledge of the dynamic performance of pumps is essential for the prediction of transient behavior and instabilities in hydraulic systems; the necessary information is in the form of a transfer function which relates the instantaneous or fluctuating pressure and mass flow rate at inlet to the same quantities in the discharge from the pump. The presence of cavitation within the pump can have a major effect on this transfer function since dynamical changes in the volume of cavitation contribute to the difference in the instantaneous inlet and discharge mass flow rates. The present paper utilizes results from free streamline cascade theory to evaluate the elements in the transfer function for a cavitating inducer and shows that the numerical results are consistent with the characteristics observed in some dynamic tests on rocket engine turbopumps.

  15. Optomechanically induced stochastic resonance and chaos transfer between optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monifi, Faraz; Zhang, Jing; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Peng, Bo; Liu, Yu-Xi; Bo, Fang; Nori, Franco; Yang, Lan

    2016-06-01

    Chaotic dynamics has been reported in many physical systems and has affected almost every field of science. Chaos involves hypersensitivity to the initial conditions of a system and introduces unpredictability into its output. Thus, it is often unwanted. Interestingly, the very same features make chaos a powerful tool to suppress decoherence, achieve secure communication and replace background noise in stochastic resonance—a counterintuitive concept that a system's ability to transfer information can be coherently amplified by adding noise. Here, we report the first demonstration of chaos-induced stochastic resonance in an optomechanical system, as well as the optomechanically mediated chaos transfer between two optical fields such that they follow the same route to chaos. These results will contribute to the understanding of nonlinear phenomena and chaos in optomechanical systems, and may find applications in the chaotic transfer of information and for improving the detection of otherwise undetectable signals in optomechanical systems.

  16. Floating and flying ferrofluid bridges induced by external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rongchao; Zhou, Yixin; Liu, Jing

    2015-04-01

    A ferrofluid is a mixture that exhibits both magnetism and fluidity. This merit enables the ferrofluid to be used in a wide variety of areas. Here we show that a floating ferrofluid bridge can be induced between two separated boards under a balanced external magnetic field generated by two magnets, while a flying ferrofluid bridge can be induced under an unbalanced external magnetic field generated by only one magnet. The mechanisms of the ferrofluid bridges were discussed and the corresponding mathematical equations were also established to describe the interacting magnetic force between the ferro particles inside the ferrofluid. This work answered a basic question that, except for the well-known floating water bridges that are related to electricity, one can also build up a liquid bridge that is related to magnetism.

  17. Low Reynolds number flow's heat transfer influenced by strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleskacz, L.; Fornalik-Wajs, E.

    2016-09-01

    For the last 20 years research concerning the strong magnetic field influence on the weakly magnetic substances has been dynamically developing. The published papers refer mainly to natural convection problems connected with the impact of strong magnetic field. This paper follows previous Authors’ approach to forced convection modification by the additional magnetic force. Presently, attention was paid to the heat transfer processes and their quality assessment done in the basis of Nusselt number for low Reynolds number flow. The analysis was done for the geometry from Graetz-Brinkman problem with the magnetic coil located at the position of adiabatic-thermal boundary condition change. The numerical analysis was performed with Ansys software and application of the user-defined functions. Presented results revealed the influence of magnetic field on the flow structure and heat transfer.

  18. Bi-directional magnetic resonance based wireless power transfer for electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Durga P.; Nayak, Praveen P.; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan; Mishra, Debasish

    2015-09-28

    In order to power or charge electronic devices wirelessly, a bi-directional wireless power transfer method has been proposed and experimentally investigated. In the proposed design, two receiving coils are used on both sides of a transmitting coil along its central axis to receive the power wirelessly from the generated magnetic fields through strongly coupled magnetic resonance. It has been observed experimentally that the maximum power transfer occurs at the operating resonant frequency for optimum electric load connected across the receiving coils on both side. The optimum wireless power transfer efficiency is 88% for the bi-directional power transfer technique compared 84% in the one side receiver system. By adopting the developed bi-directional power transfer method, two electronic devices can be powered up or charged simultaneously instead of a single device through usual one side receiver system without affecting the optimum power transfer efficiency.

  19. Magnetic Silica-Supported Ruthenium Nanoparticles: An Efficient Catalyst for Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    One-pot synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles on magnetic silica is described which involve the in situ generation of magnetic silica (Fe3O4@ SiO2) and ruthenium nano particles immobilization; the hydration of nitriles and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds occurs in hi...

  20. Skyrmion-number dependence of spin-transfer torque on magnetic bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Yuta; Sinova, Jairo

    2016-12-01

    We theoretically study the skyrmion-number dependence of spin-transfer torque acting on magnetic bubbles. The skymrion number of magnetic bubbles can take any integer value depending on the magnetic profile on its circumference and the size of the bubble. We find that the transverse motion of a bubble with respect to the charge current is greatly suppressed as the absolute value of the skyrmion number departs from unity, whereas the longitudinal motion is less sensitive.

  1. Morphology-induced defects enhance lipid transfer rates

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, Yan; Charubin, Kamil; Marquardt, Drew; ...

    2016-08-25

    Molecular transfer between nanoparticles has been considered to have important implications regarding nanoparticle stability. Recently, the interparticle spontaneous lipid transfer rate constant for discoidal bicelles was found to be very different from spherical, unilamellar vesicles (ULVs). Here, we investigate the mechanism responsible for this discrepancy. Analysis of the data indicates that lipid transfer is entropically favorable, but enthalpically unfavorable with an activation energy that is independent of bicelle size and long- to short-chain lipid molar ratio. Moreover, molecular dynamics simulations reveal a lower lipid dissociation energy cost in the vicinity of interfaces (“defects”) induced by the segregation of the long-more » and short-chain lipids in bicelles; these defects are not present in ULVs. Taken together, these results suggest that the enhanced lipid transfer observed in bicelles arises from interfacial defects as a result of the hydrophobic mismatch between the long- and short-chain lipid species. In conclusion, the observed lipid transfer rate is found to be independent of nanoparticle stability.« less

  2. Morphology-induced defects enhance lipid transfer rates

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yan; Charubin, Kamil; Marquardt, Drew; Heberle, Frederick A.; Katsaras, John; Tian, Jianhui; Cheng, Xiaolin; Liu, Ying; Nieh, Mu -Ping

    2016-08-25

    Molecular transfer between nanoparticles has been considered to have important implications regarding nanoparticle stability. Recently, the interparticle spontaneous lipid transfer rate constant for discoidal bicelles was found to be very different from spherical, unilamellar vesicles (ULVs). Here, we investigate the mechanism responsible for this discrepancy. Analysis of the data indicates that lipid transfer is entropically favorable, but enthalpically unfavorable with an activation energy that is independent of bicelle size and long- to short-chain lipid molar ratio. Moreover, molecular dynamics simulations reveal a lower lipid dissociation energy cost in the vicinity of interfaces (“defects”) induced by the segregation of the long- and short-chain lipids in bicelles; these defects are not present in ULVs. Taken together, these results suggest that the enhanced lipid transfer observed in bicelles arises from interfacial defects as a result of the hydrophobic mismatch between the long- and short-chain lipid species. In conclusion, the observed lipid transfer rate is found to be independent of nanoparticle stability.

  3. Spin-transfer torque and specific features of magnetic-state switching in vacuum tunnel nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Demin, G. D. Popkov, A. F.; Dyuzhev, N. A.

    2015-12-15

    The specific features of spin-transfer torque in vacuum tunnel structures with magnetic electrodes are investigated using the quasi-classical Sommerfeld model of electron conductivity, which takes into account the exchange splitting of the spin energy subbands of free electrons. Using the calculated voltage dependences of the transferred torques for a tunnel structure with cobalt electrodes and noncollinear magnetic moments in the electrodes, diagrams of stable spin states on the current–field parameter plane in the in-plane geometry of the initial magnetization are obtained.

  4. Magnetism in graphene oxide induced by epoxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dongwook; Seo, Jiwon; Zhu, Xi; Su, Haibin; Cole, Jacqueline M.

    2015-04-27

    We have engineered magnetism in graphene oxide. Our approach transforms graphene into a magnetic insulator while maintaining graphene's structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra reveal that graphene oxide has various chemical groups (including epoxy, ketone, hydroxyl, and C-O groups) on its surface. Destroying the epoxy group with heat treatment or chemical treatment diminishes magnetism in the material. Local density approximation calculation results well reproduce the magnetic moments obtained from experiments, and these results indicate that the unpaired spin induced by the presence of epoxy groups is the origin of the magnetism. The calculation results also explain the magnetic properties, which are generated by the interaction between separated magnetic regions and domains. Our results demonstrate tunable magnetism in graphene oxide based on controlling the epoxy group with heat or chemical treatment.

  5. Defect-induced magnetism in graphite through neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yutian; Pochet, Pascal; Jenkins, Catherine A.; Arenholz, Elke; Bukalis, Gregor; Gemming, Sibylle; Helm, Manfred; Zhou, Shengqiang

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated the variation in the magnetization of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) after neutron irradiation, which introduces defects in the bulk sample and consequently gives rise to a large magnetic signal. We observe strong paramagnetism in HOPG, increasing with the neutron fluence. The induced paramagnetism can be well correlated with structural defects by comparison with density-functional theory calculations. In addition to the in-plane vacancies, the transplanar defects also contribute to the magnetization. The lack of any magnetic order between the local moments is possibly due to the absence of hydrogen/nitrogen chemisorption, or the magnetic order cannot be established at all in the bulk form.

  6. Fuel-free locomotion of Janus motors: magnetically induced thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Baraban, Larysa; Streubel, Robert; Makarov, Denys; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Dmitriy; Schmidt, Oliver G; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2013-02-26

    We present fuel-free locomotion of magnetic spherical Janus motors driven by magnetically induced thermophoresis--a self-diffusive propulsion of an object in any liquid media due to a local temperature gradient. Within this approach an ac magnetic field is applied to induce thermophoretic motion of the objects via heating a magnetic cap of the particles, while an additional dc magnetic field is used to orient Janus motors and guide their motion on a long time scale. Full control over the motion is achieved due to specific properties of ultrathin 100-nm-thick Permalloy (Py, Fe₁₉Ni₈₁ alloys) magnetic films resulting in a topologically stable magnetic vortex state in the cap structure of Janus motors. Realized here magnetically induced thermophoretic locomotion does not require catalytic chemical reactions that imply toxic reagents. In this respect, we addressed and successfully solved one of the main shortcomings in the field of artificial motors, namely being fully controlled and remain biocompatible. Therefore, our approach is attractive for biotechnological in vitro assays and even in vivo operations, since the functioning of Janus motors offers low toxicity; it is not dependent on the presence of the fuel molecules in solution. Furthermore, the suggested magnetic ac excitation is superior compared to the previously proposed optically induced heating using lasers as it does not require transparent packaging.

  7. Noninvasive amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating the grading and cellularity of gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Kong, Lingfei; Wang, Lifu; Zuo, Panli; Vallines, Ignacio; Schmitt, Benjamin; Tian, Jie; Song, Xiaolei; Zhou, Jinyuan; Wang, Meiyun

    2017-01-01

    Using noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging techniques to accurately evaluate the grading and cellularity of gliomas is beneficial for improving the patient outcomes. Amide proton transfer imaging is a noninvasive molecular magnetic resonance imaging technique based on chemical exchange saturation transfer mechanism that detects endogenous mobile proteins and peptides in biological tissues. Between August 2012 and November 2015, a total number of 44 patients with pathologically proven gliomas were included in this study. We compared the capability of amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging with that of noninvasive diffusion-weighted imaging and noninvasive 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin imaging in evaluating the grading and cellularity of gliomas. Our results reveal that amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging is a superior imaging technique to diffusion-weighted imaging and 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin imaging in the grading of gliomas. In addition, our results showed that the Ki-67 index correlated better with the amide proton transfer-weighted signal intensity than with the apparent diffusion coefficient value or the cerebral blood flow value in the gliomas. Amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging is a promising method for predicting the grading and cellularity of gliomas. PMID:27992380

  8. Noninvasive amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating the grading and cellularity of gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Lin, Yusong; Zhang, Wei; Kong, Lingfei; Wang, Lifu; Zuo, Panli; Vallines, Ignacio; Schmitt, Benjamin; Tian, Jie; Song, Xiaolei; Zhou, Jinyuan; Wang, Meiyun

    2017-01-24

    Using noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging techniques to accurately evaluate the grading and cellularity of gliomas is beneficial for improving the patient outcomes. Amide proton transfer imaging is a noninvasive molecular magnetic resonance imaging technique based on chemical exchange saturation transfer mechanism that detects endogenous mobile proteins and peptides in biological tissues. Between August 2012 and November 2015, a total number of 44 patients with pathologically proven gliomas were included in this study. We compared the capability of amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging with that of noninvasive diffusion-weighted imaging and noninvasive 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin imaging in evaluating the grading and cellularity of gliomas. Our results reveal that amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging is a superior imaging technique to diffusion-weighted imaging and 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin imaging in the grading of gliomas. In addition, our results showed that the Ki-67 index correlated better with the amide proton transfer-weighted signal intensity than with the apparent diffusion coefficient value or the cerebral blood flow value in the gliomas. Amide proton transfer magnetic resonance imaging is a promising method for predicting the grading and cellularity of gliomas.

  9. Heat Transfer Affected by Transverse Magnetic Field using 3D Modeling of Arc Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Tatsuro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-10-01

    Gas shielded metal arc welding is used to join the various metal because this is the high quality joining technology. Thus, this welding is used for a welding of large buildings such as bridges and LNG tanks. However, the welding defect caused by the heat transfer decrement may occur with increasing the wind velocity. This is because that the convection loss increases because the arc deflects to leeward side with increasing the wind velocity. In order to prevent from the arc deflection, it is used that the transverse magnetic field is applied to the arc. However, the arc deflection occurs with increasing the transverse magnetic field excessively. The energy balance of the arc is changed with increasing the convection loss caused by the arc deflection, and the heat transfer to the anode decreases. Therefore, the analysis including the arc and anode is necessary to elucidate the heat transfer to the anode. In this paper, the heat transfer affected by the transverse magnetic field using 3D modeling of the arc plasma is elucidated. The heat transfer to the anode is calculated by using the EMTF(electromagnetic thermal fluid) simulation with increasing the transverse magnetic field. As a result, the heat transfer decreased with increasing the transverse magnetic field.

  10. Enhancing the spin transfer torque in magnetic tunnel junctions by ac modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaobin; Zhou, Chenyi; Zhang, Zhaohui; Chen, Jingzhe; Zheng, Xiaohong; Zhang, Lei; Hu, Can-Ming; Guo, Hong

    2017-03-01

    The phenomenon of spin transfer torque (STT) has attracted a great deal of interest due to its promising prospects in practical spintronic devices. In this paper, we report a theoretical investigation of STT in a noncollinear magnetic tunnel junction under ac modulation based on the nonequilibrium Green's-function formalism, and we derive a closed formulation for predicting the time-averaged STT. Using this formulation, the ac STT of a carbon-nanotube-based magnetic tunnel junction is analyzed. Under ac modulation, the low-bias linear (quadratic) dependence of the in-plane (out-of-plane) torque on bias still holds, and the sinθ dependence on the noncollinear angle is maintained. By photon-assisted tunneling, the bias-induced components of the in-plane and out-of-plane torques can be enhanced significantly, about 12 and 75 times, respectively. Our analysis reveals the condition for achieving optimized STT enhancement and suggests that ac modulation is a very effective way for electrical manipulation of STT.

  11. Radiative heat transfer in many-body systems: Coupled electric and magnetic dipole approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jian; Zhao, Junming; Liu, Linhua

    2017-03-01

    The many-body radiative heat transfer theory [P. Ben-Abdallah, S.-A. Biehs, and K. Joulain, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 114301 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.114301] considered only the contribution from the electric dipole moment. For metal particles, however, the magnetic dipole moment due to eddy current plays an important role, which can further couple with the electric dipole moment to introduce crossed terms. In this paper, we develop the coupled electric and magnetic dipole (CEMD) approach for the radiative heat transfer in a collection of objects in mutual interaction. Due to the coupled electric and magnetic interactions, four terms, namely the electric-electric, the electric-magnetic, the magnetic-electric, and the magnetic-magnetic terms, contribute to the radiative heat flux and the local energy density. The CEMD is applied to study the radiative heat transfer between various dimers of nanoparticles. It is found that each of the four terms can dominate the radiative heat transfer depending on the position and composition of particles. Moreover, near-field many-body interactions are studied by CEMD considering both dielectric and metallic nanoparticles. The near-field radiative heat flux and local energy density can be greatly increased when the particles are in coupled resonances. Surface plasmon polariton and surface phonon polariton can be coupled to enhance the radiative heat flux.

  12. Magnetism induced by the organization of self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, I.; Leitus, G.; Naaman, R.; Reich, S.; Vager, Z.

    2003-06-01

    Unique occurrence of magnetism is shown, in which magnetism appears ex nihilo, when organic molecules are self-assembled as monolayers on gold substrate. The molecules as well as the substrate, when they stand alone, are diamagnetic. Using a superconducting quantum interference device type magnetometer we obtained direct evidence that close-packed organized thio-organic films adsorbed on gold substrates possess magnetic properties at room temperature. The films studied show very high specific magnetization, up to many tens Bohr magnetons per adsorbed molecule, with a very small hysteresis. It is highly anisotropic and shows almost no temperature dependence. The magnetism observed is related to charge transfer between the organic layer and the metal substrate. Yet, the uniqueness here is that many spins are polarized per adsorbed molecules. The magnetic effect is related to the two dimensional organization of the organic molecules on the metal substrate which might explain the high anisotropy.

  13. Fluctuation-induced shear flow and energy transfer in plasma interchange turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Sun, C. K.; Wang, X. Y.; Zhou, A.; Wang, X. G.; Ernst, D. R.

    2015-11-15

    Fluctuation-induced E × B shear flow and energy transfer for plasma interchange turbulence are examined in a flux-driven system with both closed and open magnetic field lines. The nonlinear evolution of interchange turbulence shows the presence of two confinement regimes characterized by low and high E × B flow shear. In the first regime, the large-scale turbulent convection is dominant and the mean E × B shear flow is at a relatively low level. By increasing the heat flux above a certain threshold, the increased turbulent intensity gives rise to the transfer of energy from fluctuations to mean E × B flows. As a result, a transition to the second regime occurs, in which a strong mean E × B shear flow is generated.

  14. Topology of magnetic flux ropes and formation of fossil flux transfer events and boundary layer plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Ma, Z. W.; Fu, Z. F.; Otto, A.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of fossil flux transfer events and the low-level boundary layer within the framework of multiple X-line reconnection is proposed. Attention is given to conditions for which the bulk of magnetic flux in a flux rope of finite extent has a simple magnetic topology, where the four possible connections of magnetic field lines are: IMF to MSP, MSP to IMF, IMF to IMF, and MSP to MSP. For a sufficient relative shift of the X lines, magnetic flux may enter a flux rope from the magnetosphere and exit into the magnetosphere. This process leads to the formation of magnetic flux ropes which contain a considerable amount of magnetosheath plasma on closed magnetospheric field lines. This process is discussed as a possible explanation for the formation of fossil flux transfer events in the magnetosphere and the formation of the low-latitude boundary layer.

  15. Photo-induced Spin Angular Momentum Transfer into Antiferromagnetic Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fan; Fan, Yichun; Ma, Xin; Zhu, J.; Li, Q.; Ma, T. P.; Wu, Y. Z.; Chen, Z. H.; Zhao, H. B.; Luepke, Gunter; College of William and Mary Team; Department of Physics, Fudan University Team; Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University Team

    2014-03-01

    Spin angular momentum transfer into antiferromagnetic(AFM) insulator is observed in single crystalline Fe/CoO/MgO(001) heterostructure by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TR-MOKE). The transfer process is mediated by the Heisenberg exchange coupling between Fe and CoO spins. Below the Neel temperature(TN) of CoO, the fact that effective Gilbert damping parameter α is independent of external magnetic field and it is enhanced with respect to the intrinsic damping in Fe/MgO, indicates that the damping process involves both the intrinsic spin relaxation and the transfer of Fe spin angular momentum to CoO spins via FM-AFM exchange coupling and then into the lattice by spin-orbit coupling. The work at the College of William and Mary was sponsored by the Office of Naval Research. The work at Department of Physics, Fudan, was supported by NSFC. The work at Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan was supported by NSFC and NCET.

  16. A Study of Thermocurrent Induced Magnetic Fields in ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Anthony C.; Cooley, Victoria

    2014-03-31

    The case of axisymmetric ILC-type cavities with titanium helium vessels is investigated. A first-order estimate for magnetic field within the SRF current layer is presented. The induced magnetic field is found to be not more than 1.4x10-8 Tesla = 0.14 milligauss for the case of axial symmetry. Magnetic fields due to symmetry breaking effects are discussed.

  17. Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, Frances

    1998-10-03

    OAK B204 Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films. The work in the past 6 months has involved three areas of magnetic thin films: (1) amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys, (2) epitaxial Co-Pt and hTi-Pt alloy thin films, and (3) collaborative work on heat capacity measurements of magnetic thin films, including nanoparticles and CMR materials.

  18. Quantized spin-momentum transfer in atom-sized magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loth, Sebastian

    2010-03-01

    Our ability to quickly access the vast amounts of information linked in the internet is owed to the miniaturization of magnetic data storage. In modern disk drives the tunnel magnetoresistance effect (TMR) serves as sensitive reading mechanism for the nanoscopic magnetic bits [1]. At its core lies the ability to control the flow of electrons with a material's magnetization. The inverse effect, spin transfer torque (STT), allows one to influence a magnetic layer by high current densities of spin-polarized electrons and carries high hopes for applications in non-volatile magnetic memory [2]. We show that equivalent processes are active in quantum spin systems. We use a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating at low temperature and high magnetic field to address individual magnetic structures and probe their spin excitations by inelastic electron tunneling [3]. As model system we investigate transition metal atoms adsorbed to a copper nitride layer grown on a Cu crystal. The magnetic atoms on the surface possess well-defined spin states [4]. Transfer of one magnetic atom to the STM tip's apex creates spin-polarization in the probe tip. The combination of functionalized tip and surface adsorbed atom resembles a TMR structure where the magnetic layers now consist of one magnetic atom each. Spin-polarized current emitted from the probe tip not only senses the magnetic orientation of the atomic spin system, it efficiently transfers spin angular momentum and pumps the quantum spin system between the different spin states. This enables further exploration of the microscopic mechanisms for spin-relaxation and stability of quantum spin systems. [4pt] [1] Zhu and Park, Mater. Today 9, 36 (2006).[0pt] [2] Huai, AAPPS Bulletin 18, 33 (2008).[0pt] [3] Heinrich et al., Science 306, 466 (2004).[0pt] [4] Hirjibehedin et al., Science 317, 1199 (2007).

  19. Evidence of convective heat transfer enhancement induced by spinodal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Poesio, P; Lezzi, A M; Beretta, G P

    2007-06-01

    Spinodal decomposition can be driven by either diffusion or self-induced convection; the importance of convection relative to diffusion depends on the Péclet number, defined as the ratio between convective and diffusive mass fluxes. Diffusion is the dominating mechanism of phase segregation when the Péclet number is small - i.e., when viscosity and diffusivity are large - or when the domain characteristic size is small. For low-viscosity mixtures, convection is the dominating process and the segregation is very rapid as it takes a few seconds compared to the hours needed in the case of pure diffusion. In such cases, strong convective motion of the phase segregating domains is generated even in small-size systems and is almost independent of the temperature difference as long as it is below the transition value. We study experimentally the enhancement of heat transfer in a 1-mm -thick cell. A water-acetonitrile-toulene mixture is quenched into a two-phase region so as to induce convection-driven spinodal decomposition. The heat transfer rate is measured and compared to that obtained in the absence of convective motion. A substantial reduction in the cooling time obtains in the case of spinodal decomposition. The heat transfer enhancement induced by this self-induced, disordered but effectively convective effect may be exploited in the cooling or heating of small-scale systems whereby forced convection cannot be achieved because of the small sizes involved. A scaling analysis of the data based on the diffuse interface H model for a symmetric mixture near the equilibrium point yields very encouraging agreement and insights.

  20. Immediate transfer of synesthesia to a novel inducer.

    PubMed

    Mroczko, Aleksandra; Metzinger, Thomas; Singer, Wolf; Nikolić, Danko

    2009-11-30

    In synesthesia, a certain stimulus (e.g. grapheme) is associated automatically and consistently with a stable perceptual-like experience (e.g. color). These associations are acquired in early childhood and remain robust throughout the lifetime. Synesthetic associations can transfer to novel inducers in adulthood as one learns a second language that uses another writing system. However, it is not known how long this transfer takes. We found that grapheme-color associations can transfer to novel graphemes after only a 10-minute writing exercise. Most subjects experienced synesthetic associations immediately after learning a new Glagolitic grapheme. Using a Stroop task, we provide objective evidence for the creation of novel associations between the newly learned graphemes and synesthetic colors. Also, these associations generalized to graphemes handwritten by another person. The fast learning process and the generalization suggest that synesthesia begins at the semantic level of representation with the activation of a certain concept (the inducer), which then, uniquely for the synesthetes, activates representations at the perceptual level (the concurrent). Thus, the results imply that synesthesia is a much more flexible and plastic phenomenon than has been believed until now.

  1. Magnetization switching in a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction by combining spin-transfer torque and electric field-effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, S.; Nakatani, Y.; Yamanouchi, M.; Ikeda, S.; Sato, H.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-26

    We propose and demonstrate a scheme for magnetization switching in magnetic tunnel junctions, in which two successive voltage pulses are applied to utilize both spin-transfer torque and electric field effect. Under this switching scheme, a CoFeB/MgO magnetic tunnel junction with perpendicular magnetic easy axis is shown to switch faster than by spin-transfer torque alone and more reliably than that by electric fields alone.

  2. Laser-induced forward transfer of hybrid carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Filipescu, M.; Vizireanu, S.; Vogt, L.; Antohe, S.; Dinescu, M.; Wokaun, A.; Lippert, T.

    2016-06-01

    Chemically functionalized carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are promising materials for a wide range of applications, i.e. gas sensors, membranes for fuel cells, or as supports for catalysts. However, the difficulty of manipulation of these materials hinders their integration into devices. In this manuscript a procedure for rapid prototyping of CNWs and functionalized CNWs (i.e. decorated with SnO2 nanoparticles) is described. This procedure enables the use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) as a powerful technique for printing CNWs and CNW:SnO2 pixels onto rigid and flexible substrates. A morphological study shows that for a large range of laser fluences i.e. 500-700 mJ/cm2 it is possible to transfer thick (4 μm) CNW and CNW:SnO2 pixels. Micro-Raman investigation of the transferred pixels reveals that the chemical composition of the CNWs and functionalized CNWs does not change as a result of the laser transfer. Following these results one can envision that CNWs and CNW:SnO2 pixels obtained by LIFT can be ultimately applied in technological applications.

  3. Laser-induced Forward Transfer of Ag Nanopaste.

    PubMed

    Breckenfeld, Eric; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C Y; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-03-31

    Over the past decade, there has been much development of non-lithographic methods(1-3) for printing metallic inks or other functional materials. Many of these processes such as inkjet(3) and laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT)(4) have become increasingly popular as interest in printable electronics and maskless patterning has grown. These additive manufacturing processes are inexpensive, environmentally friendly, and well suited for rapid prototyping, when compared to more traditional semiconductor processing techniques. While most direct-write processes are confined to two-dimensional structures and cannot handle materials with high viscosity (particularly inkjet), LIFT can transcend both constraints if performed properly. Congruent transfer of three dimensional pixels (called voxels), also referred to as laser decal transfer (LDT)(5-9), has recently been demonstrated with the LIFT technique using highly viscous Ag nanopastes to fabricate freestanding interconnects, complex voxel shapes, and high-aspect-ratio structures. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple yet versatile process for fabricating a variety of micro- and macroscale Ag structures. Structures include simple shapes for patterning electrical contacts, bridging and cantilever structures, high-aspect-ratio structures, and single-shot, large area transfers using a commercial digital micromirror device (DMD) chip.

  4. Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of congruent voxels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Beniam, Iyoel; Breckenfeld, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of functional materials offers unique advantages and capabilities for the rapid prototyping of electronic, optical and sensor elements. The use of LIFT for printing high viscosity metallic nano-inks and nano-pastes can be optimized for the transfer of voxels congruent with the shape of the laser pulse, forming thin film-like structures non-lithographically. These processes are capable of printing patterns with excellent lateral resolution and thickness uniformity typically found in 3-dimensional stacked assemblies, MEMS-like structures and free-standing interconnects. However, in order to achieve congruent voxel transfer with LIFT, the particle size and viscosity of the ink or paste suspensions must be adjusted to minimize variations due to wetting and drying effects. When LIFT is carried out with high-viscosity nano-suspensions, the printed voxel size and shape become controllable parameters, allowing the printing of thin-film like structures whose shape is determined by the spatial distribution of the laser pulse. The result is a new level of parallelization beyond current serial direct-write processes whereby the geometry of each printed voxel can be optimized according to the pattern design. This work shows how LIFT of congruent voxels can be applied to the fabrication of 2D and 3D microstructures by adjusting the viscosity of the nano-suspension and laser transfer parameters.

  5. Laser-induced Forward Transfer of Ag Nanopaste

    PubMed Central

    Breckenfeld, Eric; Kim, Heungsoo; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been much development of non-lithographic methods1-3 for printing metallic inks or other functional materials. Many of these processes such as inkjet3 and laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT)4 have become increasingly popular as interest in printable electronics and maskless patterning has grown. These additive manufacturing processes are inexpensive, environmentally friendly, and well suited for rapid prototyping, when compared to more traditional semiconductor processing techniques. While most direct-write processes are confined to two-dimensional structures and cannot handle materials with high viscosity (particularly inkjet), LIFT can transcend both constraints if performed properly. Congruent transfer of three dimensional pixels (called voxels), also referred to as laser decal transfer (LDT)5-9, has recently been demonstrated with the LIFT technique using highly viscous Ag nanopastes to fabricate freestanding interconnects, complex voxel shapes, and high-aspect-ratio structures. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple yet versatile process for fabricating a variety of micro- and macroscale Ag structures. Structures include simple shapes for patterning electrical contacts, bridging and cantilever structures, high-aspect-ratio structures, and single-shot, large area transfers using a commercial digital micromirror device (DMD) chip. PMID:27077645

  6. Reference layer exchange in spin transfer torque experiment using magnetic-coated nanometric point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, R. O.; Baptista, D. L.; Heinemann, M.; Kuhn, M. F.; Schmidt, J. E.; Pereira, L. G.

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the importance of using nanotips on a point contact spin-transfer torque (STT) experiment. A systematic analysis comparing the STT in a magnetic thin film in current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) geometry sample for magnetic coated and uncoated tungsten nanotips is shown. The STT effect presents a reverse resistance to current behavior when using a magnetic coating layer on the nanotips. We demonstrate that the magnetic layer on the tip may assume the role of a polarizer layer. This effect opens up the possibility of exploiting simpler architectures in STT-based devices, such as STT-random access memory (STT-RAM).

  7. Evaluation of the induced electric field and compliance procedure for a wireless power transfer system in an electrical vehicle.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2013-11-07

    In this study, an induced electric field in a human body is evaluated for the magnetic field leaked from a wireless power transfer system for charging an electrical vehicle. The magnetic field from the wireless power transfer system is modelled computationally, and its effectiveness is confirmed by comparison with the field measured in a previous study. The induced electric field in a human standing around the vehicle is smaller than the allowable limit prescribed in international guidelines, although the magnetic field strength in the human body is locally higher than the allowable external field strength. Correlation between the external magnetic field and the induced electric field is confirmed to be reasonable at least in the standing posture, which is the case discussed in the international standard. Based on this finding, we discussed and confirmed the applicability of a three-point magnetic field measurement at heights of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 m for safety compliance.

  8. Magnetic field influence on the transient photoresistivity of defect-induced magnetic ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, C.; Khalid, M.; Simonelli, G.; Villafuerte, M.; Heluani, S. P.; Esquinazi, P.

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic field dependent photoresistivity was measured at 280 K in ZnO ferromagnetic films grown on r-plane Al2O3 under a N2 atmosphere. A correlation between the negative magneto photoresistivity and the existence of defect-induced magnetic order was found. The effect of magnetic field on the transient photoresistivity is to slow down the recombination process enhancing the photocarriers density. The experimental results demonstrate the possibility of tuning photocarriers life time using magnetic field in diluted magnetic semiconductors.

  9. Light-induced dynamics in the Lorentz oscillator model with magnetic forces

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, W. M.; Rand, S. C.

    2010-07-15

    The classical Lorentz oscillator model of bound electron motion ordinarily excludes magnetic forces at nonrelativistic intensities for the simple reason that their magnitude is small. However, perturbative and numerical results show that when the v-vectorxB-vector term is retained, dynamically enhanced terms give rise to large amplitude, magnetically induced charge displacements at zero frequency and at twice the driving frequency in the Cartesian laboratory frame. Numerical simulations of electron motion are in accord with the predictions of perturbative theory for steady-state motion in the classical picture. Direct integration shows that magnetic response which is comparable to electric dipole response can arise in transparent dielectrics at optical frequencies. Parametric instability in the equations of motion is implicated as the source of rapid energy transfer from electric to magnetic motions by reduction of the equations to a complex Mathieu equation.

  10. Remanent and induced contributions of the Earth's magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervelidou, Foteini; Lesur, Vincent; Thébault, Erwan; Dyment, Jérôme; Holschneider, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Inverting the magnetic field of crustal origin for the magnetization distribution that generates it suffers from non-uniqueness. The reason for this is the so-called annihilators, i.e. structures that produce no visible magnetic field outside the sources. Gubbins et al., 2011 uses the complex vector Spherical Harmonics notation in order to separate the Vertical Integrated Magnetization (VIM) distribution into the parts that do and do not contribute to the magnetic field measured in source free regions. We use their formalism and convert a crustal SH model based on the WDMAM into a model for the equivalent magnetization. However, we extend their formalism and assume that the magnetization is confined within a layer of finite thickness. A different thickness is considered for the oceanic crust than for the continental one. It is well known that the large scales of the crustal field are entirely masked by the Earth's main field. Therefore, we complement the WDMAM based magnetization map (SH degrees 16 to 800) with the magnetization map for the large wavelengths (SH degrees 1-15) that was recently derived by Vervelidou and Thébault (2015) from a series of regional statistical analyses of the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map. Finally we propose a tentative separation of this magnetization map into induced and remanent contributions on a regional scale. We do so based on the direction of the core magnetic field. We discuss the implications of these results in terms of the tectonic history of the Earth.

  11. Liquid Jet Formation in Laser-Induced Forward Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasz, C. Frederik

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-write technique capable of printing precise patterns of a wide variety of materials. In this process, a laser pulse is focused through a transparent support and absorbed in a thin donor film, propelling material onto an adjacent acceptor substrate. For fluid materials, this transfer occurs through the formation of a narrow liquid jet, which eventually pinches off due to surface tension. This thesis examines in detail the fluid mechanics of the jet formation process occurring in LIFT. The main focus is on a variant of LIFT known as blister-actuated LIFT (BA-LIFT), in which the laser pulse is absorbed in an ink-coated polymer layer, rapidly deforming it locally into a blister to induce liquid jet formation. The early-time response of a fluid layer to a deforming boundary is analyzed with a domain perturbation method and potential-flow simulations, revealing scalings for energy and momentum transfer to the fluid and providing physical insight on how and why a jet forms in BA-LIFT. The remaining chapters explore more complex applications and modifications of LIFT. One is the possibility of high-repetition rate printing and limits on time delay and separation between pulses imposed by a tilting effect found for adjacent jets. Another examines a focusing effect achieved by perturbing the interface with ring-shaped disturbances. The third contains an experimental study of LIFT using a silver paste as the donor material instead of a Newtonian liquid. The transfer mechanism is significantly different, although with repeated pulses at one location, a focusing effect is again observed. All three of these chapters investigate how perturbations to the interface can strongly influence the jet formation process.

  12. Rotating magnetic field induced oscillation of magnetic particles for in vivo mechanical destruction of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Muroski, Megan E; Petit, Dorothée C M C; Mansell, Rhodri; Vemulkar, Tarun; Morshed, Ramin A; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Horbinski, Craig M; Huang, Xinlei; Zhang, Lingjiao; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-02-10

    Magnetic particles that can be precisely controlled under a magnetic field and transduce energy from the applied field open the way for innovative cancer treatment. Although these particles represent an area of active development for drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia, the in vivo anti-tumor effect under a low-frequency magnetic field using magnetic particles has not yet been demonstrated. To-date, induced cancer cell death via the oscillation of nanoparticles under a low-frequency magnetic field has only been observed in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate the successful use of spin-vortex, disk-shaped permalloy magnetic particles in a low-frequency, rotating magnetic field for the in vitro and in vivo destruction of glioma cells. The internalized nanomagnets align themselves to the plane of the rotating magnetic field, creating a strong mechanical force which damages the cancer cell structure inducing programmed cell death. In vivo, the magnetic field treatment successfully reduces brain tumor size and increases the survival rate of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts, without adverse side effects. This study demonstrates a novel approach of controlling magnetic particles for treating malignant glioma that should be applicable to treat a wide range of cancers.

  13. Magnetic field induced differential neutron phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Walter, P.; Keil, S.; Manke, I.

    2007-12-17

    Besides the attenuation of a neutron beam penetrating an object, induced phase changes have been utilized to provide contrast in neutron and x-ray imaging. In analogy to differential phase contrast imaging of bulk samples, the refraction of neutrons by magnetic fields yields image contrast. Here, it will be reported how double crystal setups can provide quantitative tomographic images of magnetic fields. The use of magnetic air prisms adequate to split the neutron spin states enables a distinction of field induced phase shifts and these introduced by interaction with matter.

  14. Distance dependence in photo-induced intramolecular electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Sven; Volosov, Andrey

    1986-09-01

    The distance dependence of the rate of photo-induced electron transfer reactions is studied. A quantum mechanical method CNDO/S is applied to a series of molecules recently investigated by Hush et al. experimentally. The calculations show a large interaction through the saturated bridge which connects the two chromophores. The electronic matrix element HAB decreases a factor 10 in about 4 Å. There is also a decrease of the rate due to less exothermicity for the longer molecule. The results are in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Negative thermal expansion induced by intermetallic charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Masaki; Oka, Kengo; Nabetani, Koichiro

    2015-06-01

    Suppression of thermal expansion is of great importance for industry. Negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials which shrink on heating and expand on cooling are therefore attracting keen attention. Here we provide a brief overview of NTE induced by intermetallic charge transfer in A-site ordered double perovskites SaCu3Fe4O12 and LaCu3Fe4-x Mn x O12, as well as in Bi or Ni substituted BiNiO3. The last compound shows a colossal dilatometric linear thermal expansion coefficient exceeding -70 × 10(-6) K(-1) near room temperature, in the temperature range which can be controlled by substitution.

  16. Magnetically induced spreading and pattern selection in thin ferrofluid drops.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Wu, W-L; Miranda, José A

    2010-11-01

    We report an experimental study of a fingering pattern formation which occurs during the spreading of an immiscible thin ferrofluid drop subjected to a radial magnetic field. Our results indicate that this ferrohydrodynamic system works as a magnetic analog of conventional spin coating, where centrifugal driving is replaced with a magnetic body force induced by the radial applied field. In this context, a magnetically tunable pattern selection mechanism is proposed in which the shape and number of the arising fingered structures can be properly controlled.

  17. Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy and Induced Magnetic Structures of Pt Layers in the Fe/Pt Multilayers Investigated by Resonant X-ray Magnetic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mihee; Takechi, Ryota; Hosoito, Nobuyoshi

    2017-02-01

    Depth distribution of the magnetization induced in the paramagnetic Pt layers of Fe/Pt multilayers was investigated by resonant X-ray magnetic scattering (RXMS) near the Pt L3 absorption edge. Two samples with different perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) were chosen for RXMS measurements. The magnetic depth profile of the Pt layer was determined in the magnetic saturation state of the Fe magnetization with the sample of weak PMA. The magnetization process of the Pt layer was investigated with the sample of moderate PMA. It is found that the Pt atoms near the interface region have a perpendicular component of the induced magnetization even in the saturation state of the Fe magnetization, suggesting that the PMA of Fe/Pt multilayers originates from the Pt atoms near the interface region. Concerning the magnetization process, the induced Pt magnetization is not proportional to the Fe magnetization. This implies a complicated magnetizing mechanism of the Pt layer by the Fe magnetization.

  18. Identifying the magnetoconductance responses by the induced charge transfer complex states in pentacene-based diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Shun; Lee, Tsung-Hsun; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Huang, J. C. A.; Wen, Ten-Chin

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the magnetoconductance (MC) responses in photocurrent, unipolar injection, and bipolar injection regimes in pentacene-based diodes. Both photocurrent and bipolar injection contributed MC responses show large difference in MC line shape, which are attributed to triplet-polaron interaction modulated by the magnetic field dependent singlet fission and the intersystem crossing of the polaron pair, respectively. By blending 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane into pentacene, all the MC responses are suppressed but the MC response at unipolar injection regime is enhanced, which is attributed to the induced charge transfer complex states (CT complex states). This work identify the MC responses between single carrier contributed MC and exciton related MC by the induced CT complex states.

  19. Current-induced switching in a magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avci, Can Onur; Quindeau, Andy; Pai, Chi-Feng; Mann, Maxwell; Caretta, Lucas; Tang, Astera S.; Onbasli, Mehmet C.; Ross, Caroline A.; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2016-11-01

    The spin Hall effect in heavy metals converts charge current into pure spin current, which can be injected into an adjacent ferromagnet to exert a torque. This spin-orbit torque (SOT) has been widely used to manipulate the magnetization in metallic ferromagnets. In the case of magnetic insulators (MIs), although charge currents cannot flow, spin currents can propagate, but current-induced control of the magnetization in a MI has so far remained elusive. Here we demonstrate spin-current-induced switching of a perpendicularly magnetized thulium iron garnet film driven by charge current in a Pt overlayer. We estimate a relatively large spin-mixing conductance and damping-like SOT through spin Hall magnetoresistance and harmonic Hall measurements, respectively, indicating considerable spin transparency at the Pt/MI interface. We show that spin currents injected across this interface lead to deterministic magnetization reversal at low current densities, paving the road towards ultralow-dissipation spintronic devices based on MIs.

  20. Current-induced switching in a magnetic insulator.

    PubMed

    Avci, Can Onur; Quindeau, Andy; Pai, Chi-Feng; Mann, Maxwell; Caretta, Lucas; Tang, Astera S; Onbasli, Mehmet C; Ross, Caroline A; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2017-03-01

    The spin Hall effect in heavy metals converts charge current into pure spin current, which can be injected into an adjacent ferromagnet to exert a torque. This spin-orbit torque (SOT) has been widely used to manipulate the magnetization in metallic ferromagnets. In the case of magnetic insulators (MIs), although charge currents cannot flow, spin currents can propagate, but current-induced control of the magnetization in a MI has so far remained elusive. Here we demonstrate spin-current-induced switching of a perpendicularly magnetized thulium iron garnet film driven by charge current in a Pt overlayer. We estimate a relatively large spin-mixing conductance and damping-like SOT through spin Hall magnetoresistance and harmonic Hall measurements, respectively, indicating considerable spin transparency at the Pt/MI interface. We show that spin currents injected across this interface lead to deterministic magnetization reversal at low current densities, paving the road towards ultralow-dissipation spintronic devices based on MIs.

  1. Magnetically Induced Rotating Rayleigh-Taylor Instability.

    PubMed

    Scase, Matthew M; Baldwin, Kyle A; Hill, Richard J A

    2017-03-03

    Classical techniques for investigating the Rayleigh-Taylor instability include using compressed gasses(1), rocketry(2) or linear electric motors(3) to reverse the effective direction of gravity, and accelerate the lighter fluid toward the denser fluid. Other authors(e.g.)(4)(,)(5)(,)(6) have separated a gravitationally unstable stratification with a barrier that is removed to initiate the flow. However, the parabolic initial interface in the case of a rotating stratification imposes significant technical difficulties experimentally. We wish to be able to spin-up the stratification into solid-body rotation and only then initiate the flow in order to investigate the effects of rotation upon the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The approach we have adopted here is to use the magnetic field of a superconducting magnet to manipulate the effective weight of the two liquids to initiate the flow. We create a gravitationally stable two-layer stratification using standard flotation techniques. The upper layer is less dense than the lower layer and so the system is Rayleigh-Taylor stable. This stratification is then spun-up until both layers are in solid-body rotation and a parabolic interface is observed. These experiments use fluids with low magnetic susceptibility, |χ| ~ 10(-6) - 10(-5), compared to a ferrofluids. The dominant effect of the magnetic field applies a body-force to each layer changing the effective weight. The upper layer is weakly paramagnetic while the lower layer is weakly diamagnetic. When the magnetic field is applied, the lower layer is repelled from the magnet while the upper layer is attracted towards the magnet. A Rayleigh-Taylor instability is achieved with application of a high gradient magnetic field. We further observed that increasing the dynamic viscosity of the fluid in each layer, increases the length-scale of the instability.

  2. Analytical Method of Correction of B 1 Errors in Mapping of Magnetization Transfer Ratio in Highfield Magnetic Resonance Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarnykh, V. L.; Khodanovich, M. Yu.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetization Transfer Ratio (MTR) is a widely used parameter for quantitative estimation of tissues in magnetic resonance tomography (MRT). At the same time, MTR is rather sensitive to errors caused by the nonideal characteristics of magnetic resonance tomographs. In particular, MTR depends strongly on the local inhomogeneities of the radio-frequency field B 1 that limits the MTR application for high magnetic field strengths. In the present research, a simple analytical model of the MTR dependence on B 1 is derived. Based on this model, a correction algorithm is developed using a set of parameters independent of tissue. This algorithm is tested for MTR mapping of the human brain in the field with induction of 3 T. The MTR correction demonstrates high accuracy for a wide range of B 1 inhomogeneities. Combination of the analytical algorithm with fast B 1 mapping enables high-precision MTR brain mapping for neuroimaging applications and analysis of histograms on high-field scanners.

  3. Gelation induced supramolecular chirality: chirality transfer, amplification and application.

    PubMed

    Duan, Pengfei; Cao, Hai; Zhang, Li; Liu, Minghua

    2014-08-14

    Supramolecular chirality defines chirality at the supramolecular level, and is generated from the spatial arrangement of component molecules assembling through non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, van der Waals interactions, π-π stacking, hydrophobic interactions and so on. During the formation of low molecular weight gels (LMWGs), one kind of fascinating soft material, one frequently encounters the phenomenon of chirality as well as chiral nanostructures, either from chiral gelators or even achiral gelators. A view of gelation-induced supramolecular chirality will be very helpful to understand the self-assembly process of the gelator molecules as well as the chiral structures, the regulation of the chirality in the gels and the development of the "smart" chiral materials such as chiroptical devices, catalysts and chiral sensors. It necessitates fundamental understanding of chirality transfer and amplification in these supramolecular systems. In this review, recent progress in gelation-induced supramolecular chirality is discussed.

  4. Magnetic Field Effect on the Stability of Flow Induced by a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Gillies, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    A linear stability analysis has been performed for the flow induced by a rotating magnetic field in a cylindrical column filled with electrically conducting fluid. The first transition is time- independent and results in the generation of Taylor vortices. The critical value of the magnetic Taylor number has been examined as a function of the strength of the transverse rotating magnetic field, the strength of an axial static magnetic field, and thermal buoyancy. Increasing the transverse field increases the critical magnetic Taylor number and decreases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices at the onset of instability. An increase in the axial magnetic field also increases the critical magnetic Taylor number but increases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices. Thermal buoyancy is found to have only a negligible effect on the onset of instability.

  5. Magnetic Field Effect on the Stability of Flow Induced by a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Gillies, D. C.; Volz, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    A linear stability analysis has been performed for the flow induced by a rotating magnetic field in a cylindrical column filled with electrically conducting fluid. The first transition is time-independent and results in the generation of Taylor vortices. The critical value of the magnetic Taylor number has been examined as a function of the strength of the transverse rotating magnetic field, the strength of an axial static magnetic field, and thermal buoyancy. Increasing the transverse field increases the critical magnetic Taylor number and decreases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices at the onset of instability. An increase in the axial magnetic field also increases the critical magnetic Taylor number but increases the aspect ratio of the Taylor vortices. Thermal buoyancy is found to have only a negligible effect on the onset of instability.

  6. Development of an Energy Efficient Cryogenic Transfer Line with Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Quan-Sheng; Cheng, Guangfeng; Susta, Joseph T.; Hull, John R.; Demko, Jonathan A.; Britcher, Colin P.; Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, Stan D.; Werfel, Frank; Bonnema, Edward C.

    2006-04-01

    In a conventional vacuum-jacketed cryogen transfer line, the major heat transfer is dominated by two modes: i) radiation between the warm outer pipe and the cold inner pipe and ii) thermal conduction through support members and penetrations. Magnetic levitation makes it possible to eliminate the conduction portion by use of non-contact support, consisting of high temperature superconductor (HTS) and permanent magnet (PM). Several transfer line prototypes (including a 6-meter prototype) have been designed and constructed to optimized the levitation and thermal performance. This paper reviews the key design/fabrication issues, such as levitation configuration, levitation force measurement, warm-support design using smart materials, fabrication process, and technical milestones throughout a 3-year period. This novel transfer line offers the potential of significant savings of cryogens and hence reduces the cost of crygon use.

  7. Low Thermal Loss Cryogenic Transfer Line with Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Quan-Sheng; Cheng, Guangfeng; Yu, Kun; Hull, John R.; Demko, Jonathan A.; Britcher, Colin P.; Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, Stan D.

    2004-06-01

    An energy efficient, cost effective cryogenic distribution system (up to several miles) is crucial for spaceport and in-space cryogenic systems. The conduction heat loss from the supports that connect the cold inner lines to the warm support structure is ultimately the most serious heat leak after thermal radiation has been minimized. The use of magnetic levitation by permanent magnets and high temperature superconductors provides support without mechanical contact and thus, the conduction part of the heat leak can be reduced to zero. A stop structure is carefully designed to hold the center tube when the system is warm. The novel design will provide the potential of extending many missions by saving cryogens, or reducing the overall launch mass.

  8. Energy Efficient Cryogenic Transfer Line with Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Quan-Sheng; Cheng, Guangfeng; Yu, Kun; Hull, John R.; Demko, Jonathan A.; Britcher, Colin P.; Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, Stan D.

    2003-07-01

    An energy efficient, cost effective cryogenic distribution system (up to several miles) has been identified as important for spaceport and in-space cryogenic systems. The conduction heat loss from the supports that connect the lines cold mass to the warm support structure is ultimately the most serious heat leak after thermal radiation has been minimized. The use of magnetic levitation by permanent magnets and high temperature superconductors provides support without mechanical contact and thus, the conduction part of the heat leak can be reduced to zero. A stop structure is carefully designed to hold the center tube when the system is warm. The novel design will provide the potential of extending many missions by saving cryogens, or reducing the overall launch mass to accomplish a given mission.

  9. Transfer from classical mechanics context to electricity and magnetism context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Maria D.; Kanim, Stephen

    2008-10-01

    Some classical mechanics concepts, like density, vectors use, conservative fields, 3^rd Newton Law, velocity and acceleration physical and mathematical relations, are the basis for the development of related concepts that are central to the subsequent electricity and magnetism course. We believe that if students and instructors involved recognize the underlying features that are common to the two contexts, a better understanding and performance will be achieved. We are developing a pre- and post-test that is intended to measure the extent to which (1) students enter the electricity and magnetism course with a sufficient mechanics foundation; (2) there is a correlation between student responses to similar questions in mechanics and electrostatics contexts; and (3) mechanics understanding is strengthened through reintroduction of physics principles in a second context. We will give examples of ``paired'' questions and give data from administrations of the pre- and post-tests.

  10. Chirality-induced negative refraction in magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, B.

    2013-09-15

    Characteristic equations in magnetized plasma with chirality are derived in simple formulations and the dispersion relations for propagation parallel and perpendicular to the external magnetic field are studied in detail. With the help of the dispersion relations of each eigenwave, the author explores chirality-induced negative refraction in magnetized plasma and investigates the effects of parameters (i.e., chirality degree, external magnetic field, etc.) on the negative refraction. The results show that the chirality is the necessary and only one factor which leads to negative refraction without manipulating electrical permittivity and magnetic permeability. Both increasing the degree of chirality and reducing the external magnetic field can result in greater range negative refraction. Parameter dependence of the effects is calculated and discussed.

  11. Effect of different magnetic field distributions on laminar ferroconvection heat transfer in horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhnejad, Yahya; Hosseini, Reza; Saffar-avval, Majid

    2015-09-01

    The forced convection heat transfer of ferrofluid steady state laminar flow through a circular axisymmetric horizontal pipe under different magnetic field is the focus of this study. The pipe is under constant heat flux while different linear axial magnetic fields were applied on the ferrofluid with equal magnetic energy. In this scenario, viscosity of ferrofluid is temperature dependent, to capture ferrofluid real behavior a nonlinear Langevin equation was considered for equilibrium magnetization. For this purpose, the set of nonlinear governing PDEs was solved using proper CFD techniques: the finite volume method and SIMPLE algorithm were used to discretize and numerically solve the governing equation in order to obtain thermohydrodynamic flow characteristics. The numerical results show a promising enhancement of up to 135.7% in heat transfer as a consequence of the application of magnetic field. The magnetic field also increases pressure loss of up to 77% along the pipe; but effectiveness (favorable to unfavorable effect ratio) of the magnetic field as a performance index economically justifies its application such that higher magnetic field intensity causes higher effectiveness of up to 1.364.

  12. Production of miniaturized biosensors through laser-induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Duocastella, M.; Colina, M.; Serra, P.; Morenza, J. L.

    2007-05-01

    Lasers are adequate tools for the production of patterns with high spatial resolution owing to the high focusing power of their radiation. Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique allowing the deposition of tiny amounts of material from a donor thin film through the action of a pulsed laser beam. A laser pulse is focused onto the donor thin film through a transparent support, what results in the transference of a small area of the film onto a receptor substrate that is placed parallel to the film-support system. Although LIFT was originally developed to operate with solid films, it has been demonstrated that deposition is also viable from liquid films. In this case, a small amount of liquid is directly ejected from the film onto the receptor substrate, where it rests deposited in the form of a microdroplet. This makes LIFT adequate for biosensors preparation, since biological solutions can be transferred onto solid substrates to produce micrometric patterns of biomolecules. In this case, the liquid solvent acts as transport vector of the biomolecules. The viability of the technique has been demonstrated through the preparation of functional miniaturized biosensors showing similar performances and higher scales of integration than those prepared through more conventional techniques.

  13. Liquids microprinting through laser-induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, P.; Duocastella, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.

    2009-03-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique which allows the deposition of tiny amounts of material from a donor thin film onto a receptor substrate. When LIFT is applied to liquid donor films, the laser radiation affects only a localized fraction of the liquid, thereby impelling the unaffected portion towards the receptor substrate. Thus, transfer takes place with no melting or vaporization of the deposited fraction and, in this way, LIFT can be used to successfully print complex materials like inorganic inks and pastes, biomolecules in solution, and even living cells and microorganisms. In addition, and for a wide range of liquid rheologies, the material can be deposited in the form of circular microdroplets; this provides LIFT with a high degree of spatial resolution leading to feature sizes below 10 μm, and making it competitive in front of conventional printing techniques. In this work, a revision of the main achievements of the LIFT of liquids is carried out, correlating the morphological characteristics of the generated features with the results of the study of the transfer process. Special emphasis is put on the characterization of the dynamics of liquid ejection, which has provided valuable information for the understanding of microdroplets deposition. Thus, new time-resolved imaging analyses have shown a material release behavior which contrasts with most of the previously made assumptions, and that allows clarifying some of the questions open during the study of the LIFT technique.

  14. Voxel-based analyses of magnetization transfer imaging of the brain in hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miese, Falk R; Wittsack, Hans-Jörg; Kircheis, Gerald; Holstein, Arne; Mathys, Christian; Mödder, Ulrich; Cohnen, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the spatial distribution of cerebral abnormalities in cirrhotic subjects with and without hepatic encephalopathy (HE) found with magnetization transfer imaging (MTI). METHODS: Nineteen cirrhotic patients graded from neurologically normal to HE grade 2 and 18 healthy control subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging. They gave institutional-review-board-approved written consent. Magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) maps were generated from MTI. We tested for significant differences compared to the control group using statistical non-parametric mapping (SnPM) for a voxel-based evaluation. RESULTS: The MTR of grey and white matter was lower in subjects with more severe HE. Changes were found in patients with cirrhosis without neurological deficits in the basal ganglia and bilateral white matter. The loss in magnetization transfer increased in severity and spatial extent in patients with overt HE. Patients with HE grade 2 showed an MTR decrease in white and grey matter: the maximum loss of magnetization transfer effect was located in the basal ganglia [SnPM (pseudo-)t = 17.98, P = 0.0001]. CONCLUSION: The distribution of MTR changes in HE points to an early involvement of basal ganglia and white matter in HE. PMID:19891014

  15. Convective Flow Induced by Localized Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An axisymmetric traveling magnetic field induces a meridional base flow in a cylindrical zone of an electrically conducting liquid. This remotely induced flow can be conveniently controlled, in magnitude and direction, and can have benefits for crystal growth applications. In particular, it can be used to offset natural convection. For long vertical cylinders, non-uniform and localized in the propagating direction, magnetic fields are required for this purpose. Here we investigate a particular form of this field, namely that induced by a set of a few electric current coils. An order of magnitude reduction of buoyancy convection is theoretically demonstrated for a vertical Bridgman crystal growth configuration.

  16. Low-energy plasma immersion ion implantation to induce DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwijit, K.; Yu, L. D.; Sarapirom, S.; Pitakrattananukool, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) at low energy was for the first time applied as a novel biotechnology to induce DNA transfer into bacterial cells. Argon or nitrogen PIII at low bias voltages of 2.5, 5 and 10 kV and fluences ranging from 1 × 1012 to 1 × 1017 ions/cm2 treated cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Subsequently, DNA transfer was operated by mixing the PIII-treated cells with DNA. Successes in PIII-induced DNA transfer were demonstrated by marker gene expressions. The induction of DNA transfer was ion-energy, fluence and DNA-size dependent. The DNA transferred in the cells was confirmed functioning. Mechanisms of the PIII-induced DNA transfer were investigated and discussed in terms of the E. coli cell envelope anatomy. Compared with conventional ion-beam-induced DNA transfer, PIII-induced DNA transfer was simpler with lower cost but higher efficiency.

  17. Magnetization switching by combining electric field and spin-transfer torque effects in a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangli; Wang, Chengjie; Liu, Yaowen; Zhang, Zongzhi; Jin, Q. Y.; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Effective manipulation of magnetization orientation driven by electric field in a perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junction introduces technologically relevant possibility for developing low power magnetic memories. However, the bipolar orientation characteristic of toggle-like magnetization switching possesses intrinsic difficulties for practical applications. By including both the in-plane (T//) and field-like (T⊥) spin-transfer torque terms in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulation, reliable and deterministic magnetization reversal can be achieved at a significantly reduced current density of 5×109 A/m2 under the co-action of electric field and spin-polarized current, provided that the electric-field pulse duration exceeds a certain critical value τc. The required critical τc decreases with the increase of T⊥ strength because stronger T⊥ can make the finally stabilized out-of-plane component of magnetization stay in a larger negative value. The power consumption for such kind of deterministic magnetization switching is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than that of the switching driven by current only. PMID:26732287

  18. Solar wind thermally induced magnetic fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Navarro, R E; Moya, P S; Muñoz, V; Araneda, J A; F-Viñas, A; Valdivia, J A

    2014-06-20

    A kinetic description of Alfvén-cyclotron magnetic fluctuations for anisotropic electron-proton quasistable plasmas is studied. An analytical treatment, based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, consistently shows that spontaneous fluctuations in plasmas with stable distributions significantly contribute to the observed magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind, as seen, for example, in [S. D. Bale et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 211101 (2009)], even far below from the instability thresholds. Furthermore, these results, which do not require any adjustable parameters or wave excitations, are consistent with the results provided by hybrid simulations. It is expected that this analysis contributes to our understanding of the nature of magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind.

  19. Defect induced magnetism in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: bulk magnetization and 19F hyperfine interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Mohanta, S K; Mishra, S N; Davane, S M; Srivastava, S K

    2012-02-29

    We have made bulk and local investigations on defect induced magnetism in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) irradiated with a 40 MeV carbon beam. The local magnetic response of irradiated HOPG was studied by measuring the hyperfine field of recoil implanted (19)F using γ-ray time differential perturbed angular distribution (TDPAD) measurements. While the bulk magnetic properties of the irradiated sample show features characteristic of room temperature ferromagnetism, the hyperfine field data reflect enhanced paramagnetism with no indication of long range magnetic ordering. The experimental studies are further supported by ab initio density functional calculations. We believe that the ferromagnetic response in irradiated HOPG arises mostly from defect induced magnetic moments of carbon atoms in the near surface region, while those deep inside the host matrix remain paramagnetic.

  20. Numerical analysis of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetization reversal in synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, J.; Shi, M.; Tanaka, T. Matsuyama, K.

    2015-05-07

    The spin transfer torque magnetization reversal of synthetic ferrimagnetic free layers under pulsed temperature rise was numerically studied by solving the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation, taking into account the stochastic random fields, the temperature dependence of magnetic parameters, and the spin torque terms. The anti-parallel magnetization configuration was retained at the elevated temperature, due to interlayer dipole coupling. A significant thermal assistance effect, resulting in a 40% reduction in the switching current, was demonstrated during a nanosecond pulsed temperature rise up to 77% of the Curie temperature.

  1. Magnetic memory signals variation induced by applied magnetic field and static tensile stress in ferromagnetic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haihong; Yang, Cheng; Qian, Zhengchun; Han, Gang; Liu, Zhifeng

    2016-10-01

    Stress can induce a spontaneous magnetic field in ferromagnetic steel under the excitation of geomagnetic field. In order to investigate the impact of applied magnetic field and tensile stress on variation of the residual magnetic signals on the surface of ferromagnetic materials, static tensile tests of Q235 structural steel were carried out, with the normal component of the residual magnetic signals, Hp(y), induced by applied magnetic fields with different intensities measured through the tensile tests. The Hp(y), its slope coefficient KS and maximum gradient Kmax changing with the applied magnetic field H and tensile stress were observed. Results show that the magnitude of Hp(y) and its slope coefficient KS increase linearly with the increase of stress in the elastic deformation stage. Under yield stress, Hp(y) and KS reach its maximum, and then decrease slightly with further increase of stress. Applied magnetic field affects the magnitude of Hp(y) instead of changing the signal curve‧s profile; and the magnitude of Hp(y), KS, Kmax and the change rate of KS increase with the increase of applied magnetic field. The phenomenon is also discussed from the viewpoint of magnetic charge in ferromagnetic materials.

  2. Induced Magnetic Field Due to Reaction Wheel Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudney, M. A.; Kapfunde, G.; Trougnou, L.

    2016-05-01

    In situ magnetic field measurements are of critical importance to unanswered questions on the inner heliosphere, such as: how the corona and solar wind are accelerated and heated; how the solar magnetic field evolves over a solar cycle; and how this field links into space. However, accurate spacecraft magnetometer measurements require reliable in-flight calibration. The magnetic interference caused by reaction wheels on magnetometer measurements in space is well known, and a common mitigation method is to use magnetic shielding. However, the presence of high-permeability material in-flight has the side-effect of distorting the true ambient field. We present a theoretical analysis of this distortion, and suggest a transfer function that can be used to recover the ambient field from the distorted dataset. Experimental measurements on a shield prototype for the Solar Orbiter mission agree with predictions to within an order of magnitude, demonstrating a distortion of approximately 1 part in 104.

  3. The physical mechanism of "inhomogeneous" magnetization transfer MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Alan P.; Chang, Kimberley L.; MacKay, Alex L.; Michal, Carl A.

    2017-01-01

    Inhomogeneous MT (ihMT) is a new magnetic resonance imaging technique that shows promise for myelin selectivity. Materials with a high proportion of lipids, such as white matter tissue, show a reduced intensity in magnetic resonance images acquired with selective prepulses at positive and negative offsets simultaneously compared to images with a single positive or negative offset prepulse of the same power. This effect was initially explained on the basis of hole-burning in inhomogeneously broadened lines of the lipid proton spin system. Our results contradict this explanation. ihMT in lipids can be understood with a simple spin-1 model of a coupled methylene proton pair. More generally, Provotorov theory can be used to consider the evolution of dipolar order in the non-aqueous spins during the prepulses. We show that the flip-angle dependence of the proton spectrum of a model lipid system (Prolipid-161) following dipolar order generation is in quantitative agreement with the model. In addition, we directly observe dipolar order and ihMT signals in the non-aqueous components of Prolipid-161 and homogeneously-broadened systems (hair, wood, and tendon) following ihMT prepulses. The observation of ihMT signals in tendon suggests that the technique may not be as specific to myelin as previously thought. Our work shows that ihMT occurs because of dipolar couplings alone, not from a specific type of spectral line broadening as its name suggests.

  4. 2D Radiative Transfer in Magnetically Confined Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, P.; Anzer, U.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetically confined structures in the solar atmosphere exhibit a large complexity in their shapes and physical conditions. As an example, we show the case of so-called magnetic dips in prominences which are in magnetohydrostatic equilibria. For such models we solve 2D non-LTE multilevel problem for hydrogen with PRD in Lyman resonance lines. The iterative technique used is based on the MALI approach with simple diagonal ALO and SC formal solver. To compute the hydrogen ionization balance, the preconditioned MALI equations are linearized with respect to atomic level populations and electron density and solved iteratively using the Newton-Raphson scheme. Two additional problems are addressed: (i) an adequate iteration method for cases when the column-mass scale is used in one of the two dimensions but varies along the other dimension (which has a geometrical scaling); and (ii) a possibility of using AMR (Adaptive Mesh Refinement) algorithms to account for steep 2D gradients of selected variables (temperature, density, etc.).

  5. Spin transfer torque in magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicularly magnetized polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Takahiro; Gudmundsen, Theodore; Liu, Luqiao; Buhrman, R. A.; Ralph, D. C.

    2011-03-01

    Spin-torque devices containing magnetic layers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are of interest for strategies to reduce the switching currents in memory applications. We report spin-torque-driven ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR) measurements of the bias-dependent torque in magnetic tunnel junctions containing [Co/Ni]x multilayers possessing perpendicular anisotropy, acting as the polarizer layer providing spin-polarized current. We observe unusual dependence of the bias-dependent torque as a function of the magnetic orientation of the [Co/Ni]x multilayer. We speculate that this sensitivity to the magnetic orientation may originate from changes in the occupation of spin-polarized states at the Co/Ni interfaces associated with the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  6. Effects of magnetic fields on improving mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Keting; Wang, Xiaobo

    2016-02-01

    The effects of magnetic fields on improving the mass transfer in flue gas desulfurization using a fluidized bed are investigated in the paper. In this research, the magnetically fluidized bed (MFB) is used as the reactor in which ferromagnetic particles are fluidized with simulated flue gas under the influence of an external magnetic field. Lime slurry is continuously sprayed into the reactor. As a consequence, the desulfurization reaction and the slurry drying process take place simultaneously in the MFB. In this paper, the effects of ferromagnetic particles and external magnetic fields on the desulphurization efficiency are studied and compared with that of quartz particles as the fluidized particles. Experimental results show that the ferromagnetic particles not only act as a platform for lime slurry to precipitate on like quartz particles, but also take part in the desulfurization reaction. The results also show that the specific surface area of ferromagnetic particles after reaction is enlarged as the magnetic intensity increases, and the external magnetic field promotes the oxidation of S(IV), improving the mass transfer between sulphur and its sorbent. Hence, the efficiency of desulphurization under the effects of external magnetic fields is higher than that in general fluidized beds.

  7. Anomalous Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Spin Transfer Torque in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with Embedded Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Useinov, Arthur; Ye, Lin-Xiu; Useinov, Niazbeck; Wu, Te-Ho; Lai, Chih-Huang

    2015-01-01

    The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with embedded nanoparticles (NPs) was calculated in range of the quantum-ballistic model. The simulation was performed for electron tunneling through the insulating layer with embedded magnetic and non-magnetic NPs within the approach of the double barrier subsystem connected in parallel to the single barrier one. This model can be applied for both MTJs with in-plane magnetization and perpendicular one. We also calculated the in-plane component of the spin transfer torque (STT) versus the applied voltage in MTJs with magnetic NPs and determined that its value can be much larger than in single barrier system (SBS) for the same tunneling thickness. The reported simulation reproduces experimental data of the TMR suppression and peak-like TMR anomalies at low voltages available in leterature. PMID:26681336

  8. Cold denaturation induces inversion of dipole and spin transfer in chiral peptide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckshtain-Levi, Meital; Capua, Eyal; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sarkar, Soumyajit; Gavrilov, Yulian; Mathew, Shinto P.; Paltiel, Yossi; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Naaman, Ron

    2016-02-01

    Chirality-induced spin selectivity is a recently-discovered effect, which results in spin selectivity for electrons transmitted through chiral peptide monolayers. Here, we use this spin selectivity to probe the organization of self-assembled α-helix peptide monolayers and examine the relation between structural and spin transfer phenomena. We show that the α-helix structure of oligopeptides based on alanine and aminoisobutyric acid is transformed to a more linear one upon cooling. This process is similar to the known cold denaturation in peptides, but here the self-assembled monolayer plays the role of the solvent. The structural change results in a flip in the direction of the electrical dipole moment of the adsorbed molecules. The dipole flip is accompanied by a concomitant change in the spin that is preferred in electron transfer through the molecules, observed via a new solid-state hybrid organic-inorganic device that is based on the Hall effect, but operates with no external magnetic field or magnetic material.

  9. Cold denaturation induces inversion of dipole and spin transfer in chiral peptide monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Eckshtain-Levi, Meital; Capua, Eyal; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sarkar, Soumyajit; Gavrilov, Yulian; Mathew, Shinto P.; Paltiel, Yossi; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Naaman, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Chirality-induced spin selectivity is a recently-discovered effect, which results in spin selectivity for electrons transmitted through chiral peptide monolayers. Here, we use this spin selectivity to probe the organization of self-assembled α-helix peptide monolayers and examine the relation between structural and spin transfer phenomena. We show that the α-helix structure of oligopeptides based on alanine and aminoisobutyric acid is transformed to a more linear one upon cooling. This process is similar to the known cold denaturation in peptides, but here the self-assembled monolayer plays the role of the solvent. The structural change results in a flip in the direction of the electrical dipole moment of the adsorbed molecules. The dipole flip is accompanied by a concomitant change in the spin that is preferred in electron transfer through the molecules, observed via a new solid-state hybrid organic–inorganic device that is based on the Hall effect, but operates with no external magnetic field or magnetic material. PMID:26916536

  10. The permanent and induced magnetic dipole moment of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.; Lichtenstein, B. R.; Schubert, G.

    1974-01-01

    Magnetic field observations with the Apollo 15 subsatellite have been used to deduce the components of both the permanent and induced lunar dipole moments in the orbital plane. The present permanent lunar magnetic dipole moment in the orbital plane is less than 1.3 times ten to the eighteenth power gauss-cu cm. Any uniformly magnetized near surface layer is therefore constrained to have a thickness-magnetization product less than 2.5 emu-cm per g. The induced moment opposes the external field, implying the existence of a substantial lunar ionosphere with a permeability between 0.63 and 0.85. Combining this with recent measures of the ratio of the relative field strength at the ALSEP and Explorer 35 magnetometers indicates that the global lunar permeability relative to the plasma in the geomagnetic tail lobes is between 1.008 and 1.03.

  11. Investigation of magneto-induced linear dichroism of magnetic fluid.

    PubMed

    Du, Bobo; Yang, Dexing; Bai, Yang; Yuan, Yuan; Mao, Dong; Zhang, Wending; She, Xiaoyang

    2017-01-20

    A fiber-optic component is fabricated with etched fiber coated by magnetic fluid (MF) for its evanescent field to be modulated by the MF. The magneto-induced linear dichroism of the MF is investigated under different temperatures with the component. The experimental results show that the MF possesses weak linear dichroism (maximum of 2.37% at 25°C) caused by its sparse magneto-induced chains. Considering the relationships between the linear dichroisms and temperature, there is a transition point of magnetic field at ∼4  mT. Up to ∼4  mT, the linear dichroisms decrease with the temperature; however, for higher magnetic field strengths, the linear dichroisms increase with the temperature. Interestingly, a small initial linear dichroism (up to 0.255% at 5°C) without magnetic field is also observed.

  12. Ultrafast time domain demonstration of bulk magnetization precession at zero magnetic field ferromagnetic resonance induced by terahertz magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, M; Namai, A; Ohkoshi, S; Suemoto, T

    2010-08-16

    We report the first observation of sub-terahertz bulk-magnetization precession, using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetization precession in gallium-substituted epsilon-iron oxide nano-ferromagnets under zero magnetic field is induced by the impulsive magnetic field of the THz wave through the gyromagnetic effect. Just at the resonance frequency, the linear to circular polarized wave conversion is realized. This is understood as the free induction decay signal radiated from a rotating magnetic dipole corresponding to the natural resonance. Furthermore, this demonstration reveals that the series of gallium-substituted epsilon-iron oxide nano-ferromagnets is very prospective for magneto-optic devices, which work at room temperature without external magnetic field, in next-generation wireless communication.

  13. Magnetostrictive hypersound generation by spiral magnets in the vicinity of magnetic field induced phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, Igor V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Kamantsev, Alexander P.; Koledov, Victor V.; Shavrov, Vladimir G.

    2016-11-01

    In present work we have investigated magnetostrictive ultrasound generation by spiral magnets in the vicinity of magnetic field induced phase transition from spiral to collinear state. We found that such magnets may generate transverse sound waves with the wavelength equal to the spiral period. We have examined two types of spiral magnetic structures: with inhomogeneous exchange and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions. Frequency of the waves from exchange-caused spiral magnetic structure may reach some THz, while in case of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction-caused spiral it may reach some GHz. These waves will be emitted like a sound pulses. Amplitude of the waves is strictly depends on the phase transition speed. Some aspects of microwaves to hypersound transformation by spiral magnets in the vicinity of phase transition have been investigated as well. Results of the work may be interesting for investigation of phase transition kinetics as well, as for various hypersound applications.

  14. Electric-field control of magnetism via strain transfer across ferromagnetic/ferroelectric interfaces.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Tomoyasu

    2015-12-23

    By taking advantage of the coupling between magnetism and ferroelectricity, ferromagnetic (FM)/ferroelectric (FE) multiferroic interfaces play a pivotal role in manipulating magnetism by electric fields. Integrating the multiferroic heterostructures into spintronic devices significantly reduces energy dissipation from Joule heating because only an electric field is required to switch the magnetic element. New concepts of storage and processing of information thus can be envisioned when the electric-field control of magnetism is a viable alternative to the traditional current based means of controlling magnetism. This article reviews some salient aspects of the electric-field effects on magnetism, providing a short overview of the mechanisms of magneto-electric (ME) coupling at the FM/FE interfaces. A particular emphasis is placed on the ME effect via interfacial magneto-elastic coupling arising from strain transfer from the FE to FM layer. Recent results that demonstrate the electric-field control of magnetic anisotropy, magnetic order, magnetic domain wall motion, and etc are described. Obstacles that need to be overcome are also discussed for making this a reality for future device applications.

  15. Magnetically Recoverable Supported Ruthenium Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Alkynes and Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ruthenium (Ru) catalyst supported on magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and used for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The cata...

  16. A magnetic mechanism for halting inward protoplanet migration: I. Necessary conditions and angular momentum transfer timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck, Robert C.

    2008-02-01

    A magnetic torque associated with the magnetic field linking a giant, gaseous protoplanet to its host pre-main-sequence star can halt inward protoplanet migration. This torque results from a toroidal magnetic field generated from the star’s poloidal (dipole) field by the twisting differential motion between the star’s rotation and the protoplanet’s revolution. Outside the corotation radius, where a protoplanet orbits slower than its host star spins, this torque transfers angular momentum from the star to the protoplanet, halting inward migration. Necessary conditions for angular momentum transfer include the requirement that the Alfvén speed v A in the region magnetically linking a protoplanet to its host star exceeds the protoplanet’s orbital speed v K . In addition, the timescale for Ohmic dissipation τ D must exceed the protoplanet’s orbital period P to ensure that the protoplanet is magnetically coupled to its host star. For a Jupiter-mass protoplanet orbiting a solar-mass pre-main-sequence star, v A > v K and τ D > P only when the migrating protoplanet approaches within about 0.1 AU of its host star, primarily because of the rapid drop in the strength of the magnetic field with increasing distance from the central star. Because of this restricted reach, inwardly migrating gaseous protoplanets can be expected to “pile up” very close to their central stars, as is indeed observed for extrasolar planets. The characteristic timescale required for a magnetic torque to transfer angular momentum outward from a more rapidly spinning central star to a magnetically coupled protoplanet is found to be comparable to planet-forming disk lifetimes and protoplanet migration timescales.

  17. Sequential Assembly of Magnetic Prussian Blue Films with Photo-Induced Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, Mark W.

    2004-11-01

    Despite interest in the area of molecule-based magnets, there are few efforts to investigate magnetism in monolayers, surface layers, and other thin films based on these materials. New synthetic methods developed by our groups now permit deposition of single layer and multilayer thin films of cyanometallate molecule-based magnet systems. These monolayers and surface films are inherently anisotropic, thereby allowing magnetic characterizations that are only possible because of our method of fabrication. Two examples will be presented. The distance dependence of dipolar interactions on magnetic order is illustrated by comparing a monolayer, bilayer, and multilayers of a mixed organic/inorganic Fe^3+/Ni^2+ cyanometallate two-dimensional network. The magnetometry results demonstrate the influence of dipolar interactions at an interlayer separation of greater than 35 ÅSecondly, anisotropic response of the photoinduced magnetism in a thin film of Rb_jCo_k[Fe(CN)_6]l \\cdot nH_2O, which experiences a ferrimagnetic transition near 20 K, has been discovered. The photo-induced magnetism may result in a net increase or decrease of the total magnetization of the sample when the externally applied magnetic field is oriented parallel or perpendicular to the plane of the films. The strength of this anisotropy depends on the thickness of the film and the size of the magnetic domains, and the photo-induced magnetism was effective in magnetic fields up to 27 T while at 4.7 K. This work, co-authored with D. R. Talham, was performed with J.-H. Park, F. Frye, Y.-D. Huh, E. Čižmár, and S. Lane, and was supported, in part, by NSF DMR-0305371.

  18. Magnetically-induced electric polarization in an organo-metallic magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Zapf, W S; Fabris, F W; Balakirev, F F; Francoual, S M; Kenzelmann, M; Chen, Y

    2009-01-01

    The coupling between magnetic order and ferroelectricity has been under intense investigation in a wide range of transition metal oxides. The strongest coupling is obtained in so-called magnetically induced multiferroics where ferroelectricity arises directly from magnetic order that breaks inversion symmetry. However, it has been difficult to find non-oxide based materials in which these effects occur. Here we present a study of copper dimethyl sulfoxide dichloride (CDC), an organometallic quantum magnet containing S =1/1 Cu spins, in which a switchable electric polarization arises from field-tuned magnetic order. Fast magnetic field pulses allow us to perform sensitive measurements of the electric polarization and demonstrate that the electric state is present only if the magnetic order is non-collinear. Furthermore, we show that the electric polarization can be switched in a stunning hysteretic fashion. Because the magnetic order in CDC is mediated by large organic molecules, our study shows that magnetoelectric interactions can exist in this important class of materials, opening the road to designing magnetoelectrics and multiferroics using large molecules as building blocks. Further, we demonstrate that CDC undergoes a magnetoelectric quantum phase transition -the first of its kind, where both ferroelectric and magnetic order emerge simultaneously as a function of magnetic field at very low temperatures.

  19. Magnetization dynamics induced by Rashba effect in a Permalloy nanodisk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huanan; Hua, Zhong; Li, Dongfei

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic vortex dynamics mediated by spin-polarized ac current of different amplitudes and frequencies are investigated by micromagnetic simulations in a system lacking structure inversion symmetry. Micromagnetic calculations reveal that the critical current density required to induce vortex core reversal may be decreased to below 1010 A m-2 due to strong transverse magnetic field by Rashba effect. We also find the spin torque of ac current plays a trivial role in magnetic vortex dynamics in a broken inversion symmetry system when the current density is on the order of 1010 A m-2 and the current with frequency close to the vortex eigenfrequency is the most efficient for reversal.

  20. Layered Black Phosphorus: Strongly Anisotropic Magnetic, Electronic, and Electron-Transfer Properties.

    PubMed

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Sedmidubský, David; Huber, Štěpán; Luxa, Jan; Bouša, Daniel; Boothroyd, Chris; Pumera, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Layered elemental materials, such as black phosphorus, exhibit unique properties originating from their highly anisotropic layered structure. The results presented herein demonstrate an anomalous anisotropy for the electrical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties of black phosphorus. It is shown that heterogeneous electron transfer from black phosphorus to outer- and inner-sphere molecular probes is highly anisotropic. The electron-transfer rates differ at the basal and edge planes. These unusual properties were interpreted by means of calculations, manifesting the metallic character of the edge planes as compared to the semiconducting properties of the basal plane. This indicates that black phosphorus belongs to a group of materials known as topological insulators. Consequently, these effects render the magnetic properties highly anisotropic, as both diamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior can be observed depending on the orientation in the magnetic field.

  1. Observation of thermal spin-transfer torque via ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Bai, Lihui; Chen, Xiaobin; Guo, Hong; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Houssameddine, D.; Hu, C.-M.

    2016-08-01

    The thermal spin-transfer torque (TSTT) in magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) was systematically studied using electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). Evidence for the existence of TSTT in MTJs is observed. A temperature difference was applied across an MTJ acting as a TSTT on the free layer of the MTJ. The FMR of the free layer was then excited by a microwave current and electrically detected as a dc voltage. We found that the FMR line shape was changed by the TSTT, indicated by the ratio of dispersive and Lorentz components of the FMR spectra (D /L ). D /L increases by increasing the temperature difference. In addition, we analyze the magnetization orientation dependence of TSTT and provide solid evidence that this dependence differs from the magnetization orientation dependence of spin-transfer torque driven by a dc bias.

  2. Negative thermal expansion induced by intermetallic charge transfer

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Masaki; Oka, Kengo; Nabetani, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of thermal expansion is of great importance for industry. Negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials which shrink on heating and expand on cooling are therefore attracting keen attention. Here we provide a brief overview of NTE induced by intermetallic charge transfer in A-site ordered double perovskites SaCu3Fe4O12 and LaCu3Fe4−xMnxO12, as well as in Bi or Ni substituted BiNiO3. The last compound shows a colossal dilatometric linear thermal expansion coefficient exceeding −70 × 10−6 K−1 near room temperature, in the temperature range which can be controlled by substitution. PMID:27877801

  3. Magnet-induced temporary superhydrophobic coatings from one-pot synthesized hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jian; Wang, Hongxia; Xue, Yuhua; Wang, Xungai; Lin, Tong

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we report on the production of superhydrophobic coatings on various substrates (e.g., glass slide, silicon wafer, aluminum foil, plastic film, nanofiber mat, textile fabrics) using hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles and a magnet-assembly technique. Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with a thin layer of fluoroalkyl silica on the surface were synthesized by one-step coprecipitation of Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) under an alkaline condition in the presence of a fluorinated alkyl silane. Under a magnetic field, the magnetic nanoparticles can be easily deposited on any solid substrate to form a thin superhydrophobic coating with water contact angle as high as 172 degrees , and the surface superhydrophobicity showed very little dependence on the substrate type. The particulate coating showed reasonable durability because of strong aggregation effect of nanoparticles, but the coating layer can be removed (e.g., by ultrasonication) to restore the original surface feature of the substrates. By comparison, the thin particle layer deposited under no magnetic field showed much lower hydrophobicity. The main reason for magnet-induced superhydrophobic surfaces is the formation of nano- and microstructured surface features. Such a magnet-induced temporary superhydrophobic coating may have wide applications in electronic, biomedical, and defense-related areas.

  4. Strain-induced chiral magnetic effect in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortijo, Alberto; Kharzeev, Dmitri; Landsteiner, Karl; Vozmediano, Maria A. H.

    2016-12-01

    We argue that strain applied to a time-reversal and inversion breaking Weyl semimetal in a magnetic field can induce an electric current via the chiral magnetic effect. A tight-binding model is used to show that strain generically changes the locations in the Brillouin zone but also the energies of the band touching points (tips of the Weyl cones). Since axial charge in a Weyl semimetal can relax via intervalley scattering processes, the induced current will decay with a time scale given by the lifetime of a chiral quasiparticle. We estimate the strength and lifetime of the current for typical material parameters and find that it should be experimentally observable.

  5. Giant Controllable Magnetization Changes Induced by Structural Phase Transitions in a Metamagnetic Artificial Multiferroic

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, S. P.; Wong, A. T.; Glavic, A.; Herklotz, A.; Urban, C.; Valmianski, I.; Biegalski, M. D.; Christen, H. M.; Ward, T. Z.; Lauter, V.

    2016-01-01

    The realization of a controllable metamagnetic transition from AFM to FM ordering would open the door to a plethora of new spintronics based devices that, rather than reorienting spins in a ferromagnet, harness direct control of a materials intrinsic magnetic ordering. In this study FeRh films with drastically reduced transition temperatures and a large magneto-thermal hysteresis were produced for magnetocaloric and spintronics applications. Remarkably, giant controllable magnetization changes (measured to be as high has ~25%) are realized by manipulating the strain transfer from the external lattice when subjected to two structural phase transitions of BaTiO3 (001) single crystal substrate. These magnetization changes are the largest seen to date to be controllably induced in the FeRh system. Using polarized neutron reflectometry we reveal how just a slight in plane surface strain change at ~290C results in a massive magnetic transformation in the bottom half of the film clearly demonstrating a strong lattice-spin coupling in FeRh. By means of these substrate induced strain changes we show a way to reproducibly explore the effects of temperature and strain on the relative stabilities of the FM and AFM phases in multi-domain metamagnetic systems. This study also demonstrates for the first time the depth dependent nature of a controllable magnetic order using strain in an artificial multiferroic heterostructure. PMID:26940159

  6. Giant Controllable Magnetization Changes Induced by Structural Phase Transitions in a Metamagnetic Artificial Multiferroic

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, S. P.; Wong, A. T.; Glavic, A.; Herklotz, A.; Urban, C.; Valmianski, I.; Biegalski, M. D.; Christen, H. M.; Ward, T. Z.; Lauter, V.

    2016-03-04

    We realize that a controllable metamagnetic transition from AFM to FM ordering would open the door to a plethora of new spintronics based devices that, rather than reorienting spins in a ferromagnet, harness direct control of a materials intrinsic magnetic ordering. In this study FeRh films with drastically reduced transition temperatures and a large magneto-thermal hysteresis were produced for magnetocaloric and spintronics applications. Remarkably, giant controllable magnetization changes (measured to be as high has ~25%) are realized and by manipulating the strain transfer from the external lattice when subjected to two structural phase transitions of BaTiO3 (001) single crystal substrate. These magnetization changes are the largest seen to date to be controllably induced in the FeRh system. Using polarized neutron reflectometry we reveal how just a slight in plane surface strain change at ~290C results in a massive magnetic transformation in the bottom half of the film clearly demonstrating a strong lattice-spin coupling in FeRh. By means of these substrate induced strain changes we show a way to reproducibly explore the effects of temperature and strain on the relative stabilities of the FM and AFM phases in multi-domain metamagnetic systems. In our study also demonstrates for the first time the depth dependent nature of a controllable magnetic order using strain in an artificial multiferroic heterostructure.

  7. Giant Controllable Magnetization Changes Induced by Structural Phase Transitions in a Metamagnetic Artificial Multiferroic

    DOE PAGES

    Bennett, S. P.; Wong, A. T.; Glavic, A.; ...

    2016-03-04

    We realize that a controllable metamagnetic transition from AFM to FM ordering would open the door to a plethora of new spintronics based devices that, rather than reorienting spins in a ferromagnet, harness direct control of a materials intrinsic magnetic ordering. In this study FeRh films with drastically reduced transition temperatures and a large magneto-thermal hysteresis were produced for magnetocaloric and spintronics applications. Remarkably, giant controllable magnetization changes (measured to be as high has ~25%) are realized and by manipulating the strain transfer from the external lattice when subjected to two structural phase transitions of BaTiO3 (001) single crystal substrate.more » These magnetization changes are the largest seen to date to be controllably induced in the FeRh system. Using polarized neutron reflectometry we reveal how just a slight in plane surface strain change at ~290C results in a massive magnetic transformation in the bottom half of the film clearly demonstrating a strong lattice-spin coupling in FeRh. By means of these substrate induced strain changes we show a way to reproducibly explore the effects of temperature and strain on the relative stabilities of the FM and AFM phases in multi-domain metamagnetic systems. In our study also demonstrates for the first time the depth dependent nature of a controllable magnetic order using strain in an artificial multiferroic heterostructure.« less

  8. The transfer between electron bulk kinetic energy and thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Wang, Shui

    2013-06-15

    By performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate the transfer between electron bulk kinetic and electron thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection. In the vicinity of the X line, the electron bulk kinetic energy density is much larger than the electron thermal energy density. The evolution of the electron bulk kinetic energy is mainly determined by the work done by the electric field force and electron pressure gradient force. The work done by the electron gradient pressure force in the vicinity of the X line is changed to the electron enthalpy flux. In the magnetic island, the electron enthalpy flux is transferred to the electron thermal energy due to the compressibility of the plasma in the magnetic island. The compression of the plasma in the magnetic island is the consequence of the electromagnetic force acting on the plasma as the magnetic field lines release their tension after being reconnected. Therefore, we can observe that in the magnetic island the electron thermal energy density is much larger than the electron bulk kinetic energy density.

  9. Disorder-induced microscopic magnetic memory.

    PubMed

    Pierce, M S; Buechler, C R; Sorensen, L B; Turner, J J; Kevan, S D; Jagla, E A; Deutsch, J M; Mai, T; Narayan, O; Davies, J E; Liu, K; Dunn, J Hunter; Chesnel, K M; Kortright, J B; Hellwig, O; Fullerton, E E

    2005-01-14

    Using coherent x-ray speckle metrology, we have measured the influence of disorder on major loop return point memory (RPM) and complementary point memory (CPM) for a series of perpendicular anisotropy Co/Pt multilayer films. In the low disorder limit, the domain structures show no memory with field cycling--no RPM and no CPM. With increasing disorder, we observe the onset and the saturation of both the RPM and the CPM. These results provide the first direct ensemble-sensitive experimental study of the effects of varying disorder on microscopic magnetic memory and are compared against the predictions of existing theories.

  10. Direct observation of Oersted-field-induced magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanostripes

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, V.; Pizzini, S.; Rougemaille, N.; Ranno, L.; Fruchart, O.; Wagner, E.; Vogel, J.; Cros, V.; Jimenez, E.; Camarero, J.; Urbanek, M.; Gaudin, G.; Sirotti, F.

    2011-01-15

    We have used time-resolved x-ray photoemission electron microscopy to investigate the magnetization dynamics induced by nanosecond current pulses in NiFe/Cu/Co nanostripes. A large tilt of the NiFe magnetization in the direction transverse to the stripe is observed during the pulses. We show that this effect cannot be quantitatively understood from the amplitude of the Oersted field and the shape anisotropy. High-frequency oscillations observed at the onset of the pulses are attributed to precessional motion of the NiFe magnetization about the effective field. We discuss the possible origins of the large magnetization tilt and the potential implications of the static and dynamic effects of the Oersted field on current-induced domain-wall motion in such stripes.

  11. Gyro-induced acceleration of magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Comisso, L.; Grasso, D.; Waelbroeck, F. L.; Borgogno, D.

    2013-09-15

    The linear and nonlinear evolution of magnetic reconnection in collisionless high-temperature plasmas with a strong guide field is analyzed on the basis of a two-dimensional gyrofluid model. The linear growth rate of the reconnecting instability is compared to analytical calculations over the whole spectrum of linearly unstable wave numbers. In the strongly unstable regime (large Δ′), the nonlinear evolution of the reconnecting instability is found to undergo two distinctive acceleration phases separated by a stall phase in which the instantaneous growth rate decreases. The first acceleration phase is caused by the formation of strong electric fields close to the X-point due to ion gyration, while the second acceleration phase is driven by the development of an open Petschek-like configuration due to both ion and electron temperature effects. Furthermore, the maximum instantaneous growth rate is found to increase dramatically over its linear value for decreasing diffusion layers. This is a consequence of the fact that the peak instantaneous growth rate becomes weakly dependent on the microscopic plasma parameters if the diffusion region thickness is sufficiently smaller than the equilibrium magnetic field scale length. When this condition is satisfied, the peak reconnection rate asymptotes to a constant value.

  12. Lunar magnetic field - Permanent and induced dipole moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.; Schubert, G.

    1974-01-01

    Apollo 15 subsatellite magnetic field observations have been used to measure both the permanent and the induced lunar dipole moments. Although only an upper limit of 1.3 x 10 to the 18th gauss-cubic centimeters has been determined for the permanent dipole moment in the orbital plane, there is a significant induced dipole moment which opposes the applied field, indicating the existence of a weak lunar ionosphere.

  13. Highly sensitive detection and stochastic analysis of magnetization agitation induced in a single layered magnetic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Akinobu; Motoi, Keiichi; Miyajima, Hideki

    2016-03-01

    This study shows that broadband magnetic noise in a ferromagnetic wire can be detected over a wide frequency range between 500 MHz and 8 GHz using a lock-in detection technique. The magnetic noise spectrum from a 20 nm-thick single-layered Fe19Ni81 wire biased with a dc current is measured as functions of an external field and dc current. This noise is caused by thermal agitation in magnetization due to ambient temperature and Joule heating. The noise behaviors are well reproduced by a stochastic model. Thus, this paper presents a stochastic analysis of magnetic noise behaviors induced by thermal agitation using a highly sensitive technique for detecting the magnetic noise in a single layered ferromagnetic wire.

  14. Effect of the plasma-induced magnetic field on a magnetic nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Mario; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2016-08-01

    A two-fluid, two-dimensional model of the plasma expansion in a divergent magnetic nozzle is used to investigate the effect of the plasma-induced magnetic field on the acceleration and divergence of the plasma jet self-consistently. The induced field is diamagnetic and opposes the applied one, increasing the divergence of the magnetic nozzle and weakening its strength. This has a direct impact on the propulsive performance of the device, the demagnetization and detachment of the plasma, and can lead to the appearance of zero-field points and separatrix surfaces downstream. In contrast, the azimuthal induced field, albeit non-zero, is small in all cases of practical interest.

  15. Heat and momentum transfer for magnetoconvection in a vertical external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zürner, Till; Liu, Wenjun; Krasnov, Dmitry; Schumacher, Jörg

    2016-11-01

    The scaling theory of Grossmann and Lohse for the turbulent heat and momentum transfer is extended to the magnetoconvection case in the presence of a (strong) vertical magnetic field. The comparison with existing laboratory experiments and direct numerical simulations in the quasistatic limit allows to restrict the parameter space to very low Prandtl and magnetic Prandtl numbers and thus to reduce the number of unknown parameters in the model. Also included is the Chandrasekhar limit for which the outer magnetic induction field B is large enough such that convective motion is suppressed and heat is transported by diffusion. Our theory identifies four distinct regimes of magnetoconvection which are distinguished by the strength of the outer magnetic field and the level of turbulence in the flow, respectively. LIMTECH Research Alliance and Research Training Group GK 1567 on Lorentz Force Velocimetry, funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  16. Heat and momentum transfer for magnetoconvection in a vertical external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zürner, Till; Liu, Wenjun; Krasnov, Dmitry; Schumacher, Jörg

    2016-10-01

    The scaling theory of Grossmann and Lohse [J. Fluid Mech. 407, 27 (2000), 10.1017/S0022112099007545] for turbulent heat and momentum transfer is extended to the magnetoconvection case in the presence of a (strong) vertical magnetic field. A comparison with existing laboratory experiments and direct numerical simulations in the quasistatic limit allows us to restrict the parameter space to very low Prandtl and magnetic Prandtl numbers and thus to reduce the number of unknown parameters in the model. Also included is the Chandrasekhar limit, for which the outer magnetic induction field B is large enough such that convective motion is suppressed and heat is transported by diffusion. Our theory identifies four distinct regimes of magnetoconvection that are distinguished by the strength of the outer magnetic field and the level of turbulence in the flow, respectively.

  17. Flow Structure Determined Enhancing and Inhibiting Convective Heat Transfers in Quasi 1D Magnetic Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Weili; Huang, Jun; Liu, Tianshu

    2016-11-01

    We have found previously that the convective flow in magnetic fluid responds to applied magnetic fields differently, depending on the relative direction of the gradient of temperature to that of the field. In this work we report the velocity profiles from these flows obtained from optical flow method. The peculiar magnetic driving force as well as the special configurations give rise to unique flow patterns, distinctly depends on the specific relative orientation of the temperature to that of field. The streamline plots indicate formation of local or global flow structures that explain the different effects of field on the heat transfer in the sample. For one configuration, the magneto-thermo convection causing the "heat" to be localized, stopping the equilibration process in the system. We will discuss the different responses to the applied magnetic fields for two different sample configurations in terms of relative orientation of the temperature and field gradients.

  18. Dynamic anisotropy in MHD turbulence induced by mean magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Sita; Verma, Mahendra K.; Alexakis, Alexandros; Chatterjee, Anando G.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we study the development of anisotropy in strong MHD turbulence in the presence of a large scale magnetic field B0 by analyzing the results of direct numerical simulations. Our results show that the developed anisotropy among the different components of the velocity and magnetic field is a direct outcome of the inverse cascade of energy of the perpendicular velocity components u⊥ and a forward cascade of the energy of the parallel component u ∥ . The inverse cascade develops for a strong B0, where the flow exhibits a strong vortical structure by the suppression of fluctuations along the magnetic field. Both the inverse and the forward cascade are examined in detail by investigating the anisotropic energy spectra, the energy fluxes, and the shell to shell energy transfers among different scales.

  19. The meso-structured magnetic atmosphere. A stochastic polarized radiative transfer approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, T. A.; Kopf, M.

    2007-06-01

    We present a general radiative transfer model which allows the Zeeman diagnostics of complex and unresolved solar magnetic fields. Present modeling techniques still rely to a large extent on a-priori assumptions about the geometry of the underlying magnetic field. In an effort to obtain a more flexible and unbiased approach we pursue a rigorous statistical description of the underlying atmosphere. Based on a Markov random field model the atmospheric structures are characterized in terms of probability densities and spatial correlations. This approach allows us to derive a stochastic transport equation for polarized light valid in a regime with an arbitrary fluctuating magnetic field on finite scales. One of the key ingredients of the derived stochastic transfer equation is the correlation length which provides an additional degree of freedom to the transport equation and can be used as a diagnostic parameter to estimate the characteristic length scale of the underlying magnetic field. It is shown that the stochastic transfer equation represents a natural extension of the (polarized) line formation under the micro- and macroturbulent assumption and contains both approaches as limiting cases. In particular, we show how in an inhomogeneous atmosphere asymmetric Stokes profiles develop and that the correlation length directly controls the degree of asymmetry and net circular polarization (NCP). In a number of simple numerical model calculations we demonstrate the importance of a finite correlation length for the polarized line formation and its impact on the resulting Stokes line profiles. Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Magnetization transfer proportion: a simplified measure of dose response for polymer gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Heather M.; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Gore, John C.

    2008-12-01

    The response to radiation of polymer gel dosimeters has most often been described by measuring the nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation rate as a function of dose. This approach is highly dependent upon the choice of experimental parameters, such as the echo spacing time for Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill-type pulse sequences, and is difficult to optimize in imaging applications where a range of doses are applied to a single gel, as is typical for practical uses of polymer gel dosimetry. Moreover, errors in computing dose can arise when there are substantial variations in the radiofrequency (B1) field or resonant frequency, as may occur for large samples. Here we consider the advantages of using magnetization transfer imaging as an alternative approach and propose the use of a simplified quantity, the magnetization transfer proportion (MTP), to assess doses. This measure can be estimated through two simple acquisitions and is more robust in the presence of some sources of system imperfections. It also has a dependence upon experimental parameters that is independent of dose, allowing simultaneous optimization at all dose levels. The MTP is shown to be less susceptible to B1 errors than are CPMG measurements of R2. The dose response can be optimized through appropriate choices of the power and offset frequency of the pulses used in magnetization transfer imaging.

  1. 2D-ELDOR detection of magnetization transfer of nitroxides in disordered solid polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maresch, G. G.; Weber, M.; Dubinskii, A. A.; Spiess, H. W.

    1992-05-01

    Two-dimensional electron—electron double resonance (2D-ELDOR) experiments on nitroxide spin labels in solid liquid-crystalline side-group polymers have been performed employing narrow-band microwave excitation pulses followed by a rapid magnetic field step during a mixing time and detection at the new selected point of the EPR spectrum. Information about magnetization transfer throughout the full EPR spectrum is obtained by sweeping both pumping and detecting fields. In the two-dimensional representation of experimental ELDOR data, the different processes causing magnetization transfer through the EPR spectrum, i.e. electron spin diffusion, nuclear relaxation, and slow rotational motions lead to different patterns and can be distinguished by recording 2D-ELDOR spectra as a function of temperature. In the specific system studied, the 2D-ELDOR spectra show the dominance of magnetization transfer between states with close molecular orientations but different nitrogen nuclear spin projections caused by flips of nuclear spins. The results are discussed in terms of dynamic processes in glasses.

  2. THE RADIATIVE TRANSFER OF SYNCHROTRON RADIATION THROUGH A COMPRESSED RANDOM MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Cawthorne, T. V.; Hughes, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    This paper examines the radiative transfer of synchrotron radiation in the presence of a magnetic field configuration resulting from the compression of a highly disordered magnetic field. It is shown that, provided Faraday rotation and circular polarization can be neglected, the radiative transfer equations for synchrotron radiation separate for this configuration, and the intensities and polarization values for sources that are uniform on large scales can be found straightforwardly in the case where opacity is significant. Although the emission and absorption coefficients must, in general, be obtained numerically, the process is much simpler than a full numerical solution to the transfer equations. Some illustrative results are given and an interesting effect, whereby the polarization increases while the magnetic field distribution becomes less strongly confined to the plane of compression, is discussed. The results are of importance for the interpretation of polarization near the edges of lobes in radio galaxies and of bright features in the parsec-scale jets of active galactic nuclei, where such magnetic field configurations are believed to exist.

  3. Magnetically Suspended Linear Pulse Motor for Semiconductor Wafer Transfer in Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriyama, Shin-Ichi; Hiraki, Naoji; Watanabe, Katsuhide; Kanemitsu, Yoichi

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a magnetically suspended linear pulse motor for a semiconductor wafer transfer robot in a vacuum chamber. The motor can drive a wafer transfer arm horizontally without mechanical contact. In the construction of the magnetic suspension system, four pairs of linear magnetic bearings for the lift control are used for the guidance control as well. This approach allows us to make the whole motor compact in size and light in weight. The tested motor consists of a double-sided stator and a transfer arm with a width of 50 mm and a total length of 700 mm. The arm, like a ladder in shape, is designed as the floating element with a tooth width of 4 mm (a tooth pitch of 8 mm). The mover mass is limited to about 1.6 kg by adopting such an arm structure, and the ratio of thrust to mover mass reaches to 3.2 N/kg under a broad air gap (1 mm) between the stator teeth and the mover teeth. The performance testing was carried out with a transfer distance less than 450 mm and a transfer speed less than 560 mm/s. The attitude of the arm was well controlled by the linear magnetic bearings with a combined use, and consequently the repeatability on the positioning of the arm reached to about 2 micron. In addition, the positioning accuracy was improved up to about 30 micron through a compensation of the 128-step wave current which was used for the micro-step drive with a step increment of 62.5 micron.

  4. Anomaly induced effects in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Boyarsky, Alexey; Ruchayskiy, Oleg

    2008-04-01

    We consider a modification of electrodynamics by an additional light massive vector field, interacting with the photon via Chern-Simons-like coupling. This theory predicts observable effects for the experiments studying the propagation of light in an external magnetic field, very similar to those, predicted by theories of axion and axion-like particles. We discuss a possible microscopic origin of this theory from a theory with non-trivial gauge anomaly cancellation between massive and light particles (including, for example, millicharged fermions). Due to the conservation of the gauge current, the production of the new vector field is suppressed at high energies. As a result, this theory can avoid both stellar bounds (which exist for axions) and the bounds from CMB considered recently, allowing for positive results in experiments like ALPS, LIPPS, OSQAR, PVLAS-2, BMV, Q&A, etc.

  5. Electric and magnetic surface polariton mediated near-field radiative heat transfer between metamaterials made of silicon carbide particles.

    PubMed

    Francoeur, Mathieu; Basu, Soumyadipta; Petersen, Spencer J

    2011-09-26

    Near-field radiative heat transfer between isotropic, dielectric-based metamaterials is analyzed. A potassium bromide host medium comprised of silicon carbide (SiC) spheres with a volume filling fraction of 0.4 is considered for the metamaterial. The relative electric permittivity and relative magnetic permeability of the metamaterial are modeled via the Clausius-Mossotti relations linking the macroscopic response of the medium with the polarizabilities of the spheres. We show for the first time that electric and magnetic surface polariton (SP) mediated near-field radiative heat transfer occurs between dielectric-based structures. Magnetic SPs, existing in TE polarization, are physically due to strong magnetic dipole resonances of the spheres. We find that spherical inclusions with radii of 1 μm (or greater) are needed in order to induce SPs in TE polarization. On the other hand, electric SPs existing in TM polarization are generated by surface modes of the spheres, and are thus almost insensitive to the size of the inclusions. We estimate that the total heat flux around SP resonance for the metamaterial comprised of SiC spheres with radii of 1 μm is about 35% greater than the flux predicted between two bulks of SiC, where only surface phonon-polaritons in TM polarization are excited. The results presented in this work show that the near-field thermal spectrum can be engineered via dielectric-based metamaterials, which is crucial in many emerging technologies, such as in nanoscale-gap thermophotovoltaic power generation.

  6. Magnetic-field-induced bistability in resonant tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. A.; Macks, L. D.

    1998-07-01

    We report an unusual magnetic-field-induced bistability in the current-voltage characteristic of an asymmetric double-barrier resonant tunneling structure. It is suggested that this bistability is the experimental manifestation of self-sustained current oscillations that have recently been predicted by Orellana, Anda, and Claro [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1118 (1997)].

  7. Field-induced magnetic states in holmium tetraboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, D.; Balakrishnan, G.; Wildes, A. R.; Ouladdiaf, B.; Qureshi, N.; Petrenko, O. A.

    2017-01-01

    A study of the zero field and field induced magnetic states of the frustrated rare earth tetraboride HoB4 has been carried out using single crystal neutron diffraction complemented by magnetization measurements. In zero field, HoB4 shows magnetic phase transitions at TN 1=7.1 K to an incommensurate state with a propagation vector (δ ,δ ,δ') , where δ =0.02 and δ'=0.43 and at TN 2=5.7 K to a noncollinear commensurate antiferromagnetic structure. Polarized neutron diffraction measurements in zero field have revealed that the incommensurate reflections, albeit much reduced in intensity, persist down to 1.5 K despite antiferromagnetic ordering at 5.7 K. At lower temperatures, application of a magnetic field along the c axis initially re-establishes the incommensurate phase as the dominant magnetic state in a narrow field range, just prior to HoB4 ordering with an up-up-down ferrimagnetic structure characterized by the (h k 1/3 ) -type reflections between 18 and 24 kOe. This field range is marked by the previously reported M /Msat=1/3 magnetization plateau, which we also see in our magnetization measurements. The region between 21 and 33 kOe is characterized by the increase in the intensity of the antiferromagnetic reflections, such as (100), the maximum of which coincides with the appearance of the narrow magnetization plateau with M /Msat≈3/5 . Further increase of the magnetic field results in the stabilization of a polarized state above 33 kOe, while the incommensurate reflections are clearly present in all fields up to 59 kOe. We propose the H -T phase diagram of HoB4 for the H ∥c containing both stationary and transitionary magnetic phases which overlap and show significant history dependence.

  8. Collision-induced stimulated photon echo in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetov, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The action of the longitudinal magnetic field on the collision-induced stimulated photon echo formed on the transition with the angular momentum change {{J}a}=0\\to {{J}b}=1 is studied theoretically. It is shown that this action depends essentially on the sign of the difference in the orientation Γb(1) and alignment Γb(2) relaxation rates of the excited level b. If Γb(2)>Γb(1) , then the echo intensity in a weak magnetic field increases with the increase in the magnetic field strength, while in the alternative case Γb(2)<Γb(1) it decreases up to zero value. The formulae enabling the determination of the magnitude of the difference Γb(1)-Γb(2) from the experimental study of the oscillations of the echo intensity with the increase in the magnetic field strength are obtained.

  9. Spin jam induced by quantum fluctuations in a frustrated magnet

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junjie; Samarakoon, Anjana; Dissanayake, Sachith; Ueda, Hiroaki; Klich, Israel; Iida, Kazuki; Pajerowski, Daniel; Butch, Nicholas P.; Huang, Q.; Copley, John R. D.; Lee, Seung-Hun

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of spin glasses in dilute magnetic systems, their study has been largely focused on understanding randomness and defects as the driving mechanism. The same paradigm has also been applied to explain glassy states found in dense frustrated systems. Recently, however, it has been theoretically suggested that different mechanisms, such as quantum fluctuations and topological features, may induce glassy states in defect-free spin systems, far from the conventional dilute limit. Here we report experimental evidence for existence of a glassy state, which we call a spin jam, in the vicinity of the clean limit of a frustrated magnet, which is insensitive to a low concentration of defects. We have studied the effect of impurities on SrCr9pGa12-9pO19 [SCGO(p)], a highly frustrated magnet, in which the magnetic Cr3+ (s = 3/2) ions form a quasi-2D triangular system of bipyramids. Our experimental data show that as the nonmagnetic Ga3+ impurity concentration is changed, there are two distinct phases of glassiness: an exotic glassy state, which we call a spin jam, for the high magnetic concentration region (p>0.8) and a cluster spin glass for lower magnetic concentration (p<0.8). This observation indicates that a spin jam is a unique vantage point from which the class of glassy states of dense frustrated magnets can be understood. PMID:26324917

  10. Magnetic-Polaron-Induced Enhancement of Surface Raman Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qi; Liao, Fan; Ruotolo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The studies of the effects of magnetic field on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) have been so far limited to the case of ferromagnetic/noble-metal, core/shell nano-particles, where the influence was always found to be negative. In this work, we investigate the influence of magnetic field on a diluted magnetic semiconductor/metal SERS system. Guided by three dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations, a high efficient SERS substrate was obtained by diluting Mn into Au-capped ZnO, which results in an increase of the dielectric constant and, therefore, an enhancement of Raman signals. More remarkably, an increase of intensities as well as a reduction of the relative standard deviation (RSD) of Raman signals have been observed as a function of the external magnetic strength. We ascribe these positive influences to magnetic-field induced nucleation of bound magnetic polarons in the Mn doped ZnO. The combination of diluted magnetic semiconductors and SERS may open a new avenue for future magneto-optical applications. PMID:26754049

  11. Persistent optically induced magnetism in oxygen-deficient strontium titanate.

    PubMed

    Rice, W D; Ambwani, P; Bombeck, M; Thompson, J D; Haugstad, G; Leighton, C; Crooker, S A

    2014-05-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is a foundational material in the emerging field of complex oxide electronics. Although its bulk electronic and optical properties are rich and have been studied for decades, SrTiO3 has recently become a renewed focus of materials research catalysed in part by the discovery of superconductivity and magnetism at interfaces between SrTiO3 and other non-magnetic oxides. Here we illustrate a new aspect to the phenomenology of magnetism in SrTiO3 by reporting the observation of an optically induced and persistent magnetization in slightly oxygen-deficient bulk SrTiO3-δ crystals using magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. This zero-field magnetization appears below ~18 K, persists for hours below 10 K, and is tunable by means of the polarization and wavelength of sub-bandgap (400-500 nm) light. These effects occur only in crystals containing oxygen vacancies, revealing a detailed interplay between magnetism, lattice defects, and light in an archetypal complex oxide material.

  12. Spin jam induced by quantum fluctuations in a frustrated magnet.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junjie; Samarakoon, Anjana; Dissanayake, Sachith; Ueda, Hiroaki; Klich, Israel; Iida, Kazuki; Pajerowski, Daniel; Butch, Nicholas P; Huang, Q; Copley, John R D; Lee, Seung-Hun

    2015-09-15

    Since the discovery of spin glasses in dilute magnetic systems, their study has been largely focused on understanding randomness and defects as the driving mechanism. The same paradigm has also been applied to explain glassy states found in dense frustrated systems. Recently, however, it has been theoretically suggested that different mechanisms, such as quantum fluctuations and topological features, may induce glassy states in defect-free spin systems, far from the conventional dilute limit. Here we report experimental evidence for existence of a glassy state, which we call a spin jam, in the vicinity of the clean limit of a frustrated magnet, which is insensitive to a low concentration of defects. We have studied the effect of impurities on SrCr9pGa12-9pO19 [SCGO(p)], a highly frustrated magnet, in which the magnetic Cr(3+) (s = 3/2) ions form a quasi-2D triangular system of bipyramids. Our experimental data show that as the nonmagnetic Ga(3+) impurity concentration is changed, there are two distinct phases of glassiness: an exotic glassy state, which we call a spin jam, for the high magnetic concentration region (p > 0.8) and a cluster spin glass for lower magnetic concentration (p < 0.8). This observation indicates that a spin jam is a unique vantage point from which the class of glassy states of dense frustrated magnets can be understood.

  13. Phase-transfer induced room temperature ferromagnetic behavior in 1T@2H-MoSe2 nanosheets

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Baorui; Wang, Tongtong; Xiao, Wen; Zhang, Rongfang; Liu, Peitao; Ding, Jun; Gao, Daqiang; Xue, Desheng

    2017-01-01

    Manipulating electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional transitional-metal dichalcogenides has raised a lot of attention recently. Herein we report the synthesis and ferromagnetic properties of phase-transfer induced room temperature ferromagnetic behavior in 1 T@2H-MoSe2 nanosheets. Experimental results indicate the saturated magnetization of the 1 T@2H-MoSe2 compound increases first and then decreases as the increasing of 1 T-MoSe2 phase, where 65.58% 1 T-MoSe2 phase incorporation in 2H-MoSe2 could enhance the saturated magnetization from 0.32 memu/g to 8.36 memu/g. Besides, obvious magnetoresistance behaviors are observed in these samples, revealing their potential applications in future spintronics. PMID:28349939

  14. Magnetic rogue wave in a perpendicular anisotropic ferromagnetic nanowire with spin-transfer torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fei; Li, Zai-Dong; Li, Qiu-Yan; Wen, Lin; Fu, Guangsheng; Liu, W. M.

    2012-09-01

    We present the current controlled motion of a dynamic soliton embedded in spin wave background in ferromagnetic nanowire. With the stronger breather character we get the novel magnetic rogue wave and clarify its formation mechanism. The generation of magnetic rogue wave mainly arises from the accumulation of energy and magnons toward to its central part. We also observe that the spin-polarized current can control the exchange rate of magnons between the envelope soliton and the background, and the critical current condition is obtained analytically. Even more interesting is that the spin-transfer torque plays the completely opposite role for the cases below and above the critical value.

  15. Spin-transfer-torque efficiency enhanced by edge-damage of perpendicular magnetic random access memories

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kyungmi; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2015-08-07

    We numerically investigate the effect of magnetic and electrical damages at the edge of a perpendicular magnetic random access memory (MRAM) cell on the spin-transfer-torque (STT) efficiency that is defined by the ratio of thermal stability factor to switching current. We find that the switching mode of an edge-damaged cell is different from that of an undamaged cell, which results in a sizable reduction in the switching current. Together with a marginal reduction of the thermal stability factor of an edge-damaged cell, this feature makes the STT efficiency large. Our results suggest that a precise edge control is viable for the optimization of STT-MRAM.

  16. Product change of molecule-magnetic material synthesis induced by magnetic field in hydrothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Helin; Chen, Jitang; Niu, Qiong; Gao, Yuanhao; Song, Jiming; Mao, Changjie; Zhang, Shengyi; Chen, Qianwang

    2011-08-01

    4-(imidazol-1-yl) benzoic acid (HL, L=C 10H 7N 2O 2), Copper sulfate, and sodium azide were selected as precursors, an interesting case of magnetic field-induced change in the final product of molecule-magnetic materials was observed. Without external magnetic field, the only green single crystal G [Cu 5(C 10H 7N 2O 2) 4 (N 3) 2(SO 4) 2] n was prepared, but under 0.2 T external magnetic field, the other blue violet single crystal B [Cu(C 10H 7N 2O 2) 2] n was found beside the green single crystal G. The product prepared under magnetic field comprises ca 34% B and 66% G. It indicates that the magnetic field induction is a dominating factor to the final product of self-assembly reaction for the metal-organic complex. The experiments have suggested a kind of effective control means to fabricate new molecule-magnetic materials under mild magnetic field induction.

  17. Numerical investigation of the heat transfer of a ferrofluid inside a tube in the presence of a non-uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Saman; Mokhtari, Mojtaba; Gerdroodbary, M. Barzegar; Fallah, Keivan

    2017-02-01

    In this article, a three-dimensional numerical investigation is performed to study the effect of a magnetic field on a ferrofluid inside a tube. This study comprehensively analyzes the influence of a non-uniform magnetic field in the heat transfer of a tube while a ferrofluid (water with 0.86 vol% nanoparticles (Fe3O4) is let flow. The SIMPLEC algorithm is used for obtaining the flow and heat transfer inside the tube. The influence of various parameters, such as concentration of nanoparticles, intensity of the magnetic field, wire distance and Reynolds number, on the heat transfer is investigated. According to the obtained results, the presence of a non-uniform magnetic field significantly increases the Nusselt number (more than 300%) inside the tube. Also, the magnetic field induced by the parallel wire affects the average velocity of the ferrofluid and forms two strong eddies in the tube. Our findings show that the diffusion also raises as the concentration of the nanoparticle is increased.

  18. Inducing Lift on Spherical Particles by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard N.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Gravity induced sedimentation of suspensions is a serious drawback to many materials and biotechnology processes, a factor that can, in principle, be overcome by utilizing an opposing Lorentz body force. In this work we demonstrate the utility of employing a traveling magnetic field (TMF) to induce a lifting force on particles dispersed in the fluid. Theoretically, a model has been developed to ascertain the net force, induced by TMF, acting on a spherical body as a function of the fluid medium's electrical conductivity and other parameters. Experimentally, the model is compared to optical observations of particle motion in the presence of TMF.

  19. Heat Transfer of Thermocapillary Convection in a Two-Layered Fluid System Under the Influence of Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Ludovisis, D.; Cha, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    Heat transfer of a two-layer fluid system has been of great importance in a variety of industrial applications. For example, the phenomena of immiscible fluids can be found in materials processing and heat exchangers. Typically in solidification from a melt, the convective motion is the dominant factor that affects the uniformity of material properties. In the layered flow, thermocapillary forces can come into an important play, which was first emphasized by a previous investigator in 1958. Under extraterrestrial environments without gravity, thermocapillary effects can be a more dominant factor, which alters material properties in processing. Control and optimization of heat transfer in an immiscible fluid system need complete understanding of the flow phenomena that can be induced by surface tension at a fluid interface. The present work is focused on understanding of the magnetic field effects on thermocapillary convection, in order to optimize material processing. That is, it involves the study of the complicated phenomena to alter the flow motion in crystal growth. In this effort, the Marangoni convection in a cavity with differentially heated sidewalls is investigated with and without the influence of a magnetic field. As a first step, numerical analyses are performed, by thoroughly investigating influences of all pertinent physical parameters. Experiments are then conducted, with preliminary results, for comparison with the numerical analyses.

  20. Bit error rate investigation of spin-transfer-switched magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zihui; Zhou, Yuchen; Zhang, Jing; Huai, Yiming

    2012-10-01

    A method is developed to enable a fast bit error rate (BER) characterization of spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) cells without integrating with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor circuit. By utilizing the reflected signal from the devices under test, the measurement setup allows a fast measurement of bit error rates at >106, writing events per second. It is further shown that this method provides a time domain capability to examine the MTJ resistance states during a switching event, which can assist write error analysis in great detail. BER of a set of spin-transfer-torque MTJ cells has been evaluated by using this method, and bit error free operation (down to 10-8) for optimized in-plane MTJ cells has been demonstrated.

  1. Coherent population transfer in multilevel systems with magnetic sublevels. II. Algebraic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J.; Shore, B. W.; Bergmann, K.

    1995-07-01

    We extend previous theoretical work on coherent population transfer by stimulated Raman adiabatic passage for states involving nonzero angular momentum. The pump and Stokes fields are either copropagating or counterpropagating with the corresponding linearly polarized electric-field vectors lying in a common plane with the magnetic-field direction. Zeeman splitting lifts the magnetic sublevel degeneracy. We present an algebraic analysis of dressed-state properties to explain the behavior noted in numerical studies. In particular, we discuss conditions which are likely to lead to a failure of complete population transfer. The applied strategy, based on simple methods of linear algebra, will also be successful for other types of discrete multilevel systems, provided the rotating-wave and adiabatic approximation are valid.

  2. Spectral Energy Transfer and Dissipation of Magnetic Energy from Fluid to Kinetic Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, K.; Li, H.

    2007-01-19

    We investigate the magnetic energy transfer from the fluid to kinetic scales and dissipation processes using three-dimensional fully kinetic particle-in-cell plasma simulations. The nonlinear evolution of a sheet pinch is studied where we show that it exhibits both fluid scale global relaxation and kinetic scale collisionless reconnection at multiple resonant surfaces. The interactions among collisionless tearing modes destroy the original flux surfaces and produce stochastic fields, along with generating sheets and filaments of intensified currents. In addition, the magnetic energy is transferred from the original shear length scale both to the large scales due to the global relaxation and to the smaller, kinetic scales for dissipation. The dissipation is dominated by the thermal or pressure effect in the generalized Ohm's law, and electrons are preferentially accelerated.

  3. Artificial magnetic field induced by an evanescent wave

    PubMed Central

    Mochol, Małgorzata; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Cold atomic gases are perfect laboratories for realization of quantum simulators. In order to simulate solid state systems in the presence of magnetic fields special effort has to be made because atoms are charge neutral. There are different methods for realization of artificial magnetic fields, that is the creation of specific conditions so that the motion of neutral particles mimics the dynamics of charged particles in an effective magnetic field. Here, we consider adiabatic motion of atoms in the presence of an evanescent wave. Theoretical description of the adiabatic motion involves artificial vector and scalar potentials related to the Berry phases. Due to the large gradient of the evanescent field amplitude, the potentials can be strong enough to induce measurable effects in cold atomic gases. We show that the resulting artificial magnetic field is able to induce vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped close to a surface of a prism where the evanescent wave is created. We also analyze motion of an atomic cloud released from a magneto-optical trap that falls down on the surface of the prism. The artificial magnetic field is able to reflect falling atoms that can be observed experimentally. PMID:25567430

  4. A voxel based comparative analysis using magnetization transfer imaging and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in progressive supranuclear palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sandhya, Mangalore; Saini, Jitender; Pasha, Shaik Afsar; Yadav, Ravi; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Aims: In progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) tissue damage occurs in specific cortical and subcortical regions. Voxel based analysis using T1-weighted images depict quantitative gray matter (GM) atrophy changes. Magnetization transfer (MT) imaging depicts qualitative changes in the brain parenchyma. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether MT imaging could indicate abnormalities in PSP. Settings and Design: A total of 10 patients with PSP (9 men and 1 woman) and 8 controls (5 men and 3 women) were studied with T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3DMT imaging. Voxel based analysis of T1-weighted MRI was performed to investigate brain atrophy while MT was used to study qualitative abnormalities in the brain tissue. We used SPM8 to investigate group differences (with two sample t-test) using the GM and white matter (WM) segmented data. Results: T1-weighted imaging and MT are equally sensitive to detect changes in GM and WM in PSP. Magnetization transfer ratio images and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition of gradient echo revealed extensive bilateral volume and qualitative changes in the orbitofrontal, prefrontal cortex and limbic lobe and sub cortical GM. The prefrontal structures involved were the rectal gyrus, medial, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and middle frontal gyrus (MFG). The anterior cingulate, cingulate gyrus and lingual gyrus of limbic lobe and subcortical structures such as caudate, thalamus, insula and claustrum were also involved. Cerebellar involvement mainly of anterior lobe was also noted. Conclusions: The findings suggest that voxel based MT imaging permits a whole brain unbiased investigation of central nervous system structural integrity in PSP. PMID:25024571

  5. Modelling of Ocean Induced Magnetic Signals in Swarm Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einspigel, D.; Velimsky, J.; Martinec, Z.; Sachl, L.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that the motion of sea water in the Earth's main magnetic field induces the secondary magnetic field which can be measured by satellite, land-based or sea surface magnetic measurements, despite being rather weak, reaching intensities of up to a few nT. We focus on the extraction of ocean induced signals from Swarm satellite data and their interpretation by a comparison with synthetic signals. Results of our modeling and data processing efforts will be presented. We use two ocean circulation models: 1) DEBOT, a barotropic model of ocean tide flow and 2) LSOMG, a baroclinic model of global ocean circulation; and two different approaches for modelling the secondary magnetic field: 1) a single-layer approximation model and 2) a three-dimensional time-domain electromagnetic induction model. Swarm data are analyzed along night-time tracks of the satellites. Only a small amount of the data can be used for the analysis of ocean-induced signals because of permanently present strong signals from the magnetosphere and disruptive effects of polar electrojets. Nevertheless, the extracted signals from selected Swarm data tracks show a relatively good coincidence with predicted signals.

  6. Estimation of Observatory Geoelectric Fields Induced during Great Magnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, J. J.; Swidinsky, A.

    2014-12-01

    In support of a project for monitoring hazards for electric power grids, we present a new method for estimating electric fields that are induced in the Earth's interior at a particular site during magnetic storms. For this, we adopt a model of the electrical conductivity of the lithosphere that is simple but sufficient to model most variation in the induced geoelectric field: two horizontal layers, each with uniform electrical conductivity properties that can be parameterized by a galvanic distortion tensor. After Laplace transformation of the induction equations into the complex frequency domain, we obtain an electromagnetic impedance function. Upon inverse transformation back to the time domain, convolution of the impedance tensor with a geomagnetic time series yields an estimated geoelectric time series. We optimize the model conductivity parameters using 1-sec resolution magnetic and electric field data collected at the Kakioka magnetic observatory during the October 2003 Halloween storm. We validate the algorithm against Kakioka magnetic and electric field data for the July 2000 Bastille-Day storm. Finally, we infer 1-sec geoelectric fields that were realized (but not directly measured) in Japan during the 1989 Quebec storm. Results highlight the need for improved ground-level monitoring of geomagnetic and geoelectric fields. They also reveal the need for accommodating the galvanic distortion of three-dimensional conductivity when predicting geoelectric fields in the lithosphere and geomagnetically induced currents in electric power grids.

  7. Comprehensive comparison of collision induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Molina, Henrik; Matthiesen, Rune; Kandasamy, Kumaran; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2008-07-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) is a recently introduced mass spectrometric technique which has proven to be an excellent tool for the elucidation of labile post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and O-GlcNAcylation of serine and threonine residues. However, unlike collision induced dissociation (CID), which has been studied for decades, the intricacies of ETD-based fragmentation have not yet been firmly established or systematically addressed. In this analysis, we have systematically compared the CID and ETD fragmentation patterns for the large majority of the peptides that do not contain such labile modifications. Using a standard 48 protein mix, we were able to measure false-positive rates for the experiments and also assess a large number of peptides for a detailed comparison of CID and ETD fragmentation pattern. Analysis of approximately 19,000 peptides derived from both standard proteins and complex protein samples revealed that (i) CID identified 50% more peptides than ETD; (ii) ETD resulted in approximately 20% increase in amino acid sequence coverage over CID; and (iii) combining CID and ETD fragmentation increased the sequence coverage for an average tryptic peptide to 92%. Interestingly, our analysis revealed that nearly 60% of all ETD-identified peptides carried two positive charges, which is in sharp contrast to what has been generally accepted. We also present a novel strategy for automatic validation of peptide assignments based on identification of a peptide by consecutive CID and ETD fragmentation in an alternating mode.

  8. Magnetic field induced by elliptical instability in a rotating spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacaze, L.; Herreman, W.; Le Bars, M.; Le Dizès, S.; Le Gal, P.

    2006-10-01

    The tidal or the elliptical instability of the rotating fluid flows is generated by the resonant interaction of the inertial waves. In a slightly elliptically deformed rotating sphere, the most unstable linear mode is called the spin-over mode, and is a solid body rotation versus an axis aligned with the maximum strain direction. In the non-viscous case, this instability corresponds to the median moment of the inertial instability of the solid rotating bodies. This analogy is furthermore illustrated by an elliptical top experiment, which shows the expected inviscid heteroclinic behaviour. In geophysics, the elliptical instability may appear in the molten liquid cores of the rotating planets, which are slightly deformed by the tidal gravitational effects of the close bodies. It may then participate in the general outer core dynamics and possibly the geodynamo process. In this context, Kerswell and Malkus (Kerswell, R.R. and Malkus, W.V.R., Tidal instability as the source for Io's magnetic signature. Geophys. Res. Lett., 1998, 25, 603 606) showed that the puzzling magnetic field of the Jovian satellite Io may indeed be induced by the elliptically unstable motions of its liquid core that deflect the Jupiter's magnetic field. Our magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) experiment is a toy-experiment of this geophysical situation and demonstrates for the first time the possibility of an induction of a magnetic field by the flow motions due to the elliptical instability. A full analytical calculation of the magnetic dipole induced by the spin-over is presented. Finally, exponential growths of this induced magnetic field in a slightly deformed rotating sphere filled with galinstan liquid metal are measured for different rotating rates. Their growth rates compare well with the theoretical predictions in the limit of a vanishing Lorentz force.

  9. Magnet power supply control of the NSLS VUV and x-ray storage rings transfer lines

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.D.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Singh, O.; Smith, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The transfer lines for NSLS VUV and x-ray storage rings have been split. New power supplies have been incorporated with existing ones. The existing microprocessor system has been upgraded in order to control the additional functions. This system expands the input/output port of the microprocessor to an addressable serial/parallel link to each magnet power supply. The implementation of this system will be discussed.

  10. Lorentz Body Force Induced by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2003-01-01

    The Lorentz force induced by a traveling magnetic field (TMF) in a cylindrical container has been calculated. The force can be used to control flow in dectrically conducting melts and the direction of the magnetic field and resulting flow can be reversed. A TMF can be used to partially cancel flow driven by buoyancy. The penetration of the field into the cylinder decreases as the frequency increases, and there exists an optimal value of frequency for which the resulting force is a maximum. Expressions for the Lorentz force in the limiting cases of low frequency and infinite cylinder are also given and compared to the numerical calculations.

  11. Magnetically Induced Spectral Line Redshifts Full Disk Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, Roger K.; Boyden, John E.; Webster, Larry; Shieber, Tom

    1988-01-01

    A method which allows the calibration of the magnetically induced velocities and permits an improvement of the information from various planned solar oscillation experiments is presented. Based on the differential sensitivity to the magnetic effects of various spectral lines, a correction function giving the Doppler shift in each line as a function of the difference between shifts of the lines is derived. For 5250 A, the correction to be added to the observed velocity is -0.9 + or - 0.1 (V = 5237 to 5250).

  12. Magnetically coupled electromagnetically induced transparency analogy of dielectric metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fuli He, Xuan; Zhao, Qian; Lan, Chuwen; Zhou, Ji; Zhang, Weihong Qiu, Kepeng

    2014-03-31

    In this manuscript, we experimentally demonstrate magnetically coupled electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) analogy effect inside dielectric metamaterial. In contrast to previous studies employed different metallic topological microstructures to introduce dissipation loss change, barium strontium titanate, and calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}) are chosen as the bright and dark EIT resonators, respectively, due to their different intrinsic dielectric loss. Under incident magnetic field excitation, dielectric metamaterial exhibits an EIT-type transparency window around 8.9 GHz, which is accompanied by abrupt change of transmission phase. Numerical calculations show good agreement with experiment spectra and reveal remarkably increased group index, indicating potential application in slow light.

  13. Chemically induced magnetism in atomically precise gold clusters.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Katla Sai; Tarakeshwar, Pilarisetty; Mujica, Vladimiro; Kumar, Challa S S R

    2014-03-12

    Comparative theoretical and experimental investigations are reported into chemically induced magnetism in atomically-precise, ligand-stabilized gold clusters Au25 , Au38 and Au55 . The results indicate that [Au25 (PPh3 )10 (SC12 H25 )5 Cl2 ](2+) and Au38 (SC12 H25 )24 are diamagnetic, Au25 (SC2 H4 Ph)18 is paramagnetic, and Au55 (PPh3 )12 Cl6 , is ferromagnetic at room temperature. Understanding the magnetic properties resulting from quantum size effects in such atomically precise gold clusters could lead to new fundamental discoveries and applications.

  14. Heat transfer through cable insulation of Nb-Ti superconducting magnets operating in He II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granieri, P. P.

    2013-01-01

    The operation of Nb-Ti superconducting magnets in He II relies on superfluidity to overcome the severe thermal barrier represented by the cable electrical insulation. In wrapped cable insulations, like those used for the main magnets of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator, the micro-channels network created by the insulation wrappings allows to efficiently transfer the heat deposited or generated in the cable to the He bath. In this paper, available experimental data of heat transfer through polyimide electrical insulation schemes are analyzed. A steady-state thermal model is developed to describe the insulation of the LHC main dipole magnets and the Enhanced Insulation proposed for the High Luminosity LHC upgrade (HL-LHC), according to the relevant geometric parameters. The model is based on the coupled mechanisms of heat transfer through the bulk of the dielectric insulation and through micro-channels between the insulation tapes. A good agreement is found between calculations and tests performed at different applied pressures and heating configurations. The model allows identifying the heat fluxes in the cable cross-section as well as the dimensions of the micro-channels. These dimensions are confirmed by microscope images of the two insulations schemes.

  15. Passive shielding effect on space profile of magnetic field emissions for wireless power transfer to vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Batra, T. Schaltz, E.

    2015-05-07

    Magnetic fields emitted by wireless power transfer systems are of high importance with respect to human safety and health. Aluminum and ferrite are used in the system to reduce the fields and are termed as passive shielding. In this paper, the influence of these materials on the space profile has been investigated with the help of simulations on Comsol for the four possible geometries—no shielding, ferrite, aluminum, and full shielding. As the reflected impedance varies for the four geometries, the primary current is varied accordingly to maintain constant power transfer to the secondary side. Surrounding magnetic field plots in the vertical direction show that maxima's of the two coils for the no shielding geometry are centered at the respective coils and for the remaining three are displaced closer to each other. This closeness would lead to more effective addition of the two coil fields and an increase in the resultant field from space point of view. This closeness varies with distance in the horizontal direction and vertical gap between the coils and is explained in the paper. This paper provides a better understanding of effect of the passive shielding materials on the space nature of magnetic fields for wireless power transfer for vehicle applications.

  16. Optimal electron, phonon, and magnetic characteristics for low energy thermally induced magnetization switching

    SciTech Connect

    Atxitia, U.; Ostler, T. A.; Chantrell, R. W.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.

    2015-11-09

    Using large-scale computer simulations, we thoroughly study the minimum energy required to thermally induced magnetization switching (TIMS) after the application of a femtosecond heat pulse in transition metal-rare earth ferrimagnetic alloys. We find that for an energy efficient TIMS, a low ferrimagnetic net magnetization with a strong temperature dependence is the relevant factor for the magnetic system. For the lattice and electron systems, the key physics for efficient TIMS is a large electron-phonon relaxation time. Importantly, we show that as the cooling time of the heated electrons is increased, the minimum power required to produce TIMS can be reduced by an order of magnitude. Our results show the way to low power TIMS by appropriate engineering of magnetic heterostructures.

  17. Radiofrequency heating and magnetically induced displacement of dental magnetic attachments during 3.0 T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, K; Hasegawa, M; Abe, Y; Tabuchi, T; Namiki, T; Ishigami, T

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the risk of injury from dental magnetic attachments due to their radiofrequency (RF) heating and magnetically induced displacement during 3.0 T MRI. Methods To examine the magnetic attachments, we adopted the American Society for Testing and Materials F2182-02a and F2052-06 standards in two MRI systems (Achieva 3.0 T Nova Dual; Philips, Tokyo, Japan, and Signa HDxt 3.0 T; GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI). The temperature change was measured in a cylindrical keeper (GIGAUSS D600; GC, Tokyo, Japan) with coping of the casting alloy and a keeper with a dental implant at the maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) for 20 min. To measure the magnetically induced displacement force, three sizes of keepers (GIGAUSS D400, D600 and D1000) were used in deflection angle tests conducted at the point of the maximum magnetic field strength. Results Temperature elevations of both coping and implant were higher in the Signa system than in the Achieva system. The highest temperature changes in the keeper with implant and keeper with coping were 0.6 °C and 0.8 °C in the Signa system, respectively. The temperature increase did not exceed 1.0 °C at any location. The deflection angle (α) was not measurable because it exceeded 90°. GIGAUSS D400 required an extra 3.0 g load to constrain the deflection angle to less than 45°; GIGAUSS D600 and D1000 required 5.0 and 9.0 g loads, respectively. Conclusions Dental magnetic attachments pose no risk due to RF heating and magnetically induced displacement at 3.0 T MRI. However, it is necessary to confirm that these keepers are securely attached to the prosthesis before imaging. PMID:22499128

  18. Ultrafast laser induced local magnetization dynamics in Heusler compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, P.; Müller, T.; Dewhurst, J. K.; Sharma, S.; Gross, E. K. U.

    2016-12-01

    The overarching goal of the field of femtomagnetism is to control, via laser light, the magnetic structure of matter on a femtosecond time scale. The temporal limits to the light-magnetism interaction are governed by the fact that the electron spin interacts indirectly with light, with current studies showing a laser induced global loss in the magnetic moment on a time scale of the order of a few 100 s of femtoseconds. In this work, by means of ab-initio calculations, we show that more complex magnetic materials - we use the example of the Heusler and half-Heusler alloys - allow for purely optical excitations to cause a significant change in the local moments on the order of 5 fs. This, being purely optical in nature, represents the ultimate mechanism for the short time scale manipulation of spins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that qualitative behaviour of this rich magnetic response to laser light can be deduced from the ground-state spectrum, thus providing a route to tailoring the response of some complex magnetic materials, like the Heuslers, to laser light by the well established methods for material design from ground-state calculations.

  19. Ultrafast laser induced local magnetization dynamics in Heusler compounds

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, P.; Müller, T.; Dewhurst, J. K.; Sharma, S.; Gross, E. K. U.

    2016-01-01

    The overarching goal of the field of femtomagnetism is to control, via laser light, the magnetic structure of matter on a femtosecond time scale. The temporal limits to the light-magnetism interaction are governed by the fact that the electron spin interacts indirectly with light, with current studies showing a laser induced global loss in the magnetic moment on a time scale of the order of a few 100 s of femtoseconds. In this work, by means of ab-initio calculations, we show that more complex magnetic materials - we use the example of the Heusler and half-Heusler alloys - allow for purely optical excitations to cause a significant change in the local moments on the order of 5 fs. This, being purely optical in nature, represents the ultimate mechanism for the short time scale manipulation of spins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that qualitative behaviour of this rich magnetic response to laser light can be deduced from the ground-state spectrum, thus providing a route to tailoring the response of some complex magnetic materials, like the Heuslers, to laser light by the well established methods for material design from ground-state calculations. PMID:27966585

  20. Ultrafast laser induced local magnetization dynamics in Heusler compounds.

    PubMed

    Elliott, P; Müller, T; Dewhurst, J K; Sharma, S; Gross, E K U

    2016-12-14

    The overarching goal of the field of femtomagnetism is to control, via laser light, the magnetic structure of matter on a femtosecond time scale. The temporal limits to the light-magnetism interaction are governed by the fact that the electron spin interacts indirectly with light, with current studies showing a laser induced global loss in the magnetic moment on a time scale of the order of a few 100 s of femtoseconds. In this work, by means of ab-initio calculations, we show that more complex magnetic materials - we use the example of the Heusler and half-Heusler alloys - allow for purely optical excitations to cause a significant change in the local moments on the order of 5 fs. This, being purely optical in nature, represents the ultimate mechanism for the short time scale manipulation of spins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that qualitative behaviour of this rich magnetic response to laser light can be deduced from the ground-state spectrum, thus providing a route to tailoring the response of some complex magnetic materials, like the Heuslers, to laser light by the well established methods for material design from ground-state calculations.

  1. Magnetically induced decrease in droplet contact angle on nanostructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian; Ristenpart, William D; Stroeve, Pieter

    2011-10-04

    We report a magnetic technique for altering the apparent contact angle of aqueous droplets deposited on a nanostructured surface. Polymeric tubes with embedded superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles were prepared via layer-by-layer deposition in the 800 nm diameter pores of polycarbonate track-etched (PCTE) membranes. Etching away the original membrane yields a superparamagnetic film composed of mostly vertical tubes attached to a rigid substrate. We demonstrate that the apparent contact angle of pure water droplets deposited on the nanostructured film is highly sensitive to the ante situm strength of an applied magnetic field, decreasing linearly from 117 ± 1.3° at no applied field to 105 ± 0.4° at an applied field of approximately 500 G. Importantly, this decrease in contact angle did not require an inordinately strong magnetic field: a 15° decrease in contact angle was observed even with a standard alnico bar magnet. We interpret the observed contact angle behavior in terms of magnetically induced conformation changes in the film nanostructure, and we discuss the implications for reversibly switching substrates from hydrophilic to hydrophobic via externally tunable magnetic fields.

  2. Influence of spin-transfer torque on thermally activated ferromagnetic resonance excitations in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, S.; de Mestier, N.; Baraduc, C.; Thirion, C.; Liu, Y.; Li, M.; Wang, P.; Dieny, B.

    2008-11-01

    Voltage noise measurements on magnetic tunnel junctions show that thermal fluctuations of the magnetization are either amplified or quenched by subcritical spin-transfer torque depending on the current direction. We present an analytical model that describes the dependence of thermally activated ferromagnetic resonance on bias current. The evolution of the peak amplitude and linewidth with the applied current is directly related to the longitudinal torque, whereas the shift of the resonance frequency is sensitive to the transverse torque. Both spin torque terms are independently extracted from the measured noise spectra. Our results support the general idea that it is more pertinent to describe spin torque in terms of voltage rather than current in magnetic tunnel junctions.

  3. Magnetic rogue wave in a perpendicular anisotropic ferromagnetic nanowire with spin-transfer torque

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Fei; Li, Zai-Dong; Li, Qiu-Yan; Wen, Lin; Fu, Guangsheng; Liu, W.M.

    2012-09-15

    We present the current controlled motion of a dynamic soliton embedded in spin wave background in ferromagnetic nanowire. With the stronger breather character we get the novel magnetic rogue wave and clarify its formation mechanism. The generation of magnetic rogue wave mainly arises from the accumulation of energy and magnons toward to its central part. We also observe that the spin-polarized current can control the exchange rate of magnons between the envelope soliton and the background, and the critical current condition is obtained analytically. Even more interesting is that the spin-transfer torque plays the completely opposite role for the cases below and above the critical value. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We get the current controlled motion of a dynamic soliton embedded in spin wave background. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We get the novel magnetic rogue wave and clarify its formation mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The generation of magnetic rogue wave arises from the accumulation of energy and magnons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The spin-polarized current controls exchange rate of magnons between the envelope soliton and the background. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The spin-transfer torque plays the completely opposite role below and above the critical value.

  4. Optimization of magnetic refrigerators by tuning the heat transfer medium and operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremani, Mohammadreza; Aslani, Amir; Bennett, Lawrence; Della Torre, Edward

    A new reciprocating Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) experimental device has been designed, built and tested to evaluate the effect of the system's parameters on a reciprocating Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) near room temperature. Gadolinium turnings were used as the refrigerant, silicon oil as the heat transfer medium, and a magnetic field of 1.3 T was cycled. This study focuses on the methodology of single stage AMR operation conditions to get a higher temperature span near room temperature. Herein, the main objective is not to report the absolute maximum attainable temperature span seen in an AMR system, but rather to find the system's optimal operating conditions to reach that maximum span. The results of this work show that there is an optimal operating frequency, heat transfer fluid flow rate, flow duration, and displaced volume ratio in an AMR system. It is expected that such optimization and the results provided herein will permit the future design and development of more efficient room-temperature magnetic refrigeration systems.

  5. Use of an embedded contact sensor to study nanoscale heat transfer in heat assisted magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haoyu; Bogy, David

    2017-01-01

    A near field transducer is employed in the heat assisted magnetic recording technology in order to focus the light energy into a nanoscale spot on the disk. This is necessary to heat the high coercivity magnetic media to their Curie temperature, so the write transducer can record the data. However, the heat transfer mechanism across the head disk interface (HDI) is still not well understood. The current perpendicular media recording systems have a thermal fly-height control means in the air bearing slider near the read/write transducers for placing the transducers within 1 to 2 nm of the rotating disk. In order to monitor this near contact spacing, this system also uses an embedded contact sensor (ECS). Here, we investigate how this ECS can be used to study the heat transfer across the nanoscale gap between the read/write transducer and the disk. This study shows that the self heating effect of the ECS is strong when its current bias is too high. But this self heating effect can be isolated from other heat sources, which allows us to use the ECS for the desired heat transfer measurements. The experiments show that the heat transfer across the HDI is a strong function of the head-disk spacing.

  6. Deformation-induced anisotropy of remanent and induced magnetization - implications for interpretation of rock-magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovsky, E.; Machek, M.; Roxerová, Z.; Siemes, H.

    2015-12-01

    Induced and remanent magnetization measurements, e.g. shape of hysteresis loops, FORC diagrams and decomposition of isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition curves, became routine tools in rock-magnetic measurements, interpreted mostly in terms of composition and grain-size distribution of iron oxides. It is assumed that the substances investigate are with respect to these measurements isotropic and single measurement of one sample is sufficient for interpretation. This assumption is valid for powdered samples, but solid rock samples in general behave anisotropically. In our contribution we report on magnetic measurements of hematite ore samples deformed in torsion, which show significant anisotropy of shape of hysteresis loops and IRM acquisition curves; the degree of anisotropy reflecting the degree of deformation. Samples, measured in different directions, showed different shape of hysteresis loop, from regular, which may be interpreted either as randomly oriented multi-domain grains, or with different degree of distortion (wasp-waistedness), reflecting different distribution of contrasting coercivities. Also decomposition of IRM acquisition curves, measured in different direction, yielded different interpretation in terms of relative contributions of components with different coercivities. We interpret this anisotropy as result of deformation, causing preferred orientation of basal planes of hematite. Moreover, the anisotropy is asymmetric. Our results suggest that, at least in deformed rocks containing minerals with high shape and/or magnetocrystalline anisotropy, the effect of anisotropy should be considered and verified before induced and remanent magnetization measurements are interpreted.

  7. Interference of spin states in resonant photoemission induced by circularly polarized light from magnetized Gd

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, N.; Khalil, T.; Pohl, M.; Uphues, T.; Heinzmann, U.; Polcik, M.; Rader, O.; Heigl, F.; Starke, K.; Fritzsche, S.; Kabachnik, N. M.

    2006-10-15

    We have observed the spin-state interference by measuring the photoelectron spin polarization in the resonant preedge 4d{yields}4f photoemission from magnetized Gd. The photoemission is induced by circularly polarized light which determines one preferential direction of electron spin orientation due to polarization transfer and spin-orbit interaction. Another direction perpendicular to the first one is determined by the target electron spin orientation connected with the target magnetization. We have measured the component of spin polarization perpendicular to those two directions which can only appear due to spin-state interference which implies coherence of the spin states produced by the two mechanisms of the photoelectron spin polarization.

  8. Lifshitz effects on vector condensate induced by a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ya-Bo; Lu, Jun-Wang; Liu, Mo-Lin; Lu, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Cheng-Yuan; Yang, Zhuo-Qun

    2014-05-01

    By numerical and analytical methods, we study in detail the effects of the Lifshitz dynamical exponent z on the vector condensate induced by an applied magnetic field in the probe limit. Concretely, in the presence of the magnetic field, we obtain the Landau level independent of z, and we also find the critical value by coupling a Maxwell complex vector field and an SU(2) field into a (3+1)-dimensional Lifshitz black hole, respectively. The research results show that for the two models with the lowest Landau level, the increasing z improves the response of the critical temperature to the applied magnetic field even without the charge density, and the analytical results uphold the numerical results. In addition, we find that, even in the Lifshitz black hole, the Maxwell complex vector model is still a generalization of the SU(2) Yang-Mills model. Furthermore, we construct the square vortex lattice and discuss the implications of these results.

  9. Magnetic field induced lattice ground states from holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Yan-Yan; Erdmenger, Johanna; Shock, Jonathan P.; Strydom, Migael

    2013-03-01

    We study the holographic field theory dual of a probe SU(2) Yang-Mills field in a background (4 + 1)-dimensional asymptotically Anti-de Sitter space. We find a new ground state when a magnetic component of the gauge field is larger than a critical value. The ground state forms a triangular Abrikosov lattice in the spatial directions perpendicular to the magnetic field. The lattice is composed of superconducting vortices induced by the condensation of a charged vector operator. We perform this calculation both at finite temperature and at zero temperature with a hard wall cutoff dual to a confining gauge theory. The study of this state may be of relevance to both holographic condensed matter models as well as to heavy ion physics. The results shown here provide support for the proposal that such a ground state may be found in the QCD vacuum when a large magnetic field is present.

  10. X-ray induced demagnetization of single-molecule magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiser, Jan; Westerström, Rasmus; Piamonteze, Cinthia; Nolting, Frithjof; Rusponi, Stefano; Brune, Harald; Yang, Shangfeng; Popov, Alexey; Dunsch, Lothar; Greber, Thomas

    2014-07-21

    Low-temperature x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements on the endohedral single-molecule magnet DySc{sub 2}N@C{sub 80} at the Dy M{sub 4,5} edges reveal a shrinking of the opening of the observed hysteresis with increasing x-ray flux. Time-dependent measurements show that the exposure of the molecules to x-rays resonant with the Dy M{sub 5} edge accelerates the relaxation of magnetization more than off-resonant x-rays. The results cannot be explained by a homogeneous temperature rise due to x-ray absorption. Moreover, the observed large demagnetization cross sections indicate that the resonant absorption of one x-ray photon induces the demagnetization of many molecules.

  11. Discontinuous properties of current-induced magnetic domain wall depinning

    PubMed Central

    Hu, X. F.; Wu, J.; Niu, D. X.; Chen, L.; Morton, S. A.; Scholl, A.; Huang, Z. C.; Zhai, Y.; Zhang, W.; Will, I.; Xu, Y. B.; Zhang, R.; van der Laan, G.

    2013-01-01

    The current-induced motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) confined to nanostructures is of great interest for fundamental studies as well as for technological applications in spintronic devices. Here, we present magnetic images showing the depinning properties of pulse-current-driven domain walls in well-shaped Permalloy nanowires obtained using photoemission electron microscopy combined with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. In the vicinity of the threshold current density (Jth = 4.2 × 1011 A.m−2) for the DW motion, discontinuous DW depinning and motion have been observed as a sequence of “Barkhausen jumps”. A one-dimensional analytical model with a piecewise parabolic pinning potential has been introduced to reproduce the DW hopping between two nearest neighbour sites, which reveals the dynamical nature of the current-driven DW motion in the depinning regime. PMID:24170087

  12. Noise-induced bifurcations in magnetization dynamics of uniaxial nanomagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Serpico, C. Perna, S.; Quercia, A.; Bertotti, G.; D'Aquino, M.; Mayergoyz, I. D.

    2015-05-07

    Stochastic magnetization dynamics in uniformly magnetized nanomagnets is considered. The system is assumed to have rotational symmetry as the anisotropy axis, the applied field, and the spin polarization are all aligned along an axis of symmetry. By appropriate integration of the Fokker-Planck equation associated to the problem, the stochastic differential equation governing the evolution of the angle between the magnetization orientation and the symmetry axis is derived. The drift terms present in this equation contain a noise-induced drift term, which, in combination with drift terms of deterministic origin, can be written as the derivative of an effective potential. Superparamagnetic-like transitions are studied in connections with the bifurcations of the effective potential as temperature and excitation conditions are varied.

  13. Interlayer coupling through a dimensionality-induced magnetic state.

    PubMed

    Gibert, M; Viret, M; Zubko, P; Jaouen, N; Tonnerre, J-M; Torres-Pardo, A; Catalano, S; Gloter, A; Stéphan, O; Triscone, J-M

    2016-04-15

    Dimensionality is known to play an important role in many compounds for which ultrathin layers can behave very differently from the bulk. This is especially true for the paramagnetic metal LaNiO3, which can become insulating and magnetic when only a few monolayers thick. We show here that an induced antiferromagnetic order can be stabilized in the [111] direction by interfacial coupling to the insulating ferromagnet LaMnO3, and used to generate interlayer magnetic coupling of a nature that depends on the exact number of LaNiO3 monolayers. For 7-monolayer-thick LaNiO3/LaMnO3 superlattices, negative and positive exchange bias, as well as antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling are observed in different temperature windows. All three behaviours are explained based on the emergence of a (¼,¼,¼)-wavevector antiferromagnetic structure in LaNiO3 and the presence of interface asymmetry with LaMnO3. This dimensionality-induced magnetic order can be used to tailor a broad range of magnetic properties in well-designed superlattice-based devices.

  14. Interlayer coupling through a dimensionality-induced magnetic state

    PubMed Central

    Gibert, M.; Viret, M.; Zubko, P.; Jaouen, N.; Tonnerre, J.-M.; Torres-Pardo, A.; Catalano, S.; Gloter, A.; Stéphan, O.; Triscone, J.-M.

    2016-01-01

    Dimensionality is known to play an important role in many compounds for which ultrathin layers can behave very differently from the bulk. This is especially true for the paramagnetic metal LaNiO3, which can become insulating and magnetic when only a few monolayers thick. We show here that an induced antiferromagnetic order can be stabilized in the [111] direction by interfacial coupling to the insulating ferromagnet LaMnO3, and used to generate interlayer magnetic coupling of a nature that depends on the exact number of LaNiO3 monolayers. For 7-monolayer-thick LaNiO3/LaMnO3 superlattices, negative and positive exchange bias, as well as antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling are observed in different temperature windows. All three behaviours are explained based on the emergence of a (¼,¼,¼)-wavevector antiferromagnetic structure in LaNiO3 and the presence of interface asymmetry with LaMnO3. This dimensionality-induced magnetic order can be used to tailor a broad range of magnetic properties in well-designed superlattice-based devices. PMID:27079668

  15. Electro-mechanical energy conversion system having a permanent magnet machine with stator, resonant transfer link and energy converter controls

    DOEpatents

    Skeist, S. Merrill; Baker, Richard H.

    2006-01-10

    An electro-mechanical energy conversion system coupled between an energy source and an energy load comprising an energy converter device including a permanent magnet induction machine coupled between the energy source and the energy load to convert the energy from the energy source and to transfer the converted energy to the energy load and an energy transfer multiplexer to control the flow of power or energy through the permanent magnetic induction machine.

  16. Transport in superlattices of magnetic nanoparticles: coulomb blockade, hysteresis, and switching induced by a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Tan, Reasmey P; Carrey, Julian; Desvaux, Céline; Grisolia, Jérémie; Renaud, Philippe; Chaudret, Bruno; Respaud, Marc

    2007-10-26

    We report on magnetotransport measurements on millimetric superlattices of Co-Fe nanoparticles surrounded by an organic layer. At low temperature, the transition between the Coulomb blockade and the conductive regime becomes abrupt and hysteretic. The transition between both regimes can be induced by a magnetic field, leading to a novel mechanism of magnetoresistance. Between 1.8 and 10 K, a high-field magnetoresistance attributed to magnetic disorder at the surface of the particles is also observed. Below 1.8 K, this magnetoresistance abruptly collapses and a low-field magnetoresistance is observed.

  17. Induce magnetism into silicene by embedding transition-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaotian; Wang, Lu E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn; Lin, Haiping; Hou, Tingjun; Li, Youyong E-mail: yyli@suda.edu.cn

    2015-06-01

    Embedding transition-metal (TM) atoms into nonmagnetic nanomaterials is an efficient way to induce magnetism. Using first-principles calculations, we systematically investigated the structural stability and magnetic properties of TM atoms from Sc to Zn embedded into silicene with single vacancy (SV) and double vacancies (DV). The binding energies for different TM atoms correlate with the TM d-shell electrons. Sc, Ti, and Co show the largest binding energies of as high as 6 eV, while Zn has the lowest binding energy of about 2 eV. The magnetic moment of silicene can be modulated by embedding TM atoms from V to Co, which mainly comes from the 3d orbitals of TM along with partly contributions from the neighboring Si atoms. Fe atom on SV and Mn atom on DV have the largest magnetic moment of more than 3 μB. In addition, we find that doping of N or C atoms on the vacancy site could greatly enhance the magnetism of the systems. Our results provide a promising approach to design silicene-based nanoelectronics and spintronics device.

  18. Structure-induced spin reorientation in magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Alexander; Frauen, Axel; Vollmers, Julian; Meyer, Andreas; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-09-01

    We report on structuring-induced changes of the magnetic anisotropy of cylindrical nanostructures which are carved out of thin Pt/Co/Pt films. The magnetic properties of films and structures with a diameter of about 34 nm were investigated via magneto-optic Kerr effect. The magnetic anisotropy is determined for both films and nanostructures for varying Co thicknesses (0.5-7 nm). In general, the nanostructures exhibit larger perpendicular anisotropy than the films. On thickness increase of the Co layer two spin reorientation transitions at about 2.2 and 5 nm are found. At 2.2 nm the nanostructures exhibit the transition from perpendicular to in-plane orientation of magnetization while at 5 nm the reversed transition is found. The variation of the magnetic anisotropy of the Co nanostructures is not solely caused by the change of shape anisotropy. The net change, corrected for the shape, reveals a reduction of strain in the thinnest Co layers while the increase of the anisotropy of the nanostructures at higher Co thicknesses is caused by a transformation of the Co lattice from fcc to hcp.

  19. Magnetic field induced motion behavior of gas bubbles in liquid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Pei, Yu; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang

    2016-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction generally exists in electrochemical reactions. It is a ubiquitous problem about how to control the motion of oxygen bubbles released by the reaction. Here we show that oxygen bubbles during oxygen evolution reaction exhibit a variety of movement patterns in the magnetic field, including directional migration and rotational motion of oxygen bubbles when the magnet in parallel with the electrode, and exclusion movement of oxygen bubbles when the magnet perpendicular to the electrode. The results demonstrate that the direction of oxygen bubbles movement is dependent upon the magnet pole near the electrode, and the kinetics of oxygen bubbles is mainly proportional to intensity of the electromagnetic field. The magnetic-field induced rotational motion of oxygen bubbles in a square electrolyzer can increase liquid hydrodynamics, thus solve the problems of oxygen bubbles coalescence, and uneven distribution of electrolyte composition and temperature. These types of oxygen bubbles movement will not only improve energy saving and metal deposition for energy storage and metal refinery, but also propel object motion in application to medical and martial fields. PMID:26867515

  20. Magnetic field induced motion behavior of gas bubbles in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Keliang; Pei, Pucheng; Pei, Yu; Ma, Ze; Xu, Huachi; Chen, Dongfang

    2016-02-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction generally exists in electrochemical reactions. It is a ubiquitous problem about how to control the motion of oxygen bubbles released by the reaction. Here we show that oxygen bubbles during oxygen evolution reaction exhibit a variety of movement patterns in the magnetic field, including directional migration and rotational motion of oxygen bubbles when the magnet in parallel with the electrode, and exclusion movement of oxygen bubbles when the magnet perpendicular to the electrode. The results demonstrate that the direction of oxygen bubbles movement is dependent upon the magnet pole near the electrode, and the kinetics of oxygen bubbles is mainly proportional to intensity of the electromagnetic field. The magnetic-field induced rotational motion of oxygen bubbles in a square electrolyzer can increase liquid hydrodynamics, thus solve the problems of oxygen bubbles coalescence, and uneven distribution of electrolyte composition and temperature. These types of oxygen bubbles movement will not only improve energy saving and metal deposition for energy storage and metal refinery, but also propel object motion in application to medical and martial fields.

  1. Three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice on an atom chip with an optically induced fictitious magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Hui

    2010-05-15

    A robust type of three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice on an atom chip combining optically induced fictitious magnetic field with microcurrent-carrying wires is proposed. Compared to the regular optical lattice, the individual trap in this three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice can be easily addressed and manipulated.

  2. Three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice on an atom chip with an optically induced fictitious magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hui

    2010-05-01

    A robust type of three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice on an atom chip combining optically induced fictitious magnetic field with microcurrent-carrying wires is proposed. Compared to the regular optical lattice, the individual trap in this three-dimensional magnetic trap lattice can be easily addressed and manipulated.

  3. Metal nanoparticle fluids with magnetically induced electrical switching properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younghoon; Cho, Jinhan

    2013-05-01

    We report the successful preparation of solvent-free metal nanoparticle (NP) fluids with multiple-functionalities, such as rheological properties, magnetism, ionic conductivity, and electrical properties, allowing for facile synthesis and mass production. The gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) used in this study were synthesized using tetraoctylammonium bromide (TOABr) in toluene and then directly phase-transferred to solvent-free low-molecular-weight (Mw) imidazolium-type ionic liquid media containing thiol groups (i.e., IL-SH). Magnetic metal fluids (i.e., MIL-SH-AuNPs) were prepared by the addition of FeCl3 powder to metal fluids (i.e., IL-SH-AuNPs). These fluids showed relatively high ionic and electrical conductivities compared with those of conventional metal NP fluids based on organic ILs with high Mw. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that these fluids could be used as electric switches operated using an external magnetic field in organic media.We report the successful preparation of solvent-free metal nanoparticle (NP) fluids with multiple-functionalities, such as rheological properties, magnetism, ionic conductivity, and electrical properties, allowing for facile synthesis and mass production. The gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) used in this study were synthesized using tetraoctylammonium bromide (TOABr) in toluene and then directly phase-transferred to solvent-free low-molecular-weight (Mw) imidazolium-type ionic liquid media containing thiol groups (i.e., IL-SH). Magnetic metal fluids (i.e., MIL-SH-AuNPs) were prepared by the addition of FeCl3 powder to metal fluids (i.e., IL-SH-AuNPs). These fluids showed relatively high ionic and electrical conductivities compared with those of conventional metal NP fluids based on organic ILs with high Mw. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that these fluids could be used as electric switches operated using an external magnetic field in organic media. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00653k

  4. Spin polarization transfer mechanisms of SABRE: A magnetic field dependent study.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Ivanov, Konstantin L; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Petrov, Pavel A; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Kaptein, Robert; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the magnetic field dependence of Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) arising from binding of para-hydrogen (p-H2) and a substrate to a suitable transition metal complex. The magnetic field dependence of the amplification of the (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) signals of the released substrates and dihydrogen, and the transient transition metal dihydride species shows characteristic patterns, which is explained using the theory presented here. The generation of SABRE is most efficient at low magnetic fields due to coherent spin mixing at nuclear spin Level Anti-Crossings (LACs) in the SABRE complexes. We studied two Ir-complexes and have shown that the presence of a (31)P atom in the SABRE complex doubles the number of LACs and, consequently, the number of peaks in the SABRE field dependence. Interestingly, the polarization of SABRE substrates is always accompanied by the para-to-ortho conversion in dihydride species that results in enhancement of the NMR signal of free (H2) and catalyst-bound H2 (Ir-HH). The field dependences of hyperpolarized H2 and Ir-HH by means of SABRE are studied here, for the first time, in detail. The field dependences depend on the chemical shifts and coupling constants of Ir-HH, in which the polarization transfer takes place. A negative coupling constant of -7Hz between the two chemically equivalent but magnetically inequivalent hydride nuclei is determined, which indicates that Ir-HH is a dihydride with an HH distance larger than 2Å. Finally, the field dependence of SABRE at high fields as found earlier has been investigated and attributed to polarization transfer to the substrate by cross-relaxation. The present study provides further evidence for the key role of LACs in the formation of SABRE-derived polarization. Understanding the spin dynamics behind the SABRE method opens the way to optimizing its performance and overcoming the main limitation of NMR, its notoriously low sensitivity.

  5. Quantitative Magnetization Transfer Imaging of the Breast at 3.0 T: Reproducibility in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Dortch, Richard D.; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Kang, Hakmook; Abramson, Richard G.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative magnetization transfer magnetic resonance imaging provides a means for indirectly detecting changes in the macromolecular content of tissue noninvasively. A potential application is the diagnosis and assessment of treatment response in breast cancer; however, before quantitative magnetization transfer imaging can be reliably used in such settings, the technique’s reproducibility in healthy breast tissue must be established. Thus, this study aims to establish the reproducibility of the measurement of the macromolecular-to-free water proton pool size ratio (PSR) in healthy fibroglandular (FG) breast tissue. Thirteen women with no history of breast disease were scanned twice within a single scanning session, with repositioning between scans. Eleven women had appreciable FG tissue for test–retest measurements. Mean PSR values for the FG tissue ranged from 9.5% to 16.7%. The absolute value of the difference between 2 mean PSR measurements for each volunteer ranged from 0.1% to 2.1%. The 95% confidence interval for the mean difference was ±0.75%, and the repeatability value was 2.39%. These results indicate that the expected measurement variability would be ±0.75% for a cohort of a similar size and would be ±2.39% for an individual, suggesting that future studies of change in PSR in patients with breast cancer are feasible. PMID:28090588

  6. The magnetization transfer characteristics of human breast tissues: an in vitro NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callicott, C.; Thomas, J. M.; Goode, A. W.

    1999-05-01

    A series of freshly excised human breast tissues was analysed using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and then subjected to routine histopathology examination. Tissues comprised normal parenchymal, adipose, fibrocystic, fibroadenoma and malignant types. An inversion-recovery sequence performed both with and without magnetization transfer allowed T1, T1, and values to be obtained. From this information, the magnetization transfer rate constant, K, was calculated for each tissue sample. These data show that T1 provided greater discrimination between neoplasic and normal tissues than did T1. However, neither T1 nor K values provided a means of discriminating between benign and malignant disease.

  7. Equilibrium structure of solar magnetic flux tubes: Energy transport with multistream radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, S. S.; Kalkofen, W.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the equilibrium structure of vertical intense magnetic flux tubes on the Sun. Assuming cylindrical geometry, we solve the magnetohydrostatic equations in the thin flux-tube approximation, allowing for energy transport by radiation and convection. The radiative transfer equation is solved in the six-stream approximation, assuming gray opacity and local thermodynamic equilibrium. This constitutes a significant improvement over a previous study, in which the transfer was solved using the multidimensional generalization of the Eddington approximation. Convection in the flux tube is treated using mixing-length theory, with an additional parameter alpha, characterizing the suppression of convective energy transport in the tube by the strong magnetic field. The equations are solved using the method of partial linearization. We present results for tubes with different values of the magnetic field strength and radius at a fixed depth in the atmosphere. In general, we find that, at equal geometric heights, the temperature on the tube axis, compared to the ambient medium, is higher in the photosphere and lower in the convection zone, with the difference becoming larger for thicker tubes. At equal optical depths the tubes are generally hotter than their surroundings. The results are comparatively insensitive to alpha but depend upon whether radiative and convective energy transport operate simultaneously or in separate layers. A comparison of our results with semiempirical models shows that the temperature and intensity contrast are in broad agreement. However, the field strengths of the flux-tube models are somewhat lower than the values inferred from observations.

  8. Tuning the heat transfer medium and operating conditions in magnetic refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremani, Mohammadreza; Aslani, Amir; Siddique, Abid; Bennett, Lawrence H.; Della Torre, Edward

    2016-07-01

    A new experimental test bed has been designed, built, and tested to evaluate the effect of the system's parameters on a reciprocating Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) near room temperature. Bulk gadolinium was used as the refrigerant, silicon oil as the heat transfer medium, and a magnetic field of 1.3 T was cycled. This study focuses on the methodology of single stage AMR operation conditions to get a high temperature span near room temperature. Herein, the main objective is not to report the absolute maximum attainable temperature span seen in an AMR system, but rather to find the system's optimal operating conditions to reach that maximum span. The results of this research show that there is a optimal operating frequency, heat transfer fluid flow rate, flow duration, and displaced volume ratio in any AMR system. By optimizing these parameters in our AMR apparatus the temperature span between the hot and cold ends increased by 24%. The optimized values are system dependent and need to be determined and measured for any AMR system by following the procedures that are introduced in this research. It is expected that such optimization will permit the design of a more efficient magnetic refrigeration system.

  9. Experimental investigation on the boiling heat transfer of nanofluids on a flat plate in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, Ali; Reza Salimpour, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the pool boiling heat transfer of Fe3O4 -deionized (DI) water as a magnetic nanofluid has been experimentally analyzed in the atmospheric pressure. The applied nanofluid within this research has been synthesized through a single step to retain a high stability. The repeatability and precision of the testing device with deionized water show a good agreement with the equations introduced in previous studies. Parametric studies on magnetic field, surface roughness, and magnetic nanofluid concentration are performed to reveal various aspects of the boiling heat transfer. In order to study the surface roughness, two surfaces with high average roughness (480nm) and low average roughness (7.3nm) were used. The obtained results indicate that the boiling heat transfer on the rough surface increases when raising the nanofluid concentration up to 0.1% volume concentration. In addition, it is observed that there is an optimum 0.1% volume concentration for the nanofluid which makes the boiling heat transfer coefficient increase up to 43%. Moreover, the heat transfer of a nanofluid with volume concentration of 0.1% is greater for the rough surface compared with the smooth one. The results of the experiments indicate that adding nanoparticles would not necessarily increase the boiling heat transfer coefficient. In fact, the surface roughness and the magnetic field gradient on the boiling surface were the main factors that could affect the boiling heat transfer coefficient significantly. The simultaneous analysis of magnetic field, surface roughness, and nanofluid concentration reveals that the boiling heat transfer coefficient of the magnetic nanofluid with 0.1% volume concentration in the presence of a magnetic field on the rough surface is higher than on the smooth surface. Our findings show that this increase is associated to the increase of nucleation sites concentration and bubble formation sites for the rough surface.

  10. Voltage induced magnetostrictive switching of nanomagnets: Strain assisted strain transfer torque random access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Asif Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Ghani, Tahir; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-30

    A spintronic device, called the “strain assisted spin transfer torque (STT) random access memory (RAM),” is proposed by combining the magnetostriction effect and the spin transfer torque effect which can result in a dramatic improvement in the energy dissipation relative to a conventional STT-RAM. Magnetization switching in the device which is a piezoelectric-ferromagnetic heterostructure via the combined magnetostriction and STT effect is simulated by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation incorporating the influence of thermal noise. The simulations show that, in such a device, each of these two mechanisms (magnetostriction and spin transfer torque) provides in a 90° rotation of the magnetization leading a deterministic 180° switching with a critical current significantly smaller than that required for spin torque alone. Such a scheme is an attractive option for writing magnetic RAM cells.

  11. Heat transfer characteristics of Fe3O4 ferrofluid flowing in a mini channel under constant and alternating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemian, M.; Najafian Ashrafi, Z.; Goharkhah, M.; Ashjaee, M.

    2015-05-01

    Laminar forced convection heat transfer of water based Fe3O4 ferrofluid in a mini channel in the presence of constant and alternating magnetic fields is studied numerically. The hot ferrofluid flows into the 20 mm (l)×2 mm (h) mini channel with isothermal top and bottom cold surfaces and is subjected to a transverse non-uniform magnetic field produced by current carrying wires. Two-phase mixture model is implemented and the governing equations are solved using the finite volume approach. Primarily, the effects of the constant magnetic field location and intensity on the convective heat transfer are investigated. Simulation results show that the heat transfer is enhanced due to the disruption of the thermal boundary layer. However, this effect is more pronounced when the magnetic field source is placed in the fully developed region. In the next section, an alternating magnetic field with frequencies ranging from 0 to 10 Hz is imposed to the ferrofluid at different Reynolds numbers of Re=10, 25 and 50. A 16.48% heat transfer enhancement is obtained with a constant magnetic field at Re=25 and magnetic field intensity, Mn=1.07×108. This value is increased up to 27.72% by applying an alternating magnetic field with the same intensity at f=4 Hz. Results also indicate that the heat transfer enhancement due to the magnetic field is more significant at lower Reynolds numbers. The optimum frequency for heat transfer enhancement has been obtained for all the cases which shows that it has an increasing trend with the Reynolds number.

  12. Skin temperature changes induced by strong static magnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Ichioka, Shigeru; Minegishi, Masayuki; Iwasaka, Masakazu; Shibata, Masahiro; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Ando, Joji; Ueno, Shoogo

    2003-09-01

    High intensity static magnetic fields, when applied to the whole body of the anesthetized rat, have previously been reported to decrease skin temperature. The hypothesis of the present study was that in diamagnetic water, molecules in the air play significant roles in the mechanism of skin temperature decrease. We used a horizontal cylindrical superconducting magnet. The magnet produced 8 T at its center. A thermistor probe was inserted in a subcutaneous pocket of the anesthetized rats to measure skin temperature. Animals (n=10) were placed in an open plastic holder in which the ambient air was free to move in any direction (group I). Animals (n=10) were placed in a closed holder in which the air circulation toward the direction of weak magnetic field was restricted (group II). Each holder was connected to a hydrometer to measure humidity around the animal in the holder. The data acquisition phase consisted of a 5 min baseline interval, followed by inserting the animal together with the holder into the center of the magnet bore for a 5 min exposure and a 5 min postexposure period outside the bore. In group I, skin temperature and humidity around the animal significantly decreased during exposure, followed by recovery after exposure. In group II, skin temperature and humidity did not decrease during the measurement. The skin temperature decrease was closely related to the decrease in humidity around the body of the animal in the holder, and the changes were completely blocked by restricting the air circulation in the direction of the bore entrance. Possible mechanisms responsible for the decrease in skin temperature may be associated with magnetically induced movement of water vapor at the skin surface, leading to skin temperature decrease.

  13. Continuum effects in transfer reactions induced by heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Marta, H.D.; Donangelo, R.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Pacheco, A.J.

    2006-02-15

    In the usual treatment of transfer nuclear reactions, the continuum states of the transferred particle are neglected. Here we perform a semiclassical calculation that treats the continuum in an exact way. For comparison purposes, we perform a second calculation in which the continuum is completely disregarded. The results of these two calculations indicates that the influence of the continuum states may be very important in systems with weakly bound reactants.

  14. Static magnetic field induced hypovitaminosis D in rat.

    PubMed

    Aïda, Lahbib; Frédéric, Lecomte; Soumaya, Ghodbane; Philippe, Hubert; Mohsen, Sakly; Hafedh, Abdelmelek

    2013-01-01

    In the following study, we mainly investigate the effects of static magnetic field (SMF) (128 mT, 1 hr/day during 5 consecutive days) on 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and calcium homeostasis. Wistar male rats, weighing 50-70 g, were randomly divided into four experimental groups: control, SMF-exposed rat, co-exposed rats (the last day and after exposure rats received a single dose of vitamin D per os) and supplemented with vitamin D group (without exposure to SMF). Exposure to SMF induced a decrease of plasmatic 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 level (P < 0.001). While, calcium and phosphorus levels were not affected (P > 0.05). The same treatment failed also to alter body, relative liver and kidney weights. Interestingly, oral supplementation with vitamin D corrected hypovitaminosis D induced by SMF. Likewise, the same treatment failed to alter calcium homeostasis. More studies are needed to evaluate how SMF induces hypovitaminosis D.

  15. Controlled normal and inverse current-induced magnetization switching and magnetoresistance in magnetic nanopillars.

    PubMed

    AlHajDarwish, M; Kurt, H; Urazhdin, S; Fert, A; Loloee, R; Pratt, W P; Bass, J

    2004-10-08

    By combining pairs of ferromagnetic metals with the same or different signs of scattering anisotropies in ferromagnetic-nonmagnetic-ferromagnetic metal nanopillars, we independently invert just the magnetoresistance, just the direction of current-induced magnetization switching, or both together, at room temperature (295 K) and at 4.2 K. In all cases studied, the switching direction is correctly predicted from the net scattering anisotropy of the fixed ferromagnet, including both bulk and interfacial contributions.

  16. Percolation induced heat transfer in deep unsaturated zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; LeCain, G.D.

    2003-01-01

    Subsurface temperature data from a borehole located in a desert wash were measured and used to delineate the conductive and advective heat transfer regimes, and to estimate the percolation quantity associated with the 1997-1998 El Ni??no precipitation. In an arid environment, conductive heat transfer dominates the variation of shallow subsurface temperature most of the time, except during sporadic precipitation periods. The subsurface time-varying temperature due to conductive heat transfer is highly correlated with the surface atmospheric temperature variation, whereas temperature variation due to advective heat transfer is strongly correlated with precipitation events. The advective heat transfer associated with precipitation and infiltration is the focus of this paper. Disruptions of the subsurface conductive temperature regime, associated with the 1997-1998 El Ni??no precipitation, were detected and used to quantify the percolation quantity. Modeling synthesis using a one-dimensional coupled heat and unsaturated flow model indicated that a percolation per unit area of 0.7 to 1.3 m height of water in two weeks during February 1998 was responsible for the observed temperature deviations down to a depth of 35.2 m. The reported study demonstrated quantitatively, for the first time, that the near surface temperature variation due to advective heat transfer can be significant at a depth greater than 10 m in unsaturated soils and can be used to infer the percolation amount in thick unsaturated soils.

  17. Förster-Induced Energy Transfer in Functionalized Graphene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures are ideal substrates for functionalization with molecules since they consist of a single atomic layer giving rise to an extraordinary sensitivity to changes in their surrounding. The functionalization opens a new research field of hybrid nanostructures with tailored properties. Here, we present a microscopic view on the substrate–molecule interaction in the exemplary hybrid material consisting of graphene functionalized with perylene molecules. First experiments on similar systems have been recently realized illustrating an extremely efficient transfer of excitation energy from adsorbed molecules to the carbon substrate, a process with a large application potential for high-efficiency photovoltaic devices and biomedical imaging and sensing. So far, there has been no microscopically founded explanation for the observed energy transfer. Based on first-principle calculations, we have explicitly investigated the different transfer mechanisms revealing the crucial importance of Förster coupling. Due to the efficient Coulomb interaction in graphene, we obtain strong Förster rates in the range of 1/fs. We investigate its dependence on the substrate–molecule distance R and describe the impact of the momentum transfer q for an efficient energy transfer. Furthermore, we find that the Dexter transfer mechanism is negligibly small due to the vanishing overlap between the involved strongly localized orbital functions. The gained insights are applicable to a variety of carbon-based hybrid nanostructures. PMID:24808936

  18. Enhancement of thermal spin transfer torque by double-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions with a nonmagnetic metal spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H.; Tseng, P.; Yang, Y. Y.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Enhancement of thermal spin transfer torque in a double-barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal spacer is proposed in this study. The results indicate that, given the same temperature difference, thermal spin transfer torque and charge current density for the proposed double barrier magnetic tunnel junction configuration can be approximately twice as much as that of the traditional single-barrier magnetic tunnel junctions. This enhancement can be attributed to the resonant tunneling mechanism in the double-barrier structure.

  19. Ultrafast heating-induced magnetization switching in ferrimagnets.

    PubMed

    Gridnev, V N

    2016-09-26

    We study theoretically the light-induced magnetization switching in a binary ferrimagnet of the type [Formula: see text], randomly occupied by two different species of magnetic ions. The localized spins are coupled with spins of itinerant electrons via s-d exchange interaction. Model parameters are chosen so that to achieve similarity between magnetic characteristics of the model and those of ferrimagnetic rare-earth-transition metal GdFeCo alloys. The switching is triggered by heating of the itinerant electrons by a laser pulse. The spin dynamics is governed by the cooling of itinerant electrons, exchange scattering, induced by the s-d exchange interaction and spin-lattice relaxation of the itinerant spins with a characteristic time [Formula: see text]. The dynamics of the localized and itinerant spins is described by coupled rate equations. The main conclusion of this study is that the switching occurs only in a certain temperature range depending on [Formula: see text]. For long [Formula: see text] the switching occurs only below the magnetisation compensation temperature T K. For physically reasonable values of [Formula: see text] this temperature range extends from 0 K to [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is slightly higher than the compensation temperature T K. With further decrease of [Formula: see text] this temperature range shifts to temperatures higher than T K.

  20. Ultrafast heating-induced magnetization switching in ferrimagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gridnev, V. N.

    2016-11-01

    We study theoretically the light-induced magnetization switching in a binary ferrimagnet of the type {{A}p} {{B}1-p} , randomly occupied by two different species of magnetic ions. The localized spins are coupled with spins of itinerant electrons via s-d exchange interaction. Model parameters are chosen so that to achieve similarity between magnetic characteristics of the model and those of ferrimagnetic rare-earth-transition metal GdFeCo alloys. The switching is triggered by heating of the itinerant electrons by a laser pulse. The spin dynamics is governed by the cooling of itinerant electrons, exchange scattering, induced by the s-d exchange interaction and spin-lattice relaxation of the itinerant spins with a characteristic time {τs} . The dynamics of the localized and itinerant spins is described by coupled rate equations. The main conclusion of this study is that the switching occurs only in a certain temperature range depending on {τs} . For long {τs} the switching occurs only below the magnetisation compensation temperature T K. For physically reasonable values of {τs} this temperature range extends from 0 K to {{T}f} ≤ft({τs}\\right) , where {{T}f} ≤ft({τs}\\right) is slightly higher than the compensation temperature T K. With further decrease of {τs} this temperature range shifts to temperatures higher than T K.

  1. Induced magnetic-field effects in inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Ronald H.; Rognlien, Thomas D.

    1996-05-01

    In inductive plasma sources, the rapid spatial decay of the electric field arising from the skin effect produces a large radio frequency (RF) magnetic field via Faraday's law. It was previously shown that this magnetic field leads to a reduction of the electron density in the skin region, as well as a reduction in the collisionless heating rate. The electron deficit leads to the formation of an electrostatic potential which pulls electrons in to restore quasineutrality. Here the electron density calculation is extended to include both the induced and electrostatic fields. If the wave frequency is not too low, the ions respond only to the averaged fields, and hence the electrostatic field is oscillatory, predominantly at the second harmonic of the applied field. The potential required to establish a constant electron density is calculated and compared with numerical orbit-code calculations. For times short compared to ion transit times, the quasineutral density is just the initial ion density. For timescales long enough that the ions can relax, the density profile can be found from the solution of fluid equations with an effective (ponderomotive-like) potential added. Although the time-varying electrostatic potential is an extra source of heating, the net effect of the induced magnetic and electrostatic fields through trapping, early turning, and direct heating is a significant reduction in collisionless heating for parameters of interest.

  2. Induced magnetic-field effects in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1995-11-04

    In inductive plasma sources, the rapid spatial decay of the electric field arising from the skin effect produces a large radio frequency (RF) magnetic field via Faraday`s law. We previously determined that this magnetic field leads to a reduction of the electron density in the skin region, as well as a reduction in the collisionless heating rate. The electron deficit leads to the formation of an electrostatic potential which pulls electrons in to restore quasineutrality. Here we calculate the electron density including both the induced and electrostatic fields. If the wave frequency is not too low, the ions respond only to the averaged fields, and hence the electrostatic field is oscillatory, predominantly at the second harmonic of the applied field. We calculate the potential required to establish a constant electron density, and compare with numerical orbit-code calculations. For times short compared to ion transit times, the quasineutral density is just the initial ion density. For timescales long enough that the ions can relax, the density profile can be found from the solution of fluid equations with an effective (ponderomotive-like) potential added. Although the time-varying electrostatic potential is an extra source of heating, the net effect of the induced magnetic and electrostatic fields through trapping, early turning, and direct heating is a significant reduction in collisionless heating for parameters of interest.

  3. Effects of magnetic field and Hall current to the blood velocity and LDL transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, I.; Naser, N.; Talib, A. H.; Mahali, S.

    2015-09-01

    The magnetic field and Hall current effects have been considered on blood velocity and concentration of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). It is important to observe those effects to the flowing blood in a stenosed artery. The analysis from the obtained results may be useful to some clinical procedures, such as MRI, where the radiologists may have more information in the investigations before cardiac operations could be done. In this study, the uniform magnetic field and Hall current are applied to the Newtonian blood flow through an artery having a cosine-shaped stenosis. The governing equations are coupled with mass transfer and solved employing a finite difference Marker and Cell (MAC) method with an appropriate initial and boundary conditions. The graphical results of velocity profiles and LDL concentration are presented in this paper and the results show that the velocity increases and concentration decreases as Hall parameter increased.

  4. Simulations on shifting medium and its application in wireless power transfer system to enhance magnetic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenwen; Zhang, Yingyi; Yao, Chen; Tang, Houjun

    2016-05-01

    Shifting medium is a kind of an anisotropic but homogeneous metamaterial designed by transformation optics. An object or free space enclosed by the shifting medium could be moved to a certain distance away from the original position. In this paper, we propose a cone-shaped shifting medium shell to move an internal coil to the given position. In this way, the two coils in a wireless power transfer system could be equivalently moved closer; thus, their magnetic coupling is enhanced. The theoretical models and numerical simulations are presented and analyzed to validate the effects of the shifting medium shell. Both ohmic loss and magnetic loss are also considered for practical concerns. Finally, we discuss the simplification of such a shifting medium to facilitate its fabrication.

  5. Sensitivity Enhancement by Exchange Mediated MagnetizationTransfer of the Xenon Biosensor Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Sandra; Chavez, Lana; Lowery, Thomas J.; Han, Song-I.; Wemmer, David E.; Pines, Alexander

    2006-08-31

    Hyperpolarized xenon associated with ligand derivitized cryptophane-A cages has been developed as a NMR based biosensor. To optimize the detection sensitivity we describe use of xenon exchange between the caged and bulk dissolved xenon as an effective signal amplifier. This approach, somewhat analogous to 'remote detection' described recently, uses the chemical exchange to repeatedly transfer spectroscopic information from caged to bulk xenon, effectively integrating the caged signal. After an optimized integration period, the signal is read out by observation of the bulk magnetization. The spectrum of the caged xenon is reconstructed through use of a variable evolution period before transfer and Fourier analysis of the bulk signal as a function of the evolution time.

  6. Magnetic moments induce strong phonon renormalization in FeSi

    PubMed Central

    Krannich, S.; Sidis, Y.; Lamago, D.; Heid, R.; Mignot, J.-M.; Löhneysen, H. v.; Ivanov, A.; Steffens, P.; Keller, T.; Wang, L.; Goering, E.; Weber, F.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of electronic, spin and lattice degrees of freedom in solids result in complex phase diagrams, new emergent phenomena and technical applications. While electron–phonon coupling is well understood, and interactions between spin and electronic excitations are intensely investigated, only little is known about the dynamic interactions between spin and lattice excitations. Noncentrosymmetric FeSi is known to undergo with increasing temperature a crossover from insulating to metallic behaviour with concomitant magnetic fluctuations, and exhibits strongly temperature-dependent phonon energies. Here we show by detailed inelastic neutron-scattering measurements and ab initio calculations that the phonon renormalization in FeSi is linked to its unconventional magnetic properties. Electronic states mediating conventional electron–phonon coupling are only activated in the presence of strong magnetic fluctuations. Furthermore, phonons entailing strongly varying Fe–Fe distances are damped via dynamic coupling to the temperature-induced magnetic moments, highlighting FeSi as a material with direct spin–phonon coupling and multiple interaction paths. PMID:26611619

  7. Polarization Factors and Spin-Transfer Torque in Magnetic Tunneling Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slonczewski, John

    2004-03-01

    Recent advances in fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions having small RA enhance the prospect of 2-terminal memory elements using spin transfer for writing and TMR for reading. Using Bardeen theory, I find a sufficient condition for the existence of the tunnel-effective polarization factors which I-V experiments support. The mere presence of an ideal crystalline slab within the barrier suffices, regardless of electron structure and atomic disorder within the magnets and interface regions. I find the moment-coplanar torque density L_R=(h/4π e)P_LJ_0sin θ acting on a right magnet with applied voltage V. Here, P_L(V) and P_R(V) are the polarization factors of the left and right magnets, and J_0(V) is the mean current density in the conventional expression J=J_0(1+P_LP_Rs θ ). This connection between LR and J may aid laboratory exploration of junction technology for current-driven switching by study of J(V,θ ) prior to the difficult fabrication of pillars having submicron dimensions.

  8. Design of Novel FBG-Based Sensor of Differential Pressure with Magnetic Transfer.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Guohui; Che, Guohang; Li, Junqing; Jiang, Xu; Wang, Keda; Han, Yueqiang; Gao, Laixu

    2017-02-15

    In this paper, a differential pressure sensor with magnetic transfer is proposed, in which the non-electric measurement based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with the position limiting mechanism is implemented without the direct contact of the sensing unit with the measuring fluid. The test shows that the designed sensor is effective for measuring differential pressure in the range of 0~10 kPa with a sensitivity of 0.0112 nm/kPa, which can be used in environments with high temperature, strong corrosion and high overload measurements.

  9. Design of Novel FBG-Based Sensor of Differential Pressure with Magnetic Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Guohui; Che, Guohang; Li, Junqing; Jiang, Xu; Wang, Keda; Han, Yueqiang; Gao, Laixu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a differential pressure sensor with magnetic transfer is proposed, in which the non-electric measurement based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with the position limiting mechanism is implemented without the direct contact of the sensing unit with the measuring fluid. The test shows that the designed sensor is effective for measuring differential pressure in the range of 0~10 kPa with a sensitivity of 0.0112 nm/kPa, which can be used in environments with high temperature, strong corrosion and high overload measurements. PMID:28212272

  10. Correcting reaction rates measured by saturation-transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabr, Refaat E.; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2008-04-01

    Off-resonance or spillover irradiation and incomplete saturation can introduce significant errors in the estimates of chemical rate constants measured by saturation-transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Existing methods of correction are effective only over a limited parameter range. Here, a general approach of numerically solving the Bloch-McConnell equations to calculate exchange rates, relaxation times and concentrations for the saturation-transfer experiment is investigated, but found to require more measurements and higher signal-to-noise ratios than in vivo studies can practically afford. As an alternative, correction formulae for the reaction rate are provided which account for the expected parameter ranges and limited measurements available in vivo. The correction term is a quadratic function of experimental measurements. In computer simulations, the new formulae showed negligible bias and reduced the maximum error in the rate constants by about 3-fold compared to traditional formulae, and the error scatter by about 4-fold, over a wide range of parameters for conventional saturation transfer employing progressive saturation, and for the four-angle saturation-transfer method applied to the creatine kinase (CK) reaction in the human heart at 1.5 T. In normal in vivo spectra affected by spillover, the correction increases the mean calculated forward CK reaction rate by 6-16% over traditional and prior correction formulae.

  11. Comptonization in Ultra-Strong Magnetic Fields: Numerical Solution to the Radiative Transfer Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceccobello, C.; Farinelli, R.; Titarchuk, L.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the radiative transfer problem in a plane-parallel slab of thermal electrons in the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field (B approximately greater than B(sub c) approx. = 4.4 x 10(exp 13) G). Under these conditions, the magnetic field behaves like a birefringent medium for the propagating photons, and the electromagnetic radiation is split into two polarization modes, ordinary and extraordinary, that have different cross-sections. When the optical depth of the slab is large, the ordinary-mode photons are strongly Comptonized and the photon field is dominated by an isotropic component. Aims. The radiative transfer problem in strong magnetic fields presents many mathematical issues and analytical or numerical solutions can be obtained only under some given approximations. We investigate this problem both from the analytical and numerical point of view, provide a test of the previous analytical estimates, and extend these results with numerical techniques. Methods. We consider here the case of low temperature black-body photons propagating in a sub-relativistic temperature plasma, which allows us to deal with a semi-Fokker-Planck approximation of the radiative transfer equation. The problem can then be treated with the variable separation method, and we use a numerical technique to find solutions to the eigenvalue problem in the case of a singular kernel of the space operator. The singularity of the space kernel is the result of the strong angular dependence of the electron cross-section in the presence of a strong magnetic field. Results. We provide the numerical solution obtained for eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the space operator, and the emerging Comptonization spectrum of the ordinary-mode photons for any eigenvalue of the space equation and for energies significantly lesser than the cyclotron energy, which is on the order of MeV for the intensity of the magnetic field here considered. Conclusions. We derived the specific intensity of the

  12. MESSENGER observations of induced magnetic fields in Mercury's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine L.; Philpott, Lydia C.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Hauck, Steven A.; Heyner, Daniel; Phillips, Roger J.; Winslow, Reka M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-03-01

    Orbital data from the Magnetometer on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft allow investigation of magnetic fields induced at the top of Mercury's core by time-varying magnetospheric fields. We used 15 Mercury years of observations of the magnetopause position as well as the magnetic field inside the magnetosphere to establish the presence and magnitude of an annual induction signal. Our results indicate an annual change in the internal axial dipole term, g10, of 7.5 to 9.5 nT. For negligible mantle conductivity, the average annual induction signal provides an estimate of Mercury's core radius to within ±90 km, independent of geodetic results. Larger induction signals during extreme events are expected but are challenging to identify because of reconnection-driven erosion. Our results indicate that the magnetopause reaches the dayside planetary surface 1.5-4% of the time.

  13. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  14. Stability Analysis of Flow Induced by the Traveling Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2003-01-01

    Re-circulating flow in molten metal columns can be conveniently induced by the axisymmetric traveling magnetic field. A number of applications can benefit from this technique, such as mixing under microgravity environment, or.crysta1 growth from metallic melts. For small magnetic field excitations, the flow is laminar and stationary. As the imposed field increases, a more complex flow will set up in the cylindrical column. Conditions for stable laminar flow are of importance for practical applications. In this work, a linear stability analysis is performed in order to determine the onset of the bifurcation in the system. Here the analysis is restricted to the axisymmetric modes and the low-frequency regime.

  15. The opposite induced magnetic moment in narrow zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong; Hu, Bian; Liu, Na

    2016-11-01

    Based on the analysis of band structure and edge states on zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs), we can study theoretically the origination of two minimal quantum conductance. At the two energy points - 0.20 eV and 0.15 eV corresponding to the two dips of quantum conductance, the spin-polarized quantum conductance is about 45%. Furthermore, the two types of edge-localized carriers in the opposite transport directions along the two opposite edge sides form the quantum internal loop current, which can generate one big magnetic moment. At these two energy points - 0.17 eV and 0.15 eV the two induced magnetic moments are in opposite signals.

  16. Repetitive magnetic stimulation induces plasticity of inhibitory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Maximilian; Galanis, Christos; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Opitz, Alexander; Wierenga, Corette J.; Szabó, Gábor; Ziemann, Ulf; Deller, Thomas; Funke, Klaus; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used as a therapeutic tool in neurology and psychiatry. While repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) has been shown to induce plasticity of excitatory synapses, it is unclear whether rMS can also modify structural and functional properties of inhibitory inputs. Here we employed 10-Hz rMS of entorhinohippocampal slice cultures to study plasticity of inhibitory neurotransmission on CA1 pyramidal neurons. Our experiments reveal a rMS-induced reduction in GABAergic synaptic strength (2–4 h after stimulation), which is Ca2+-dependent and accompanied by the remodelling of postsynaptic gephyrin scaffolds. Furthermore, we present evidence that 10-Hz rMS predominantly acts on dendritic, but not somatic inhibition. Consistent with this finding, a reduction in clustered gephyrin is detected in CA1 stratum radiatum of rTMS-treated anaesthetized mice. These results disclose that rTMS induces coordinated Ca2+-dependent structural and functional changes of specific inhibitory postsynapses on principal neurons. PMID:26743822

  17. HF-Induced Airglow at Magnetic Zenith: Theoretical Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    7.8 MHz. Significantly, green -to-red ratios fgr >0.3 are often ob- For a heater ERP Po= 150 MW and distance R=250 kin, served. Gustavsson et al...and 145.15’W) show that the HF-induced airglow maximizes 557.7nm ( green line) during HF modification experiments during injections toward magnetic...1989; Pedersen and injected frequency f0. Here, Oc=arcsin( fsinx), f, is Carlson, 2001; Gustavsson et al., 2001, 2002; Kosch et al., the electron

  18. Ultracold Fermions in a Cavity-Induced Artificial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollath, Corinna; Sheikhan, Ameneh; Wolff, Stefan; Brennecke, Ferdinand

    2016-02-01

    We propose how a fermionic quantum gas confined to an optical lattice and coupled to an optical cavity can self-organize into a state where the spontaneously emerging cavity field amplitude induces an artificial magnetic field. The fermions form either a chiral insulator or a chiral liquid carrying chiral currents. The feedback mechanism via the dynamical cavity field enables robust and fast switching in time of the chiral phases, and the cavity output can be employed for a direct nondestructive measurement of the chiral current.

  19. Strong Magnetic Field Induced Changes of Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.; Klingenberg, B.; Brooks, J. S.; Morgan, A. N.; Yowtak, J.; Meisel, M. W.

    2005-07-01

    We review our studies of the biological impact of magnetic field strengths of up to 30 T on transgenic arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Field strengths in excess of 15 T induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. Microarray analyses indicate that such field strengths have a far reaching effect on the genome. Wide spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism are prominent examples.

  20. Magnetic field induced minigap in double quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Klem, J.F.; Harff, N.E. |

    1994-07-01

    We report discovery of a partial energy gap, or minigap, in strongly coupled double quantum wells (QWs), due to an anticrossing of the two QW dispersion curves. The anticrossing and minigap are induced by an in-plane magnetic field B{sub {parallel}}, and give rise to large distortions in the Fermi surface and density of states, including a Van Hove singularity. Sweeping B{sub {parallel}} moves the minigap through the Fermi level, with the upper and lower gap edges producing a sharp maximum and minimum in the low-temperature in-plane conductance, in agreement with theoretical calculations. The gap energy may be directly determined from the data.

  1. Enhancement of the spin transfer torque efficiency in magnetic STM junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palotás, Krisztián; Mándi, Gábor; Szunyogh, László

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a method for a combined calculation of charge and vector spin transport of elastically tunneling electrons in magnetic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The method is based on the three-dimensional Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (3D-WKB) approach combined with electronic structure calculations using first-principles density functional theory. As an application, we analyze the STM contrast inversion of the charge current above the Fe/W(110) surface depending on the bias voltage, tip-sample distance, and relative magnetization orientation between the sample and an iron tip. For the spin transfer torque (STT) vector we find that its in-plane component is generally larger than the out-of-plane component, and we identify a longitudinal spin current component, which, however, does not contribute to the torque. Our results suggest that the torque-current relationship in magnetic STM junctions follows the power law rather than a linear function. Consequently, we show that the ratio between the STT and the spin-polarized charge current is not constant, and more importantly, it can be tuned by the bias voltage, tip-sample distance, and magnetization rotation. We find that the STT efficiency can be enhanced by about a factor of seven by selecting a proper bias voltage. Thus, we demonstrate the possible enhancement of the STT efficiency in magnetic STM junctions, which can be exploited in technological applications. We discuss our results in view of the indirect measurement of the STT above the Fe/W(110) surface reported by S. Krause et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 186601 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.107.186601].

  2. Exploration of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy material system for application in spin transfer torque - Random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajarathinam, Anusha

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) materials have unique advantages when used in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) which are the most critical part of spin-torque transfer random access memory devices (STT-RAMs) that are being researched intensively as future non-volatile memory technology. They have high magnetoresistance which improves their sensitivity. The STT-RAM has several advantages over competing technologies, for instance, low power consumption, non-volatility, ultra-fast read and write speed and high endurance. In personal computers, it can replace SRAM for high-speed applications, Flash for non-volatility, and PSRAM and DRAM for high-speed program execution. The main aim of this research is to identify and optimize the best perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) material system for application to STT-RAM technology. Preliminary search for perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) materials for pinned layer for MTJs started with the exploration and optimization of crystalline alloys such as Co50Pd50 alloy, Mn50Al50 and amorphous alloys such as Tb21Fe72Co7 and are first presented in this work. Further optimization includes the study of Co/[Pd/Pt]x multilayers (ML), and the development of perpendicular synthetic antiferromagnets (SAF) utilizing these multilayers. Focused work on capping and seed layers to evaluate interfacial perpendicular anisotropy in free layers for pMTJs is then discussed. Optimization of the full perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction (pMTJ) includes the CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB trilayer coupled to a pinned/pinning layer with perpendicular Co/[Pd/Pt]x SAF and a thin Ta seeded CoFeB free layer. Magnetometry, simulations, annealing studies, transport measurements and TEM analysis on these samples will then be presented.

  3. Composite dipolar recoupling: anisotropy compensated coherence transfer in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Khaneja, Navin; Kehlet, Cindie; Glaser, Steffen J; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2006-03-21

    The efficiency of dipole-dipole coupling driven coherence transfer experiments in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of powder samples is limited by dispersion of the orientation of the internuclear vectors relative to the external magnetic field. Here we introduce general design principles and resulting pulse sequences that approach full polarization transfer efficiency for all crystallite orientations in a powder in magic-angle-spinning experiments. The methods compensate for the defocusing of coherence due to orientation dependent dipolar coupling interactions and inhomogeneous radio-frequency fields. The compensation scheme is very simple to implement as a scaffold (comb) of compensating pulses in which the pulse sequence to be improved may be inserted. The degree of compensation can be adjusted and should be balanced as a compromise between efficiency and length of the overall pulse sequence. We show by numerical and experimental data that the presented compensation protocol significantly improves the efficiency of known dipolar recoupling solid-state NMR experiments.

  4. In vitro evaluation of genotoxic effects under magnetic resonant coupling wireless power transfer.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kohei; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2015-04-07

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) technology using the resonant coupling phenomenon has been widely studied, but there are very few studies concerning the possible relationship between WPT exposure and human health. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to magnetic resonant coupling WPT has genotoxic effects on WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA human fibroblast cells. WPT exposure was performed using a helical coil-based exposure system designed to transfer power with 85.4% efficiency at a 12.5-MHz resonant frequency. The magnetic field at the positions of the cell culture dishes is approximately twice the reference level for occupational exposure as stated in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. The specific absorption rate at the positions of the cell culture dishes matches the respective reference levels stated in the ICNIRP guidelines. For assessment of genotoxicity, we studied cell growth, cell cycle distribution, DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, micronucleus formation, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene mutation, and did not detect any significant effects between the WPT-exposed cells and control cells. Our results suggest that WPT exposure under the conditions of the ICNIRP guidelines does not cause detectable cellular genotoxicity.

  5. Inducing magnetic anisotropy and optimized microstructure in rapidly solidified Nd-Fe-B based magnets by thermal gradient, magnetic field and hot deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L. Z.; Li, W.; Wu, X. H.; Hussain, M.; Liu, Z. W.; Zhang, G. Q.; Greneche, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    Direct preparation of Nd-Fe-B alloys by rapid solidification of copper mold casting is a very simple and low cost process for mini-magnets, but these magnets are generally magnetically isotropic. In this work, high coercivity Nd24Co20Fe41B11Al4 rods were produced by injection casting. To induce magnetic anisotropy, temperature gradient, assisted magnetic field, and hot deformation (HD) procedures were employed. As-cast samples showed non-uniform microstructure due to the melt convection. The thermal gradient during solidification led to the formation of radially distributed acicular hard magnetic grains, which gives the magnetic anisotropy. The growth of the oriented grains was confirmed by phase field simulation. A magnetic field up to 1 T applied along the casting direction could not induce significant magnetic anisotropy, but it improved the magnetic properties by reducing the non-uniformity and forming a uniform microstructure. The annealed alloys exhibited high intrinsic coercivity but disappeared anisotropy. HD was demonstrated to be a good approach for inducing magnetic anisotropy and enhanced coercivity by deforming and refining the grains. This work provides an alternative approach for preparing fully dense Nd-rich anisotropic bulk Nd-Fe-B magnets.

  6. The Development of Instruction to Induce Skill Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelzheiser, Lynn M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Two short-term strategy training programs were used to teach learning disabled 9- to 12-year-old students (N=42) to use an organizational strategy for a memory task. A three-rule program stressing the acquisition of specific strategy content showed a greater transfer of learning than a six-rule program teaching both specific strategy content and…

  7. Calcium induced ATP synthesis: Isotope effect, magnetic parameters and mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Kuznetsov, D. A.; Breslavskaya, N. N.; Shchegoleva, L. N.; Arkhangelsky, S. E.

    2011-03-01

    ATP synthesis by creatine kinase with calcium ions is accompanied by 43Ca/ 40Ca isotope effect: the enzyme with 43Ca 2+ was found to be 2.0 ± 0.3 times more active than enzymes, in which Ca 2+ ions have nonmagnetic nuclei 40Ca. The effect demonstrates that primary reaction in ATP synthesis is electron transfer between reaction partners, Сa( HO)n2+ ( n ⩽ 3) and Ca 2+(ADP) 3-. It generates ion-radical pair, in which spin conversion results in the isotope effect. Magnetic parameters (g-factors and HFC constants a( 43Ca) and a( 31P)) confirm that namely terminal oxygen atom of the ADP ligand in the complex Ca 2+(ADP) 3- donates electron to the Ca( HO)n2+ ion.

  8. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Kristina; Slater, Lee; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  9. Characteristics analysis of a high speed permanent magnet synchronous generator using the transfer relations theorem and equivalent circuit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seok-Myeong; Ko, Kyoung-Jin; Park, Ji-Hoon; Cho, Han-Wook; Hong, Jung-Pyo

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents analytical methods to predict the magnetic field distribution, electrical parameters, and output characteristics of a high speed synchronous generator equipped with surface-mounted permanent magnet. In order to analyze the magnetic field distribution and to estimate the electrical parameters, electromagnetic transfer relation (TR) theorem is employed. Moreover, output characteristics for variable resistive load and the operating speed are also obtained by solving the permanent magnet machine's equivalent circuit equation. The analytical results are validated extensively by nonlinear finite element analysis and experimental results.

  10. Magnetically sensitive light-induced reactions in cryptochrome are consistent with its proposed role as a magnetoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kiminori; Robinson, Alexander J; Henbest, Kevin B; Hogben, Hannah J; Biskup, Till; Ahmad, Margaret; Schleicher, Erik; Weber, Stefan; Timmel, Christiane R; Hore, P J

    2012-03-27

    Among the biological phenomena that fall within the emerging field of "quantum biology" is the suggestion that magnetically sensitive chemical reactions are responsible for the magnetic compass of migratory birds. It has been proposed that transient radical pairs are formed by photo-induced electron transfer reactions in cryptochrome proteins and that their coherent spin dynamics are influenced by the geomagnetic field leading to changes in the quantum yield of the signaling state of the protein. Despite a variety of supporting evidence, it is still not clear whether cryptochromes have the properties required to respond to magnetic interactions orders of magnitude weaker than the thermal energy, k(B)T. Here we demonstrate that the kinetics and quantum yields of photo-induced flavin-tryptophan radical pairs in cryptochrome are indeed magnetically sensitive. The mechanistic origin of the magnetic field effect is clarified, its dependence on the strength of the magnetic field measured, and the rates of relevant spin-dependent, spin-independent, and spin-decoherence processes determined. We argue that cryptochrome is fit for purpose as a chemical magnetoreceptor.

  11. Magnetically sensitive light-induced reactions in cryptochrome are consistent with its proposed role as a magnetoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Kiminori; Robinson, Alexander J.; Henbest, Kevin B.; Hogben, Hannah J.; Biskup, Till; Ahmad, Margaret; Schleicher, Erik; Weber, Stefan; Timmel, Christiane R.; Hore, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Among the biological phenomena that fall within the emerging field of “quantum biology” is the suggestion that magnetically sensitive chemical reactions are responsible for the magnetic compass of migratory birds. It has been proposed that transient radical pairs are formed by photo-induced electron transfer reactions in cryptochrome proteins and that their coherent spin dynamics are influenced by the geomagnetic field leading to changes in the quantum yield of the signaling state of the protein. Despite a variety of supporting evidence, it is still not clear whether cryptochromes have the properties required to respond to magnetic interactions orders of magnitude weaker than the thermal energy, kBT. Here we demonstrate that the kinetics and quantum yields of photo-induced flavin—tryptophan radical pairs in cryptochrome are indeed magnetically sensitive. The mechanistic origin of the magnetic field effect is clarified, its dependence on the strength of the magnetic field measured, and the rates of relevant spin-dependent, spin-independent, and spin-decoherence processes determined. We argue that cryptochrome is fit for purpose as a chemical magnetoreceptor. PMID:22421133

  12. Magnetic field effect on Poiseuille flow and heat transfer of carbon nanotubes along a vertical channel filled with Casson fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman, Sidra; Khan, Ilyas; Ismail, Zulkhibri; Salleh, Mohd Zuki; Alshomrani, Ali Saleh; Alghamdi, Metib Said

    2017-01-01

    Applications of carbon nanotubes, single walls carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multiple walls carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in thermal engineering have recently attracted significant attention. However, most of the studies on CNTs are either experimental or numerical and the lack of analytical studies limits further developments in CNTs research particularly in channel flows. In this work, an analytical investigation is performed on heat transfer analysis of SWCNTs and MWCNTs for mixed convection Poiseuille flow of a Casson fluid along a vertical channel. These CNTs are suspended in three different types of base fluids (Water, Kerosene and engine Oil). Xue [Phys. B Condens. Matter 368, 302-307 (2005)] model has been used for effective thermal conductivity of CNTs. A uniform magnetic field is applied in a transverse direction to the flow as magnetic field induces enhancement in the thermal conductivity of nanofluid. The problem is modelled by using the constitutive equations of Casson fluid in order to characterize the non-Newtonian fluid behavior. Using appropriate non-dimensional variables, the governing equations are transformed into the non-dimensional form, and the perturbation method is utilized to solve the governing equations with some physical conditions. Velocity and temperature solutions are obtained and discussed graphically. Expressions for skin friction and Nusselt number are also evaluated in tabular form. Effects of different parameters such as Casson parameter, radiation parameter and volume fraction are observed on the velocity and temperature profiles. It is found that velocity is reduced under influence of the exterior magnetic field. The temperature of single wall CNTs is found greater than MWCNTs for all the three base fluids. Increase in volume fraction leads to a decrease in velocity of the fluid as the nanofluid become more viscous by adding CNTs.

  13. Forward modeling magnetic fields of induced and remanent magnetization in the lithosphere using tesseroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykiev, Eldar; Ebbing, Jörg; Brönner, Marco; Fabian, Karl

    2016-11-01

    A newly developed software package to calculate the magnetic field in a spherical coordinate system near the Earth's surface and on satellite height is shown to produce reliable modeling results for global and regional applications. The discretization cells of the model are uniformly magnetized spherical prisms, so called tesseroids. The presented algorithm extends an existing code for gravity calculations by applying Poisson's relation to identify the magnetic potential with the sum over pseudogravity fields of tesseroids. By testing different lithosphere discretization grids it is possible to determine the optimal size of tesseroids for field calculations on satellite altitude within realistic measurement error bounds. Also the influence of the Earth's ellipticity upon the modeling result is estimated and global examples are studied. The new software calculates induced and remanent magnetic fields for models at global and regional scale. For regional models far-field effects are evaluated and discussed. This provides bounds for the minimal size of a regional model that is necessary to predict meaningful satellite total field anomalies over the corresponding area.

  14. Magnetic domain wall induced ferroelectricity in double perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hai Yang; Zhao, Hong Jian E-mail: xmchen59@zju.edu.cn; Chen, Xiang Ming E-mail: xmchen59@zju.edu.cn; Zhang, Wen Qing

    2015-04-13

    Recently, a magnetically induced ferroelectricity occurring at magnetic domain wall of double perovskite Lu{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6} has been reported experimentally. However, there exists a conflict whether the electric polarization is along b or c direction. Here, by first-principles calculations, we show that the magnetic domain wall (with ↑↑↓↓ spin configuration) can lead to the ferroelectric displacements of R{sup 3+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 4+}, and O{sup 2−} ions in double perovskites R{sub 2}NiMnO{sub 6} (R = rare earth ion) via exchange striction. The resulted electric polarization is along b direction with the P2{sub 1} symmetry. We further reveal the origin of the ferroelectric displacements as that: (1) on a structural point of view, such displacements make the two out-of-plane Ni-O-Mn bond angles as well as Ni-Mn distance unequal, and (2) on an energy point of view, such displacements weaken the out-of-plane Ni-Mn super-exchange interaction obviously. Finally, our calculations show that such a kind of ferroelectric order is general in ferromagnetic double perovskites.

  15. Magnetic domain wall induced ferroelectricity in double perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hai Yang; Zhao, Hong Jian; Zhang, Wen Qing; Chen, Xiang Ming

    2015-04-01

    Recently, a magnetically induced ferroelectricity occurring at magnetic domain wall of double perovskite Lu2CoMnO6 has been reported experimentally. However, there exists a conflict whether the electric polarization is along b or c direction. Here, by first-principles calculations, we show that the magnetic domain wall (with ↑↑↓↓ spin configuration) can lead to the ferroelectric displacements of R3+, Ni2+, Mn4+, and O2- ions in double perovskites R2NiMnO6 (R = rare earth ion) via exchange striction. The resulted electric polarization is along b direction with the P21 symmetry. We further reveal the origin of the ferroelectric displacements as that: (1) on a structural point of view, such displacements make the two out-of-plane Ni-O-Mn bond angles as well as Ni-Mn distance unequal, and (2) on an energy point of view, such displacements weaken the out-of-plane Ni-Mn super-exchange interaction obviously. Finally, our calculations show that such a kind of ferroelectric order is general in ferromagnetic double perovskites.

  16. Exact transfer functions for the PEP storage ring magnets and some general characteristics and techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1982-05-01

    The exact, ion-optical transfer functions for the dipoles, quadrupoles and sextupoles of the PEP standard PODC cell are calculated for any single particle with initial coordinates (r, p, s). Modifications resulting from radiative energy loss are also calculated and discussed. These functions allow one to characterize individual magnets or classes of magnets by their aberrations and thereby simplify their study and correction. In contrast to high-energy spectrometers where aberrations are often analyzed away, those in storage rings drive series of high order resonances, even for perfect magnets (2), that can produce stop bands and other effects which can seriously limit performance. Thus, one would like to eliminate them altogether or failing this to develop local and global correction schemes. Even then, one should expect higher order effects to influence injection, extraction or single-pass systems either because of orbit distortions or overly large phase spece distortions such as may occur in low-beta insertions or any final-focus optics. The term exact means that the results here are based on solving the relativistic Lorentz force equation with accurate representations of measured magnetostatic fields. Such fields satisfy Maxwell's equations and are the actual fields seen by a particle as it propagates around a real storage ring. This is discussed in detail and illustrated with examples that show that this is possible, practical and may even be useful.

  17. Dry-cured ham tissue characterization by fast field cycling NMR relaxometry and quantitative magnetization transfer.

    PubMed

    Bajd, Franci; Gradišek, Anton; Apih, Tomaž; Serša, Igor

    2016-05-31

    Fast field cycling (FFC) and quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) NMR methods are two powerful tools in NMR analysis of biological tissues. The qMT method is well established in biomedical NMR applications, while the FFC method is often used in investigations of molecular dynamics on which longitudinal NMR relaxation times of the investigated material critically depend. Despite their proven analytical potential, these two methods were rarely used in NMR studies of food, especially when combined together. In our study, we demonstrate the feasibility of a combined FFC/qMT-NMR approach for the fast and nondestructive characterization of dry-curing ham tissues differing by protein content. The characterization is based on quantifying the pure quadrupolar peak area (area under the quadrupolar contribution of dispersion curve obtained by FFC-NMR) and the restricted magnetization pool size (obtained by qMT-NMR). Both quantities correlate well with concentration of partially immobilized, nitrogen-containing and proton magnetization exchanging muscle proteins. Therefore, these two quantities could serve as potential markers for dry-curing process monitoring. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Resonant spin-transfer torque in asymmetric double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daqiq, Reza; Ghobadi, Nader

    2017-02-01

    The substitution effect of a Ferro-magnet (FM) electrode by a half-metallic FM material La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) on charge current and spin-transfer torque (STT) components is studied in MgO-based double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions (DBMTJs) with a middle non-magnetic metal (NM) layer. Using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism, it is observed that the current and STT components show oscillatory behavior due to quantum well states in the middle NM layer and resonant tunneling effect. We also study effect of difference in the thickness of the MgO insulators. Bias dependence demonstrate the magnitude enhancement of the current and in-plane STT in new asymmetric DBMTJs (A-DBMTJs) compared with symmetric DBMTJs (S-DBMTJs), however, perpendicular STT decreases in the A-DBMTJs. Results also show different behavior compared with conventional asymmetric MTJs and spin valves (SVs). Therefore, one can design new memory devices by means of suitable insulator and FM electrodes with proper thicknesses.

  19. Radiative transfer with POLARIS. I. Analysis of magnetic fields through synthetic dust continuum polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reissl, S.; Wolf, S.; Brauer, R.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: We present POLARIS (POLArized RadIation Simulator), a newly developed three-dimensional Monte-Carlo radiative transfer code. POLARIS was designed to calculate dust temperature, polarization maps, and spectral energy distributions. It is optimized to handle data that results from sophisticated magneto-hydrodynamic simulations. The main purpose of the code is to prepare and analyze multi-wavelength continuum polarization measurements in the context of magnetic field studies in the interstellar medium. An exemplary application is the investigation of the role of magnetic fields in star formation processes. Methods: We combine currently discussed state-of-the-art grain alignment theories with existing dust heating and polarization algorithms. We test the POLARIS code on multiple scales in complex astrophysical systems that are associated with different stages of star formation. POLARIS uses the full spectrum of dust polarization mechanisms to trace the underlying magnetic field morphology. Results: Resulting temperature distributions are consistent with the density and position of radiation sources resulting from magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) - collapse simulations. The calculated layers of aligned dust grains in the considered cirumstellar disk models are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Finally, we compute unique patterns in synthetic multi-wavelength polarization maps that are dependent on applied dust-model and grain-alignment theory in analytical cloud models.

  20. Defect-induced magnetism in SiC probed by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. T.; Dmytriieva, D.; Molatta, S.; Wosnitza, J.; Wang, Yutian; Helm, M.; Zhou, Shengqiang; Kühne, H.

    2017-02-01

    We give evidence for intrinsic defect-induced bulk paramagnetism in SiC by means of 13C and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of the internal dipole-field distribution, probed by the spin part of the NMR Knight shift and the spectral linewidth, follows the Curie law and scales very well with the macroscopic dc susceptibility. In order to quantitatively analyze the NMR spectra, a microscopic model based on dipole-dipole interactions was developed. The very good agreement between these simulations and the NMR data establishes a direct relation between the frequency distribution of the spectral intensity and the corresponding real-space volumes of nuclear spins. The presented approach by NMR can be applied to a variety of similar materials and, thus, opens a new avenue for the microscopic exploration and exploitation of diluted bulk magnetism in semiconductors.

  1. High magnetic field induced otolith fusion in the zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Pais-Roldán, Patricia; Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Schulz, Hildegard; Yu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoreception in animals illustrates the interaction of biological systems with the geomagnetic field (geoMF). However, there are few studies that identified the impact of high magnetic field (MF) exposure from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners (>100,000 times of geoMF) on specific biological targets. Here, we investigated the effects of a 14 Tesla MRI scanner on zebrafish larvae. All zebrafish larvae aligned parallel to the B0 field, i.e. the static MF, in the MRI scanner. The two otoliths (ear stones) in the otic vesicles of zebrafish larvae older than 24 hours post fertilization (hpf) fused together after the high MF exposure as short as 2 hours, yielding a single-otolith phenotype with aberrant swimming behavior. The otolith fusion was blocked in zebrafish larvae under anesthesia or embedded in agarose. Hair cells may play an important role on the MF-induced otolith fusion. This work provided direct evidence to show that high MF interacts with the otic vesicle of zebrafish larvae and causes otolith fusion in an “all-or-none” manner. The MF-induced otolith fusion may facilitate the searching for MF sensors using genetically amenable vertebrate animal models, such as zebrafish. PMID:27063288

  2. Strain-induced magnetism in MoS{sub 2} monolayer with defects

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Peng; Guo, Huaihong; Yang, Teng Zhang, Zhidong

    2014-02-07

    The strain-induced magnetism is observed in single-layer MoS{sub 2} with atomic single vacancies from density functional calculations. Calculated magnetic moment is no less than 2 μ{sub B} per vacancy defect. The strain-induced band gap closure is concurrent with the occurrence of the magnetism. Possible physical mechanism of the emergence of strain-induced magnetism is illustrated. We also demonstrate the possibility to test the predicted magnetism in experiment. Our study may provide an opportunity for the design of new type of memory-switching or logic devices by using earth-rich nonmagnetic materials MoS{sub 2}.

  3. Robust population transfer in atomic beams induced by Doppler shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unanyan, R. G.

    2016-10-01

    The influence of photon momentum recoil on adiabatic population transfer in an atomic three-level lambda system is studied. It is shown that the Doppler frequency shifts, due to atomic motion, can play an important role in adiabatic population transfer processes of atomic internal states by a pair of laser fields. For the limiting case of slow atoms (Doppler shift much smaller than the photon recoil energy), the atoms occupy the same target state regardless of the order of switching of laser fields, while for the case of fast atoms interacting with the intuitive sequence of pulses, the target state is the intermediate atomic state. Furthermore, it is shown that this novel technique for adiabatic population transfer is related to a level crossing in the bright-intermediate state basis (rather than in the original atomic basis). It is shown that these processes are robust with respect to parameter fluctuations, such as the laser pulse area and the relative spatial offset (delay) of the laser beams. The obtained results can be used for the control of temporal evolution of atomic populations in cold atomic beams by externally adjustable Doppler shifts.

  4. Collision Induced Dissociation and Energy Transfer in Molecular Hydroge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandy, Margot E.

    2006-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen is a significant constituent in giant molecular clouds in the interstellar medium. Shocks in these clouds are associated with star formation. The cooling of the shocks is governed by competition of collisional energy transfer and dissociation with radiative cooling by quadrupole emission. Thus a detailed understanding of collisional behaviour of molecular hydrogen is needed. Work in this group has examined energy transfer and dissociation in molecular energy transfer as the result of collisions with H, D, He, and H2. Using quasiclassical trajectories and chemically accurate ab initio potentials state-to-state rate coefficients have been determined. The uncertainties of the cross sections are propagated rigourously to give uncertainties of the rate coefficients and the rate coefficients are parameterized as a function of temperature. Comparisons with quantum calculations are discussed and the proposed website is described.This work was supported by a grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. The calculations were carried out using the high performance computing facility jointly supported by the Canadian Foundation for Innovation, the British Columbia Knowledge Development Fund, and Silicon Graphics at the University of Northern British Columbia.

  5. ATP-induced electron transfer by redox-selective partner recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Sandra E.; Goetzl, Sebastian; Jeoung, Jae-Hun; Bommer, Martin; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Hildebrandt, Peter; Dobbek, Holger

    2014-08-01

    Thermodynamically unfavourable electron transfers are enabled by coupling to an energy-supplying reaction. How the energy is transduced from the exergonic to the endergonic process is largely unknown. Here we provide the structural basis for an energy transduction process in the reductive activation of B12-dependent methyltransferases. The transfer of one electron from an activating enzyme to the cobalamin cofactor is energetically uphill and relies on coupling to an ATPase reaction. Our results demonstrate that the key to coupling is, besides the oxidation state-dependent complex formation, the conformational gating of the electron transfer. Complex formation induces a substitution of the ligand at the electron-accepting Co ion. Addition of ATP initiates electron transfer by provoking conformational changes that destabilize the complex. We show how remodelling of the electron-accepting Co2+ promotes ATP-dependent electron transfer; an efficient strategy not seen in other electron-transferring ATPases.

  6. In Vivo Magnetization Transfer and Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detects Thrombus Composition in a Mouse Model of Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Prakash; Modarai, Bijan; Smith, Alberto; Botnar, René M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep vein thrombosis remains a major health problem necessitating accurate diagnosis. Thrombolysis is associated with significant morbidity and is effective only for the treatment of unorganized thrombus. We tested the feasibility of in vivo magnetization transfer (MT) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to detect thrombus organization in a murine model of deep vein thrombosis. Methods and Results Deep vein thrombosis was induced in the inferior vena cava of male BALB/C mice. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at days 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after thrombus induction using MT, diffusion-weighted, inversion-recovery, and T1-mapping protocols. Delayed enhancement and T1 mapping were repeated 2 hours after injection of a fibrin contrast agent. Finally, excised thrombi were used for histology. We found that MT and diffusion-weighted imaging can detect histological changes associated with thrombus aging. MT rate (MTR) maps and percentage of MT rate (%MTR) allowed visualization and quantification of the thrombus protein content, respectively. The %MTR increased with thrombus organization and was significantly higher at days 14, 21, and 28 after thrombus induction (days 1, 7, 14, 21, 28: %MTR=2483±451, 2079±1210, 7029±2490, 10 295±4356, 32 994±25 449; Panova<0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between the %MTR and the histological protein content of the thrombus (r=0.70; P<0.05). The apparent diffusion coefficient was lower in erythrocyte-rich and collagen-rich thrombus (0.72±0.10 and 0.69±0.05 [×10−3 mm2/s]). Thrombus at days 7 and 14 had the highest apparent diffusion coefficient values (0.95±0.09 and 1.10±0.18 [×10−3 mm2/s]). Conclusions MT and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging sequences are promising for the staging of thrombus composition and could be useful in guiding medical intervention. PMID:23564561

  7. Fluoroquinolone-induced gene transfer in multidrug-resistant Salmonella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluoroquinolones are broad spectrum antibiotics that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase activity. Bacterial exposure to fluoroquinolones can cause DNA damage and induce a bacterial SOS response to stimulate repair of damaged DNA. Certain prophages (integrated in bacterial chromosomes) ...

  8. Transfer of the magnetic axis of an undulator to mechanical fiducial marks of a laser tracker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketenoğlu, Bora; Englisch, Uwe; Li, Yuhui; Wolff-Fabris, Frederik; Benecke, Wolf; Noak, Martin; Prenting, Johannes; Schloesser, Markus; Pflueger, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    The exact geometric location of the magnetic centers of sensors or sensor systems using Hall probes or pick-up coils is usually not known with high precision. In order to transfer the high spatial accuracy of magnetic measurements to external mechanic fiducials a device called "Magnetic Landmark" was developed and is described in this report. Its purpose is to establish the exact relation between "magnetic" coordinates used on magnetic measurement systems and "mechanic" coordinates used for alignment. The landmark consists of a permanent magnet configuration, which generates a field distribution with well-defined zero crossings in two orthogonal directions, which can be exactly localized with micrometer precision using magnetic measurement systems. For the "mechanic" measurements several redundant monuments for laser fiducials can be used. Using flip tests for the magnetic as well as mechanic measurements the center positions are determined in magnetic and mechanic coordinates. Using them the relation between the magnetic and surveying coordinates can be established with high accuracy. This report concentrates on the description of the landmark. A thorough analysis on achievable accuracy is presented. The method was developed for the alignment of the 91 undulator segments needed for the European XFEL but can be applied to other magnet systems as well.

  9. Analysis of self-heating of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory.

    PubMed

    Deschenes, Austin; Muneer, Sadid; Akbulut, Mustafa; Gokirmak, Ali; Silva, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Thermal assistance has been shown to significantly reduce the required operation power for spin torque transfer magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM). Proposed heating methods include modified material stack compositions that result in increased self-heating or external heat sources. In this work we analyze the self-heating process of a standard perpendicular magnetic anisotropy STT-MRAM device through numerical simulations in order to understand the relative contributions of Joule, thermoelectric Peltier and Thomson, and tunneling junction heating. A 2D rotationally symmetric numerical model is used to solve the coupled electro-thermal equations including thermoelectric effects and heat absorbed or released at the tunneling junction. We compare self-heating for different common passivation materials, positive and negative electrical current polarity, and different device thermal anchoring and boundaries resistance configurations. The variations considered are found to result in significant differences in maximum temperatures reached. Average increases of 3 K, 10 K, and 100 K for different passivation materials, positive and negative polarity, and different thermal anchoring configurations, respectively, are observed. The highest temperatures, up to 424 K, are obtained for silicon dioxide as the passivation material, positive polarity, and low thermal anchoring with thermal boundary resistance configurations. Interestingly it is also found that due to the tunneling heat, Peltier effect, device geometry, and numerous interfacial layers around the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), most of the heat is dissipated on the lower potential side of the magnetic junction. This asymmetry in heating, which has also been observed experimentally, is important as thermally assisted switching requires heating of the free layer specifically and this will be significantly different for the two polarity operations, set and reset.

  10. Analysis of self-heating of thermally assisted spin-transfer torque magnetic random access memory

    PubMed Central

    Muneer, Sadid; Akbulut, Mustafa; Gokirmak, Ali; Silva, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Thermal assistance has been shown to significantly reduce the required operation power for spin torque transfer magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM). Proposed heating methods include modified material stack compositions that result in increased self-heating or external heat sources. In this work we analyze the self-heating process of a standard perpendicular magnetic anisotropy STT-MRAM device through numerical simulations in order to understand the relative contributions of Joule, thermoelectric Peltier and Thomson, and tunneling junction heating. A 2D rotationally symmetric numerical model is used to solve the coupled electro-thermal equations including thermoelectric effects and heat absorbed or released at the tunneling junction. We compare self-heating for different common passivation materials, positive and negative electrical current polarity, and different device thermal anchoring and boundaries resistance configurations. The variations considered are found to result in significant differences in maximum temperatures reached. Average increases of 3 K, 10 K, and 100 K for different passivation materials, positive and negative polarity, and different thermal anchoring configurations, respectively, are observed. The highest temperatures, up to 424 K, are obtained for silicon dioxide as the passivation material, positive polarity, and low thermal anchoring with thermal boundary resistance configurations. Interestingly it is also found that due to the tunneling heat, Peltier effect, device geometry, and numerous interfacial layers around the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), most of the heat is dissipated on the lower potential side of the magnetic junction. This asymmetry in heating, which has also been observed experimentally, is important as thermally assisted switching requires heating of the free layer specifically and this will be significantly different for the two polarity operations, set and reset. PMID:28144517

  11. Current-induced Orbital and Spin Magnetizations in Crystals with Helical Structure

    PubMed Central

    Yoda, Taiki; Yokoyama, Takehito; Murakami, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically show that in a crystal with a helical lattice structure, orbital and spin magnetizations along a helical axis are induced by an electric current along the helical axis. We propose a simple tight-binding model for calculations, and the results can be generalized to any helical crystals. The induced magnetizations are opposite for right-handed and left-handed helices. The current-induced spin magnetization along the helical axis comes from a radial spin texture on the Fermi surface. This is in sharp contrast to Rashba systems where the induced spin magnetization is perpendicular to the applied current. PMID:26156643

  12. Attosecond Electro-Magnetic Forces Acting on Metal Nanospheres Induced By Relativistic Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, M. J.; Batson, P. E.; Reyes-Coronado, A.; Echenique, P. M.; Aizpurua, J.

    2014-03-01

    Swift electron scattering near nanoscale materials provides information about light-matter behavior, including induced forces. We calculate time-dependent electromagnetic forces acting on 1-1.5 nm metal nanospheres induced by passing swift electrons, finding both impulse-like and oscillatory response forces. Initially, impulse-like forces are generated by a competition between attractive electric forces and repulsive magnetic forces, lasting a few attoseconds (5-10 as). Oscillatory, plasmonic response forces take place later in time, last a few femtoseconds (1- 5 fs), and apparently rely on photon emission by decay of the electron-induced surface plasmons. A comparison of the strength of these two forces suggests that the impulse-like behavior dominates the process, and can transfer significant linear momentum to the sphere. Our results advance understanding of the physics behind the observation of both attractive and repulsive behavior of gold nano-particles induced by electron beams in aberration-corrected electron microscopy. Work supported under DOE, Award # DE-SC0005132, Basque Gov. project ETORTEK inano, Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion, No. FIS2010-19609-C02-01.

  13. Noninvasive thermography of laser-induced hyperthermia using magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maswadi, Saher M.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Dodd, Stephen J.; Gao, Jia Hong

    2004-07-01

    The possibility to induce selective hyperthermia in a target tissue or organ is of great interest for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. An emerging application of thermotherapy is for choroidal neovascularization, a complication of age-related macular degeneration. The therapy is currently limited because the temperature required for optimal tissue response is unknown. We report here an investigation of near infrared laser-induced heating in an ocular phantom. Magnetic resonance thermography (MRT) was used as a non-invasive method to determine the temperature distribution inside the phantom during exposure to a continuous wave diode laser at 806 nm wavelength with 1 watt maximum output. The laser beam had a quasi-gaussian profile, with a radius of 0.8-2.4 mm at target. High quality temperature images were obtained from temperature-dependent phase shifts in the proton resonance frequency with a resolution of 1deg C or better, using a 2T magnet. A phantom with a layer of bovine RPE melanin of 1.5 mm thickness was used to determine the spatial resolution of the MRT measurements. Three dimensional temperature maps were also constructed showing a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm in all direction. The heat distribution depended on the laser parameters, as well as the orientation of the melanin layer with respect to the incident laser beam. The temperature profiles determined by MRT closely followed predictions of a heat diffusion model, based on the optical properties of infrared light in melanin. These results support the use of MRT to optimize laser-induced hyperthermia in a small organ such as the eye.

  14. Charge transfer induced polarity switching in carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Klinke, Christian; Chen, Jia; Afzali, Ali; Avouris, Phaedon

    2005-03-01

    We probed the charge transfer interaction between the amine-containing molecules hydrazine, polyaniline, and aminobutyl phosphonic acid and carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs). We successfully converted p-type CNTFETs to n-type and drastically improved the device performance in both the ON- and OFF-transistor states, utilizing hydrazine as dopant. We effectively switched the transistor polarity between p- and n- type by accessing different oxidation states of polyaniline. We also demonstrated the flexibility of modulating the threshold voltage (Vth) of a CNTFET by engineering various charge-accepting and -donating groups in the same molecule.

  15. Long-range doublon transfer in a dimer chain induced by topology and ac fields

    PubMed Central

    Bello, M.; Creffield, C. E.; Platero, G.

    2016-01-01

    The controlled transfer of particles from one site of a spatial lattice to another is essential for many tasks in quantum information processing and quantum communication. In this work we study how to induce long-range transfer between the two ends of a dimer chain, by coupling states that are localized just on the chain’s end-points. This has the appealing feature that the transfer occurs only between the end-points – the particle does not pass through the intermediate sites–making the transfer less susceptible to decoherence. We first show how a repulsively bound-pair of fermions, known as a doublon, can be transferred from one end of the chain to the other via topological edge states. We then show how non-topological surface states of the familiar Shockley or Tamm type can be used to produce a similar form of transfer under the action of a periodic driving potential. Finally we show that combining these effects can produce transfer by means of more exotic topological effects, in which the driving field can be used to switch the topological character of the edge states, as measured by the Zak phase. Our results demonstrate how to induce long range transfer of strongly correlated particles by tuning both topology and driving. PMID:26932406

  16. Heat Transfer to Anode of Arc as Function of Transverse Magnetic Field and Lateral Gas Flow Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zama, Yoshiyuki; Shiino, Toru; Ishii, Yoko; Maeda, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-10-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding has useful joining technology because of high-energy and high-current characteristics. It can be flexible from the transverse magnetic field and lateral gas flow velocity. In this case, the weld defect occurs. In this research, the heat transfer to the anode of the arc as a function of the transverse magnetic field and lateral gas flow velocity is elucidated. That magnetic flux density and lateral gas velocity were varied from 0 to 3 mT and 0 to 50?m?s -1, respectively. The axial plasma gas argon flow rates were 3?slm. A transverse magnetic field is applied to the arc using Helmholtz coil. The anode is used by a water-cooled copper plate, and the heat transfer is measured by temperature of cooled water. As a result, the arc is deflected by the Lorentz force and lateral gas convection. Thus, the heat transfer to the anode of the arc decreases with increasing the transverse magnetic field and lateral gas flow velocity. In addition, the heat transfer to the anode changes with different attachments modes. The lateral gas flow causes a convective heat loss from the arc to the chamber walls.

  17. Transverse magnetization transfer under planar mixing conditions in spin systems consisting of three coupled spins 1/2.

    PubMed

    Luy, Burkhard; Glaser, Steffen J

    2003-10-01

    Polarization transfer under planar mixing conditions is a widely used tool in modern NMR-experiments. In the case of two coupled spins 1/2 or a chain of three or more spins 1/2 with only nearest neighbor couplings, it is only possible to transfer a single magnetization component (longitudinal magnetization in the principle axis system of the planar coupling tensors). However, if all couplings in a three-spin system are non-zero, it turns out that all magnetization components can be efficiently transferred even under strictly planar mixing conditions. In this article a detailed theoretical analysis is presented based on analytical transverse coherence transfer functions and on the underlying commutator algebra. In addition, transverse magnetization transfer is demonstrated experimentally. The results show that in highly coupled spin systems, as for example in the case of partially aligned samples with many residual dipolar couplings, special care has to be taken to avoid phase distortions if planar mixing steps are used.

  18. Ab Initio Theory of Coherent Laser-Induced Magnetization in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berritta, Marco; Mondal, Ritwik; Carva, Karel; Oppeneer, Peter M.

    2016-09-01

    We present the first materials specific ab initio theory of the magnetization induced by circularly polarized laser light in metals. Our calculations are based on nonlinear density matrix theory and include the effect of absorption. We show that the induced magnetization, commonly referred to as inverse Faraday effect, is strongly materials and frequency dependent, and demonstrate the existence of both spin and orbital induced magnetizations which exhibit a surprisingly different behavior. We show that for nonmagnetic metals (such as Cu, Au, Pd, Pt) and antiferromagnetic metals the induced magnetization is antisymmetric in the light's helicity, whereas for ferromagnetic metals (Fe, Co, Ni, FePt) the imparted magnetization is only asymmetric in the helicity. We compute effective optomagnetic fields that correspond to the induced magnetizations and provide guidelines for achieving all-optical helicity-dependent switching.

  19. Three-dimensional stress-induced magnetic anisotropic constitutive model for ferromagnetic material in low intensity magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Le; Liu, Xin'en; Jia, Dong; Niu, Hongpan

    2016-09-01

    Metal magnetic memory (MMM) technique is a promising tool for inspecting early damage in ferromagnetic components due to its high sensitivity to stress in weak geomagnetic field. However, the quantitative analysis methods for the MMM haven't been sufficiently studied yet for absence of a reasonable constitutive model. A three-dimensional stress-induced magnetic anisotropic constitutive model is proposed in this paper to study magneto-mechanical coupling effect of the MMM. The model is developed in principal stress space and a linear relation between magnetization and magnetic field is employed for low intensity magnetic field. As a result, stress-induced magnetic anisotropy is represented by stress dependence of magnetic permeability in different directions, which is simple and convenient for applications in the MMM technique. Based on the model, the effect of stress on magnetic permeability and surface magnetic field is computed and compared with experimental data for a tensioned ferromagnetic specimen in low intensity magnetic field. The good consistency implies the validity of the proposed model.

  20. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.; Moster, M.L.; Sedwick, L.A.; Quisling, R.G.; Rhoton, A.L. Jr.; Protzko, E.E.; Schiffman, J. )

    1991-03-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence of both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain.

  1. Experimental Studies on Flexible Forming of Sheet Metals Assisted by Magnetic Force Transfer Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Zhou, Fu Jian; Wang, Mo Nan; Xu, Peng; Jin, Cheng Chuang

    2016-08-01

    To improve the thickness uniformity and increase the forming limit of sheets to enhance their overall quality, a magnetorheological fluid (MRF) was injected into the punch cavity to act as the force transfer medium and fulfill the function of flexible pressing during the sheet bulging process. The rheological properties of the MRF were changed under the influence of a magnetic field produced by loading different currents, which allowed variation of stress states and deformation modes in the 0.75-mm-thick 304 stainless steel sheets. With increasing current (up to 3.5 A), the sheet-forming limit increased by 16.13% at most, and the fracture morphology experienced a certain change. Additionally, both the bulge height and the wall thickness distribution had obvious changes with a punch stroke of 10 mm. According to the experimental analysis, the MRF can be used successfully as a pressure-carrying medium in the sheet forming process.

  2. Role of spin-transfer torques on synchronization and resonance phenomena in stochastic magnetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accioly, Artur; Locatelli, Nicolas; Mizrahi, Alice; Querlioz, Damien; Pereira, Luis G.; Grollier, Julie; Kim, Joo-Von

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical study on how synchronization and resonance-like phenomena in superparamagnetic tunnel junctions can be driven by spin-transfer torques is presented. We examine the magnetization of a superparamagnetic free layer that reverses randomly between two well-defined orientations due to thermal fluctuations, acting as a stochastic oscillator. When subject to an external ac forcing, this system can present stochastic resonance and noise-enhanced synchronization. We focus on the roles of the mutually perpendicular damping-like and field-like torques, showing that the response of the system is very different at low and high frequencies. We also demonstrate that the field-like torque can increase the efficiency of the current-driven forcing, especially at sub-threshold electric currents. These results can be useful for possible low-power, more energy efficient applications.

  3. Magnetic resonant wireless power transfer for propulsion of implantable micro-robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Kim, M.; Yoo, J.; Park, H.-H.; Ahn, S.

    2015-05-01

    Recently, various types of mobile micro-robots have been proposed for medical and industrial applications. Especially in medical applications, a motor system for propulsion cannot easily be used in a micro-robot due to their small size. Therefore, micro-robots are usually actuated by controlling the magnitude and direction of an external magnetic field. However, for micro-robots, these methods in general are only applicable for moving and drilling operations, but not for the undertaking of various missions. In this paper, we propose a new micro-robot concept, which uses wireless power transfer to deliver the propulsion force and electric power simultaneously. The mechanism of Lorentz force generation and the coil design methodologies are explained, and validation of the proposed propulsion system for a micro-robot is discussed thorough a simulation and with actual measurements with up-scaled test vehicles.

  4. Time-domain analysis of spin-torque induced switching paths in nanoscale CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction devices

    SciTech Connect

    Heindl, R.; Rippard, W. H.; Russek, S. E.; Pufall, M. R.

    2014-12-28

    We performed thousands of single-shot, real-time measurements of spin-transfer-torque induced switching in nanoscale CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions having in-plane magnetizations. Our investigation discovered a variety of switching paths occurring in consecutive, nominally identical switching trials of a single device. By mapping the voltage as a function of time to an effective magnetization angle, we determined that reversal of a single device occurs via a variety of thermally activated paths. Our results show a complex switching behavior that has not been captured by previous observations and cannot be fully explained within the simple macrospin model.

  5. Binary information propagation in circular magnetic nanodot arrays using strain induced magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi-Fashami, M.; Al-Rashid, M.; Sun, Wei-Yang; Nordeen, P.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Chavez, A. C.; Carman, G. P.; Atulasimha, J.

    2016-10-01

    Nanomagnetic logic has emerged as a potential replacement for traditional Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) based logic because of superior energy-efficiency (Salahuddin and Datta 2007 Appl. Phys. Lett. 90 093503, Cowburn and Welland 2000 Science 287 1466-68). One implementation of nanomagnetic logic employs shape-anisotropic (e.g. elliptical) ferromagnets (with two stable magnetization orientations) as binary switches that rely on dipole-dipole interaction to communicate binary information (Cowburn and Welland 2000 Science 287 1466-8, Csaba et al 2002 IEEE Trans. Nanotechnol. 1 209-13, Carlton et al 2008 Nano Lett. 8 4173-8, Atulasimha and Bandyopadhyay 2010 Appl. Phys. Lett. 97 173105, Roy et al 2011 Appl. Phys. Lett. 99 063108, Fashami et al 2011 Nanotechnology 22 155201, Tiercelin et al 2011 Appl. Phys. Lett. 99 , Alam et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Nanotechnol. 9 348-51 and Bhowmik et al 2013 Nat. Nanotechnol. 9 59-63). Normally, circular nanomagnets are incompatible with this approach since they lack distinct stable in-plane magnetization orientations to encode bits. However, circular magnetoelastic nanomagnets can be made bi-stable with a voltage induced anisotropic strain, which provides two significant advantages for nanomagnetic logic applications. First, the shape-anisotropy energy barrier is eliminated which reduces the amount of energy required to reorient the magnetization. Second, the in-plane size can be reduced (˜20 nm) which was previously not possible due to thermal stability issues. In circular magnetoelastic nanomagnets, a voltage induced strain stabilizes the magnetization even at this size overcoming the thermal stability issue. In this paper, we analytically demonstrate the feasibility of a binary ‘logic wire’ implemented with an array of circular nanomagnets that are clocked with voltage-induced strain applied by an underlying piezoelectric substrate. This leads to an energy-efficient logic paradigm orders of magnitude superior to

  6. Kalman Filtered Bio Heat Transfer Model Based Self-adaptive Hybrid Magnetic Resonance Thermometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxin; Chen, Shuo; Deng, Kexin; Chen, Bingyao; Wei, Xing; Yang, Jiafei; Wang, Shi; Ying, Kui

    2017-01-01

    To develop a self-adaptive and fast thermometry method by combining the original hybrid magnetic resonance thermometry method and the bio heat transfer equation (BHTE) model. The proposed Kalman filtered Bio Heat Transfer Model Based Self-adaptive Hybrid Magnetic Resonance Thermometry, abbreviated as KalBHT hybrid method, introduced the BHTE model to synthesize a window on the regularization term of the hybrid algorithm, which leads to a self-adaptive regularization both spatially and temporally with change of temperature. Further, to decrease the sensitivity to accuracy of the BHTE model, Kalman filter is utilized to update the window at each iteration time. To investigate the effect of the proposed model, computer heating simulation, phantom microwave heating experiment and dynamic in-vivo model validation of liver and thoracic tumor were conducted in this study. The heating simulation indicates that the KalBHT hybrid algorithm achieves more accurate results without adjusting λ to a proper value in comparison to the hybrid algorithm. The results of the phantom heating experiment illustrate that the proposed model is able to follow temperature changes in the presence of motion and the temperature estimated also shows less noise in the background and surrounding the hot spot. The dynamic in-vivo model validation with heating simulation demonstrates that the proposed model has a higher convergence rate, more robustness to susceptibility problem surrounding the hot spot and more accuracy of temperature estimation. In the healthy liver experiment with heating simulation, the RMSE of the hot spot of the proposed model is reduced to about 50% compared to the RMSE of the original hybrid model and the convergence time becomes only about one fifth of the hybrid model. The proposed model is able to improve the accuracy of the original hybrid algorithm and accelerate the convergence rate of MR temperature estimation.

  7. Chemiexcitation induced proton transfer: enolate oxyluciferin as the firefly bioluminophore.

    PubMed

    Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G

    2015-02-12

    Firefly bioluminescence is a phenomenon that attracts attention from the research community because of complex challenges for fundamental investigation, as well as diverse opportunities for practical application. Here we have studied the potential deprotonation of firefly oxyluciferin by using a theoretical approach in an enzymatic-like microenvironment in chemiexcited proton transfer involving adenosine 5'-monophosphate. We have uncovered a reaction route that links the evidence that the light-emitter is an anionic molecule while it is chemiexcited in its neutral form. Moreover, the results indicated that the anionic bioluminophore is the enolate anion and not the ketonic one. Further calculations supported this identification of the light-emitter: the spectrum of resulting enolate anion covers the entire yellow-green/red bioluminescence range, which is in line with the experimental findings regarding firefly multicolor bioluminescence.

  8. Population transfer in a Lambda system induced by detunings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, P. G.; Paladino, E.; D'Arrigo, A.; Falci, G.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we propose a protocol to achieve coherent population transfer between two states in a three-level atom by using two ac fields. It is based on the physics of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP), but it is implemented with the constraint of a reduced control, namely, one of the fields cannot be switched off. A combination of frequency chirps is used with resonant fields, allowing us to achieve approximate destructive interference, despite the fact that an exact dark state does not exist. This chirped STIRAP protocol is tailored for applications to artificial atoms, where architectures with several elementary units can be strongly coupled but where the possibility of switching on and off such couplings is often very limited. Demonstration of this protocol would be a benchmark for the implementation of a class of multilevel advanced control procedures for quantum computation and microwave quantum photonics in artificial atoms.

  9. Adoptive transfer of induced-Treg cells effectively attenuates murine airway allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Lan, Qin; Chen, Maogen; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Ning; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Julie; Fan, Huimin; Yan, Chun-Song; Kuang, Jiu-Long; Warburton, David; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Ryffel, Bernhard; Zheng, Song-Guo; Shi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Both nature and induced regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes are potent regulators of autoimmune and allergic disorders. Defects in endogenous Treg cells have been reported in patients with allergic asthma, suggesting that disrupted Treg cell-mediated immunological regulation may play an important role in airway allergic inflammation. In order to determine whether adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells generated in vitro can be used as an effective therapeutic approach to suppress airway allergic inflammation, exogenously induced Treg cells were infused into ovalbumin-sensitized mice prior to or during intranasal ovalbumin challenge. The results showed that adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells prior to allergen challenge markedly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophil recruitment, mucus hyper-production, airway remodeling, and IgE levels. This effect was associated with increase of Treg cells (CD4(+)FoxP3(+)) and decrease of dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes, and with reduction of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell response as compared to the controls. Moreover, adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells during allergen challenge also effectively attenuate airway inflammation and improve airway function, which are comparable to those by natural Treg cell infusion. Therefore, adoptive transfer of in vitro induced Treg cells may be a promising therapeutic approach to prevent and treat severe asthma.

  10. Spin-Induced Optical Phenomena in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeyama, Shojiro

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * GENERAL FEATURES * Materials * Crystal Structures * Band Structure at ěc{k}≃ 0 * sp-d Exchange Interaction * Magnetic Properties and Parameters * Magnetization Steps due to Nearest-Neighbor Spin Pairs * The Physical Origin of the sp-d Exchange Constants * OPTICAL RESPONSE OF THE LOW-DIMENSIONAL DMSs * Anisotropy of the Zeeman Effect in Two-Dimensional DMSs * Magneto-Optical Method of Interface Characterization * MAGNETIC POLARONS * Bound Magnetic Polarons * Free Magnetic Polarons * OPTICAL OBSERVATION OF MAGNETIC POLARONS * A Selective Excitation Photoluminescence Study * Optical Survey of Free Magnetic Polarons * Two-Dimensional Exciton Free Magnetic Polarons * SUMMARY * REFERENCES

  11. Femtosecond laser field induced modifications of electron-transfer processes in Ne{sup +}-He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhenzhong; Chen Deying; Fan Rongwei; Xia Yuanqin

    2012-01-02

    We demonstrate the presence of femtosecond laser induced charge transfer in Ne{sup +}-He collisions. Electron transfer in ion-atom collisions is considerably modified when the collision is embedded in a strong laser field with the laser intensity of {approx}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The observed anisotropy of the He{sup +} angular distribution confirms the prediction of early work that the capture probability varies significantly with the laser polarization angle.

  12. MESSENGER Observations of Induced Magnetic Fields at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. L.; Winslow, R. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Purucker, M. E.; Heyner, D.; Phillips, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Benna, M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    We use orbital data from the Magnetometer (MAG) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft to study induction signals from Mercury's core. The weak dipole moment (190 nT-RM3, where RM is Mercury's radius) yields a mean subsolar magnetopause distance,RSS, from the dipole origin of 1.45 RM. Time variations in Mercury's magnetopause position, and hence in the magnetopause fields, are driven by changes in solar wind dynamic pressure, Pram, and induce currents in Mercury's interior, in particular at the top of the large, highly conductive core. Mercury's eccentric orbit leads to periodic, annual variations in Pram with an amplitude of ˜50% of the mean Pram. Shorter-timescale, higher-amplitude variations in Pram also occur due to variability in the solar wind. We use a model of Mercury's magnetosphere derived from MESSENGER observations together with a two-layer, radial conductivity model to calculate the expected geometry and magnitude of induced field signatures. The inducing field geometry is obtained via a spherical harmonic expansion of the model magnetopause field at distinct RSS values corresponding to the range observed in MESSENGER MAG data. For the two-layer model and time variations in the field with periods longer than ~1 h, the transfer function between the inducing and induced fields depends only on the spherical harmonic degree and on the ratio of the core radius to the planetary radius. We observe two lines of evidence for an annual induced signature at Mercury. First, RSS varies with heliocentric distance, Rh, as Rhb where b < 1/3. Second, a stronger planetary dipole moment is observed at perihelion than at aphelion. The magnitudes of the observed signals are consistent with the recent estimate of Mercury's core radius (2020 × 30 km) derived from gravity and spin-state data, and independently rule out a core radius less than ˜1900 km. Larger amplitude induced signals are observed in association with

  13. Thermally induced magnetization switching in Gd/Fe multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Ostler, T. A.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical model of Gd/Fe multilayers is constructed using the atomistic spin dynamics formalism. By varying the thicknesses and number of layers we have shown that a strong dependence of the energy required for thermally induced magnetization switching (TIMS) is present; with a larger number of interfaces, lower energy is required. The results of the layer resolved dynamics show that the reversal process of the multilayered structures, similar to that of a GdFeCo alloy, is driven by the antiferromagnetic interaction between the transition-metal and rare-earth components. Finally, while the presence of the interface drives the reversal process, we show here that the switching process does not initiate at the surface but from the layers furthest from it, a departure from the alloy behavior which expands the classes of material types exhibiting TIMS.

  14. Spin nutation induced by atomic motion in a magnetic lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Shiraishi, Y.; Hatakeyama, A.

    2010-12-15

    An atom moving in a spatially periodic field experiences a temporally periodic perturbation and undergoes a resonance transition between atomic internal states when the transition frequency is equal to the atomic velocity divided by the field period. We demonstrated that spin nutation was induced by this resonant transition in a polarized rubidium (Rb) atomic beam passing through a magnetic lattice. The lattice was produced by current flowing through an array of parallel wires crossing the beam. This array structure, reminiscent of a multiwire chamber for particle detection, allowed the Rb beam to pass through the lattice at a variety of incident angles. The dephasing of spin nutation was reduced by varying the incident angle.

  15. Turbulence-Induced Magnetic Flux Asymmetry at Nanoscale Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushong, Neil; Pershin, Yuriy; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-11-01

    It was recently predicted [J. Phys. Condens. MatterJCOMEL0953-8984 18, 11059 (2006)10.1088/0953-8984/18/49/001] that turbulence of electron flow may develop at nonadiabatic nanoscale junctions under appropriate conditions. Here we show that such an effect leads to an asymmetric current-induced magnetic field on the two sides of an otherwise symmetric junction. We propose that measuring the fluxes ensuing from these fields across two surfaces placed at the two sides of the junction would provide direct and noninvasive evidence of the transition from laminar to turbulent electron flow. The flux asymmetry is predicted to first increase, reach a maximum, and then decrease with increasing current, i.e., with increasing amount of turbulence.

  16. Electromagnetically induced transparency resonances inverted in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D. E-mail: david@ipr.sci.am; Pashayan-Leroy, Y.; Leroy, C.; Cartaleva, S.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.; Auzinsh, M.

    2015-12-15

    The phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is investigated in a Λ-system of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 1} line in an external transverse magnetic field. Two spectroscopic cells having strongly different values of the relaxation rates γ{sub rel} are used: an Rb cell with antirelaxation coating (L ∼ 1 cm) and an Rb nanometric- thin cell (nanocell) with a thickness of the atomic vapor column L = 795 nm. For the EIT in the nanocell, we have the usual EIT resonances characterized by a reduction in the absorption (dark resonance (DR)), whereas for the EIT in the Rb cell with an antirelaxation coating, the resonances demonstrate an increase in the absorption (bright resonances (BR)). We suppose that such an unusual behavior of the EIT resonances (i.e., the reversal of the sign from DR to BR) is caused by the influence of an alignment process. The influence of alignment strongly depends on the configuration of the coupling and probe frequencies as well as on the configuration of the magnetic field.

  17. The agricultural antibiotic carbadox induces phage-mediated gene transfer in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Bearson, Bradley L.; Allen, Heather K.; Brunelle, Brian W.; Lee, In Soo; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Stanton, Thaddeus B.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are used for disease therapeutic or preventative effects in humans and animals, as well as for enhanced feed conversion efficiency in livestock. Antibiotics can also cause undesirable effects in microbial populations, including selection for antibiotic resistance, enhanced pathogen invasion, and stimulation of horizontal gene transfer. Carbadox is a veterinary antibiotic used in the US during the starter phase of swine production for improved feed efficiency and control of swine dysentery and bacterial swine enteritis. Carbadox has been shown in vitro to induce phage-encoded Shiga toxin in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and a phage-like element transferring antibiotic resistance genes in Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, but the effect of carbadox on prophages in other bacteria is unknown. This study examined carbadox exposure on prophage induction and genetic transfer in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a human foodborne pathogen that frequently colonizes swine without causing disease. S. Typhimurium LT2 exposed to carbadox induced prophage production, resulting in bacterial cell lysis and release of virions that were visible by electron microscopy. Carbadox induction of phage-mediated gene transfer was confirmed by monitoring the transduction of a sodCIII::neo cassette in the Fels-1 prophage from LT2 to a recipient Salmonella strain. Furthermore, carbadox frequently induced generalized transducing phages in multidrug-resistant phage type DT104 and DT120 isolates, resulting in the transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA that included antibiotic resistance genes. Our research indicates that exposure of Salmonella to carbadox induces prophages that can transfer virulence and antibiotic resistance genes to susceptible bacterial hosts. Carbadox-induced, phage-mediated gene transfer could serve as a contributing factor in bacterial evolution during animal production, with prophages being a reservoir for bacterial fitness genes in the

  18. Wake-induced unsteady stagnation-region heat-transfer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magari, P. J.; Lagraff, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of wake-induced unsteady heat transfer in the stagnation region of a cylinder are presented. A quasi-steady representation of the stator/rotor interaction in a gas turbine using two stationary cylinders in crossflow is created. Time-averaged and time-resolved heat-transfer results are obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers at two Mach numbers: one incompressible and one transonic. The augmentation of the heat transfer in the stagnation region due to wake unsteadiness is documented by comparison with isolated cylinder tests. The time-averaged heat-transfer rate at the stagnation line, expressed in terms of the Frossling number, is found to reach a maximum independent of the Reynolds number. The power spectra and cross correlation of the heat-transfer signals in the stagnation region reveal the importance of large vortical structures shed from the upstream wake generator.

  19. Effects of phase transfer ligands on monodisperse iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Palma, Susana I C J; Marciello, Marzia; Carvalho, Alexandra; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino; Morales, Maria del Puerto; Roque, Ana C A

    2015-01-01

    Oleic acid coated iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by thermal decomposition in organic medium are highly monodisperse but at the same time are unsuitable for biological applications. Ligand-exchange reactions are useful to make their surface hydrophilic. However, these could alter some structural and magnetic properties of the modified particles. Here we present a comprehensive study and comparison of the effects of employing either citric acid (CA) or meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) ligand-exchange protocols for phase transfer of monodisperse hydrophobic iron oxide nanoparticles produced by thermal decomposition of Fe(acac)3 in benzyl ether. We show the excellent hydrodynamic size distribution and colloidal stability of the hydrophilic particles obtained by the two protocols and confirm that there is a certain degree of oxidation caused by the ligand-exchange. CA revealed to be more aggressive towards the iron oxide surface than DMSA and greatly reduced the saturation magnetization values and initial susceptibility of the resulting particles compared to the native ones. Besides being milder and more straightforward to perform, the DMSA ligand exchange protocol produces MNP chemically more versatile for further functionalization possibilities. This versatility is shown through the covalent linkage of gum Arabic onto MNP-DMSA using carboxyl and thiol based chemical routes and yielding particles with comparable properties.

  20. Charge transfer of He2 + with H in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Lei; Zou, Shi-Yang; He, Bin; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2015-09-01

    By solving a time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE), we studied the electron capture process in the He2 + +H collision system under a strong magnetic field in a wide projectile energy range. The strong enhancement of the total charge transfer cross section is observed for the projectile energy below 2.0 keV/u. With the projectile energy increasing, the cross sections will reduce a little and then increase again, compared with those in the field-free case. The cross sections to the states with different magnetic quantum numbers are presented and analyzed where the influence due to Zeeman splitting is obviously found, especially in the low projectile energy region. The comparison with other models is made and the tendency of the cross section varying with the projectile energy is found closer to that from other close coupling models. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11104017, 11025417, 11275029, and 11474032), the National Basic Research Programm of China (Grant No. 2013CB922200), and the Foundation for the Development of Science and Technology of the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. 2014B09036 and 2013A0102005).

  1. Correlation between charge transfer and exchange coupling in carbon-based magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Nguyen, Van Thanh; Nguyen, Huy Sinh; Pham, Thi Tuan Anh; Do, Viet Thang; Dam, Hieu Chi

    2015-10-15

    Several forms of carbon-based magnetic materials, i.e. single radicals, radical dimers, and alternating stacks of radicals and diamagnetic molecules, have been investigated using density-functional theory with dispersion correction and full geometry optimization. Our calculated results demonstrate that the C{sub 31}H{sub 15} (R{sub 4}) radical has a spin of ½. However, in its [R{sub 4}]{sub 2} dimer structure, the net spin becomes zero due to antiferromagnetic spin-exchange between radicals. To avoid antiferromagnetic spin-exchange of identical face-to-face radicals, eight alternating stacks, R{sub 4}/D{sub 2m}/R{sub 4} (with m = 3-10), were designed. Our calculated results show that charge transfer (Δn) between R{sub 4} radicals and the diamagnetic molecule D{sub 2m} occurs with a mechanism of spin exchange (J) in stacks. The more electrons that transfer from R{sub 4} to D{sub 2m}, the stronger the ferromagnetic spin-exchange in stacks. In addition, our calculated results show that Δn can be tailored by adjusting the electron affinity (E{sub a}) of D{sub 2m}. The correlation between Δn, E{sub a}, m, and J is discussed. These results give some hints for the design of new ferromagnetic carbon-based materials.

  2. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shit, G. C.; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-01

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank-Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance.

  3. Real-time electron dynamics simulation of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    Real-time electron dynamics of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion is calculated by three methods: the numerically exact propagation method, the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) method and the Ehrenfest method. We find that, as long as the nuclei move as localized wave packets, the TDH and Ehrenfest methods can reproduce the exact electron dynamics of a simple charge transfer reaction model containing two electrons qualitatively well, even when nonadiabatic transitions between adiabatic states occur. In particular, both methods can reproduce the cases where a complete two-electron transfer reaction occurs and those where it does not occur.

  4. In-plane current induced domain wall nucleation and its stochasticity in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Hall cross structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, P.; Murapaka, C.; Lim, G. J.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-11-01

    Hall cross structures in magnetic nanowires are commonly used for electrical detection of magnetization reversal in which a domain wall (DW) is conventionally nucleated by a local Oersted field. In this letter, we demonstrate DW nucleation in Co/Ni perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire at the magnetic Hall cross junction. The DWs are nucleated by applying an in-plane pulsed current through the nanowire without the need of a local Oersted field. The change in Hall resistance, detected using anomalous Hall effect, is governed by the magnetic volume switched at the Hall junction, which can be tuned by varying the magnitude of the applied current density and pulse width. The nucleated DWs are driven simultaneously under the spin transfer torque effect when the applied current density is above a threshold. The possibility of multiple DW generation and variation in magnetic volume switched makes nucleation process stochastic in nature. The in-plane current induced stochastic nature of DW generation may find applications in random number generation.

  5. In-plane current induced domain wall nucleation and its stochasticity in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Hall cross structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sethi, P.; Murapaka, C.; Lim, G. J.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-11-09

    Hall cross structures in magnetic nanowires are commonly used for electrical detection of magnetization reversal in which a domain wall (DW) is conventionally nucleated by a local Oersted field. In this letter, we demonstrate DW nucleation in Co/Ni perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire at the magnetic Hall cross junction. The DWs are nucleated by applying an in-plane pulsed current through the nanowire without the need of a local Oersted field. The change in Hall resistance, detected using anomalous Hall effect, is governed by the magnetic volume switched at the Hall junction, which can be tuned by varying the magnitude of the applied current density and pulse width. The nucleated DWs are driven simultaneously under the spin transfer torque effect when the applied current density is above a threshold. The possibility of multiple DW generation and variation in magnetic volume switched makes nucleation process stochastic in nature. The in-plane current induced stochastic nature of DW generation may find applications in random number generation.

  6. Mechanisms of ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L. D.; Sangwijit, K.; Prakrajang, K.; Phanchaisri, B.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Thopan, P.; Singkarat, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-05-01

    As a useful ion beam biotechnology, ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells has been successfully operated using argon ions. In the process ion bombardment of the bacterial cells modifies the cell envelope materials to favor the exogenous DNA molecules to pass through the envelope to enter the cell. The occurrence of the DNA transfer induction was found ion energy and fluence dependent in a complex manner. At ion energy of a few keV and a few tens of keV to moderate fluences the DNA transfer could be induced by ion bombardment of the bacterial cells, while at the same ion energy but to high fluences DNA transfer could not be induced. On the other hand, when the ion energy was medium, about 10-20 keV, the DNA transfer could not be induced by ion bombardment of the cells. The complexity of the experimental results indicated a complex mechanism which should be related to the complex structure of the bacterial E. coli cell envelope. A phase diagram was proposed to interpret different mechanisms involved as functions of the ion energy and fluence.

  7. Ruthenium supported on magnetic nanoparticles: An efficient and recoverable catalyst for hydrogenation of alkynes and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ruthenium supported on surface modified magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and applied for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The ...

  8. Redox induced electron transfer in doublet azo-anion diradical rhenium(II) complexes. Characterization of complete electron transfer series.

    PubMed

    Paul, Nandadulal; Samanta, Subhas; Goswami, Sreebrata

    2010-03-15

    Reactions of dirhenium decacarbonyl with the two azoaromatic ligands, L(a) = (2-phenylazo)pyridine and L(b) = (4-chloro-2-phenylazo)pyridine (general abbreviation of the ligands is L) afford paramagnetic rhenium(II) complexes, [Re(II)(L(*-))(2)(CO)(2)] (1) (S = 1/2 ground state) with two one-electron reduced azo-anion radical ligands in an octahedral geometrical arrangement. At room temperature (300 K) the complexes 1a-b, showed magnetic moments (mu(eff)) close to 1.94 mu(B), which is suggestive of the existence of strong antiferromagnetic interactions in the complexes. The results of magnetic measurements on one of the complexes, 1b, in the temperature range 2-300 K are reported. The above complexes showed two cathodic and two anodic responses in cyclic voltammetry where one-electron oxidation leads to an unusual redox event involving simultaneous reduction of the rhenium(II) and oxidation of the second ligand via intramolecular electron transfer. The oxidized complexes 1a(+) and 1b(+) are air stable and were isolated as crystalline solids as their tri-iodide (I(3)(-)) salts. The structures of the two representative complexes, 1b and [1b]I(3), as determined by X-ray crystallography, are compared. The anionic complexes, [1](-) and [1](2-) were characterized in solution by their spectral properties.

  9. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.

  10. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction. PMID:26235646

  11. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.

  12. Exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays a role in radiation-induced bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuai; Wang, Jufang; Ding, Nan; Hu, Wentao; Zhang, Xurui; Wang, Bing; Hua, Junrui; Wei, Wenjun; Zhu, Qiyun

    2015-01-01

    Bystander effects can be induced through cellular communication between irradiated cells and non-irradiated cells. The signals that mediate this cellular communication, such as cytokines, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and even microRNAs, can be transferred between cells via gap junctions or extracellular medium. We have previously reported that miR-21, a well described DDR (DNA damage response) microRNA, is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects through a medium-mediated way. However, the mechanisms of the microRNA transfer have not been elucidated in details. In the present study, it was found that exosomes isolated from irradiated conditioned medium could induce bystander effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated plenty of evidences that miR-21, which is up-regulated as a result of mimic transfection or irradiation, can be transferred from donor or irradiated cells into extracellular medium and subsequently get access to the recipient or bystander cells through exosomes to induce bystander effects. Inhibiting the miR-21 expression in advance can offset the bystander effects to some extent. From all of these results, it can be concluded that the exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays an important role in the radiation-induced bystander effects. These findings provide new insights into the functions of microRNAs and the cellular communication between the directly irradiated cells and the non-irradiated cells.

  13. Absorbing film assisted laser induced forward transfer of fungi (Trichoderma conidia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, B.; Smausz, T.; Antal, Zs.; Kresz, N.; Bor, Zs.; Chrisey, D.

    2004-09-01

    We present an investigation on absorbing film assisted laser induced forward transfer (AFA-LIFT) of fungus (Trichoderma) conidia. A KrF excimer laser beam [λ =248nm,FWHM=30ns (FWHM, full width at half maximum)] was directed through a quartz plate and focused onto its silver coated surface where conidia of the Trichoderma strain were uniformly spread. The laser fluence was varied in the range of 0-2600mJ/cm2 and each laser pulse transferred a pixel of target material. The average irradiated area was 8×10-2mm2. After the transfer procedure, the yeast extract medium covered glass slide and the transferred conidia patterns were incubated for 20 h and then observed using an optical microscope. The transferred conidia pixels were germinated and the areas of the culture medium surfaces covered by the pixels were evaluated as a function of laser fluence. As the laser fluence was increased from 0 to 355mJ/cm2 the transferred and germinated pixel area increased from 0 to 0.25mm2. Further increase in fluence resulted in a drastic decrease down to an approximately constant value of 0.06mm2. The yield of successful transfer by AFA-LIFT and germination was as much as 75% at 355mJ/cm2. The results prove that AFA-LIFT can successfully be applied for the controlled transfer of biological objects.

  14. Single crystalline BaTiO3 thin films synthesized using ion implantation induced layer transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Bae; Diest, Kenneth; Atwater, Harry A.

    2007-10-01

    Layer transfer of BaTiO3 thin films onto silicon-based substrates has been investigated. Hydrogen and helium ions were co-implanted to facilitate ion-implantation-induced layer transfer of films from BaTiO3 single crystals. From thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, we suggest that the dominant species during cavity nucleation and growth are H2, H+, H2O, Ba2+ and Ba-OH, and that the addition of hydrogen to the Ba-Ti-O system can effectively suppress volatile oxide formation during layer transfer and subsequent annealing. After ion implantation, BaTiO3 layers contain microstructural defects and hydrogen precipitates in the lattice, but after layer transfer, the single crystal is found to be stoichiometric. Using direct wafer bonding and layer splitting, single crystal BaTiO3 thin films were transferred onto amorphous Si3N4 and Pt substrates. Micro-Raman spectroscopy indicated that the density of defects generated by ion implantation in BaTiO3 can be significantly reduced during post-transfer annealing, returning the transferred layer to its single crystal state. Characterization using piezoresponse force microscopy shows that the layer transferred thin films are ferroelectric, with domain structures and piezoresponse characteristics similar to that of bulk crystals.

  15. Characterization of magnetization-induced second harmonic generation in iron oxide polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Vandendriessche, Stefaan; Valev, Ventsislav K; Verbiest, Thierry

    2012-01-10

    We have measured the magnetization-induced second harmonic generation (MSHG) of a nanocomposite consisting of iron oxide nanoparticles in a polymer film. The existing theoretical framework is extended to include DC magnetic fields in order to characterize the MSHG signal and analyze the measurements. Additionally, magnetic hysteresis loops are measured for four principal polarizer-analyzer configurations, revealing the P(IN)-P(OUT) and S(IN)-P(OUT) polarizer-analyzer configurations to be sensitive to the transverse magnetic field. These results demonstrate the use of MSHG and the applied formalism as a tool to study magnetic nanoparticles and their magnetic properties.

  16. Switching local magnetization by electric-field-induced domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakizakai, Haruka; Ando, Fuyuki; Koyama, Tomohiro; Yamada, Kihiro; Kawaguchi, Masashi; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Kab-Jin; Moriyama, Takahiro; Chiba, Daichi; Ono, Teruo

    2016-06-01

    Electric field effect on magnetism is an appealing technique for manipulating magnetization at a low energy cost. Here, we show that the local magnetization of an ultrathin Co film can be switched by simply applying a gate electric field without the assistance of any external magnetic field or current flow. The local magnetization switching is explained by nucleation and annihilation of magnetic domains through domain wall motion induced by the electric field. Our results lead to external-field-free and ultralow-energy spintronic applications.

  17. Magnetic-field induced orientational transition in a helicoidal liquid-crystalline antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhlevnykh, A. N.; Kuznetsova, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    The magnetic-field induced orientational transition in helicoidal liquid-crystalline antiferromagnets representing compensated suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles in cholesteric liquid crystals is theoretically studied. The untwisting of a helicoidal structure and the behavior of mean magnetization as a function of the field strength and material parameters are investigated. It is shown that the magnetic subsystems in the field-untwisted ferronematic phase are not completely compensated, and the ferronematic phase is ferrimagnetic.

  18. Transfer and contact-induced variation in child Basque.

    PubMed

    Austin, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Young Basque-speaking children produce Differential Object Marking (DOM) and pre-verbal complementizers in their speech, variants argued to stem from contact with Spanish (Austin, 2006; Rodríguez-Ordóñez, 2013). In this paper, I claim that despite their contact-induced origin, these forms reflect distinct developmental tendencies on the part of the child acquiring Basque. Children's use of pre-verbal complementizers in Basque seems to be a relief strategy that bilingual children employ until they have acquired the post-verbal complementizers in Basque, which are low-frequency morphemes. In contrast, the use of DOM is present in the adult input, although children use this construction to a greater extent than adults do. Finally, I discuss the implications of these findings for the part that child learners play in advancing language change.

  19. Transfer and contact-induced variation in child Basque

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Young Basque-speaking children produce Differential Object Marking (DOM) and pre-verbal complementizers in their speech, variants argued to stem from contact with Spanish (Austin, 2006; Rodríguez-Ordóñez, 2013). In this paper, I claim that despite their contact-induced origin, these forms reflect distinct developmental tendencies on the part of the child acquiring Basque. Children's use of pre-verbal complementizers in Basque seems to be a relief strategy that bilingual children employ until they have acquired the post-verbal complementizers in Basque, which are low-frequency morphemes. In contrast, the use of DOM is present in the adult input, although children use this construction to a greater extent than adults do. Finally, I discuss the implications of these findings for the part that child learners play in advancing language change. PMID:25653632

  20. A potential diagnostic application of magnetization transfer contrast: an in vitro NMR study of excised human thyroid tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callicott, C.; Goode, A. W.

    1998-03-01

    A series of freshly excised thyroid tissues was analysed using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and then subjected to routine histo-pathology examination. Whilst simple values for normal tissue and goitre are not significantly different, the degree of intra-subject and variability is shown to be an indicator of benign thyroid disease. Using data collected from an inversion-recovery sequence performed with and without magnetization transfer, a magnetization transfer rate constant was calculated for each tissue sample. These data suggest that this parameter may provide in vivo discrimination between follicular cancer and follicular adenoma.

  1. Observatory geoelectric fields induced in a two-layer lithosphere during magnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Swidinsky, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    We report on the development and validation of an algorithm for estimating geoelectric fields induced in the lithosphere beneath an observatory during a magnetic storm. To accommodate induction in three-dimensional lithospheric electrical conductivity, we analyze a simple nine-parameter model: two horizontal layers, each with uniform electrical conductivity properties given by independent distortion tensors. With Laplace transformation of the induction equations into the complex frequency domain, we obtain a transfer function describing induction of observatory geoelectric fields having frequency-dependent polarization. Upon inverse transformation back to the time domain, the convolution of the corresponding impulse-response function with a geomagnetic time series yields an estimated geoelectric time series. We obtain an optimized set of conductivity parameters using 1-s resolution geomagnetic and geoelectric field data collected at the Kakioka, Japan, observatory for five different intense magnetic storms, including the October 2003 Halloween storm; our estimated geoelectric field accounts for 93% of that measured during the Halloween storm. This work demonstrates the need for detailed modeling of the Earth’s lithospheric conductivity structure and the utility of co-located geomagnetic and geoelectric monitoring.

  2. Magnetization transfer contrast imaging detects early white matter changes in the APP/PS1 amyloidosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Praet, Jelle; Bigot, Christian; Orije, Jasmien; Naeyaert, Maarten; Shah, Disha; Mai, Zhenhua; Guns, Pieter-Jan; Van der Linden, Annemie; Verhoye, Marleen

    While no definitive cure for Alzheimer's disease exists yet, currently available treatments would benefit greatly from an earlier diagnosis. It has previously been shown that Magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) imaging is able to detect amyloid β plaques in old APP/PS1 mice. In the current study we investigated if MTC is also able to visualize early amyloid β (Aβ) induced pathological changes. In a cross-sectional study, a comparison was made between the MT ratio of wild type (WT) and APP/PS1 mice at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 24 months of age. We observed an increased MT-ratio in the cortex of 24 month old APP/PS1 mice as compared to WT mice. However, when comparing the MT-ratio of the cortex of WT mice with the MT-ratio of the APP/PS1 mice at 2, 4, 6 or 8 months of age, no significant changes could be observed. In contrast to the cortex, we consistently observed a decreased MT-ratio in the splenium of 4, 6 and 8 month old APP/PS1 mice as compared to age-matched WT mice. Lastly, the decreased MT-ratio in the splenium of APP/PS1 mice correlated to the Aβ plaque deposition, astrogliosis and microgliosis. This MT-ratio decrease did however not correlate to the myelin content. Combined, our results suggest that MTC is able to visualize early Aβ-induced changes in the splenium but not the cortex of APP/PS1 mice.

  3. Magnetic strip patterns induced by focused ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, D.; Tibus, S.; Rettner, C. T.; Thomson, T.; Terris, B. D.; Schrefl, T.; Albrecht, M.

    2008-03-15

    Focused ion beam exposure was used to locally alter the magnetic properties of a continuous Co/Pd multilayer film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The saturation magnetization, coercivity, and magnetic anisotropy of the films can be tuned by Ga irradiation depending on exposure dose. As a result, a periodic strip pattern consisting of 80 nm wide exposed strips which are magnetically soft, separated by 170 nm wide magnetically hard, unexposed areas was created. Due to strong magnetostatic coupling between the strips, a number of magnetic domain configurations could be stabilized and these have been observed by magnetic force microscopy and magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements. The magnetic domain configurations and their reversal behavior were investigated by micromagnetic simulations as a function of exposure dose and strip period.

  4. Early Detection of T cell Transfer-induced Autoimmune Colitis by In Vivo Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Ling; Chen, Yi-Ting; Lo, Cheng-Feng; Hsieh, Ching-I; Chiu, Shang-Yi; Wu, Chang-Yen; Yeh, Yu-Shan; Hung, Shu-Hsuan; Cheng, Po-Hao; Su, Yu-Hsuan; Jiang, Si-Tse; Chin, Hsian-Jean; Su, Yu-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic and progressive inflammatory intestinal disease that includes two major types, namely ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease (CD). CD is characterized by intestinal epithelial hyperplasia and inflammatory cell infiltration. Transfer of CD25−CD45RBhiCD4+ (naïve) T cells into immunodeficiency mice induces autoimmune colitis with pathological lesions similar to CD and loss of body weight 4 weeks after cell transfer. However, weight loss neither has sufficient sensitivity nor totally matches the pathological findings of CD. To establish an early and sensitive indicator of autoimmune colitis model, the transferred T cell-induced colitis mouse model was modified by transferring luciferase-expressing donor T cells and determining the colitis by in vivo imaging system (IVIS). Colitis was detected with IVIS 7–10 days before the onset of body weight loss and diarrhea. IVIS was also applied in the dexamethasone treatment trial, and was a more sensitive indicator than body weight changes. All IVIS signals were parallel to the pathological abnormalities of the gut and immunological analysis results. In summary, IVIS provides both sensitive and objective means to monitor the disease course of transferred T cell-induced CD and fulfills the 3Rs principle of humane care of laboratory animals. PMID:27762297

  5. Magnetization-induced enhancement of photoluminescence in core-shell CoFe2O4@YVO4:Eu3+ composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yanmin; Zhou, Zhihua; Wei, Yongbin; Wu, Zheng; Chen, Jianrong; Zhang, Yihe; Liu, Yongsheng

    2013-12-01

    After the core-shell CoFe2O4@YVO4:Eu3+ composite synthesized through a facile sol-gel method was magnetized under an external magnetic field of 0.25 T for 4 h, an enhancement of ˜56% in photoluminescence intensity was observed. The remanent magnetization of the CoFe2O4 core increases the intensity of the excited charge transfer transition of VO43- group in YVO4:Eu3+ shell, which may enhance the probability related to the Eu3+ radiative transition 5D0-7F2, yielding to a high photoluminescence. The obvious remanent-magnetization-induced enhancement in photoluminescence is helpful in developing excellent magnetic/luminescent material for the practical display devices.

  6. Magnetization-induced enhancement of photoluminescence in core-shell CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}@YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} composite

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Yanmin E-mail: wuzheng@zjnu.cn; Zhou, Zhihua; Wei, Yongbin; Wu, Zheng E-mail: wuzheng@zjnu.cn; Chen, Jianrong; Zhang, Yihe; Liu, Yongsheng

    2013-12-07

    After the core-shell CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}@YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} composite synthesized through a facile sol-gel method was magnetized under an external magnetic field of 0.25 T for 4 h, an enhancement of ∼56% in photoluminescence intensity was observed. The remanent magnetization of the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} core increases the intensity of the excited charge transfer transition of VO{sub 4}{sup 3−} group in YVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} shell, which may enhance the probability related to the Eu{sup 3+} radiative transition {sup 5}D{sub 0}-{sup 7}F{sub 2}, yielding to a high photoluminescence. The obvious remanent-magnetization-induced enhancement in photoluminescence is helpful in developing excellent magnetic/luminescent material for the practical display devices.

  7. Micromagnetic simulations of spin-wave normal modes and the spin-transfer-torque driven magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cross

    SciTech Connect

    Pramanik, Tanmoy Roy, Urmimala; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Tsoi, Maxim

    2014-05-07

    We studied spin-transfer-torque (STT) switching of a cross-shaped magnetic tunnel junction in a recent report [Roy et al., J. Appl. Phys. 113, 223904 (2013)]. In that structure, the free layer is designed to have four stable energy states using the shape anisotropy of a cross. STT switching showed different regions with increasing current density. Here, we employ the micromagnetic spectral mapping technique in an attempt to understand how the asymmetry of cross dimensions and spin polarization direction of the injected current affect the magnetization dynamics. We compute spatially averaged frequency-domain spectrum of the time-domain magnetization dynamics in the presence of the current-induced STT term. At low currents, the asymmetry of polarization direction and that of the arms are observed to cause a splitting of the excited frequency modes. Higher harmonics are also observed, presumably due to spin-wave wells caused by the regions of spatially non-uniform effective magnetic field. The results could be used towards designing a multi-bit-per-cell STT-based random access memory with an improved storage density.

  8. Image information transfer via electromagnetically induced transparency-based slow light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Xiao; Sun, Jia-Xiang; Sun, Yuan-Hang; Li, Ai-Jun; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Kang, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Lei; Wang, Hai-Hua; Gao, Jin-Yue

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we experimentally demonstrate an image information transfer between two channels by using slow light based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a solid. The probe optical image is slowed due to steep dispersion induced by EIT. By applying an additional control field to an EIT-driven medium, the slowed image is transferred into two information channels. Image intensities between two information channels can be controlled by adjusting the intensities of the control fields. The similarity of output images is further analyzed. This image information transfer allows for manipulating images in a controlled fashion, and will be important in further information processing. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB921603), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374126, 11347137, 11204103, 11404336, and 11204029), and the Fund for Fostering Talents in Basic Science of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. J1103202).

  9. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-01-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing(TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated. PMID:26553110

  10. From cloned frogs to patient matched stem cells: induced pluripotency or somatic cell nuclear transfer?

    PubMed

    Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Byrne, James; Egli, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear transfer has seen a remarkable comeback in the past few years. Three groups have independently reported the derivation of stem cell lines by somatic cell nuclear transfer, from either adult, neonatal or fetal cells. Though the ability of human oocytes to reprogram somatic cells to stem cells had long been anticipated, success did not arrive on a straightforward path. Little was known about human oocyte biology, and nuclear transfer protocols developed in animals required key changes to become effective with human eggs. By overcoming these challenges, human nuclear transfer research has contributed to a greater understanding of oocyte biology, provided a point of reference for the comparison of induced pluripotent stem cells, and delivered a method for the generation of personalized stem cells with therapeutic potential.

  11. High Fidelity Tape Transfer Printing Based On Chemically Induced Adhesive Strength Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Kyoseung; Chen, Song; Li, Yuhang; Kammoun, Mejdi; Peng, Yun; Xu, Minwei; Gao, Yang; Song, Jizhou; Zhang, Yingchun; Ardebili, Haleh; Yu, Cunjiang

    2015-11-01

    Transfer printing, a two-step process (i.e. picking up and printing) for heterogeneous integration, has been widely exploited for the fabrication of functional electronics system. To ensure a reliable process, strong adhesion for picking up and weak or no adhesion for printing are required. However, it is challenging to meet the requirements of switchable stamp adhesion. Here we introduce a simple, high fidelity process, namely tape transfer printing(TTP), enabled by chemically induced dramatic modulation in tape adhesive strength. We describe the working mechanism of the adhesion modulation that governs this process and demonstrate the method by high fidelity tape transfer printing several types of materials and devices, including Si pellets arrays, photodetector arrays, and electromyography (EMG) sensors, from their preparation substrates to various alien substrates. High fidelity tape transfer printing of components onto curvilinear surfaces is also illustrated.

  12. Exposure to time varying magnetic fields associated with magnetic resonance imaging reduces fentanyl-induced analgesia in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Teskey, G.C.; Prato, F.S.; Ossenkopp, K.P.; Kavaliers, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of exposure to clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on analgesia induced by the mu opiate agonist, fentanyl, was examined in mice. During the dark period, adult male mice were exposed for 23.2 min to the time-varying (0.6 T/sec) magnetic field (TVMF) component of the MRI procedure. Following this exposure, the analgesic potency of fentanyl citrate (0.1 mg/kg) was determined at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min post-injection, using a thermal test stimulus (hot-plate 50 degrees C). Exposure to the magnetic-field gradients attenuated the fentanyl-induced analgesia in a manner comparable to that previously observed with morphine. These results indicate that the time-varying magnetic fields associated with MRI have significant inhibitory effects on the analgesic effects of specific mu-opiate-directed ligands.

  13. Electromagnetically induced absorption due to transfer of coherence and coherence population oscillation for the Fg = 3 →Fe = 4 transition in 85Rb atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Hafeez Ur; Mohsin, Muhammad Qureshi; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2016-12-01

    Lineshapes for the electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) of thermal 85Rb atoms in a degenerate two-level system have been investigated using matching (σ∥σ , π∥π) and orthogonal (σ ⊥ σ , π ⊥ π) polarization configurations of coupling and probe beams. EIA signals, which result from coherence population oscillation and transfer of coherence of the excited state, are obtained in detail theoretically and experimentally. The observed EIA linewidths, which are limited due to the decoherence rate between the magnetic sublevels in the ground state from transit-time relaxation, match well with the calculated ones. Decompositions of the absorption signals analyzed with respect to magnetic sublevels of the ground state show that enhanced or decreased absorption signals for each component of magnetic sublevels in the ground state depend on several factors. These factors include the decay rates and transition strengths, which determine the overall absorption spectral profile.

  14. Control of magnetic relaxation by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition and inhomogeneous domain switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Tianxiang; Emori, Satoru; Peng, Bin; Wang, Xinjun; Hu, Zhongqiang; Xie, Li; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Jiao, Jie; Luo, Haosu; Budil, David; Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.; Liu, Ming; Sun, Nian

    2016-01-01

    Electric-field modulation of magnetism in strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructures is considered a promising scheme for enabling memory and magnetic microwave devices with ultralow power consumption. However, it is not well understood how electric-field-induced strain influences magnetic relaxation, an important physical process for device applications. Here, we investigate resonant magnetization dynamics in ferromagnet/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures, FeGaB/PMN-PT and NiFe/PMN-PT, in two distinct strain states provided by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition. The strain not only modifies magnetic anisotropy but also magnetic relaxation. In FeGaB/PMN-PT, we observe a nearly two-fold change in intrinsic Gilbert damping by electric field, which is attributed to strain-induced tuning of spin-orbit coupling. By contrast, a small but measurable change in extrinsic linewidth broadening is attributed to inhomogeneous ferroelastic domain switching during the phase transition of the PMN-PT substrate.

  15. Control of magnetic relaxation by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition and inhomogeneous domain switching

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Tianxiang; Emori, Satoru; Wang, Xinjun; Hu, Zhongqiang; Xie, Li; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hwaider; Sun, Nian; Peng, Bin; Liu, Ming; Jiao, Jie; Luo, Haosu; Budil, David; Jones, John G.; Howe, Brandon M.; Brown, Gail J.

    2016-01-04

    Electric-field modulation of magnetism in strain-mediated multiferroic heterostructures is considered a promising scheme for enabling memory and magnetic microwave devices with ultralow power consumption. However, it is not well understood how electric-field-induced strain influences magnetic relaxation, an important physical process for device applications. Here, we investigate resonant magnetization dynamics in ferromagnet/ferroelectric multiferroic heterostructures, FeGaB/PMN-PT and NiFe/PMN-PT, in two distinct strain states provided by electric-field-induced ferroelectric phase transition. The strain not only modifies magnetic anisotropy but also magnetic relaxation. In FeGaB/PMN-PT, we observe a nearly two-fold change in intrinsic Gilbert damping by electric field, which is attributed to strain-induced tuning of spin-orbit coupling. By contrast, a small but measurable change in extrinsic linewidth broadening is attributed to inhomogeneous ferroelastic domain switching during the phase transition of the PMN-PT substrate.

  16. 3-D joint inversion of the magnetotelluric phase tensor and vertical magnetic transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Kristina; Ritter, Oliver; Egbert, Gary D.

    2015-11-01

    With advancing computational resources, 3-D inversion techniques have become feasible in recent years and are now a more widely used tool for magnetotelluric (MT) data interpretation. Galvanic distortion caused by small-scale near-surface inhomogeneities remains an obstacle for 3-D MT inversion which so far has experienced little attention. If not considered properly, the effect on 3-D inversion can be immense and result in erroneous subsurface models and interpretations. To tackle the problem we implemented inversion of the distortion-free phase tensor into the ModEM inversion package. The dimensionless phase tensor components describe only variations of the conductivity structure. When inverting these data, particular care has to be taken of the conductivity structure in the a priori model, which provides the reference frame when transferring the information from phase tensors into absolute conductivity values. Our results obtained with synthetic data show that phase tensor inversion can recover the regional conductivity structure in presence of galvanic distortion if the a priori model provides a reasonable assumption for the regional resistivity average. Joint inversion of phase tensor data and vertical magnetic transfer functions improves recovery of the absolute resistivity structure and is less dependent on the prior model. We also used phase tensor inversion for a data set of more than 250 MT sites from the central San Andreas fault, California, where a number of sites showed significant galvanic distortion. We find the regional structure of the phase tensor inversion results compatible with previously obtained models from impedance inversion. In the vicinity of distorted sites, phase tensor inversion models exhibit more homogeneous/smoother conductivity structures.

  17. A pulse sequence for singlet to heteronuclear magnetization transfer: S2hM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevanato, Gabriele; Eills, James; Bengs, Christian; Pileio, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    We have recently demonstrated, in the context of para-hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP), the conversion of hyperpolarized proton singlet order into heteronuclear magnetisation can be efficiently achieved via a new sequence named S2hM (Singlet to heteronuclear Magnetisation). In this paper we give a detailed theoretical description, supported by an experimental illustration, of S2hM. Theory and experiments on thermally polarized samples demonstrate the proposed method is robust to frequency offset mismatches and radiofrequency field inhomogeneities. The simple implementation, optimisation and the high conversion efficiency, under various regimes of magnetic equivalence, makes S2hM an excellent candidate for a widespread use, particularly within the PHIP arena.

  18. Magnetic field induced modulated phases in a ferrofluid lutidine silicone oil mixture.

    PubMed

    Bugase, Jonas; Berner, Johannes; Fischer, Thomas M

    2016-10-19

    A mixture of an ester based ferrofluid with silicone oil and 2,6-lutidine is exposed to an external magnetic field. We find a region of composition of the ternary mixture, where weak magnetic fields of the order of a few kA m(-1) induce a modulated phase with a pattern characterized by equilibrium size droplets of the minority phase immersed into the extended majority phase. While the pattern resembles in many ways the pattern of immiscible magnetic fluids, the dependence of the characteristic parameters of the pattern on the magnetic field are completely different than in immiscible fluids. We theoretically explain the pattern formation as a magnetic field induced polymerization of magnetic particles into magnetic chains that goes along with a reduction of the entropy of mixing. This entropy reduction causes the Ostwald ripening of chains into mesoscopic droplets the size of which is limited by repulsive dipolar interactions between the chains.

  19. Dynamic blocked transfer stiffness method of characterizing the magnetic field and frequency dependent dynamic viscoelastic properties of MRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poojary, Umanath R.; Hegde, Sriharsha; Gangadharan, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    Magneto rheological elastomer (MRE) is a potential resilient element for the semi active vibration isolator. MRE based isolators adapt to different frequency of vibrations arising from the source to isolate the structure over wider frequency range. The performance of MRE isolator depends on the magnetic field and frequency dependent characteristics of MRE. Present study is focused on experimentally evaluating the dynamic stiffness and loss factor of MRE through dynamic blocked transfer stiffness method. The dynamic stiffness variations of MRE exhibit strong magnetic field and mild frequency dependency. Enhancements in dynamic stiffness saturate with the increase in magnetic field and the frequency. The inconsistent variations of loss factor with the magnetic field substantiate the inability of MRE to have independent control over its damping characteristics.

  20. Electric tuning of magnetization dynamics and electric field-induced negative magnetic permeability in nanoscale composite multiferroics.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chenglong; Wang, Fenglong; Jiang, Changjun; Berakdar, Jamal; Xue, Desheng

    2015-06-09

    Steering magnetism by electric fields upon interfacing ferromagnetic (FM) and ferroelectric (FE) materials to achieve an emergent multiferroic response bears a great potential for nano-scale devices with novel functionalities. FM/FE heterostructures allow, for instance, the electrical manipulation of magnetic anisotropy via interfacial magnetoelectric (ME) couplings. A charge-mediated ME effect is believed to be generally weak and active in only a few angstroms. Here we present an experimental evidence uncovering a new magnon-driven, strong ME effect acting on the nanometer range. For Co92Zr8 (20 nm) film deposited on ferroelectric PMN-PT we show via ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) that this type of linear ME allows for electrical control of simultaneously the magnetization precession and its damping, both of which are key elements for magnetic switching and spintronics. The experiments unravel further an electric-field-induced negative magnetic permeability effect.

  1. Electric tuning of magnetization dynamics and electric field-induced negative magnetic permeability in nanoscale composite multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chenglong; Wang, Fenglong; Jiang, Changjun; Berakdar, Jamal; Xue, Desheng

    2015-06-01

    Steering magnetism by electric fields upon interfacing ferromagnetic (FM) and ferroelectric (FE) materials to achieve an emergent multiferroic response bears a great potential for nano-scale devices with novel functionalities. FM/FE heterostructures allow, for instance, the electrical manipulation of magnetic anisotropy via interfacial magnetoelectric (ME) couplings. A charge-mediated ME effect is believed to be generally weak and active in only a few angstroms. Here we present an experimental evidence uncovering a new magnon-driven, strong ME effect acting on the nanometer range. For Co92Zr8 (20 nm) film deposited on ferroelectric PMN-PT we show via ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) that this type of linear ME allows for electrical control of simultaneously the magnetization precession and its damping, both of which are key elements for magnetic switching and spintronics. The experiments unravel further an electric-field-induced negative magnetic permeability effect.

  2. Electric tuning of magnetization dynamics and electric field-induced negative magnetic permeability in nanoscale composite multiferroics

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chenglong; Wang, Fenglong; Jiang, Changjun; Berakdar, Jamal; Xue, Desheng

    2015-01-01

    Steering magnetism by electric fields upon interfacing ferromagnetic (FM) and ferroelectric (FE) materials to achieve an emergent multiferroic response bears a great potential for nano-scale devices with novel functionalities. FM/FE heterostructures allow, for instance, the electrical manipulation of magnetic anisotropy via interfacial magnetoelectric (ME) couplings. A charge-mediated ME effect is believed to be generally weak and active in only a few angstroms. Here we present an experimental evidence uncovering a new magnon-driven, strong ME effect acting on the nanometer range. For Co92Zr8 (20 nm) film deposited on ferroelectric PMN-PT we show via ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) that this type of linear ME allows for electrical control of simultaneously the magnetization precession and its damping, both of which are key elements for magnetic switching and spintronics. The experiments unravel further an electric-field-induced negative magnetic permeability effect. PMID:26058060

  3. Infrared thermography analysis of thermal diffusion induced by RF magnetic field on agar phantoms loaded with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, Jose; Macías, J. D.; Caballero-Aguilar, L.; Vales-Pinzón, C.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, several treatments for fighting malignant tumors have been designed. However these procedures have well known inconveniences, depending on their applicability, tumor size and side effects, among others. Magnetic hyperthermia is a safe, non-invasive method for cancer therapy. This treatment is applied via elevation of target tissue temperature by dissipation of heat from Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNPs), previously located within the tumor. The induction of heat causes cell death and therefore the removal of the tumor. In this work the thermal diffusion in phantoms of agar loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is studied using the infrared thermography technique, which is widely used in biology/medicine (e.g. skin temperature mapping). Agar is one of the materials used to simulate different types of body tissues, these samples are known as "phantoms". Agar is of natural origin, low cost and high degree of biocompatibility. In this work the agar gel was embedded with MNPs by coprecipitation and placed in an alternating magnetic field radiation. As a consequence, the energy from the radiation source is dissipated as heat and then transferred from the MNP to the gel, increasing its temperature. For the temperature analysis, the samples of agar gel were stimulated by RF magnetic field generated by coils. Heating was measured with infrared thermography using a Thermovision A20M infrared camera. Thermographic images allowed obtaining the dependence of thermal diffusion in the phantom as a function of the magnitude of the applied RF magnetic field and the load of magnetic particles.

  4. State diagram of a perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction driven by spin transfer torque: A power dissipation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavanant, M.; Petit-Watelot, S.; Kent, A. D.; Mangin, S.

    2017-04-01

    The state diagram of a magnetic tunnel junction with perpendicularly magnetized electrodes in the presence of spin-transfer torques is computed in a macrospin approximation using a power dissipation model. Starting from the macrospin's energy we determine the stability of energy extremum in terms of power received and dissipated, allowing the consideration of non-conservative torques associated with spin transfer and damping. The results are shown to be in agreement with those obtained by direct integration of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski equation. However, the power dissipation model approach is faster and shows the reason certain magnetic states are stable, such as states that are energy maxima but are stabilized by spin transfer torque. Breaking the axial system, such as by a tilted applied field or tilted anisotropy, is shown to dramatically affect the state diagrams. Finally, the influence of a higher order uniaxial anisotropy that can stabilize a canted magnetization state is considered and the results are compared to experimental data.

  5. Optimization of wireless power transfer via magnetic resonance in different media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonah, Olutola

    A wide range of non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for the monitoring the health of concrete structure has been studied for several years. The recent rapid evolution of wireless sensor network (WSN) technologies has resulted in the development of sensing elements that can be embedded in concrete, to monitor the health of infrastructure, collect and report valuable related data. The monitoring system can potentially decrease the high installation time and reduce maintenance cost associated with wired monitoring systems. The monitoring sensors need to operate for a long period of time, but sensors batteries have a finite life span. Hence, novel wireless powering methods must be devised. The optimization of wireless power transfer via Strongly Coupled Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) to sensors embedded in concrete is studied here. First, we analytically derive the optimal geometric parameters for transmission of power in the air. This specifically leads to the identification of the local and global optimization parameters and conditions, it was validated through electromagnetic simulations. Second, the optimum conditions were employed in the model for propagation of energy through plain and reinforced concrete at different humidity conditions, and frequencies with extended Debye's model. This analysis leads to the conclusion that SCMR can be used to efficiently power sensors in plain and reinforced concrete at different humidity levels and depth, also validated through electromagnetic simulations. The optimization of wireless power transmission via SMCR to Wearable and Implantable Medical Device (WIMD) are also explored. The optimum conditions from the analytics were used in the model for propagation of energy through different human tissues. This analysis shows that SCMR can be used to efficiently transfer power to sensors in human tissue without overheating through electromagnetic simulations, as excessive power might result in overheating of the tissue. Standard SCMR

  6. Preventing High Fat Diet-induced Obesity and Improving Insulin Sensitivity through Neuregulin 4 Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yongjie; Gao, Mingming; Liu, Dexi

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin 4 (NRG4), an epidermal growth factor-like signaling molecule, plays an important role in cell-to-cell communication during tissue development. Its function to regulate energy metabolism has recently been reported. This current study was designed to assess the preventive and therapeutic effects of NRG4 overexpression on high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Using the hydrodynamic gene transfer method, we demonstrate that Nrg4 gene transfer in mice suppressed the development of diet-induced obesity, but did not affect pre-existing adiposity and body weight in obese mice. Nrg4 gene transfer curbed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis by inhibiting lipogenesis and PPARγ-mediated lipid storage. Concurrently, overexpression of NRG4 reduced chronic inflammation in both preventive and treatment studies, evidenced by lower mRNA levels of macrophage marker genes including F4/80, Cd68, Cd11b, Cd11c, and macrophage chemokine Mcp1, resulting in improved insulin sensitivity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that overexpression of the Nrg4 gene by hydrodynamic gene delivery prevents HFD-induced weight gain and fatty liver, alleviates obesity-induced chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and supports the health benefits of NRG4 in managing obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders. PMID:27184920

  7. Defect-induced magnetism in neutron irradiated 6H-SiC single crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Gang; Wang, Shunchong; Yang, Jianhui; Chen, Liang; Qin, Xiubo; Song, Bo; Wang, Baoyi; Chen, Xiaolong

    2011-02-25

    Defect-induced magnetism is firstly observed in neutron irradiated SiC single crystals. We demonstrated that the intentionally created defects dominated by divacancies (V(Si)V(C)) are responsible for the observed magnetism. First-principles calculations revealed that defect states favor the formation of local moments and the extended tails of defect wave functions make long-range spin couplings possible. Our results confirm the existence of defect-induced magnetism, implying the possibility of tuning the magnetism of wide band-gap semiconductors by defect engineering.

  8. A longitudinal study of patients with cirrhosis treated with L-ornithine L-aspartate, examined with magnetization transfer, diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grover, Vijay P B; McPhail, Mark J W; Wylezinska-Arridge, Marzena; Crossey, Mary M E; Fitzpatrick, Julie A; Southern, Louise; Saxby, Brian K; Cook, Nicola A; Cox, I Jane; Waldman, Adam D; Dhanjal, Novraj S; Bak-Bol, Aluel; Williams, Roger; Morgan, Marsha Y; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D

    2017-02-01

    The presence of overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is associated with structural, metabolic and functional changes in the brain discernible by use of a variety of magnetic resonance (MR) techniques. The changes in patients with minimal HE are less well documented. Twenty-two patients with well-compensated cirrhosis, seven of whom had minimal HE, were examined with cerebral 3 Tesla MR techniques, including T1- and T2-weighted, magnetization transfer and diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy sequences. Studies were repeated after a 4-week course of oral L-ornithine L-aspartate (LOLA). Results were compared with data obtained from 22 aged-matched healthy controls. There was no difference in mean total brain volume between patients and controls at baseline. Mean cerebral magnetization transfer ratios were significantly reduced in the globus pallidus and thalamus in the patients with cirrhosis irrespective of neuropsychiatric status; the mean ratio was significantly reduced in the frontal white matter in patients with minimal HE compared with healthy controls but not when compared with their unimpaired counterparts. There were no significant differences in either the median apparent diffusion coefficients or the mean fractional anisotropy, calculated from the diffusion-weighted imaging, or in the mean basal ganglia metabolite ratios between patients and controls. Psychometric performance improved in 50 % of patients with minimal HE following LOLA, but no significant changes were observed in brain volumes, cerebral magnetization transfer ratios, the diffusion weighted imaging variables or the cerebral metabolite ratios. MR variables, as applied in this study, do not identify patients with minimal HE, nor do they reflect changes in psychometric performance following LOLA.

  9. Noise magnetic fields abolish the gap junction intercellular communication suppression induced by 50 hz magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qunli; Ke, Xueqin; Gao, Xiangwei; Fu, Yiti; Lu, Deqiang; Chiang, Huai; Xu, Zhengping

    2006-05-01

    Previously, we have reported that exposure to 50 Hz coherent sinusoidal magnetic fields (MF) for 24 h inhibits gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in mammalian cells at an intensity of 0.4 mT and enhances the inhibition effect of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) at 0.2 mT. In the present study, we further explored the effects of incoherent noise MF on MF-induced GJIC inhibition. GJIC was determined by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) with a laser-scanning confocal microscope. The rate of fluorescence recovery (R) at 10 min after photobleaching was adopted as the functional index of GJIC. The R-value of NIH3T3 cells exposed to 50 Hz sinusoidal MF at 0.4 mT for 24 h was 30.85 +/- 14.70%, while the cells in sham exposure group had an R-value of 46.36 +/- 20.68%, demonstrating that the GJIC of NIH3T3 cells was significantly inhibited by MF exposure (P < .05). However, there were no significant differences in the R-values of the sham exposure, MF-plus-noise MF exposure (R: 49.58 +/- 19.38%), and noise MF exposure groups (R: 46.74 +/- 21.14%) (P > .05), indicating that the superposition of a noise MF alleviated the suppression of GJIC induced by the 50 Hz MF. In addition, although MF at an intensity of 0.2 mT synergistically enhanced TPA-induced GJIC inhibition (R: 24.90 +/- 13.50% vs. 35.82 +/- 17.18%, P < .05), further imposition of a noise MF abolished the synergistic effect of coherent MF (R: 32.51 +/- 18.37%). Overall, the present data clearly showed that although noise MF itself had no effect on GJIC of NIH3T3 cells, its superposition onto a coherent sinusoidal MF at the same intensity abolished MF-induced GJIC suppression. This is the first report showing that noise MF neutralizes 50 Hz MF-induced biological effect by using a signaling component as the test endpoint.

  10. Shrink-induced sorting using integrated nanoscale magnetic traps.

    PubMed

    Nawarathna, Dharmakeerthi; Norouzi, Nazila; McLane, Jolie; Sharma, Himanshu; Sharac, Nicholas; Grant, Ted; Chen, Aaron; Strayer, Scott; Ragan, Regina; Khine, Michelle

    2013-02-11

    We present a plastic microfluidic device with integrated nanoscale magnetic traps (NSMTs) that separates magnetic from non-magnetic beads with high purity and throughput, and unprecedented enrichments. Numerical simulations indicate significantly higher localized magnetic field gradients than previously reported. We demonstrated >20 000-fold enrichment for 0.001% magnetic bead mixtures. Since we achieve high purity at all flow-rates tested, this is a robust, rapid, portable, and simple solution to sort target species from small volumes amenable for point-of-care applications. We used the NSMT in a 96 well format to extract DNA from small sample volumes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR).

  11. Inter-Slice Blood Flow and Magnetization Transfer Effects as A New Simultaneous Imaging Strategy.

    PubMed

    Han, Paul Kyu; Barker, Jeffrey W; Kim, Ki Hwan; Choi, Seung Hong; Bae, Kyongtae Ty; Park, Sung-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The recent blood flow and magnetization transfer (MT) technique termed alternate ascending/descending directional navigation (ALADDIN) achieves the contrast using interslice blood flow and MT effects with no separate preparation RF pulse, thereby potentially overcoming limitations of conventional methods. In this study, we examined the signal characteristics of ALADDIN as a simultaneous blood flow and MT imaging strategy, by comparing it with pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and conventional MT asymmetry (MTA) methods, all of which had the same bSSFP readout. Bloch-equation simulations and experiments showed ALADDIN perfusion signals increased with flip angle, whereas MTA signals peaked at flip angle around 45°-60°. ALADDIN provided signals comparable to those of pCASL and conventional MTA methods emulating the first, second, and third prior slices of ALADDIN under the same scan conditions, suggesting ALADDIN signals to be superposition of signals from multiple labeling planes. The quantitative cerebral blood flow signals from a modified continuous ASL model overestimated the perfusion signals compared to those measured with a pulsed ASL method. Simultaneous mapping of blood flow, MTA, and MT ratio in the whole brain is feasible with ALADDIN within a clinically reasonable time, which can potentially help diagnosis of various diseases.

  12. A rapid approach for quantitative magnetization transfer imaging in thigh muscles using the pulsed saturation method.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Dortch, Richard D; Kroop, Susan F; Huston, Joseph W; Gochberg, Daniel F; Park, Jane H; Damon, Bruce M

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) imaging in skeletal muscle may be confounded by intramuscular adipose components, low signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and voluntary and involuntary motion artifacts. Collectively, these issues could create bias and error in parameter fitting. In this study, technical considerations related to these factors were systematically investigated, and solutions were proposed. First, numerical simulations indicate that the presence of an additional fat component significantly underestimates the pool size ratio (F). Therefore, fat-signal suppression (or water-selective excitation) is recommended for qMT imaging of skeletal muscle. Second, to minimize the effect of motion and muscle contraction artifacts in datasets collected with a conventional 14-point sampling scheme, a rapid two-parameter model was adapted from previous studies in the brain and spinal cord. The consecutive pair of sampling points with highest accuracy and precision for estimating F was determined with numerical simulations. Its performance with respect to SNR and incorrect parameter assumptions was systematically evaluated. QMT data fitting was performed in healthy control subjects and polymyositis patients, using both the two- and five-parameter models. The experimental results were consistent with the predictions from the numerical simulations. These data support the use of the two-parameter modeling approach for qMT imaging of skeletal muscle as a means to reduce total imaging time and/or permit additional signal averaging.

  13. Transverse Relaxation and Magnetization Transfer in Skeletal Muscle: Effect of pH

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Elizabeth A.; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Does, Mark D.; Damon, Bruce M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise increases the intracellular T2 (T2,i) of contracting muscles. The mechanism(s) for the T2,i increase have not been fully described, and may include increased intracellular free water and acidification. These changes may alter chemical exchange processes between intracellular free water and proteins. In this study, the hypotheses were tested that 1) pH changes T2,i by affecting the rate of magnetization transfer (MT) between free intracellular water and intracellular proteins and 2) the magnitude of the T2,i effect depends on acquisition mode (localized or non-localized) and echo spacing. Frog gastrocnemius muscles were excised and their intracellular pH was either kept at physiological pH (7.0) or modified to model exercising muscle (pH 6.5). The intracellular transverse relaxation rate (R2,i =1/T2,i) always decreased in the acidic muscles, but the changes were greater when measured using more rapid refocusing rates. The MT rate from the macromolecular proton pool to the free water proton pool, its reverse rate, and the spin-lattice relaxation rate of water decreased in acidic muscles. It is concluded that intracellular acidification alters the R2,i of muscle water in a refocusing rate-dependent manner and that the R2,i changes are correlated with changes in the MT rate between macromolecules and free intracellular water. PMID:19097244

  14. Pulsed magnetization transfer contrast MRI by a sequence with water selective excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Schick, F.

    1996-01-01

    A water selective SE imaging sequence was developed providing suitable properties for the assessment of magnetization transfer (MT) effects in tissues with considerable amounts of fat. The sequence with water selective excitation and slice selective refocusing combines the following features: The RIF exposure on the macromolecular protons is relatively low for single slice imaging without MT prepulses, since no additional pulses for fat saturation are necessary. Water selection by frequency selective excitation diminishes faults in the subtraction of images recorded with and without MT prepulses (which might arise from movements). High differences in the signal amplitudes from hyaline cartilage and muscle tissue were obtained comparing images recorded with irradiation of the series of prepulses for MT and those lacking MT prepulses. Utilizations of the described water selective approach for the assessment of MT effects in lesions of cartilage and bone are demonstrated. MT saturation was also examined in muscles with fatty degeneration of patients suffering from progressive muscular dystrophy. The described technique allows determination of MT effects with good precision in a single slice, especially in regions with dominating fat signals. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Nanosized graphene crystallite induced strong magnetism in pure carbon films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Xi; Diao, Dongfeng

    2015-03-14

    We report strong magnetism in pure carbon films grown by electron irradiation assisted physical vapor deposition in electron cyclotron resonance plasma. The development of graphene nanocrystallites in the amorphous film matrix, and the dependence of the magnetic behavior on amorphous, nanocrystallite and graphite-like structures were investigated. Results were that the amorphous structure shows weak paramagnetism, graphene nanocrystallites lead to strong magnetization, and graphite-like structures corresponded with a lower magnetization. At a room temperature of 300 K, the highest saturation magnetization of 0.37 emu g(-1) was found in the nanosized graphene nanocrystallite structure. The origin of strong magnetism in nanocrystallites was ascribed to the spin magnetic moment at the graphene layer edges.

  16. Lateral Domain Transfer In a Magnetic Nanowire With Perpendicular-to-Plane-Anisotropy For Three-Dimensional Memory Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokce, Aisha; Ozatay, Ozhan; Bulut, Bugra; Rainey, Coleman; Katine, Jordan A.; Hauet, Thomas; Giordano, Anna; Finocchio, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    Spin torque driven magnetic domain transport has been of great interest with potential applications in three dimensional magnetic race track memory and also for domain wall logic. Here we report on experimental and micromagnetic modelling results of spin torque driven magnetic domain transport in CoNi/Pd multilayers with perpendicular-to-plane anisotropy patterned to form magnetic nanowires with double constrictions where domains can be moved with spin polarized current pulses in between constricted sites. The domain nucleation was triggered by joule heating in the presence of a magnetic tip a few nm above the surface which was otherwise in the remanent state. We show that with low or high amplitude nanosecond current pulses two different types of domain transfer behavior is possible: a replicated or partially displaced domain in the neighboring constriction, or an expansion of the domain into the spacer region and the neighboring pinning site. Micromagnetic modelling of the domain transport in such devices suggests that in addition to the experimentally observed behavior a third regime where the full transfer of a single domain is also attainable. Our study shows that CoNi/Pd nanowires can be of potential practical use in a three dimensional memory structure.

  17. Step induced magnetic anisotropy of iron/tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mireles, Hector Cordova

    Surface Magneto Optic Kerr Effect (SMOKE) measurements of ultrathin layers of Fe on graded-step-density W(001) are used to test essential predictions of a hysteresis loop phase diagram model reported by Zangwill et al. [1]. The one-dimensional micromagetic model produces a rich variety of hysteresis loop shapes as well as predictions of switching field strengths that depend on two parameters: Λ = normalized step length and κ = normalized step-anisotropy energy. These parameters are varied in the experiment by using a graded-step-density W(001) surface (vicinal angle α range from 0°-15°), and by reducing the step anisotropy energy with chemisorption. Spot-Profile- Analysis Low Energy Electron Diffraction (SPA- LEED) is used to characterize the stepped surfaces. The experiments indicate that the Zangwill model successfully accounts for general trends in hysteresis loop shapes and switching field dependencies as a function of Λ and κ. Our measured switching fields, ( Hswitch) vs vicinality for 2 monolayers thick Fe films are generally compatible with results reported by Kawakami et al. [2] over the range 0° < α < 7°, although our results over this range yield a power law of Hswitch ~ αn where n = 2.6 +/- .1, which is different from the quadratic behavior Hswitch ~ α 2 obtained from their measurements and those predicted by the Néel model [3]. Above a critical vicinal angle, αq the step-induced anisotropy becomes ineffective and the loops revert back to the square shape observed on flat surfaces. The angle αq is dependent on the oxygen dosage on the sample as well as on the film thickness. Novel two- state switching is observed at selected vicinal angles, which is related to surface-step-induced anisotropy. While both the Néel model and the Zangwill model account for general trends in step-induced magnetic anisotropy, refinements in the micromagnetic model appear to be required to explain the observed phenomena in detail.

  18. Magnetic properties on the surface of FeAl stripes induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiju, H.; Yoshida, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Kondo, K.; Ishibashi, A.; Yoshimi, K.

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate the formation of magnetic nanostripes on the surface of Fe52Al48 induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation and investigate their magnetic properties. The magnetic stripe consists of a disordered A2 phase of Fe-Al alloys with Al-oxide along the [110] direction on the (111)-oriented plane. According to the focused magneto-optical Kerr effect measurement, the coercive force of the magnetic stripe obeys the 1/cos θ law, where θ is the field rotation angle estimated from the stripe direction. Also, the jump field can be observed in the magnetic hysteresis loop. These results indicate that the magnetization reversal in the magnetic stripe originates from the domain pinning, showing that the magnetization rotates incoherently.

  19. Detection of Defect-Induced Magnetism in Low-Dimensional ZnO Structures by Magnetophotocurrent.

    PubMed

    Lorite, Israel; Kumar, Yogesh; Esquinazi, Pablo; Zandalazini, Carlos; de Heluani, Silvia Perez

    2015-09-09

    The detection of defect-induced magnetic order in single low-dimensional oxide structures is in general difficult because of the relatively small yield of magnetically ordered regions. In this work, the effect of an external magnetic field on the transient photocurrent measured after light irradiation on different ZnO samples at room temperature is studied. It has been found that a magnetic field produces a change in the relaxation rate of the transient photocurrent only in magnetically ordered ZnO samples. This rate can decrease or increase with field, depending on whether the magnetically ordered region is in the bulk or only at the surface of the ZnO sample. The phenomenon reported here is of importance for the development of magneto-optical low-dimensional oxides devices and provides a new guideline for the detection of magnetic order in low-dimensional magnetic semiconductors.

  20. External magnetic field-induced selective biodistribution of magnetoliposomes in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study looked at the effect of an external magnet on the biodistribution of magnetoliposomes intravenously administrated in mice (8 mg iron/kg) with and without induced acute inflammation. Our results showed that due to enhanced vascular permeability, magnetoliposomes accumulated at the site of inflammation in the absence of an external magnetic field, but the amount of iron present increased under the effect of a magnet located at the inflammation zone. This increase was dependent on the time (20 or 60 min) of exposure of the external magnetic field. It was also observed that the presence of the magnet was associated with lower amounts of iron in the liver, spleen, and plasma than was found in mice in which a magnet had not been applied. The results of this study confirm that it is possible to target drugs encapsulated in magnetic particles by means of an external magnet. PMID:22883385

  1. Magnetization transfer ratio measures in normal-appearing white matter show periventricular gradient abnormalities in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Pardini, Matteo; Yaldizli, Özgür; Sethi, Varun; Muhlert, Nils; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Samson, Rebecca S; Miller, David H; Chard, Declan T

    2015-05-01

    In multiple sclerosis, there is increasing evidence that demyelination, and neuronal damage occurs preferentially in cortical grey matter next to the outer surface of the brain. It has been suggested that this may be due to the effects of pathology outside the brain parenchyma, in particular meningeal inflammation or through cerebrospinal fluid mediated factors. White matter lesions are often located adjacent to the ventricles of the brain, suggesting the possibility of a similar outside-in pathogenesis, but an investigation of the relationship of periventricular normal-appearing white matter abnormalities with distance from the ventricles has not previously been undertaken. The present study investigates this relationship in vivo using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and compares the abnormalities between secondary progressive and relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. Forty-three patients with relapsing remitting and 28 with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, and 38 healthy control subjects were included in this study. T1-weighted volumetric, magnetization transfer and proton density/T2-weighted scans were acquired for all subjects. From the magnetization transfer data, magnetization transfer ratio maps were prepared. White matter tissue masks were derived from SPM8 segmentations of the T1-weighted images. Normal-appearing white matter masks were generated by subtracting white matter lesions identified on the proton density/T2 scan, and a two-voxel perilesional ring, from the SPM8 derived white matter masks. White matter was divided in concentric bands, each ∼1-mm thick, radiating from the ventricles toward the cortex. The first periventricular band was excluded from analysis to mitigate partial volume effects, and normal-appearing white matter and lesion magnetization transfer ratio values were then computed for the 10 bands nearest to the ventricles. Compared with controls, magnetization transfer ratio in the normal-appearing white matter

  2. Convective heat and mass transfer on MHD peristaltic flow of Williamson fluid with the effect of inclined magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veera Krishna, M.; Swarnalathamma, B. V.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discussed the peristaltic MHD flow of an incompressible and electrically conducting Williamson fluid in a symmetric planar channel with heat and mass transfer under the effect of inclined magnetic field. Viscous dissipation and Joule heating are also taken into consideration. Mathematical model is presented by using the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. The differential equations governing the flow are highly nonlinear and thus perturbation solution for small Weissenberg number (We < 1) is presented. Effects of the heat and mass transfer on the longitudinal velocity, temperature and concentration are studied in detail. Main observations are presented in the concluding section. The streamlines pattern is also given due attention.

  3. A study of the mechanism of metal deposition by the laser-induced forward transfer process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, F. J.; Bohandy, J.; Kim, B. F.; Jette, A. N.; Thompson, P.

    1987-10-01

    The mechanism of the laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) technique for transferring metal features from a film to a substrate is examined by using the one-dimensional thermal diffusion equation with a moving solid-melt boundary to model the heating, melting, and vaporization of the metal film by the laser. For typical LIFT conditions the calculations show that the back of the film (i.e., the part exposed to the laser) will reach the boiling point before the film melts through, which supports the qualitative picture that the LIFT process involves vapor-driven propulsion of metal from the film onto the target.

  4. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; ...

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, wheremore » the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.« less

  5. Study of the laser-induced forward transfer of liquids for laser bioprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duocastella, M.; Colina, M.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Serra, P.; Morenza, J. L.

    2007-07-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-writing technique that allows printing patterns of diverse materials with a high degree of spatial resolution. In conventional LIFT a small fraction of a solid thin film is vaporized by means of a laser pulse focused on the film through its transparent holder, and the resulting material recondenses on the receptor substrate. It has been recently shown that LIFT can also be used to transfer materials from liquid films. This widened its field of application to biosensors manufacturing, where small amounts of biomolecules-containing solutions have to be deposited with high precision on the sensing elements. However, there is still little knowledge on the physical processes and parameters determining the characteristics of the transfers. In this work, different parameters and their effects upon the transferred material were studied. It was found that the deposited material corresponds to liquid droplets which volume depends linearly on the laser pulse energy, and that a minimum threshold energy has to be overcome for transfer to occur. The liquid film thickness was varied and droplets as small as 10 μm in diameter were obtained. Finally, the effects of the variation of the film to substrate distance were also studied and it was found that there exists a wide range of distances where the morphology of the transferred droplets is independent of this parameter, what provides LIFT with a high degree of flexibility.

  6. Combined effect of demagnetizing field and induced magnetic anisotropy on the magnetic properties of manganese-zinc ferrite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayan, V.; Kazantseva, N. E.; Moučka, R.; Sapurina, I.; Spivak, Yu. M.; Moshnikov, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    This work is devoted to the analysis of factors responsible for the high-frequency shift of the complex permeability (μ*) dispersion region in polymer composites of manganese-zinc (MnZn) ferrite, as well as to the increase in their thermomagnetic stability. The magnetic spectra of the ferrite and its composites with polyurethane (MnZn-PU) and polyaniline (MnZn-PANI) are measured in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 3 GHz in a longitudinal magnetization field of up to 700 Ое and in the temperature interval from -20 °С to +150 °С. The approximation of the magnetic spectra by a model, which takes into account the role of domain wall motion and magnetization rotation, allows one to determine the specific contribution of resonance processes associated with domain wall motion and the natural ferromagnetic resonance to the μ*. It is established that, at high frequencies, the μ* of the MnZn ferrite is determined solely by magnetization rotation, which occurs in the region of natural ferromagnetic resonance when the ferrite is in the “single domain” state. In the polymer composites of the MnZn ferrite, the high-frequency permeability is also determined mainly by the magnetization rotation; however, up to high values of magnetizing fields, there is a contribution of domain wall motion, thus the “single domain” state in ferrite is not reached. The frequency and temperature dependence of μ* in polymer composites are governed by demagnetizing field and the induced magnetic anisotropy. The contribution of the induced magnetic anisotropy is crucial for MnZn-PANI. It is attributed to the elastic stresses that arise due to the domain wall pinning by a polyaniline film adsorbed on the surface of the ferrite during in-situ polymerization.

  7. Experimental study on heat transfer enhancement of laminar ferrofluid flow in horizontal tube partially filled porous media under fixed parallel magnet bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhnejad, Yahya; Hosseini, Reza; Saffar Avval, Majid

    2017-02-01

    In this study, steady state laminar ferroconvection through circular horizontal tube partially filled with porous media under constant heat flux is experimentally investigated. Transverse magnetic fields were applied on ferrofluid flow by two fixed parallel magnet bar positioned on a certain distance from beginning of the test section. The results show promising notable enhancement in heat transfer as a consequence of partially filled porous media and magnetic field, up to 2.2 and 1.4 fold enhancement were observed in heat transfer coefficient respectively. It was found that presence of both porous media and magnetic field simultaneously can highly improve heat transfer up to 2.4 fold. Porous media of course plays a major role in this configuration. Virtually, application of Magnetic field and porous media also insert higher pressure loss along the pipe which again porous media contribution is higher that magnetic field.

  8. Cage-to-cage migration rates of Xe atoms in zeolite NaA from magnetization transfer experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, A. Keith; Jameson, Cynthia J.; Gerald, Rex E., II

    1994-08-01

    Xenon trapped in the alpha cages of zeolite NaA exhibits distinct NMR signals for clusters Xe1, Xe2, Xe3,..., up to Xe8. Using multisite magnetization transfer experiments, we have measured the rate constants kmn for the elementary processes that are involved in the cage-to-cage transfer of Xe atoms in the zeolite NaA, that is, for a single Xe atom leaving a cage containing Xen to appear in a neighboring cage containing Xem-1, thereby forming Xem. In a random walk simulation, these rate constants reproduce over a hundred magnetization decay/recovery curves that we have measured in four samples of Xe in zeolite NaA at room temperature, in selective inversion, and complementary experiments for all the significantly populated clusters. The simulations also lead to the correct experimental equilibrium distributions, that is, the fractions of the alpha cages containing Xe1,Xe2,...,Xe8.

  9. Preliminary Observations on Sensitivity and Specificity of Magnetization Transfer Asymmetry for Imaging Myelin of Rat Brain at High Field

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Woong; Choi, Jiye; Cho, Janggeun; Lee, Chulhyun; Jeon, Daejong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) has been often used for imaging myelination. Despite its high sensitivity, the specificity of MTR to myelination is not high because tissues with no myelin such as muscle can also show high MTR. In this study, we propose a new magnetization transfer (MT) indicator, MT asymmetry (MTA), as a new method of myelin imaging. The experiments were performed on rat brain at 9.4 T. MTA revealed high signals in white matter and significantly low signals in gray matter and muscle, indicating that MTA has higher specificity than MTR. Demyelination and remyelination studies demonstrated that the sensitivity of MTA to myelination was as high as that of MTR. These experimental results indicate that MTA can be a good biomarker for imaging myelination. In addition, MTA images can be efficiently acquired with an interslice MTA method, which may accelerate clinical application of myelin imaging. PMID:26413534

  10. Preliminary Observations on Sensitivity and Specificity of Magnetization Transfer Asymmetry for Imaging Myelin of Rat Brain at High Field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Woong; Choi, Jiye; Cho, Janggeun; Lee, Chulhyun; Jeon, Daejong; Park, Sung-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) has been often used for imaging myelination. Despite its high sensitivity, the specificity of MTR to myelination is not high because tissues with no myelin such as muscle can also show high MTR. In this study, we propose a new magnetization transfer (MT) indicator, MT asymmetry (MTA), as a new method of myelin imaging. The experiments were performed on rat brain at 9.4 T. MTA revealed high signals in white matter and significantly low signals in gray matter and muscle, indicating that MTA has higher specificity than MTR. Demyelination and remyelination studies demonstrated that the sensitivity of MTA to myelination was as high as that of MTR. These experimental results indicate that MTA can be a good biomarker for imaging myelination. In addition, MTA images can be efficiently acquired with an interslice MTA method, which may accelerate clinical application of myelin imaging.

  11. Interfacial spin-filter assisted spin transfer torque effect in Co/BeO/Co magnetic tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.-H. Chu, F.-C.

    2015-03-07

    The first-principles calculation is employed to demonstrate the spin-selective transport properties and the non-collinear spin-transfer torque (STT) effect in the newly proposed Co/BeO/Co magnetic tunnel junction. The subtle spin-polarized charge transfer solely at O/Co interface gives rise to the interfacial spin-filter (ISF) effect, which can be simulated within the tight binding model to verify the general expression of STT. This allows us to predict the asymmetric bias behavior of non-collinear STT directly via the interplay between the first-principles calculated spin current densities in collinear magnetic configurations. We believe that the ISF effect, introduced by the combination between wurtzite-BeO barrier and the fcc-Co electrode, may open a new and promising route in semiconductor-based spintronics applications.

  12. Multifield measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux in a high-temperature toroidal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport is explored in the high-temperature, high-beta interior of the Madison symmetric torus (MST) reversed-field pinch by performing a multifield measurement of the correlated product of magnetic and density fluctuations associated with global resistive tearing modes. Local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data after resolving the mode helicity through correlation techniques. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of Faraday-effect polarimetry measurements. Reconstructed 2D images of density and current density perturbations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved. The convective magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux profile is measured for both standard and high-performance plasmas in MST with tokamak-like confinement, showing large reduction in the flux during improved confinement.

  13. The influence of the distribution of sea-water conductivity on the ocean induced magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saynisch, Jan; Irrgang, Christopher; Hagedoorn, Jan; Thomas, Maik

    2016-04-01

    The variability of oceanic contributions to Earth's magnetic field ranges from sub-daily scales to thousands of years. To study the sensitivity and the range of oceanic magnetic signals, an induction model is coupled to an ocean general circulation model. In the presented study, the sensitivity of the induction process to spatial and temporal variations in sea-water conductivity is investigated. In current calculations of ocean induced magnetic fields, a realistic distribution of sea-water conductivity is often neglected. We shown that assuming an ocean-wide constant conductivity is insufficient to accurately capture the spatial and, more important, the temporal variability of the magnetic signal. Using a realistic global sea-water conductivity distribution changes the temporal variability of the magnetic field up to 45%. Vertical gradients in sea-water conductivity prove to be a key factor for the variability of the oceanic induced magnetic field.

  14. Spin-orbit-coupling-induced magnetic heterostructure in the bilayer Bose-Hubbard system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Zheng, Jun-hui; Lin, Yu-Ju; Wang, Daw-wei

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the magnetic phases of a bilayer system of ultracold bosons in the presence of Raman-induced spin-orbit (SO) coupling and laser-assisted interlayer tunneling. We consider this bilayer system in the Mott-insulating regime where on-site two-body interactions exceed all the tunneling terms. In such a system there exists a rich set of spin textures including hetero-ferromagnetic, heterochiral magnetic, and chiral magnetic phases with interlayer antiferromagnetic. In particular, the heterochiral magnetic phase induced by SO coupling occurs extremely rarely in solid-state materials. We theoretically analyze the contribution of interlayer ferromagnetic interaction to the formation of these magnetic phases, including interactions that arise from laser-assisted tunneling, stagger "magnetic field," and antisymmetric exchange, i.e., Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions. Finally, we detail an experimental setup that produces the desired interactions in a system of cold alkali-metal atoms.

  15. Theory of light-induced effective magnetic field in Rashba ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaiumzadeh, Alireza; Titov, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on all-optical magnetization reversal in conductive ferromagnetic thin films we use nonequilibrium formalism to calculate the effective magnetic field induced in a Rashba ferromagnet by a short laser pulse. The main contribution to the effect originates in the direct optical transitions between spin-split subbands. The resulting effective magnetic field is inversely proportional to the impurity scattering rate and can reach the amplitude of a few Tesla in the systems like Co/Pt bilayers. We show that the total light-induced effective magnetic field in ferromagnetic systems is the sum of two contributions: a helicity dependent term, which is an even function of magnetization, and a helicity independent term, which is an odd function of magnetization. The primary role of the spin-orbit interaction is to widen the frequency range for direct optical transitions.

  16. Thermally induced magnon accumulation in two-sublattice magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritzmann, Ulrike; Hinzke, Denise; Nowak, Ulrich

    2017-02-01

    We present a temperature-dependent study of the thermal excitation of a magnon accumulation in two-sublattice magnetic materials. Using atomistic spin model simulations, we study the local magnetization profiles sublattice-wise in the vicinity of a temperature step in antiferromagnets, as well as in ferrimagnets. It is shown that the strength of the magnon accumulation in these systems scales with the derivative of the magnetization with respect to the temperature. These results give an insight into the complex temperature dependence of the magnon accumulation by making a direct link to the macroscopic behavior of the magnetization.

  17. Oliver E. Buckley Condensed Matter Prize Lecture: Transfer of spin momentum between magnets: its genesis and prospect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slonczewski, John

    2013-03-01

    Consider two nanoscopic monodomain magnets connected by a spacer that is composed of a non-magnetic metal or a tunnel barrier. Any externally applied electric current flowing through these three layers contributes tiny pseudo-torques to both magnetic moments (J . S . 1989). Such a weak spin-transfer torque (STT) may counteract and overcome a comparably small torque caused by viscous dissipation (L. Berger1996; J . S . 1996). Any initial motion (e. g. excited by ambient temperature) of one moment (or both), may grow in amplitude and culminate in steady precession or a transient switch to a new direction of static equilibrium. In a memory element, the STT effect writes 0 or 1 in a magnetic-tunnel junction. Indeed, world-wide developments of memory arrays and radio-frequency oscillators utilizing current-driven STT today enjoy a nine-digit dollar commitment. But the fact that transfer of each half-unit of spin momentum h/4 π through a barrier requires the transfer of at least one unit of electric charge limits its efficiency. Arguably, STT should also arise from the flow of external heat, in either direction, between an insulating magnet, of ferrite or garnet (e. g. YIG) composition, and a metallic spacer (J . S . 2010). Whenever s-d exchange annihilates a hot magnon at the insulator/metal-spacer interface, it transfers one unit h/2 π of spin momentum to the spacer. Conduction electrons within the spacer will transport this spin momentum to the second magnet without requiring an electric current. Such a thermagnonicmethod, modestly powered by a Joule-effect heater, can substantially increase the efficiency of STT. Support for this prediction comes from (1) an estimate of the sd-exchange coefficient from data on spin relaxation in magnetically dilute (Cu,Ag,Au):Mn alloys; (2) a DFT computation (J. Xiao et al 2010); and (3) most persuasively, data from spin pumping driven across a YIG/Au interface by ferromagnetic resonance (B. Heinrich et al 2011; C. Burrowes et al

  18. Computer circuit analysis of induced currents in the MFTF-B magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Magnuson, G.D.; Woods, E.L.

    1981-10-23

    An analysis was made of the induced current behavior of the MFTF-B magnet system. Although the magnet system consists of 22 coils, because of its symmetry we considered only 11 coils in the analysis. Various combinations of the coils were dumped either singly or in groups, with the current behavior in all magnets calculated as a function of time after initiation of the dump.

  19. Role of coherence and delocalization in photo-induced electron transfer at organic interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Abramavicius, V.; Pranculis, V.; Melianas, A.; Inganäs, O.; Gulbinas, V.; Abramavicius, D.

    2016-01-01

    Photo-induced charge transfer at molecular heterojunctions has gained particular interest due to the development of organic solar cells (OSC) based on blends of electron donating and accepting materials. While charge transfer between donor and acceptor molecules can be described by Marcus theory, additional carrier delocalization and coherent propagation might play the dominant role. Here, we describe ultrafast charge separation at the interface of a conjugated polymer and an aggregate of the fullerene derivative PCBM using the stochastic Schrödinger equation (SSE) and reveal the complex time evolution of electron transfer, mediated by electronic coherence and delocalization. By fitting the model to ultrafast charge separation experiments, we estimate the extent of electron delocalization and establish the transition from coherent electron propagation to incoherent hopping. Our results indicate that even a relatively weak coupling between PCBM molecules is sufficient to facilitate electron delocalization and efficient charge separation at organic interfaces. PMID:27605035

  20. Förster energy transfer induced random lasing at unconventional excitation wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadak Alee, K.; Barik, Sabyasachi; Mujumdar, Sushil

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally demonstrate efficient lasing from a Rhodamine-nanoscatterer random laser when pumped with unconventional wavelengths, at which the absorption of Rhodamine is negligible. Förster-type energy transfer was realized by using Coumarin molecules as donors. Explicit time-resolved spectroscopy provided direct evidence for the nonradiative transfer with ˜48% efficiency. We obtained lasing at reduced thresholds by a factor of over 3 and increased amplification rates by a factor of ˜4 in the Förster regime, even in samples with sub-diffusive disorder strength. We characterize the efficacy of the Förster transfer induced lasing over a range of unconventional wavelengths for the Rh-based system.

  1. An impurity-induced gap system as a quantum data bus for quantum state transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bing; Li, Yong; Song, Z.; Sun, C.-P.

    2014-09-15

    We introduce a tight-binding chain with a single impurity to act as a quantum data bus for perfect quantum state transfer. Our proposal is based on the weak coupling limit of the two outermost quantum dots to the data bus, which is a gapped system induced by the impurity. By connecting two quantum dots to two sites of the data bus, the system can accomplish a high-fidelity and long-distance quantum state transfer. Numerical simulations for finite system show that the numerical and analytical results of the effective coupling strength agree well with each other. Moreover, we study the robustness of this quantum communication protocol in the presence of disorder in the couplings between the nearest-neighbor quantum dots. We find that the gap of the system plays an important role in robust quantum state transfer.

  2. Free convectively induced air intrusion effects on heat transfer through porous insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaung, R.

    1981-08-01

    The thermal resistance of porous thermal insulation is investigated. A 4.0 ft. by 5.0 ft. double heat transfer gage test apparatus is employed to study the thermal performance of a sandwich-type insulator system quantitatively. Heat transfer through porous medium without free convectively induced air intrusion effects is also investigated. Boundary emissivity effects and cellularization effects are studied to understand the role of radiative heat transfer. Various arrangements of nonpermeable and semipermeable membranes were inserted at the air insulator interface to improve its performance. Incompressible fluid dynamic equations describing the convective flow are analyzed and approximated using finite difference methods. The thermal boundary layer is studied experimentally. Interferometric experimental results are qualitatively agreed with the numerical solutions. It is shown that the installation of interfacial barriers upgrade the thermal performance of sandwich insulation.

  3. ``Cold Denaturation'' induces inversion of dipole and spin transfer in chiral peptide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Soumyajit; Eckshtain-Levi, Meital; Capua, Eyal; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Gavrilov, Yulian; Mathew, Shinto; Paltiel, Yossi; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Naaman, Ron

    Using a combination of several experimental and computational techniques, we show that the α-helix structure of oligopeptides based on alanine and aminoisobutyric acid is transformed to a more linear conformation upon cooling, due to interaction with neighboring molecules in a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) structure. This process is similar to the known ``cold denaturation'' in peptides, but here the SAM plays the role of the solvent. Our DFT-based first principles calculations show that the structural change results in a flip in the direction of the electrical dipole moment of the adsorbed molecules. The dipole flip is accompanied by an associated change in the spin channel that is preferred in electron transfer through the molecules. This is also experimentally observed via a new solid state hybrid organic-inorganic device that is based on the Hall effect, but operates with no external magnetic field or magnetic material.

  4. Robust magnetic moments on the basal plane of the graphene sheet effectively induced by OH groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tao; Tang, Nujiang; Zheng, Yongping; Wan, Xiangang; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Fuchi; Xu, Qinghua; Du, Youwei

    2015-02-01

    Inducing robust magnetic moments on the basal plane of the graphene sheet is very difficult, and is one of the greatest challenges in the study of physical chemistry of graphene materials. Theoretical studies predicted that introduction of a kind of sp3-type defects formed by OH groups is an effective pathway to achieve this goal [Boukhvalov, D. W. & Katsnelson, M. I. ACS Nano 5, 2440-2446 (2011)]. Here we demonstrate that OH groups can efficiently induce robust magnetic moments on the basal plane of the graphene sheet. We show that the inducing efficiency can reach as high as 217 μB per 1000 OH groups. More interestingly, the magnetic moments are robust and can survive even at 900°C. Our findings highlight the importance of OH group as an effective sp3-type candidate for inducing robust magnetic moments on the basal plane of the graphene sheet.

  5. Selective-resputtering-induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in amorphous TbFe films.

    PubMed

    Harris, V G; Pokhil, T

    2001-08-06

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energy in rf magnetron sputtered amorphous TbFe films is measured to increase exponentially with pair-order anisotropy induced by the selective resputtering of surface adatoms during film growth.

  6. Basic study on the influence of inhibition induced by the magnetic stimulation on the peripheral nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Aya; Torii, Tetsuya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Iramina, Keiji

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the inhibition mechanism of magnetic stimulation on motor function. A magnetic stimulator with a flat figure-eight coil was used to stimulate the peripheral nerve of the antebrachium. The intensity of magnetic stimulation was 0.8 T, and the stimulation frequency was 1 Hz. The amplitudes of the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) at the abductor pollicis brevis muscle and first dorsal interosseous muscle were used to evaluate the effects of magnetic stimulation. The effects of magnetic stimulation were evaluated by analyzing the MEP amplitude before and after magnetic stimulation to the primary motor cortex. The results showed that MEP amplitude after magnetic stimulation compared with before magnetic stimulation decreased. Because there were individual differences in MEP amplitude induced by magnetic stimulation, the MEP amplitude after stimulation was normalized by the amplitude of each participant before stimulation. The MEP amplitude after stimulation decreased by approximately 58% (p < 0.01) on average compared with before stimulation. Previous studies suggested that magnetic stimulation to the primary motor cortex induced an increase or a decrease in MEP amplitude. Furthermore, previous studies have shown that the alteration in MEP amplitude was induced by cortical excitability based on magnetic stimulation. The results of this study showed that MEP amplitude decreased following magnetic stimulation to the peripheral nerve. We suggest that the decrease in MEP amplitude found in this study was obtained via the feedback from a peripheral nerve through an afferent nerve to the brain. This study suggests that peripheral excitement by magnetic stimulation of the peripheral nerve may control the central nervous system via afferent feedback.

  7. Shock-induced modifications of magnetic minerals from impact structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontny, A. M.

    2013-05-01

    Meteorite impact structures are an important feature of most planetary surfaces. The effects of shock waves on the intrinsic magnetic properties of minerals and rocks are therefore essential for the understanding of magnetization processes related to impact events on Earth and other planetary bodies. Despite numerous observations on natural settings (Carporzen et al. 2005; Mang et al. 2012), and experimental studies (Louzada et al. 2010, 2011; Gattacecca et al 2007; Gilder et al. 2004; Mang et al. 2013) there remain uncertainties concerning the rock magnetic properties and the magnetization process related to natural impact structures on Earth. In general, the magnetic signature of terrestrial impact structures is a combined effect between disrupted main regional magnetic trends due to shock and / or thermal demagnetization and high-amplitude, short-wavelength magnetic anomalies in the centre of intermediate to large impact structures. Some large structures (>40 km) are reported to exhibit central high-amplitude anomalies but the dominant magnetic feature is a magnetic low (Pilkington and Grieve 1992). The latter observation is especially important for the giant non-magnetized impact basins on Mars. Therefore numerous studies focused on the understanding of the demagnetization processes during shock pressure (Gilder et al. 2004; Louzada et al. 2010, 2011; Rochette et al. 2003). Many investigations of terrestrial impact structures, however, demonstrated that a natural remanent magnetization (NRM), which is imprinted into terrestrial rocks by the Earth magnetic field, is the main cause of the observed magnetic anomalies. Magnetic signatures of impact structures on Earth are therefore thought to be a combination of three parameters: (1) composition and magnetic properties of the target rocks, (2) modification of rocks and magnetic minerals (fracturing and melting) due to impact-related p-T conditions, (3) acquisition of new natural remanent magnetization (TRM, SRM or

  8. Adventitial gene transfer of catalase attenuates angiotensin II-induced vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cun-Fei; Zhang, Jia; Shen, Kai; Gao, Ping-Jin; Wang, Hai-Ya; Jin, Xin; Meng, Chao; Fang, Ning-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Vascular adventitia and adventitia‑derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to vascular remodeling following vascular injury. A previous ex vivo study in adventitial fibroblasts showed that catalase, one of most important anti‑oxide enzymes, was downregulated by angiotensin II (AngII). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether adventitial gene transfer of catalase affects AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in vivo. Adenoviruses co‑expressing catalase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or expressing eGFP only were applied to the adventitial surface of common carotid arteries of Sprague‑Dawley rats. Alzet minipumps administering AngII (0.75 mg/kg/day) were then implanted subcutaneously for 14 days. Systolic blood pressure and biological parameters of vascular remodeling were measured in each group. Adventitial fibroblasts were cultured and p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was measured using western blot analysis. The results showed that adventitial gene transfer of catalase had no effect on AngII‑induced systolic blood pressure elevation. However, catalase adenovirus transfection significantly inhibited AngII‑induced media hypertrophy compared with that of the control virus (P<0.05). In addition, catalase transfection significantly attenuated AngII‑induced ROS generation, macrophage infiltration, collagen deposition and adventitial α‑smooth muscle actin expression. Furthermore, catalase transfection significantly inhibited the AngII‑induced increase in p38MAPK phosphorylation. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that adventitial gene transfer of catalase significantly attenuated AngII‑induced vascular remodeling in rats via inhibition of adventitial p38MAPK phosphorylation.

  9. Combining Satellite and Ground Magnetic Measurements to Improve Estimates of Electromagnetic Induction Transfer Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, G.; Egbert, G. D.

    2005-12-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) induction studies using satellite and ground-based magnetic data may ultimately provide critical new constraints on the electrical conductivity of Earth's mantle. Unlike ground-based observatories, which leave large areas of the Earth (especially the ocean basins) unsampled, satellites have the potential for nearly complete global coverage. However, because the number of operating satellites is limited, spatially complex (especially non-zonal) external current sources are sampled relatively poorly by satellites at any fixed time. The comparatively much larger number of ground-based observatories provides more complete synoptic sampling of external source structure. By combining data from both satellites and observatories models of external sources can be improved, leading to more reliable global mapping of Earth conductivity. For example, estimates of EM induction transfer functions estimated from night-side CHAMP data have been previously shown to have biases which depend systematically on local time (LT). This pattern of biases suggests that a purely zonal model does not adequately describe magnetospheric sources. As a first step toward improved modeling of spatial complexity in sources, we have applied empirical orthogonal function (EOF) methods to exploratory analysis of night-side observatory data. After subtraction of the predictions of the CM4 comprehensive model, which includes a zonally symmetric storm-time correction based on Dst, we find significant non-axisymmetric, but large scale coherent variability in the mid-latitude night-side observatory residuals. Over the restricted range of local times (18:00-6:00) and latitudes (50°S to 50°N) considered, the dominant spatial mode of variability is reasonably approximated by a q21 quadrupole spherical harmonic. Temporal variability of this leading EOF mode is well correlated with Dst. Strategies for moving beyond this initial exploratory EOF analysis to combine observatory data with

  10. Estimating nanoparticle optical absorption with magnetic resonance temperature imaging and bioheat transfer simulation

    PubMed Central

    MacLellan, Christopher J.; Fuentes, David T.; Elliott, Andrew M.; Schwartz, Jon; Hazle, John D.; Stafford, R. Jason

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Optically activated nanoparticle-mediated heating for thermal therapy applications is an area of intense research. The ability to characterize the spatiotemporal heating potential of these particles for use in modeling under various exposure conditions can aid in the exploration of new approaches for therapy as well as more quantitative prospective approaches to treatment planning. The purpose of this research was to investigate an inverse solution to the heat equation, using magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) feedback, for providing optical characterization of two types of nanoparticles (gold-silica nanoshells and gold nanorods). Methods The optical absorption of homogeneous nanoparticle-agar mixtures was measured during exposure to an 808nm laser using real-time MRTI. A coupled finite element solution of heat transfer was registered with the data and used to solve the inverse problem. The L2 norm of the difference between the temperature increase in the model and MRTI was minimized using a pattern search algorithm by varying the absorption coefficient of the mixture. Results Absorption fractions were within 10% of literature values for similar nanoparticles. Comparison of temporal and spatial profiles demonstrated good qualitative agreement between the model and the MRTI. The weighted root mean square error was <1.5 σMRTI and the average Dice similarity coefficient for ΔT = 5°C isotherms was > 0.9 over the measured time interval. Conclusion This research demonstrates the feasibility of using an indirect method for making minimally invasive estimates of nanoparticle absorption that might be expanded to analyze a variety of geometries and particles of interest. PMID:24350668

  11. Hijacking common mycorrhizal networks for herbivore-induced defence signal transfer between tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuan Yuan; Ye, Mao; Li, Chuanyou; He, Xinhua; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan; Wang, Rui Long; Su, Yi Juan; Luo, Shi Ming; Zeng, Ren Sen

    2014-01-28

    Common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs) link multiple plants together. We hypothesized that CMNs can serve as an underground conduit for transferring herbivore-induced defence signals. We established CMN between two tomato plants in pots with mycorrhizal fungus Funneliformis mosseae, challenged a 'donor' plant with caterpillar Spodoptera litura, and investigated defence responses and insect resistance in neighbouring CMN-connected 'receiver' plants. After CMN establishment caterpillar infestation on 'donor' plant led to increased insect resistance and activities of putative defensive enzymes, induction of defence-related genes and activation of jasmonate (JA) pathway in the 'receiver' plant. However, use of a JA biosynthesis defective mutant spr2 as 'donor' plants resulted in no induction of defence responses and no change in insect resistance in 'receiver' plants, suggesting that JA signalling is required for CMN-mediated interplant communication. These results indicate that plants are able to hijack CMNs for herbivore-induced defence signal transfer and interplant defence communication.

  12. Gluon Vortices and Induced Magnetic Field in Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Efrain J.

    2007-10-26

    The natural candidates for the realization of color superconductivity are the extremely dense cores of compact stars, many of which have very large magnetic fields, especially the so called magnetars. In this paper we discuss how a color superconducting core can serve to generate and enhance the stellar magnetic field without appealing to a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo mechanism.

  13. Method to study temperature and stress induced magnetic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Harsh Deep; Sullivan, Matthew R.

    2005-01-01

    A new method called magnetic transition spectrum (MTS) is described for studying magnetic phase transitions. The MTS method is an electronic method that monitors the dynamics of the micromagnetic structure as a function of temperature, stress, or any other perturbation that can cause a sudden variation in flux inside the magnetic material. It is based on the same principle upon which the well-known and established Barkhausen method is based, namely, Faraday's law. However, instead of applying a magnetic field as in the Barkhausen method, temperature or stress is the external "force." The efficacy of the MTS method is illustrated by studying magnetic transitions in magnetic shape memory alloys. The MTS method is simple to implement and is equally applicable for studying magnetic transitions in other systems, such as, for example, dynamics of exchange anisotropy, using the Co-CoO system, by cooling the sample across the Néel temperature. In general, it can be used to study magnetic phase transitions driven by any external influence that would cause an abrupt change in the micromagnetic state of the sample (for example, change in temperature, pressure, etc.).

  14. Preservation and detectability of shock-induced magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikoo, Sonia M.; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Swanson-Hysell, Nicholas L.; Weiss, Benjamin P.; Suavet, Clément; Cournède, Cécile

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the effects of hypervelocity impacts on the magnetization of natural samples is required for interpreting paleomagnetic records of meteorites, lunar rocks, and cratered planetary surfaces. Rocks containing ferromagnetic minerals have been shown to acquire shock remanent magnetization (SRM) due to the passage of a shock wave in the presence of an ambient magnetic field. In this study, we conducted pressure remanent magnetization (PRM) acquisition experiments on a variety of natural samples as an analog for SRM acquisition at pressures ranging up to 1.8 GPa. Comparison of the alternating field (AF) and thermal demagnetization behavior of PRM confirms that AF demagnetization is a more efficient method for removing SRM overprints than thermal demagnetization because SRM may persist to unblocking temperatures approaching the Curie temperatures of magnetic minerals. The blocking of SRM to high temperatures suggests that SRM could persist without being eradicated by viscous relaxation over geologic timescales. However, SRM has been rarely observed in natural samples likely because of two factors: (1) other forms of impact-related remanence (e.g., thermal remanent magnetization from impact-related heating or chemical remanent magnetization from postimpact hydrothermal activity) are often acquired by target rocks that overprint SRM, and (2) low SRM acquisition efficiencies may prevent SRM from being distinguished from the underlying primary remanence or other overprints due to its low magnetization intensity.

  15. Growth induced magnetic anisotropy in crystalline and amorphous thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, F.

    1998-07-20

    The work in the past 6 months has involved three areas of magnetic thin films: (1) amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys, (2) epitaxial Co-Pt and Ni-Pt alloy thin films, and (3) collaborative work on heat capacity measurements of magnetic thin films, including nanoparticles and CMR materials. A brief summary of work done in each area is given.

  16. Parametric resonance induced chaos in magnetic damped driven pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomeriki, Giorgi

    2016-07-01

    A damped driven pendulum with a magnetic driving force, appearing from a solenoid, where ac current flows is considered. The solenoid acts on the magnet, which is located at a free end of the pendulum. In this system the existence and interrelation of chaos and parametric resonance is theoretically examined. Derived analytical results are supported by numerical simulations and conducted experiments.

  17. Cutin monomer induces expression of the rice OsLTP5 lipid transfer protein gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Jong Ho; Kim, Moon Chul; Cho, Sung Ho

    2008-01-01

    Treatment with the cutin monomer 16-hydroxypalmitic acid (HPA), a major component of cutin, elicited the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in rice leaves and induced the expression of the lipid transfer protein gene OsLTP5. Treatment with HPA also induced expression of OsLTP1, OsLTP2, and the pathogen-related PR-10 genes to a lesser extent. The OsLTP5 transcript was expressed prominently in stems and flowers, but was barely detectable in leaves. Expression of OsLTP5 was induced in shoots in response to ABA and salicylic acid. It is proposed that HPA is perceived by rice as a signal, inducing defense reactions.

  18. Chiral spiral induced by a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuki, Hiroaki

    2016-11-01

    We study the modification of the chiral phase structure of QCD due to an external magnetic field. We first demonstrate how the effect of magnetic field can systematically be incorporated into a generalized Ginzburg-Landau framework. We then analyze the phase structure in the vicinity of the chiral critical point. In the chiral limit, the effect is found to be so drastic that it brings a "continent" of chiral spiral in the phase diagram, by which the chiral tricritical point is totally washed out. This is the case no matter how small the intensity of magnetic field is. On the other hand, the current quark mass protects the chiral critical point from a weak magnetic field. However, the critical point will eventually be covered by the chiral spiral phase as the magnetic field grows.

  19. Magnetization process and topological plateau phase induced by circularly polarized laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayoshi, Shintaro; Sato, Masahiro; Oka, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    One of the fundamental experiments to investigate magnetic properties of materials is a measurement of magnetization curve. Antiferromagnets with large exchange couplings, however, need high external field to achieve their saturated magnetization, and large equipment is required in experiments. We theoretically propose a new and dynamic way to realize magnetization processes of general quantum magnets without any static field. The way is to apply a circularly polarized laser to magnetic systems. We can show that the coupling between the laser and magnets is mapped to an effective static Zeeman term with a longitudinal magnetic field via a time-dependent unitary transformation or Floquet theory. It is hence expected that the magnetization curve of magnets can be realized by applying a suitable laser. We demonstrate dynamical magnetization processes by numerically solving Schrödinger equations for concrete quantum spin models under applied lasers. We also show that a laser-induced magnetization plateau state appears in a simple Ferro-Ferro-Antiferro spin chain model under a certain condition and it has a topological nature.

  20. Experimental measurements of shock induced changes to the magnetization of unexploded ordnance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, Stephen; Beran, Laurens

    2014-06-01

    Millions of acres of land around the world are potentially contaminated by unexploded ordnance (UXO). Magnetometry is a technique widely used to both detect and characterize buried UXO. It has been hypothesized that ordnance suffer a large shock on firing and impact that erases any preexisting remanent magnetization. If such demagnetization occurs, an apparent remanence metric has been shown to be effective at distinguishing hazardous ordnance from non-hazardous metallic debris. To test the shock demagnetization hypothesis, an experiment was conducted at a firing range to measure the magnetic remanence of sixty-five inert 81 mm mortars before firing and after impact. As delivered, 64 of the 65 rounds had very low remanent magnetization and a magnetizer had to be used to impose various amounts of remanence on the mortars. Three different categories of initial remanent magnetization were created (low, medium and high remanence) and these were fired at three different initial velocities. The mortars that initially had low remanent magnetization acquired a magnetization in the direction of the Earth's inducing field after impact, with the amount of re-magnetization decreasing with an increasing impact velocity. This effect is known as shock magnetization. The mortars with medium and high initial magnetization all lost some of their magnetic remanence, with the amount of demagnetization increasing with an increasing impact velocity. However, even at the highest impact velocity, shock demagnetization of initially highly magnetized mortars was insufficient to guarantee effective discrimination using apparent remanence.

  1. Tuning magnetic anisotropy and the damping constant using substrate-induced strain in a FeCo/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chengcheng; Wang, Fenglong; Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Cai; Jiang, Changjun

    2015-11-01

    To investigate how substrate-induced strain affects the magnetic anisotropy and damping constant, FeCo films were deposited onto Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) (0 1 1)-orientated substrates by RF-magnetron sputtering. Interestingly, as the strain, which is controlled by an applied electric field, increases, the magnetic anisotropy is enhanced while the damping constant decreases sharply. The angular dependence of coercive force and magnetoelastic energy were obtained to analyze the mechanism of magnetization reversal under strain modulation. The nonvolatile strain-modulation was demonstrated by the application of different pulsed electric fields. The reversible magnetization processes and low magnetic damping constant can be modulated by the substrate-induced strain, which can contribute to the realization of low-loss strain-mediated spin-transfer-torque based magnetic devices.

  2. Toward 3D Printing of Pure Metals by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer.

    PubMed

    Visser, Claas Willem; Pohl, Ralph; Sun, Chao; Römer, Gert-Willem; Huis in 't Veld, Bert; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-07-15

    3D printing of common metals is highly challenging because metals are generally solid at room conditions. Copper and gold pillars are manufactured with a resolution below 5 μm and a height up to 2 mm, using laser-induced forward transfer to create and eject liquid metal droplets. The solidified drop's shape is crucial for 3D printing and is discussed as a function of the laser energy.

  3. Printing Functional 3D Microdevices by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Pohl, Ralph; Qi, Lehua; Römer, Gert-Willem; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Visser, Claas Willem

    2017-03-01

    Slender, out-of-plane metal microdevices are made in a new spatial domain, by using laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of metals. Here, a thermocouple with a thickness of 10 µm and a height of 250 µm, consisting of platinum and gold pillars is demonstrated. Multimaterial LIFT enables manufacturing in the micrometer to millimeter range, i.e., between lithography and other 3D printing technologies.

  4. Pulse-Current-Induced Switching of Ta/CoFeB/MgO with Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Yu-Ming; Rehm, Laura; Wolf, Georg; Kent, Andrew D.

    2015-03-01

    We study current-induced switching of thin magnetic layers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy using in-plane currents and the spin-Hall effect in the quasi-static (swept current) and pulsed-current regimes. Our aim is to investigate the dynamics and efficiency of spin-transfer switching. The layer stacks consists of β-Ta(5nm)/Co40Fe40B20(0.8nm)/MgO(2nm)/Ta(2nm) layers on oxidized silicon substrates. Hall bar structures with dimensions of 15 × 180 μm2 and cross shaped devices with width of 6 μm are investigated with DC transport and pulse measurement, respectively. In DC transport experiments, we could switch the magnetization states reproducibly by varying the in-plane field and current. In pulsed experiments, we measured the dependence of the switching probability on pulse amplitude and duration in the presence of an in-plane field. A histogram analysis indicates the existence of intermediate states and suggests incoherent magnetization switching. Nearly 100% switching probability could be achieved at high enough pulse amplitude of 25.5 MA/cm2 with 10 ns pulse duration and an applied field of ~120 mT. Supported by SRC-INDEX program.

  5. Magneto-dielectric effects induced by optically-generated intermolecular charge-transfer states in organic semiconducting materials.

    PubMed

    Zang, Huidong; Yan, Liang; Li, Mingxing; He, Lei; Gai, Zheng; Ivanov, Ilia; Wang, Min; Chiang, Long; Urbas, Augustine; Hu, Bin

    2013-10-02

    Traditionally, magneto-dielectric effects have been developed by combining ferroelectric and magnetic materials. Here, we show a magneto-dielectric effect from optically-generated intermolecular charge-transfer states in an organic semiconducting donor:acceptor (PVK:TCNB) system. We observe in magnetic field effects of photoluminescence that a magnetic field can change singlet/triplet population ratio in intermolecular charge-transfer states. Furthermore, our theoretical analysis and experimental evidence indicate that the singlets and triplets in charge-transfer states have stronger and weaker electrical polarizations, respectively. Therefore, the observed magneto-dielectric effect can be attributed to magnetically-dependent singlet/triplet ratio in intermolecular charge-transfer states. In principle, a magneto-dielectric effect can be generated through two different channels based on magneto-polarization and magneto-current effects when the singlet/triplet ratio in intermolecular charge-transfer states is changed by a magnetic field. We find, from the simulation of dielectric effects, that magneto-polarization and magneto-current effects play primary and secondary roles in the generation of magneto-dielectric effect.

  6. Hole-transfer induced energy transfer in perylene diimide dyads with a donor-spacer-acceptor motif.

    PubMed

    Kölle, Patrick; Pugliesi, Igor; Langhals, Heinz; Wilcken, Roland; Esterbauer, Andreas J; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina; Riedle, Eberhard

    2015-10-14

    We investigate the photoinduced dynamics of perylene diimide dyads based on a donor-spacer-acceptor motif with polyyne spacers of varying length by pump-probe spectroscopy, time resolved fluorescence, chemical variation and quantum chemistry. While the dyads with pyridine based polyyne spacers undergo energy transfer with near-unity quantum efficiency, in the dyads with phenyl based polyyne spacers the energy transfer efficiency drops below 50%. This suggests the presence of a competing electron transfer process from the spacer to the energy donor as the excitation sink. Transient absorption spectra, however, reveal that the spacer actually mediates the energy transfer dynamics. The ground state bleach features of the polyyne spacers appear due to the electron transfer decay with the same time constant present in the rise of the ground state bleach and stimulated emission of the perylene energy acceptor. Although the electron transfer process initially quenches the fluorescence of the donor it does not inhibit energy transfer to the perylene energy acceptor. The transient signatures reveal that electron and energy transfer processes are sequential and indicate that the donor-spacer electron transfer state itself is responsible for the energy transfer. Through the introduction of a Dexter blocker unit into the spacer we can clearly exclude any through bond Dexter-type energy transfer. Ab initio calculations on the donor-spacer and the donor-spacer-acceptor systems reveal the existence of a bright charge transfer state that is close in energy to the locally excited state of the acceptor. Multipole-multipole interactions between the bright charge transfer state and the acceptor state enable the energy transfer. We term this mechanism coupled hole-transfer FRET. These dyads represent a first example that shows how electron transfer can be connected to energy transfer for use in novel photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices.

  7. Non-invasive brain stimulation can induce paradoxical facilitation. Are these neuroenhancements transferable and meaningful to security services?

    PubMed Central

    Levasseur-Moreau, Jean; Brunelin, Jerome; Fecteau, Shirley

    2013-01-01

    For ages, we have been looking for ways to enhance our physical and cognitive capacities in order to augment our security. One potential way to enhance our capacities may be to externally stimulate the brain. Methods of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS), such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial electrical stimulation (tES), have been recently developed to modulate brain activity. Both techniques are relatively safe and can transiently modify motor and cognitive functions outlasting the stimulation period. The purpose of this paper is to review data suggesting that NIBS can enhance motor and cognitive performance in healthy volunteers. We frame these findings in the context of whether they may serve security purposes. Specifically, we review studies reporting that NIBS induces paradoxical facilitation in motor (precision, speed, strength, acceleration endurance, and execution of daily motor task) and cognitive functions (attention, impulsive behavior, risk-taking, working memory, planning, and deceptive capacities). Although transferability and meaningfulness of these NIBS-induced paradoxical facilitations into real-life situations are not clear yet, NIBS may contribute at improving training of motor and cognitive functions relevant for military, civil, and forensic security services. This is an enthusiastic perspective that also calls for fair and open debates on the ethics of using NIBS in healthy individuals to enhance normal functions. PMID:23966923

  8. Non-invasive brain stimulation can induce paradoxical facilitation. Are these neuroenhancements transferable and meaningful to security services?

    PubMed

    Levasseur-Moreau, Jean; Brunelin, Jerome; Fecteau, Shirley

    2013-01-01

    For ages, we have been looking for ways to enhance our physical and cognitive capacities in order to augment our security. One potential way to enhance our capacities may be to externally stimulate the brain. Methods of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS), such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial electrical stimulation (tES), have been recently developed to modulate brain activity. Both techniques are relatively safe and can transiently modify motor and cognitive functions outlasting the stimulation period. The purpose of this paper is to review data suggesting that NIBS can enhance motor and cognitive performance in healthy volunteers. We frame these findings in the context of whether they may serve security purposes. Specifically, we review studies reporting that NIBS induces paradoxical facilitation in motor (precision, speed, strength, acceleration endurance, and execution of daily motor task) and cognitive functions (attention, impulsive behavior, risk-taking, working memory, planning, and deceptive capacities). Although transferability and meaningfulness of these NIBS-induced paradoxical facilitations into real-life situations are not clear yet, NIBS may contribute at improving training of motor and cognitive functions relevant for military, civil, and forensic security services. This is an enthusiastic perspective that also calls for fair and open debates on the ethics of using NIBS in healthy individuals to enhance normal functions.

  9. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis.

  10. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis.

  11. Coupling of light-induced electron transfer to proton uptake in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Remy, André; Gerwert, Klaus

    2003-08-01

    Light energy is transformed into chemical energy in photosynthesis by coupling a light-induced electron transfer to proton uptake. The resulting proton gradient drives ATP synthesis. In this study, we monitored the light-induced reactions in a 100-kDa photosynthetic protein from 30 ns to 35 s by FTIR difference spectroscopy. The results provide detailed mechanistic insights into the electron and proton transfer reactions of the QA to QB transition: reduction of QA in picoseconds induces protonation of histidines, probably of His126 and His128 in the H subunit at the entrance of the proton uptake channel, and of Asp210 in the L subunit inside the channel at 12 micros and 150 micros. This seems to be a prerequisite for the reduction of QB, mainly at 150 micros. QA- is reoxidized at 1.1 ms, and a proton is transferred from Asp210 to Glu212 in the L subunit, the proton donor to QB-. Notably, our data indicate that QB is not reduced directly by QA- but presumably through an intermediary electron donor.

  12. Substrate-induced magnetism in epitaxial graphene buffer layers.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramaniam, A; Medhekar, N V; Shenoy, V B

    2009-07-08

    Magnetism in graphene is of fundamental as well as technological interest, with potential applications in molecular magnets and spintronic devices. While defects and/or adsorbates in freestanding graphene nanoribbons and graphene sheets have been shown to cause itinerant magnetism, controlling the density and distribution of defects and adsorbates is in general difficult. We show from first principles calculations that graphene buffer layers on SiC(0001) can also show intrinsic magnetism. The formation of graphene-substrate chemical bonds disrupts the graphene pi-bonds and causes localization of graphene states near the Fermi level. Exchange interactions between these states lead to itinerant magnetism in the graphene buffer layer. We demonstrate the occurrence of magnetism in graphene buffer layers on both bulk-terminated as well as more realistic adatom-terminated SiC(0001) surfaces. Our calculations show that adatom density has a profound effect on the spin distribution in the graphene buffer layer, thereby providing a means of engineering magnetism in epitaxial graphene.

  13. Accuracy and uncertainty of asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio quantification for amide proton transfer (APT) imaging at 3T: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Qinwei; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Wei, Juan; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2013-01-01

    Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging offers a novel and powerful MRI contrast mechanism for quantitative molecular imaging based on the principle of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST). Asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTR(asym)) quantification is crucial for Z-spectrum analysis of APT imaging, but is still challenging, particularly at clinical field strength. This paper studies the accuracy and uncertainty in the quantification of MTR(asym) for APT imaging at 3T, by using high-order polynomial fitting of Z-spectrum through Monte Carlo simulation. Results show that polynomial fitting is a biased estimator that consistently underestimates MTR(asym). For a fixed polynomial order, the accuracy of MTR(asym) is almost constant with regard to signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) while the uncertainty decreases exponentially with SNR. The higher order polynomial fitting increases both the accuracy and the uncertainty of MTR(asym). For different APT signal intensity levels, the relative accuracy and the absolute uncertainty keep constant for a fixed polynomial order. These results indicate the limitations and pitfalls of polynomial fitting for MTR(asym) quantification so better quantification technique for MTR(asym) estimation is warranted.

  14. Magnetic-field-induced criticality in superconducting two-leg ladders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekua, Temo

    2017-03-01

    We study magnetic-field-induced critical singularities in the superconducting phase of the hole-doped Hubbard model of repulsively interacting electrons, defined on a two-leg ladder. We argue that, provided the low-energy spin excitations in doped ladders carry electric charge, the low-temperature thermodynamic quantities, such as the specific-heat coefficient and magnetic susceptibility, will show logarithmic singularities in the quantum critical regime. This behavior is in drastic contrast to the magnetic-field-induced criticality in undoped Mott insulator ladders, which is governed by the zero-scale-factor universality with its hallmark square-root singularities.

  15. Enhanced magnetic-field-induced optical properties of nanostructured magnetic fluids by doping nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang; Pu, Shengli; Ji, Hongzhu; Yu, Guojun

    2012-05-01

    Ferronematic materials composed of 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl nematic liquid crystal and oil-based Fe3O4 magnetic fluid were prepared using ultrasonic agitation. The birefringence (Δ n) and figure of merit of optical properties ( Q = Δ n/α, where α is the extinction coefficient) of pure magnetic fluids and the as-prepared ferronematic materials were examined and compared. The figure of merit of optical properties weighs the birefringence and extinction of the materials and is more appropriate to evaluate their optical properties. Similar magnetic-field- and magnetic-particle-concentration-dependent properties of birefringence and figure of merit of optical properties were obtained for the pure magnetic fluids and the ferronematic materials. For the ferronematic materials, the values of Q increase with the volume fractions of nematic liquid crystal under certain fixed field strength and are larger than those of their corresponding pure magnetic fluids at high field region. In addition, the enhancement of Q value increases monotonously with the magnetic field and becomes remarkable when the applied magnetic field is beyond 50 mT. The maximum relative enhanced value of Q R exceeds 6.8% in our experiments. The results of this work may conduce to extend the pragmatic applications of nanostructured magnetic fluids in optical field.

  16. Magnetic induction-induced resistive heating of optical fibers and gratings.

    PubMed

    Canning, John; Naqshbandi, Masood; Cook, Kevin; Huyang, George

    2013-03-15

    Magnetic induction heating of optical fibers packaged with a steel plate is studied using a fiber Bragg grating. The dependence on the induced wavelength shift with magnetic field is obtained for a commercially available induction heater. More than a 300°C temperature rise is observed within seconds. The potential of magnetic induction as an efficient and rapid means of modulating devices and as a novel approach to potential optical based magnetic field and current sensing is proposed and discussed. The extension of the ideas into micro and nanophotonics is described.

  17. A procedure to estimate the electric field induced in human body exposed to unknown magnetic sources.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wencui; Bottauscio, Oriano; Chiampi, Mario; Giordano, Domenico; Zilberti, Luca

    2013-04-01

    The paper proposes and discusses a boundary element procedure able to predict the distribution of the electric field induced in a human body exposed to a low-frequency magnetic field produced by unknown sources. As a first step, the magnetic field on the body surface is reconstructed starting from the magnetic field values detected on a closed surface enclosing the sources. Then, the solution of a boundary value problem provides the electric field distribution inside the human model. The procedure is tested and validated by considering different non-uniform magnetic field distributions generated by a Helmholtz coil system as well as different locations of the human model.

  18. Quantification of cellular properties from external fields and resulting induced velocity: magnetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, J J; Haam, S; Zhao, Y; McCloskey, K; Moore, L; Zborowski, M; Williams, P S

    1999-09-05

    An experimental technique is discussed in which the magnetic susceptibility of immunomagnetically labeled cells can be determined on a cell-by-cell basis. This technique is based on determining the magnetically induced velocity that an immunomagnetically labeled cell has in a well-defined magnetic energy gradient. This velocity is determined through the use of video recordings of microscopic images of cells moving in the magnetic energy gradient. These video images are then computer digitized and processed using a computer algorithm, cell tracking velocimetry, which allows larger numbers (>10(3)) of cells to be analyzed.

  19. First-principles study for vacancy-induced magnetism in nonmagnetic ferroelectric BaTiO3.

    PubMed

    Cao, D; Cai, M Q; Zheng, Yue; Hu, W Y

    2009-12-14

    The possibilities of vacancy-induced magnetism in perovskite BaTiO(3) are investigated by first-principles calculations. Calculated results show that both titanium and oxygen vacancies could induce magnetism, but the barium vacancy did not induce magnetism. New and interesting magnetic properties of half-metallic magnetism are found in BaTiO(3) induced by the Ti-vacancy. Based on the density of states and the spin charge density distribution of BaTiO(3), we discuss the different origins of magnetism induced by the partial spin-polarized O 2p states around Ti vacancies and the partially filled d-states Ti around the oxygen vacancies. The discrepancy between the magnetic moments in the cubic phase and the tetragonal phase is due to anisotropic spin polarization induced by structure distortions. Our calculations would enable exploring magneto-electric coupling in nonmagnetic ferroelectric oxides.

  20. ELF magnetic fields do not affect cell survival and DNA damage induced by ultraviolet B.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kohei; Narita, Eijiro; Yamada, Masaru; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2014-02-01

    We investigated whether extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field exposure has modification effects on cell survival after ultraviolet B (UV-B) irradiation and on repair process of DNA damage induced by UV-B irradiation in WI38VA13 subcloned 2RA and XP2OS(SV) cells. The ELF magnetic field exposure was conducted using a Helmholtz coil-based system that was designed to generate a sinusoidal magnetic field at 5 mT and 60 Hz. Cell survival was assessed by WST assay after UV-B irradiation at 20-80 J/m(2) , ELF magnetic field exposure for 24 h, followed by incubation for 48 h. DNA damage was assessed by quantification of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation and 6-4 photoproduct formation using ELISA after UV-B irradiation at 20-80 J/m(2) followed by ELF magnetic field exposure for 24 h. No significant changes were observed in cell survival between ELF magnetic field and sham exposures. Similarly, DNA damage induced by UV-B irradiation did not change significantly following ELF magnetic field exposure. Our results suggest that ELF magnetic field exposure at 5 mT does not have modification effect on cell survival after UV-B irradiation and on repair process of DNA damage induced by UV-B irradiation.