Science.gov

Sample records for magnetoreception bird cryptochrome

  1. Acuity of a Cryptochrome and Vision-Based Magnetoreception System in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Mouritsen, Henrik; Schulten, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The magnetic compass of birds is embedded in the visual system and it has been hypothesized that the primary sensory mechanism is based on a radical pair reaction. Previous models of magnetoreception have assumed that the radical pair-forming molecules are rigidly fixed in space, and this assumption has been a major objection to the suggested hypothesis. In this article, we investigate theoretically how much disorder is permitted for the radical pair-forming, protein-based magnetic compass in the eye to remain functional. Our study shows that only one rotational degree of freedom of the radical pair-forming protein needs to be partially constrained, while the other two rotational degrees of freedom do not impact the magnetoreceptive properties of the protein. The result implies that any membrane-associated protein is sufficiently restricted in its motion to function as a radical pair-based magnetoreceptor. We relate our theoretical findings to the cryptochromes, currently considered the likeliest candidate to furnish radical pair-based magnetoreception. PMID:20655831

  2. Localisation of the Putative Magnetoreceptive Protein Cryptochrome 1b in the Retinae of Migratory Birds and Homing Pigeons.

    PubMed

    Bolte, Petra; Bleibaum, Florian; Einwich, Angelika; Günther, Anja; Liedvogel, Miriam; Heyers, Dominik; Depping, Anne; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Janssen-Bienhold, Ulrike; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are ubiquitously expressed in various animal tissues including the retina. Some cryptochromes are involved in regulating circadian activity. Cryptochrome proteins have also been suggested to mediate the primary mechanism in light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in birds. Cryptochrome 1b (Cry1b) exhibits a unique carboxy terminus exclusively found in birds so far, which might be indicative for a specialised function. Cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a) is so far the only cryptochrome protein that has been localised to specific cell types within the retina of migratory birds. Here we show that Cry1b, an alternative splice variant of Cry1a, is also expressed in the retina of migratory birds, but it is primarily located in other cell types than Cry1a. This could suggest different functions for the two splice products. Using diagnostic bird-specific antibodies (that allow for a precise discrimination between both proteins), we show that Cry1b protein is found in the retinae of migratory European robins (Erithacus rubecula), migratory Northern Wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) and pigeons (Columba livia). In all three species, retinal Cry1b is localised in cell types which have been discussed as potentially well suited locations for magnetoreception: Cry1b is observed in the cytosol of ganglion cells, displaced ganglion cells, and in photoreceptor inner segments. The cytosolic rather than nucleic location of Cry1b in the retina reported here speaks against a circadian clock regulatory function of Cry1b and it allows for the possible involvement of Cry1b in a radical-pair-based magnetoreception mechanism.

  3. Compass magnetoreception in birds arising from photo-induced radical pairs in rotationally disordered cryptochromes

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jason C. S.; Rodgers, Christopher T.; Hore, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    According to the radical pair model, the magnetic compass sense of migratory birds relies on photochemical transformations in the eye to detect the direction of the geomagnetic field. Magnetically sensitive radical pairs are thought to be generated in cryptochrome proteins contained in magnetoreceptor cells in the retina. A prerequisite of the current model is for some degree of rotational ordering of both the cryptochromes within the cells and of the cells within the retina so that the directional responses of individual molecules do not average to zero. Here, it is argued that anisotropic distributions of radical pairs can be generated by the photoselection effects that arise from the directionality of the light entering the eye. Light-induced rotational order among the transient radical pairs rather than intrinsic ordering of their molecular precursors is seen as the fundamental condition for a magnetoreceptor cell to exhibit an anisotropic response. A theoretical analysis shows that a viable compass magnetoreceptor could result from randomly oriented cryptochromes contained in randomly oriented cells distributed around the retina. PMID:22977104

  4. Chemical magnetoreception in birds: The radical pair mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Christopher T.; Hore, P. J.

    2009-01-01

    Migratory birds travel vast distances each year, finding their way by various means, including a remarkable ability to perceive the Earth's magnetic field. Although it has been known for 40 years that birds possess a magnetic compass, avian magnetoreception is poorly understood at all levels from the primary biophysical detection events, signal transduction pathways and neurophysiology, to the processing of information in the brain. It has been proposed that the primary detector is a specialized ocular photoreceptor that plays host to magnetically sensitive photochemical reactions having radical pairs as fleeting intermediates. Here, we present a physical chemist's perspective on the “radical pair mechanism” of compass magnetoreception in birds. We outline the essential chemical requirements for detecting the direction of an Earth-strength ≈50 μT magnetic field and comment on the likelihood that these might be satisfied in a biologically plausible receptor. Our survey concludes with a discussion of cryptochrome, the photoactive protein that has been put forward as the magnetoreceptor molecule. PMID:19129499

  5. Cryptochrome expression in the eye of migratory birds depends on their migratory status.

    PubMed

    Fusani, Leonida; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Frigato, Elena; Foà, Augusto

    2014-03-15

    Most passerine birds are nocturnal migrants. When kept in captivity during the migratory periods, these species show a migratory restlessness, or Zugunruhe. Recent studies on Sylvia warblers have shown that Zugunruhe is an excellent proxy of migratory disposition. Passerine birds can use the Earth's geomagnetic field as a compass to keep their course during their migratory flight. Among the candidate magnetoreceptive mechanisms are the cryptochromes, flavoproteins located in the retina that are supposed to perceive the magnetic field through a light-mediated process. Previous work has suggested that expression of Cryptochrome 1 (Cry1) is increased in migratory birds compared with non-migratory species. Here we tested the hypothesis that Cry1 expression depends on migratory status. Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla were caught before fall migration and held in registration cages. When the birds were showing robust Zugunruhe, we applied a food deprivation protocol that simulates a long migratory flight. When the birds were refed after 2 days, their Zugunruhe decreased substantially, as is expected from birds that would interrupt migration for a refuelling stopover. We found that Cry1 expression was higher at night than during daytime in birds showing Zugunruhe, whereas in birds that underwent the fasting-and-refeeding protocol and reduced their levels of Zugunruhe, night Cry1 expression decreased to daytime levels. Our work shows that Cry1 expression is dependent on the presence of Zugunruhe and not on species-specific or seasonal factors, or on the birds being active versus inactive. These results support the hypothesis that cryptochromes underlie magnetoreceptive mechanisms in birds.

  6. Light-dependent magnetoreception in birds: the crucial step occurs in the dark.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Ahmad, Margaret; Nießner, Christine; Gehring, Dennis; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The Radical Pair Model proposes that the avian magnetic compass is based on spin-chemical processes: since the ratio between the two spin states singlet and triplet of radical pairs depends on their alignment in the magnetic field, it can provide information on magnetic directions. Cryptochromes, blue light-absorbing flavoproteins, with flavin adenine dinucleotide as chromophore, are suggested as molecules forming the radical pairs underlying magnetoreception. When activated by light, cryptochromes undergo a redox cycle, in the course of which radical pairs are generated during photo-reduction as well as during light-independent re-oxidation. This raised the question as to which radical pair is crucial for mediating magnetic directions. Here, we present the results from behavioural experiments with intermittent light and magnetic field pulses that clearly show that magnetoreception is possible in the dark interval, pointing to the radical pair formed during flavin re-oxidation. This differs from the mechanism considered for cryptochrome signalling the presence of light and rules out most current models of an avian magnetic compass based on the radical pair generated during photo-reduction. Using the radical pair formed during re-oxidation may represent a specific adaptation of the avian magnetic compass. © 2016 The Authors.

  7. Spin relaxation of radicals in cryptochrome and its role in avian magnetoreception

    SciT

    Worster, Susannah; Kattnig, Daniel R.; Hore, P. J., E-mail: peter.hore@chem.ox.ac.uk

    2016-07-21

    Long-lived spin coherence and rotationally ordered radical pairs have previously been identified as key requirements for the radical pair mechanism of the avian magnetic compass sense. Both criteria are hard to meet in a biological environment, where thermal motion of the radicals creates dynamic disorder and drives efficient spin relaxation. This has long been cited as a major stumbling block of the radical pair hypothesis. Here we combine Redfield relaxation theory with analytical solutions to a rotational diffusion equation to assess the impact of restricted rotational motion of the radicals on the operation of the compass. The effects of suchmore » motions are first investigated generally in small, model systems and are then critically examined in the magnetically sensitive flavin-tryptophan radical pair that is formed photochemically in the proposed magnetoreceptor protein, cryptochrome. We conclude that relaxation is slowest when rotational motion of the radicals within the protein is fast and highly constrained; that in a regime of slow relaxation, the motional averaging of hyperfine interactions has the potential to improve the sensitivity of the compass; and that consideration of motional effects can significantly alter the design criteria for an optimal compass. In addition, we demonstrate that motion of the flavin radical is likely to be compatible with its role as a component of a functioning radical-pair compass, whereas the motion of the tryptophan radical is less ideal, unless it is particularly fast.« less

  8. Millitesla magnetic field effects on the photocycle of an animal cryptochrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Dean M. W.; Li, Jing; Henbest, Kevin B.; Neil, Simon R. T.; Maeda, Kiminori; Storey, Jonathan; Schleicher, Erik; Biskup, Till; Rodriguez, Ryan; Weber, Stefan; Hore, P. J.; Timmel, Christiane R.; MacKenzie, Stuart R.

    2017-02-01

    Drosophila have been used as model organisms to explore both the biophysical mechanisms of animal magnetoreception and the possibility that weak, low-frequency anthropogenic electromagnetic fields may have biological consequences. In both cases, the presumed receptor is cryptochrome, a protein thought to be responsible for magnetic compass sensing in migratory birds and a variety of magnetic behavioural responses in insects. Here, we demonstrate that photo-induced electron transfer reactions in Drosophila melanogaster cryptochrome are indeed influenced by magnetic fields of a few millitesla. The form of the protein containing flavin and tryptophan radicals shows kinetics that differ markedly from those of closely related members of the cryptochrome-photolyase family. These differences and the magnetic sensitivity of Drosophila cryptochrome are interpreted in terms of the radical pair mechanism and a photocycle involving the recently discovered fourth tryptophan electron donor.

  9. Radical-pair based avian magnetoreception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procopio, Maria; Ritz, Thorsten

    2014-03-01

    Behavioural experiments suggest that migratory birds possess a magnetic compass sensor able to detect the direction of the geomagnetic. One hypothesis for the basis of this remarkable sensory ability is that the coherent quantum spin dynamics of photoinduced radical pair reactions transduces directional magnetic information from the geomagnetic field into changes of reaction yields, possibly involving the photoreceptor cryptochrome in the birds retina. The suggested radical-pair based avian magnetoreception has attracted attention in the field of quantum biology as an example of a biological sensor which might exploit quantum coherences for its biological function. Investigations on such a spin-based sensor have focussed on uncovering the design features for the design of a biomimetic magnetic field sensor. We study the effects of slow fluctuations in the nuclear spin environment on the directional signal. We quantitatively evaluate the robustness of signals under fluctuations on a timescale longer than the lifetime of a radical pair, utilizing two models of radical pairs. Our results suggest design principles for building a radical-pair based compass sensor that is both robust and highly directional sensitive.

  10. Magnetoreception in birds: different physical processes for two types of directional responses

    PubMed Central

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Stapput, Katrin; Ritz, Thorsten; Thalau, Peter; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Migratory orientation in birds involves an inclination compass based on radical-pair processes. Under certain light regimes, however, “fixed-direction” responses are observed that do not undergo the seasonal change between spring and autumn typical for migratory orientation. To identify the underlying transduction mechanisms, we analyzed a fixed-direction response under a combination of 502 nm turquoise and 590 nm yellow light, with migratory orientation under 565 nm green light serving as the control. High-frequency fields, diagnostic for a radical-pair mechanism, disrupted migratory orientation without affecting fixed-direction responses. Local anaesthesia of the upper beak where magnetite is found in birds, in contrast, disrupted the fixed-direction response without affecting migratory orientation. The two types of responses are thus based on different physical principles, with the compass response based on a radical pair mechanism and the fixed-direction responses probably originating in magnetite-based receptors in the upper beak. Directional input from these receptors seems to affect the behavior only when the regular inclination compass does not work properly. Evolutionary considerations suggest that magnetite-based receptors may represent an ancient mechanism that, in birds, has been replaced by the modern inclination compass based on radical-pair processes now used for directional orientation. PMID:19404459

  11. Interactions between the visual and the magnetoreception system: different effects of bichromatic light regimes on the directional behavior of migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Dehe, Lars; Gehring, Dennis; Thalau, Peter; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    When magnetic compass orientation of migratory robins was tested, the birds proved well oriented under low intensity monochromatic light of shorter wavelengths up to 565 nm green; from 583 nm yellow onward, they were disoriented. In the present study, we tested robins under bichromatic lights composed (1) of 424 nm blue and 565 nm green and (2) of 565 nm green and 583 nm yellow at two intensities. Under dim blue-green light with a total quantal flux of ca. 8 × 10(15)quanta/sm(2), the birds were well oriented in their migratory direction by their inclination compass; under blue-green light of twice this intensity, their orientation became axial. In both cases, the magnetic directional information was mediated by the radical pair processes in the eye. When green and yellow light were combined, however, the nature of the behavior changed. Under green-yellow light of the higher intensity, the birds showed a 'fixed direction' response that was polar, no longer controlled by the normal inclination compass; under dim green-yellow light, the response became axial. Under these two light conditions, the respective directional information was mediated by the magnetite-based receptors in the skin of the upper beak. Apparently, yellow light leads to a change from one magnetoreception system to the other. How this change is effected is still unknown; it appears to reflect complex interactions between the visual and the two magnetoreception systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Light-dependent magnetoreception: orientation behaviour of migratory birds under dim red light.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Munro, Ursula; Ford, Hugh; Stapput, Katrin; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2008-10-01

    Magnetic compass orientation in migratory birds has been shown to be based on radical pair processes and to require light from the short wavelength part of the spectrum up to 565 nm Green. Under dim red light of 645 nm wavelength and 1 mW m(-2) intensity, Australian silvereyes and European robins showed a westerly tendency that did not change between spring and autumn, identifying it as a 'fixed direction' response. A thorough analysis revealed that this orientation did not involve the inclination compass, but was a response based on the polarity of the magnetic field. Furthermore, in contrast to the orientation under short-wavelength light, it could be disrupted by local anaesthesia of the upper beak where iron-containing receptors are located, indicating that it is controlled by these receptors. The similarity of the response under dim red light to the response in total darkness suggests that the two responses may be identical. These findings indicate that the observed 'fixed direction' response under dim red light is fundamentally different from the normal compass orientation, which is based on radical pair processes.

  13. Avian magnetoreception: elaborate iron mineral containing dendrites in the upper beak seem to be a common feature of birds.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, Gerald; Fleissner, Gerta; Schuchardt, Kirsten; Kuehbacher, Markus; Thalau, Peter; Mouritsen, Henrik; Heyers, Dominik; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Fleissner, Guenther

    2010-02-16

    The magnetic field sensors enabling birds to extract orientational information from the Earth's magnetic field have remained enigmatic. Our previously published results from homing pigeons have made us suggest that the iron containing sensory dendrites in the inner dermal lining of the upper beak are a candidate structure for such an avian magnetometer system. Here we show that similar structures occur in two species of migratory birds (garden warbler, Sylvia borin and European robin, Erithacus rubecula) and a non-migratory bird, the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus). In all these bird species, histological data have revealed dendrites of similar shape and size, all containing iron minerals within distinct subcellular compartments of nervous terminals of the median branch of the Nervus ophthalmicus. We also used microscopic X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyses to identify the involved iron minerals to be almost completely Fe III-oxides. Magnetite (Fe II/III) may also occur in these structures, but not as a major Fe constituent. Our data suggest that this complex dendritic system in the beak is a common feature of birds, and that it may form an essential sensory basis for the evolution of at least certain types of magnetic field guided behavior.

  14. Cryptochrome 1 in Retinal Cone Photoreceptors Suggests a Novel Functional Role in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Nießner, Christine; Denzau, Susanne; Malkemper, Erich Pascal; Gross, Julia Christina; Burda, Hynek; Winklhofer, Michael; Peichl, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are a ubiquitous group of blue-light absorbing flavoproteins that in the mammalian retina have an important role in the circadian clock. In birds, cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a), localized in the UV/violet-sensitive S1 cone photoreceptors, is proposed to be the retinal receptor molecule of the light-dependent magnetic compass. The retinal localization of mammalian Cry1, homologue to avian Cry1a, is unknown, and it is open whether mammalian Cry1 is also involved in magnetic field sensing. To constrain the possible role of retinal Cry1, we immunohistochemically analysed 90 mammalian species across 48 families in 16 orders, using an antiserum against the Cry1 C-terminus that in birds labels only the photo-activated conformation. In the Carnivora families Canidae, Mustelidae and Ursidae, and in some Primates, Cry1 was consistently labeled in the outer segment of the shortwave-sensitive S1 cones. This finding would be compatible with a magnetoreceptive function of Cry1 in these taxa. In all other taxa, Cry1 was not detected by the antiserum that likely also in mammals labels the photo-activated conformation, although Western blots showed Cry1 in mouse retinal cell nuclei. We speculate that in the mouse and the other negative-tested mammals Cry1 is involved in circadian functions as a non-light-responsive protein. PMID:26898837

  15. Cryptochrome 1 in Retinal Cone Photoreceptors Suggests a Novel Functional Role in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Nießner, Christine; Denzau, Susanne; Malkemper, Erich Pascal; Gross, Julia Christina; Burda, Hynek; Winklhofer, Michael; Peichl, Leo

    2016-02-22

    Cryptochromes are a ubiquitous group of blue-light absorbing flavoproteins that in the mammalian retina have an important role in the circadian clock. In birds, cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a), localized in the UV/violet-sensitive S1 cone photoreceptors, is proposed to be the retinal receptor molecule of the light-dependent magnetic compass. The retinal localization of mammalian Cry1, homologue to avian Cry1a, is unknown, and it is open whether mammalian Cry1 is also involved in magnetic field sensing. To constrain the possible role of retinal Cry1, we immunohistochemically analysed 90 mammalian species across 48 families in 16 orders, using an antiserum against the Cry1 C-terminus that in birds labels only the photo-activated conformation. In the Carnivora families Canidae, Mustelidae and Ursidae, and in some Primates, Cry1 was consistently labeled in the outer segment of the shortwave-sensitive S1 cones. This finding would be compatible with a magnetoreceptive function of Cry1 in these taxa. In all other taxa, Cry1 was not detected by the antiserum that likely also in mammals labels the photo-activated conformation, although Western blots showed Cry1 in mouse retinal cell nuclei. We speculate that in the mouse and the other negative-tested mammals Cry1 is involved in circadian functions as a non-light-responsive protein.

  16. Zebra finches have a light-dependent magnetic compass similar to migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Pinzon-Rodriguez, Atticus; Muheim, Rachel

    2017-04-01

    Birds have a light-dependent magnetic compass that provides information about the spatial alignment of the geomagnetic field. It is proposed to be located in the avian retina and mediated by a light-induced, radical-pair mechanism involving cryptochromes as sensory receptor molecules. To investigate how the behavioural responses of birds under different light spectra match with cryptochromes as the primary magnetoreceptor, we examined the spectral properties of the magnetic compass in zebra finches. We trained birds to relocate a food reward in a spatial orientation task using magnetic compass cues. The birds were well oriented along the trained magnetic compass axis when trained and tested under low-irradiance 521 nm green light. In the presence of a 1.4 MHz radio-frequency electromagnetic (RF)-field, the birds were disoriented, which supports the involvement of radical-pair reactions in the primary magnetoreception process. Birds trained and tested under 638 nm red light showed a weak tendency to orient ∼45 deg clockwise of the trained magnetic direction. Under low-irradiance 460 nm blue light, they tended to orient along the trained magnetic compass axis, but were disoriented under higher irradiance light. Zebra finches trained and tested under high-irradiance 430 nm indigo light were well oriented along the trained magnetic compass axis, but disoriented in the presence of a RF-field. We conclude that magnetic compass responses of zebra finches are similar to those observed in nocturnally migrating birds and agree with cryptochromes as the primary magnetoreceptor, suggesting that light-dependent, radical-pair-mediated magnetoreception is a common property for all birds, including non-migratory species. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Geomagnetic field impacts on cryptochrome and phytochrome signaling.

    PubMed

    Agliassa, Chiara; Narayana, Ravishankar; Christie, John M; Maffei, Massimo E

    2018-05-29

    The geomagnetic field (GMF) is an environmental element whose instability affects plant growth and development. Despite known plant responses to GMF direction and intensity, the mechanism of magnetoreception in plants is still not known. Magnetic field variations affect many light-dependent plant processes, suggesting that the magnetoreception could require light. The objective of this work was to comprehensively investigate the influence of GMF on Arabidopsis thaliana (Col-0) photoreceptor signaling. Wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings and photoreceptor-deficient mutants (cry1cry2, phot1, phyA and phyAphyB) were exposed to near null magnetic field (NNMF, ≤40 nT) and GMF (~43 μT) under darkness and different light wavelengths. The GMF did not alter skotomorphogenic or photomorphogenic seedling development but had a significant impact on gene expression pathways downstream of cryptochrome and phytochrome photoactivation. GMF-induced changes in gene expression observed under blue light were partially associated with an alteration of cryptochrome activation. GMF impacts on phytochrome-regulated gene expression could be attributed to alterations in phytochrome protein abundance that were also dependent on the presence of cry1, cry2 and phot1. Moreover, the GMF was found to impact photomorphogenic-promoting gene expression in etiolated seedlings, indicating the existence of a light-independent magnetoreception mechanism. In conclusion, our data shows that magnetoreception alters photoreceptor signaling in Arabidopsis, but it does not necessarily depend on light. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Chemical compass model of avian magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kiminori; Henbest, Kevin B; Cintolesi, Filippo; Kuprov, Ilya; Rodgers, Christopher T; Liddell, Paul A; Gust, Devens; Timmel, Christiane R; Hore, P J

    2008-05-15

    Approximately 50 species, including birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, fish, crustaceans and insects, are known to use the Earth's magnetic field for orientation and navigation. Birds in particular have been intensively studied, but the biophysical mechanisms that underlie the avian magnetic compass are still poorly understood. One proposal, based on magnetically sensitive free radical reactions, is gaining support despite the fact that no chemical reaction in vitro has been shown to respond to magnetic fields as weak as the Earth's ( approximately 50 muT) or to be sensitive to the direction of such a field. Here we use spectroscopic observation of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene model system to demonstrate that the lifetime of a photochemically formed radical pair is changed by application of < or =50 microT magnetic fields, and to measure the anisotropic chemical response that is essential for its operation as a chemical compass sensor. These experiments establish the feasibility of chemical magnetoreception and give insight into the structural and dynamic design features required for optimal detection of the direction of the Earth's magnetic field.

  19. Electron Spin Relaxation Can Enhance the Performance of a Cryptochrome-Based Magnetic Compass Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-19

    quantumbiology,migratory birds, animal navigation, radical pairmechanism Supplementarymaterial for this article is available online Abstract The radical ...certain spin relaxationmechanisms can enhance its performance.We focus on the flavin–tryptophan radical pair in cryptochrome, currently the only...candidatemagnetoreceptor molecule. Correlation functions for fluctuations in the distance between the two radicals in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome

  20. Magnetic particle-mediated magnetoreception

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jeremy; Boyd, Alastair; House, Michael; Woodward, Robert; Mathes, Falko; Cowin, Gary; Saunders, Martin; Baer, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Behavioural studies underpin the weight of experimental evidence for the existence of a magnetic sense in animals. In contrast, studies aimed at understanding the mechanistic basis of magnetoreception by determining the anatomical location, structure and function of sensory cells have been inconclusive. In this review, studies attempting to demonstrate the existence of a magnetoreceptor based on the principles of the magnetite hypothesis are examined. Specific attention is given to the range of techniques, and main animal model systems that have been used in the search for magnetite particulates. Anatomical location/cell rarity and composition are identified as two key obstacles that must be addressed in order to make progress in locating and characterizing a magnetite-based magnetoreceptor cell. Avenues for further study are suggested, including the need for novel experimental, correlative, multimodal and multidisciplinary approaches. The aim of this review is to inspire new efforts towards understanding the cellular basis of magnetoreception in animals, which will in turn inform a new era of behavioural research based on first principles. PMID:26333810

  1. Magnetoreception and its trigeminal mediation in the homing pigeon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Cordula V.; Davison, Michael; Martin Wild, J.; Walker, Michael M.

    2004-11-01

    Two conflicting hypotheses compete to explain how a homing pigeon can return to its loft over great distances. One proposes the use of atmospheric odours and the other the Earth's magnetic field in the `map' step of the `map and compass' hypothesis of pigeon homing. Although magnetic effects on pigeon orientation provide indirect evidence for a magnetic `map', numerous conditioning experiments have failed to demonstrate reproducible responses to magnetic fields by pigeons. This has led to suggestions that homing pigeons and other birds have no useful sensitivity to the Earth's magnetic field. Here we demonstrate that homing pigeons (Columba livia) can discriminate between the presence and absence of a magnetic anomaly in a conditioned choice experiment. This discrimination is impaired by attachment of a magnet to the cere, local anaesthesia of the upper beak area, and bilateral section of the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve, but not of the olfactory nerve. These results suggest that magnetoreception (probably magnetite-based) occurs in the upper beak area of the pigeon. Traditional methods of rendering pigeons anosmic might therefore cause simultaneous impairment of magnetoreception so that future orientation experiments will require independent evaluation of the pigeon's magnetic and olfactory systems.

  2. Magnetoreception and its trigeminal mediation in the homing pigeon.

    PubMed

    Mora, Cordula V; Davison, Michael; Wild, J Martin; Walker, Michael M

    2004-11-25

    Two conflicting hypotheses compete to explain how a homing pigeon can return to its loft over great distances. One proposes the use of atmospheric odours and the other the Earth's magnetic field in the 'map' step of the 'map and compass' hypothesis of pigeon homing. Although magnetic effects on pigeon orientation provide indirect evidence for a magnetic 'map', numerous conditioning experiments have failed to demonstrate reproducible responses to magnetic fields by pigeons. This has led to suggestions that homing pigeons and other birds have no useful sensitivity to the Earth's magnetic field. Here we demonstrate that homing pigeons (Columba livia) can discriminate between the presence and absence of a magnetic anomaly in a conditioned choice experiment. This discrimination is impaired by attachment of a magnet to the cere, local anaesthesia of the upper beak area, and bilateral section of the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve, but not of the olfactory nerve. These results suggest that magnetoreception (probably magnetite-based) occurs in the upper beak area of the pigeon. Traditional methods of rendering pigeons anosmic might therefore cause simultaneous impairment of magnetoreception so that future orientation experiments will require independent evaluation of the pigeon's magnetic and olfactory systems.

  3. Magnetoreception in Eusocial Insects: An Update

    Behavioral experiments for magnetoreception in eusocial insects in the last decade are reviewed. Ants and bees use the geomagnetic field to orient and navigate in areas around their nests and in migratory paths. Bees show sensitivity to small changes in magnetic fields in conditioning experiments a...

  4. Cryptochrome, Phytochrome, and Anthocyanin Production

    PubMed Central

    Mancinelli, Alberto L.; Rossi, Federica; Moroni, Anna

    1991-01-01

    Anthocyanin production in cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seedlings exposed to prolonged irradiations was studied under conditions that allowed discrimination, within certain limits, between the contribution of cryptochrome and phytochrome in the photoregulation of the response. The results of the study provide confirming evidence for the involvement of cryptochrome and direct evidence for a significant contribution of cryptochrome to the fluence rate dependence of the response to blue. The results provide some preliminary, direct indication for an interaction between cryptochrome and phytochrome in the photoregulation of anthocyanin production in seedlings exposed to the prolonged irradiations required for a high level of expression of the response. The type and degree of interaction between the two photoreceptors vary significantly, depending on the species and experimental conditions. PMID:16668301

  5. Polarized light modulates light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in birds.

    PubMed

    Muheim, Rachel; Sjöberg, Sissel; Pinzon-Rodriguez, Atticus

    2016-02-09

    Magnetoreception of the light-dependent magnetic compass in birds is suggested to be mediated by a radical-pair mechanism taking place in the avian retina. Biophysical models on magnetic field effects on radical pairs generally assume that the light activating the magnetoreceptor molecules is nondirectional and unpolarized, and that light absorption is isotropic. However, natural skylight enters the avian retina unidirectionally, through the cornea and the lens, and is often partially polarized. In addition, cryptochromes, the putative magnetoreceptor molecules, absorb light anisotropically, i.e., they preferentially absorb light of a specific direction and polarization, implying that the light-dependent magnetic compass is intrinsically polarization sensitive. To test putative interactions between the avian magnetic compass and polarized light, we developed a spatial orientation assay and trained zebra finches to magnetic and/or overhead polarized light cues in a four-arm "plus" maze. The birds did not use overhead polarized light near the zenith for sky compass orientation. Instead, overhead polarized light modulated light-dependent magnetic compass orientation, i.e., how the birds perceive the magnetic field. Birds were well oriented when tested with the polarized light axis aligned parallel to the magnetic field. When the polarized light axis was aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, the birds became disoriented. These findings are the first behavioral evidence to our knowledge for a direct interaction between polarized light and the light-dependent magnetic compass in an animal. They reveal a fundamentally new property of the radical pair-based magnetoreceptor with key implications for how birds and other animals perceive the Earth's magnetic field.

  6. Polarized light modulates light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in birds

    PubMed Central

    Muheim, Rachel; Sjöberg, Sissel; Pinzon-Rodriguez, Atticus

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoreception of the light-dependent magnetic compass in birds is suggested to be mediated by a radical-pair mechanism taking place in the avian retina. Biophysical models on magnetic field effects on radical pairs generally assume that the light activating the magnetoreceptor molecules is nondirectional and unpolarized, and that light absorption is isotropic. However, natural skylight enters the avian retina unidirectionally, through the cornea and the lens, and is often partially polarized. In addition, cryptochromes, the putative magnetoreceptor molecules, absorb light anisotropically, i.e., they preferentially absorb light of a specific direction and polarization, implying that the light-dependent magnetic compass is intrinsically polarization sensitive. To test putative interactions between the avian magnetic compass and polarized light, we developed a spatial orientation assay and trained zebra finches to magnetic and/or overhead polarized light cues in a four-arm “plus” maze. The birds did not use overhead polarized light near the zenith for sky compass orientation. Instead, overhead polarized light modulated light-dependent magnetic compass orientation, i.e., how the birds perceive the magnetic field. Birds were well oriented when tested with the polarized light axis aligned parallel to the magnetic field. When the polarized light axis was aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, the birds became disoriented. These findings are the first behavioral evidence to our knowledge for a direct interaction between polarized light and the light-dependent magnetic compass in an animal. They reveal a fundamentally new property of the radical pair-based magnetoreceptor with key implications for how birds and other animals perceive the Earth’s magnetic field. PMID:26811473

  7. Magnetoreception in eusocial insects: an update

    PubMed Central

    Wajnberg, Eliane; Acosta-Avalos, Daniel; Alves, Odivaldo Cambraia; de Oliveira, Jandira Ferreira; Srygley, Robert B.; Esquivel, Darci M. S.

    2010-01-01

    Behavioural experiments for magnetoreception in eusocial insects in the last decade are reviewed. Ants and bees use the geomagnetic field to orient and navigate in areas around their nests and along migratory paths. Bees show sensitivity to small changes in magnetic fields in conditioning experiments and when exiting the hive. For the first time, the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles found in eusocial insects, obtained by magnetic techniques and electron microscopy, are reviewed. Different magnetic oxide nanoparticles, ranging from superparamagnetic to multi-domain particles, were observed in all body parts, but greater relative concentrations in the abdomens and antennae of honeybees and ants have focused attention on these segments. Theoretical models for how these specific magnetosensory apparatuses function have been proposed. Neuron-rich ant antennae may be the most amenable to discovering a magnetosensor that will greatly assist research into higher order processing of magnetic information. The ferromagnetic hypothesis is believed to apply to eusocial insects, but interest in a light-sensitive mechanism is growing. The diversity of compass mechanisms in animals suggests that multiple compasses may function in insect orientation and navigation. The search for magnetic compasses will continue even after a magnetosensor is discovered in eusocial insects. PMID:20106876

  8. Schizophrenia, cryptochromes and magnetite. A possible connection?

    PubMed

    Størmer, Fredrik C

    2012-09-01

    Since cryptochromes have an effect upon circadian physiology and magnetite may be involved in memory storage, there must be a link between these compounds and schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A role for cryptochromes in sleep regulation.

    PubMed

    Wisor, Jonathan P; O'Hara, Bruce F; Terao, Akira; Selby, Chris P; Kilduff, Thomas S; Sancar, Aziz; Edgar, Dale M; Franken, Paul

    2002-12-20

    The cryptochrome 1 and 2 genes (cry1 and cry2) are necessary for the generation of circadian rhythms, as mice lacking both of these genes (cry1,2-/-) lack circadian rhythms. We studied sleep in cry1,2-/- mice under baseline conditions as well as under conditions of constant darkness and enforced wakefulness to determine whether cryptochromes influence sleep regulatory processes. Under all three conditions, cry1,2-/- mice exhibit the hallmarks of high non-REM sleep (NREMS) drive (i.e., increases in NREMS time, NREMS consolidation, and EEG delta power during NREMS). This unexpected phenotype was associated with elevated brain mRNA levels of period 1 and 2 (per1,2), and albumin d-binding protein (dbp), which are known to be transcriptionally inhibited by CRY1,2. To further examine the relationship between circadian genes and sleep homeostasis, we examined wild type mice and rats following sleep deprivation and found increased levels of per1,2 mRNA and decreased levels of dbp mRNA specifically in the cerebral cortex; these changes subsided with recovery sleep. The expression of per3, cry1,2, clock, npas2, bmal1, and casein-kinase-1epsilon did not change with sleep deprivation. These results indicate that mice lacking cryptochromes are not simply a genetic model of circadian arrhythmicity in rodents and functionally implicate cryptochromes in the homeostatic regulation of sleep.

  10. Hypothesis on the Role of Cryptochromes in Inflammation and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Adriano Barreto; Nogueira, Ariel Barreto; Veiga, José Carlos Esteves; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2017-01-01

    We have recently found that the temperature variability (TV) in the day–night cycle may predict the mean intracranial pressure in the following 24 h (ICP24) in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients under multimodality monitoring, sedation, and hypothermia (<35°C). Specifically, we found that ICP24 = 6 (4 − TV) mmHg. TV is the ratio between the coefficient of variation of temperature during the nocturnal and the preceding diurnal periods. This result suggests that the circadian clock reflects brain plasticity mechanisms and its malfunctioning leads to deterioration of the neurologic status. The sleep–wake cycle is absent in these patients and their circadian clock can function properly only by environment light-independent mechanisms. One mechanism involves the circadian clock proteins named cryptochromes (CRYs). CRYs are highly preserved and widespread in the evolutionary tree, are expressed in different cell types in humans [type II CRYs, in two forms: human cryptochrome 1 and 2 (hCRY1 and hCRY2)], and in certain species, respond to blue light and play role in magnetoreception. Interestingly, SAH outcome seems to correlate with inflammation, and CRYs decrease inflammatory activity. Our hypothesis derived from these observations is that CRYs modulate the circadian oscillation of temperature even during therapeutic hypothermia and improve outcome in SAH through decrease in inflammation. A strategy to test this hypothesis is to measure periodically during the acute phase of high-grade SAH the level of CRYs in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and circulating white blood cells, and to correlate these levels with outcome, TV, ICP24, and pro- and anti-inflammatory markers in CSF and blood. If this hypothesis is true, the development of therapies targeting inflammation in SAH could take advantage of cryptochrome properties. It has been shown that blue light phototherapy increases the expression of CRYs in blood mononuclear cells in jaundiced neonates. Likewise

  11. Hypothesis on the Role of Cryptochromes in Inflammation and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Outcome.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Adriano Barreto; Nogueira, Ariel Barreto; Veiga, José Carlos Esteves; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2017-01-01

    We have recently found that the temperature variability (TV) in the day-night cycle may predict the mean intracranial pressure in the following 24 h (ICP 24 ) in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients under multimodality monitoring, sedation, and hypothermia (<35°C). Specifically, we found that ICP 24  = 6 (4 - TV) mmHg. TV is the ratio between the coefficient of variation of temperature during the nocturnal and the preceding diurnal periods. This result suggests that the circadian clock reflects brain plasticity mechanisms and its malfunctioning leads to deterioration of the neurologic status. The sleep-wake cycle is absent in these patients and their circadian clock can function properly only by environment light-independent mechanisms. One mechanism involves the circadian clock proteins named cryptochromes (CRYs). CRYs are highly preserved and widespread in the evolutionary tree, are expressed in different cell types in humans [type II CRYs, in two forms: human cryptochrome 1 and 2 (hCRY1 and hCRY2)], and in certain species, respond to blue light and play role in magnetoreception. Interestingly, SAH outcome seems to correlate with inflammation, and CRYs decrease inflammatory activity. Our hypothesis derived from these observations is that CRYs modulate the circadian oscillation of temperature even during therapeutic hypothermia and improve outcome in SAH through decrease in inflammation. A strategy to test this hypothesis is to measure periodically during the acute phase of high-grade SAH the level of CRYs in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and circulating white blood cells, and to correlate these levels with outcome, TV, ICP 24 , and pro- and anti-inflammatory markers in CSF and blood. If this hypothesis is true, the development of therapies targeting inflammation in SAH could take advantage of cryptochrome properties. It has been shown that blue light phototherapy increases the expression of CRYs in blood mononuclear cells in jaundiced neonates. Likewise

  12. Low-Light Dependence of the Magnetic Field Effect on Cryptochromes: Possible Relevance to Plant Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Vanderstraeten, Jacques; Gailly, Philippe; Malkemper, E. Pascal

    2018-01-01

    Various responses to static magnetic fields (MF) have been reported in plants, and it has been suggested that the geomagnetic field influences plant physiology. Accordingly, diverse mechanisms have been proposed to mediate MF effects in plants. The currently most probable sensor candidates are cryptochromes (Cry) which are sensitive to submillitesla MF. Here, we propose a quantitative approach of the MF effect on Cry depending on light intensity, and try to link it to a possible functional role for magnetic sensitivity in plants. Based on a theoretical evaluation and on a review of relevant data on Arabidopsis thaliana Cry 1, we point out that the MF effect on the signaling state of Cry, as well as the possible consequences of that effect on certain phenotypes (growth in particular) show parallel dependences on light intensity, being most prominent at low light levels. Based on these findings, we propose that Cry magnetosensitivity in plants could represent an ecological adaptation which regulates the amount of Cry signaling state under low light conditions. That hypothesis would preferentially be tested by studying sensitive and specific endpoints, such as the expression of clock proteins that are downregulated by Cry, but under light intensities lower than those used so far. Finally, we highlight that the low-light dependence of the MF effect described here could also apply to light-dependent functions of animal Cry, in particular magnetoreception which, from the present evaluation, would be based on the magnetic sensitivity of the photoreduction reaction, like in plants. PMID:29491873

  13. Birds

    Jared Verner; Edward C. Beedy; Stephen L. Granholm; Lyman V. Ritter; Edward F. Toth

    1980-01-01

    This chapter offers information on the status, distribution (by habitat type and seral stage), and basic life history for each of 208 species of birds that are found in the western Sierra Nevada. Many of the data came from the literature, altl)ough the professional ornithologists involved with this project drew upon extensive personal experience with birds in the...

  14. Magnetite-based Magnetoreception in Animals: 25+ Years of Theory & Experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Walker, M. M.

    2005-12-01

    Living organisms ranging from bacteria through higher vertebrates rely on orientation, navigation, and homing to survive. Any sensory cue that enhances these behaviors will be subject to intense natural selection over geological time. Reproducible behavioral responses to earth-strength magnetic fields(1) have been documented in Bacteria, Protoctists, and in nearly every major group of animals, and are possibly also present in the Archaea. Several groups of animals, including birds and cetaceans, respond behaviorally to magnetic anomalies below 100 nT in magnitude, implying that their magnetoreception ability approaches the thermal noise limit. This approach to thermal noise is commonly observed in other sensory systems, including hearing, olfaction, and electroreception. The hypothesis of magnetite-based magnetoreception(2) is the only theory proposed so far that is capable of explaining all of the magnetic behavioral data. Tiny crystals of single-domain magnetite (or in some bacteria, greigite) rotate the cells of microorganisms passively like a simple compass needle. The initial detection of biogenic magnetite with rock magnetic techniques in birds and bees over 25 years ago has led progressively to the identification of a group of specialized cells in fish and birds which contain organized magnetite-containing structures. In these animals (and presumably all vertebrates) magnetic signals are transmitted to the brain via the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve(3, 4). Experiments with pulse-remagnetization, like those that convert North-seeking bacteria into South-seekers, have dramatic effects on animal behavior, confirming the role of magnetite in the sensory system. This is therefore a general mechanism for a highly sensitive magnetic sense, the origin of which probably dates to the ancestral metazoan, and perhaps earlier. The largest debate presently occurring in the field concerns the interpretation of magnetic compass responses that vary with intensity

  15. Identification of Small Molecule Activators of Cryptochrome

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, Tsuyoshi; Lee, Jae Wook; St. John, Peter C.; Sawa, Mariko; Iwaisako, Keiko; Noguchi, Takako; Pongsawakul, Pagkapol Y.; Sonntag, Tim; Welsh, David K.; Brenner, David A.; Doyle, Francis J.; Schultz, Peter G.; Kay, Steve A.

    2013-01-01

    Impairment of the circadian clock has been associated with numerous disorders, including metabolic disease. Although small molecules that modulate clock function might offer therapeutic approaches to such diseases, only a few compound have been identified that selectively target core clock proteins. From an unbiased cell-based circadian screen, we identified KL001, a small molecule that specifically interacts with cryptochrome (CRY). KL001 prevented ubiquitin-dependent degradation of CRY, resulting in lengthening of the circadian period. In combination with mathematical modeling, KL001 revealed that CRY1 and CRY2 share a similar functional role in the period regulation. Furthermore, KL001- mediated CRY stabilization inhibited glucagon-induced gluconeogenesis in primary hepatocytes. KL001 thus provides a tool to study the regulation of CRY-dependent physiology and aid development of clock-based therapeutics of diabetes. PMID:22798407

  16. Bioinspired magnetoreception and navigation using magnetic signatures as waypoints.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brian K

    2018-05-15

    Diverse taxa use Earth's magnetic field in conjunction with other sensory modalities to accomplish navigation tasks ranging from local homing to long-distance migration across continents and ocean basins. However, despite extensive research, the mechanisms that underlie animal magnetoreception are not clearly understood, and how animals use Earth's magnetic field to navigate is an active area of investigation. Concurrently, Earth's magnetic field offers a signal that engineered systems can leverage for navigation in environments where man-made systems such as GPS are unavailable or unreliable. Using a proxy for Earth's magnetic field, and inspired by migratory animal behavior, this work implements a behavioral strategy that uses combinations of magnetic field properties as rare or unique signatures that mark specific locations. Using a discrete number of these signatures as goal waypoints, the strategy navigates through a closed set of points several times in a variety of environmental conditions, and with various levels of sensor noise. The results from this engineering/quantitative biology approach support existing notions that some animals may use combinations of magnetic properties as navigational markers, and provides insights into features and constraints that would enable navigational success or failure. The findings also offer insights into how autonomous engineered platforms might be designed to leverage the magnetic field as a navigational resource.

  17. Cryptochrome Mediates Light-Dependent Magnetosensitivity of Drosophila's Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Yoshii, Taishi; Ahmad, Margaret; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Since 1960, magnetic fields have been discussed as Zeitgebers for circadian clocks, but the mechanism by which clocks perceive and process magnetic information has remained unknown. Recently, the radical-pair model involving light-activated photoreceptors as magnetic field sensors has gained considerable support, and the blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome (CRY) has been proposed as a suitable molecule to mediate such magnetosensitivity. Since CRY is expressed in the circadian clock neurons and acts as a critical photoreceptor of Drosophila's clock, we aimed to test the role of CRY in magnetosensitivity of the circadian clock. In response to light, CRY causes slowing of the clock, ultimately leading to arrhythmic behavior. We expected that in the presence of applied magnetic fields, the impact of CRY on clock rhythmicity should be altered. Furthermore, according to the radical-pair hypothesis this response should be dependent on wavelength and on the field strength applied. We tested the effect of applied static magnetic fields on the circadian clock and found that flies exposed to these fields indeed showed enhanced slowing of clock rhythms. This effect was maximal at 300 μT, and reduced at both higher and lower field strengths. Clock response to magnetic fields was present in blue light, but absent under red-light illumination, which does not activate CRY. Furthermore, cryb and cryOUT mutants did not show any response, and flies overexpressing CRY in the clock neurons exhibited an enhanced response to the field. We conclude that Drosophila's circadian clock is sensitive to magnetic fields and that this sensitivity depends on light activation of CRY and on the applied field strength, consistent with the radical pair mechanism. CRY is widespread throughout biological systems and has been suggested as receptor for magnetic compass orientation in migratory birds. The present data establish the circadian clock of Drosophila as a model system for CRY

  18. Structure of Full-length Drosophila Cryptochrome

    PubMed Central

    Zoltowski, Brian D.; Vaidya, Anand T.; Top, Deniz; Widom, Joanne; Young, Michael W.; Crane, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    The Cryptochrome/Photolyase (CRY/PL) family of photoreceptors mediates adaptive responses to UV and blue light exposure in all kingdoms of life 1; 2; 3; 4; 5. Whereas PLs function predominantly in DNA repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs)and 6-4 photolesions caused by UV radiation, CRYs transduce signals important for growth, development, magnetosensitivity and circadian clocks1; 2; 3; 4; 5. Despite these diverse functions, PLs/CRYs preserve a common structural fold, a dependence on flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and an internal photoactivation mechanism3; 6. However, members of the CRY/PL family differ in the substrates recognized (protein or DNA), photochemical reactions catalyzed and involvement of an antenna cofactor. It is largely unknown how the animal CRYs that regulate circadian rhythms act on their substrates. CRYs contain a variable C-terminal tail that appends the conserved PL homology domain (PHD) and is important for function 7; 8; 9; 10; 11; 12. Herein, we report a 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of Drosophila CRY with an intact C-terminus. The C-terminal helix docks in the analogous groove that binds DNA substrates in PLs. Conserved Trp536 juts into the CRY catalytic center to mimic PL recognition of DNA photolesions. The FAD anionic semiquinone found in the crystals assumes a conformation to facilitate restructuring of the tail helix. These results help reconcile the diverse functions of the CRY/PL family by demonstrating how conserved protein architecture, and photochemistry can be elaborated into a range of light-driven functions. PMID:22080955

  19. Birds, Birds, Birds!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Ranger Rick's Nature Scope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. Contents are organized into the following sections: (1) "What Makes a Bird a Bird?," which…

  20. Magnetic Orientation in Birds and Other Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    The use of the geomagnetic field for compass orientation is widespread among animals, with two types of magnetic compass mechanisms described: an shape inclination compass in birds, turtles and salamanders and a shape polarity compass in arthropods, fishes and mammals. Additionally, some vertebrates appear to derive positional information from the total intensity and/or inclination of the geomagnetic field. For magnetoreception by animals, two models are currently discussed, the shape Radical Pair model assuming light-dependent processes by specialized photopigments, and the shape Magnetite hypothesis proposing magnetoreception by crystals of magnetite, Fe304. Behavioral experiments with migratory birds, testing them under monochromatic lights and subjecting them to a brief, strong pulse that could reverse the magnetization of magnetite particles, produced evidence for both mechanisms. However, monochromatic lights affect old, experienced and young birds alike, whereas the pulse affects only experienced birds, leaving young, inexperienced birds unaffected. These observations suggest that a radical pair mechanism provides birds with directional information for their innate magnetic compass and a magnetite-based mechanism possibly mediates information about total intensity for indicating position.

  1. Purification and Characterization of the Danaus Plexippus Cryptochromes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    It was also recently discovered that Apis 13 mellifera (honey bee) possess only one mCry-like cryptochrome (28). Additional components of the honey...and phylogenetic analyses reveal mammalian-like clockwork in the honey bee ( Apis mellifera ) and shed new light on the molecular evolution of the

  2. Chemically induced and light-independent cryptochrome photoreceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeldt, Gesa; Viana, Rafael Muñoz; Mootz, Henning D; von Arnim, Albrecht G; Batschauer, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    The cryptochrome photoreceptors of higher plants are dimeric proteins. Their N-terminal photosensory domain mediates dimerization, and the unique C-terminal extension (CCT) mediates signaling. We made use of the human FK506-binding protein (FKBP) that binds with high affinity to rapamycin or rapamycin analogs (rapalogs). The FKBP-rapamycin complex is recognized by another protein, FRB, thus allowing rapamycin-induced dimerization of two target proteins. Here we demonstrate by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays the applicability of this regulated dimerization system to plants. Furthermore, we show that fusion proteins consisting of the C-terminal domain of Arabidopsis cryptochrome 2 fused to FKBP and FRB and coexpressed in Arabidopsis cells specifically induce the expression of cryptochrome-controlled reporter and endogenous genes in darkness upon incubation with the rapalog. These results demonstrate that the activation of cryptochrome signal transduction can be chemically induced in a dose-dependent fashion and uncoupled from the light signal, and provide the groundwork for gain-of-function experiments to study specifically the role of photoreceptors in darkness or in signaling cross-talk even under light conditions that activate members of all photoreceptor families.

  3. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremers, Dorothee; López Marulanda, Juliana; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2014-11-01

    Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation/navigation in some terrestrial and aquatic species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans' migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking. Here, we tested the spontaneous response of six captive bottlenose dolphins to the presentation of two magnetized and demagnetized controlled devices while they were swimming freely. Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation.

  4. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Kremers, Dorothee; López Marulanda, Juliana; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2014-11-01

    Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation/navigation in some terrestrial and aquatic species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans' migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking. Here, we tested the spontaneous response of six captive bottlenose dolphins to the presentation of two magnetized and demagnetized controlled devices while they were swimming freely. Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation.

  5. Avian magnetite-based magnetoreception: a physiologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cadiou, Hervé; McNaughton, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    It is now well established that animals use the Earth's magnetic field to perform long-distance migration and other navigational tasks. However, the transduction mechanisms that allow the conversion of magnetic field variations into an electric signal by specialized sensory cells remain largely unknown. Among the species that have been shown to sense Earth-strength magnetic fields, birds have been a model of choice since behavioural tests show that their direction-finding abilities are strongly influenced by magnetic fields. Magnetite, a ferromagnetic mineral, has been found in a wide range of organisms, from bacteria to vertebrates. In birds, both superparamagnetic (SPM) and single-domain magnetite have been found to be associated with the trigeminal nerve. Electrophysiological recordings from cells in the trigeminal ganglion have shown an increase in action potential firing in response to magnetic field changes. More recently, histological evidence has demonstrated the presence of SPM magnetite in the subcutis of the pigeon's upper beak. The aims of the present review are to review the evidence for a magnetite-based mechanism in birds and to introduce physiological concepts in order to refine the proposed models. PMID:20106875

  6. A novel concept of Fe-mineral-based magnetoreception: histological and physicochemical data from the upper beak of homing pigeons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleissner, Gerta; Stahl, Branko; Thalau, Peter; Falkenberg, Gerald; Fleissner, Günther

    2007-08-01

    Animals make use of the Earth’s magnetic field for navigation and regulation of vegetative functions; however, the anatomical and physiological basis for the magnetic sense has not been elucidated yet. Our recent results from histology and X-ray analyses support the hypothesis that delicate iron-containing structures in the skin of the upper beak of homing pigeons might serve as a biological magnetometer. Histology has revealed various iron sites within dendrites of the trigeminal nerve, their arrangement along strands of axons, the existence of three dendritic fields in each side of the beak with specific 3D-orientations, and the bilateral symmetry of the whole system. Element mapping by micro-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence analysis has shown the distribution of iron and its quantities. Micro-synchrotron X-ray absorption near-edge-structure spectroscopy has allowed us to unambiguously identify maghemite as the predominating iron mineral (90 vs 10% magnetite). In this paper, we show that iron-based magnetoreception needs the presence of both of these iron minerals, their specific dimensions, shapes, and arrangements in three different subcellular compartments. We suggest that an inherent magnetic enhancement process via an iron-crusted vesicle and the attached chains of iron platelets might be sufficient to account for the sensitivity and specificity required by such a magnetoreceptor. The appropriate alignment between the Earth’s magnetic field and the maghemite bands would induce a multiple attraction of the magnetite bullets perpendicular to the membrane, thus, triggering strain-sensitive membrane channels and a primary receptor potential. Due to its 3D architecture and physicochemical nature, the dendritic system should be able to separately sense the three vector components of the Earth’s local field, simultaneously—allowing birds to detect their geographic position by the magnetic vector, i.e., amplitude and direction of the local magnetic field

  7. Could Magnetic Fields Affect the Circadian Clock Function of Cryptochromes? Testing the Basic Premise of the Cryptochrome Hypothesis (ELF Magnetic Fields).

    PubMed

    Vanderstraeten, Jacques; Burda, Hynek; Verschaeve, Luc; De Brouwer, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    It has been suggested that weak 50/60 Hz [extremely low frequency (ELF)] magnetic fields (MF) could affect circadian biorhythms by disrupting the clock function of cryptochromes (the "cryptochrome hypothesis," currently under study). That hypothesis is based on the premise that weak (Earth strength) static magnetic fields affect the redox balance of cryptochromes, thus possibly their signaling state as well. An appropriate method for testing this postulate could be real time or short-term study of the circadian clock function of retinal cryptochromes under exposure to the static field intensities that elicit the largest redox changes (maximal "low field" and "high field" effects, respectively) compared to zero field. Positive results might encourage further study of the cryptochrome hypothesis itself. However, they would indicate the need for performing a similar study, this time comparing the effects of only slight intensity changes (low field range) in order to explore the possible role of the proximity of metal structures and furniture as a confounder under the cryptochrome hypothesis.

  8. CRYPTOCHROME mediates behavioral executive choice in response to UV light

    PubMed Central

    Baik, Lisa S.; Fogle, Keri J.; Roberts, Logan; Galschiodt, Alexis M.; Chevez, Joshua A.; Recinos, Yocelyn; Nguy, Vinh; Holmes, Todd C.

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster CRYPTOCHROME (CRY) mediates behavioral and electrophysiological responses to blue light coded by circadian and arousal neurons. However, spectroscopic and biochemical assays of heterologously expressed CRY suggest that CRY may mediate functional responses to UV-A (ultraviolet A) light as well. To determine the relative contributions of distinct phototransduction systems, we tested mutants lacking CRY and mutants with disrupted opsin-based phototransduction for behavioral and electrophysiological responses to UV light. CRY and opsin-based external photoreceptor systems cooperate for UV light-evoked acute responses. CRY mediates behavioral avoidance responses related to executive choice, consistent with its expression in central brain neurons. PMID:28062690

  9. Action spectrum for cryptochrome-dependent hypocotyl growth inhibition in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Margaret; Grancher, Nicholas; Heil, Mary; Black, Robert C; Giovani, Baldissera; Galland, Paul; Lardemer, Danielle

    2002-06-01

    Cryptochrome blue-light photoreceptors are found in both plants and animals and have been implicated in numerous developmental and circadian signaling pathways. Nevertheless, no action spectrum for a physiological response shown to be entirely under the control of cryptochrome has been reported. In this work, an action spectrum was determined in vivo for a cryptochrome-mediated high-irradiance response, the blue-light-dependent inhibition of hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis. Comparison of growth of wild-type, cry1cry2 cryptochrome-deficient double mutants, and cryptochrome-overexpressing seedlings demonstrated that responsivity to monochromatic light sources within the range of 390 to 530 nm results from the activity of cryptochrome with no other photoreceptor having a significant primary role at the fluence range tested. In both green- and norflurazon-treated (chlorophyll-deficient) seedlings, cryptochrome activity is fairly uniform throughout its range of maximal response (390-480 nm), with no sharply defined peak at 450 nm; however, activity at longer wavelengths was disproportionately enhanced in CRY1-overexpressing seedlings as compared with wild type. The action spectrum does not correlate well with the absorption spectra either of purified recombinant cryptochrome photoreceptor or to that of a second class of blue-light photoreceptor, phototropin (PHOT1 and PHOT2). Photoreceptor concentration as determined by western-blot analysis showed a greater stability of CRY2 protein under the monochromatic light conditions used in this study as compared with broad band blue light, suggesting a complex mechanism of photoreceptor activation. The possible role of additional photoreceptors (in particular phytochrome A) in cryptochrome responses is discussed.

  10. Linking magnetite in the abdomen of honey bees to a magnetoreceptive function

    PubMed Central

    Lambinet, Veronika; Hayden, Michael E.; Reigl, Katharina; Gomis, Surath

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies of magnetoreception in honey bees, Apis mellifera, focused on the identification of magnetic material, its formation, the location of the receptor and potential underlying sensory mechanisms, but never directly linked magnetic material to a magnetoreceptive function. In our study, we demonstrate that ferromagnetic material consistent with magnetite plays an integral role in the bees' magnetoreceptor. Subjecting lyophilized and pelletized bee tagmata to analyses by a superconducting quantum interference device generated a distinct hysteresis loop for the abdomen but not for the thorax or the head of bees, indicating the presence of ferromagnetic material in the bee abdomen. Magnetic remanence of abdomen pellets produced from bees that were, or were not, exposed to the 2.2-kOe field of a magnet while alive differed, indicating that magnet exposure altered the magnetization of this magnetite in live bees. In behavioural two-choice field experiments, bees briefly exposed to the same magnet, but not sham-treated control bees, failed to sense a custom-generated magnetic anomaly, indicating that magnet exposure had rendered the bees' magnetoreceptor dysfunctional. Our data support the conclusion that honey bees possess a magnetite-based magnetoreceptor located in the abdomen. PMID:28330921

  11. Linking magnetite in the abdomen of honey bees to a magnetoreceptive function.

    PubMed

    Lambinet, Veronika; Hayden, Michael E; Reigl, Katharina; Gomis, Surath; Gries, Gerhard

    2017-03-29

    Previous studies of magnetoreception in honey bees, Apis mellifera , focused on the identification of magnetic material, its formation, the location of the receptor and potential underlying sensory mechanisms, but never directly linked magnetic material to a magnetoreceptive function. In our study, we demonstrate that ferromagnetic material consistent with magnetite plays an integral role in the bees' magnetoreceptor. Subjecting lyophilized and pelletized bee tagmata to analyses by a superconducting quantum interference device generated a distinct hysteresis loop for the abdomen but not for the thorax or the head of bees, indicating the presence of ferromagnetic material in the bee abdomen. Magnetic remanence of abdomen pellets produced from bees that were, or were not, exposed to the 2.2-kOe field of a magnet while alive differed, indicating that magnet exposure altered the magnetization of this magnetite in live bees. In behavioural two-choice field experiments, bees briefly exposed to the same magnet, but not sham-treated control bees, failed to sense a custom-generated magnetic anomaly, indicating that magnet exposure had rendered the bees' magnetoreceptor dysfunctional. Our data support the conclusion that honey bees possess a magnetite-based magnetoreceptor located in the abdomen. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. Effect of magnetic pulses on Caribbean spiny lobsters: implications for magnetoreception.

    PubMed

    Ernst, David A; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2016-06-15

    The Caribbean spiny lobster, Panulirus argus, is a migratory crustacean that uses Earth's magnetic field as a navigational cue, but how these lobsters detect magnetic fields is not known. Magnetic material thought to be magnetite has previously been detected in spiny lobsters, but its role in magnetoreception, if any, remains unclear. As a first step toward investigating whether lobsters might have magnetite-based magnetoreceptors, we subjected lobsters to strong, pulsed magnetic fields capable of reversing the magnetic dipole moment of biogenic magnetite crystals. Lobsters were subjected to a single pulse directed from posterior to anterior and either: (1) parallel to the horizontal component of the geomagnetic field (i.e. toward magnetic north); or (2) antiparallel to the horizontal field (i.e. toward magnetic south). An additional control group was handled but not subjected to a magnetic pulse. After treatment, each lobster was tethered in a water-filled arena located within 200 m of the capture location and allowed to walk in any direction. Control lobsters walked in seemingly random directions and were not significantly oriented as a group. In contrast, the two groups exposed to pulsed fields were significantly oriented in approximately opposite directions. Lobsters subjected to a magnetic pulse applied parallel to the geomagnetic horizontal component walked westward; those subjected to a pulse directed antiparallel to the geomagnetic horizontal component oriented approximately northeast. The finding that a magnetic pulse alters subsequent orientation behavior is consistent with the hypothesis that magnetoreception in spiny lobsters is based at least partly on magnetite-based magnetoreceptors. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. A cryptochrome-like protein is involved in the regulation of photosynthesis genes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Hendrischk, Anne-Kathrin; Frühwirth, Sebastian Walter; Moldt, Julia; Pokorny, Richard; Metz, Sebastian; Kaiser, Gebhard; Jäger, Andreas; Batschauer, Alfred; Klug, Gabriele

    2009-11-01

    Blue light receptors belonging to the cryptochrome/photolyase family are found in all kingdoms of life. The functions of photolyases in repair of UV-damaged DNA as well as of cryptochromes in the light-dependent regulation of photomorphogenetic processes and in the circadian clock in plants and animals are well analysed. In prokaryotes, the only role of members of this protein family that could be demonstrated is DNA repair. Recently, we identified a gene for a cryptochrome-like protein (CryB) in the alpha-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The protein lacks the typical C-terminal extension of cryptochromes, and is not related to the Cry DASH family. Here we demonstrate that CryB binds flavin adenine dinucleotide that can be photoreduced by blue light. CryB binds single-stranded DNA with very high affinity (K(d) approximately 10(-8) M) but double-stranded DNA and single-stranded RNA with far lower affinity (K(d) approximately 10(-6) M). Despite of that, no in vitro repair activity for pyrimidine dimers in single-stranded DNA could be detected. However, we show that CryB clearly affects the expression of genes for pigment-binding proteins and consequently the amount of photosynthetic complexes in R. sphaeroides. Thus, for the first time a role of a bacterial cryptochrome in gene regulation together with a biological function is demonstrated.

  14. A Cryptochrome 2 mutation yields advanced sleep phase in humans.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Arisa; Shi, Guangsen; Jones, Christopher R; Lipzen, Anna; Pennacchio, Len A; Xu, Ying; Hallows, William C; McMahon, Thomas; Yamazaki, Maya; Ptáček, Louis J; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2016-08-16

    Familial Advanced Sleep Phase (FASP) is a heritable human sleep phenotype characterized by very early sleep and wake times. We identified a missense mutation in the human Cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) gene that co-segregates with FASP in one family. The mutation leads to replacement of an alanine residue at position 260 with a threonine (A260T). In mice, the CRY2 mutation causes a shortened circadian period and reduced phase-shift to early-night light pulse associated with phase-advanced behavioral rhythms in the light-dark cycle. The A260T mutation is located in the phosphate loop of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding domain of CRY2. The mutation alters the conformation of CRY2, increasing its accessibility and affinity for FBXL3 (an E3 ubiquitin ligase), thus promoting its degradation. These results demonstrate that CRY2 stability controlled by FBXL3 plays a key role in the regulation of human sleep wake behavior.

  15. A novel cryptochrome-dependent oscillator in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Nsa, Imade Y; Karunarathna, Nirmala; Liu, Xiaoguang; Huang, Howard; Boetteger, Brittni; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the circadian clock is constructed of multiple molecular feedback oscillators that function to generate robust rhythms in organisms. However, while core oscillator mechanisms driving specific behaviors are well described in several model systems, the nature of other potential circadian oscillators is not understood. Using genetic approaches in the fungus Neurospora crassa, we uncovered an oscillator mechanism that drives rhythmic spore development in the absence of the well-characterized FRQ/WCC oscillator (FWO) and in constant light, conditions under which the FWO is not functional. While this novel oscillator does not require the FWO for activity, it does require the blue-light photoreceptor CRYPTOCHROME (CRY); thus, we call it the CRY-dependent oscillator (CDO). The CDO was uncovered in a strain carrying a mutation in cog-1 (cry-dependent oscillator gate-1), has a period of ∼1 day in constant light, and is temperature-compensated. In addition, cog-1 cells lacking the circadian blue-light photoreceptor WC-1 respond to blue light, suggesting that alternate light inputs function in cog-1 mutant cells. We show that the blue-light photoreceptors VIVID and CRY compensate for each other and for WC-1 in CRY-dependent oscillator light responses, but that WC-1 is necessary for circadian light entrainment. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. A Novel Cryptochrome-Dependent Oscillator in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Nsa, Imade Y.; Karunarathna, Nirmala; Liu, Xiaoguang; Huang, Howard; Boetteger, Brittni; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the circadian clock is constructed of multiple molecular feedback oscillators that function to generate robust rhythms in organisms. However, while core oscillator mechanisms driving specific behaviors are well described in several model systems, the nature of other potential circadian oscillators is not understood. Using genetic approaches in the fungus Neurospora crassa, we uncovered an oscillator mechanism that drives rhythmic spore development in the absence of the well-characterized FRQ/WCC oscillator (FWO) and in constant light, conditions under which the FWO is not functional. While this novel oscillator does not require the FWO for activity, it does require the blue-light photoreceptor CRYPTOCHROME (CRY); thus, we call it the CRY-dependent oscillator (CDO). The CDO was uncovered in a strain carrying a mutation in cog-1 (cry-dependent oscillator gate-1), has a period of ∼1 day in constant light, and is temperature-compensated. In addition, cog-1 cells lacking the circadian blue-light photoreceptor WC-1 respond to blue light, suggesting that alternate light inputs function in cog-1 mutant cells. We show that the blue-light photoreceptors VIVID and CRY compensate for each other and for WC-1 in CRY-dependent oscillator light responses, but that WC-1 is necessary for circadian light entrainment. PMID:25361899

  17. FAD Regulates CRYPTOCHROME Protein Stability and Circadian Clock in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Arisa; Braas, Daniel; Fu, Ying-Hui; Ptáček, Louis J

    2017-04-11

    The circadian clock generates biological rhythms of metabolic and physiological processes, including the sleep-wake cycle. We previously identified a missense mutation in the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding pocket of CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2), a clock protein that causes human advanced sleep phase. This prompted us to examine the role of FAD as a mediator of the clock and metabolism. FAD stabilized CRY proteins, leading to increased protein levels. In contrast, knockdown of Riboflavin kinase (Rfk), an FAD biosynthetic enzyme, enhanced CRY degradation. RFK protein levels and FAD concentrations oscillate in the nucleus, suggesting that they are subject to circadian control. Knockdown of Rfk combined with a riboflavin-deficient diet altered the CRY levels in mouse liver and the expression profiles of clock and clock-controlled genes (especially those related to metabolism including glucose homeostasis). We conclude that light-independent mechanisms of FAD regulate CRY and contribute to proper circadian oscillation of metabolic genes in mammals. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C.; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F.; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W.; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa. Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  19. The Cryptochrome/Photolyase Family in aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, Paola; Fortunato, Antonio E; Petrone, Libero; Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Yuri; Todo, Takeshi; Antonova, Olga; Arboleda, Enrique; Zantke, Juliane; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin; Falciatore, Angela

    2014-04-01

    The Cryptochrome/Photolyase Family (CPF) represents an ancient group of widely distributed UV-A/blue-light sensitive proteins sharing common structures and chromophores. During the course of evolution, different CPFs acquired distinct functions in DNA repair, light perception and circadian clock regulation. Previous phylogenetic analyses of the CPF have allowed reconstruction of the evolution and distribution of the different CPF super-classes in the tree of life. However, so far only limited information is available from the CPF orthologs in aquatic organisms that evolved in environments harboring great diversity of life forms and showing peculiar light distribution and rhythms. To gain new insights into the evolutionary and functional relationships within the CPF family, we performed a detailed study of CPF members from marine (diatoms, sea urchin and annelid) and freshwater organisms (teleost) that populate diverse habitats and exhibit different life strategies. In particular, we first extended the CPF family phylogeny by including genes from aquatic organisms representative of several branches of the tree of life. Our analysis identifies four major super-classes of CPF proteins and importantly singles out the presence of a plant-like CRY in diatoms and in metazoans. Moreover, we show a dynamic evolution of Cpf genes in eukaryotes with various events of gene duplication coupled to functional diversification and gene loss, which have shaped the complex array of Cpf genes in extant aquatic organisms. Second, we uncover clear rhythmic diurnal expression patterns and light-dependent regulation for the majority of the analyzed Cpf genes in our reference species. Our analyses reconstruct the molecular evolution of the CPF family in eukaryotes and provide a solid foundation for a systematic characterization of novel light activated proteins in aquatic environments. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. A Study of Gibberellin Homeostasis and Cryptochrome-Mediated Blue Light Inhibition of Hypocotyl Elongation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoying; Yu, Xuhong; Foo, Eloise; Symons, Gregory M.; Lopez, Javier; Bendehakkalu, Krishnaprasad T.; Xiang, Jing; Weller, James L.; Liu, Xuanming; Reid, James B.; Lin, Chentao

    2007-01-01

    Cryptochromes mediate blue light-dependent photomorphogenic responses, such as inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. To investigate the underlying mechanism, we analyzed a genetic suppressor, scc7-D (suppressors of cry1cry2), which suppressed the long-hypocotyl phenotype of the cry1cry2 (cryptochrome1/cryptochrome2) mutant in a light-dependent but wavelength-independent manner. scc7-D is a gain-of-expression allele of the GA2ox8 gene encoding a gibberellin (GA)-inactivating enzyme, GA 2-oxidase. Although scc7-D is hypersensitive to light, transgenic seedlings expressing GA2ox at a level higher than scc7-D showed a constitutive photomorphogenic phenotype, confirming a general role of GA2ox and GA in the suppression of hypocotyl elongation. Prompted by this result, we investigated blue light regulation of mRNA expression of the GA metabolic and catabolic genes. We demonstrated that cryptochromes are required for the blue light regulation of GA2ox1, GA20ox1, and GA3ox1 expression in transient induction, continuous illumination, and photoperiodic conditions. The kinetics of cryptochrome induction of GA2ox1 expression and cryptochrome suppression of GA20ox1 or GA3ox1 expression correlate with the cryptochrome-dependent transient reduction of GA4 in etiolated wild-type seedlings exposed to blue light. Therefore we propose that in deetiolating seedlings, cryptochromes mediate blue light regulation of GA catabolic/metabolic genes, which affect GA levels and hypocotyl elongation. Surprisingly, no significant change in the GA4 content was detected in the whole shoot samples of the wild-type or cry1cry2 seedlings grown in the dark or continuous blue light, suggesting that cryptochromes may also regulate GA responsiveness and/or trigger cell- or tissue-specific changes of the level of bioactive GAs. PMID:17644628

  1. Cryptochrome-1 expression: a new prognostic marker in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lewintre, Eloisa Jantus; Martín, Cristina Reinoso; Ballesteros, Carlos García; Montaner, David; Rivera, Rosa Farrás; Mayans, José Ramón; García-Conde, Javier

    2009-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an adult-onset leukemia with a heterogeneous clinical behavior. When chronic lymphocytic leukemia cases were divided on the basis of IgV(H) mutational status, widely differing clinical courses were revealed. Since IgV(H) sequencing is difficult to perform in a routine diagnostic laboratory, finding a surrogate for IgV(H) mutational status seems an important priority. In the present study, we proposed the use of Cryptochrome-1 as a new prognostic marker in early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Seventy patients (Binet stage A, without treatment) were included in the study. We correlated Cryptochrome-1 mRNA with well established prognostic markers such as IgV(H) mutations, ZAP70, LPL or CD38 expression and chromosomal abnormalities. High Cryptochrome-1 expression correlated with IgV(H) unmutated samples. In addition, Cryptochrome-1 was a valuable predictor of disease progression in early-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia, therefore it can be introduced in clinical practice with the advantage of a simplified method of quantification.

  2. Molecular basis for blue light-dependent phosphorylation of Arabidopsis cryptochrome 2

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Qin; Deng, Weixian; Wang, Xu; Piao, Mingxin; Cai, Dawei; Li, Yaxing; Barshop, William D.; Yu, Xiaolan; Zhou, Tingting; Liu, Bin; Oka, Yoshito; Wohlschlegel, James; Zuo, Zecheng; Lin, Chentao

    2017-01-01

    Plant cryptochromes undergo blue light-dependent phosphorylation to regulate their activity and abundance, but the protein kinases that phosphorylate plant cryptochromes have remained unclear. Here we show that photoexcited Arabidopsis cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) is phosphorylated in vivo on as many as 24 different residues, including 7 major phosphoserines. We demonstrate that four closely related Photoregulatory Protein Kinases (previously referred to as MUT9-like kinases) interact with and phosphorylate photoexcited CRY2. Analyses of the ppk123 and ppk124 triple mutants and amiR4k artificial microRNA-expressing lines demonstrate that PPKs catalyse blue light-dependent CRY2 phosphorylation to both activate and destabilize the photoreceptor. Phenotypic analyses of these mutant lines indicate that PPKs may have additional substrates, including those involved in the phytochrome signal transduction pathway. These results reveal a mechanism underlying the co-action of cryptochromes and phytochromes to coordinate plant growth and development in response to different wavelengths of solar radiation in nature. PMID:28492234

  3. The Bird.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, Jean

    2001-01-01

    Students use a dead bird to learn about bird life, anatomy, and death. Students examine a bird body and discuss what happened to the bird. Uses outdoor education as a resource for learning about animals. (SAH)

  4. Lateralization of magnetic compass orientation in a migratory bird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Traudt, Joachim; Güntürkün, Onur; Prior, Helmut; Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2002-10-01

    Lateralization of brain functions, once believed to be a human characteristic, has now been found to be widespread among vertebrates. In birds, asymmetries of visual functions are well studied, with each hemisphere being specialized for different tasks. Here we report lateralized functions of the birds' visual system associated with magnetoperception, resulting in an extreme asymmetry of sensing the direction of the magnetic field. We found that captive migrants tested in cages with the magnetic field as the only available orientation cue were well oriented in their appropriate migratory direction when using their right eye only, but failed to show a significant directional preference when using their left eye. This implies that magnetoreception for compass orientation, assumed to take place in the eyes alongside the visual processes, is strongly lateralized, with a marked dominance of the right eye/left brain hemisphere.

  5. Light-Responsive Cryptochromes from a Simple Multicellular Animal, the Coral Acropora millepora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, O.; Appelbaum, L.; Leggat, W.; Gothlif, Y.; Hayward, D. C.; Miller, D. J.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.

    2007-10-01

    Hundreds of species of reef-building corals spawn synchronously over a few nights each year, and moonlight regulates this spawning event. However, the molecular elements underpinning the detection of moonlight remain unknown. Here we report the presence of an ancient family of blue-light-sensing photoreceptors, cryptochromes, in the reef-building coral Acropora millepora. In addition to being cryptochrome genes from one of the earliest-diverging eumetazoan phyla, cry1 and cry2 were expressed preferentially in light. Consistent with potential roles in the synchronization of fundamentally important behaviors such as mass spawning, cry2 expression increased on full moon nights versus new moon nights. Our results demonstrate phylogenetically broad roles of these ancient circadian clock-related molecules in the animal kingdom.

  6. A Plant Cryptochrome Controls Key Features of the Chlamydomonas Circadian Clock and Its Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Müller, Nico; Wenzel, Sandra; Zou, Yong; Künzel, Sandra; Sasso, Severin; Weiß, Daniel; Prager, Katja; Grossman, Arthur; Kottke, Tilman; Mittag, Maria

    2017-05-01

    Cryptochromes are flavin-binding proteins that act as blue light receptors in bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects and are components of the circadian oscillator in mammals. Animal and plant cryptochromes are evolutionarily divergent, although the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii ( Chlamydomonas throughout) has both an animal-like cryptochrome and a plant cryptochrome (pCRY; formerly designated CPH1). Here, we show that the pCRY protein accumulates at night as part of a complex. Functional characterization of pCRY was performed based on an insertional mutant that expresses only 11% of the wild-type pCRY level. The pcry mutant is defective for central properties of the circadian clock. In the mutant, the period is lengthened significantly, ultimately resulting in arrhythmicity, while blue light-based phase shifts show large deviations from what is observed in wild-type cells. We also show that pCRY is involved in gametogenesis in Chlamydomonas pCRY is down-regulated in pregametes and gametes, and in the pcry mutant, there is altered transcript accumulation under blue light of the strictly light-dependent, gamete-specific gene GAS28 pCRY acts as a negative regulator for the induction of mating ability in the light and for the loss of mating ability in the dark. Moreover, pCRY is necessary for light-dependent germination, during which the zygote undergoes meiosis that gives rise to four vegetative cells. In sum, our data demonstrate that pCRY is a key blue light receptor in Chlamydomonas that is involved in both circadian timing and life cycle progression. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Second Positive Phototropism Results from Coordinated Co-Action of the Phototropins and Cryptochromes1

    PubMed Central

    Whippo, Craig W.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    Phototropism and hypocotyl growth inhibition are modulated by the coaction of different blue-light photoreceptors and their signaling pathways. How seedlings integrate the activities of the different blue-light photoreceptors to coordinate these hypocotyl growth responses is still unclear. We have used time-lapse imaging and a nontraditional mathematical approach to conduct a detailed examination of phototropism in wild-type Arabidopsis and various blue-light photoreceptor mutants. Our results indicate that high fluence rates of blue light (100 μmol m–2 s–1) attenuate phototropism through the coaction of the phototropin and cryptochrome blue-light photoreceptors. In contrast, we also demonstrate that phototropins and cryptochromes function together to enhance phototropism under low fluence rates (<1.0 μmol m–2 s–1) of blue light. Based on our results, we hypothesize that phototropins and cryptochromes regulate phototropism by coordinating the balance between stimulation and inhibition of growth of the hypocotyl depending on the fluence rate of blue light. PMID:12857830

  8. Second positive phototropism results from coordinated co-action of the phototropins and cryptochromes.

    PubMed

    Whippo, Craig W; Hangarter, Roger P

    2003-07-01

    Phototropism and hypocotyl growth inhibition are modulated by the coaction of different blue-light photoreceptors and their signaling pathways. How seedlings integrate the activities of the different blue-light photoreceptors to coordinate these hypocotyl growth responses is still unclear. We have used time-lapse imaging and a nontraditional mathematical approach to conduct a detailed examination of phototropism in wild-type Arabidopsis and various blue-light photoreceptor mutants. Our results indicate that high fluence rates of blue light (100 micro mol m(-)(2) s(-)(1)) attenuate phototropism through the coaction of the phototropin and cryptochrome blue-light photoreceptors. In contrast, we also demonstrate that phototropins and cryptochromes function together to enhance phototropism under low fluence rates (<1.0 micro mol m(-)(2) s(-)(1)) of blue light. Based on our results, we hypothesize that phototropins and cryptochromes regulate phototropism by coordinating the balance between stimulation and inhibition of growth of the hypocotyl depending on the fluence rate of blue light.

  9. A Flavin Binding Cryptochrome Photoreceptor Responds to Both Blue and Red Light in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[W

    PubMed Central

    Beel, Benedikt; Prager, Katja; Spexard, Meike; Sasso, Severin; Weiss, Daniel; Müller, Nico; Heinnickel, Mark; Dewez, David; Ikoma, Danielle; Grossman, Arthur R.; Kottke, Tilman; Mittag, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoproteins that act as sensory blue light receptors in insects, plants, fungi, and bacteria. We have investigated a cryptochrome from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with sequence homology to animal cryptochromes and (6-4) photolyases. In response to blue and red light exposure, this animal-like cryptochrome (aCRY) alters the light-dependent expression of various genes encoding proteins involved in chlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis, light-harvesting complexes, nitrogen metabolism, cell cycle control, and the circadian clock. Additionally, exposure to yellow but not far-red light leads to comparable increases in the expression of specific genes; this expression is significantly reduced in an acry insertional mutant. These in vivo effects are congruent with in vitro data showing that blue, yellow, and red light, but not far-red light, are absorbed by the neutral radical state of flavin in aCRY. The aCRY neutral radical is formed following blue light absorption of the oxidized flavin. Red illumination leads to conversion to the fully reduced state. Our data suggest that aCRY is a functionally important blue and red light–activated flavoprotein. The broad spectral response implies that the neutral radical state functions as a dark form in aCRY and expands the paradigm of flavoproteins and cryptochromes as blue light sensors to include other light qualities. PMID:22773746

  10. Differential regulation of mammalian Period genes and circadian rhythmicity by cryptochromes 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Selby, Christopher P.; Todo, Takeshi; Niwa, Hitoshi; Thompson, Carol; Fruechte, Ethan M.; Hitomi, Kenichi; Thresher, Randy J.; Ishikawa, Tomoko; Miyazaki, Junichi; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Sancar, Aziz

    1999-01-01

    Cryptochromes regulate the circadian clock in animals and plants. Humans and mice have two cryptochrome (Cry) genes. A previous study showed that mice lacking the Cry2 gene had reduced sensitivity to acute light induction of the circadian gene mPer1 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and had an intrinsic period 1 hr longer than normal. In this study, Cry1−/− and Cry1−/−Cry2−/− mice were generated and their circadian clocks were analyzed at behavioral and molecular levels. Behaviorally, the Cry1−/− mice had a circadian period 1 hr shorter than wild type and the Cry1−/−Cry2−/− mice were arrhythmic in constant darkness (DD). Biochemically, acute light induction of mPer1 mRNA in the SCN was blunted in Cry1−/− and abolished in Cry1−/−Cry2−/− mice. In contrast, the acute light induction of mPer2 in the SCN was intact in Cry1−/− and Cry1−/−Cry2−/− animals. Importantly, in double mutants, mPer1 expression was constitutively elevated and no rhythmicity was detected in either 12-hr light/12-hr dark or DD, whereas mPer2 expression appeared rhythmic in 12-hr light/12-hr dark, but nonrhythmic in DD with intermediate levels. These results demonstrate that Cry1 and Cry2 are required for the normal expression of circadian behavioral rhythms, as well as circadian rhythms of mPer1 and mPer2 in the SCN. The differential regulation of mPer1 and mPer2 by light in Cry double mutants reveals a surprising complexity in the role of cryptochromes in mammals. PMID:10518585

  11. Disruption of Magnetic Compass Orientation in Migratory Birds by Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Hiscock, Hamish G; Mouritsen, Henrik; Manolopoulos, David E; Hore, P J

    2017-10-03

    The radical-pair mechanism has been put forward as the basis of the magnetic compass sense of migratory birds. Some of the strongest supporting evidence has come from behavioral experiments in which birds exposed to weak time-dependent magnetic fields lose their ability to orient in the geomagnetic field. However, conflicting results and skepticism about the requirement for abnormally long quantum coherence lifetimes have cast a shroud of uncertainty over these potentially pivotal studies. Using a recently developed computational approach, we explore the effects of various radiofrequency magnetic fields on biologically plausible radicals within the theoretical framework of radical-pair magnetoreception. We conclude that the current model of radical-pair magnetoreception is unable to explain the findings of the reported behavioral experiments. Assuming that an unknown mechanism amplifies the predicted effects, we suggest experimental conditions that have the potential to distinguish convincingly between the two distinct families of radical pairs currently postulated as magnetic compass sensors. We end by making recommendations for experimental protocols that we hope will increase the chance that future experiments can be independently replicated. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Interaction of magnetite-based receptors in the beak with the visual system underlying 'fixed direction' responses in birds

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background European robins, Erithacus rubecula, show two types of directional responses to the magnetic field: (1) compass orientation that is based on radical pair processes and lateralized in favor of the right eye and (2) so-called 'fixed direction' responses that originate in the magnetite-based receptors in the upper beak. Both responses are light-dependent. Lateralization of the 'fixed direction' responses would suggest an interaction between the two magnetoreception systems. Results Robins were tested with either the right or the left eye covered or with both eyes uncovered for their orientation under different light conditions. With 502 nm turquoise light, the birds showed normal compass orientation, whereas they displayed an easterly 'fixed direction' response under a combination of 502 nm turquoise with 590 nm yellow light. Monocularly right-eyed birds with their left eye covered were oriented just as they were binocularly as controls: under turquoise in their northerly migratory direction, under turquoise-and-yellow towards east. The response of monocularly left-eyed birds differed: under turquoise light, they were disoriented, reflecting a lateralization of the magnetic compass system in favor of the right eye, whereas they continued to head eastward under turquoise-and-yellow light. Conclusion 'Fixed direction' responses are not lateralized. Hence the interactions between the magnetite-receptors in the beak and the visual system do not seem to involve the magnetoreception system based on radical pair processes, but rather other, non-lateralized components of the visual system. PMID:20707905

  13. Behavioural and physiological mechanisms of polarized light sensitivity in birds.

    PubMed

    Muheim, Rachel

    2011-03-12

    Polarized light (PL) sensitivity is relatively well studied in a large number of invertebrates and some fish species, but in most other vertebrate classes, including birds, the behavioural and physiological mechanism of PL sensitivity remains one of the big mysteries in sensory biology. Many organisms use the skylight polarization pattern as part of a sun compass for orientation, navigation and in spatial orientation tasks. In birds, the available evidence for an involvement of the skylight polarization pattern in sun-compass orientation is very weak. Instead, cue-conflict and cue-calibration experiments have shown that the skylight polarization pattern near the horizon at sunrise and sunset provides birds with a seasonally and latitudinally independent compass calibration reference. Despite convincing evidence that birds use PL cues for orientation, direct experimental evidence for PL sensitivity is still lacking. Avian double cones have been proposed as putative PL receptors, but detailed anatomical and physiological evidence will be needed to conclusively describe the avian PL receptor. Intriguing parallels between the functional and physiological properties of PL reception and light-dependent magnetoreception could point to a common receptor system.

  14. Behavioural and physiological mechanisms of polarized light sensitivity in birds

    PubMed Central

    Muheim, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Polarized light (PL) sensitivity is relatively well studied in a large number of invertebrates and some fish species, but in most other vertebrate classes, including birds, the behavioural and physiological mechanism of PL sensitivity remains one of the big mysteries in sensory biology. Many organisms use the skylight polarization pattern as part of a sun compass for orientation, navigation and in spatial orientation tasks. In birds, the available evidence for an involvement of the skylight polarization pattern in sun-compass orientation is very weak. Instead, cue-conflict and cue-calibration experiments have shown that the skylight polarization pattern near the horizon at sunrise and sunset provides birds with a seasonally and latitudinally independent compass calibration reference. Despite convincing evidence that birds use PL cues for orientation, direct experimental evidence for PL sensitivity is still lacking. Avian double cones have been proposed as putative PL receptors, but detailed anatomical and physiological evidence will be needed to conclusively describe the avian PL receptor. Intriguing parallels between the functional and physiological properties of PL reception and light-dependent magnetoreception could point to a common receptor system. PMID:21282180

  15. Role of the phytochrome and cryptochrome signaling pathways in hypocotyl phototropism.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida-Mayama, Tomoko; Sakai, Tatsuya; Hanada, Atsushi; Uehara, Yukiko; Asami, Tadao; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro

    2010-05-01

    Unilateral blue-light irradiation activates phototropin (phot) photoreceptors, resulting in asymmetric distribution of the phytohormone auxin and induction of a phototropic response in higher plants. Other photoreceptors, including phytochrome (phy) and cryptochrome (cry), have been proposed as modulators of phototropic responses. We show here that either phy or cry is required for hypocotyl phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana under high fluence rates of blue light, and that constitutive expression of ROOT PHOTOTROPISM 2 (RPT2) and treatment with the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol partially and independently complement the non-phototropic hypocotyl phenotype of the phyA cry1 cry2 mutant under high fluence rates of blue light. Our results indicate that induction of RPT2 and reduction in the GA are crucial for hypocotyl phototropic regulation by phy and cry. We also show that GA suppresses hypocotyl bending via destabilization of DELLA transcriptional regulators under darkness, but does not suppress the phototropic response in the presence of either phyA or cryptochromes, suggesting that these photoreceptors control not only the GA content but also the GA sensing and/or signaling that affects hypocotyl phototropism. The metabolic and signaling regulation of not only auxin but also GA by photoreceptors therefore appears to determine the hypocotyl growth pattern, including phototropic and gravitropic responses and inhibition of hypocotyl elongation, for adaptation to various light environments.

  16. Circadian Clock-Regulated Expression of Phytochrome and Cryptochrome Genes in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Réka; Kevei, Éva; Hall, Anthony; Millar, Andrew J.; Nagy, Ferenc; Kozma-Bognár, László

    2001-01-01

    Many physiological and biochemical processes in plants exhibit endogenous rhythms with a period of about 24 h. Endogenous oscillators called circadian clocks regulate these rhythms. The circadian clocks are synchronized to the periodic environmental changes (e.g. day/night cycles) by specific stimuli; among these, the most important is the light. Photoreceptors, phytochromes, and cryptochromes are involved in setting the clock by transducing the light signal to the central oscillator. In this work, we analyzed the spatial, temporal, and long-term light-regulated expression patterns of the Arabidopsis phytochrome (PHYA to PHYE) and cryptochrome (CRY1 and CRY2) promoters fused to the luciferase (LUC+) reporter gene. The results revealed new details of the tissue-specific expression and light regulation of the PHYC and CRY1 and 2 promoters. More importantly, the data obtained demonstrate that the activities of the promoter::LUC+ constructs, with the exception of PHYC::LUC+, display circadian oscillations under constant conditions. In addition, it is shown by measuring the mRNA abundance of PHY and CRY genes under constant light conditions that the circadian control is also maintained at the level of mRNA accumulation. These observations indicate that the plant circadian clock controls the expression of these photoreceptors, revealing the formation of a new regulatory loop that could modulate gating and resetting of the circadian clock. PMID:11743105

  17. Development of Transgenic Minipigs with Expression of Antimorphic Human Cryptochrome 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunxin; Bolund, Lars; Vajta, Gábor; Dou, Hongwei; Yang, Wenxian; Xu, Ying; Luan, Jing; Wang, Jun; Yang, Huanming; Staunstrup, Nicklas Heine; Du, Yutao

    2013-01-01

    Minipigs have become important biomedical models for human ailments due to similarities in organ anatomy, physiology, and circadian rhythms relative to humans. The homeostasis of circadian rhythms in both central and peripheral tissues is pivotal for numerous biological processes. Hence, biological rhythm disorders may contribute to the onset of cancers and metabolic disorders including obesity and type II diabetes, amongst others. A tight regulation of circadian clock effectors ensures a rhythmic expression profile of output genes which, depending on cell type, constitute about 3–20% of the transcribed mammalian genome. Central to this system is the negative regulator protein Cryptochrome 1 (CRY1) of which the dysfunction or absence has been linked to the pathogenesis of rhythm disorders. In this study, we generated transgenic Bama-minipigs featuring expression of the Cys414-Ala antimorphic human Cryptochrome 1 mutant (hCRY1AP). Using transgenic donor fibroblasts as nuclear donors, the method of handmade cloning (HMC) was used to produce reconstructed embryos, subsequently transferred to surrogate sows. A total of 23 viable piglets were delivered. All were transgenic and seemingly healthy. However, two pigs with high transgene expression succumbed during the first two months. Molecular analyzes in epidermal fibroblasts demonstrated disturbances to the expression profile of core circadian clock genes and elevated expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, known to be risk factors in cancer and metabolic disorders. PMID:24146819

  18. Photocycle dynamics of the E149A mutant of cryptochrome 3 from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zirak, P; Penzkofer, A; Moldt, J; Pokorny, R; Batschauer, A; Essen, L-O

    2009-11-09

    The E149A mutant of the cryDASH member cryptochrome 3 (cry3) from Arabidopsis thaliana was characterized in vitro by optical absorption and emission spectroscopic studies. The mutant protein non-covalently binds the chromophore flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). In contrast to the wild-type protein it does not bind N5,N10-methenyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (MTHF). Thus, the photo-dynamics caused by FAD is accessible without the intervening coupling with MTHF. In dark adapted cry3-E149A, FAD is present in the oxidized form (FAD(ox)), semiquinone form (FADH(.)), and anionic hydroquinone form (FAD(red)H(-)). Blue-light photo-excitation of previously unexposed cry3-E149A transfers FAD(ox) to the anionic semiquinone form (FAD()(-)) with a quantum efficiency of about 2% and a back recovery time of about 10s (photocycle I). Prolonged photo-excitation leads to an irreversible protein re-conformation with structure modification of the U-shaped FAD and enabling proton transfer. Thus, a change in the photocycle dynamics occurs with photo-conversion of FAD(ox) to FADH(.), FADH(.) to FAD(red)H(-), and thermal back equilibration in the dark (photocycle II). The photocycle dynamics of cry3-E149A is compared with the photocycle behaviour of wild-type cry3 and other photo-sensory cryptochromes.

  19. The quantum needle of the avian magnetic compass

    PubMed Central

    Hiscock, Hamish G.; Worster, Susannah; Kattnig, Daniel R.; Steers, Charlotte; Jin, Ye; Manolopoulos, David E.; Mouritsen, Henrik; Hore, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Migratory birds have a light-dependent magnetic compass, the mechanism of which is thought to involve radical pairs formed photochemically in cryptochrome proteins in the retina. Theoretical descriptions of this compass have thus far been unable to account for the high precision with which birds are able to detect the direction of the Earth's magnetic field. Here we use coherent spin dynamics simulations to explore the behavior of realistic models of cryptochrome-based radical pairs. We show that when the spin coherence persists for longer than a few microseconds, the output of the sensor contains a sharp feature, referred to as a spike. The spike arises from avoided crossings of the quantum mechanical spin energy-levels of radicals formed in cryptochromes. Such a feature could deliver a heading precision sufficient to explain the navigational behavior of migratory birds in the wild. Our results (i) afford new insights into radical pair magnetoreception, (ii) suggest ways in which the performance of the compass could have been optimized by evolution, (iii) may provide the beginnings of an explanation for the magnetic disorientation of migratory birds exposed to anthropogenic electromagnetic noise, and (iv) suggest that radical pair magnetoreception may be more of a quantum biology phenomenon than previously realized. PMID:27044102

  20. A visual pathway links brain structures active during magnetic compass orientation in migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Heyers, Dominik; Manns, Martina; Luksch, Harald; Güntürkün, Onur; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2007-09-26

    The magnetic compass of migratory birds has been suggested to be light-dependent. Retinal cryptochrome-expressing neurons and a forebrain region, "Cluster N", show high neuronal activity when night-migratory songbirds perform magnetic compass orientation. By combining neuronal tracing with behavioral experiments leading to sensory-driven gene expression of the neuronal activity marker ZENK during magnetic compass orientation, we demonstrate a functional neuronal connection between the retinal neurons and Cluster N via the visual thalamus. Thus, the two areas of the central nervous system being most active during magnetic compass orientation are part of an ascending visual processing stream, the thalamofugal pathway. Furthermore, Cluster N seems to be a specialized part of the visual wulst. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that migratory birds use their visual system to perceive the reference compass direction of the geomagnetic field and that migratory birds "see" the reference compass direction provided by the geomagnetic field.

  1. Bird guard

    DOEpatents

    Fairchild, Dana M [Armour, SD

    2010-03-02

    The bird guard provides a device to protect electrical insulators comprising a central shaft; a clamp attached to an end of the shaft to secure the device to a transmission tower; a top and bottom cover to shield transmission tower insulators; and bearings to allow the guard to rotate in order to frighten birds away from the insulators.

  2. PDF-modulated visual inputs and cryptochrome define diurnal behavior in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cusumano, Paola; Klarsfeld, André; Chélot, Elisabeth; Picot, Marie; Richier, Benjamin; Rouyer, François

    2009-11-01

    Morning and evening circadian oscillators control the bimodal activity of Drosophila in light-dark cycles. The lateral neurons evening oscillator (LN-EO) is important for promoting diurnal activity at dusk. We found that the LN-EO autonomously synchronized to light-dark cycles through either the cryptochrome (CRY) that it expressed or the visual system. In conditions in which CRY was not activated, flies depleted for pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) or its receptor lost the evening activity and displayed reversed PER oscillations in the LN-EO. Rescue experiments indicated that normal PER cycling and the presence of evening activity relied on PDF secretion from the large ventral lateral neurons and PDF receptor function in the LN-EO. The LN-EO thus integrates light inputs and PDF signaling to control Drosophila diurnal behavior, revealing a new clock-independent function for PDF.

  3. Cryptochrome 1 regulates the circadian clock through dynamic interactions with the BMAL1 C-terminus

    PubMed Central

    Sammons, Patrick J.; Khan, Sanjoy K.; Parsley, Nicole C.; Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Liu, Andrew C.; Partch, Carrie L.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular circadian clock in mammals is generated from transcriptional activation by the bHLH-PAS transcription factor CLOCK–BMAL1 and subsequent repression by PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME (CRY). The mechanism by which CRYs repress CLOCK–BMAL1 to close the negative feedback loop and generate 24-hour timing is not known. Here we show that CRY1 competes for binding with coactivators to the intrinsically unstructured C-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of BMAL1 to establish a functional switch between activation and repression of CLOCK–BMAL1. Mutations within the TAD that alter affinities for coregulators change the balance of repression and activation to consequently change intrinsic circadian period or eliminate cycling altogether. Our results suggest that CRY1 fulfills its role as an essential circadian repressor by sequestering the TAD from coactivators and highlight regulation of the BMAL1 TAD as a critical mechanism for establishing circadian timing. PMID:25961797

  4. Cryptochrome and Phytochrome Cooperatively but Independently Reduce Active Gibberellin Content in Rice Seedlings under Light Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Fumiaki; Inagaki, Noritoshi; Hanada, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Kamiya, Yuji; Miyao, Akio; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takano, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to a wealth of knowledge about the photoregulation of gibberellin metabolism in dicots, that in monocots remains largely unclear. In this study, we found that a blue light signal triggers reduction of active gibberellin content in rice seedlings with simultaneous repression of two gibberellin 20-oxidase genes (OsGA20ox2 and OsGA20ox4) and acute induction of four gibberellin 2-oxidase genes (OsGA2ox4–OsGA2ox7). For further examination of the regulation of these genes, we established a series of cryptochrome-deficient lines through reverse genetic screening from a Tos17 mutant population and construction of knockdown lines based on an RNA interference technique. By using these lines and phytochrome mutants, we elucidated that cryptochrome 1 (cry1), consisting of two species in rice plants (cry1a and cry1b), is indispensable for robust induction of the GA2ox genes. On the other hand, repression of the GA20ox genes is mediated by phytochromes. In addition, we found that the phytochromes also mediate the repression of a gibberellin 3-oxidase gene (OsGA3ox2) in the light. These results imply that, in rice seedlings, phytochromes mediate the repression of gibberellin biosynthesis capacity, while cry1 mediates the induction of gibberellin inactivation capacity. The cry1 action was demonstrated to be dominant in the reduction of active gibberellin content, but, in rice seedlings, the cumulative effects of these independent actions reduced active gibberellin content in the light. This pathway design in which different types of photoreceptors independently but cooperatively regulate active gibberellin content is unique from the viewpoint of dicot research. This redundancy should provide robustness to the response in rice plants. PMID:22764280

  5. Cryptochrome and phytochrome cooperatively but independently reduce active gibberellin content in rice seedlings under light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Fumiaki; Inagaki, Noritoshi; Hanada, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Kamiya, Yuji; Miyao, Akio; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takano, Makoto

    2012-09-01

    In contrast to a wealth of knowledge about the photoregulation of gibberellin metabolism in dicots, that in monocots remains largely unclear. In this study, we found that a blue light signal triggers reduction of active gibberellin content in rice seedlings with simultaneous repression of two gibberellin 20-oxidase genes (OsGA20ox2 and OsGA20ox4) and acute induction of four gibberellin 2-oxidase genes (OsGA2ox4-OsGA2ox7). For further examination of the regulation of these genes, we established a series of cryptochrome-deficient lines through reverse genetic screening from a Tos17 mutant population and construction of knockdown lines based on an RNA interference technique. By using these lines and phytochrome mutants, we elucidated that cryptochrome 1 (cry1), consisting of two species in rice plants (cry1a and cry1b), is indispensable for robust induction of the GA2ox genes. On the other hand, repression of the GA20ox genes is mediated by phytochromes. In addition, we found that the phytochromes also mediate the repression of a gibberellin 3-oxidase gene (OsGA3ox2) in the light. These results imply that, in rice seedlings, phytochromes mediate the repression of gibberellin biosynthesis capacity, while cry1 mediates the induction of gibberellin inactivation capacity. The cry1 action was demonstrated to be dominant in the reduction of active gibberellin content, but, in rice seedlings, the cumulative effects of these independent actions reduced active gibberellin content in the light. This pathway design in which different types of photoreceptors independently but cooperatively regulate active gibberellin content is unique from the viewpoint of dicot research. This redundancy should provide robustness to the response in rice plants.

  6. Blue Light–Dependent Interaction between Cryptochrome2 and CIB1 Regulates Transcription and Leaf Senescence in Soybean[W

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yingying; Li, Hongyu; Wang, Qin; Liu, Bin; Lin, Chentao

    2013-01-01

    Cryptochromes are blue light receptors that regulate light responses in plants, including various crops. The molecular mechanism of plant cryptochromes has been extensively investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana, but it has not been reported in any crop species. Here, we report a study of the mechanism of soybean (Glycine max) cryptochrome2 (CRY2a). We found that CRY2a regulates leaf senescence, which is a life history trait regulated by light and photoperiods via previously unknown mechanisms. We show that CRY2a undergoes blue light–dependent interaction with the soybean basic helix-loop-helix transcription activator CIB1 (for cryptochrome-interacting bHLH1) that specifically interacts with the E-box (CANNTG) DNA sequences. Analyses of transgenic soybean plants expressing an elevated or reduced level of the CRY2a or CIB1 demonstrate that CIB1 promotes leaf senescence, whereas CRY2a suppresses leaf senescence. Results of the gene expression and molecular interaction analyses support the hypothesis that CIB1 activates transcription of senescence-associated genes, such as WRKY DNA BINDING PROTEIN53b (WRKY53b), and leaf senescence. CIB1 interacts with the E-box–containing promoter sequences of the WRKY53b chromatin, whereas photoexcited CRY2a interacts with CIB1 to inhibit its DNA binding activity. These findings argue that CIB-dependent transcriptional regulation is an evolutionarily conserved CRY-signaling mechanism in plants, and this mechanism is opted in evolution to mediate light regulation of different aspects of plant development in different plant species. PMID:24272488

  7. Birds, Examining Your Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBean, John C.; And Others

    Designed to provide new and different ways of observing birds rather than simply identifying them, this book attempts to develop skills for how to look at birds. Activities in each of the four sections, "Live Birds,""Birds' Eggs,""Birds' Nests," and "Dead Birds," are specifically planned to get one involved with birds in their natural environment.…

  8. The CRYPTOCHROME photoreceptor gates PDF neuropeptide signaling to set circadian network hierarchy in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luoying; Lear, Bridget C; Seluzicki, Adam; Allada, Ravi

    2009-12-15

    Circadian clocks in the brain are organized as coupled oscillators that integrate seasonal cues such as light and temperature to time daily behaviors. In Drosophila, the PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) neuropeptide-expressing morning (M) and non-PDF evening (E) cells are coupled cell groups important for morning and evening behavior, respectively. Depending on day length, either M cells (short days) or E cells (long days) dictate both the morning and the evening phase, a phenomenon that we term network hierarchy. To examine the role of PDF in light-dark conditions, we examined flies lacking both the PDF receptor (PDFR) and the circadian photoreceptor CRYPTOCHROME (CRY). We found that subsets of E cells exhibit molecular oscillations antiphase to those of wild-type flies, single cry mutants, or single Pdfr mutants, demonstrating a potent role for PDF in light-mediated entrainment, specifically in the absence of CRY. Moreover, we find that the evening behavioral phase is more strongly reset by PDF(+) M cells in the absence of CRY. On the basis of our findings, we propose that CRY can gate PDF signaling to determine behavioral phase and network hierarchy.

  9. Insight into the Chemical Compass Mechanism of Cryptochromes by Computational Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachter, Ruth; Hong, Gongyi

    2014-03-01

    In this work we investigated aspects of the light-dependent inclination compass, largely assumed in avian magnetic perception, e.g. of European robins. It is postulated that radical pairs (RPs) are formed in cryptochrome (Cry) photoreceptors that contain a redox-active flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in proximity to a Trp triad. The hypothesis was previously rationalized theoretically for the Cry from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtCry1), and the pKa of the proximate residue (PR) to the FAD we derived from QM/MM MD simulations is consistent with this assumption. However, attempts to extrapolate the results to other species are complicated. In the Cry from Drosophila melanogaster (DmCry1), which demonstrated a magnetic response, the FAD anionic radical ground state differs from an oxidized form in AtCry1, and the PR to the FAD is Cys rather than Asp in AtCry1. Investigation for DmCry1 model compounds, showing potential feasibility of a RP mechanism, will be described, where the calculated excitation energy is in agreement with experiment. Involvement of a Tyr instead of Trp in the triad was also considered. Because Crys from the garden warbler form RPs, a RP mechanism was examined, based on a 3D structure derived by homology modeling and MD simulations.

  10. Light signaling to the zebrafish circadian clock by Cryptochrome 1a

    PubMed Central

    Tamai, T. Katherine; Young, Lucy C.; Whitmore, David

    2007-01-01

    Zebrafish tissues and cells have the unusual feature of not only containing a circadian clock, but also being directly light-responsive. Several zebrafish genes are induced by light, but little is known about their role in clock resetting or the mechanism by which this might occur. Here we show that Cryptochrome 1a (Cry1a) plays a key role in light entrainment of the zebrafish clock. Intensity and phase response curves reveal a strong correlation between light induction of Cry1a and clock resetting. Overexpression studies show that Cry1a acts as a potent repressor of clock function and mimics the effect of constant light to “stop” the circadian oscillator. Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrates that the Cry1a protein interacts directly with specific regions of core clock components, CLOCK and BMAL, blocking their ability to fully dimerize and transactivate downstream targets, providing a likely mechanism for clock resetting. A comparison of entrainment of zebrafish cells to complete versus skeleton photoperiods reveals that clock phase is identical under these two conditions. However, the amplitude of the core clock oscillation is much higher on a complete photoperiod, as are the levels of light-induced Cry1a. We believe that Cry1a acts on the core clock machinery in both a continuous and discrete fashion, leading not only to entrainment, but also to the establishment of a high-amplitude rhythm and even stopping of the clock under long photoperiods. PMID:17785416

  11. Aberrant rhythmic expression of cryptochrome2 regulates the radiosensitivity of rat gliomas.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wang; Caiyan, Li; Ling, Zhu; Jiayun, Zhao

    2017-09-29

    In this study, we investigated the role of the clock regulatory protein cryptochrome 2 (Cry2) in determining the radiosensitivity of C6 glioma cells in a rat model. We observed that Cry2 mRNA and protein levels showed aberrant rhythmic periodicity of 8 h in glioma tissues, compared to 24 h in normal brain tissue. Cry2 mRNA and protein levels did not respond to irradiation in normal tissues, but both were increased at the ZT4 (low Cry2) and ZT8 (high Cry2) time points in gliomas. Immunohistochemical staining of PCNA and TUNEL assays demonstrated that high Cry2 expression in glioma tissues was associated with increased cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis. Western blot analysis showed that glioma cell fate was independent of p53, but was probably dependent on p73, which was more highly expressed at ZT4 (low Cry2) than at ZT8 (high Cry2). Levels of both p53 and p73 were unaffected by irradiation in normal brain tissues. These findings suggest aberrant rhythmic expression of Cry2 influence on radiosensitivity in rat gliomas.

  12. Rhythm Defects Caused by Newly Engineered Null Mutations in Drosophila's cryptochrome Gene

    PubMed Central

    Dolezelova, Eva; Dolezel, David; Hall, Jeffrey C.

    2007-01-01

    Much of the knowledge about cryptochrome function in Drosophila stems from analyzing the cryb mutant. Several features of this variant's light responsiveness imply either that CRYb retains circadian-photoreceptive capacities or that additional CRY-independent light-input routes subserve these processes. Potentially to resolve these issues, we generated cry knock-out mutants (cry0's) by gene replacement. They behaved in an anomalously rhythmic manner in constant light (LL). However, cry0 flies frequently exhibited two separate circadian components in LL, not observed in most previous cryb analyses. Temperature-dependent circadian phenotypes exhibited by cry0 flies suggest that CRY is involved in core pacemaking. Further locomotor experiments combined cry0 with an externally blinding mutation (norpAP24), which caused the most severe decrements of circadian photoreception observed so far. cryb cultures were shown previously to exhibit either aperiodic or rhythmic eclosion in separate studies. We found cry0 to eclose in a solidly periodic manner in light:dark cycles or constant darkness. Furthermore, both cry0 and cryb eclosed rhythmically in LL. These findings indicate that the novel cry0 type causes more profound defects than does the cryb mutation, implying that CRYb retains residual activity. Because some norpAP24 cry0 individuals can resynchronize to novel photic regimes, an as-yet undetermined light-input route exists in Drosophila. PMID:17720919

  13. Nongame birds

    John C. Kilgo; A. Lawrence Bryan

    2005-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) provides habitat for an impressive array of avian species. During its fifty-year existence, 259 bird species have been recorded there (Mayer et al. 1997 and unpublished data). This figure represents more than two thirds of the 379 species on the South Carolina state list (McNair and Post 1993). Explanations for SRS's diverse avifauna...

  14. Is blue light, cryptochrome in the eye, and magnetite in the brain involved in the development of frontotemporal dementia and other diseases?

    PubMed

    Størmer, Fredrik C

    2015-04-01

    When cryptochrome in the retina is exposed to blue light, it undergo series of complicated chemical reactions. One of these intermediates has magnetic properties. It could be a link between the magnetic stage of cryptochrome in the retina and magnetite in the brain. A disturbance in this system could be involved in the development of frontotemporal dementia and other mental disturbances like Alzheimer's disease. There could also be a link between circadian rhythms and memory dysfunction connected to schizophrenia, type 2 diabetes, and blue light. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Blue Light-Dependent Polyubiquitination and Degradation of Arabidopsis Cryptochrome2 Requires Multiple E3 Ubiquitin Ligases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Qin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xu; Park, Joon; Yang, Zhenming; Du, Xinglin; Bian, Mingdi; Lin, Chentao

    2016-10-01

    Cryptochromes are blue light receptors regulated by light-dependent ubiquitination and degradation in both plant and animal lineages. The Arabidopsis genome encodes two cryptochromes, CRY1 and CRY2, of which CRY2 undergoes blue light-dependent ubiquitination and 26S proteasome-dependent degradation. The molecular mechanism regulating blue light-dependent proteolysis of CRY2 is still not fully understood. We found that the F-box proteins ZEITLUPE (ZTL) and Lov Kelch Protein2 (LKP2), which mediate blue light suppression of degradation of the CRY2 signaling partner CIB1, are not required for the blue light-dependent CRY2 degradation. We further showed that the previously reported function of the COP1-SPA1 protein complex in blue light-dependent CRY2 degradation is more likely to be attributable to its cullin 4 (CUL4)-based E3 ubiquitin ligase activity than its activity as the cryptochrome signaling partner. However, the blue light-dependent CRY2 degradation is only partially impaired in the cul4 mutant, the cop1-5 null mutant and the spa1234 quadruple mutant, suggesting a possible involvement of additional E3 ubiquitin ligases in the regulation of CRY2. Consistent with this hypothesis, we demonstrated that the blue light-dependent CRY2 degradation is significantly impaired in the temperature-sensitive cul1 mutant allele (axr6-3), especially under the non-permissive temperature. Based on these and other results presented, we propose that photoexcited CRY2 undergoes Lys48-linked polyubiquitination catalyzed by the CUL4- and CUL1-based E3 ubiquitin ligases. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Bacterial bioluminescence regulates expression of a host cryptochrome gene in the squid-Vibrio symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; Peyer, Suzanne M; Whistler, Cheryl A; Apicella, Michael A; Goldman, William E; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J

    2013-04-02

    The symbiosis between the squid Euprymna scolopes and its luminous symbiont, Vibrio fischeri, is characterized by daily transcriptional rhythms in both partners and daily fluctuations in symbiont luminescence. In this study, we sought to determine whether symbionts affect host transcriptional rhythms. We identified two transcripts in host tissues (E. scolopes cry1 [escry1] and escry2) that encode cryptochromes, proteins that influence circadian rhythms in other systems. Both genes cycled daily in the head of the squid, with a pattern similar to that of other animals, in which expression of certain cry genes is entrained by environmental light. In contrast, escry1 expression cycled in the symbiont-colonized light organ with 8-fold upregulation coincident with the rhythms of bacterial luminescence, which are offset from the day/night light regime. Colonization of the juvenile light organ by symbionts was required for induction of escry1 cycling. Further, analysis with a mutant strain defective in light production showed that symbiont luminescence is essential for cycling of escry1; this defect could be complemented by presentation of exogenous blue light. However, blue-light exposure alone did not induce cycling in nonsymbiotic animals, but addition of molecules of the symbiont cell envelope to light-exposed animals did recover significant cycling activity, showing that light acts in synergy with other symbiont features to induce cycling. While symbiont luminescence may be a character specific to rhythms of the squid-vibrio association, resident microbial partners could similarly influence well-documented daily rhythms in other systems, such as the mammalian gut.

  17. Bacterial Bioluminescence Regulates Expression of a Host Cryptochrome Gene in the Squid-Vibrio Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A. C.; Peyer, Suzanne M.; Whistler, Cheryl A.; Apicella, Michael A.; Goldman, William E.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The symbiosis between the squid Euprymna scolopes and its luminous symbiont, Vibrio fischeri, is characterized by daily transcriptional rhythms in both partners and daily fluctuations in symbiont luminescence. In this study, we sought to determine whether symbionts affect host transcriptional rhythms. We identified two transcripts in host tissues (E. scolopes cry1 [escry1] and escry2) that encode cryptochromes, proteins that influence circadian rhythms in other systems. Both genes cycled daily in the head of the squid, with a pattern similar to that of other animals, in which expression of certain cry genes is entrained by environmental light. In contrast, escry1 expression cycled in the symbiont-colonized light organ with 8-fold upregulation coincident with the rhythms of bacterial luminescence, which are offset from the day/night light regime. Colonization of the juvenile light organ by symbionts was required for induction of escry1 cycling. Further, analysis with a mutant strain defective in light production showed that symbiont luminescence is essential for cycling of escry1; this defect could be complemented by presentation of exogenous blue light. However, blue-light exposure alone did not induce cycling in nonsymbiotic animals, but addition of molecules of the symbiont cell envelope to light-exposed animals did recover significant cycling activity, showing that light acts in synergy with other symbiont features to induce cycling. While symbiont luminescence may be a character specific to rhythms of the squid-vibrio association, resident microbial partners could similarly influence well-documented daily rhythms in other systems, such as the mammalian gut. PMID:23549919

  18. Game Birds of Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Div. of Wildlife, Denver.

    This booklet is intended to familiarize the reader with game birds typical of Colorado. Discussions in English and Spanish are presented. Discussions cover the management of game birds, individual game bird species, and endangered species of birds related to game birds. (RE)

  19. 9 CFR 93.104 - Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds. 93.104 Section 93.104 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN...

  20. 9 CFR 93.104 - Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds. 93.104 Section 93.104 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN...

  1. Tips for Teaching Birding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burtch, Bob

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions of indoor and outdoor activities that can be used in teaching a unit on birds. Suggests techniques that can be helpful in bird identification. Includes a reference list of audiovisual materials, books, and field guides on birds. (ML)

  2. Spectro-temporal characterization of the photoactivation mechanism of two new oxidized cryptochrome/photolyase photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Brazard, Johanna; Usman, Anwar; Lacombat, Fabien; Ley, Christian; Martin, Monique M; Plaza, Pascal; Mony, Laetitia; Heijde, Marc; Zabulon, Gérald; Bowler, Chris

    2010-04-07

    The photoactivation dynamics of two new flavoproteins (OtCPF1 and OtCPF2) of the cryptochrome photolyase family (CPF), belonging to the green alga Ostreococcus tauri , was studied by broadband UV-vis femtosecond absorption spectroscopy. Upon excitation of the protein chromophoric cofactor, flavin adenine dinucleotide in its oxidized form (FAD(ox)), we observed in both cases the ultrafast photoreduction of FAD(ox): in 390 fs for OtCPF1 and 590 fs for OtCPF2. Although such ultrafast electron transfer has already been reported for other flavoproteins and CPF members, the present result is the first demonstration with full spectral characterization of the mechanism. Analysis of the photoproduct spectra allowed identifying tryptophan as the primary electron donor. This residue is found to be oxidized to its protonated radical cation form (WH(*+)), while FAD(ox) is reduced to FAD(*-). Subsequent kinetics were observed in the picosecond and subnanosecond regime, mostly described by a biexponential partial decay of the photoproduct transient signal (9 and 81 ps for OtCPF1, and 13 and 340 ps for OtCPF2), with reduced spectral changes, while a long-lived photoproduct remains in the nanosecond time scale. We interpret these observations within the model proposed by the groups of Brettel and Vos, which describes the photoreduction of FADH(*) within E. coli CPD photolyase (EcCPD) as a sequential electron transfer along a chain of three tryptophan residues, although in that case the rate limiting step was the primary photoreduction in 30 ps. In the present study, excitation of FAD(ox) permitted to reveal the following steps and spectroscopically assign them to the hole-hopping process along the tryptophan chain, accompanied by partial charge recombination at each step. In addition, structural analysis performed by homology modeling allowed us to propose a tentative structure of the relative orientations of FAD and the conserved tryptophan triad. The results of preliminary

  3. Cryptochrome 1 interacts with PIF4 to regulate high temperature-mediated hypocotyl elongation in response to blue light.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dingbang; Li, Xu; Guo, Yongxia; Chu, Jingfang; Fang, Shuang; Yan, Cunyu; Noel, Joseph P; Liu, Hongtao

    2016-01-05

    Cryptochrome 1 (CRY1) is a blue light receptor that mediates primarily blue-light inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Very little is known of the mechanisms by which CRY1 affects growth. Blue light and temperature are two key environmental signals that profoundly affect plant growth and development, but how these two abiotic factors integrate remains largely unknown. Here, we show that blue light represses high temperature-mediated hypocotyl elongation via CRY1. Furthermore, CRY1 interacts directly with PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) in a blue light-dependent manner to repress the transcription activity of PIF4. CRY1 represses auxin biosynthesis in response to elevated temperature through PIF4. Our results indicate that CRY1 signal by modulating PIF4 activity, and that multiple plant photoreceptors [CRY1 and PHYTOCHROME B (PHYB)] and ambient temperature can mediate morphological responses through the same signaling component-PIF4.

  4. Cryptochrome 1 interacts with PIF4 to regulate high temperature-mediated hypocotyl elongation in response to blue light

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dingbang; Li, Xu; Guo, Yongxia; Chu, Jingfang; Fang, Shuang; Yan, Cunyu; Noel, Joseph P.; Liu, Hongtao

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome 1 (CRY1) is a blue light receptor that mediates primarily blue-light inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Very little is known of the mechanisms by which CRY1 affects growth. Blue light and temperature are two key environmental signals that profoundly affect plant growth and development, but how these two abiotic factors integrate remains largely unknown. Here, we show that blue light represses high temperature-mediated hypocotyl elongation via CRY1. Furthermore, CRY1 interacts directly with PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) in a blue light-dependent manner to repress the transcription activity of PIF4. CRY1 represses auxin biosynthesis in response to elevated temperature through PIF4. Our results indicate that CRY1 signal by modulating PIF4 activity, and that multiple plant photoreceptors [CRY1 and PHYTOCHROME B (PHYB)] and ambient temperature can mediate morphological responses through the same signaling component—PIF4. PMID:26699514

  5. A synthetic cryptochrome inhibitor induces anti-proliferative effects and increases chemosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

    SciT

    Chun, Sung Kook; Department of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747; Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747

    Disruption of circadian rhythm is a major cause of breast cancer in humans. Cryptochrome (CRY), a circadian transcription factor, is a risk factor for initiation of breast cancer, and it is differentially expressed between normal and breast cancer tissues. Here, we evaluated the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of KS15, a recently discovered small-molecule inhibitor of CRY, in human breast cancer cells. First, we investigated whether KS15 treatment could promote E-box-mediated transcription by inhibiting the activity of CRY in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Protein and mRNA levels of regulators of cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as core clock genes,more » were differentially modulated in response to KS15. Next, we investigated whether KS15 could inhibit proliferation and increase sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs in MCF-7 cells. We found that KS15 decreased the speed of cell growth and increased the chemosensitivity of MCF-7 cells to doxorubicin and tamoxifen, but had no effect on MCF-10A cells. These findings suggested that pharmacological inhibition of CRY by KS15 exerts an anti-proliferative effect and increases sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs in a specific type of breast cancer. - Highlights: • Cryptochrome inhibitor (KS15) has anti-tumor activity to human breast cancer cells. • KS15 induces differential changes in cell cycle regulators and pro-apoptotic genes. • KS15 inhibits MCF-7 cell growth and enhances susceptibility to anti-tumor drugs.« less

  6. Resonance Raman spectroscopic investigation of the light-harvesting chromophore in escherichia coli photolyase and Vibrio cholerae cryptochrome-1.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Olga; Cecala, Christine; Gopal, Anand; Cortazar, Frank; McDowell-Buchanan, Carla; Sancar, Aziz; Gindt, Yvonne M; Schelvis, Johannes P M

    2007-03-27

    Photolyases and cryptochromes are flavoproteins that belong to the class of blue-light photoreceptors. They usually bind two chromophores: flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), which forms the active site, and a light-harvesting pigment, which is a 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate polyglutamate (MTHF) in most cases. In Escherichia coli photolyase (EcPhr), the MTHF cofactor is present in substoichiometric amounts after purification, while in Vibrio cholerae cryptochrome-1 (VcCry1) the MTHF cofactor is bound more strongly and is present at stoichiometric levels after purification. In this paper, we have used resonance Raman spectroscopy to monitor the effect of loss of MTHF on the protein-FAD interactions in EcPhr and to probe the protein-MTHF interactions in both EcPhr and VcCry1. We find that removal of MTHF does not perturb protein-FAD interactions, suggesting that it may not affect the physicochemical properties of FAD in EcPhr. Our data demonstrate that the pteridine ring of MTHF in EcPhr has different interactions with the protein matrix than that of MTHF in VcCry1. Comparison to solution resonance Raman spectra of MTHF suggests that the carbonyl of its pteridine ring in EcPhr experiences stronger hydrogen bonding and a more polar environment than in VcCry1, but that hydrogen bonding to the pteridine ring amine hydrogens is stronger in VcCry-1. These differences in hydrogen bonding may account for the higher binding affinity of MTHF in VcCry1 compared to EcPhr.

  7. Chemical-Induced Inhibition of Blue Light-Mediated Seedling Development Caused by Disruption of Upstream Signal Transduction Involving Cryptochromes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ong, Wen-Dee; Okubo-Kurihara, Emiko; Kurihara, Yukio; Shimada, Setsuko; Makita, Yuko; Kawashima, Mika; Honda, Kaori; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Osada, Hiroyuki; Cutler, Sean R; Sudesh, Kumar; Matsui, Minami

    2017-01-01

    Plants have a remarkable ability to perceive and respond to various wavelengths of light and initiate regulation of different cascades of light signaling and molecular components. While the perception of red light and the mechanisms of its signaling involving phytochromes are largely known, knowledge of the mechanisms of blue light signaling is still limited. Chemical genetics involves the use of diverse small active or synthetic molecules to evaluate biological processes. By combining chemicals and analyzing the effects they have on plant morphology, we identified a chemical, 3-bromo-7-nitroindazole (3B7N), that promotes hypocotyl elongation of wild-type Arabidopsis only under continuous blue light. Further evaluation with loss-of-function mutants confirmed that 3B7N inhibits photomorphogenesis through cryptochrome-mediated light signaling. Microarray analysis demonstrated that the effect of 3B7N treatment on gene expression in cry1cry2 is considerably smaller than that in the wild type, indicating that 3B7N specifically interrupts cryptochrome function in the control of seedling development in a light-dependent manner. We demonstrated that 3B7N directly binds to CRY1 protein using an in vitro binding assay. These results suggest that 3B7N is a novel chemical that directly inhibits plant cryptochrome function by physical binding. The application of 3B7N can be used on other plants to study further the blue light mechanism and the genetic control of cryptochromes in the growth and development of plant species. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Essential Role of an Unusually Long-lived Tyrosyl Radical in the Response to Red Light of the Animal-like Cryptochrome aCRY*

    PubMed Central

    Oldemeyer, Sabine; Franz, Sophie; Wenzel, Sandra; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Mittag, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes constitute a group of flavin-binding blue light receptors in bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects. Recently, the response of cryptochromes to light was extended to nearly the entire visible spectral region on the basis of the activity of the animal-like cryptochrome aCRY in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This finding was explained by the absorption of red light by the flavin neutral radical as the dark state of the receptor, which then forms the anionic fully reduced state. In this study, time-resolved UV-visible spectroscopy on the full-length aCRY revealed an unusually long-lived tyrosyl radical with a lifetime of 2.6 s, which is present already 1 μs after red light illumination of the flavin radical. Mutational studies disclosed the tyrosine 373 close to the surface to form the long-lived radical and to be essential for photoreduction. This residue is conserved exclusively in the sequences of other putative aCRY proteins distinguishing them from conventional (6–4) photolyases. Size exclusion chromatography showed the full-length aCRY to be a dimer in the dark at 0.5 mm injected concentration with the C-terminal extension as the dimerization site. Upon illumination, partial oligomerization was observed via disulfide bridge formation at cysteine 482 in close proximity to tyrosine 373. The lack of any light response in the C-terminal extension as evidenced by FTIR spectroscopy differentiates aCRY from plant and Drosophila cryptochromes. These findings imply that aCRY might have evolved a different signaling mechanism via a light-triggered redox cascade culminating in photooxidation of a yet unknown substrate or binding partner. PMID:27189948

  9. Drug metabolism in birds

    Pan, Huo Ping; Fouts, James R.

    1979-01-01

    Papers published over 100 years since the beginning of the scientific study of drug metabolism in birds were reviewed. Birds were found to be able to accomplish more than 20 general biotransformation reactions in both functionalization and conjugation. Chickens were the primary subject of study but over 30 species of birds were used. Large species differences in drug metabolism exist between birds and mammals as well as between various birds, these differences were mostly quantitative. Qualitative differences were rare. On the whole, drug metabolism studies in birds have been neglected as compared with similar studies on insects and mammals. The uniqueness of birds and the advantages of using birds in drug metabolism studies are discussed. Possible future studies of drug metabolism in birds are recommended.

  10. Bird Flu (Avian Influenza)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with bird and human flu viruses. Poultry and egg products Because heat destroys avian viruses, cooked poultry ... 165 F (74 C). Steer clear of raw eggs. Because eggshells are often contaminated with bird droppings, ...

  11. Birds: Old Questions and New.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses questions such as how birds fly and the meaning of bird songs. Explains the relationship between birds and ecological activism and points out the excitement in research and observation of birds. (Contains 34 references.) (YDS)

  12. Audubon Bird Study Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Audubon Society, New York, NY.

    Included are a student reader, "The Story of Birds," a leaders' guide, a large colored Audubon bird chart, and a separate guide for the chart. The student reader is divided into eleven sections which relate to the various physical and behavioral features of birds such as feathers, feeding habits as related to the shape of bills and feet, nests,…

  13. Breeding bird communities

    Vanessa L. Artman; Randy Dettmers

    2003-01-01

    Prescribed burning is being applied on an experimental basis to restore and maintain mixed-oak communities in southern Ohio. This chapter describes baseline conditions for the breeding bird community prior to prescribed burning. We surveyed breeding bird populations at four study areas using the territory-mapping method. We observed 35 bird species during the surveys....

  14. Bird community composition

    T.J. Antrobus; M.P. Guilfoyle; W.C. Barrow; Paul B. Hamel; J.S. Wakeley

    2000-01-01

    Neotropical migrants are birds that breed in North America and winter primarily in Central and South America. Longterm population studies of birds in the Eastern United States indicated declines of some forest-dwelling birds, many of which winter in the Neotropics (Peterjohn and others 1995). These declines were attributed to loss of wintering and breeding habitat due...

  15. The blue light-induced interaction of cryptochrome 1 with COP1 requires SPA proteins during Arabidopsis light signaling.

    PubMed

    Holtkotte, Xu; Ponnu, Jathish; Ahmad, Margaret; Hoecker, Ute

    2017-10-01

    Plants constantly adjust their growth, development and metabolism to the ambient light environment. Blue light is sensed by the Arabidopsis photoreceptors CRY1 and CRY2 which subsequently initiate light signal transduction by repressing the COP1/SPA E3 ubiquitin ligase. While the interaction between cryptochromes and SPA is blue light-dependent, it was proposed that CRY1 interacts with COP1 constitutively, i.e. also in darkness. Here, our in vivo co-immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that CRY1 and CRY2 form a complex with COP1 only after seedlings were exposed to blue light. No association between COP1 and CRY1 or CRY2 was observed in dark-grown seedlings. Thus, our results suggest that cryptochromes bind the COP1/SPA complex after photoactivation by blue light. In a spa quadruple mutant that is devoid of all four SPA proteins, CRY1 and COP1 did not interact in vivo, neither in dark-grown nor in blue light-grown seedlings. Hence, SPA proteins are required for the high-affinity interaction between CRY1 and COP1 in blue light. Yeast three-hybrid experiments also show that SPA1 enhances the CRY1-COP1 interaction. The coiled-coil domain of SPA1 which is responsible for COP1-binding was necessary to mediate a CRY1-SPA1 interaction in vivo, implying that-in turn-COP1 may be necessary for a CRY1-SPA1 complex formation. Hence, SPA1 and COP1 may act cooperatively in recognizing and binding photoactivated CRY1. In contrast, the blue light-induced association between CRY2 and COP1 was not dependent on SPA proteins in vivo. Similarly, ΔCC-SPA1 interacted with CRY2, though with a much lower affinity than wild-type SPA1. In total, our results demonstrate that CRY1 and CRY2 strongly differ in their blue light-induced interaction with the COP1/SPA complex.

  16. Coupling Drosophila melanogaster Cryptochrome Light Activation and Oxidation of the Kvβ Subunit Hyperkinetic NADPH Cofactor.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gongyi; Pachter, Ruth; Ritz, Thorsten

    2018-06-28

    Motivated by the observations on the involvement of light-induced processes in the Drosophila melanogaster cryptochrome (DmCry) in regulation of the neuronal firing rate, which is achieved by a redox-state change of its voltage-dependent K + channel Kvβ subunit hyperkinetic (Hk) reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) cofactor, we propose in this work two hypothetical pathways that may potentially enable such coupling. In the first pathway, triggered by blue-light-induced formation of a radical pair [FAD •- TRP •+ ] in DmCry, the hole (TRP •+ ) may hop to Hk, for example, through a tryptophan chain and oxidize NADPH, possibly leading to inhibition of the N-terminus inactivation in the K + channel. In a second possible pathway, DmCry's FAD •- is reoxidized by molecular oxygen, producing H 2 O 2 , which then diffuses to Hk and oxidizes NADPH. In this work, by applying a combination of quantum and empirical-based methods for free-energy calculations, we find that the oxidation of NADPH by TRP •+ or H 2 O 2 and the reoxidation of FAD •- by O 2 are thermodynamically feasible. Our results may have an implication in identifying a magnetic sensing signal transduction pathway, specifically upon Drosophila's Hk NADPH cofactor oxidation, with a subsequent inhibition of the K + channel N-terminus inactivation gate, permitting K + flux.

  17. Cryptochromes regulate IGF-1 production and signaling through control of JAK2-dependent STAT5B phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Amol; Gupta, Richa; Patel, Sonal; Velingkaar, Nikkhil; Kondratov, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling plays an important role in cell growth and proliferation and is implicated in regulation of cancer, metabolism, and aging. Here we report that IGF-1 level in blood and IGF-1 signaling demonstrates circadian rhythms. Circadian control occurs through cryptochromes (CRYs)—transcriptional repressors and components of the circadian clock. IGF-1 rhythms are disrupted in Cry-deficient mice, and IGF-1 level is reduced by 80% in these mice, which leads to reduced IGF signaling. In agreement, Cry-deficient mice have reduced body (∼30% reduction) and organ size. Down-regulation of IGF-1 upon Cry deficiency correlates with reduced Igf-1 mRNA expression in the liver and skeletal muscles. Igf-1 transcription is regulated through growth hormone–induced, JAK2 kinase–mediated phosphorylation of transcriptional factor STAT5B. The phosphorylation of STAT5B on the JAK2-dependent Y699 site is significantly reduced in the liver and skeletal muscles of Cry-deficient mice. At the same time, phosphorylation of JAK2 kinase was not reduced upon Cry deficiency, which places CRY activity downstream from JAK2. Thus CRYs link the circadian clock and JAK-STAT signaling through control of STAT5B phosphorylation, which provides the mechanism for circadian rhythms in IGF signaling in vivo. PMID:28100634

  18. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic characterisation of the circadian blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome from Drosophila melanogaster (dCry)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirdel, J.; Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Breitkreuz, H.; Wolf, E.

    2008-09-01

    The absorption and fluorescence behaviour of the circadian blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome from Drosophila melanogaster (dCry) in a pH 8 aqueous buffer solution is studied. The flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor of dCry is identified to be present in its oxidized form (FAD ox), and the 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF) cofactor is found to be hydrolyzed and oxidized to 10-formyldihydrofolate (10-FDHF). The absorption and the fluorescence behaviour of dCry is investigated in the dark-adapted (receptor) state, the light-adapted (signalling) state, and under long-time violet light exposure. Photo-excitation of FAD ox in dCry causes a reductive electron transfer to the formation of anionic FAD semiquinone (FAD rad - ), and photo-excitation of the generated FAD rad - causes an oxidative electron transfer to the back formation of FAD ox. In light adapted dCry a photo-induced equilibrium between FAD ox and FAD rad - exists. The photo-cycle dynamics of signalling state formation and recovery is discussed. Quantum yields of photo-induced signalling state formation of about 0.2 and of photo-induced back-conversion of about 0.2 are determined. A recovery of FAD rad - to FAD ox in the dark with a time constant of 1.6 min at room temperature is found.

  19. Angry Birds in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halford, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    When space computers first started listening into space radio, they noticed that there were radio noises that happened on the morning side of the Earth. Because these waves sounded like noises birds make in the morning, we named these waves after them. These bird sounding waves can move around the Earth, flying up and down, and sometimes move into an area where there is more stuff. This area is also much colder than where these bird noises are first made. When the waves move into this cold area where there is more stuff, they start to sound like angry birds instead of happy birds. Both of these waves, the happy and angry bird sounding waves, are very important to our understanding of how the tiny things in space move and change. Sometimes the waves which sound like birds can push these tiniest of things into the sky. The happy bird sounding waves can push the tiniest things quickly while the angry bird sounding waves push the tinest of things more slowly. When the tiny things fall into the sky, they create beautiful space lights and light that burns which can hurt people in up goers and not so up goers as well as our things like phones, and space computers. We study these waves that sound like birds to better understand when and where the tiny things will fall. That way we can be prepared and enjoy watching the pretty space lights at night with no worries.

  20. Magnetic field changes activate the trigeminal brainstem complex in a migratory bird

    PubMed Central

    Heyers, Dominik; Zapka, Manuela; Hoffmeister, Mara; Wild, John Martin; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    The upper beak of birds, which contains putative magnetosensory ferro-magnetic structures, is innervated by the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve (V1). However, because of the absence of replicable neurobiological evidence, a general acceptance of the involvement of the trigeminal nerve in magnetoreception is lacking in birds. Using an antibody to ZENK protein to indicate neuronal activation, we here document reliable magnetic activation of neurons in and near the principal (PrV) and spinal tract (SpV) nuclei of the trigeminal brainstem complex, which represent the two brain regions known to receive primary input from the trigeminal nerve. Significantly more neurons were activated in PrV and in medial SpV when European robins (Erithacus rubecula) experienced a magnetic field changing every 30 seconds for a period of 3 h (CMF) than when robins experienced a compensated, zero magnetic field condition (ZMF). No such differences in numbers of activated neurons were found in comparison structures. Under CMF conditions, sectioning of V1 significantly reduced the number of activated neurons in and near PrV and medial SpV, but not in lateral SpV or in the optic tectum. Tract tracing of V1 showed spatial proximity and regional overlap of V1 nerve endings and ZENK-positive (activated) neurons in SpV, and partly in PrV, under CMF conditions. Together, these results suggest that magnetic field changes activate neurons in and near the trigeminal brainstem complex and that V1 is necessary for this activation. We therefore suggest that V1 transmits magnetic information to the brain in this migratory passerine bird. PMID:20439705

  1. FIN219/JAR1 and cryptochrome1 antagonize each other to modulate photomorphogenesis under blue light in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Plant development is affected by the integration of light and phytohormones, including jasmonates (JAs). To address the molecular mechanisms of possible interactions between blue light and JA signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana, we used molecular and transgenic approaches to understand the regulatory relationships between FAR-RED INSENSITIVE 219 (FIN219)/JASMONATE RESISTANT1 (JAR1) and the blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome1 (CRY1). FIN219 overexpression in the wild type resulted in a short-hypocotyl phenotype under blue light. However, FIN219 overexpression in cry1, cry2 and cry1cry2 double mutant backgrounds resulted in phenotypes similar to their respective mutant backgrounds, which suggests that FIN219 function may require blue light photoreceptors. Intriguingly, FIN219 overexpression in transgenic plants harboring ectopic expression of the C terminus of CRY1 (GUS-CCT1), which exhibits a hypersensitive short-hypocotyl phenotype in all light conditions including darkness, led to a rescued phenotype under all light conditions except red light. Further expression studies showed mutual suppression between FIN219 and CRY1 under blue light. Strikingly, FIN219 overexpression in GUS-CCT1 transgenic lines (FIN219-OE/GUS-CCT1) abolished GUS-CCT1 fusion protein under blue light, whereas GUS-CCT1 fusion protein was stable in the fin219-2 mutant background (fin219-2/GUS-CCT1). Moreover, FIN219 strongly interacted with COP1 under blue light, and methyl JA (MeJA) treatment enhanced the interaction between FIN219 and GUS-CCT1 under blue light. Furthermore, FIN219 level affected GUS-CCT1 seedling responses such as anthocyanin accumulation and bacterial resistance under various light conditions and MeJA treatment. Thus, FIN219/JAR1 and CRY1 antagonize each other to modulate photomorphogenic development of seedlings and stress responses in Arabidopsis. PMID:29561841

  2. FIN219/JAR1 and cryptochrome1 antagonize each other to modulate photomorphogenesis under blue light in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huai-Ju; Fu, Tsu-Yu; Yang, Shao-Li; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang

    2018-03-01

    Plant development is affected by the integration of light and phytohormones, including jasmonates (JAs). To address the molecular mechanisms of possible interactions between blue light and JA signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana, we used molecular and transgenic approaches to understand the regulatory relationships between FAR-RED INSENSITIVE 219 (FIN219)/JASMONATE RESISTANT1 (JAR1) and the blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome1 (CRY1). FIN219 overexpression in the wild type resulted in a short-hypocotyl phenotype under blue light. However, FIN219 overexpression in cry1, cry2 and cry1cry2 double mutant backgrounds resulted in phenotypes similar to their respective mutant backgrounds, which suggests that FIN219 function may require blue light photoreceptors. Intriguingly, FIN219 overexpression in transgenic plants harboring ectopic expression of the C terminus of CRY1 (GUS-CCT1), which exhibits a hypersensitive short-hypocotyl phenotype in all light conditions including darkness, led to a rescued phenotype under all light conditions except red light. Further expression studies showed mutual suppression between FIN219 and CRY1 under blue light. Strikingly, FIN219 overexpression in GUS-CCT1 transgenic lines (FIN219-OE/GUS-CCT1) abolished GUS-CCT1 fusion protein under blue light, whereas GUS-CCT1 fusion protein was stable in the fin219-2 mutant background (fin219-2/GUS-CCT1). Moreover, FIN219 strongly interacted with COP1 under blue light, and methyl JA (MeJA) treatment enhanced the interaction between FIN219 and GUS-CCT1 under blue light. Furthermore, FIN219 level affected GUS-CCT1 seedling responses such as anthocyanin accumulation and bacterial resistance under various light conditions and MeJA treatment. Thus, FIN219/JAR1 and CRY1 antagonize each other to modulate photomorphogenic development of seedlings and stress responses in Arabidopsis.

  3. Cryptochrome 2 expression level is critical for adrenocorticotropin stimulation of cortisol production in the capuchin monkey adrenal.

    PubMed

    Torres-Farfan, C; Abarzua-Catalan, L; Valenzuela, F J; Mendez, N; Richter, H G; Valenzuela, G J; Serón-Ferré, M

    2009-06-01

    Timely production of glucocorticoid hormones in response to ACTH is essential for survival by coordinating energy intake and expenditure and acting as homeostatic regulators against stress. Adrenal cortisol response to ACTH is clock time dependent, suggesting that an intrinsic circadian oscillator in the adrenal cortex contributes to modulate the response to ACTH. Circadian clock gene expression has been reported in the adrenal cortex of several species. However, there are no reports accounting for potential involvement of adrenal clock proteins on cortisol response to ACTH. Here we explored whether the clock protein cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) knockdown modifies the adrenal response to ACTH in a primate. Adrenal gland explants from adult capuchin monkey (n = 5) were preincubated for 6 h with transfection vehicle (control) or with two different Cry2 antisense and sense probes followed by 48 h incubation in medium alone (no ACTH) or with 100 nm ACTH. Under control and sense conditions, ACTH increased cortisol production, whereas CRY2 suppression inhibited ACTH-stimulated cortisol production. Expression of the steroidogenic enzymes steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase at 48 h of incubation was increased by ACTH in control explants and suppressed by Cry2 knockdown. Additionally, we found that Cry2 knockdown decreased the expression of the clock gene brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like protein (Bmal1) at the mRNA and protein levels. Altogether these results strongly support that the clock protein CRY2 is involved in the mechanism by which ACTH increases the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Thus, adequate expression levels of components of the adrenal circadian clock are required for an appropriate cortisol response to ACTH.

  4. Vertebrate-like CRYPTOCHROME 2 from monarch regulates circadian transcription via independent repression of CLOCK and BMAL1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Markert, Matthew J.; Groves, Shayna C.; Hardin, Paul E.; Merlin, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Circadian repression of CLOCK-BMAL1 by PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME (CRY) in mammals lies at the core of the circadian timekeeping mechanism. CRY repression of CLOCK-BMAL1 and regulation of circadian period are proposed to rely primarily on competition for binding with coactivators on an α-helix located within the transactivation domain (TAD) of the BMAL1 C terminus. This model has, however, not been tested in vivo. Here, we applied CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis in the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), which possesses a vertebrate-like CRY (dpCRY2) and an ortholog of BMAL1, to show that insect CRY2 regulates circadian repression through TAD α-helix–dependent and –independent mechanisms. Monarch mutants lacking the BMAL1 C terminus including the TAD exhibited arrhythmic eclosion behavior. In contrast, mutants lacking the TAD α-helix but retaining the most distal C-terminal residues exhibited robust rhythms during the first day of constant darkness (DD1), albeit with a delayed peak of eclosion. Phase delay in this mutant on DD1 was exacerbated in the presence of a single functional allele of dpCry2, and rhythmicity was abolished in the absence of dpCRY2. Reporter assays in Drosophila S2 cells further revealed that dpCRY2 represses through two distinct mechanisms: a TAD-dependent mechanism that involves the dpBMAL1 TAD α-helix and dpCLK W328 and a TAD-independent mechanism involving dpCLK E333. Together, our results provide evidence for independent mechanisms of vertebrate-like CRY circadian regulation on the BMAL1 C terminus and the CLK PAS-B domain and demonstrate the importance of a BMAL1 TAD-independent mechanism for generating circadian rhythms in vivo. PMID:28831003

  5. Vertebrate-like CRYPTOCHROME 2 from monarch regulates circadian transcription via independent repression of CLOCK and BMAL1 activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Markert, Matthew J; Groves, Shayna C; Hardin, Paul E; Merlin, Christine

    2017-09-05

    Circadian repression of CLOCK-BMAL1 by PERIOD and CRYPTOCHROME (CRY) in mammals lies at the core of the circadian timekeeping mechanism. CRY repression of CLOCK-BMAL1 and regulation of circadian period are proposed to rely primarily on competition for binding with coactivators on an α-helix located within the transactivation domain (TAD) of the BMAL1 C terminus. This model has, however, not been tested in vivo. Here, we applied CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis in the monarch butterfly ( Danaus plexippus ), which possesses a vertebrate-like CRY (dpCRY2) and an ortholog of BMAL1, to show that insect CRY2 regulates circadian repression through TAD α-helix-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Monarch mutants lacking the BMAL1 C terminus including the TAD exhibited arrhythmic eclosion behavior. In contrast, mutants lacking the TAD α-helix but retaining the most distal C-terminal residues exhibited robust rhythms during the first day of constant darkness (DD1), albeit with a delayed peak of eclosion. Phase delay in this mutant on DD1 was exacerbated in the presence of a single functional allele of dpCry2 , and rhythmicity was abolished in the absence of dpCRY2. Reporter assays in Drosophila S2 cells further revealed that dpCRY2 represses through two distinct mechanisms: a TAD-dependent mechanism that involves the dpBMAL1 TAD α-helix and dpCLK W328 and a TAD-independent mechanism involving dpCLK E333. Together, our results provide evidence for independent mechanisms of vertebrate-like CRY circadian regulation on the BMAL1 C terminus and the CLK PAS-B domain and demonstrate the importance of a BMAL1 TAD-independent mechanism for generating circadian rhythms in vivo.

  6. [Influence of extremely low-frequency magnetic field on circadian rhythm of cryptochrome in mouse embryonic fibroblasts].

    PubMed

    Sun, Z Y; Geng, D Y; Chen, C F; Wang, P P; Song, T

    2017-06-20

    Objective: To investigate the influence of extremely low-frequency magnetic field on periodical expression of cryptochrome ( Cry ) gene in mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH3T3 cells. Methods: The NIH3T3 cells were divided into magnetic field group and sham-exposure group. The NIH3T3 cells in the magnetic field group were stimulated by horse serum and then exposed to an extremely low-frequency magnetic field (50 Hz and 0.3 mT) for 48 hours, and those in the sham-exposure group were also stimulated by horse serum and then exposed to a coil for 48 hours. The NIH3T3 cells were collected, total RNA was extracted, and cDNA was obtained via reverse transcription. Real-time fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR was used to measure the changes in transcription cycles of Cry and Period genes in both groups. Results: There was no significant difference in the proliferation rate at 0, 12, 24, and 48 hours of exposure between the two groups ( P >0.05) . Both sham-exposure group and magnetic field group showed a rhythmic change in the expression of Cry gene, and compared with the sham-exposure group, the magnetic field group had a significantly shortened circadian rhythm of Cry gene in NIH3T3 cells ( t =2.57, P <0.05) . Both groups had rhythmic and periodical expression of Period gene and there was no significant difference between the two groups ( t =0.70, P >0.05) . Conclusion: Extremely low-frequency magnetic field can significantly shorten the circadian rhythm of Cry gene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, while there is no significant change in the circadian rhythm of Period gene.

  7. Nature Photography - Birds

    2017-01-04

    A Great Blue Heron wades in a waterway at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The center shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The bird is one of more than 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles that call Kennedy and the wildlife refuge home.

  8. Nature Photography - Birds

    2017-01-04

    A snowy egret perches on a branch near a waterway at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The center shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The bird is one of more than 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles that call Kennedy and the wildlife refuge home.

  9. Lori Bird | NREL

    , Nickie Menemenlis, Antje Orths, Peter Borre Eriksen, J. Charles Smith, Lennart Soder, Poul Sorensen Sustainable Energy Reviews Vol. 65 November 2016 pp. 577-586. Jenny Heeter, Jeffrey J. Cook, Lori Bird. 2017 -6A20-64011. Bird, L., J. Cochran, and X. Wang. 2014. Wind and Solar Energy Curtailment: Experience and

  10. Migratory Birds. Issue Pac.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of an overview, teaching guides and student data sheets for three activities, and a poster. The overview discusses why, how, where, and when birds migrate as well as problems birds encounter while migrating; the importance of research…

  11. Magical Morning Birds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Cynthia Cox

    1999-01-01

    Presents a lesson where second- and third-grade students draw imaginary birds after examining pictures of real birds to get ideas for various poses. Explains the use of colors where the students learn to blend colors using an art technique called "rainbow order." (CMK)

  12. Theoretical Analysis of an Iron Mineral-Based Magnetoreceptor Model in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Greiner, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Sensing the magnetic field has been established as an essential part of navigation and orientation of various animals for many years. Only recently has the first detailed receptor concept for magnetoreception been published based on histological and physical results. The considered mechanism involves two types of iron minerals (magnetite and maghemite) that were found in subcellular compartments within sensory dendrites of the upper beak of several bird species. But so far a quantitative evaluation of the proposed receptor is missing. In this article, we develop a theoretical model to quantitatively and qualitatively describe the magnetic field effects among particles containing iron minerals. The analysis of forces acting between these subcellular compartments shows a particular dependence on the orientation of the external magnetic field. The iron minerals in the beak are found in the form of crystalline maghemite platelets and assemblies of magnetite nanoparticles. We demonstrate that the pull or push to the magnetite assemblies, which are connected to the cell membrane, may reach a value of 0.2 pN—sufficient to excite specific mechanoreceptive membrane channels in the nerve cell. The theoretical analysis of the assumed magnetoreceptor system in the avian beak skin clearly shows that it might indeed be a sensitive biological magnetometer providing an essential part of the magnetic map for navigation. PMID:17496012

  13. Magnetic orientation in birds: non-compass responses under monochromatic light of increased intensity.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Munro, Ursula; Ford, Hugh; Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2003-10-22

    Migratory Australian silvereyes (Zosterops lateralis) were tested under monochromatic light at wavelengths of 424 nm blue and 565 nm green. At a low light level of 7 x 10(15) quanta m(-2) s(-1) in the local geomagnetic field, the birds preferred their seasonally appropriate southern migratory direction under both wavelengths. Their reversal of headings when the vertical component of the magnetic field was inverted indicated normal use of the avian inclination compass. A higher light intensity of 43 x 10(15) quanta m(-2) s(-1), however, caused a fundamental change in behaviour: under bright blue, the silvereyes showed an axial tendency along the east-west axis; under bright green, they showed a unimodal preference of a west-northwesterly direction that followed a shift in magnetic north, but was not reversed by inverting the vertical component of the magnetic field. Hence it is not based on the inclination compass. The change in behaviour at higher light intensities suggests a complex interaction between at least two receptors. The polar nature of the response under bright green cannot be explained by the current models of light-dependent magnetoreception and will lead to new considerations on these receptive processes.

  14. THE RADIOSENSITIVITY OF BIRDS

    SciT

    Kushnuruk, V.A.

    1962-01-01

    ABS>Earlier reports suggest that the radiosensitivity of birds varies according to the systematic position of the species in question. To study this question in greater detail, birds belonging to different species were exposed to x rays and the LD/sub 50/ for 30 days recorded. During exposure, the birds were kept in a small cage but could move freely. Five different species were investigated: the greenfinch (Chloris chloris L.), goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis L.), linnet (Acantis cannabina L.), house sparrow (Passer domesticus), and the canary (Serinus canarina L.). It appeared that the radiosensitivity of the birds moved within a fairly narrow rangemore » quite independently of the species. The LD/ sub 50/ for 30 days varied in the 5 species in question between 400 and 625 r. All birds showed disorders of the coordination of movements, in the reflex governing the picking of food, in flight, and in perching. (OTS)« less

  15. Spermiogenesis in birds

    PubMed Central

    Aire, Tom A

    2014-01-01

    Current knowledge on avian spermiogenesis, including strengths and weaknesses, has been reviewed. Information on avian spermiogenesis considerably lags behind that in mammals because of the paucity of reports in birds. Spermiogenesis in passerine birds has received even much less attention than in non-passerine birds. Mechanisms underlying morphogenesis of the acrosome and nucleus, and roles of microtubular assemblies are poorly understood. The proximal centriole found in non-passerine birds, but hitherto considered to be absent in passerine birds, has recently been described in spermatids and mature spermatozoa of 2 passeridan species, including the Masked weaver for which new and detailed spermiogenetic information is provided in this review. A great deal more studies on spermiogenesis, and spermatogenesis generally, in various avian species are required to considerably enhance knowledge of this phenomenon, contribute to comparative spermatology, provide a basis for appropriate applied studies, and contribute to understanding of phylogeny in this vast order of vertebrates. PMID:26413401

  16. Miscellaneous herpesviruses of birds

    Hansen, W.

    1999-01-01

    Herpesviruses other than duck plague and inclusion body disease of cranes (see Chapters 16 and 17 in this Section) have been isolated from many groups of wild birds. The diseases that these viruses cause have been described, but their comparative taxonomy and host ranges require additional study. All of these DNA viruses are classified in the family Herpesviridae, but they belong to various taxonomic subfamilies. The mechanisms for transmitting avian herpesviruses appear to be direct bird-to-bird contact and exposure to a virus-contaminated environment. The virus is transmitted to raptors and owls when they feed on infected prey that serve as a source of virus exposure. The development of disease carriers among birds that survive infection is typical of herpesvirus. Stress induced by many different factors is often associated with the onset of virus shedding by carrier birds resulting in the occurrence and spread of clinical disease.

  17. Cryptochrome 1 regulates growth and development in Brassica through alteration in the expression of genes involved in light, phytohormone and stress signalling.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pooja; Chatterjee, Mithu; Burman, Naini; Khurana, Jitendra P

    2014-04-01

    The blue light photoreceptors cryptochromes are ubiquitous in higher plants and are vital for regulating plant growth and development. In spite of being involved in controlling agronomically important traits like plant height and flowering time, cryptochromes have not been extensively characterized from agriculturally important crops. Here we show that overexpression of CRY1 from Brassica napus (BnCRY1), an oilseed crop, results in short-statured Brassica transgenics, likely to be less prone to wind and water lodging. The overexpression of BnCRY1 accentuates the inhibition of cell elongation in hypocotyls of transgenic seedlings. The analysis of hypocotyl growth inhibition and anthocyanin accumulation responses in BnCRY1 overexpressors substantiates that regulation of seedling photomorphogenesis by cry1 is dependent on light intensity. This study highlights that the photoactivated cry1 acts through coordinated induction and suppression of specific downstream genes involved in phytohormone synthesis or signalling, and those involved in cell wall modification, during de-etiolation of Brassica seedlings. The microarray-based transcriptome profiling also suggests that the overexpression of BnCRY1 alters abiotic/biotic stress signalling pathways; the transgenic seedlings were apparently oversensitive to abscisic acid (ABA) and mannitol. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Residues at a Single Site Differentiate Animal Cryptochromes from Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimer Photolyases by Affecting the Proteins' Preferences for Reduced FAD.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Wen, Bin; Wang, Yuan; Tian, Changqing; Wu, Mingcai; Zhu, Guoping

    2017-06-19

    Cryptochromes (CRYs) and photolyases belong to the cryptochrome/photolyase family (CPF). Reduced FAD is essential for photolyases to photorepair UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) or 6-4 photoproducts in DNA. In Drosophila CRY (dCRY, a type I animal CRY), FAD is converted to the anionic radical but not to the reduced state upon illumination, which might induce a conformational change in the protein to relay the light signal downstream. To explore the foundation of these differences, multiple sequence alignment of 650 CPF protein sequences was performed. We identified a site facing FAD (Ala377 in Escherichia coli CPD photolyase and Val415 in dCRY), hereafter referred to as "site 377", that was distinctly conserved across these sequences: CPD photolyases often had Ala, Ser, or Asn at this site, whereas animal CRYs had Ile, Leu, or Val. The binding affinity for reduced FAD, but not the photorepair activity of E. coli photolyase, was dramatically impaired when replacing Ala377 with any of the three CRY residues. Conversely, in V415S and V415N mutants of dCRY, FAD was photoreduced to its fully reduced state after prolonged illumination, and light-dependent conformational changes of these mutants were severely inhibited. We speculate that the residues at site 377 play a key role in the different preferences of CPF proteins for reduced FAD, which differentiate animal CRYs from CPD photolyases. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Unique Aspects of Cryptochrome in Chronobiology and Metabolism, Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction, and Regeneration: Research into Cysteine414-Alanine Mutant CRY1.

    PubMed

    Okano, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome proteins (CRYs), which can bind noncovalently to cofactor (chromophore) flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), occur widely among organisms. CRYs play indispensable roles in the generation of circadian rhythm in mammals. Transgenic mice (Tg mice), ubiquitously expressing mouse CRY1 having a mutation in which cysteine414 (the zinc-binding site of CRY1) being replaced with alanine, display unique phenotypes in their circadian rhythms. Moreover, male Tg mice exhibit symptoms of diabetes characterized by beta-cell dysfunction, resembling human maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY). The lowered proliferation of β -cells is a primary cause of age-dependent β -cell loss. Furthermore, unusually enlarged duct-like structures developed prominently in the Tg mice pancreases. The duct-like structures contained insulin-positive cells, suggesting neogenesis of β -cells in the Tg mice. This review, based mainly on the author's investigation of the unique features of Tg mice, presents reported results and recent findings related to molecular processes associated with mammalian cryptochromes, especially their involvement in the regulation of metabolism. New information is described with emphasis on the aspects of islet architecture, pancreatic β -cell dysfunction, and regeneration.

  20. [Birds' sense of direction].

    PubMed

    Hohtola, Esa

    2016-01-01

    Birds utilize several distinct sensory systems in a flexible manner in their navigation. When navigating with the help of landmarks, location of the sun and stars, or polarization image of the dome of the sky, they resort to vision. The significance of olfaction in long-range navigation has been under debate, even though its significance in local orientation is well documented. The hearing in birds extends to the infrasound region. It has been assumed that they are able to hear the infrasounds generated in the mountains and seaside and navigate by using them. Of the senses of birds, the most exotic one is the ability to sense magnetic fields of the earth.

  1. Melatonin and cryptochrome 2 in metabolic syndrome patients with or without diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Al-Sarraf, Ibrahim Abdul Kareem; Kasabri, Violet; Akour, Amal; Naffa, Randa

    2018-05-29

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic risk factors which increases the chances for future cardiovascular diseases, as well as diabetes. The underlying causes of MetS include overweight and obesity, physical inactivity and genetic factors. Our intension here was to focus in this study on the importance of the chronobiology, represented by melatonin (MT) and cryptochrome 2 (CRY2), in developing MetS and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Thus, we aimed to compare MT and CRY2 plasma levels and correlate both biomarkers with adiposity, atherogenicity and hematological indices in MetS and T2DM cohorts. Methods In a cross-sectional study, 28 normoglycemic lean subjects (controls), 29 normoglycemic MetS subjects and 30 MetS (pre-diabetic/diabetic) were recruited. Results MT (pg/mL) was elevated significantly in MetS arm p-value < 0.05, whereas CRY2 levels (ng/mL) were markedly higher in both MetS groups (non-diabetic and pre-diabetic/diabetic) (all with p-value < 0.001). A reciprocal MT-CRY2 relationship was observed in the MetS (non-diabetic) group (p-value = 0.003). Of note in the total study population, both MT and CRY2 proportionally correlated with each of the following: atherogenicity index of plasma (AIP), waist circumference (WC) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) (all with p-value < 0.05) for MT and CRY2, respectively). Whereas MT correlated inversely with high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) (p-value < 0.05). Additionally, CRY2 correlated directly with each of the following: diastolic blood pressure (DBP), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), hip circumference (HC), body adiposity index (BAI), weight-to-height (WHtR) ratio, mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) (p-value < 0.05). Conclusion These findings substantiate that both metabolic risk biomarkers can be prognostic tools and pharmacotherapeutic targets to slowdown the accelerated nature of T2DM.

  2. Bird Communities of Southern Forests

    William C. Hunter; James G. Dickson; David N. Pashley; Paul B. Hamel

    2002-01-01

    Birds constitute a high-profile group of species that attract a great deal of attention as watchable wildlife. Also, birds are important as indicators of habitat conditions and environmental health. Compared to other groups of animals and plants, birds are relatively conspicuous and can be easily monitored. Available information on bird ecology is substantial, but...

  3. Nuisance Birds Webinar Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    All over the nation, birds of all shapes and sizes attempt to make schools a their favorite hangout. Their arrival can lead to sanitation issues, added facility degradation, distracted students and health problems.

  4. Formax Preserved Birds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Philip

    1978-01-01

    A quick, simple method for preserving bird specimens using borax and a formalin solution is described. Procedures for injecting and mounting the specimens are given along with certain restrictions on preserving specimens. (MA)

  5. Awesome Audubon Birds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahler, Laura

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a watercolor art lesson on Audubon birds. She also discusses how science, technology, writing skills, and the elements and principles of art can be incorporated into the lesson.

  6. Calcium metabolism in birds.

    PubMed

    de Matos, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    Calcium is one of the most important plasma constituents in mammals and birds. It provides structural strength and support (bones and eggshell) and plays vital roles in many of the biochemical reactions in the body. The control of calcium metabolism in birds is highly efficient and closely regulated in a number of tissues, primarily parathyroid gland, intestine, kidney, and bone. The hormones with the greatest involvement in calcium regulation in birds are parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (calcitriol), and estrogen, with calcitonin playing a minor and uncertain role. The special characteristics of calcium metabolism in birds, mainly associated with egg production, are discussed, along with common clinical disorders secondary to derangements in calcium homeostasis.

  7. Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread Bird Flu to People Interim Guidance on Testing Pandemic Flu Key Information Prevention & Treatment Influenza A Type Viruses & Subtypes Transmission of Avian Influenza A Viruses Between Animals and People Related Links Research Glossary of Influenza ( ...

  8. Bird Vision System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Bird Vision system is a multicamera photogrammerty software application that runs on a Microsoft Windows XP platform and was developed at Kennedy Space Center by ASRC Aerospace. This software system collects data about the locations of birds within a volume centered on the Space Shuttle and transmits it in real time to the laptop computer of a test director in the Launch Control Center (LCC) Firing Room.

  9. Modeling birds on wires.

    PubMed

    Aydoğdu, A; Frasca, P; D'Apice, C; Manzo, R; Thornton, J M; Gachomo, B; Wilson, T; Cheung, B; Tariq, U; Saidel, W; Piccoli, B

    2017-02-21

    In this paper we introduce a mathematical model to study the group dynamics of birds resting on wires. The model is agent-based and postulates attraction-repulsion forces between the interacting birds: the interactions are "topological", in the sense that they involve a given number of neighbors irrespective of their distance. The model is first mathematically analyzed and then simulated to study its main properties: we observe that the model predicts birds to be more widely spaced near the borders of each group. We compare the results from the model with experimental data, derived from the analysis of pictures of pigeons and starlings taken in New Jersey: two different image elaboration protocols allow us to establish a good agreement with the model and to quantify its main parameters. We also discuss the potential handedness of the birds, by analyzing the group organization features and the group dynamics at the arrival of new birds. Finally, we propose a more refined mathematical model that describes landing and departing birds by suitable stochastic processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Two Cryptochrome/Photolyase Family Proteins Fulfill Distinct Roles in DNA Photorepair and Regulation of Conidiation in the Gray Mold Fungus Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Cohrs, Kim C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The plant-pathogenic leotiomycete Botrytis cinerea is known for the strict regulation of its asexual differentiation programs by environmental light conditions. Sclerotia are formed in constant darkness; black/near-UV (NUV) light induces conidiation; and blue light represses both differentiation programs. Sensing of black/NUV light is attributed to proteins of the cryptochrome/photolyase family (CPF). To elucidate the molecular basis of the photoinduction of conidiation, we functionally characterized the two CPF proteins encoded in the genome of B. cinerea as putative positive-acting components. B. cinerea CRY1 (BcCRY1), a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyase, acts as the major enzyme of light-driven DNA repair (photoreactivation) and has no obvious role in signaling. In contrast, BcCRY2, belonging to the cry-DASH proteins, is dispensable for photorepair but performs regulatory functions by repressing conidiation in white and especially black/NUV light. The transcription of bccry1 and bccry2 is induced by light in a White Collar complex (WCC)-dependent manner, but neither light nor the WCC is essential for the repression of conidiation through BcCRY2 when bccry2 is constitutively expressed. Further, BcCRY2 affects the transcript levels of both WCC-induced and WCC-repressed genes, suggesting a signaling function downstream of the WCC. Since both CPF proteins are dispensable for photoinduction by black/NUV light, the origin of this effect remains elusive and may be connected to a yet unknown UV-light-responsive system. IMPORTANCE Botrytis cinerea is an economically important plant pathogen that causes gray mold diseases in a wide variety of plant species, including high-value crops and ornamental flowers. The spread of disease in the field relies on the formation of conidia, a process that is regulated by different light qualities. While this feature has been known for a long time, we are just starting to understand the underlying molecular

  11. A Field Guide to Common Educator Birds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smock, Judith N.

    1990-01-01

    Teaching may be for the birds, but many educator birds have been abandoning the field of late for downier nests. Several species still remain, including the crown-tufted superintendent bird, the red-throated assistant superintendent bird, the crested fly-catcher principal bird, the exotic scenery bird, the roadrunner psychologist bird, and the…

  12. Sex Reversal in Birds.

    PubMed

    Major, Andrew T; Smith, Craig A

    2016-01-01

    Sexual differentiation in birds is controlled genetically as in mammals, although the sex chromosomes are different. Males have a ZZ sex chromosome constitution, while females are ZW. Gene(s) on the sex chromosomes must initiate gonadal sex differentiation during embryonic life, inducing paired testes in ZZ individuals and unilateral ovaries in ZW individuals. The traditional view of avian sexual differentiation aligns with that expounded for other vertebrates; upon sexual differentiation, the gonads secrete sex steroid hormones that masculinise or feminise the rest of the body. However, recent studies on naturally occurring or experimentally induced avian sex reversal suggest a significant role for direct genetic factors, in addition to sex hormones, in regulating sexual differentiation of the soma in birds. This review will provide an overview of sex determination in birds and both naturally and experimentally induced sex reversal, with emphasis on the key role of oestrogen. We then consider how recent studies on sex reversal and gynandromorphic birds (half male:half female) are shaping our understanding of sexual differentiation in avians and in vertebrates more broadly. Current evidence shows that sexual differentiation in birds is a mix of direct genetic and hormonal mechanisms. Perturbation of either of these components may lead to sex reversal. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Rabbits killing birds revisited.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jimin; Fan, Meng; Kuang, Yang

    2006-09-01

    We formulate and study a three-species population model consisting of an endemic prey (bird), an alien prey (rabbit) and an alien predator (cat). Our model overcomes several model construction problems in existing models. Moreover, our model generates richer, more reasonable and realistic dynamics. We explore the possible control strategies to save or restore the bird by controlling or eliminating the rabbit or the cat when the bird is endangered. We confirm the existence of the hyperpredation phenomenon, which is a big potential threat to most endemic prey. Specifically, we show that, in an endemic prey-alien prey-alien predator system, eradication of introduced predators such as the cat alone is not always the best solution to protect endemic insular prey since predator control may fail to protect the indigenous prey when the control of the introduced prey is not carried out simultaneously.

  14. Aging in Birds.

    PubMed

    Travin, D Y; Feniouk, B A

    2016-12-01

    Rodents are the most commonly used model organisms in studies of aging in vertebrates. However, there are species that may suit this role much better. Most birds (Aves), having higher rate of metabolism, live two-to-three times longer than mammals of the same size. This mini-review briefly covers several evolutionary, ecological, and physiological aspects that may contribute to the phenomenon of birds' longevity. The role of different molecular mechanisms known to take part in the process of aging according to various existing theories, e.g. telomere shortening, protection against reactive oxygen species, and formation of advanced glycation end-products is discussed. We also address some features of birds' aging that make this group unique and perspective model organisms in longevity studies.

  15. Wildlife Photography - Birds

    2017-12-14

    Seagulls gather along a shoreline at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Kennedy shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge encompasses 140,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fish, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  16. Wildlife Photography - Birds

    2017-12-14

    A wild turkey is seen at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Kennedy shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge encompasses 140,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fish, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  17. Wildlife Photography - Birds

    2017-12-14

    A little green heron is perched in a tree at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Kennedy shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge encompasses 140,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fish, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  18. Wildlife Photography - Birds

    2017-12-14

    A snowy egret is seen at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Kennedy shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge encompasses 140,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fish, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  19. Wildlife Photography - Birds

    2017-12-14

    Ducks gather in a waterway at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Kennedy shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge encompasses 140,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fish, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  20. LiteBIRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishino, Hirokazu

    2016-07-01

    We present LiteBIRD, a satellite project dedicated for the detection of the CMB B-mode polarization. The purpose of LiteBIRD is to measure the tensor-to-scalar ratio r with a precision of σr < 0.001 to test large-single-field slow-roll inflation models by scanning all the sky area for three years at the sun-earth L2 with the sensitivity of 3.2μKṡarcmin. We report an overview and the status of the project, including the ongoing detector and systematic studies.

  1. The Physics of Data: Can your degree in condensed matter theory get you a job at Google?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, Jeff M.

    2015-03-01

    Migratory birds travel spectacular distances, navigating and orienting by a variety of means, most of which are poorly understood. Among them is a remarkable ability to perceive the intensity and direction of the Earth's magnetic field. Biologically credible mechanisms for the sensing of such weak fields (25-65 microtesla) are scarce and in recent years just two proposals have emerged as frontrunners. One involves biogenic iron-containing nanoparticles; the other relies on the magnetic sensitivity of short-lived photochemical intermediates known as radical pairs. The latter began to attract attention following the proposal 15 years ago that the necessary physics and chemistry could take place in the bird's retina in specialised photoactive proteins called cryptochromes. The coherent dynamics of the electron-nuclear spin systems of pairs of photo-induced radicals is conjectured to form the basis of the sensing mechanism even though the interaction of an electron spin with the geomagnetic field is six orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal energy. The possibility that slowing decohering, entangled electron spins could form the basis of an important sensory mechanism has qualified radical pair magnetoreception for a place under the umbrella of ``Quantum Biology.'' In this talk, I will introduce the radical pair mechanism, comment on the roles of entanglement and quantum coherence, outline some of the experimental evidence for the cryptochrome hypothesis, and summarize what still needs to be done to determine whether birds (and maybe other animals) really do use a chemical compass to find their way around.

  2. Nature Photography - Birds

    2017-01-04

    A Cooper's hawk takes flight from the branches of a small tree at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The center shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. More than 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles call Kennedy and the wildlife refuge home.

  3. Nature Photography - Birds

    2017-01-04

    A Cooper's hawk perches on branch of a small tree at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The center shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. More than 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles call Kennedy and the wildlife refuge home.

  4. Nature Photography - Birds

    2017-01-04

    A common gallinule swims in a waterway at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The center shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. More than 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles call Kennedy and the wildlife refuge home.

  5. Nature Photography - Birds

    2016-12-12

    A flock of egrets soars above the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, near NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge is home to more than 65 amphibian and reptile species, along with 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammal and 117 fish species.

  6. Nature Photography - Birds

    2016-12-12

    A flock of egrets touches down near the Skid Strip at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, near NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge is home to more than 65 amphibian and reptile species, along with 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammal and 117 fish species.

  7. Cavity Nesting Birds

    Virgil E. Scott; Keith E. Evans; David R. Patton; Charles P. Stone

    1977-01-01

    Many species of cavity-nesting birds have declined because of habitat reduction. In the eastern United States, where primeval forests are gone, purple martins depend almost entirely on man-made nesting structures (Allen and Nice 1952). The hole-nesting population of peregrine falcons disappeared with the felling of the giant trees upon which they depended (Hickey and...

  8. Fish, birds and flies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbings, J. C.

    2013-04-01

    The article in your animal physics special issue on the use of magnetic field sensing in bird navigation (November 2012 pp38-42) reminded me of a comment made regarding a paper that I presented in the US many years ago.

  9. Birds Kept as Pets

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Animal Product Import Information U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA/APHIS) Non-U.S. Origin Pet Birds U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA/APHIS) ...

  10. Bird community composition

    Antrobus, T.J.; Guilfoyle, M.P.; Barrow, W.C.; Hamel, P.B.; Wakeley, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    Neotropical migrants are birds that breed in North America and winter primarily in Central and South America. Long-term population studies of birds in the Eastern United States indicated declines of some forest-dwelling birds, many of which winter in the Neotropics (Peterjohn and others 1995). These declines were attributed to loss of wintering and breeding habitat due to deforestation and fragmentation, respectively. Many species of Nearctic migrants--birds that breed in the northern regions of North America and winter in the Southern United States--are also experiencing population declines. Because large areas of undistrubed, older, bottomland hardwood forests oftern contain large numbers of habitat specialists, including forest-interior neotropical migrants and wintering Nearctic migrants, these forests may be critical in maintaining avian diversity. This study had two primary objectivs: (1) to create a baseline data set that can be used as a standard against which other bottomland hardwood forests can be compared, and (2) to establish long-term monitoring stations during both breeding and wintering seasons to discern population trends of avian species using bottomland hardwood forests.

  11. Wildlife Photography - Birds

    2017-05-04

    Common gallinules search for food in a waterway at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The center shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. More than 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles call Kennedy and the wildlife refuge home.

  12. Wildlife Photography - Birds

    2017-05-04

    Three glossy ibises walk through a marshy area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The center shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. More than 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles call Kennedy and the wildlife refuge home.

  13. Wildlife Photography - Birds

    2017-05-04

    A juvenile white ibis stands in a waterway at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The center shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. More than 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles call Kennedy and the wildlife refuge home.

  14. Wildlife Photography - Birds

    2017-05-04

    A snowy egret perches on a branch at the shoreline of a waterway at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The center shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. More than 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles call Kennedy and the wildlife refuge home.

  15. Wildlife Photography - Birds

    2017-05-04

    A glossy ibis searches for food in a marshy area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The center shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. More than 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles call Kennedy and the wildlife refuge home.

  16. Wildlife Photography - Birds

    2017-05-04

    A red-winged blackbird perches on a fire hydrant at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The center shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. More than 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles call Kennedy and the wildlife refuge home.

  17. Wildlife Photography - Birds

    2017-05-04

    A juvenile heron wades in a waterway at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The center shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. More than 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles call Kennedy and the wildlife refuge home.

  18. Wildlife Photography - Birds

    2017-05-04

    Common gallinules swim in a shallow waterway at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The center shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. More than 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles call Kennedy and the wildlife refuge home.

  19. Birds of Prey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Harriet

    Introducing students to different hawks and owls found in Wisconsin and building a basis for appreciation of these birds in their own environment is the purpose of this teacher's guide. Primarily geared for upper elementary and junior high grades, the concepts presented could be used in conjunction with the study of ecology. A filmstrip is…

  20. Birds. Nature Discovery I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Sally F.

    The birds of New England and their particular habitats are explored in this guide which is part of a series of Nature Discovery publications. The materials are designed to directly supplement the natural science curricula and to complement other subject areas including social studies, language arts, music, and art. The program is designed for…

  1. Eating Like a Bird.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brothers, Chris; Fortner, Rosanne W.

    This teacher guide and student workbook set contains two learning activities, designed for fifth through ninth grade students, that concentrate on the adaptations of shorebird beaks for a variety of habitats and food sources, and the effect of toxic chemicals in the food chain on the birds. In activity A, students discover how shorebirds are…

  2. 9 CFR 93.104 - Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... been vaccinated with with a vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza; (5) That Newcastle...) of this subchapter as a region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists; and (7) That the birds... vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza; (6) That Newcastle disease did not occur anywhere on...

  3. 9 CFR 93.104 - Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... been vaccinated with with a vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza; (5) That Newcastle...) of this subchapter as a region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists; and (7) That the birds... vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza; (6) That Newcastle disease did not occur anywhere on...

  4. 9 CFR 93.104 - Certificate for pet birds, commercial birds, zoological birds, and research birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... been vaccinated with with a vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza; (5) That Newcastle...) of this subchapter as a region where highly pathogenic avian influenza exists; and (7) That the birds... vaccine for the H5 or H7 subtype of avian influenza; (6) That Newcastle disease did not occur anywhere on...

  5. Timber and forest birds

    Brian Roy Lockhart

    2009-01-01

    Many years ago, I had an epiphany that I would like to share. Several students and I were installing research plots in the forests on Pittman Island, Issaquena County, Mississippi, an island adjacent to the Mississippi River, near the borders of Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana. While eating lunch, we watched a bird, more specifically a prothonotary warbler (

  6. Birds of Cimarron National Grassland

    Ted T. Cable; Scott Seltman; Kevin J. Cook

    1996-01-01

    Bird records for the Cimarron National Grassland were collected from literature searches and unpublished field notes submitted by cooperators. Almost 14,000 bird records were compiled in a data file. Based on these data, the status of each bird species reported to have occurred on the Cimarron National Grassland was established. In addition to the species accounts, the...

  7. Birds of Prey of Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamerstrom, Frances

    This copiously illustrated document is designed to be a field quide to birds of prey that are common to Wisconsin, as well as to some that enter the state occasionally. An introduction discusses birds of prey with regard to migration patterns, the relationship between common names and the attitudes of people toward certain birds, and natural signs…

  8. Biological objectives for bird populations

    Jonathan Bart; Mark Koneff; Steve Wendt

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the development of population based objectives for birds. The concept of population based objectives for bird conservation lies at the core of planning in the North American Bird Conservation Initiative. Clear objectives are needed as a basis for partnership, and a basis for program evaluation in an adaptive context. In the case of waterfowl,...

  9. Science Is for the Birds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potenza, Susan Ade

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses a five-month interdisciplinary bird study that she designed for her seventh-grade students that combines life science, technology, writing, art, mathematics, social studies and literature. The driving force behind this yearly unit is the BirdSleuth eBird program (formerly the Cornell University Classroom…

  10. Birding--Fun and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    This feature article presents the basics of birding, or bird watching, and discusses its appeal, especially to serious birders. A section on "citizen scientists" explains organizations that collect data on birds and describes projects they organize. Other sections discuss the legacy of John James Audubon and the bald eagle.

  11. Winter bird population studies and project prairie birds for surveying grassland birds

    Daniel J. Twedt; Paul B. Hamel; Mark S. Woodrey

    2008-01-01

    We compared 2 survey methods for assessing winter bird communities in temperate grasslands: Winter Bird Population Study surveys are area-searches that have long been used in a variety of habitats whereas Project Prairie Bird surveys employ active-flushing techniques on strip-transects and are intended for use in grasslands.

  12. Alien invasive birds.

    PubMed

    Brochier, B; Vangeluwe, D; van den Berg, T

    2010-08-01

    A bird species is regarded as alien invasive if it has been introduced, intentionally or accidentally, to a location where it did not previously occur naturally, becomes capable of establishing a breeding population without further intervention by humans, spreads and becomes a pest affecting the environment, the local biodiversity, the economy and/or society, including human health. European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris), Common Myna (Acridotheres tristis) and Red-vented Bulbul (Pycnonotus cafer) have been included on the list of '100 of the World's Worst Invasive Alien Species', a subset of the Global Invasive Species Database. The 'Delivering Alien Invasive Species Inventories for Europe' project has selected Canada Goose (Branta canadensis), Ruddy Duck (Oxyura jamaicensis), Rose-ringed Parakeet (Psittacula krameri) and Sacred Ibis (Threskiornis aethiopicus) as among 100 of the worst invasive species in Europe. For each of these alien bird species, the geographic range (native and introduced range), the introduction pathway, the general impacts and the management methods are presented.

  13. Wildlife Photography - Birds

    2017-05-04

    An osprey sits in its nest atop a wooden speaker pole at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the background is the NASA insignia on the exterior of the iconic Vehicle Assemble Building. The center shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. More than 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles call Kennedy and the wildlife refuge home.

  14. Nature Photography - Birds

    2017-01-04

    An Anhinga perches on a branch in an area of underbrush at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Anhinga is also known as a Water-Turkey for its swimming habits and broad tail. The center shares a border with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. More than 330 native and migratory bird species, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles call Kennedy and the wildlife refuge home.

  15. Winter bird population studies and project prairie birds for surveying grassland birds

    Twedt, D.J.; Hamel, P.B.; Woodrey, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    We compared 2 survey methods for assessing winter bird communities in temperate grasslands: Winter Bird Population Study surveys are area-searches that have long been used in a variety of habitats whereas Project Prairie Bird surveys employ active-flushing techniques on strip-transects and are intended for use in grasslands. We used both methods to survey birds on 14 herbaceous reforested sites and 9 coastal pine savannas during winter and compared resultant estimates of species richness and relative abundance. These techniques did not yield similar estimates of avian populations. We found Winter Bird Population Studies consistently produced higher estimates of species richness, whereas Project Prairie Birds produced higher estimates of avian abundance for some species. When it is important to identify all species within the winter bird community, Winter Bird Population Studies should be the survey method of choice. If estimates of the abundance of relatively secretive grassland bird species are desired, the use of Project Prairie Birds protocols is warranted. However, we suggest that both survey techniques, as currently employed, are deficient and recommend distance- based survey methods that provide species-specific estimates of detection probabilities be incorporated into these survey methods.

  16. Access to bird population data

    Martin, E.; Peterjohn, B.G.; Koneff, M.D.

    2001-01-01

    Access to bird population data is critical for effective conservation planning and implementation. Although a tremendous volume of baseline data exists, it is often diffusely distributed and inaccessible to the resource manager and decision maker. A mechanism that facilitates assembly, documentation and delivery of avian data in a user-friendly manner is needed in order to integrate bird-related information resources across agencies and organizations. To address this fundamental need, the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII), in partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is developing a web-based interactive system that will focus on access to bird population and habitat data used in bird management and conservation. This system, known as the NBII Bird Conservation Node, will support planning and evaluation of bird conservation activities within the context of the North American Bird Conservation Initiative (NABCI), a framework for collaboration among organizations interested in bird conservation across North America. Initial development of the NBII Bird Conservation Node will focus on creating a prototype mapping application that will provide interactive access to data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey, the Colonial Waterbird Survey, the Breeding Waterfowl Population and Habitat Survey, and the Atlantic Flyway Mid-winter Waterfowl Survey. This prototype mapping application, to be available on-line at http://www.nbii.gov by Sep 2001, will lay the foundation for establishment of a Migratory Bird Data Center at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, and will provide an opportunity for linking to and establishing partnerships with other sources of bird population and habitat data available over the Internet.

  17. Radar studies of bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of bird migration with NASA radars were made at Wallops Island, Va. Simultaneous observations were made at a number of radar sites in the North Atlantic Ocean in an effort to discover what happened to those birds that were observed leaving the coast of North America headed toward Bermuda, the Caribbean and South America. Transatlantic migration, utilizing observations from a large number of radars is discussed. Detailed studies of bird movements at Wallops Island are presented.

  18. Phototropins But Not Cryptochromes Mediate the Blue Light-Specific Promotion of Stomatal Conductance, While Both Enhance Photosynthesis and Transpiration under Full Sunlight12[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Boccalandro, Hernán E.; Giordano, Carla V.; Ploschuk, Edmundo L.; Piccoli, Patricia N.; Bottini, Rubén; Casal, Jorge J.

    2012-01-01

    Leaf epidermal peels of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants lacking either phototropins 1 and 2 (phot1 and phot2) or cryptochromes 1 and 2 (cry1 and cry2) exposed to a background of red light show severely impaired stomatal opening responses to blue light. Since phot and cry are UV-A/blue light photoreceptors, they may be involved in the perception of the blue light-specific signal that induces the aperture of the stomatal pores. In leaf epidermal peels, the blue light-specific effect saturates at low irradiances; therefore, it is considered to operate mainly under the low irradiance of dawn, dusk, or deep canopies. Conversely, we show that both phot1 phot2 and cry1 cry2 have reduced stomatal conductance, transpiration, and photosynthesis, particularly under the high irradiance of full sunlight at midday. These mutants show compromised responses of stomatal conductance to irradiance. However, the effects of phot and cry on photosynthesis were largely nonstomatic. While the stomatal conductance phenotype of phot1 phot2 was blue light specific, cry1 cry2 showed reduced stomatal conductance not only in response to blue light, but also in response to red light. The levels of abscisic acid were elevated in cry1 cry2. We conclude that considering their effects at high irradiances cry and phot are critical for the control of transpiration and photosynthesis rates in the field. The effects of cry on stomatal conductance are largely indirect and involve the control of abscisic acid levels. PMID:22147516

  19. Phototropins but not cryptochromes mediate the blue light-specific promotion of stomatal conductance, while both enhance photosynthesis and transpiration under full sunlight.

    PubMed

    Boccalandro, Hernán E; Giordano, Carla V; Ploschuk, Edmundo L; Piccoli, Patricia N; Bottini, Rubén; Casal, Jorge J

    2012-03-01

    Leaf epidermal peels of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants lacking either phototropins 1 and 2 (phot1 and phot2) or cryptochromes 1 and 2 (cry1 and cry2) exposed to a background of red light show severely impaired stomatal opening responses to blue light. Since phot and cry are UV-A/blue light photoreceptors, they may be involved in the perception of the blue light-specific signal that induces the aperture of the stomatal pores. In leaf epidermal peels, the blue light-specific effect saturates at low irradiances; therefore, it is considered to operate mainly under the low irradiance of dawn, dusk, or deep canopies. Conversely, we show that both phot1 phot2 and cry1 cry2 have reduced stomatal conductance, transpiration, and photosynthesis, particularly under the high irradiance of full sunlight at midday. These mutants show compromised responses of stomatal conductance to irradiance. However, the effects of phot and cry on photosynthesis were largely nonstomatic. While the stomatal conductance phenotype of phot1 phot2 was blue light specific, cry1 cry2 showed reduced stomatal conductance not only in response to blue light, but also in response to red light. The levels of abscisic acid were elevated in cry1 cry2. We conclude that considering their effects at high irradiances cry and phot are critical for the control of transpiration and photosynthesis rates in the field. The effects of cry on stomatal conductance are largely indirect and involve the control of abscisic acid levels.

  20. Lunar Phase-Dependent Expression of Cryptochrome and a Photoperiodic Mechanism for Lunar Phase-Recognition in a Reef Fish, Goldlined Spinefoot

    PubMed Central

    Fukushiro, Masato; Takeuchi, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Yuki; Hur, Sung-Pyo; Sugama, Nozomi; Takemura, Akihiro; Kubo, Yoko; Okano, Keiko; Okano, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    Lunar cycle-associated physiology has been found in a wide variety of organisms. Recent study has revealed that mRNA levels of Cryptochrome (Cry), one of the circadian clock genes, were significantly higher on a full moon night than on a new moon night in coral, implying the involvement of a photoreception system in the lunar-synchronized spawning. To better establish the generalities surrounding such a mechanism and explore the underlying molecular mechanism, we focused on the relationship between lunar phase, Cry gene expression, and the spawning behavior in a lunar-synchronized spawner, the goldlined spinefoot (Siganus guttatus), and we identified two kinds of Cry genes in this animal. Their mRNA levels showed lunar cycle-dependent expression in the medial part of the brain (mesencephalon and diencephalon) peaking at the first quarter moon. Since this lunar phase coincided with the reproductive phase of the goldlined spinefoot, Cry gene expression was considered a state variable in the lunar phase recognition system. Based on the expression profiles of SgCrys together with the moonlight's pattern of timing and duration during its nightly lunar cycle, we have further speculated on a model of lunar phase recognition for reproductive control in the goldlined spinefoot, which integrates both moonlight and circadian signals in a manner similar to photoperiodic response. PMID:22163321

  1. Lunar phase-dependent expression of cryptochrome and a photoperiodic mechanism for lunar phase-recognition in a reef fish, goldlined spinefoot.

    PubMed

    Fukushiro, Masato; Takeuchi, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Yuki; Hur, Sung-Pyo; Sugama, Nozomi; Takemura, Akihiro; Kubo, Yoko; Okano, Keiko; Okano, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    Lunar cycle-associated physiology has been found in a wide variety of organisms. Recent study has revealed that mRNA levels of Cryptochrome (Cry), one of the circadian clock genes, were significantly higher on a full moon night than on a new moon night in coral, implying the involvement of a photoreception system in the lunar-synchronized spawning. To better establish the generalities surrounding such a mechanism and explore the underlying molecular mechanism, we focused on the relationship between lunar phase, Cry gene expression, and the spawning behavior in a lunar-synchronized spawner, the goldlined spinefoot (Siganus guttatus), and we identified two kinds of Cry genes in this animal. Their mRNA levels showed lunar cycle-dependent expression in the medial part of the brain (mesencephalon and diencephalon) peaking at the first quarter moon. Since this lunar phase coincided with the reproductive phase of the goldlined spinefoot, Cry gene expression was considered a state variable in the lunar phase recognition system. Based on the expression profiles of SgCrys together with the moonlight's pattern of timing and duration during its nightly lunar cycle, we have further speculated on a model of lunar phase recognition for reproductive control in the goldlined spinefoot, which integrates both moonlight and circadian signals in a manner similar to photoperiodic response.

  2. Cryptochrome and Period Proteins Are Regulated by the CLOCK/BMAL1 Gene: Crosstalk between the PPARs/RXRα-Regulated and CLOCK/BMAL1-Regulated Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Koh-ichi; Inoue, Ikuo; Takahashi, Seiichiro; Komoda, Tsugikazu; Katayama, Shigehiro

    2008-01-01

    Feeding and the circadian system regulate lipid absorption and metabolism, and the expression of enzymes involved in lipid metabolism is believed to be directly controlled by the clock system. To investigate the interaction between the lipid metabolism system and the circadian system, we analyzed the effect of a CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer on the transcriptional regulation of PPAR-controlled genes through PPAR response elements (PPREs). Transcription of acyl-CoA oxidase, cellular retinol binding protein II (CRBPII), and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase was altered by CLOCK/BMAL1, and transcriptional activity via PPRE by PPARs/RXRα was enhanced by CLOCK/BMAL1 and/or by PPARs ligand/activators. We also found that CLOCK/BMAL1-mediated transcription of period (PER) and cryptochrome (CRY) was modulated by PPARα/RXRα. These results suggest that there may be crosstalk between the PPARs/RXRα-regulated system and the CLOCK/BMAL1-regulated system. PMID:18317514

  3. Tuberculosis in wild birds: implications for captive birds

    Converse, K. A.; Dein, F. J.

    1990-01-01

    The geographic distribution of avian tuberculosis is widespread but the lack of visible epizootics makes assessment of its impact on wild birds difficult. Generally a low prevalence, widely-scattered, individual animal disease, avian tuberculosis is caused by the same agent in wild and domestic birds. Thus there exists the potential for disease transfer between these two groups in situations that result in direct contact such as wild animals newly captured or transferred from rehabilitation centers, and wild and captive animals intermingling in exhibit areas. During the past 7 yr, tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium avium, was diagnosed in 64 birds submitted to the National Wildlife Health Research Center from 16 states; avian tuberculosis was the primary diagnosis in 52 of the 64 birds, while the remaining 12 isolates were incidental findings. Twenty-eight of these birds were picked up during epizootics caused by other disease agents including avian cholera, botulism type C, and lead, organophosphorus compound, and cyanide poisoning. Twelve birds were found incidental to birds collected during disease monitoring programs and research projects, and 10 birds were collected by hunters or found sick and euthanatized. Tuberculosis lesions occurred (in order of decreasing frequency) in the liver, intestine, spleen, lung, and air sacs. Several unusual morphological presentations were observed in the gizzard, shoulder joint, jugular vein, face, nares and bill, ureter and bone marrow. Infected birds were collected during all 12 mo of the yr from a variety of species in the Anseriformes, Podicipediformes, Gruiformes, and Falconiformes. Nine of the 46 known age birds were immature indicating that lesions can develop during the first year.

  4. Laboratory Animal Management: Wild Birds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Inst. of Lab. Animal Resources.

    This is a report on the care and use of wild birds in captivity as research animals. Chapters are presented on procurement and identification, housing, nutrition, health of birds and personnel, reproduction in confinement, and surgical procedures. Also included are addresses of federal, state, and provencial regulatory agencies concerned with wild…

  5. Long distance tracking of birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, W. W.

    1972-01-01

    The application of radio telemetry techniques to the long distance tracking of birds is discussed. The types of equipment developed and methods for attachment to a bird are described. The operating range of the radio transmitter receiver system is examined, and methods for acquiring and analyzing the data are explained.

  6. Resumes of the Bird mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, E.; Borwald, W.; Briess, K.; Kayal, H.; Schneller, M.; Wuensten, Herbert

    2004-11-01

    The DLR micro satellite BIRD (Bi-spectral Infra Red Detection) was piggy- back launched with the Indian Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle PSLV-C3 into a 570 km circular sun-synchronous orbit on 22 October 2001. The BIRD mission, fully funded by the DLR, answers topical technological and scientific questions related to the operation of a compact infra- red push-broom sensor system on board of a micro satellite and demonstrates new spacecraft bus technologies. BIRD mission control is conducted by DLR / GSOC in Oberpfaffenhofen. Commanding, data reception and data processing is performed via ground stations in Weilheim and Neustrelitz (Germany). The BIRD mission is a demonstrator for small satellite projects dedicated to the hazard detection and monitoring. In the year 2003 BIRD has been used in the ESA project FUEGOSAT to demonstrate the utilisation of innovative space technologies for fire risk management.

  7. Conservation of wading birds

    Kushlan, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The conservation and management of wading birds has received considerable attention over the past twenty years, through research, population monitoring, habitat protection, and through activities of specialist groups devoted to all three groups, the herons, ibises and allies, and flamingos. While populations are best known in North America, greatest advances in knowledge may have come in Australasia. The status of most species and many populations is now sufficiently known to allow assessment of risk. Conservation and management techniques allow creation of global and regional action plans for conservation of many species. Global action plans are being developed, but few regional plans have been undertaken. Management of nesting sites is now particularly well appreciated. Although known in broad stroke, much remains to be learned about managing feeding habitat. Problems related to disturbance, conflict with humans, habitat loss, contaminants and other environmental stresses remain for some species and many populations. New challenges lie in creating conservation action that account for genetic stocks.

  8. Arabidopsis Casein Kinase1 Proteins CK1.3 and CK1.4 Phosphorylate Cryptochrome2 to Regulate Blue Light Signaling[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shu-Tang; Dai, Cheng; Liu, Hong-Tao; Xue, Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Casein kinase1 (CK1) plays crucial roles in regulating growth and development via phosphorylating various substrates throughout the eukaryote kingdom. Blue light is crucial for normal growth of both plants and animals, and blue light receptor cryptochrome2 (CRY2) undergoes blue light–dependent phosphorylation and degradation in planta. To study the function of plant CK1s, systematic genetic analysis showed that deficiency of two paralogous Arabidopsis thaliana CK1s, CK1.3 and CK1.4, caused shortened hypocotyls, especially under blue light, while overexpression of either CK1.3 or CK1.4 resulted in the insensitive response to blue light and delayed flowering under long-day conditions. CK1.3 or CK1.4 act dependently on CRY2, and overexpression of CK1.3 or CK1.4 significantly suppresses the hypersensitive response to blue light by CRY2 overexpression. Biochemical studies showed that CK1.3 and CK1.4 directly phosphorylate CRY2 at Ser-587 and Thr-603 in vitro and negatively regulate CRY2 stability in planta, which are stimulated by blue light, further confirming the crucial roles of CK1.3 and CK1.4 in blue light responses through phosphorylating CRY2. Interestingly, expression of CK1.3 and CK1.4 is stimulated by blue light and feedback regulated by CRY2-mediated signaling. These results provide direct evidence for CRY2 phosphorylation and informative clues on the mechanisms of CRY2-mediated light responses. PMID:23897926

  9. Cryptochromes and Hormone Signal Transduction under Near-Zero Magnetic Fields: New Clues to Magnetic Field Effects in a Rice Planthopper.

    PubMed

    Wan, Gui-Jun; Wang, Wen-Jing; Xu, Jing-Jing; Yang, Quan-Feng; Dai, Ming-Jiang; Zhang, Feng-Jiao; Sword, Gregory A; Pan, Wei-Dong; Chen, Fa-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Although there are considerable reports of magnetic field effects (MFE) on organisms, very little is known so far about the MFE-related signal transduction pathways. Here we establish a manipulative near-zero magnetic field (NZMF) to investigate the potential signal transduction pathways involved in MFE. We show that exposure of migratory white-backed planthopper, Sogatella furcifera, to the NZMF results in delayed egg and nymphal development, increased frequency of brachypterous females, and reduced longevity of macropterous female adults. To understand the changes in gene expression underlying these phenotypes, we examined the temporal patterns of gene expression of (i) CRY1 and CRY2 as putative magnetosensors, (ii) JHAMT, FAMeT and JHEH in the juvenile hormone pathway, (iii) CYP307A1 in the ecdysone pathway, and (iv) reproduction-related Vitellogenin (Vg). The significantly altered gene expression of CRY1 and CRY2 under the NZMF suggest their developmental stage-specific patterns and potential upstream location in magnetic response. Gene expression patterns of JHAMT, JHEH and CYP307A1 were consistent with the NZMF-triggered delay in nymphal development, higher proportion of brachypterous female adults, and the shortened longevity of macropterous female adults, which show feasible links between hormone signal transduction and phenotypic MFE. By conducting manipulative NZMF experiments, our study suggests an important role of the geomagnetic field (GMF) in modulating development and physiology of insects, provides new insights into the complexity of MFE-magnetosensitivity interactions, and represents an initial but crucial step forward in understanding the molecular basis of cryptochromes and hormone signal transduction involved in MFE.

  10. Anatomy of a Bird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-12-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, an international team of astronomers [1] has discovered a stunning rare case of a triple merger of galaxies. This system, which astronomers have dubbed 'The Bird' - albeit it also bears resemblance with a cosmic Tinker Bell - is composed of two massive spiral galaxies and a third irregular galaxy. ESO PR Photo 55a/07 ESO PR Photo 55a/07 The Tinker Bell Triplet The galaxy ESO 593-IG 008, or IRAS 19115-2124, was previously merely known as an interacting pair of galaxies at a distance of 650 million light-years. But surprises were revealed by observations made with the NACO instrument attached to ESO's VLT, which peered through the all-pervasive dust clouds, using adaptive optics to resolve the finest details [2]. Underneath the chaotic appearance of the optical Hubble images - retrieved from the Hubble Space Telescope archive - the NACO images show two unmistakable galaxies, one a barred spiral while the other is more irregular. The surprise lay in the clear identification of a third, clearly separate component, an irregular, yet fairly massive galaxy that seems to be forming stars at a frantic rate. "Examples of mergers of three galaxies of roughly similar sizes are rare," says Petri Väisänen, lead author of the paper reporting the results. "Only the near-infrared VLT observations made it possible to identify the triple merger nature of the system in this case." Because of the resemblance of the system to a bird, the object was dubbed as such, with the 'head' being the third component, and the 'heart' and 'body' making the two major galaxy nuclei in-between of tidal tails, the 'wings'. The latter extend more than 100,000 light-years, or the size of our own Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 55b/07 ESO PR Photo 55b/07 Anatomy of a Bird Subsequent optical spectroscopy with the new Southern African Large Telescope, and archive mid-infrared data from the NASA Spitzer space observatory, confirmed the separate nature of the 'head', but also added

  11. Returns from banded birds: Some longevity records of wild birds

    Cooke, May Thacher

    1942-01-01

    Records indicating the possible life-span of birds in the wild are accumulating in the return file for banded birds. In Bird-Banding, vol. viii, 1937, p. 52-65, a number of these were published. The expressed interest in this phase of bird life, together with the increased amount of material, seem to justify further publication on this subject. These papers by no means exhaust the subject; probably as many more equally interesting records could be found.As in the previous article, a bird must have been at least five years old at its latest report to be included in the list. In the case of Common Terns, the minimum has had to be made ten years, and few ducks less than ten years old have been included. No special effort has been made to 'dig out' the complete records of birds that have returned several times to the banding station, but when the record has been supplied on the return card by the operator it has been used.

  12. Ten years of International Migratory Bird Day

    Jennifer Wheeler; Susan Bonfield

    2005-01-01

    Public awareness and concern are crucial components of migratory bird conservation. Citizens who are enthusiastic about birds, informed about threats, and empowered to become involved in addressing those threats can make a tremendous contribution to maintaining healthy bird populations. One of the most successful vehicles for public education on migratory birds is...

  13. 21 CFR 1240.65 - Psittacine birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Psittacine birds. 1240.65 Section 1240.65 Food and... DISEASES Specific Administrative Decisions Regarding Interstate Shipments § 1240.65 Psittacine birds. (a) The term psittacine birds shall include all birds commonly known as parrots, Amazons, Mexican double...

  14. 21 CFR 1240.65 - Psittacine birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Psittacine birds. 1240.65 Section 1240.65 Food and... DISEASES Specific Administrative Decisions Regarding Interstate Shipments § 1240.65 Psittacine birds. (a) The term psittacine birds shall include all birds commonly known as parrots, Amazons, Mexican double...

  15. The Variety of Shore Birds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varza, Dennis

    1977-01-01

    The types of habitats that exist along the ocean shore and the various types of birds inhabiting them are detailed. Topics discussed include shorebird feeding habits and methods, nesting patterns, and seasonal migration. (BT)

  16. Comparative Phylogeography of Neotropical Birds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    of lowland Neotropical rainforest birds that have populations isolated on either side of the Andes, Amazon River, and Madeira River. I found widely...Unlike canopy species, understory birds were structured at smaller spatial scales, particularly across riverine barriers of the Amazon basin...expansive complementary forest of the Amazon Basin. This divide is relatively young as the northern Andes were only half their present elevation

  17. 78 FR 21199 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed 2013-14 Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations (Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... 50 CFR Part 20 Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed 2013-14 Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations... Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed 2013-14 Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations (Preliminary) With Requests... to establish annual hunting regulations for certain migratory game birds for the 2013-14 hunting...

  18. 77 FR 29515 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Supplemental Proposals for Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... Service 50 CFR Part 20 Migratory Bird Hunting; Supplemental Proposals for Migratory Game Bird Hunting...] RIN 1018-AX97 Migratory Bird Hunting; Supplemental Proposals for Migratory Game Bird Hunting... in an earlier document to establish annual hunting regulations for certain migratory game birds for...

  19. 77 FR 23093 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed 2012-13 Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations (Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... Service 50 CFR Part 20 Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed 2012-13 Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations... Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed 2012-13 Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations (Preliminary) With Requests... to establish annual hunting regulations for certain migratory game birds for the 2012-13 hunting...

  20. Observing Flat Birds and Other Fun Birding Activities for K-12 Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine E.; Connors, John

    2002-01-01

    Introduces the concept of the flat bird, which is a life-size color cutout of a bird, and uses flat birds to introduce the study of birds. Includes suggestions for teaching about common characteristics of birds and information on resource materials. (YDS)

  1. Birds of a feather

    Knick, Steven T.; Gondhaleker, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasiunus, hereafter sage-grouse) are broadly distributed, occupy a diversity of sagebrush habitats, and face multiple threats. As a result of these threats, sage-grouse populations are declining and are now absent from almost one-half of their estimated range prior to Euro-American settlement. The risks to sage-grouse are significant enough to merit candidate status for this species for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (Federal Register Notice, March 5, 2010). According to this decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2010, population and habitat fragmentation coupled with lack of regulatory mechanisms warranted listing, although implementation of actions has been precluded by other priorities. Candidate status for listing under the Endangered Species Act and possible regulatory action in the near future provide strong motivation to better understand the dynamics of sage-grouse populations and their habitat requirements. The general approach currently taken by managers focuses on maintaining or enhancing sage-grouse populations across their distribution in regions containing the highest densities of breeding birds and their important seasonal habitats, also known as priority areas for conservation (PACs). The rationale behind this approach is that it permits limited resources to be applied in regions that have the greatest potential to benefit the largest proportion of sage-grouse. Development and other forms of land use can then proceed under standard regulations in areas outside PACs. Implementation of this approach requires detailed information about habitat, connections among sage-grouse populations, and approaches to restore and maintain sagebrush. These are important topics of study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its research partners.

  2. Lab-on-a-bird: biophysical monitoring of flying birds.

    PubMed

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Lee, Seoho; Ahsan, Syed S; Karlsson, Kolbeinn; Gabrielson, Richard; Guglielmo, Christopher G; Winkler, David W; Erickson, David

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of birds is finely tuned to their activities and environments, and thus research on avian systems can play an important role in understanding organismal responses to environmental changes. At present, however, the physiological monitoring of bird metabolism is limited by the inability to take real-time measurements of key metabolites during flight. In this study, we present an implantable biosensor system that can be used for continuous monitoring of uric acid levels of birds during various activities including flight. The system consists of a needle-type enzymatic biosensor for the amperometric detection of uric acid in interstitial fluids. A lightweight two-electrode potentiostat system drives the biosensor, reads the corresponding output current and wirelessly transfers the data or records to flash memory. We show how the device can be used to monitor, in real time, the effects of short-term flight and rest cycles on the uric acid levels of pigeons. In addition, we demonstrate that our device has the ability to measure uric acid level increase in homing pigeons while they fly freely. Successful application of the sensor in migratory birds could open up a new way of studying birds in flight which would lead to a better understanding of the ecology and biology of avian movements.

  3. Birds as predators in tropical agroforestry systems.

    PubMed

    Van Bael, Sunshine A; Philpott, Stacy M; Greenberg, Russell; Bichier, Peter; Barber, Nicholas A; Mooney, Kailen A; Gruner, Daniel S

    2008-04-01

    Insectivorous birds reduce arthropod abundances and their damage to plants in some, but not all, studies where predation by birds has been assessed. The variation in bird effects may be due to characteristics such as plant productivity or quality, habitat complexity, and/or species diversity of predator and prey assemblages. Since agroforestry systems vary in such characteristics, these systems provide a good starting point for understanding when and where we can expect predation by birds to be important. We analyze data from bird exclosure studies in forests and agroforestry systems to ask whether birds consistently reduce their arthropod prey base and whether bird predation differs between forests and agroforestry systems. Further, we focus on agroforestry systems to ask whether the magnitude of bird predation (1) differs between canopy trees and understory plants, (2) differs when migratory birds are present or absent, and (3) correlates with bird abundance and diversity. We found that, across all studies, birds reduce all arthropods, herbivores, carnivores, and plant damage. We observed no difference in the magnitude of bird effects between agroforestry systems and forests despite simplified habitat structure and plant diversity in agroforests. Within agroforestry systems, bird reduction of arthropods was greater in the canopy than the crop layer. Top-down effects of bird predation were especially strong during censuses when migratory birds were present in agroforestry systems. Importantly, the diversity of the predator assemblage correlated with the magnitude of predator effects; where the diversity of birds, especially migratory birds, was greater, birds reduced arthropod densities to a greater extent. We outline potential mechanisms for relationships between bird predator, insect prey, and habitat characteristics, and we suggest future studies using tropical agroforests as a model system to further test these areas of ecological theory.

  4. Do birds sleep in flight?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattenborg, Niels C.

    2006-09-01

    The following review examines the evidence for sleep in flying birds. The daily need to sleep in most animals has led to the common belief that birds, such as the common swift ( Apus apus), which spend the night on the wing, sleep in flight. The electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings required to detect sleep in flight have not been performed, however, rendering the evidence for sleep in flight circumstantial. The neurophysiology of sleep and flight suggests that some types of sleep might be compatible with flight. As in mammals, birds exhibit two types of sleep, slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep. Whereas, SWS can occur in one or both brain hemispheres at a time, REM sleep only occurs bihemispherically. During unihemispheric SWS, the eye connected to the awake hemisphere remains open, a state that may allow birds to visually navigate during sleep in flight. Bihemispheric SWS may also be possible during flight when constant visual monitoring of the environment is unnecessary. Nevertheless, the reduction in muscle tone that usually accompanies REM sleep makes it unlikely that birds enter this state in flight. Upon landing, birds may need to recover the components of sleep that are incompatible with flight. Periods of undisturbed postflight recovery sleep may be essential for maintaining adaptive brain function during wakefulness. The recent miniaturization of EEG recording devices now makes it possible to measure brain activity in flight. Determining if and how birds sleep in flight will contribute to our understanding of a largely unexplored aspect of avian behavior and may also provide insight into the function of sleep.

  5. Developing indicators for European birds

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Richard D; van Strien, Arco; Vorisek, Petr; Gmelig Meyling, Adriaan W; Noble, David G; Foppen, Ruud P.B; Gibbons, David W

    2005-01-01

    The global pledge to deliver ‘a significant reduction in the current rate of biodiversity loss by 2010’ is echoed in a number of regional and national level targets. There is broad consensus, however, that in the absence of conservation action, biodiversity will continue to be lost at a rate unprecedented in the recent era. Remarkably, we lack a basic system to measure progress towards these targets and, in particular, we lack standard measures of biodiversity and procedures to construct and assess summary statistics. Here, we develop a simple classification of biodiversity indicators to assist their development and clarify purpose. We use European birds, as example taxa, to show how robust indicators can be constructed and how they can be interpreted. We have developed statistical methods to calculate supranational, multi-species indices using population data from national annual breeding bird surveys in Europe. Skilled volunteers using standardized field methods undertake data collection where methods and survey designs differ slightly across countries. Survey plots tend to be widely distributed at a national level, covering many bird species and habitats with reasonable representation. National species' indices are calculated using log-linear regression, which allows for plot turnover. Supranational species' indices are constructed by combining the national species' indices weighted by national population sizes of each species. Supranational, multi-species indicators are calculated by averaging the resulting indices. We show that common farmland birds in Europe have declined steeply over the last two decades, whereas woodland birds have not. Evidence elsewhere shows that the main driver of farmland bird declines is increased agricultural intensification. We argue that the farmland bird indicator is a useful surrogate for trends in other elements of biodiversity in this habitat. PMID:15814345

  6. Epidemiologic characterization of Colorado backyard bird flocks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Emily I; Reif, John S; Hill, Ashley E; Slota, Katharine E; Miller, Ryan S; Bjork, Kathe E; Pabilonia, Kristy L

    2012-06-01

    Backyard gallinaceous bird flocks may play an important role in the spread of infectious diseases within poultry populations as well as the transmission of zoonotic diseases to humans. An epidemiologic characterization was conducted of Colorado backyard flocks to gather information on general flock characteristics, human movement of birds, human-bird interaction, biosecurity practices, and flock health. Our results suggest that backyard poultry flocks in Colorado are small-sized flocks (68.6% of flocks had < 50 birds); consist primarily of layer chickens (85.49% of flocks), show chickens (32.18% of flocks), and waterfowl (34.07% of flocks); and are primarily owned for food (meat or egg) production for the family (86.44%) or as pet or hobby birds (42.27%). The backyard flock environment may promote bird-to-bird transmission as well as bird-to-human transmission of infectious disease. Birds are primarily housed with free access to the outside (96.85%), and many are moved from the home premises (46.06% within 1 yr). Human contact with backyard flocks is high, biosecurity practices are minimal, and bird health is negatively impacted by increased movement events. Increased knowledge of backyard bird characteristics and associated management practices can provide guidelines for the development of measures to decrease disease transmission between bird populations, decrease disease transmission from birds to humans, and increase the overall health of backyard birds.

  7. Parthenogenesis in birds: a review.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, R; McDaniel, C D

    2018-06-01

    Parthenogenesis or 'virgin birth' is embryonic development in unfertilized eggs. It is a routine means of reproduction in many invertebrates. However, even though parthenogenesis occurs naturally in even more advanced vertebrates, like birds, it is mostly abortive in nature. In fact, multiple limiting factors, such as delayed and unorganized development as well as unfavorable conditions developing within the unfertilized egg upon incubation, are associated with termination of progressive development of parthenogenetic embryos. In birds, diploid parthenogenesis is automictic and facultative producing only males. However, the mechanisms controlling parthenogenesis in birds are not clearly elucidated. Additionally, it appears from even very recent research that these mechanisms may hinder the normal fertilization process and subsequent embryonic development. For instance, virgin quail and turkey hens exhibiting parthenogenesis have reduced reproductive performance following mating. Also, genetic selection and environmental factors, such as live virus vaccinations, are known to trigger the process of parthenogenesis in birds. Therefore, parthenogenesis has a plausible negative impact on the poultry industry. Hence, a better understanding of parthenogenesis and the mechanisms that control it could benefit commercial poultry production. In this context, the aim of this review is to provide a complete overview of the process of parthenogenesis in birds. © 2018 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  8. Birds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Albers, P.H.

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are present throughout the global environment and are produced naturally and by activities of humans. Effects of PAH on birds have been determined by studies employing egg injection, egg immersion, egg shell application, single and multiple oral doses, subcutaneous injection, and chemical analysis of field-collected eggs and tissue. The four-to six-ring aromatic compounds are the most toxic to embryos, young birds, and adult birds. For embryos, effects include death, developmental abnormalities, and a variety of cellular and biochemical responses. For adult and young birds, effects include reduced egg production and hatching, increased clutch or brood abandonment, reduced growth, increased organweights, and a variety of biochemical responses. Trophic level accumulation is unlikely. Environmental exposure to PAH in areas of high human population or habitats affected by recent petroleum spills might be sufficient to adversely affect reproduction. Evidence of long-term effects of elevated concentrations of environmental PAH on bird populations is very limited and the mechanisms of effect are unclear.

  9. 9 CFR 95.30 - Restrictions on entry of products and byproducts of poultry, game birds, or other birds from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... byproducts of poultry, game birds, or other birds from regions where highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI... UNITED STATES § 95.30 Restrictions on entry of products and byproducts of poultry, game birds, or other..., including feathers, birds' nests, and bird trophies, of poultry, game birds, or other birds may be imported...

  10. 9 CFR 95.30 - Restrictions on entry of products and byproducts of poultry, game birds, or other birds from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... byproducts of poultry, game birds, or other birds from regions where highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI... UNITED STATES § 95.30 Restrictions on entry of products and byproducts of poultry, game birds, or other..., including feathers, birds' nests, and bird trophies, of poultry, game birds, or other birds may be imported...

  11. 9 CFR 95.30 - Restrictions on entry of products and byproducts of poultry, game birds, or other birds from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... byproducts of poultry, game birds, or other birds from regions where highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI... UNITED STATES § 95.30 Restrictions on entry of products and byproducts of poultry, game birds, or other..., including feathers, birds' nests, and bird trophies, of poultry, game birds, or other birds may be imported...

  12. The Superconducting Bird: A Didactical Toy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarner, E.; Sanchez, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the design of the superconducting bird, a device to demonstrate the phenomenon of superconductivity. Discusses the utilization of the device as an example of a motor and compares it to the toy called the drinking bird. (MDH)

  13. The breeding bird survey, 1966

    Robbins, Chandler S.; Van Velzen, Willet T.

    1967-01-01

    A Breeding Bird Survey of a large section on North America was conducted during June 1966. Cooperators ran a total of 585 Survey routes in 26 eastern States and 4 Canadian Provinces. Future coverage of established routes will enable changes in the abundance of North American breeding birds to be measured. Routes are selected at random on the basis of one-degree blocks of latitude and longitude. Each 241/2-mile route, with 3-minute stops spaced one-half mile apart, is driven by automobile. All birds heard or seen at the stops are recorded on special forms and the data are then transferred to machine punch cards. The average number of birds per route is tabulated by State, along with the total number of each species and the percent of routes and stops upon which they were recorded. Maps are presented showing the range and abundance of selected species. Also, a year-to-year comparison is made of populations of selected species on Maryland routes in 1965 and 1966.

  14. Managing a Bird Flu Pandemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Del

    2006-01-01

    Concern about a possible bird flu pandemic has grown in the medical community with the spread of the avian flu virus around the globe. Health officials say there is no immediate threat but add that an influenza pandemic occurs every 30 to 40 years, and prudence demands planning now. That planning will increasingly involve local school officials,…

  15. The Bird Box Survey Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    When high school students are asked what's the best part of science class, many will say it's the field trips. Students enjoy engaging in authentic, community-based science outside the classroom. To capitalize on this, Patrick Willis created the Bird Box Survey Project for his introductory field biology class. The project takes students…

  16. Using birds to guide management

    Bob Budd

    2005-01-01

    Most years, bluebirds come home to Wyoming on the 23rd day of March. I know this date because I have watched the birds for decades. It is not a date of great ornithological importance. The 23rd of March is my mother's birthday, and my mother loves bluebirds. As a son, you tend to remember things like mothers and bluebirds.

  17. Improving the breeding bird survey

    Jonathan Bart; Joseph B. Buchanan; Bob Altman

    2005-01-01

    We investigated increasing the number of Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) routes and reducing potential bias as ways to increase the number of species adequately monitored by the BBS in the Pacific Northwest. Estimates of place-to-place variance in trends were used to assess the effects of increasing the number of additional BBS routes. Increasing the number of BBS routes...

  18. State of the Birds 2017

    Report Methods Acknowledgments Contact Us Search ×Close Search Go Eastern Meadowlark by Ray Hennessy via Birdshare. The State of the Birds 2017: Farm Bill Special Report cover of Farm Bill Special Report Download the Report Northern Pintail by Stuart Lewis via Birdshare Benefits of the Farm Bill Farmer Frederick

  19. Illinois Birds. Nature Discovery I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Sally F.

    The birds of Illinois and their particular habitats are explored in this guide which is a part of a series of Nature Discovery publications. The materials are designed to directly supplement the natural science curricula and to complement other subject areas including social studies, language arts, music, and art. The program is formated for…

  20. 76 FR 19875 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed 2011-12 Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations (Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... 50 CFR Part 20 Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed 2011-12 Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations... Hunting; Proposed 2011-12 Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations (Preliminary) With Requests for Indian... annual hunting regulations for certain migratory game birds for the 2011-12 hunting season. We annually...

  1. 78 FR 65576 - Migratory Bird Permits; Definition of “Hybrid” Migratory Bird

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. We revise the definition to make it clear that it applies to all... applied to falconry and raptor propagation birds, in particular, where hybrids between two separate taxa... the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA, 16 U.S.C. 703-712) ``applies only to migratory bird species that...

  2. Birds and Bird Habitat: What Are the Risks from Industrial Wind Turbine Exposure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprague, Terry; Harrington, M. Elizabeth; Krogh, Carmen M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Bird kill rate and disruption of habitat has been reported when industrial wind turbines are introduced into migratory bird paths or other environments. While the literature could be more complete regarding the documentation of negative effects on birds and bird habitats during the planning, construction, and operation of wind power projects,…

  3. 76 FR 32224 - Migratory Birds; Take of Migratory Birds by the Armed Forces

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Migratory Birds; Take of Migratory Birds by... Forces to incidentally take migratory birds during approved military readiness activities without violating the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). The Authorization Act provided this interim authority to...

  4. 75 FR 29917 - Migratory Bird Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Migratory Bird Rehabilitation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ...-1231-9BPP] RIN 1018-AX09 Migratory Bird Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Migratory Bird... governing migratory bird rehabilitation in the United States. Before creation of those regulations.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. George T. Allen, Division of Migratory Bird Management, U.S. Fish...

  5. 76 FR 69223 - Migratory Bird Permits; Definition of “Hybrid” Migratory Bird

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ...-0060; 91200-1231-9BPP] RIN 1018-AX90 Migratory Bird Permits; Definition of ``Hybrid'' Migratory Bird... Wildlife Service (Service), propose to revise the definition of ``hybrid'' as it relates to birds protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. At present, the definition applies only to hybrids of two species...

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A BIRD INTEGRITY INDEX: USING BIRD ASSEMBLAGES AS INDICATORS OF RIPARIAN CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe the development of a Bird Integrity Index (BII) that uses bird assemblage information to assess human impacts on 13 stream reaches in the Willamette Valley, Oregon. We used bird survey field data to test 62 candidate metrics representing aspects of bird taxonomic ric...

  7. 14 CFR 35.36 - Bird impact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bird impact. 35.36 Section 35.36... STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.36 Bird impact. The applicant must demonstrate, by tests or... 4-pound bird at the critical location(s) and critical flight condition(s) of a typical installation...

  8. 14 CFR 29.631 - Bird strike.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bird strike. 29.631 Section 29.631... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.631 Bird strike. The... safe landing (for Category B) after impact with a 2.2-lb (1.0 kg) bird when the velocity of the...

  9. The Physics of Bird Flight: An Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihail, Michael D.; George, Thomas F.; Feldman, Bernard J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an experiment that measures the forces acting on a flying bird during takeoff. The experiment uses a minimum of equipment and only an elementary knowledge of kinematics and Newton's second law. The experiment involves first digitally videotaping a bird during takeoff, analyzing the video to determine the bird's position as a…

  10. 14 CFR 29.631 - Bird strike.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bird strike. 29.631 Section 29.631... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General § 29.631 Bird strike. The... safe landing (for Category B) after impact with a 2.2-lb (1.0 kg) bird when the velocity of the...

  11. 14 CFR 35.36 - Bird impact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bird impact. 35.36 Section 35.36... STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.36 Bird impact. The applicant must demonstrate, by tests or... 4-pound bird at the critical location(s) and critical flight condition(s) of a typical installation...

  12. Annotated Bibliography of Bird Hazards to Aircraft: Bird Strike Committee Citations 1967-1997.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    reduce losses from birdstrikes by applying state-of-the-art technologies to improve aircraft survivability to bird hazards and overall reduced cost-of... losses for the aviation industry from birds are estimated to exceed $1 billion annually. Recent birdstrikes involving significant loss -of-life and...aviation losses caused by birds. 2 CONTRIBUTING ORGANIZATIONS 2.1 Bird Strike Committee Europe The Bird Strike Committee Europe (BSCE) was formed in

  13. 9 CFR 95.30 - Restrictions on entry of products and byproducts of poultry, game birds, or other birds from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... byproducts of poultry, game birds, or other birds from regions where highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI... THE UNITED STATES § 95.30 Restrictions on entry of products and byproducts of poultry, game birds, or...) Products or byproducts, including feathers, birds' nests, and bird trophies, of poultry, game birds, or...

  14. 9 CFR 95.30 - Restrictions on entry of products and byproducts of poultry, game birds, or other birds from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... byproducts of poultry, game birds, or other birds from regions where highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI... THE UNITED STATES § 95.30 Restrictions on entry of products and byproducts of poultry, game birds, or...) Products or byproducts, including feathers, birds' nests, and bird trophies, of poultry, game birds, or...

  15. Nesting bird "host funnel" increases mosquito-bird contact rate.

    PubMed

    Caillouët, Kevin A; Riggan, Anna E; Bulluck, Lesley P; Carlson, John C; Sabo, Roy T

    2013-03-01

    Increases in vector-host contact rates can enhance arbovirus transmission intensity. We investigated weekly fluctuations in contact rates between mosquitoes and nesting birds using the recently described Nest Mosquito Trap (NMT). The number of mosquitoes per nestling increased from < 1 mosquito per trap night to 36.2 in the final 2 wk of the nesting season. Our evidence suggests the coincidence of the end of the avian nesting season and increasing mosquito abundances may have caused a "host funnel," concentrating host-seeking mosquitoes to the few remaining nestlings. The relative abundance of mosquitoes collected by the NMT suggests that significantly more Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and Culex pipiens (L.) /restuans (Theobald) sought nesting bird bloodmeals than were predicted by their relative abundances in CO2-baited Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light and gravid traps. Culex salinarius (Coquillett) and Culex erraticus Dyar and Knab were collected in NMTs in proportion to their relative abundances in the generic traps. Temporal host funnels and nesting bird host specificity may enhance arbovirus amplification and explain observed West Nile virus and St. Louis encephalitis virus amplification periods.

  16. Bird Strike Risk for Space Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Christy; Czech, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Within seconds after liftoff of the Space Shuttle during mission STS-114, a turkey vulture impacted the vehicle's external tank. The contact caused no apparent damage to the shuttle, but the incident led NASA to consider the potential consequences of bird strikes during a shuttle launch. The environment at Kennedy Space Center provides unique bird strike challenges due to the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge and the Atlantic Flyway bird migration routes. This presentation will outline an approach for estimating risk resulting from bird strikes to space launch vehicles. The migration routes, types of birds present, altitudes of those birds, exposed area of the launch vehicle, and its capability to withstand impacts all affect the risk due to bird strike. Lessons learned, challenges over lack of data, and significant risk contributors will be discussed.

  17. Energetics and longevity in birds

    PubMed Central

    Furness, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    The links between energy expenditure and ageing are different at different levels of enquiry. When studies have examined the relationships between different species within a given class the association is generally negative—animals with greater metabolism per gram of tissue live shorter lives. Within species, or between classes (e.g. between birds and mammals) the association is the opposite—animals with higher metabolic rates live longer. We have previously shown in mammals that the negative association between lifespan and metabolic rate is in fact an artefact of using resting rather than daily energy expenditure, and of failing to adequately take into account the confounding effects of body size and the lack of phylogenetic independence of species data. When these factors are accounted for, across species of mammals, the ones with higher metabolism also have the largest lifetime expenditures of energy—consistent with the inter-class and intra-specific data. A previous analysis in birds did not yield the same pattern, but this may have been due to a lack of sufficient power in the analysis. Here we present an analysis of a much enlarged data set (>300 species) for metabolic and longevity traits in birds. These data show very similar patterns to those in mammals. Larger individuals have longer lives and lower per-gram resting and daily energy expenditures, hence there is a strong negative relationship between longevity and mass-specific metabolism. This relationship disappears when the confounding effects of body mass and phylogeny are accounted for. Across species of birds, lifetime expenditure of energy per gram of tissue based on both daily and resting energy expenditure is positively related to metabolic intensity, mirroring these statistical relationships in mammals and synergising with the positive associations of metabolism with lifespan within species and between vertebrate classes. PMID:19424858

  18. Nearshore Birds in Puget Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Published by Seattle District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle, Washington. Kriete, B. 2007. Orcas in Puget Sound . Puget Sound Near- shore...Technical Report 2006-05 Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership I Nearshore Birds in Puget Sound Prepared in...support of the Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership Joseph B. Buchanan Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Technical Report 2006-05 ii

  19. Critical Care of Pet Birds.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Jeffrey Rowe

    2016-05-01

    Successful care of the critical pet bird patient is dependent on preparation and planning and begins with the veterinarian and hospital staff. An understanding of avian physiology and pathophysiology is key. Physical preparation of the hospital or clinic includes proper equipment and understanding of the procedures necessary to provide therapeutic and supportive care to the avian patient. An overview of patient intake and assessment, intensive care environment, and fluid therapy is included. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. F-8 Iron Bird Cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The F-8 DFBW (Digital-Fly-By-Wire) simulator used an 'Iron-Bird' for its cockpit. It was used from 1971 to 1986. The F-8 DFBW simulator was used in the development, testing, and validation of an all digital flight-control system installed in the F-8 aircraft that replaced the normal mechanical/hydraulic controls. Many military and commercial aircraft have digital flight control systems based on the technologies developed at NASA Dryden.

  1. Chlamydial infections in free-living birds

    Brand, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    Most studies of chlamydial infections in free-living wild birds have been limited to surveys for the presence of Chlamydia psittaci or antibody to C psittaci and have largely been done in association with the identification of chlamydiosis in human beings, commercial fowl, or pet birds. The emphasis of these studies has been to determine the prevalence of infection and the potential role of wild birds in the spread of chlamydiae to domestic birds and human beings. Little is known about the epizootiology of chlamydiosis in free-living birds or its affect on their population dynamics. The following article is a summary of reported studies of chlamydiosis in free-living wild birds in relation to host range, ecologic aspects of transmission and maintenance, and the prevalence of disease.

  2. Bat predation on nocturnally migrating birds

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Carlos; Juste, Javier; García-Mudarra, Juan L.; Agirre-Mendi, Pablo T.

    2001-01-01

    Bat predation on birds is a very rare phenomenon in nature. Most documented reports of bird-eating bats refer to tropical bats that occasionally capture resting birds. Millions of small birds concentrate and cross over the world's temperate regions during migration, mainly at night, but no nocturnal predators are known to benefit from this enormous food resource. An analysis of 14,000 fecal pellets of the greater noctule bat (Nyctalus lasiopterus) reveals that this species captures and eats large numbers of migrating passerines, making it the only bat species so far known that regularly preys on birds. The echolocation characteristics and wing morphology of this species strongly suggest that it captures birds in flight. PMID:11493689

  3. Evaluation of semen from nondomestic birds

    Gee, G.F.; Bakst, M.R.; Cecil, H.C.

    1997-01-01

    Aspects of poultry Al technology are applicable to nondomestic birds. However, modifications in the methods of semen collection, evaluation, and insemination are often necessary to accomodate either the bird's size, sperm numbers, or. female anatomy. This section provides a brief overview of procedures used to evaluate semen from nondomestic birds. Unless specified, materials, reagents, etc., are identical to those used in evaluating poultry semen (see appropriate chapters).

  4. Handbook on Bird Management and Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    strike hazard ...................... 70 FIGURE 10. Sample application of sharp projections ........ 80 FIGURE 11. Plans for a low profile pigeon trap...particularly with Domestic Pigeons , Starlings, and House Sparrows, can reduce most of the hazards mentioned in this chapter. 4.2. HEALTH HAZARDS 4.2.1...damage, pest bird control, hazardous bird control, bird biology t behavior, altering the concept, altering the situation, exclusion, repulsion, removal

  5. Annotated checklist of Georgia birds

    Beaton, G.; Sykes, P.W.; Parrish, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    This edition of the checklist includes 446 species, of which 407 are on the Regular Species List, 8 on the Provisional, and 31 on the Hypothetical. This new publication has been greatly expanded and much revised over the previous checklist (GOS Occasional Publ. No. 10, 1986, 48 pp., 6x9 inches) to a 7x10-inch format with an extensive Literature Cited section added, 22 species added to the Regular List, 2 to the Provisional List, and 9 to the Hypothetical List. Each species account is much more comprehensive over all previous editions of the checklist. Among some of the new features are citations for sources of most information used, high counts of individuals for each species on the Regular List, extreme dates of occurrence within physiographic regions, a list of abbreviations and acronyms, and for each species the highest form of verifiable documentation given with its repository institution with a catalog number. This checklist is helpful for anyone working with birds in the Southeastern United States or birding in that region. Sykes' contribution to this fifth edition of the Annotated Checklist of Georgia Birds includes: suggestion of the large format and spiral binding, use of Richard A. Parks' painting of the Barn Owl on the front cover, use of literature citations throughout, and inclusion of high counts for each species. Sykes helped plan all phases of the publication, wrote about 90% of the Introduction and 84 species accounts (Osprey through Red Phalarope), designed the four maps in the introduction section and format for the Literature Cited, and with Giff Beaton designed the layout of the title page.

  6. COMPLEX EVOLUTION OF BILE SALTS IN BIRDS

    PubMed Central

    Hagey, Lee R.; Vidal, Nicolas; Hofmann, Alan F.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    Bile salts are the major end-metabolites of cholesterol and are important in lipid digestion and shaping of the gut microflora. There have been limited studies of bile-salt variation in birds. The purpose of our study was to determine bile-salt variation among birds and relate this variation to current avian phylogenies and hypotheses on the evolution of bile salt pathways. We determined the biliary bile-salt composition of 405 phylogenetically diverse bird species, including 7 paleognath species. Bile salt profiles were generally stable within bird families. Complex bile-salt profiles were more common in omnivores and herbivores than in carnivores. The structural variation of bile salts in birds is extensive and comparable to that seen in surveys of bile salts in reptiles and mammals. Birds produce many of the bile salts found throughout nonavian vertebrates and some previously uncharacterized bile salts. One difference between birds and other vertebrates is extensive hydroxylation of carbon-16 of bile salts in bird species. Comparison of our data set of bird bile salts with that of other vertebrates, especially reptiles, allowed us to infer evolutionary changes in the bile salt synthetic pathway. PMID:21113274

  7. Lead and zinc intoxication in companion birds.

    PubMed

    Puschner, Birgit; Poppenga, Robert H

    2009-01-01

    Although the toxicity of lead and zinc to birds is widely recognized by veterinarians and bird owners, these metals are frequently found in the environments of pet and aviary birds, and intoxications are common. Clinical signs exhibited by intoxicated birds are often nonspecific, which makes early diagnosis difficult. Fortunately, lead and zinc analyses of whole blood and serum or plasma, respectively, are readily available and inexpensive; elevated concentrations can confirm intoxication. Once diagnosed, intoxication can be effectively treated by (1) preventing further exposure, (2) administering chelating drugs, and (3) providing symptomatic and supportive care.

  8. Capturing birds with mist nets: A review

    Keyes, B.E.; Grue, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    Herein we have tried to provide a comprehensive review of mist-netting techniques suitable for both novice and experienced netters. General mist-netting procedures and modifications developed by netters for particular bird species and habitats are included. Factors which influence capture success, including site selection, net specifications and placement, weather, and time of day, are discussed. Guidelines are presented for the care of netted birds and the use of mist-net data in the study of bird communities. The advantages of the use of mist nets over other methods of capturing birds are also discussed.

  9. Bird sexing by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Gerald; Bartels, Thomas; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Koch, Edmund

    2010-02-01

    Birds are traditionally classified as male or female based on their anatomy and plumage color as judged by the human eye. Knowledge of a bird's gender is important for the veterinary practitioner, the owner and the breeder. The accurate gender determination is essential for proper pairing of birds, and knowing the gender of a bird will allow the veterinarian to rule in or out gender-specific diseases. Several biochemical methods of gender determination have been developed for avian species where otherwise the gender of the birds cannot be determined by their physical appearances or characteristics. In this contribution, we demonstrate that FT-IR spectroscopy is a suitable tool for a quick and objective determination of the bird's gender. The method is based on differences in chromosome size. Male birds have two Z chromosomes and female birds have a W-chromosome and a Z-chromosome. Each Z-chromosome has approx. 75.000.000 bps whereas the W-chromosome has approx. 260.00 bps. This difference can be detected by FT-IR spectroscopy. Spectra were recorded from germ cells obtained from the feather pulp of chicks as well as from the germinal disk of fertilized but non-bred eggs. Significant changes between cells of male and female birds occur in the region of phosphate vibrations around 1080 and 1120 cm-1.

  10. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  11. Video cameras on wild birds.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Christian; Bluff, Lucas A; Weir, Alex A S; Kacelnik, Alex

    2007-11-02

    New Caledonian crows (Corvus moneduloides) are renowned for using tools for extractive foraging, but the ecological context of this unusual behavior is largely unknown. We developed miniaturized, animal-borne video cameras to record the undisturbed behavior and foraging ecology of wild, free-ranging crows. Our video recordings enabled an estimate of the species' natural foraging efficiency and revealed that tool use, and choice of tool materials, are more diverse than previously thought. Video tracking has potential for studying the behavior and ecology of many other bird species that are shy or live in inaccessible habitats.

  12. 75 FR 32872 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Supplemental Proposals for Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... Game Bird Hunting Regulations for the 2010-11 Hunting Season; Notice of Meetings AGENCY: Fish and... migratory game birds for the 2010-11 hunting season. This supplement to the proposed rule provides the... addressed the establishment of seasons, limits, and other regulations for hunting migratory game birds under...

  13. 75 FR 27143 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed 2010-11 Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations (Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... Hunting; Proposed 2010-11 Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations (Preliminary) With Requests for Indian...-2010-0040] [91200-1231-9BPP-L2] RIN 1018-AX06 Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed 2010-11 Migratory Game... for certain migratory game birds for the 2010-11 hunting season. We annually prescribe outside limits...

  14. 75 FR 52398 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Proposed Frameworks for Late-Season Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... late-season hunting regulations for certain migratory game birds. We annually prescribe frameworks, or... migratory game birds under Sec. Sec. 20.101 through 20.107, 20.109, and 20.110 of subpart K. Major steps in... game birds and developed recommendations for the 2010-11 regulations for these species plus regulations...

  15. 78 FR 35844 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Supplemental Proposals for Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations for the 2013-14 Hunting Season; Notice of Meetings AGENCY: Fish and... migratory game birds for the 2013-14 hunting season. This supplement to the proposed rule provides the... migratory game birds under Sec. Sec. 20.101 through 20.107, 20.109, and 20.110 of subpart K. This document...

  16. 76 FR 36508 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Supplemental Proposals for Migratory Game Bird Hunting Regulations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Game Bird Hunting Regulations for the 2011-12 Hunting Season; Notice of Meetings AGENCY: Fish and... migratory game birds for the 2011-12 hunting season. This supplement to the proposed rule provides the... migratory game birds under Sec. Sec. 20.101 through 20.107, 20.109, and 20.110 of subpart K. This document...

  17. Integrated Migratory Bird Planning in the Lower Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Plain Bird Conservation Region

    Chuck Hayes; Andrew Milliken; Randy Dettmers; Kevin Loftus; Brigitte Collins; Isabelle Ringuet

    2005-01-01

    The Atlantic Coast and Eastern Habitat Joint Ventures hosted two international planning workshops to begin the process of integrating bird conservation strategies under the North American Bird Conservation Initiative in the Lower Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Plain Bird Conservation Region. The workshops identified priority species and habitats, delineated focus areas,...

  18. Accommodating Birds in Managed Forests of North America: A Review of Bird-Forestry Relationships

    Rex Sallabanks; Edward B. Arnett

    2005-01-01

    Managed forests of North America provide important breeding and wintering habitat for many bird species. It is therefore essential that we understand all aspects of bird-forestry relationships if forest managers are to balance the needs of birds with timber harvest objectives. To help meet this need, here we provide a review of 116 research articles, dating from 1960...

  19. 78 FR 67183 - Proposed Information Collection; Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program and Migratory Bird...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ...-91200 FF09M26000] Proposed Information Collection; Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program and Migratory Bird Surveys AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; request for comments...) or 703- 358-2482 (telephone). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The Migratory Bird Treaty Act...

  20. 78 FR 27927 - Migratory Bird Permits; Depredation Order for Migratory Birds in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ...-0037; FF09M21200-234-FXMB1232099BPP0] RIN 1018-AY65 Migratory Bird Permits; Depredation Order for Migratory Birds in California AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: We propose to revise the regulations that allow control of depredating birds in some counties in...

  1. 75 FR 3888 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ...-0082; 91200-1231-9BPP-L2] RIN 1018-AW67 Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska During the 2010 Season AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior... Service, are reopening the public comment period on our proposed rule to establish migratory bird...

  2. 78 FR 65578 - Migratory Bird Permits; Depredation Order for Migratory Birds in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ...-0037; FF09M21200-134-FXMB1231099BPP0] RIN 1018-AY65 Migratory Bird Permits; Depredation Order for Migratory Birds in California AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We revise the regulations that allow control of depredating birds in California. We specify the counties in...

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A BIRD INTEGRITY INDEX: USING BIRD ASSEMBLAGES AS INDICATORS OF RIPARIAN CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe the development of a Bird Integrity Index (Bll) that uses bird assemblage information to assess human impacts on 13 stream reaches in the Willamette Valley, Oregon. We used bird survey field data to test 62 candidate metrics that were expected to respond positively or...

  4. Priority setting for bird conservation in Mexico: the role of the Important Bird Areas program

    Ma. del Coro Arizmendi; Laura Marquez Valdelamar; Humberto Berlanga

    2005-01-01

    Many species in Mexico are threatened and in need of protection. At least seventy species are considered to be globally threatened, yet conservation actions have been scarce and not coordinated. In 1996 BirdLife International’s Important Bird Areas Program was initiated in Mexico to identify a network of the most important places in Mexico for birds, with the...

  5. Avian Assemblages at Bird Baths: A Comparison of Urban and Rural Bird Baths in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Gráinne P.; Parsons, Holly; Davis, Adrian; Coleman, Bill R.; Jones, Darryl N.; Miller, Kelly K.; Weston, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Private gardens provide habitat and resources for many birds living in human-dominated landscapes. While wild bird feeding is recognised as one of the most popular forms of human-wildlife interaction, almost nothing is known about the use of bird baths. This citizen science initiative explores avian assemblages at bird baths in private gardens in south-eastern Australia and how this differs with respect to levels of urbanisation and bioregion. Overall, 992 citizen scientists collected data over two, four-week survey periods during winter 2014 and summer 2015 (43% participated in both years). Avian assemblages at urban and rural bird baths differed between bioregions with aggressive nectar-eating species influenced the avian assemblages visiting urban bird baths in South Eastern Queensland, NSW North Coast and Sydney Basin while introduced birds contributed to differences in South Western Slopes, Southern Volcanic Plains and Victorian Midlands. Small honeyeaters and other small native birds occurred less often at urban bird baths compared to rural bird baths. Our results suggest that differences between urban versus rural areas, as well as bioregion, significantly influence the composition of avian assemblages visiting bird baths in private gardens. We also demonstrate that citizen science monitoring of fixed survey sites such as bird baths is a useful tool in understanding large-scale patterns in avian assemblages which requires a vast amount of data to be collected across broad areas. PMID:26962857

  6. Dermal extracellular lipid in birds.

    PubMed

    Stromberg, M W; Hinsman, E J; Hullinger, R L

    1990-01-01

    A light and electron microscopic study of the skin of domestic chickens, seagulls, and antarctic penguins revealed abundant extracellular dermal lipid and intracellular epidermal lipid. Dermal lipid appeared ultrastructurally as extracellular droplets varying from less than 1 micron to more than 25 microns in diameter. The droplets were often irregularly contoured, sometimes round, and of relatively low electron density. Processes of fibrocytes were often seen in contact with extracellular lipid droplets. Sometimes a portion of such a droplet was missing, and this missing part appeared to have been "digested away" by the cell process. In places where cells or cell processes are in contact with fact droplets, there are sometimes extracellular membranous whorls or fragments which have been associated with the presence of fatty acids. Occasionally (in the comb) free fat particles were seen in intimate contact with extravasated erythrocytes. Fat droplets were seen in the lumen of small dermal blood and lymph vessels. We suggest that the dermal extracellular lipid originates in the adipocyte layer and following hydrolysis the free fatty acids diffuse into the epidermis. Here they become the raw material for forming the abundant neutral lipid contained in many of the epidermal cells of both birds and dolphins. The heretofore unreported presence and apparently normal utilization of abundant extracellular lipid in birds, as well as the presence of relatively large droplets of neutral lipid in dermal vessels, pose questions which require a thorough reappraisal of present concepts of the ways in which fat is distributed and utilized in the body.

  7. Lead Poisoning in Wild Birds

    Lahner, Lesanna L.; Franson, J. Christian

    2009-01-01

    Lead in its various forms has been used for thousands of years, originally in cooking utensils and glazes and more recently in many industrial and commercial applications. However, lead is a potent, potentially deadly toxin that damages many organs in the body and can affect all animals, including humans. By the mid 1990s, lead had been removed from many products in the United States, such as paint and fuel, but it is still commonly used in ammunition for hunting upland game birds, small mammals, and large game animals, as well as in fishing tackle. Wild birds, such as mourning doves, bald eagles, California condors, and loons, can die from the ingestion of one lead shot, bullet fragment, or sinker. According to a recent study on loon mortality, nearly half of adult loons found sick or dead during the breeding season in New England were diagnosed with confirmed or suspected lead poisoning from ingestion of lead fishing weights. Recent regulations in some states have restricted the use of lead ammunition on certain upland game hunting areas, as well as lead fishing tackle in areas frequented by common loons and trumpeter swans. A variety of alternatives to lead are available for use in hunting, shooting sports, and fishing activities.

  8. Eye lesions in pet birds.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S S; Park, J H; Hirai, K; Itakura, C

    1993-03-01

    Amongst eye lesions in birds that died in quarantine, cataracts were the most common disorders (37/241, 15.4%), being prevalent in the annular pads of cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus), Amazon parrots (Amazona aestiva aestiva) and budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus). The incidence in male birds was more than twice that in females. Deposition of crystals, mostly in the cornea, was the second most frequent lesion (21/293, 8.7%), mainly found in cockatiels, parakeets (Psittacula krameri manillensis), Amazon parrots (Amazona aestiva aestiva), budgerigars and finches (Poephila gouldiae gouldiae). These corneal crystals were negative to PAS and Kossa's stains. Six parakeets (Psittacula krameri manillensis) had calcium salts deposited in the inner plexiform layer of the retina and occasionally in the iris and ciliary body. Neither inflammation nor neo-vascularization was observed when cataracts, corneal crystalline deposition, and retinal and ciliary calcification were present. Intranuclear inclusion bodies typical for papovavirus infection were found in the eyelids of six budgerigars (2.5%). Similar inclusions were simultaneously found in the pars ciliaris retinae (4, 1.7%), inner plexiform of retina (1, 0.4%) and anterior epithelium of the cornea (1, 0.4%). Other lesions such as candidial endophthalmitis, conjunctival cryptosporidiosis, corneal dystrophy, keratitis, corneal perforation and iridocyclitis, were occasional findings.

  9. Thyroid hormone deiodination in birds.

    PubMed

    Darras, Veerle M; Verhoelst, Carla H J; Reyns, Geert E; Kühn, Eduard R; Van der Geyten, Serge

    2006-01-01

    Because the avian thyroid gland secretes almost exclusively thyroxine (T4), the availability of receptor-active 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) has to be regulated in the extrathyroidal tissues, essentially by deiodination. Like mammals and most other vertebrates, birds possess three types of iodothyronine deiodinases (D1, D2, and D3) that closely resemble their mammalian counterparts, as shown by biochemical characterization studies in several avian species and by cDNA cloning of the three enzymes in chicken. The tissue distribution of these deiodinases has been studied in detail in chicken at the level of activity and mRNA expression. More recently specific antibodies were used to study cellular localization at the protein level. The abundance and distribution of the different deiodinases shows substantial variation during embryonic development and postnatal life. Deiodination in birds is subject to regulation by hormones from several endocrine axes, including thyroid hormones, growth hormone and glucocorticoids. In addition, deiodination is also influenced by external parameters, such as nutrition, temperature, light and also a number of environmental pollutants. The balance between the outer and inner ring deiodination resulting from the impact of all these factors ultimately controls T3 availability.

  10. Effects of bird-feeding activities on the health of wild birds

    PubMed Central

    Horn, David J; Hogan, Brianna M; Hubble, Cody N; Huber, Sarah J; Flamm, Joseph; Knott, Madeline; Lundstrom, Lisa; Salik, Faaria; Wassenhove, Samantha J; Wrobel, Elizabeth R

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Among the most popular reasons that people feed wild birds is that they want to help birds. The extent to which supplemental food helps birds, however, is not well established. From spring 2011 to spring 2014, we examined how feeding of wild birds influences the health of individual birds at forested sites in central Illinois, USA. Specifically, we compared three forested sites where we provided supplemental food with three forested sites for which no supplemental food was available and monitored changes in the individual health of birds. In addition, we determined whether any changes in bird health had occurred after feeders had been removed from sites 10 months before. Generally, the individual health of birds improved with supplemental feeding, including increased antioxidant levels, reduced stress (heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio) and more rapid feather growth. In some species, we also found improved body condition index scores and innate immune defense. The difference among sites was not present 10 months after feeders were removed, suggesting that the impact on health was indeed related to supplemental feeding. Potential negative effects of supplemental feeding were also found, including an increase in infectious disease prevalence among individual birds at forested sites where supplemental food was offered. Birds with clear signs of pathology showed deficits in most of the physiological metrics in which birds at feeder sites typically showed improved health condition. At the peak of prevalence of infectious disease, 8.3% of all birds at feeders exhibited symptoms of conjunctivitis, pox, dermal disease or cloacal disease. We found both positive and negative impacts of wild bird feeding, and that, in general, birds that had access to supplemental food were in better physiological condition. Moreover, the negative effects we found may be mitigated by hobbyists engaging in safer bird-feeding practices. PMID:27293740

  11. Assessment of bird response to the Migratory Bird Habitat Initiative using weather-surveillance radar

    Sieges, Mason L.; Smolinsky, Jaclyn A.; Baldwin, Michael J.; Barrow, Wylie C.; Randall, Lori A.; Buler, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    In response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in spring 2010, the Natural Resources Conservation Service implemented the Migratory Bird Habitat Initiative (MBHI) to provide temporary wetland habitat for migrating and wintering waterfowl, shorebirds, and other birds along the northern Gulf of Mexico via managed flooding of agricultural lands. We used weather-surveillance radar to conduct broad regional assessments of bird response to MBHI activities within the Mississippi Alluvial Valley and the West Gulf Coastal Plain. Across both regions, birds responded positively to MBHI management by exhibiting greater relative bird densities within sites relative to pre-management conditions in prior years and relative to surrounding non-flooded agricultural lands. Bird density at MBHI sites was generally greatest during winter for both regions. Unusually high flooding in the years prior to implementation of the MBHI confounded detection of overall changes in remotely sensed soil wetness across sites. The magnitude of bird response at MBHI sites compared to prior years and to non-flooded agricultural lands was generally related to the surrounding landscape context: proximity to areas of high bird density, amount of forested wetlands, emergent marsh, non-flooded agriculture, or permanent open water. However, these relationships varied in strength and direction between regions and seasons, a finding which we attribute to differences in seasonal bird composition and broad regional differences in landscape configuration and composition. We detected greater increases in relative bird use at sites in closer proximity to areas of high bird density during winter in both regions. Additionally, bird density was greater during winter at sites with more emergent marsh in the surrounding landscape. Thus, bird use of managed wetlands could be maximized by enrolling lands located near areas of known bird concentration and within a mosaic of existing wetlands. Weather-radar observations

  12. Silvicultural options for neotropical migratory birds

    Frank R. Thompson; John R. Probst; Martin G. Raphael

    1993-01-01

    We review: factors that affect forest bird populations; basic concepts of silvicultural systems; potential impacts of these systems on neotropical migratory birds (NTMBs); and conclude with management recommendations for integrating NTMB conservation with forest management. We approach this topic from a regional-landscape scale to a forest stand-habitat scale, rather...

  13. Present and future of scientific bird ringing

    Spina, F.; Tautin, J.; Adams, N.J.; Slotow, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    In 1999 scientific bird ringing will celebrate its first century of existence. Started mainly to investigate bird movements, bird ringing has become a much more flexible method to study different aspects of bird biology. Bird ringing can only be properly organised if an effective international co-operation exists. In Europe, this co-ordination is ensured by EURING, made of 35 national ringing centres; sister organisations exist in other parts of the world (like Africa, Australia, U.S. and Canada), sharing the same aims and problems. This RTD is mainly targeted to ornithologists involved with the co-ordination of bird ringing stations and national centres world-wide. Common aspects of the organisation of ringing activities, as well as of the potential ringing has and will have in the future in addressing major scientific questions in Ornithology will be taken into account. The advisability of setting up a standing committee on bird ringing within the IOC will be discussed, and the project of creating a world-wide organisation of ringing schemes in order to further improve communication and exchange of experiences will also be addressed. This new organisation would be formally founded in 1999, when an international conference organised by EURING to celebrate the first 100 years of bird ringing will be held in Denmark.

  14. Present and future of scientific bird ringing

    Spina, F.; Tautin, J.; Adams, N.J.; Slotow, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    In 1999 scientific bird ringing will celebrate its first century of existence. Started mainly to investigate bird movements, bird ringing has become a much more flexible method to study different aspects of bird biology. Bird ringing can only be properly organised if an effective international co-operation exists. In Europe, this co-ordination is ensured by EURING, made of 35 national ringing centres; sister organisations exist in other parts of the world (like Africa, Australia, U.S. and Canada), sharing the same aims and problems. This RTD is mainly targeted to ornithologists involved with the co-ordination of bird ringing stations and national centres world-wide. Common aspects of the organisation of ringing activities, as well as of the potential ringing has and will have in the future in addressing major scientific questions in Ornithology will be taken into account. The advisability of setting up a standing committee on bird ringing within the IOC will be discussed, and the project of creating a world-wide organisation of ringing schemes in order to further improve communication and exchange of experiences will also be addressed. This new organisation would be formally founded in 1999, when an international conference organised by EURING to celebrate the first 100 years of bird ringing will be held in Denmark.

  15. Monitoring bird populations by point counts

    C. John Ralph; John R. Sauer; Sam Droege

    1995-01-01

    This volume contains in part papers presented at the Symposium on Monitoring Bird Population Trends by Point Counts, which was held November 6-7, 1991, in Beltsville, Md., in response to the need for standardization of methods to monitor bird populations by point counts. Data from various investigators working under a wide variety of conditions are presented, and...

  16. 21 CFR 1240.65 - Psittacine birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS... traffic any psittacine bird unless the shipment is accompanied by a permit from the State health... finds that psittacine birds or human beings in any area are infected with psittacosis and there is such...

  17. 21 CFR 1240.65 - Psittacine birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS... traffic any psittacine bird unless the shipment is accompanied by a permit from the State health... finds that psittacine birds or human beings in any area are infected with psittacosis and there is such...

  18. 21 CFR 1240.65 - Psittacine birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS... traffic any psittacine bird unless the shipment is accompanied by a permit from the State health... finds that psittacine birds or human beings in any area are infected with psittacosis and there is such...

  19. Endogenous timing factors in bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwinner, E. G.

    1972-01-01

    Several species of warbler birds were observed in an effort to determine what initiates and terminates migration. Environmental and endogenous timing mechanisms were analyzed. The results indicate that endogenous stimuli are dominant factors for bird migration especially for long distances. It was concluded that environmental factors act as an assist mechanism.

  20. An integrative approach to understanding bird origins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing; Zhou, Zhonghe; Dudley, Robert; Mackem, Susan; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Erickson, Gregory M; Varricchio, David J

    2014-12-12

    Recent discoveries of spectacular dinosaur fossils overwhelmingly support the hypothesis that birds are descended from maniraptoran theropod dinosaurs, and furthermore, demonstrate that distinctive bird characteristics such as feathers, flight, endothermic physiology, unique strategies for reproduction and growth, and a novel pulmonary system originated among Mesozoic terrestrial dinosaurs. The transition from ground-living to flight-capable theropod dinosaurs now probably represents one of the best-documented major evolutionary transitions in life history. Recent studies in developmental biology and other disciplines provide additional insights into how bird characteristics originated and evolved. The iconic features of extant birds for the most part evolved in a gradual and stepwise fashion throughout archosaur evolution. However, new data also highlight occasional bursts of morphological novelty at certain stages particularly close to the origin of birds and an unavoidable complex, mosaic evolutionary distribution of major bird characteristics on the theropod tree. Research into bird origins provides a premier example of how paleontological and neontological data can interact to reveal the complexity of major innovations, to answer key evolutionary questions, and to lead to new research directions. A better understanding of bird origins requires multifaceted and integrative approaches, yet fossils necessarily provide the final test of any evolutionary model. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. A Birding Program for the Blind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Eileen Koper

    1994-01-01

    A birding program developed as part of the leisure-time instructional program at the Greater Pittsburgh Guild for the Blind is described. Visits to the local aviary and field trips in which birds were identified by sound made this a particularly suitable activity. Sample activities conducted to involve participants are described. (DB)

  2. Foraging interactions of small Hawaiian forest birds

    C. John Ralph; Barry R. Noon

    1986-01-01

    In a search for competition, limiting factors, and other patterns in a community of small passerine birds in Hawaii, we recorded the foraging behaviors, resource abundances, and climatic variables believed to influence resource levels. Some definite patterns were found, showing that the rare, endangered birds were specialists; however, some specialists were quite...

  3. [Hemoparasites in wild birds in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Raharimanga, V; Soula, F; Raherilalao, M J; Goodman, S M; Sadonès, H; Tall, A; Randrianarivelojosia, M; Raharimalala, L; Duchemin, J B; Ariey, F; Robert, V

    2002-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the prevalence and density of haemoparasites in native Malagasy birds. Among the 387 birds, belonging to 43 species sampled at six localities in different bio-climatic zones of the island, 139 (35.9%) showed at least 1 hemoparasite with, by order of frequency, Plasmodium and/or Haemoproteus (19.9%), microfilariae (13.7% of 387 birds), Leucocytozoon (11.1%) and Trypanosoma (1.0%). An analysis to further elucidate these observations took into account the interaction of different environmental variables (altitude, season, site of collection) or aspects of the birds (age, weight, sex). There is evidence that some parasites preferentially infect some bird species or families. The largest male birds harboured the highest prevalences and densities of haemoparasite, regardless of species. These findings extend knowledge of bird/blood parasite relationships of Malagasy birds and provide interesting insights, especially concerning the pathogenicity of this type of parasitism and the parasite transmission by insect vectors.

  4. The Popularity of Birding is Still Growing

    H. Ken Cordell; Nancy G. Herbert

    2002-01-01

    What are the "field marks" of the entry-level birder of the past few years? She is probably between 40 and 59 years old and is white. She puts in about 10 birding days or fewer per year, trying to squeeze birding into a busy life, although she also finds herself engaged in related activities: walking for pleasure, attending family outdoor gatherings...

  5. Ability of Slovakian Pupils to Identify Birds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokop, Pavol; Rodak, Rastislav

    2009-01-01

    A pupil's ability to identify common organisms is necessary for acquiring further knowledge of biology. We investigated how pupils were able to identify 25 bird species following their song, growth habits, or both features presented simultaneously. Just about 19% of birds were successfully identified by song, about 39% by growth habit, and 45% of…

  6. Response of bird communities to natural disturbance

    Michael P. Guilfoyle; Wylie C. Barrow; Paul B. Hamel; James S. Wakeley; Sammy L. King; Teny J. Antrobus

    2000-01-01

    In addition to providing numerous important ecological functions, bottomland hardwoods provide important habitat for many wildlife species (Harris 1989), particularly many forest interior birds (Hamel and others 1996). National monitoring efforts showed nationwide declines for many forest bird species, including forest-dependent neotropical migrants (Johnston and Hagan...

  7. Foraging guilds of North American birds

    Richard M. DeGraaf; Nancy G. Tilghman; Stanley H. Anderson

    1985-01-01

    Many approaches have been taken to describe bird feeding behavior. Comparisons between different studies, however, have been difficult because of differences in terminology. We propose to establish a classification scheme for North American birds by using common terminology based on major food type, substrate, and technique, using foraging guilds.

  8. Fernbank Forest Birds in the Summer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmalz, Georgann

    1991-01-01

    Provided is a listing of the common nesting birds and the neotropical migrant birds with nesting records in the approximate 65 acres of Fernbank Forest which is a preserve of mature urban hardwoods and pines within 10 miles of downtown Atlanta and a relic of what was once a large, uninterrupted tract of the Piedmont forest. (JJK)

  9. Cryptococcosis outbreak in psittacine birds in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Raso, T F; Werther, K; Miranda, E T; Mendes-Giannini, M J S

    2004-08-01

    An outbreak of cryptococcosis occurred in a breeding aviary in São Paulo, Brazil. Seven psittacine birds (of species Charmosyna papou, Lorius lory, Trichoglossus goldiei, Psittacula krameri and Psittacus erithacus) died of disseminated cryptococcosis. Incoordination, progressive paralysis and difficulty in flying were seen in five birds, whereas superficial lesions coincident with respiratory alterations were seen in two birds. Encapsulated yeasts suggestive of Cryptococcus sp. were seen in faecal smears stained with India ink in two cases. Histological examination of the birds showed cryptococcal cells in various tissues, including the beak, choana, sinus, lungs, air sacs, heart, liver, spleen, kidneys, intestines and central nervous system. High titres of cryptococcal antigen were observed in the serum of an affected bird. In this case, titres increased during treatment and the bird eventually died. Yeasts were isolated from the nasal mass, faeces and liver of one bird. Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii serovar B was identified based on biochemical, physiological and serological tests. These strains were resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration 64 microg/ml) to fluconazole. This is the first report of C. neoformans var. gattii occurring in psittacine birds in Brazil.

  10. Supplementary feeding restructures urban bird communities

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Josie A.; Jones, Darryl N.; Stanley, Margaret C.

    2015-01-01

    Food availability is a primary driver of avian population regulation. However, few studies have considered the effects of what is essentially a massive supplementary feeding experiment: the practice of wild bird feeding. Bird feeding has been posited as an important factor influencing the structure of bird communities, especially in urban areas, although experimental evidence to support this is almost entirely lacking. We carried out an 18-mo experimental feeding study at 23 residential properties to investigate the effects of bird feeding on local urban avian assemblages. Our feeding regime was based on predominant urban feeding practices in our region. We used monthly bird surveys to compare avian community composition, species richness, and the densities of local species at feeding and nonfeeding properties. Avian community structure diverged at feeding properties and five of the commonest garden bird species were affected by the experimental feeding regime. Introduced birds particularly benefitted, with dramatic increases observed in the abundances of house sparrow (Passer domesticus) and spotted dove (Streptopelia chinensis) in particular. We also found evidence of a negative effect on the abundance of a native insectivore, the grey warbler (Gerygone igata). Almost all of the observed changes did not persist once feeding had ceased. Our study directly demonstrates that the human pastime of bird feeding substantially contributes to the structure of avian community in urban areas, potentially altering the balance between native and introduced species. PMID:25941361

  11. Fire and bird communities in the South

    James G. Dickson

    2002-01-01

    Fire has long been a natural and anthropogenic force shaping southern forests and their fauna. Some species are attracted to recent burns. There is little direct mortality of adult birds by fire, but growing season fires may consume some nests. Fire affects bird communities mainly through effects on vegetation. Fires effective enough to limit understory hardwood...

  12. Neospora caninum in birds: A review.

    PubMed

    de Barros, Luiz Daniel; Miura, Ana Carolina; Minutti, Ana Flávia; Vidotto, Odilon; Garcia, João Luis

    2018-08-01

    Neospora caninum is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that infects domestic and wild animals. Canids are considered to be definitive hosts since they may shed oocysts into the environment through their feces. The disease is recognized as one of the major causes of bovine abortion worldwide, leading to important economic losses in the dairy and beef cattle industries. Previous studies have reported N. caninum infection in different species of birds; infection in birds has been associated with increased seroprevalence and reproductive problems in dairy cattle. Although the role of birds in the epidemiological cycle of neosporosis is unknown, birds are exposed to infection because they feed on the ground and could thus contribute to parasite dissemination. This review is focused on the current state of knowledge of neosporosis in birds. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Occurrence of keratinophilic fungi on Indian birds.

    PubMed

    Dixit, A K; Kushwaha, R K

    1991-01-01

    Keratinophilic fungi were isolated from feathers of most common Indian birds, viz. domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), domestic pigeon (Columba livia), house sparrow (Passer domesticus), house crow (Corvus splendens), duck (Anas sp.), rose-ringed parakeet (Psittacula krameri). Out of 87 birds, 58 yielded 4 keratinophilic fungal genera representing 13 fungal species and one sterile mycelium. The isolated fungi were cultured on Sabouraud's dextrose agar at 28 +/- 2 degrees C. Chrysosporium species were isolated on most of the birds. Chrysosporium lucknowense and Chrysosporium tropicum were the most common fungal species associated with these Indian birds. Maximum occurrence of fungi (47%) was recorded on domestic chickens and the least number of keratinophilic fungi was isolated from the domestic pigeon and duck. The average number of fungi per bird was found to be the 0.44.

  14. The Origin and Diversification of Birds.

    PubMed

    Brusatte, Stephen L; O'Connor, Jingmai K; Jarvis, Erich D

    2015-10-05

    Birds are one of the most recognizable and diverse groups of modern vertebrates. Over the past two decades, a wealth of new fossil discoveries and phylogenetic and macroevolutionary studies has transformed our understanding of how birds originated and became so successful. Birds evolved from theropod dinosaurs during the Jurassic (around 165-150 million years ago) and their classic small, lightweight, feathered, and winged body plan was pieced together gradually over tens of millions of years of evolution rather than in one burst of innovation. Early birds diversified throughout the Jurassic and Cretaceous, becoming capable fliers with supercharged growth rates, but were decimated at the end-Cretaceous extinction alongside their close dinosaurian relatives. After the mass extinction, modern birds (members of the avian crown group) explosively diversified, culminating in more than 10,000 species distributed worldwide today. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biosecurity and bird movement practices in upland game bird facilities in the United States.

    PubMed

    Slota, Katharine E; Hill, Ashley E; Keefe, Thomas J; Bowen, Richard A; Pabilonia, Kristy L

    2011-06-01

    Since 1996, the emergence of Asian-origin highly pathogenic avian influenza subtype H5N1 has spurred great concern for the global poultry industry. In the United States, there is concern over the potential of a foreign avian disease incursion into the country. Noncommercial poultry operations, such as upland game bird facilities in the United States, may serve as a potential source of avian disease introduction to other bird populations including the commercial poultry industry, backyard flocks, or wildlife. In order to evaluate how to prevent disease transmission from these facilities to other populations, we examined biosecurity practices and bird movement within the upland game bird industry in the United States. Persons that held a current permit to keep, breed, or release upland game birds were surveyed for information on biosecurity practices, flock and release environments, and bird movement parameters. Biosecurity practices vary greatly among permit holders. Many facilities allow for interaction between wild birds and pen-reared birds, and there is regular long-distance movement of live adult birds among facilities. Results suggest that upland game bird facilities should be targeted for biosecurity education and disease surveillance efforts.

  16. Overseas seed dispersal by migratory birds

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Long-distance dispersal (LDD) promotes the colonization of isolated and remote habitats, and thus it has been proposed as a mechanism for explaining the distributions of many species. Birds are key LDD vectors for many sessile organisms such as plants, yet LDD beyond local and regional scales has never been directly observed nor quantified. By sampling birds caught while in migratory flight by GPS-tracked wild falcons, we show that migratory birds transport seeds over hundreds of kilometres and mediate dispersal from mainland to oceanic islands. Up to 1.2% of birds that reached a small island of the Canary Archipelago (Alegranza) during their migration from Europe to Sub-Saharan Africa carried seeds in their guts. The billions of birds making seasonal migrations each year may then transport millions of seeds. None of the plant species transported by the birds occurs in Alegranza and most do not occur on nearby Canary Islands, providing a direct example of the importance of environmental filters in hampering successful colonization by immigrant species. The constant propagule pressure generated by these LDD events might, nevertheless, explain the colonization of some islands. Hence, migratory birds can mediate rapid range expansion or shifts of many plant taxa and determine their distribution. PMID:26740610

  17. Impact of estuarine pollution on birds

    Blus, L.J.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Kerwin, J.A.; Stendell, R.C.; Ohlendorf, H.M.; Stickel, L.F.

    1977-01-01

    Pollution of estuaries affects bird populations indirectly through changes in habitat and food supply. The multi-factor pollution of Chesapeake Bay has resulted in diminution of submerged aquatic plants and consequent change in food habits of the canvasback duck. Although dredge-spoil operations can improve wildlife habitat, they often result in its demise. Pollution of estuaries also affects birds directly, through chemical toxication, which may result in outright mortality or in reproductive impairment. Lead from industrial sources and roadways enters the estuaries and is accumulated in tissues of birds. Lead pellets deposited in estuaries as a result of hunting are consumed by ducks with sufficient frequency .to result m large annual die-offs from lead poisoning. Fish in certain areas, usually near industrial sources, may contain levels of mercury high enough to be hazardous to birds that consume them. Other heavy metals are present in estuarine birds, but their significance is poorly known. Oil exerts lethal or sublethal effects on birds by oiling their feathers, oiling eggs and young by contaminated parents, and by ingestion of oil-contaminated food. Organochlorine chemicals, of both agricultural and industrial origin, travel through the food chains and reach harmful levels in susceptible species of birds in certain estuarine ecosystems. Both outright mortality and reproductive impairment have occurred.

  18. Overseas seed dispersal by migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Viana, Duarte S; Gangoso, Laura; Bouten, Willem; Figuerola, Jordi

    2016-01-13

    Long-distance dispersal (LDD) promotes the colonization of isolated and remote habitats, and thus it has been proposed as a mechanism for explaining the distributions of many species. Birds are key LDD vectors for many sessile organisms such as plants, yet LDD beyond local and regional scales has never been directly observed nor quantified. By sampling birds caught while in migratory flight by GPS-tracked wild falcons, we show that migratory birds transport seeds over hundreds of kilometres and mediate dispersal from mainland to oceanic islands. Up to 1.2% of birds that reached a small island of the Canary Archipelago (Alegranza) during their migration from Europe to Sub-Saharan Africa carried seeds in their guts. The billions of birds making seasonal migrations each year may then transport millions of seeds. None of the plant species transported by the birds occurs in Alegranza and most do not occur on nearby Canary Islands, providing a direct example of the importance of environmental filters in hampering successful colonization by immigrant species. The constant propagule pressure generated by these LDD events might, nevertheless, explain the colonization of some islands. Hence, migratory birds can mediate rapid range expansion or shifts of many plant taxa and determine their distribution. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Book review: Oklahoma Breeding Bird Atlas

    Peterjohn, Bruce G.

    2004-01-01

    The first North American breeding bird atlases were initiated during the 1970s. With atlases completed or ongoing in more than 40 U.S. states and most Canadian provinces, these projects are now familiar to professional ornithologists and amateur birders. This book provides the results of the Oklahoma Breeding Bird Atlas, the data for which were collected during 1997–2001. Its appearance less than 3 years after completing fieldwork is remarkable and everyone associated with its timely publication should be congratulated for their efforts.Review info: Oklahoma Breeding Bird Atlas. By Dan L. Reinking, 2004. ISBN: 0806136146, 528 pp.

  20. The birds of Genome10K.

    PubMed

    OBrien, Stephen J; Haussler, David; Ryder, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Everyone loves the birds of the world. From their haunting songs and majesty of flight to dazzling plumage and mating rituals, bird watchers - both amateurs and professionals - have marveled for centuries at their considerable adaptations. Now, we are offered a special treat with the publication of a series of papers in dedicated issues of Science, Genome Biology and GigaScience (which also included pre-publication data release). These present the successful beginnings of an international interdisciplinary venture, the Avian Phylogenomics Project that lets us view, through a genomics lens, modern bird species and the evolutionary events that produced them.

  1. Space Shuttle Orbiter windshield bird impact analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, Karen S.; Mccarty, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter's windshield employs three glass panes separated by air gaps. The brittleness of the glass offers much less birdstrike energy-absorption capability than the laminated polycarbonate windshields of more conventional aircraft; attention must accordingly be given to the risk of catastrophic bird impact, and to methods of strike prevention that address bird populations around landing sites rather than the modification of the window's design. Bird populations' direct reduction, as well as careful scheduling of Orbiter landing times, are suggested as viable alternatives. The question of birdstrike-resistant glass windshield design for hypersonic aerospacecraft is discussed.

  2. Coastal and Marine Bird Data Base

    Anderson, S.H.; Geissler, P.H.; Dawson, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    Summary: This report discusses the development of a coastal and marine bird data base at the Migratory Bird and Habitat Research Laboratory. The system is compared with other data bases, and suggestions for future development, such as possible adaptations for other taxonomic groups, are included. The data base is based on the Statistical Analysis System but includes extensions programmed in PL/I. The Appendix shows how the system evolved. Output examples are given for heron data and pelagic bird data which indicate the types of analyses that can be conducted and output figures. The Appendixes include a retrieval language user's guide and description of the retrieval process and listing of translator program.

  3. All about Owls: Studying Owls, State Birds, and Endangered Species.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivard, Leonard P.

    1991-01-01

    Activities are included that acquaint students with the parts of birds and the structure of feathers; that identify the prey of owls by opening owl pellets; working with information about threatened and endangered species of birds; and follow-up activities for bird study. A list of state and provincial birds of the United States and Canada and…

  4. Potential effects of climate change on birds of the Northeast

    N.L. Rodenhouse; S.N. Matthews; K.P. McFarland; J.D. Lambert; L.R. Iverson; A. Prasad; T.S. Stillett; R.T. Holmes

    2008-01-01

    We used three approaches to assess potential effects of climate change on birds of the Northeast. First, we created distribution and abundance models for common bird species using climate, elevation, and tree species variables and modeled how bird distributions might change as habitats shift. Second, we assessed potential effects on high-elevation birds, especially...

  5. Bird population and habitat surveys in urban areas

    Richard M. DeGraaf; Aelred D. Geis; Patricia A. Healy

    1991-01-01

    Breeding bird populations in six habitats in Columbia. MD. were studied to develop procedures suitable for measuring bird use of residential areas and to identify habitat characteristics that define the distribution of various common bird species. A procedure to measure bird use based on 4-min transect counts on plots measuring 91 m × 91 m proved better than point...

  6. 19 CFR 10.76 - Game animals and birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Game animals and birds. 10.76 Section 10.76... § 10.76 Game animals and birds. (a) The following classes of live game animals and birds may be...) [Reserved] (d) Game animals and birds killed in foreign countries by residents of the United States, if not...

  7. 50 CFR 20.40 - Gift of migratory game birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gift of migratory game birds. 20.40... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.40 Gift of migratory game birds. No person may receive, possess, or give to another, any freshly killed migratory game birds as a gift...

  8. 19 CFR 10.76 - Game animals and birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Game animals and birds. 10.76 Section 10.76... § 10.76 Game animals and birds. (a) The following classes of live game animals and birds may be...) [Reserved] (d) Game animals and birds killed in foreign countries by residents of the United States, if not...

  9. 50 CFR 20.40 - Gift of migratory game birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gift of migratory game birds. 20.40... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.40 Gift of migratory game birds. No person may receive, possess, or give to another, any freshly killed migratory game birds as a gift...

  10. 50 CFR 20.40 - Gift of migratory game birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gift of migratory game birds. 20.40... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.40 Gift of migratory game birds. No person may receive, possess, or give to another, any freshly killed migratory game birds as a gift...

  11. 19 CFR 10.76 - Game animals and birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Game animals and birds. 10.76 Section 10.76... § 10.76 Game animals and birds. (a) The following classes of live game animals and birds may be...) [Reserved] (d) Game animals and birds killed in foreign countries by residents of the United States, if not...

  12. 19 CFR 10.76 - Game animals and birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Game animals and birds. 10.76 Section 10.76... § 10.76 Game animals and birds. (a) The following classes of live game animals and birds may be...) [Reserved] (d) Game animals and birds killed in foreign countries by residents of the United States, if not...

  13. 19 CFR 10.76 - Game animals and birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Game animals and birds. 10.76 Section 10.76... § 10.76 Game animals and birds. (a) The following classes of live game animals and birds may be...) [Reserved] (d) Game animals and birds killed in foreign countries by residents of the United States, if not...

  14. 50 CFR 20.40 - Gift of migratory game birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gift of migratory game birds. 20.40... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.40 Gift of migratory game birds. No person may receive, possess, or give to another, any freshly killed migratory game birds as a gift...

  15. 50 CFR 20.40 - Gift of migratory game birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gift of migratory game birds. 20.40... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.40 Gift of migratory game birds. No person may receive, possess, or give to another, any freshly killed migratory game birds as a gift...

  16. 9 CFR 82.15 - Replacement birds and poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Replacement birds and poultry. 82.15...- EASE (END) AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) § 82.15 Replacement birds and poultry. Birds and poultry that have been destroyed because of a quarantine for END may not be replaced by birds or...

  17. 50 CFR 92.22 - Subsistence migratory bird species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Subsistence migratory bird species. 92.22... (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS MIGRATORY BIRD SUBSISTENCE HARVEST IN ALASKA General Regulations Governing Subsistence Harvest § 92.22 Subsistence migratory bird species. You may harvest birds or gather...

  18. 45 CFR 670.20 - Designation of native birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Designation of native birds. 670.20 Section 670.20... CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates § 670.20 Designation of native birds. The following are designated native birds: Albatross Black-browed—Diomedea...

  19. 9 CFR 82.15 - Replacement birds and poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Replacement birds and poultry. 82.15...- EASE (END) AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) § 82.15 Replacement birds and poultry. Birds and poultry that have been destroyed because of a quarantine for END may not be replaced by birds or...

  20. 50 CFR 20.37 - Custody of birds of another.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Custody of birds of another. 20.37 Section... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.37 Custody of birds of another. No person shall receive or have in custody any migratory game birds belonging to another person unless such...

  1. 76 FR 39368 - Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ...-0045; 91200-1231-9BPP] RIN 1018-AW75 Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement Regulations AGENCY: Fish and... promulgating migratory bird permit regulations for a permit to use raptors (birds of prey) in abatement activities. Abatement means the use of trained raptors to flush, scare (haze), or take birds or other...

  2. Ornithologists by Design: Kindergarteners Design, Construct, and Evaluate Bird Feeders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorter, Angela; Segers, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    How can an engineer design a bird feeder that attracts many birds? This question resulted from kindergarten students' observations of the bird feeders in their school's bird sanctuary. The challenging question is the heart of project-based learning (PBL), a teaching strategy in which students tackle real-world problems and design projects to solve…

  3. 50 CFR 20.20 - Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program... IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Taking § 20.20 Migratory Bird Harvest... information will be used to provide a sampling frame for the national Migratory Bird Harvest Survey. Response...

  4. 76 FR 67650 - Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ...-0045; 91200-1231-9BPP] RIN 1018-AW75 Migratory Bird Permits; Abatement Regulations AGENCY: Fish and... and suggestions on migratory bird permit regulations for a permit to use raptors (birds of prey) in abatement activities. Abatement means the use of trained raptors to flush, scare (haze), or take birds or...

  5. 50 CFR 20.38 - Possession of live birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Possession of live birds. 20.38 Section 20... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.38 Possession of live birds. Every migratory game bird wounded by hunting and reduced to possession by the hunter shall be immediately killed...

  6. 50 CFR 20.42 - Transportation of birds of another.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transportation of birds of another. 20.42... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Transportation Within the United States § 20.42 Transportation of birds of another. No person shall transport migratory game birds belonging to another person...

  7. 50 CFR 92.22 - Subsistence migratory bird species.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subsistence migratory bird species. 92.22... (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS MIGRATORY BIRD SUBSISTENCE HARVEST IN ALASKA General Regulations Governing Subsistence Harvest § 92.22 Subsistence migratory bird species. You may harvest birds or gather...

  8. Effects of prescribed burns on wintering cavity-nesting birds

    Heather L. Bateman; Margaret A. O' Connell

    2006-01-01

    Primary cavity-nesting birds play a critical role in forest ecosystems by excavating cavities later used by other birds and mammals as nesting or roosting sites. Several species of cavity-nesting birds are non-migratory residents and consequently subject to winter conditions. We conducted winter bird counts from 1998 to 2000 to examine the abundance and habitat...

  9. 14 CFR 25.631 - Bird strike damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bird strike damage. 25.631 Section 25.631... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.631 Bird strike damage. The... airplane after impact with an 8-pound bird when the velocity of the airplane (relative to the bird along...

  10. 50 CFR 20.62 - Importation of birds of another.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Importation of birds of another. 20.62... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Importations § 20.62 Importation of birds of another. No person shall import migratory game birds belonging to another person. ...

  11. 50 CFR 20.38 - Possession of live birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Possession of live birds. 20.38 Section 20... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.38 Possession of live birds. Every migratory game bird wounded by hunting and reduced to possession by the hunter shall be immediately killed...

  12. 50 CFR 20.62 - Importation of birds of another.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Importation of birds of another. 20.62... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Importations § 20.62 Importation of birds of another. No person shall import migratory game birds belonging to another person. ...

  13. 14 CFR 25.631 - Bird strike damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bird strike damage. 25.631 Section 25.631... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction General § 25.631 Bird strike damage. The... airplane after impact with an 8-pound bird when the velocity of the airplane (relative to the bird along...

  14. 50 CFR 20.42 - Transportation of birds of another.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transportation of birds of another. 20.42... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Transportation Within the United States § 20.42 Transportation of birds of another. No person shall transport migratory game birds belonging to another person...

  15. 50 CFR 20.20 - Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Migratory Bird Harvest Information Program... IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Taking § 20.20 Migratory Bird Harvest... information will be used to provide a sampling frame for the national Migratory Bird Harvest Survey. Response...

  16. 50 CFR 20.37 - Custody of birds of another.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Custody of birds of another. 20.37 Section... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) MIGRATORY BIRD HUNTING Possession § 20.37 Custody of birds of another. No person shall receive or have in custody any migratory game birds belonging to another person unless such...

  17. Effects of fire on birds in Madrean forests and woodlands

    Joseph L. Ganey; William M. Block; Paul F. Boucher

    1996-01-01

    Fire usually affects birds indirectly, by altering habitat or food resources. Bird response may be positive or negative, depending on life-history characteristics and fire extent, intensity, and duration. Disruption of natural fire regimes may have far-reaching consequences for these birds and their habitat. The effects of fire on forest birds should be studied...

  18. Avian Bornavirus in Free-Ranging Psittacine Birds, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Encinas-Nagel, Nuri; Enderlein, Dirk; Piepenbring, Anne; Herden, Christiane; Heffels-Redmann, Ursula; Felippe, Paulo A.N.; Arns, Clarice; Hafez, Hafez M.

    2014-01-01

    Avian bornavirus (ABV) has been identified as the cause of proventricular dilatation disease in birds, but the virus is also found in healthy birds. Most studies of ABV have focused on captive birds. We investigated 86 free-ranging psittacine birds in Brazil and found evidence for natural, long-term ABV infection. PMID:25417715

  19. Causes of hatching failure in endangered birds

    PubMed Central

    Hemmings, N.; West, M.; Birkhead, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    About 10 per cent of birds' eggs fail to hatch, but the incidence of failure can be much higher in endangered species. Most studies fail to distinguish between infertility (due to a lack of sperm) and embryo mortality as the cause of hatching failure, yet doing so is crucial in order to understand the underlying problem. Using newly validated techniques to visualize sperm and embryonic tissue, we assessed the fertility status of unhatched eggs of five endangered species, including both wild and captive birds. All eggs were classified as ‘infertile’ when collected, but most were actually fertile with numerous sperm on the ovum. Eggs of captive birds had fewer sperm and were more likely to be infertile than those of wild birds. Our findings raise important questions regarding the management of captive breeding programmes. PMID:22977070

  20. Birding Lessons and the Teachings of Cicadas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jardine, David W.

    1998-01-01

    Explores the ecological and pedagogical images hidden within a tale of the author's returning to the place where he grew up and going for a birding walk with some old friends. Contains 18 references. (DDR)

  1. Bird exclosures for branches and whole trees.

    Robert W. Campbell; Torolf R. Torgersen; Steven C. Forrest; Lorna C. Youngs

    1981-01-01

    Two types of lightweight, portable bird exclosures are described. One is for individual branches or branch tips; the other is for whole trees up to 9 m tall. Several alternative configurations and uses of these exclosures are discussed.

  2. Oral biology and beak disorders of birds

    Olsen, Glenn H.

    2003-01-01

    The beak, or bill, of the bird is a complicated structure. The avian skull is described as having some reptilian features; this includes a quadrate bone that articulates with the articular bone of the lower jaw.

  3. Neotropical Migratory Birds of the Southern Appalachians

    Kathleen E. Franzreb; Ricky A. Phillips

    1996-01-01

    This publication describes Neotropical migratory birds in the Southern Appalachians, their general ecology and habitat associations, population status, possible reasons for declines and management needs. This paper concentrates on migratory landbirds, thus it does not include waterfowl or shorebirds.

  4. Freeze-frame fruit selection by birds

    Foster, Mercedes S.

    2008-01-01

    The choice of fruits by an avian frugivore is affected by choices it makes at multiple hierarchical levels (e.g., species of fruit, individual tree, individual fruit). Factors that influence those choices vary among levels in the hierarchy and include characteristics of the environment, the tree, and the fruit itself. Feeding experiments with wild-caught birds were conducted at El Tirol, Departamento de Itapua, Paraguay to test whether birds were selecting among individual fruits based on fruit size. Feeding on larger fruits, which have proportionally more pulp, is generally more efficient than feeding on small fruits. In trials (n = 56) with seven species of birds in four families, birds selected larger fruits 86% of the time. However, in only six instances were size differences significant, which is likely a reflection of small sample sizes.

  5. Predicting bird song from space

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Thomas B; Harrigan, Ryan J; Kirschel, Alexander N G; Buermann, Wolfgang; Saatchi, Sassan; Blumstein, Daniel T; de Kort, Selvino R; Slabbekoorn, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Environmentally imposed selection pressures are well known to shape animal signals. Changes in these signals can result in recognition mismatches between individuals living in different habitats, leading to reproductive divergence and speciation. For example, numerous studies have shown that differences in avian song may be a potent prezygotic isolating mechanism. Typically, however, detailed studies of environmental pressures on variation in animal behavior have been conducted only at small spatial scales. Here, we use remote-sensing data to predict animal behavior, in this case, bird song, across vast spatial scales. We use remotely sensed data to predict the song characteristics of the little greenbul (Andropadus virens), a widely distributed African passerine, found across secondary and mature rainforest habitats and the rainforest-savanna ecotone. Satellite data that captured ecosystem structure and function explained up to 66% of the variation in song characteristics. Song differences observed across habitats, including those between human-altered and mature rainforest, have the potential to lead to reproductive divergence, and highlight the impacts that both natural and anthropogenic change may have on natural populations. Our approach offers a novel means to examine the ecological correlates of animal behavior across large geographic areas with potential applications to both evolutionary and conservation biology. PMID:24062797

  6. Molecular epidemiology of avian bornavirus from pet birds in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sassa, Yukiko; Horie, Masayuki; Fujino, Kan; Nishiura, Naomi; Okazaki, Sachiko; Furuya, Tetsuya; Nagai, Makoto; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Kojima, Atsushi; Mizugami, Masaya; Ueda, Kengo; Iki, Haruko; Ebisawa, Kazumasa; Tomonaga, Keizo; Mizutani, Tetsuya

    2013-08-01

    Recently, Avian bornavirus (ABV) was detected in proventricular dilatation disease (PDD) affected-birds and feather picking diseases affected-birds. However, the pathogenicity of ABV has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we surveyed ABV in pet birds in Japan. We found four ABV-infected birds among 93 pet birds using RT-PCR, and genotypes of the ABV were determined as ABV-2 and -4. Two of the birds positive for ABV-4 showed proventricular dilatation typically found in PDD, and chronic stomach disturbance, whereas two of the birds positive for ABV-2 showed unexplained behavioral problems that are tapping, autophagia, and cloaca prolapse.

  7. Nocturnal bird migration in opaque clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The use of a tracking radar to measure the flight paths of migrating birds on nights with opaque clouds is discussed. The effects of wind and lack of visual references are examined. The limitations of the radar observations are described, and samples of tracks obtained during radar observations are included. It is concluded that nonvisual mechanisms of orientation make it possible for birds to migrate in opaque clouds, but the exact nature of the sensory information cannot be determined by radar observations.

  8. Netting bias in tropical bird studies

    Coates-Estrada, R.; Dowell, B.A.; Fallon, J.E.; Robbins, C.S.; Wilson, Marcia H.; Sader, Steven A.

    1995-01-01

    Mist netting is the method most commonly used for gathering quantitative information on birds in the American tropics. Point count surveys or other methods often are used in conjunction with netting to reduce some of the many biases associated with netting, specially the failure of stationary nets within 2 m of the ground to sample birds of the tall canopy. We compare totals by both methods. Even close to the ground there are biases related to time of day and mesh size that have not been addressed in tropical studies. Some researchers operate nets all day, others only in the morning or in the morning and evening. Since 1986 we have netted birds and conducted point count surveys at more than 130 sites representing a broad spectrum of habitats in Mexico, Belize, and Guatemala. Using data only from those days when we could operate nets continuously from about dawn to dusk, we compare capture rates throughout the day to show the bias per part-day operations for certain families and species of birds and for the ratio of neotropical migrants to resident birds. More than half of 5000+ birds captured were caught after noon. Trochilidae and parulinae were captured primarily in the morning, Dendrocolaptidae in the middle of the day. Tyrannidae were more active than most birds in early afternoon, and Turdinae had morning and evening peaks. At each site we use a combination of 30-mm and 36-mm nets. The 30-mm mesh consistently captured more seedeaters, gnatcatchers, and small warblers, whereas the 36-mm mesh was more effective for birds of thrush size and larger.

  9. Are there optimal densities for prairie birds?

    Skagen, S.K.; Adams, A.A.Y.

    2010-01-01

    The major forces of food and predation shape fitness-enhancing decisions of birds at all stages of their life cycles. During the breeding season, birds can minimize nest loss due to predation by selecting sites with a lower probability of predation. To understand the environmental and social aspects and consequences of breedingsite selection in prairie birds, we explored variation in nest-survival patterns of the Lark Bunting (Calamospiza melanocorys) in the shortgrass prairie region of North America. Over four breeding seasons, we documented the survival of 405 nests, conducted 60 surveys to estimate bird densities, and measured several vegetative features to describe habitat structure in 24 randomly selected study plots. Nest survival varied with the buntings' density as described by a quadratic polynomial, increasing with density below 1.5 birds ha-1 and decreasing with density between 1.5 and 3 birds ha-1, suggesting that an optimal range of densities favors reproductive success of the Lark Bunting, which nests semi-colonially. Nest survival also increased with increasing vegetation structure of study plots and varied with age of the nest, increasing during early incubation and late in the nestling stage and declining slightly from mid-incubation to the middle of the nestling period. The existence of an optimal range of densities in this semi-colonial species can be elucidated by the "commodity-selection hypothesis" at low densities and density dependence at high densities. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2010.

  10. American Bird conservancy's approach to the U.S. Important Bird Area Program - identifying the top 500 global sites

    Robert M. Chipley

    2005-01-01

    The idea for the Important Bird Area Program originated in a series of studies in the early 1980s conducted by BirdLife International. Recognizing that these studies could become a powerful tool for conservation, BirdLife International began an effort to identify and gather data regarding the most important areas for birds in Europe and to make this information...

  11. A Review of Research on Bird Impacting on Jet Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yuecheng

    2018-03-01

    Bird strikes can lead to permanent deformations, sudden decrease of thrust, even engine failure during the flight. Bird strikes on rotating blades can also cause slices of birds hitting other parts which may lead to greater damages. Bird strikes cannot be completely avoided. However, reduction of bird impacting on jet engines can be achieved by suitable design and manufacturing, through the mathematical modelling, simulation analysis and practical experiment of jet engines.

  12. Neotropical Migratory Bird Communities in a Developing Pine Plantation

    James G. Dickson; Richard N. Conner; J. Howard Williamson

    1993-01-01

    Birds were censused annually from 4 250-x80-in transects in a young pine plantation from age to 2 to 17 to assess changes in the bird community.Bird abundance was low and the bird communitry was the least diverse when the pine plantation was sparsely vegetated at age 2. As the plantation developed rapidly into the shrub stage, the bird communitry became more abundant...

  13. Book review: Bird census techniques, Second edition

    Sauer, John R.

    2002-01-01

    Conservation concerns, federal mandates to monitor birds, and citizen science programs have spawned a variety of surveys that collect information on bird populations. Unfortunately, all too frequently these surveys are poorly designed and use inappropriate counting methods. Some of the flawed approaches reflect a lack of understanding of statistical design; many ornithologists simply are not aware that many of our most entrenched counting methods (such as point counts) cannot appropriately be used in studies that compare densities of birds over space and time. It is likely that most of the readers of The Condor have participated in a bird population survey that has been criticized for poor sampling methods. For example, North American readers may be surprised to read in Bird Census Techniques that the North American Breeding Bird Survey 'is seriously flawed in its design,' and that 'Analysis of trends is impossible from points that are positioned along roads' (p. 109). Our conservation efforts are at risk if we do not acknowledge these concerns and improve our survey designs. Other surveys suffer from a lack of focus. In Bird Census Techniques, the authors emphasize that all surveys require clear statements of objectives and an understanding of appropriate survey designs to meet their objectives. Too often, we view survey design as the realm of ornithologists who know the life histories and logistical issues relevant to counting birds. This view reflects pure hubris: survey design is a collaboration between ornithologists, statisticians, and managers, in which goals based on management needs are met by applying statistical principles for design to the biological context of the species of interest. Poor survey design is often due to exclusion of some of these partners from survey development. Because ornithologists are too frequently unaware of these issues, books such as Bird Census Techniques take on added importance as manuals for educating ornithologists about

  14. Comparative analysis of vestibular ecomorphology in birds.

    PubMed

    Benson, Roger B J; Starmer-Jones, Ethan; Close, Roger A; Walsh, Stig A

    2017-12-01

    The bony labyrinth of vertebrates houses the semicircular canals. These sense rotational accelerations of the head and play an essential role in gaze stabilisation during locomotion. The sizes and shapes of the semicircular canals have hypothesised relationships to agility and locomotory modes in many groups, including birds, and a burgeoning palaeontological literature seeks to make ecological interpretations from the morphology of the labyrinth in extinct species. Rigorous tests of form-function relationships for the vestibular system are required to support these interpretations. We test the hypothesis that the lengths, streamlines and angles between the semicircular canals are related to body size, wing kinematics and flying style in birds. To do this, we applied geometric morphometrics and multivariate phylogenetic comparative methods to a dataset of 64 three-dimensional reconstructions of the endosseous labyrinth obtained using micro-computed tomography scanning of bird crania. A strong relationship between centroid size of the semicircular canals and body size indicates that larger birds have longer semicircular canals compared with their evolutionary relatives. Wing kinematics related to manoeuvrability (and quantified using the brachial index) explain a small additional portion of the variance in labyrinth size. We also find strong evidence for allometric shape change in the semicircular canals of birds, indicating that major aspects of the shape of the avian labyrinth are determined by spatial constraints. The avian braincase accommodates a large brain, a large eye and large semicircular canals compared with other tetrapods. Negative allometry of these structures means that the restriction of space within the braincase is intense in small birds. This may explain our observation that the angles between planes of the semicircular canals of birds deviate more strongly from orthogonality than those of mammals, and especially from agile, gliding and flying

  15. Delineating Focus Areas for Bird Conservation in the Central Hardwoods Bird Conservation Region

    Jane A. Fitzgerald; C. Diane True; David D. Diamond; Troy Ettel; Laurel Moore; Timothy A. Nigh; Shawchyi Vorisek; Greg Wathen

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on a process used to identify landscape-scale focus areas for the conservation of priority grassland, grass-shrubland, wetland and forest-woodland birds in the Central Hardwoods Bird Conservation Region (CHBCR). The areas were delineated by biologists and other technical staff of partner agencies and organizations in the CHBCR with the use of...

  16. Integrating bird-habitat modeling into national forest planning for bird conservation in the southern Appalachians

    David A. Buehler; Eric T. Linder; Kathleen E. Franzreb; Nathan A. Klaus; Randy Dettmers; John G. Bartlett

    2005-01-01

    We developed spatially-explicit bird-habitat models with a variety of site-specific and landscape parameters to predict avian species distributions on southern Appalachian National Forests to aid National Forests with bird conservation planning. These models can be used to assess the effects of different forest management alternatives on long-term population viability...

  17. Important Bird Areas and international Migratory Bird Day - a beneficial convergence in 2002

    Jennifer Wheeler; Susan Bonfield

    2005-01-01

    International Migratory Bird Day (IMBD) was created in 1993 to increase public awareness, education, and concern for migratory birds and their habitats. As a day of recognition, it serves as both a celebration and a call to conservation action.4 Programmatically, IMBD offers resources to celebrants in the form of a suite of promotional and educational products as well...

  18. Monitoring Birds in a Regional Landscape: Lessons from the Nicolet National Forest Bird Survey

    Robert W. Howe; Amy T. Wolf; Tony Rinaldi

    1995-01-01

    The Nicolet National Forest Bird Survey represents one of the first systematic bird monitoring programs in a USDA National Forest. Volunteers visit approximately 500 permanently marked points biennially (250 each year) during a single weekend of mid-June. Results from the first 6 years provide a general inventory of the Forest's avifauna, documentation of...

  19. Bird pollination of Canary Island endemic plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollerton, Jeff; Cranmer, Louise; Stelzer, Ralph J.; Sullivan, Steve; Chittka, Lars

    2009-02-01

    The Canary Islands are home to a guild of endemic, threatened bird-pollinated plants. Previous work has suggested that these plants evolved floral traits as adaptations to pollination by flower specialist sunbirds, but subsequently, they appear to have co-opted generalist passerine birds as sub-optimal pollinators. To test this idea, we carried out a quantitative study of the pollination biology of three of the bird-pollinated plants, Canarina canariensis (Campanulaceae), Isoplexis canariensis (Veronicaceae) and Lotus berthelotii (Fabaceae), on the island of Tenerife. Using colour vision models, we predicted the detectability of flowers to bird and bee pollinators. We measured pollinator visitation rates, nectar standing crops as well as seed-set and pollen removal and deposition. These data showed that the plants are effectively pollinated by non-flower specialist passerine birds that only occasionally visit flowers. The large nectar standing crops and extended flower longevities (>10 days) of Canarina and Isoplexis suggests that they have evolved a bird pollination system that effectively exploits these low frequency non-specialist pollen vectors and is in no way sub-optimal. Seed set in two of the three species was high and was significantly reduced or zero in flowers where pollinator access was restricted. In L. berthelotii, however, no fruit set was observed, probably because the plants were self-incompatible horticultural clones of a single genet. We also show that, while all three species are easily detectable for birds, the orange Canarina and the red Lotus (but less so the yellow-orange Isoplexis) should be difficult to detect for insect pollinators without specialised red receptors, such as bumblebees. Contrary to expectations if we accept that the flowers are primarily adapted to sunbird pollination, the chiffchaff ( Phylloscopus canariensis) was an effective pollinator of these species.

  20. Enhancing bird banding information sharing across the western hemishpere

    Rojo, A.; Berlanga, H.; Howes, L.; Tomosy, M.

    2007-01-01

    Bird banding and marking provide indispensable tools for ornithological research, management, and conservation of migratory birds and their habitats along migratory routes, breeding and non-breeding grounds. With the growing interest in international coordination of tracking bird movements, coordination amongst developing and existing programs is essential for effective data management. The North American Bird Banding Program (Canadian Bird Banding Office and U.S. Bird Banding Laboratory and the Mexican government) has been working to enhance collaboration with other Western Hemisphere countries to establish a voluntary bird banding communication network. This network addresses challenges, such as: demonstrating how sharing banding expertise and information management can support the stewardship of Western Hemisphere migratory birds, ensuring that valuable banding and encounter data are captured and shared. With increasing numbers of international scientific and conservation initiatives, bird banding and marking programs must provide essential international coordination functions as well as support local activities by facilitating access to bands, training, data management and encounter reporting.

  1. A preliminary investigation of bird classification by Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary study of the application of Doppler radar to the classification of birds is reported. The desirability for improvements in bird classification stems primarily from the hazards they present to jet aircraft in flight and in the vicinity of airports. A secondary need exists in the study of bird migration. The wing body and tail motion of a bird in flight reflect signals which, when analyzed properly present a signature of wing beat pattern which is unique for each bird species. Although the results of this investigation did not validate the feasibility of classifying bird species, they do indicate that a more thorough investigation is warranted. Certain gross characteristics such as wing beat rates, multiple bird patterns, and bird maneuverability, were indicated clearly in the results. Large birds with slow wing beat rates appear to be the most optimum subject for further study with the X-band Doppler radar used in this investigation.

  2. Osedax borings in fossil marine bird bones

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Goedert, James L.

    2010-01-01

    The bone-eating marine annelid Osedax consumes mainly whale bones on the deep-sea floor, but recent colonization experiments with cow bones and molecular age estimates suggesting a possible Cretaceous origin of Osedax indicate that this worm might be able grow on a wider range of substrates. The suggested Cretaceous origin was thought to imply that Osedax could colonize marine reptile or fish bones, but there is currently no evidence that Osedax consumes bones other than those of mammals. We provide the first evidence that Osedax was, and most likely still is, able to consume non-mammalian bones, namely bird bones. Borings resembling those produced by living Osedax were found in bones of early Oligocene marine flightless diving birds (family Plotopteridae). The species that produced these boreholes had a branching filiform root that grew to a length of at least 3 mm, and lived in densities of up to 40 individuals per square centimeter. The inclusion of bird bones into the diet of Osedax has interesting implications for the recent suggestion of a Cretaceous origin of this worm because marine birds have existed continuously since the Cretaceous. Bird bones could have enabled this worm to survive times in the Earth’s history when large marine vertebrates other than fish were rare, specifically after the disappearance of large marine reptiles at the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event and before the rise of whales in the Eocene. PMID:21103978

  3. Osedax borings in fossil marine bird bones.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Steffen; Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Goedert, James L

    2011-01-01

    The bone-eating marine annelid Osedax consumes mainly whale bones on the deep-sea floor, but recent colonization experiments with cow bones and molecular age estimates suggesting a possible Cretaceous origin of Osedax indicate that this worm might be able grow on a wider range of substrates. The suggested Cretaceous origin was thought to imply that Osedax could colonize marine reptile or fish bones, but there is currently no evidence that Osedax consumes bones other than those of mammals. We provide the first evidence that Osedax was, and most likely still is, able to consume non-mammalian bones, namely bird bones. Borings resembling those produced by living Osedax were found in bones of early Oligocene marine flightless diving birds (family Plotopteridae). The species that produced these boreholes had a branching filiform root that grew to a length of at least 3 mm, and lived in densities of up to 40 individuals per square centimeter. The inclusion of bird bones into the diet of Osedax has interesting implications for the recent suggestion of a Cretaceous origin of this worm because marine birds have existed continuously since the Cretaceous. Bird bones could have enabled this worm to survive times in the Earth's history when large marine vertebrates other than fish were rare, specifically after the disappearance of large marine reptiles at the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event and before the rise of whales in the Eocene.

  4. Comparing bird and human soaring strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ákos, Zsuzsa; Nagy, Máté; Vicsek, Tamás

    2008-01-01

    Gliding saves much energy, and to make large distances using only this form of flight represents a great challenge for both birds and people. The solution is to make use of the so-called thermals, which are localized, warmer regions in the atmosphere moving upwards with a speed exceeding the descent rate of bird and plane. Whereas birds use this technique mainly for foraging, humans do it as a sporting activity. Thermalling involves efficient optimization including the skilful localization of thermals, trying to guess the most favorable route, estimating the best descending rate, etc. In this study, we address the question whether there are any analogies between the solutions birds and humans find to handle the above task. High-resolution track logs were taken from thermalling falcons and paraglider pilots to determine the essential parameters of the flight patterns. We find that there are relevant common features in the ways birds and humans use thermals. In particular, falcons seem to reproduce the MacCready formula widely used by gliders to calculate the best slope to take before an upcoming thermal. PMID:18316724

  5. Ultra-Rapid Vision in Birds.

    PubMed

    Boström, Jannika E; Dimitrova, Marina; Canton, Cindy; Håstad, Olle; Qvarnström, Anna; Ödeen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Flying animals need to accurately detect, identify and track fast-moving objects and these behavioral requirements are likely to strongly select for abilities to resolve visual detail in time. However, evidence of highly elevated temporal acuity relative to non-flying animals has so far been confined to insects while it has been missing in birds. With behavioral experiments on three wild passerine species, blue tits, collared and pied flycatchers, we demonstrate temporal acuities of vision far exceeding predictions based on the sizes and metabolic rates of these birds. This implies a history of strong natural selection on temporal resolution. These birds can resolve alternating light-dark cycles at up to 145 Hz (average: 129, 127 and 137, respectively), which is ca. 50 Hz over the highest frequency shown in any other vertebrate. We argue that rapid vision should confer a selective advantage in many bird species that are ecologically similar to the three species examined in our study. Thus, rapid vision may be a more typical avian trait than the famously sharp vision found in birds of prey.

  6. Osedax borings in fossil marine bird bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiel, Steffen; Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Goedert, James L.

    2011-01-01

    The bone-eating marine annelid Osedax consumes mainly whale bones on the deep-sea floor, but recent colonization experiments with cow bones and molecular age estimates suggesting a possible Cretaceous origin of Osedax indicate that this worm might be able grow on a wider range of substrates. The suggested Cretaceous origin was thought to imply that Osedax could colonize marine reptile or fish bones, but there is currently no evidence that Osedax consumes bones other than those of mammals. We provide the first evidence that Osedax was, and most likely still is, able to consume non-mammalian bones, namely bird bones. Borings resembling those produced by living Osedax were found in bones of early Oligocene marine flightless diving birds (family Plotopteridae). The species that produced these boreholes had a branching filiform root that grew to a length of at least 3 mm, and lived in densities of up to 40 individuals per square centimeter. The inclusion of bird bones into the diet of Osedax has interesting implications for the recent suggestion of a Cretaceous origin of this worm because marine birds have existed continuously since the Cretaceous. Bird bones could have enabled this worm to survive times in the Earth's history when large marine vertebrates other than fish were rare, specifically after the disappearance of large marine reptiles at the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event and before the rise of whales in the Eocene.

  7. Visual perception and social foraging in birds.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Juricic, Esteban; Erichsen, Jonathan T; Kacelnik, Alex

    2004-01-01

    Birds gather information about their environment mainly through vision by scanning their surroundings. Many prevalent models of social foraging assume that foraging and scanning are mutually exclusive. Although this assumption is valid for birds with narrow visual fields, these models have also been applied to species with wide fields. In fact, available models do not make precise predictions for birds with large visual fields, in which the head-up, head-down dichotomy is not accurate and, moreover, do not consider the effects of detection distance and limited attention. Studies of how different types of visual information are acquired as a function of body posture and of how information flows within flocks offer new insights into the costs and benefits of living in groups.

  8. Coccidia of gallinaceous meat birds in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Marcel; Melo, Antônio Diego Brandão; Albuquerque, George Rego; Rocha, Patrícia Tironi; Monteiro, Jomar Patrício

    2015-01-01

    Coccidiosis is a disease that limits the production and marketing of gallinaceous birds in North America, especially quails, pheasants and chukar partridges. Virtually no research has been conducted in South America on the causative agents of diseases among these birds, including coccidia. The aim of this work was to make first observations on Eimeria spp. in the chukar partridge Alectoris chukar and the grey quail Coturnix coturnix, which are reared for meat in Brazil. Fecal and tissue samples were collected from commercial farms and were examined for oocysts, gross and microscopic lesions or endogenous stages. From this examination, it was found that partridges raised in Brazil did not have any visible infection. However, grey quails presented mild infection and two Eimeria species that had previously been described in other birds were identified.

  9. Breeding bird response to juniper woodland expansion

    Rosenstock, Steven S.; van Riper, Charles

    2001-01-01

    In recent times, pinyon (Pinus spp.)-juniper (Juniperus spp.) woodlands have expanded into large portions of the Southwest historically occupied by grassland vegetation. From 1997-1998, we studied responses of breeding birds to one-seed juniper (J. monosperma) woodland expansion at 2 grassland study areas in northern Arizona. We sampled breeding birds in 3 successional stages along a grassland-woodland gradient: un-invaded grassland, grassland undergoing early stages of juniper establishment, and developing woodland. Species composition varied greatly among successional stages and was most different between endpoints of the gradient. Ground-nesting grassland species predominated in uninvaded grassland but declined dramatically as tree density increased. Tree- and cavity-nesting species increased with tree density and were most abundant in developing woodland. Restoration of juniper-invaded grasslands will benefit grassland-obligate birds and other wildlife.

  10. Microbiological survey of birds of prey pellets.

    PubMed

    Dipineto, Ludovico; Bossa, Luigi Maria De Luca; Pace, Antonino; Russo, Tamara Pasqualina; Gargiulo, Antonio; Ciccarelli, Francesca; Raia, Pasquale; Caputo, Vincenzo; Fioretti, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    A microbiological survey of 73 pellets collected from different birds of prey species housed at the Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Center of Napoli (southern Italy) was performed. Pellets were analyzed by culture and biochemical methods as well as by serotyping and polymerase chain reaction. We isolated a wide range of bacteria some of them also pathogens for humans (i.e. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, Campylobacter coli, Escherichia coli O serogroups). This study highlights the potential role of birds of prey as asymptomatic carriers of pathogenic bacteria which could be disseminated in the environment not only through the birds of prey feces but also through their pellets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The physiological basis of bird flight

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Flapping flight is energetically more costly than running, although it is less costly to fly a given body mass a given distance per unit time than it is for a similar mass to run the same distance per unit time. This is mainly because birds can fly faster than they can run. Oxygen transfer and transport are enhanced in migrating birds compared with those in non-migrators: at the gas-exchange regions of the lungs the effective area is greater and the diffusion distance smaller. Also, migrating birds have larger hearts and haemoglobin concentrations in the blood, and capillary density in the flight muscles tends to be higher. Species like bar-headed geese migrate at high altitudes, where the availability of oxygen is reduced and the energy cost of flapping flight increased compared with those at sea level. Physiological adaptations to these conditions include haemoglobin with a higher affinity for oxygen than that in lowland birds, a greater effective ventilation of the gas-exchange surface of the lungs and a greater capillary-to-muscle fibre ratio. Migrating birds use fatty acids as their source of energy, so they have to be transported at a sufficient rate to meet the high demand. Since fatty acids are insoluble in water, birds maintain high concentrations of fatty acid–binding proteins to transport fatty acids across the cell membrane and within the cytoplasm. The concentrations of these proteins, together with that of a key enzyme in the β-oxidation of fatty acids, increase before migration. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight’. PMID:27528774

  12. Regionalizing land use impacts on farmland birds.

    PubMed

    Glemnitz, Michael; Zander, Peter; Stachow, Ulrich

    2015-06-01

    The environmental impacts of land use vary regionally. Differences in geomorphology, climate, landscape structure, and biotope inventories are regarded as the main causes of this variation. We present a methodological approach for identifying regional responses in land use type to large-scale changes and the implications for the provision of habitat for farmland birds. The methodological innovations of this approach are (i) the coupling of impact assessments with economic models, (ii) the linking of cropping techniques at the plot scale with the regional distribution of land use, and (iii) the integration of statistical or monitoring data on recent states. This approach allows for the regional differentiation of farmers' responses to changing external conditions and for matching the ecological impacts of land use changes with regional environmental sensitivities. An exemplary scenario analysis was applied for a case study of an area in Germany, assessing the impacts of increased irrigation and the promotion of energy cropping on farmland birds, evaluated as a core indicator for farmland biodiversity. The potential effects on farmland birds were analyzed based on the intrinsic habitat values of the crops and cropping techniques. The results revealed that the strongest decrease in habitat availability for farmland birds occurred in regions with medium-to-low agricultural yields. As a result of the limited cropping alternatives, the increase in maize production was highest in marginal regions for both examined scenarios. Maize production replaced many crops with good-to-medium habitat suitability for birds. The declines in habitat quality were strongest in regions that are not in focus for conservation efforts for farmland birds.

  13. Traffic effects on bird counts on North American Breeding Bird Survey routes

    Griffith, Emily H.; Sauer, John R.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) is an annual roadside survey used to estimate population change in >420 species of birds that breed in North America. Roadside sampling has been criticized, in part because traffic noise can interfere with bird counts. Since 1997, data have been collected on the numbers of vehicles that pass during counts at each stop. We assessed the effect of traffic by modeling total vehicles as a covariate of counts in hierarchical Poisson regression models used to estimate population change. We selected species for analysis that represent birds detected at low and high abundance and birds with songs of low and high frequencies. Increases in vehicle counts were associated with decreases in bird counts in most of the species examined. The size and direction of these effects remained relatively constant between two alternative models that we analyzed. Although this analysis indicated only a small effect of incorporating traffic effects when modeling roadside counts of birds, we suggest that continued evaluation of changes in traffic at BBS stops should be a component of future BBS analyses.

  14. Detection of Mycobacterium avium in pet birds

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Silvia Neri; Sakamoto, Sidnei Miyoshi; de Paula, Cátia Dejuste; Catão-Dias, José Luiz; Matushima, Eliana Reiko

    2009-01-01

    The present study is a report on the presence of Mycobacterium avium in four birds of the psittaciform order kept as pets. Anatomopathological diagnosis showed lesions suggestive of the agent and presence of alcohol-acid resistant bacilli (AARB) shown by the Ziehl-Neelsen staining. The identification of Mycobacterium avium was performed by means of PRA (PCR Restriction Analysis). DNA was directly extracted from tissue of the lesions and blocked in paraffin. The role of this agent in pet bird infection is discussed, as well as its zoonotic potential. PMID:24031356

  15. Avian influenza surveillance of wild birds

    Slota, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The President's National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza directs federal agencies to expand the surveillance of United States domestic livestock and wildlife to ensure early warning of hightly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in the U.S. The immediate concern is a potential introduction of HPAI H5N1 virus into the U.S. The presidential directive resulted in the U.S. Interagency Strategic Plan for Early Detection of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Wild Migratory Birds (referred to as the Wild Bird Surveillance Plan or the Plan).

  16. Enzyme immunoassay of Chlamydia in birds.

    PubMed

    Ruppanner, R; Behymer, D E; DeLong, W J; Franti, C E; Schulz, T

    1984-01-01

    Serum samples from 192 free-living birds (27 species) were tested for antibodies against Chlamydia using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); 97 (51%) were seropositive. The highest antibody prevalence was among pheasants (96%), ducks (88%), and blackbirds (86%). None of 41 starlings tested were seropositive. The serotesting of 42 confined pheasants indicated 100% exposure to the organism. The ELISA is a sensitive, rapid serologic method that can be of epidemiologic and diagnostic value for detecting exposure to Chlamydia. The ELISA could also be used for mass-screening of pet birds where chlamydiosis may be considered a potential public health hazard.

  17. Blood protozoa of free-living birds

    Herman, C.M.; McDiarmid, Archibald

    1969-01-01

    Blood protozoa were first reported from wild birds in 1884. Since then numerous surveys throughout the world have demonstrated their presence in a wide variety of hosts and localities with continuing designations of new species. Taxonomic determinations include parasites in the genera Plasmodium, Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon, Babesia, Lankesterella and Trypanosoma. Transmission of Plasmodium by mosquitoes was demonstrated with a bird parasite before these insects were proven as vectors of human malaria. All the genera under consideration require an insect vector to complete their life-cycles and susceptible vectors have been demonstrated. Most experimental work on the blood protozoa of birds has been carried on with captive birds. An extensive volume of research has been conducted on Plasmodium because of its close similarity to malaria in man. Field studies that would provide information on the epizootiology of occurrence of these parasites in wild populations have been very limited, mainly confined to single blood film surveys. Such data are inadequate to provide an understanding of true prevalence or incidence or of factual knowledge of their impact on the wild population. Mechanisms for procuring such information are available in some cases and can be developed to fit other situations. Isodiagnosis, inoculation of blood from wild birds into susceptible captive hosts, has revealed a prevalence of over 60 % for Plasmodium in situations where microscope examination of single peripheral blood preparations yielded less than 1 %. Culture of bone marrow collected by biopsy demonstrates high prevalence of trypanosomes even when none are evident from microscopic examination of blood. Often preparations of tissues collected at necropsy reveal Leucocytozoon and Lankesterella when examination of peripheral blood gave no indication of infection. Methods developed by bird ringers provide techniques for obtaining repeat examinations of free-living birds that can yield further

  18. Medication for Behavior Modification in Birds.

    PubMed

    van Zeeland, Yvonne

    2018-01-01

    The use of behavior modifying drugs may be considered in birds with behavior problems, especially those refractory to behavior modification therapy and environmental management. To accomplish behavior change, a variety of drugs can be used, including psychoactive drugs, hormones, antihistamines, analgesics, and anticonvulsants. Because their prescription to birds is off-label, these drugs are considered appropriate only when a sound rationale can be provided for their use. This requires a (correct) behavioral diagnosis to be established. In addition, regular monitoring and follow-up are warranted to determine the efficacy of the treatment and evaluate the occurrence of potential adverse side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Birds of Oregon: A general reference

    Marshall, David B.; Hunter, Matthew G.; Contreras, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Birds of Oregon is the first complete reference work on Oregon's birds to be published since Gabrielson and Jewett's landmark book in 1940. This comprehensive volume includes individual accounts of the approximately 500 species now known to occur in Oregon (about 150 more than in 1940), including detailed accounts of the 353 species that regularly occur and briefer accounts of another 133 species that are considered vagrants. A separate chapter covers extirpated and questionable species as well as those which have been introduced but have not become established.

  20. North American Breeding Bird Survey in Mississippi

    Twedt, Daniel J.; Pardieck, Keith L.

    2017-01-01

    Does it seem like you are hearing fewer Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) calls in recent years than you remember when you were younger? Conversely, have you also noticed hearing more “cooing” of Eurasian Collared-Doves (Streptopelia decaocto)? Do such experiences reflect changes in bird populations or are they false impressions? Well, fortunately for us, we have one of the most powerful wildlife data sets freely available, only a few mouse clicks away, for divining these answers. For most of our songbirds, their population trends are estimated from data gathered during the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS).

  1. The Radical Pair Mechanism and the Avian Chemical Compass: Quantum Coherence and Entanglement

    SciT

    Zhang, Yiteng; Kais, Sabre; Berman, Gennady Petrovich

    2015-02-02

    We review the spin radical pair mechanism which is a promising explanation of avian navigation. This mechanism is based on the dependence of product yields on 1) the hyperfine interaction involving electron spins and neighboring nuclear spins and 2) the intensity and orientation of the geomagnetic field. One surprising result is that even at ambient conditions quantum entanglement of electron spins can play an important role in avian magnetoreception. This review describes the general scheme of chemical reactions involving radical pairs generated from singlet and triplet precursors; the spin dynamics of the radical pairs; and the magnetic field dependence ofmore » product yields caused by the radical pair mechanism. The main part of the review includes a description of the chemical compass in birds. We review: the general properties of the avian compass; the basic scheme of the radical pair mechanism; the reaction kinetics in cryptochrome; quantum coherence and entanglement in the avian compass; and the effects of noise. We believe that the quantum avian compass can play an important role in avian navigation and can also provide the foundation for a new generation of sensitive and selective magnetic-sensing nano-devices.« less

  2. Following radical pair reactions in solution: a step change in sensitivity using cavity ring-down detection.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kiminori; Neil, Simon R T; Henbest, Kevin B; Weber, Stefan; Schleicher, Erik; Hore, P J; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Timmel, Christiane R

    2011-11-09

    The study of radical pair intermediates in biological systems has been hampered by the low sensitivity of the optical techniques usually employed to investigate these highly reactive species. Understanding the physical principles governing the spin-selective and magneto-sensitive yields and kinetics of their reactions is essential in identifying the mechanism governing bird migration, and might have significance in the discussion of potential health hazards of electromagnetic radiation. Here, we demonstrate the powerful capabilities of optical cavity-enhanced techniques, such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) in monitoring radical recombination reactions and associated magnetic field effects (MFEs). These include submicrosecond time-resolution, high sensitivity (baseline noise on the order of 10(-6) absorbance units) and small (μL) sample volumes. Combined, we show that these represent significant advantages over the single-pass flash-photolysis techniques conventionally applied. The studies described here focus on photoinduced radical pair reactions involving the protein lysozyme and one of two possible photosensitizers: anthraquinone-2,6-disulphonate and flavin mononucleotide. CRDS-measured MFEs are observed in pump-probe experiments and discussed in terms of the sensitivity gains and sample-volume minimization afforded by CRDS when compared with flash photolysis methods. Finally, CRDS is applied to an in vitro MFE study of intramolecular electron transfer in the DNA-repair enzyme, Escherichia coli photolyase, a protein closely related to cryptochrome which has been proposed to mediate animal magnetoreception.

  3. Surveys of Forest Birds on Puerto Rico, 2015.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, John D; Rimmer, Christopher C

    2017-01-01

    The island of Puerto Rico supports a diverse assemblage of breeding birds, including 16 endemic species (Raffaele et al. 1998), and provides critical wintering habitat for many North American migratory birds (Wunderle and Waide 1994). Despite being a hotspot of avian biodiversity, spatially extensive data on the distribution and abundance of birds on the island are scarce. Breeding-bird assemblages were sampled by the North American Breeding Bird Survey from 1997-2007 (Sauer et al. 2013), but comparable primary data are not available for bird assemblages present during the boreal winter. We provide data from one of the few spatially extensive surveys of forest birds on Puerto Rico. We sampled 211 locations in forests across the island during January-March 2015 using repeated point-count surveys. These data are suitable for use in estimating abundance, occupancy, and distribution of forest birds on Puerto Rico during the winter.

  4. Risk Considerations of Bird Strikes to Space Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Christy; Ring, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Within seconds after liftoff of the Space Shuttle during mission STS-114, a turkey vulture impacted the vehicle's external tank. The contact caused no apparent damage to the Shuttle, but the incident led NASA to consider the potential consequences of bird strikes during a Shuttle launch. The environment at Kennedy Space Center provides unique bird strike challenges due to the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge and the Atlantic Flyway bird migration routes. NASA is currently refining risk assessment estimates for the probability of bird strike to space launch vehicles. This paper presents an approach for analyzing the risks of bird strikes to space launch vehicles and presents an example. The migration routes, types of birds present, altitudes of those birds, exposed area of the launch vehicle, and its capability to withstand impacts affect the risk due to bird strike. A summary of significant risk contributors is discussed.

  5. Research on an infectious disease transmission by flocking birds.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingsheng; Mao, Xinjun; Guessoum, Zahia

    2013-01-01

    The swarm intelligence is becoming a hot topic. The flocking of birds is a natural phenomenon, which is formed and organized without central or external controls for some benefits (e.g., reduction of energy consummation). However, the flocking also has some negative effects on the human, as the infectious disease H7N9 will easily be transmited from the denser flocking birds to the human. Zombie-city model has been proposed to help analyzing and modeling the flocking birds and the artificial society. This paper focuses on the H7N9 virus transmission in the flocking birds and from the flocking birds to the human. And some interesting results have been shown: (1) only some simple rules could result in an emergence such as the flocking; (2) the minimum distance between birds could affect H7N9 virus transmission in the flocking birds and even affect the virus transmissions from the flocking birds to the human.

  6. Evolution: How Some Birds Survived When All Other Dinosaurs Died.

    PubMed

    Brusatte, Stephen L

    2016-05-23

    The end-Cretaceous mass extinction wiped out the dinosaurs, including many birds. But some bird lineages survived. May seed-eating have been the key? Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Native woodlands and birds of South Dakota: Past and present

    Mark A. Rumble; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Daniel W. Uresk; Jody Javersak

    1998-01-01

    Eighty-four percent of the upland bird species in present-day bird counts along the Missouri River were included in bird species lists 150 years ago. Eighty-three percent of upland bird species in the Slim Buttes area also occurred 80 to 120 years ago. Historical photographs show native woodlands were part of the presettlement landscape. Expansion of the ranges of blue...

  8. Reactions of migrating birds to lights and aircraft.

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, R P; Torre-Bueno, J R; Griffin, D R; Walcott, C

    1975-01-01

    Midair collsions between birds and aircraft pose a hazard for both. While observing migrating birds with a tracking radar, we find that birds often react, by taking evasive maneuvers, at distances of 200-300 m to both searchlight beams and the approach of a small airplane with its landing lights on. Appropriately arranged lights on aircraft should decrease the hazard of collisions with birds. Images PMID:1056007

  9. 9 CFR 130.10 - User fees for pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false User fees for pet birds. 130.10... AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.10 User fees for pet birds. (a) User fees for pet birds of U.S. origin returning to the United States, except pet birds of U.S. origin returning from Canada, are as follows...

  10. 9 CFR 130.10 - User fees for pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false User fees for pet birds. 130.10... AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.10 User fees for pet birds. (a) User fees for pet birds of U.S. origin returning to the United States, except pet birds of U.S. origin returning from Canada, are as follows...

  11. 9 CFR 130.10 - User fees for pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false User fees for pet birds. 130.10... AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.10 User fees for pet birds. (a) User fees for pet birds of U.S. origin returning to the United States, except pet birds of U.S. origin returning from Canada, are as follows...

  12. 9 CFR 130.10 - User fees for pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false User fees for pet birds. 130.10... AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.10 User fees for pet birds. (a) User fees for pet birds of U.S. origin returning to the United States, except pet birds of U.S. origin returning from Canada, are as follows...

  13. Bird counts in stands of big sagebrush and greasewood

    Bruce L. Welch

    2005-01-01

    Total numbers of birds and numbers of bird species were significantly (p=0.05 percent) higher in stands of big sagebrush than in stands of greasewood. This was especially true for Brewer’s sparrow, lark sparrow, and mourning dove. The big sagebrush ecosystem appears to support greater number of birds and more species of birds than does the greasewood ecosystem.

  14. 9 CFR 130.10 - User fees for pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false User fees for pet birds. 130.10... AGRICULTURE USER FEES USER FEES § 130.10 User fees for pet birds. (a) User fees for pet birds of U.S. origin returning to the United States, except pet birds of U.S. origin returning from Canada, are as follows...

  15. From a Bird's Eye View: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Migration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Juliann

    2007-01-01

    Inspiring students to learn about birds can be a daunting task--students see birds just about every day and often don't think twice about them. The activity described here is designed to excite students to "become" birds. Students are asked to create a model and tell the life story of a bird by mapping its migration pattern. (Contains 6 figures, 6…

  16. Toxoplasmosis in three species of native and introduced Hawaiian birds

    Work, Thierry M.; Massey, J. Gregory; Lindsay, D.S.; Dubey, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii was found in endemic Hawaiian birds, including 2 nene geese (Nesochen sandvicensis), 1 red-footed booby (Sula sula), and an introduced bird, the Erckels francolin (Francolinus erckelii). All 4 birds died of disseminated toxoplasmosis; the parasite was found in sections of many organs, and the diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining with anti–T. gondii–specific polyclonal antibodies. This is the first report of toxoplasmosis in these species of birds.

  17. Influence of hiking trails on montane birds

    William V. Deluca; David I. King

    2014-01-01

    Montane forests contribute significantly to regional biodiversity. Long-term monitoring data, often located along hiking trails, suggests that several indicator species of this ecosystem have declined in recent decades. Declining montane bird populations have been attributed to anthropogenic stressors such as climate change and atmospheric deposition. Several studies...

  18. Tracking radar studies of bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. C.; Williams, J. M.; Teal, J. M.; Kanwisher, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The application of tracking radar for determining the flight paths of migratory birds is discussed. The effects produced by various meteorological parameters are described. Samples of radar scope presentations obtained during tracking studies are presented. The characteristics of the radars and their limitations are examined.

  19. Teaching Bird Identification & Vocabulary with Twitter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallman, Tyler A.; Robinson, W. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Species identification is essential to biology, conservation, and management. The ability to focus on specific diagnostic characteristics of a species helps improve the speed and accuracy of identification. Birds are excellent subjects for teaching species identification because, in combination with their different shapes and sizes, their plumages…

  20. Trainee Teachers' Ideas about Endangered Birds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torkar, Gregor; Bajd, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    This article explores trainee teachers' conceptions and ideas about endangered bird species and their protection. The study involved 191 students majoring in kindergarten education, primary school natural science or secondary school biology education at the University of Ljubljana Faculty of Education, Slovenia. Data analyses showed that the…

  1. Mechanisms of Song Perception in Oscine Birds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudsen, Daniel P.; Gentner, Timothy Q.

    2010-01-01

    Songbirds share a number of parallels with humans that make them an attractive model system for studying the behavioral and neurobiological mechanisms that underlie the learning and processing of vocal communication signals. Here we review the perceptual and cognitive mechanisms of audition in birds, and emphasize the behavioral and neural basis…

  2. Evidence for leafy spurge dissemination by birds?

    Daniel L. Noble

    1980-01-01

    Questions are often raised concerning the spread of leafy spurge (Euphorbia esula; E. virgata; and their complex) by birds, particularly, since this noxious weed is often found in inaccessible places and beneath lines and other apparent perches. In a study in 1936, Bakke reported no viable seed passed through the digestive...

  3. Selenium toxicosis in wild aquatic birds

    Ohlendorf, H.M.; Kilness, A.W.; Simmons, J.L.; Stroud, R.K.; Hoffman, D.J.; Moore, John F.

    1988-01-01

    Severe gross and microscopic lesions and other changes were found in adult aquatic birds and in embryos from Kesterson Reservoir (a portion of Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge), Merced County, Calif., during 1984. Adult birds from that area were emaciated, had subacute to extensive chronic hepatic lesions, and had excess fluid and fibrin in the peritoneal cavity. Biochemical changes in their livers included elevated glycogen and non-protein-bound sulfhydryl concentrations and glutathione peroxidase activity but lowered protein, total sulfhydryl, and protein-bound sulfhydryl concentrations. Congenital malformations observed grossly in embryos were often multiple and included anophthalmia, microphthalmia, abnormal beaks, amelia, micromelia, ectrodactyly, and hydrocephaly. Mean concentrations of selenium in livers (94.4 ppm, dry weight) and kidneys (96.6 ppm) of birds collected at the Kesterson ponds were about 10 times those found at a nearby control area (8.3 and 12.2 ppm). We conclude that selenium present in the agricultural drainage water supplied to the Kesterson ponds accumulated in the food chain of aquatic birds to toxic concentrations and caused the lesion and other changes observed.

  4. Interspecific nest use by aridland birds

    Deborah M. Finch

    1982-01-01

    Nest holes drilled by woodpeckers (Picidae) are frequently used by secondary cavity-nesting species, but interspecific use of open and domed nests is less well known. Nests constructed by many southwestern desert birds last longer than one year (pers. obs.) and are consequently reused by the same pair (e.g., Abert's Towhees [Pipilo aberti], pers. obs.) or by other...

  5. Zoonoses in pet birds: review and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pet birds are a not-so-well known veterinarian’s clientship fraction. Bought individually or in couples, as families often do (which is a lucrative business for pet shops or local breeders) or traded (sometimes illegally) for their very high genetic or exotic value, these birds, commonly canaries, parakeets or parrots, are regularly sold at high prices. These animals, however, are potential carriers and/or transmitters of zoonotic diseases. Some of them could have an important impact on human health, like chlamydophilosis, salmonellosis or even highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1. This review paper, although non exhaustive, aims at enlightening, by the description of several cases of bird-human transmission, the risks encountered by bird owners, including children. Public health consequences will be discussed and emphasis will be made on some vector-borne diseases, known to be emergent or which are underestimated, like those transmitted by the red mite Dermanyssus gallinae. Finally, biosecurity and hygiene, as well as prevention guidelines will be developed and perspectives proposed. PMID:23687940

  6. Census Methods for Caribbean Land Birds

    Joseph M. Wunderle

    1994-01-01

    Different census methods can be used to survey the distribution of a terrestrial bird species or to monitor population changes. The appropriate method depends on whether the objective is simply to document the presence of a species or to quantify its relative abundance, population density, population trends over time, habitat use, survivorship, or the physical...

  7. 14 CFR 33.76 - Bird ingestion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 aimed at the most critical exposed location on the first stage rotor blades and ingested at a bird... demonstration of blade containment and rotor unbalance than the requirements of this paragraph. Table 1 to § 33... rotating stage or stages at a blade airfoil height of not less than 50 percent measured at the leading edge...

  8. 14 CFR 33.76 - Bird ingestion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 aimed at the most critical exposed location on the first stage rotor blades and ingested at a bird... demonstration of blade containment and rotor unbalance than the requirements of this paragraph. Table 1 to § 33... rotating stage or stages at a blade airfoil height of not less than 50 percent measured at the leading edge...

  9. 14 CFR 33.76 - Bird ingestion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 aimed at the most critical exposed location on the first stage rotor blades and ingested at a bird... demonstration of blade containment and rotor unbalance than the requirements of this paragraph. Table 1 to § 33... rotating stage or stages at a blade airfoil height of not less than 50 percent measured at the leading edge...

  10. 14 CFR 33.76 - Bird ingestion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 aimed at the most critical exposed location on the first stage rotor blades and ingested at a bird... demonstration of blade containment and rotor unbalance than the requirements of this paragraph. Table 1 to § 33... rotating stage or stages at a blade airfoil height of not less than 50 percent measured at the leading edge...

  11. 14 CFR 33.76 - Bird ingestion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 aimed at the most critical exposed location on the first stage rotor blades and ingested at a bird... demonstration of blade containment and rotor unbalance than the requirements of this paragraph. Table 1 to § 33... rotating stage or stages at a blade airfoil height of not less than 50 percent measured at the leading edge...

  12. Development of a bird banding recapture database

    Tautin, J.; Doherty, P.F.; Metras, L.

    2001-01-01

    Recaptures (and resightings) constitute the vast majority of post-release data from banded or otherwise marked nongame birds. A powerful suite of contemporary analytical models is available for using recapture data to estimate population size, survival rates and other parameters, and many banders collect recapture data for their project specific needs. However, despite widely recognized, broader programmatic needs for more and better data, banders' recapture data are not centrally reposited and made available for use by others. To address this need, the US Bird Banding Laboratory, the Canadian Bird Banding Office and the Georgia Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit are developing a bird banding recapture database. In this poster we discuss the critical steps in developing the database, including: determining exactly which recapture data should be included; developing a standard record format and structure for the database; developing electronic means for collecting, vetting and disseminating the data; and most importantly, developing metadata descriptions and individual data set profiles to facilitate the user's selection of appropriate analytical models. We provide examples of individual data sets to be included in the database, and we assess the feasibility of developing a prescribed program for obtaining recapture data from banders who do not presently collect them. It is expected that the recapture database eventually will contain millions of records made available publicly for a variety of avian research and management purposes

  13. 14 CFR 35.36 - Bird impact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.36 Bird impact. The applicant must demonstrate, by tests or analysis based on tests or experience on similar designs, that the propeller can withstand the impact of a... without causing a major or hazardous propeller effect. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood...

  14. 14 CFR 35.36 - Bird impact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.36 Bird impact. The applicant must demonstrate, by tests or analysis based on tests or experience on similar designs, that the propeller can withstand the impact of a... without causing a major or hazardous propeller effect. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood...

  15. 14 CFR 35.36 - Bird impact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Tests and Inspections § 35.36 Bird impact. The applicant must demonstrate, by tests or analysis based on tests or experience on similar designs, that the propeller can withstand the impact of a... without causing a major or hazardous propeller effect. This section does not apply to fixed-pitch wood...

  16. Official opening remarks: bird conservation in Canada

    Michael S. W. Bradstreet

    1997-01-01

    It is my pleasure, as Executive Director of Bird Studies Canada (BSC), to take part in the opening ceremonies of the Second International Symposium: Biology and Conservation of Owls of the Northern Hemisphere. It is entirely appropriate that this symposium should take place in one of the colder cities in the Northern Hemisphere, in mid-winter, and it is fitting that...

  17. Status and management of neotropical migratory birds

    Deborah M. Finch; Peter W. Stangel

    1993-01-01

    This proceedings is the product of a National Training Workshop held at the Estes Park Center, Estes Park, Colorado, 21-25 September, 1992. Invited papers discuss all aspects of management, monitoring, and conservation of neotropical migratory birds on the breeding grounds. The proceedings is divided into seven sections that range from philosophical discussions to...

  18. Angry Birds Mathematics: Parabolas and Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, John H.

    2013-01-01

    John Lamb, a professor of mathematics education and a teacher of high school precalculus, describes how he developed a way to use the elements of the game Angry Birds® as a platform to engage his students with the concepts of parabolas and vectors. The game could be categorized as a type of microworld game in which students interact with the…

  19. Burning for birds: concepts and applications

    R. Todd Engstrom; David J. Brownlie

    2002-01-01

    Prescribed fire is being used extensively for habitat management of non-game birds, although the area burned today is small relative to the amount of land that burned historically. Results of a non-scientific questionnaire of public and private land managers in the eastern U.S. revealed prescribed fire is being used to provide winter, breeding season, and migration...

  20. The Birds and Their Nests Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizondo, Liliana; Valencia, Lilian

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses a project about birds and their nests undertaken by 3- to 5-year-olds in a preschool class in Florida. After a description of the center and the goal of the project, the three phases of the project are presented. Reflections of the teachers and photographs taken for documenting the project are also included.

  1. Fluff-thieving birds sabotage seed dispersal.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, Vanya G; Pauw, Anton; Martin, Paul R

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing many species interactions as mutualisms can be misleading because some members of the interaction derive greater fitness benefits at the expense of other members. We provide detailed natural history data on a suspected bird-plant mutualism in South Africa where many species of birds use fluffy Eriocephalus seed material to construct their nests, potentially dispersing seeds for the plant. We focus on a common bird, Prinia maculosa , which invests heavily in gathering Eriocephalus material. Prinias spent 5 of their median 6-day nest construction period adding seed material to their nests and frequently travelled outside their territory boundary to gather Eriocephalus material. Yet, prinias gathered primarily Eriocephalus fluff and actively avoided gathering seeds. The average prinia nest contained only 6.6 seeds, but contained fluff from 579 seeds. These data suggest that prinias provide limited dispersal benefits to Eriocephalus plants. By contrast, the large amounts of Eriocephalus fluff in prinia nests, and the effort that prinias invest in gathering it, suggest that prinias benefit from constructing their nests with Eriocephalus material. We end by outlining hypotheses for possible fitness benefits that Eriocephalus material could provide prinias and other birds.

  2. Fire and birds in maritime Pacific Northwest

    Mark H. Huff; Nathaniel E. Seavy; John D. Alexander; C. John Ralph

    2005-01-01

    Resource managers face the challenge of understanding how numerous factors, including fire and fire suppression, influence habitat composition and animal communities. We summarize information on fire effects on major vegetation types and bird/fire relations within the maritime Pacific Northwest, and pose management related questions and research considerations....

  3. Low ecological disparity in Early Cretaceous birds

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jonathan S.; Makovicky, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Ecological divergence is thought to be coupled with evolutionary radiations, yet the strength of this coupling is unclear. When birds diversified ecologically has received much less attention than their hotly debated crown divergence time. Here, we quantify how accurately skeletal morphology can predict ecology in living and extinct birds, and show that the earliest known assemblage of birds (= pygostylians) from the Jehol Biota (≈ 125 Ma) was substantially impoverished ecologically. The Jehol avifauna has few representatives of highly preservable ecomorphs (e.g. aquatic forms) and a notable lack of ecomorphological overlap with the pterosaur assemblage (e.g. no large or aerially foraging pygostylians). Comparisons of the Jehol functional diversity with modern and subfossil avian assemblages show that taphonomic bias alone cannot explain the ecomorphological impoverishment. However, evolutionary simulations suggest that the constrained ecological diversity of the Early Cretaceous pygostylians is consistent with what is expected from a relatively young radiation. Regardless of the proximate biological explanation, the anomalously low functional diversity of the Jehol birds is evidence both for ecological vacancies in Cretaceous ecosystems, which were subsequently filled by the radiation of crown Aves, and for discordance between taxonomic richness and ecological diversity in the best-known Mesozoic ecosystem. PMID:24870044

  4. The North American Breeding Bird Survey

    Bystrak, D.; Ralph, C. John; Scott, J. Michael

    1981-01-01

    A brief history of the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) and a discussion of the technique are presented. The approximately 2000 random roadside routes conducted yearly during the breeding season throughout North America produce an enormous bank of data on distribution and abundance of breeding birds with great potential use. Data on about one million total birds of 500 species per year are on computer tape to facilitate accessibility and are available to any serious investigator. The BBS includes the advantages of wide geographic coverage, sampling of most habitat types, standardization of data collection, and a relatively simple format. The Survey is limited by placement of roads (e.g., marshes and rugged mountainous areas are not well sampled), traffic noise interference in some cases and preference of some bird species for roadside habitats. These and other problems and biases of the BBS are discussed. The uniformity of the technique allows for detecting changes in populations and for creation of maps of relative abundance. Examples of each are presented.

  5. Genetic Basis for Red Coloration in Birds.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Ricardo J; Johnson, James D; Toomey, Matthew B; Ferreira, Mafalda S; Araujo, Pedro M; Melo-Ferreira, José; Andersson, Leif; Hill, Geoffrey E; Corbo, Joseph C; Carneiro, Miguel

    2016-06-06

    The yellow and red feather pigmentation of many bird species [1] plays pivotal roles in social signaling and mate choice [2, 3]. To produce red pigments, birds ingest yellow carotenoids and endogenously convert them into red ketocarotenoids via an oxidation reaction catalyzed by a previously unknown ketolase [4-6]. We investigated the genetic basis for red coloration in birds using whole-genome sequencing of red siskins (Spinus cucullata), common canaries (Serinus canaria), and "red factor" canaries, which are the hybrid product of crossing red siskins with common canaries [7]. We identified two genomic regions introgressed from red siskins into red factor canaries that are required for red coloration. One of these regions contains a gene encoding a cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP2J19. Transcriptome analysis demonstrates that CYP2J19 is significantly upregulated in the skin and liver of red factor canaries, strongly implicating CYP2J19 as the ketolase that mediates red coloration in birds. Interestingly, a second introgressed region required for red feathers resides within the epidermal differentiation complex, a cluster of genes involved in development of the integument. Lastly, we present evidence that CYP2J19 is involved in ketocarotenoid formation in the retina. The discovery of the carotenoid ketolase has important implications for understanding sensory function and signaling mediated by carotenoid pigmentation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Update on ghrelin biology in birds.

    PubMed

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2013-09-01

    Ghrelin is a peptide found in the mucosal layer of the rat stomach that exhibits growth hormone-releasing and appetite-stimulating activities. Since the discovery of ghrelin in chicken in 2002, information on its structure, distribution, function, and receptors has been accumulated, mainly in poultry. Here, we summarize the following findings since 2008 in birds: (1) central ghrelin acts as an anorexigenic neuropeptide, but the effect of peripheral ghrelin differs depending on the chicken strain and light conditions the birds are kept in; (2) central ghrelin inhibits not only food intake but also water drinking, and it may be mediated by urocortin, a member of the corticotropin-releasing factor family; (3) peripheral ghrelin acts as an anti-lipogenic factor in broiler chickens but not in rats; (4) the enzyme involved in ghrelin acylation (ghrelin-O-acyltransferase [GOAT]) has been identified in chickens; (5) dietary lipids are used for ghrelin acylation; (6) des-acyl ghrelin administered alone or with ghrelin does not affect feeding behavior; (7) the existence and physiological function of obestatin must now be carefully examined in birds; (8) other than the growth hormone secretagogue receptors (GHS) R1a and 1b, GHS-R variants not found in mammals have been found in chicken and Japanese quail; and finally (9) little is known about the involvement of the ghrelin system in wild birds and in avian-specific behavior such as brooding and migration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An evaluation of beached bird monitoring approaches.

    PubMed

    Seys, Jan; Offringa, Henk; Van Waeyenberge, Jeroen; Meire, Patrick; Kuijken, Eckhart

    2002-04-01

    Oil-pollution monitoring at sea through beach bird surveying would undoubtedly benefit from a further standardisation of methods, enhancing the efficiency of data collection. In order to come up with useful recommendations, we evaluated various approaches of beached bird collection at the Belgian coast during seven winters (1993-1999). Data received in a passive way by one major rehabilitation centre were compared to the results of targeted beach surveys carried out at different scales by trained ornithologists: 'weekly' surveys - with a mean interval of 9 days - restricted to a fixed 16.7 km beach stretch, 'monthly' surveys over the entire coastline (62.1 km) and an annual 'international' survey in Belgium over the same distance at the end of February. Data collected through Belgian rehabilitation centres concern injured, living birds collected in a non-systematical way. Oil rates derived from these centres appear to be strongly biased to oiled auks and inshore bird species, and are hence of little use in assessing the extent of oil pollution at sea. The major asset of rehabilitation centres in terms of data collection seems to be their continuous warning function for events of mass mortality. Weekly surveys on a representative and large enough section rendered reliable data on oil rates, estimates of total number of bird victims, representation of various taxonomic groups and species-richness and were most sensitive in detecting events quickly (wrecks, oil-slicks, severe winter mortality, etc.). Monthly surveys gave comparable results, although they overlooked some important beaching events and demonstrated slightly higher oil rates, probably due to the higher chance to miss short-lasting wrecks of auks. Since the monthly surveys in Belgium were carried out by a network of volunteers and were spread over a larger beach section, they should be considered as best performing. Single 'international beached bird surveys' in February gave reliable data on total victim

  8. Pesticide residues in birds and mammals

    Stickel, L.F.; Edwards, C.A.

    1973-01-01

    SUMMARY: Residues of organochlorine pesticides and their breakdown products are present in the tissues of essentially all wild birds throughout the world. These chemicals accumulate in fat from a relatively small environmental exposure. DDE and dieldrin are most prevalent. Others, such as heptachlor epoxide, chlordane, endrin, and benzene hexachloride also occur, the quantities and kinds generally reflecting local or regional use. Accumulation may be sufficient to kill animals following applications for pest control. This has occurred in several large-scale programmes in the United States. Mortality has also resulted from unintentional leakage of chemical from commercial establishments. Residues may persist in the environment for many years, exposing successive generations of animals. In general, birds that eat other birds, or fish, have higher residues than those that eat seeds and vegetation. The kinetic processes of absorption, metabolism, storage, and output differ according to both kind of chemical and species of animal. When exposure is low and continuous, a balance between intake and excretion may be achieved. Residues reach a balance at an approximate animal body equilibrium or plateau; the storage is generally proportional to dose. Experiments with chickens show that dieldrin and heptachlor epoxide have the greatest propensity for storage, endrin next, then DDT, then lindane. The storage of DDT was complicated by its metabolism to DDE and DDD, but other studies show that DDE has a much greater propensity for storage than either DDD or DDT. Methoxychlor has little cumulative capacity in birds. Residues in eggs reflect and parallel those in the parent bird during accumulation, equilibrium, and decline when dosage is discontinued. Residues with the greatest propensity for storage are also lost most slowly. Rate of loss of residues can be modified by dietary components and is speeded by weight loss of the animal. Under sublethal conditions of continuous

  9. Consumption of bird eggs by invasive Burmese Pythons in Florida

    Dove, Carla J.; Reed, Robert N.; Snow, Ray W.

    2012-01-01

    Burmese Pythons (Python molurus bivittatus or P. bivittatus) have been reported to consume 25 species of adult birds in Everglades National Park, Florida (Dove et al. 2011), but until now no records documented this species eating bird eggs. Here we report three recent cases of bird-egg consumption by Burmese Pythons and discuss egg-eating in basal snakes.

  10. Invite Birds to Your Home. Conservation Plantings for the Midwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1981

    Descriptons of familiar birds of the Midwest and suggestions for attracting them to urban settings are offered in this publication. Plants which serve as food and protection for birds are identified. These plants are described by: the number of bird species that use the plant; the plant's ornamental value; its time in bloom and in fruit; its…

  11. Point Count Length and Detection of Forest Neotropical Migrant Birds

    Deanna K. Dawson; David R. Smith; Chandler S. Robbins

    1995-01-01

    Comparisons of bird abundances among years or among habitats assume that the rates at which birds are detected and counted are constant within species. We use point count data collected in forests of the Mid-Atlantic states to estimate detection probabilities for Neotropical migrant bird species as a function of count length. For some species, significant differences...

  12. Birding economics and birder demographics studies as conservation tools

    Paul Kerlinger

    1993-01-01

    Birders are the primary user-group of neotropical migratory birds. In the United States, birders number in the tens of millions and spend upwards of $20 billion dollars per year on bird seed, travel, and birding paraphernalia. Average yearly spending by active birders averages between $1,500 and $3,400, with travel being the major expenditure. Research needs include...

  13. Bird conservation as a flagship for global diversity conservation

    David Brackett

    2005-01-01

    It is a pleasure to be here at the Third International meeting of Partners in Flight (PIF) ? and the international aspect is important. Bird conservation is a global problem. Building on the work of Bird Life International and other partners, the 2000 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species listed more than 12 percent of the world?s known species as at risk. Bird...

  14. Planning for bird conservation: a tale of two models

    Douglas H. Johnson; Maiken Winter

    2005-01-01

    Planning for bird conservation has become increasingly reliant on remote sensing, geographical information systems, and, especially, models used to predict the occurrence of bird species as well as their density and demographics. We address the role of such tools by contrasting two models used in bird conservation. One, the Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos...

  15. Bird Conservation Planning and Implementation in Canada's Intermountain Region

    Ilia Hartasanchez; Krista De Groot; Andre Breault; Rob W. Butler

    2005-01-01

    Bird conservation planning in British Columbia and Yukon has been carried out by each of the major bird initiatives. The purpose of this paper is to provide a status report of planning activities and to discuss how integration of the initiatives is being accomplished for efficient and effective implementation of bird conservation actions.

  16. Mitigation measures for highway-caused impacts to birds

    Sandra L. Jacobson

    Highways cause significant impacts to birds in four ways: direct mortality, indirect mortality, habitat fragmentation, and disturbance. In this paper I discuss highway-related impacts, and suggest solutions from a highway management perspective. Non-flying birds (either behaviorally or structurally) such as gallinaceous birds and ducklings; waterbirds such as terns;...

  17. 50 CFR 14.17 - Personally owned pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Personally owned pet birds. 14.17 Section 14.17 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Ports § 14.17 Personally owned pet birds. Any person may import a personally owned pet bird at any port...

  18. 50 CFR 14.17 - Personally owned pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Personally owned pet birds. 14.17 Section 14.17 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Ports § 14.17 Personally owned pet birds. Any person may import a personally owned pet bird at any port...

  19. 50 CFR 14.17 - Personally owned pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Personally owned pet birds. 14.17 Section 14.17 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Ports § 14.17 Personally owned pet birds. Any person may import a personally owned pet bird at any port...

  20. A review of climate change effects on terrestrial rangeland birds

    D. M. Finch; K. E. Bagne; M. M. Friggens; D. M. Smith; K. M. Brodhead

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated existing literature on predicted and known climate change effects on terrestrial rangeland birds. We asked the following questions: 1) How does climate change affect birds? 2) How will birds respond to climate change? 3) Are species already responding? 4) How will habitats be impacted?

  1. Species Diversity and Bird Feed in Residential Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadinoto; Suhesti, Eni

    2017-12-01

    Bird is one component of the ecosystem which has an important role in supporting the occurrence of an organism's life cycle. Therefore, the presence of birds in an area is important, because it can affect the existence and distribution of plant species. The purpose of this study is to calculate the diversity of bird species and identify the source of bird feed in the compound. This study was conducted by field surveys in the residential complex. In addition to the birds as a research object vegetation as habitat / foraging birds were also observed. Data were analyzed by using the bird diversity index, richenes index, bundance index, dominance analysis, analysis of bird distribution and analysis of the level of meeting types, while vegetation will be analyzed based on the type and part of what is eaten by birds. In Pandau Jaya housing complex, found as many as 12 species of birds which consists of seven families. Bird species often present is Cucak Kutilang (Pycnonotus aurigaster) of 20 individuals, Bondol Peking (Lonchura punctulata) 14 individuals and Perkutut Jawa (Geopelia striata) 10 individuals. Bird species diversity (H ‘) in Pandau Jaya housing complex is still relatively moderate with a value of 2.27, while the Evenness Index (E) of 0.91 and Richenes Index (R) of 2.45. Types of vegetation as a food source, among others: mango, guava, cherry, jackfruit, ketapang, coconut, areca, palm, banana, papaya, flowers and grasses.

  2. Integrated bird conservation web site in the United States

    Roxanne Bogart; Chris Eberly; Elizabeth Martin

    2005-01-01

    In working towards a vision of integrated bird conservation, scientists, conservationists, land managers, and administrators are faced with a variety of scientific, managerial, administrative, and logistical challenges and complexities. The broad scope of integrated bird conservation requires organizations to work together to conserve birds across taxonomic groups,...

  3. Risk assessment for two bird species in northern Wisconsin

    Megan M. Friggens; Stephen N. Matthews

    2012-01-01

    Species distribution models for 147 bird species have been derived using climate, elevation, and distribution of current tree species as potential predictors (Matthews et al. 2011). In this case study, a risk matrix was developed for two bird species (fig. A2-5), with projected change in bird habitat (the x axis) based on models of changing suitable habitat resulting...

  4. Relative prevalence of African Americans among bird watchers

    John C. Robinson

    2005-01-01

    The demographics of bird watchers have recently become a topic of increased interest. Race or nationality is one demographic parameter that has been discussed in some depth. This paper further quantifies the relative prevalence of African Americans among U.S. bird watchers and identifies potential barriers that may prevent African Americans from becoming bird watchers...

  5. 78 FR 78377 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Service Regulations Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ...-134-FXMB1231099BPP0] RIN 1018-AZ80 Migratory Bird Hunting; Service Regulations Committee Meeting... preliminary issues concerning the 2014-15 migratory bird hunting regulations. DATES: The meeting will be held..., Division of Migratory Bird Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior, ms-4107...

  6. 50 CFR 216.83 - Importation of birds or mammals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Importation of birds or mammals. 216.83 Section 216.83 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... MAMMALS Pribilof Islands Administration § 216.83 Importation of birds or mammals. No mammals or birds...

  7. 50 CFR 216.83 - Importation of birds or mammals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Importation of birds or mammals. 216.83 Section 216.83 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... MAMMALS Pribilof Islands Administration § 216.83 Importation of birds or mammals. No mammals or birds...

  8. 77 FR 60381 - Migratory Bird Conservation; Executive Order 13186

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... Bird Conservation; Executive Order 13186 AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National... promote the conservation of migratory birds. DATES: This MOU went into effect on July 17, 2012, the date..., ``Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds''. One of the requirements of E.O. 13186 is that...

  9. 50 CFR 14.17 - Personally owned pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Personally owned pet birds. 14.17 Section 14.17 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Ports § 14.17 Personally owned pet birds. Any person may import a personally owned pet bird at any port...

  10. 50 CFR 14.17 - Personally owned pet birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personally owned pet birds. 14.17 Section 14.17 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Ports § 14.17 Personally owned pet birds. Any person may import a personally owned pet bird at any port...

  11. 78 FR 3446 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Service Regulations Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ...-FXMB1231099BPP0] Migratory Bird Hunting; Service Regulations Committee Meeting AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... 2013-14 migratory bird hunting regulations. DATES: The meeting will be held February 6, 2013. ADDRESSES... Migratory Bird Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior, ms-4107-ARLSQ, 1849 C...

  12. 77 FR 1718 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Service Regulations Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ...-FXMB1231099BPP0L2] Migratory Bird Hunting; Service Regulations Committee Meeting AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... 2012-13 migratory bird hunting regulations. DATES: The meeting will be held February 1, 2012. ADDRESSES... Migratory Bird Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior, ms-4107-ARLSQ, 1849 C...

  13. A variable circular-plot method for estimating bird numbers

    R. T. Reynolds; J. M. Scott; R. A. Nussbaum

    1980-01-01

    A bird census method is presented that is designed for tall, structurally complex vegetation types, and rugged terrain. With this method the observer counts all birds seen or heard around a station, and estimates the horizontal distance from the station to each bird. Count periods at stations vary according to the avian community and structural complexity of the...

  14. Bird mortality after spraying for Dutch elm disease with DDT

    Wurster, C.F.; Wurster, D.H.; Strickland, W.N.

    1965-01-01

    In Hanover, New Hampshire, where elms were sprayed with DDT, 151 dead birds were found; 10 dead birds were found in Norwich, Vermont, where no DDT was used. Chemical analyses of dead birds, observation of symptoms of DDT poisoning, and a population decline after spraying all indicate severe mortality among certain species in Hanover.

  15. Build a Bird House. Grades 3-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Erik; Ryan, Emily; Swift, Charles

    In this activity, students construct bird nests and birdhouses. Students research a bird of their choice in order to design a house that will meet that bird's specific needs. The activity works well in conjunction with a high school level woodshop class where students would partner up. This activity requires an 80-minute time period for…

  16. Nest defense- Grassland bird responses to snakes

    Ellison, Kevin S.; Ribic, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Predation is the primary source of nest mortality for most passerines; thus, behaviors to reduce the impacts of predation are frequently quantified to study learning, adaptation, and coevolution among predator and prey species. Video surveillance of nests has made it possible to examine real-time parental nest defense. During 1999-2009, we used video camera systems to monitor 518 nests of grassland birds. We reviewed video of 48 visits by snakes to 34 nests; 37 of these visits resulted in predation of active nests. When adult birds encountered snakes at the nest (n = 33 visits), 76% of the encounters resulted in a form of nest defense (nonaggressive or aggressive); in 47% of the encounters, birds physically struck snakes. When defending nests, most birds pecked at the snakes; Eastern Meadowlarks (Sturnella magna) and Bobolinks (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) pecked most frequently in anyone encounter. Also, two Eastern Meadowlarks ran around snakes, frequently with wings spread, and three Bobolinks struck at snakes from the air. Nest defense rarely appeared to alter snake behavior; the contents of seven nests defended aggressively and two nests defended nonaggressively were partially depredated, whereas the contents of six nests defended each way were consumed completely. One fledgling was produced at each of three nests that had been aggressively defended. During aggressive defense, one snake appeared to be driven away and one was wounded. Our findings should be a useful starting point for further research. For example, future researchers may be able to determine whether the behavioral variation we observed in nest defense reflects species differences, anatomic or phylogenetic constraints, or individual differences related to a bird's prior experience. There appears to be much potential for studying nest defense behavior using video recording of both real and simulated encounters. 

  17. Assessing allowable take of migratory birds

    Runge, M.C.; Sauer, J.R.; Avery, M.L.; Blackwell, B.F.; Koneff, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    Legal removal of migratory birds from the wild occurs for several reasons, including subsistence, sport harvest, damage control, and the pet trade. We argue that harvest theory provides the basis for assessing the impact of authorized take, advance a simplified rendering of harvest theory known as potential biological removal as a useful starting point for assessing take, and demonstrate this approach with a case study of depredation control of black vultures (Coragyps atratus) in Virginia, USA. Based on data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey and other sources, we estimated that the black vulture population in Virginia was 91,190 (95% credible interval = 44,520?212,100) in 2006. Using a simple population model and available estimates of life-history parameters, we estimated the intrinsic rate of growth (rmax) to be in the range 7?14%, with 10.6% a plausible point estimate. For a take program to seek an equilibrium population size on the conservative side of the yield curve, the rate of take needs to be less than that which achieves a maximum sustained yield (0.5 x rmax). Based on the point estimate for rmax and using the lower 60% credible interval for population size to account for uncertainty, these conditions would be met if the take of black vultures in Virginia in 2006 was < 3,533 birds. Based on regular monitoring data, allowable harvest should be adjusted annually to reflect changes in population size. To initiate discussion about how this assessment framework could be related to the laws and regulations that govern authorization of such take, we suggest that the Migratory Bird Treaty Act requires only that take of native migratory birds be sustainable in the long-term, that is, sustained harvest rate should be < rmax. Further, the ratio of desired harvest rate to 0.5 x rmax may be a useful metric for ascertaining the applicability of specific requirements of the National Environmental Protection Act.

  18. Music for the birds: effects of auditory enrichment on captive bird species.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Lindsey; Margulis, Susan W

    2016-01-01

    With the increase of mixed species exhibits in zoos, targeting enrichment for individual species may be problematic. Often, mammals may be the primary targets of enrichment, yet other species that share their environment (such as birds) will unavoidably be exposed to the enrichment as well. The purpose of this study was to determine if (1) auditory stimuli designed for enrichment of primates influenced the behavior of captive birds in the zoo setting, and (2) if the specific type of auditory enrichment impacted bird behavior. Three different African bird species were observed at the Buffalo Zoo during exposure to natural sounds, classical music and rock music. The results revealed that the average frequency of flying in all three bird species increased with naturalistic sounds and decreased with rock music (F = 7.63, df = 3,6, P = 0.018); vocalizations for two of the three species (Superb Starlings and Mousebirds) increased (F = 18.61, df = 2,6, P = 0.0027) in response to all auditory stimuli, however one species (Lady Ross's Turacos) increased frequency of duetting only in response to rock music (X(2) = 18.5, df = 2, P < 0.0001). Auditory enrichment implemented for large mammals may influence behavior in non-target species as well, in this case leading to increased activity by birds. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Forest habitat management for non-game birds in central Appalachia

    John D. Gill; Richard M. DeGraaf; Jack Ward Thomas

    1974-01-01

    To woodland owners or managers who are interested in bird-habitat improvement, the authors suggest managing for: (1) people with slight to moderate knowledge of birds; (2) high numbers of both individual birds and bird species, particularly the conspicuous species; (3) seeing and hearing birds near trails and other human-activity areas; (4) bird nesting; and (5)...

  20. 77 FR 58627 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Late Seasons and Bag and Possession Limits for Certain Migratory Game Birds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Migratory Game Birds; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 184 / Friday, September 21, 2012... Hunting; Late Seasons and Bag and Possession Limits for Certain Migratory Game Birds AGENCY: Fish and... addressed the establishment of seasons, limits, and other regulations for hunting migratory game birds under...

  1. 76 FR 59271 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Late Seasons and Bag and Possession Limits for Certain Migratory Game Birds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... Limits for Certain Migratory Game Birds AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Final rule..., and other regulations for hunting migratory game birds under Sec. Sec. 20.101 through 20.107, 20.109... of migratory shore and upland game birds and developed recommendations for the 2011-12 regulations...

  2. 78 FR 58204 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Late Seasons and Bag and Possession Limits for Certain Migratory Game Birds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... Possession Limits for Certain Migratory Game Birds AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Final..., and other regulations for hunting migratory game birds under Sec. Sec. 20.101 through 20.107, 20.109... participants reviewed information on the current status of migratory shore and upland game birds and developed...

  3. 75 FR 58993 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Late Seasons and Bag and Possession Limits for Certain Migratory Game Birds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ...; Late Seasons and Bag and Possession Limits for Certain Migratory Game Birds; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal... Certain Migratory Game Birds AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY... seasons, limits, and other regulations for hunting migratory game birds under Sec. Sec. 20.101 through 20...

  4. Bird species and numbers of birds in oak savannas of the Southwestern Borderlands region including effects of burning

    Peter F. Ffolliott; Hui Chen; Gerald J. Gottfried

    2011-01-01

    Oak savannas of the Southwestern Borderlands region provide food, cover, and sites for nesting, roosting, and perching for a diversity of bird species. The results of a five-year (2003-2007) study of bird species, numbers of birds, and their diversities in the naturally occurring (unburned) oak savannas of the region are reported in this paper. Effects of cool-season...

  5. International trade of CITES listed bird species in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Linlin; Jiang, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Commercial trade of wild birds may devastate wild bird populations. Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) controls the trade of wild species listed in its appendices to avoid these species being threatened by international trade. China used to be one of the major trading countries with significant bird trade with foreign countries; on the other hand, China is a country with unique avian fauna, many Important Bird Areas and critically endangered bird species. What is the role of the country in world wild bird trade? What kind of insights can we extract from trade records for improving future management of wild bird trade in the country? We retrieved and analyzed international trade records of the CITES listed bird species of China from 1981 to 2010 from the CITES Trade Database maintained by United Nations Environment Program and World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC). We found that: (1) International trade of live birds in China peaked during the late 1990s, then decreased to the level before the surge of trade in a few years, the trade dynamics of wild birds may be affected by governmental policy and the outbreak of avian influenza during the period. (2) Most frequently traded CITES Appendix listed birds in China were parrots, most of which were exotic species to the country. (3) Birds were mainly traded for commercial purpose. Exotic birds in trade were mainly captive-bred while the most Chinese birds traded internationally were captured from the wild. Since many bird species in international trade are threatened to extinction, China should take stricter measures on importing of wild-captured birds and should collaborate with the countries of original in the international bird trade to avoid unsustainable harvesting of wild birds. It is urgent for China to carry out population surveys on those domestic bird species once in significant international trade and to make better conservation decisions based on

  6. International Trade of CITES Listed Bird Species in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linlin; Jiang, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Commercial trade of wild birds may devastate wild bird populations. Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) controls the trade of wild species listed in its appendices to avoid these species being threatened by international trade. China used to be one of the major trading countries with significant bird trade with foreign countries; on the other hand, China is a country with unique avian fauna, many Important Bird Areas and critically endangered bird species. What is the role of the country in world wild bird trade? What kind of insights can we extract from trade records for improving future management of wild bird trade in the country? We retrieved and analyzed international trade records of the CITES listed bird species of China from 1981 to 2010 from the CITES Trade Database maintained by United Nations Environment Program and World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC). We found that: (1) International trade of live birds in China peaked during the late 1990s, then decreased to the level before the surge of trade in a few years, the trade dynamics of wild birds may be affected by governmental policy and the outbreak of avian influenza during the period. (2) Most frequently traded CITES Appendix listed birds in China were parrots, most of which were exotic species to the country. (3) Birds were mainly traded for commercial purpose. Exotic birds in trade were mainly captive-bred while the most Chinese birds traded internationally were captured from the wild. Since many bird species in international trade are threatened to extinction, China should take stricter measures on importing of wild-captured birds and should collaborate with the countries of original in the international bird trade to avoid unsustainable harvesting of wild birds. It is urgent for China to carry out population surveys on those domestic bird species once in significant international trade and to make better conservation decisions based on

  7. Leucocytozoon spp. infection in Accipitriformes birds in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rassouli, Maryam; Aghazamani, Ghazaleh; Ardekani, Abbas Oliya

    2017-09-01

    Leucocytozoon spp. (Haemosporida, Leucocytozoidae) are vector-borne parasites of various birds. Leucocytozoon can infect different reticuloendothelial tissues and blood cells of birds. In this study peripheral blood samples were collected from Accipitriformes birds [three marsh harriers ( Circus aeruginosus ) and one tawny eagle ( Aquila rapax )] in one birds' garden in Iran. Blood films were observed for identification of hemoparasites. All samples were infected by different Leucocytozoon species. All of the observed species were first reported in Iran in Accipitriformes birds which one of them was described as a new species.

  8. Quantification of bird-to-bird and bird-to-human infections during 2013 novel H7N9 avian influenza outbreak in China.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ying-Hen; Wu, Jianhong; Fang, Jian; Yang, Yong; Lou, Jie

    2014-01-01

    From February to May, 2013, 132 human avian influenza H7N9 cases were identified in China resulting in 37 deaths. We developed a novel, simple and effective compartmental modeling framework for transmissions among (wild and domestic) birds as well as from birds to human, to infer important epidemiological quantifiers, such as basic reproduction number for bird epidemic, bird-to-human infection rate and turning points of the epidemics, for the epidemic via human H7N9 case onset data and to acquire useful information regarding the bird-to-human transmission dynamics. Estimated basic reproduction number for infections among birds is 4.10 and the mean daily number of human infections per infected bird is 3.16*10-5 [3.08*10-5, 3.23*10-5]. The turning point of 2013 H7N9 epidemic is pinpointed at April 16 for bird infections and at April 9 for bird-to-human transmissions. Our result reveals very low level of bird-to-human infections, thus indicating minimal risk of widespread bird-to-human infections of H7N9 virus during the outbreak. Moreover, the turning point of the human epidemic, pinpointed at shortly after the implementation of full-scale control and intervention measures initiated in early April, further highlights the impact of timely actions on ending the outbreak. This is the first study where both the bird and human components of an avian influenza epidemic can be quantified using only the human case data.

  9. Bird community specialization, bird conservation and disturbance: the role of wildfires.

    PubMed

    Clavero, Miguel; Brotons, Lluís; Herrando, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    1. Although niche theory predicts that disturbance should favour generalist species, the community-level implications of this pattern have been sparsely analysed. Here, we test the hypothesis that disturbance favours generalist species within communities, analysing effects of wildfires in bird communities in a Mediterranean climate area as a case study. 2. We use bird occurrence data in more than 500 1 × 1 km squares forming a gradient running from forest to completely burnt areas. The level of specialization of bird communities was estimated by means of three complementary species specialization indices, calculated for different landscape gradients and averaged at the community level (i.e. 1 × 1 km squares), and mean species rarity. 3. We also calculated mean habitat preferences along landscape gradients, as well as an index of conservation value and total species richness. 4. Different estimators of bird community specialization varied in contrasting fashion along the wildfire disturbance gradient, and thus we conclude that it is not justified to expect unique community responses to the sharp variations in habitat characteristics brought by wildfire disturbances. 5. Burnt areas tended to have rarer and urban-avoider bird species, whereas unburnt forests tended to have larger proportions of forest specialist species. 6. The mean conservation value of communities clearly increased towards the burnt extreme of the wildfire disturbance gradient, while this had a negligible effect on species richness. 7. Wildfires seem to play an important role for the maintenance of open-habitat, urban-avoider bird populations in Mediterranean landscapes and also to benefit a set of bird species of unfavourable European conservation status. 8. In this context, it cannot be unambiguously concluded that fire disturbance, even in a context in which fires are greatly favoured by human-related activities, leads to more functionally simplified communities dominated by generalist species

  10. Bird community response to filter strips in Maryland

    Blank, P.J.; Dively, G.P.; Gill, D.E.; Rewa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Filter strips are strips of herbaceous vegetation planted along agricultural field margins adjacent to streams or wetlands and are designed to intercept sediment, nutrients, and agrichemicals. Roughly 16,000 ha of filter strips have been established in Maryland through the United States Department of Agriculture's Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program. Filter strips often represent the only uncultivated herbaceous areas on farmland in Maryland and therefore may be important habitat for early-successional bird species. Most filter strips in Maryland are planted to either native warm-season grasses or cool-season grasses and range in width from 10.7 m to 91.4 m. From 2004 to 2007 we studied the breeding and wintering bird communities in filter strips adjacent to wooded edges and non-buffered field edges and the effect that grass type and width of filter strips had on bird community composition. We used 5 bird community metrics (total bird density, species richness, scrub-shrub bird density, grassland bird density, and total avian conservation value), species-specific densities, nest densities, and nest survival estimates to assess the habitat value of filter strips for birds. Breeding and wintering bird community metrics were greater in filter strips than in non-buffered field edges but did not differ between cool-season and warm-season grass filter strips. Most breeding bird community metrics were negatively related to the percent cover of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata) in ???1 yr. Breeding bird density was greater in narrow (60 m) filter strips. Our results suggest that narrow filter strips adjacent to wooded edges can provide habitat for many bird species but that wide filter strips provide better habitat for grassland birds, particularly obligate grassland species. If bird conservation is an objective, avoid planting orchardgrass in filter strips and reduce or eliminate orchardgrass from filter strips through management practices. Copyright ?? 2011 The

  11. Bird Communities and Biomass Yields in Potential Bioenergy Grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Peter J.; Sample, David W.; Williams, Carol L.; Turner, Monica G.

    2014-01-01

    Demand for bioenergy is increasing, but the ecological consequences of bioenergy crop production on working lands remain unresolved. Corn is currently a dominant bioenergy crop, but perennial grasslands could produce renewable bioenergy resources and enhance biodiversity. Grassland bird populations have declined in recent decades and may particularly benefit from perennial grasslands grown for bioenergy. We asked how breeding bird community assemblages, vegetation characteristics, and biomass yields varied among three types of potential bioenergy grassland fields (grass monocultures, grass-dominated fields, and forb-dominated fields), and assessed tradeoffs between grassland biomass production and bird habitat. We also compared the bird communities in grassland fields to nearby cornfields. Cornfields had few birds compared to perennial grassland fields. Ten bird Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) were observed in perennial grassland fields. Bird species richness and total bird density increased with forb cover and were greater in forb-dominated fields than grass monocultures. SGCN density declined with increasing vertical vegetation density, indicating that tall, dense grassland fields managed for maximum biomass yield would be of lesser value to imperiled grassland bird species. The proportion of grassland habitat within 1 km of study sites was positively associated with bird species richness and the density of total birds and SGCNs, suggesting that grassland bioenergy fields may be more beneficial for grassland birds if they are established near other grassland parcels. Predicted total bird density peaked below maximum biomass yields and predicted SGCN density was negatively related to biomass yields. Our results indicate that perennial grassland fields could produce bioenergy feedstocks while providing bird habitat. Bioenergy grasslands promote agricultural multifunctionality and conservation of biodiversity in working landscapes. PMID:25299593

  12. Fossil birds of the Kibish Formation.

    PubMed

    Louchart, Antoine; Haile-Selassie, Y; Vignaud, P; Likius, A; Brunet, M

    2008-09-01

    The Kibish Formation has yielded a small collection of bird fossils, which are identified here as belonging to five species in four different families: Pelecanidae (pelicans), Anhingidae (darters), Ardeidae (herons) and Phasianidae (gamefowl). Two species of pelicans are identified: Pelecanus cf. P. onocrotalus, and P. aff. P. rufescens. The darter is referrable to Anhinga melanogaster. The heron is identifiable as Ardea sp., and the gamefowl as Numidinae indet. (guineafowl). Pelecanus cf. P. onocrotalus is represented by, among other remains, a well-preserved partial skull. Four of the birds are thus referrable to extant taxa that provide some paleoenvironmental clues for Member I of the Kibish Formation. The two species of pelican, the darter, and the heron indicate the presence of local freshwater bodies, a lake or a slow river, supporting resources of fish. The guineafowl is poorly informative ecologically, but probably excludes the notion that the local terrestrial landscape was treeless.

  13. Summer bird use of Kansas windbreaks

    Cable, T.T.; Schroeder, R.L.; Brack, V.; Cook, P.S.

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-four windbreaks in Stafford and Pawnee counties in Kansas were censused for birds during the nesting seasons of 1988-1990. Eighty-nine species of birds were found in the windbreaks with 60 species believed to be nesting. Fifteen species used the windbreaks for feeding or as singing perches but did not nest, and 14 species were spring migrants. Species representing 20 taxonomic families and 15 foraging guilds nested in the windbreaks. Fifteen species were members of the omnivore/ground forager guild. Five species considered forest interior or area sensitive were found nesting in the windbreaks. Windbreak area was important in determining which species were present. Windbreaks provide habitat for a large component of the Great Plains' avifauna, including some species whose populations are decreasing in the region.

  14. Optical designing of LiteBIRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Hajime; Kashima, Shingo; Kimura, Kimihiro; Matsumura, Tomotake; Inoue, Masanori; Ito, Makoto; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Sekimoto, Yutaro; Ishino, Hirokazu; Sakurai, Yuki; Imada, Hiroaki; Fujii, Takenori

    2016-07-01

    LiteBIRD aims to detect the footprint of the primordial gravitational wave on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) in a form of polarization pattern called B mode. In order to separate CMB from the Galactic emission, our measurements cover 35 GHz to 450 GHz. The LiteBIRD optics consists of two telescopes: a crossed Dragone type for lower frequencies, which provides a compact configuration with a wide field of view, and a refractor type for higher frequencies. The whole optical system is cooled down to around 5 K to minimize the thermal emission. We use two kinds of approaches of designing calculations as well as the experimental confirmation particularly for the lower frequency telescope.

  15. West Nile Virus Infection of Birds, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Sánchez, Sergio; Cuevas-Romero, Sandra; Nemeth, Nicole M.; Trujillo-Olivera, María Teresa Jesús; Worwa, Gabriella; Dupuis, Alan; Brault, Aaron C.; Kramer, Laura D.; Komar, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has caused disease in humans, equids, and birds at lower frequency in Mexico than in the United States. We hypothesized that the seemingly reduced virulence in Mexico was caused by attenuation of the Tabasco strain from southeastern Mexico, resulting in lower viremia than that caused by the Tecate strain from the more northern location of Baja California. During 2006–2008, we tested this hypothesis in candidate avian amplifying hosts: domestic chickens, rock pigeons, house sparrows, great-tailed grackles, and clay-colored thrushes. Only great-tailed grackles and house sparrows were competent amplifying hosts for both strains, and deaths occurred in each species. Tecate strain viremia levels were higher for thrushes. Both strains produced low-level viremia in pigeons and chickens. Our results suggest that certain avian hosts within Mexico are competent for efficient amplification of both northern and southern WNV strains and that both strains likely contribute to bird deaths. PMID:22172633

  16. West Nile virus infection of birds, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Sánchez, Sergio; Cuevas-Romero, Sandra; Nemeth, Nicole M; Trujillo-Olivera, María Teresa Jesús; Worwa, Gabriella; Dupuis, Alan; Brault, Aaron C; Kramer, Laura D; Komar, Nicholas; Estrada-Franco, José Guillermo

    2011-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has caused disease in humans, equids, and birds at lower frequency in Mexico than in the United States. We hypothesized that the seemingly reduced virulence in Mexico was caused by attenuation of the Tabasco strain from southeastern Mexico, resulting in lower viremia than that caused by the Tecate strain from the more northern location of Baja California. During 2006-2008, we tested this hypothesis in candidate avian amplifying hosts: domestic chickens, rock pigeons, house sparrows, great-tailed grackles, and clay-colored thrushes. Only great-tailed grackles and house sparrows were competent amplifying hosts for both strains, and deaths occurred in each species. Tecate strain viremia levels were higher for thrushes. Both strains produced low-level viremia in pigeons and chickens. Our results suggest that certain avian hosts within Mexico are competent for efficient amplification of both northern and southern WNV strains and that both strains likely contribute to bird deaths.

  17. An evaluation of condition indices for birds

    Johnson, D.H.; Krapu, G.L.; Reinecke, K.J.; Jorde, Dennis G.

    1985-01-01

    A Lipid Index, the ratio of fat to fat-free dry weight, is proposed as a measure of fat stores in birds. The estimation of the index from field measurements of live birds is illustrated with data on the sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) and greater white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons). Of the various methods of assessing fat stores, lipid extraction is the most accurate but also the most involved. Water extraction is a simpler laboratory method that provides a good index to fat and can be calibrated to serve as an estimator. Body weight itself is often inadequate as a condition index, but scaling by morphological measurements can markedly improve its value.

  18. Psychotherapy. Sublimation and the psychodynamics of birding.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Norman A

    2012-07-01

    An adventure in extreme birding prompted the psychoanalyst author to reflect on "why do people do this?" Like myriad human interests, vocations, and avocations, the activity of bird watching is a socially acceptable activity that is the final pathway for multiple motivations that are likely to have a long history in the individual's development. It may have origins in basic survival skills. Various psychological defense mechanisms may be involved, the most mature and successful one being sublimation. Success of a defense-like sublimation may be viewed in terms of freedom from anxiety or from obsessive extremes that interfere with the individual's wellbeing, important relationships, or physical or financial health. The author considers whether the characters in the film The Big Year exemplify such success or the lack of it.

  19. Siadenovirus infection in two psittacine bird species.

    PubMed

    Wellehan, James F X; Greenacre, Cheryl B; Fleming, Gregory J; Stetter, Mark D; Childress, April L; Terrell, Scott P

    2009-10-01

    Consensus polymerase chain reaction was used to identify a novel adenovirus from two psittacine birds: a plum-headed parakeet (Psittacula cyanocephala) with lethargy, weight loss, and marked leukocytosis; and an umbrella cockatoo (Cacatua alba) with lethargy, weight loss, and feather abnormalities. Phylogenetic and comparative sequence analysis suggested that this virus is a member of the genus Siadenovirus, and is here termed psittacine adenovirus 2. This extends the characterized adenoviruses of psittacine birds beyond Aviadenovirus to include the genus Siadenovirus. Identification and further study of adenoviral types and species will provide useful diagnostic, prognostic, and epidemiologic information for the clinician. Like other known members of the genus Siadenovirus, Psittacine adenovirus 2 is AT-rich over the region sequenced, and it is hypothesized that this may be associated with shorter host-virus evolutionary association.

  20. Can a bird brain do phonology?

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Bridget D.

    2015-01-01

    A number of recent studies have revealed correspondences between song- and language-related neural structures, pathways, and gene expression in humans and songbirds. Analyses of vocal learning, song structure, and the distribution of song elements have similarly revealed a remarkable number of shared characteristics with human speech. This article reviews recent developments in the understanding of these issues with reference to the phonological phenomena observed in human language. This investigation suggests that birds possess a host of abilities necessary for human phonological computation, as evidenced by behavioral, neuroanatomical, and molecular genetic studies. Vocal-learning birds therefore present an excellent model for studying some areas of human phonology, though differences in the primitives of song and language as well as the absence of a human-like morphosyntax make human phonology differ from birdsong phonology in crucial ways. PMID:26284006