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Sample records for magnetohydrodynamic shear instabilities

  1. Density-shear instability in electron magneto-hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, T. S. Hollerbach, R.; Lyutikov, M.

    2014-05-15

    We discuss a novel instability in inertia-less electron magneto-hydrodynamics (EMHD), which arises from a combination of electron velocity shear and electron density gradients. The unstable modes have a lengthscale longer than the transverse density scale, and a growth-rate of the order of the inverse Hall timescale. We suggest that this density-shear instability may be of importance in magnetic reconnection regions on scales smaller than the ion skin depth, and in neutron star crusts. We demonstrate that the so-called Hall drift instability, previously argued to be relevant in neutron star crusts, is a resistive tearing instability rather than an instability of the Hall term itself. We argue that the density-shear instability is of greater significance in neutron stars than the tearing instability, because it generally has a faster growth-rate and is less sensitive to geometry and boundary conditions. We prove that, for uniform electron density, EMHD is “at least as stable” as regular, incompressible MHD, in the sense that any field configuration that is stable in MHD is also stable in EMHD. We present a connection between the density-shear instability in EMHD and the magneto-buoyancy instability in anelastic MHD.

  2. Compressibility effect on magnetic-shear-localized ideal magnetohydrodynamic interchange instability

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sangeeta; Callen, J.D.; Hegna, C.C.

    2005-08-15

    Eigenmode analysis of a magnetic-shear-localized ideal magnetohydrodynamic interchange instability in the presence of plasma compressibility indicates the marginal stability criterion (D{sub I}=1/4) is not affected by the compressibility effects. Above the marginal stability criterion, plasma compressibility causes a significant reduction in the growth rate of an ideal interchange instability.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.; Cargill, P.; Forbes, T. G.; Hood, A. W.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    There have been major advances in the theory of magnetic reconnection and of magnetic instability, with important implications for the observations, as follows: (1) Fast and slow magnetic shock waves are produced by the magnetohydrodynamics of reconnection and are potential particle accelerators. (2) The impulsive bursty regime of reconnection gives a rapid release of magnetic energy in a series of bursts. (3) The radiative tearing mode creates cool filamentary structures in the reconnection process. (4) The stability analyses imply that an arcade can become unstable when either its height or twist of plasma pressure become too great.

  4. Role of natural length and time scales on shear driven two-dimensional electron magnetohydrodynamic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Gurudatt; Sundar, Sita; Yadav, Sharad K.; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Sharma, Sarveshwar

    2009-07-15

    The electron magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) model represents an incompressible electron fluid flow against a static neutralizing background ion species. In contrast to hydrodynamic fluid models the EMHD model contains intrinsic length (the electron skin depth) and time scale (the whistler period). The paper discusses the role of skin depth and the existence of whistler waves on a prominent fluid instability, namely, the velocity shear driven Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the context of two-dimensional EMHD. Numerical simulations are also carried out to understand the role played by the whistler waves in the nonlinear saturated regime of the instability.

  5. Linear and nonlinear studies of velocity shear driven three dimensional electron-magnetohydrodynamics instability

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Gurudatt; Das, Amita

    2012-07-15

    The study of electron velocity shear driven instability in electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) regime in three dimensions has been carried out. It is well known that the instability is non-local in the plane defined by the flow direction and that of the shear, which is the usual Kelvin-Helmholtz mode, often termed as the sausage mode in the context of EMHD. On the other hand, a local instability with perturbations in the plane defined by the shear and the magnetic field direction exists which is termed as kink mode. The interplay of these two modes for simple sheared flow case as well as that when an external magnetic field exists has been studied extensively in the present manuscript in both linear and nonlinear regimes. Finally, these instability processes have been investigated for the exact 2D dipole solutions of EMHD equations [M. B. Isichenko and A. N. Marnachev, Sov. Phys. JETP 66, 702 (1987)] for which the electron flow velocity is sheared. It has been shown that dipoles are very robust and stable against the sausage mode as the unstable wavelengths are typically longer than the dipole size. However, we observe that they do get destabilized by the local kink mode.

  6. Dynamics of the magnetic shearing instability and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in accretion disks. 1: Vertical magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, W.; Diamond, P. H.; Vishniac, E. T.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, the magnetic shearing instability (MSI) has been proposed as a dynamical mechanism for angular momentum transport in accretion disks (Balbus & Hawley 1991; Hawley & Balbus 1991). In this paper, the nonlinear dynamics of MSI modes in the presence of a vertical magnetic field B(sub 0) is discussed. In particular, the saturation levels of the fluctuating fields, the angular momentum flux, and the energy dissipation mechanism, are examined in detail. It is shown that MSI induces strong magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in a range of wavenumbers 1/H is less than K is less than or equal to Omega/V(sub A)(sub 0)), where H is the thickness, Omega is the rotation frequency of the disk, and V(sub A)(sub 0) is the Alfven velocity. Despite the fact that the linear growth rate of MSI is maximal at small-scale (i.e., k is approximately Omega/V(sub A(sub 0)), angular momentum transport due to MSI turbulence is dominated by the magnetic Reynolds stress driven by large-scale modes (k is approximately 1/H). It is shown that the amplitude of low k(sub r) MSI eddies is limited primarily by subscale shear flow instability. Thus, dominant MSI cells are quasi-isotropic. In a stationary state, the effective Shakura-Sunyaev 'alpha' value is predicted to be of order V(sub A)(sub 0)0/C(sub s). In addition, the veritcal magnetic-field-induced MSI cells convert vertical magnetic field B(sub 0) into azimuthal magnetic field B(sub theta) in the disk. The generation of azimuthal magnetic field in turn introduces new physical processes, such as dynamo activity and azimuthal MSI turbulence. We conclude that it is not possible to decouple vertical MSI saturation from azimuthal MSI evolution. Low-frequency MSI cells are shown to co-exist with high-frequency radial buoyancy or internal waves. We show that modulational interaction between waves on these two frequency ranges is usually weak in the case when mean magnetic field is vertical. Thus, MSI and internal wave dynamics must be

  7. Ideal and resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in cylindrical geometry with a sheared flow along the axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, D.; Lazzaro, E.; Nowak, S.

    2017-05-01

    The problem of the linear stability of internal magnetohydrodynamic modes in a cylindrical plasma with a sheared longitudinal flow is addressed. A Newcomb-like equation describing the perturbation is derived and exactly solved for a class of analytic profiles for rotational transform, equilibrium flow and pressure. A dispersion relation for ideal modes is then derived and analysed for different limits of the poloidal mode number (viz. m = 1, m> 1 and m\\gg 1). In the resistive case, a simple and exact expression for the tearing stability index {{Δ }}\\prime is derived using the same class of equilibrium profiles. It is found that a small flow shear has a destabilising effect, while if the flow shear is dominant over the magnetic shear the tearing mode is stabilised. Implications on the stability of the m = 1 resistive mode are also discussed.

  8. Current-driven magnetohydrodynamic thermal instabilities in sheared fields. [of solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodo, G.; Ferrari, A.; Massaglia, S.; Rosner, R.

    1987-01-01

    Approximate analytic solutions are sought for the dispersion relation for the MHD stability of magnetized medium in current-driven filamentation modes such as those observed in the solar atmosphere. The magnetic field is assumed to have a self-consistent sheared equilibrium structure. The analysis is carried out in the small wavenumber regime, where shear length is similar to the mode wavelength. Instability is found to depend on the ratio between the thermal and magnetic diffusivities, i.e., the Prandtl number, which identifies the unstable transverse wavenumbers. The instability conditions are expressed in an algebraic equation amenable to numerical solution. Results are provided from use of the model to determine the maximum growth rate and typical scale lengths of instabilities in a precoronal atmosphere and the lower transition region.

  9. Kinetic effects on the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability in ion-to-magnetohydrodynamic scale transverse velocity shear layers: Particle simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, T. K. M.; Hasegawa, H.; Shinohara, I.

    2010-01-01

    Ion-to-magnetohydrodynamic scale physics of the transverse velocity shear layer and associated Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI) in a homogeneous, collisionless plasma are investigated by means of full particle simulations. The shear layer is broadened to reach a kinetic equilibrium when its initial thickness is close to the gyrodiameter of ions crossing the layer, namely, of ion-kinetic scale. The broadened thickness is larger in B⋅Ω<0 case than in B⋅Ω>0 case, where Ω is the vorticity at the layer. This is because the convective electric field, which points out of (into) the layer for B⋅Ω<0 (B⋅Ω>0), extends (reduces) the gyrodiameters. Since the kinetic equilibrium is established before the KHI onset, the KHI growth rate depends on the broadened thickness. In the saturation phase of the KHI, the ion vortex flow is strengthened (weakened) for B⋅Ω<0 (B⋅Ω>0), due to ion centrifugal drift along the rotational plasma flow. In ion inertial scale vortices, this drift effect is crucial in altering the ion vortex size. These results indicate that the KHI at Mercury-like ion-scale magnetospheric boundaries could show clear dawn-dusk asymmetries in both its linear and nonlinear growth. PMID:20838425

  10. LOCAL RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC INSTABILITIES IN MAGNETICALLY STRATIFIED MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Ted; Blaes, Omer

    2011-11-20

    We study local radiation magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in static, optically thick, vertically stratified media with constant flux mean opacity. We include the effects of vertical gradients in a horizontal background magnetic field. Assuming rapid radiative diffusion, we use the zero gas pressure limit as an entry point for investigating the coupling between the photon bubble instability and the Parker instability. Apart from factors that depend on wavenumber orientation, the Parker instability exists for wavelengths longer than a characteristic wavelength {lambda}{sub tran}, while photon bubbles exist for wavelengths shorter than {lambda}{sub tran}. The growth rate in the Parker regime is independent of the orientation of the horizontal component of the wavenumber when radiative diffusion is rapid, but the range of Parker-like wavenumbers is extended if there exists strong horizontal shear between field lines (i.e., horizontal wavenumber perpendicular to the magnetic field). Finite gas pressure introduces an additional short-wavelength limit to the Parker-like behavior, and also limits the growth rate of the photon bubble instability to a constant value at short wavelengths. We also consider the effects of differential rotation with accretion disk applications in mind. Our results may explain why photon bubbles have not yet been observed in recent stratified shearing box accretion disk simulations. Photon bubbles may physically exist in simulations with high radiation to gas pressure ratios, but higher spatial resolution will be needed to resolve the asymptotically growing unstable wavelengths.

  11. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved.

  12. Structure Formation through Magnetohydrodynamical Instabilities in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, K.; Tajima, T.; Horton, W.

    2000-12-01

    The shear flow instabilities under the presence of magnetic fields in the protoplanetary disk can greatly facilitate the formation of density structures that serve as seeds prior to the onset of the gravitational Jeans instability. Such a seeding process may explain several outstanding puzzles in the planetary genesis that are further compounded by the new discoveries of extrasolar planets and a new insight into the equation of state of dense matter. This puzzle also includes the apparent narrow window of the age difference of the Sun and the Earth. We evaluate the effects of the Parker, magnetorotational(Balbus-Hawley), and kinematic dynamo instabilities by comparing the properties of these instabilities. We calculate the mass spectra of aggregated density structures by the above mechanism in the radial direction for an axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic(MHD) torus equiblium and power-law density profile models. The mass spectrum of the magnetorotational instability may describe the origin of giant planets away from the central star such as Jupiter. Our local three-dimentional MHD simulation indicates that the coupling of the Parker and magnetorotational instabilities creates spiral arms and gas blobs in the accretion disk, reinforcing the theory and model.

  13. Magnetic control of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strait, E. J.

    2015-02-01

    Externally applied, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields form the basis of several relatively simple and direct methods to control magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in a tokamak, and most present and planned tokamaks now include a set of non-axisymmetric control coils for application of fields with low toroidal mode numbers. Non-axisymmetric applied fields are routinely used to compensate small asymmetries ( δB /B ˜10-3 to 10-4 ) of the nominally axisymmetric field, which otherwise can lead to instabilities through braking of plasma rotation and through direct stimulus of tearing modes or kink modes. This compensation may be feedback-controlled, based on the magnetic response of the plasma to the external fields. Non-axisymmetric fields are used for direct magnetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode—a kink instability with a growth rate slow enough that feedback control is practical. Saturated magnetic islands are also manipulated directly with non-axisymmetric fields, in order to unlock them from the wall and spin them to aid stabilization, or position them for suppression by localized current drive. Several recent scientific advances form the foundation of these developments in the control of instabilities. Most fundamental is the understanding that stable kink modes play a crucial role in the coupling of non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma, determining which field configurations couple most strongly, how the coupling depends on plasma conditions, and whether external asymmetries are amplified by the plasma. A major advance for the physics of high-beta plasmas ( β = plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) has been the understanding that drift-kinetic resonances can stabilize the resistive wall mode at pressures well above the ideal-MHD stability limit, but also that such discharges can be very sensitive to external asymmetries. The common physics of stable kink modes has brought significant unification to the topics of static error fields at low

  14. Magnetic control of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, Edward J.

    2014-11-24

    Externally applied, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields form the basis of several relatively simple and direct methods to control magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in a tokamak, and most present and planned tokamaks now include a set of non-axisymmetric control coils for application of fields with low toroidal mode numbers. Non-axisymmetric applied fields are routinely used to compensate small asymmetries ( δB/B ~ 10-3 to 10-4) of the nominally axisymmetric field, which otherwise can lead to instabilities through braking of plasma rotation and through direct stimulus of tearing modes or kink modes. This compensation may be feedback-controlled, based on the magnetic response of the plasma to the external fields. Non-axisymmetric fields are used for direct magnetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode — a kink instability with a growth rate slow enough that feedback control is practical. Saturated magnetic islands are also manipulated directly with non-axisymmetric fields, in order to unlock them from the wall and spin them to aid stabilization, or position them for suppression by localized current drive. Several recent scientific advances form the foundation of these developments in the control of instabilities. Most fundamental is the understanding that stable kink modes play a crucial role in the coupling of non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma, determining which field configurations couple most strongly, how the coupling depends on plasma conditions, and whether external asymmetries are amplified by the plasma. A major advance for the physics of high-beta plasmas ( β = plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) has been the understanding that drift-kinetic resonances can stabilize the resistive wall mode at pressures well above the ideal-MHD stability limit, but also that such discharges can be very sensitive to external asymmetries. The common physics of stable kink modes has brought significant unification to the topics of static

  15. Magnetic control of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks

    DOE PAGES

    Strait, Edward J.

    2014-11-24

    Externally applied, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields form the basis of several relatively simple and direct methods to control magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in a tokamak, and most present and planned tokamaks now include a set of non-axisymmetric control coils for application of fields with low toroidal mode numbers. Non-axisymmetric applied fields are routinely used to compensate small asymmetries ( δB/B ~ 10-3 to 10-4) of the nominally axisymmetric field, which otherwise can lead to instabilities through braking of plasma rotation and through direct stimulus of tearing modes or kink modes. This compensation may be feedback-controlled, based on the magnetic response of themore » plasma to the external fields. Non-axisymmetric fields are used for direct magnetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode — a kink instability with a growth rate slow enough that feedback control is practical. Saturated magnetic islands are also manipulated directly with non-axisymmetric fields, in order to unlock them from the wall and spin them to aid stabilization, or position them for suppression by localized current drive. Several recent scientific advances form the foundation of these developments in the control of instabilities. Most fundamental is the understanding that stable kink modes play a crucial role in the coupling of non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma, determining which field configurations couple most strongly, how the coupling depends on plasma conditions, and whether external asymmetries are amplified by the plasma. A major advance for the physics of high-beta plasmas ( β = plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) has been the understanding that drift-kinetic resonances can stabilize the resistive wall mode at pressures well above the ideal-MHD stability limit, but also that such discharges can be very sensitive to external asymmetries. The common physics of stable kink modes has brought significant unification to the topics of static error fields

  16. Magnetic control of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E. J.

    2015-02-15

    Externally applied, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields form the basis of several relatively simple and direct methods to control magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in a tokamak, and most present and planned tokamaks now include a set of non-axisymmetric control coils for application of fields with low toroidal mode numbers. Non-axisymmetric applied fields are routinely used to compensate small asymmetries (δB/B∼10{sup −3} to 10{sup −4}) of the nominally axisymmetric field, which otherwise can lead to instabilities through braking of plasma rotation and through direct stimulus of tearing modes or kink modes. This compensation may be feedback-controlled, based on the magnetic response of the plasma to the external fields. Non-axisymmetric fields are used for direct magnetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode—a kink instability with a growth rate slow enough that feedback control is practical. Saturated magnetic islands are also manipulated directly with non-axisymmetric fields, in order to unlock them from the wall and spin them to aid stabilization, or position them for suppression by localized current drive. Several recent scientific advances form the foundation of these developments in the control of instabilities. Most fundamental is the understanding that stable kink modes play a crucial role in the coupling of non-axisymmetric fields to the plasma, determining which field configurations couple most strongly, how the coupling depends on plasma conditions, and whether external asymmetries are amplified by the plasma. A major advance for the physics of high-beta plasmas (β = plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) has been the understanding that drift-kinetic resonances can stabilize the resistive wall mode at pressures well above the ideal-MHD stability limit, but also that such discharges can be very sensitive to external asymmetries. The common physics of stable kink modes has brought significant unification to the topics of static error

  17. Transverse electron-scale instability in relativistic shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E. P.; Grismayer, T.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2015-08-01

    Electron-scale surface waves are shown to be unstable in the transverse plane of a sheared flow in an initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma, not captured by (magneto)hydrodynamics. It is found that these unstable modes have a higher growth rate than the closely related electron-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in relativistic shears. Multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations verify the analytic results and further reveal the emergence of mushroomlike electron density structures in the nonlinear phase of the instability, similar to those observed in the Rayleigh Taylor instability despite the great disparity in scales and different underlying physics. This transverse electron-scale instability may play an important role in relativistic and supersonic sheared flow scenarios, which are stable at the (magneto)hydrodynamic level. Macroscopic (≫c /ωp e ) fields are shown to be generated by this microscopic shear instability, which are relevant for particle acceleration, radiation emission, and to seed magnetohydrodynamic processes at long time scales.

  18. Instabilities and propagation of neutrino magnetohydrodynamic waves in arbitrary direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Fernando; Pascoal, Kellen Alves

    2017-09-01

    In a previous work [Haas et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 012104 (2016)], a new model was introduced, taking into account the role of the Fermi weak force due to neutrinos coupled to magnetohydrodynamic plasmas. The resulting neutrino-magnetohydrodynamics was investigated in a particular geometry associated with the magnetosonic wave, where the ambient magnetic field and the wavevector are perpendicular. The corresponding fast, short wavelength neutrino beam instability was then obtained in the context of supernova parameters. The present communication generalizes these results, allowing for arbitrary direction of wave propagation, including fast and slow magnetohydrodynamic waves and the intermediate cases of oblique angles. The numerical estimates of the neutrino-plasma instabilities are derived in extreme astrophysical environments where dense neutrino beams exist.

  19. Instability of the magnetohydrodynamics system at vanishing Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouya, Ismaël

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this note is to study the dynamo properties of the magnetohydrodynamics system at vanishing R m . Improving the analysis in Gérard-Varet (SIAM J Math Anal 37(3):815-840, 2006), we shall establish a generic Lyapunov instability result.

  20. Wind Instability and Interaction of Vibrations of a Thin Plate with a Magnetohydrodynamic Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gestrin, S. G.; Gorbatenko, B. B.; Mezhonnova, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that the resonance effect of a magnetohydrodynamic hypersonic shear flow on an elastic plate placed in it causes the development of wind instability. Plate bending oscillations propagating along the flow are stabilized in the hypersonic flow regime, whereas waves running at an angle to the flow remain unstable. Expression derived for the instability increment allows conclusions about the effect of the magnetic field on the interaction of waves with the flow to be drawn as well as about the feasibility of its suppression in an unstable flow regime.

  1. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ruderman, M. S.; Terradas, J.; Ballester, J. L.

    2014-04-20

    Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities may play a relevant role in many astrophysical problems. In this work the effect of magnetic shear on the growth rate of the MRT instability is investigated. The eigenmodes of an interface and a slab model under the presence of gravity are analytically calculated assuming that the orientation of the magnetic field changes in the equilibrium, i.e., there is magnetic shear. We solve the linearized magnetohydrodynamic equations in the incompressible regime. We find that the growth rate is bounded under the presence of magnetic shear. We have derived simple analytical expressions for the maximum growth rate, corresponding to the most unstable mode of the system. These expressions provide the explicit dependence of the growth rate on the various equilibrium parameters. For small angles the growth time is linearly proportional to the shear angle, and in this regime the single interface problem and the slab problem tend to the same result. On the contrary, in the limit of large angles and for the interface problem the growth time is essentially independent of the shear angle. In this regime we have also been able to calculate an approximate expression for the growth time for the slab configuration. Magnetic shear can have a strong effect on the growth rates of the instability. As an application of the results found in this paper we have indirectly determined the shear angle in solar prominence threads using their lifetimes and the estimation of the Alfvén speed of the structure.

  2. Diffusive Magnetohydrodynamic Instabilities beyond the Chandrasekhar Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, Günther; Schultz, Manfred; Stefani, Frank; Mond, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We consider the stability of axially unbounded cylindrical flows that contain a toroidal magnetic background field with the same radial profile as their azimuthal velocity. For ideal fluids, Chandrasekhar had shown the stability of this configuration if the Alfvén velocity of the field equals the velocity of the background flow, i.e., if the magnetic Mach number {Mm}=1. We demonstrate that magnetized Taylor-Couette flows with such profiles become unstable against non-axisymmetric perturbations if at least one of the diffusivities is finite. We also find that for small magnetic Prandtl numbers {Pm} the lines of marginal instability scale with the Reynolds number and the Hartmann number. In the limit {Pm}\\to 0 the lines of marginal instability completely lie below the line for {Mm}=1 and for {Pm}\\to ∞ they completely lie above this line. For any finite value of {Pm}, however, the lines of marginal instability cross the line {Mm}=1, which separates slow from fast rotation. The minimum values of the field strength and the rotation rate that are needed for the instability (slightly) grow if the rotation law becomes flat. In this case, the electric current of the background field becomes so strong that the current-driven Tayler instability (which also exists without rotation) appears in the bifurcation map at low Hartmann numbers.

  3. MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) instabilities in simple plasma configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Manheimer, W.M.; Lashmore-Davies, C.

    1984-01-01

    This work provides what, we hope, is a relatively simple, self contained description of MHD instabilities in plasmas with simple configurations. By simple configuration, we mean a plasma in which all quantities vary in only one spatial direction. We deal with such plasmas here because we want to emphasize the basic physics of MHD instabilities. Although some fusion devices are inherently two or three dimensional in nature, there are others, specifically tokamaks and reversed field pinches which are, to good approximation, one dimensional. Also, these devices both display a wealth of complex MHD activity which can be fruitfully discussed. One deceptive aspect of MHD instabilities is that the simplest ones are extremely easy to understand. However more complicated instabilities, for instance in a plasma where both an axial and azimuthal field are present are much more difficult to visualize; but they are also much more interesting. This work is divided into two parts. Chapters 2-9 describe linear theory and chapters 10-15 describe the nonlinear theory. The latter part is naturally much more speculative than the former because less is known about nonlinear theory.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic ballooning instabilities excited by energetic trapped particles

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, J.; Chen, L.

    1984-09-01

    A new branch of magnetohydrodynamic ballooning modes is shown to be destabilized by energetic trapped particles. Both the real frequencies and growth rates of the instabilities are comparable to the trapped-particle precession frequencies. The theoretical results are also shown to be consistent with the high-frequency (approx. 100 kHz) oscillations observed during the high-power beam-injection experiments in PDX.

  5. Stability of compressible reduced magnetohydrodynamic equilibria-Analogy with magnetorotational instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, P. J.; Tassi, E.; Tronko, N.

    2013-04-15

    Stability analyses for equilibria of the compressible reduced magnetohydrodynamics (CRMHD) model are carried out by means of the Energy-Casimir (EC) method. Stability results are compared with those obtained for ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) from the classical {delta}W criterion. An identification of the terms in the second variation of the free energy functional for CRMHD with those of {delta}W is made: two destabilizing effects present for CRMHD turn out to correspond to the kink and interchange instabilities in usual MHD, while the stabilizing roles of field line bending and compressibility are also identified in the reduced model. Also, using the EC method, stability conditions in the presence of toroidal flow are obtained. A formal analogy between CRMHD and a reduced incompressible model for magnetized rotating disks, due to Julien and Knobloch [EAS Pub. Series, 21, 81 (2006)], is discovered. In light of this analogy, energy stability analysis shows that the condition for magnetorotational instability (MRI) for the latter model corresponds to the condition for interchange instability in CRMHD, with the Coriolis term and shear velocity playing the roles of the curvature term and pressure gradient, respectively. Using the EC method, stability conditions for the rotating disk model, for a large class of equilibria with possible non-uniform magnetic fields, are obtained. In particular, this shows it is possible for the MRI system to undergo, in addition to the MRI, another instability that is analogous to the kink instability. For vanishing magnetic field, the Rayleigh hydrodynamical stability condition is recovered.

  6. Electron Thermal Transport Barrier and Magnetohydrodynamic Activity Observed in Tokamak Plasmas with Negative Central Shear

    SciTech Connect

    de Baar, M.R.; Hogeweij, G.M.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Oomens, A.A.; Schueller, F.C.

    1997-06-01

    In the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, plasmas with steady-state negative central shear (NCS) are made with off-axis electron cyclotron heating. Shifting the power deposition by 2mm results in a sharp transition of confinement. The good confinement branch features a transport barrier at the off-axis minimum of the safety factor (q) , where q{le}3, and two magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities, where one is localized at the off-axis minimum of q and one covers the entire NCS region. The low confinement branch has q{gt}3 everywhere, no transport barrier, and no MHD activity. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Nonlinear electron magnetohydrodynamics physics. IV. Whistler instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.; Strohmaier, K. D.

    2008-06-15

    A very large low-frequency whistler mode is excited with magnetic loop antennas in a uniform laboratory plasma. The wave magnetic field exceeds the ambient field causing in one polarity a field reversal, and a magnetic topology resembling that of spheromaks in the other polarity. These propagating ''whistler spheromaks'' strongly accelerate the electrons and create non-Maxwellian distributions in their toroidal current ring. It is observed that the locally energized electrons in the current ring excite new electromagnetic instabilities and emit whistler modes with frequencies unrelated to the applied frequency. Emissions are also observed from electrons excited in X-type neutral lines around the antenna. The properties of the excited waves such as amplitudes, frequency spectra, field topologies, propagation, polarization, growth, and damping have been investigated. The waves remain linear (B{sub wave}<

  8. Theory of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities excited by energetic particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. )

    1994-05-01

    The resonant excitations of high-[ital n] magnetohydrodynamic instabilities by the energetic ions/alpha particles in tokamaks are theoretically analyzed. Here, [ital n] is the toroidal mode number. The magnetohydrodynamic eigenmodes, typically, consist of two-scale structures; one corresponds to the singular ( inertial'') region and the other the regular (ideal) region. Due to the finite-size orbits, the energetic particle contributions in the singular region are suppressed. Analytical dispersion relations can be derived via the asymptotic matching analysis. The dispersion relations have the generic form of the fishbone'' dispersion relation [Phys. Rev. Lett. [bold 52], 1122 (1984)] and demonstrate, in particular, the existence of two types of modes; that is, the discrete gap mode and the energetic-particle continuum mode. Specific expressions are given for both the kinetic ballooning modes and the toroidal Alfven modes.

  9. Instability of subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity shear waves.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Nasraoui, S

    2013-12-01

    We study analytically the instability of the subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity waves excited by a (vertical) time-periodic shear for an inviscid and nondiffusive unbounded conducting fluid. Due to the fact that the magnetic potential induction is a Lagrangian invariant for magnetohydrodynamic Euler-Boussinesq equations, we show that plane-wave disturbances are governed by a four-dimensional Floquet system in which appears, among others, the parameter ɛ representing the ratio of the periodic shear amplitude to the vertical Brunt-Väisälä frequency N(3). For sufficiently small ɛ and when the magnetic field is horizontal, we perform an asymptotic analysis of the Floquet system following the method of Lebovitz and Zweibel [Astrophys. J. 609, 301 (2004)]. We determine the width and the maximal growth rate of the instability bands associated with subharmonic resonances. We show that the instability of subharmonic resonance occurring in gravity shear waves has a maximal growth rate of the form Δ(m)=(3√[3]/16)ɛ. This instability persists in the presence of magnetic fields, but its growth rate decreases as the magnetic strength increases. We also find a second instability involving a mixing of hydrodynamic and magnetic modes that occurs for all magnetic field strengths. We also elucidate the similarity between the effect of a vertical magnetic field and the effect of a vertical Coriolis force on the gravity shear waves considering axisymmetric disturbances. For both cases, plane waves are governed by a Hill equation, and, when ɛ is sufficiently small, the subharmonic instability band is determined by a Mathieu equation. We find that, when the Coriolis parameter (or the magnetic strength) exceeds N(3)/2, the instability of the subharmonic resonance vanishes.

  10. Instability of subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Nasraoui, S.

    2013-12-01

    We study analytically the instability of the subharmonic resonances in magnetogravity waves excited by a (vertical) time-periodic shear for an inviscid and nondiffusive unbounded conducting fluid. Due to the fact that the magnetic potential induction is a Lagrangian invariant for magnetohydrodynamic Euler-Boussinesq equations, we show that plane-wave disturbances are governed by a four-dimensional Floquet system in which appears, among others, the parameter ɛ representing the ratio of the periodic shear amplitude to the vertical Brunt-Väisälä frequency N3. For sufficiently small ɛ and when the magnetic field is horizontal, we perform an asymptotic analysis of the Floquet system following the method of Lebovitz and Zweibel [Astrophys. J. 609, 301 (2004), 10.1086/420972]. We determine the width and the maximal growth rate of the instability bands associated with subharmonic resonances. We show that the instability of subharmonic resonance occurring in gravity shear waves has a maximal growth rate of the form Δm=(3√3 /16)ɛ. This instability persists in the presence of magnetic fields, but its growth rate decreases as the magnetic strength increases. We also find a second instability involving a mixing of hydrodynamic and magnetic modes that occurs for all magnetic field strengths. We also elucidate the similarity between the effect of a vertical magnetic field and the effect of a vertical Coriolis force on the gravity shear waves considering axisymmetric disturbances. For both cases, plane waves are governed by a Hill equation, and, when ɛ is sufficiently small, the subharmonic instability band is determined by a Mathieu equation. We find that, when the Coriolis parameter (or the magnetic strength) exceeds N3/2, the instability of the subharmonic resonance vanishes.

  11. Microwave imaging of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabot, Roland; Elbèze, Didier; Lee, Woochang; Nam, Yoonbum; Park, Hyeon; Shen, Junsong; Yun, Gunsu; Choi, Minjun; Giacalone, Jean-Claude; Nicolas, Timothée; Bottereau, Christine; Clairet, Frédéric; Lotte, Philippe; Molina, Diego

    2016-11-01

    Microwave imaging diagnostics are extremely useful for observing magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in magnetic fusion plasmas. Two imaging diagnostics will be available on the WEST tokamak. A method was developed to reconstruct electron density maps from electron density profiles measured by ultrafast reflectometry, a technique based on FM-CW radar principle. It relies on plasma rotation to perform 2D reconstruction. An Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) diagnostic will image directly the temperature fluctuations. It will be equivalent to 24 stacked vertically radiometers, each probing a spot of few centimetres. These two complementary techniques will contribute to the validation of MHD models.

  12. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-11-02

    Here, this article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of alpha effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is nomore » strong prediction for a sign of alpha, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other.« less

  13. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence.

    PubMed

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of α effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is no strong prediction for a sign of α, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other.

  14. Electromotive force due to magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations in sheared rotating turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-11-02

    Here, this article presents a calculation of the mean electromotive force arising from general small-scale magnetohydrodynamical turbulence, within the framework of the second-order correlation approximation. With the goal of improving understanding of the accretion disk dynamo, effects arising through small-scale magnetic fluctuations, velocity gradients, density and turbulence stratification, and rotation, are included. The primary result, which supplements numerical findings, is that an off-diagonal turbulent resistivity due to magnetic fluctuations can produce large-scale dynamo action-the magnetic analog of the "shear-current" effect. In addition, consideration of alpha effects in the stratified regions of disks gives the puzzling result that there is no strong prediction for a sign of alpha, since the effects due to kinetic and magnetic fluctuations, as well as those due to shear and rotation, are each of opposing signs and tend to cancel each other.

  15. Instabilities in shear and simple shear deformations of gold crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, A. A.; Batra, R. C.

    We use the tight-binding potential and molecular mechanics simulations to study local and global instabilities in shear and simple shear deformations of three initially defect-free finite cubes of gold single crystal containing 3480, 7813, and 58,825 atoms. Displacements on all bounding surfaces are prescribed while studying simple shear deformations, but displacements on only two opposite surfaces are assigned during simulations of shear deformations with the remaining four surfaces kept free of external forces. The criteria used to delineate local instabilities in the system include the following: (i) a component of the second-order spatial gradients of the displacement field having large values relative to its average value in the body, (ii) the minimum eigenvalue of the Hessian of the energy of an atom becoming non-positive, and (iii) structural changes represented by a high value of the common neighborhood parameter. It is found that these criteria are met essentially simultaneously at the same atomic position. Effects of free surfaces are evidenced by different deformation patterns for the same specimen deformed in shear and simple shear. The shear strength of a specimen deformed in simple shear is more than three times that of the same specimen deformed in shear. It is found that for each cubic specimen deformed in simple shear the evolution with the shear strain of the average shear stress, prior to the onset of instabilities, is almost identical to that in an equivalent hyperelastic material with strain energy density derived from the tight-binding potential and the assumption that it obeys the Cauchy-Born rule. Even though the material response of the hyperelastic body predicted from the strain energy density is stable over the range of the shear strain simulated in this work, the molecular mechanics simulations predict local and global instabilities in the three specimens.

  16. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, D. S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A local electrostatic dispersion equation is derived for a shear flow perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter. The dispersion equation is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and is solved numerically. Numerical solutions indicate that an ion cyclotron instability is excited. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (modified by the shear), with the growth rate or the individual harmonics overlapping in the wavenumber. At large values of the shear parameter, the instability is confined to long wavelengths, but at smaller shear, a second distinct branch at shorter wavelengths also appears. The properties of the instability obtained are compared with those obtained in the nonlocal limit by Ganguli et al. (1985, 1988).

  17. Finite Larmor radius magnetohydrodynamics of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.

    1996-07-01

    The evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied using finite Larmor radius (FLR) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. Finite Larmor radius effects are introduced in the momentum equation through an anisotropic ion stress tensor. Roberts and Taylor [Phys. Rev. Lett. 3, 197 (1962)], using fluid theory, demonstrated that FLR effects can stabilize the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the short-wavelength limit (kLn≫1, where k is the wave number and Ln is the density gradient scale length). In this paper a linear mode equation is derived that is valid for arbitrary kLn. Analytic solutions are presented in both the short-wavelength (kLn≫1) and long-wavelength (kLn≪1) regimes, and numerical solutions are presented for the intermediate regime (kLn˜1). The long-wavelength modes are shown to be the most difficult to stabilize. More important, the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied using a newly developed two-dimensional (2-D) FLR MHD code. The FLR effects are shown to be a stabilizing influence on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability; the short-wavelength modes are the easiest to stabilize, consistent with linear theory. In the nonlinear regime, the FLR effects cause the ``bubbles and spikes'' that develop because of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to convect along the density gradient and to tilt. Applications of this model to space and laboratory plasma phenomena are discussed.

  18. The transverse field Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.; Pullin, D. I.; Gehre, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is investigated for the case where the initial magnetic field is unperturbed and aligned with the mean interface location. For this initial condition, the magnetic field lines penetrate the perturbed density interface, forbidding a tangential velocity jump and therefore the presence of a vortex sheet. Through simulation, we find that the vorticity distribution present on the interface immediately after the shock acceleration breaks up into waves traveling parallel and anti-parallel to the magnetic field, which transport the vorticity. The interference of these waves as they propagate causes the perturbation amplitude of the interface to oscillate in time. This interface behavior is accurately predicted over a broad range of parameters by an incompressible linearized model derived presently by solving the corresponding impulse driven, linearized initial value problem. Our use of an equilibrium initial condition results in interface motion produced solely by the impulsive acceleration. Nonlinear compressible simulations are used to investigate the behavior of the transverse field magnetohydrodynamic Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, and the performance of the incompressible model, over a range of shock strengths, magnetic field strengths, perturbation amplitudes and Atwood numbers.

  19. Viscorotational shear instability of Keplerian granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poniatowski, Luka G.; Tevzadze, Alexander G.

    2017-07-01

    The linear stability of viscous Keplerian flow around a gravitating center is studied using the rheological granular fluid model. The linear rheological instability triggered by the interplay of the shear rheology and Keplerian differential rotation of incompressible dense granular fluids is found. Instability sets in in granular fluids, where the viscosity parameter grows faster than the square of the local shear rate (strain rate) at constant pressure. Found instability can play a crucial role in the dynamics of dense planetary rings and granular flows in protoplanetary disks.

  20. Dynamical instabilities in magnetohydrodynamic wind-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banda-Barragan, Wladimir Eduardo; Parkin, Elliot Ross; Crocker, Roland M.; Federrath, Christoph; Bicknell, Geoffrey Vincent

    2015-08-01

    We report the results from a comprehensive numerical study that investigates the role of dynamical instabilities in magnetohydrodynamic interactions between winds and spherical clouds in the interstellar medium. The growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at interfaces between wind and cloud material is responsible for the disruption of clouds and the formation of filamentary tails. We show how different strengths and orientations of the initial magnetic field affect the development of unstable modes and the ultimate morphology of these filaments. In the weak field limit, for example, KH instabilities developing at the flanks of clouds are dominant, whilst they are suppressed when stronger fields are considered. On the other hand, perturbations that originate RT instabilities at the leading edge of clouds are enhanced when fields are locally stronger. The orientation of the field lines also plays an important role in the structure of filaments. Magnetic ropes are key features of systems in which fields are aligned with the wind velocity, whilst current sheets are favoured when the initial field is preferentially transverse to the wind velocity. We compare our findings with analytical predictions obtained from the linear theory of hydromagnetic stability and provide a classification of filamentary tails based on their morphology.

  1. Turbulent Magnetohydrodynamic Reconnection Mediated by the Plasmoid Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Min; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-02-01

    It has been established that the Sweet-Parker current layer in high Lundquist number reconnection is unstable to the super-Alfvénic plasmoid instability. Past two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations have demonstrated that the plasmoid instability leads to a new regime where the Sweet-Parker current layer changes into a chain of plasmoids connected by secondary current sheets, and the averaged reconnection rate becomes nearly independent of the Lundquist number. In this work, a three-dimensional simulation with a guide field shows that the additional degree of freedom allows plasmoid instabilities to grow at oblique angles, which interact and lead to self-generated turbulent reconnection. The averaged reconnection rate in the self-generated turbulent state is of the order of a hundredth of the characteristic Alfvén speed, which is similar to the two-dimensional result but is an order of magnitude lower than the fastest reconnection rate reported in recent studies of externally driven three-dimensional turbulent reconnection. Kinematic and magnetic energy fluctuations both form elongated eddies along the direction of the local magnetic field, which is a signature of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Both energy fluctuations satisfy power-law spectra in the inertial range, where the magnetic energy spectral index is in the range from -2.3 to -2.1, while the kinetic energy spectral index is slightly steeper, in the range from -2.5 to -2.3. The anisotropy of turbulence eddies is found to be nearly scale-independent, in contrast with the prediction of the Goldreich-Sridhar theory for anisotropic turbulence in a homogeneous plasma permeated by a uniform magnetic field.

  2. TURBULENT MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC RECONNECTION MEDIATED BY THE PLASMOID INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi-Min; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-02-10

    It has been established that the Sweet–Parker current layer in high Lundquist number reconnection is unstable to the super-Alfvénic plasmoid instability. Past two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations have demonstrated that the plasmoid instability leads to a new regime where the Sweet–Parker current layer changes into a chain of plasmoids connected by secondary current sheets, and the averaged reconnection rate becomes nearly independent of the Lundquist number. In this work, a three-dimensional simulation with a guide field shows that the additional degree of freedom allows plasmoid instabilities to grow at oblique angles, which interact and lead to self-generated turbulent reconnection. The averaged reconnection rate in the self-generated turbulent state is of the order of a hundredth of the characteristic Alfvén speed, which is similar to the two-dimensional result but is an order of magnitude lower than the fastest reconnection rate reported in recent studies of externally driven three-dimensional turbulent reconnection. Kinematic and magnetic energy fluctuations both form elongated eddies along the direction of the local magnetic field, which is a signature of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Both energy fluctuations satisfy power-law spectra in the inertial range, where the magnetic energy spectral index is in the range from −2.3 to −2.1, while the kinetic energy spectral index is slightly steeper, in the range from −2.5 to −2.3. The anisotropy of turbulence eddies is found to be nearly scale-independent, in contrast with the prediction of the Goldreich–Sridhar theory for anisotropic turbulence in a homogeneous plasma permeated by a uniform magnetic field.

  3. Instability of periodic MHD shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zaqarashvili, T.V.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J.L.; Belvedere, G.

    2004-11-12

    The stability of periodic MHD shear flows generated by an external transversal periodic force in magnetized plasma is studied. It is shown that the temporal behaviour of magnetosonic wave spatial Fourier harmonics in such flows is governed by Mathieu equation. Consequently the harmonics with the half frequency of the shear flows grow exponentially in time. Therefore the periodic shear motions are unstable to the perturbations of compressible magnetosonic waves. The motions represent the kinetic part of the transversal oscillation in magnetized plasma. Therefore due to the instability of periodic shear motions, the transversal oscillations may quickly be damped, so transferring their energy to compressible magnetosonic perturbations.

  4. SUPERSONIC SHEAR INSTABILITIES IN ASTROPHYSICAL BOUNDARY LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2012-06-20

    Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized astrophysical objects often proceeds via a boundary layer (BL) that forms near the object's surface, in which the rotation speed of the accreted gas changes rapidly. Here, we study the initial stages of formation for such a BL around a white dwarf or a young star by examining the hydrodynamical shear instabilities that may initiate mixing and momentum transport between the two fluids of different densities moving supersonically with respect to each other. We find that an initially laminar BL is unstable to two different kinds of instabilities. One is an instability of a supersonic vortex sheet (implying a discontinuous initial profile of the angular speed of the gas) in the presence of gravity, which we find to have a growth rate of order (but less than) the orbital frequency. The other is a sonic instability of a finite width, supersonic shear layer, which is similar to the Papaloizou-Pringle instability. It has a growth rate proportional to the shear inside the transition layer, which is of order the orbital frequency times the ratio of stellar radius to the BL thickness. For a BL that is thin compared to the radius of the star, the shear rate is much larger than the orbital frequency. Thus, we conclude that sonic instabilities play a dominant role in the initial stages of nonmagnetic BL formation and give rise to very fast mixing between disk gas and stellar fluid in the supersonic regime.

  5. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Uchava, E. S.; Shergelashvili, B. M.; Tevzadze, A. G.; Poedts, S.

    2014-08-15

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model, the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also important in astrophysical environments, where it will limit the maximal value of magnetic field that a low density ionized anisotropic flow can sustain.

  6. Global magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailov, M. I.; Shchepetov, S. V.; Nührenberg, C.; Nührenberg, J.

    2015-12-15

    Analysis of global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in the L-2M stellarator (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences) is presented. The properties of free-boundary equilibria states are outlined, the stability conditions for small-scale modes are briefly discussed, and the number of trapped particles is estimated. All the magnetic configurations under study are stable against ballooning modes. It is shown that global ideal internal MHD modes can be found reliably only in Mercier unstable plasmas. In plasma that is stable with respect to the Mercier criterion, global unstable modes that are localized in the vicinity of the free plasma boundary and are not associated with any rational magnetic surface inside the plasma (the so-called peeling modes) can be found. The radial structure of all perturbations under study is almost entirely determined by the poloidal coupling of harmonics. The results of calculations are compared with the available experimental data.

  7. Theory of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities excited by energetic particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. )

    1994-07-20

    The resonant excitations of high-n magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities by the energetic ions/alpha particles in tokamaks are theoretically analyzed. Here, n is the toroidal mode number. Since, typically, the MHD modes consist of two-scale structures; one singular ( inertial'') region and one regular (ideal) region, the energetic particle contributions in the singular region are suppressed by the finite-size orbits. Analytical dispersion relations can then be derived via the asymptotic matching analysis. The dispersion relations have the generic form of the fishbone'' dispersion relation and demonstrate, in particular, the existence of two types of modes; that is, the MHD gap mode and the energetic-particle continuum mode. Specific expressions are given for both the kinetic ballooning modes (KBM) and the toroidal Alfven modes (TAM). It is suggested that the stability property may be qualitatively regarded as the hybrid'' of conventional MHD tokamaks and field reversed ion rings. [copyright]American Institute of Physics

  8. Electrostatic ion cyclotron velocity shear instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, D.S.; Winske, D.; Gary, S.P. )

    1992-12-01

    An electrostatic ion cyclotron instability driven by sheared velocity flow perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field is investigated in the local approximation. The dispersion equation, which includes all kinetic effects and involves only one important parameter, is cast in the form of Gordeyev integrals and solved numerically. The instability occurs roughly at multiples of the ion cyclotron frequency (but modified by the shear) with the growth rate of the individual harmonics overlapping in wavenumber. At small values of the shear parameter, the instability exists in two branches, one at long wavelength, [kappa][rho][sub i] [approximately] 0.5, and one at short wavelength, [kappa][rho][sub i] > 1.5 ([kappa][rho][sub i] is the wavenumber normalized to the ion gyroradius). At larger values of the shear parameter only the longer wavelength branch persists. The growth rate of the long wavelength mode, maximized over wavenumber and frequency, increases monotonically with the shear parameter. Properties of the instability are compared to those of Ganguli et al. obtained in the nonlocal limit.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic Instabilities in a Simple Gasdynamic Mirror Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.; Hawk, Clark W.

    2004-01-01

    The gasdynamic mirror has been proposed as a concept which could form the basis of a highly efficient fusion rocket engine. Gasdynamic mirrors differ from most other mirror type plasma confinement schemes in that they have much larger aspect ratios and operate at somewhat higher plasma densities. To evaluate whether a gasdynamic mirror could indeed confine plasmas in a stable manner for long periods of time, a small scale experimental gasdynamic mirror was built and tested. The objective of this experiment was to determine ranges of mirror ratios and plasma densities over which gasdynamic mirror could maintain stable plasmas. Theoretical analyses indicated that plasma magnetohydrodynamic instabilities were likely to occur during subsonic to supersonic flow transitions in the mirror throat region of the gasdynamic mirror. The experimental evidence based upon data derived from the Langmuir probe measurements seems to confirm this analysis. The assumption that a gasdynamic mirror using a simple mirror geometry could be used as a propulsion system, therefore, appears questionable. Modifications to the simple mirror concept are presented which could mitigate these MHD instabilities.

  10. Supersonic regime of the Hall-magnetohydrodynamics resistive tearing instability

    SciTech Connect

    Ahedo, Eduardo; Ramos, Jesus J.

    2012-07-15

    An earlier analysis of the Hall-magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) tearing instability [E. Ahedo and J. J. Ramos, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51, 055018 (2009)] is extended to cover the regime where the growth rate becomes comparable or exceeds the sound frequency. Like in the previous subsonic work, a resistive, two-fluid Hall-MHD model with massless electrons and zero-Larmor-radius ions is adopted and a linear stability analysis about a force-free equilibrium in slab geometry is carried out. A salient feature of this supersonic regime is that the mode eigenfunctions become intrinsically complex, but the growth rate remains purely real. Even more interestingly, the dispersion relation remains of the same form as in the subsonic regime for any value of the instability Mach number, provided only that the ion skin depth is sufficiently small for the mode ion inertial layer width to be smaller than the macroscopic lengths, a generous bound that scales like a positive power of the Lundquist number.

  11. Residual turbulence from velocity shear stabilized interchange instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, C. P.; Hassam, A. B.

    2013-01-15

    The stabilizing effect of velocity shear on the macroscopic, broad bandwidth, ideal interchange instability is studied in linear and nonlinear regimes. A 2D dissipative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code is employed to simulate the system. For a given flow shear, V Prime , linear growth rates are shown to be suppressed to below the shear-free level at both the small and large wavelengths. With increasing V Prime , the unstable band in wavenumber-space shrinks so that the peak growth results for modes that correspond to relatively high wavenumbers, on the scale of the density gradient. In the nonlinear turbulent steady state, a similar turbulent spectrum obtains, and the convection cells are roughly circular. In addition, the density fluctuation level and the degree of flattening of the initial inverted density profile are found to decrease as V Prime increases; in fact, unstable modes are almost completely stabilized and the density profile reverts to laminar when V Prime is a few times the classic interchange growth rate. Moreover, the turbulent particle flux diminishes with increasing velocity shear such that all the flux is carried by the classical diffusive flux in the asymptotic limit. The simulations are compared with measurements of magnetic fluctuations from the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, MCX, which investigated interchange modes in the presence of velocity shear. The experimental spectral data, taken in the plasma edge, are in general agreement with the numerical data obtained in higher viscosity simulations for which the level of viscosity is chosen consistent with MCX Reynolds numbers at the edge. In particular, the residual turbulence in both cases is dominated by elongated convection cells. Finally, concomitant Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the system are also examined. Complete stability to interchanges is obtained only in the parameter space wherein the generalized Rayleigh inflexion theorem is satisfied.

  12. Radiative instabilities in sheared magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, J. F.; Sparks, L.; Van Hoven, G.

    1988-01-01

    The structure and growth rate of the radiative instability in a sheared magnetic field B have been calculated analytically using the Braginskii fluid equations. In a shear layer, temperature and density perturbations are linked by the propagation of sound waves parallel to the local magnetic field. As a consequence, density clumping or condensation plays an important role in driving the instability. Parallel thermal conduction localizes the mode to a narrow layer where K(parallel) is small and stabilizes short wavelengths k larger-than(c) where k(c) depends on the local radiation and conduction rates. Thermal coupling to ions also limits the width of the unstable spectrum. It is shown that a broad spectrum of modes is typically unstable in tokamak edge plasmas and it is argued that this instability is sufficiently robust to drive the large-amplitude density fluctuations often measured there.

  13. Exploring non-normality in magnetohydrodynamic rotating shear flows: Application to astrophysical accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Bhatia, Tanayveer; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-10-01

    The emergence of turbulence in shear flows is a well-investigated field. Yet, there are some lingering issues that have not been sufficiently resolved. One of them is the apparent contradiction between the results of linear stability analysis showing a flow to be stable and yet experiments and simulations proving it to be otherwise. There is some success, in particular in astrophysical systems, based on magnetorotational instability (MRI), revealing turbulence. However, MRI requires the system to be weakly magnetized. Such instability is neither a feature of general magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows nor revealed in purely hydrodynamic flows. Nevertheless, linear perturbations of such flows are non-normal in nature, which argues for a possible origin of nonlinearity therein. The concept behind this is that non-normal perturbations could produce huge transient energy growth (TEG), which may lead to nonlinearity and further turbulence. However, so far, non-normal effects in shear flows have not been explored much in the presence of magnetic fields. In this spirit, here we consider the perturbed viscoresistive MHD shear flows with rotation in general. Basically we recast the magnetized momentum balance and associated equations into the magnetized version of Orr-Sommerfeld and Squire equations and their magnetic analogs. We also assume the flow to be incompressible and in the presence of Coriolis effect solve the equations using a pseudospectral eigenvalue approach. We investigate the possible emergence of instability and large TEG in three different types of flows, namely, the Keplerian flow, the Taylor-Couette (or constant angular momentum) flow, and plane Couette flow. We show that, above a certain value of magnetic field, instability and TEG both stop occurring. We also show that TEG is maximum in the vicinity of regions of instability in the wave number space for a given magnetic field and Reynolds number, leading to nonlinearity and plausible turbulence. Rotating

  14. Shear coaxial injector instability mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puissant, C.; Kaltz, T.; Glogowski, M.; Micci, M.

    1994-01-01

    There is no definitive knowledge of which of several concurrent processes ultimately results in unstable combustion within liquid rocket chambers employing shear coaxial injectors. Possible explanations are a detrimental change in the atomization characteristics due to a decrease in the gas-to-liquid velocity ratio, a change in the gas side injector pressure drop allowing acoustic coupling to the propellant feed system or the disappearance of a stabilizing recirculation region at the base of the LOX post. The aim of this research effort is to investigate these proposed mechanisms under conditions comparable to actual engine operation. Spray characterization was accomplished with flash photography and planar laser imaging to examine the overall spray morphology and liquid jet breakup processes and with a PDPA to quantify the spatial distribution of droplet size and mean axial velocity. A simplified stability model based on the Rayleigh criterion was constructed for the flow dynamics occurring within the chamber and injector to evaluate the potential coupling between the chamber and injector acoustic modes and was supported by high frequency measurements of chamber and injector pressure oscillations. To examine recirculation within the LOX post recess, velocity measurements were performed in the recess region by means of LDV. Present experiments were performed under noncombusting conditions using LOX/GH2 stimulants at pressures up to 4 MPa.

  15. Edge localized linear ideal magnetohydrodynamic instability studies in an extended-magnetohydrodynamic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, B. J.; Kruger, S. E.; Hegna, C. C.; Zhu, P.; Snyder, P. B.; Sovinec, C. R.; Howell, E. C.

    2010-03-01

    A linear benchmark between the linear ideal MHD stability codes ELITE [H. R. Wilson et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 1277 (2002)], GATO [L. Bernard et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 24, 377 (1981)], and the extended nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, NIMROD [C. R. Sovinec et al.., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] is undertaken for edge-localized (MHD) instabilities. Two ballooning-unstable, shifted-circle tokamak equilibria are compared where the stability characteristics are varied by changing the equilibrium plasma profiles. The equilibria model an H-mode plasma with a pedestal pressure profile and parallel edge currents. For both equilibria, NIMROD accurately reproduces the transition to instability (the marginally unstable mode), as well as the ideal growth spectrum for a large range of toroidal modes (n =1-20). The results use the compressible MHD model and depend on a precise representation of "ideal-like" and "vacuumlike" or "halo" regions within the code. The halo region is modeled by the introduction of a Lundquist-value profile that transitions from a large to a small value at a flux surface location outside of the pedestal region. To model an ideal-like MHD response in the core and a vacuumlike response outside the transition, separate criteria on the plasma and halo Lundquist values are required. For the benchmarked equilibria the critical Lundquist values are 108 and 103 for the ideal-like and halo regions, respectively. Notably, this gives a ratio on the order of 105, which is much larger than experimentally measured values using Te values associated with the top of the pedestal and separatrix. Excellent agreement with ELITE and GATO calculations are made when sharp boundary transitions in the resistivity are used and a small amount of physical dissipation is added for conditions very near and below marginal ideal stability.

  16. Edge localized linear ideal magnetohydrodynamic instability studies in an extended-magnetohydrodynamic code

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, B. J.; Kruger, S. E.; Hegna, C. C.; Zhu, P.; Snyder, P. B.; Sovinec, C. R.; Howell, E. C.

    2010-03-15

    A linear benchmark between the linear ideal MHD stability codes ELITE [H. R. Wilson et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 1277 (2002)], GATO [L. Bernard et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 24, 377 (1981)], and the extended nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, NIMROD [C. R. Sovinec et al.., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] is undertaken for edge-localized (MHD) instabilities. Two ballooning-unstable, shifted-circle tokamak equilibria are compared where the stability characteristics are varied by changing the equilibrium plasma profiles. The equilibria model an H-mode plasma with a pedestal pressure profile and parallel edge currents. For both equilibria, NIMROD accurately reproduces the transition to instability (the marginally unstable mode), as well as the ideal growth spectrum for a large range of toroidal modes (n=1-20). The results use the compressible MHD model and depend on a precise representation of 'ideal-like' and 'vacuumlike' or 'halo' regions within the code. The halo region is modeled by the introduction of a Lundquist-value profile that transitions from a large to a small value at a flux surface location outside of the pedestal region. To model an ideal-like MHD response in the core and a vacuumlike response outside the transition, separate criteria on the plasma and halo Lundquist values are required. For the benchmarked equilibria the critical Lundquist values are 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 3} for the ideal-like and halo regions, respectively. Notably, this gives a ratio on the order of 10{sup 5}, which is much larger than experimentally measured values using T{sub e} values associated with the top of the pedestal and separatrix. Excellent agreement with ELITE and GATO calculations are made when sharp boundary transitions in the resistivity are used and a small amount of physical dissipation is added for conditions very near and below marginal ideal stability.

  17. Fast reconnection in relativistic plasmas: the magnetohydrodynamics tearing instability revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, L.; Papini, E.; Landi, S.; Bugli, M.; Bucciantini, N.

    2016-08-01

    Fast reconnection operating in magnetically dominated plasmas is often invoked in models for magnetar giant flares, for magnetic dissipation in pulsar winds, or to explain the gamma-ray flares observed in the Crab nebula; hence, its investigation is of paramount importance in high-energy astrophysics. Here we study, by means of two-dimensional numerical simulations, the linear phase and the subsequent non-linear evolution of the tearing instability within the framework of relativistic resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), as appropriate in situations where the Alfvén velocity approaches the speed of light. It is found that the linear phase of the instability closely matches the analysis in classical MHD, where the growth rate scales with the Lundquist number S as S-1/2, with the only exception of an enhanced inertial term due to the thermal and magnetic energy contributions. In addition, when thin current sheets of inverse aspect ratio scaling as S-1/3 are considered, the so-called ideal tearing regime is retrieved, with modes growing independently of S and extremely fast, on only a few light crossing times of the sheet length. The overall growth of fluctuations is seen to solely depend on the value of the background Alfvén velocity. In the fully non-linear stage, we observe an inverse cascade towards the fundamental mode, with Petschek-type supersonic jets propagating at the external Alfvén speed from the X-point, and a fast reconnection rate at the predicted value {R}˜ (ln S)^{-1}.

  18. Axisymmetric single shear element combustion instability experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-01-01

    The combustion stability characteristics of a combustor consisting of a single shear element and a cylindrical chamber utilizing LOX and gaseous hydrogen as propellants are presented. The combustor geometry and the resulting longitudinal mode instability are axisymmetric. Hydrogen injection temperature and pyrotechnic pulsing were used to determine stability boundaries. Mixture ratio, fuel annulus gap, and LOX post configuration were varied. Performance and stability data are presented for chamber pressures of 300 and 1000 psia.

  19. Axisymmetric single shear element combustion instability experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin J.

    1993-01-01

    The combustion stability characteristics of a combustor consisting of a single shear element and a cylindrical chamber utilizing LOX and gaseous hydrogen as propellants are presented. The combustor geometry and the resulting longitudinal mode instability are axisymmetric. Hydrogen injection temperature and pyrotechnic pulsing were used to determine stability boundaries. Mixture ratio, fuel annulus gap, and LOX post configuration were varied. Performance and stability data were obtained for chamber pressures of 300 and 1000 psia.

  20. Weakening of magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities by Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Benilov, E. S.; Hassam, A. B.

    2008-02-15

    Alfven waves, made to propagate along an ambient magnetic field and polarized transverse to a gravitational field g, with wave amplitude stratified along g, are shown to reduce the growth rate of interchange instability by increasing the effective inertia by a factor of 1+(B{sub y}{sup '}/B{sub z}k{sub z}){sup 2}, where B{sub z} is the ambient magnetic field, k{sub z} is the wavenumber, and B{sub y}{sup '} is the wave amplitude shear. Appropriately placed Alfven wave power could thus be used to enhance the stability of interchange and ballooning modes in tokamaks and other interchange-limited magnetically confined plasmas.

  1. Plasmoid Instabilities Mediated Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulent Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi-min; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-21

    After some introductory remarks on fast reconnection in resistive MHD due to plasmoid instability, oblique tearing modes in 3D, and previous studies on 3D turbulent reconnection, the subject is presented under the following topics: 3D simulation setup, time evolution of the 3D simulation, comparison with Sweet-Parker and 2D plasmoid reconnection, and diagnostics of the turbulent state (decomposition of mean fields and fluctuations, power spectra of energy fluctuations, structure function and eddy anisotropy with respect to local magnetic field). Three primary conclusions were reached: (1) The results suggest that 3D plasmoid instabilities can lead to self-generated turbulent reconnection (evidence of energy cascade and development of inertial range, energy fluctuations preferentially align with the local magnetic field, which is one of the characteristics of MHD turbulence); (2) The turbulence is highly inhomogeneous, due to the presence of magnetic shear and outflow jets (conventional MHD turbulence theories or phenomenologies may not be applicable – e.g. scale-dependent anisotropy as predicted by Goldreich & Sridhar is not found); (3) 3D turbulent reconnection is different from 2D plasmoid-dominated reconnection in many aspects. However, in fully developed state, reconnection rates in 2D and 3D are comparable — this result needs to be further checked in higher S.

  2. Natural instability of free shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Husain, Z. D.; Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Under controlled small-amplitude excitation, an initially laminar free shear layer experiences maximum growth rate at a Strouhal number St(theta) of 0.017 (consistent with theory) and maximum growth at St(theta) = 0.011, while the natural instability frequency St(theta-n) (of an unexcited shear layer) is found to have an intermediate value. Investigations in both axisymmetric and plane shear layers in a number of independent facilities reveal that the St(theta-n) value falls in the range 0.0125-0.0155, depending on the exit boundary-layer fluctuation level and the spanwise radius of curvature. The St(theta-n) value decreases with increasing jet diameter or exit boundary-layer fluctuation level, but is not a direct function of the exit momentum thickness Reynolds number. For a given facility, the instability details are found to be independent of whether the entrainment at the lip is parallel to the stream or orthogonal (due to the addition of an end plate). The steamwise evolutions of the amplitudes at the fundamental frequency and its harmonics and subharmonics are unique functions of the downstream distance nondimensionalized by the exit momentum thickness, but their details remain functions of the flow geometry (i.e., axisymmetric or plane).

  3. Linear instability of curved free shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.

    1993-01-01

    The linear inviscid hydrodynamic stability of slightly curved free mixing layers is studied in this paper. The disturbance equation is solved numerically using a shooting technique. Two mean velocity profiles that represent stably and unstably curved free mixing layers are considered. Results are shown for cases of five curvature Richardson numbers. The stability characteristics of the shear layer are found to vary significantly with the introduction of the curvature effects. The results also indicate that, in a manner similar to the Goertler vortices observed in a boundary layer along a concave wall, instability modes of spatially developing streamwise vortex pairs may appear in centrifugally unstable curved mixing layers.

  4. Imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence modified by velocity shear in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoberidze, G.; Voitenko, Y. M.

    2016-11-01

    We study incompressible imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the presence of background velocity shears. Using scaling arguments, we show that the turbulent cascade is significantly accelerated when the background velocity shear is stronger than the velocity shears in the subdominant Alfvén waves at the injection scale. The spectral transport is then controlled by the background shear rather than the turbulent shears and the Tchen spectrum with spectral index -1 is formed. This spectrum extends from the injection scale to the scale of the spectral break where the subdominant wave shear becomes equal to the background shear. The estimated spectral breaks and power spectra are in good agreement with those observed in the fast solar wind. The proposed mechanism can contribute to enhanced turbulent cascades and modified -1 spectra observed in the fast solar wind with strong velocity shears. This mechanism can also operate in many other astrophysical environments where turbulence develops on top of non-uniform plasma flows.

  5. Effects of shear flow and transverse magnetic field on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Jintao; Ren Haijun; Li Ding; Wu Zhengwei

    2008-04-15

    The effects of shear flow and transverse magnetic field on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability are examined and the expression of the interface perturbation is obtained by analytically solving the linear ideal magnetohydrodynamics equations. It shows that the perturbation evolves exponentially rather than linearly in the presence of shear flow and magnetic field when v{sub a}<{radical}(1-A{sub T}{sup 2}){delta}{sub u}/2, where v{sub a} is the modified Alfven velocity, A{sub T} is the Atwood number, and {delta}{sub u} is the relative shear velocity, respectively. The shear flow acts as a destabilizing source, while the magnetic field is a stabilizing mechanism of the shocked corrugated interface problem. The whole analysis is based on the assumption that the fluid is incompressible.

  6. Shear dynamo, turbulence, and the magnetorotational instability

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    The formation, evolution, and detailed structure of accretion disks remain poorly understood, with wide implications across a variety of astrophysical disciplines. While the most pressing question – what causes the high angular momentum fluxes that are necessary to explain observations? – is nicely answered by the idea that the disk is turbulent, a more complete grasp of the fundamental processes is necessary to capture the wide variety of behaviors observed in the night sky. This thesis studies the turbulence in ionized accretion disks from a theoretical standpoint, in particular focusing on the generation of magnetic fields in these processes, known as dynamo. Such fields are expected to be enormously important, both by enabling the magnetorotational instability (which evolves into virulent turbulence), and through large-scale structure formation, which may transport angular momentum in different ways and be fundamental for the formation of jets. The central result of this thesis is the suggestion of a new large-scale dynamo mechanism in shear flows – the “magnetic shear-current effect” – which relies on a positive feedback from smallscale magnetic fields. As well as being a very promising candidate for driving field generation in the central regions of accretion disks, this effect is interesting because small-scale magnetic fields have historically been considered to have a negative effect on the large-scale dynamo, damping growth and leading to dire predictions for final saturation amplitudes. Given that small-scale fields are ubiquitous in plasma turbulence above moderate Reynolds numbers, the finding that they could instead have a positive effect in some situations is interesting from a theoretical and practical standpoint. The effect is studied using direct numerical simulation, analytic techniques, and novel statistical simulation methods. In addition to the dynamo, much attention is given to the linear physics of disks and its relevance to

  7. Turbulent transport and dynamo in sheared magnetohydrodynamics turbulence with a nonuniform magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-Jin

    2009-08-01

    We investigate three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics turbulence in the presence of velocity and magnetic shear (i.e., with both a large-scale shear flow and a nonuniform magnetic field). By assuming a turbulence driven by an external forcing with both helical and nonhelical spectra, we investigate the combined effect of these two shears on turbulence intensity and turbulent transport represented by turbulent diffusivities (turbulent viscosity, alpha and beta effect) in Reynolds-averaged equations. We show that turbulent transport (turbulent viscosity and diffusivity) is quenched by a strong flow shear and a strong magnetic field. For a weak flow shear, we further show that the magnetic shear increases the turbulence intensity while decreasing the turbulent transport. In the presence of a strong flow shear, the effect of the magnetic shear is found to oppose the effect of flow shear (which reduces turbulence due to shear stabilization) by enhancing turbulence and transport, thereby weakening the strong quenching by flow shear stabilization. In the case of a strong magnetic field (compared to flow shear), magnetic shear increases turbulence intensity and quenches turbulent transport.

  8. Parallel-Flow-Shear Driven Low-Frequency Plasma Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiguro, Seiji; Matsumoto, Noriaki; Kaneko, Toshiro; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2004-12-01

    Full three dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations are performed in order to investigate effects of field-aligned (parallel) ion flow shears on low-frequency plasma instabilities. It is shown that the parallel ion flow velocity shear can induce the ion-acoustic instability, even when the ion flow velocity is so small that the instability can not take place. Simulation results are consistent with the analysis based on the local theory.

  9. Fluctuation dynamo amplified by intermittent shear bursts in convectively driven magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J.; Busse, A.; Müller, W.-C.

    2013-09-01

    Intermittent large-scale high-shear flows are found to occur frequently and spontaneously in direct numerical simulations of statistically stationary turbulent Boussinesq magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) convection. The energetic steady state of the system is sustained by convective driving of the velocity field and small-scale dynamo action. The intermittent emergence of flow structures with strong velocity and magnetic shearing generates magnetic energy at an elevated rate on time scales that are longer than the characteristic time of the large-scale convective motion. The resilience of magnetic energy amplification suggests that intermittent shear bursts are a significant driver of dynamo action in turbulent magnetoconvection.

  10. Theory of resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities excited by energetic-trapped particles in large-size tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Biglari, H.; Chen, L.; White, R.B.

    1987-02-01

    It is shown that, in present-day large-size tokamaks, finite resistivity modifies qualitatively the stability properties of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities resonantly excited by the unfavorable processional drift of energetic-trapped particles, i.e., the so-called ''fishbone''-type instabilities. Specifically, it is found that (1) the n = 1 energetic-trapped particle-induced internal kink (''fishbone'') instability is strongly stabilized by resistive dissipation and (2) finite resistivity lowers considerably the threshold conditions for resonant excitations of high-n ballooning/interchange modes. The possibility of exciting fishbones by alpha particles in ignition experiments is also considered.

  11. Feedback control of multimode magnetohydrodynamic instabilities via neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A.K.

    1998-08-01

    In most scenarios of confinement degradation due to MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) fluctuations in both tokamaks and reversed field pinches several MHD modes are involved. This is the motivation for the development of a multimode feedback scheme in the present paper, in contrast to the past work. The scheme is based on modal (state) feedback, where each mode is unscrambled out of the sensor signal, which is a superposition of all mode information and then individually acted upon by a unique gain and phase. Finally, all these individually processed mode signals are electronically summed and impressed on the accelerator grid of a neutral beam as a single control signal. It is shown that this process can lead to the stabilization of all unstable modes without destabilization of any stable modes, in contrast to previous feedback experiments. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. E X B instability with sheared magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Salil; Nasrin, Shahin; Bose, Mridul

    2016-10-01

    The cross-field instability is ubiquitous in all electromagnetic systems. Effect of this instability is studied rigorously in plasma system with steady external magnetic field. Therefore, we have considered a sheared magnetic field to study the E X B instability which is observed in the internal transport barrier of fusion machines. Depending on the relation between y & LS we have considered three different regimes. The response of the magnetic shear, i.e. y/LS, (where, y is the magnitude of the applied magnetic field along y-direction and LS is the shear length) is then estimated which shows few interesting features.

  13. A combined theory for magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with anisotropic pressure and magnetic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, J. D. B.; Neukirch, T.

    2017-03-01

    We present a new approach to the theory of magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with anisotropic pressure, magnetic shear and translational/rotational invariance. This approach involves combining two existing formalisms in order to eliminate their individual weaknesses. The theoretical aspects of the method are explored in detail along with numerical solutions which make use of the method. Eventually, this method could be applied to model various plasma systems, such as planetary magnetospheres.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic instabilities at Comet P/Halley - Giotto observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, G.; Formisano, V.; Amata, E.

    1992-10-01

    We examine the plasma parameters observed by the ion mass spectrometer of the Giotto JPA experiment, downstream the bow shock and up to the closest approach of Comet P/Halley. From the analysis of the observations we have identified two regions where the Delta-V between the proton and water group ion bulk velocities is first parallel and later perpendicular, respectively, to the magnetic-field direction. In the parallel region, a strong MHD turbulence is observed that we suppose to be generated by a firehose instability mechanism driven by the velocity difference. At about 5 x 10 exp 5 km from closest approach, the center of mass switches from solar-wind protons to the cometary ions, while the velocity difference becomes perpendicular to the magnetic field, causing the quenching of the instability and the disappearing of the plasma fluctuations.

  15. Singular diffusionless limits of double-diffusive instabilities in magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, Oleg N.

    2017-09-01

    We study local instabilities of a differentially rotating viscous flow of electrically conducting incompressible fluid subject to an external azimuthal magnetic field. In the presence of the magnetic field, the hydrodynamically stable flow can demonstrate non-axisymmetric azimuthal magnetorotational instability (AMRI) both in the diffusionless case and in the double-diffusive case with viscous and ohmic dissipation. Performing stability analysis of amplitude transport equations of short-wavelength approximation, we find that the threshold of the diffusionless AMRI via the Hamilton-Hopf bifurcation is a singular limit of the thresholds of the viscous and resistive AMRI corresponding to the dissipative Hopf bifurcation and manifests itself as the Whitney umbrella singular point. A smooth transition between the two types of instabilities is possible only if the magnetic Prandtl number is equal to unity, Pm=1. At a fixed Pm≠1, the threshold of the double-diffusive AMRI is displaced by finite distance in the parameter space with respect to the diffusionless case even in the zero dissipation limit. The complete neutral stability surface contains three Whitney umbrella singular points and two mutually orthogonal intervals of self-intersection. At these singularities, the double-diffusive system reduces to a marginally stable system which is either Hamiltonian or parity-time-symmetric.

  16. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CURRENT-DRIVEN INSTABILITY. III. ROTATING RELATIVISTIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Lyubarsky, Yuri; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2012-09-20

    We have investigated the influence of jet rotation and differential motion on the linear and nonlinear development of the current-driven (CD) kink instability of force-free helical magnetic equilibria via three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In this study, we follow the temporal development within a periodic computational box. Displacement of the initial helical magnetic field leads to the growth of the CD kink instability. We find that, in accordance with the linear stability theory, the development of the instability depends on the lateral distribution of the poloidal magnetic field. If the poloidal field significantly decreases outward from the axis, then the initial small perturbations grow strongly, and if multiple wavelengths are excited, then nonlinear interaction eventually disrupts the initial cylindrical configuration. When the profile of the poloidal field is shallow, the instability develops slowly and eventually saturates. We briefly discuss implications of our findings for Poynting-dominated jets.

  17. Some observations of a sheared Rayleigh-Taylor/Benard instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, J. A. C.; Marcus, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    An account is provided of preliminary flow visualization observations made in an unstably stratified flow with shear superimposed. The structures observed appear to be the superposition of a Rayleigh-Taylor/Benard instability and a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Aside from its intrinsic fundamental value, the study of these structures is of special interest to theoreticians developing nonlinear stability calculation methodologies.

  18. Some observations of a sheared Rayleigh-Taylor/Benard instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, J. A. C.; Marcus, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    An account is provided of preliminary flow visualization observations made in an unstably stratified flow with shear superimposed. The structures observed appear to be the superposition of a Rayleigh-Taylor/Benard instability and a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Aside from its intrinsic fundamental value, the study of these structures is of special interest to theoreticians developing nonlinear stability calculation methodologies.

  19. Shear instability in fluids with a density-dependent viscosity.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, V; Ivlev, A V; Kompaneets, R; Morfill, G E

    2008-06-27

    We present a shear instability, which can be triggered in compressible fluids with density-dependent viscosity at shear rates above critical. The instability mechanism is generic: It is based on density-dependent viscosity, compressibility, as well as flow two-(three-)dimensionality that provides coupling between streamwise and transversal velocity components and density variations. The only factor stabilizing the instability is fluid elasticity. The corresponding eigenvalue problem for a plane Couette flow is solved analytically in the limiting cases of large and small wave numbers.

  20. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE POWERED BY MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN NASCENT PROTONEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Masada, Youhei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei

    2015-01-01

    Magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a convectively stable layer around the neutrinosphere is simulated by a three-dimensional model of a supernova core. To resolve MRI-unstable modes, a thin layer approximation considering only the radial global stratification is adopted. Our intriguing finding is that the convectively stable layer around the neutrinosphere becomes fully turbulent due to the MRI and its nonlinear penetration into the strongly stratified MRI-stable region. The intensity of the MRI-driven turbulence increases with magnetic flux threading the core, but is limited by the free energy stored in the differential rotation. The turbulent neutrinosphere is a natural consequence of rotating core-collapse and could exert a positive impact on the supernova mechanism.

  1. Time evolution from linear to nonlinear stages in magnetohydrodynamic parametric instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoshino, M.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1989-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) parametric instability of wave fluctuations propagating along an unperturbed magnetic field is investigated. Both a magnetohydrodynamic perturbation-theoretical approach and a nonlinear MHD simulation are used. It is shown that high harmonic waves are rapidly excited by wave-wave coupling, and that the wave spectrum evolves from a state containing a small number of degrees of freedom in k space to one which contains a large number of degrees of freedom. It is found that the spectral evolution prior to nonlinear saturation is well described by the prturbation theory. During this stage, the ratio of the growth rate of the nth harmonic wave to the linear growth rate of the fundamental wave is n. The nonlinear saturation stage is characterized by a frequency shift of the fundamental wave that destroys the wave-wave resonance condition which, in turn, causes the wave amplitude to cease its growth.

  2. Transition from resistive ballooning to neoclassical magnetohydrodynamic pressure-gradient-driven instability

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, D. A.; Shaing, K. C.; Carreras, B. A.; Charlton, L. A.; Callen, J. D.; Garcia, L.

    1988-10-01

    The linearized neoclassical magnetohydrodynamic equations, including perturbed neoclassical flows and currents, have been solved for parameter regimes where the neoclassical pressure-gradient-driven instability becomes important. This instability is driven by the fluctuating bootstrap current term in Ohm's law. It begins to dominate the conventional resistive ballooning mode in the banana-plateau collisionality regime ({mu}{sub e}/{nu}{sub e} approx {radical}{epsilon}/(1 + {nu}{sub *e}) > {epsilon}{sup 2}) and is characterized by a larger radial mode width and higher growth rate. The neoclassical instability persists in the absence of the usual magnetic field curvature drive and is not significantly affected by compressibility. Scalings with respect to {beta}, n (toroidal mode number), and {mu} (neoclassical viscosity) are examined using a large-aspect-ratio, three-dimensional initial-value code that solves linearized equations for the magnetic flux, fluid vorticity, density, and parallel ion flow velocity in axisymmetric toroidal geometry. 13 refs., 10 figs.

  3. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CURRENT-DRIVEN INSTABILITY. I. INSTABILITY OF A STATIC COLUMN

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Lyubarsky, Yuri; Hardee, Philip E.

    2009-07-20

    We have investigated the development of current-driven (CD) kink instability through three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. A static force-free equilibrium helical magnetic configuration is considered in order to study the influence of the initial configuration on the linear and nonlinear evolution of the instability. We found that the initial configuration is strongly distorted but not disrupted by the kink instability. The instability develops as predicted by linear theory. In the nonlinear regime, the kink amplitude continues to increase up to the terminal simulation time, albeit at different rates, for all but one simulation. The growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the CD kink instability depend moderately on the density profile and strongly on the magnetic pitch profile. The growth rate of the kink mode is reduced in the linear regime by an increase in the magnetic pitch with radius and reaches the nonlinear regime at a later time than the case with constant helical pitch. On the other hand, the growth rate of the kink mode is increased in the linear regime by a decrease in the magnetic pitch with radius and reaches the nonlinear regime sooner than the case with constant magnetic pitch. Kink amplitude growth in the nonlinear regime for decreasing magnetic pitch leads to a slender helically twisted column wrapped by magnetic field. On the other hand, kink amplitude growth in the nonlinear regime nearly ceases for increasing magnetic pitch.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic instability excited by interplay between a resistive wall mode and stable ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes in rotating tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aiba, N.; Hirota, M.

    2015-08-15

    In a rotating toroidal plasma surrounded by a resistive wall, it is shown that linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can be excited by interplay between the resistive wall mode (RWM) and stable ideal MHD modes, where the RWM can couple with not only a stable external kink mode but also various stable Alfvén eigenmodes that abound in a toroidal plasma. The RWM growth rate is shown to peak repeatedly as the rotation frequency reaches specific values for which the frequencies of the ideal MHD modes are Doppler-shifted to the small RWM frequency. Such destabilization can be observed even when the RWM in a static plasma is stable. A dispersion relation clarifies that the unstable mode changes from the RWM to the ideal MHD mode destabilized by wall resistivity when the rotation frequency passes through these specific values. The unstable mode is excited at these rotation frequencies even though plasma rotation also tends to stabilize the RWM from the combination of the continuum damping and the ion Landau damping.

  5. Nonlinear transverse cascade and two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic subcritical turbulence in plane shear flows.

    PubMed

    Mamatsashvili, G R; Gogichaishvili, D Z; Chagelishvili, G D; Horton, W

    2014-04-01

    We find and investigate via numerical simulations self-sustained two-dimensional turbulence in a magnetohydrodynamic flow with a maximally simple configuration: plane, noninflectional (with a constant shear of velocity), and threaded by a parallel uniform background magnetic field. This flow is spectrally stable, so the turbulence is subcritical by nature and hence it can be energetically supported just by a transient growth mechanism due to shear flow non-normality. This mechanism appears to be essentially anisotropic in the spectral (wave-number) plane and operates mainly for spatial Fourier harmonics with streamwise wave numbers less than the ratio of flow shear to Alfvén speed, kyshear rate). We focus on analysis of the character of nonlinear processes and the underlying self-sustaining scheme of the turbulence, i.e., on the interplay between linear transient growth and nonlinear processes, in the spectral plane. Our study, being concerned with a new type of energy-injecting process for turbulence-the transient growth-represents an alternative to the main trends of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence research. We find similarity of the nonlinear dynamics to the related dynamics in hydrodynamic flows: to the bypass concept of subcritical turbulence. The essence of the analyzed nonlinear MHD processes appears to be a transverse redistribution of kinetic and magnetic spectral energies in the wave-number plane [as occurs in the related hydrodynamic flow; see Horton et al., Phys. Rev. E 81, 066304 (2010)] and differs fundamentally from the existing concepts of (anisotropic direct and inverse) cascade processes in MHD shear flows.

  6. Nonlinear transverse cascade and two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic subcritical turbulence in plane shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamatsashvili, G. R.; Gogichaishvili, D. Z.; Chagelishvili, G. D.; Horton, W.

    2014-04-01

    We find and investigate via numerical simulations self-sustained two-dimensional turbulence in a magnetohydrodynamic flow with a maximally simple configuration: plane, noninflectional (with a constant shear of velocity), and threaded by a parallel uniform background magnetic field. This flow is spectrally stable, so the turbulence is subcritical by nature and hence it can be energetically supported just by a transient growth mechanism due to shear flow non-normality. This mechanism appears to be essentially anisotropic in the spectral (wave-number) plane and operates mainly for spatial Fourier harmonics with streamwise wave numbers less than the ratio of flow shear to Alfvén speed, kyshear rate). We focus on analysis of the character of nonlinear processes and the underlying self-sustaining scheme of the turbulence, i.e., on the interplay between linear transient growth and nonlinear processes, in the spectral plane. Our study, being concerned with a new type of energy-injecting process for turbulence—the transient growth—represents an alternative to the main trends of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence research. We find similarity of the nonlinear dynamics to the related dynamics in hydrodynamic flows: to the bypass concept of subcritical turbulence. The essence of the analyzed nonlinear MHD processes appears to be a transverse redistribution of kinetic and magnetic spectral energies in the wave-number plane [as occurs in the related hydrodynamic flow; see Horton et al., Phys. Rev. E 81, 066304 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.066304] and differs fundamentally from the existing concepts of (anisotropic direct and inverse) cascade processes in MHD shear flows.

  7. Secondary instability of wall-bounded shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.; Patera, A. T.

    1983-01-01

    The present analysis of a secondary instability in a wide class of wall-bounded parallel shear flows indicates that two-dimensional, finite amplitude waves are exponentially unstable to infinitessimal three-dimensional disturbances. The instability appears to be the prototype of transitional instability in such flows as Poiseuille flow, Couette flow, and flat plate boundary layers, in that it has the convective time scales observed in the typical transitions. The energetics and vorticity dynamics of the instability are discussed, and it is shown that the two-dimensional perturbation without directly providing energy to the disturbance. The three-dimensional instability requires that a threshold two-dimensional amplitude be achieved. It is found possible to identify experimental features of transitional spot structure with aspects of the nonlinear two-dimensional/linear three-dimensional instability.

  8. Interaction of scrape-off layer currents with magnetohydrodynamical instabilities in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2007-06-01

    A simple theoretical model is developed which describes how current eddies are excited in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of a large-aspect-ratio, low-β, circular cross-section tokamak by time-varying magnetohydrodynamical instabilities originating from within the plasma. This model is used to study the interaction of SOL currents with tearing modes and resistive wall modes in a typical tokamak plasma. SOL currents are found to be fairly effective at braking the rotation of tearing modes, and to have a significant destabilizing effect on resistive wall modes.

  9. Polarization Signatures of Kink Instabilities in the Blazar Emission Region from Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Haocheng; Li, Hui; Guo, Fan; ...

    2017-01-23

    Kink instabilities are likely to occur in the current-carrying magnetized plasma jets. Recent observations of the blazar radiation and polarization signatures suggest that the blazar emission region may be considerably magnetized. While the kink instability has been studied with first-principle magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, the corresponding time-dependent radiation and polarization signatures have not been investigated. Here, in this paper, we perform comprehensive polarization-dependent radiation modeling of the kink instability in the blazar emission region based on relativistic MHD (RMHD) simulations. We find that the kink instability may give rise to strong flares with polarization angle (PA) swings or weak flares withmore » polarization fluctuations, depending on the initial magnetic topology and magnetization. These findings are consistent with observations. In addition, compared with the shock model, the kink model generates polarization signatures that are in better agreement with the general polarization observations. Therefore, we suggest that kink instabilities may widely exist in the jet environment and provide an efficient way to convert the magnetic energy and produce multiwavelength flares and polarization variations.« less

  10. Polarization Signatures of Kink Instabilities in the Blazar Emission Region from Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Li, Hui; Guo, Fan; Taylor, Greg

    2017-02-01

    Kink instabilities are likely to occur in the current-carrying magnetized plasma jets. Recent observations of the blazar radiation and polarization signatures suggest that the blazar emission region may be considerably magnetized. While the kink instability has been studied with first-principle magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, the corresponding time-dependent radiation and polarization signatures have not been investigated. In this paper, we perform comprehensive polarization-dependent radiation modeling of the kink instability in the blazar emission region based on relativistic MHD (RMHD) simulations. We find that the kink instability may give rise to strong flares with polarization angle (PA) swings or weak flares with polarization fluctuations, depending on the initial magnetic topology and magnetization. These findings are consistent with observations. Compared with the shock model, the kink model generates polarization signatures that are in better agreement with the general polarization observations. Therefore, we suggest that kink instabilities may widely exist in the jet environment and provide an efficient way to convert the magnetic energy and produce multiwavelength flares and polarization variations.

  11. Experimental and numerical study of electrically driven magnetohydrodynamic flow in a modified cylindrical annulus. II. Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, Zacharias; Miralles, Sophie; Cébron, David; Noir, Jérôme; Vantieghem, Stijn; Jackson, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    We present an investigation of the stability of liquid metal flow under the influence of an imposed magnetic field by means of a laboratory experiment as well as a linear stability analysis of the setup using the finite element method. The experimental device ZUrich Cylindrical CHannel INstability Investigation is a modified cylindrical annulus with electrically driven flow of liquid GaInSn operating at Hartmann and Reynolds numbers up to M = 2022 and Re = 2.6 ṡ 105, respectively. The magnetic field gives rise to a free shear layer at the prominent inner electrode. We identify several flow regimes characterized by the nature of the instabilities. Above a critical current I c = O ( 0 . 1 A ) , the steady flow is destabilized by a Kelvin-Helmholtz mechanism at the free shear layer. The instability consists of counterrotating vortices traveling with the mean flow. For low forcing, the vortices are restricted to the free shear layer. Their azimuthal wave number m grows with M and decreases with Re. At Re/M ≈ 25, the instability becomes container-filling and energetically significant. It enhances the radial momentum transport which manifests itself in a broadening of the free shear layer width δS. We propose that this transition may be related to an unstable Hartmann layer. At R e / M 2 = O ( 1 ) , an abrupt change is observed in the mean azimuthal velocity < u ϕ ¯ > and the friction factor F, which we interpret as the transition between an inertialess and an inertial regime.

  12. Nonlinear evolution of electron shear flow instabilities in the presence of an external guide magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Neeraj; Büchner, Jörg; Muñoz, Patricio A.

    2017-03-01

    The dissipation mechanism by which the magnetic field reconnects in the presence of an external (guide) magnetic field in the direction of the main current is not well understood. In thin electron current sheets (half thickness close to an electron inertial length) formed in a quasi-steady state of collisionless magnetic reconnection, electron shear flow instabilities are potential candidates for providing an anomalous dissipation mechanism which can break the frozen-in condition of the magnetic field affecting the structure and rate of reconnection. We present the results of investigations of the evolution of electron shear flow instabilities, from linear to nonlinear state, in guide field magnetic reconnection. The properties of the plasma turbulence resulting from the growth of instability and their dependence on the strength of the guide field are studied. For this sake, we utilize the three dimensional electron-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of electron current sheets. We show that, unlike the case of current sheets self-consistently embedded in anti-parallel magnetic fields, the evolution of thin electron current sheets in the presence of a finite external guide field (equal to the asymptotic value of the reconnecting magnetic field or larger) is dominated by high wave number non-tearing mode instabilities. The latter causes the development of, first, a wavy structure of the current sheet. The turbulence, developed later, consists of current filaments and electron flow vortices. As a result of the nonlinear evolution of instability, the current sheet broadens simultaneously with its flattening in the central region mimicking a viscous-like turbulent dissipation. Later, the flattened current sheet bifurcates. During the time of bifurcation, the rate of the change of mean electron flow velocity is proportional to the magnitude of the flow velocity, suggesting a resistive-like dissipation. The turbulence energy cascades to shorter wavelengths preferentially in

  13. Periodic Viscous Shear Heating Instability in Fine-Grained Shear Zones: Mechanism for Intermediate Depth Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, E.; Kelemen, P.; Hirth, G.; Spiegelman, M.

    2005-12-01

    Kelemen and Hirth (Fall 2004 AGU) presented a model for periodic, viscous shear heating instabilities along pre-existing, fine grained shear zones. This provides an attractive alternative to dehydration embrittlement for explaining intermediate-depth earthquakes, especially those in a narrow thermal window within the mantle section of subducting oceanic plates (Hacker et al JGR03). Ductile shear zones with widths of cm to m are common in shallow mantle massifs and peridotite along oceanic fracture zones. Pseudotachylites in a mantle shear zone show that shear heating temperatures exceeded the mantle solidus (Obata & Karato Tectonophys95). Olivine grain growth in shear zones is pinned by closely spaced pyroxenes; thus, once formed, these features do not `heal' on geological time scales in the absence of melt or fluid (Warren & Hirth EPSL05). Grain-size sensitive creep will be localized within these shear zones, in preference to host rocks with olivine grain size from 1 to 10 mm. Inspired by the work of Whitehead & Gans (GJRAS74), we proposed that such pre-existing shear zones might undergo repeated shear heating instabilities. This is not a new concept; what is new is that viscous deformation is limited to a narrow shear zone, because grain boundary sliding, sensitive to both stress and grain size, may accommodate creep even at high stress and high temperature. These new ideas yield a new result: simple models for a periodic shear heating instability. Last year, we presented a 1D numerical model using olivine flow laws, assuming that viscous deformation remains localized in shear zones, surrounded by host rocks undergoing elastic deformation. Stress evolves due to elastic strain and drives viscous deformation in a shear zone of specified width. Shear heating and thermal diffusion control T. A maximum of 1400 C (substantial melting of peridotite ) was imposed. Grain size evolves due to recrystallization and diffusion. For strain rates of E-13 to E-14 per sec and

  14. Relativistic thermal electron scale instabilities in sheared flow plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Evan D.; Rogers, Barrett N.

    2016-04-01

    > The linear dispersion relation obeyed by finite-temperature, non-magnetized, relativistic two-fluid plasmas is presented, in the special case of a discontinuous bulk velocity profile and parallel wave vectors. It is found that such flows become universally unstable at the collisionless electron skin-depth scale. Further analyses are performed in the limits of either free-streaming ions or ultra-hot plasmas. In these limits, the system is highly unstable in the parameter regimes associated with either the electron scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (ESKHI) or the relativistic electron scale sheared flow instability (RESI) recently highlighted by Gruzinov. Coupling between these modes provides further instability throughout the remaining parameter space, provided both shear flow and temperature are finite. An explicit parameter space bound on the highly unstable region is found.

  15. Influence of velocity shear on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Guzdar, P.N.; Satyanarayana, P.; Huba, J.D.; Ossakow, S.L.

    1982-05-01

    The influence of a transverse velocity shear on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated. It is found that a sheared velocity flow can substantially reduce the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in short wavelength regime (i.e., kL>1 where L is the scale length of the density inhomogeneity), and causes the growth rate to maximize at kL<1.0. Applications of this result to ionospheric phenomena (equatorial spread F (ESF) and ionospheric plasma clouds) are discussed. In particular, the effect of shear could account for, at times, the 100's of km modulation observed on the bottomside of the ESF ionosphere and the km scale size wavelengths observed in barium cloud prompt striation phenomena.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic study for three-dimensional instability of the Petschek type magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, T.; Kondoh, K.

    2013-12-15

    The 3D instability of the spontaneous fast magnetic reconnection process is studied with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations, where the 2D model of the spontaneous fast magnetic reconnection is destabilized in three dimension. As well known in many 2D numerical MHD studies, when a 1D current sheet is destabilized with the current-driven anomalous resistivity, the 2D Petschek type fast magnetic reconnection is established. This paper shows that the 2D Petschek type fast magnetic reconnection can be destabilized in three dimension by an initial resistive disturbance which includes a weak fluctuation in the sheet current direction, i.e., along the magnetic neutral line. The resulting 3D fast magnetic reconnection finally becomes intermittent and random through a 3D instability. In addition, it is also shown that the 3D instability is suppressed by the uniform resistivity. It suggests that the 3D instability is caused in the Petschek-type reconnection process which is characterized by a strongly localized magnetic diffusion region and the slow shock acceleration of the plasma jets and is suppressed in the Sweet-Parker type reconnection process.

  17. 3D Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Current-Driven Instability. 1; Instability of a Static Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Lyubarsky, Yuri; ishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the development of current-driven (CD) kink instability through three-dimensional relativistic MHD simulations. A static force-free equilibrium helical magnetic configuration is considered in order to study the influence of the initial configuration on the linear and nonlinear evolution of the instability. We found that the initial configuration is strongly distorted but not disrupted by the kink instability. The instability develops as predicted by linear theory. In the non-linear regime the kink amplitude continues to increase up to the terminal simulation time, albeit at different rates, for all but one simulation. The growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the CD kink instability depends moderately on the density profile and strongly on the magnetic pitch profile. The growth rate of the kink mode is reduced in the linear regime by an increase in the magnetic pitch with radius and the non-linear regime is reached at a later time than for constant helical pitch. On the other hand, the growth rate of the kink mode is increased in the linear regime by a decrease in the magnetic pitch with radius and reaches the non-linear regime sooner than the case with constant magnetic pitch. Kink amplitude growth in the non-linear regime for decreasing magnetic pitch leads to a slender helically twisted column wrapped by magnetic field. On the other hand, kink amplitude growth in the non-linear regime nearly ceases for increasing magnetic pitch.

  18. KELVIN-HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY IN CORONAL MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES DUE TO AZIMUTHAL SHEAR FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Terradas, J.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Goossens, M.

    2010-04-01

    Transverse oscillations of coronal loops are often observed and have been theoretically interpreted as kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. Numerical simulations by Terradas et al. suggest that shear flows generated at the loop boundary during kink oscillations could give rise to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). Here, we investigate the linear stage of the KHI in a cylindrical magnetic flux tube in the presence of azimuthal shear motions. We consider the basic, linearized MHD equations in the beta = 0 approximation and apply them to a straight and homogeneous cylindrical flux tube model embedded in a coronal environment. Azimuthal shear flows with a sharp jump of the velocity at the cylinder boundary are included in the model. We obtain an analytical expression for the dispersion relation of the unstable MHD modes supported by the configuration, and compute analytical approximations of the critical velocity shear and the KHI growth rate in the thin tube limit. A parametric study of the KHI growth rates is performed by numerically solving the full dispersion relation. We find that fluting-like modes can develop a KHI in timescales comparable to the period of kink oscillations of the flux tube. The KHI growth rates increase with the value of the azimuthal wavenumber and decrease with the longitudinal wavenumber. However, the presence of a small azimuthal component of the magnetic field can suppress the KHI. Azimuthal motions related to kink oscillations of untwisted coronal loops may trigger a KHI, but this phenomenon has not been observed to date. We propose that the azimuthal component of the magnetic field is responsible for suppressing the KHI in a stable coronal loop. The required twist is small enough to prevent the development of the pinch instability.

  19. Shear Instabilities as a Probe of Jupiter's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosak, Tanja; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-01-01

    Linear wave patterns in Jupiter clouds with wavelengths strongly clustered around 300 km are commonly observed in the planet's equatorial atmosphere. We propose that the preferred wavelength is related to the thickness of an unstable shear layer within the clouds. We numerically analyze the linear stability of wavelike disturbances that have nonzero horizontal phase speeds in Jupiter's atmosphere and find that. if the static stability in the strongly clustered around 300 km are commonly observed in the planet's equatorial atmosphere. We propose that the preferred wavelength is related to the thickness of an unstable shear layer within the clouds. We numerically analyze the linear stability of wavelike disturbances that have nonzero horizontal phase speeds in Jupiter's atmosphere and find that. if the static stability in the shear layer is very low (but still nonnegative), a deep vertical shear layer like the one measured by the Galileo probe can generate the instabilities. The fastest growing waves grow exponentially within an hour, and their wavelengths match the observations. Close to zero values of static stability that permit the growth of instabilities are within the range of values measured by the Galileo probe in a hot spot. Our model probes Jupiter's equatorial atmosphere below the cloud deck and suggests that thick regions of wind shear and low static stability exist outside hot spots.

  20. Shear flow effects on the nonlinear evolution of thermal instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, J.; Charlton, L.A.; Carreras, B.A. )

    1993-08-01

    In the weak radiation drive regime, the coupling between the thermal instability driven by impurity radiation and the self-consistent flow profile modification leads to a simple dynamical system that can be approximated by the Volterra--Lotka equations. In this system the shear flow acts as a predator and the temperature fluctuations act as prey. The solutions are oscillatory, and their behavior resembles that of edge-localized modes (ELM's). The solutions of the simplified model are compared with the three-dimensional and two-dimensional nonlinear numerical results for this instability.

  1. Instabilities and Transition in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows in Ducts with Electrically Conducting Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Kinet, Maxime; Knaepen, Bernard; Molokov, Sergei

    2009-10-09

    This Letter presents a numerical study of a magnetohydrodynamic flow in a square duct with electrically conducting walls subject to a uniform, transverse magnetic field. Two regimes of instability and transition of Hunt's jets at the walls parallel to the magnetic field have been identified. The first one occurs for relatively low values of the Reynolds number Re and is associated with weak, periodic, counterrotating vortices discovered previously in linear stability studies. The second is a new regime taking place for higher values of Re. It is associated with trains of small-scale vortices enveloped into larger structures, and involves partial detachment of jets from parallel walls. Once this regime sets in, the kinetic energy of perturbations increases by 2 orders of magnitude.

  2. Spectral-element adaptive refinement magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the island coalescence instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, D.; Pouquet, A.; Germaschewski, K.; Ng, C. S.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2006-10-01

    A recently developed spectral-element adaptive refinement incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code is applied to simulate the problem of island coalescence instability (ICI) in 2D. The MHD solver is explicit, and uses the Elsasser formulation on high-order elements. It automatically takes advantage of the adaptive grid mechanics that have been described in [Rosenberg, Fournier, Fischer, Pouquet, J. Comp. Phys., 215, 59-80 (2006)], allowing both statically refined and dynamically refined grids. ICI is a MHD process that can produce strong current sheets and subsequent reconnection and heating in a high-Lundquist number plasma such as the solar corona [cf., Ng and Bhattacharjee, Phys. Plasmas, 5, 4028 (1998)]. Thus, it is desirable to use adaptive refinement grids to increase resolution, and to maintain accuracy at the same time. Results are compared with simulations using finite difference method with the same refinement grid, as well as pesudo-spectral simulations using uniform grid.

  3. Sheared Buneman Instabilities in Current-Driven Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Sen, N.

    2005-05-01

    Simulation studies of magnetic reconnection in strongly magnetized plasmas1 have indicated that electron phase-space holes evolve out of current-driven Buneman instabilities and that these holes play an important role in supplying the needed dissipation in the reconnection process by acting as electron scattering centers. Drake and collaborators have shown in simulations that the evolution of electron holes is mediated by lower hybrid waves. We have shown independently, via 2-D simulations of the evolution of Buneman instabilities, that electron phase space holes evolve and interact with lower hybrid waves in a manner similar to that seen in the reconnection simulations2 Perpendicular shear in the parallel velocity and the current will be present near the edges and elsewhere in realistic current sheets associated with magnetic reconnection. We have studied the effects of such shear on the nature and evolution of Buneman instabilities and the resulting electron phase space holes. Both linear theory and 2-D Vlasov simulations are employed. It is shown that even a small amount of velocity shear can have a large effect on the nonlinear evolution of holes and lower hybrid waves. 1Drake, J. F., M. Swisdak, C. Cattell, M. A. Shay, B. N. Rogers, and A.~Zeiler, Formation of Electron Holes and Particle Energization During Magnetic Reconnection, Science, 299, (2003). 2Martin V. Goldman, D. L. Newman, A. Mangeney, F. Califano, Theory and Simulation of Sheared Electron Beam Instabilities in Strongly Magnetized Plasmas, COSPAR04-A-02395; D3.5-0015-04, 35th COSPAR Scientific Assembly Paris, France, 18 - 25 July 2004. This research was supported by DOE, NSF and NASA.

  4. Non-resonant fishbone instabilities of qmin ≳ 1 in tokamak plasmas with weakly reversed magnetic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Qu; Zhang, Rui-Bin; Qin, Liang; Wang, Xiao-Gang

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we theoretically explore properties of non-resonant fishbone (NRF) instabilities with a safety factor profile slightly above unity (qmin ≳ 1) in tokamak plasmas with reversed magnetic shear configuration. From the dispersion relation of the NRF mode, it is found that the growth rate of the mode in general reversed shear scenarios with qmin ≳ 1 depends on fast ion beta βh in a power law of {\\sim} \\beta_{h}^{2/3} , different from that of ˜βh in a conventional positive magnetic shear configuration. Meanwhile, due to the slow ion precession and small continuum damping in ITER-like tokamaks with reversed shear, the mode has a lower trigger threshold than those with monotonously positive magnetic shear. In addition, the ion diamagnetic drift has been found to destabilize the fast ion-driven NRF mode. Other effects such as the shape of the q-profile, characterized by values of qmin and q(0), neutral beam energy, magnetohydrodynamic potential energy and the fraction of fast ions on the instability threshold are also discussed. Nonlinear behavior of the mode is further analyzed using a modified model.

  5. Linear Stability Analysis of Magnetohydrodynamic Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in Cyindrical Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhsh, Abeer; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations and analysis in Cartesian slab geometry for nonlinear ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) indicate that the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is suppressed in the presence of a magnetic field. An analytical solution of incompressible 2-D MHD RMI of an impulsively accelerated interface was investigated by Wheatley et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2005; J. Fluid Mech. 2005) who found that, for a finite magnetic field, although the initial growth rate of the interface is unaffected by the presence of magnetic field, the late-time amplitude of the interface asymptotes to a constant value. In the framework of incompressible MHD, we examine analytically the behavior of an impulsively accelerated interface separating conducting fluids of different densities in cylindrical geometry. We investigate the stability properties of such a system and study the influence of the magnetic field on the growth rate of the interface. In converging cylindrical geometry, the RMI is followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) phase. Our analysis does not account for the RT phase of the instability but is valid for the duration of the RMI phase. We compare results of the incompressible analysis with linear compressible MHD simulations. Supported by the KAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds under Award No. URF/1/2162-01.

  6. Modulational instability and associated rogue structures of slow magnetosonic wave in Hall magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Panwar, Anuraj; Ryu, Chang-Mo

    2014-06-15

    The modulational instability and associated rogue structures of a slow magnetosonic wave are investigated for a Hall magnetohydrodynamic plasma. Nonlinear Schrodinger equation is obtained by using the multiple scale method, which shows a modulationally unstable slow magnetosonic mode evolving into bright wavepackets. The dispersive effects induced by the Hall electron current increase with the increase in plasma β and become weaker as the angle of propagation increases. The growth rate of the modulational instability also increases with the increase in plasma β. The growth rate is greatest for the parallel propagation and drops to zero for perpendicular propagation. The envelope wavepacket of a slow magnetosonic is widened with less oscillations as plasma β increases. But the wavepacket becomes slightly narrower and more oscillatory as the angle of propagation increases. Further a non-stationary envelope solution of the Peregrine soliton is analyzed for rogue waves. The Peregrine soliton contracts temporally and expands spatially with increase in plasma β. However, the width of a slow magnetosonic Peregrine soliton decreases both temporally and spatially with increase of the propagation angle.

  7. Pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Seguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Landen, O. L.; Town, R. P. J.; Betti, R.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Soures, J. M.

    2009-07-15

    Recent experiments using proton backlighting of laser-foil interactions provide unique opportunities for studying magnetized plasma instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas. Time-gated proton radiograph images indicate that the outer structure of a magnetic field entrained in a hemispherical plasma bubble becomes distinctly asymmetric after the laser turns off. It is shown that this asymmetry is a consequence of pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interchange instabilities. In contrast to the predictions made by ideal MHD theory, the increasing plasma resistivity after laser turn-off allows for greater low-mode destabilization (m>1) from reduced stabilization by field-line bending. For laser-generated plasmas presented herein, a mode-number cutoff for stabilization of perturbations with m>{approx}[8{pi}{beta}(1+D{sub m}k{sub perpendicular}{sup 2}{gamma}{sub max}{sup -1})]{sup 1/2} is found in the linear growth regime. The growth is measured and is found to be in reasonable agreement with model predictions.

  8. Pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Li, C K; Frenje, J A; Petrasso, R D; Séguin, F H; Amendt, P A; Landen, O L; Town, R P J; Betti, R; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Soures, J M

    2009-07-01

    Recent experiments using proton backlighting of laser-foil interactions provide unique opportunities for studying magnetized plasma instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas. Time-gated proton radiograph images indicate that the outer structure of a magnetic field entrained in a hemispherical plasma bubble becomes distinctly asymmetric after the laser turns off. It is shown that this asymmetry is a consequence of pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interchange instabilities. In contrast to the predictions made by ideal MHD theory, the increasing plasma resistivity after laser turn-off allows for greater low-mode destabilization (m>1) from reduced stabilization by field-line bending. For laser-generated plasmas presented herein, a mode-number cutoff for stabilization of perturbations with m> approximately [8pibeta(1+D_{m}k_{ perpendicular};{2}gamma_{max};{-1})];{1/2} is found in the linear growth regime. The growth is measured and is found to be in reasonable agreement with model predictions.

  9. The effect of compressibility on magnetohydrodynamic jets and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praturi, Divya Sri; Girimaji, Sharath

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the effect of compressibility and magnetic field on the evolution of planar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jets. These jets are susceptible to Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability when subjected to an in-plane transverse velocity perturbation. Various linear stability analyses have shown that compressibility and magnetic field along the jet have a stabilizing influence on the KH instability. We performed three-dimensional numerical simulations using magneto gas kinetic method (MGKM) to study the effect of the Mach number, Alfvén Mach number, and the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the jet velocity direction on the flow-field evolution. In MGKM, the magnetic effects are added as source terms in the hydrodynamic gas kinetic scheme which also take into account the non-ideal MHD terms for finite plasma conductivity and the Hall effects. An in-depth analysis of linear and nonlinear physics is presented. The first author was supported by Texas A&M University Institute for Advanced Study HEEP fellowship.

  10. On the vertical-shear instability in astrophysical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, A. J.; Latter, H. N.

    2015-06-01

    We explore the linear stability of astrophysical discs exhibiting vertical shear, which arises when there is a radial variation in the temperature or entropy. Such discs are subject to a `vertical-shear instability', which recent non-linear simulations have shown to drive hydrodynamic activity in the MRI-stable regions of protoplanetary discs. We first revisit locally isothermal discs using the quasi-global reduced model derived by Nelson et al. This analysis is then extended to global axisymmetric perturbations in a cylindrical domain. We also derive and study a reduced model describing discs with power-law radial entropy profiles (`locally polytropic discs'), which are somewhat more realistic in that they possess physical (as opposed to numerical) surfaces. The fastest growing modes have very short wavelengths and are localized at the disc surfaces (if present), where the vertical shear is maximal. An additional class of modestly growing vertically global body modes is excited, corresponding to destabilized classical inertial waves (`r modes'). We discuss the properties of both types of modes, and stress that those that grow fastest occur on the shortest available length-scales (determined either by the numerical grid or the physical viscous length). This ill-posedness makes simulations of the instability difficult to interpret. We end with some brief speculation on the non-linear saturation and resulting angular momentum transport.

  11. Particle-in-cell simulation of two-dimensional electron velocity shear driven instability in relativistic domain

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-08-15

    We carry out particle-in-cell simulations to study the instabilities associated with a 2-D sheared electron flow configuration against a neutralizing background of ions. Both weak and strong relativistic flow velocities are considered. In the weakly relativistic case, we observe the development of electromagnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with similar characteristics as that predicted by the electron Magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) model. On the contrary, in a strong relativistic case, the compressibility effects of electron fluid dominate and introduce upper hybrid electrostatic oscillations transverse to the flow which are very distinct from EMHD fluid behavior. In the nonlinear regime, both weak and strong relativistic cases lead to turbulence with broad power law spectrum.

  12. Particle-in-cell simulation of two-dimensional electron velocity shear driven instability in relativistic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-08-01

    We carry out particle-in-cell simulations to study the instabilities associated with a 2-D sheared electron flow configuration against a neutralizing background of ions. Both weak and strong relativistic flow velocities are considered. In the weakly relativistic case, we observe the development of electromagnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with similar characteristics as that predicted by the electron Magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) model. On the contrary, in a strong relativistic case, the compressibility effects of electron fluid dominate and introduce upper hybrid electrostatic oscillations transverse to the flow which are very distinct from EMHD fluid behavior. In the nonlinear regime, both weak and strong relativistic cases lead to turbulence with broad power law spectrum.

  13. Suppression of the spherically converging magnetohydrodynamic Richtmyer-Meshkov instablity in an octahedrally symmetric seed magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostert, Wouter; Wheatley, Vincent; Pullin, Dale; Samtaney, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    We present results of ideal magnetohydrodynamics simulations investigating the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in near-spherical implosions in the presence of an octahedrally symmetric seed magnetic field. The problem is motivated by the desire to maintain a symmetrical collapse of the primary shock wave, minimally distorted by the effect of the seed magnetic field, while retaining the seed-field-induced suppression of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The field is generated by a set of six current loops arranged around the target as on the faces of a cube. The instability is generated on a perturbed spherical density interface that is accelerated from the outside by imploding magnetohydrodynamic shocks, which are in turn generated by a spherical Riemann problem. The perturbation on the density interface is formed with a single-dominant-mode spherical harmonics expansion. We investigate the evolution of the interface and the transport of baroclinic vorticity near the interface, and examine the extent of the distortion to the primary magnetohydrodynamic shock system induced by the seed field. This work was partially supported by the KAUST Office of Sponsored Research under Award URF/1/2162-01.

  14. Parametric instabilities in shallow water magnetohydrodynamics of astrophysical plasma in external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimachkov, D. A.; Petrosyan, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows of a thin rotating layer of astrophysical plasma in external magnetic field. We use the shallow water approximation to describe thin rotating plasma layer with a free surface in a vertical external magnetic field. The MHD shallow water equations with external vertical magnetic field are revised by supplementing them with the equations that are consequences of the magnetic field divergence-free conditions and reveal the existence of third component of the magnetic field in such approximation providing its relation with the horizontal magnetic field. It is shown that the presence of a vertical magnetic field significantly changes the dynamics of the wave processes in astrophysical plasma compared to the neutral fluid and plasma layer in a toroidal magnetic field. The equations for the nonlinear wave packets interactions are derived using the asymptotic multiscale method. The equations for three magneto-Poincare waves interactions, for three magnetostrophic waves interactions, for the interactions of two magneto-Poincare waves and for one magnetostrophic wave and two magnetostrophic wave and one magneto-Poincare wave interactions are obtained. The existence of parametric decay and parametric amplifications is predicted. We found following four types of parametric decay instabilities: magneto-Poincare wave decays into two magneto-Poincare waves, magnetostrophic wave decays into two magnetostrophic waves, magneto-Poincare wave decays into one magneto-Poincare wave and one magnetostrophic wave, magnetostrophic wave decays into one magnetostrophic wave and one magneto-Poincare wave. Following mechanisms of parametric amplifications are found: parametric amplification of magneto-Poincare waves, parametric amplification of magnetostrophic waves, magneto-Poincare wave amplification in magnetostrophic wave presence and magnetostrophic wave amplification in magneto-Poincare wave presence. The instabilities growth rates

  15. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic Kelvin–Helmholtz instability of cylindrical flow with permeable boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Awasthi, Mukesh

    2014-03-15

    We study the linear magnetohydrodynamic Kelvin–Helmholtz instability of the interface between two viscous, incompressible, and electrically conducting fluids. The phases are enclosed between two coaxial cylindrical porous layers with the interface through which mass and heat transfer takes place. The fluids are subjected to a constant magnetic field parallel to the streaming direction, and the suction/injection velocities for the fluids at the permeable boundaries are also taken into account. Here, we use an irrotational theory in which the motion and pressure are irrotational, and the viscosity enters through the jump in the viscous normal stress in the normal stress balance at the interface. We consider both asymmetric and axisymmetric disturbances in our analysis. A quadratic dispersion relation is deduced and stability criterion is given in terms of a critical value of relative velocity, as well as, magnetic field. It has been observed that in the case of permeable boundaries, heat and mass transfer phenomena play a dual in the stability analysis. The flow through porous medium is more stable than the pure flow.

  16. Local magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and the wave-driven dynamo in accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, Ethan T.; Diamond, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    We consider the consequences of magnetic buoyancy and the magnetic shearing instability (MSI) on the strength and organization of the magnetic field in a thin accretion disk. We discuss a model in which the wave-driven dynamo growth rate is balanced by the dissipative effects of the MSI. As in earlier work, the net helicity is due to small advective motions driven by nonlinear interactions between internal waves. Assuming a simple model of the internal wave spectrum generated from the primary m = 1 internal waves, we find that the magnetic energy density saturates at about (H/r) exp 4/3 times the local pressure (where H is the disk thickness and r is its radius). On very small scales the shearing instability will produce an isotropic fluctuating field. For a stationary disk this is equivalent to a dimensionless 'viscosity' of about (H/r) exp 4/3. The vertical and radial diffusion coefficients will be comparable to each other. Magnetic buoyancy will be largely suppressed by the turbulence due to the MSI. We present a rough estimate of its effects and find that it removes magnetic flux from the disk at a rate comparable to that caused by turbulent diffusion.

  17. Linear theory of the current sheet shear instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Keizo; Sydora, Richard D.

    2017-05-01

    The present study investigates the linear properties of the current sheet shear instability (CSSI) based on the two-fluid equations. The mode is typically excited in the thin current layer formed around the X line during a quasi-steady phase of collisionless reconnection and is considered to give rise to the anomalous momentum transport. The linear analyses are carried out for a realistic current sheet as evolved in collisionless reconnection, where the current density profile is produced by the nonuniform ion and electron flows and the pressure balance is maintained due to the temperature gradients. The density profile is assumed to be uniform, so that the lower hybrid drift instability is mostly suppressed. We confirm that the eigenfunctions in the numerical analysis are well consistent with the profiles in a kinetic simulation, implying that the two-fluid approximation is valid for the CSSI. The mass ratio dependencies of the wave number and growth rate are remarkable for the electron-scale current sheet, indicating that both the electrons and ions contribute to the wave generation. From the analytical analysis, it is found that these mass ratio dependencies originate from the fact that the ion momentum balance is coupled with the electron dynamics in the electron-scale current layer. In particular, the electron inertia and electron flow shear play a significant role in generating the CSSI through the induction electric and magnetic fields.

  18. Magnetic Shear, Rayleigh-Taylor Instability, And Prominence Threads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, C. Richard

    2012-05-01

    One striking feature of solar prominences is their very long, narrow threads of cool plasma that are observed in emission above the limb (and in absorption against the disk in filaments). It is generally accepted that this structure illuminates the prominence magnetic field, which both mechanical supports the cool mass against gravity and thermally insulates it against conduction from the surrounding hot corona. A mystery yet to be resolved is the origin of the narrow widths of prominence threads. We are investigating the hypothesis that it is fixed by a competition between the gravitational instability of a dense fluid (the prominence) residing above a dilute fluid (the corona) and the stabilizing influence of magnetic tension forces when the prominence field is distorted. It is well known (e.g., Stone & Gardiner 2007) that this process leads to the formation of ropes of dense fluid whose characteristic lengths are long parallel to the field (minimizing the increase in magnetic energy) but arbitrarily short perpendicular to the field (maximizing the release of gravitational energy). A key issue that has yet to be addressed is the effect on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of shear in a magnetic field whose direction rotates continuously through the body of the prominence. Linear analysis indicates that marginal stability is reached for aspect ratios (parallel to perpendicular wavelengths) of about 25:1 for solar parameters; unstable modes have still larger ratios. High-resolution numerical simulations of initially monolithic slab prominences show developing fragmentation of the prominence/corona interface driven by the early, linear growth of the shear-modified Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Our investigation also is probing the nonlinear consequences of this evolution. This work was supported by NASA’s LWS TR&T program.

  19. Magnetorotational dynamo instability in statistical models of shearing box turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Jonathan; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2014-10-01

    A large scale dynamo generating a strong azimuthal field is a fundamental component of the turbulence induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). The dynamo appears to be inherently time-dependent, producing well-defined butterfly diagrams, and is never kinematic even in its earliest stages, since without the magnetic field the MRI does not exist. In this talk we consider the dynamo in MRI turbulence in its simplest possible form, studying the zero net-flux unstratified shearing box. With the aim of isolating the core dynamo process, we remove as much of the nonlinearity as possible from the system, studying the statistics of driven linear fluctuations in a vertically dependent mean-field that evolves self-consistently due to Reynolds and Maxwell stresses. We find that homogeneous background turbulence becomes unstable above some critical parameter to a mean-field dynamo instability with a strong dependence on magnetic Prandtl number. This instability saturates to either time-independent or time-periodic states with characteristics that strongly resemble features of fully developed MRI turbulence. We discuss the driving and saturation terms in this MRI dynamo and the relation of these to the underlying nonmodal linear dynamics. This work was supported by Max Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics and U.S. DOE (DE-AC02- 09CH11466).

  20. Experimental study of shear layer instability below a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2015-11-01

    Relaxation of a laminar boundary layer at a free surface is an inviscidly unstable process and can lead to millimeter-scale surface waves, influencing interfacial processes. Due to the small time- and length-scales involved, previous experimental studies have been limited to visual observations and point-wise measurements of the surface profile to determine instability onset and frequency. However, effects of viscosity, surface tension, and non-linearity of the wave profile have not been systematically studied. In fact, no data have been reported on the velocity fields associated with this instability. In the present study, planar laser induced fluorescence and particle image velocimetry provide surface profiles coupled with liquid phase velocity fields for this instability in a time resolved manner. Wave steepness (ak, with a the amplitude and k the wave number) and Reynolds and Weber numbers based on momentum thickness range from 0 to 1.2, 143 to 177, and 4.79 to 6.61, respectively. Large datasets are analyzed to gain statistical information on the surface behavior. Discrete vortices are resolved, showing that the shear layer becomes unstable and rolls up above a Reynolds number of 140. The detection onset and steepness of the subsequent surface deformation by the vortices depend upon the Weber number. Non-linear behavior such as vortex motion and wave profile asymmetry are observed at steepness larger than 0.5.

  1. Multi-phase hybrid simulation of energetic particle driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todo, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities driven by energetic particles in tokamak plasmas and the energetic particle distribution formed with the instabilities, neutral beam injection, and collisions are investigated with hybrid simulations for energetic particles and an MHD fluid. The multi-phase simulation, which is a combination of classical simulation and hybrid simulation, is applied to examine the distribution formation process in the collisional slowing-down time scale of energetic ions for various beam deposition power ({P}{NBI}) and slowing-down time ({τ }{{s}}). The physical parameters other than {P}{NBI} and {τ }{{s}} are similar to those of a Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) experiment (Wong et al 1991 Phys. Rev. Lett. 66 1874). For {P}{NBI} = 10 MW and {τ }{{s}} = 100 ms, which is similar to the TFTR experiment, the bursts of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes take place with a time interval 2 ms, which is close to that observed in the experiment. The maximum radial velocity amplitude (v r) of the dominant TAE at the bursts in the simulation is {v}{{r}}/{v}{{A}}∼ 3× {10}-3 where v A is the Alfvén velocity at the plasma center. For {P}{NBI} = 5 MW and {τ }{{s}} = 20 ms, the amplitude of the dominant TAE is kept at a constant level {v}{{r}}/{v}{{A}}∼ 4× {10}-4. The intermittency of TAE rises with increasing {P}{NBI} and increasing {τ }{{s}} (= decreasing collision frequency). With increasing volume-averaged classical energetic ion pressure, which is well proportional to {P}{NBI}{τ }{{s}}, the energetic ion confinement degrades monotonically due to the transport by the instabilities. The volume-averaged energetic ion pressure depends only on the volume-averaged classical energetic ion pressure, not independently on {P}{NBI} or {τ }{{s}}. The energetic ion pressure profile resiliency, where the increase in energetic ion pressure profile is saturated, is found for the cases with the highest {P}{NBI}{τ }{{s}} where the TAE bursts take place.

  2. Nonlocal aspects of electrostatic current-driven ion cyclotron instability due to magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguli, G.; Bakshi, P.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of the magnetic shear on the current-driven ion cyclotron instability has been studied. Taking into account the asymmetry introduced by the external current, an analytical theory to study the nonlocal behavior of this instability is given. The main consequences of the magnetic shear are to (i) localize the instability in space and (ii) reduce the growth rates in general. The damping influence of shear arises in two distinct ways; (a) a damping rate directly proportional to the shear strength, and (b) a damping rate (due to the nonlocal nature of the dispersion relation) not explicitly dependent on shear which can be quite strong for above marginal currents. Shear makes this instability more coherent by reducing the band of the perpendicular wavelengths which is unstable. The general physics of this instability and the parametric dependences of the growth rates are studied and marginal stability curves given.

  3. Laboratory Study of Magnetohydrodynamic and Hydrodynamic Instabilities in Rotating Flows Relevant to Astrophysical Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hantao

    Efficient dissipation of the orbital energy of plasma occurs in accretion disks ranging from those in which planets form around protostars, to those around supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei. Two mechanisms have been proposed for the turbulence that drives dissipation and angular-momentum transport in such disks: (1) a linear instability of magnetized and electrically conducting flow known as magnetorotational instability (MRI); and (2) nonlinear hydrodynamic shear-flow instability. Two laboratory apparatuses have been constructed at Princeton to study these mechanisms. The LiquidMetal MRI experiment is designed to study MRI and related MHD instabilities. The Hydrodynamic Turbulence Experiment (HTX) is designed to study nonlinear hydrodynamic transition. Both of these devices are novel in two respects: large Reynolds numbers (Regtrsim 10(6) ) and multiple independently driven rings on the axial boundaries to minimize secondary (Ekman) flows. We have demonstrated negligible angular momentum transport at Re ≤ 2× 10(6) in quasi-keplerian hydrodynamic flow with minimized Ekman circulation. This result, published in Nature, has generated significant interest among astrophysicists and fluid dynamicists. Recently, the MHD experiment has demonstrated robust nonaxisymmetric Shercliff-layer instabilities in strong axial magnetic fields. The latter result has paved a clear path towards first conclusive demonstration of MRI in the laboratory. Support is requested to continue fundamental laboratory studies with these devices. The proposed research will focus on experimental studies of the following major questions: (Q1) Why are quasi-keplerian flows resistant to turbulence? Can the turbulence found by other experiments be explained by differences in the boundary conditions or diagnostics used? Can nonlinear hydrodynamic transition occur in flow that is partially magnetized but too diffusive for MRI? (Q2) How do MRI, Shercliff-layer instabilities, and other

  4. Growth and detachment of single hydrogen bubbles in a magnetohydrodynamic shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baczyzmalski, Dominik; Karnbach, Franziska; Mutschke, Gerd; Yang, Xuegeng; Eckert, Kerstin; Uhlemann, Margitta; Cierpka, Christian

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates the effect of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shear flow on the growth and detachment of single sub-millimeter-sized hydrogen gas bubbles. These bubbles were electrolytically generated at a horizontal Pt microelectrode (100 μ m in diameter) in an acidic environment (1 M H2SO4 ). The inherent electric field was superimposed by a homogeneous electrode-parallel magnetic field of up to 700 mT to generate Lorentz forces in the electrolyte, which drive the MHD flow. The growth and motion of the hydrogen bubble was analyzed by microscopic high-speed imaging and measurements of the electric current, while particle tracking velocimetry (μ PTV ) and particle image velocimetry (μ PIV ) were applied to measure the surrounding electrolyte flow. In addition, numerical flow simulations were performed based on the experimental conditions. The results show a significant reduction of the bubble growth time and detachment diameter with increasing magnetic induction, which is known to improve the efficiency of water electrolysis. In order to gain further insight into the bubble detachment mechanism, an analysis of the forces acting on the bubble was performed. The strong MHD-induced drag force causes the bubble to slowly slide away from the center of the microelectrode before its detachment. This motion increases the active electrode area and enhances the bubble growth rate. The results further indicate that at large current densities the coalescence of tiny bubbles formed at the foot of the main bubble might play an important role for the bubble detachment. Moreover, the occurrence of Marangoni stresses at the gas-liquid interface is discussed.

  5. Linear Vlasov theory in the shearing sheet approximation with application to the magneto-rotational instability

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, Tobias; Quataert, Eliot E-mail: eliot@berkeley.edu

    2014-09-01

    We derive the conductivity tensor for axisymmetric perturbations of a hot, collisionless, and charge-neutral plasma in the shearing sheet approximation. Our results generalize the well-known linear Vlasov theory for uniform plasmas to differentially rotating plasmas and can be used for wide range of kinetic stability calculations. We apply these results to the linear theory of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) in collisionless plasmas. We show analytically and numerically how the general kinetic theory results derived here reduce in appropriate limits to previous results in the literature, including the low-frequency guiding center (or 'kinetic MHD') approximation, Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), and the gyro-viscous approximation. We revisit the cold plasma model of the MRI and show that, contrary to previous results, an initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma is linearly stable to axisymmetric perturbations in the cold plasma approximation. In addition to their application to astrophysical plasmas, our results provide a useful framework for assessing the linear stability of differentially rotating plasmas in laboratory experiments.

  6. Observational Signatures of Transverse Magnetohydrodynamic Waves and Associated Dynamic Instabilities in Coronal Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolin, P.; De Moortel, I.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Yokoyama, T.

    2017-02-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves permeate the solar atmosphere and constitute potential coronal heating agents. Yet, the waves detected so far may be but a small subset of the true existing wave power. Detection is limited by instrumental constraints but also by wave processes that localize the wave power in undetectable spatial scales. In this study, we conduct 3D MHD simulations and forward modeling of standing transverse MHD waves in coronal loops with uniform and non-uniform temperature variation in the perpendicular cross-section. The observed signatures are largely dominated by the combination of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), resonant absorption, and phase mixing. In the presence of a cross-loop temperature gradient, we find that emission lines sensitive to the loop core catch different signatures compared to those that are more sensitive to the loop boundary and the surrounding corona, leading to an out-of-phase intensity and Doppler velocity modulation produced by KHI mixing. In all of the considered models, common signatures include an intensity and loop width modulation at half the kink period, a fine strand-like structure, a characteristic arrow-shaped structure in the Doppler maps, and overall line broadening in time but particularly at the loop edges. For our model, most of these features can be captured with a spatial resolution of 0.″33 and a spectral resolution of 25 km s-1, although we do obtain severe over-estimation of the line width. Resonant absorption leads to a significant decrease of the observed kinetic energy from Doppler motions over time, which is not recovered by a corresponding increase in the line width from phase mixing and KHI motions. We estimate this hidden wave energy to be a factor of 5-10 of the observed value.

  7. Flow Instability and Wall Shear Stress Ocillation in Intracranial Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyoungsu; Jayamaran, Mahesh; Richardson, Peter; Karniadakis, George

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the flow dynamics and oscillatory behavior of wall shear stress (WSS) vectors in intracranial aneurysms using high-order spectral/hp simulations. We analyze four patient- specific internal carotid arteries laden with aneurysms of different characteristics : a wide-necked saccular aneurysm, a hemisphere-shaped aneurysm, a narrower-necked saccular aneurysm, and a case with two adjacent saccular aneurysms. Simulations show that the pulsatile flow in aneurysms may be subject to a hydrodynamic instability during the decelerating systolic phase resulting in a high-frequency oscillation in the range of 30-50 Hz. When the aneurysmal flow becomes unstable, both the magnitude and the directions of WSS vectors fluctuate. In particular, the WSS vectors around the flow impingement region exhibit significant spatial and temporal changes in direction as well as in magnitude.

  8. Instability at the Interface between Two Shearing Fluids in a Channel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    INSTAWILITY AT vin.. INTERFIACE I*.VWUN , TWO SUEARING FLUIDS IN A C|UANNEL Yuriko Renardy Mathematics Research Center University of Wisconsin-Madison...RESEARCH CENTER INSTABILITY AT THE INTERFACE BETWEEN TWO SHEARING FLUIDS IN A CHANNEL Yuriko Renardy Technical Summary Report #2787 February 1985...INSTABILITY AT THE INTERFACE BETWEEN TWO SHEARING FLUIDS IN A CHANNEL Yuriko Renardy 0 §1

  9. Firehose, Mirror, and Magnetorotational Instabilities in a Collisionless Shearing Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Matthew; Schekochihin, Alexander; Stone, James; Melville, Scott; Quataert, Eliot

    2015-11-01

    Describing the large-scale behavior of weakly collisional magnetized plasmas, such as the solar wind, black-hole accretion flows, or the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters, necessitates a detailed understanding of the kinetic-scale physics governing the dynamics of magnetic fields and the transport of momentum and heat. This physics is complicated by the fact that such plasmas are expected to exhibit particle distribution functions with unequal thermal pressures in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the local magnetic field. This pressure anisotropy can trigger fast Larmor-scale instabilities - namely, firehose and mirror - which solar-wind observations suggest to be effective at regulating the pressure anisotropy to marginally stable levels. Results from weakly nonlinear theory and hybrid-kinetic particle-in-cell simulations that address how marginal stability is achieved and maintained in a plasma whose pressure anisotropy is driven by a shearing magnetic field are presented. Fluctuation spectra and effective collisionality are highlighted. These results are placed in the context of our ongoing studies of magnetorotational turbulence in collisionless astrophysical accretion disks, in which microscale plasma instabilities regulate angular-momentum transport.

  10. The shear instability energy: a new parameter for materials design?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanani, M.; Hartmaier, A.; Janisch, R.

    2017-10-01

    Reliable and predictive relationships between fundamental microstructural material properties and observable macroscopic mechanical behaviour are needed for the successful design of new materials. In this study we establish a link between physical properties that are defined on the atomic level and the deformation mechanisms of slip planes and interfaces that govern the mechanical behaviour of a metallic material. To accomplish this, the shear instability energy Γ is introduced, which can be determined via quantum mechanical ab initio calculations or other atomistic methods. The concept is based on a multilayer generalised stacking fault energy calculation and can be applied to distinguish the different shear deformation mechanisms occurring at TiAl interfaces during finite-temperature molecular dynamics simulations. We use the new parameter Γ to construct a deformation mechanism map for different interfaces occurring in this intermetallic. Furthermore, Γ can be used to convert the results of ab initio density functional theory calculations into those obtained with an embedded atom method type potential for TiAl. We propose to include this new physical parameter into material databases to apply it for the design of materials and microstructures, which so far mainly relies on single-crystal values for the unstable and stable stacking fault energy.

  11. High-Energy-Density Shear Flow and Instability Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, F. W.; Flippo, K. A.; Merritt, E. C.; di Stefano, C. A.; Devolder, B. G.; Kurien, S.; Kline, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    High-energy-density shear experiments have been performed by LANL at the OMEGA Laser Facility and National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments have been simulated using the LANL radiation-hydrocode RAGE and have been used to assess turbulence models' ability to function in the high-energy-density, inertial-fusion-relevant regime. Beginning with the basic configuration of two counter-oriented shock-driven flows of > 100 km/s, which initiate a strong shear instability across an initially solid-density, 20 μm thick Al plate, variations of the experiment to details of the initial conditions have been performed. These variations have included increasing the fluid densities (by modifying the plate material from Al to Ti and Cu), imposing sinusoidal seed perturbations on the plate, and directly modifying the plate's intrinsic surface roughness. Radiography of the unseeded layer has revealed the presence of emergent Kelvin-Helmholtz structures which may be analyzed to infer fluid-mechanical properties including turbulent energy density. This work is conducted by the US DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  12. Multiple shear band development and related instabilities in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajo, A.; Bigoni, D.; Wood, D. Muir

    2004-12-01

    A new, small-strain constitutive model, incorporating elastoplastic coupling to describe developing elastic anisotropy, and density as a state variable to capture compaction and dilation, is proposed to simulate the behaviour of granular materials, in particular sand. This developing elastic anisotropy is related to grain reorientation and is shown to be crucial to obtain localisation during strain hardening, as experiments exhibit. Post-localisation analysis is also performed under simplificative assumptions, which evinces a number of features, including softening induced by localisation, size effects and snap-back, all phenomena found in qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments. No prior model of granular material deformation correctly captures all these behaviours. The post-localisation analysis has revealed a new form of material instability in granular materials, consisting of a saturation mechanism, in which shear bands just formed unload, permitting new bands to form. This phenomenon shares similarities with the mechanics of phase transformation in metal strips and results in a stress oscillation during increasing deformation. The investigation of this mechanism of localised deformation reveals that loose and dense sands behave in qualitatively different ways. In particular, saturation is not persistent in dense sand; rather, after several shear bands form and saturate, this process is terminated by the formation of a differently inclined shear band occurring in the material transformed by previous strain localisation. In this case, the resulting 'global' stress-strain curve exhibits a few stress oscillations followed by a strong softening. On the other hand, band saturation is found to be a persistent phenomenon in loose sand, yielding a continuing stress oscillation. This provides a consistent description of specific experimental results.

  13. Drift-Alfven instabilities of a finite beta plasma shear flow along a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2016-02-01

    It was derived that the drift-Alfven instabilities with the shear flow parallel to the magnetic field have significant difference from the drift-Alfven instabilities of a shearless plasma when the ion temperature is comparable with electron temperature for a finite plasma beta. The velocity shear not only modifies the frequency and the growth rate of the known drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the inverse electron Landau damping, but also triggers a combined effect of the velocity shear and the inverse ion Landau damping, which manifests the development of the ion kinetic shear-flow-driven drift-Alfven instability. The excited unstable waves have the phase velocities along the magnetic field comparable with the ion thermal velocity, and the growth rate is comparable with the frequency. The development of this instability may be the efficient mechanism of the ion energization in shear flows.

  14. Multiple MHD instabilities in high-β N toroidal plasmas with reversed magnetic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Yang, J. F.; Hao, G. Z.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, Z. X.; Zheng, S.; Wang, A. K.; He, H. D.

    2017-06-01

    The toroidal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code MARS-F (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681) is applied to numerically investigate multiple MHD instabilities in high-β N (β N is the beta normalized) toroidal plasmas with reversed magnetic shear, and with different radial separations {{Δ }}{r}s between the two q = 2 rational surfaces. A resistive wall is also taken into account. In the small {{Δ }}{r}s regime, it is found that a finite β N leads to multiple branches of the double tearing mode (DTM). The beta normalized has a stabilizing effect on the most unstable branch. There exists a critical value β Nc , above which the real frequency of the most unstable mode becomes finite due to the favorable average curvature effect (Glasser et al 1975 Phys. Fluids 18 875). Moreover, the critical value β Nc decreases with increasing plasma resistivity η . In the large {{Δ }}{r}s regime, on the other hand, finite beta normalized can help to transform the two DTM branches into an external kink mode (EKM). Increasing β N can also couple two single tearing modes, forming a DTM. In the intermediate {{Δ }}{r}s regime, interestingly, a new branch with EKM structure appears, which successively couples with the other two branches as {{Δ }}{r}s increases, recovering the EKM found in the large {{Δ }}{r}s limit. Characteristics of the eigenmode structures in different {{Δ }}{r}s regimes are compared and analyzed in detail. Furthermore, the properties of the high-β N MHD instabilities, with higher toroidal mode number n, are also investigated. It is found that, in the small {{Δ }}{r}s limit, the growth rate always first increases and then decreases with n, forming a broad n spectrum. The critical value {β }Nc decreases with n. In the large {{Δ }}{r}s limit, however, the growth rate of the n = 2 mode is strongly reduced with increasing β N .

  15. 1D Modeling of the Initial Stage of Wire Explosions and 2D Modeling of the m=0 Sausage Instability With Sheared Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhin, Volodymyr; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Bauer, Bruno; Lindemuth, Irvin; Sheehey, Peter

    2001-10-01

    1D modeling of the initial state of wire explosions (“cold start” with updated SESAME tables) was examined using 1D version of the Eulerian Magnetohydrodynamic Radiative Code (MHRDR). Simulations were carried out for two regimes: with (black body radiative model) and without radiative losses. Results of the simulations revealed strong dependence of the time of explosion and expansion speed of the wire on the implemented radiative model. This shows that it is necessary to accurately include radiative losses to model “cold start” wire explosions. 2D modeling of the m=0 sausage instability with sheared axial flow. The MHRDR simulations were used to obtain the growth rate of the m=0 sausage instability in plasma column with initial Bennett equilibrium profile with and without shear flow. These growth rates appeared to be in good agreement with growth rates calculated from the linearized MHD equations.

  16. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CURRENT-DRIVEN INSTABILITY WITH A SUB-ALFVENIC JET: TEMPORAL PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2011-06-10

    We have investigated the influence of a velocity shear surface on the linear and nonlinear development of the current-driven (CD) kink instability of force-free helical magnetic equilibria in three dimensions. In this study, we follow the temporal development within a periodic computational box and concentrate on flows that are sub-Alfvenic on the cylindrical jet's axis. Displacement of the initial force-free helical magnetic field leads to the growth of CD kink instability. We find that helically distorted density structure propagates along the jet with speed and flow structure dependent on the radius of the velocity shear surface relative to the characteristic radius of the helically twisted force-free magnetic field. At small velocity shear surface radius, the plasma flows through the kink with minimal kink propagation speed. The kink propagation speed increases as the velocity shear radius increases and the kink becomes more embedded in the plasma flow. A decreasing magnetic pitch profile and faster flow enhance the influence of velocity shear. Simulations show continuous transverse growth in the nonlinear phase of the instability. The growth rate of the CD kink instability and the nonlinear behavior also depend on the velocity shear surface radius and flow speed, and the magnetic pitch radial profile. Larger velocity shear radius leads to slower linear growth, makes a later transition to the nonlinear stage, and with larger maximum amplitude than that occuring for a static plasma column. However, when the velocity shear radius is much greater than the characteristic radius of the helical magnetic field, linear and nonlinear development can be similar to the development of a static plasma column.

  17. Flow instability and wall shear stress variation in intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Baek, H.; Jayaraman, M. V.; Richardson, P. D.; Karniadakis, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the flow dynamics and oscillatory behaviour of wall shear stress (WSS) vectors in intracranial aneurysms using high resolution numerical simulations. We analyse three representative patient-specific internal carotid arteries laden with aneurysms of different characteristics: (i) a wide-necked saccular aneurysm, (ii) a narrower-necked saccular aneurysm, and (iii) a case with two adjacent saccular aneurysms. Our simulations show that the pulsatile flow in aneurysms can be subject to a hydrodynamic instability during the decelerating systolic phase resulting in a high-frequency oscillation in the range of 20–50 Hz, even when the blood flow rate in the parent vessel is as low as 150 and 250 ml min−1 for cases (iii) and (i), respectively. The flow returns to its original laminar pulsatile state near the end of diastole. When the aneurysmal flow becomes unstable, both the magnitude and the directions of WSS vectors fluctuate at the aforementioned high frequencies. In particular, the WSS vectors around the flow impingement region exhibit significant spatio-temporal changes in direction as well as in magnitude. PMID:20022896

  18. Linear Instability of a Uni-Directional Transversely Sheared Mean Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of spanwise-periodic mean-flow distortions (i.e. streamwise-vortex structures) on the evolution of small-amplitude, single-frequency instability waves in an otherwise two-dimensional shear flow is investigated. The streamwise-vortex structures are taken to be just weak enough so that the spatially growing instability waves behave (locally) like linear perturbations about a uni-directional transversely sheared mean flow. Numerical solutions are computed and discussed for both the mean flow and the instability waves. The influence of the streamwise-vortex wavelength on the properties of the most rapidly growing instability wave is also discussed.

  19. Experiments on magneto-hydrodynamics instabilities with ECH/ECCD in FTU using a minimal real-time control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozzi, C.; Galperti, C.; Alessi, E.; Nowak, S.; Apruzzese, G.; Belli, F.; Bin, W.; Boncagni, L.; Botrugno, A.; Bruschi, A.; Buratti, P.; Calabrò, G.; Esposito, B.; Figini, L.; Garavaglia, S.; Granucci, G.; Grosso, L. A.; Marchetto, C.; Marinucci, M.; Marocco, D.; Mazzotta, C.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Mosconi, M.; Moro, A.; Piergotti, V.; Pucella, G.; Ramogida, G.; Romano, A.; Tudisco, O.

    2015-08-01

    Experiments on real time control of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities using injection of electron cyclotron waves (ECW) are being performed with a control system based on only three real time key items: an equilibrium estimator based on a statistical regression, a MHD instability marker (SVDH) using a three-dimensional array of pick-up coils and a fast ECW launcher able to poloidally steer the EC absorption volume with dρ/dt = 0.1/30 ms maximum radial speed. The MHD instability, usually a tearing mode with poloidal mode number m and toroidal mode number n such that m/n = 2/1 or 3/2 is deliberately induced either by neon gas injection or by a density ramp hitting the density limit. No diagnostics providing the radial localization of the instabilities have been used. The sensitivity of the used MHD marker allows to close the control loop solely on the effect of the actuator’s action with little elaboration. The nature of the instability triggering mechanism in these plasma prevents that the stabilization lasts longer than the ECW pulse. However when the ECW power is switched on, the instability amplitude shows a marked sensitivity to the position of the absorption volume with an increase or decrease of its growth rate. Moreover the suppression of the dominant mode by ECRH performed at high plasma density even at relatively low power level facilitates the development of a secondary mode. This minimized set of control tools aim to explore some of the difficulties which can be expected in a fusion reactor where reduced diagnostic capabilities and reduced actuator flexibility can be expected.

  20. Cooling Requirements for the Vertical Shear Instability in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min-Kai; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2015-09-01

    The vertical shear instability (VSI) offers a potential hydrodynamic mechanism for angular momentum transport in protoplanetary disks (PPDs). The VSI is driven by a weak vertical gradient in the disk’s orbital motion, but must overcome vertical buoyancy, a strongly stabilizing influence in cold disks, where heating is dominated by external irradiation. Rapid radiative cooling reduces the effective buoyancy and allows the VSI to operate. We quantify the cooling timescale tc needed for efficient VSI growth, through a linear analysis of the VSI with cooling in vertically global, radially local disk models. We find the VSI is most vigorous for rapid cooling with {t}{{c}}\\lt {{{Ω }}}{{K}}-1h| q| /(γ -1) in terms of the Keplerian orbital frequency, {{{Ω }}}{{K}}, the disk’s aspect-ratio, h\\ll 1, the radial power-law temperature gradient, q, and the adiabatic index, γ. For longer tc, the VSI is much less effective because growth slows and shifts to smaller length scales, which are more prone to viscous or turbulent decay. We apply our results to PPD models where tc is determined by the opacity of dust grains. We find that the VSI is most effective at intermediate radii, from ∼5 to ∼50 AU with a characteristic growth time of ∼30 local orbital periods. Growth is suppressed by long cooling times both in the opaque inner disk and the optically thin outer disk. Reducing the dust opacity by a factor of 10 increases cooling times enough to quench the VSI at all disk radii. Thus the formation of solid protoplanets, a sink for dust grains, can impede the VSI.

  1. Azimuthal instability of the interface in a shear banded flow by direct visual observation.

    PubMed

    Decruppe, J P; Bécu, L; Greffier, O; Fazel, N

    2010-12-17

    The stability of the shear banded flow of a Maxwellian fluid is studied from an experimental point of view using rheology and flow visualization with polarized light. We show that the one-layer homogeneous flow cannot sustain shear rates corresponding to the end of the stress plateau. The high shear rate branch is not found and the shear stress oscillates at the end of the plateau. An azimuthal instability appears: the shear induced band becomes unstable and the interface between the two bands undulates in time and space with a period τ, a wavelength λ and a wave vector k parallel to the direction of the tangential velocity.

  2. Generalized reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, S.E.

    1999-02-01

    A new derivation of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations is presented. A multiple-time-scale expansion is employed. It has the advantage of clearly separating the three time scales of the problem associated with (1) MHD equilibrium, (2) fluctuations whose wave vector is aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, and (3) those aligned parallel to the magnetic field. The derivation is carried out without relying on a large aspect ratio assumption; therefore this model can be applied to any general configuration. By accounting for the MHD equilibrium and constraints to eliminate the fast perpendicular waves, equations are derived to evolve scalar potential quantities on a time scale associated with the parallel wave vector (shear-Alfven wave time scale), which is the time scale of interest for MHD instability studies. Careful attention is given in the derivation to satisfy energy conservation and to have manifestly divergence-free magnetic fields to all orders in the expansion parameter. Additionally, neoclassical closures and equilibrium shear flow effects are easily accounted for in this model. Equations for the inner resistive layer are derived which reproduce the linear ideal and resistive stability criterion of Glasser, Greene, and Johnson. The equations have been programmed into a spectral initial value code and run with shear flow that is consistent with the equilibrium input into the code. Linear results of tearing modes with shear flow are presented which differentiate the effects of shear flow gradients in the layer with the effects of the shear flow decoupling multiple harmonics.

  3. Crystallization of semi-solid magnesium alloys and composites in the presence of magnetohydrodynamic shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivès, Charles

    1994-04-01

    The working principle of a new electromagnetic rheocaster, which is based on the use of rotating permanent magnets and which allows the production of intense three-dimensional multiphase flows in solidifying semi-solid alloy slurries and metal matrix composites, is described. Local measurement techniques are applied to the study of the evolution of non-newtonian magnetohydrodynamic multiphase flow phenomena with the rotational speed of the inductor, the solid fraction of the magnesium alloy matrix and the size and volume percent of SiC particles. A discussion is presented relating the metallurgical findings to the heat and three-phase flow measurements.

  4. DOUBLE-DIFFUSIVE INSTABILITIES OF A SHEAR-GENERATED MAGNETIC LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Silvers, Lara J.; Proctor, Michael R. E.; Vasil, Geoffrey M.; Brummell, Nicholas H.

    2009-09-01

    Previous theoretical work has speculated about the existence of double-diffusive magnetic buoyancy instabilities of a dynamically evolving horizontal magnetic layer generated by the interaction of forced vertically sheared velocity and a background vertical magnetic field. Here, we confirm numerically that if the ratio of the magnetic to thermal diffusivities is sufficiently low then such instabilities can indeed exist, even for high Richardson number shear flows. Magnetic buoyancy may therefore occur via this mechanism for parameters that are likely to be relevant to the solar tachocline, where regular magnetic buoyancy instabilities are unlikely.

  5. The inhomogeneous ion temperature anisotropy instabilities of magnetic-field-aligned plasma sheared flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2016-11-01

    The stability of the magnetic field aligned sheared flow with anisotropic ion temperatures, which have the anisotropic spatial inhomogeneities across the magnetic field and are comparable with or are above the electron temperature, is investigated numerically and analytically. The ion temperatures gradients across the magnetic field affect the instability development only when the inhomogeneous is the ion temperature along the magnetic field irrespective the inhomogeneity of the ion temperature across the magnetic field. In this case, the instability is developed due to the combined effect of the ion Landau damping, velocity shear, ion temperature anisotropy, and anisotropy of the ion temperature gradients. In the case when the ion temperature along the magnetic field is homogeneous, but the ion temperature across the magnetic field is inhomogeneous, the short wavelength instability develops with the wave length less than the thermal ion Larmor radius. This instability excites due to the coupled effect of the ion Landau damping, velocity shear and ion temperature anisotropy.

  6. The stability of dissipative magnetohydrodynamic shear flow in a parallel magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, J.; Knobloch, E.

    1985-01-01

    The linear stability properties of dissipative field-aligned shear flow are described analytically. The results are used to calculate the decay bounds of linearized perturbations occurring in unbounded planes of Couette flow in a parallel magnetic field. It is shown that the perturbations associated with small-amplitude localized disturbances may take the form of rolls along the shear, and exhibit ordinary potential decay, while misaligned perturbations exhibit enhanced decay in the presence of dissipation. A decay criterion is established for MHD shear flow in an accretion disk on the basis of the analytical results.

  7. Effects of a weakly 3-D equilibrium on ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hegna, C. C.

    2014-07-15

    The effect of a small three-dimensional equilibrium distortion on an otherwise axisymmetric configuration is shown to be destabilizing to ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes. The calculations assume that the 3-D fields are weak and that shielding physics is present so that no islands appear in the resulting equilibrium. An eigenfunction that has coupled harmonics of different toroidal mode number is constructed using a perturbation approach. The theory is applied to the case of tokamak H-modes with shielded resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) present indicating RMPs can be destabilizing to intermediate-n peeling-ballooning modes.

  8. Periodic Viscous Shear Heating Instability in Fine-Grained Shear Zones: Possible Mechanism for Intermediate Depth Earthquakes and Slow Earthquakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.

    2004-12-01

    Localized ductile shear zones with widths of cm to m are observed in exposures of Earth's shallow mantle (e.g., Kelemen & Dick JGR 95; Vissers et al. Tectonophys 95) and dredged from oceanic fracture zones (e.g., Jaroslow et al. Tectonophys 96). These are mylonitic (grain size 10 to 100 microns) and record mineral cooling temperatures from 1100 to 600 C. Pseudotachylites in a mantle shear zone show that shear heating temperatures can exceed the mantle solidus (e.g., Obata & Karato Tectonophys 95). Simple shear, recrystallization, and grain boundary sliding all decrease the spacing between pyroxenes, so olivine grain growth at lower stress is inhibited; thus, once formed, these shear zones do not "heal" on geological time scales. Reasoning that grain-size sensitive creep will be localized within these shear zones, rather than host rocks (grain size 1 to 10 mm), and inspired by the work of Whitehead & Gans (GJRAS 74), we thought these might undergo repeated shear heating instabilities. In this view, as elastic stress increases, the shear zone weakens via shear heating; rapid deformation of the weak shear zone releases most stored elastic stress; lower stress and strain rate coupled with diffusion of heat into host rocks leads to cooling and strengthening, after which the cycle repeats. We constructed a simple numerical model incorporating olivine flow laws for dislocation creep, diffusion creep, grain boundary sliding, and low T plasticity. We assumed that viscous deformation remains localized in shear zones, surrounded by host rocks undergoing elastic deformation. We fixed the velocity along one side of an elastic half space, and calculated stress due to elastic strain. This stress drives viscous deformation in a shear zone of specified width. Shear heating and thermal diffusion control temperature evolution in the shear zone and host rocks. A maximum of 1400 C (where substantial melting of peridotite would occur) is imposed. Grain size evolves during dislocation

  9. The Effect of "Wave Breakers" on the Magnetohydrodynamic Instability in Aluminum Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedcenko, Alex; Molokov, Sergei; Bardet, Benoit

    2017-02-01

    We report the results of the experiments on the suppression of the MHD instability in a model of the aluminum reduction cells (Pedchenko et al. in EPL 88:24001, 2009). The idea behind the study is to introduce obstacles in the liquid metal to suppress the propagation of the rolling-pad instability wave. As a result, in some configurations with obstacles, we detect lowering of the wave amplitude, reduction of its propagation speed, and rise of the main parameters' thresholds, responsible for the instability onset.

  10. Minimal model for zero-inertia instabilities in shear-dominated non-Newtonian flows.

    PubMed

    Boi, S; Mazzino, A; Pralits, J O

    2013-09-01

    The emergence of fluid instabilities in the relevant limit of vanishing fluid inertia (i.e., arbitrarily close to zero Reynolds number) has been investigated for the well-known Kolmogorov flow. The finite-time shear-induced order-disorder transition of the non-Newtonian microstructure and the corresponding viscosity change from lower to higher values are the crucial ingredients for the instabilities to emerge. The finite-time low-to-high viscosity change for increasing shear characterizes the rheopectic fluids. The instability does not emerge in shear-thinning or -thickening fluids where viscosity adjustment to local shear occurs instantaneously. The lack of instabilities arbitrarily close to zero Reynolds number is also observed for thixotropic fluids, in spite of the fact that the viscosity adjustment time to shear is finite as in rheopectic fluids. Renormalized perturbative expansions (multiple-scale expansions), energy-based arguments (on the linearized equations of motion), and numerical results (of suitable eigenvalue problems from the linear stability analysis) are the main tools leading to our conclusions. Our findings may have important consequences in all situations where purely hydrodynamic fluid instabilities or mixing are inhibited due to negligible inertia, as in microfluidic applications. To trigger mixing in these situations, suitable (not necessarily viscoelastic) non-Newtonian fluid solutions appear as a valid answer. Our results open interesting questions and challenges in the field of smart (fluid) materials.

  11. Shear flow instability generated by non-homogeneous external forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment has been designed and conducted in order to ascertain whether instability waves can be generated by nonhomogeneous forcing, using a biconvex vane located outside the mixing layer whose oscillation was induced by an electromagnetic shaker through a linkage. The vane was oscillated at 20 Hz, and the resulting spectra were computed by a spectrum analyzer. The data are judged to provide an example of instability waves generated solely through nonhomogeneous forcing.

  12. Influence of Velocity Shear on the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-16

    Agency and the O~ffice of Naval Research. 111 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 44 References Chandresekhar, S., Hydrodynamic and Hydromagnetic Stabililty (Int. Ser...recovered. However I , ’ 0 for V I 0 the velocity shear term is clearly stabilizing . 0 0 Moreover, the stabilizing influence is k dependent and we expect...Observations of the development of striations in large barium clouds, Planet. Space Sci., 22, 67, 1974. TDrazin, P.C., The stability of a shear layer in an

  13. Electrostatic drift-wave instability in a nonuniform quantum magnetoplasma with parallel velocity shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Tariq, Sabeen; Mirza, Arshad M.; Masood, W.

    2010-10-15

    The propagation of high and low frequency (in comparison with the cyclotron frequency) electrostatic drift-waves is investigated in a nonuniform, dense magnetoplasma (composed of electrons and ions), in the presence of parallel shear flow, by employing the quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model. Using QMHD model, a new set of equations is presented in order to investigate linear properties of electrostatic drift-waves with sheared plasma flows for dense plasmas. In this regard, dispersion relations for coupled electron-thermal and drift-ion acoustic modes are derived and several interesting limiting cases are discussed. For instance, it is found that sheared ion flow parallel to the external magnetic field can drive the quantum drift-ion acoustic wave unstable, etc. The present investigation may have relevance in dense astrophysical environments where quantum effects are significant.

  14. Electroconvective Instability in Flow-shear-induced Transport Barrier: Threshold for Stable Vortices and Chaotic Eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Han, Jongyoon

    2014-11-01

    Suppression of turbulence and transport by shear flow is a common process in plasma fluid dynamics, while it has been rarely observed in nonionized fluids. Here, we visualize this effect in microfluidic nonionized system with electroconvective instability (EC) initiated by ion concentration polarization on ion selective membrane. The membranes act as the source of both instability and flow shear (wall shear of Hagen-Poiseuille (HP) flow) simultaneously, fitting the requisite for this shear suppression effect; turbulence in the domain of flow shear. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first characterization of flow-shear-induced transport barrier in microfluidics, captured by scaling analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling. Selected by balancing flow shear and velocity fluctuation, which generated by HP flow and vortical EC, the threshold for shear suppression scales by EC thickness dec/ w < 0.618. Stable unidirectional EC occurs under the threshold, while chaotic EC occurs over the threshold by overcoming flow shear. It also has significant implications on the energy saving of electrochemical systems (e . g . electrodialysis) to prevent chaotic turbulences and corresponding energy dissipations. This work was supported by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Grant (DE-AR0000294).

  15. The influence of fast ions on the magnetohydrodynamic stability of negative shear profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Gimblett, C.G.; Hastie, R.J.; McClements, K.G.

    1997-06-01

    The influence of energetic ions on the stability of ideal double kink modes in a tokamak plasma with negative magnetic shear is investigated. It is found that the fast ions play a similar role as for the ordinary m=n=1 internal kink. In particular, phenomena analogous to sawtooth stabilization and fishbone excitation are possible.

  16. Neutrino magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Fernando; Pascoal, Kellen Alves; Mendonça, José Tito

    2016-01-15

    A new neutrino magnetohydrodynamics (NMHD) model is formulated, where the effects of the charged weak current on the electron-ion magnetohydrodynamic fluid are taken into account. The model incorporates in a systematic way the role of the Fermi neutrino weak force in magnetized plasmas. A fast neutrino-driven short wavelengths instability associated with the magnetosonic wave is derived. Such an instability should play a central role in strongly magnetized plasma as occurs in supernovae, where dense neutrino beams also exist. In addition, in the case of nonlinear or high frequency waves, the neutrino coupling is shown to be responsible for breaking the frozen-in magnetic field lines condition even in infinite conductivity plasmas. Simplified and ideal NMHD assumptions were adopted and analyzed in detail.

  17. Instability of Stratified Shear Flow: Intermittency and Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecke, Robert; Odier, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The stability of stratified shear flows which occur in oceanic overflows, wind-driven thermoclines, and atmospheric inversion layers is governed by the Richardson Number Ri , a non-dimensional balance between stabilizing stratification and destabilizing shear. For a shear flow with velocity difference U, density difference Δρ and characteristic length H, one has Ri = g (Δρ / ρ) H /U2 . A more precise definition is the gradient Richardson Number Rig =N2 /S2 where the buoyancy frequency N =√{ (g / ρ) ∂ρ / ∂z } , the mean strain S = ∂U / ∂z with z parallel to gravity and with ensemble or time averages defining the gradients. We explore the stability and mixing properties of a wall-bounded shear flow for 0 . 1 < Rig < 1 using simultaneous measurements of density and velocity fields. The flow, confined from the top by a horizontal boundary, is a lighter alcohol-water mixture injected from a nozzle into quiescent heavier salt-water fluid. The injected flow is turbulent with Taylor Reynolds number about 75. We compare a set of length scales that characterize the mixing properties of our turbulent stratified shear flow including Thorpe Length LT, Ozmidov Length LO, and Ellison Length LE.

  18. Role of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the evolution of magnetized relativistic sheared plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D.; Newman, William I.

    2013-04-01

    We explore, via analytical and numerical methods, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in relativistic magnetized plasmas, with applications to astrophysical jets. We solve the single-fluid relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations in conservative form using a scheme which is fourth order in space and time. To recover the primitive RMHD variables, we use a highly accurate, rapidly convergent algorithm which improves upon such schemes as the Newton-Raphson method. Although the exact RMHD equations are marginally stable, numerical discretization renders them unstable. We include numerical viscosity to restore numerical stability. In relativistic flows, diffusion can lead to a mathematical anomaly associated with frame transformations. However, in our KH studies, we remain in the rest frame of the system, and therefore do not encounter this anomaly. We use a two-dimensional slab geometry with periodic boundary conditions in both directions. The initial unperturbed velocity peaks along the central axis and vanishes asymptotically at the transverse boundaries. Remaining unperturbed quantities are uniform, with a flow-aligned unperturbed magnetic field. The early evolution in the nonlinear regime corresponds to the formation of counter-rotating vortices, connected by filaments, which persist in the absence of a magnetic field. A magnetic field inhibits the vortices through a series of stages, namely, field amplification, vortex disruption, turbulent breakdown, and an approach to a flow-aligned equilibrium configuration. Similar stages have been discussed in MHD literature. We examine how and to what extent these stages manifest in RMHD for a set of representative field strengths. To characterize field strength, we define a relativistic extension of the Alfvénic Mach number MA. We observe close complementarity between flow and magnetic field behavior. Weaker fields exhibit more vortex rotation, magnetic reconnection, jet broadening, and intermediate turbulence

  19. Finite-width currents, magnetic shear, and the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakshi, P.; Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.

    1983-01-01

    Our earlier results that non-local effects due to even a small magnetic shear produce a significant reduction of the growth rate of the ion cyclotron instability driven by a uniform current are now generalized to finite width currents. Externally prescribed as well as self-consistent shears are considered. If the current width Lc exceeds the shear length Ls, the previous results are recovered. Shear becomes less effective with reduction of Lc, and for typical parameters, the growth rate attains its (shearless) local value for Lc/Ls approximately less than 10 to the minus 2. Non-local effects of the finite current width itself come into play if Lc is further reduced to a few ion Larmor radii and can quench the instability. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28996

  20. Finite-width currents, magnetic shear, and the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakshi, P.; Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.

    1983-01-01

    Our earlier results that non-local effects due to even a small magnetic shear produce a significant reduction of the growth rate of the ion cyclotron instability driven by a uniform current are now generalized to finite width currents. Externally prescribed as well as self-consistent shears are considered. If the current width Lc exceeds the shear length Ls, the previous results are recovered. Shear becomes less effective with reduction of Lc, and for typical parameters, the growth rate attains its (shearless) local value for Lc/Ls approximately less than 10 to the minus 2. Non-local effects of the finite current width itself come into play if Lc is further reduced to a few ion Larmor radii and can quench the instability. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28996

  1. Nonlinear Interaction of Shear Alfven Waves with Gradient Driven Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, David William

    An experimental study of the interactions between gradient-driven instabilities (GDI) and beat waves driven between two Alfven waves is presented. A cylindrical density depletion is imposed on the otherwise uniform plasma in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) by selectively blocking the electron beam that produces the plasma. Coherent, single mode fluctuations in density, temperature, plasma potential, and magnetic field are observed to be unstable on the gradient. Measurements of the relative cross-phase between the density and potential fluctuations indicate that the fluctuations are not likely to drive significant cross field transport. Comparisons of the properties of the modes to theoretical predictions for Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and drift wave modes indicate that the fluctuations are likely to be a hybrid of the two instabilities. Analytic eigenmode solutions to the linearized Braginskii fluid equations using the experimentally measured gradient profiles support the conclusion that both instabilities are active. A beat wave between two driven Alfven waves is broadcast into the gradient region using a pair of loop antennas with independently controlled frequency and power. This beat wave is observed to resonantly drive the unstable mode, as well as a second otherwise stable mode slightly higher in frequency and azimuthal mode number. During the drive of the secondary stable mode, the growth of the primary instability is suppressed. The broadcast of the Alfven waves and the beat wave is also observed to drive other fluctuations in the plasma at frequencies higher than either the spontaneous instability or the second, stable mode. Both the resonant drive of the modes and the control of the mode number are observed to have non-linear threshold and saturation behavior.

  2. Dampening the asymmetric instability in pipe flow of shear thinning fluids using elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, David; Wen, Chaofan; Poole, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Recent experimental results have shown that the asymmetric flow of shear-thinning fluid through a cylindrical pipe, which was previously associated with the laminar-turbulent transition process, is actually a non-hysteretic and reversible, supercritical instability of the laminar base state. These experiments were performed using largely inelastic shear-thinning fluids (aqueous solutions of xanthan gum) and it was found that the greater the degree of shear-thinning the larger the magnitude of the asymmetry. In this talk we show that a viscoelastic fluid (an aqueous solution of high molecular weight polyacrylamide), with approximately the same shear-thinning characteristics as the inelastic fluid, does not exhibit the asymmetry when freshly mixed. However, once the elasticity of this fluid is degraded (by prolonged shearing) the asymmetry reappears. This suggests that the shear-thinning nature of the fluid causes the instability and the viscoelastic nature works to dampen the asymmetry. To test this hypothesis we add varyingly small amounts of polyacrylamide to xanthan gum solutions and find an inverse relationship between viscoelasticity and the magnitude of the asymmetry, although the Reynolds number at which the instability is first observed stays approximately constant.

  3. Kelvin-Helmholtz versus Hall magnetoshear instability in astrophysical flows.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Daniel O; Bejarano, Cecilia; Mininni, Pablo D

    2014-05-01

    We study the stability of shear flows in a fully ionized plasma. Kelvin-Helmholtz is a well-known macroscopic and ideal shear-driven instability. In sufficiently low-density plasmas, also the microscopic Hall magnetoshear instability can take place. We performed three-dimensional simulations of the Hall-magnetohydrodynamic equations where these two instabilities are present, and carried out a comparative study. We find that when the shear flow is so intense that its vorticity surpasses the ion-cyclotron frequency of the plasma, the Hall magnetoshear instability is not only non-negligible, but it actually displays growth rates larger than those of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  4. A novel low inertia shear flow instability triggered by a chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghelea, Teodor; Wielage-Burchard, Kerstin; Frigaard, Ian; Martinez, D. Mark; Feng, James J.

    2007-08-01

    We present an experimental investigation of a novel low Reynolds number shear flow instability triggered by a chemical reaction. An acid-base reaction taking place at the interface between a Newtonian fluid and carbopol-940 solution leads to a strong viscosity stratification, which locally destabilizes the flow. Our experimental observations are made in the context of a miscible displacement flow, for which the flow instability promotes local mixing and subsequently improves the displacement efficiency. The experimental study is complemented by a simplified normal mode analysis to shed light on the origin of the instability.

  5. Electron Velocity Shear Instability in the Auroral Ionosphere.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-25

    an active auroral arc, J. Geophys. Res. 82, 2349, 1977. Chandrasekhar, S., Hydrodynamic and Hydromagnetic Stability , Clarendon Press, Oxford, England... stabilizing influence (iikhailovskii and Rukhadze, 1966). Moreover, the density gradient is most effective in stabilizing the instability when a2 >> 1 (i.e...w2 >> f22) anda pe e kyLn << 1. The latter condition indicates that the density gradient acts to stabilize long wavelength modes before short

  6. ROSSBY WAVE INSTABILITY AT DEAD ZONE BOUNDARIES IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL RESISTIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL GLOBAL MODELS OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lyra, Wladimir; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org

    2012-09-01

    It has been suggested that the transition between magnetorotationally active and dead zones in protoplanetary disks should be prone to the excitation of vortices via Rossby wave instability (RWI). However, the only numerical evidence for this has come from alpha disk models, where the magnetic field evolution is not followed, and the effect of turbulence is parameterized by Laplacian viscosity. We aim to establish the phenomenology of the flow in the transition in three-dimensional resistive-magnetohydrodynamical models. We model the transition by a sharp jump in resistivity, as expected in the inner dead zone boundary, using the PENCIL CODE to simulate the flow. We find that vortices are readily excited in the dead side of the transition. We measure the mass accretion rate finding similar levels of Reynolds stress at the dead and active zones, at the {alpha} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -2} level. The vortex sits in a pressure maximum and does not migrate, surviving until the end of the simulation. A pressure maximum in the active zone also triggers the RWI. The magnetized vortex that results should be disrupted by parasitical magneto-elliptic instabilities, yet it subsists in high resolution. This suggests that either the parasitic modes are still numerically damped or that the RWI supplies vorticity faster than they can destroy it. We conclude that the resistive transition between the active and dead zones in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, if sharp enough, can indeed excite vortices via RWI. Our results lend credence to previous works that relied on the alpha-disk approximation, and caution against the use of overly reduced azimuthal coverage on modeling this transition.

  7. Suppression of drift wave instability due to sheared field-aligned flow and negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiki, Ryuta; Hayashi, Kenichiro; Kaneko, Toshiro; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2006-10-01

    Sheared field-aligned plasma flow is a significant topic in space/circumterrestrial plasmas. Taking into account negative ions or dust grains will make the space plasma physics more general and accurate. Using the QT-Upgrade Machine, we have conducted laboratory experiments to examine negative ion effects on shear-modified drift waves. Field-aligned K^+ ion flow and its shear strength are controlled with a concentrically segmented W hot plate. Negative ions SF6^- are produced by introducing SF6 gas in the plasma. The drift wave shows a gradual monotonic decrease in amplitude as the shear strength is increased from zero. However, as the shear strength is decreased from zero to negative values, the amplitude increases up to a certain shear strength and rapidly decreases after the peaking. The negative ion introduction, in general, suppresses this instability while retaining the dependence of the amplitude on the shear. These wave characteristics are interpreted using the theories of current-driven (kinetic) and of D’Angelo (fluid) instabilities.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamical simulation of the formation of clumps and filaments in quiescent diffuse medium by thermal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wareing, C. J.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Van Loo, S.

    2016-06-01

    We have used the adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic code, MG, to perform idealized 3D magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the formation of clumpy and filamentary structure in a thermally unstable medium without turbulence. A stationary thermally unstable spherical diffuse atomic cloud with uniform density in pressure equilibrium with low density surroundings was seeded with random density variations and allowed to evolve. A range of magnetic field strengths threading the cloud have been explored, from β = 0.1 to 1.0 to the zero magnetic field case (β = ∞), where β is the ratio of thermal pressure to magnetic pressure. Once the density inhomogeneities had developed to the point where gravity started to become important, self-gravity was introduced to the simulation. With no magnetic field, clouds and clumps form within the cloud with aspect ratios of around unity, whereas in the presence of a relatively strong field (β = 0.1) these become filaments, then evolve into interconnected corrugated sheets that are predominantly perpendicular to the magnetic field. With magnetic and thermal pressure equality (β = 1.0), filaments, clouds and clumps are formed. At any particular instant, the projection of the 3D structure on to a plane parallel to the magnetic field, i.e. a line of sight perpendicular to the magnetic field, resembles the appearance of filamentary molecular clouds. The filament densities, widths, velocity dispersions and temperatures resemble those observed in molecular clouds. In contrast, in the strong field case β = 0.1, projection of the 3D structure along a line of sight parallel to the magnetic field reveals a remarkably uniform structure.

  9. Comprehensive magnetohydrodynamic hybrid simulations of fast ion driven instabilities in a Large Helical Device experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todo, Y.; Seki, R.; Spong, D. A.; Wang, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Yamamoto, S.; Nakajima, N.; Osakabe, M.

    2017-08-01

    Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) destabilized by the neutral beam injection (NBI) in a Large Helical Device experiment are investigated using multi-phase magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid simulation, which is a combination of classical and MHD hybrid simulations for fast ions. The fast ion distribution is simulated with NBI, collisions, and losses in the equilibrium magnetic field in the classical simulation, while the MHD hybrid simulation takes account of the interaction between fast ions and an MHD fluid, in addition to the classical dynamics. It is found in the multi-phase hybrid simulation that the stored fast ion energy is saturated due to the interaction with AEs at a lower level than that of the classical simulation. Two groups of AEs with frequencies close to those observed in the experiment are destabilized alternately at each hybrid simulation. Firstly destabilized are two toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes whose frequency is close to the local minimum of the upper Alfvén continuous spectrum. Secondly destabilized is a global Alfvén eigenmode whose frequency is located well inside the Alfvén continuous spectrum gap. In addition, two AEs whose frequencies are close to that of the ellipticity-induced Alfvén eigenmode are observed with a lower amplitude. When the hybrid simulation is run continuously, the interchange mode grows more slowly than the AEs, but becomes dominant in the long time scale. The interchange mode oscillates with a constant amplitude and a frequency of ˜1 kHz. The interchange mode reduces the stored fast ion energy to a lower level than that of the AEs.

  10. Study of micro-instabilities in toroidal plasmas with negative magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, J.Q.; Zhang, Y.Z.; Mahajan, S.M.; Guzdar, P.N.

    1996-03-01

    The micro-instabilities driven by a parallel velocity shear, and a temperature gradient of ions are studied in toroidal plasmas with negative magnetic shear. Both the fluid and the gyro-kinetic formulations are investigated. It is found that for a broad range of parameters, the linear growth rates of the modes are lower, and the threshold temperature gradient {eta}{sub icr} is higher for plasmas with negative magnetic shear compared to plasmas with positive magnetic shear of equal magnitude. The reduction in the growth rate (with negative shear), although not insignificant, does not seem to be enough to account for the dramatic improvement in the confinement observed experimentally. Other possible physical mechanisms for the improved confinement are discussed.

  11. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of magnetohydrodynamic waves propagating on solar surges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Chandra, R.; Srivastava, A. K.; Mishonov, T.

    2015-04-01

    In the present paper, we study the evolutionary conditions for Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in a high-temperature solar surge observed in NOAA AR 11271 using the Solar Dynamics Observatory data on 2011 August 25. The jet with speed of ≈100 km s-1, width of 7 Mm, and electron number density of 4.17×109 cm-3 is assumed to be confined in an untwisted/twisted magnetic flux tube with magnetic field of 10 G. The temperature of the plasma flow is 2×106 K while that of its environment, according to the observational data, is of the order of 106 K. The electron number density of surrounding magnetized plasma is evaluated to be equal to 1.15×109 cm-3. Under these conditions, the Alfvén speed inside the flux tube is 337.6 km s-1, the sound speed is around 166 km s-1, while these characteristic speeds of the environment are ≅719 km s-1 and ≅117 km s-1, respectively. We study the propagation of normal MHD modes in the flux tube considering the two cases, notably of untwisted magnetic flux tube and the twisted one. The numerical solution to the dispersion relation shows that the kink ( m=1) wave traveling in an untwisted flux tube becomes unstable if the jet speed exceeds 1060 km s-1—a speed which is inaccessible for solar surges. A weak twist (the ratio of azimuthal to longitudinal magnetic field component) of the internal magnetic field in the range of 0.025-0.2 does not change substantially the critical flow velocity. Thus, one implies that, in general, the kink mode is stable against the KH instability. It turns out, however, that the m=-2 and m=-3 MHD modes can become unstable when the twist parameter has values between 0.2 and 0.4. Therefore, the corresponding critical jet speed for instability onset lies in the range of 93.5-99.3 km s-1. The instability wave growth rate, depending on the value of the wavelength, is of the order of several dozen inverse milliseconds. It remains to be seen whether these predictions will be observationally validated in

  12. Nonlinear Instability of a Uni-directional Transversely Sheared Mean Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.; Goldstein, Marvin E.

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that the presence of a weak cross flow in an otherwise two-dimensional shear flow results in a spanwise variation in the mean streamwise velocity profile that can lead to an amplification of certain three-dimensional disturbances through a kind of resonant-interaction mechanism (Goldstein and Wundrow 1994). The spatial evolution of an initially linear, finite-growth-rate, instability wave in such a spanwise-varying shear flow is considered, The base flow, which is governed by the three-dimensional parabolized Navier-Stokes equations, is initiated by imposing a spanwise- periodic cross-flow velocity on an otherwise two-dimensional shear flow at some fixed streamwise location. The resulting mean-flow distortion initially grows with increasing streamwise distance, reaches a maximum and eventually decays through the action of viscosity. This decay, which coincides with the viscous spread of of the shear layer, means that the local growth rate of the instability wave will eventually decrease as the wave propagates downstream. Nonlinear effects can then become important within a thin spanwise-modulated critical layer once the local instability-wave amplitude and growth rate become sufficiently large and small, respectively. The amplitude equation that describes this stage of evolution is shown to be a generalization of the one obtained by Goldstein and Choi (1989) who considered the related problem of the interaction of two oblique modes in a two-dimensional shear layer.

  13. Interchange and Flow Velocity Shear Instabilities in the Presence of Finite Larmor Radius Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Mishin, E.; Genoni, T.; Rose, D.; Mehlhorn, T.

    2014-09-01

    Ionospheric irregularities cause scintillations of electromagnetic signals that can severely affect navigation and transionospheric communication, in particular during Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs) events. However, the existing ionospheric models do not describe density irregularities with typical scales of several ion Larmor radii that affect UHF and L bands. These irregularities can be produced in the process of nonlinear evolution of interchange or flow velocity shear instabilities. The model of nonlinear development of these instabilities based on two-fluid hydrodynamic description with inclusion of finite Larmor radius effects will be presented. The derived nonlinear equations will be numerically solved by using the code Flute, which was originally developed for High Energy Density applications and modified to describe interchange and flow velocity shear instabilities in the ionosphere. The high-resolution simulations will be driven by the ambient conditions corresponding to the AFRL C/NOFS satellite low-resolution data during EPBs.

  14. Influence of velocity shear on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Guzdar, P.N.; Satyanarayana, P.; Huba, J.D.; Ossakow, S.L.

    1981-12-16

    The influence of a transverse velocity shear on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated. It is found that a sheared velocity flow can substantially reduce the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the short wavelength regime (i.e., kL > 1 where L is the scale length of the density inhomogeneity), and causes the growth rate to maximize at kL < 1.0. Applications of this result to ionospheric phenomena (equatorial spread F (ESF) and ionospheric plasma clouds) are discussed. In particular, the effect of shear could account for, at times, the 100's of km modulation observed on the bottomside of the ESF ionosphere and the km scale size wavelengths observed in barium cloud prompt striation phenomena.

  15. Introduction to Modern Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    Preface; Table of physical quantities; Part I. Foundations: 1. Introduction; 2. Magnetohydrodynamics; 3. Conservation laws; Part II. Fundamental Processes: 4. Magnetohydrodynamic waves; 5. Dynamo; 6. Discontinuities and shocks; 7. Magnetic reconnection; Part III. Instabilities and Magnetic Confinement: 8. Static equilibrium; 9. Linear perturbation theory; 10. Study of MHD instabilities; Part IV. Turbulence: 11. Hydrodynamic turbulence; 12. MHD turbulence; 13. Advanced MHD turbulence; Appendix 1. Solutions to the exercises; Appendix 2. Formulary; References; Index.

  16. Nonlinear shearing modes approach to the diocotron instability of a planar electron strip

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. V. Mikhailenko, V. S.; Jo, Younghyun; Lee, Hae June

    2015-09-15

    The nonlinear evolution of the diocotron instability of a planar electron strip is investigated analytically by means of the nonlinear shearing mode for the solution of the initial and boundary value problems. The method is based on the sheared spatial coordinates which account for the motion of electron flow in the electrostatic field of the unstable diocotron modes in addition to the unperturbed sheared motion of the electron flow on the transformed shear coordinates. The time evolutions are studied by the solution of the initial and boundary value problems. The obtained solutions for the perturbed electrostatic potential include two nonlinear effects—the effect of the distortion of the boundaries of the planar electron strip and the effect of the coupling of the sheared nonmodal diocotron modes. It was proved by a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation that the developed theory is valid as long as the distortion of the boundaries of the basic shear flow does not change the frequency and growth rate of the linear diocotron instability in the transformed coordinates.

  17. Magnetorotational instability: nonmodal growth and the relationship of global modes to the shearing box

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2014-12-10

    We study magnetorotational instability (MRI) using nonmodal stability techniques. Despite the spectral instability of many forms of MRI, this proves to be a natural method of analysis that is well-suited to deal with the non-self-adjoint nature of the linear MRI equations. We find that the fastest growing linear MRI structures on both local and global domains can look very different from the eigenmodes, invariably resembling waves shearing with the background flow (shear waves). In addition, such structures can grow many times faster than the least stable eigenmode over long time periods, and be localized in a completely different region of space. These ideas lead—for both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes—to a natural connection between the global MRI and the local shearing box approximation. By illustrating that the fastest growing global structure is well described by the ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing a single shear wave, we find that the shearing box is a very sensible approximation for the linear MRI, contrary to many previous claims. Since the shear wave ODEs are most naturally understood using nonmodal analysis techniques, we conclude by analyzing local MRI growth over finite timescales using these methods. The strong growth over a wide range of wave-numbers suggests that nonmodal linear physics could be of fundamental importance in MRI turbulence.

  18. Magnetorotational Instability: Nonmodal Growth and the Relationship of Global Modes to the Shearing Box

    SciTech Connect

    J Squire, A Bhattacharjee

    2014-07-01

    We study the magnetorotational instability (MRI) (Balbus & Hawley 1998) using non-modal stability techniques.Despite the spectral instability of many forms of the MRI, this proves to be a natural method of analysis that is well-suited to deal with the non-self-adjoint nature of the linear MRI equations. We find that the fastest growing linear MRI structures on both local and global domains can look very diff erent to the eigenmodes, invariably resembling waves shearing with the background flow (shear waves). In addition, such structures can grow many times faster than the least stable eigenmode over long time periods, and be localized in a completely di fferent region of space. These ideas lead – for both axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes – to a natural connection between the global MRI and the local shearing box approximation. By illustrating that the fastest growing global structure is well described by the ordinary diff erential equations (ODEs) governing a single shear wave, we find that the shearing box is a very sensible approximation for the linear MRI, contrary to many previous claims. Since the shear wave ODEs are most naturally understood using non-modal analysis techniques, we conclude by analyzing local MRI growth over finite time-scales using these methods. The strong growth over a wide range of wave-numbers suggests that non-modal linear physics could be of fundamental importance in MRI turbulence (Squire & Bhattacharjee 2014).

  19. New instability modes for bounded, free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, Michele G.; Streett, Craig L.

    1989-01-01

    A class of highly amplified supersonic disturbances are found for high-speed, bounded mixing layers at high values of streamwise wavenumber. Their amplification is an order of magnitude greater than the most amplified modes, which occur at 60-65 deg at low streamwise wavenumber. These disturbances are stabilized by increasing Mach number, viscosity, and sweep; however, the effect of sweep on the most amplified mode is not significant until the wave propagation angle reaches 30 deg. The maximum growth rate of the unstable disturbances decreases as the temperature of the higher Mach number stream is increased. The structure of these disturbances is such that the phase speed with respect to the mean flow is subsonic in a small region in the center of the shear layer, and supersonic on either side of this region.

  20. Instability analysis and free volume simulations of shear band directions and arrangements in notched metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2016-10-10

    As a commonly used method to enhance the ductility in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), the introduction of geometric constraints blocks and confines the propagation of the shear bands, reduces the degree of plastic strain on each shear band so that the catastrophic failure is prevented or delayed, and promotes the formation of multiple shear bands. The clustering of multiple shear bands near notches is often interpreted as the reason for improved ductility. Experimental works on the shear band arrangements in notched metallic glasses have been extensively carried out, but a systematic theoretical study is lacking. Using instability theory that predicts the onset of strain localization and the free-volume- based nite element simulations that predict the evolution of shear bands, this work reveals various categories of shear band arrangements in double edge notched BMGs with respect to the mode mixity of the applied stress fields. In conclusion, a mechanistic explanation is thus provided to a number of related experiments and especially the correlation between various types of shear bands and the stress state.

  1. Instability Analysis and Free Volume Simulations of Shear Band Directions and Arrangements in Notched Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2016-10-01

    As a commonly used method to enhance the ductility in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), the introduction of geometric constraints blocks and confines the propagation of the shear bands, reduces the degree of plastic strain on each shear band so that the catastrophic failure is prevented or delayed, and promotes the formation of multiple shear bands. The clustering of multiple shear bands near notches is often interpreted as the reason for improved ductility. Experimental works on the shear band arrangements in notched metallic glasses have been extensively carried out, but a systematic theoretical study is lacking. Using instability theory that predicts the onset of strain localization and the free-volume-based finite element simulations that predict the evolution of shear bands, this work reveals various categories of shear band arrangements in double edge notched BMGs with respect to the mode mixity of the applied stress fields. A mechanistic explanation is thus provided to a number of related experiments and especially the correlation between various types of shear bands and the stress state.

  2. Instability analysis and free volume simulations of shear band directions and arrangements in notched metallic glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2016-10-10

    As a commonly used method to enhance the ductility in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), the introduction of geometric constraints blocks and confines the propagation of the shear bands, reduces the degree of plastic strain on each shear band so that the catastrophic failure is prevented or delayed, and promotes the formation of multiple shear bands. The clustering of multiple shear bands near notches is often interpreted as the reason for improved ductility. Experimental works on the shear band arrangements in notched metallic glasses have been extensively carried out, but a systematic theoretical study is lacking. Using instability theory that predictsmore » the onset of strain localization and the free-volume- based nite element simulations that predict the evolution of shear bands, this work reveals various categories of shear band arrangements in double edge notched BMGs with respect to the mode mixity of the applied stress fields. In conclusion, a mechanistic explanation is thus provided to a number of related experiments and especially the correlation between various types of shear bands and the stress state.« less

  3. Instability Analysis and Free Volume Simulations of Shear Band Directions and Arrangements in Notched Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidong; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    As a commonly used method to enhance the ductility in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), the introduction of geometric constraints blocks and confines the propagation of the shear bands, reduces the degree of plastic strain on each shear band so that the catastrophic failure is prevented or delayed, and promotes the formation of multiple shear bands. The clustering of multiple shear bands near notches is often interpreted as the reason for improved ductility. Experimental works on the shear band arrangements in notched metallic glasses have been extensively carried out, but a systematic theoretical study is lacking. Using instability theory that predicts the onset of strain localization and the free-volume-based finite element simulations that predict the evolution of shear bands, this work reveals various categories of shear band arrangements in double edge notched BMGs with respect to the mode mixity of the applied stress fields. A mechanistic explanation is thus provided to a number of related experiments and especially the correlation between various types of shear bands and the stress state. PMID:27721462

  4. The radiation of sound by the instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Morris, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of acoustic radiation generated by instability waves of a compressible plane turbulent shear layer is solved. The solution provided is valid up to the acoustic far-field region. It represents a significant improvement over the solution obtained by classical hydrodynamic-stability theory which is essentially a local solution with the acoustic radiation suppressed. The basic instability-wave solution which is valid in the shear layer and the near-field region is constructed in terms of an asymptotic expansion using the method of multiple scales. This solution accounts for the effects of the slightly divergent mean flow. It is shown that the multiple-scales asymptotic expansion is not uniformly valid far from the shear layer. Continuation of this solution into the entire upper half-plane is described. The extended solution enables the near- and far-field pressure fluctuations associated with the instability wave to be determined. Numerical results show that the directivity pattern of acoustic radiation into the stationary medium peaks at 20 degrees to the axis of the shear layer in the downstream direction for supersonic flows. This agrees qualitatively with the observed noise-directivity patterns of supersonic jets.

  5. Comparison of kinetic and extended magnetohydrodynamics computational models for the linear ion temperature gradient instability in slab geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnack, D. D.; Cheng, J.; Barnes, D. C.; Parker, S. E.

    2013-06-01

    We perform linear stability studies of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability in unsheared slab geometry using kinetic and extended magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models, in the regime k∥/k⊥≪1. The ITG is a parallel (to B) sound wave that may be destabilized by finite ion Larmor radius (FLR) effects in the presence of a gradient in the equilibrium ion temperature. The ITG is stable in both ideal and resistive MHD; for a given temperature scale length LTi0, instability requires that either k⊥ρi or ρi/LTi0 be sufficiently large. Kinetic models capture FLR effects to all orders in either parameter. In the extended MHD model, these effects are captured only to lowest order by means of the Braginskii ion gyro-viscous stress tensor and the ion diamagnetic heat flux. We present the linear electrostatic dispersion relations for the ITG for both kinetic Vlasov and extended MHD (two-fluid) models in the local approximation. In the low frequency fluid regime, these reduce to the same cubic equation for the complex eigenvalue ω =ωr+iγ. An explicit solution is derived for the growth rate and real frequency in this regime. These are found to depend on a single non-dimensional parameter. We also compute the eigenvalues and the eigenfunctions with the extended MHD code NIMROD, and a hybrid kinetic δf code that assumes six-dimensional Vlasov ions and isothermal fluid electrons, as functions of k⊥ρi and ρi/LTi0 using a spatially dependent equilibrium. These solutions are compared with each other, and with the predictions of the local kinetic and fluid dispersion relations. Kinetic and fluid calculations agree well at and near the marginal stability point, but diverge as k⊥ρi or ρi/LTi0 increases. There is good qualitative agreement between the models for the shape of the unstable global eigenfunction for LTi0/ρi=30 and 20. The results quantify how far fluid calculations can be extended accurately into the kinetic regime. We conclude that for the linear ITG

  6. Dynamical instability of shear-free collapsing star in extended teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawad, Abdul; Rani, Shamaila

    2015-11-01

    We study the spherically symmetric collapsing star in terms of dynamical instability. We take the framework of extended teleparallel gravity with a non-diagonal tetrad, a power-law form of the model presenting torsion and a matter distribution as a non-dissipative anisotropic fluid. The vanishing shear scalar condition is adopted to gain insight in a collapsing star. We apply a first order linear perturbation scheme to the metric, the matter, and f( T) functions. The dynamical equations are formulated under this perturbation scheme to develop collapsing equation for finding dynamical instability limits in two regimes, such as the Newtonian and the post-Newtonian regime. We obtain a constraint-free solution of a perturbed time dependent part with the help of a vanishing shear scalar. The adiabatic index exhibits the instability ranges through the second dynamical equation which depend on physical quantities such as the density, the pressure components, the perturbed parts of the symmetry of the star, etc. We also develop some constraints on the positivity of these quantities and obtain instability ranges to satisfy the dynamical instability condition.

  7. Localization and instability in sheared granular materials: Role of friction and vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Konik R.; Elbanna, Ahmed E.

    2017-02-01

    Shear banding and stick-slip instabilities have been long observed in sheared granular materials. Yet, their microscopic underpinnings, interdependencies, and variability under different loading conditions have not been fully explored. Here we use a nonequilibrium thermodynamics model, the Shear Transformation Zone theory, to investigate the dynamics of strain localization and its connection to stability of sliding in sheared, dry, granular materials. We consider frictional and frictionless grains as well as the presence and absence of acoustic vibrations. Our results suggest that at low and intermediate strain rates, persistent shear bands develop only in the absence of vibrations. Vibrations tend to fluidize the granular network and delocalize slip at these rates. Stick-slip is observed only for frictional grains, and it is confined to the shear band. At high strain rates, stick-slip disappears and the different systems exhibit similar stress-slip response. Changing the vibration intensity, duration or time of application alters the system response and may cause long-lasting rheological changes. We analyze these observations in terms of possible transitions between rate strengthening and rate weakening response facilitated by a competition between shear-induced dilation and vibration-induced compaction. We discuss the implications of our results on dynamic triggering, quiescence, and strength evolution in gouge-filled fault zones.

  8. Localization and instability in sheared granular materials: Role of friction and vibration.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Konik R; Elbanna, Ahmed E

    2017-02-01

    Shear banding and stick-slip instabilities have been long observed in sheared granular materials. Yet, their microscopic underpinnings, interdependencies, and variability under different loading conditions have not been fully explored. Here we use a nonequilibrium thermodynamics model, the Shear Transformation Zone theory, to investigate the dynamics of strain localization and its connection to stability of sliding in sheared, dry, granular materials. We consider frictional and frictionless grains as well as the presence and absence of acoustic vibrations. Our results suggest that at low and intermediate strain rates, persistent shear bands develop only in the absence of vibrations. Vibrations tend to fluidize the granular network and delocalize slip at these rates. Stick-slip is observed only for frictional grains, and it is confined to the shear band. At high strain rates, stick-slip disappears and the different systems exhibit similar stress-slip response. Changing the vibration intensity, duration or time of application alters the system response and may cause long-lasting rheological changes. We analyze these observations in terms of possible transitions between rate strengthening and rate weakening response facilitated by a competition between shear-induced dilation and vibration-induced compaction. We discuss the implications of our results on dynamic triggering, quiescence, and strength evolution in gouge-filled fault zones.

  9. Role of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the evolution of magnetized relativistic sheared plasma flows.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D; Newman, William I

    2013-04-01

    We explore, via analytical and numerical methods, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in relativistic magnetized plasmas, with applications to astrophysical jets. We solve the single-fluid relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations in conservative form using a scheme which is fourth order in space and time. To recover the primitive RMHD variables, we use a highly accurate, rapidly convergent algorithm which improves upon such schemes as the Newton-Raphson method. Although the exact RMHD equations are marginally stable, numerical discretization renders them unstable. We include numerical viscosity to restore numerical stability. In relativistic flows, diffusion can lead to a mathematical anomaly associated with frame transformations. However, in our KH studies, we remain in the rest frame of the system, and therefore do not encounter this anomaly. We use a two-dimensional slab geometry with periodic boundary conditions in both directions. The initial unperturbed velocity peaks along the central axis and vanishes asymptotically at the transverse boundaries. Remaining unperturbed quantities are uniform, with a flow-aligned unperturbed magnetic field. The early evolution in the nonlinear regime corresponds to the formation of counter-rotating vortices, connected by filaments, which persist in the absence of a magnetic field. A magnetic field inhibits the vortices through a series of stages, namely, field amplification, vortex disruption, turbulent breakdown, and an approach to a flow-aligned equilibrium configuration. Similar stages have been discussed in MHD literature. We examine how and to what extent these stages manifest in RMHD for a set of representative field strengths. To characterize field strength, we define a relativistic extension of the Alfvénic Mach number M(A). We observe close complementarity between flow and magnetic field behavior. Weaker fields exhibit more vortex rotation, magnetic reconnection, jet broadening, and intermediate turbulence

  10. Shear flow instability in a partially-ionized plasma sheath around a fast-moving vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, V. I.; Mudaliar, S.; Genoni, T. C.; Rose, D. V.; Oliver, B. V.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2011-06-15

    The stability of ion acoustic waves in a sheared-flow, partially-ionized compressible plasma sheath around a fast-moving vehicle in the upper atmosphere, is described and evaluated for different flow profiles. In a compressible plasma with shear flow, instability occurs for any velocity profile, not just for profiles with an inflection point. A second-order differential equation for the electrostatic potential of excited ion acoustic waves in the presence of electron and ion collisions with neutrals is derived and solved numerically using a shooting method with boundary conditions appropriate for a finite thickness sheath in contact with the vehicle. We consider three different velocity flow profiles and find that in all cases that neutral collisions can completely suppress the instability.

  11. A Pure Hydrodynamic Instability in Shear Flows and Its Application to Astrophysical Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Sujit Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-10-01

    We provide a possible resolution for the century-old problem of hydrodynamic shear flows, which are apparently stable in linear analysis but shown to be turbulent in astrophysically observed data and experiments. This mismatch is noticed in a variety of systems, from laboratory to astrophysical flows. There are so many uncountable attempts made so far to resolve this mismatch, beginning with the early work of Kelvin, Rayleigh, and Reynolds toward the end of the nineteenth century. Here we show that the presence of stochastic noise, whose inevitable presence should not be neglected in the stability analysis of shear flows, leads to pure hydrodynamic linear instability therein. This explains the origin of turbulence, which has been observed/interpreted in astrophysical accretion disks, laboratory experiments, and direct numerical simulations. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first solution to the long-standing problem of hydrodynamic instability of Rayleigh-stable flows.

  12. 2D instabilities of surface gravity waves on a linear shear current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francius, Marc; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Periodic 2D surface water waves propagating steadily on a rotational current have been studied by many authors (see [1] and references therein). Although the recent important theoretical developments have confirmed that periodic waves can exist over flows with arbitrary vorticity, their stability and their nonlinear evolution have not been much studied extensively so far. In fact, even in the rather simple case of uniform vorticity (linear shear), few papers have been published on the effect of a vertical shear current on the side-band instability of a uniform wave train over finite depth. In most of these studies [2-5], asymptotic expansions and multiple scales method have been used to obtain envelope evolution equations, which allow eventually to formulate a condition of (linear) instability to long modulational perturbations. It is noted here that this instability is often referred in the literature as the Benjamin-Feir or modulational instability. In the present study, we consider the linear stability of finite amplitude two-dimensional, periodic water waves propagating steadily on the free surface of a fluid with constant vorticity and finite depth. First, the steadily propagating surface waves are computed with steepness up to very close to the highest, using a Fourier series expansions and a collocation method, which constitutes a simple extension of Fenton's method [6] to the cases with a linear shear current. Then, the linear stability of these permanent waves to infinitesimal 2D perturbations is developed from the fully nonlinear equations in the framework of normal modes analysis. This linear stability analysis is an extension of [7] to the case of waves in the presence of a linear shear current and permits the determination of the dominant instability as a function of depth and vorticity for a given steepness. The numerical results are used to assess the accuracy of the vor-NLS equation derived in [5] for the characteristics of modulational

  13. Cloud formation by combined instabilities in galactic gas layers - Evidence for a Q threshold in the fragmentation of shearing wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    1991-09-01

    The growth of shearing wavelets in thick galactic gas disks is studied, including the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability perpendicular to the plane, various degrees of thermal instability, and the gravitational instability. Growth rates are calculated numerically for a wide range of parameter values, giving an effective dispersion relation and mass distribution function, and an approximate dispersion relation is derived analytically for the epoch of peak growth. An extensive coverage of parameter space illustrates the relative insensitivity of the gaseous shear instability to the axisymmetric stability parameter Q. The fragmentation of shearing wavelets by self-gravitational collapse parallel to the wave crest is also considered. Such fragmentation is sensitive to Q, requiring Q equal to or less than 1-2 for the growth of parallel perturbations to overcome shear inside the wavelet. Fragmentation instabilities may provide the link between shear instabilities and the formation of individual clouds. They are much more sensitive to Q than shear instabilities, and may regulate star formation so that Q approximately equals 1.

  14. Internal Waves and Shear Instability in the Southern Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovatsky, I.; Wijesekera, H. W.; Jarosz, E.; Teague, W. J.; Lilover, M. J.; Pirro, A.; Centurioni, L.; Silver, Z.; Fernando, H. J.

    2016-02-01

    Recent measurements in the southern Bay of Bengal (BoB) conducted in July 2014 as a part of the ASIRI-EBOB program facilitated by the US Office of Naval Research, shed light on basic characteristics of high-frequency internal waves in the upper pycnocline and corresponding velocity structure affected by episodic events of shear instability. A 20 hour series of CTD, ADCP, and acoustic backscatter profiles (down to 150 m) plus temporal CTD measurements at z = 54 m in the pycnocline were taken at the northeastern periphery of the cold Sri Lanka Dome (evident from satellite images and drifter trajectories). Quasi-harmonic internal waves with periods ranged from 10 to 40 min were registered at all depths below a shallow ( 20 - 30 m) surface mixed layer in the background of a 10 m amplitude internal tide. Periodic (about every 6 hr) increase/decrease of the wave kinetic energy links it to the tidal motions. Vertical displacements associated with high-frequency waves followed the Weibull distribution with the median value 2.3 m and a 95% quintile 6.5 m. Sporadic appearance of high-amplitude (> 5 m) vertical displacements mainly coincided with patches of low Richardson number, pointing to local shear instability as possible mechanism of internal-wave induced turbulence. However, the probability of shear instability in the summer BoB pycnocline is relatively low, not exceeding 5% for Ri < 0.25 and 35% for Ri < 1.

  15. Local parametric instability near elliptic points in vortex flows under shear deformation.

    PubMed

    Koshel, Konstantin V; Ryzhov, Eugene A

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of two point vortices embedded in an oscillatory external flow consisted of shear and rotational components is addressed. The region associated with steady-state elliptic points of the vortex motion is established to experience local parametric instability. The instability forces the point vortices with initial positions corresponding to the steady-state elliptic points to move in spiral-like divergent trajectories. This divergent motion continues until the nonlinear effects suppress their motion near the region associated with the steady-state separatrices. The local parametric instability is then demonstrated not to contribute considerably to enhancing the size of the chaotic motion regions. Instead, the size of the chaotic motion region mostly depends on overlaps of the nonlinear resonances emerging in the perturbed system.

  16. Numerical Investigation of the Preferential Concentration Instability of Particle Laden Homogeneous Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasbaoui, Mohamed; Koch, Donald; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    In a previous study (Kasbaoui et al., J. Fluid Mech. 2015), particle laden homogeneous shear was shown to be subject to an algebraic instability. Initially randomly distributed particles are entrained by wave-like perturbations in the fluid velocity and segregate in a similar wave-like pattern while they sediment under gravity. The preferential concentration mechanism, which is the tendency of particles to exit vortical regions and gather in straining regions, causes the two waves to amplify each other resulting in an algebraic instability. By means of simulations, we compare the perturbations growth to the one yielded by the theory in the limit of small Stokes number particles. The simulations are conducted with an Eulerian model of the particles as well as a Lagrangian model. The two are compared. A secondary Rayleigh-Taylor instability caused by the periodic stacking of heavy layers of concentrated particles on top of depleted lighter layers is analyzed.

  17. Excitation of instability waves in a two-dimensional shear layer by sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.

    1978-01-01

    The excitation of instability waves in a plane compressible shear layer by sound waves is studied. The problem is formulated mathematically as an inhomogeneous boundary-value problem. A general solution for abitrary incident sound wave is found by first constructing the Green's function of the problem. Numerical values of the coupling constants between incident sound waves and excited instability waves for a range of flow Mach number are calculated. The effect of the angle of incidence in the case of a beam of acoustic waves is analyzed. It is found that for moderate subsonic Mach numbers a narrow beam aiming at an angle between 50 to 80 deg to the flow direction is most effective in exciting instability waves.

  18. Local parametric instability near elliptic points in vortex flows under shear deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Koshel, Konstantin V.; Ryzhov, Eugene A.

    2016-08-15

    The dynamics of two point vortices embedded in an oscillatory external flow consisted of shear and rotational components is addressed. The region associated with steady-state elliptic points of the vortex motion is established to experience local parametric instability. The instability forces the point vortices with initial positions corresponding to the steady-state elliptic points to move in spiral-like divergent trajectories. This divergent motion continues until the nonlinear effects suppress their motion near the region associated with the steady-state separatrices. The local parametric instability is then demonstrated not to contribute considerably to enhancing the size of the chaotic motion regions. Instead, the size of the chaotic motion region mostly depends on overlaps of the nonlinear resonances emerging in the perturbed system.

  19. Hybrid simulations of plasma transport by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetopause: magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Cowee, Misa M; Winske, Dan; Gary, S Peter

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional hybrid (kinetic ions, massless fluid electrons) simulations of the Kelvin Helmholtz Instability (KHI) for a magnetopause configuration with a magnetic shear across the boundary are carried out to examine how the transport of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere is affected by the shear field. Low magnetic shear conditions where the magnetosheath magnetic field is within 30{sup o} of northward is included in the simulations because KHI is thought to be important for plasma transport only for northward or near-northward interplanetary magnetic field orientations. The simulations show that coherent vortices can grow for these near-northward angles, and that they are sometimes more coherent than for pure northward conditions because the turbulence which breaks-down these vortices is reduced when there are magnetic tension forces. With increasing magnetic shear angle, the growth rate is reduced, and the vortices do not grow to as large of size which reduces the plasma transport. By tracking the individual particle motions diffusion coefficients can be obtained for the system, where the diffusion is not classical in nature but instead has a time dependence resulting from both the increasingly large-scale vortex motion and the small-scale turbulence generated in the break-down of the instabilities. Results indicate that diffusion on the order of 10{sup 9} m{sup 2}/s could possibly be generated by KHI on the flanks of the magnetosphere.

  20. Sensitivity of the magnetorotational instability to the shear parameter in stratified simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauman, Farrukh; Blackman, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is a shear instability and thus its sensitivity to the shear parameter q = -d ln Ω/d ln r is of interest to investigate. Motivated by astrophysical discs, most (but not all) previous MRI studies have focused on the Keplerian value of q = 1.5. Using simulation with eight vertical density scaleheights, we contribute to the subset of studies addressing the effect of varying q in stratified numerical simulations. We discuss why shearing boxes cannot easily be used to study q > 2 and thus focus on q < 2. As per previous simulations, which were either unstratified or stratified with a smaller vertical domain, we find that the q dependence of stress for the stratified case is not linear, contrary to the Shakura-Sunyaev model. We find that the scaling agrees with Abramowicz, Brandenburg & Lasota who found it to be proportional to the shear to vorticity ratio q/(2 - q). We also find however that the shape of the magnetic and kinetic energy spectra are relatively insensitive to q and that the ratio of Maxwell stress to magnetic energy ratio also remains nearly independent of q. This is consistent with a theoretical argument in which the rate of amplification of the azimuthal field depends linearly on q and the turbulent correlation time τ depends inversely on q. As such, we measure the correlation time of the turbulence and find that indeed it is inversely proportional to q.

  1. Compressibility Effect on the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with Sheared Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, M. S.

    2017-04-01

    We study the effect of plasma compressibility on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a magnetic interface with a sheared magnetic field. We assume that the plasma is ideal and the equilibrium quantities are constant above and below the interface. We derive the dispersion equation. Written in dimensionless variables, it contains seven dimensionless parameters: the ratio of plasma densities above and below the interface ζ, the ratio of magnetic field magnitude squared χ, the shear angle α, the plasma beta above and below the interface, β2 and β1, the angle between the perturbation wave number and the magnetic field direction above the interface φ, and the dimensionless wave number κ. Only six of these parameters are independent because χ, β1, and β2 are related by the condition of total pressure continuity at the interface. Only perturbations with the wave number smaller than the critical wave number are unstable. The critical wave number depends on φ, but it is independent of β1 and β2, and is the same as that in the incompressible plasma approximation. The dispersion equation is solved numerically with ζ= 100, χ= 1, and β1 = β2 = β. We obtain the following results. When β decreases, so does the maximum instability increment. However, the effect is very moderate. It is more pronounced for high values of α. We also calculate the dependence on φ of the maximum instability increment with respect to κ. The instability increment takes its maximum at φ= φm. Again, the decrease of β results in the reduction of the instability increment. This reduction is more pronounced for high values of |φ- φm|. When both α and |φ- φm| are small, the reduction effect is practically negligible. The theoretical results are applied to the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability of prominence threads in the solar atmosphere.

  2. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of shear-induced instabilities of lipid bilayer membranes in water.

    PubMed

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Walther, Jens H; Kawano, Satoyuki; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    We study shear-induced instabilities of lipid bilayers immersed in water using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. The shear imposed by the flow of the water induces initially microscopic structural changes of the membrane, starting with tilting of the molecules in the direction of the shear. The tilting propagates in the spanwise direction when the shear rate exceeds a critical value and the membrane undergoes a bucklinglike deformation in the direction perpendicular to the shear. The bucklinglike undulation continues until a localized Kelvin-Helmholtz-like instability leads to membrane rupture. We study the different modes of membrane undulation using membranes of different geometries and quantify the relative importance of the bucklinglike bending and the Kelvin-Helmholtz-like instability of the membrane.

  3. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of shear-induced instabilities of lipid bilayer membranes in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Walther, Jens H.; Kawano, Satoyuki; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    We study shear-induced instabilities of lipid bilayers immersed in water using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. The shear imposed by the flow of the water induces initially microscopic structural changes of the membrane, starting with tilting of the molecules in the direction of the shear. The tilting propagates in the spanwise direction when the shear rate exceeds a critical value and the membrane undergoes a bucklinglike deformation in the direction perpendicular to the shear. The bucklinglike undulation continues until a localized Kelvin-Helmholtz-like instability leads to membrane rupture. We study the different modes of membrane undulation using membranes of different geometries and quantify the relative importance of the bucklinglike bending and the Kelvin-Helmholtz-like instability of the membrane.

  4. Synergistic mitigation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions by sheared axial flow and finite Larmor radius effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, X. M.; Huang, L.; Jian, G. D.

    2003-07-01

    The synergistic stabilizing effect of sheared axial flow (SAF) and finite Larmor radius (FLR) on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions is considered by means of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The SAF is introduced into the MHD equations in a conventional way and the FLR is introduced in the same way as used by Roberts and Taylor [Phys. Rev. Lett. 8, 197 (1962)]. Therefore, the linearized MHD equations include both SAF and FLR effects. The results indicate that in the whole wavenumber region the synergistic effect of FLR and SAF can mitigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability; at low flow velocity the synergistic effect of FLR and the SAF is slightly (˜10%) stronger than the mitigation effect of FLR alone and remarkably stronger than the mitigation effect of the SAF alone; at higher flow velocities in the large wavenumber region (for normalized wavenumber κ>2.4) the synergistic effect of FLR and the SAF is remarkably stronger than the mitigation effect due to either one of the two, respectively, and in the small wavenumber region (κ<2.4) it is stronger than the mitigation effect due to either one of the two, respectively.

  5. Localized modelling and feedback control of linear instabilities in 2-D wall bounded shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tol, Henry; Kotsonis, Marios; de Visser, Coen

    2016-11-01

    A new approach is presented for control of instabilities in 2-D wall bounded shear flows described by the linearized Navier-Stokes equations (LNSE). The control design accounts both for spatially localized actuators/sensors and the dominant perturbation dynamics in an optimal control framework. An inflow disturbance model is proposed for streamwise instabilities that drive laminar-turbulent transition. The perturbation modes that contribute to the transition process can be selected and are included in the control design. A reduced order model is derived from the LNSE that captures the input-output behavior and the dominant perturbation dynamics. This model is used to design an optimal controller for suppressing the instability growth. A 2-D channel flow and a 2-D boundary layer flow over a flat plate are considered as application cases. Disturbances are generated upstream of the control domain and the resulting flow perturbations are estimated/controlled using wall shear measurements and localized unsteady blowing and suction at the wall. It will be shown that the controller is able to cancel the perturbations and is robust to unmodelled disturbances.

  6. Prediction of plastic instabilities under thermo-mechanical loadings in tension and simple shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manach, P. Y.; Mansouri, L. F.; Thuillier, S.

    2016-08-01

    Plastic instabilities like Portevin-Le Châtelier were quite thoroughly investigated experimentally in tension, under a large range of strain rates and temperatures. Such instabilities are characterized both by a jerky flow and a localization of the strain in bands. Similar phenomena were also recorded for example in simple shear [1]. Modelling of this phenomenon is mainly performed at room temperature, taking into account the strain rate sensitivity, though an extension of the classical Estrin-Kubin-McCormick was proposed in the literature, by making some of the material parameters dependent on temperature. A similar approach is considered in this study, furthermore extended for anisotropic plasticity with Hill's 1948 yield criterion. Material parameters are identified at 4 different temperatures, ranging from room temperature up to 250°C. The identification procedure is split in 3 steps, related to the elasticity, the average stress level and the magnitude of the stress drops. The anisotropy is considered constant in this temperature range, as evidenced by experimental results [2]. The model is then used to investigate the temperature dependence of the critical strain, as well as its capability to represent the propagation of the bands. Numerical predictions of the instabilities in tension and simple shear at room temperature and up to 250°C are compared with experimental results [3]. In the case of simple shear, a monotonic loading followed by unloading and reloading in the reverse direction (“Bauschinger-type” test) is also considered, showing that (i) kinematic hardening should be taken into account to fully describe the transition at re-yielding (ii) the modelling of the critical strain has to be improved.

  7. Experimental evidence of a helical, supercritical instability in pipe flow of shear thinning fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picaut, L.; Ronsin, O.; Caroli, C.; Baumberger, T.

    2017-08-01

    We study experimentally the flow stability of entangled polymer solutions extruded through glass capillaries. We show that the pipe flow becomes linearly unstable beyond a critical value (Wic≃5 ) of the Weissenberg number, via a supercritical bifurcation which results in a helical distortion of the extrudate. We find that the amplitude of the undulation vanishes as the aspect ratio L /R of the capillary tends to zero, and saturates for large L /R , indicating that the instability affects the whole pipe flow, rather than the contraction or exit regions. These results, when compared to previous theoretical and experimental works, lead us to argue that the nature of the instability is controlled by the level of shear thinning of the fluids. In addition, we provide strong hints that the nonlinear development of the instabiilty is mitigated, in our system, by the gradual emergence of gross wall slip.

  8. Development of a Flow Velocity Shear Instability in the Presence of Finite Larmor Radius Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V. I.; Kim, T. C.; Mishin, E. V.; Genoni, T. C.; Rose, D. V.; Paraschiv, I.

    2014-12-01

    Ionospheric irregularities cause scintillations of electromagnetic signals that can severely affect navigation and transionospheric communication, in particular during Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs) events. However, the existing ionospheric models do not describe density irregularities with typical scales of several ion Larmor radii that affect UHF and L bands. These irregularities can be produced in the process of nonlinear evolution of interchange or flow velocity shear instabilities. We present the results of numerical simulations of excitation and nonlinear saturation of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability by means of two-fluid hydrodynamic model which includes finite Larmor radius effects. The high-resolution simulations are driven by the ambient conditions corresponding to the AFRL C/NOFS satellite low-resolution data during EPBs.

  9. Three-dimensional flow instability near ion selective membrane under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyukjin J.; Pham, Sang Van; Kim, Bumjoo; Lim, Geunbae; White, Jacob; Han, Jongyoon

    2015-11-01

    Ion transport through ion selective membranes is critically determined by concentration polarization in bulk solutions near the membrane, which is a complicated multiphysics phenomena. For the first time, we report a full experimental and numerical characterization of three-dimensional electrokinetic instability near ion selective membrane under a DC bias and shear flow. A new pattern of instability vortex is found, which was shown to be critically affected by the confinement geometry of the system. It is also found that the onset of over-limiting current and over-limiting resistance can be controlled by geometry of the system, which has significant implications on the optimization of electrodialysis and other electrochemical systems. This work is supported by ARPA-E grant (DE-AR0000294), and also by Kuwait-MIT Center for Natural Resources and the Environment (CNRE), which was funded by Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences (KFAS). V. S. Pham was partially supported by SMAR.

  10. Kinetic shear Alfvén instability in the presence of impurity ions in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Gaimin; Shen, Y.; Xie, T.; He, Zhixiong; He, Hongda; Qi, Longyu; Cui, Shaoyan

    2013-10-15

    The effects of impurity ions on the kinetic shear Alfvén (KSA) instability in tokamak plasmas are investigated by numerically solving the integral equations for the KSA eigenmode in the toroidal geometry. The kinetic effects of hydrogen and impurity ions, including transit motion, finite ion Larmor radius, and finite-orbit-width, are taken into account. Toroidicity induced linear mode coupling is included through the ballooning-mode representation. Here, the effects of carbon, oxygen, and tungsten ions on the KSA instability in toroidal plasmas are investigated. It is found that, depending on the concentration and density profile of the impurity ions, the latter can be either stabilizing or destabilizing for the KSA modes. The results here confirm the importance of impurity ions in tokamak experiments and should be useful for analyzing experimental data as well as for understanding anomalous transport and control of tokamak plasmas.

  11. A hybrid Rayleigh-Taylor-current-driven coupled instability in a magnetohydrodynamically collimated cylindrical plasma with lateral gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Xiang Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-03-15

    We present an MHD theory of Rayleigh-Taylor instability on the surface of a magnetically confined cylindrical plasma flux rope in a lateral external gravity field. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is found to couple to the classic current-driven instability, resulting in a new type of hybrid instability that cannot be described by either of the two instabilities alone. The lateral gravity breaks the axisymmetry of the system and couples all azimuthal modes together. The coupled instability, produced by combination of helical magnetic field, curvature of the cylindrical geometry, and lateral gravity, is fundamentally different from the classic magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurring at a two-dimensional planar interface. The theory successfully explains the lateral Rayleigh-Taylor instability observed in the Caltech plasma jet experiment [Moser and Bellan, Nature 482, 379 (2012)]. Potential applications of the theory include magnetic controlled fusion, solar emerging flux, solar prominences, coronal mass ejections, and other space and astrophysical plasma processes.

  12. Inflectional instabilities in the wall region of bounded turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swearingen, Jerry D.; Blackwelder, Ron F.; Spalart, Philippe R.

    1987-01-01

    The primary thrust of this research was to identify one or more mechanisms responsible for strong turbulence production events in the wall region of bounded turbulent shear flows. Based upon previous work in a transitional boundary layer, it seemed highly probable that the production events were preceded by an inflectional velocity profile which formed on the interface between the low-speed streak and the surrounding fluid. In bounded transitional flows, this unstable profile developed velocity fluctuations in the streamwise direction and in the direction perpendicular to the sheared surface. The rapid growth of these instabilities leads to a breakdown and production of turbulence. Since bounded turbulent flows have many of the same characteristics, they may also experience a similar type of breakdown and turbulence production mechanism.

  13. Pressure-induced amorphization in crystalline silica: Soft phonon modes and shear instabilities in coesite

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, David W.; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.; Keskar, N.; Chelikowsky, James R.; Binggeli, N.

    2000-02-01

    Quartz and closely related materials will transform under pressure from crystalline states to amorphous forms. Here we examine coesite, a high-pressure form of silica which also undergoes pressure induced amorphization. We find that coesite, like quartz, possesses a shear instability closely coupled to a zone-edge phonon softening at pressures comparable to the amorphization transformation. The commonality of these features strongly suggests that a coupling between a shear and a phonon soft mode plays an important role in pressure induced amorphization. This mechanism is similar to that observed in martensitic transformations. The densities for the phases produced at high pressures, as calculated from variable cell shape molecular dynamics, follow the experimental glassy region joining coesite to stishovite. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Sheared Flow Driven Drift Instability and Vortices in Dusty Plasmas with Opposite Polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtaq, A.; Shah, AttaUllah; Ikram, M.; Clark, R. E. H.

    2016-02-01

    Low-frequency electrostatic drift waves are studied in an inhomogeneous dust magnetoplasma containing dust with components of opposite polarity. The drift waves are driven by the magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) sheared flows in the presence of electrons and ions. Due to sheared flow in the linear regime, the electrostatic dust drift waves become unstable. The conditions of mode instability, with the effects of dust streaming and opposite polarity, are studied. These are excited modes which gain large amplitudes and exhibit interactions among themselves. The interaction is governed by the Hasegawa-Mima (HM) nonlinear equation with vector nonlinearity. The stationary solutions of the HM equation in the form of a vortex chain and a dipolar vortex, including effects of dust polarity and electron (ion) temperatures, are studied. The relevance of the present work to space and laboratory four component dusty plasmas is noted.

  15. Instability of a Lamellar Phase under Shear Flow: Formation of Multilamellar Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbin, L.; Delville, J. P.; Rouch, J.; Panizza, P.

    2002-09-01

    The formation of closed-compact multilamellar vesicles (referred to in the literature as the ``onion texture'') obtained upon shearing lamellar phases is studied using small-angle light scattering and cross-polarized microscopy. By varying the shear rate γ ˙, the gap cell D, and the smectic distance d, we show that: (i)the formation of this structure occurs homogeneously in the cell at a well-defined wave vector qi, via a strain-controlled process, and (ii)the value of qi varies as (dγ ˙/D)1/3. These results strongly suggest that formation of multilamellar vesicles may be monitored by an undulation (buckling) instability of the membranes, as expected from theory.

  16. The thermal instability in a sheared magnetic field - Filament condensation with anisotropic heat conduction. [solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.; Mok, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The condensation-mode growth rate of the thermal instability in an empirically motivated sheared field is shown to depend upon the existence of perpendicular thermal conduction. This typically very small effect (perpendicular conductivity/parallel conductivity less than about 10 to the -10th for the solar corona) increases the spatial-derivative order of the compressible temperature-perturbation equation, and thereby eliminates the singularities which appear when perpendicular conductivity = 0. The resulting growth rate is less than 1.5 times the controlling constant-density radiation rate, and has a clear maximum at a cross-field length of order 100 times and a width of about 0.1 the magnetic shear scale for solar conditions. The profiles of the observable temperature and density perturbations are independent of the thermal conductivity, and thus agree with those found previously. An analytic solution to the short-wavelength incompressible case is also given.

  17. Experimental and numerical study of plastic shear instability under high-speed loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sokovikov, Mikhail E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Chudinov, Vasiliy E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Bilalov, Dmitry E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Oborin, Vladimir E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Uvarov, Sergey E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Plekhov, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Terekhina, Alena E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Naimark, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru

    2014-11-14

    The behavior of specimens dynamically loaded during the split Hopkinson (Kolsky) bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions was studied. The lateral surface of the specimens was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was examined using a high-speed infra-red camera and a VISAR velocity measurement system. The microstructure of tested specimens was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The development of plastic shear instability regions has been simulated numerically.

  18. Direct Numerical Simulations of Small-Scale Gravity Wave Instability Dynamics in Variable Stratification and Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mixa, T.; Fritts, D. C.; Laughman, B.; Wang, L.; Kantha, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple observations provide compelling evidence that gravity wave dissipation events often occur in multi-scale environments having highly-structured wind and stability profiles extending from the stable boundary layer into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Such events tend to be highly localized and thus yield local energy and momentum deposition and efficient secondary gravity wave generation expected to have strong influences at higher altitudes [e.g., Fritts et al., 2013; Baumgarten and Fritts, 2014]. Lidars, radars, and airglow imagers typically cannot achieve the spatial resolution needed to fully quantify these small-scale instability dynamics. Hence, we employ high-resolution modeling to explore these dynamics in representative environments. Specifically, we describe numerical studies of gravity wave packets impinging on a sheet of high stratification and shear and the resulting instabilities and impacts on the gravity wave amplitude and momentum flux for various flow and gravity wave parameters. References: Baumgarten, Gerd, and David C. Fritts (2014). Quantifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability dynamics observed in noctilucent clouds: 1. Methods and observations. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 119.15, 9324-9337. Fritts, D. C., Wang, L., & Werne, J. A. (2013). Gravity wave-fine structure interactions. Part I: Influences of fine structure form and orientation on flow evolution and instability. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(12), 3710-3734.

  19. Origin of intermittent plastic flow and instability of shear band sliding in bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Sun, B A; Pauly, S; Hu, J; Wang, W H; Kühn, U; Eckert, J

    2013-05-31

    Intermittent or serrated plastic flow is widely observed in the deformation of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) or other disordered solids at low temperatures. However, the underlying physical process responsible for the phenomena is still poorly understood. Here, we give an interpretation of the serrated flow behavior in BMGs by relating the atomic-scale deformation with the macroscopic shear band behavior. Our theoretical analysis shows that serrated flow in fact arises from an intrinsic dynamic instability of the shear band sliding, which is determined by a critical stiffness parameter in stick-slip dynamics. Based on this, the transition from serrated to nonserrated flow with the strain rate or the temperature is well predicted and the effects of various extrinsic and intrinsic factors on shear band stability can be quantitatively analyzed in BMGs. Our results, which are verified by a series of compression tests on various BMGs, provide key ingredients to fundamentally understand serrated flow and may bridge the gap between the atomic-scale physics and the larger-scale shear band dynamics governing the deformation of BMGs.

  20. Impacts of Shear Flow on the Low-n Kink Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianguo; Xu, Xueqiao

    2016-10-01

    We report the progress on studies of the effects of shear flow on the edge instabilities using the reduced 3-field two fluid MHD model under the BOUT + + framework. Using the equilibrium profiles in JET-like Tokamak geometry with a circular cross section, the results of simulations demonstrate that: (1) the low-n peeling modes are mainly driven by the gradient of parallel current and the large pressure gradient leads to high-n ballooning modes; (2) in low density cases, the low-n kink modes are sensitive to the Er shear; (3) using the shear flow's profiles measured from DIII-D experiment, the intermediate-n modes (n 20) are triggered firstly and the peak of it shifts to low-n mode with narrower mode spectrum when increasing the shear flow in the linear simulation; (4) the nonlinear results show the enhanced nonlinear mode-mode interaction in saturate phase and are quantitatively consistent with the transition from coherent harmonic oscillation(EHO) to the broad band turbulence state discovered in DIII-D discharge with net-zero NBI torque and the QH-mode can be achieved by NBI in both co- and counter direction. It's significant for understanding the mechanism of EHO and QH-mode.

  1. Observation and Analysis of Resistive Instabilities in Negative Central Shear in DIII-D Discharges with L-Mode Edge

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, R.J.; Austin, M.E.; Brennan, D.P.; Chu, M.S.; Luce, T.C.; Strait, E.J.; Turnbull, A.D.

    2002-07-01

    In DIII-D plasmas with L-mode edge and negative central shear (q{sub axis}-q{sub min} {approx}0.3 to 0.5), an interchange-like instability has been observed [1]. The instability and a subsequent tearing mode cause reduction of the core electron temperature and plasma rotation, and therefore the instability affects discharge evolution and the desired high performance is not achieved. Stability analyses indicate robust ideal stability, while the Resistive Interchange Mode criterion is marginal and the instability appears to be localized initially. Based on this, we believe that the mode is, most likely, a Resistive Interchange Mode. The amplitude of the instability is correlated with the location of the q{sub min} surface and inversely with the fast-ion pressure. There is indication that the interchange-like instability may be ''seeding'' the tearing mode that sometimes follows the interchange-like instability.

  2. Shear-driven instabilities and shocks in the atmospheres of hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromang, Sébastien; Leconte, Jeremy; Heng, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Context. General circulation models of the atmosphere of hot Jupiters have shown the existence of a supersonic eastward equatorial jet. These results have been obtained using numerical schemes that filter out vertically propagating sound waves and assume vertical hydrostatic equilibrium, or were acquired with fully compressive codes that use large dissipative coefficients. Aims: We remove these two limitations and investigate the effects of compressibility on the atmospheric dynamics by solving the standard Euler equations. Methods: This was done by means of a series of simulations performed in the framework of the equatorial β-plane approximation using the finite-volume shock-capturing code RAMSES. Results: At low resolution, we recover the classical results described in the literature: we find a strong and steady supersonic equatorial jet of a few km s-1 that displays no signature of shocks. We next show that the jet zonal velocity depends significantly on the grid meridional resolution. When this resolution is fine enough to properly resolve the jet, the latter is subject to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The jet zonal mean velocity displays regular oscillations with a typical timescale of a few days and a significant amplitude of about 15% of the jet velocity. We also find compelling evidence for the development of a vertical shear instability at pressure levels of a few bars. It seems to be responsible for an increased downward kinetic energy flux that significantly affects the temperature of the deep atmosphere and appears to act as a form of drag on the equatorial jet. This instability also creates velocity fluctuations that propagate upward and steepen into weak shocks at pressure levels of a few mbars. Conclusions: We conclude that hot-Jupiter equatorial jets are potentially unstable to both a barotropic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and a vertical shear instability. Upon confirmation using more realistic models, these two instabilities could result in

  3. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Betancourt, O.; Garabedian, P.

    1981-01-01

    The computer code developed by Bauer et al. (1978) for the study of the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability of a plasma in toroidal geometry is extended so that the growth rates of instabilities may be estimated more accurately. The original code, which is based on the variational principle of ideal magnetohydrodynamics, is upgraded by the introduction of a nonlinear formula for the growth rate of an unstable mode which acts as a quantitative measure of instability that is important in estimating numerical errors. The revised code has been applied to the determination of the nonlinear saturation, ballooning modes and beta limits for tokamaks, stellarators and torsatrons.

  4. Interfacial instabilities in two immiscible flows in an annular duct: Shear-thinning fluids surrounded with Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zijing; Liu, Rong; Liu, Zhou

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the stability of two co-axial immiscible fluids flowing in an annular duct is investigated. The inner layer consists of a shear-thinning fluid, which is surrounded by a Newtonian liquid annulus in the outer layer. A constant pressure gradient is applied to drive the flow in the annular channel. Linear stability analysis is employed to investigate the shear-thinning effect on the Rayleigh-Plateau instability and the interface wave instability. Results show that the Rayleigh-Plateau mode can be enhanced and the topological structures of the marginal stability curve of the Rayleigh-Plateau mode can be significantly changed by the shear-thinning effect. When the shear-thinning effect is strong, a case study shows that the Rayleigh-Plateau instability can be slightly suppressed by the viscosity stratification in the inner layer. The shear-thinning effect has a dual influence on the interface wave instability. It can either enhance or suppress the interface wave instability, depending on the thickness ratio and viscosity ratio between the outer layer and the inner layer.

  5. Radiation and porosity effects on the magnetohydrodynamic flow near a vertical plate that applies shear stress to the fluid with mass diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Arshad; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan

    2014-06-19

    This article studies the radiation and porosity effects on the unsteady magnetohydrodynamic free convection flow of an incompressible viscous fluid past an infinite vertical plate that applies a shear stress f(t) to the fluid. Conjugate phenomenon of heat and mass transfer is considered. General solutions of the dimensionless governing equations along with imposed initial and boundary conditions are determined using Laplace transform technique. The solution of velocity is presented as a sum of mechanical and non mechanical parts. These solutions satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions and reduce to some known solutions from the literature as special cases. The results for embedded parameters are shown graphically. Numerical results for skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are computed and presented in tabular forms.

  6. Ion-temperature-gradient sensitivity of the hydrodynamic instability caused by shear in the magnetic-field-aligned plasma flow

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June; Koepke, M. E.

    2014-07-15

    The cross-magnetic-field (i.e., perpendicular) profile of ion temperature and the perpendicular profile of the magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) plasma flow are sometimes inhomogeneous for space and laboratory plasma. Instability caused either by a gradient in the ion-temperature profile or by shear in the parallel flow has been discussed extensively in the literature. In this paper, (1) hydrodynamic plasma stability is investigated, (2) real and imaginary frequency are quantified over a range of the shear parameter, the normalized wavenumber, and the ratio of density-gradient and ion-temperature-gradient scale lengths, and (3) the role of inverse Landau damping is illustrated for the case of combined ion-temperature gradient and parallel-flow shear. We find that increasing the ion-temperature gradient reduces the instability threshold for the hydrodynamic parallel-flow shear instability, also known as the parallel Kelvin-Helmholtz instability or the D'Angelo instability. We also find that a kinetic instability arises from the coupled, reinforcing action of both free-energy sources. For the case of comparable electron and ion temperature, we illustrate analytically the transition of the D'Angelo instability to the kinetic instability as (a) the shear parameter, (b) the normalized wavenumber, and (c) the ratio of density-gradient and ion-temperature-gradient scale lengths are varied and we attribute the changes in stability to changes in the amount of inverse ion Landau damping. We show that near a normalized wavenumber k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub i} of order unity (i) the real and imaginary values of frequency become comparable and (ii) the imaginary frequency, i.e., the growth rate, peaks.

  7. The Effects of Contact Conditions on the Onset of Shear Instability in Cold-Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanchao; Aydin, Huseyin; Yue, Stephen; Song, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Using ABAQUS/Explicit, the effects of contact conditions between the particle and substrate, including tangential friction, normal constraint, and contact geometry on the plastic deformation during the cold-spray process are studied. It was found that the onset of shear instability, an event often used to indicate the establishment of bonding, is very sensitive to the choice of contact conditions. This suggests that the onset of shear instability does not serve as an accurate means to identify the plasticity threshold responsible for bonding. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the evolution of the overall equivalent plastic strain (i.e., ) and the overall von Mises stress, being linearly proportional to each other, are both independent of contact conditions. Furthermore, it is shown that an energy value, defined as the product of the and the von Mises stress integrated over all particle elements, can quantitatively represent the energy dissipated via plastic deformation while being independent of contact conditions. The and associated energy value as defined may provide robust tools to assess the plasticity and the consequent bonding during cold-spray.

  8. Turbulent mixing due to Holmboe wave instability in stratified shear flows at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehipour, Hesam; Caulfield, Colm-Cille; Peltier, W. Richard

    2015-11-01

    We consider numerically the transition to turbulence and associated mixing in parallel stratified shear flows with hyperbolic tangent initial velocity and density distributions. When the characteristic length scale of density variation is sufficiently sharper than that of the velocity variation, this flow is primarily susceptible to Holmboe wave instability (HWI) which perturbs the interface to exhibit characteristic cusped interfacial waves. Unlike previous low- Re experimental and numerical studies, in the high- Re regime in which our DNS analyses are performed, the primary HWI triggers a vigorous yet markedly more long-lived turbulent event compared to its better known relative, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). HWI `scours' the primary density interface, leading to substantial irreversible mixing and vertical transport of density displaced above and below the (robust) primary density interface which is comparable in both absolute terms and relative efficiency to the mixing associated with an equivalent KHI. Our results establish categorically that, provided the Reynolds number is high enough, shear layers with sharp density interfaces and associated locally high values of the gradient Richardson number are sites of substantial and efficient irreversible mixing. H.S. is grateful to the David Crighton Fellowship from DAMTP, University of Cambridge.

  9. Nonlinear simulations of Alfvénic instabilities driven by energetic particles in a reversed shear tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Briguglio, Sergio; Chen, Liu; Fogaccia, Giuliana; Vlad, Gregorio; Zonca, Fulvio

    2013-10-01

    The extended version of nonlinear hybrid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-Gyrokinetic code HMGC (XHMGC) is used to investigate the reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes (RSAE)/energetic particle modes (EPM) driven by an anisotropic Maxwellian energetic particles with reversed shear q profiles. In the region near the minimum-q surface, EPM are shown to exist inside the kinetic low-frequency shear Alfvén continuum gap. Fast non-adiabatic down-ward chirping frequency is found for given equilibrium profiles, which is understood as consequence of nonlinear wave particle dynamics. In our current case, the mode structure is dominated by two neighbor poloidal components, while wave energetic particle interaction is dominated by the sidebands of the dominant transit resonance. S. Briguglio et al., Phys. Plasmas 2, 3711 (1995).

  10. Shear instabilities in metallic nanoparticles: hydrogen-stabilized structure of Pt37 on carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Johnson, D D

    2007-03-28

    Using density functional theory calculations, we have studied the morphology of a Pt37 nanoparticle supported on carbon with and without hydrogen (H) passivation that arises with postprocessing of nanoparticles before characterization. Upon heating in an anneal cycle, we find that without H (e.g., in a helium atmosphere or evacuation at high temperature), the morphology change of a truncated cuboctahedral Pt37 is driven by the shearing of (100) to (111) facets to lower the surface energy, a remnant shear instability that drives surface reconstruction in semi-infinite Pt(100). With H passivation from a postprocessing anneal, we show that the sheared structure automatically reverts to the observed truncated cuboctahedral structure and the average first nearest-neighbor Pt-Pt bond length increases by 3%, agreeing well with experiment. We explain the stabilization of the truncated cuboctahedral structure due to H passivation via adsorption energetics of hydrogen on Pt(100) and (111) facets, specifically, the preference for H adsorption at bridge sites on (100) facets, which should be considered in a realistic model for H adsorption on Pt nanoparticles. We find that dramatic morphological change of a nanoparticle can occur even with small changes to first-shell Pt-Pt coordination number. The implications of our findings when comparing to experimental data are discussed.

  11. Generation of auroral Omega bands by shear instability of the neutral winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Walterscheid, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Thermospheric neutral wind acceleration via ion drag in the conducting E-region of the ionosphere is greatly increased by electron precipitation associated with auroras. This increased acceleration can lead to the development of significant horizontal wind shears, which were found to be unstable to the Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability. Numerical simulation of the neutral response to an intense, postmidnight, diffuse aurora shows tne formation of an E-region 'jet stream' within the aurora, with peak winds speeds greather than 700 m/s after one hour. It is proposed that this jet stream produces unstable Kelvin-Helmholtz waves, which can drive waves of discrete aurora along the poleward boundary of the preexisting diffuse aurora. It is suggested that such auroral waves, driven by the neutral winds, form eastward propagating waves (omega bands) occasionally observed along the poleward boundary of postmidnight diffuse auroras. It was found that neutral wind shears that develop in response to discrete auroral arcs are unstable; however, the resulting wind waves are not expected to drive significant auroral waves along discrete arcs.

  12. Stick-slip instabilities and shear strain localization in amorphous materials.

    PubMed

    Daub, Eric G; Carlson, Jean M

    2009-12-01

    We study the impact of strain localization on the stability of frictional slipping in dense amorphous materials. We model the material using shear transformation zone (STZ) theory, a continuum approximation for plastic deformation in amorphous solids. In the STZ model, the internal state is quantified by an effective disorder temperature, and the effective temperature dynamics capture the spontaneous localization of strain. We study the effect of strain localization on stick-slip instabilities by coupling the STZ model to a noninertial spring slider system. We perform a linear stability analysis to generate a phase diagram that connects the small scale physics of strain localization to the macroscopic stability of sliding. Our calculations determine the values of spring stiffness and driving velocity where steady sliding becomes unstable and we confirm our results through numerical integration. We investigate both homogeneous deformation, where no shear band forms, and localized deformation, where a narrow shear band spontaneously forms and accommodates all of the deformation. Our results show that at a given velocity, strain localization leads to unstable frictional sliding at a much larger spring stiffness compared to homogeneous deformation, and that localized deformation cannot be approximated by a homogeneous model with a narrower material. We also find that strain localization provides a physical mechanism for irregular stick-slip cycles in certain parameter ranges. Our results quantitatively connect the internal physics of deformation in amorphous materials to the larger scale frictional dynamics of stick-slip.

  13. Rotational and magnetic shear stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic modes and turbulence in DIII-D high performance discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, L.L.; Burrell, K.H.; Casper, T.S.

    1996-08-01

    The confinement and the stability properties of the DIII-D tokamak high performance discharges are evaluated in terms of rotational and magnetic shear with emphasis on the recent experimental results obtained from the negative central magnetic shear (NCS) experiments. In NCS discharges, a core transport barrier is often observed to form inside the NCS region accompanied by a reduction in core fluctuation amplitudes. Increasing negative magnetic shear contributes to the formation of this core transport barrier, but by itself is not sufficient to fully stabilize the toroidal drift mode (trapped- electron-{eta}{sub i}mode) to explain this formation. Comparison of the Doppler shift shear rate to the growth rate of the {eta}{sub i} mode suggests that the large core {bold E x B} flow shear can stabilize this mode and broaden the region of reduced core transport . Ideal and resistive stability analysis indicates the performance of NCS discharges with strongly peaked pressure profiles is limited by the resistive interchange mode to low {Beta}{sub N} {lt} 2.3. This mode is insensitive to the details of the rotational and the magnetic shear profiles. A new class of discharges which has a broad region of weak or slightly negative magnetic shear (WNS) is described. The WNS discharges have broader pressure profiles and higher values than the NCS discharges together with high confinement and high fusion reactivity.

  14. Finite width currents, non-uniform magnetic shear and the current driven ion cyclotron instability. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Bakshi, P.; Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.

    1983-03-17

    Our earlier results that non-local effects due to even a small magnetic shear produce a significant reduction of the growth rate of the ion cyclotron instability driven by a uniform current are now generalized to finite width currents. Externally prescribed as well as self-consistent shears are considered. If the current width Lc exceeds the shear length Ls, the previous results are recovered. Shear becomes less effective with reduction of Lc, and for typical parameters, the growth rate attains its (shearless) local value for Lc/Ls approximately less than 10/sup -2/. Non-local effects of the finite current width itself come into play if Lc is further reduced to a few ion Larmor radii and can quench the instability.

  15. Inviscid vortex motions in weakly three-dimensional boundary layers and their relation with instabilities in stratified shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackaby, Nicholas D.; Choudhari, Meelan

    1993-01-01

    We consider the inviscid instability of three-dimensional boundary-layer flows with a small crossflow over locally concave or convex walls, along with the inviscid instability of stratified shear flows. We show how these two problems are closely related through the forms of their governing equations. A proposed definition of a generalized Richardson number for the neutrally stable inviscid vortex motions is given. Implications of the similarity between the two problems are discussed.

  16. Coupling of the Okuda-Dawson model with a shear current-driven wave and the associated instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Saleem, H.; Saleem

    2013-12-01

    It is pointed out that the Okuda-Dawson mode can couple with the newly proposed current-driven wave. It is also shown that the Shukla-Varma mode can couple with these waves if the density inhomogeneity is taken into account in a plasma containing stationary dust particles. A comparison of several low-frequency electrostatic waves and instabilities driven by shear current and shear plasma flow in an electron-ion plasma with and without stationary dust is also presented.

  17. Post calibration of the two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument with electron temperature characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Nam, Y. B.; Choe, G. H.; Lee, W.; Jardin, S.

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) instrument is widely used to study the local electron temperature (Te) fluctuations by measuring the ECE intensity IECE ∝ Te in tokamak plasmas. The ECEI measurement is often processed in a normalized fluctuation quantity against the time averaged value due to complication in absolute calibration. In this paper, the ECEI channels are relatively calibrated using the flat Te assumption of the sawtooth crash or the tearing mode island and a proper extrapolation. The 2-D relatively calibrated electron temperature (Te,rel) images are reconstructed and the displacement amplitude of the magnetohydrodynamic modes can be measured for the accurate quantitative growth analysis.

  18. Non-modal theory of the kinetic ion temperature gradient driven instability of plasma shear flows across the magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. V. Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-15

    The temporal evolution of the kinetic ion temperature gradient driven instability and of the related anomalous transport of the ion thermal energy of plasma shear flow across the magnetic field is investigated analytically. This instability develops in a steady plasma due to the inverse ion Landau damping and has the growth rate of the order of the frequency when the ion temperature is equal to or above the electron temperature. The investigation is performed employing the non-modal methodology of the shearing modes which are the waves that have a static spatial structure in the frame of the background flow. The solution of the governing linear integral equation for the perturbed potential displays that the instability experiences the non-modal temporal evolution in the shearing flow during which the unstable perturbation becomes very different from a canonical modal form. It transforms into the non-modal structure with vanishing frequency and growth rate with time. The obtained solution of the nonlinear integral equation, which accounts for the random scattering of the angle of the ion gyro-motion due to the interaction of ions with ensemble of shearing waves, reveals similar but accelerated process of the transformations of the perturbations into the zero frequency structures. It was obtained that in the shear flow the anomalous ion thermal conductivity decays with time. It is a strictly non-modal effect, which originates from the temporal evolution of the shearing modes turbulence.

  19. Non-modal theory of the kinetic ion temperature gradient driven instability of plasma shear flows across the magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-01

    The temporal evolution of the kinetic ion temperature gradient driven instability and of the related anomalous transport of the ion thermal energy of plasma shear flow across the magnetic field is investigated analytically. This instability develops in a steady plasma due to the inverse ion Landau damping and has the growth rate of the order of the frequency when the ion temperature is equal to or above the electron temperature. The investigation is performed employing the non-modal methodology of the shearing modes which are the waves that have a static spatial structure in the frame of the background flow. The solution of the governing linear integral equation for the perturbed potential displays that the instability experiences the non-modal temporal evolution in the shearing flow during which the unstable perturbation becomes very different from a canonical modal form. It transforms into the non-modal structure with vanishing frequency and growth rate with time. The obtained solution of the nonlinear integral equation, which accounts for the random scattering of the angle of the ion gyro-motion due to the interaction of ions with ensemble of shearing waves, reveals similar but accelerated process of the transformations of the perturbations into the zero frequency structures. It was obtained that in the shear flow the anomalous ion thermal conductivity decays with time. It is a strictly non-modal effect, which originates from the temporal evolution of the shearing modes turbulence.

  20. Prominence Bubble Shear Flows and the Coupled Kelvin-Helmholtz — Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas; Hillier, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Prominence bubbles are large arched structures that rise from below into quiescent prominences, often growing to heights on the order of 10 Mm before going unstable and generating plume upflows. While there is general agreement that emerging flux below pre-existing prominences causes the structures, there is lack of agreement on the nature of the bubbles and the cause of the instability flows. One hypothesis is that the bubbles contain coronal temperature plasma and rise into the prominence above due to both magnetic and thermal buoyancy, eventually breaking down via a magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability to release hot plasma and magnetic flux and helicity into the overlying coronal flux rope. Another posits that the bubbles are actually just “arcades” in the prominence indicating a magnetic separator line between the bipole and the prominence fields with the observed upflows and downflows caused by reconnection along the separator. We analyze Hinode/SOT, SDO/AIA, and IRIS observations of prominence bubbles, focusing on characteristics of the bubble boundary layers that may discriminate between the two hypotheses. We find speeds on the order of 10 km/s in prominence plasma downflows and lateral shear flows along the bubble boundary. Inflows to the boundary gradually increase the thickness and brightness of the layer until plasma drains from there, apparently around the dome-like bubble domain. In one case, shear flow across the bubble boundary develops Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices that we use to infer flow speeds in the low-density bubble on the order of 100 km/sec. IRIS spectra indicate that plasma flows on the bubble boundary at transition region temperatures achieve Doppler speeds on the order of 50 km/s, consistent with this inference. Combined magnetic KH-RT instability analysis leads to flux density estimates of 10 G with a field angle of 30° to the prominence, consistent with vector magnetic field measurements. In contrast, we find no evidence

  1. Rotational and magnetic shear stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic modes and turbulence in DIII-D high performance discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lao, L.L.; Burrell, K.H.; Casper, T.S.; Chan, V.S.; Chu, M.S.; DeBoo, J.C.; Doyle, E.J.; Durst, R.D.; Forest, C.B.; Greenfield, C.M.; Groebner, R.J.; Hinton, F.L.; Kawano, Y.; Lazarus, E.A.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Mauel, M.E.; Meyer, W.H.; Miller, R.L.; Navratil, G.A.; Osborne, T.H.; Peng, Q.; Rettig, C.L.; Rewoldt, G.; Rhodes, T.L.; Rice, B.W.; Schissel, D.P.; Stallard, B.W.; Strait, E.J.; Tang, W.M.; Taylor, T.S.; Turnbull, A.D.; Waltz, R.E.; the DIII-D Team

    1996-05-01

    The confinement and the stability properties of the DIII-D tokamak [{ital Plasma} {ital Physics} {ital and} {ital Controlled} {ital Nuclear} {ital Fusion} {ital Research} 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 159] high-performance discharges are evaluated in terms of rotational and magnetic shear, with an emphasis on the recent experimental results obtained from the negative central magnetic shear (NCS) experiments. In NCS discharges, a core transport barrier is often observed to form inside the NCS region accompanied by a reduction in core fluctuation amplitudes. Increasing negative magnetic shear contributes to the formation of this core transport barrier, but by itself is not sufficient to fully stabilize the toroidal drift mode (trapped-electron-{eta}{sub {ital i}} mode) to explain this formation. Comparison of the Doppler shift shear rate to the growth rate of the {eta}{sub {ital i}} mode suggests that the large core {ital E}{times}{ital B} flow shear can stabilize this mode and broaden the region of reduced core transport. Ideal and resistive stability analysis indicates the performance of NCS discharges with strongly peaked pressure profiles is limited by the resistive interchange mode to low {beta}{sub {ital N}}{le}2.3. This mode is insensitive to the details of the rotational and the magnetic shear profiles. A new class of discharges, which has a broad region of weak or slightly negative magnetic shear (WNS), is described. The WNS discharges have broader pressure profiles and higher {beta} values than the NCS discharges, together with high confinement and high fusion reactivity. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Earthquakes initiation and thermal shear instability in the Hindu Kush intermediate depth nest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, Piero; Prieto, German; Rivera, Efrain; Ruiz, Sergio

    2016-02-01

    Intermediate depth earthquakes often occur along subducting lithosphere, but despite their ubiquity the physical mechanism responsible for promoting brittle or brittle-like failure is not well constrained. Large concentrations of intermediate depth earthquakes have been found to be related to slab break-off, slab drip, and slab tears. The intermediate depth Hindu Kush nest is one of the most seismically active regions in the world and shows the correlation of a weak region associated with ongoing slab detachment process. Here we study relocated seismicity in the nest to constraint the geometry of the shear zone at the top of the detached slab. The analysis of the rupture process of the Mw 7.5 Afghanistan 2015 earthquake and other several well-recorded events over the past 25 years shows an initially slow, highly dissipative rupture, followed by a dramatic dynamic frictional stress reduction and corresponding large energy radiation. These properties are typical of thermal driven rupture processes. We infer that thermal shear instabilities are a leading mechanism for the generation of intermediated-depth earthquakes especially in presence of weak zone subjected to large strain accumulation, due to ongoing detachment process.

  3. Rotational instability of the electric polarization and divergence of the shear elastic compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, F.; Langhammer, H. T.; Müller, T.; Buscaglia, V.; Nanni, P.

    2016-02-01

    The rotational instability of the electric polarization P during phase transformations between ferroelectric phases is of great practical interest, since it may be accompanied by extremely large values of the piezoelectric coefficient, and a divergence of the coupled shear compliance contributes to such enhancements. In the literature, this has been explicitly calculated in the framework of the Landau theory and discussed with specific numerical simulations involving tetragonal, orthorhombic, and rhombohedral ferroelectric phases. When monoclinic phases are involved, such an approach is practically impossible, and an approximated treatment has been proposed, based on the observation that in those cases there are shear strains almost linearly coupled to the transverse component of P , implying a divergence of the Curie-Weiss type in the associated compliances. Here the argument is extended to the general case of transitions whose major effect is a rotation of the polarization, and the limits of its validity are discussed. As experimental verification, the elastic response of BaTiO3 is measured and analyzed, together with those of other ferroelectric perovskites available in the literature, such as KNN.

  4. Renormalized theory of ion temperature gradient instability of the magnetic-field-aligned plasma shear flow with hot ions

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. V. Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2015-10-15

    The developed kinetic theory for the stability of a magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) shear flow with inhomogeneous ion temperature [Mikhailenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 072117 (2014)] predicted that a kinetic instability arises from the coupled reinforcing action of the flow velocity shear and ion temperature gradient in the cases where comparable ion and electron temperatures exist. In the present paper, the nonlinear theory was developed for the instability caused by the combined effects of ion-temperature-gradient and shear-flow (ITG–SF). The level of the electrostatic turbulence is determined for the saturation state of the instability on the basis of the nonlinear dispersion equation, which accounts for a nonlinear scattering of ions by the developed turbulence in a sheared flow. The renormalized quasilinear equation for the ion distribution function, which accounts for the turbulent scattering of ions by ITG–SF driven turbulence, was derived and employed for the estimation of the turbulent ion viscosity, the anomalous ion thermal conductivity, and anomalous ion heating rate at the saturation state of the instability.

  5. Post calibration of the two-dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging instrument with electron temperature characteristics of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Nam, Y. B.; Choe, G. H.; Lee, W.; Jardin, S.

    2016-01-15

    The electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) instrument is widely used to study the local electron temperature (T{sub e}) fluctuations by measuring the ECE intensity I{sub ECE} ∝ T{sub e} in tokamak plasmas. The ECEI measurement is often processed in a normalized fluctuation quantity against the time averaged value due to complication in absolute calibration. In this paper, the ECEI channels are relatively calibrated using the flat T{sub e} assumption of the sawtooth crash or the tearing mode island and a proper extrapolation. The 2-D relatively calibrated electron temperature (T{sub e,rel}) images are reconstructed and the displacement amplitude of the magnetohydrodynamic modes can be measured for the accurate quantitative growth analysis.

  6. High-speed digital mode control feedback on magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities in the HBT-EP tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Alexander Jorgen

    Ideal magneto-hydromagnetic (MHD) instabilities set the limit on sustainable pressures in advanced tokamak devices, which are the leading candidates for viable fusion reactor concepts. Active feedback control of these instabilities may present a route to high-pressure operation with burning plasmas and is therefore of intense interest. The feedback system on the HBT-EP tokamak uses magnetic pick up and control coils which are arranged in what is called a "mode control" configuration and are coupled via a set of high-speed digital processors. Experiments are presented which show that this system is capable of suppressing these instabilities even when they are near the ideal limit. The effects of transfer function phase shifts, loop latency, and control coil coverage of the feedback system are characterized and shown to be critically important.

  7. Parallel shear flow instabilities in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids: A comparison of generalized hydrodynamic model and molecular dynamics results

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwin, J.; Ganesh, R.

    2010-10-15

    Using a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model, the growth rate spectra of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability has been obtained analytically for a step shear profile in strongly coupled Yukawa liquids. The class of shear flows studied is assumed to be incompressible in nature. The growth rate spectra calculated exhibit viscous damping at high mode numbers, destabilization at stronger coupling, and in the limit {tau}{sub m} (viscoelastic relaxation time){yields}0, reduce to the regular Navier-Stokes growth rate spectra. A direct comparison is made with previous molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [Ashwin J. and R. Ganesh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 215003 (2010)] of KH instability. We find that for a given value of Reynolds number R and coupling parameter 1<{Gamma}<100, the GH and MD growth rates are in a qualitative agreement. The inclusion of the effect of shear heating as an effective coupling parameter {Gamma}{sub e} appears to improve the quantitative comparison as well.

  8. Linear and non-linear evolution of the vertical shear instability in accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Richard P.; Gressel, Oliver; Umurhan, Orkan M.

    2013-11-01

    We analyse the stability and non-linear dynamics of power-law accretion disc models. These have mid-plane densities that follow radial power laws and have either temperature or entropy distributions that are strict power-law functions of cylindrical radius, R. We employ two different hydrodynamic codes to perform high-resolution 2D axisymmetric and 3D simulations that examine the long-term evolution of the disc models as a function of the power-law indices of the temperature or entropy, the disc scaleheight, the thermal relaxation time of the fluid and the disc viscosity. We present an accompanying stability analysis of the problem, based on asymptotic methods, that we use to guide our interpretation of the simulation results. We find that axisymmetric disc models whose temperature or entropy profiles cause the equilibrium angular velocity to vary with height are unstable to the growth of perturbations whose most obvious character is modes with horizontal and vertical wavenumbers that satisfy |kR/kZ| ≫ 1. Instability occurs only when the thermodynamic response of the fluid is isothermal, or the thermal evolution time is comparable to or shorter than the local dynamical time-scale. These discs appear to exhibit the Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke or `vertical shear' linear instability. Closer inspection of the simulation results uncovers the growth of two distinct modes. The first are characterized by very short radial wavelength perturbations that grow rapidly at high latitudes in the disc, and descend down towards the mid-plane on longer time-scales. We refer to these as `finger modes' because they display kR/kZ ≫ 1. The second appear at slightly later times in the main body of the disc, including near the mid-plane. These `body modes' have somewhat longer radial wavelengths. Early on they manifest themselves as fundamental breathing modes, but quickly become corrugation modes as symmetry about the mid-plane is broken. The corrugation modes are a prominent feature

  9. Locating the origin of stick slip instabilities in sheared granular layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkolis, Evangelos; Niemeijer, André

    2017-04-01

    stress or sliding velocities above 20 μm/s. We calculated the source location of each AE associated with significant stress drops (slip events). A very prominent feature, particularly among the large shear displacement experiments, was the development of regions that sustained increased AE activity. Some of these regions remained fixed in space, whereas others kept migrating with increasing shear displacement. We observed that for an arbitrarily small number of consecutive slip events, their associated AEs did not necessarily nucleate in the same region. We believe that the calculated AE source locations reveal the sites where load-bearing microstructures, known as force chains, begin to fail, leading to slip instabilities. The existence of regions of increased AE activity suggests that triggering of force chain failure is controlled to some extent by the loading conditions imposed on the sample by the machine, but may also indicate the lasting influence of previous particle re-organization events on the particles populating these regions.

  10. Scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Muñoz, M.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Zohm, H.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2009-05-01

    A scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses has been designed and installed on the ASDEX upgrade (AUG) tokamak [A. Herrmann and O. Gruber, Fusion Sci. Technol. 44, 569 (2003)]. The detector resolves in time the energy and pitch angle of fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluctuations. The use of a novel scintillator material with a very short decay time and high quantum efficiency allows to identify the MHD fluctuations responsible for the ion losses through Fourier analysis. A Faraday cup (secondary scintillator plate) has been embedded behind the scintillator plate for an absolute calibration of the detector. The detector is mounted on a manipulator to vary its radial position with respect to the plasma. A thermocouple on the inner side of the graphite protection enables the safety search for the most adequate radial position. To align the scintillator light pattern with the light detectors a system composed by a lens and a vacuum-compatible halogen lamp has been allocated within the detector head. In this paper, the design of the scintillator probe, as well as the new technique used to analyze the data through spectrograms will be described. A last section is devoted to discuss the diagnosis prospects of this method for ITER [M. Shimada et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S1 (2007)].

  11. Scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Zohm, H.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2009-05-15

    A scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses has been designed and installed on the ASDEX upgrade (AUG) tokamak [A. Herrmann and O. Gruber, Fusion Sci. Technol. 44, 569 (2003)]. The detector resolves in time the energy and pitch angle of fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluctuations. The use of a novel scintillator material with a very short decay time and high quantum efficiency allows to identify the MHD fluctuations responsible for the ion losses through Fourier analysis. A Faraday cup (secondary scintillator plate) has been embedded behind the scintillator plate for an absolute calibration of the detector. The detector is mounted on a manipulator to vary its radial position with respect to the plasma. A thermocouple on the inner side of the graphite protection enables the safety search for the most adequate radial position. To align the scintillator light pattern with the light detectors a system composed by a lens and a vacuum-compatible halogen lamp has been allocated within the detector head. In this paper, the design of the scintillator probe, as well as the new technique used to analyze the data through spectrograms will be described. A last section is devoted to discuss the diagnosis prospects of this method for ITER [M. Shimada et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S1 (2007)].

  12. Influence of the outer-magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamic waveguide on the reflection of hydromagnetic waves from a shear flow at the magnetopause

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, V. A. Chuiko, D. A.

    2013-12-15

    The coefficient of reflection of a fast magnetosonic wave incident on the magnetosphere from the solar wind is studied analytically in the framework of a plane-stratified model of the medium with allowance for the transverse inhomogeneity of the magnetosphere and a jump of the plasma parameters at the magnetopause. Three factors decisively affecting the properties of reflection are taken into account: the shear flow of the solar wind plasma relative to the magnetosphere; the presence of a magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamic waveguide caused by the transverse plasma inhomogeneity; and the presence of an Alfvén resonance deep in the magnetosphere, where the oscillation energy dissipates. If the solar wind velocity exceeds the wave phase velocity along the magnetopause, then the wave energy in the solar wind is negative and such a wave experiences overreflection. In the opposite case, the wave energy is positive and the wave is reflected only partially. The wave reflection has a pronounced resonant character: the reflection coefficient has deep narrow minima or high narrow maxima at the eigenfrequencies of the magnetospheric waveguide. For other frequencies, the reflection coefficient only slightly differs from unity. The wave energy influx into the magnetosphere is positive for waves with both positive and negative energies. For waves with a negative energy, this is a consequence of their overreflection, because the flux of negative energy carried away by the reflected wave exceeds the incident flux of negative energy.

  13. Influence of the poloidal equilibrium flow and flow shear on the tearing mode instabilities in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Yue; Zhou, Deng

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the poloidal equilibrium flow and flow shear on the tearing mode instabilities for tokamak plasmas is investigated. The vorticity equation is derived and approximately solved for large poloidal mode numbers (m). Asymptotic matching of the inner solution to the outer solution can approximately give the classical tearing mode stability index Δ' . For typical plasma parameters with positive flow shear, we notice that the poloidal mean flows have a beneficial effect on the classical tearing mode and vice versa. To study the modes with arbitrary poloidal mode numbers, we numerically solve the vorticity equation for delta prime ( Δ' ) for typical plasma parameters with positive flow shear at the rational surface and the resulting Δ' with large m also decreases with increasing poloidal flow velocity, consistent with the approximate analytical large m results. Our numerical calculations indicate that the poloidal mean flow with positive flow shear has beneficial influence on the stabilization of classical tearing modes in tokamak plasmas.

  14. Particle dynamics in discs with turbulence generated by the vertical shear instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Moritz H. R.; Kley, Wilhelm

    2016-10-01

    Context. Among the candidates for generating turbulence in accretion discs in situations with low intrinsic ionization, the vertical shear instability (VSI) has become an interesting candidate, since it relies purely on a vertical gradient in the angular velocity. Existing numerical simulations have shown that α-values a few times 10-4 can be generated. Aims: The particle growth in the early planet formation phase is determined by the dynamics of embedded dust particles. Here, we address, in particular, the efficiency of VSI-turbulence in concentrating particles to generate overdensities and low collision velocities. Methods: We perform three-dimensional (3D) numerical hydrodynamical simulations of accretion discs around young stars that include radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. The motion of embedded particles within a size range of a fraction of mm up to several m is followed using standard drag formula. Results: We confirm that, under realistic conditions, the VSI is able to generate turbulence in full 3D protoplanetary discs. The irradiated disc shows turbulence within 10 to 60 au. The mean radial motion of the gas is such that it is directed inward near the midplane and outward in the surface layers. We find that large particles drift inward with the expected speed, while small particles can experience phases of outward drift. Additionally, the particles show bunching behaviour with overdensities reaching five times the average value, which is strongest for dimensionless stopping times around unity. Conclusions: Particles in a VSI-turbulent discs are concentrated in large-scale turbulent eddies and show low relative speeds that allow for growing collisions. The reached overdensities will also enable the onset of streaming instabilities, further enhancing particle growth. The outward drift for small particles at higher disk elevations enable the transport of processed high temperature material in the solar system to greater distances.

  15. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the magnetopause, magnetohydrodynamic waveguide in the outer magnetosphere, and Alfven resonance deep in the magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, V. A. Chuiko, D. A.

    2013-06-15

    Oscillations of the 'magnetosphere-solar wind' system are studied analytically in the framework of a plane-stratified model of the medium. The properties of oscillations are determined by three phenomena: Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the tangential discontinuity (magnetopause) separating the magnetosphere and the solar wind, the presence of a waveguide for fast magnetosonic waves in the magnetosphere, and the Alfven resonance-a sharp increase in the amplitude of oscillations having the properties of Alfven waves-in the inner magnetosphere. The oscillations of the system form a discrete spectrum of eigenmodes. Analytical expressions are obtained for the frequency and growth rate of instability of each mode, as well as for the functions describing the spatial structure of these modes. All these characteristics of the eigenmodes are shown to depend on the velocity of the solar wind as a parameter. The dependences of the main mode characteristics (such as the instability thresholds, the points of the maximum and minimum growth rate, and the spatial distributions of the oscillation energy) on this parameter are determined for each eigenmode.

  16. ANALYSES OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC INSTABILITY OF ANTISOLAR LATITUDINAL DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION IN F, G, AND K STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Cally, Paul S. E-mail: paul.cally@monash.edu

    2011-09-20

    Motivated by observations that only a very few stars have been found to have antisolar differential rotation, much weaker in amplitude than that of the Sun, we analyze the stability of antisolar and solar-type latitudinal differential rotations in the tachoclines of typical F, G, and K stars. We employ two three-dimensional thin-shell models, one for a Boussinesq but nonhydrostatic system and the other for a hydrostatic but non-Boussinesq system. We find that, in general, the combination of toroidal field band and differential rotation is more unstable, and unstable for lower toroidal fields, for antisolar than for solar-type differential rotation. In the antisolar case, the instability is always found to weaken the differential rotation, even if the primary energy source for the instability is the magnetic field. This favors surface antisolar differential rotations in stars being weaker than solar types, if the instability in the tachocline is felt at the surface of the star. This is most likely to happen in F stars, whose convection zones are much thinner than they are in G and K stars. This effect could help explain why the antisolar differential rotations that have been found are very weak compared with the rotation of the Sun.

  17. TOWARD A MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC THEORY OF THE STATIONARY ACCRETION SHOCK INSTABILITY: TOY MODEL OF THE ADVECTIVE-ACOUSTIC CYCLE IN A MAGNETIZED FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Guilet, Jerome; Foglizzo, Thierry

    2010-03-01

    The effect of a magnetic field on the linear phase of the advective-acoustic instability is investigated as a first step toward a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory of the stationary accretion shock instability taking place during stellar core collapse. We study a toy model where the flow behind a planar stationary accretion shock is adiabatically decelerated by an external potential. Two magnetic field geometries are considered: parallel or perpendicular to the shock. The entropy-vorticity wave, which is simply advected in the unmagnetized limit, separates into five different waves: the entropy perturbations are advected, while the vorticity can propagate along the field lines through two Alfven waves and two slow magnetosonic waves. The two cycles existing in the unmagnetized limit, advective-acoustic and purely acoustic, are replaced by up to six distinct MHD cycles. The phase differences among the cycles play an important role in determining the total cycle efficiency and hence the growth rate. Oscillations in the growth rate as a function of the magnetic field strength are due to this varying phase shift. A vertical magnetic field hardly affects the cycle efficiency in the regime of super-Alfvenic accretion that is considered. In contrast, we find that a horizontal magnetic field strongly increases the efficiencies of the vorticity cycles that bend the field lines, resulting in a significant increase of the growth rate if the different cycles are in phase. These magnetic effects are significant for large-scale modes if the Alfven velocity is a sizable fraction of the flow velocity.

  18. Strong temperature gradients and vertical wind shear on MLT region associated to instability source at 23°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrioli, V. F.; Batista, P. P.; Xu, Jiyao; Yang, Guotao; Chi, Wang; Zhengkuan, Liu

    2017-04-01

    Na lidar temperature measurements were taken successfully from 2007 to 2009 in the mesopause region over São José dos Campos (23.1°S, 45.9°W). Strong gradients on these vertical temperature profiles are often observed. A simple theoretical study has shown that temperature gradient of at least -8 K/km is required concurrently with the typical tidal wind shear in order to generate dynamical instability in the MLT region. We have studied vertical shear in horizontal wind related to atmospheric tides, inferred by meteor radar, with the aim of analyzing instability occurrence. These wind measurements were taken from an all-sky meteor radar at Cachoeira Paulista (22.7°S, 45°W). Two years of simultaneous data, wind and temperature, were used in this analysis which represent 79 days, totalizing 589 h of simultaneous observations. We realize that the condition for the local Richardson number (Ri) dropping below the critical value of instability (Ri < 0.25) is often reached in 98% of the analyzed cases. The mean probabilities for occurrence of convective and dynamical instabilities, in the altitude region between 82 and 98 km, were observed to be about 3% and 17.5%, respectively. Additionally, vertical distribution of these probabilities has revealed a weak occurrence of dynamical instability around 90 km, and this fact can be related to the double mesopause typically observed in this site.

  19. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic detonation: Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O.A.; Fong, B.H.; Cowley, S.C.

    1997-10-01

    The sudden release of magnetic free energy, as occurs in spectacular solar flare events, tokamak disruptions, and enigmatic magnetospheric substorms, has long defied any acceptable theoretical explanation. Usual attempts at explaining these explosive events invoke magnetic reconnection and/or ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability. However, neither of these two mechanisms can explain the fast time scales without nonlinear destabilization. Recently, Cowley {ital et al.} [Phys. Plasmas {bold 3}, 1848 (1996)] have demonstrated a new mechanism for nonlinear explosive MHD destabilization of a line tied Rayleigh{endash}Taylor model. In this paper, this picture is generalized to arbitrary magnetic field geometries. As an intermediate step, the ballooning equation in a general equilibrium is derived including the effects of magnetic field curvature, shear, and gravity. This equation determines the linear stability of the plasma configuration and the behavior of the plasma displacement along the magnetic field line. The nonlinear equation which determines the time and spatial dependence, transverse to the equilibrium magnetic field, of the plasma displacement is obtained in fifth order of the expansion. The equations show that explosive behavior is a natural and generic property of ballooning instabilities close to the linear stability boundary. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Large scale dynamo action precedes turbulence in shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Pallavi; Ebrahimi, Fatima; Blackman, Eric G.

    2016-10-01

    We study dynamo generation (exponential growth) of large scale (planar averaged) fields in the in shearing box simulations of magnetorotational instability (MRI). By computing space-time planar averaged fields and power spectra, we find large scale dynamo action in early MRI growth phase, a previously unidentified feature. Non-axisymmetric linear MRI modes with low horizontal wavenumbers and vertical wavenumbers near that of expected maximal growth, amplify the large scale fields exponentially before turbulence and high wavenumber fluctuations arise. Thus the large scale dynamo requires only linear fluctuations but not nonlinear turbulence (or mode-mode coupling). In contrast to previous studies restricted to horizontal (x- y) averaging, we also show the presence of large scale fields when vertical (y- z) averaging is employed instead. We compute the terms in the mean field equations to identify the contributions to large scale field growth in both types of averaging. The large scale fields obtained from vertical averaging are found to match well with global simulations and quasilinear analytical analysis from a previous study by Ebrahimi & Blackman. We discuss implications of our new results for understanding large scale MRI dynamo saturation and turbulence. Work supported by DOE DE-SC0012467.

  1. On magnetohydrodynamic thermal instabilities in magnetic flux tubes. [in plane parallel stellar atmosphere in LTE and hydrostatic equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massaglia, S.; Ferrari, A.; Bodo, G.; Kalkofen, W.; Rosner, R.

    1985-01-01

    The stability of current-driven filamentary modes in magnetic flux tubes embedded in a plane-parallel atmosphere in LTE and in hydrostatic equilibrium is discussed. Within the tube, energy transport by radiation only is considered. The dominant contribution to the opacity is due to H- ions and H atoms (in the Paschen continuum). A region in the parameter space of the equilibrium configuration in which the instability is effective is delimited, and the relevance of this process for the formation of structured coronae in late-type stars and accretion disks is discussed.

  2. The Role of Atmospheric Instability and Importance of Wind Shear Exponent on Wind and Solar Energy Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamuk, Onur; Akyol, Altan; Aslan, Zafer

    2013-04-01

    Spatial and temporal distributions of wind and solar energy potential are function of atmospheric stability, wind shear exponent, aerosol contents, heat fluxes etc. Richardson number is one of the indicators of the evolution of atmospheric instability. It is a function of the static stability and wind shear exponent. The logarithmic wind profile is commonly used for wind energy evaluation processes in the atmospheric surface layer. Definition of the vertical variation of horizontal wind speeds above the ground by logarithmic profile is limited by 100 meters. The main objective of this study is to take into account atmospheric instability and wind shear exponent in wind power assessment. In the first part of this paper, stability parameters and wind shear exponent have been calculated by using radiosonde data and the wind measuring system for the local area of Istanbul; northwestern part of Turkey between 2011 and 2012. These data were analyzed to define hourly, daily, monthly and seasonal variations of the Richardson number and wind shear exponent. Analyses of early morning soundings produced negative skewwness and afternoon soundings produced a positive skewwness for Ri numbers. The larger negative values of Ri numbers (extremely unstable conditions) have been observed in early morning in winter at the lower levels of atmosphere. The second part of this study covers temporal variations of wind speed and daily total radiation in Istanbul. By using time series and wavelet techniques, small, meso and large scale factors and their roles on wind speed and total daily solar radiation variations have been analyzed. The second part of the paper underlines the role of atmospheric stability and importance of wind shear exponent on variations of wind and solar energy potential. The results of this study would be applicable in the field of wind and solar combined energy systems. Keywords: Wind shear exponent, total daily radiation, wavelet wind and solar energy. Corresponding

  3. Separate and combined effects of static stability and shear variation on the baroclinic instability of a two-layer current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyun, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Quasi-geostrophic disturbance instability characteristics are studied in light of a linearized, two-layer Eady model in which both the static stability and the zonal current shear are uniform but different in each layer. It is shown that the qualitative character of the instability is determined by the sign of the basic-state potential vorticity gradient at the layer interface, and that there is a qualitative similarity between the effects of Richardson number variations due to changes in static stability and those due to changes in shear. The two-layer model is also used to construct an analog of the Williams (1974) continuous model of generalized Eady waves, the basic state in that case having zero potential vorticity gradient in the interior. The model results are in good agreement with the earlier Williams findings.

  4. Experimental study of small-scale instabilities in Rayleigh-Bénard convection driven by a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Valerie; Davaille, Anne; Crambes, Christine

    2003-11-01

    Small-scale convection appears under a cold thermal boundary layer when the local Rayleigh number exceeds a critical value Ra_δ. We have studied experimentally the interaction of this small-scale instabilities with a shear flow. Experiments are performed in a tank heated from one side and cooled from above. Rayleigh numbers are between 10^4 and 10^8, and Prandtl numbers are high (≥ 1000). Fluids are polymer solutions (constant viscosity), sugar or corn syrups (viscosity depending on temperature) or wax (phase transition). Two scales of motion are observed: a large convection cell (whole tank) and, for sufficiently high Rayleigh numbers, small-scale instabilities that remain trapped in the shear zone, following an helicoidal path with axis parallel to the shear. The intermittency of the associated temperature time series has been analyzed. The temporal periodicity scales as τ ˜ Ra-2/3. The presence of these instabilities under the lithosphere could explain some geophysical observations, such as small-wavelength lineations in the terrestrial gravity field.

  5. The stabilizing effect of collision-induced velocity shear on the ionospheric feedback instability in Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydorenko, D.; Rankin, R.

    2017-07-01

    The feedback instability in the ionospheric Alfvén resonator in Earth's magnetosphere is examined using a two-dimensional multifluid numerical model of coupled ionosphere and magnetosphere. Two simulation configurations are used to demonstrate that the instability occurs under an assumption that is unrealistic for Earth's ionosphere. In the first configuration, a flat sheet height-integrated conducting boundary replaces the ionospheric E layer. In the second configuration, plasma dynamics in a simplified E layer is resolved ignoring ion production, loss, and diffusion. For the same parameters (plasma and neutral density profiles and convection electric field), the instability develops only with the flat sheet boundary. When the E layer is resolved, the variation of ion-neutral collision frequencies with altitude produces vertical shear in the horizontal ion flow velocity. The shear prevents density perturbations from remaining field aligned, causing them to decay rather than grow. It is suggested that the instability cannot occur in Earth's ionosphere because ion-neutral collision frequencies always have a significant variation with altitude through the E layer.

  6. Large-scale dynamo action precedes turbulence in shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability

    DOE PAGES

    Bhat, Pallavi; Ebrahimi, Fatima; Blackman, Eric G.

    2016-07-06

    Here, we study the dynamo generation (exponential growth) of large-scale (planar averaged) fields in unstratified shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI). In contrast to previous studies restricted to horizontal (x–y) averaging, we also demonstrate the presence of large-scale fields when vertical (y–z) averaging is employed instead. By computing space–time planar averaged fields and power spectra, we find large-scale dynamo action in the early MRI growth phase – a previously unidentified feature. Non-axisymmetric linear MRI modes with low horizontal wavenumbers and vertical wavenumbers near that of expected maximal growth, amplify the large-scale fields exponentially before turbulence and high wavenumbermore » fluctuations arise. Thus the large-scale dynamo requires only linear fluctuations but not non-linear turbulence (as defined by mode–mode coupling). Vertical averaging also allows for monitoring the evolution of the large-scale vertical field and we find that a feedback from horizontal low wavenumber MRI modes provides a clue as to why the large-scale vertical field sustains against turbulent diffusion in the non-linear saturation regime. We compute the terms in the mean field equations to identify the individual contributions to large-scale field growth for both types of averaging. The large-scale fields obtained from vertical averaging are found to compare well with global simulations and quasi-linear analytical analysis from a previous study by Ebrahimi & Blackman. We discuss the potential implications of these new results for understanding the large-scale MRI dynamo saturation and turbulence.« less

  7. Large-scale dynamo action precedes turbulence in shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Pallavi; Ebrahimi, Fatima; Blackman, Eric G.

    2016-07-06

    Here, we study the dynamo generation (exponential growth) of large-scale (planar averaged) fields in unstratified shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI). In contrast to previous studies restricted to horizontal (x–y) averaging, we also demonstrate the presence of large-scale fields when vertical (y–z) averaging is employed instead. By computing space–time planar averaged fields and power spectra, we find large-scale dynamo action in the early MRI growth phase – a previously unidentified feature. Non-axisymmetric linear MRI modes with low horizontal wavenumbers and vertical wavenumbers near that of expected maximal growth, amplify the large-scale fields exponentially before turbulence and high wavenumber fluctuations arise. Thus the large-scale dynamo requires only linear fluctuations but not non-linear turbulence (as defined by mode–mode coupling). Vertical averaging also allows for monitoring the evolution of the large-scale vertical field and we find that a feedback from horizontal low wavenumber MRI modes provides a clue as to why the large-scale vertical field sustains against turbulent diffusion in the non-linear saturation regime. We compute the terms in the mean field equations to identify the individual contributions to large-scale field growth for both types of averaging. The large-scale fields obtained from vertical averaging are found to compare well with global simulations and quasi-linear analytical analysis from a previous study by Ebrahimi & Blackman. We discuss the potential implications of these new results for understanding the large-scale MRI dynamo saturation and turbulence.

  8. Large-scale dynamo action precedes turbulence in shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Pallavi; Ebrahimi, Fatima; Blackman, Eric G.

    2016-10-01

    We study the dynamo generation (exponential growth) of large-scale (planar averaged) fields in unstratified shearing box simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI). In contrast to previous studies restricted to horizontal (x-y) averaging, we also demonstrate the presence of large-scale fields when vertical (y-z) averaging is employed instead. By computing space-time planar averaged fields and power spectra, we find large-scale dynamo action in the early MRI growth phase - a previously unidentified feature. Non-axisymmetric linear MRI modes with low horizontal wavenumbers and vertical wavenumbers near that of expected maximal growth, amplify the large-scale fields exponentially before turbulence and high wavenumber fluctuations arise. Thus the large-scale dynamo requires only linear fluctuations but not non-linear turbulence (as defined by mode-mode coupling). Vertical averaging also allows for monitoring the evolution of the large-scale vertical field and we find that a feedback from horizontal low wavenumber MRI modes provides a clue as to why the large-scale vertical field sustains against turbulent diffusion in the non-linear saturation regime. We compute the terms in the mean field equations to identify the individual contributions to large-scale field growth for both types of averaging. The large-scale fields obtained from vertical averaging are found to compare well with global simulations and quasi-linear analytical analysis from a previous study by Ebrahimi & Blackman. We discuss the potential implications of these new results for understanding the large-scale MRI dynamo saturation and turbulence.

  9. The inviscid and viscous instability of an unbounded shear layer: Effect of surface tension, density, viscosity and velocity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabduljalil, Saad Abdulateef

    Parallel flows constitute prototypical configurations in many important applications in industry such as atomization and spraying of liquid fuels. A full description and understanding of the inviscid and viscous instability of realistic velocity profiles in unbounded two-phase shear layers without restriction on the range of the physical parameters of the flow are yet to be accomplished. The inviscid and viscous instability characteristics of unbounded parallel flows of two fluids with different viscosities and densities are extensively investigated by performing a full linear stability analysis. The effects of density and viscosity stratifications, surface tension, Reynolds number and velocity profile are determined. The neutral stability and the maximal growth rate for the instability modes are calculated for a wide range of flow parameters. The inviscid instability is first studied for the piecewise-linear profile and the error-function profile. Apart from the stabilizing effect observed in most of the cases, surface tension is found to destabilize the neutrally-stable waves that exist when surface tension is absent. A mathematical explanation and a physical explanation are given. The piecewise-linear profile does not match the more realistic results obtained with the error-function profile in the short-wavelength range, especially in nonhomogeneous shear layers. The viscous instability is then studied for the error-function profile. A numerical scheme which is efficiently capable of handling a broad range of flow configurations and parameters is developed. The inclusion of viscosity alters the inviscid perturbations and produces additional modes, most remarkably, the interfacial mode that arises at large wavenumbers. The coexistence of three distinct modes in gas-liquid systems is observed. The parameters that control the mode crossing between these modes are determined. Energy considerations and parametric properties are found to be efficient tools to identify

  10. Nonlocal size dependency in nonlinear instability of axially loaded exponential shear deformable FG-CNT reinforced nanoshells under heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahmani, S.; Fattahi, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    The present study deals with size-dependent nonlinear instability characteristics of functionally graded carbon nanotube (FG-CNT) reinforced composite shells at nanoscale subjected to axial compression combined with through-thickness heat conduction. To take size dependency into account, Eringen's nonlocal continuum elasticity is incorporated to a novel shear deformation shell theory including a refined exponential distribution for transverse shear strain. In addition to the uniform distribution (UD) of CNT reinforcements, three FG patterns are also considered, namely FG-A, FG-V and FG-X. Also, on the basis of polynomial series, the temperature variation due to the through-thickness heat conduction is estimated. Via a perturbation-based boundary layer-type solving procedure, explicit expressions for nonlocal equilibrium curves are proposed relevant to the prebuckling and postbuckling regimes of FG-CNT exponential shear deformable nanoshells with temperature-dependent and temperature-independent material properties. It is observed that by taking the nonlocality size effect into consideration, the influence of the through-thickness heat conduction on the nonlinear axial instability response of FG-CNT reinforced nanoshells becomes more significant.

  11. Influence of equilibrium shear flow on peeling-ballooning instability and edge localized mode crash

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, P. W.; Xu, X. Q.; Wang, X. G.; Xia, T. Y.

    2012-09-15

    The E Multiplication-Sign B shear flow plays a dual role on peeling-ballooning modes and their subsequently triggered edge localized mode (ELM) crashes. On one hand, the flow shear can stabilize high-n modes and twist the mode in the poloidal direction, constraining the mode's radial extent and reducing the size of the corresponding ELM. On the other hand, the shear flow also introduces the Kelvin-Helmholtz drive, which can destabilize peeling-ballooning modes. The overall effect of equilibrium shear flow on peeling-ballooning modes and ELM crashes depends on the competition between these two effects. When the flow shear is either small or very large, it can reduce ELM size. However, for moderate values of flow shear, the destabilizing effect from the Kelvin-Helmholtz term is dominant and leads to larger ELM crashes.

  12. A Note on the Wave Action Density of a Viscous Instability Mode on a Laminar Free-shear Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsa, Thomas F.

    1994-01-01

    Using the assumptions of an incompressible and viscous flow at large Reynolds number, we derive the evolution equation for the wave action density of an instability wave traveling on top of a laminar free-shear flow. The instability is considered to be viscous; the purpose of the present work is to include the cumulative effect of the (locally) small viscous correction to the wave, over length and time scales on which the underlying base flow appears inhomogeneous owing to its viscous diffusion. As such, we generalize our previous work for inviscid waves. This generalization appears as an additional (but usually non-negligible) term in the equation for the wave action. The basic structure of the equation remains unaltered.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.-T.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic fields are pervasive in barred galaxies, especially in gaseous substructures such as dust lanes and nuclear rings. To explore the effects of magnetic fields on the formation of the substructures as well as on the mass inflow rates to the galaxy center, we run two-dimensional, ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We use a modified version of the Athena code whose numerical magnetic diffusivity is shown to be of third order in space. In the bar regions, magnetic fields are compressed and abruptly bent around the dust-lane shocks. The associated magnetic stress not only reduces the peak density of the dust-lane shocks but also removes angular momentum further from the gas that is moving radially in. Nuclear rings that form at the location of centrifugal barrier rather than resonance with the bar are smaller and more radially distributed, and the mass flow rate to the galaxy center is correspondingly larger in models with stronger magnetic fields. Outside the bar regions, the bar potential and strong shear conspire to amplify the field strength near the corotation resonance. The amplified fields transport angular momentum outward, producing trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The base of the magnetic arms are found to be unstable to a tearing-mode instability of magnetic reconnection. This produces numerous magnetic islands that eventually make the outer regions highly chaotic.

  14. Extra dissipation and flow uniformization due to elastic instabilities of shear-thinning polymer solutions in model porous media

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Anaïs; Bodiguel, Hugues; Beaumont, Julien; Clisson, Gérald; Colin, Annie

    2016-01-01

    We study flows of hydrolized polyacrylamide solutions in two dimensional porous media made using microfluidics, for which elastic effects are dominant. We focus on semi-dilute solutions (0.1%–0.4%) which exhibit a strong shear thinning behavior. We systematically measure the pressure drop and find that the effective permeability is dramatically higher than predicted when the Weissenberg number is greater than about 10. Observations of the streamlines of the flow reveal that this effect coincides with the onset of elastic instabilities. Moreover, and importantly for applications, we show using local measurements that the mean flow is modified: it appears to be more uniform at high Weissenberg number than for Newtonian fluids. These observations are compared and discussed using pore network simulations, which account for the effect of disorder and shear thinning on the flow properties. PMID:27478522

  15. Large-Amplitude Long-Wave Instability of a Supersonic Shear Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    For sufficiently high Mach numbers, small disturbances on a supersonic vortex sheet are known to grow in amplitude because of slow nonlinear wave steepening. Under the same external conditions, linear theory predicts slow growth of long-wave disturbances to a thin supersonic shear layer. An asymptotic formulation is given here which adds nonzero shear-layer thickness to the weakly nonlinear formulation for a vortex sheet. Spatial evolution is considered, for a spatially periodic disturbance having amplitude of the same order, in Reynolds number, as the shear-layer thickness. A quasi-equilibrium inviscid nonlinear critical layer is found, with effects of diffusion and slow growth appearing through nonsecularity condition. Other limiting cases are also considered, in an attempt to determine a relationship between the vortex-sheet limit and the long-wave limit for a thin shear layer; there appear to be three special limits, corresponding to disturbances of different amplitudes at different locations along the shear layer.

  16. Incompressible Modes Excited by Supersonic Shear in Boundary Layers: Acoustic CFS Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.

    2017-02-01

    We present an instability for exciting incompressible modes (e.g., gravity or Rossby modes) at the surface of a star accreting through a boundary layer. The instability excites a stellar mode by sourcing an acoustic wave in the disk at the boundary layer, which carries a flux of energy and angular momentum with the opposite sign as the energy and angular momentum density of the stellar mode. We call this instability the acoustic Chandrasekhar–Friedman–Schutz (CFS) instability, because of the direct analogy to the CFS instability for exciting modes on a rotating star by emission of energy in the form of gravitational waves. However, the acoustic CFS instability differs from its gravitational wave counterpart in that the fluid medium in which the acoustic wave propagates (i.e., the accretion disk) typically rotates faster than the star in which the incompressible mode is sourced. For this reason, the instability can operate even for a non-rotating star in the presence of an accretion disk. We discuss applications of our results to high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in accreting black hole and neutron star systems and dwarf nova oscillations in cataclysmic variables.

  17. The effect of plasma shear flow on drift Alfven instabilities of a finite beta plasma and on anomalous heating of ions by ion cyclotron turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Young Hyun; Lee, Hae June; Mikhailenko, Vladimir V.; Mikhailenko, Vladimir S.

    2016-01-01

    It was derived that the drift-Alfven instabilities with the shear flow parallel to the magnetic field have significant difference from the drift-Alfven instabilities of a shearless plasma when the ion temperature is comparable with electron temperature for a finite plasma beta. The velocity shear not only modifies the frequency and the growth rate of the known drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the inverse electron Landau damping, but also triggers a combined effect of the velocity shear and the inverse ion Landau damping, which manifests the development of the ion kinetic shear-flow-driven drift-Alfven instability. The excited unstable waves have the phase velocities along the magnetic field comparable with the ion thermal velocity, and the growth rate is comparable with the frequency. The development of this instability may be the efficient mechanism of the ion energization in shear flows. The levels of the drift--Alfven turbulence, resulted from the development of both instabilities, are determined from the renormalized nonlinear dispersion equation, which accounts for the nonlinear effect of the scattering of ions by the electromagnetic turbulence. The renormalized quasilinear equation for the ion distribution function, which accounts for the same effect of the scattering of ions by electromagnetic turbulence, is derived and employed for the analysis of the ion viscosity and ions heating, resulted from the interactions of ions with drift-Alfven turbulence. In the same way, the phenomena of the ion cyclotron turbulence and anomalous anisotropic heating of ions by ion cyclotron plasma turbulence has numerous practical applications in physics of the near-Earth space plasmas. Using the methodology of the shearing modes, the kinetic theory of the ion cyclotron turbulence of the plasma with transverse current with strong velocity shear has been developed.

  18. Nonlinear evolution of resistive tearing mode instability with shear flow and viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Morrison, P. J.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of shear flow on the nonlinear evolution of the tearing mode is investigated via numerical solutions of the resistive MHD equations in slab geometry, using a finite-difference alternative-direction implicit method. It was found that, when the shear flow is small (V less than 0.3), the tearing mode saturates within one resistive time, whereas for larger flows the nonlinear saturation develops on longer time scales. The magnetic energy release decreases and the saturation time increases with increasing values of V for both small and large resistivity. Shear flow was found to decrease the saturated magnetic island width and to generate currents far from the tearing layer. Results suggest that equilibrium shear flow may improve the confinement of tokamak plasma.

  19. Nonlinear evolution of resistive tearing mode instability with shear flow and viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Morrison, P. J.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of shear flow on the nonlinear evolution of the tearing mode is investigated via numerical solutions of the resistive MHD equations in slab geometry, using a finite-difference alternative-direction implicit method. It was found that, when the shear flow is small (V less than 0.3), the tearing mode saturates within one resistive time, whereas for larger flows the nonlinear saturation develops on longer time scales. The magnetic energy release decreases and the saturation time increases with increasing values of V for both small and large resistivity. Shear flow was found to decrease the saturated magnetic island width and to generate currents far from the tearing layer. Results suggest that equilibrium shear flow may improve the confinement of tokamak plasma.

  20. Impact of E × B shear flow on low-n MHD instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. G.; Xu, X. Q.; Ma, C. H.; Xi, P. W.; Kong, D. F.; Lei, Y. A.

    2017-05-01

    Recently, the stationary high confinement operations with improved pedestal conditions have been achieved in DIII-D [K. H. Burrell et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 056103 (2016)], accompanying the spontaneous transition from the coherent edge harmonic oscillation (EHO) to the broadband MHD turbulence state by reducing the neutral beam injection torque to zero. It is highly significant for the burning plasma devices such as ITER. Simulations about the effects of E × B shear flow on the quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) are carried out using the three-field two-fluid model in the field-aligned coordinate under the BOUT++ framework. Using the shifted circular cross-section equilibriums including bootstrap current, the results demonstrate that the E × B shear flow strongly destabilizes low-n peeling modes, which are mainly driven by the gradient of parallel current in peeling-dominant cases and are sensitive to the Er shear. Adopting the much more general shape of E × B shear ( ω E = E r / R B θ ) profiles, the linear and nonlinear BOUT++ simulations show qualitative consistence with the experiments. The stronger shear flow shifts the most unstable mode to lower-n and narrows the mode spectrum. At the meantime, the nonlinear simulations of the QH-mode indicate that the shear flow in both co- and counter directions of diamagnetic flow has some similar effects. The nonlinear mode interaction is enhanced during the mode amplitude saturation phase. These results reveal that the fundamental physics mechanism of the QH-mode may be shear flow and are significant for understanding the mechanism of EHO and QH-mode.

  1. Spontaneous generation of pure ice streams via flow instability: Role of longitudinal shear stresses and subglacial till

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayag, Roiy; Tziperman, Eli

    2008-05-01

    A significant portion of the ice discharge in ice sheets is drained through ice streams, with subglacial sediment (till) acting as a lubricant. The known importance of horizontal friction in shear margins to ice stream dynamics suggests a critical role of longitudinal stresses. The effects of subglacial till and longitudinal stresses on the stability of an ice sheet flow are studied by linear stability analysis of an idealized ice-till model in two horizontal dimensions. A power law-viscous constitutive relation is used, explicitly including longitudinal shear stresses. The till, which has compressible viscous rheology, affects the ice flow through bottom friction. We examine the possibility that pure ice streams develop via a spontaneous instability of ice flow. We demonstrate that this model can be made intrinsically unstable for a seemingly relevant range of parameters and that the wavelengths and growth rates that correspond to the most unstable modes are in rough agreement with observed pure ice streams. Instabilities occur owing to basal friction and meltwater production at the ice-till interface. The most unstable wavelength arise because of selective dissipation of both short and long perturbation scales. Longitudinal stress gradients stabilize short transverse wavelengths, while Nye diffusion stabilizes long transverse wavelengths. The selection of an intermediate unstable wavelength occurs, however, only for certain parameter and perturbation structure choices. These results do not change qualitatively for a Newtonian ice flow law, indicating no significant role to shear thinning, although this may very well be due to the restrictive assumptions of the model and analysis.

  2. Shear flow instabilities induced by trapped ion modes in collisionless temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Palermo, F.; Garbet, X.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Ghizzo, A.

    2015-04-15

    One important issue in turbulence self-organization is the interplay between the Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) instability and streamers and/or zonal flows. This question has been debated for a long time. The effects of the KH instability and its position in the sequence of events between streamers, turbulence, and zonal flows have been investigated with a reduced gyro-bounce averaged kinetic code devoted to study the primary ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability linked to trapped ion modes (TIM). In toroidal geometry, the specific dynamics of TIM linked to trapped particles becomes important when the frequency of ITG modes falls below the ion bounce frequency, allowing one to average on both the cyclotron and bounce motion fast time scales. This reduction of the number of degrees of freedom leads to a strong reduction of computer resources (memory and computation time). Bounce-averaged gyrokinetic code can be considered as a toy model able to describe basic structures of turbulent transport in tokamak devices. In particular, by means of this code, we have observed that the energy injected in the system by the TIM instability is exchanged between streamers and zonal flows by means of KH vortices that grow along these structures in the nonlinear phase. The energy transfer occurs throughout the relaxation phase of the streamer growth leading to a modification of the KH modes and to the generation of the zonal flows.

  3. First Laboratory Observation of a Shear Alfvén Wave Parametric Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, S.; Carter, T.; Vincena, S.; Pribyl, P.; Rossi, G.; Lin, Y.; Sydora, R.

    2016-10-01

    Alfvén waves, a fundamental mode of magnetized plasmas, are ubiquitous in lab and space. The non-linear behavior of these modes is thought to play a key role in important problems such as the heating of the solar corona, solar wind turbulence, and Alfvén eigenmodes in tokamaks. In particular, theoretical predictions show that these Alfvén waves may be unstable to various parametric instabilities. Recent results from the Large Plasma Device at UCLA have recorded the first observation of a sheer Alfvén wave parametric instability in the laboratory [Dorfman and Carter, PRL 2016]. When a single finite ω /Ωi , finite k⊥ Alfvén wave is launched above a threshold amplitude, three daughter waves are observed: two sideband Alfvén waves co-propagating with the pump and a low frequency nonresonant mode. Frequency and parallel wave number matching relations are satisfied. Although these features are consistent with the k⊥ = 0 modulational instability theory, the theoretical growth rate is too small to explain observations. Efforts are underway to determine the nature of the perpendicular (to the background magnetic field) nonlinear drive, conduct comparative simulation studies, and identify parametric instabilities in spacecraft data. Supported by DOE, NSF, and NASA Eddy Postdoctoral Fellowship.

  4. Finite Larmor radius assisted velocity shear stabilization of the interchange instability in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ng Sheungwah; Hassam, A.B.

    2005-06-15

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects, originally shown to stabilize magnetized plasma interchange modes at short wavelength, are shown to assist velocity shear stabilization of long wavelength interchanges. It is shown that the FLR effects result in stabilization with roughly the same efficacy as the stabilization from dissipative (resistive and viscous) effects found earlier.

  5. EXPLOSIVE INSTABILITY AND CORONAL HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Liu, J.-H.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Nigro, G.

    2009-10-20

    The observed energy-loss rate from the solar corona implies that the coronal magnetic field has a critical angle at which energy is released. It has been hypothesized that at this critical angle an 'explosive instability' would occur, leading to an enhanced conversion of magnetic energy into heat. In earlier investigations, we have shown that a shear-dependent magnetohydrodynamic process called 'secondary instability' has many of the distinctive features of the hypothetical 'explosive instability'. In this paper, we give the first demonstration that this 'secondary instability' occurs in a system with line-tied magnetic fields and boundary shearing-basically the situation described by Parker. We also show that, as the disturbance due to secondary instability attains finite amplitude, there is a transition to turbulence which leads to enhanced dissipation of magnetic and kinetic energy. These results are obtained from numerical simulations performed with a new parallelized, viscoresistive, three-dimensional code that solves the cold plasma equations. The code employs a Fourier collocation-finite difference spatial discretization, and uses a third-order Runge-Kutta temporal discretization.

  6. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Juan; Kovtun, Pavel

    2017-05-01

    We present the equations of relativistic hydrodynamics coupled to dynamical electromagnetic fields, including the effects of polarization, electric fields, and the derivative expansion. We enumerate the transport coefficients at leading order in derivatives, including electrical conductivities, viscosities, and thermodynamic coefficients. We find the constraints on transport coefficients due to the positivity of entropy production, and derive the corresponding Kubo formulas. For the neutral state in a magnetic field, small fluctuations include Alfvén waves, magnetosonic waves, and the dissipative modes. For the state with a non-zero dynamical charge density in a magnetic field, plasma oscillations gap out all propagating modes, except for Alfvén-like waves with a quadratic dispersion relation. We relate the transport coefficients in the "conventional" magnetohydrodynamics (formulated using Maxwell's equations in matter) to those in the "dual" version of magnetohydrodynamics (formulated using the conserved magnetic flux).

  7. GRIM: General Relativistic Implicit Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Mani; Foucart, Francois; Gammie, Charles F.

    2017-02-01

    GRIM (General Relativistic Implicit Magnetohydrodynamics) evolves a covariant extended magnetohydrodynamics model derived by treating non-ideal effects as a perturbation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. Non-ideal effects are modeled through heat conduction along magnetic field lines and a difference between the pressure parallel and perpendicular to the field lines. The model relies on an effective collisionality in the disc from wave-particle scattering and velocity-space (mirror and firehose) instabilities. GRIM, which runs on CPUs as well as on GPUs, combines time evolution and primitive variable inversion needed for conservative schemes into a single step using only the residuals of the governing equations as inputs. This enables the code to be physics agnostic as well as flexible regarding time-stepping schemes.

  8. Use of a fluid membrane in the observation of a shear instability caused by rotational motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couder, Y.

    1981-07-01

    An experiment to study the shear layer disturbances formed around a cylinder rotating in a fluid by means of a fluid film is presented. A cylinder with a large radius relative to its height was covered with a soapy film over the top, while motor driven disks with variable speed and radius were inserted from the bottom. Traces of HCl and NH3 were added to the top of the disk to form a smoke which was entrained on the inner side of the soapy film as the disk below turned and turbulent shear zones formed at certain critical speeds of the inner disks. A speed was eventually found with total oscillation of the vortexes. Replacement of the soap film with glass required much greater thickness of the transparency and higher speeds of the rotating disks, giving rise to unstable vortex formation. The method is effective in quantitative visualization of vortex formation and mode transitions.

  9. Baroclinic Critical Layers and the Zombie Vortex Instability (ZVI) in Stratified, Rotating Shear Flows: Where They Form and Why

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Huerre, Patrick; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Pei, Suyang; Rui, Maryann; Marcus, Philip

    2015-11-01

    It has been found recently that baroclinic critical layers are responsible for a new finite-amplitude instability, called the Zombie Vortex Instability (ZVI), in stratified (with Brunt-Väisälä frequency N) flows, rotating with angular velocity Ω and shear σ. ZVI occurs via baroclinic critical layers that create linearly unstable vortex layers, which roll-up into vortices. Those vortices excite new baroclinic critical layers, which form new generations of vortices, resulting in ``vortex self-replication'' that fills the fluid with turbulent vortices. To understand the role of baroclinic critical layers in ZVI, we analyze their structures with matched asymptotic expansions, assuming viscosity determines the magnitude and thickness of the critical layer. We verify our analytically obtained leading order inner and outer layer solutions with numerical simulations. In addition, maps of the control parameter space (Reynolds number, N/ Ω and σ/ Ω) are presented that show two regimes where ZVI occurs, and the physics that determines the boundaries of the two regimes is interpreted. The parameter map and its underlying physics provide guidance for designing practical laboratory experiments in which ZVI could be observed.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann model for resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, F; Mendoza, M; Succi, S; Herrmann, H J

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we develop a lattice Boltzmann model for relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Even though the model is derived for resistive MHD, it is shown that it is numerically robust even in the high conductivity (ideal MHD) limit. In order to validate the numerical method, test simulations are carried out for both ideal and resistive limits, namely the propagation of Alfvén waves in the ideal MHD and the evolution of current sheets in the resistive regime, where very good agreement is observed comparing to the analytical results. Additionally, two-dimensional magnetic reconnection driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is studied and the effects of different parameters on the reconnection rate are investigated. It is shown that the density ratio has a negligible effect on the magnetic reconnection rate, while an increase in shear velocity decreases the reconnection rate. Additionally, it is found that the reconnection rate is proportional to σ-1/2, σ being the conductivity, which is in agreement with the scaling law of the Sweet-Parker model. Finally, the numerical model is used to study the magnetic reconnection in a stellar flare. Three-dimensional simulation suggests that the reconnection between the background and flux rope magnetic lines in a stellar flare can take place as a result of a shear velocity in the photosphere.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann model for resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, F.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we develop a lattice Boltzmann model for relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Even though the model is derived for resistive MHD, it is shown that it is numerically robust even in the high conductivity (ideal MHD) limit. In order to validate the numerical method, test simulations are carried out for both ideal and resistive limits, namely the propagation of Alfvén waves in the ideal MHD and the evolution of current sheets in the resistive regime, where very good agreement is observed comparing to the analytical results. Additionally, two-dimensional magnetic reconnection driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is studied and the effects of different parameters on the reconnection rate are investigated. It is shown that the density ratio has a negligible effect on the magnetic reconnection rate, while an increase in shear velocity decreases the reconnection rate. Additionally, it is found that the reconnection rate is proportional to σ-1 / 2, σ being the conductivity, which is in agreement with the scaling law of the Sweet-Parker model. Finally, the numerical model is used to study the magnetic reconnection in a stellar flare. Three-dimensional simulation suggests that the reconnection between the background and flux rope magnetic lines in a stellar flare can take place as a result of a shear velocity in the photosphere.

  12. Orbital Advection with Magnetohydrodynamics and Vector Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyra, Wladimir; McNally, Colin P.; Heinemann, Tobias; Masset, Frédéric

    2017-10-01

    Orbital advection is a significant bottleneck in disk simulations, and a particularly tricky one when used in connection with magnetohydrodynamics. We have developed an orbital advection algorithm suitable for the induction equation with magnetic potential. The electromotive force is split into advection and shear terms, and we find that we do not need an advective gauge since solving the orbital advection implicitly precludes the shear term from canceling the advection term. We prove and demonstrate the third order in time accuracy of the scheme. The algorithm is also suited to non-magnetic problems. Benchmarked results of (hydrodynamical) planet–disk interaction and of the magnetorotational instability are reproduced. We include detailed descriptions of the construction and selection of stabilizing dissipations (or high-frequency filters) needed to generate practical results. The scheme is self-consistent, accurate, and elegant in its simplicity, making it particularly efficient for straightforward finite-difference methods. As a result of the work, the algorithm is incorporated in the public version of the Pencil Code, where it can be used by the community.

  13. Velocity shear driven instability and its effect on magnetic reconnection: MMS observations compared with PIC simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, K. J.; Choi, E.; Sibeck, D. G.; Giles, B. L.; Goldstein, M.; Pollock, C.; Ergun, R.; Gershman, D. J.; Dorelli, J.; Avanov, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Burch, J. L.; Russell, C.; Strangeway, R. J.; Torbert, R. B.

    2016-12-01

    Both observations and simulations indicate the frequent occurrence, often simultaneously, of current-driven magnetic reconnection and velocity shear driven flow vortices on the Earth's dayside magnetopause. MMS spacecraft observations not only enable the quantitative testing of micro and meso-scale reconnection physics but also permit the calculation of flow vorticities. Here we inspect MMS observations including an event on 19 September 2015 to determine how the current-driven and shear-driven instabilities interact to determine microscopic (magnetic topology) to macroscopic (merging rate) aspects of dayside reconnection. In particular, we examine the effects of flow vorticity on dayside dynamics in terms of R, the ratio between the plasma vorticity parallel to the magnetic field and the cyclotron frequency for each relevant species. We consider two cases: (1) the dusk magnetopause where the flow vorticity is parallel to the magnetic field and ions gyrate opposite the vortex and (2) the dawn magnetopause where the flow vorticity is antiparallel to the magnetic field and ions gyrate with the vortex. Our synthesized MMS observations and PIC simulation results show that flow vorticity, a fluid quantity, when it is sufficiently large (i.e., greater than the relevant gyro-frequencies), becomes an important parameter indicating coupling to the kinetic regime.

  14. FLUID DYNAMICS PRIZE: W.C. Reynolds, Stanford University, presiding: Core Dynamics Instability of a Vortex in Shear: A Physical-Space Cascade Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Fazle

    1998-11-01

    We study a rectilinear vortex normal to a uniform shear - a prototypical coherent structure in shear flows. A newly found instability of the vortex due to core size variations, absent without shear, is shown to result from stretching by shear of helically twisted vortex lines. Core Dynamics (CD)-induced strong axial flow generates a large low-enstrophy bubble, surrounded by a thin sheath of vorticity, which rolls up into fine-scale vortices due to localized instability. Additionally, fine-scale 3D vorticity fluctuations are generated within the bubble by vortex filament folding and reconnection. Despite its smaller linear growth rate compared to vortex bending modes, the CD instability (CDI) is shown to dominate transition and cascade when both modes are present. In particular, CDI of spanwise rolls by oblique modes dominates transition in a mixing layer (ML) even in the presence of well developed ribs. Interestingly, initiation of CDI in a ML closely resembles streak instability in fully-developed near-wall turbulence, the latter producing streamwise vortices and hence enhanced drag.

  15. Magnetic viscosity by localized shear flow instability in magnetized accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, R.; Tajima, T.

    1995-01-01

    Differentially rotating disks are subject to the axisymmetric instability for perfectly conducting plasma in the presence of poloidal magnetic fields. For nonaxisymmetric perturbations, the authors find localized unstable eigenmodes whose eigenfunction is confined between two Alfven singularities at {omega}{sub d} = {+-} {omega}{sub A}, where {omega}{sub d} is the Doppler-shifted wave frequency, and {omega}{sub A} = k{parallel}v{sub A} is the Alfven frequency. The radial width of the unstable eigenfunction is {Delta}x {approximately} {omega}{sub A}/(Ak{sub y}), where A is the Oort`s constant, and k{sub y} is the azimuthal wave number. The growth rate of the fundamental mode is larger for smaller value of k{sub y}/k{sub z}. The maximum growth rate when k{sub y}/k{sub z} {approximately} 0.1 is {approximately} 0.2{Omega} for the Keplerian disk with local angular velocity {Omega}. It is found that the purely growing mode disappears when k{sub y}/k{sub z} > 0.12. In a perfectly conducting disk, the instability grows even when the seed magnetic field is infinitesimal. Inclusion of the resistivity, however, leads to the appearance of an instability threshold. When the resistivity {eta} depends on the instability-induced turbulent magnetic fields {delta}B as {eta}([{delta}B{sup 2}]), the marginal stability condition self-consistently determines the {alpha} parameter of the angular momentum transport due to the magnetic stress. For fully ionized disks, the magnetic viscosity parameter {alpha}{sub B} is between 0.001 and 1. The authors` three-dimensional MHD simulation confirms these unstable eigenmodes. It also shows that the {alpha} parameter observed in simulation is between 0.01 and 1, in agreement with theory. The observationally required smaller {alpha} in the quiescent phase of accretion disks in dwarf novae may be explained by the decreased ionization due to the temperature drop.

  16. Localized Density Instabilities Driven By Interface Shear and Their Influence on Removal of Sediment from Buoyant Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhnia, M.; Strom, K.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment removal rates from buoyant river discharges are typically scaled with particle settling velocity. However, some field and laboratory data suggest that removal can take place at rates higher than those predicted by individual particle settling. It is possible that these enhanced removal rates could potentially be due, at least in part, to mass settling of fluid and sediment near the fresh and saltwater interface. Fluid shear at the interface can mix the freshwater and sediment with the underlying saltwater and lead to pockets or bands of saltwater and sediment that are more dense than the underlying clear saltwater; resulting in an unstable configuration that can lead to rapid vertical transport of sediment. In this study, we perform laboratory experiments to study the enhancement of sediment removal from buoyant plumes under the effect of shear-driven gravitational instabilities. To do this, we ran a 5 cm deep layer of freshwater with flocculated kaolinite over a 50 cm deep basin of clear saltwater in a 1 m long glass flume under a range of upper layer velocities, concentrations, and initial stratification ratios. A Vectrino profiler is placed such that it constantly records velocity profiles from 2 cm above to 2 cm below the original interface. The velocity of the buoyant layer is controlled using a vertical head pipe at the flume inlet, and the Richardson number is varied from 0.05 to 0.25. The interface is monitored with a digital camera and a laser sheet, and Rhodamine B is added to the buoyant layer for better visualization. Snapshots from the video are used to observe the overall dynamics and developments of instabilities at the interface. The sediment concentration of the inflow and outflow of the system are continuously measured with a pair of OBS sensors, and floc size is measured with a floc imaging system and converted to a floc settling velocity. The difference in sediment concentration between the two OBS sensors is used along with a mass

  17. Singing sand as an instability arising from a shear-plug flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Courrech Du Pont, Sylvain; Douady, Stéphane

    2010-05-01

    Desert sand dunes can have the peculiar ability to emit a loud sound up to 110 dB, with a well-defined frequency: this is the song of the dunes. After the early travelers who first mentioned it (Darwin, Marco-Polo, ...) later scientific observations have shown that if not all dunes sing, all the singing dunes are composed of dry, well-sorted and coated sand; this sound occurs when the sand is sheared, and particularly on field during avalanches on a slip face of a singing dune? Several observations—recent and less recent—have shown that the sound frequency is likely equal to the shear rate of the flow, or at least is varying in the same way. We have been able to reproduce these avalanches in laboratory on an inclined plane with singing sand from Morocco and Oman, which has made possible to study them more accurately than on the field. Signals of accelerometers measuring local vertical oscillations of the flowing surface show that the phenomenon does not require resonance in the depth or in the dune. Measures of velocity and flow rate during avalanches enhance the co-existence of a plug flow with a large shear band underneath, both strongly correlated to the sound emission. A new model has been developed, based on the mechanical interaction between the plug area and the transient force chains in the flow. This model predicts a threshold that depends on the compacity of the granular media and on the surface friction and adhesion properties of the grains, and the value predicted fits quantitively well the data collected from avalanches, as well as from other experimental set-up of singing sand.

  18. Collisionless reversed magnetic shear trapped electron instability and contribution of sidebands to anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogister, André L.; Singh, Raghvendra

    2005-11-01

    By keeping account of the trapped electron ∇B and curvature drifts, it is found that the spatial decay of the collisionless electron drift wave is governed either by the trapped electron response or by the resonant interaction of ions with the sidebands of the primary oscillation. In the former case, pairs of spatially bounded unstable and damped solutions are obtained for negative magnetic shear (ŝ<0) if, as usual, LTe=1/∂rlnTe<0; there are no bounded solutions if ŝLTe<0. In the latter case, there is either a set of bounded damped solutions if ηi>0 or a set of bounded unstable solutions if ηi<0. The unstable modes have a radiating character and the growth rates are γ ˜(2n+1)√1+2q2 ∣ŝ∣∣LNωe*/qR∣ (n is the Hermite polynomial solution index, q the safety factor, ŝ the magnetic shear parameter, R the major radius, ωe* the electron diamagnetic frequency, LN=1/∂rlnNe, and ηi=LN/LTi).The sidebands are responsible for unusually large ratios Qe/TeΓe, where Qe and Γe are the anomalous electron energy flux and the particle flux. These results may explain the box-type Te profile observed in lower hybrid current drive reversed magnetic shear plasmas on the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak 60 Upgrade (JT-60U) [H. Ninomiya and the JT-60U Team, Phys. Fluids B 4, 2070 (1992)]. It is finally demonstrated that the ballooning hypothesis generally leads to conflicting requirements: it is thus hardly relevant for the electron drift branch! The "radiating" boundary condition that has formerly been imposed on the slab solution is finally discussed.

  19. The anterior shear and distraction tests for craniocervical instability. An evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Osmotherly, Peter G; Rivett, Darren A; Rowe, Lindsay J

    2012-10-01

    Screening for integrity of the ligaments of the craniocervical complex has been suggested prior to the application of manual techniques to the upper cervical spine. However, most tests proposed lack validation limiting their usefulness clinically. This study examined the effect of the anterior shear test for the transverse ligament and the distraction test for the tectorial membrane in normal volunteers. MRI was performed in supine in neutral and end-range stress test positions in 16 individuals using proton density-weighted sequences and a standard head coil in a 3-T system. Measurements were made with respect to a strictly standardised protocol. The anterior shear test was assessed using changes in atlantodental interval and distance from the anterior arch of the atlas to the posterior aspect of the odontoid process. Distraction testing for the tectorial membrane was assessed by changes in basion-dental interval and by direct measurement of the tectorial membrane. Differences were compared using Wilcoxon Sign Rank tests or paired t-test depending upon each variables assessment of normality. Anterior shear testing resulted in a 0.41 mm mean increase in atlantodental interval (p = 0.03) and 0.35 mm mean increase in axial plane distance (p = 0.05). Distraction testing for the tectorial membrane resulted in a 0.64 mm increase in basion-dental interval (p < 0.01) and a 1.11 mm increase in direct ligament length measurement (p = 0.02). Reliability of measurements ranged from moderate to substantial. These results indicate that these tests produce a consistent direct effect on the transverse ligament and the tectorial membrane which is consistent with their theorised mechanism for clinical use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of Magnetic Shear on the Collisional Current Driven Ion Cyclotron Instability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-05

    I DRIVEN ION CYCLOTRON INSTA9ILITY(U) NAVAL RESEARCH LAB MASHINOTON DC P SATYRNARAYRNA ET AL. S5 JUL 64 UNCLASSIFIED NRLD-NR-5345 FIG 2/9 L II 13J6...These results are verified by directly solving Eq. (14) using a numerical shooting code. We present the former results in the following. In Fig . 1 we...some light on the magnetic shear required to significantly reduce the growth rate, we plot in Fig . 2, the normalized growth rate versus the normalized

  1. Formation of Kinneyia via shear-induced instabilities in microbial mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Katherine; Herminghaus, Stephan; Porada, Hubertus; Goehring, Lucas

    2013-03-01

    Kinneyia are a class of microbially mediated sedimentary fossils. Characterised by clearly defined ripple structures, Kinneyia are generally found in areas that were formally littoral habitats and covered by microbial mats. To date there has been no conclusive explanation as to the processes involved in the formation of these fossils. Microbial mats behave like viscoelastic fluids. We propose that the key mechanism involved in the formation of Kinneyia is a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability induced in a viscoelastic film under flowing water. A ripple corrugation is spontaneously induced in the film and grows in amplitude over time. Theoretical predictions show that the ripple instability has a wavelength proportional to the thickness of the film. Experiments carried out using viscoelastic films confirm this prediction. The ripple pattern that forms has a wavelength roughly three times the thickness of the film. This behaviour is independent of the viscosity of the film and the flow conditions. Well-ordered patterns form, with both honeycomb-like and parallel ridges being observed, depending on the flow speed. These patterns correspond well with those found in Kinneyia fossils, with similar morphologies, wavelengths and amplitudes being observed.

  2. Formation of Kinneyia via shear-induced instabilities in microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Katherine; Herminghaus, Stephan; Porada, Hubertus; Goehring, Lucas

    2013-12-13

    Kinneyia are a class of microbially mediated sedimentary fossils. Characterized by clearly defined ripple structures, Kinneyia are generally found in areas that were formally littoral habitats and covered by microbial mats. To date, there has been no conclusive explanation of the processes involved in the formation of these fossils. Microbial mats behave like viscoelastic fluids. We propose that the key mechanism involved in the formation of Kinneyia is a Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability induced in a viscoelastic film under flowing water. A ripple corrugation is spontaneously induced in the film and grows in amplitude over time. Theoretical predictions show that the ripple instability has a wavelength proportional to the thickness of the film. Experiments carried out using viscoelastic films confirm this prediction. The ripple pattern that forms has a wavelength roughly three times the thickness of the film. This behaviour is independent of the viscosity of the film and the flow conditions. Laboratory-analogue Kinneyia were formed via the sedimentation of glass beads, which preferentially deposit in the troughs of the ripples. Well-ordered patterns form, with both honeycomb-like and parallel ridges being observed, depending on the flow speed. These patterns correspond well with those found in Kinneyia, with similar morphologies, wavelengths and amplitudes being observed.

  3. Formation of Kinneyia via shear-induced instabilities in microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Katherine; Herminghaus, Stephan; Porada, Hubertus; Goehring, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    Kinneyia are a class of microbially mediated sedimentary fossils. Characterized by clearly defined ripple structures, Kinneyia are generally found in areas that were formally littoral habitats and covered by microbial mats. To date, there has been no conclusive explanation of the processes involved in the formation of these fossils. Microbial mats behave like viscoelastic fluids. We propose that the key mechanism involved in the formation of Kinneyia is a Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability induced in a viscoelastic film under flowing water. A ripple corrugation is spontaneously induced in the film and grows in amplitude over time. Theoretical predictions show that the ripple instability has a wavelength proportional to the thickness of the film. Experiments carried out using viscoelastic films confirm this prediction. The ripple pattern that forms has a wavelength roughly three times the thickness of the film. This behaviour is independent of the viscosity of the film and the flow conditions. Laboratory-analogue Kinneyia were formed via the sedimentation of glass beads, which preferentially deposit in the troughs of the ripples. Well-ordered patterns form, with both honeycomb-like and parallel ridges being observed, depending on the flow speed. These patterns correspond well with those found in Kinneyia, with similar morphologies, wavelengths and amplitudes being observed.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Boquist, Carl W.; Marchant, David D.

    1978-01-01

    A ceramic-metal composite suitable for use in a high-temperature environment consists of a refractory ceramic matrix containing 10 to 50 volume percent of a continuous high-temperature metal reinforcement. In a specific application of the composite, as an electrode in a magnetohydrodynamic generator, the one surface of the electrode which contacts the MHD fluid may have a layer of varying thickness of nonreinforced refractory ceramic for electrode temperature control. The side walls of the electrode may be coated with a refractory ceramic insulator. Also described is an electrode-insulator system for a MHD channel.

  5. The nucleation of "fast" and "slow" stick slip instabilities in sheared granular aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkolis, Evangelos; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Niemeijer, André

    2017-04-01

    Seismological observations in the past few decades have revealed a diversity of slip behaviors of faults, involving interactions and transition between slow to fast slip phenomena. Field studies show that exhumed fault zones comprise mixtures of materials with variable frictional strength and stability. Emergent models of slip diversity emphasize the role of heterogeneities of fault zone properties and the potential interactions between seismic and aseismic deformation. Here, we develop analog laboratory experiments to study the mechanics of heterogeneous faults with the goal to identify factors controlling their slip stability and rupture style. We report on results from room temperature sliding experiments using a rotary shear apparatus. We simulated gouge heterogeneity by using materials with different frictional strength and stability. At room temperature conditions, dry glass beads typically stick slip, whereas dry granular calcite exhibits stable sliding. The peak strength of glass beads aggregates is typically lower than that of granular calcite aggregates. Our samples consisted of a layer of glass beads sandwiched between two layers of granular calcite. The initial particle size was between 100 and 200 μm for both materials and the initial thickness of each layer was about 1.5 mm. We tested our layered aggregates under 1 to 7 MPa normal stress and at sliding velocities between 1 and 100 μm/s. Within that range of conditions, high normal stress and slow sliding velocities promoted fast, regular stick slip. For normal stress values of less than about 4 MPa, the recurrence time and stress drop of stick slips became irregular, particularly at sliding rates above 20 μm/s. As the accumulated shear displacement increased, slip events became slower and the magnitudes of their stress drop, compaction and slip distance decreased. We recorded acoustic emissions (AEs) associated with each slip event (fast and slow) and estimated their source azimuth. AE activity was

  6. Some wind and instability parameters associated with strong and violent tornadoes: 1. Wind shear and helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Jonathan M.; Johns, Robert H.

    Although the vertical wind profile through the troposphere has been recognized to be important in tornado development since the beginning of tornado forecasting efforts in the 1950s, only recently have researchers begun to investigate more detailed characteristics of wind profiles contributing to low-level mesocyclone formation and tornado production in supercell thunderstorms. Davies-Jones et al. [1990] provide an overview of recent work completed in this area. From modeling results and storm observations, it appears that both (1) the wind profile in the low levels (i.e., the storm inflow layer) and (2) the strength of the wind field and shear extending through a deeper layer of the troposphere (i.e., through middle levels) are important to supercell-induced tornado development.

  7. Flow Shear Effects in the Onset Physics of Resistive MHD Instabilities in Tokamaks. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Dylan P.

    2013-04-24

    The progress in this research centers around the computational analysis of flow shear effects in the onset of a 3/2 mode driven by a 1/1 mode in DIII-D equilibria. The initial idea was to try and calculate, via nonlinear simulations with NIMROD, the effects of rotation shear on driven 3/2 and 2/1 seed island physics, in experimentally relevant DIIID equilibria. The simulations indicated that very small seed islands were directly driven, as shielding between the sawtooth and the surfaces is significant at the high Lundquist numbers of the experiment. Instead, long after the initial crash the difference in linear stability of the 3/2, which remained prevalent despite the flattening of the core profiles from the sawtooth, contributed to a difference in the eventual seed island evolution. Essentially the seed islands grew or decayed long after the sawtooth crash, and not directly from it. Effectively the dominant 1/1 mode was found to be dragging the coupled modes surrounding it at a high rate through the plasma at their surfaces. The 1/1 mode is locked to the local frame of the plasma in the core, where the flow rate is greatest. The resonant perturbations at the surrounding surfaces propagate in the 'high slip regime' in the language of Fitzpatrick. Peaked flux averaged jxb forces (see Figs. 1 and 2) agree with localized flow modifications at the surfaces in analogy with Ebrahimi, PRL 2007. We track the mode into nonlinear saturation and have found oscillatory states in the evolution. During a visit (11/09) to Tulsa by R.J. LaHaye (GA), it became clear that similar oscillatory states are observed in DIII-D for these types of discharges.

  8. Saturation of the magnetorotational instability in the unstratified shearing box with zero net flux: convergence in taller boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ji-Ming; Stone, James M.; Huang, Chelsea X.

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies of the non-linear regime of the magnetorotational instability in one particular type of shearing box model - unstratified with no net magnetic flux - find that without explicit dissipation (viscosity and resistivity) the saturation amplitude decreases with increasing numerical resolution. We show that this result is strongly dependent on the vertical aspect ratio of the computational domain Lz/Lx. When Lz/Lx ≲ 1, we recover previous results. However, when the vertical domain is extended Lz/Lx ≳ 2.5, we find the saturation level of the stress is greatly increased (giving a ratio of stress to pressure α ≳ 0.1), and moreover the results are independent of numerical resolution. Consistent with previous results, we find that saturation of the magnetorotational (MRI) in this regime is controlled by a cyclic dynamo which generates patches of strong toroidal field that switches sign on scales of Lx in the vertical direction. We speculate that when Lz/Lx ≲ 1, the dynamo is inhibited by the small size of the vertical domain, leading to the puzzling dependence of saturation amplitude on resolution. We show that previous toy models developed to explain the MRI dynamo are consistent with our results, and that the cyclic pattern of toroidal fields observed in stratified shearing box simulations (leading to the so-called butterfly diagram) may also be related. In tall boxes the saturation amplitude is insensitive to whether or not explicit dissipation is included in the calculations, at least for large magnetic Reynolds and Prandtl number. Finally, we show MRI turbulence in tall domains has a smaller critical Pmc, and an extended lifetime compared to Lz/Lx ≲ 1 boxes.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic electrode

    DOEpatents

    Marchant, David D.; Killpatrick, Don H.

    1978-01-01

    An electrode capable of withstanding high temperatures and suitable for use as a current collector in the channel of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator consists of a sintered powdered metal base portion, the upper surface of the base being coated with a first layer of nickel aluminide, an intermediate layer of a mixture of nickel aluminide - refractory ceramic on the first layer and a third or outer layer of a refractory ceramic material on the intermediate layer. The sintered powdered metal base resists spalling by the ceramic coatings and permits greater electrode compliance to thermal shock. The density of the powdered metal base can be varied to allow optimization of the thermal conductivity of the electrode and prevent excess heat loss from the channel.

  10. Pulling out a peptide chain from -sheet crystallite: Propagation of instability of H-bonds under shear force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Changjian; Li, Dechang; Cheng, Yuan; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yongwei; Ji, Baohua

    2015-06-01

    Anti-parallel -sheet crystallite as the main component of silk fibroin has attracted much attention due to its superior mechanical properties. In this study, we examine the processes of pulling a peptide chain from -sheet crystallite using steered molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the rupture behavior of the crystallite. We show that the failure of -sheet crystallite was accompanied by a propagation of instability of hydrogen-bonds (H-bonds) in the crystallite. In addition, we find that there is an optimum size of the crystallite at which the H-bonds can work cooperatively to achieve the highest shear strength. In addition, we find that the stiffness of loading device and the loading rates have significant effects on the rupture behavior of -sheet crystallite. The stiff loading device facilitates the rebinding of the H-bond network in the stick-slip motion between the chains, while the soft one suppresses it. Moreover, the rupture force of -sheet crystallites decreases with loading rate. Particularly, when the loading rate decreases to a critical value, the rupture force of the -sheet crystallite becomes independent of the loading rates. This study provides atomistic details of rupture behaviors of -sheet crystallite, and, therefore, sheds valuable light on the underlying mechanism of the superior mechanical properties of silk fibroin.

  11. The development of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in relation to convection activity and synoptic systems in AVE 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Data from the Fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment were used to investigate conditions/factors responsible for the development (local time rate-of-change) of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in areas with varying degrees of convective activity. AVE IV sounding data were taken at 3 or 6 h intervals during a 36 h period on 24-25 April 1975 over approximately the eastern half of the United States. An error analysis was performed for each variable studied.

  12. Some Investigations of the General Instability of Stiffened Metal Cylinders VI : Stiffened Metal Cylinders Subjected to Combined Bending and Transverse Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    This is the sixth of a series of reports covering an investigation of the general instability problem by the California Institute of Technology. The first five reports of this series cover investigations of the general instability problem under the loading conditions of pure bending and were prepared under the sponsorship of the Civil Aeronautics Administration. This report and the succeeding reports of this series cover the work done on other loading conditions under the sponsorship of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. This report summarizes the work that has been carried on in the experimental investigation of the problem of general instability of stiffened metal cylinders subjected to combined bending and transverse shear at the C.I.T. This part of the investigation includes tests on 55 sheet-covered specimens.

  13. DISCO: A 3D Moving-mesh Magnetohydrodynamics Code Designed for the Study of Astrophysical Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffell, Paul C.

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the publicly available moving-mesh magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code DISCO. DISCO is efficient and accurate at evolving orbital fluid motion in two and three dimensions, especially at high Mach numbers. DISCO employs a moving-mesh approach utilizing a dynamic cylindrical mesh that can shear azimuthally to follow the orbital motion of the gas. The moving mesh removes diffusive advection errors and allows for longer time-steps than a static grid. MHD is implemented in DISCO using an HLLD Riemann solver and a novel constrained transport (CT) scheme that is compatible with the mesh motion. DISCO is tested against a wide variety of problems, which are designed to test its stability, accuracy, and scalability. In addition, several MHD tests are performed which demonstrate the accuracy and stability of the new CT approach, including two tests of the magneto-rotational instability, one testing the linear growth rate and the other following the instability into the fully turbulent regime.

  14. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, E. C. Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-15

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. We also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.

  15. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    DOE PAGES

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; ...

    2015-06-24

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varyingmore » two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. In addition, we also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.« less

  16. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-24

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. In addition, we also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic mechanism for pedestal formation.

    PubMed

    Guazzotto, L; Betti, R

    2011-09-16

    Time-dependent two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations are carried out for tokamak plasmas with edge poloidal flow. Differently from conventional equilibrium theory, a density pedestal all around the edge is obtained when the poloidal velocity exceeds the poloidal sound speed. The outboard pedestal is induced by the transonic discontinuity, the inboard one by mass redistribution. The density pedestal follows the formation of a highly sheared flow at the transonic surface. These results may be relevant to the L-H transition and pedestal formation in high performance tokamak plasmas.

  18. Nonlinear evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the double current sheet configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Aohua; Li, Jiquan; Liu, Jinyuan; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2016-03-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability driven by a radially antisymmetric shear flow in the double current sheet configuration is numerically investigated based on a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model. Simulations reveal different nonlinear fate of the KH instability depending on the amplitude of the shear flow, which restricts the strength of the KH instability. For strong shear flows far above the KH instability threshold, the linear electrostatic-type KH instability saturates and achieves a vortex flow dominated quasi-steady state of the electromagnetic (EM) KH turbulence with large-amplitude zonal flows as well as zonal fields. The magnetic surfaces are twisted significantly due to strong vortices but without the formation of magnetic islands. However, for the shear flow just over the KH instability threshold, a weak EM-type KH instability is saturated and remarkably damped by zonal flows through modifying the equilibrium shear flow. Interestingly, a secondary double tearing mode (DTM) is excited subsequently in highly damped KH turbulence, behaving as a pure DTM in a flowing plasma as described in Mao et al. [Phys. Plasmas 21, 052304 (2014)]. However, the explosive growth phenomenon is replaced by a gradually growing oscillation due to the extremely twisted islands. As a result, the release of the magnetic energy becomes slow and the global magnetic reconnection tends to be gentle. A complex nonlinear interaction between the EM KH turbulence and the DTMs occurs for the medium shear flows above the KH instability threshold, turbulent EM fluctuations experience oscillatory nonlinear growth of the DTMs, finally achieves a quasi-steady state with the interplay of the fluctuations between the DTMs and the EM KH instability.

  19. The stabilizing effect of shear thinning on the onset of purely elastic instabilities in serpentine microflows† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sm00326e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Casanellas, Laura; Alves, Manuel A.; Poole, Robert J.; Lerouge, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    We determine both experimentally and numerically the onset of elastic flow instabilities in viscoelastic polymer solutions with different levels of shear thinning. Previous experiments realized in microfluidic serpentine channels using dilute polymeric solutions showed that the onset of elastic instabilities strongly depends on the channel curvature. The scaling dependence is well captured by the general instability scaling criterion proposed by Pakdel and McKinley [Phys. Rev. Lett., 1996, 76, 2459:1–4]. We determine here the influence of fluid shear thinning on the onset of such purely-elastic flow instabilities. By testing a set of polyethylene oxide solutions of high molecular weight at different polymer concentrations in microfluidic serpentine channels we observe that shear thinning has a stabilizing effect on the microfluidic flow. Three-dimensional numerical simulations performed using the White–Metzner model predict similar trends, which are not captured by a simple scaling analysis using the Pakdel–McKinley criterion. PMID:27265240

  20. Feedback instability in the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system: Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T.-H.

    2010-02-15

    A coupled set of the reduced magnetohydrodynamic and the two-fluid equations is applied to the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) feedback interactions in relation to growth of quite auroral arcs. A theoretical analysis revisiting the linear feedback instability reveals asymptotic behaviors of the dispersion relation and a non-Hermite property in the M-I coupling. A nonlinear simulation of the feedback instability in the M-I coupling system manifests growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz-like mode in the magnetosphere as the secondary instability. The distorted vortex and field-aligned current profiles propagating as the shear Alfven waves lead to spontaneous deformation of ionospheric density and current structures associated with auroral arcs.

  1. Feedback instability in the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.-H.

    2010-02-01

    A coupled set of the reduced magnetohydrodynamic and the two-fluid equations is applied to the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) feedback interactions in relation to growth of quite auroral arcs. A theoretical analysis revisiting the linear feedback instability reveals asymptotic behaviors of the dispersion relation and a non-Hermite property in the M-I coupling. A nonlinear simulation of the feedback instability in the M-I coupling system manifests growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz-like mode in the magnetosphere as the secondary instability. The distorted vortex and field-aligned current profiles propagating as the shear Alfvén waves lead to spontaneous deformation of ionospheric density and current structures associated with auroral arcs.

  2. Single-fluid stability of stationary plasma equilibria with velocity shear and magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Akira

    2009-10-15

    By using incompressible single-fluid equations with a generalized Ohm's law neglecting the electron inertia, a linear eigenmode equation for a magnetic field perturbation is derived for stationary equilibria in a slab geometry with velocity and magnetic shears. The general eigenmode equation contains a fourth-order derivative of the perturbation in the highest order and contains Alfven and whistler mode components for a homogeneous plasma. The ratio of the characteristic ion inertia length to the characteristic inhomogeneity scale length is chosen as a small parameter for expansion. Neglecting whistler mode in the lowest order, the eigenmode equation becomes a second-order differential equation similar to the ideal magnetohydrodynamic eigenmode equation except for the fact that the unperturbed perpendicular velocity contains both electric and ion diamagnetic drifts. A sufficient condition for stability against the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability driven by shear in the ion diamagnetic drift velocity is derived and then applied to tokamaks.

  3. Examining the evolution towards turbulence through spatio-temporal analysis of multi-dimensional structures formed by instability growth along a shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Elizabeth; Doss, Forrest; Loomis, Eric; Flippo, Kirk; Devolder, Barbara; Welser-Sherrill, Leslie; Fincke, James; Kline, John

    2014-10-01

    The counter-propagating shear campaign is examining instability growth and its transition to turbulence relevant to mix in ICF capsules. Experimental platforms on both OMEGA and NIF use anti-symmetric flows about a shear interface to examine isolated Kelvin-Helmholtz instability growth. Measurements of interface (an Al or Ti tracer layer) dynamics are used to benchmark the LANL RAGE hydrocode with BHR turbulence model. The tracer layer does not expand uniformly, but breaks up into multi-dimensional structures that are initially quasi-2D due to the target geometry. We are developing techniques to analyze the multi-D structure growth along the tracer surface with a focus on characterizing the time-dependent structures' spectrum of scales in order to appraise a transition to turbulence in the system and potentially provide tighter constraints on initialization schemes for the BHR model. To this end, we use a wavelet based analysis to diagnose single-time radiographs of the tracer layer surface (w/low and amplified roughness for random noise seeding) with observed spatially non-repetitive features, in order to identify spatial and temporal trends in radiographs taken at different times across several experimental shots. This work conducted under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LANL under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  4. Magnetoconvection in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N. H.; Garcia, O. E.

    2008-10-15

    The development of magnetoconvection in a sheared magnetic field is investigated. The equilibrium magnetic field B{sub 0} is horizontal and its orientation varies linearly along the vertical axis. Preliminary consideration of the transition from the inertial to the viscous regime of the gravitational resistive interchange instability, reveals that the latter is characterized by the existence of viscoresistive boundary layers of vertical width which scales as Q{sup -1/6}, where Q is the Chandrasekhar number. The situation is analogous to the one encountered in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas, where convective flows are constrained by the magnetic shear to develop in boundary layers located around resonant magnetic surfaces in order to fulfill the 'interchange condition'k{center_dot}B{sub 0}=0, where k is the wave vector of the magnetic perturbation. It follows that when the effect of thermal diffusion is taken into account in the process, convection can only occur above a certain critical value of the Rayleigh number which scales as Q{sup 2/3} for large Q. At the onset, the convection pattern is a superposition of identically thin convective rolls everywhere aligned with the local magnetic field lines and which therefore adopt the magnetic field geometry, a situation also reminiscent of the penumbra of sunspots. Using this degeneracy, equations describing the weakly nonlinear state are obtained and discussed. A reduced magnetohydrodynamic description of magnetoconvection is introduced. Since it is valid for arbitrary magnetic field configurations, it allows a simple extension to the case where there exists an inclination between the direction of gravity and the plane spanned by the equilibrium magnetic field. These reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations are proposed as a powerful tool for further investigations of magnetoconvection in more complex field line geometries.

  5. Compressible magnetohydrodynamic sawtooth crash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Linda E.

    2014-02-01

    In a toroidal magnetically confined plasma at low resistivity, compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) predicts that an m = 1/n = 1 sawtooth has a fast, explosive crash phase with abrupt onset, rate nearly independent of resistivity, and localized temperature redistribution similar to experimental observations. Large scale numerical simulations show that the 1/1 MHD internal kink grows exponentially at a resistive rate until a critical amplitude, when the plasma motion accelerates rapidly, culminating in fast loss of the temperature and magnetic structure inside q < 1, with somewhat slower density redistribution. Nonlinearly, for small effective growth rate the perpendicular momentum rate of change remains small compared to its individual terms ∇p and J × B until the fast crash, so that the compressible growth rate is determined by higher order terms in a large aspect ratio expansion, as in the linear eigenmode. Reduced MHD fails completely to describe the toroidal mode; no Sweet-Parker-like reconnection layer develops. Important differences result from toroidal mode coupling effects. A set of large aspect ratio compressible MHD equations shows that the large aspect ratio expansion also breaks down in typical tokamaks with rq =1/Ro≃1/10 and a /Ro≃1/3. In the large aspect ratio limit, failure extends down to much smaller inverse aspect ratio, at growth rate scalings γ =O(ɛ2). Higher order aspect ratio terms, including B˜ϕ, become important. Nonlinearly, higher toroidal harmonics develop faster and to a greater degree than for large aspect ratio and help to accelerate the fast crash. The perpendicular momentum property applies to other transverse MHD instabilities, including m ≥ 2 magnetic islands and the plasma edge.

  6. Morphological instability of the solid-liquid interface under a thin shear flow with a free surface-ripples on icicles and stalactites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Kazuto

    2007-03-01

    Icicles and stalactites grow when their surfaces are covered with a thin film of flowing water through which latent heat of fusion and carbon dioxide are released to the surrounding air by diffusion and convection. Despite the complete difference in their basic growth mechanism, their surfaces often have ripples of centimeter-scale wavelengths. We consider the underlying common mechanism of ripple formation and find that the mean thickness of the water film and the capillary length associated with the surface tension of the water-air surface are common important characteristic lengths in determining the centimeter-scale wavelength of ripples. This is the first theoretical work on the morphological instability of solidification front during icicle and stalactite growth from a thin shear flow with one side being a free surface, in which we take into account the change of shape of the water-air surface when the shape of the solid-liquid interface is changed.

  7. Nonaxisymmetric instabilities in rotating shear flows - Internal gravity modes in stratified media and analogies with plane flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, P.; Abramowicz, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    The role of the internal gravity modes in mediating the growth of nonaxisymmetric instabilities is investigated by studying the instability of stratified incompressible differentially rotating fluid cylinders to global nonaxisymmetric modes. The results indicate that, in addition to a modified version of the well-known principal branch mediated by surface modes of the system (analogous to f-modes of stars), there exist unstable branches of the dispersion relation mediated by internal gravity modes of the system (similar to the g-modes of stars). These branches arise due to the interaction between the g-modes. It is shown that the maximum growth rate on one of the new branches can sometimes equal or exceed that on the principal branch, thus modifying the principal branch.

  8. Self-similar wave produced by local perturbation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz shear-layer instability.

    PubMed

    Hoepffner, Jérôme; Blumenthal, Ralf; Zaleski, Stéphane

    2011-03-11

    We show that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability excited by a localized perturbation yields a self-similar wave. The instability of the mixing layer was first conceived by Helmholtz as the inevitable growth of any localized irregularity into a spiral, but the search and uncovering of the resulting self-similar evolution was hindered by the technical success of Kelvin's wavelike perturbation theory. The identification of a self-similar solution is useful since its specific structure is witness of a subtle nonlinear equilibrium among the forces involved. By simulating numerically the Navier-Stokes equations, we analyze the properties of the wave: growth rate, propagation speed and the dependency of its shape upon the density ratio of the two phases of the mixing layer.

  9. Plasma structuring by the gradient drift instability at high latitudes and comparison with velocity shear driven processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Sunanda; Mackenzie, E.; Basu, S.; Coley, W. R.; Sharber, J. R.; Hoegy, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Using results of the in situ measurements made by the DE 2 satellite, the nature of plasma structuring at high latitudes, caused by the gradient drift instability process, is described. Using noon-midnight and dawn-dusk orbits of the DE 2 satellite, it was possible to examine the simultaneous density and electric field spectra of convecting large-scale plasma density enhancements in the polar cap known as 'patches', in directions parallel and perpendicular to their antisunward convection. The results provide evidence for the existence of at least two generic classes of instabilities operating in the high-latitude ionosphere: one driven by large-scale density gradients in a homogeneous convection field with respect to the neutrals, and the other driven by the structured convection field itself in an ambient ionosphere where density fluctuations are ubiquitous.

  10. Shear-driven instability in zirconium at high pressure and temperature and its relationship to phase-boundary behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, M. K.; Velisavljevic, N.; Kono, Y.; Park, C.; Kenney-Benson, C.

    2017-04-01

    Evidence in support of a shear driven anomaly in zirconium at elevated temperatures and pressures has been determined through the combined use of ultrasonic, diffractive, and radiographic techniques. Implications that these have on the phase diagram are explored through thermoacoustic parameters associated with the elasticity and thermal characteristics. In particular, our results illustrate a deviating phase boundary between the α and ω phases, referred to as a kink, at elevated temperatures and pressures. Further, pair distribution studies of this material at more extreme temperatures and pressures illustrate the scale on which diffusion takes place in this material. Possible interpretation of these can be made through inspection of shear-driven anomalies in other systems.

  11. Linear and weakly nonlinear aspects of free shear layer instability, roll-up, subharmonic interaction and wall influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, A. B.; Thompson, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    The growth of the momentum thickness and the modal disturbance energies are examined to study the nature and onset of nonlinearity in a temporally growing free shear layer. A shooting technique is used to find solutions to the linearized eigenvalue problem, and pseudospectral weakly nonlinear simulations of this flow are obtained for comparison. The roll-up of a fundamental disturbance follows linear theory predictions even with a 20 percent disturbance amplitude. A weak nonlinear interaction of the disturbance creates a finite-amplitude mean shear stress which dominates the growth of the layer momentum thickness, and the disturbance growth rate changes until the fundamental disturbance dominates. The fundamental then becomes an energy source for the harmonic, resulting in an increase in the growth rate of the subharmonic over the linear prediction even when the fundamental has no energy to give. Also considered are phase relations and the wall influence.

  12. Linear and weakly nonlinear aspects of free shear layer instability, roll-up, subharmonic interaction and wall influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, A. B.; Thompson, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    The growth of the momentum thickness and the modal disturbance energies are examined to study the nature and onset of nonlinearity in a temporally growing free shear layer. A shooting technique is used to find solutions to the linearized eigenvalue problem, and pseudospectral weakly nonlinear simulations of this flow are obtained for comparison. The roll-up of a fundamental disturbance follows linear theory predictions even with a 20 percent disturbance amplitude. A weak nonlinear interaction of the disturbance creates a finite-amplitude mean shear stress which dominates the growth of the layer momentum thickness, and the disturbance growth rate changes until the fundamental disturbance dominates. The fundamental then becomes an energy source for the harmonic, resulting in an increase in the growth rate of the subharmonic over the linear prediction even when the fundamental has no energy to give. Also considered are phase relations and the wall influence.

  13. Shear-driven instability in zirconium at high pressure and temperature and its relationship to phase-boundary behaviors

    DOE PAGES

    Jacobsen, Matthew K.; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Kono, Yoshio; ...

    2017-04-05

    Evidence in support of a shear driven anomaly in zirconium at elevated temperatures and pressures has been determined through the combined use of ultrasonic, diffractive, and radiographic techniques. Implications that these have on the phase diagram are explored through thermoacoustic parameters associated with the elasticity and thermal characteristics. In particular, our results illustrate a deviating phase boundary between the α and ω phases, referred to as a kink, at elevated temperatures and pressures. Furthermore, pair distribution studies of this material at more extreme temperatures and pressures illustrate the scale on which diffusion takes place in this material. Possible interpretation ofmore » these can be made through inspection of shear-driven anomalies in other systems.« less

  14. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Daniel J.

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents an overview and introduction to smoothed particle hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics in theory and in practice. Firstly, we give a basic grounding in the fundamentals of SPH, showing how the equations of motion and energy can be self-consistently derived from the density estimate. We then show how to interpret these equations using the basic SPH interpolation formulae and highlight the subtle difference in approach between SPH and other particle methods. In doing so, we also critique several 'urban myths' regarding SPH, in particular the idea that one can simply increase the 'neighbour number' more slowly than the total number of particles in order to obtain convergence. We also discuss the origin of numerical instabilities such as the pairing and tensile instabilities. Finally, we give practical advice on how to resolve three of the main issues with SPMHD: removing the tensile instability, formulating dissipative terms for MHD shocks and enforcing the divergence constraint on the particles, and we give the current status of developments in this area. Accompanying the paper is the first public release of the NDSPMHD SPH code, a 1, 2 and 3 dimensional code designed as a testbed for SPH/SPMHD algorithms that can be used to test many of the ideas and used to run all of the numerical examples contained in the paper.

  15. NDSPMHD Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an overview and introduction to Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics and Magnetohydrodynamics in theory and in practice. Firstly, we give a basic grounding in the fundamentals of SPH, showing how the equations of motion and energy can be self-consistently derived from the density estimate. We then show how to interpret these equations using the basic SPH interpolation formulae and highlight the subtle difference in approach between SPH and other particle methods. In doing so, we also critique several 'urban myths' regarding SPH, in particular the idea that one can simply increase the 'neighbour number' more slowly than the total number of particles in order to obtain convergence. We also discuss the origin of numerical instabilities such as the pairing and tensile instabilities. Finally, we give practical advice on how to resolve three of the main issues with SPMHD: removing the tensile instability, formulating dissipative terms for MHD shocks and enforcing the divergence constraint on the particles, and we give the current status of developments in this area. Accompanying the paper is the first public release of the NDSPMHD SPH code, a 1, 2 and 3 dimensional code designed as a testbed for SPH/SPMHD algorithms that can be used to test many of the ideas and used to run all of the numerical examples contained in the paper.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamic stability spectrum with flow and a resistive wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Sterling Paul

    Magnetically confined fusion plasmas are known to develop a variety of instabilities. Some of these instabilities can be understood with the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. A plasma in MHD equilibrium can be unstable to small perturbations, which are always present in experiments. One particular instability is the external kink mode. While this mode might be stabilized by a perfectly conducting wall, actual walls have some finite resistivity such that the kink still grows on the L/R time of the wall---it is a resistive wall mode (RWM). In this dissertation, the RWM is studied with the ideal MHD equilibrium and stability equations that include equilibrium flow. The stability equation is a nonlinear eigenvalue problem, which is transformed by the use of an auxiliary variable into a set of linear eigenvalue equations. For a flowing cylindrical plasma, these equations are formulated as a matrix eigenvalue problem by expanding the radial dependence of the perturbations as finite elements. The perturbations at the edge of the plasma are coupled to the surrounding resistive wall by the use of a Green's function for the vacuum fields and by the introduction of an additional unknown that represents the induced current in the wall. The matrix eigenvalue formulation of the RWM problem was solved numerically with a new finite element eigenvalue code. The code is benchmarked both analytically and numerically for the boundary conditions of a close fitting conducting wall, no wall, a perfectly conducting wall, and a resistive wall. The RWM is shown to be stabilized by flow for a window of wall positions, both with and without parallel viscosity, the latter requiring an extrapolation to a grid step size of zero in the region of resonance between the RWM and the sound continuum. Finally, flow shear is introduced, which reveals that the RWM does not move with the plasma at the resonance location, but rather with the plasma at a radial location which is independent of the

  17. On the weakly nonlinear three-dimensional instability of shear layers to pairs of oblique waves - The Stokes layer as a paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuesong; Lee, Sang S.; Cowley, Stephen J.

    1993-08-01

    The nonlinear evolution of a pair of initially linear oblique waves in a high-Reynolds-number shear layer is studied. Attention is focused on times when disturbances of amplitude epsilon have O(epsilon (exp 1/3) R) growth rates, where R is the Reynolds number. The development of a pair of oblique waves is then controlled by nonlinear critical-layer effects (Goldstein & Choi, 1989). Viscous effects are included by studying the distinguished scaling epsilon = O(R exp -1). When viscosity is not too large, solutions to the amplitude equation develop a finite-time singularity, indicating that an explosive growth can be induced by nonlinear effects; we suggest that such explosive growth is the precursor to certain of the bursts observed in experiments on Stokes layers and other shear layers. Increasing the importance of viscosity generally delays the occurrence of the finite-time singularity, and sufficiently large viscosity may lead to the disturbance decaying exponentially. For the special case when the streamwise and spanwise wavenumbers are equal, the solution can evolve into a periodic oscillation. A link between the unsteady critical-layer approach to high-Reynolds-number flow instability and the wave/vortex approach of Hall & Smith (1991) is identified.

  18. Electron Inertia Effects in Hall-Driven Magnetic Field Penetration in Electron-Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Andrew; Angus, Justin; Swanekamp, Stephen; Schumer, Joseph; Ottinger, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic field penetration in electron-magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) can be driven by density gradients through the Hall term. Here we describe the effect of electron inertia on simplified one- and two- dimensional models of a magnetic front. Nonlinear effects due to inertia cause the 1D model to develop peaked solitary waves, while in 2D a shear-driven Kelvin-Helholtz like instability causes the front to break into a series of vortices which propagate into the plasma. The combination of these two effects means that in 2D, Hall driven magnetic field penetration will typically happen in the form of complex vortex-dominated penetration, rather than as a transversely-smooth shock front. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory Base Program.

  19. The equilibria, stability and nonlinear dynamics of magnetically sheared atmospheres with applications to the solar environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, Ward Beecher, IV

    2000-11-01

    The subject of this thesis is the equilibria, stability and nonlinear dynamics of magnetically-sheared atmospheres as they relate to magnetic flux emergence and the structure and disruption of magnetic arcades of the sun. To begin this study, two families of analytical solutions describing isothermal magnetostatic atmospheres in uniform gravity are presented that are characterized by magnetic shear. Both families of solutions vary in two Cartesian dimensions, one family is composed of an undulating magnetic layer while the other is composed of a periodic system of magnetic arcades. Two aspects of these magnetostatic atmospheres are addresses. First, linear stability analyses demonstrates that certain members of both families of equilibria are stable. Next, it is shown that planar magnetostatic atmospheres are deformable into a continuous sequence of the shear layer equilibria by prescribed ideal magnetohydrodynamic displacements that combine undulating, interchanging, and shearing of field lines. The shearing of the field lines is performed in such a manner that the Lorentz force in the invariant direction vanishes. Since no other body forces point in this direction, the shearing establishes force balance in the direction of invariance. Two- dimensional time-dependent simulations are then performed with the Zeus2D code to show that shearing motions naturally arise in conjunction with mixed-mode (interchanging and undulating) instabilities of magnetostatic atmospheres. In these simulations, it is found that ascending magnetic loops shear in response to the Lorentz force which drives large amplitude shear Alfvén waves. The Alfvén waves provide an explanation for impulsive shearing motions at the photosphere in newly emerged bipolar active regions. Simulations of instabilities of sheared magnetic arcades indicate that self-induced, shear Alfvén waves coupled with magnetic buoyancy provide a powerful feedback mechanism that results in multiple eruptions of the

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic cellular automata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, David; Doolen, Gary D.

    1987-01-01

    A generalization of the hexagonal lattice gas model of Frisch, Hasslacher and Pomeau is shown to lead to two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics. The method relies on the ideal point-wise conservation law for vector potential.

  1. Experiments in Magnetohydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, J. P.

    1970-01-01

    Describes three student experiments in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In these experiments, it was found that the electrical conductivity of the local water supply was sufficient to demonstrate effectively some of the features of MHD flowmeters, generators, and pumps. (LC)

  2. Experiments in Magnetohydrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner, J. P.

    1970-01-01

    Describes three student experiments in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In these experiments, it was found that the electrical conductivity of the local water supply was sufficient to demonstrate effectively some of the features of MHD flowmeters, generators, and pumps. (LC)

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Power Generation is a concise summary of MHD theory, history, and future trends. Results of the major international MHD research projects are discussed. Data from MHD research is included. Economics of initial and operating costs are considered.

  4. Gyroscopic analog for magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    The gross features of plasma equilibrium and dynamics in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model can be understood in terms of a dynamical system which closely resembles the equations for a deformable gyroscope.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic fluidic system

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Bachman, Mark G.

    2004-08-24

    A magnetohydrodynamic fluidic system includes a reagent source containing a reagent fluid and a sample source containing a sample fluid that includes a constituent. A reactor is operatively connected to the supply reagent source and the sample source. MHD pumps utilize a magnetohydrodynamic drive to move the reagent fluid and the sample fluid in a flow such that the reagent fluid and the sample fluid form an interface causing the constituent to be separated from the sample fluid.

  6. Magnetic effects on the low-T /|W | instability in differentially rotating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhlberger, Curran D.; Nouri, Fatemeh Hossein; Duez, Matthew D.; Foucart, Francois; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Ott, Christian D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilágyi, Béla; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2014-11-01

    Dynamical instabilities in protoneutron stars may produce gravitational waves whose observation could shed light on the physics of core-collapse supernovae. When born with sufficient differential rotation, these stars are susceptible to a shear instability (the "low-T /|W | instability"), but such rotation can also amplify magnetic fields to strengths where they have a considerable impact on the dynamics of the stellar matter. Using a new magnetohydrodynamics module for the Spectral Einstein Code, we have simulated a differentially-rotating neutron star in full 3D to study the effects of magnetic fields on this instability. Though strong toroidal fields were predicted to suppress the low-T /|W | instability, we find that they do so only in a small range of field strengths. Below 4 ×1 013 G , poloidal seed fields do not wind up fast enough to have an effect before the instability saturates, while above 5 ×1 014 G , magnetic instabilities can actually amplify a global quadrupole mode (this threshold may be even lower in reality, as small-scale magnetic instabilities remain difficult to resolve numerically). Thus, the prospects for observing gravitational waves from such systems are not in fact diminished over most of the magnetic parameter space. Additionally, we report that the detailed development of the low-T /|W | instability, including its growth rate, depends strongly on the particular numerical methods used. The high-order methods we employ suggest that growth might be considerably slower than found in some previous simulations.

  7. Influence of surface tension on the instabilities and bifurcations of a particle in a drop under shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaire, Francois; Zhu, Lailai

    2016-11-01

    While the deformation regimes under flow of anuclear cells, like red blood cells, have been widely analyzed, the dynamics of nuclear cells are less explored. The objective of this work is to investigate the interplay between the stiff nucleus, modeled here as a rigid spherical particle and the surrounding deformable cell membrane, modeled for simplicity as an immiscible droplet, subjected to an external unbounded plane shear flow. A three-dimensional boundary integral implementation is developed to describe the interface-structure interaction characterized by two dimensionless numbers: the capillary number Ca , defined as the ratio of shear to capillary forces and and the particle-droplet size ratio. For large Ca , i.e. very deformable droplets, the particle has a stable equilibrium position at the center of the droplet. However, for smaller Ca , both the plane symmetry and the time invariance are broken and the particle migrates to a closed orbit located off the symmetry plane, reaching a limit cycle. For even smaller capillary numbers, the time invariance is restored and the particle reaches a steady equilibrium position off the symmetry plane. This series of bifurcations is analyzed and possible physical mechanisms from which they originate are discussed. Financial support by ERC Grant SimCoMiCs 280117 is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. SYMMETRIES, SCALING LAWS, AND CONVERGENCE IN SHEARING-BOX SIMULATIONS OF MAGNETO-ROTATIONAL INSTABILITY DRIVEN TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bodo, G.; Rossi, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Ferrari, A.; Mignone, A.

    2011-10-01

    We consider the problem of convergence in homogeneous shearing-box simulations of magneto-rotationally driven turbulence. When there is no mean magnetic flux, if the equations are non-dimensionalized with respect to the diffusive scale, the only free parameter in the problem is the size of the computational domain. The problem of convergence then relates to the asymptotic form of the solutions as the computational box size becomes large. By using a numerical code with a high order of accuracy we show that the solutions become asymptotically independent of domain size. We also show that cases with weak magnetic flux join smoothly to the zero-flux cases as the flux vanishes. These results are consistent with the operation of a subcritical small-scale dynamo driving the turbulence. We conclude that for this type of turbulence the angular momentum transport is proportional to the diffusive flux and therefore has limited relevance in astrophysical situations.

  9. Double fishbone instability excited by energetic ions with m = n = 1 in a reversed magnetic shear tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Guo; Wang, Xian-Qu; Wang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Rui-Bin

    2015-09-01

    Double fishbone mode excited by energetic particles at q = 1 rational surfaces is studied, with the minimum of the safety factor q min < 1 . The dispersion relation of the mode is derived based on energy principle and the radial displacement structure is calculated by an iterative method self-consistently. It is found that the double fishbone mode has a two-step mode structure similar to that of double kink modes. For q min → 1 , the sharp slope of the ξ r distribution at the rational surfaces is smoothened. The effects of the magnetic shear, the minimum of safety factor, the fast ion beta, and the precession frequency on the plasma displacement and growth rate are also analyzed, respectively.

  10. Resolution Dependence of Magnetorotational Turbulence in the Isothermal Stratified Shearing Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Benjamin R.; Gammie, Charles F.; Fromang, Sebastien; Kestener, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability can provide diffusive transport of angular momentum in astrophysical disks, and a widely studied computational model for this process is the ideal, stratified, isothermal shearing box. Here we report results of a convergence study of such boxes up to a resolution of N = 256 zones per scale height, performed on blue waters at NCSA with ramses-gpu. We find that the time and vertically integrated dimensionless shear stress \\overline{α }˜ {N}-1/3, i.e., the shear stress is resolution dependent. We also find that the magnetic field correlation length decreases with resolution, λ ˜ {N}-1/2. This variation is strongest at the disk midplane. We show that our measurements of \\overline{α } are consistent with earlier studies, and we discuss possible reasons for the lack of convergence.

  11. Zonal flow dynamics in the double tearing mode with antisymmetric shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Aohua; Li, Jiquan; Liu, Jinyuan; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2014-05-15

    The generation dynamics and the structural characteristics of zonal flows are investigated in the double tearing mode (DTM) with antisymmetric shear flows. Two kinds of zonal flow oscillations are revealed based on reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations, which depend on the shear flow amplitudes corresponding to different DTM eigen mode states, elaborated by Mao et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20, 022114 (2013)]. For the weak shear flows below an amplitude threshold, v{sub c}, at which two DTM eigen states with antisymmetric or symmetric magnetic island structure are degenerated, the zonal flows grow oscillatorily in the Rutherford regime during the nonlinear evolution of the DTMs. It is identified that the oscillation mechanism results from the nonlinear interaction between the distorted islands and the zonal flows through the modification of shear flows. However, for the medium shear flows above v{sub c} but below the critical threshold of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, an oscillatory growing zonal flow occurs in the linear phase of the DTM evolution. It is demonstrated that the zonal flow oscillation originates from the three-wave mode coupling or a modulation instability pumped by two DTM eigen modes with the same frequency but opposite propagating direction. With the shear flows increasing, the amplitude of zonal flow oscillation increases first and then decreases, whilst the oscillation frequency as twice of the Doppler frequency shift increases. Furthermore, impacts of the oscillatory zonal flows on the nonlinear evolution of DTM islands and the global reconnection are also discussed briefly.

  12. On the nonlinear three dimensional instability of Stokes layers and other shear layers to pairs of oblique waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Xuesong; Lee, Sang Soo; Cowley, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of a pair of initially oblique waves in a high Reynolds Number Stokes layer is studied. Attention is focused on times when disturbances of amplitude epsilon have O(epsilon(exp 1/3)R) growth rates, where R is the Reynolds number. The development of a pair of oblique waves is then controlled by nonlinear critical-layer effects. Viscous effects are included by studying the distinguished scaling epsilon = O(R(exp -1)). This leads to a complicated modification of the kernel function in the integro-differential amplitude equation. When viscosity is not too large, solutions to the amplitude equation develop a finite-time singularity, indicating that an explosive growth can be introduced by nonlinear effects; we suggest that such explosive growth can lead to the bursts observed in experiments. Increasing the importance of viscosity generally delays the occurrence of the finite-time singularity, and sufficiently large viscosity may lead to the disturbance decaying exponentially. For the special case when the streamwise and spanwise wavenumbers are equal, the solution can evolve into a periodic oscillation. A link between the unsteady critical-layer approach to high-Reynolds-number flow instability, and the wave vortex approach is identified.

  13. Irregular magnetohydrodynamic shock refraction in the presence of a normal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, Vincent; Bilgi, Pavaman; Samtaney, Ravi; Pullin, Dale

    2015-11-01

    Shock refraction occurs when an incident shock encounters a density interface, which is important in a number of applications. When all waves resulting from the interaction meet at a point, this is termed regular shock refraction. In magnetohydrodynamics, analytical solutions for regular refraction cases show that magnetohydrodynamic waves transport vorticity from the shocked density interface so that it is not a shear layer. This is the mechanism that underpins the suppression of shock driven instabilities in the presence of a magnetic field. Here, we examine the case of irregular shock refraction where the initial magnetic field is normal to the incident shock. Regular analytical solutions are used to map the boundary of the irregular refraction region in parameter space. Beyond this boundary, the structure of irregular solutions is investigated via numerical simulations. Particular attention is given to whether all fluid interface emanating from wave intersection points are free of vorticity. This work was partially supported by the KAUST Office of Sponsored Research under Award URF/1/2162-01.

  14. A Transformation-Induced Shear Instability Model for Deep Earthquakes Based on Laboratory Nanoseismological and Microstructural Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Zhu, L.; Shi, F.; Schubnel, A.; Hilairet, N.; Yu, T.; Rivers, M. L.; Gasc, J.; Li, Z.; Brunet, F.

    2016-12-01

    Global earthquake hypocenters depth displays a bimodal distribution: a first peak at < 50 km and a second peak around 550 - 600 km, before ceasing abruptly near 700 km. How fractures initiate, nucleate, and propagate at depths >70 km remains one of the greatest puzzles in earth science, since increasing pressure inhibits fracture propagation. Here we report high-resolution acoustic emission (AE) analysis of fractures triggered by partial transformation from olivine to spinel in Mg2GeO4, an analog to (Mg,Fe)2SiO4, the dominant mineral in the upper mantle. State-of-the-art synchrotron techniques and seismological methodologies were used for fault imaging and for event location and waveform analysis. Our results reveal unprecedented details of rupture nucleation and propagation, in both space and time: AE event magnitudes follow the Gutenberg-Richter law, with b values generally consistent with seismological observations, while the empirical relation between magnitude and rupture area is extended to millimeter-sized samples. A new rupture model for deep-focus earthquakes is proposed based on the well-known strain localization theory for pressure sensitive (dilatant) materials. The results show that shear failure processes, even at great depths, are scale-invariant.

  15. Numerical simulations of toroidal Alfven instabilities excited by trapped energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.-J.; Chen, Liu; Santoro, R. A.

    2000-06-01

    Extensive magnetohydrodynamic-gyrokinetic hybrid simulations have been carried out to study the excitations of Alfven instabilities by trapped energetic ions in tokamak plasmas. Depending on the parameters, the most unstable mode can be either the toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) or the energetic-particle mode (EPM). In both cases, the dominant instability driving mechanism is the resonance with the trapped-particle magnetic precessional drifts. The mode frequencies of the most unstable modes, meanwhile, tend to be near the toroidal frequency gap in order to minimize the continuum damping. It is also demonstrated that the instabilities can be quenched by reversing the magnetic precessional drifts via either negative magnetic shear or locating the magnetic turning points in the inner (strong B) side of the torus. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Nonlinear Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafranov, V.

    1998-08-01

    equations of a plasma in a magnetic field (which will be used further in models of dynamic processes), approaches to the description of three dimensional (3-D) equilibrium are briefly discussed, and the basis of the theory of linear instabilities and the basic types of MHD instabilities, with account taken of ideal resistive modes, are considered. The value of the material of these chapters is that here in a brief form the results of numerous researches in this area are presented, and frequently with a fresh point of view of old results. Chapters 5 to 10 are devoted to the subject of the book, non-linear magnetohydrodynamics. In the introduction to Chapter 5 the author pays attention to the fact that long standing doubts about the feasibility of magnetic thermonuclear reactors because of inevitable instabilities of non-uniform plasmas have been overcome in the last two decades: the plasma in tokamaks is rather well confined, despite the presence of some instabilities. The latter, as a rule, result only in the redistribution of current and plasma pressure profiles and some increase of transport, but can also lead to extremely undesirable effects. In this connection in Chapter 5 the attention of the reader is directed to the physics of the most important plasma instabilities in tokamaks. Models of the development of external and internal kink modes in tokamaks are considered, including the `vacuum bubble' model in shearless plasmas, the evolution of the resistive tearing mode together with saturation of the magnetic islands arising at a tearing instability. The rather long Chapter 6 is devoted to the fundamentals of the magnetic hydrodynamic dissipative process in the magnetic field line reconnection. This process of rapid dissipation of the energy of a magnetic field, having in the simplest case different directions in two adjacent volumes of plasma, underlies the theory of the phenomenon of powerful flares in the solar chromosphere, resulting in the well-known `magnetic

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic effects in liquid metal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, F.; Galindo, V.; Kasprzyk, C.; Landgraf, S.; Seilmayer, M.; Starace, M.; Weber, N.; Weier, T.

    2016-07-01

    Liquid metal batteries (LMBs) consist of two liquid metal electrodes and a molten salt ionic conductor sandwiched between them. The density ratios allow for a stable stratification of the three layers. LMBs were already considered as part of energy conversion systems in the 1960s and have recently received renewed interest for economical large-scale energy storage. In this paper, we concentrate on the magnetohydrodynamic aspects of this cell type with special focus on electro-vortex flows and possible effects of the Tayler instability.

  18. Guiding center equations for ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.

    2013-04-15

    Guiding center simulations are routinely used for the discovery of mode-particle resonances in tokamaks, for both resistive and ideal instabilities and to find modifications of particle distributions caused by a given spectrum of modes, including large scale avalanches during events with a number of large amplitude modes. One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through {delta}B-vector={nabla} Multiplication-Sign ({xi}-vector Multiplication-Sign B-vector), however, perturbs the magnetic topology, introducing extraneous magnetic islands in the field. A proper treatment of an ideal perturbation involves a full Lagrangian displacement of the field due to the perturbation and conserves magnetic topology as it should. In order to examine the effect of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes on particle trajectories, the guiding center equations should include a correct Lagrangian treatment. Guiding center equations for an ideal displacement {xi}-vector are derived which preserve the magnetic topology and are used to examine mode particle resonances in toroidal confinement devices. These simulations are compared to others which are identical in all respects except that they use the linear representation for the field. Unlike the case for the magnetic field, the use of the linear field perturbation in the guiding center equations does not result in extraneous mode particle resonances.

  19. Guiding Center Equations for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Roscoe B. White

    2013-02-21

    Guiding center simulations are routinely used for the discovery of mode-particle resonances in tokamaks, for both resistive and ideal instabilities and to find modifications of particle distributions caused by a given spectrum of modes, including large scale avalanches during events with a number of large amplitude modes. One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through δ~B = ∇ X (ξ X B) however perturbs the magnetic topology, introducing extraneous magnetic islands in the field. A proper treatment of an ideal perturbation involves a full Lagrangian displacement of the field due to the perturbation and conserves magnetic topology as it should. In order to examine the effect of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes on particle trajectories the guiding center equations should include a correct Lagrangian treatment. Guiding center equations for an ideal displacement ξ are derived which perserve the magnetic topology and are used to examine mode particle resonances in toroidal confinement devices. These simulations are compared to others which are identical in all respects except that they use the linear representation for the field. Unlike the case for the magnetic field, the use of the linear field perturbation in the guiding center equations does not result in extraneous mode particle resonances.

  20. INTERDEPENDENCE OF ELECTRIC DISCHARGE AND MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Muranushi, Takayuki; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro E-mail: okuzumi@nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2012-11-20

    We study how the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in protoplanetary disks is affected by the electric discharge caused by the electric field in the resistive magnetohydrodynamic. We performed three-dimensional shearing box simulations with various values of plasma beta and electrical breakdown models. We find that the MRI is self-sustaining in spite of the high resistivity. The instability gives rise to the large electric field that causes the electrical breakdown, and the breakdown maintains the high degree of ionization required for the instability. The condition for this self-sustained MRI is set by the balance between the energy supply from the shearing motion and the energy consumed by ohmic dissipation. We apply the condition to various disk models and study where the active, self-sustained, and dead zones of MRI are located. In the fiducial minimum-mass solar-nebula model, the newly found sustained zone occupies only a limited volume of the disk. In the late-phase gas-depleted disk models, however, the sustained zone occupies a larger volume of the disk.

  1. SIMULATIONS OF THE KELVIN–HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY DRIVEN BY CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS IN THE TURBULENT CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez, Daniel O.; DeLuca, Edward E.; Mininni, Pablo D.

    2016-02-20

    Recent high-resolution Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory images show evidence of the development of the Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) instability, as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) expand in the ambient corona. A large-scale magnetic field mostly tangential to the interface is inferred, both on the CME and on the background sides. However, the magnetic field component along the shear flow is not strong enough to quench the instability. There is also observational evidence that the ambient corona is in a turbulent regime, and therefore the criteria for the development of the instability are a priori expected to differ from the laminar case. To study the evolution of the KH instability with a turbulent background, we perform three-dimensional simulations of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamic equations. The instability is driven by a velocity profile tangential to the CME–corona interface, which we simulate through a hyperbolic tangent profile. The turbulent background is generated by the application of a stationary stirring force. We compute the instability growth rate for different values of the turbulence intensity, and find that the role of turbulence is to attenuate the growth. The fact that KH instability is observed sets an upper limit on the correlation length of the coronal background turbulence.

  2. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1986-01-01

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1,000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  3. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-11-16

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  4. Interactions between magnetohydrodynamical discontinuities

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, W.; Woodward, P.R. )

    1994-11-01

    Interactions between magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) discontinuities are studied through numerical simulations for the set of one-dimensional MHD equations. The interactions include the impact of a shock on a contact discontinuity, the collision of two shocks, and the catchup of a shock over another shock. The shocks involved in the interactions may be very strong. Each shock in an interaction may be either a fast or a slow shock.

  5. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  6. Future of Magnetohydrodynamic Ship Propulsion,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-16

    83 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION FUTURE OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHIP PROPULSION by A.P. Baranov DTIQ ~E tJ Approved for public release; 0.. distribution...MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHIP PROPULSION By: A.P. Baranov -,English pages: 10 Source: Sudostroyeniye, Nr. 12, December 1966, pp. 3-6 . Country of origin: USSR X...equations, etc. merged into this translation were extracted from the best quality copy available. FUTURE OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHIP PROPULSION A. P

  7. On the nature of magnetic turbulence in rotating, shearing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Justin; Lesur, Geoffroy; Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2016-03-01

    The local properties of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in rotating, shearing flows are studied in the framework of a shearing-box model. Based on numerical simulations, we propose that the MRI-driven turbulence comprises two components: the large-scale shear-aligned strong magnetic field and the small-scale fluctuations resembling magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The energy spectrum of the large-scale component is close to k-2, whereas the spectrum of the small-scale component agrees with the spectrum of strong MHD turbulence k-3/2. While the spectrum of the fluctuations is universal, the outer-scale characteristics of the turbulence are not; they depend on the parameters of the system, such as the net magnetic flux. However, there is remarkable universality among the allowed turbulent states - their intensity v0 and their outer scale λ0 satisfy the balance condition v0/λ0 ˜ dΩ/dln r, where dΩ/dln r is the local orbital shearing rate of the flow. Finally, we find no sustained dynamo action in the Pm = 1 zero net-flux case for Reynolds numbers as high as 45 000, casting doubts on the existence of an MRI dynamo in the Pm ≤ 1 regime.

  8. The Role of the Magnetorotational Instability in the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Daniel; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2014-05-01

    We calculate growth rates for nonaxisymmetric instabilities including the magnetorotational instability (MRI) throughout the Sun. We first derive a dispersion relation for nonaxisymmetric instability including the effects of shear, convective buoyancy, and three diffusivities (thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity). We then use a solar model evolved with the stellar evolution code MESA and angular velocity profiles determined by Global Oscillations Network Group helioseismology to determine the unstable modes present at each location in the Sun and the associated growth rates. The overall instability has unstable modes throughout the convection zone and also slightly below it at middle and high latitudes. It contains three classes of modes: large-scale hydrodynamic convective modes, large-scale hydrodynamic shear modes, and small-scale magnetohydrodynamic shear modes, which may be properly called MRI modes. While large-scale convective modes are the most rapidly growing modes in most of the convective zone, MRI modes are important in both stably stratified and convectively unstable locations near the tachocline at colatitudes θ < 53°. Nonaxisymmetric MRI modes grow faster than the corresponding axisymmetric modes; for some poloidal magnetic fields, the nonaxisymmetric MRI growth rates are similar to the angular rotation frequency Ω, while axisymmetric modes are stabilized. We briefly discuss the saturation of the field produced by MRI modes, finding that the implied field at the base of the convective zone in the Sun is comparable to that derived based on dynamos active in the tachocline and that the saturation of field resulting from the MRI may be of importance even in the upper convection zone.

  9. The role of the magnetorotational instability in the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Daniel; Wheeler, J. Craig E-mail: wheel@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2014-05-20

    We calculate growth rates for nonaxisymmetric instabilities including the magnetorotational instability (MRI) throughout the Sun. We first derive a dispersion relation for nonaxisymmetric instability including the effects of shear, convective buoyancy, and three diffusivities (thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity). We then use a solar model evolved with the stellar evolution code MESA and angular velocity profiles determined by Global Oscillations Network Group helioseismology to determine the unstable modes present at each location in the Sun and the associated growth rates. The overall instability has unstable modes throughout the convection zone and also slightly below it at middle and high latitudes. It contains three classes of modes: large-scale hydrodynamic convective modes, large-scale hydrodynamic shear modes, and small-scale magnetohydrodynamic shear modes, which may be properly called MRI modes. While large-scale convective modes are the most rapidly growing modes in most of the convective zone, MRI modes are important in both stably stratified and convectively unstable locations near the tachocline at colatitudes θ < 53°. Nonaxisymmetric MRI modes grow faster than the corresponding axisymmetric modes; for some poloidal magnetic fields, the nonaxisymmetric MRI growth rates are similar to the angular rotation frequency Ω, while axisymmetric modes are stabilized. We briefly discuss the saturation of the field produced by MRI modes, finding that the implied field at the base of the convective zone in the Sun is comparable to that derived based on dynamos active in the tachocline and that the saturation of field resulting from the MRI may be of importance even in the upper convection zone.

  10. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Plasma as a Dielectric Medium; Nyquist Technique; Absolute and Convective Instabilities; Landau Damping and Phase Mixing; Particle Trapping and Breakdown of Linear Theory; Solution of Viasov Equation via Guilding-Center Transformation; Kinetic Theory of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves; Geometric Optics; Wave-Kinetic Equation; Cutoff and Resonance; Resonant Absorption; Mode Conversion; Gyrokinetic Equation; Drift Waves; Quasi-Linear Theory; Ponderomotive Force; Parametric Instabilities; Problem Sets for Homework, Midterm and Final Examinations.

  11. Shear coaxial injector instability mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaltz, T.; Glogowski, M.; Micci, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    Although stable operating regimes for cryogenic coaxial injectors have been empirically determined, there is no knowledge of the spray characteristics corresponding to stable operation, or the physical processes which produce the atomization patterns that result in stable or unstable operation. The current engineering method for determining the stable operating regime of a cryogenic coaxial injector is the 'hydrogen temperature ramping' method, however there is no definitive knowledge of whether the hydrogen temperature influences the chamber stability by decreasing the injected gas velocity, by affecting a recirculation region at the base of the LOX Post, or by changing the pressure drop across the injector, allowing chamber pressure oscillations to couple to the fuel feed system. Results for the injector response from a linearized lumped-element model are presented as a function of temperature and frequency. LDV measurements in the recess region at the base of the LOX post show reverse flow indicative of a recirculation region. Finally, Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) measurements of droplet size and velocity distributions are discussed for a coaxial injector element similar to the SSME preburner element operating with water and air at atmospheric pressure and liquid and gaseous nitrogen at 20 bars.

  12. Shear coaxial injector instability mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltz, T.; Glogowski, M.; Micci, M. M.

    1993-11-01

    Although stable operating regimes for cryogenic coaxial injectors have been empirically determined, there is no knowledge of the spray characteristics corresponding to stable operation, or the physical processes which produce the atomization patterns that result in stable or unstable operation. The current engineering method for determining the stable operating regime of a cryogenic coaxial injector is the 'hydrogen temperature ramping' method, however there is no definitive knowledge of whether the hydrogen temperature influences the chamber stability by decreasing the injected gas velocity, by affecting a recirculation region at the base of the LOX Post, or by changing the pressure drop across the injector, allowing chamber pressure oscillations to couple to the fuel feed system. Results for the injector response from a linearized lumped-element model are presented as a function of temperature and frequency. LDV measurements in the recess region at the base of the LOX post show reverse flow indicative of a recirculation region. Finally, Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) measurements of droplet size and velocity distributions are discussed for a coaxial injector element similar to the SSME preburner element operating with water and air at atmospheric pressure and liquid and gaseous nitrogen at 20 bars.

  13. Gyrokinetic verification of the persistence of kinetic ballooning modes in the magnetohydrodynamic second stability regime

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, N.; Hirose, A.

    2008-08-15

    The kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) has been shown in previous work to be unstable within the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) region (in s-{alpha} space) of second stability [Hirose et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 3993 (2004)]. In this work we verify this result using the gyrokinetic code GS2 [Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1996)] treating both ions and electrons as kinetic species and retaining the magnetosonic perturbation B{sub parallel}. Growth rates calculated using GS2 differ significantly from the previous differential/shooting code analysis. Calculations without B{sub parallel} find the stability region is preserved, while the addition of B{sub parallel} causes the mode to be more unstable than previously calculated within the region of MHD second stability. The inclusion of parallel ion current and B{sub parallel} into the shooting code does not account for the GS2 results. The evidence presented in this paper leads us to the conclusion that the adiabatic electron approximation employed in previous studies is found to be unsuitable for this type of instability. Based on the findings of this work, the KBM becomes an interesting instability in the context of internal transport barriers, where {alpha} is often large and magnetic shear is small (positive or negative)

  14. Numerical simulations of magnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at a twisted solar flux tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawski, K.; Chmielewski, P.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-07-01

    The paper aims to study the response of a solar small-scale and weak magnetic flux tube to photospheric twisting motions. We numerically solve three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations to describe the evolution of the perturbation within the initially static flux tube, excited by twists in the azimuthal component of the velocity. These twists produce rotation of the magnetic field lines. Perturbation of magnetic field lines propagates upwardly, driving vertical and azimuthal flow as well as plasma compressions and rarefactions in the form of eddies. We conclude that these eddies result from the sheared azimuthal flow which seeds Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) between the flux tube and the ambient medium. Numerically obtained properties of the KHI confirm the analytical predictions for the occurrence of the instability.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of global accretion disks with vertical magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2014-04-01

    We report results of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of global accretion disks threaded with weak vertical magnetic fields. We perform the simulations in the spherical coordinates with different temperature profiles and accordingly different rotation profiles. In the cases with a spatially constant temperature, because the rotation frequency is vertically constant in the equilibrium condition, general properties of the turbulence excited by magnetorotational instability are quantitatively similar to those obtained in local shearing box simulations. On the other hand, in the cases with a radially variable temperature profile, the vertical differential rotation, which is inevitable in the equilibrium condition, winds up the magnetic field lines in addition to the usual radial differential rotation. As a result, the coherent wound magnetic fields contribute to the Maxwell stress in the surface regions. We obtain nondimensional density and velocity fluctuations ∼0.1-0.2 at the midplane. The azimuthal power spectra of the magnetic fields show shallower slopes, ∼m {sup 0} – m {sup –1}, than those of velocity and density. The Poynting flux associated with the MHD turbulence drives intermittent and structured disk winds as well as sound-like waves toward the midplane. The mass accretion mainly occurs near the surfaces, and the gas near the midplane slowly moves outward in the time domain of the present simulations. The vertical magnetic fields are also dragged inward in the surface regions, while they stochastically move outward and inward around the midplane. We also discuss an observational implication of induced spiral structure in the simulated turbulent disks.

  16. Two-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woong-Tae; Stone, James M.

    2012-06-01

    Barred galaxies are known to possess magnetic fields that may affect the properties of bar substructures such as dust lanes and nuclear rings. We use two-dimensional high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate the effects of magnetic fields on the formation and evolution of such substructures, as well as on the mass inflow rates to the galaxy center. The gaseous medium is assumed to be infinitesimally thin, isothermal, non-self-gravitating, and threaded by initially uniform, azimuthal magnetic fields. We find that there exists an outermost x 1-orbit relative to which gaseous responses to an imposed stellar bar potential are completely different between inside and outside. Inside this orbit, gas is shocked into dust lanes and infalls to form a nuclear ring. Magnetic fields are compressed in dust lanes, reducing their peak density. Magnetic stress removes further angular momentum of the gas at the shocks, temporarily causing the dust lanes to bend into an "L" shape and eventually leading to a smaller and more centrally distributed ring than in unmagnetized models. The mass inflow rates in magnetized models correspondingly become larger, by more than two orders of magnitude when the initial fields have an equipartition value with thermal energy, than in the unmagnetized counterparts. Outside the outermost x 1-orbit, on the other hand, an MHD dynamo due to the combined action of the bar potential and background shear operates near the corotation and bar-end regions, efficiently amplifying magnetic fields. The amplified fields shape into trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The base of the magnetic arms has a thin layer in which magnetic fields with opposite polarity reconnect via a tearing-mode instability. This produces numerous magnetic islands with large density that propagate along the arms to turn the outer disk into a highly chaotic state.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamics of fractal media

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2006-05-15

    The fractal distribution of charged particles is considered. An example of this distribution is the charged particles that are distributed over the fractal. The fractional integrals are used to describe fractal distribution. These integrals are considered as approximations of integrals on fractals. Typical turbulent media could be of a fractal structure and the corresponding equations should be changed to include the fractal features of the media. The magnetohydrodynamics equations for fractal media are derived from the fractional generalization of integral Maxwell equations and integral hydrodynamics (balance) equations. Possible equilibrium states for these equations are considered.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Underwater Acoustic Transducer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    conductivity of an electrolyte not in the vicinity of an electrode + surface is "classically" analyzed using the theories of Debye and HuckelI5 and Debye and...15. P. Debye and E. Huckel , Physik. Z. 24 (1933) (in German). 16. P. Debye and H. Falkenhagen, Physik. Z. 29 121 (1928) (in German). 153 17. K. J...Transdtction 3 B. Present Work 4 Chapter 2 THEORY : THE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC- THERMOACOUSTIC WAVE EQUATION A. Ohm’s Law for an Electrolyte 7 B Derivation of the

  19. Material Instabilities in Particulate Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Following is a brief summary of a theoretical investigation of material (or constitutive) instability associated with shear induced particle migration in dense particulate suspensions or granular media. It is shown that one can obtain a fairly general linear-stability analysis, including the effects of shear-induced anisotropy in the base flow as well as Reynolds dilatancy. A criterion is presented here for simple shearing instability in the absence of inertia and dilatancy.

  20. Linear growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with an adiabatic cosmic-ray gas

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Kudoh, Takahiro

    2014-06-01

    We investigate effects of cosmic rays on the linear growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Cosmic rays are treated as an adiabatic gas and allowed to diffuse along magnetic field lines. We calculated the dispersion relation of the instability for various sets of two free parameters, the ratio of the cosmic-ray pressure to the thermal gas pressure, and the diffusion coefficient. Including cosmic-ray effects, a shear layer is more destabilized and the growth rates can be enhanced in comparison with the ideal magnetohydrodynamical case. Whether the growth rate is effectively enhanced or not depends on the diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays. We obtain the criterion for effective enhancement by comparing the growing timescale of the instability with the diffusion timescale of cosmic rays. These results can be applied to various astrophysical phenomena where a velocity shear is present, such as outflows from star-forming galaxies, active galactic nucleus jet, channel flows resulting from the nonlinear development of the magnetorotational instability, and galactic disks.

  1. Shearing box simulations in the Rayleigh unstable regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauman, Farrukh; Blackman, Eric G.

    2017-01-01

    We study the stability properties of Rayleigh unstable flows both in the purely hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regimes for two different values of the shear q = 2.1, 4.2 (q = -dln Ω/dln r) and compare it with the Keplerian case q = 1.5. We find that the q > 2 regime is unstable both in the hydrodynamic and in the MHD limit (with an initially weak magnetic field). In this regime, the velocity fluctuations dominate the magnetic fluctuations. In contrast, in the q < 2 (magnetorotational instability (MRI)) regime the magnetic fluctuations dominate. This highlights two different paths to MHD turbulence implied by the two regimes, suggesting that in the q > 2 regime the instability produces primarily velocity fluctuations that cause magnetic fluctuations, with the causality reversed for the q < 2 MRI unstable regime. We also find that the magnetic field correlation is increasingly localized as the shear is increased in the Rayleigh unstable regime. In calculating the time evolution of spatial averages of different terms in the MHD equations, we find that the q > 2 regime is dominated by terms which are nonlinear in the fluctuations, whereas for q < 2, the linear terms play a more significant role.

  2. Chiral magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlović, Petar; Leite, Natacha; Sigl, Günter

    2017-07-01

    In this work the influence of the chiral anomaly effect on the evolution of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence was studied. We argue that before the electroweak symmetry breaking and for temperatures high enough such that the electron mass can be ignored, the description of a charged plasma in general needs to take into account the interplay between turbulence and the anomaly effects. It was demonstrated that this generalization can have important consequences on the evolution of turbulence, leading to the creation of maximally-helical fields from initially nonhelical ones. Therefore, chiral effects can strongly support turbulent inverse cascade, and lead to a slower decrease of the magnetic field with time, and also to a faster growth of the correlation length, when compared to the evolution predicted by the standard magnetohydrodynamics description. Using the weak anomaly approximation, and treating the anomaly contributions to magnetic energy and helicity as a small perturbation, we derive the specific solutions for the inverse cascade regime that demonstrate how chiral effects support the inverse cascade.

  3. Filamentation instability in a quantum magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.

    2008-02-15

    The filamentation instability occurring when a nonrelativistic electron beam passes through a quantum magnetized plasma is investigated by means of a cold quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. It is proved that the instability can be completely suppressed by quantum effects if and only if a finite magnetic field is present. A dimensionless parameter is identified that measures the strength of quantum effects. Strong quantum effects allow for a much smaller magnetic field to suppress the instability than in the classical regime.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence Mediated by Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav; Loureiro, Nuno F.

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic field fluctuations in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence can be viewed as current sheets that are progressively more anisotropic at smaller scales. As suggested by Loureiro & Boldyrev and Mallet et al., below a certain critical thickness, {λ }c, such current sheets become tearing-unstable. We propose that the tearing instability changes the effective alignment of the magnetic field lines in such a way as to balance the eddy turnover rate at all scales smaller than {λ }c. As a result, turbulent fluctuations become progressively less anisotropic at smaller scales, with the alignment angle increasing as θ ∼ {(λ /{λ }* )}-4/5+β , where {λ }* ∼ {L}0{S}0-3/4 is the resistive dissipation scale. Here L 0 is the outer scale of the turbulence, S 0 is the corresponding Lundquist number, and 0≤slant β < 4/5 is a parameter. The resulting Fourier energy spectrum is E({k}\\perp )\\propto {k}\\perp -11/5+2β /3, where {k}\\perp is the wavenumber normal to the local mean magnetic field, and the critical scale is {λ }c∼ {S}L-(4-5β )/(7-20β /3). The simplest model corresponds to β = 0, in which case the predicted scaling formally agrees with one of the solutions obtained in Mallet et al. from a discrete hierarchical model of abruptly collapsing current sheets, an approach different from and complementary to ours. We also show that the reconnection-mediated interval is non-universal with respect to the dissipation mechanism. Hyper-resistivity of the form \\tilde{η }{k}2+2s leads (in the simplest case of β = 0) to the different transition scale {λ }c∼ {L}0{\\tilde{S}}0-4/(7+9s) and the energy spectrum E({k}\\perp )\\propto {k}\\perp -(11+9s)/(5+3s), where {\\tilde{S}}0 is the corresponding hyper-resistive Lundquist number.

  5. Accurate, meshless methods for magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Raives, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we explored new meshless finite-volume Lagrangian methods for hydrodynamics: the `meshless finite mass' (MFM) and `meshless finite volume' (MFV) methods; these capture advantages of both smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) schemes. We extend these to include ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The MHD equations are second-order consistent and conservative. We augment these with a divergence-cleaning scheme, which maintains nabla \\cdot B≈ 0. We implement these in the code GIZMO, together with state-of-the-art SPH MHD. We consider a large test suite, and show that on all problems the new methods are competitive with AMR using constrained transport (CT) to ensure nabla \\cdot B=0. They correctly capture the growth/structure of the magnetorotational instability, MHD turbulence, and launching of magnetic jets, in some cases converging more rapidly than state-of-the-art AMR. Compared to SPH, the MFM/MFV methods exhibit convergence at fixed neighbour number, sharp shock-capturing, and dramatically reduced noise, divergence errors, and diffusion. Still, `modern' SPH can handle most test problems, at the cost of larger kernels and `by hand' adjustment of artificial diffusion. Compared to non-moving meshes, the new methods exhibit enhanced `grid noise' but reduced advection errors and diffusion, easily include self-gravity, and feature velocity-independent errors and superior angular momentum conservation. They converge more slowly on some problems (smooth, slow-moving flows), but more rapidly on others (involving advection/rotation). In all cases, we show divergence control beyond the Powell 8-wave approach is necessary, or all methods can converge to unphysical answers even at high resolution.

  6. Electron magnetohydrodynamics: Dynamics and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). We argue that there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. On the other hand, the relaxation principle, the long term evolution of a weakly dissipative system towards Taylor-Beltrami state, remains valid in EMHD. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact nonlinear solutions; (ii) collinear whistlers do not interact (including counterpropagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector k1=k2 do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfvén turbulence can not be transferred to the EMHD turbulence. We derive the Hamiltonian formulation of EMHD, and using Bogoliubov transformation reduce it to the canonical form; we calculate the matrix elements for the three-wave interaction of whistlers. We solve numerically the kinetic equation and show that, generally, the EMHD cascade develops within a broad range of angles, while transiently it may show anisotropic, nearly two-dimensional structures. Development of a cascade depends on the forcing (nonuniversal) and often fails to reach a steady state. Analytical estimates predict the spectrum of magnetic fluctuations for the quasi-isotropic cascade ∝k-2. The cascade remains weak (not critically balanced). The cascade is UV local, while the infrared locality is weakly (logarithmically) violated.

  7. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    SciTech Connect

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1986-07-08

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator is described comprising a magnet having a magnetic field, an elongate hollow housing containing an electrically conductive liquid and a thermoacoustic structure positioned in the liquid, heat exchange means thermally connected to the thermoacoustic structure for inducing the liquid to oscillate at an acoustic resonant frequency within the housing. The housing is positioned in the magnetic field and oriented such that the direction of the magnetic field and the direction of oscillatory motion of the liquid are substantially orthogonal to one another, first and second electrical conductor means connected to the liquid on opposite sides of the housing along an axis which is substantially orthogonal to both the direction of the magnetic field and the direction of oscillatory motion of the liquid, an alternating current output signal is generated in the conductor means at a frequency corresponding to the frequency of the oscillatory motion of the liquid.

  8. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic interchanges in low density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yimin; Goel, Deepak; Hassam, A.B.

    2005-03-01

    The ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations are usually derived under the assumption V{sub A}<instabilities in 'line-tied' slab geometry as well as to centrifugally confined plasmas. It is found that interchange growth rates are reduced by a factor of 1+V{sub A}{sup 2}/c{sup 2}, corresponding to a larger effective mass resulting from the extra electromagnetic momentum. Line tying is unaffected.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of tokamak edge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J.W.; Hastie, R.J.; Wilson, H.R.; Miller, R.L.

    1998-07-01

    A new formalism for analyzing the magnetohydrodynamic stability of a limiter tokamak edge plasma is developed. Two radially localized, high toroidal mode number n instabilities are studied in detail: a peeling mode and an edge ballooning mode. The peeling mode, driven by edge current density and stabilized by edge pressure gradient, has features which are consistent with several properties of tokamak behavior in the high confinement {open_quotes}H{close_quotes}-mode of operation, and edge localized modes (or ELMs) in particular. The edge ballooning mode, driven by the pressure gradient, is identified; this penetrates {approximately}n{sup 1/3} rational surfaces into the plasma (rather than {approximately}n{sup 1/2}, expected from conventional ballooning mode theory). Furthermore, there exists a coupling between these two modes and this coupling provides a picture of the ELM cycle.

  10. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of the spheromak configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S.C.

    1982-01-19

    Results are presented of a parametric study of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability properties of the spheromak, or compact torus, configuration. In the absence of a nearby conducting wall, the spheromak is always unstable to at least one current driven mode. With a conducting wall at the surface, the spheromak can be unstable to current driven modes if the current is too peaked, i.e., q/sub o/(R/a) less than or equal to 2/3, or if the shear is too low at the origin. The Mercier criterion sets an upper limit on the pressure gradient everywhere, but configurations that are everywhere Mercier stable can be unstable to pressure driven low-n modes. Stable toroidal configurations exist with a spherical wall separated by half a minor radius, and with ..beta../sub theta/ = 30%.

  11. Conservation of circulation in magnetohydrodynamics

    PubMed

    Bekenstein; Oron

    2000-10-01

    We demonstrate at both the Newtonian and (general) relativistic levels the existence of a generalization of Kelvin's circulation theorem (for pure fluids) that is applicable to perfect magnetohydrodynamics. The argument is based on the least action principle for magnetohydrodynamic flow. Examples of the new conservation law are furnished. The new theorem should be helpful in identifying new kinds of vortex phenomena distinct from magnetic ropes or fluid vortices.

  12. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability under Parker-Spiral Interplanetary Magnetic Field conditions at the magnetospheric flanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, E.; Nykyri, K.; Otto, A.

    2016-07-01

    We have generated fully three-dimensional, high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) Instability during Parker-Spiral Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) conditions at the dawnside magnetospheric flank magnetopause. Results of these simulations show that, although the draping of a strong tangential magnetic field component around the magnetopause, tailward of the terminator (due to the Parker-Spiral orientation), tends to stabilize the growth of such instabilities within the shear-flow plane, Kelvin-Helmholtz waves with a k -vector tilted out of this plane may, nonetheless, develop into the nonlinear phase. This result suggests that obliquely propagating KH waves may contribute to the dawn-dusk asymmetries observed in plasma sheet parameters.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cole, John; Lineberry, John; Chapman, Jim; Schmidt, Harold; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental obstacle to routine space access is the specific energy limitations associated with chemical fuels. In the case of vertical take-off, the high thrust needed for vertical liftoff and acceleration to orbit translates into power levels in the 10 GW range. Furthermore, useful payload mass fractions are possible only if the exhaust particle energy (i.e., exhaust velocity) is much greater than that available with traditional chemical propulsion. The electronic binding energy released by the best chemical reactions (e.g., LOX/LH2 for example, is less than 2 eV per product molecule (approx. 1.8 eV per H2O molecule), which translates into particle velocities less than 5 km/s. Useful payload fractions, however, will require exhaust velocities exceeding 15 km/s (i.e., particle energies greater than 20 eV). As an added challenge, the envisioned hypothetical RLV (reusable launch vehicle) should accomplish these amazing performance feats while providing relatively low acceleration levels to orbit (2-3g maximum). From such fundamental considerations, it is painfully obvious that planned and current RLV solutions based on chemical fuels alone represent only a temporary solution and can only result in minor gains, at best. What is truly needed is a revolutionary approach that will dramatically reduce the amount of fuel and size of the launch vehicle. This implies the need for new compact high-power energy sources as well as advanced accelerator technologies for increasing engine exhaust velocity. Electromagnetic acceleration techniques are of immense interest since they can be used to circumvent the thermal limits associated with conventional propulsion systems. This paper describes the Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment (MAPX) being undertaken at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this experiment, a 1-MW arc heater is being used as a feeder for a 1-MW magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cole, John; Lineberry, John; Chapman, Jim; Schmidt, Harold; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental obstacle to routine space access is the specific energy limitations associated with chemical fuels. In the case of vertical take-off, the high thrust needed for vertical liftoff and acceleration to orbit translates into power levels in the 10 GW range. Furthermore, useful payload mass fractions are possible only if the exhaust particle energy (i.e., exhaust velocity) is much greater than that available with traditional chemical propulsion. The electronic binding energy released by the best chemical reactions (e.g., LOX/LH2 for example, is less than 2 eV per product molecule (approx. 1.8 eV per H2O molecule), which translates into particle velocities less than 5 km/s. Useful payload fractions, however, will require exhaust velocities exceeding 15 km/s (i.e., particle energies greater than 20 eV). As an added challenge, the envisioned hypothetical RLV (reusable launch vehicle) should accomplish these amazing performance feats while providing relatively low acceleration levels to orbit (2-3g maximum). From such fundamental considerations, it is painfully obvious that planned and current RLV solutions based on chemical fuels alone represent only a temporary solution and can only result in minor gains, at best. What is truly needed is a revolutionary approach that will dramatically reduce the amount of fuel and size of the launch vehicle. This implies the need for new compact high-power energy sources as well as advanced accelerator technologies for increasing engine exhaust velocity. Electromagnetic acceleration techniques are of immense interest since they can be used to circumvent the thermal limits associated with conventional propulsion systems. This paper describes the Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment (MAPX) being undertaken at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this experiment, a 1-MW arc heater is being used as a feeder for a 1-MW magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate

  15. Self-similar evolution of nonlinear magnetic bouyancy instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, K.; Tajima, T.; Matsumoto, R.

    1988-06-01

    A new type of self-similar solution of ideal magnetohydrodynamics in the nonlinear stage of undular mode (k /parallel/ B) of magnetic buoyancy instability (Parker instability or ballooning instability) is found through MHD simulation and theory. The solution has the characteristics of nonlinear instability in Lagrangian coordinates; the fluid velocity and the Alfven speed on each magnetic loop increases exponentially with time, because the loop is evacuated by the field aligned motion of matter due to gravitational acceleration.

  16. Magnetohydrodynamics in Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic fields can be used to melt, pump, stir, and stabilize liquid metals. This provides a nonintrusive means of controlling the flow of metal in commercial casting and refining operations. The quest for greater efficiency and more control in the production of steel, aluminum, and high-performance superalloys has led to a revolution in the application of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) to process metallurgy. Three typical applications are described here, chosen partially on the basis of their general interest to fluid dynamicists, and partially because of their considerable industrial importance. We look first at magnetic stirring, where a rotating magnetic field is used to agitate and homogenize the liquid zone of a partially-solidified ingot. This is a study in Ekman pumping. Next, we consider magnetic damping, where an intense, static magnetic field is used to suppress fluid motion. In particular, we look at the damping of jets, vortices, and turbulence. We conclude with a discussion of the magnetic destabilization of liquid-liquid interfaces. This is of particular importance in aluminum production.

  17. Multi-symplectic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, G. M.; McKenzie, J. F.; Zank, G. P.; Zank

    2014-10-01

    A multi-symplectic formulation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is developed based on the Clebsch variable variational principle in which the Lagrangian consists of the kinetic minus the potential energy of the MHD fluid modified by constraints using Lagrange multipliers that ensure mass conservation, entropy advection with the flow, the Lin constraint, and Faraday's equation (i.e. the magnetic flux is Lie dragged with the flow). The analysis is also carried out using the magnetic vector potential à where α=Ã. d x is Lie dragged with the flow, and B=∇×Ã. The multi-symplectic conservation laws give rise to the Eulerian momentum and energy conservation laws. The symplecticity or structural conservation laws for the multi-symplectic system corresponds to the conservation of phase space. It corresponds to taking derivatives of the momentum and energy conservation laws and combining them to produce n(n-1)/2 extra conservation laws, where n is the number of independent variables. Noether's theorem for the multi-symplectic MHD system is derived, including the case of non-Cartesian space coordinates, where the metric plays a role in the equations.

  18. Filamentary magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, R.; Tajima, T.; Petviashvili, N.; McWilliams, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    A filamentary construct of magnetohydrodynamical plasma dynamics, based on the Elsasser variables was developed. This approach is modeled after discrete vortex models of hydrodynamical turbulence, which cannot be expected in general to produce results identical to ones based on a Fourier decomposition of the fields. In a highly intermittent plasma, the induction force is small compared to the convective motion, and when this force is neglected. the plasma vortex system is described by a Hamiltonian. For a system with many such vortices we present a statistical treatment of a collection of discrete current-vorticity concentrations. Canonical and microcanonical statistical calculations show that both the vorticity and the current spectra are peaked at long wavelengths, and the expected states revert to known hydrodynamical states as the magnetic field vanishes. These results differ from previous Fourier-based statistical theories. but it is found that when the filament calculation is expanded to include the inductive force, the results approach the Fourier equilibria in the low-temperature limit, and the previous Hamiltonian plasma vortex results in the high-temperature limit. Numerical simulations of a large number of filaments are carried out and support the theory. A three-dimensional vortex model is outlined as well, which is also Hamiltonian when the inductive force is neglected.

  19. The plasmoid instability during asymmetric inflow magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Young, Aleida K.; Shen, Chengcai; Lin, Jun; Ni, Lei

    2013-06-15

    Theoretical studies of the plasmoid instability generally assume that the reconnecting magnetic fields are symmetric. We relax this assumption by performing two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the plasmoid instability during asymmetric inflow magnetic reconnection. Magnetic asymmetry modifies the onset, scaling, and dynamics of this instability. Magnetic islands develop preferentially into the weak magnetic field upstream region. Outflow jets from individual X-points impact plasmoids obliquely rather than directly as in the symmetric case. Consequently, deposition of momentum by the outflow jets into the plasmoids is less efficient, the plasmoids develop net vorticity, and shear flow slows down secondary merging between islands. Secondary merging events have asymmetry along both the inflow and outflow directions. Downstream plasma is more turbulent in cases with magnetic asymmetry because islands are able to roll around each other after exiting the current sheet. As in the symmetric case, plasmoid formation facilitates faster reconnection for at least small and moderate magnetic asymmetries. However, when the upstream magnetic field strengths differ by a factor of 4, the reconnection rate plateaus at a lower value than expected from scaling the symmetric results. We perform a parameter study to investigate the onset of the plasmoid instability as a function of magnetic asymmetry and domain size. There exist domain sizes for which symmetric simulations are stable but asymmetric simulations are unstable, suggesting that moderate magnetic asymmetry is somewhat destabilizing. We discuss the implications for plasmoid and flux rope formation in solar eruptions, laboratory reconnection experiments, and space plasmas. The differences between symmetric and asymmetric simulations provide some hints regarding the nature of the three-dimensional plasmoid instability.

  20. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT BY ACOUSTIC MODES GENERATED IN THE BOUNDARY LAYER. II. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Stone, James M.

    2013-06-10

    We perform global unstratified three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of an astrophysical boundary layer (BL)-an interface region between an accretion disk and a weakly magnetized accreting object such as a white dwarf-with the goal of understanding the effects of magnetic field on the BL. We use cylindrical coordinates with an isothermal equation of state and investigate a number of initial field geometries including toroidal, vertical, and vertical with zero net flux. Our initial setup consists of a Keplerian disk attached to a non-rotating star. In a previous work, we found that in hydrodynamical simulations, sound waves excited by shear in the BL were able to efficiently transport angular momentum and drive mass accretion onto the star. Here we confirm that in MHD simulations, waves serve as an efficient means of angular momentum transport in the vicinity of the BL, despite the magnetorotational instability (MRI) operating in the disk. In particular, the angular momentum current due to waves is at times larger than the angular momentum current due to MRI. Our results suggest that angular momentum transport in the BL and its vicinity is a global phenomenon occurring through dissipation of waves and shocks. This point of view is quite different from the standard picture of transport by a local anomalous turbulent viscosity. In addition to angular momentum transport, we also study magnetic field amplification within the BL. We find that the field is indeed amplified in the BL, but only by a factor of a few, and remains subthermal.

  1. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE FORMATION OF COLD FRONTS IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: EFFECTS OF ANISOTROPIC VISCOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Matsumoto, Ryoji E-mail: ogawa@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp E-mail: matumoto@astro.s.chiba-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-10

    We carried out three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to study the effects of plasma viscosity on the formation of sharp discontinuities of density and temperature distributions, cold fronts, in clusters of galaxies. By fixing the gravitational potential that confines the cool, dense plasma in a moving subcluster, we simulated its interaction with the hot, lower density plasma around the subcluster. At the initial state, the intracluster medium (ICM) is assumed to be threaded by uniform magnetic fields. The enhancement of plasma viscosity along the direction of magnetic fields is incorporated as anisotropic viscosity depending on the direction of magnetic fields. We found that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the surface of the subcluster grows even in models with anisotropic viscosity, because its effects on the velocity shear across the magnetic field lines are suppressed. We also found that magnetic fields around the interface between the subcluster and ICM are amplified even in the presence of viscosity, while magnetic fields behind the subcluster are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.01 in models with viscosity, whereas they are amplified up to {beta}{sup -1} {approx} 0.1 in models without viscosity, where {beta} is the ratio of gas pressure to magnetic pressure.

  2. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics of the rheological and structural properties of linear and branched molecules. Simple shear and poiseuille flows; instabilities and slip.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Tejas, Jorge; Alvarado, Juan F J; González-Alatorre, Guillermo; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel; Sanchez, Isaac C; Macias-Salinas, Ricardo; Manero, Octavio

    2005-08-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations are performed for linear and branched chain molecules to study their rheological and structural properties under simple shear and Poiseuille flows. Molecules are described by a spring-monomer model with a given intermolecular potential. The equations of motion are solved for shear and Poiseuille flows with Lees and Edward's [A. W. Lees and S. F. Edwards, J. Phys. C 5, 1921 (1972)] periodic boundary conditions. A multiple time-scale algorithm extended to nonequilibrium situations is used as the integration method, and the simulations are performed at constant temperature using Nose-Hoover [S. Nose, J. Chem. Phys. 81, 511 (1984)] dynamics. In simple shear, molecules with flow-induced ellipsoidal shape, having significant segment concentrations along the gradient and neutral directions, exhibit substantial flow resistance. Linear molecules have larger zero-shear-rate viscosity than that of branched molecules, however, this behavior reverses as the shear rate is increased. The relaxation time of the molecules is associated with segment concentrations directed along the gradient and neutral directions, and hence it depends on structure and molecular weight. The results of this study are in qualitative agreement with other simulation studies and with experimental data. The pressure (Poiseuille) flow is induced by an external force F(e) simulated by confining the molecules in the region between surfaces which have attractive forces. Conditions at the boundary strongly influence the type of the slip flow predicted. A parabolic velocity profile with apparent slip on the wall is predicted under weakly attractive wall conditions, independent of molecular structure. In the case of strongly attractive walls, a layer of adhered molecules to the wall produces an abrupt distortion of the velocity profile which leads to slip between fluid layers with magnitude that depends on the molecular structure. Finally, the molecular deformation

  3. Modeling eruptive coronal magnetohydrodynamic systems with FLUX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmeler, L. A.

    In this dissertation I explore solar coronal energetic eruptions in the context of magnetic reconnection, which is commonly thought to be a required trigger mechanism for solar eruptions. Reconnection is difficult to directly observe in the corona, and current numerical methods cannot model reconnectionless control cases. Thus, it is not possible to determine if reconnection is a necessary component of these eruptions. I have executed multiple controlled simulations to determine the importance of reconnection for initiation and evolution of several eruptive systems using FLUX, a numerical model that uses the comparatively new fluxon technique. I describe two types of eruptions modeled with FLUX: a metastable confined flux rope theory for coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation, and symmetrically twisted coronal jets in a uniform vertical background field. In the former, I identified an ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability that allows metastable twisted flux rope systems to suddenly lose stability and erupt even in the absence of reconnection, contradicting previous conjecture. The CME result is in contrast to the azimuthally symmetric coronal jet initiation model, where jet-like behavior does not manifest without reconnection. My work has demonstrated that some of the observed eruptive phenomena may be triggered by non-reconnective means such as ideal MHD instabilities, and that magnetic reconnection is not a required element in all coronal eruptions.

  4. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 1032 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  5. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  6. Jeans instability in a quantum dusty magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect

    Salimullah, M.; Jamil, M.; Shah, H. A.; Murtaza, G.

    2009-01-15

    Jeans instability in a homogeneous cold quantum dusty plasma in the presence of the ambient magnetic field and the quantum effect arising through the Bohm potential has been examined using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. It is found that the Jeans instability is significantly reduced by the presence of the dust-lower-hybrid wave and the ion quantum effect. The minimum wavenumber for Jeans stability depends clearly on ion quantum effect and the dust-lower-hybrid frequency also.

  7. Structures in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Detection and scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Pouquet, A.; Rosenberg, D.; Mininni, P. D.; Donovan, E. F.

    2010-11-01

    We present a systematic analysis of statistical properties of turbulent current and vorticity structures at a given time using cluster analysis. The data stem from numerical simulations of decaying three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the absence of an imposed uniform magnetic field; the magnetic Prandtl number is taken equal to unity, and we use a periodic box with grids of up to 15363 points and with Taylor Reynolds numbers up to 1100. The initial conditions are either an X -point configuration embedded in three dimensions, the so-called Orszag-Tang vortex, or an Arn’old-Beltrami-Childress configuration with a fully helical velocity and magnetic field. In each case two snapshots are analyzed, separated by one turn-over time, starting just after the peak of dissipation. We show that the algorithm is able to select a large number of structures (in excess of 8000) for each snapshot and that the statistical properties of these clusters are remarkably similar for the two snapshots as well as for the two flows under study in terms of scaling laws for the cluster characteristics, with the structures in the vorticity and in the current behaving in the same way. We also study the effect of Reynolds number on cluster statistics, and we finally analyze the properties of these clusters in terms of their velocity-magnetic-field correlation. Self-organized criticality features have been identified in the dissipative range of scales. A different scaling arises in the inertial range, which cannot be identified for the moment with a known self-organized criticality class consistent with magnetohydrodynamics. We suggest that this range can be governed by turbulence dynamics as opposed to criticality and propose an interpretation of intermittency in terms of propagation of local instabilities.

  8. Three dimensional instabilities of an electron scale current sheet in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Neeraj; Büchner, Jörg

    2014-06-15

    In collisionless magnetic reconnection, electron current sheets (ECS) with thickness of the order of an electron inertial length form embedded inside ion current sheets with thickness of the order of an ion inertial length. These ECS's are susceptible to a variety of instabilities which have the potential to affect the reconnection rate and/or the structure of reconnection. We carry out a three dimensional linear eigen mode stability analysis of electron shear flow driven instabilities of an electron scale current sheet using an electron-magnetohydrodynamic plasma model. The linear growth rate of the fastest unstable mode was found to drop with the thickness of the ECS. We show how the nature of the instability depends on the thickness of the ECS. As long as the half-thickness of the ECS is close to the electron inertial length, the fastest instability is that of a translational symmetric two-dimensional (no variations along flow direction) tearing mode. For an ECS half thickness sufficiently larger or smaller than the electron inertial length, the fastest mode is not a tearing mode any more and may have finite variations along the flow direction. Therefore, the generation of plasmoids in a nonlinear evolution of ECS is likely only when the half-thickness is close to an electron inertial length.

  9. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.C.

    1998-11-01

    This is a final report on the research activities carried out under the above grant at Dartmouth. During the period considered, the grant was identified as being for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics, considered as the most tractable theoretical framework in which the plasma problems associated with magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas could be studied. During the first part of the grant`s lifetime, the author was associated with Los Alamos National Laboratory as a consultant and the work was motivated by the reversed-field pinch. Later, when that program was killed at Los Alamos, the problems became ones that could be motivated by their relation to tokamaks. Throughout the work, the interest was always on questions that were as fundamental as possible, compatible with those motivations. The intent was always to contribute to plasma physics as a science, as well as to the understanding of mission-oriented confined fusion plasmas. Twelve Ph.D. theses were supervised during this period and a comparable number of postdoctoral research associates were temporarily supported. Many of these have gone on to distinguished careers, though few have done so in the context of the controlled fusion program. Their work was a combination of theory and numerical computation, in gradually less and less idealized settings, moving from rectangular periodic boundary conditions in two dimensions, through periodic straight cylinders and eventually, before the grant was withdrawn, to toroids, with a gradually more prominent role for electrical and mechanical boundary conditions. The author never had access to a situation where he could initiate experiments and relate directly to the laboratory data he wanted. Computers were the laboratory. Most of the work was reported in referred publications in the open literature, copies of which were transmitted one by one to DOE at the time they appeared. The Appendix to this report is a bibliography of published work which was carried out under the

  10. Microphysics of Cosmic Ray Driven Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Brandenburg, A.; Malkov, M. A.; Osipov, S. M.

    Energetic nonthermal particles (cosmic rays, CRs) are accelerated in supernova remnants, relativistic jets and other astrophysical objects. The CR energy density is typically comparable with that of the thermal components and magnetic fields. In this review we discuss mechanisms of magnetic field amplification due to instabilities induced by CRs. We derive CR kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic equations that govern cosmic plasma systems comprising the thermal background plasma, comic rays and fluctuating magnetic fields to study CR-driven instabilities. Both resonant and non-resonant instabilities are reviewed, including the Bell short-wavelength instability, and the firehose instability. Special attention is paid to the longwavelength instabilities driven by the CR current and pressure gradient. The helicity production by the CR current-driven instabilities is discussed in connection with the dynamo mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field amplification.

  11. Microphysics of Cosmic Ray Driven Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Brandenburg, A.; Malkov, M. A.; Osipov, S. M.

    2013-10-01

    Energetic nonthermal particles (cosmic rays, CRs) are accelerated in supernova remnants, relativistic jets and other astrophysical objects. The CR energy density is typically comparable with that of the thermal components and magnetic fields. In this review we discuss mechanisms of magnetic field amplification due to instabilities induced by CRs. We derive CR kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic equations that govern cosmic plasma systems comprising the thermal background plasma, comic rays and fluctuating magnetic fields to study CR-driven instabilities. Both resonant and non-resonant instabilities are reviewed, including the Bell short-wavelength instability, and the firehose instability. Special attention is paid to the longwavelength instabilities driven by the CR current and pressure gradient. The helicity production by the CR current-driven instabilities is discussed in connection with the dynamo mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field amplification.

  12. Action Principle for Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avignon, Eric; Morrison, Philip; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    A covariant action principle for ideal relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in terms of natural Eulerian field variables is given. This is done by generalizing the covariant Poisson bracket theory of Marsden et al., which uses a noncanonical bracket to implement constrained variations of an action functional. Various implications and extensions of this action principle are also discussed.

  13. Identification of Mercier instabilities in Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    In, Y.; Ramos, J. J.; Hastie, R. J.; Catto, P. J.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Marmar, E.; Porkolab, M.; Snipes, J.; Wolfe, S.

    2000-12-01

    During current ramp-up discharges, highly localized magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations were observed on the electron cyclotron emission diagnostics of Alcator C-Mod tokamak [I. H. Hutchinson , Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)]. The electron temperature profile was hollow, while the density profile was weakly decreasing. Assuming that the equilibration time was short enough to quickly thermalize ions the pressure profile was also found to be hollow. Using this pressure profile as an additional constraint to the EFIT program, an equilibrium with reversed shear was constructed having a q(0)>>1. The localized MHD activity was observed near the inner q=5 rational surface in this reconstructed equilibrium, where the Mercier criterion for ideal MHD stability was violated because of the reversed pressure gradient (dp/dr>0), q>1 and moderate shear. When kinetic effects were added, the ideal Mercier mode was finite ion Larmor radius stabilized. However, ion Landau damping was found to be strong enough to drive a kinetic Mercier instability.

  14. Energy decay laws in strongly anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Bigot, Barbara; Galtier, Sébastien; Politano, Hélène

    2008-02-22

    We investigate the influence of a uniform magnetic field B(0)=B(0)e( parallel) on energy decay laws in incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The nonlinear transfer reduction along B(0) is included in a model that distinguishes parallel and perpendicular directions, following a phenomenology of Kraichnan. We predict a slowing down of the energy decay due to anisotropy in the limit of strong B(0), with distinct power laws for energy decay of shear- and pseudo-Alfvén waves. Numerical results from the kinetic equations of Alfvén wave turbulence recover these predictions, and MHD numerical results clearly tend to follow them in the lowest perpendicular planes.

  15. The role of creep cavitation and ductile failure in mid-crustal deformation - a critical one in the formation of shear instabilities and the nucleation of deep slow slip events?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusseis, Florian; Gilgannon, James; Burns, Thomas; Menegon, Luca

    2017-04-01

    domains, viscous grain boundary sliding (VGBS) becomes active and cavities form as superplastic voids. Quartz creep cavities are suggested to evolve in tandem with creep cavities present in the fine-grained polyphase domains (as described in Fusseis et al., 2009). The polymineralic domains in the samples show grain boundary alignments extending parallel to the shear plane for several grain diameters. These phenomena are hard to explain by conventional models for grain boundary sliding, and we interpret them as the remnants of former ductile failure events that emerged where a critical creep cavity density was reached, but stalled. Our study is among the first to identify specific mechanisms behind the formation of synkinematic creep cavities and anchors cavitation firmly in the microstructural evolution of the rock. We demonstrate that, during the deformation of the ultramylonite, fluid could not move freely through the rock, but was channelized into sheet-like conduits parallel to the shear plane provided by creep cavitation. Synkinematic fluid movements were likely driven by the granular fluid pump, following hydraulic potentials that arose dynamically on the grain scale. Our study provides an observational database for testing the hypothesis that creep cavitation could have led to ductile failure in these rocks, a process we consider relevant for the emergence of shear instabilities and the nucleation of slow slip events at the frictional-viscous transition.

  16. The two-stream plasma instability in a velocity shear and its role in the solar wind-Venus ionosphere interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Aceves, H.; Perez De Tejada, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    We study the linear development of the two-stream instability in a plasma consisting of cold ions, assumed at rest and taken to represent planetary ions, and a hot, streaming population of electrons, representing the solar wind. The stability of quasi-global perturbations is analyzed as a function of plasma density, temperature and streaming velocity, using a QR algorithm to compute the growth rate of eigenmodes of the coupled fluid equations of motion for both species. The sense of the cross-flow, viscous-like momentum transfer from the streaming plasma to ionospheric ions, is determined on the basis of an heuristic estimation following a Reynolds averaging procedure of the cross-flow momentum flux term in the equation of motion.

  17. High conductivity magnetic tearing instability. [of neutral plasma sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, M. A.; Van Hoven, G.

    1976-01-01

    Linearized equations of magnetohydrodynamics are used to investigate the tearing mode, for arbitrary values of the conductivity, through a consideration of the additional effect of the electron-inertia contribution to Ohm's law. A description is provided of the equilibrium and subsequent instability in the magnetohydrodynamic approximation. A method for solving the perturbation equations in the linear approximation is discussed and attention is given to the results in the high conductivity limit.

  18. Calculations of two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic axisymmetric steady-states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, N. M.; Jardin, S. C.

    2009-11-01

    M3D- C1 is an implicit, high-order finite element code for the solution of the time-dependent nonlinear two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic equations [S.C. Jardin, J. Breslau, N. Ferraro, A high-order implicit finite element method for integrating the two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic equations in two dimensions, J. Comp. Phys. 226 (2) (2007) 2146-2174]. This code has now been extended to allow computations in toroidal geometry. Improvements to the spatial integration and time-stepping algorithms are discussed. Steady-states of a resistive two-fluid model, self-consistently including flows, anisotropic viscosity (including gyroviscosity) and heat flux, are calculated for diverted plasmas in geometries typical of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Exploration of spherical torus physics in the NSTX device, Nucl. Fusion 40 (3Y) (2000) 557-561]. These states are found by time-integrating the dynamical equations until the steady-state is reached, and are therefore stationary or statistically steady on both magnetohydrodynamic and transport time-scales. Resistively driven cross-surface flows are found to be in close agreement with Pfirsch-Schlüter theory. Poloidally varying toroidal flows are in agreement with comparable calculations [A.Y. Aydemir, Shear flows at the tokamak edge and their interaction with edge-localized modes, Phys. Plasmas 14]. New effects on core toroidal rotation due to gyroviscosity and a local particle source are observed.

  19. The parametric decay of Alfven waves into shear Alfven waves and dust lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Jamil, M.; Shah, H. A.; Zubia, K.; Zeba, I.; Uzma, Ch.; Salimullah, M.

    2010-07-15

    The parametric decay instability of Alfven wave into low-frequency electrostatic dust-lower-hybrid and electromagnetic shear Alfven waves has been investigated in detail in a dusty plasma in the presence of external/ambient uniform magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic fluid equations of plasmas have been employed to find the linear and nonlinear response of the plasma particles for this three-wave nonlinear coupling in a dusty magnetoplasma. Here, relatively high frequency electromagnetic Alfven wave has been taken as the pump wave. It couples with other two low-frequency internal possible modes of the dusty magnetoplasma, viz., the dust-lower-hybrid and shear Alfven waves. The nonlinear dispersion relation of the dust-lower-hybrid wave has been solved to obtain the growth rate of the parametric decay instability. The growth rate is maximum for small value of external magnetic field B{sub s}. It is noticed that the growth rate is proportional to the unperturbed electron number density n{sub oe}.

  20. Stability of negative central magnetic shear discharges in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E.J.; Chu, M.S.; Ferron, J.R.

    1996-12-01

    Discharges with negative central magnetic shear (NCS) hold the promise of enhanced fusion performance in advanced tokamaks. However, stability to long wavelength magnetohydrodynamic modes is needed to take advantage of the improved confinement found in NCS discharges. The stability limits seen in DIII-D experiments depend on the pressure and current density profiles and are in good agreement with stability calculations. Discharges with a strongly peaked pressure profile reach a disruptive limit at low beta, {beta}{sub N} = {beta} (I/aB){sup -1} {le} 2.5 (% m T/MA), caused by an n = 1 ideal internal kink mode or a global resistive instability close to the ideal stability limit. Discharges with a broad pressure profile reach a soft beta limit at significantly higher beta, {beta}{sub N} = 4 to 5, usually caused by instabilities with n > 1 and usually driven near the edge of the plasma. With broad pressure profiles, the experimental stability limit is independent of the magnitude of negative shear but improves with the internal inductance, corresponding to lower current density near the edge of the plasma. Understanding of the stability limits in NCS discharges has led to record DIII-D fusion performance in discharges with a broad pressure profile and low edge current density.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic Numerical Simulations of Magnetic Reconnection in Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, Syuniti

    2000-03-01

    In this thesis, we perform two-dimensional (2D) resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations of the magnetic reconnection in interstellar medium. Part I is introduction. The motivation of the study is to investigate the origin of hot gas in interstellar medium. A scenario for generating X-ray gas in Galaxy is proposed, and examined by performing 2D MHD simulations with simple assumptions (Part II). The magnetic reconnection triggered by a supernova (Part III) and Parker instability (Part IV) are studied in detail, by performing 2D MHD simulations. Furthermore, the magnetic reconnection is also studied by performing three-dimensional (3D) MHD numerical simulation in (Part V). % Finally, we discuss and summarize the thesis (Parts VI and VII). Part I First, we review observation of Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE) and its problems. Second, we describe observation of interstellar magnetic field briefly. Third, we review magnetic reconnection, theoretical models, numerical simulations, observations and experiments, and tearing instability. Forth, Parker instability (undular mode of magnetobuoyancy instability) is mentioned. Finally, we show the purpose of this thesis. Part II We present a scenario for the origin of the hot plasma in Galaxy as a model of strong X-ray emission [sim 3-10 keV; LX(2-10 keV) sim 1038 erg s-1], called GRXE, which has been observed near to the galactic plane. GRXE is thermal emission from a hot component (sim 7 keV) and a cool component (sim 0.8 keV). Observations suggest that the hot component is diffuse, and that it is not escaping away freely. Both what heats the hot component and what confines it in Galactic ridge still remain puzzling, while the cool component is believed to be created by supernovae. We propose a new scenario: the hot component is heated by magnetic reconnection, and confined by a helical magnetic field produced by magnetic reconnection. We solved 2D MHD equations numerically to study how magnetic

  2. Radiation magnetohydrodynamics in global simulations of protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, M.; Fromang, S.; González, M.; Commerçon, B.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: Our aim is to study the thermal and dynamical evolution of protoplanetary discs in global simulations, including the physics of radiation transfer and magneto-hydrodynamic turbulence caused by the magneto-rotational instability. Methods: We have developed a radiative transfer method based on the flux-limited diffusion approximation that includes frequency dependent irradiation by the central star. This hybrid scheme is implemented in the PLUTO code. The focus of our implementation is on the performance of the radiative transfer method. Using an optimized Jacobi preconditioned BiCGSTAB solver, the radiative module is three times faster than the magneto-hydrodynamic step for the disc set-up we consider. We obtain weak scaling efficiencies of 70% up to 1024 cores. Results: We present the first global 3D radiation magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of a stratified protoplanetary disc. The disc model parameters were chosen to approximate those of the system AS 209 in the star-forming region Ophiuchus. Starting the simulation from a disc in radiative and hydrostatic equilibrium, the magneto-rotational instability quickly causes magneto-hydrodynamic turbulence and heating in the disc. We find that the turbulent properties are similar to that of recent locally isothermal global simulations of protoplanetary discs. For example, the rate of angular momentum transport α is a few times 10-3. For the disc parameters we use, turbulent dissipation heats the disc midplane and raises the temperature by about 15% compared to passive disc models. The vertical temperature profile shows no temperature peak at the midplane as in classical viscous disc models. A roughly flat vertical temperature profile establishes in the optically thick region of the disc close to the midplane. We reproduce the vertical temperature profile with viscous disc models for which the stress tensor vertical profile is flat in the bulk of the disc and vanishes in the disc corona. Conclusions: The present

  3. Magnetic reconnection from a multiscale instability cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Auna L.; Bellan, Paul M.

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic reconnection, the process whereby magnetic field lines break and then reconnect to form a different topology, underlies critical dynamics of magnetically confined plasmas in both nature and the laboratory. Magnetic reconnection involves localized diffusion of the magnetic field across plasma, yet observed reconnection rates are typically much higher than can be accounted for using classical electrical resistivity. It is generally proposed that the field diffusion underlying fast reconnection results instead from some combination of non-magnetohydrodynamic processes that become important on the `microscopic' scale of the ion Larmor radius or the ion skin depth. A recent laboratory experiment demonstrated a transition from slow to fast magnetic reconnection when a current channel narrowed to a microscopic scale, but did not address how a macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic system accesses the microscale. Recent theoretical models and numerical simulations suggest that a macroscopic, two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic current sheet might do this through a sequence of repetitive tearing and thinning into two-dimensional magnetized plasma structures having successively finer scales. Here we report observations demonstrating a cascade of instabilities from a distinct, macroscopic-scale magnetohydrodynamic instability to a distinct, microscopic-scale (ion skin depth) instability associated with fast magnetic reconnection. These observations resolve the full three-dimensional dynamics and give insight into the frequently impulsive nature of reconnection in space and laboratory plasmas.

  4. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF A SIGMOID ERUPTION OF ACTIVE REGION 11283

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Chaowei; Feng Xueshang; Wu, S. T.; Hu Qiang E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn E-mail: qh0001@uah.edu

    2013-07-10

    Current magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the initiation of solar eruptions are still commonly carried out with idealized magnetic field models, whereas the realistic coronal field prior to eruptions can possibly be reconstructed from the observable photospheric field. Using a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation prior to a sigmoid eruption in AR 11283 as the initial condition in an MHD model, we successfully simulate the realistic initiation process of the eruption event, as is confirmed by a remarkable resemblance to the SDO/AIA observations. Analysis of the pre-eruption field reveals that the envelope flux of the sigmoidal core contains a coronal null and furthermore the flux rope is prone to a torus instability. Observations suggest that reconnection at the null cuts overlying tethers and likely triggers the torus instability of the flux rope, which results in the eruption. This kind of simulation demonstrates the capability of modeling the realistic solar eruptions to provide the initiation process.

  5. Viscous, resistive magnetohydrodynamic stability computed by spectral techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Zang, T. A.; Montgomery, D.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Expansions in Chebyshev polynomials are used to study the linear stability of one-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic quasiequilibria, in the presence of finite resistivity and viscosity. The method is modeled on the one used by Orszag in accurate computation of solutions of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation. Two Reynolds-like numbers involving Alfvén speeds, length scales, kinematic viscosity, and magnetic diffusivity govern the stability boundaries, which are determined by the geometric mean of the two Reynolds-like numbers. Marginal stability curves, growth rates versus Reynolds-like numbers, and growth rates versus parallel wave numbers are exhibited. A numerical result that appears general is that instability has been found to be associated with inflection points in the current profile, though no general analytical proof has emerged. It is possible that nonlinear subcritical three-dimensional instabilities may exist, similar to those in Poiseuille and Couette flow. PMID:16593375

  6. Energetic particle effects on global magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z. )

    1990-06-01

    The effects of energetic particles on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) type modes are studied using analytical theories and the nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K) ({ital Workshop} {ital on} {ital Theory} {ital of} {ital Fusion} {ital Plasmas}, (Societa Italiana di Fisica, Bologna, 1987), p. 185). In particular, the problems of (1) the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of resonant fishbone'' internal modes and (2) the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances are addressed. Analytical theories are presented to help explain the NOVAresults. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral beam injection or ion cyclotron resonant heating, a stability window for the {ital n}=1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beta space exists even in the absence of core ion finite Larmor radius effect. On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to resonantly excite instability of the {ital n}=1 internal mode and can lower the critical beta threshold. The circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha-particle pressure.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamics of Mira's cometary tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, E. A.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: The asymptotic giant-branch, long-period variable star Mira exhibits a 4 parsec long cometary tail in the far-ultraviolet. We address the issue of the origin of this structure and its emission process by simulating the transition of this star from the interstellar medium to the Local Bubble, which is a tenuous, high-pressure medium. Methods: We use the hydrodynamic and the magnetohydrodynamic modules of the PLUTO astrophysical code to carry out our simulations. We study the system without a cooling function, with a simplified exponential cooling function, and with a simplified nonequilibrium cooling function. Results: We find evidence that magnetohydrodynamics constrain the shape of the cometary tail and explain features of its far-ultraviolet emission. We suggest an emission process that involves C0 excitation through inelastic electron collisions and a two-photon continuum to explain the luminosity of Mira's tail.

  8. Representation of Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Roscoe B. White

    2013-01-15

    One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through δ Β = ∇ X (xi X B) ensures that δ B • ∇ ψ = 0 at a resonance, with ψ labelling an equilibrium flux surface. Also useful for the analysis of guiding center orbits in a perturbed field is the representation δ Β = ∇ X αB. These two representations are equivalent, but the vanishing of δ B • ∇ψ at a resonance is necessary but not sufficient for the preservation of field line topology, and a indiscriminate use of either perturbation in fact destroys the original equilibrium flux topology. It is necessary to find the perturbed field to all orders in xi to conserve the original topology. The effect of using linearized perturbations on stability and growth rate calculations is discussed

  9. A drift model of interchange instability

    SciTech Connect

    Benilov, E. S.; Power, O. A.

    2007-08-15

    A set of asymptotic equations is derived, describing the dynamics of the flute mode in a magnetized plasma with cold ions, under a 'local' approximation (i.e., near a particular point). The asymptotic set is then used to calculate the growth rate of interchange instability in the slab model. It is shown that, unlike the magnetohydrodynamic ordering, the drift one allows instability to occur for either sign of the pressure gradient (i.e., for both 'bad' and 'good' curvature of the magnetic field). It is also demonstrated that finite beta gives rise to an extra instability that does not exist in the small-beta limit.

  10. Dynamic multiscaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Sahoo, Ganapati; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of the multiscaling of time-dependent velocity and magnetic-field structure functions in homogeneous, isotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in three dimensions. We generalize the formalism that has been developed for analogous studies of time-dependent structure functions in fluid turbulence to MHD. By carrying out detailed numerical studies of such time-dependent structure functions in a shell model for three-dimensional MHD turbulence, we obtain both equal-time and dynamic scaling exponents.

  11. LOCAL SIMULATIONS OF THE MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Masada, Youhei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei; Sano, Takayoshi E-mail: kkotake@th.nao.ac.jp

    2012-11-10

    Bearing in mind the application of core-collapse supernovae, we study the nonlinear properties of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) by means of three-dimensional simulations in the framework of a local shearing box approximation. By systematically changing the shear rates that symbolize the degree of differential rotation in nascent proto-neutron stars (PNSs), we derive a scaling relation between the turbulent stress sustained by the MRI and the shear-vorticity ratio. Our parametric survey shows a power-law scaling between the turbulent stress (((w {sub tot}))) and the shear-vorticity ratio (g{sub q} ) as ((w {sub tot})){proportional_to}g {sup {delta}} {sub q} with an index of {delta} {approx} 0.5. The MRI-amplified magnetic energy has a similar scaling relative to the turbulent stress, while the Maxwell stress has a slightly smaller power-law index ({approx}0.36). By modeling the effect of viscous heating rates from MRI turbulence, we show that the stronger magnetic fields, or the larger shear rates initially imposed, lead to higher dissipation rates. For a rapidly rotating PNS with a spin period in milliseconds and with strong magnetic fields of 10{sup 15} G, the energy dissipation rate is estimated to exceed 10{sup 51} erg s{sup -1}. Our results suggest that the conventional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mechanism of core-collapse supernovae is likely to be affected by MRI-driven turbulence, which we speculate, on the one hand, could harm the MHD-driven explosions due to the dissipation of the shear rotational energy at the PNS surface; or, on the other hand, its energy deposition might be potentially favorable for the working of the neutrino-heating mechanism.

  12. Local Simulations of the Magnetorotational Instability in Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masada, Youhei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei; Sano, Takayoshi

    2012-11-01

    Bearing in mind the application of core-collapse supernovae, we study the nonlinear properties of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) by means of three-dimensional simulations in the framework of a local shearing box approximation. By systematically changing the shear rates that symbolize the degree of differential rotation in nascent proto-neutron stars (PNSs), we derive a scaling relation between the turbulent stress sustained by the MRI and the shear-vorticity ratio. Our parametric survey shows a power-law scaling between the turbulent stress (langlangw totrangrang) and the shear-vorticity ratio (gq ) as langlangw totrangrangvpropg δ q with an index of δ ~ 0.5. The MRI-amplified magnetic energy has a similar scaling relative to the turbulent stress, while the Maxwell stress has a slightly smaller power-law index (~0.36). By modeling the effect of viscous heating rates from MRI turbulence, we show that the stronger magnetic fields, or the larger shear rates initially imposed, lead to higher dissipation rates. For a rapidly rotating PNS with a spin period in milliseconds and with strong magnetic fields of 1015 G, the energy dissipation rate is estimated to exceed 1051 erg s-1. Our results suggest that the conventional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mechanism of core-collapse supernovae is likely to be affected by MRI-driven turbulence, which we speculate, on the one hand, could harm the MHD-driven explosions due to the dissipation of the shear rotational energy at the PNS surface; or, on the other hand, its energy deposition might be potentially favorable for the working of the neutrino-heating mechanism.

  13. Microinstability properties of negative magnetic shear discharges in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.; Lao, L.L.

    1997-03-01

    The microinstability properties of discharges with negative (reversed) magnetic shear in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and DIII-D experiments with and without confinement transitions are investigated. A comprehensive kinetic linear eigenmode calculation employing the ballooning representation is employed with experimentally measured profile data, and using the corresponding numerically computed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria. The instability considered is the toroidal drift mode (trapped-electron-{eta}{sub i} mode). A variety of physical effects associated with differing q-profiles are explained. In addition, different negative magnetic shear discharges at different times in the discharge for TFTR and DIII-D are analyzed. The effects of sheared toroidal rotation, using data from direct spectroscopic measurements for carbon, are analyzed using comparisons with results from a two-dimensional calculation. Comparisons are also made for nonlinear stabilization associated with shear in E{sub r}/RB{sub {theta}}. The relative importance of changes in different profiles (density, temperature, q, rotation, etc.) on the linear growth rates is considered.

  14. Towards the detection of magnetohydrodynamics instabilities in a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sozzi, Carlo Alessi, E. Figini, L. Galperti, G. Lazzaro, E. Marchetto, C. Nowak, S.; Mosconi, M.

    2014-08-21

    Various active control strategies of the Neoclassical tearing modes are being studied in present tokamaks using established detection techniques which exploit the measurements of the fluctuations of the magnetic field and of the electron temperature. The extrapolation of such techniques to the fusion reactor scale is made problematic by the neutron fluence and by the physics conditions related to the high plasma temperature and density which degrade the spatial resolution of such measurements.

  15. Towards the detection of magnetohydrodynamics instabilities in a fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozzi, Carlo; Alessi, E.; Figini, L.; Galperti, G.; Lazzaro, E.; Marchetto, C.; Mosconi, M.; Nowak, S.

    2014-08-01

    Various active control strategies of the Neoclassical tearing modes are being studied in present tokamaks using established detection techniques which exploit the measurements of the fluctuations of the magnetic field and of the electron temperature. The extrapolation of such techniques to the fusion reactor scale is made problematic by the neutron fluence and by the physics conditions related to the high plasma temperature and density which degrade the spatial resolution of such measurements.

  16. Nonlinear evolution of three-dimensional instabilities of thin and thick electron scale current sheets: Plasmoid formation and current filamentation

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Neeraj; Büchner, Jörg

    2014-07-15

    Nonlinear evolution of three dimensional electron shear flow instabilities of an electron current sheet (ECS) is studied using electron-magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The dependence of the evolution on current sheet thickness is examined. For thin current sheets (half thickness =d{sub e}=c/ω{sub pe}), tearing mode instability dominates. In its nonlinear evolution, it leads to the formation of oblique current channels. Magnetic field lines form 3-D magnetic spirals. Even in the absence of initial guide field, the out-of-reconnection-plane magnetic field generated by the tearing instability itself may play the role of guide field in the growth of secondary finite-guide-field instabilities. For thicker current sheets (half thickness ∼5 d{sub e}), both tearing and non-tearing modes grow. Due to the non-tearing mode, current sheet becomes corrugated in the beginning of the evolution. In this case, tearing mode lets the magnetic field reconnect in the corrugated ECS. Later thick ECS develops filamentary structures and turbulence in which reconnection occurs. This evolution of thick ECS provides an example of reconnection in self-generated turbulence. The power spectra for both the thin and thick current sheets are anisotropic with respect to the electron flow direction. The cascade towards shorter scales occurs preferentially in the direction perpendicular to the electron flow.

  17. Experimental and numerical study of electrically driven magnetohydrodynamic flow in a modified cylindrical annulus. I. Base flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, Zacharias; Cébron, David; Miralles, Sophie; Vantieghem, Stijn; Noir, Jérôme; Scarfe, Peter; Jackson, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Shear layers in confined liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow play an important role in geo- and astrophysical bodies as well as in engineering applications. We present an experimental and numerical study of liquid metal MHD flow in a modified cylindrical annulus that is driven by an azimuthal Lorentz force resulting from a forced electric current under an imposed axial magnetic field. Hartmann and Reynolds numbers reach Mmax ≈ 2000 and Remax ≈ 1.3 × 104, respectively, in the steady regime. The peculiarity of our model geometry is the protruding inner disk electrode which gives rise to a free Shercliff layer at its edge. The flow of liquid GaInSn in the experimental device ZUCCHINI (ZUrich Cylindrical CHannel INstability Investigation) is probed with ultrasound Doppler velocimetry. We establish the base flow in ZUCCHINI and study the scaling of velocities and the free Shercliff layer in both experiment and finite element simulations. Experiment and numerics agree well on the mean azimuthal velocity uϕ(r) following the prediction of a large-M theoretical model. The large-M limit, which is equivalent to neglecting inertial effects, appears to be reached for M ≳ 30 in our study. In the numerics, we recover the theoretical scaling of the free Shercliff layer δS ˜ M-1/2 whereas δS appears to be largely independent of M in the experiment.

  18. Magnetorotational and Tayler Instabilities in the Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urpin, Vadim

    2017-09-01

    The magnetospheres around neutron stars should be very particular because of their strong magnetic field and rapid rotation. A study of the pulsar magnetospheres is of crucial importance since it is the key issue to understand how energy outflow to the exterior is produced. In this paper, we discuss magnetohydrodynamic processes in the pulsar magnetosphere. We consider in detail the properties of magnetohydrodynamic waves that can exist in the magnetosphere and their instabilities. These instabilities lead to formation of magnetic structures and can be responsible for short-term variability of the pulsar emission.

  19. Micromechanics of shear banding

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  20. Micromechanics of shear banding

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  1. Data assimilation for magnetohydrodynamics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, O. Barrero; de Moor, B.; Bernstein, D. S.

    2006-05-01

    Prediction of solar storms has become a very important issue due to the fact that they can affect dramatically the telecommunication and electrical power systems at the earth. As a result, a lot of research is being done in this direction, space weather forecast. Magnetohydrodynamics systems are being studied in order to analyse the space plasma dynamics, and techniques which have been broadly used in the prediction of earth environmental variables like the Kalman filter (KF), the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), the extended Kalman filter (EKF), etc., are being studied and adapted to this new framework. The assimilation of a wide range of space environment data into first-principles-based global numerical models will improve our understanding of the physics of the geospace environment and the forecasting of its behaviour. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to study the performance of nonlinear observers in magnetohydrodynamics systems, namely, the EnKF.The EnKF is based on a Monte Carlo simulation approach for propagation of process and measurement errors. In this paper, the EnKF for a nonlinear two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (2D-MHD) system is considered. For its implementation, two software packages are merged, namely, the Versatile Advection Code (VAC) written in Fortran and Matlab of Mathworks. The 2D-MHD is simulated with the VAC code while the EnKF is computed in Matlab. In order to study the performance of the EnKF in MHD systems, different number of measurement points as well as ensemble members are set.

  2. Non-conventional Fishbone Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; V.V. Lutsenko; V.S. Marchenko; R.B. White

    2004-11-10

    New instabilities of fishbone type are predicted. First, a trapped-particle-induced m = n = 1 instability with the mode structure having nothing to do with the conventional rigid kink displacement. This instability takes place when the magnetic field is weak, so that the precession frequency of the energetic ions is not small as compared to the frequency of the corresponding Alfven continuum at r = 0 and the magnetic shear is small inside the q = 1 radius [the case relevant to spherical tori]. Second, an Energetic Particle Mode fishbone instability driven by circulating particles. Third, a double-kink-mode instability driven by the circulating energetic ions. In particular, the latter can have two frequencies simultaneously: we refer to it as ''doublet'' fishbones. This instability can occur when the radial profile of the energetic ions has an off-axis maximum inside the region of the mode localization.

  3. Method for manufacturing magnetohydrodynamic electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Killpatrick, D.H.; Thresh, H.R.

    1980-06-24

    A method of manufacturing electrodes for use in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator is described comprising the steps of preparing a billet having a core of a first metal, a tubular sleeve of a second metal, and an outer sheath of an extrusile metal; evacuating the space between the parts of the assembled billet; extruding the billet; and removing the outer jacket. The extruded bar may be made into electrodes by cutting and bending to the shape required for an MHD channel frame. The method forms a bond between the first metal of the core and the second metal of the sleeve strong enough to withstand a hot and corrosive environment.

  4. Isogeometric analysis in reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnani, A.; Sonnendrücker, E.

    2012-01-01

    Isogeometric analysis (IGA) consists of using computer-aided design (CAD) models defining the geometry of the computational domain using both B-splines and non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS) to represent the unknowns that are the solution of a partial differential equation using a finite element principle. In this paper, we review the main ideas of IGA and apply it to a reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model that is used in tokamak simulations. This is a first step towards arbitrary high-order and smooth approximations of reduced MHD generalizing the Bézier splines approach of Czarny and Huysmans (2008 J. Comput. Phys. 227 7423-45).

  5. Action principle for relativistic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Avignon, Eric; Morrison, P. J.; Pegoraro, F.

    2015-04-01

    A covariant action principle for ideal relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in terms of natural Eulerian field variables is given. This is done by generalizing the covariant Poisson bracket theory of Marsden et al. [Ann. Phys. 169, 29 (1986)], which uses a noncanonical bracket to effect constrained variations of an action functional. Various implications and extensions of this action principle are also discussed. Two significant byproducts of this formalism are the introduction of a new divergence-free 4-vector variable for the magnetic field, and a new Lie-dragged form for the theory.

  6. Galerkin approximations for dissipative magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Hudong; Shan, Xiaowen; Montgomery, David

    1990-01-01

    A Galerkin approximation scheme is proposed for voltage-driven, dissipative magnetohydrodynamics. The trial functions are exact eigenfunctions of the linearized continuum equations and represent helical deformations of the axisymmetric, zero-flow, driven steady state. The lowest nontrivial truncation is explored: one axisymmetric trial function and one helical trial function each for the magnetic and velocity fields. The system resembles the Lorenz approximation to Benard convection, but in the region of believed applicability, its dynamical behavior is rather different, including relaxation to a helically deformed state similar to those that have emerged in the much higher resolution computations of Dahlburg et al.

  7. Magneto-Hydrodynamics Based Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Shizhi; Bau, Haim H.

    2009-01-01

    In microfluidic devices, it is necessary to propel samples and reagents from one part of the device to another, stir fluids, and detect the presence of chemical and biological targets. Given the small size of these devices, the above tasks are far from trivial. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) offers an elegant means to control fluid flow in microdevices without a need for mechanical components. In this paper, we review the theory of MHD for low conductivity fluids and describe various applications of MHD such as fluid pumping, flow control in fluidic networks, fluid stirring and mixing, circular liquid chromatography, thermal reactors, and microcoolers. PMID:20046890

  8. PHURBAS: AN ADAPTIVE, LAGRANGIAN, MESHLESS, MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS CODE. II. IMPLEMENTATION AND TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, Colin P.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Maron, Jason L. E-mail: jmaron@amnh.org

    2012-05-01

    We present an algorithm for simulating the equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics and other systems of differential equations on an unstructured set of points represented by sample particles. The particles move with the fluid, so the time step is not limited by the Eulerian Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition. Full spatial adaptivity is required to ensure the particles fill the computational volume and gives the algorithm substantial flexibility and power. A target resolution is specified for each point in space, with particles being added and deleted as needed to meet this target. We have parallelized the code by adapting the framework provided by GADGET-2. A set of standard test problems, including 10{sup -6} amplitude linear magnetohydrodynamics waves, magnetized shock tubes, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities is presented. Finally, we demonstrate good agreement with analytic predictions of linear growth rates for magnetorotational instability in a cylindrical geometry. This paper documents the Phurbas algorithm as implemented in Phurbas version 1.1.

  9. Simulation of the Magneto-Thermal Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, Ian; Stone, James

    2004-11-01

    Recent work by Balbus has shown that there exists an instability in convectively stable atmospheres in the presence of anisotropic thermal conductivity.^1,2 An analogy can be made between this instability and the well-studied magneto-thermal instability.^3 We simulate this instability by using the Athena magnetohydrodynamics code with the addition of anisotropic heat conduction.^4 We compare the analytical expression for the linear behavior of this instability with the computational model. The computational results are extended to the non-linear regime to study its saturation. ^1. Balbus, S. Astrophysical Journal 534 (2000) 420-427. ^2. Balbus, S. Astrophysical Journal 562 (2001) 909-917. ^3. Balbus, S. and Hawley J. Rev. Mod. Phys. 70 (1998) 1. ^4. Gardiner, T. and Stone, J. J. Comp. Phys., Submitted.

  10. Zonal flow formation in the presence of ambient mean shear

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Pei-Chun; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of mean shear flows on zonal flow formation is considered in the contexts of plasma drift wave turbulence and quasi-geostrophic turbulence models. The generation of zonal flows by modulational instability in the presence of large-scale mean shear flows is studied using the method of characteristics as applied to the wave kinetic equation. It is shown that mean shear flows reduce the modulational instability growth rate by shortening the coherency time of the wave spectrum with the zonal shear. The scalings of zonal flow growth rate and turbulent vorticity flux with mean shear are determined in the strong shear limit.

  11. Vortex simulation of reacting shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    Issues involved in the vortex simulation of reacting shear flow are discussed. It is shown that maintaining accuracy in the vortex methods requires the application of elaborate vorticity-updating schemes as vortex elements are moved along particle trajectories when shear or a strong strain field is represented. Solutions using 2D and 3D methods are discussed to illustrate some of the most common instabilities encountered in nonreacting and reacting shear flows and to reveal the mechanisms by which the maturation of these instabilities enhance mixing and hence burning in a reacting flow. The transport element method is developed and its application to compute scalar mixing in a shear layer is reviewed. The method is then combined with the vortex method to solve the problem of nonuniform-density shear flow. The results of incompressible reacting flow models are used to examine reaction extinction due to the formation of localized regions of strong strains as instabilities grow into their nonlinear range.

  12. Variational integrators for reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Michael; Tassi, Emanuele; Grasso, Daniela

    2016-09-15

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics is a simplified set of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and consequently a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. The resulting integrator preserves important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As the integrator is free of numerical resistivity, spurious reconnection along current sheets is absent in the ideal case. If effects of electron inertia are added, reconnection of magnetic field lines is allowed, although the resulting model still possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure. After reviewing the conservation laws of the model equations, the adopted variational principle with the related conservation laws is described both at the continuous and discrete level. We verify the favourable properties of the variational integrator in particular with respect to the preservation of the invariants of the models under consideration and compare with results from the literature and those of a pseudo-spectral code.

  13. Variational integrators for reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Michael; Tassi, Emanuele; Grasso, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics is a simplified set of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and consequently a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. The resulting integrator preserves important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As the integrator is free of numerical resistivity, spurious reconnection along current sheets is absent in the ideal case. If effects of electron inertia are added, reconnection of magnetic field lines is allowed, although the resulting model still possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure. After reviewing the conservation laws of the model equations, the adopted variational principle with the related conservation laws is described both at the continuous and discrete level. We verify the favourable properties of the variational integrator in particular with respect to the preservation of the invariants of the models under consideration and compare with results from the literature and those of a pseudo-spectral code.

  14. Representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.

    2013-02-15

    One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through {delta}B(vector sign)={nabla} Multiplication-Sign ({xi}(vector sign) Multiplication-Sign B(vector sign)) ensures that {delta}B(vector sign){center_dot}{nabla}{psi}=0 at a resonance, with {psi} labelling an equilibrium flux surface. Also useful for the analysis of guiding center orbits in a perturbed field is the representation {delta}B(vector sign)={nabla} Multiplication-Sign {alpha}B(vector sign). These two representations are equivalent, but the vanishing of {delta}B(vector sign){center_dot}{nabla}{psi} at a resonance is necessary but not sufficient for the preservation of field line topology, and a indiscriminate use of either perturbation in fact destroys the original equilibrium flux topology. It is necessary to find the perturbed field to all orders in {xi}(vector sign) to conserve the original topology. The effect of using linearized perturbations on stability and growth rate calculations is discussed.

  15. Shear Alfven waves with Landau and collisional effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, C.L.; Leboeuf, J.; Spong, D.A.

    1995-06-01

    Shear Alfven waves can be driven unstable by hot particles such as alpha particles in an ignited fusion device or hot ions in existing devices. Motivated by rather collisional Wendelstein 7 Advanced Stellarator (W7-AS) [Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 72}, 1220 (1994)] beam-driven global Alfven instability experiments, the effect of electron and ion collisions on these modes has been examined. Collisions broaden and suppress the peak associated with Landau effects. This broadening makes ion damping more important, while the electron damping is suppressed. Additional resistive effects provide increased damping for the main part of the spectrum, which can have a rather high phase velocity. Of more general interest is the fact that collisional and collisionless resistivity has a numerically stabilizing effect that is known to be important for nonlinear resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). This can preclude the need for introducing and testing the sensitivity to similar ad hoc effects. Numerical and analytic results for both a particle-conserving Krook collision operator and a Lorentz (pitch angle) collision operator are compared and contrasted.

  16. On stability criteria for kinetic magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    The existence of a potential energy functional in the zero-Larmor-radius collisionless plasma theory of Kruskal & Oberman (Phys. Fluids, vol. 1, 1958 p. 275), Rosenbluth & Rostoker (Phys. Fluids, vol. 2, 1959, p. 23) allows us to derive easily sufficient conditions for linear stability. However, this kinetic magnetohydrodynamics (KMHD) theory does not have a self-adjointness property, making it difficult to derive necessary conditions. In particular, the standard methods to prove that an instability follows if some trial perturbation makes the incremental potential energy negative, which rely on the self-adjointness of the force operator or on the existence of a complete basis of normal modes, are not applicable to KMHD. This paper investigates KMHD linear stability criteria based on the time evolution of initial-value solutions, without recourse to the classic bounds or comparison theorems of Kruskal-Oberman and Rosenbluth-Rostoker for the KMHD potential energy. The adopted approach does not solve the kinetic equations by integration along characteristics and does not require that the particle orbits be periodic or nearly periodic. Most importantly, the investigation of a necessary condition for stability does not require the self-adjointness of the force operator or the existence of a complete basis of normal modes. It is thereby shown that stability in isothermal ideal-MHD is a sufficient condition for stability in KMHD and that, with a proviso on the long-time behaviour of oscillations about stable equilibria, stability in the double-adiabatic fluid theory, including the variation of the parallel fluid displacement, would be a necessary condition for stability in KMHD.

  17. Stability of an accelerated shear layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mjolsness, R.C.; Ruppel, H.M.

    1986-07-01

    A fluid shear layer with free boundary conditions is subject to a Kelvin--Helmholtz-like instability. When the shear layer is accelerated by a difference in applied pressures it is also subject to a Rayleigh--Taylor-like instability. The combined action of these instabilities leads to at most one unstable mode at each wavelength, whose behavior depends in detail on fluid parameters, the fluid acceleration and the perturbation wavelength. Typically, at longest wavelengths the instability is essentially of Rayleigh--Taylor form; its behavior resembles the Kelvin--Helmholtz-like mode at shorter wavelengths, near the thickness of the shear layer, cutting off when the Kelvin--Helmholtz-like mode does. At still shorter wavelengths, the shear layer is subject to a Rayleigh--Taylor-like instability. Careful control of fluid parameters could place the most unstable wavelength for Rayleigh--Taylor instability, calculated from viscous theory, in the range of wavelengths where the accelerated shear layer has no unstable mode. However, this may be difficult to achieve in practice. If this can be realized, the most unstable growth rate may be reduced by about an order of magnitude by the presence of shear.

  18. Self-similar evolution of nonlinear magnetic bouyancy instability

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, K.; Tajima, T.; Matsumoto, R.

    1988-06-01

    A new type of self-similar solution of ideal magnetohydrodynamics in the nonlinear stage of undular mode (k /parallel/ B) of magnetic buoyancy instability (Parker instability or ballooning instability) is found through MHD simulation and theory. The solution has the characteristics of nonlinear instability in Lagrangian coordinates; the fluid velocity and the Alfven speed on each magnetic loop increases exponentially with time, because the loop is evacuated by the field aligned motion of matter due to gravitational acceleration. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Some Basic Aspects of Magnetohydrodynamic Boundary-Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Robert V.

    1959-01-01

    An appraisal is made of existing solutions of magnetohydrodynamic boundary-layer equations for stagnation flow and flat-plate flow, and some new solutions are given. Since an exact solution of the equations of magnetohydrodynamics requires complicated simultaneous treatment of the equations of fluid flow and of electromagnetism, certain simplifying assumptions are generally introduced. The full implications of these assumptions have not been brought out properly in several recent papers. It is shown in the present report that for the particular law of deformation which the magnetic lines are assumed to follow in these papers a magnet situated inside the missile nose would not be able to take up any drag forces; to do so it would have to be placed in the flow away from the nose. It is also shown that for the assumption that potential flow is maintained outside the boundary layer, the deformation of the magnetic lines is restricted to small values. The literature contains serious disagreements with regard to reductions in heat-transfer rates due to magnetic action at the nose of a missile, and these disagreements are shown to be mainly due to different interpretations of reentry conditions rather than more complicated effects. In the present paper the magnetohydrodynamic boundary-layer equation is also expressed in a simple form that is especially convenient for physical interpretation. This is done by adapting methods to magnetic forces which in the past have been used for forces due to gravitational or centrifugal action. The simplified approach is used to develop some new solutions of boundary-layer flow and to reinterpret certain solutions existing in the literature. An asymptotic boundary-layer solution representing a fixed velocity profile and shear is found. Special emphasis is put on estimating skin friction and heat-transfer rates.

  20. PARTICLE TRAPPING AND STREAMING INSTABILITY IN VORTICES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Raettig, Natalie; Klahr, Hubert; Lyra, Wladimir E-mail: klahr@mpia.de

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the concentration of solid particles in vortices created and sustained by radial buoyancy in protoplanetary disks, e.g., baroclinic vortex growth. Besides the gas drag acting on particles, we also allow for back-reaction from dust onto the gas. This becomes important when the local dust-to-gas ratio approaches unity. In our two-dimensional, local, shearing sheet simulations, we see high concentrations of grains inside the vortices for a broad range of Stokes numbers, St. An initial dust-to-gas ratio of 1:100 can easily be reversed to 100:1 for St = 1.0. The increased dust-to-gas ratio triggers the streaming instability, thus counter-intuitively limiting the maximal achievable overdensities. We find that particle trapping inside vortices opens the possibility for gravity assisted planetesimal formation even for small particles (St = 0.01) and a low initial dust-to-gas ratio of 1:10{sup 4}, e.g., much smaller than in the previously studied magnetohydrodynamic zonal flow case.

  1. Sustained turbulence and magnetic energy in nonrotating shear flows.

    PubMed

    Nauman, Farrukh; Blackman, Eric G

    2017-03-01

    From numerical simulations, we show that nonrotating magnetohydrodynamic shear flows are unstable to finite amplitude velocity perturbations and become turbulent, leading to the growth and sustenance of magnetic energy, including large scale fields. This supports the concept that sustained magnetic energy from turbulence is independent of the driving mechanism for large enough magnetic Reynolds numbers.

  2. Sustained turbulence and magnetic energy in nonrotating shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauman, Farrukh; Blackman, Eric G.

    2017-03-01

    From numerical simulations, we show that nonrotating magnetohydrodynamic shear flows are unstable to finite amplitude velocity perturbations and become turbulent, leading to the growth and sustenance of magnetic energy, including large scale fields. This supports the concept that sustained magnetic energy from turbulence is independent of the driving mechanism for large enough magnetic Reynolds numbers.

  3. Kinetic approach to Kaluza's magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, A.; Garcia-Colin, L. S.

    2011-11-01

    Ten years ago we presented a formalism by means of which the basic tenets of relativistic magnetohydrodynamics were derived using Kaluza's ideas about unifying fields in terms of the corresponding space time curvature for a given metric. In this work we present an attempt to obtain the thermodynamic properties of a charged fluid using using Boltzmann's equation for a dilute system adapted to kaluza's formalism. The main results that we obtain are analytical expressions for the main currents and corresponding forces, within the formalism of linear irreversible thermodynamics. We also indicate how transport coefficients can be calculated. Other relevant results are also mentioned. A. Sandoval-Villalbazo and L.S. Garcia-Colin; Phys. of Plasmas 7, 4823 (2000).

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Observation and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. R.; Schaffner, D. A.; Weck, P. J.

    2015-05-15

    We provide a tutorial on the paradigms and tools of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The principal paradigm is that of a turbulent cascade from large scales to small, resulting in power law behavior for the frequency power spectrum for magnetic fluctuations E{sub B}(f). We will describe five useful statistical tools for MHD turbulence in the time domain: the temporal autocorrelation function, the frequency power spectrum, the probability distribution function of temporal increments, the temporal structure function, and the permutation entropy. Each of these tools will be illustrated with an example taken from MHD fluctuations in the solar wind. A single dataset from the Wind satellite will be used to illustrate all five temporal statistical tools.

  5. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Hadden, Samuel

    2012-02-01

    We derive a number of solutions for one-dimensional dynamics of relativistic magnetized plasma that can be used as benchmark estimates in relativistic hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic numerical codes. First, we analyze the properties of simple waves of fast modes propagating orthogonally to the magnetic field in relativistically hot plasma. The magnetic and kinetic pressures obey different equations of state, so that the system behaves as a mixture of gases with different polytropic indices. We find the self-similar solutions for the expansion of hot strongly magnetized plasma into vacuum. Second, we derive linear hodograph and Darboux equations for the relativistic Khalatnikov potential, which describe arbitrary one-dimensional isentropic relativistic motion of cold magnetized plasma and find their general and particular solutions. The obtained hodograph and Darboux equations are very powerful: A system of highly nonlinear, relativistic, time-dependent equations describing arbitrary (not necessarily self-similar) dynamics of highly magnetized plasma reduces to a single linear differential equation.

  6. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Hadden, Samuel

    2012-02-01

    We derive a number of solutions for one-dimensional dynamics of relativistic magnetized plasma that can be used as benchmark estimates in relativistic hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic numerical codes. First, we analyze the properties of simple waves of fast modes propagating orthogonally to the magnetic field in relativistically hot plasma. The magnetic and kinetic pressures obey different equations of state, so that the system behaves as a mixture of gases with different polytropic indices. We find the self-similar solutions for the expansion of hot strongly magnetized plasma into vacuum. Second, we derive linear hodograph and Darboux equations for the relativistic Khalatnikov potential, which describe arbitrary one-dimensional isentropic relativistic motion of cold magnetized plasma and find their general and particular solutions. The obtained hodograph and Darboux equations are very powerful: A system of highly nonlinear, relativistic, time-dependent equations describing arbitrary (not necessarily self-similar) dynamics of highly magnetized plasma reduces to a single linear differential equation.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence and the Geodynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2014-01-01

    The ARES Directorate at JSC has researched the physical processes that create planetary magnetic fields through dynamo action since 2007. The "dynamo problem" has existed since 1600, when William Gilbert, physician to Queen Elizabeth I, recognized that the Earth was a giant magnet. In 1919, Joseph Larmor proposed that solar (and by implication, planetary) magnetism was due to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), but full acceptance did not occur until Glatzmaier and Roberts solved the MHD equations numerically and simulated a geomagnetic reversal in 1995. JSC research produced a unique theoretical model in 2012 that provided a novel explanation of these physical observations and computational results as an essential manifestation of broken ergodicity in MHD turbulence. Research is ongoing, and future work is aimed at understanding quantitative details of magnetic dipole alignment in the Earth as well as in Mercury, Jupiter and its moon Ganymede, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and the Sun and other stars.

  8. Method for manufacturing magnetohydrodynamic electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Killpatrick, Don H.; Thresh, Henry R.

    1982-01-01

    A method of manufacturing electrodes for use in a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator comprising the steps of preparing a billet having a core 10 of a first metal, a tubular sleeve 12 of a second metal, and an outer sheath 14, 16, 18 of an extrusile metal; evacuating the space between the parts of the assembled billet; extruding the billet; and removing the outer jacket 14. The extruded bar may be made into electrodes by cutting and bending to the shape required for an MDH channel frame. The method forms a bond between the first metal of the core 10 and the second metal of the sleeve 12 strong enough to withstand a hot and corrosive environment.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic production of relativistic jets.

    PubMed

    Meier, D L; Koide, S; Uchida, Y

    2001-01-05

    A number of astronomical systems have been discovered that generate collimated flows of plasma with velocities close to the speed of light. In all cases, the central object is probably a neutron star or black hole and is either accreting material from other stars or is in the initial violent stages of formation. Supercomputer simulations of the production of relativistic jets have been based on a magnetohydrodynamic model, in which differential rotation in the system creates a magnetic coil that simultaneously expels and pinches some of the infalling material. The model may explain the basic features of observed jets, including their speed and amount of collimation, and some of the details in the behavior and statistics of different jet-producing sources.

  10. ANISOTROPIC INTERMITTENCY OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, K. T.; Kiyani, K. H.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2014-03-10

    A higher-order multiscale analysis of spatial anisotropy in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is presented using measurements from the STEREO spacecraft in fast ambient solar wind. We show for the first time that, when measuring parallel to the local magnetic field direction, the full statistical signature of the magnetic and Elsässer field fluctuations is that of a non-Gaussian globally scale-invariant process. This is distinct from the classic multiexponent statistics observed when the local magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow direction. These observations are interpreted as evidence for the weakness, or absence, of a parallel magnetofluid turbulence energy cascade. As such, these results present strong observational constraints on the statistical nature of intermittency in turbulent plasmas.

  11. Numerical Investigations of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, W. C.

    2006-12-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence studied by large-scale direct numerical simulations has revealed a number of new interesting facets. The Goldreich-Sridhar phenomenology partly breaks down in turbulence subject to a strong mean magnetic field. This leads to a measureable anisotropy of two-point statistics. The nonlinear dynamics of kinetic (E^K) and magnetic energy (E^M) is the result of a dynamical equilibrium of Alfvén effect and a small-sale dynamo leading to a scaling relation between total and residual energy: (E^M-E^K)~ k(E^K+E^M)2. The probability density functions of cascading quantities are found to exhibit mono-scaling.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Observation and experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. R.; Schaffner, D. A.; Weck, P. J.

    2015-05-01

    We provide a tutorial on the paradigms and tools of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The principal paradigm is that of a turbulent cascade from large scales to small, resulting in power law behavior for the frequency power spectrum for magnetic fluctuations EB(f ) . We will describe five useful statistical tools for MHD turbulence in the time domain: the temporal autocorrelation function, the frequency power spectrum, the probability distribution function of temporal increments, the temporal structure function, and the permutation entropy. Each of these tools will be illustrated with an example taken from MHD fluctuations in the solar wind. A single dataset from the Wind satellite will be used to illustrate all five temporal statistical tools.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence and the Geodynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research results concerning forced, dissipative, rotating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence will be discussed. In particular, we present new results from long-time Fourier method (periodic box) simulations in which forcing contains varying amounts of magnetic and kinetic helicity. Numerical results indicate that if MHD turbulence is forced so as to produce a state of relatively constant energy, then the largest-scale components are dominant and quasistationary, and in fact, have an effective dipole moment vector that aligns closely with the rotation axis. The relationship of this work to established results in ideal MHD turbulence, as well as to models of MHD turbulence in a spherical shell will also be presented. These results appear to be very pertinent to understanding the Geodynamo and the origin of its dominant dipole component. Our conclusion is that MHD turbulence, per se, may well contain the origin of the Earth's dipole magnetic field.

  14. Weakly nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic wave interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G.M.; Brio, M.; Kruse, M.T.; Zank, G.P.

    1999-06-01

    Equations describing weakly nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave interactions in one Cartesian space dimension are discussed. For wave propagation in uniform media, the wave interactions of interest consist of: (a) three-wave resonant interactions in which high frequency waves, may evolve on long space and time scales if the wave phases satisfy the resonance conditions; (b) Burgers self-wave steepening for the magnetoacoustic waves, and (c) mean wave field effects, in which a particular wave interacts with the mean wave field of the other waves. For wave propagation in non-uniform media, further linear wave mixing terms appear in the equations. The equations describe four types of resonant triads: slow-fast magnetosonic wave interaction; Alfv{acute e}n-entropy wave interaction; Alfv{acute e}n-magnetosonic wave interaction; and magnetosonic-entropy wave interaction. The formalism is restricted to coherent wave interactions. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Micromachined magnetohydrodynamic actuators and sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.

    2000-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump and microsensor which utilizes micromachining to integrate the electrodes with microchannels and includes a magnet for producing magnetic fields perpendicular to both the electrical current direction and the fluid flow direction. The magnet can also be micromachined and integrated with the micropump using existing technology. The MHD micropump, for example, can generate continuous, reversible flow, with readily controllable flow rates. The flow can be reversed by either reversing the electrical current flow or reversing the magnetic field. By mismatching the electrodes, a swirling vortex flow can be generated for potential mixing applications. No moving parts are necessary and the dead volume is minimal. The micropumps can be placed at any position in a fluidic circuit and a combination of micropumps can generate fluidic plugs and valves.

  16. Scaling laws in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2004-10-15

    We analyze the decay laws of the kinetic and magnetic energies and the evolution of correlation lengths in freely decaying incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Scale invariance of MHD equations assures that, in the case of constant dissipation parameters (i.e., kinematic viscosity and resistivity) and null magnetic helicity, the kinetic and magnetic energies decay in time as E{approx}t{sup -1}, and the correlation lengths evolve as {xi}{approx}t{sup 1/2}. In the helical case, assuming that the magnetic field evolves towards a force-free state, we show that (in the limit of large magnetic Reynolds number) the magnetic helicity remains constant, and the kinetic and magnetic energies decay as E{sub v}{approx}t{sup -1} and E{sub B}{approx}t{sup -1/2} respectively, while both the kinetic and magnetic correlation lengths grow as {xi}{approx}t{sup 1/2}.

  17. A Study of Generalized Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability With Asymmetric Development of Compressible Waves at a Tangential Discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, L.; Lai, S.

    2003-12-01

    Simulation results of Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability at a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) tangential discontinuity (TD) show asymmetric development of nonlinear waves when magnetic field is perpendicular to the velocity shear on one side of the TD but parallel to the velocity shear on the other side of the TD. To explain these simulation results, an analytic study is carried out to obtain generalized solutions of K-H instability. Both incompressibility and pure surface wave conditions are removed from our basic assumptions. Nonlinear waves in our model are allowed to propagate at directions both tangent and normal to the surface of TD. Plasma is assumed to follow an adiabatic process. Nonlinear waves on two sides of the TD have a common tangential wavelength, but may have different normal wavelengths. Wave amplitude is assumed to decay exponentially away from the surface of TD. Our solutions indicate that the exponential decay length increases with increasing normal wavelength. On the other hand, the normal wavelength will decrease with increasing velocity shear. Our simulation results are in good agreement with the analytic solutions. For magnetic field parallel or anti-parallel to the velocity shear direction, the normal wavelength is much longer than the tangential wavelength. Thus, nonlinear waves are developed from the TD like a toothbrush with wave normal nearly perpendicular to the normal of the TD. With flow energy converted into wave energy and carried away from the TD, amplification of the surface wave become stabilized. Only a finite amplitude disturbance can be found at surface of the TD in our simulation. Our analytic solutions and simulation results indicate possible existence of another type of nonlinear waves in magnetosheath and in the tail lobes as a result of solar wind-magnetopause interactions.

  18. Resonance instability of axially symmetric magnetostatic equilibria.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Alfio; Urpin, Vadim

    2011-11-01

    We review the evidence for and against the possibility that a strong enough poloidal field stabilizes an axisymmetric magnetostatic field configuration. We show that there does exist a class of resonant magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves which produce instability for any value of the ratio of poloidal and toroidal field strength. We argue that recent investigations of the stability of mixed poloidal and toroidal field configurations based on three-dimensional numerical simulations can miss this instability because of the very large azimuthal wave numbers involved and its resonant character.

  19. Role of Shear Instability in Ballistic Penetration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    example of this is shown in Figure 1 (taken from Reference 1). Two sets of targets were made from the same steel alloy ( 4340 ), processed in the same way...Figure 3 shows that for both VIM and ESR steels , the drop in ballistic performance is clearly associated with the change in failure mode from plastic flow...diabticshea bads n ths pper -Or A R * Failure by Plastic Flow A. * Failure by Plugging i 1.4 a Failure by Discing 6 1.3 ,0 A ESR Steel % 1.2 A A ~1.1 06 0 acr

  20. Dynamo quenching due to shear flow.

    PubMed

    Leprovost, Nicolas; Kim, Eun-jin

    2008-04-11

    We provide a theory of dynamo (alpha effect) and momentum transport in three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics. For the first time, we show that the alpha effect is reduced by the shear even in the absence of magnetic field. The alpha effect is further suppressed by magnetic fields well below equipartition (with the large-scale flow) with different scalings depending on the relative strength of shear and magnetic field. The turbulent viscosity is also found to be significantly reduced by shear and magnetic fields, with positive value. These results suggest a crucial effect of shear and magnetic field on dynamo quenching and momentum transport reduction, with important implications for laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, in particular, for the dynamics of the Sun.

  1. Implicit Methods for the Magnetohydrodynamic Description of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S C

    2010-09-28

    Implicit algorithms are essential for predicting the slow growth and saturation of global instabilities in today’s magnetically confined fusion plasma experiments. Present day algorithms for obtaining implicit solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations for highly magnetized plasma have their roots in algorithms used in the 1960s and 1970s. However, today’s computers and modern linear and non-linear solver techniques make practical much more comprehensive implicit algorithms than were previously possible. Combining these advanced implicit algorithms with highly accurate spatial representations of the vector fields describing the plasma flow and magnetic fields and with improved methods of calculating anisotropic thermal conduction now makes possible simulations of fusion experiments using realistic values of plasma parameters and actual configuration geometry.

  2. Three-dimensional force-free looplike magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John M.; Guzdar, Parvez N.; Usikov, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Computations of three-dimensional force-free magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, del x B = lambdaB with lambda = lambda(sub 0), a constant are presented. These equilibria are determined by boundary conditions on a surface corresponding to the solar photosphere. The specific boundary conditions used correspond to looplike magnetic fields in the corona. It is found that as lambda(sub 0) is increased, the loops of flux become kinked, and for sufficiently large lambda(sub 0), develop knots. The relationship between the kinking and knotting properties of these equilibria and the presence of a kink instability and related loss of equilibrium is explored. Clearly, magnetic reconnection must be involved for an unknotted loop equilibrium to become knotted, and speculations are made about the creation of a closed hyperbolic field line (X-line) about which this reconnection creating knotted field lines is centered.

  3. Three-dimensional force-free looplike magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John M.; Guzdar, Parvez N.; Usikov, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Computations of three-dimensional force-free magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, del x B = lambdaB with lambda = lambda(sub 0), a constant are presented. These equilibria are determined by boundary conditions on a surface corresponding to the solar photosphere. The specific boundary conditions used correspond to looplike magnetic fields in the corona. It is found that as lambda(sub 0) is increased, the loops of flux become kinked, and for sufficiently large lambda(sub 0), develop knots. The relationship between the kinking and knotting properties of these equilibria and the presence of a kink instability and related loss of equilibrium is explored. Clearly, magnetic reconnection must be involved for an unknotted loop equilibrium to become knotted, and speculations are made about the creation of a closed hyperbolic field line (X-line) about which this reconnection creating knotted field lines is centered.

  4. Hall diffusion and the magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardle, Mark; Salmeron, Raquel

    2012-06-01

    The destabilizing effect of Hall diffusion in a weakly ionized Keplerian disc allows the magnetorotational instability (MRI) to occur for much lower ionization levels than would otherwise be possible. However, simulations incorporating Hall and Ohm diffusion give the impression that the consequences of this for the non-linear saturated state are not as significant as suggested by the linear instability. Close inspection reveals that this is not actually the case as the simulations have not yet probed the Hall-dominated regime. Here we revisit the effect of Hall diffusion on the MRI and the implications for the extent of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in protoplanetary discs, where Hall diffusion dominates over a large range of radii. We conduct a local, linear analysis of the instability for a vertical, weak magnetic field subject to axisymmetric perturbations with a purely vertical wave vector. In contrast to previous analyses, we express the departure from ideal MHD in terms of Hall and Pedersen diffusivities ηH and ηP, which provide transparent notation that is directly connected to the induction equation. This allows us to present a crisp overview of the dependence of the instability on magnetic diffusivity. We present analytic expressions and contours in the ηH-ηP plane for the maximum growth rate and corresponding wavenumber, the upper cut-off for unstable wavenumbers and the loci that divide the plane into regions of different characteristic behaviour. We find that for ?, where vA is the Alfvén speeds and Ω is the Keplerian frequency, Hall diffusion suppresses the MRI irrespective of the value of ηP. In the highly diffusive limit, the magnetic field decouples from the fluid perturbations and simply diffuses in the background Keplerian shear flow. The diffusive MRI reduces to a diffusive plane-parallel shear instability with effective shear rate (3/2)Ω. We give simple analytic expressions for the growth rate and wavenumber of the most unstable

  5. Development of magnetohydrodynamic modes during sawteeth in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Firpo, M.-C.; Ettoumi, W.; Farengo, R.; Ferrari, H. E.; García-Martínez, P. L.; Lifschitz, A. F.

    2013-07-15

    A dynamical analysis applied to a reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics model is shown to explain the chronology of the nonlinear destabilization of modes observed in tokamak sawteeth. A special emphasis is put on the nonlinear self-consistent perturbation of the axisymmetric m = n = 0 mode that manifests through the q-profile evolution. For the very low fusion-relevant resistivity values, the q-profile is shown to remain almost unchanged on the early nonlinear timescale within the central tokamak region, which supports a partial reconnection scenario. Within the resistive region, indications for a local flattening or even a local reversed-shear of the q-profile are given. The impact of this ingredient in the occurrence of the sawtooth crash is discussed.

  6. Coherent motion in excited free shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, Israel J.; Petersen, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the inviscid instability approach to externally excited turbulent free shear flows at high Reynolds numbers is explored. Attention is given to the cases of a small-deficit plane turbulent wake, a plane turbulent jet, an axisymmetric jet, the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in free shear flows, the concept of the 'preferred mode', vortex pairing in turbulent mixing layers, and experimental results for the control of free turbulent shear layers. The special features often attributed to pairing or to the preferred mode are found to be difficult to comprehend; the concept of feedback requires further substantiation in the case of incompressible flow.

  7. Secondary Instability in 3-D Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Lin, Y.; Chen, L.

    2016-12-01

    3-D magnetic reconnection is investigated using the gyrokinetic-electron and fully-kinetic ion (GeFi) particle simulation model. The simulation is carried out in the force free current sheet for cases with a strong guide field BG as occurring in the solar and laboratory plasmas. It is found that, following the growth of the primary reconnection, a secondary instability is excited in the separatrix region, which leads to the electron heating and acceleration in the direction parallel to the magnetic field. The instability is due to the 3-D physics associated with a finite kz, where kz is the wave number along the guide field direction. Dependences of the growth rate of the secondary instability on the electron-ion resistivity, the ion-to-electron mass ratio mi/me, beta values, and the half-width of the current sheet are investigated. It is demonstrated that the secondary instability is of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink type.

  8. Propulsive Efficiencies of Magnetohydrodynamic Submerged Vehicular Propulsors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    Research and Development Report Propulsive Efficiencies of Magnetohydrodynamic Submerged Vehicular Propulsors by S. H. Brown, J.S. Walker, N.A...Analysis of Magnetohydrodynamic Propulsors ." In addition, this work was partially supported by the DTRC Block Program sponsored by ONT (Gene Remmers), Work...Vehicular Propulsors 1•. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Samuel H. Brown, John S. Walker, Neal A. Sondergaard, Patrick J. Reilly, and David E. Bagley 13L. TYPE OF REPORT

  9. Universal small-scale structure in turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Walker, Justin; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Lesur, Geoffroy

    2017-05-01

    The intermittent small-scale structure of turbulence governs energy dissipation in many astrophysical plasmas and is often believed to have universal properties for sufficiently large systems. In this work, we argue that small-scale turbulence in accretion discs is universal in the sense that it is insensitive to the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and background shear, and therefore indistinguishable from standard homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence at small scales. We investigate the intermittency of current density, vorticity and energy dissipation in numerical simulations of incompressible MHD turbulence driven by the MRI in a shearing box. We find that the simulations exhibit a similar degree of intermittency as in standard MHD turbulence. We perform a statistical analysis of intermittent dissipative structures and find that energy dissipation is concentrated in thin sheet-like structures that span a wide range of scales up to the box size. We show that these structures exhibit strikingly similar statistical properties to those in standard MHD turbulence. Additionally, the structures are oriented in the toroidal direction with a characteristic tilt of approximately 17.^{circ}5, implying an effective guide field in that direction.

  10. ANALYSIS OF MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY WITH THE EFFECT OF COSMIC-RAY DIFFUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, Takuhito; Ko, Chung-Ming E-mail: cmko@astro.ncu.edu.tw

    2015-01-10

    We present the results obtained from the linear stability analysis and 2.5 dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of magnetorotational instability (MRI), including the effects of cosmic rays (CRs). We took into account the CR diffusion along the magnetic field but neglected the cross-field-line diffusion. Two models are considered in this paper: the shearing box model and differentially rotating cylinder model. We studied how MRI is affected by the initial CR pressure (i.e., energy) distribution. In the shearing box model, the initial state is uniform distribution. Linear analysis shows that the growth rate of MRI does not depend on the value of the CR diffusion coefficient. In the differentially rotating cylinder model, the initial state is a constant angular momentum polytropic disk threaded by a weak uniform vertical magnetic field. Linear analysis shows that the growth rate of MRI becomes larger if the CR diffusion coefficient is larger. Both results are confirmed by MHD simulations. The MHD simulation results show that the outward movement of matter by the growth of MRI is not impeded by the CR pressure gradient, and the centrifugal force that acts on the concentrated matter becomes larger. Consequently, the growth rate of MRI is increased. On the other hand, if the initial CR pressure is uniform, then the growth rate of the MRI barely depends on the value of the CR diffusion coefficient.

  11. Migrational Instabilities in Particle Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, Joe D.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with an instability arising from the shear-induced migration of particles in dense suspensions coupled with a dependence of viscosity on particle concentration. The analysis summarized here treats the inertialess (Re = O) linear stability of homogeneous simple shear flows for a Stokesian suspension model of the type proposed by Leighton and Acrivos (1987). Depending on the importance of shear-induced migration relative to concentration-driven diffusion, this model admits short-wave instability arising from wave-vector stretching by the base flow and evolving into particle-depleted shear bands. Moreover, this instability in the time-dependent problem corresponds to loss of ellipticity in the associated static problem (Re = O, Pe = O). While the isotropic version of the Leighton-Acrivos model is found to be stable with their experimentally determined parameters for simple shear, it is known that the stable model does not give a good quantitative description of particle clustering in the core of pipe flow (Nott and Brady 1994). This leads to the conjecture that an appropriate variant on the above model could explain such clustering as a two-phase bifurcation in the base flow.

  12. FAST MAGNETIC FIELD AMPLIFICATION IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE: GROWTH OF COLLISIONLESS PLASMA INSTABILITIES IN TURBULENT MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Falceta-Gonçalves, D.; Kowal, G.

    2015-07-20

    In this work we report on a numerical study of the cosmic magnetic field amplification due to collisionless plasma instabilities. The collisionless magnetohydrodynamic equations derived account for the pressure anisotropy that leads, in specific conditions, to the firehose and mirror instabilities. We study the time evolution of seed fields in turbulence under the influence of such instabilities. An approximate analytical time evolution of the magnetic field is provided. The numerical simulations and the analytical predictions are compared. We found that (i) amplification of the magnetic field was efficient in firehose-unstable turbulent regimes, but not in the mirror-unstable models; (ii) the growth rate of the magnetic energy density is much faster than the turbulent dynamo; and (iii) the efficient amplification occurs at small scales. The analytical prediction for the correlation between the growth timescales and pressure anisotropy is confirmed by the numerical simulations. These results reinforce the idea that pressure anisotropies—driven naturally in a turbulent collisionless medium, e.g., the intergalactic medium, could efficiently amplify the magnetic field in the early universe (post-recombination era), previous to the collapse of the first large-scale gravitational structures. This mechanism, though fast for the small-scale fields (∼kpc scales), is unable to provide relatively strong magnetic fields at large scales. Other mechanisms that were not accounted for here (e.g., collisional turbulence once instabilities are quenched, velocity shear, or gravitationally induced inflows of gas into galaxies and clusters) could operate afterward to build up large-scale coherent field structures in the long time evolution.

  13. Computational Methods for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kercher, Andrew D.

    Numerical schemes for the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are widely used for modeling space weather and astrophysical flows. They are designed to resolve the different waves that propagate through a magnetohydro fluid, namely, the fast, Alfven, slow, and entropy waves. Numerical schemes for ideal magnetohydrodynamics that are based on the standard finite volume (FV) discretization exhibit pseudo-convergence in which non-regular waves no longer exist only after heavy grid refinement. A method is described for obtaining solutions for coplanar and near coplanar cases that consist of only regular waves, independent of grid refinement. The method, referred to as Compound Wave Modification (CWM), involves removing the flux associated with non-regular structures and can be used for simulations in two- and three-dimensions because it does not require explicitly tracking an Alfven wave. For a near coplanar case, and for grids with 213 points or less, we find root-mean-square-errors (RMSEs) that are as much as 6 times smaller. For the coplanar case, in which non-regular structures will exist at all levels of grid refinement for standard FV schemes, the RMSE is as much as 25 times smaller. A multidimensional ideal MHD code has been implemented for simulations on graphics processing units (GPUs). Performance measurements were conducted for both the NVIDIA GeForce GTX Titan and Intel Xeon E5645 processor. The GPU is shown to perform one to two orders of magnitude greater than the CPU when using a single core, and two to three times greater than when run in parallel with OpenMP. Performance comparisons are made for two methods of storing data on the GPU. The first approach stores data as an Array of Structures (AoS), e.g., a point coordinate array of size 3 x n is iterated over. The second approach stores data as a Structure of Arrays (SoA), e.g. three separate arrays of size n are iterated over simultaneously. For an AoS, coalescing does not occur, reducing memory efficiency

  14. Collective instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  15. [Intervertebral instability].

    PubMed

    Colaiacomo, M C; Tortora, A; Di Biasi, C; Polettini, E; Casciani, E; Gualdi, G F

    2009-01-01

    The clinic diagnosis of degenerative lumbar intervertebral instability is a controversial topic and have not yet been clarified clinical criteria for to define this condition with accuracy. Although the lumbar pain is the most common symptom in patients who have lumbar intervertebral instability its clinical presentation is not specific; moreover in patients with lumbar pain there are no agreed signs and symptoms that can be truly attributable to instability. Despite better imaging techniques of testing spinal instability there is not a clear relations between radiologic signs of instability and clinical symptoms. It is, however, still far from unanimous definition of degenerative lumbar intervertebral instability accepted from all specialists involved in diagnosis and treatment of this condition; however, seem there is most agree about suspected vertebral instability. Nevertheless this unresolved topic, it is possible to state that imaging play an increasing role in diagnosis and management of patients with suspected instability. The aim of this study is to investigate the different imaging modalities most indicated in diagnosis if vertebral instability and whether degenerative change can be associated with lower back pain.

  16. Double Hall instability: A catalyzer of magnetic energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchatinov, L. L.

    2017-09-01

    A pictorial explanation for shear-Hall instability is suggested and shows that the shear flow is not necessary for the instability because its role can be played by the Hall effect of an inhomogeneous backgroundmagnetic field. Linear stability analysis for a simplemodel of magnetic field varying periodically in space confirms such a "double Hall" instability. Numerical computations show a considerable increase in Ohmic dissipation rate at the nonlinear stage of instability development. Field dissipation has a spiky character associated with magnetic reconnection in current sheets and X-points. Double Hall instability can be significant for magnetic field dissipation in neutron star crusts and, possibly, in the solar corona.

  17. Shell models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunian, Franck; Stepanov, Rodion; Frick, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Shell models of hydrodynamic turbulence originated in the seventies. Their main aim was to describe the statistics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in spectral space, using a simple set of ordinary differential equations. In the eighties, shell models of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence emerged based on the same principles as their hydrodynamic counter-part but also incorporating interactions between magnetic and velocity fields. In recent years, significant improvements have been made such as the inclusion of non-local interactions and appropriate definitions for helicities. Though shell models cannot account for the spatial complexity of MHD turbulence, their dynamics are not over simplified and do reflect those of real MHD turbulence including intermittency or chaotic reversals of large-scale modes. Furthermore, these models use realistic values for dimensionless parameters (high kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, low or high magnetic Prandtl number) allowing extended inertial range and accurate dissipation rate. Using modern computers it is difficult to attain an inertial range of three decades with direct numerical simulations, whereas eight are possible using shell models. In this review we set up a general mathematical framework allowing the description of any MHD shell model. The variety of the latter, with their advantages and weaknesses, is introduced. Finally we consider a number of applications, dealing with free-decaying MHD turbulence, dynamo action, Alfvén waves and the Hall effect.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic Models of Molecular Tornadoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Kelvin; Fiege, Jason D.

    2017-07-01

    Recent observations near the Galactic Center (GC) have found several molecular filaments displaying striking helically wound morphology that are collectively known as molecular tornadoes. We investigate the equilibrium structure of these molecular tornadoes by formulating a magnetohydrodynamic model of a rotating, helically magnetized filament. A special analytical solution is derived where centrifugal forces balance exactly with toroidal magnetic stress. From the physics of torsional Alfvén waves we derive a constraint that links the toroidal flux-to-mass ratio and the pitch angle of the helical field to the rotation laws, which we find to be an important component in describing the molecular tornado structure. The models are compared to the Ostriker solution for isothermal, nonmagnetic, nonrotating filaments. We find that neither the analytic model nor the Alfvén wave model suffer from the unphysical density inversions noted by other authors. A Monte Carlo exploration of our parameter space is constrained by observational measurements of the Pigtail Molecular Cloud, the Double Helix Nebula, and the GC Molecular Tornado. Observable properties such as the velocity dispersion, filament radius, linear mass, and surface pressure can be used to derive three dimensionless constraints for our dimensionless models of these three objects. A virial analysis of these constrained models is studied for these three molecular tornadoes. We find that self-gravity is relatively unimportant, whereas magnetic fields and external pressure play a dominant role in the confinement and equilibrium radial structure of these objects.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic Propulsion for the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Gabriel I.; Dudley, Scott C.

    2004-10-01

    The cinema industry can sometimes prove to be an ally when searching for material with which to motivate students to learn physics. Consider, for example, the electromagnetic force on a current in the presence of a magnetic field. This phenomenon is at the heart of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion systems. A submarine employing this type of propulsion was immortalized in the movie Hunt for Red October. While mentioning this to students certainly gets their attention, it often elicits comments that it is only fiction and not physically possible. Imagine their surprise when a working system is demonstrated! It is neither difficult nor expensive to construct a working system that can be demonstrated in the front of a classroom.2 In addition, all aspects of the engineering hurdles that must be surmounted and myths concerning this "silent propulsion" system are borne out in a simple apparatus. This paper details how to construct an inexpensive MHD propulsion boat that can be demonstrated for students in the classroom.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) driven droplet mixer

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.; Miles, Robin R.

    2004-05-11

    A magnetohydrodynamic fluidic system mixes a first substance and a second substance. A first substrate section includes a first flow channel and a first plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes operatively connected to the first flow channel. A second substrate section includes a second flow channel and a second plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes operatively connected to the second flow channel. A third substrate section includes a third flow channel and a third plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes operatively connected to the third flow channel. A magnetic section and a control section are operatively connected to the spaced electrodes. The first substrate section, the second substrate section, the third substrate section, the first plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes, the second plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes, the third plurality of pairs of spaced electrodes, the magnetic section, and the control section are operated to move the first substance through the first flow channel, the second substance through the second flow channel, and both the first substance and the second substance into the third flow channel where they are mixed.