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Sample records for magnetoresistive heat switch

  1. A Magnetoresistive Heat Switch for the Continuous ADR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canavan, E. R.; Dipirro, M. J.; Jackson, M.; Panek, J.; Shirron, P. J.; Tuttle, J. G.; Krebs, C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In compensated elemental metals at low temperature, a several Tesla field can suppress electronic heat conduction so thoroughly that heat is effectively carried by phonons alone. In approximately one mm diameter single crystal samples with impurity concentrations low enough that electron conduction is limited by surface scattering, the ratio of zerofield to high-field thermal conductivity can exceed ten thousand. We have used this phenomenon to build a compact, solid-state heat switch with no moving parts and no enclosed fluids. The time scale for switching states is limited by time scale for charging the magnet that supplies the controlling field. Our design and fabrication techniques overcome the difficulties associated with manufacturing and assembling parts from single crystal tungsten. A clear disadvantage of the magnetoresistive switch is the mass and complexity of the magnet system for the controlling field. We have discovered a technique of minimizing this mass and complexity, applicable to the continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator.

  2. Performance of a fast response miniature Adiabatic Demagnetisation Refrigerator using a single crystal tungsten magnetoresistive heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, J.; Hardy, G.; Hepburn, I. D.

    2015-12-01

    The performance of a fast thermal response miniature Adiabatic Demagnetisation Refrigerator (ADR) is presented. The miniature ADR is comprised of a fast thermal response Chromium Potassium Alum (CPA) salt pill, two superconducting magnets and unconventionally, a single crystal tungsten magnetoresistive (MR) heat switch. The development of this ADR is a result of the ongoing development of a continuously operating millikelvin cryocooler (mKCC), which will use only magnetoresistive heat switches. The design and performance of the MR heat switch developed for the mKCC and used in the miniature ADR is presented in this paper; the heat switch has a measured Residual Resistivity Ratio of 32,000 ± 3000 and an estimated switching ratio (on thermal conductivity divided by the off thermal conductivity) of 15,200 at 3.6 K and 38,800 at 0.2 K when using a 3 T magnetic field. The performance of the miniature ADR operating from a 3.6 K bath is presented, demonstrating that a complete cycle (magnetisation, cooling to the bath and demagnetisation) can be accomplished in 82 s. A magnet current step test, conducted when the ADR is cold and fully demagnetised, has shown the thermal response of the ADR to be sub-second. The measured hold times of the ADR with just parasitic heat load are given, ranging from 3 min at 0.2 K with 13.14 μW of parasitics, to 924 min at 3 K with 4.55 μW of parasitics. The cooling power has been measured for operating temperatures in the range 0.25-3 K by applying an additional heat load to the ADR via a heater, in order to reduce the hold time to 3 min (i.e. approximately double the recycle time); the maximum cooling power of the miniature ADR (in addition to parasitic load) when operating at 250 mK is 20 μW, which increases to 45 μW at 300 mK and continues to increase linearly to nearly 1.1 mW at 3 K. To conclude, the predicted performance of a tandem continuous ADR utilising two of the miniature ADRs is presented.

  3. Heat Switches for ADRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  4. Heat switches for ADRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-07-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  5. Large magnetoresistance in oxide based ferromagnet/superconductor spin switches.

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, V.; Nemes, N.; Visani, C.; Garcia-Barriocanal, J.; Bruno, F.; Arias, D.; Sefrioui, Z.; Leon, C.; te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Garcia-Hernandez, M.; Santamaria, J.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Complutense de Madrid; Inst. de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid

    2006-01-01

    We report large magnetoresistance (in excess of 1000%) in ferromagnet / superconductor / ferromagnet structures made of La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} in the current in plane (CIP) geometry. This magnetoresistance has many of the ingredients of the giant magnetoresistance of metallic superlattices: it is independent on the angle between current and magnetic field, depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization in the ferromagnetic layers, and takes very large values. The origin is enhanced scattering at the F/S interface in the anti parallel configuration of the magnetizations. Furthermore, we examine the dependence of the magnetoresistance effect on the thickness of the superconducting layer, and show that the magnetoresistance dies out for thickness in excess of 30 nm, setting a length scale for the diffusion of spin polarized quasiparticles.

  6. Heat-transfer thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedell, M. V.; Anderson, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal switch maintains temperature of planetary lander, within definite range, by transferring heat. Switch produces relatively large stroke and force, uses minimum electrical power, is lightweight, is vapor pressure actuated, and withstands sterilization temperatures without damage.

  7. Gas adsorption/absorption heat switch, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    The service life and/or reliability of far-infrared sensors on surveillance satellites is presently limited by the cryocooler. The life and/or reliability, however, can be extended by using redundant cryocoolers. To reduce parasitic heat leak, each stage of the inactive redundant cryocooler must be thermally isolated from the optical system, while each stage of the active cryocooler must be thermally connected to the system. The thermal break or the thermal contact can be controlled by heat switches. Among different physical mechanisms for heat switching, mechanically activated heat switches tend to have low reliability and, furthermore, require a large contact force. Magnetoresistive heat switches are, except at very low temperatures, of very low efficiency. Heat switches operated by the heat pipe principle usually require a long response time. A sealed gas gap heat switch operated by an adsorption pump has no mechanical motion and should provide the reliability and long lifetime required in long-term space missions. Another potential application of a heat switch is the thermal isolation of the optical plane during decontamination.

  8. Controlled normal and inverse current-induced magnetization switching and magnetoresistance in magnetic nanopillars.

    PubMed

    AlHajDarwish, M; Kurt, H; Urazhdin, S; Fert, A; Loloee, R; Pratt, W P; Bass, J

    2004-10-08

    By combining pairs of ferromagnetic metals with the same or different signs of scattering anisotropies in ferromagnetic-nonmagnetic-ferromagnetic metal nanopillars, we independently invert just the magnetoresistance, just the direction of current-induced magnetization switching, or both together, at room temperature (295 K) and at 4.2 K. In all cases studied, the switching direction is correctly predicted from the net scattering anisotropy of the fixed ferromagnet, including both bulk and interfacial contributions.

  9. All-optical switching of magnetoresistive devices using telecom-band femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Li; Chen, Jun-Yang; Wang, Jian-Ping; Li, Mo

    2015-09-01

    Ultrafast all-optical switching of the magnetization of various magnetic systems is an intriguing phenomenon that can have tremendous impact on information storage and processing. Here, we demonstrate all-optical switching of GdFeCo alloy films using a telecom-band femtosecond fiber laser. We further fabricate Hall cross devices and electrically readout all-optical switching by measuring anomalous Hall voltage changes. The use of a telecom laser and the demonstrated all-optical switching of magnetoresistive devices represent the first step toward integration of opto-magnetic devices with mainstream photonic devices to enable novel optical and spintronic functionalities.

  10. All-optical switching of magnetoresistive devices using telecom-band femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    He, Li; Chen, Jun-Yang; Wang, Jian-Ping E-mail: moli@umn.edu; Li, Mo E-mail: moli@umn.edu

    2015-09-07

    Ultrafast all-optical switching of the magnetization of various magnetic systems is an intriguing phenomenon that can have tremendous impact on information storage and processing. Here, we demonstrate all-optical switching of GdFeCo alloy films using a telecom-band femtosecond fiber laser. We further fabricate Hall cross devices and electrically readout all-optical switching by measuring anomalous Hall voltage changes. The use of a telecom laser and the demonstrated all-optical switching of magnetoresistive devices represent the first step toward integration of opto-magnetic devices with mainstream photonic devices to enable novel optical and spintronic functionalities.

  11. A Piezoelectric Cryogenic Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Sullivan, Dan F.

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios greater than 100 were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an optimized PZHS.

  12. Resistive switching and voltage induced modulation of tunneling magnetoresistance in nanosized perpendicular organic spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Göckeritz, Robert; Homonnay, Nico; Müller, Alexander; Fuhrmann, Bodo; Schmidt, Georg

    2016-04-15

    Nanoscale multifunctional perpendicular organic spin valves have been fabricated. The devices based on an La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/Alq3/Co trilayer show resistive switching of up to 4-5 orders of magnitude and magnetoresistance as high as -70% the latter even changing sign when voltage pulses are applied. This combination of phenomena is typically observed in multiferroic tunnel junctions where it is attributed to magnetoelectric coupling between a ferromagnet and a ferroelectric material. Modeling indicates that here the switching originates from a modification of the La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} surface. This modification influences the tunneling of charge carriers and thus both the electrical resistance and the tunneling magnetoresistance which occurs at pinholes in the organic layer.

  13. Magnetoresistance Behavior of Conducting Filaments in Resistive-Switching NiO with Different Resistance States.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Diyang; Qiao, Shuang; Luo, Yuxiang; Chen, Aitian; Zhang, Pengfei; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Zhong; Guo, Minghua; Chiang, Fu-Kuo; Wu, Jian; Luo, Jianlin; Li, Jianqi; Kokado, Satoshi; Wang, Yayu; Zhao, Yonggang

    2017-03-29

    The resistive switching (RS) effect in various materials has attracted much attention due to its interesting physics and potential for applications. NiO is an important system and its RS effect has been generally explained by the formation/rupture of Ni-related conducting filaments. These filaments are unique since they are formed by an electroforming process, so it is interesting to explore their magnetoresistance (MR) behavior, which can also shed light on unsolved issues such as the nature of the filaments and their evolution in the RS process, and this behavior is also important for multifunctional devices. Here, we focus on MR behavior in NiO RS films with different resistance states. Rich and interesting MR behaviors have been observed, including the normal and anomalous anisotropic magnetoresistance and tunneling magnetoresistance, which provide new insights into the nature of the filaments and their evolution in the RS process. First-principles calculation reveals the essential role of oxygen migration into the filaments during the RESET process and can account for the experimental results. Our work provides a new avenue for exploration of the conducting filaments in resistive switching materials and is significant for understanding the mechanism of RS effect and multifunctional devices.

  14. A piezoelectric cryogenic heat switch.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Amir E; Sullivan, Dan F

    2014-06-01

    We have measured the thermal conductance of a mechanical heat switch actuated by a piezoelectric positioner, the PZHS (PieZo electric Heat Switch), at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal conductance of the PZHS was measured between 4 K and 10 K, and on/off conductance ratios of about 100-200 at lowest and highest measures temperature were achieved when the positioner applied its maximum force of 8 N, respectively. We discuss the advantages of using this system in cryogenic applications, and estimate the ultimate performance of an ideal PZHS.

  15. Realization of resistive switching and magnetoresistance in ZnO/ZnO-Co composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoli; Jia, Juan; Li, Yanchun; Bai, Yuhao; Li, Jie; Shi, Yana; Wang, Lanfang; Xu, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    Combining resistive switching and magnetoresistance in a system exhibits great potential for application in multibit nonvolatile data storage. It is in significance and difficulty to seek a material with resistances that can be stably switched at different resistance states modulated by an electrical field and a magnetic field. In this paper, we propose a novel electrode/ZnO/ZnO-Co/electrode device in which the storage layer combines a nanostructured ZnO-Co layer and a ZnO layer. The device exhibits bipolar resistive switching characteristics, which can be explained by the accumulation of oxygen vacancies due to the migration of oxygen ions by external electrical stimuli and the contribution of Co particles in the ZnO-Co layer. Moreover, the magnetoresistance effect at room temperature can be observed in the device at high and low resistance states. Therefore, through electrical and magnetic control, four resistance states are achieved in this system, presenting a new possibility towards enhancing data densities by many folds.

  16. Realization of resistive switching and magnetoresistance in ZnO/ZnO-Co composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoli; Jia, Juan; Li, Yanchun; Bai, Yuhao; Li, Jie; Shi, Yana; Wang, Lanfang; Xu, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Combining resistive switching and magnetoresistance in a system exhibits great potential for application in multibit nonvolatile data storage. It is in significance and difficulty to seek a material with resistances that can be stably switched at different resistance states modulated by an electrical field and a magnetic field. In this paper, we propose a novel electrode/ZnO/ZnO-Co/electrode device in which the storage layer combines a nanostructured ZnO-Co layer and a ZnO layer. The device exhibits bipolar resistive switching characteristics, which can be explained by the accumulation of oxygen vacancies due to the migration of oxygen ions by external electrical stimuli and the contribution of Co particles in the ZnO-Co layer. Moreover, the magnetoresistance effect at room temperature can be observed in the device at high and low resistance states. Therefore, through electrical and magnetic control, four resistance states are achieved in this system, presenting a new possibility towards enhancing data densities by many folds. PMID:27585644

  17. Atomistic switch of giant magnetoresistance and spin thermopower in graphene-like nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Ming-Xing; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the giant magnetoresistance can be switched off (on) in even- (odd-) width zigzag graphene-like nanoribbons by an atomistic gate potential or edge disorder inside the domain wall in the antiparallel (ap) magnetic configuration. A strong magneto-thermopower effect is also predicted that the spin thermopower can be greatly enhanced in the ap configuration while the charge thermopower remains low. The results extracted from the tight-binding model agree well with those obtained by first-principles simulations for edge doped graphene nanoribbons. Analytical expressions in the simplest case are obtained to facilitate qualitative analyses in general contexts. PMID:27857156

  18. Atomistic switch of giant magnetoresistance and spin thermopower in graphene-like nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Ming-Xing; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate that the giant magnetoresistance can be switched off (on) in even- (odd-) width zigzag graphene-like nanoribbons by an atomistic gate potential or edge disorder inside the domain wall in the antiparallel (ap) magnetic configuration. A strong magneto-thermopower effect is also predicted that the spin thermopower can be greatly enhanced in the ap configuration while the charge thermopower remains low. The results extracted from the tight-binding model agree well with those obtained by first-principles simulations for edge doped graphene nanoribbons. Analytical expressions in the simplest case are obtained to facilitate qualitative analyses in general contexts.

  19. Manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance via temperature and voltage control

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Houfang; Wang, Ran; Guo, Peng; Wen, Zhenchao; Feng, Jiafeng; Wei, Hongxiang; Han, Xiufeng; Ji, Yang; Zhang, Shufeng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization switching between parallel and antiparallel alignments of two magnetic layers in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is conventionally controlled either by an external magnetic field or by an electric current. Here, we report that the manipulation of magnetization switching and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in perpendicularly magnetized CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB MTJs can be achieved by both temperature and voltage. At a certain range of temperature, coercivity crossover between top and bottom magnetic layers is observed in which the TMR ratio of the MTJs is almost unmeasurable. Furthermore, the temperature range can be tuned reversibly by an electric voltage. Magnetization switching driven by the voltage reveals an unconventional phenomenon such that the voltage driven coercivity changes with temperature are quite different for top and bottom CoFeB layers. A model based on thermally-assisted domain nucleation and propagation is developed to explain the frequency and temperature dependence of coercivity. The present results of controlling the magnetization switching by temperature and voltage may provide an alternative route for novel applications of MTJs based spintronic devices. PMID:26658213

  20. Current-driven switching of exchange biased spin-valve giant magnetoresistive nanopillars using a conducting nanoprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, J.; Ito, K.; Fujimori, M.; Heike, S.; Hashizume, T.; Steen, J.; Brugger, J.; Ohno, H.

    2004-09-01

    An array of exchange biased spin-valve giant-magnetoresistance nanopillars was fabricated and the current I dependence of the resistance R was investigated using an electrically conducting atomic-force microscope (AFM) probe contact at room temperature. We observed current induced switching in a MnIr /CoFe/Cu/CoFe/NiFe nanopillar using the AFM probe contact. Current-driven switching using nanoprobe contact is a powerful method for developing nonvolatile and rewritable magnetic memory with high density.

  1. Large magnetization and frustration switching of magnetoresistance in the double-perovskite ferrimagnet Mn2FeReO6.

    PubMed

    Arévalo-López, Angel M; McNally, Graham M; Attfield, J Paul

    2015-10-05

    Ferrimagnetic A2 BB'O6 double perovskites, such as Sr2 FeMoO6 , are important spin-polarized conductors. Introducing transition metals at the A-sites offers new possibilities to increase magnetization and tune magnetoresistance. Herein we report a ferrimagnetic double perovskite, Mn2 FeReO6 , synthesized at high pressure which has a high Curie temperature of 520 K and magnetizations of up to 5.0 μB which greatly exceed those for other double perovskite ferrimagnets. A novel switching transition is discovered at 75 K where magnetoresistance changes from conventional negative tunneling behavior to large positive values, up to 265 % at 7 T and 20 K. Neutron diffraction shows that the switch is driven by magnetic frustration from antiferromagnetic Mn(2+) spin ordering which cants Fe(3+) and Re(5+) spins and reduces spin-polarization. Ferrimagnetic double perovskites based on A-site Mn(2+) thus offer new opportunities to enhance magnetization and control magnetoresistance in spintronic materials.

  2. A heat-switch-based electrocaloric cooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. D.; Smullin, S. J.; Sheridan, M. J.; Wang, Q.; Eldershaw, C.; Schwartz, D. E.

    2015-09-01

    A heat-switch-based electrocaloric cooler is reported in this letter. The device consists of two silicon heat switches and an electrocaloric module based on BaTO3 multilayer capacitors (MLCs). To operate the cooler, the heat switches are actuated synchronously with the application of electric fields across the MLCs. Heat flux versus temperature lift is fully characterized. With an electric field strength of 277 kV/cm, the system achieves a maximum heat flux of 36 mW and maximum temperature lift of greater than 0.3 °C, close to the expected MLC adiabatic temperature change of 0.5 °C. The cooler is shown to work reliably over thousands of actuation cycles.

  3. Tunable electron heating induced giant magnetoresistance in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Samaraweera, R. L.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Mani, R. G.

    2016-01-01

    Electron-heating induced by a tunable, supplementary dc-current (Idc) helps to vary the observed magnetoresistance in the high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2D electron system. The magnetoresistance at B = 0.3 T is shown to progressively change from positive to negative with increasing Idc, yielding negative giant-magnetoresistance at the lowest temperature and highest Idc. A two-term Drude model successfully fits the data at all Idc and T. The results indicate that carrier heating modifies a conductivity correction σ1, which undergoes sign reversal from positive to negative with increasing Idc, and this is responsible for the observed crossover from positive- to negative- magnetoresistance, respectively, at the highest B. PMID:27924953

  4. Customizable Gas-Gap Heat Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, D.; Catarino, I.; Schroder, U.; Ricardo, J.; Patricio, R.; Duband, L.; Bonfait, G.

    2010-04-01

    The so-called gas gap heat switch, in which the pressure is managed by a coupled small cryopump having no moving parts, is known to be a very reliable and simple heat switch. Mechanical design improvements can lead to optimized ON or OFF characteristics of a gas-gap heat switch. Their ON conductance characteristics are mainly determined by the gas properties and the gap geometry. However, their operational temperature range is limited by the gas-sorbent pair adsorption characteristics. Traditionally the gas chosen is helium, since it is the best conductive one below 100 K, and the sorbent used is activated charcoal. Such a switch is limited to be used at cold end temperatures below ˜15 K. In order to obtain a customizable device working at the whole range below 100 K, a gas gap heat switch was studied and extensively characterized. Hydrogen, Neon and Nitrogen were used as conducting gas, under different sorption conditions. A thermal model was built in order to determine the ON and OFF conductances over each entire temperature range. This work presents the operational temperature windows established for each gas, depending on the amount of gas used. The experimental results and those predicted by the model are in quite good agreement. Such windows allow the tuning of a gas gap heat switch to be used under particular circumstances. The adsorption properties of various types of activated charcoals and their consequences on the operational temperature windows are being studied in order to allow a still larger customization of such heat switches.

  5. Integrated Heat Switch/Oxide Sorption Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Thermally-driven, nonmechanical compressor uses container filled with compressed praseodymium cerium oxide powder (PrCeOx) to provide high-pressure flow of oxygen gas for driving closed-cycle Joule-Thomson-expansion refrigeration unit. Integrated heat switch/oxide sorption compressor has no moving parts except check valves, which control flow of oxygen gas between compressor and closed-cycle Joule-Thomson refrigeration system. Oxygen expelled from sorbent at high pressure by evacuating heat-switch gap and turning on heater.

  6. Improved heat switch for gas sorption compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal conductivities of the charcoal bed and the copper matrix for the gas adsorption compressor were measured by the concentric-cylinder method. The presence of the copper matrix in the charcoal bed enhanced the bed conductance by at least an order of magnitude. Thermal capacities of the adsorbent cell and the heat leaks to two compressor designs were measured by the transient method. The new gas adsorption compressor had a heat switch that could transfer eight times more heat than the previous one. The cycle time for the new prototype compressor is also improved by a factor of eight to within the minute range.

  7. Calculation of energy-barrier lowering by incoherent switching in spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munira, Kamaram; Visscher, P. B.

    2015-05-01

    To make a useful spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) device, it is necessary to be able to calculate switching rates, which determine the error rates of the device. In a single-macrospin model, one can use a Fokker-Planck equation to obtain a low-current thermally activated rate ∝exp(-Ee f f/kBT ) . Here, the effective energy barrier Eeff scales with the single-macrospin energy barrier KV, where K is the effective anisotropy energy density and V the volume. A long-standing paradox in this field is that the actual energy barrier appears to be much smaller than this. It has been suggested that incoherent motions may lower the barrier, but this has proved difficult to quantify. In the present paper, we show that the coherent precession has a magnetostatic instability, which allows quantitative estimation of the energy barrier and may resolve the paradox.

  8. Magnetoresistance engineering and singlet/triplet switching in InAs nanowire quantum dots with ferromagnetic sidegates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fábián, G.; Makk, P.; Madsen, M. H.; Nygârd, J.; Schönenberger, C.; Baumgartner, A.

    2016-11-01

    We present magnetoresistance (MR) experiments on an InAs nanowire quantum dot device with two ferromagnetic sidegates (FSGs) in a split-gate geometry. The wire segment can be electrically tuned to a single dot or to a double dot regime using the FSGs and a backgate. In both regimes we find a strong MR and a sharp MR switching of up to 25% at the field at which the magnetizations of the FSGs are inverted by the external field. The sign and amplitude of the MR and the MR switching can both be tuned electrically by the FSGs. In a double dot regime close to pinch-off we find two sharp transitions in the conductance, reminiscent of tunneling MR (TMR) between two ferromagnetic contacts, with one transition near zero and one at the FSG switching fields. These surprisingly rich characteristics we explain in several simple resonant tunneling models. For example, the TMR-like MR can be understood as a stray-field controlled transitions between singlet and triplet double dot states. Such local magnetic fields are the key elements in various proposals to engineer novel states of matter and may be used for testing electron spin based Bell inequalities.

  9. A simple model of thermoelastic heat switches and heat transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criado-Sancho, M.; Jou, D.

    2017-01-01

    By combining differences in thermal conductivity and in thermal expansion coefficients of two materials A and B in series, but not physically attached to each other, a thermal switch or a thermal transistor may be achieved, depending on the relative role of near-field contribution to the radiative heat transport across the occasional gap between A and B. Indeed, when the temperature gradient becomes high enough, the contraction of the colder part may be bigger than the expansion of the hotter one, and a spatial gap appears between both materials. When the radiative heat transport across the gap is described by the Stefan-Boltzmann law, the drop in heat transport is very steep, and the system behaves as a thermal switch. In contrast, if the near-field contribution is dominant, negative differential thermal conductivity may arise, leading to the possibility of a thermal transistor.

  10. Electrocaloric devices based on thin-film heat switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Richard I.; Malloy, Kevin J.

    2009-09-01

    We describe a new approach to refrigeration, heat pumping, and electrical generation that allows one to exploit the attractive properties of thin films of electrocaloric materials. Layers of electrocaloric material coupled with thin-film heat switches can work as either refrigerators and heat pumps or electrical generators, depending on the phasing of the applied voltages and heat switching. With heat switches based on thin layers of liquid crystals, the efficiency of electrocaloric thin-film devices can be at least as high as that of current thermoelectric devices. Advanced heat switches that may use carbon nanotubes would enable thin-film refrigerators and generators to outperform conventional vapor-compression devices.

  11. Electrocaloric devices based on thini-film heat switches

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Richard I; Malloy, Kevin J

    2009-01-01

    We describe a new approach to refrigeration and electrical generation that exploits the attractive properties of thin films of electrocaloric materials. Layers of electrocaloric material coupled with thin-film heat switches can work as either refrigerators or electrical generators, depending on the phasing of the applied voltages and heat switching. With heat switches based on thin layers of liquid crystals, the efficiency of these thin-film heat engines can be at least as high as that of current thermoelectric devices. Advanced heat switches would enable thin-film heat engines to outperform conventional vaporcompression devices.

  12. Passive gas-gap heat switch for adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor); Di Pirro, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A passive gas-gap heat switch for use with a multi-stage continuous adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The passive gas-gap heat switch turns on automatically when the temperature of either side of the switch rises above a threshold value and turns off when the temperature on either side of the switch falls below this threshold value. One of the heat switches in this multistage process must be conductive in the 0.25? K to 0.3? K range. All of the heat switches must be capable of switching off in a short period of time (1-2 minutes), and when off to have a very low thermal conductance. This arrangement allows cyclic cooling cycles to be used without the need for separate heat switch controls.

  13. Magnetoresistive waves in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, F. S.; Hunter, R. O., Jr.; Pereira, N. R.; Tajima, T.

    1982-10-01

    The self-generated magnetic field of a current diffusing into a plasma between conductors can magnetically insulate the plasma. Propagation of magnetoresistive waves in plasmas is analyzed. Applications to plasma opening switches are discussed.

  14. Calculation of energy-barrier lowering by incoherent switching in spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory

    SciTech Connect

    Munira, Kamaram; Visscher, P. B.

    2015-05-07

    To make a useful spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) device, it is necessary to be able to calculate switching rates, which determine the error rates of the device. In a single-macrospin model, one can use a Fokker-Planck equation to obtain a low-current thermally activated rate ∝exp(−E{sub eff}/k{sub B}T). Here, the effective energy barrier E{sub eff} scales with the single-macrospin energy barrier KV, where K is the effective anisotropy energy density and V the volume. A long-standing paradox in this field is that the actual energy barrier appears to be much smaller than this. It has been suggested that incoherent motions may lower the barrier, but this has proved difficult to quantify. In the present paper, we show that the coherent precession has a magnetostatic instability, which allows quantitative estimation of the energy barrier and may resolve the paradox.

  15. Magnetoelectric assisted 180° magnetization switching for electric field addressable writing in magnetoresistive random-access memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguang; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Yaojin; Li, Yanxi; Luo, Haosu; Li, Jiefang; Viehland, Dwight

    2014-08-26

    Magnetization-based memories, e.g., hard drive and magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM), use bistable magnetic domains in patterned nanomagnets for information recording. Electric field (E) tunable magnetic anisotropy can lower the energy barrier between two distinct magnetic states, promising reduced power consumption and increased recording density. However, integration of magnetoelectric heterostructure into MRAM is a highly challenging task owing to the particular architecture requirements of each component. Here, we show an epitaxial growth of self-assembled CoFe2O4 nanostripes with bistable in-plane magnetizations on Pb(Mg,Nb)O3-PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) substrates, where the magnetic switching can be triggered by E-induced elastic strain effect. An unprecedented magnetic coercive field change of up to 600 Oe was observed with increasing E. A near 180° magnetization rotation can be activated by E in the vicinity of the magnetic coercive field. These findings might help to solve the 1/2-selection problem in traditional MRAM by providing reduced magnetic coercive field in E field selected memory cells.

  16. Annealing temperature window for tunneling magnetoresistance and spin torque switching in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, H.; Sbiaa, R.; Wang, C. C.; Lua, S. Y. H.; Akhtar, M. A. K.

    2011-11-01

    Annealing temperature (Ta) and free layer thickness dependencies of magnetic properties and spin-transfer torque switching were investigated in CoFeB-MgO based magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Annealing process was found to be critical to buildup PMA. As Ta increases, switching field of free layer and reference layer is enhanced first then drops, corresponding to the improvement and collapse of PMA in both layers. However, it should be noted that PMA of free layer and the tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) are maximized at different Ta zones. Spin transfer torque study pointed out that switching current density (Jc) depends on the combined effects from PMA, spin polarization, and saturation magnetization, which all depend on Ta values. Thickness dependence study revealed that Jc relies on the competing results of the thickness and PMA. The lowest critical switching current density achieved is 2.1 MA/cm2, accompanied with a TMR around 52% at room temperature.

  17. A lightweight thermal heat switch for redundant cryocooling on satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, M.; Euler, A.; Thummes, G.

    2017-04-01

    A previously designed cryogenic thermal heat switch for space applications has been optimized for low mass, high structural stability, and reliability. The heat switch makes use of the large linear thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) of the thermoplastic UHMW-PE for actuation. A structure model, which includes the temperature dependent properties of the actuator, is derived to be able to predict the contact pressure between the switch parts. This pressure was used in a thermal model in order to predict the switch performance under different heat loads and operating temperatures. The two models were used to optimize the mass and stability of the switch. Its reliability was proven by cyclic actuation of the switch and by shaker tests.

  18. Bistable magnetoresistance switching in exchange-coupled CoFe₂O₄--Fe₃O₄ binary nanocrystal superlattices by self-assembly and thermal annealing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Ye, Xingchen; Oh, Soong Ju; Kikkawa, James M; Kagan, Cherie R; Murray, Christopher B

    2013-02-26

    Self-assembly of multicomponent nanocrystal superlattices provides a modular approach to the design of metamaterials by choosing constituent nanocrystal building blocks with desired physical properties and engineering the interparticle coupling. In this work, we report the self-assembly of binary nanocrystal superlattices composed of magnetically hard CoFe₂O₄ nanocrystals and magnetically soft Fe₃O₄ nanocrystals. Both NaZn₁₃- and MgZn₂-type CoFe₂O₄--Fe₃O₄ binary nanocrystal superlattices have been formed by the liquid-air interfacial assembly approach. Exchange coupling is achieved in both types of binary superlattices after thermal annealing under vacuum at 400 °C. The exchange-coupled CoFe₂O₄--Fe₃O₄ binary nanocrystal superlattices show single-phase magnetization switching behavior and magnetoresistance switching behavior below 200 K. The NaZn₁₃-type CoFe₂O₄--Fe₃O₄ binary nanocrystal superlattices annealed at 500 °C even exhibit bistable magnetoresistance switching behavior at room temperature constituting a simple nonvolatile memory function.

  19. Electro-mechanical heat switch for cryogenic applications

    DOEpatents

    van den Berg, Marcel L.; Batteux, Jan D.; Labov, Simon E.

    2003-01-01

    A heat switch includes two symmetric jaws. Each jaw is comprised of a link connected at a translatable joint to a flexible arm. Each arm rotates about a fixed pivot, and has an articulated end including a thermal contact pad connected to a heat sink. The links are joined together at a translatable main joint. To close the heat switch, a closing solenoid is actuated and forces the main joint to an over-center position. This movement rotates the arms about their pivots, respectively, forces each of them into a stressed configuration, and forces the thermal contact pads towards each other and into compressive contact with a cold finger. The closing solenoid is then deactivated. The heat switch remains closed due to a restoring force generated by the stressed configuration of each arm, until actuation of an opening solenoid returns the main joint to its starting open-switch position.

  20. Design and application of gas-gap heat switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Gas-gap heat switches can serve as an effective means of thermally disconnecting a standby cryocooler when the primary (operating) cooler is connected and vice versa. The final phase of the development and test of a cryogenic heat switch designed for loads ranging from 2 watts at 8 K, to 100 watts at 80 K are described. Achieved heat-switch on/off conductance ratio ranged from 11,000 at 8 K to 2200 at 80 K. A particularly challenging element of heat-switch design is achieving satisfactory operation when large temperatures differentials exist across the switch. A special series of tests and analyses was conducted and used in this Phase-2 activity to evaluate the developed switches for temperature differentials ranging up to 200 K. Problems encountered at the maximum levels are described and analyzed, and means of avoiding the problems in the future are presented. A comprehensive summary of the overall heat-switch design methodology is also presented with special emphasis on lessons learned over the course of the 4-year development effort.

  1. Note: Cryogenic heat switch with stepper motor actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, B. S.; Timbie, P. T.

    2015-12-01

    A mechanical cryogenic heat switch has been developed using a commercially available stepper motor and control electronics. The motor requires 4 leads, each carrying a maximum, pulsed current of 0.5 A. With slight modifications of the stepper motor, the switch functions reliably in vacuum at temperatures between 300 K and 4 K. The switch generates a clamping force of 262 N at room temperature. At 4 K it achieves an "on state" thermal conductance of 5.04 mW/K and no conductance in the "off state." The switch is optimized for cycling an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator.

  2. Note: Cryogenic heat switch with stepper motor actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, B. S. Timbie, P. T.

    2015-12-15

    A mechanical cryogenic heat switch has been developed using a commercially available stepper motor and control electronics. The motor requires 4 leads, each carrying a maximum, pulsed current of 0.5 A. With slight modifications of the stepper motor, the switch functions reliably in vacuum at temperatures between 300 K and 4 K. The switch generates a clamping force of 262 N at room temperature. At 4 K it achieves an “on state” thermal conductance of 5.04 mW/K and no conductance in the “off state.” The switch is optimized for cycling an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator.

  3. Self-actuating heat switches for redundant refrigeration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chung K.

    1988-09-01

    A dual refrigeration system for cooling a sink device is described, which automatically thermally couples the cold refrigerator to the sink device while thermally isolating the warm refrigerator from the sink device. The system includes two gas gap heat switches that each thermally couples one of the refrigerators to the sink device, and a pair of sorption pumps that are coupled through tubes to the heat switches. When the first refrigerator is operated and therefore cold, the first pump which is thermally coupled to it is also cooled and adsorbs gas to withdraw it from the second heat switch, to thereby thermally isolate the sink device from the warm second refrigerator. With the second refrigerator being warm, the second pump is also warm and desorbs gas, so the gas lies in the first switch, to close that switch and therefore thermally couple the cold first refrigerator to the sink device. Thus, the heat switches are automatically switched according to the temperature of the corresponding refrigerator.

  4. Self-actuating heat switches for redundant refrigeration systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Chung K. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A dual refrigeration system for cooling a sink device is described, which automatically thermally couples the cold refrigerator to the sink device while thermally isolating the warm refrigerator from the sink device. The system includes two gas gap heat switches that each thermally couples one of the refrigerators to the sink device, and a pair of sorption pumps that are coupled through tubes to the heat switches. When the first refrigerator is operated and therefore cold, the first pump which is thermally coupled to it is also cooled and adsorbs gas to withdraw it from the second heat switch, to thereby thermally isolate the sink device from the warm second refrigerator. With the second refrigerator being warm, the second pump is also warm and desorbs gas, so the gas lies in the first switch, to close that switch and therefore thermally couple the cold first refrigerator to the sink device. Thus, the heat switches are automatically switched according to the temperature of the corresponding refrigerator.

  5. Cryogenic flat-panel gas-gap heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, S.; Keijzer, R.; Buitelaar, P.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2016-09-01

    A compact additive manufactured flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at cryogenic temperature is reported in this paper. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus has been developed to measure the thermal conductance of the heat switch with the heat sink temperature in the range of 100-180 K. The apparatus is cooled by a two-stage GM cooler and the temperature is controlled with a heater and a braided copper wire connection. A thermal guard is mounted on the hot side of the device to confine the heat flow axially through the sample. A gas handling system allows testing the device with different gas pressures in the heat switch. Experiments are performed at various heat sink temperatures, by varying gas pressure in the gas-gap and with helium, hydrogen and nitrogen gas. The measured off-conductance with a heat sink temperature of 115 K and the hot plate at 120 K is 0.134 W/K, the on-conductance with helium and hydrogen gases at the same temperatures is 4.80 W/K and 4.71 W/K, respectively. This results in an on/off conductance ratio of 37 ± 7 and 35 ± 6 for helium and hydrogen respectively. The experimental results matches fairly well with the predicted heat conductance at cryogenic temperatures.

  6. A Passive, Adaptive and Autonomous Gas Gap heat Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, Srinivas; Colijn, Bram; Vermeer, Cris; Holland, Harry; Tirolien, Thierry; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    We report on the development of a heat switch for autonomous temperature control of electronic components in a satellite. A heat switch can modulate when needed between roles of a good thermal conductor and a good thermal insulator. Electronic boxes on a satellite should be maintained within a typical optimum temperature range of 260 to 310 K. The heat sinking is usually by means of a radiator. When the operating temperature of the electronic box increases beyond 310 K, a good contact to the radiator is desired for maximum cooling. On the other hand, when the satellite is in a cold dormant state, the electronics box should be heated by the onboard batteries. In this state a weak thermal contact is desired between the electronic box and the heat sink. In the present study, we are developing a gas gap heat switch in which the sorber material is thermally anchored to the electronic box. A temperature change of the electronic box triggers the (de-)sorption of gas from the sorber material and subsequently the gas pressure in the gas gap. This paper describes the physical principles and the current status of this technology. This approach can be extended to cryogenic temperature range.

  7. Electric switch of magnetoresistance in the Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3/(La0.67Ca0.33)MnO3 heterostructure film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Li, Yong-Chao; Pan, Dan-Feng; Zhou, Hao; Xu, Guo-Min; Wan, Jian-Guo

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3/(La0.67Ca0.33)MnO3 heterostructure film is deposited on the Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si wafer. The dominant transport is the inelastic hopping conduction. Due to the interaction between ferroelectric domain and magnetic polaron, film still exhibits weak ferromagnetism above the Curie temperature. Under lower bias voltage, the non-zero sequential magnetoresistance occurs on the magnetic granular junction. As soon as bias voltage exceeds the coercive voltage, the ferroelectric domain is aligned, consequently the magnetoresistance tends to vanish. Such electric switch of magnetoresistance is potential for the electric-write magnetic-read storage device.

  8. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance of Nano-conductive Filament in Co/HfO2/Pt Resistive Switching Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Leilei; Liu, Yang; Teng, Jiao; Long, Shibing; Guo, Qixun; Zhang, Meiyun; Wu, Yu; Yu, Guanghua; Liu, Qi; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Ming

    2017-03-01

    Conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) has been extensively studied as a next-generation non-volatile memory. The conductive filament (CF) shows rich physical effects such as conductance quantization and magnetic effect. But so far, the study of filaments is not very sufficient. In this work, Co/HfO2/Pt CBRAM device with magnetic CF was designed and fabricated. By electrical manipulation with a partial-RESET method, we controlled the size of ferromagnetic metal filament. The resistance-temperature characteristics of the ON-state after various partial-RESET behaviors have been studied. Using two kinds of magnetic measurement methods, we measured the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of the CF at different temperatures to reflect the magnetic structure characteristics. By rotating the direction of the magnetic field and by sweeping the magnitude, we obtained the spatial direction as well as the easy-axis of the CF. The results indicate that the easy-axis of the CF is along the direction perpendicular to the top electrode plane. The maximum magnetoresistance was found to appear when the angle between the direction of magnetic field and that of the electric current in the CF is about 30°, and this angle varies slightly with temperature, indicating that the current is tilted.

  9. Joule heating-induced coexisted spin Seebeck effect and spin Hall magnetoresistance in the platinum/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Wang, S. H.; Zou, L. K.; Cai, J. W.; Sun, J. R. E-mail: sun-zg@whut.edu.cn; Sun, Z. G.

    2014-11-03

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) and spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) are observed simultaneously in the Pt/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} hybrid structure when thermal gradient is produced by Joule heating. According to their dependences on applied current, these two effects can be separated. Their dependence on heating power and magnetic field is systematically studied. With the increase of heating power, the SSE enhances linearly, whereas the SMR decreases slowly. The origin of the spin currents is further analyzed. The heating power dependences of the spin currents associated with the SSE and the SMR are found to be different.

  10. Co/Nb/Co trilayers as efficient cryogenic spin valves and supercurrent switches: the relevance to the standard giant and tunnel magnetoresistance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamopoulos, D.; Aristomenopoulou, E.; Lagogiannis, A.

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, Ferromagnetic/Superconducting/Ferromagnetic trilayers (FM/SC/FM TLs) are intensively studied. Here, based on (CoO-)Co/Nb/Co TLs of thin Nb interlayer (below 30 nm) we introduce two classes of low-T c SC-based cryogenic devices, depending on the thickness of the Co outer layers and the presence of a CoO underlayer. An extended range of Co thickness (from 10 to 80 nm) was investigated and an underlayer of CoO was selectively employed, practically aiming to control in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization processes through utilization of shape anisotropy and exchange bias. To this effect magnetic force microscopy, magnetization and magnetoresistance data are presented. Ancillary atomic force microscopy and Rutherford back scattering data are presented, as well. CoO-Co/Nb/Co TLs of the first class have thin Co outer layers (10-30 nm) and are further assisted by the presence of a CoO underlayer to behave as efficient spin valves (ΔR/Rnor = 1.5% and ΔR/Rmin = 2.4%) under the action of the FMs in-plane exchange fields; the effect is termed superconducting Spin-Valve Effect (sSVE). Co/Nb/Co TLs of the second class have thick Co outer layers (50-80 nm) and without the need of a CoO underlayer act as almost absolute supercurrent switches (ΔR/Rnor = 97.7% and ΔR/Rmin = 28000%) under the action of FMs out-of-plane stray fields; the effect is termed superconducting Magneto-Resistance Effect (sMRE). The properties of these (CoO-)Co/Nb/Co TLs resemble the behavior of standard FM/normal-metal/FM and FM/insulator/FM TLs that exhibit the effects giant (GMR) and tunnel (TMR) magnetoresistance, respectively. Aiming to utilize the FM/SC/FM TLs studied here into cryogenic applications we thoroughly surveyed their operational H-T phase diagram and discuss how can be used to realize binary (‘0’-‘1’) elemental devices for information management in both read heads and memory units. The underlying physical mechanisms responsible for the sSVE and sMRE observed in the two

  11. System optimization of a heat-switch-based electrocaloric heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smullin, Sylvia J.; Wang, Yunda; Schwartz, David E.

    2015-08-01

    Realization of the potential of electrocaloric heat pumps includes consideration of not only material properties but also device characteristics and cycle operation. We present detailed models and analysis that elucidate the key parameters for performance optimization. We show that the temperature lift, cooling power, and efficiency of a system driven by heat switches depend on system operating conditions and the combined thermal properties of both the heat switches and the electrocaloric capacitor. We show experimental results that validate the models and draw conclusions about building high-performance systems.

  12. Ultrafast heating-induced magnetization switching in ferrimagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gridnev, V. N.

    2016-11-01

    We study theoretically the light-induced magnetization switching in a binary ferrimagnet of the type {{A}p} {{B}1-p} , randomly occupied by two different species of magnetic ions. The localized spins are coupled with spins of itinerant electrons via s-d exchange interaction. Model parameters are chosen so that to achieve similarity between magnetic characteristics of the model and those of ferrimagnetic rare-earth-transition metal GdFeCo alloys. The switching is triggered by heating of the itinerant electrons by a laser pulse. The spin dynamics is governed by the cooling of itinerant electrons, exchange scattering, induced by the s-d exchange interaction and spin-lattice relaxation of the itinerant spins with a characteristic time {τs} . The dynamics of the localized and itinerant spins is described by coupled rate equations. The main conclusion of this study is that the switching occurs only in a certain temperature range depending on {τs} . For long {τs} the switching occurs only below the magnetisation compensation temperature T K. For physically reasonable values of {τs} this temperature range extends from 0 K to {{T}f} ≤ft({τs}\\right) , where {{T}f} ≤ft({τs}\\right) is slightly higher than the compensation temperature T K. With further decrease of {τs} this temperature range shifts to temperatures higher than T K.

  13. Quantifying the heat switching capability of a thermionic diode

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, A.M.; Verrill, D.A.

    1995-12-01

    The Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) Advanced Technology Demonstrator (ATD) program, recently initiated by the US Air Force Phillips Laboratory (USAF PL), will demonstrate the feasibility of a combined solar power and propulsion upper stage. The solar bimodal design approach will use thermal energy storage to reduce engine mass and concentrator area. However, in order to store enough energy over an orbit period there must be minimal heat lost with a system that is designed to remove heat for energy conversion. A unique feature of thermionics is their ability to reduce heat flow by reducing or eliminating the electron cooling. However, demonstration and quantification of this capability is needed. This paper presents the results to date of the Receiver Diode Integration Test, one of two critical experiments of the ISUS ATD program being performed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Results of the demonstration testing of thermionic heat pipe modules (THPMs) to operate as heat switches in conjunction with the solar receiver cavity are presented as are the performance limits and operational constraints of a combined receiver/diode subsystem.

  14. Design and Test of Passively Operated Heat Switches for 0.2 to 15 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.; Canavan, E. R.; Francis, J. J.; Tuttle, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    Heat switches have many uses in cryogenics, from regulating heat flow between refrigeration stages to thermally isolating components once they have cooled to low temperature. Among the techniques one can use for thermal switching, the gas-gap technique has the advantages of wide operating temperature range, high switching ratio, and no moving parts. The traditional gas-gap switch uses copper conductors separated by a small gap and an external getter. The switch is activated by heating and cooling the getter by moving gas into and out of the gap, turning the switch on and off. We have designed, built and tested heat switches that use an internal getter to passively turn off at temperatures between 0.2 and 15 K. The getter is thermally anchored to one side of the switch, and when that side of the switch cools through a transition region, gas adsorbs onto the getter and the switch turns off. The challenges are to make the transition region very narrow and tailorable to a wide range of applications, and to achieve high gas conductance when the switch is on. We have made switches using He-3, He-4, hydrogen, and neon gas, and have used charcoal and various metal substrates as getters. Switching ratios range from 1000 to over 10,000. Design and performance of these switches will be discussed in detail.

  15. Fabrication and local laser heating of freestanding Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} bridges with Pt contacts displaying anisotropic magnetoresistance and anomalous Nernst effect

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, F.; Grundler, D.

    2014-04-28

    In spin caloritronics, ferromagnetic samples subject to relatively large in-plane temperature gradients ∇T have turned out to be extremely interesting. We report on a preparation technique that allows us to create freely suspended permalloy/Pt hybrid structures where a scanning laser induces ∇T on the order of a few K/μm. We observe both the anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature and the magnetic field dependent anomalous Nernst effect under laser heating. The technique is promising for the realization of device concepts considered in spin caloritronics based on suspended ferromagnetic nanostructures with electrical contacts.

  16. Heat accumulation and all-optical switching by domain wall motion in Co/Pd superlattices.

    PubMed

    Hoveyda, F; Hohenstein, E; Smadici, S

    2017-06-07

    All-optical switching by domain wall motion has been obtained in Co/Pd superlattices with a TiS oscillator. Heat accumulation is part of the switching process for our experimental conditions. Numerical calculations point to a connection between domain wall motion and in-plane heat diffusion.

  17. Quick-Response Thermal Actuator for Use as a Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepeda-Rizo, Juan

    2010-01-01

    This work improves the performance of a heat switch, or a thermal actuator, by delivering heat to the actuator in a more efficient manner. The method uses a heat pipe as the plunger or plug instead of just using a solid piece of metal. The heat pipe could be one tailored for fast transient thermal response.

  18. Critical fields and fluctuations determined from specific heat and magnetoresistance in the same nanogram SmFeAs(O,F) single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeski, S.; Moll, P. W. J.; Zhigadlo, N.; Mattenberger, K.; Batlogg, B.

    2017-09-01

    Through a direct comparison of specific heat and magnetoresistance, we critically asses the nature of superconducting fluctuations in the same nanogram crystal of SmFeAs(O,F). We show that although the superconducting fluctuation contribution to conductivity scales well within the two-dimensional lowest Landau level (2D-LLL) scheme, its predictions contrast with the inherently 3D nature of SmFeAs(O,F) in the vicinity of Tc. Furthermore, the transition seen in specific heat cannot be satisfactory described either by the LLL or the X Y scaling. Additionally we have validated, through comparing Hc 2 values obtained from the entropy conservation construction (Hc 2 //a b=-19.5 T /K and Hc 2 //c=-2.9 T /K ) , the analysis of fluctuation contribution to conductivity as a reasonable method for estimating the H c 2 slope.

  19. Characterization of a dynamic micro heat engine with integrated thermal switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, L. W.; Cho, J. H.; McNeil, K. E.; Richards, C. D.; Bahr, D. F.; Richards, R. F.

    2006-09-01

    Progress toward the realization of an external combustion dynamic micro heat engine is documented. First, the development of a thermal switch suitable to control heat transfer to and from the micro heat engine is described. Second, the integration of a thermal switch with an engine is detailed. The thermal switch is shown to be an effective means to control heat transfer into the engine from a continuous heat source and out of the engine to a continuous heat sink. The use of the thermal switch is shown to enable engine cycle speeds up to 100 Hz, engine efficiencies up to 0.095% and power output up to 1.0 mW. The internal irreversibility of the engine is measured to be 23%.

  20. Development of a flight qualified heat switch for LN2 temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bascunan, Juan; Nixon, Terry; Maguire, James

    A self-contained heat switch with no moving parts has been designed, assembled, and tested. The device utilizes concentric cylinders separated by a small gap, filled or emptied of gas to achieve its switching action. The presence or absence of gas is controlled by an adsorption pump containing activated charcoal. During the development of the switch, different geometries were studied - multiple and single gaps, and also different materials - copper, aluminum. Prototypes were built and tested with different gases - helium, nitrogen, argon, neon. As a result of this study, two gas-gap heat switches with ratios of 'ON' to 'OFF' conductances of about 600 were manufactured, thermally tested, and flight qualified. They will be part of a cryogenic heat pipe experiment, to be conducted in a future shuttle mission. This paper describes the technical approach and thermal and structural analyses used in the design of the heat switch as well as the results of the thermal and environmental testing.

  1. Organic Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Arthur

    2009-03-01

    In recent years a broad range of magnetoresistance phenomena have been reported for organic-based semiconductors, conductors and magnets. Organic systems illustrating magnetoresistance, include molecular- and polymer-based nonmagnetic semiconductors[1], organic-based spin polarized magnetic semiconductors,[2] nonmagnetic conducting polymers, and ferromagnet/organic semiconductor/ferromagnet heterojunctions. Examples of each of these organic-based systems will be presented together with a discussion of the roles of magnetotransport mechanisms including interconversion of singlets and triplets, compression of the electronic wavefunction in presence of a magnetic field, quantum interference phenomena, effects of a ``Coulomb gap'' in π* subbands of organic magnetic semiconductors with resulting near complete spin polarization in conduction and valence bands of magnetic organic semiconductors.[2,3] Opportunities for magnetotransport in Ferromagnet/Organic Semiconductor/Ferromagnet heterojunctions will be discussed.[4] [4pt] [1] V.N. Prigodin et al., Synth. Met. 156, 757 (2006); J.D. Bergeson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 067201 (2008) [0pt] [2] V.N. Prigodin et al., Adv. Mater. 14, 1230 (2002. [0pt] [3] J.B. Kortright et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 100, 257204 (2008). [0pt] [4] J.D. Bergeson, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 172505 (2008).

  2. Giant magnetoresistance in silicene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengyong; Luo, Guangfu; Liu, Qihang; Zheng, Jiaxin; Zhang, Zhimeng; Nagase, Shigeru; Gao, Zhengxiang; Lu, Jing

    2012-05-21

    By performing first-principle quantum transport calculations, we predict a giant magnetoresistance in zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) connecting two semi-infinite silicene electrodes through switch of the edge spin direction of ZSiNRs. Spin-filter efficiency of both the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic ZSiNRs is sign-changeable with the bias voltage. Therefore, potential application of silicene in spintronics devices is suggested.

  3. Enhanced Thermo-Optical Switching of Paraffin-Wax Composite Spots under Laser Heating.

    PubMed

    Said, Asmaa; Salah, Abeer; Fattah, Gamal Abdel

    2017-05-12

    Thermo-optical switches are of particular significance in communications networks where increasingly high switching speeds are required. Phase change materials (PCMs), in particular those based on paraffin wax, provide wealth of exciting applications with unusual thermally-induced switching properties, only limited by paraffin's rather low thermal conductivity. In this paper, the use of different carbon fillers as thermal conductivity enhancers for paraffin has been investigated, and a novel structure based on spot of paraffin wax as a thermo-optic switch is presented. Thermo-optical switching parameters are enhanced with the addition of graphite and graphene, due to the extreme thermal conductivity of the carbon fillers. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) are performed on paraffin wax composites, and specific heat capacities are calculated based on DSC measurements. Thermo-optical switching based on transmission is measured as a function of the host concentration under conventional electric heating and laser heating of paraffin-carbon fillers composites. Further enhancements in thermo-optical switching parameters are studied under Nd:YAG laser heating. This novel structure can be used in future networks with huge bandwidth requirements and electric noise free remote aerial laser switching applications.

  4. Enhanced Thermo-Optical Switching of Paraffin-Wax Composite Spots under Laser Heating

    PubMed Central

    Said, Asmaa; Salah, Abeer; Abdel Fattah, Gamal

    2017-01-01

    Thermo-optical switches are of particular significance in communications networks where increasingly high switching speeds are required. Phase change materials (PCMs), in particular those based on paraffin wax, provide wealth of exciting applications with unusual thermally-induced switching properties, only limited by paraffin’s rather low thermal conductivity. In this paper, the use of different carbon fillers as thermal conductivity enhancers for paraffin has been investigated, and a novel structure based on spot of paraffin wax as a thermo-optic switch is presented. Thermo-optical switching parameters are enhanced with the addition of graphite and graphene, due to the extreme thermal conductivity of the carbon fillers. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) are performed on paraffin wax composites, and specific heat capacities are calculated based on DSC measurements. Thermo-optical switching based on transmission is measured as a function of the host concentration under conventional electric heating and laser heating of paraffin-carbon fillers composites. Further enhancements in thermo-optical switching parameters are studied under Nd:YAG laser heating. This novel structure can be used in future networks with huge bandwidth requirements and electric noise free remote aerial laser switching applications. PMID:28772884

  5. Development of Gas Gap Heat Switch Actuator for the Planck Sorption Cryocooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prina, M.; Bhandari, P.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Paine, C. G.; Wade, L. A.

    1999-01-01

    We present the general principles of gas gap heat switches that impact their performances for the Planck cryocooler, develop two figures of merit relevant to this application, and present initial characterization results of switches using uranium or ZrNi as the hydriding material.

  6. Local temperature redistribution and structural transition during joule-heating-driven conductance switching in VO2.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suhas; Pickett, Matthew D; Strachan, John Paul; Gibson, Gary; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R Stanley

    2013-11-13

    Joule-heating induced conductance-switching is studied in VO2 , a Mott insulator. Complementary in situ techniques including optical characterization, blackbody microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and numerical simulations are used. Abrupt redistribution in local temperature is shown to occur upon conductance-switching along with a structural phase transition, at the same current.

  7. Assessment of Zr-Fe-V getter alloy for gas-gap heat switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prina, M.; Kulleck, J. G.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A commercial Zr-V-Fe alloy (i.e., SAES Getters trade name alloy St-172) has been assessed as reversible hydrogen storage material for use in actuators of gas gap heat switches. Two prototype actuators containing the SAES St-172 material were built and operated for several thousand cycles to evaluate performance of the metal hydride system under conditions simulating heat switch operation.

  8. Passive Gas-Gap Heat Switches for Use in Low-Temperature Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, M. O.; Shirron, P. J.; Canavan, E. R.; Tuttle, J. G.; Jahromi, A. E.; Dipirro, M. J.; James, B. L.; Sampson, M. A.; Letmate, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    We present the current state of development in passive gas-gap heat switches. This type of switch does not require a separate heater to activate heat transfer but, instead, relies upon the warming of one end due to an intrinsic step in a thermodynamic cycle to raise a getter above a threshold temperature. Above this temperature sequestered gas is released to couple both sides of the switch. This enhances the thermodynamic efficiency of the system and reduces the complexity of the control system. Various gas mixtures and getter configurations will be presented.

  9. A 3He gas heat switch for the 0.5-2 K temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Eric N.; Parpia, Jeevak M.; Beamish, John R.

    2000-07-01

    We have constructed a prototype heat switch for use in a cyclic demagnetization apparatus. The desired operating range of the switch is from 0.5 to 1.8 K. The measured conductivity of the switch is 50 μW/ K at 1.5 K when ‘off ’ and 8 mW/K at 0.5 K when ‘on’. The switching is carried out by 3He gas which is admitted and extracted from the device by a miniature charcoal adsorption pump which is controlled by electrical heat and a weak thermal link to a pumped 4He bath. In this paper we discuss details of construction and the performance as a function of temperature, and consider the switching time between on and off states.

  10. MW-scale ICRF plasma heating using IGBT switches in a multi-pulse scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'ery, I.; Kogan, K.; Seemann, O.

    2015-06-01

    Solid-state silicon switches are cheap and reliable option for 1-10 MHz RF power sources, required for plasma ion cyclotron RF heating (ICRF). The large `on' resistance of MOSFET and similar devices limits their power delivery to a few tens of kW per switch. Low resistivity devices, such as IGBT, suffer from large `off' switching time, which limits their useful frequency range and increases the power dissipated in the switch. Here we demonstrate more than 0.8 MW circulated RF power at 2 MHz using only three high voltage IGBT switches. The circuit uses the fast `on' switching capability of the IGBTs to generate high-Q pulse train. This operation mode also simplifies the measurement of RF coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  11. A Magnetoresistance Measuring Probe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The in line four point probe, commonly used for measuring the sheet resistance in a conductor, cannot measure the anisotropic ferromagnetic magnetoresistance. However, the addition of two contact points that are not collinear with the current contacts give the probe the ability to non-destructively measure the anistropic magnetoresistance. Keywords: Magnetoresistance; Anisotropic; Thin-Film; Permalloy; Four Point Probe; Anisotropic Resistance.

  12. Compact flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at 295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krielaart, M. A. R.; Vermeer, C. H.; Vanapalli, S.

    2015-11-01

    Heat switches are devices that can change from a thermally conducting (on-) state to an insulating (off-) state whenever the need arises. They enable adaptive thermal management strategies in which cooling rates are altered either spatially or temporally, leading to a substantial reduction in the energy and mass budget of a large range of systems. State-of-the-art heat switches are only rarely employed in thermal system architectures, since they are rather bulky and have a limited thermal performance (expressed as the heat transfer ratio between the on- and off-state heat conductance). Using selective laser melting additive manufacturing technology, also known as 3D printing, we developed a compact flat-panel gas-gap heat switch that offers superior thermal performance, is simpler and more economic to produce and assemble, contains no moving parts, and is more reliable because it lacks welded joints. The manufactured rectangular panel heat switch has frontal device dimensions of 10 cm by 10 cm, thickness of 3.2 mm and weighs just 121 g. An off heat conductance of 0.2 W/K and on-off heat conductance ratio of 38 is observed at 295 K.

  13. Methane cryogenic heat pipe for space use with a liquid trap for on-off switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda-Rizo, Juan; Rodriguez, Jose Israel; Bugby, David

    2012-06-01

    A methane cryogenic heat pipe with a liquid trap for on-off actuation was developed by ATK for use on Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Space Interferometer Mission Lite (SIM Lite) pre-Phase A hardware technology demonstration tests. The cryogenic heat pipe coupled to a cold radiator at 160K provides cooling to the Charged Coupled Device camera focal planes. The heat pipe was designed for a transport capacity of 15 W across a 1.5 m span through a near room-temperature spacecraft environment. A key and driving requirement for the heat pipe was the need for switching the heat pipe on and off needed to support low power decontamination cycles to near room temperature of the cryogenic focal planes. The cryogenic heat pipe is turned off by removing the methane working fluid from the heat pipe and storing in the liquid trap. The heat pipe is turned-on by simply reintroducing the working fluid from the liquid trap. This on-off switching capability is a key requirement for cryogenic heat pipes used with passive or active cryocoolers for cooling focal planes or optics. This switching capability provides a means to decouple a cold focal plane or optics from a redundant stand-by cryocooler or a passive cooler when in need for a decontamination cycle.

  14. Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Spin-Transfer-Torque Switching in Polycrystalline Co2FeAl Full-Heusler-Alloy Magnetic Tunnel Junctions on Amorphous Si /SiO2 Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Zhenchao; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Kasai, Shinya; Inomata, Koichiro; Mitani, Seiji

    2014-08-01

    We study polycrystalline B2-type Co2FeAl (CFA) full-Heusler-alloy-based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) fabricated on a Si /SiO2 amorphous substrate. Polycrystalline CFA films with a (001) orientation, a high B2 ordering, and a flat surface are achieved by using a MgO buffer layer. A tunnel magnetoresistance ratio up to 175% is obtained for a MTJ with a CFA /MgO/CoFe structure on a 7.5-nm-thick MgO buffer. Spin-transfer-torque-induced magnetization switching is achieved in the MTJs with a 2-nm-thick polycrystalline CFA film as a switching layer. By using a thermal activation model, the intrinsic critical current density (Jc0) is determined to be 8.2×106 A /cm2, which is lower than 2.9×107 A /cm2, the value for epitaxial CFA MTJs [Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 182403 (2012), 10.1063/1.4710521]. We find that the Gilbert damping constant (α) evaluated by using ferromagnetic resonance measurements for the polycrystalline CFA film is approximately 0.015 and is almost independent of the CFA thickness (2-18 nm). The low Jc0 for the polycrystalline MTJ is mainly attributed to the low α of the CFA layer compared with the value in the epitaxial one (approximately 0.04).

  15. Passive Gas-Gap Heat Switches for Use in Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, P. J.; Canavan, E. R.; DiPirro, M. J.; Jackson, M.; Panek, J.; Tuttle, J. G.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have designed, built, and tested a gas gap heat switch that works passively, without the need for a separate, thermally activated getter. This switch uses He-3 condensed as a thin film on alternating plates of copper. The switch is thermally conductive at temperatures above about 0.2 K, and is insulating if either end of the switch is below about 0.15 K. The "on" conductance (7 mW/K at 0.25K) is limited by the surface area and gap between the copper leaves, the saturated vapor pressure of the He-3, and the Kapitza boundary resistance between the He-3 and the copper. The "off" conductance is determined by the helium containment shell which physically supports the two conductive ends. We have also designed and are building passive gas gap heat switches which will passively turn off near 1 K and 4 K. For these switches we rely on the rapidly changing vapor pressure of He-4 above neon or copper substrates, respectively, when the coverage is less than one monolayer. The different binding energies of the He-4 to the neon or copper give rise to the different temperatures where the switches transition between the on and off states.

  16. Thermal magnetoresistance of potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huberman, M. L.

    1988-11-01

    It has recently been shown that an inhomogeneous, anisotropic Hall coefficient, arising from a charge-density-wave domain structure, explains the nonsaturating electrical magnetoresistance of potassium. It is shown here that the same mechanism also explains the observed behavior of the thermal magnetoresistance. The transverse thermal magnetoresistance of a domain structure increases with increasing field, having both a linear and quadratic component. The longitudinal thermal magnetoresistance of a domain structure initially increases linearly with increasing field. Its behavior in higher fields, however, depends on whether or not the domain distribution is symmetric about the field direction. If the distribution is symmetric, saturation occurs; otherwise, a residual increase is possible.

  17. Extraordinary Magnetoresistance in Hybrid Semiconductor-Metal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, T. H.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    We show that extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) arises in systems consisting of two components; a semiconducting ring with a metallic inclusion embedded. The important aspect of this discovery is that the system must have a quasi-two-dimensional character. Using the same materials and geometries for the samples as in experiments by Solin et al.1,2, we show that such systems indeed exhibit a huge magnetoresistance. The magnetoresistance arises due to the switching of electrical current paths passing through the metallic inclusion. Diagrams illustrating the flow of the current density within the samples are utilised in discussion of the mechanism responsible for the magnetoresistance effect. Extensions are then suggested which may be applicable to the silver chalcogenides. Our theory offers an excellent description and explanation of experiments where a huge magnetoresistance has been discovered2,3.

  18. Extraordinary Magnetoresistance in Hybrid Semiconductor-Metal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, T. H.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2010-12-01

    We show that extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) arises in systems consisting of two components; a semiconducting ring with a metallic inclusion embedded. The important aspect of this discovery is that the system must have a quasi-two-dimensional character. Using the same materials and geometries for the samples as in experiments by Solin et al.1,2, we show that, such systems indeed exhibit a huge magnetoresistance. The magnetoresistance arises due to the switching of electrical current paths passing through the metallic inclusion. Diagrams illustrating the flow of the current density within the samples are utilised in discussion of the mechanism responsible for the magnetoresistance effect. Extensions are then suggested which may be applicable to the silver chalcogenides. Our theory offers an excellent description and explanation of experiments where a huge magnetoresistance has been discovered2,3.

  19. High speed magneto-resistive random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A high speed read MRAM memory element is configured from a sandwich of magnetizable, ferromagnetic film surrounding a magneto-resistive film which may be ferromagnetic or not. One outer ferromagnetic film has a higher coercive force than the other and therefore remains magnetized in one sense while the other may be switched in sense by a switching magnetic field. The magneto-resistive film is therefore sensitive to the amplitude of the resultant field between the outer ferromagnetic films and may be constructed of a high resistivity, high magneto-resistive material capable of higher sensing currents. This permits higher read voltages and therefore faster read operations. Alternate embodiments with perpendicular anisotropy, and in-plane anisotropy are shown, including an embodiment which uses high permeability guides to direct the closing flux path through the magneto-resistive material. High density, high speed, radiation hard, memory matrices may be constructed from these memory elements.

  20. Self-heating, bistability, and thermal switching in organic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Pahner, P; Lüssem, B; Leo, K; Scholz, R; Koprucki, T; Gärtner, K; Glitzky, A

    2013-03-22

    We demonstrate electric bistability induced by the positive feedback of self-heating onto the thermally activated conductivity in a two-terminal device based on the organic semiconductor C(60). The central undoped layer with a thickness of 300 nm is embedded between thinner n-doped layers adjacent to the contacts, minimizing injection barriers. The observed current-voltage characteristics follow the general theory for thermistors described by an Arrhenius-like conductivity law. Our findings include hysteresis phenomena and are of general relevance for the entire material class since most organic semiconductors can be described by a thermally activated conductivity.

  1. Design and Development of a Series Switch for High Voltage in RF Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Himanshu K.; Shah, Deep; Thacker, Mauli; Shah, Atman

    2013-02-01

    Plasma is the fourth state of matter. To sustain plasma in its ionic form very high temperature is essential. RF heating systems are used to provide the required temperature. Arching phenomenon in these systems can cause enormous damage to the RF tube. Heavy current flows across the anode-cathode junction, which need to be suppressed in minimal time for its protection. Fast-switching circuit breakers are used to cut-off the load from the supply in cases of arching. The crowbar interrupts the connection between the high voltage power supply (HVPS) and the RF tube for a temporary period between which the series switch has to open. The crowbar shunts the current across the load but in the process leads to short circuiting the HVPS. Thus, to protect the load as well as the HVPS a series switch is necessary. This paper presents the design and development of high voltage Series Switch for the high power switching applications. Fiber optic based Optimum triggering scheme is designed and tested to restrict the time delay well within the stipulated limits. The design is well supported with the experimental results for the whole set-up along with the series switch at various voltage level before its approval for operation at 5.2 kV.

  2. Operation of an ADR Using Helium Exchange Gas as a Substitute for a Failed Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, P.; DiPirro, M.; Kimball, M.; Sneiderman, G.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C.; Kelley, R.; Fujimoto, R.; Yoshida, S.; Takei, Y.; Mitsuda, K.

    2014-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is one of four instruments on the Japanese Astro-H mission, which is currently planned for launch in late 2015. The SXS will perform imaging spectroscopy in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV) using a 6 6 pixel array of microcalorimeters cooled to 50 mK. The detectors are cooled by a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that rejects heat to either a superfluid helium tank (at 1.2 K) or to a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Four gas-gap heat switches are used in the assembly to manage heat flow between the ADR stages and the heat sinks. The engineering model (EM) ADR was assembled and performance tested at NASA/GSFC in November 2011, and subsequently installed in the EM dewar at Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Japan. During the first cooldown in July 2012, a failure of the heat switch that linked the two colder stages of the ADR to the helium tank was observed. Operation of the ADR requires some mechanism for thermally linking the salt pills to the heat sink, and then thermally isolating them. With the failed heat switch unable to perform this function, an alternate plan was devised which used carefully controlled amounts of exchange gas in the dewar's guard vacuum to facilitate heat exchange. The process was successfully demonstrated in November 2012, allowing the ADR to cool the detectors to 50 mK for hold times in excess of 10 h. This paper describes the exchange-gas-assisted recycling process, and the strategies used to avoid helium contamination of the detectors at low temperature.

  3. Operation of an ADR using helium exchange gas as a substitute for a failed heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, P.; DiPirro, M.; Kimball, M.; Sneiderman, G.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C.; Kelley, R.; Fujimoto, R.; Yoshida, S.; Takei, Y.; Mitsuda, K.

    2014-11-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is one of four instruments on the Japanese Astro-H mission, which is currently planned for launch in late 2015. The SXS will perform imaging spectroscopy in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV) using a 6 × 6 pixel array of microcalorimeters cooled to 50 mK. The detectors are cooled by a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that rejects heat to either a superfluid helium tank (at 1.2 K) or to a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Four gas-gap heat switches are used in the assembly to manage heat flow between the ADR stages and the heat sinks. The engineering model (EM) ADR was assembled and performance tested at NASA/GSFC in November 2011, and subsequently installed in the EM dewar at Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Japan. During the first cooldown in July 2012, a failure of the heat switch that linked the two colder stages of the ADR to the helium tank was observed. Operation of the ADR requires some mechanism for thermally linking the salt pills to the heat sink, and then thermally isolating them. With the failed heat switch unable to perform this function, an alternate plan was devised which used carefully controlled amounts of exchange gas in the dewar's guard vacuum to facilitate heat exchange. The process was successfully demonstrated in November 2012, allowing the ADR to cool the detectors to 50 mK for hold times in excess of 10 h. This paper describes the exchange-gas-assisted recycling process, and the strategies used to avoid helium contamination of the detectors at low temperature.

  4. Temperature switching waves in a silicon wafer on lamp-based heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovcharov, Vladimir V.; Kurenya, Alexey L.; Rudakov, Valery I.; Prigara, Valeriya P.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic properties of a silicon wafer thermally heated up under a bistable regime in a lamp-based reactor are simulated with regard to an optical non-gomogeneity as a nucleus of a high-temperature phase. The optical non-gomogeneity is represented by a doped layer region on the surface of the wafer imposed by radiation. It is shown that under these conditions temperature switching waves are formed in the wafer. Experimental verification of propagating the switching waves of temperature is obtained at the silicon wafer transition derived from the lower-temperature state to its upper-temperature state and the velocity of the waves is evaluated.

  5. Design and development of a shape memory alloy activated heat pipe-based thermal switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benafan, O.; Notardonato, W. U.; Meneghelli, B. J.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2013-10-01

    This work reports on the design, fabrication and testing of a thermal switch wherein the open and closed states were actuated by shape memory alloy (SMA) elements while heat was transferred by a two-phase heat pipe. The motivation for such a switch comes from NASA’s need for thermal management in advanced spaceport applications associated with future lunar and Mars missions. As the temperature can approximately vary between -233 and 127 ° C during lunar day/night cycles, the switch was designed to reject heat from a cryogen tank into space during the night cycle while providing thermal isolation during the day cycle. A Ni47.1Ti49.6Fe3.3 (at.%) alloy that exhibited a reversible phase transformation between a trigonal R-phase and a cubic austenite phase was used as the sensing and actuating elements. Thermomechanical actuation, accomplished through an antagonistic spring system, resulted in strokes up to 7 mm against bias forces of up to 45 N. The actuation system was tested for more than thirty cycles, equivalent to one year of operation. The thermal performance, accomplished via a variable length, closed two-phase heat pipe, was evaluated, resulting in heat transfer rates of 13 W using pentane and 10 W using R-134a as working fluids. Experimental data were also compared to theoretical predictions where possible. Direct comparisons between different design approaches of SMA helical actuators, highlighting the effects of the helix angle, were carried out to give a layout of more accurate design methodologies.

  6. Dynamic switching between escape and avoidance regimes reduces Caenorhabditis elegans exposure to noxious heat.

    PubMed

    Schild, Lisa C; Glauser, Dominique A

    2013-01-01

    To survive, animals need to minimize exposure to damaging agents. They can either stay away from noxious stimuli (defined as avoidance), requiring the detection of remote warning cues, or run away upon exposure to noxious stimuli (defined as escape). Here we combine behavioural quantitative analyses, simulations and genetics to determine how Caenorhabditis elegans minimizes exposure to noxious heat when navigating in thermogradients. We find that worms use both escape and avoidance strategies, each involving the modulation of multiple parameters like speed and the frequency of steering and withdrawal behaviours. As some behavioural parameters promote escape while impairing avoidance, and vice versa, worms need to dynamically tune those parameters according to temperature. Furthermore, selectively disrupting avoidance or escape, through mutations affecting neuropeptide or TRPV channel signalling, increases exposure to heat. We conclude that dynamically switching between avoidance and escape regimes along the innocuous-noxious temperature continuum efficiently minimizes exposure to noxious heat.

  7. A (He-3)-gap heat switch for use below 2 K in zero g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat R.; Helvensteijn, Ben P. M.

    1992-01-01

    We have designed and tested a compact heat switch that has a simple design and a very large ON/OFF ratio. The design uses concentric cylinders of copper that can be fabricated with higher precision and with thinner web thickness than other designs. It is assembled with a technique that carefully controls the narrow gap between adjacent segments. These features allow a very large surface area for conduction to be fitted into a small volume. The conduction medium is liquid or gaseous He-3, which is put into or taken out of the switch by a small nearby charcoal pump in order to avoid an external mechanical pump and a long pump line. Measurements of its performance down to 1 K show an ON/OFF conduction ratio of about 4000.

  8. A He-3-gap heat switch for use below 2 K in zero G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat R.; Helvensteijn, Ben P. M.

    1991-01-01

    We have designed and tested a compact heat switch that has a simple design and a very large ON/OFF ratio. The design uses concentric cylinders of copper that can be fabricated with higher precision and with thinner web thickness than other designs. It is assembled with a technique that carefully controls the narrow gap between adjacent segments. These features allow a very large surface area for conduction to be fitted into a small volume. The conduction medium is liquid or gaseous He-3 which is put into or taken out of the switch by a small nearby charcoal pump in order to avoid an external mechanical pump and a long pump line. Measurements of its performance down to 1 K show an ON/OFF conduction ratio of about 4000.

  9. Magnetoresistive system with concentric ferromagnetic asymmetric nanorings

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, J. I. Tumelero, M. A.; Pasa, A. A.; Viegas, A. D. C.

    2015-03-14

    A structure consisting of two concentric asymmetric nanorings, each displaying vortex remanent states, is studied with micromagnetic calculations. By orienting in suitable directions, both the asymmetry of the rings and a uniform magnetic field, the vortices chiralities can be switched from parallel to antiparallel, obtaining in this way the analogue of the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations found in bar magnets pairs. Conditions on the thickness of single rings to obtain vortex states, as well as formulas for their remanent magnetization are given. The concentric ring structure enables the creation of magnetoresistive systems comprising the qualities of magnetic nanorings, such as low stray fields and high stability. A possible application is as contacts in spin injection in semiconductors, and estimations obtained here of magnetoresistance change for a cylindrical spin injection based device show significant variations comparable to linear geometries.

  10. Molecular anisotropic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, Fabian; Heinze, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2015-12-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we demonstrate that the effect of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) can be enhanced by orders of magnitude with respect to conventional bulk ferromagnets in junctions containing molecules sandwiched between ferromagnetic leads. We study ballistic transport in metal-benzene complexes contacted by 3 d transition-metal wires. We show that a gigantic AMR can arise from spin-orbit coupling effects in the leads, drastically enhanced by orbital-symmetry filtering properties of the molecules. We further discuss how this molecular anisotropic magnetoresistance (MAMR) can be tuned by the proper choice of materials and their electronic properties.

  11. Longitudinal magnetoresistance of potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huberman, M. L.

    1987-06-01

    Recently, Zhu and Overhauser showed that the Hall coefficient of potassium is anisotropic, depending on the angle between the applied magnetic field and the charge-density wave. It follows that the Hall coefficient of a polydomain sample is inhomogeneous. By means of effective-medium theory, the magnetoresistance of a domain structure has been evaluated. It is shown that both the longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistance increase with increasing field. The Kohler slope depends on the domain distribution. For a random distribution, the longitudinal and transverse Kohler slopes are about (1/2)% and 1(1/2)%, respectively.

  12. Heat switch effect in an antiferromagnetic insulator Co3V2O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Wu, J. C.; Zhao, Z. Y.; He, Z. Z.; Song, J. D.; Zhao, J. Y.; Liu, X. G.; Sun, X. F.; Li, X. G.

    2016-06-01

    We report a heat switch effect in single crystals of an antiferromagnet Co3V2O8, that is, the thermal conductivity (κ) can be changed with magnetic field in an extremely large scale. Due to successive magnetic phase transitions at 12-6 K, the zero-field κ(T ) displays a deep minimum at 6.7 K and rather small magnitude at low temperatures. Both the temperature and field dependencies of κ demonstrate that the phonons are strongly scattered at the regime of magnetic phase transitions. Magnetic field can suppress magnetic scattering effect and significantly recover the phonon thermal conductivity. In particular, a 14 T field along the a axis increases the κ at 7.5 K up to 100 times. For H ∥c , the magnitude of κ can be suppressed down to ˜8% at some field-induced transition and can be enhanced up to 20 times at 14 T. The present results demonstrate that it is possible to design a kind of heat switch in the family of magnetic materials.

  13. Joule Heating Effect on Field-Free Magnetization Switching by Spin-Orbit Torque in Exchange-Biased Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Seyed Armin; Wu, Di; Yu, Guoqiang; Lau, Yong-Chang; Wong, Kin L.; Zhu, Weihua; He, Congli; Zhang, Zongzhi; Coey, J. M. D.; Stamenov, Plamen; Khalili Amiri, Pedram; Wang, Kang L.

    2017-02-01

    Switching of magnetization via spin-orbit torque provides an efficient alternative for nonvolatile memory and logic devices. However, to achieve deterministic switching of perpendicular magnetization, an external magnetic field collinear with the current is usually required, which makes these devices inappropriate for practical applications. In this work, we examine the current-induced magnetization switching in a perpendicularly magnetized exchange-biased Pt /CoFe /IrMn system. A magnetic field annealing technique is used to introduce in-plane exchange biases, which are quantitatively characterized. Under proper conditions, field-free current-driven switching is achieved. We study the Joule heating effect, and we show how it can decrease the in-plane exchange bias and degrade the field-free switching. Furthermore, we discuss that the exchange-bias training effect can have similar effects.

  14. Application of multi-model switching predictive functional control on the temperature system of an electric heating furnace.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weide; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhang, Ridong

    2017-02-06

    A method of multi-model switching based predictive functional control is proposed and applied to the temperature control system of an electric heating furnace. The control strategies provide the effective and independent control modes of the electric heating furnace temperature in order to obtain improved control performance. The method depends on conventional implementation of the multi-model switching state, which requires some endeavors to tune the switching model in the model predictive control and allows a reduction of the calculation compared with the weighted multiple model algorithms. In order to test the advantage of the proposed method, experimental equipment is set up and experiments are done on the temperature process of a heating furnace, which verify the validity and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  15. Reversible and irreversible magnetoresistance of quasisingle domain permalloy microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, M.; Pels, C.; Meier, G.

    2004-06-01

    Permalloy microstructures are investigated by magnetoresistance measurements at 2.0 K and by magnetic-force microscopy at room temperature. While the reversible anisotropic magnetoresistance is determined to be 2.4% at saturation fields of Bsat=1020 mT, the irreversible switching yields a resistance change of the order of 0.05% at 13 mT. By tilting the external magnetic field relative to the easy axis of the quasi single-domain microstructures insight in the reversal process is gained. Comparison with an analytical model provides evidence for magnetization reversal by curling.

  16. Thermal analysis of an indirectly heat pulsed non-volatile phase change material microwave switch

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Robert M. El-Hinnawy, Nabil; Borodulin, Pavel; Wagner, Brian P.; King, Matthew R.; Jones, Evan B.; Howell, Robert S.; Lee, Michael J.

    2014-08-07

    We show the finite element simulation of the melt/quench process in a phase change material (GeTe, germanium telluride) used for a radio frequency switch. The device is thermally activated by an independent NiCrSi (nickel chrome silicon) thin film heating element beneath a dielectric separating it electrically from the phase change layer. A comparison is made between the predicted and experimental minimum power to amorphize (MPA) for various thermal pulse powers and pulse time lengths. By including both the specific heat and latent heat of fusion for GeTe, we find that the MPA and the minimum power to crystallize follow the form of a hyperbola on the power time effect plot. We also find that the simulated time at which the entire center GeTe layer achieves melting accurately matches the MPA curve for pulse durations ranging from 75–1500 ns and pulse powers from 1.6–4 W.

  17. Dynamic control of Hsf1 during heat shock by a chaperone switch and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xu; Krakowiak, Joanna; Patel, Nikit; Beyzavi, Ali; Ezike, Jideofor; Khalil, Ahmad S; Pincus, David

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor (Hsf1) regulates the expression of molecular chaperones to maintain protein homeostasis. Despite its central role in stress resistance, disease and aging, the mechanisms that control Hsf1 activity remain unresolved. Here we show that in budding yeast, Hsf1 basally associates with the chaperone Hsp70 and this association is transiently disrupted by heat shock, providing the first evidence that a chaperone repressor directly regulates Hsf1 activity. We develop and experimentally validate a mathematical model of Hsf1 activation by heat shock in which unfolded proteins compete with Hsf1 for binding to Hsp70. Surprisingly, we find that Hsf1 phosphorylation, previously thought to be required for activation, in fact only positively tunes Hsf1 and does so without affecting Hsp70 binding. Our work reveals two uncoupled forms of regulation - an ON/OFF chaperone switch and a tunable phosphorylation gain - that allow Hsf1 to flexibly integrate signals from the proteostasis network and cell signaling pathways. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18638.001 PMID:27831465

  18. Use of Hydroxyapatite Doping to Enhance Responsiveness of Heat-Inducible Gene Switches to Focused Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Fabiilli, Mario L; Phanse, Rahul A; Moncion, Alexander; Fowlkes, J Brian; Franceschi, Renny T

    2016-03-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that ultrasound-based hyperthermia can activate cells containing a heat-activated and ligand-inducible gene switch in a spatio-temporally controlled manner. These engineered cells can be incorporated into hydrogel scaffolds (e.g., fibrin) for in vivo implantation, where ultrasound can be used to non-invasively pattern transgene expression. Due to their high water content, the acoustic attenuation of fibrin scaffolds is low. Thus, long ultrasound exposures and high acoustic intensities are needed to generate sufficient hyperthermia for gene activation. Here, we demonstrate that the attenuation of fibrin scaffolds and the resulting hyperthermia achievable with ultrasound can be increased significantly by doping the fibrin with hydroxyapatite (HA) nanopowder. The attenuation of a 1% (w/v) fibrin scaffold with 5% (w/v) HA was similar to soft tissue. Transgene activation of cells harboring the gene switch occurred at lower acoustic intensities and shorter exposures when the cells were encapsulated in HA-doped fibrin scaffolds versus undoped scaffolds. Inclusion of HA in the fibrin scaffold did not affect the viability of the encapsulated cells.

  19. Use of Hydroxyapatite Doping to Enhance Responsiveness of Heat-Inducible Gene Switches to Focused Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Phanse, Rahul A.; Moncion, Alexander; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Franceschi, Renny T.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that ultrasound-based hyperthermia can activate cells containing a heat-activated and ligand-inducible gene switch in a spatio-temporally controlled manner. These engineered cells can be incorporated into hydrogel scaffolds (e.g., fibrin) for in vivo implantation, where ultrasound can be used to non-invasively pattern transgene expression. Due to their high water content, the acoustic attenuation of fibrin scaffolds is low. Thus, long ultrasound exposures and high acoustic intensities are needed to generate sufficient hyperthermia for gene activation. Here, we demonstrate that the attenuation of fibrin scaffolds and the resulting hyperthermia achievable with ultrasound can be increased significantly by doping the fibrin with hydroxyapatite (HA) nanopowder. The attenuation of a 1% (w/v) fibrin scaffold with 5% (w/v) HA was similar to soft tissue. Transgene activation of cells harboring the gene switch occurred at lower acoustic intensities and shorter exposures when the cells were encapsulated in HA-doped fibrin scaffolds versus undoped scaffolds. Inclusion of HA in the fibrin scaffold did not affect the viability of the encapsulated cells. PMID:26712417

  20. Giant magnetoresistive sensor

    DOEpatents

    Stearns, Daniel G.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Ceglio, Natale M.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.

    1999-01-01

    A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

  1. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-12-10

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  2. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; ...

    2014-12-10

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  3. Magnetoresistive Emulsion Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening. PMID:23989504

  4. Negative magnetoresistivity in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ya-Wen; Yang, Qing

    2016-09-01

    Negative magnetoresistivity is a special magnetotransport property associated with chiral anomaly in four dimensional chiral anomalous systems, which refers to the transport behavior that the DC longitudinal magnetoresistivity decreases with increasing magnetic field. We calculate the longitudinal magnetoconductivity in the presence of back-reactions of the magnetic field to gravity in holographic zero charge and axial charge density systems with and without axial charge dissipation. In the absence of axial charge dissipation, we find that the quantum critical conductivity grows with increasing magnetic field when the backreaction strength is larger than a critical value, in contrast to the monotonically decreasing behavior of quantum critical conductivity in the probe limit. With axial charge dissipation, we find the negative magnetoresistivity behavior. The DC longitudinal magnetoconductivity scales as B in the large magnetic field limit, which deviates from the exact B 2 scaling of the probe limit result. In both cases, the small frequency longitudinal magnetoconductivity still agrees with the formula obtained from the hydrodynamic linear response theory, even in the large magnetic field limit.

  5. Superconducting magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers.

    PubMed

    Stamopoulos, D; Aristomenopoulou, E

    2015-08-26

    Magnetoresistance is a multifaceted effect reflecting the diverse transport mechanisms exhibited by different kinds of plain materials and hybrid nanostructures; among other, giant, colossal, and extraordinary magnetoresistance versions exist, with the notation indicative of the intensity. Here we report on the superconducting magnetoresistance observed in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers, namely Co/Nb/Co trilayers, subjected to a parallel external magnetic field equal to the coercive field. By manipulating the transverse stray dipolar fields that originate from the out-of-plane magnetic domains of the outer layers that develop at coercivity, we can suppress the supercurrent of the interlayer. We experimentally demonstrate a scaling of the magnetoresistance magnitude that we reproduce with a closed-form phenomenological formula that incorporates relevant macroscopic parameters and microscopic length scales of the superconducting and ferromagnetic structural units. The generic approach introduced here can be used to design novel cryogenic devices that completely switch the supercurrent 'on' and 'off', thus exhibiting the ultimate magnetoresistance magnitude 100% on a regular basis.

  6. Superconducting magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers

    PubMed Central

    Stamopoulos, D.; Aristomenopoulou, E.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistance is a multifaceted effect reflecting the diverse transport mechanisms exhibited by different kinds of plain materials and hybrid nanostructures; among other, giant, colossal, and extraordinary magnetoresistance versions exist, with the notation indicative of the intensity. Here we report on the superconducting magnetoresistance observed in ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers, namely Co/Nb/Co trilayers, subjected to a parallel external magnetic field equal to the coercive field. By manipulating the transverse stray dipolar fields that originate from the out-of-plane magnetic domains of the outer layers that develop at coercivity, we can suppress the supercurrent of the interlayer. We experimentally demonstrate a scaling of the magnetoresistance magnitude that we reproduce with a closed-form phenomenological formula that incorporates relevant macroscopic parameters and microscopic length scales of the superconducting and ferromagnetic structural units. The generic approach introduced here can be used to design novel cryogenic devices that completely switch the supercurrent ‘on’ and ‘off’, thus exhibiting the ultimate magnetoresistance magnitude 100% on a regular basis. PMID:26306543

  7. Low-current-density spin-transfer switching in Gd{sub 22}Fe{sub 78}-MgO magnetic tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Kinjo, Hidekazu Machida, Kenji; Aoshima, Ken-ichi; Kato, Daisuke; Kuga, Kiyoshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Shimidzu, Naoki; Matsui, Koichi

    2014-05-28

    Magnetization switching of a relatively thick (9 nm) Gd-Fe free layer was achieved with a low spin injection current density of 1.0 × 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} using MgO based magnetic tunnel junction devices, fabricated for light modulators. At about 560 × 560 nm{sup 2} in size, the devices exhibited a tunneling magnetoresistance ratio of 7%. This low-current switching is mainly attributed to thermally assisted spin-transfer switching in consequence of its thermal magnetic behavior arising from Joule heating.

  8. Prediction and measurement of heat transfer in a switched reluctance generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himes, Marvin Eugene, Jr.

    This research is an experimental investigation of the convective film coefficients on the unique pole faces of a high speed rotor operating within a generator. The specific geometry studied is that of a switched reluctance generator under development by the United States Air Force for use on jet aircraft as an integrated power unit (IPU) to provide auxiliary and emergency power to the aircraft's electrical system. The generator consists of a four pole rotor, nominally 4.30 inches in diameter, housed within a stator assembly. The clearance gap between the rotor pole tip and the stator wall is nominally 0.020 inches. The rotor is designed to rotate at 55,000 rpm. Rotor cooling is achieved by convection to air flowing axially through the rotor cavities. The convective film coefficient for each unique pole face, as well as an overall film coefficient for the four pole faces are inferred from the rate at which insulated test rates cool when subjected to various rates of rotor rotational speed and axial airflows. The high velocity of the rotor tips in close proximity to the stator wall results in aerodynamic heating of the air in the gap region. Convective film coefficients associated with high speed flow must be referenced to the adiabatic wall temperature to account for the effects of viscous heating. An estimate of the adiabatic wall temperature in the rotor gap region is developed analytically starting with the fundamental case of high-speed, wall-driven flow. These analytical results for wall-driven flow are verified experimentally using a smooth poled rotor. The analytically predicted film coefficients are within 10% of the experimental results. Experiments are conducted for rotor speeds ranging from 5,000 to 30,000 rpm and axial airflows ranging from 0.036 to 0.073 kg/s (0.08 to 0.16 lbm/s). The convective film coefficients for each pole face as well as average values representing heat loss from the combined faces are presented in terms of Stanton and Nusselt

  9. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. L. Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, X.-G.

    2014-12-14

    Classical magnetoresistance (MR) in nonmagnetic metals are conventionally understood in terms of the Kohler rule, with violation usually viewed as anomalous electron transport, in particular, as evidence of non-Fermi liquid behavior. Measurement of the MR of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms. Consequently, the Kohler rule should not be used to distinguish normal and anomalous electron transport in solids.

  10. Tunnel magnetoresistance of diamondoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2016-10-01

    Tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of diamondoids has been predicted by first principles density functional theory. Diamantane was used as a basic molecular proxy for diamondoids because hydrogen atoms in the apical position are easily substituted for a thiol group. The pristine diamantane exhibited a low TMR ratio of 7%, and boron-substitution considerably decreased the TMR ratio. Conversely, nitrogen-substitution enhanced the TMR ratio by up to 20%. Heteroatom-substitution changes the tunneling probabilities by varying the molecular bond lengths. Furthermore, when the spins of the electrodes are parallel, the heteroatoms resulted in transmittance probabilities at an energy range near the Fermi level. Consequently, heteroatom-substitution can control the TMR ratios of diamondoids very well.

  11. Support of NASA ADR/ Cross-Enterprise NRA Advanced Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators for Continuous Cooling from 10K to 50mK, Development of a Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Paul L.

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical heat switches are used in conjunction with sorption refrigerators, adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators and for other cryogenic tasks including the pre-cooling cryogenic systems. They use a mechanical actuator which closes Au plated Cu jaws on an Au plated Cu bar. The thermal conductance in the closed position is essentially independent of the area of the jaws and proportional to the force applied. It varies linearly with T. It is approximately 10mW/K for 200 N at 1.5K. In some applications, the heat switch can be driven from outside the cryostat by a rotating rod and a screw. Such heat switches are available commercially from several sources. In other applications, including systems for space, it is desirable to drive the switch using a cold linear motor, or solenoid. Superconducting windings are used at temperatures s 4.2K to minimize power dissipation, but are not appropriate for pre-cooling a system at higher temperatures. This project was intended to improve the design of solenoid activated mechanical heat switches and to provide such switches as required to support the development of Advanced Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators for Continuous Cooling from 10 K to 50 mK at GSFC. By the time funding began in 5/1/01, the immediate need for mechanical heat switches at GSFC had subsided but, at the same time, the opportunity had arisen to improve the design of mechanical heat switching by incorporating a "latching solenoid". In this device, the solenoid current is required only for changing the state of the switch and not during the whole time that the switch is closed.

  12. Anomalous magnetoresistance in Fibonacci multilayers.

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, L. D.; Bezerra, C. G.; Correa, M. A.; Chesman, C.; Pearson, J. E.; Hoffmann, A.

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigated magnetoresistance curves in quasiperiodic magnetic multilayers for two different growth directions, namely, [110] and [100]. We considered identical ferromagnetic layers separated by nonmagnetic layers with two different thicknesses chosen based on the Fibonacci sequence. Using parameters for Fe/Cr multilayers, four terms were included in our description of the magnetic energy: Zeeman, cubic anisotropy, bilinear coupling, and biquadratic coupling. The minimum energy was determined by the gradient method and the equilibrium magnetization directions found were used to calculate magnetoresistance curves. By choosing spacers with a thickness such that biquadratic coupling is stronger than bilinear coupling, unusual behaviors for the magnetoresistance were observed: (i) for the [110] case, there is a different behavior for structures based on even and odd Fibonacci generations, and, more interesting, (ii) for the [100] case, we found magnetic field ranges for which the magnetoresistance increases with magnetic field.

  13. Transversal magnetoresistance in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klier, J.; Gornyi, I. V.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    We explore theoretically the magnetoresistivity of three-dimensional Weyl and Dirac semimetals in transversal magnetic fields within two alternative models of disorder: (i) short-range impurities and (ii) charged (Coulomb) impurities. Impurity scattering is treated using the self-consistent Born approximation. We find that an unusual broadening of Landau levels leads to a variety of regimes of the resistivity scaling in the temperature-magnetic field plane. In particular, the magnetoresistance is nonmonotonous for the white-noise disorder model. For H →0 the magnetoresistance for short-range impurities vanishes in a nonanalytic way as H1 /3. In the limits of strongest magnetic fields H , the magnetoresistivity vanishes as 1 /H for pointlike impurities, while it is linear and positive in the model with Coulomb impurities.

  14. Magnetoresistance, electrical conductivity, and Hall effect of glassy carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.F.

    1983-02-01

    These properties of glassy carbon heat treated for three hours between 1200 and 2700/sup 0/C were measured from 3 to 300/sup 0/K in magnetic fields up to 5 tesla. The magnetoresistance was generally negative and saturated with reciprocal temperature, but still increased as a function of magnetic field. The maximum negative magnetoresistance measured was 2.2% for 2700/sup 0/C material. Several models based on the negative magnetoresistance being proportional to the square of the magnetic moment were attempted; the best fit was obtained for the simplest model combining Curie and Pauli paramagnetism for heat treatments above 1600/sup 0/C. Positive magnetoresistance was found only in less than 1600/sup 0/C treated glassy carbon. The electrical conductivity, of the order of 200 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at room temperature, can be empirically written as sigma = A + Bexp(-CT/sup -1/4) - DT/sup -1/2. The Hall coefficient was independent of magnetic field, insensitive to temperature, but was a strong function of heat treatment temperature, crossing over from negative to positive at about 1700/sup 0/C and ranging from -0.048 to 0.126 cm/sup 3//coul. The idea of one-dimensional filaments in glassy carbon suggested by the electrical conductivity is compatible with the present consensus view of the microstructure.

  15. Extremely large magnetoresistance in few-layer graphene/boron–nitride heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Gopinadhan, Kalon; Shin, Young Jun; Jalil, Rashid; Venkatesan, Thirumalai; Geim, Andre K.; Neto, Antonio H. Castro; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding magnetoresistance, the change in electrical resistance under an external magnetic field, at the atomic level is of great interest both fundamentally and technologically. Graphene and other two-dimensional layered materials provide an unprecedented opportunity to explore magnetoresistance at its nascent stage of structural formation. Here we report an extremely large local magnetoresistance of∼2,000% at 400 K and a non-local magnetoresistance of >90,000% in an applied magnetic field of 9 T at 300 K in few-layer graphene/boron–nitride heterostructures. The local magnetoresistance is understood to arise from large differential transport parameters, such as the carrier mobility, across various layers of few-layer graphene upon a normal magnetic field, whereas the non-local magnetoresistance is due to the magnetic field induced Ettingshausen–Nernst effect. Non-local magnetoresistance suggests the possibility of a graphene-based gate tunable thermal switch. In addition, our results demonstrate that graphene heterostructures may be promising for magnetic field sensing applications. PMID:26388149

  16. Evaluation of Magnetoresistive RAM for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidecker, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM) is a non-volatile memory that exploits electronic spin, rather than charge, to store data. Instead of moving charge on and off a floating gate to alter the threshold voltage of a CMOS transistor (creating different bit states), MRAM uses magnetic fields to flip the polarization of a ferromagnetic material thus switching its resistance and bit state. These polarized states are immune to radiation-induced upset, thus making MRAM very attractive for space application. These magnetic memory elements also have infinite data retention and erase/program endurance. Presented here are results of reliability testing of two space-qualified MRAM products from Aeroflex and Honeywell.

  17. Observation of turbulence suppression after electron-cyclotron-resonance-heating switch-off on the HL-2A tokamak.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Shi, Z B; Dong, Y B; Sun, H J; Sun, A P; Li, Y G; Xia, Z W; Li, W; Ding, X T; Xiao, W W; Zhou, Y; Zhou, J; Rao, J; Liu, Z T; Yang, Q W; Duan, X R

    2011-07-01

    The formation of a transient internal transport barrier (ITB) is observed after the electron-cyclotron-resonance-heating (ECRH) switch-off in the HL-2A plasmas, characterized by transient increase of central electron temperature. The newly developed correlation reflectometer provided direct measurements showing reduction of turbulence in the region of steepened gradients for the period of ITB formation triggered by the ECRH switch-off. Furthermore, the reduction of core turbulence is correlated in time with the appearance of a low-frequency mode with a spectrally broad poloidal structure that peaks near zero frequency in the core region. These structures have low poloidal mode number, high poloidal correlation, and short radial correlation and are strongly coupled with high-frequency ambient turbulence. Observation indicates that these structures play important roles in the reduction of the core turbulence and in improvements of the core transport after the off-axis ECRH is turned off.

  18. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 2. Biomarkers of exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Michael W.; Marano, Kristin M.; Jones, Bobbette A.; Morgan, Walter T.; Stiles, Mitchell F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A randomized, multi-center study of adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) was conducted, and subjects’ experience with the products was followed for 24 weeks. Differences in biomarkers of tobacco exposure between smokers and never smokers at baseline and among groups relative to each other and over time were assessed. Results indicated reduced exposure to many potentially harmful constituents found in cigarette smoke following product switching. Findings support differences in exposure from the use of various tobacco products and are relevant to the understanding of a risk continuum among tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917). PMID:26554277

  19. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 2. Biomarkers of exposure.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Michael W; Marano, Kristin M; Jones, Bobbette A; Morgan, Walter T; Stiles, Mitchell F

    2015-01-01

    A randomized, multi-center study of adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) was conducted, and subjects' experience with the products was followed for 24 weeks. Differences in biomarkers of tobacco exposure between smokers and never smokers at baseline and among groups relative to each other and over time were assessed. Results indicated reduced exposure to many potentially harmful constituents found in cigarette smoke following product switching. Findings support differences in exposure from the use of various tobacco products and are relevant to the understanding of a risk continuum among tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917).

  20. Observation of turbulence suppression after electron-cyclotron-resonance-heating switch-off on the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Shi, Z. B.; Dong, Y. B.; Sun, H. J.; Sun, A. P.; Li, Y. G.; Xia, Z. W.; Li, W.; Ding, X. T.; Xiao, W. W.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, J.; Rao, J.; Liu, Z. T.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.

    2011-07-15

    The formation of a transient internal transport barrier (ITB) is observed after the electron-cyclotron-resonance-heating (ECRH) switch-off in the HL-2A plasmas, characterized by transient increase of central electron temperature. The newly developed correlation reflectometer provided direct measurements showing reduction of turbulence in the region of steepened gradients for the period of ITB formation triggered by the ECRH switch-off. Furthermore, the reduction of core turbulence is correlated in time with the appearance of a low-frequency mode with a spectrally broad poloidal structure that peaks near zero frequency in the core region. These structures have low poloidal mode number, high poloidal correlation, and short radial correlation and are strongly coupled with high-frequency ambient turbulence. Observation indicates that these structures play important roles in the reduction of the core turbulence and in improvements of the core transport after the off-axis ECRH is turned off.

  1. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Si nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, E.; Rungger, I.; Sanvito, S.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the tunneling magnetoresistance of small diameter semiconducting Si nanowires attached to ferromagnetic Fe electrodes, using first principles density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green’s functions method for quantum transport. Silicon nanowires represent an interesting platform for spin devices. They are compatible with mature silicon technology and their intrinsic electronic properties can be controlled by modifying the diameter and length. Here we systematically study the spin transport properties for neutral nanowires and both n and p doping conditions. We find a substantial low bias magnetoresistance for the neutral case, which halves for an applied voltage of about 0.35 V and persists up to 1 V. Doping in general decreases the magnetoresistance, as soon as the conductance is no longer dominated by tunneling.

  2. Origin of nonsaturating linear magnetoresistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisslinger, Ferdinand; Ott, Christian; Weber, Heiko B.

    2017-01-01

    The observation of nonsaturating classical linear magnetoresistivity has been an enigmatic phenomenon in solid-state physics. We present a study of a two-dimensional ohmic conductor, including local Hall effect and a self-consistent consideration of the environment. An equivalent-circuit scheme delivers a simple and convincing argument why the magnetoresistivity is linear in strong magnetic field, provided that current and biasing electric field are misaligned by a nonlocal mechanism. A finite-element model of a two-dimensional conductor is suited to display the situations that create such deviating currents. Besides edge effects next to electrodes, charge carrier density fluctuations are efficiently generating this effect. However, mobility fluctuations that have frequently been related to linear magnetoresistivity are barely relevant. Despite its rare observation, linear magnetoresitivity is rather the rule than the exception in a regime of low charge carrier densities, misaligned current pathways and strong magnetic field.

  3. Case studies of mental models in home heat control: searching for feedback, valve, timer and switch theories.

    PubMed

    Revell, Kirsten M A; Stanton, Neville A

    2014-05-01

    An intergroup case study was undertaken to determine if: 1) There exist distinct mental models of home heating function, that differ significantly from the actual functioning of UK heating systems; and 2) Mental models of thermostat function can be categorized according to Kempton's (1986) valve and feedback shared theories, and others from the literature. Distinct, inaccurate mental models of the heating system, as well as thermostat devices in isolation, were described. It was possible to categorise thermostat models by Kempton's (1986) feedback shared theory, but other theories proved ambiguous. Alternate control devices could be categorized by Timer (Norman, 2002) and Switch (Peffer et al., 2011) theories. The need to consider the mental models of the heating system in terms of an integrated set of control devices, and to consider user's goals and expectations of the system benefit, was highlighted. The value of discovering shared theories, and understanding user mental models, of home heating, are discussed with reference to their present day relevance for reducing energy consumption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Bipolaron mechanism for organic magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Bobbert, P A; Nguyen, T D; van Oost, F W A; Koopmans, B; Wohlgenannt, M

    2007-11-23

    We present a mechanism for the recently discovered magnetoresistance in disordered pi-conjugated materials, based on hopping of polarons and bipolaron formation, in the presence of the random hyperfine fields of the hydrogen nuclei and an external magnetic field. Within a simple model we describe the magnetic field dependence of the bipolaron density. Monte Carlo simulations including on-site and longer-range Coulomb repulsion show how this leads to positive and negative magnetoresistance. Depending on the branching ratio between bipolaron formation or dissociation and hopping rates, two different line shapes in excellent agreement with experiment are obtained.

  5. Bipolaron Mechanism for Organic Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbert, P. A.; Nguyen, T. D.; van Oost, F. W. A.; Koopmans, B.; Wohlgenannt, M.

    2007-11-01

    We present a mechanism for the recently discovered magnetoresistance in disordered π-conjugated materials, based on hopping of polarons and bipolaron formation, in the presence of the random hyperfine fields of the hydrogen nuclei and an external magnetic field. Within a simple model we describe the magnetic field dependence of the bipolaron density. Monte Carlo simulations including on-site and longer-range Coulomb repulsion show how this leads to positive and negative magnetoresistance. Depending on the branching ratio between bipolaron formation or dissociation and hopping rates, two different line shapes in excellent agreement with experiment are obtained.

  6. Magnetoresistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li; Kang, N.; Kong, W. J.; Hu, J. S.; Pan, Z. W.; Xie, S. S.

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the magnetoresistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes bundles. At temperatures above 15 K, the magnetoresistance was found to follow exactly a scaling law as predicted by the theory of two-dimensional (2D) weak localization. Below 15 K, the 2D weak localization behavior is modified due to the formation of a Coulomb gap. This modification does not fit to those theories which treat electron-electron interaction as a perturbation. Altshular-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) resistance oscillation was observed in milli-Kelvin temperature range. The results will be discussed in terms of the interplay between electron-electron interaction and disorder scattering in multiwall carbon nanotube.

  7. Magnetoresistive smart fluid (marsonpol) and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reji, John; Suresh, G.; Narayanadas, D. J.

    2003-10-01

    Magnetorheological fluid, Electrorheological fluid and ferro fluids are the smart fluids known today. These fluids are either electrically conductive or non conductive. They do not exhibit variable electrical resistance or switching behavior. Of recent interest to researchers has been the development of new types of magnetoresistive materials. Such materials can be of large practical importance, as they will change their electrical resistance in the presence of a magnetic field. However, most materials only exhibit appreciable magnetoresistance under extreme conditions, such as high magnetic fields or low temperatures. A smart fluid whose electrical resistance can be varied by several orders of magnitude under nominal level of magnetic field is reported in this paper (designated MARSONPOL). In the absence of a magnetic field the fluid is an insulator having electrical resistance in the order of 108 ohm-meter and in the presence of a magnetic field the resistance of the material reduces to less than 1 ohm-meter, at room temperature of 30°C. The sharp and reversible change in resistivity makes the material transform from an insulator to conductor, rendering properties characteristic of either state, within a fraction of a second. Fluids with such characteristics are not reported in the literature making this development a breakthrough and opening up potentials for the development of several smart devices. One such device is the magnetic field sensor probe currently under development at NPOL. A capsule of MARSONPOL forms the basic sensor element. Depending on the strength of the Magnetic field, the electrical resistivity of the capsule undergoes changes. The present paper will discuss details of the smart fluid as well as features of the magnetic field sensor.

  8. Magnetoresistance and magnetic properties in amorphous Fe-based wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordin, G.; Buttino, G.; Cecchetti, A.; Poppi, M.

    2001-06-01

    The longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistances in amorphous Fe 77.5Si 7.5B 15 wires are studied at different values of the DC-bias currents in order to clarify the mechanism of the magnetization according to a 'core-shell' domain model. The role of closure domain structures in the magnetization process of the wires is analysed. Moreover, the effects of the Joule heating on the internal stresses, introduced during the rapid quenching in the sample preparation, are examined.

  9. Unusual behavior of the magnetoresistance of boron carbonitride films at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Filipozzi, L.; Piraux, L.; Marchand, A.; Derre, A.; Adouard, A.; Kinany-Alaoui, M.

    1997-07-01

    We have performed resistivity, and magnetoresistance measurements down to 0.3 K, and under fields up to 37 T of boron carbonitride and BC{sub 3} films prepared by chemical vapor deposition. The turbostratic structure of the as-deposited materials favors a 2D weak localization effect which is invoked to explain the negative magnetoresistance (MR) as well as the log T variation of the resistivity. However, at very low temperature a positive component is superimposed on the negative MR. At high fields, the total MR is positive and almost isotropic. Usual theories are unable to account for the observed phenomenon. Increasing heat-treatments up to 1800{degree}C increases the 2D character of the deposits, which show an increasingly negative magnetoresistance. For still higher treatments, the change of the films to a 3D graphitic-like structure leads to a vanishing of the negative magnetoresistance. {copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  10. Giant magnetoresistance of manganese oxides with a layered perovskite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritomo, Y.; Asamitsu, A.; Kuwahara, H.; Tokura, Y.

    1996-03-01

    MANGANESE oxides with the cubic perovskite structure (typified by LaMnO3) have stimulated considerable interest because of their magnetoresistive properties1-9 they exhibit extremely large changes in electrical resistance in response to applied magnetic fields, a property that is of technological relevance for the development of magnetic memory and switching devices. But for such applications to be viable, great improvements will be needed in both the sensitivity and temperature dependence of the magnetoresistive response. One approach under consideration for optimizing these properties is chemical substitution10. Here we demonstrate an alternative strategy, in which we synthesize layered variants of the cubic perovskite parent compounds that have a controlled number of MnO2 sheets per unit cell. This strategy is structurally analogous to that employed for the systematic exploration of the high-transition-temperature copper oxide superconductors11. We find that the magneto-resistive properties of these materials depend sensitively on the dimensionality of the manganese oxide lattice. Although the properties of our materials are still far from optimal, further exploration of this series of layered perovskites may prove fruitful.

  11. Three-dimensional integration technology of magnetic tunnel junctions for magnetoresistive random access memory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushiji, Kay; Takagi, Hideki; Watanabe, Naoya; Fukushima, Akio; Kikuchi, Katsuya; Kurashima, Yuuichi; Sugihara, Atsushi; Kubota, Hitoshi; Yuasa, Shinji

    2017-06-01

    Three-dimensional integration processes (based on direct wafer bonding and back-surface silicon removal) for magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetization (p-MTJs) were developed. Perfect wafer bonding, namely, bonding without interfacial voids, and damageless silicon removal were successfully demonstrated by using very flat tantalum cap layers. Moreover, p-MTJ nanopillars subjected to these processes exhibited no degradation in magnetoresistance or spin-transfer-torque (STT) switching. Magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) technology incorporating these processes (direct wafer bonding and back-surface silicon removal) will make it possible to integrate epitaxial MTJs (with a single-crystal tunnel barrier) and ferromagnetic electrode layers (based on new materials).

  12. Exposure evaluation of adult male Japanese smokers switched to a heated cigarette in a controlled clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Chikako; Kakehi, Aoi; Minami, Naoki; Kikuchi, Akira; Futamura, Yasuyuki

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this clinical study was to investigate changes in levels of biomarkers of exposure (BOEs) in healthy Japanese male smokers who switched to a prototype heated cigarette (HC). This was a controlled, semi-randomized, open-label, residential study conducted in Japan. A total of 70 healthy Japanese male smokers were enrolled. Following enrollment, subjects smoked their usual brand of cigarette for 2days and were subsequently randomized either to an HC group or a 10mg tar conventional cigarette (CC10) group for four consecutive weeks. Levels of BOEs for ten selected cigarette smoke constituents (nicotine, carbon monoxide (CO), benzene, 1,3-butadiene, acrolein, hydrogen cyanide, crotonaldehyde, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone [NNK], pyrene, 4-aminobiphenyl), and urine mutagenicity were measured at several time points during the study period. At the end of the study period, except for blood carboxyhemoglobin, levels of BOEs for the other nine constituents and urine mutagenicity were significantly lower in the HC group compared to the CC10 group. These results suggest that exposure to most cigarette smoke constituents, except CO, can be reduced by switching from CC10 to HC.

  13. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 3. Biomarkers of biological effect

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Michael W.; Marano, Kristin M.; Jones, Bobbette A.; Morgan, Walter T.; Stiles, Mitchell F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A randomized, multi-center study of adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) for 24 weeks was conducted. Evaluation of biomarkers of biological effect (e.g. inflammation, lipids, hypercoaguable state) indicated that the majority of consistent and statistically significant improvements over time within each group were observed in markers of inflammation. Consistent and statistically significant differences in pairwise comparisons between product groups were not observed. These findings are relevant to the understanding of biomarkers of biological effect related to cigarette smoking as well as the risk continuum across various tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917). PMID:26525962

  14. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 3. Biomarkers of biological effect.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Michael W; Marano, Kristin M; Jones, Bobbette A; Morgan, Walter T; Stiles, Mitchell F

    2015-01-01

    A randomized, multi-center study of adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) for 24 weeks was conducted. Evaluation of biomarkers of biological effect (e.g. inflammation, lipids, hypercoaguable state) indicated that the majority of consistent and statistically significant improvements over time within each group were observed in markers of inflammation. Consistent and statistically significant differences in pairwise comparisons between product groups were not observed. These findings are relevant to the understanding of biomarkers of biological effect related to cigarette smoking as well as the risk continuum across various tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917).

  15. Switching from usual brand cigarettes to a tobacco-heating cigarette or snus: Part 1. Study design and methodology

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Michael W.; Marano, Kristin M.; Jones, Bobbette A.; Stiles, Mitchell F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A randomized, multi-center study was conducted to assess potential improvement in health status measures, as well as changes in biomarkers of tobacco exposure and biomarkers of biological effect, in current adult cigarette smokers switched to tobacco-heating cigarettes, snus or ultra-low machine yield tobacco-burning cigarettes (50/group) evaluated over 24 weeks. Study design, conduct and methodology are presented here along with subjects’ disposition, characteristics, compliance and safety results. This design and methodology, evaluating generally healthy adult smokers over a relatively short duration, proved feasible. Findings from this randomized study provide generalized knowledge of the risk continuum among various tobacco products (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02061917). PMID:26525849

  16. Giant tunneling magnetoresistance in silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yu; Lou, Yiyi

    2013-11-14

    We have theoretically studied ballistic electron transport in silicene under the manipulation of a pair of ferromagnetic gate. Transport properties like transmission and conductance have been calculated by the standard transfer matrix method for parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations. It is demonstrated here that, due to the stray field-induced wave-vector filtering effect, remarkable difference in configuration-dependent transport gives rise to a giant tunneling magnetoresistance. In combination with the peculiar buckled structure of silicene and its electric tunable energy gap, the receiving magnetoresistance can be efficiently modulated by the externally-tunable stray field, electrostatic potential, and staggered sublattice potential, providing some flexible strategies to construct silicene-based nanoelectronic device.

  17. Magnetoresistance behavior of UNiGe

    SciTech Connect

    Nakotte, H.; Lacerda, A.; Purwanto, A.; Havela, L.; Sechovsky, V.; Prokes, K.; Brueck, E.; Boer, F.R. de; Torikachvili, M.S.

    1995-05-01

    The authors have measured the temperature dependences of the magnetoresistance of single-crystalline UNiGe for both parallel (i//B//c-axis) and perpendicular configurations (i//a-axis, B//c-axis) in magnetic fields up to 18 T. Both configurations yield similar magnetoresistance behavior, which emphasizes the strong magnetic contribution to the resistivity in all directions. Crossing magnetic-phase boundaries causes anomalies in the magnetoresistance, which allowed a completion of the previously proposed magnetic phase diagram.

  18. Extraordinary magnetoresistance: sensing the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, Thomas; Kusmartsev, Feodor

    2012-06-01

    Simulations utilising the finite element method (FEM) have been produced in order to investigate aspects of circular extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) devices. The effect of three specific features on the resultant magnetoresistance were investigated: the ratio of the metallic to semiconducting conductivities (σ M/σ S); the semiconductor mobility; and the introduction of an intermediate region at the semiconductormetal interface in order to simulate a contact resistance. In order to obtain a large EMR effect the conductivity ratio (σ M/σ S) is required to be larger than two orders of magnitude; below this critical value the resultant magnetoresistance effect is dramatically reduced. Large mobility semiconductors exhibit larger EMR values for a given field (below saturation) and reduce the magnetic field required to produce saturation of the magnetoresistance. This is due to a larger Hall angle produced at a given magnetic field and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. Since practical magnetic field sensors are required to operate at low magnetic fields, high mobility semiconductors are required in the production of more sensitive EMR sensors. The formation of a Schottky barrier at the semiconductor-metal interface has been modelled with the introduction of a contact resistance at the semiconductor-metal interface. Increasing values of contact resistance are found to reduce the EMR effect with it disappearing altogether for large values. This has been shown explicitly by looking at the current flow in the system and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. The interface resistance was used to fit the simulated model to existing experimental data. The best fit occurred with an interface with resistivity of 1.55×10-4 m (overestimate). The EMR effect holds great potential with regard to its future application to magnetic field sensors. The design of any such devices should incorporate high mobility materials (such as graphene) along

  19. Extraordinary magnetoresistance: sensing the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, Thomas H.; Kusmartsev, Feodor V.

    2012-06-01

    Simulations utilising the finite element method (FEM) have been produced in order to investigate aspects of circular extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) devices. The effect of three specific features on the resultant magnetoresistance were investigated: the ratio of the metallic to semiconducting conductivities ( σ M / σ S ); the semiconductor mobility; and the introduction of an intermediate region at the semiconductormetal interface in order to simulate a contact resistance. In order to obtain a large EMR effect the conductivity ratio ( σ M / σ S ) is required to be larger than two orders of magnitude; below this critical value the resultant magnetoresistance effect is dramatically reduced. Large mobility semiconductors exhibit larger EMR values for a given field (below saturation) and reduce the magnetic field required to produce saturation of the magnetoresistance. This is due to a larger Hall angle produced at a given magnetic field and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. Since practical magnetic field sensors are required to operate at low magnetic fields, high mobility semiconductors are required in the production of more sensitive EMR sensors. The formation of a Schottky barrier at the semiconductor-metal interface has been modelled with the introduction of a contact resistance at the semiconductor-metal interface. Increasing values of contact resistance are found to reduce the EMR effect with it disappearing altogether for large values. This has been shown explicitly by looking at the current flow in the system and is consistent with the mechanism of the EMR effect. The interface resistance was used to fit the simulated model to existing experimental data. The best fit occurred with an interface with resistivity of 1.55×10-4 m (overestimate). The EMR effect holds great potential with regard to its future application to magnetic field sensors. The design of any such devices should incorporate high mobility materials (such as graphene

  20. Magnetoresistive sensors for string instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenssen, K.-M. H.; Somers, G. H. J.; van Zon, J. B. A. D.

    2002-05-01

    Pickup elements for string instruments, in particular for electric guitars, represent a new application area for magnetoresistive sensors. Recently we developed a sensor configuration with permanent magnets for this purpose. For the first experiments we used commercial anisotropic magnetoresistance sensors (Philips KMZ10) mounted on small ferrite bias magnets. Recently we equipped an electric guitar with prototypes comprising giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors. These prototype MR pickup elements showed several clear advantages compared to the presently commonly used inductive pickup units. They are much less sensitive to disturbing electromagnetic fields (>1000×at 5 kHz), mainly because their active sensor area is several orders of magnitude smaller (a few mm2 instead of cm2). Also the larger freedom in the choice of the permanent magnets (due to the larger sensitivity of the GMR elements) is advantageous: employing smaller magnets reduces the damping and thus significantly improves the sustain, the magnets can be less expensive and more stable magnet materials can be chosen so that aging effects are eliminated.

  1. Frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fujian; Rybicki, James; Lin, Ran; Hutchinson, Kent; Hou, Jia; Wohlgenannt, Markus

    2011-03-01

    Organic magnetoresistive (OMAR) devices show a large enough magnetoresistive response (typically 10%) for potential applications as magnetic field sensors. However, applications often require sensing high frequency magnetic fields, and the examination of the frequency-dependent magnetoresistive response is therefore required. Analysis of time constants that limit the frequency response may also shed light on the mechanism behind the OMAR effect, because different OMAR mechanisms occur at different time scales In our experiments, the AC magnetic field is supplied by a coil with a ferrite core which is driven by a function generator The AC magnet shows a frequency response that is almost flat up to 1MHz. We found that the OMAR frequency limit is about 10 kHz for a typical organic semiconductor device and at least 100 kHz for devices made from a doped polymer film. We also performed capacitance and conductance vs. frequency measurements to understand the origin of the observed limit frequencies. This work was supported by Army MURI under GrantNo. W911NF-08-1-0317 and NSF under Grant No. ECS 0725280.

  2. Plasma membranes as heat stress sensors: from lipid-controlled molecular switches to therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Török, Zsolt; Crul, Tim; Maresca, Bruno; Schütz, Gerhard J; Viana, Felix; Dindia, Laura; Piotto, Stefano; Brameshuber, Mario; Balogh, Gábor; Péter, Mária; Porta, Amalia; Trapani, Alfonso; Gombos, Imre; Glatz, Attila; Gungor, Burcin; Peksel, Begüm; Vigh, László; Csoboz, Bálint; Horváth, Ibolya; Vijayan, Mathilakath M; Hooper, Phillip L; Harwood, John L; Vigh, László

    2014-06-01

    The classic heat shock (stress) response (HSR) was originally attributed to protein denaturation. However, heat shock protein (Hsp) induction occurs in many circumstances where no protein denaturation is observed. Recently considerable evidence has been accumulated to the favor of the "Membrane Sensor Hypothesis" which predicts that the level of Hsps can be changed as a result of alterations to the plasma membrane. This is especially pertinent to mild heat shock, such as occurs in fever. In this condition the sensitivity of many transient receptor potential (TRP) channels is particularly notable. Small temperature stresses can modulate TRP gating significantly and this is influenced by lipids. In addition, stress hormones often modify plasma membrane structure and function and thus initiate a cascade of events, which may affect HSR. The major transactivator heat shock factor-1 integrates the signals originating from the plasma membrane and orchestrates the expression of individual heat shock genes. We describe how these observations can be tested at the molecular level, for example, with the use of membrane perturbers and through computational calculations. An important fact which now starts to be addressed is that membranes are not homogeneous nor do all cells react identically. Lipidomics and cell profiling are beginning to address the above two points. Finally, we observe that a deregulated HSR is found in a large number of important diseases where more detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved may offer timely opportunities for clinical interventions and new, innovative drug treatments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Large linear magnetoresistance in a transition-metal stannide β-RhSn4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, X. Z.; Xu, C. Q.; Zhou, N.; Li, B.; Zhang, Jinglei; Shi, Z. X.; Xu, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Materials exhibiting large magnetoresistance may not only be of fundamental research interest, but also can lead to wide-ranging applications in magnetic sensors and switches. Here we demonstrate a large linear-in-field magnetoresistance, Δρ/ρ reaching as high as ˜600% at 2 K under a 9 T field, in the tetragonal phase of a transition-metal stannide β-RhSn4. Detailed analyses show that its magnetic responses are overall inconsistent with the classical model based on the multiple electron scattering by mobility fluctuations in an inhomogenous conductor, but rather in line with the quantum effects due to the presence of Dirac-like dispersions in the electronic structure. Our results may help guiding the future quest for quantum magnetoresistive materials into the family of stannides, similar to the role played by PtSn4 with topological node arcs.

  4. Surface plasmon enhanced heating of gold nanoparticles: A plasmonic optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Philip G.

    Recent work by Lereu et al. (Appl. Phys. Lett. Vol. 86, 154101, 2005) demonstrates a method of all-optical transfer of modulation signals using surface plasmon excitation on thin gold films. Localized heating of the film, resulting from surface plasmon decay, alter the optical properties of the device. A similar optical modulation method is now presented using gold nanoparticles. Computational models are used to generate realistic values of the thermo-optical response of gold and the thermal dynamics of a hot nanoparticle-substrate device. Differential pump-probe reflectivity measurements were perferomed and demonstrate modulation frequencies of upto 10kHz, an improvement of two orders of magnitude over the thin-film device. Sample fabrication techniques using physical vapor deposition and interference lithography, and heat transport on the nanoscale are also discussed.

  5. Heat-Treatment-Induced Switching of Magnetic States in the Doped Polar Semiconductor Ge1‑xMnxTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriener, M.; Nakajima, T.; Kaneko, Y.; Kikkawa, A.; Yu, X. Z.; Endo, N.; Kato, K.; Takata, M.; Arima, T.; Tokura, Y.; Taguchi, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Cross-control of a material property - manipulation of a physical quantity (e.g., magnetisation) by a nonconjugate field (e.g., electrical field) – is a challenge in fundamental science and also important for technological device applications. It has been demonstrated that magnetic properties can be controlled by electrical and optical stimuli in various magnets. Here we find that heat-treatment allows the control over two competing magnetic phases in the Mn-doped polar semiconductor GeTe. The onset temperatures Tc of ferromagnetism vary at low Mn concentrations by a factor of five to six with a maximum Tc ≈ 180 K, depending on the selected phase. Analyses in terms of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy indicate a possible segregation of the Mn ions, which is responsible for the high-Tc phase. More importantly, we demonstrate that the two states can be switched back and forth repeatedly from either phase by changing the heat-treatment of a sample, thereby confirming magnetic phase-change-memory functionality.

  6. Heat-Treatment-Induced Switching of Magnetic States in the Doped Polar Semiconductor Ge1-xMnxTe.

    PubMed

    Kriener, M; Nakajima, T; Kaneko, Y; Kikkawa, A; Yu, X Z; Endo, N; Kato, K; Takata, M; Arima, T; Tokura, Y; Taguchi, Y

    2016-05-10

    Cross-control of a material property - manipulation of a physical quantity (e.g., magnetisation) by a nonconjugate field (e.g., electrical field) - is a challenge in fundamental science and also important for technological device applications. It has been demonstrated that magnetic properties can be controlled by electrical and optical stimuli in various magnets. Here we find that heat-treatment allows the control over two competing magnetic phases in the Mn-doped polar semiconductor GeTe. The onset temperatures Tc of ferromagnetism vary at low Mn concentrations by a factor of five to six with a maximum Tc ≈ 180 K, depending on the selected phase. Analyses in terms of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy indicate a possible segregation of the Mn ions, which is responsible for the high-Tc phase. More importantly, we demonstrate that the two states can be switched back and forth repeatedly from either phase by changing the heat-treatment of a sample, thereby confirming magnetic phase-change-memory functionality.

  7. Heat-Treatment-Induced Switching of Magnetic States in the Doped Polar Semiconductor Ge1−xMnxTe

    PubMed Central

    Kriener, M.; Nakajima, T.; Kaneko, Y.; Kikkawa, A.; Yu, X. Z.; Endo, N.; Kato, K.; Takata, M.; Arima, T.; Tokura, Y.; Taguchi, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-control of a material property - manipulation of a physical quantity (e.g., magnetisation) by a nonconjugate field (e.g., electrical field) – is a challenge in fundamental science and also important for technological device applications. It has been demonstrated that magnetic properties can be controlled by electrical and optical stimuli in various magnets. Here we find that heat-treatment allows the control over two competing magnetic phases in the Mn-doped polar semiconductor GeTe. The onset temperatures Tc of ferromagnetism vary at low Mn concentrations by a factor of five to six with a maximum Tc ≈ 180 K, depending on the selected phase. Analyses in terms of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy indicate a possible segregation of the Mn ions, which is responsible for the high-Tc phase. More importantly, we demonstrate that the two states can be switched back and forth repeatedly from either phase by changing the heat-treatment of a sample, thereby confirming magnetic phase-change-memory functionality. PMID:27160657

  8. Quantum criticality and DBI magneto-resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiritsis, Elias; Li, Li

    2017-03-01

    We use the DBI action from string theory and holography to study the magneto-resistance at quantum criticality with hyperscaling violation. We find and analyze a rich class of scaling behaviors for the magneto-resistance. A special case describes the scaling results found in pnictides by Hayers et al in 2014 (arXiv:1412.6484).

  9. Metal-insulator transition upon heating and negative-differential-resistive-switching induced by self-heating in BaCo{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}S{sub 1.8}

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, B.; Genossar, J.; Chashka, K. B.; Patlagan, L.; Reisner, G. M.

    2014-04-14

    The layered compound BaCo{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}S{sub 2−y} (0.05 < x < 0.2 and 0.05 < y < 0.2) exhibits an unusual first-order structural and electronic phase transition from a low-T monoclinic paramagnetic metal to a high-T tetragonal antiferromagnetic insulator around 200 K with huge hysteresis (∼40 K) and large volume change (∼0.01). Here, we report on unusual voltage-controlled resistive switching followed by current-controlled resistive switching induced by self-heating in polycrystalline BaCo{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}S{sub 2−y} (nominal x = 0.1 and y = 0.2). These were due to the steep metal to insulator transition upon heating followed by the activated behavior of the resistivity above the transition. The major role of Joule heating in switching is supported by the absence of nonlinearity in the current as function of voltage, I(V), obtained in pulsed measurements, in the range of electric fields relevant to d.c. measurements. The voltage-controlled negative differential resistance around the threshold for switching was explained by a simple model of self-heating. The main difficulty in modeling I(V) from the samples resistance as function of temperature R(T) was the progressive increase of R(T), and to a lesser extend the decrease of the resistance jumps at the transitions, caused by the damage induced by cycling through the transitions by heating or self-heating. This was dealt with by following systematically R(T) over many cycles and by using the data of R(T) in the heating cycle closest to that of the self-heating one.

  10. Magnetoresistance in relativistic hydrodynamics without anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Andrew; Karch, Andreas; Lucas, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    We present expressions for the magnetoconductivity and the magnetoresistance of a strongly interacting metal in 3 + 1 dimensions, derivable from relativistic hydrodynamics. Such an approach is suitable for ultraclean metals with emergent Lorentz invariance. When this relativistic fluid contains chiral anomalies, it is known to exhibit longitudinal negative magnetoresistance. We show that similar effects can arise in non-anomalous relativistic fluids due to the distinctive gradient expansion. In contrast with a Galilean-invariant fluid, the resistivity tensor of a dirty relativistic fluid exhibits similar angular dependence to negative magnetoresistance, even when the constitutive relations and momentum relaxation rate are isotropic. We further account for the effect of magnetic field-dependent corrections to the gradient expansion and the effects of long-wavelength impurities on magnetoresistance. We note that the holographic D3/D7 system exhibits negative magnetoresistance.

  11. Rashba-Edelstein Magnetoresistance in Metallic Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Hiroyasu; Kanno, Yusuke; An, Hongyu; Tashiro, Takaharu; Haku, Satoshi; Nomura, Akiyo; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-09-01

    We report the observation of magnetoresistance originating from Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in a metallic heterostructure: the Rashba-Edelstein (RE) magnetoresistance. We show that the simultaneous action of the direct and inverse RE effects in a Bi /Ag /CoFeB trilayer couples current-induced spin accumulation to the electric resistance. The electric resistance changes with the magnetic-field angle, reminiscent of the spin Hall magnetoresistance, despite the fact that bulk SOC is not responsible for the magnetoresistance. We further found that, even when the magnetization is saturated, the resistance increases with increasing the magnetic-field strength, which is attributed to the Hanle magnetoresistance in this system.

  12. Frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemans, W.; Janssen, P.; van der Heijden, E. H. M.; Kemerink, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2010-09-01

    To identify the microscopic mechanisms of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR), the dependency on the frequency of the applied magnetic field is explored, which consists of a dc and ac component. The measured magnetoconductance decreases when the frequency is increased. The decrease is stronger for lower voltages, which is shown to be linked to the presence of a negative capacitance, as measured with admittance spectroscopy. The negative capacitance disappears when the frequency becomes comparable to the inverse transit time of the minority carriers. These results are in agreement with recent interpretations that magnetic field effects on minority carrier mobility dominate OMAR.

  13. Prosequence switching: an effective strategy to produce biologically active E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin STh.

    PubMed

    Weiglmeier, Philipp R; Berkner, Hanna; Seebahn, Angela; Vogel, Nico; Schreiber, Rainer; Wöhrl, Birgitta M; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Rösch, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections account for the majority of cases of acute secretory diarrhea. The causative agents are enterotoxins secreted by ETEC, among them is the heat-stable enterotoxin, STh. STh is a 19-amino acid peptide containing three disulfide bonds that stimulates fluid secretion in the bowel by binding to the receptor domain of intestinal guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C). Since GC-C agonists have pharmacologic potential for diagnosis and treatment of disorders such as constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C), chronic constipation, and colorectal carcinoma, it is crucial to develop methods for the large-scale production of STh and related peptides. Here, we present a strategy for recombinant expression of STh that relies on the use of the prosequence of human uroguanylin to support proper folding and disulfide bond formation. The chimeric protein CysCys-STh consisting of the propeptide of uroguanylin as N-terminus and the STh peptide as C-terminus was expressed in E. coli, and an efficient purification protocol was developed. Trypsin digestion of this protein released the enterotoxin which could be obtained in high purity. NMR and mass spectrometry confirmed the identity and homogeneity of the toxin, and its biological activity was confirmed by a cell-based in vivo assay. The expression scheme introduced here represents a cost-efficient and scalable way of STh production.

  14. Route towards huge magnetoresistance in doped polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersten, S. P.; Meskers, S. C. J.; Bobbert, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    Room-temperature magnetoresistance of the order of 10% has been observed in organic semiconductors. We predict that even larger magnetoresistance can be realized in suitably synthesized doped conjugated polymers. In such polymers, ionization of dopants creates free charges that recombine with a rate governed by a competition between an applied magnetic field and random hyperfine fields. This leads to a spin-blocking effect that depends on the magnetic field. We show that the combined effects of spin blocking and charge blocking, the fact that two free charges cannot occupy the same site, lead to a magnetoresistance of almost two orders of magnitude. This magnetoresistance occurs even at vanishing electric field and is therefore a quasiequilibrium effect. The influences of the dopant strength, energetic disorder, and interchain hopping are investigated. We find that the dopant strength and energetic disorder have only little influence on the magnetoresistance. Interchain hopping strongly decreases the magnetoresistance because it can lift spin-blocking and charge-blocking configurations that occur in strictly one-dimensional transport. We provide suggestions for realization of polymers that should show this magnetoresistance.

  15. Magnetoresistive sensor for weak magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Timothy J.; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    1997-04-01

    A new excitation technique is described for the measurement of weak magnetic fields (<0.01 Oe). The resistance variation of a magnetoresistive element due to an oscillating excitation field is converted into a voltage proportional to the environmental field. The excitation field amplitude is set large enough to saturate the magnetization during each half-cycle, greatly reducing hysteresis effects in the output signal. Both anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and giant magnetoresistance (GMR) structures have been used to measure fields with sufficient accuracy for compass applications. Such devices could be made with extremely small dimensions and power requirements.

  16. Voltage-Source Series Resonant Zero Current Soft Switching High-Frequency Inverter with PDM Scheme for Induction Heating Roller in Copy Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yuelu; Nakaoka, Mutsuo

    This paper presents a voltage source half bridge series load resonant ZCS-PDM high frequency inverter using IGBT power module for the induction-heating roller in copy machines. The steady-state operating principle and unique features of this high frequency inverter with two ZCS-assisted inductive snubbers in series with the active power switch are presented, which can achieve stable zero current soft commutation under pulse density modulated power regulation scheme. The experimental results of cost effective ZCS-PDM inverter treated here are evaluated on basis of computer simulation ones and discussed for the induction-heating roller from a practice point of view

  17. Tunneling magnetoresistance of silicon chains

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2016-05-28

    The tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) of a silicon chain sandwiched between nickel electrodes was examined by using first-principles density functional theory. The relative orientation of the magnetization in a parallel-alignment (PA) configuration of two nickel electrodes enhanced the current with a bias less than 0.4 V compared with that in an antiparallel-alignment configuration. Consequently, the silicon chain-nickel electrodes yielded good TMR characteristics. In addition, there was polarized spin current in the PA configuration. The spin polarization of sulfur atoms functioning as a linking bridge between the chain and nickel electrode played an important role in the magnetic effects of the electric current. Moreover, the hybridization of the sulfur 3p orbital and σ-conjugated silicon 3p orbital contributed to increasing the total current.

  18. Unidirectional spin Hall magnetoresistance in ferromagnet/normal metal bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avci, Can Onur; Garello, Kevin; Ghosh, Abhijit; Gabureac, Mihai; Alvarado, Santos F.; Gambardella, Pietro

    2015-07-01

    Magnetoresistive effects are usually invariant on inversion of the magnetization direction. In non-centrosymmetric conductors, however, nonlinear resistive terms can give rise to a current dependence that is quadratic in the applied voltage and linear in the magnetization. Here we demonstrate that such conditions are realized in simple bilayer metal films where the spin-orbit interaction and spin-dependent scattering couple the current-induced spin accumulation to the electrical conductivity. We show that the longitudinal resistance of Ta|Co and Pt|Co bilayers changes when reversing the polarity of the current or the sign of the magnetization. This unidirectional magnetoresistance scales linearly with current density and has opposite sign in Ta and Pt, which we associate with the modification of the interface scattering potential induced by the spin Hall effect in these materials. Our results suggest a route to control the resistance and detect magnetization switching in spintronic devices using a two-terminal geometry, which applies also to heterostructures including topological insulators.

  19. Competing Mechanisms in Organic Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, Bert

    2013-03-01

    A surprisingly large ``organic magnetoresistance'' (OMAR) has been found in both polymers and small molecule organic semiconductors at relatively small applied magnetic fields (~ 5 mT) and at room temperature. Unlike spin-injection devices, where the occurrence of a finite spin polarization of the current is essential for measuring a finite magnetoresistance, OMAR is generally considered to be due to spin correlations between spin carrying particles in the organic material. Although the microscopic mechanisms of hyperfine field induced spin mixing are relatively well understood, it is still intensively debated which particles are involved and how they can affect the current in such a drastic manner. In this presentation recent developments and new insights as to the underlying physics are discussed. Quantitative models will be introduced, based on different pairs of particles and mechanisms, and giving rise to effects at a variety of field scales. It will be discussed how specific device physics causes a non-trivial relation between microscopic spin-dependent reactions and macroscopic device behaviour. Finally, it will be shown how comprehensive studies on especially engineered organic systems, including polymer-fullerene blends and molecular doping, can be used to pinpoint the relevance of different mechanisms in the complementary regimes. The experimentally observed linewidth, sign and amplitude of both ``high-field'' (>100 mT) and ``low-field'' (~ 5 mT) effects, as well as their bias voltage dependence display very pronounced features as a function of fullerene doping. They provide unique fingerprints for which mechanism is of relevance. After careful analysis, this allows for identification of three earlier proposed mechanisms, involving exciton-charge, electron-hole and bipolaron (polarons of like charge) reactions. Present activities are aiming at using this insight for tailoring OMAR response by design.

  20. Viscous magnetoresistance of correlated electron liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchenko, Alex; Xie, Hong-Yi; Andreev, A. V.

    2017-03-01

    We develop a theory of magnetoresistance of two-dimensional electron systems in a smooth disorder potential in the hydrodynamic regime. Our theory applies to two-dimensional semiconductor structures with strongly correlated carriers when the mean free path due to electron-electron collisions is sufficiently short. The dominant contribution to magnetoresistance arises from the modification of the flow pattern by the Lorentz force, rather than the magnetic field dependence of the kinetic coefficients of the electron liquid. The resulting magnetoresistance is positive and quadratic at weak fields. Although the resistivity is governed by both the viscosity and thermal conductivity of the electron fluid, the magnetoresistance is controlled by the viscosity only. This enables the extraction of viscosity of the electron liquid from magnetotransport measurements.

  1. Magnetoresistance in inhomogeneous graphene/metal hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moktadir, Zakaria; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    We investigate extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) of inhomogeneous graphene-metal hybrids using finite element modelling. Inhomogeneous graphene is a binary system made of electron and hole puddles. Two geometries of the embedded metallic structure were considered: circular and fishbone geometries. We found that the breaking of graphene into charge puddles weakens the magnetoresistance of the hybrid system compared to a homogeneous graphene-metal system. For a fixed value of the magnetic field, the magnetoresistance increases with decreasing area fraction occupied by electrons puddles. Fishbone geometry showed an enhanced magnetoresistance compared to circular geometry. The EMR is also investigated as a function of the contact resistance for the fishbone geometry where it was found that a minimal contact resistance is essential to obtain enhanced EMR in graphene-metal hybrid devices.

  2. Evaluation of Biomarkers of Exposure in Smokers Switching to a Carbon-Heated Tobacco Product: A Controlled, Randomized, Open-Label 5-Day Exposure Study

    PubMed Central

    Haziza, Christelle; Weitkunat, Rolf; Magnette, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tobacco harm reduction aims to provide reduced risk alternatives to adult smokers who would otherwise continue smoking combustible cigarettes (CCs). This randomized, open-label, three-arm, parallel-group, single-center, short-term confinement study aimed to investigate the effects of exposure to selected harmful and potentially harmful constituents (HPHCs) of cigarette smoke in adult smokers who switched to a carbon-heated tobacco product (CHTP) compared with adult smokers who continued to smoke CCs and those who abstained from smoking for 5 days. Methods: Biomarkers of exposure to HPHCs, including nicotine and urinary excretion of mutagenic material, were measured in 24-hour urine and blood samples in 112 male and female Caucasian smokers switching from CCs to the CHTP ad libitum use. Puffing topography was assessed during product use. Results: Switching to the CHTP or smoking abstinence (SA) resulted in marked decreases from baseline to Day 5 in all biomarkers of exposure measured, including carboxyhemoglobin (43% and 55% decrease in the CHTP and SA groups, respectively). The urinary excretion of mutagenic material was also markedly decreased on Day 5 compared with baseline (89% and 87% decrease in the CHTP and SA groups, respectively). No changes in biomarkers of exposure to HPHCs or urinary mutagenic material were observed between baseline and Day 5 in the CC group. Conclusions: Our results provide clear evidence supporting a reduction in the level of exposure to HPHCs of tobacco smoke in smokers who switch to CHTP under controlled conditions, similar to that observed in SA. Implications: The reductions observed in biomarkers of exposure to HPHCs of tobacco smoke in this short-term study could potentially also reduce the incidence of cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases in those smokers who switch to a heated tobacco product. PMID:26817490

  3. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  4. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-tao; Tian, Yu-feng; Yan, Shi-shen; Lin, Zhao-jun; Kang, Shi-shou; Chen, Yan-xue; Liu, Guo-lei; Mei, Liang-mo

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices. PMID:26387967

  5. Large rectification magnetoresistance in nonmagnetic Al/Ge/Al heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Grünberg, Peter; Li, Qiang; Ye, Sheng-Tao; Tian, Yu-Feng; Yan, Shi-Shen; Lin, Zhao-Jun; Kang, Shi-Shou; Chen, Yan-Xue; Liu, Guo-Lei; Mei, Liang-Mo

    2015-09-21

    Magnetoresistance and rectification are two fundamental physical properties of heterojunctions and respectively have wide applications in spintronics devices. Being different from the well known various magnetoresistance effects, here we report a brand new large magnetoresistance that can be regarded as rectification magnetoresistance: the application of a pure small sinusoidal alternating-current to the nonmagnetic Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions can generate a significant direct-current voltage, and this rectification voltage strongly varies with the external magnetic field. We find that the rectification magnetoresistance in Al/Ge Schottky heterojunctions is as large as 250% at room temperature, which is greatly enhanced as compared with the conventional magnetoresistance of 70%. The findings of rectification magnetoresistance open the way to the new nonmagnetic Ge-based spintronics devices of large rectification magnetoresistance at ambient temperature under the alternating-current due to the simultaneous implementation of the rectification and magnetoresistance in the same devices.

  6. Organic magnetoresistance based on hopping theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fu-Jiang; Xie, Shi-Jie

    2014-09-01

    For the organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) effect, we suggest a spin-related hopping of carriers (polarons) based on Marcus theory. The mobility of polarons is calculated with the master equation (ME) and then the magnetoresistance (MR) is obtained. The theoretical results are consistent with the experimental observation. Especially, the sign inversion of the MR under different driving bias voltages found in the experiment is predicted. Besides, the effects of molecule disorder, hyperfine interaction (HFI), polaron localization, and temperature on the MR are investigated.

  7. Giant magnetoresistance through a single molecule.

    PubMed

    Schmaus, Stefan; Bagrets, Alexei; Nahas, Yasmine; Yamada, Toyo K; Bork, Annika; Bowen, Martin; Beaurepaire, Eric; Evers, Ferdinand; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2011-03-01

    Magnetoresistance is a change in the resistance of a material system caused by an applied magnetic field. Giant magnetoresistance occurs in structures containing ferromagnetic contacts separated by a metallic non-magnetic spacer, and is now the basis of read heads for hard drives and for new forms of random access memory. Using an insulator (for example, a molecular thin film) rather than a metal as the spacer gives rise to tunnelling magnetoresistance, which typically produces a larger change in resistance for a given magnetic field strength, but also yields higher resistances, which are a disadvantage for real device operation. Here, we demonstrate giant magnetoresistance across a single, non-magnetic hydrogen phthalocyanine molecule contacted by the ferromagnetic tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. We measure the magnetoresistance to be 60% and the conductance to be 0.26G(0), where G(0) is the quantum of conductance. Theoretical analysis identifies spin-dependent hybridization of molecular and electrode orbitals as the cause of the large magnetoresistance.

  8. Automatic thermal switch. [spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, J. W.; Wing, L. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An automatic thermal switch to control heat flow includes two thermally conductive plates and a thermally conductive switch saddle pivotally mounted to the first plate. A flexible heat carrier is connected between the switch saddle and the second plate. A phase-change power unit, including a piston coupled to the switch saddle, is in thermal contact with the first thermally conductive plate. A biasing element biases the switch saddle in a predetermined position with respect to the first plate. When the phase-change power unit is actuated by an increase in heat transmitted through the first place, the piston extends and causes the switch saddle to pivot, thereby varying the thermal conduction between the two plates through the switch saddle and flexible heat carrier. The biasing element, switch saddle, and piston can be arranged to provide either a normally closed or normally opened thermally conductive path between the two plates.

  9. Tunneling magnetoresistive heads for magnetic data storage.

    PubMed

    Mao, Sining

    2007-01-01

    Spintronics is emerging to be a new form of nanotechnologies, which utilizes not only the charge but also spin degree of freedom of electrons. Spin-dependent tunneling transport is one of the many kinds of physical phenomena involving spintronics, which has already found industrial applications. In this paper, we first provide a brief review on the basic physics and materials for magnetic tunnel junctions, followed more importantly by a detailed coverage on the application of magnetic tunneling devices in magnetic data storage. The use of tunneling magnetoresistive reading heads has helped to maintain a fast growth of areal density, which is one of the key advantages of hard disk drives as compared to solid-state memories. This review is focused on the first commercial tunneling magnetoresistive heads in the industry at an areal density of 80 approximately 100 Gbit/in2 for both laptop and desktop Seagate hard disk drive products using longitudinal media. The first generation tunneling magnetoresistive products utilized a bottom stack of tunnel junctions and an abutted hard bias design. The output signal amplitude of these heads was 3 times larger than that of comparable giant magnetoresistive devices, resulting in a 0.6 decade bit error rate gain over the latter. This has enabled high component and drive yields. Due to the improved thermal dissipation of vertical geometry, the tunneling magnetoresistive head runs cooler with a better lifetime performance, and has demonstrated similar electrical-static-discharge robustness as the giant magnetoresistive devices. It has also demonstrated equivalent or better process and wafer yields compared to the latter. The tunneling magnetoresistive heads are proven to be a mature and capable reader technology. Using the same head design in conjunction with perpendicular recording media, an areal density of 274 Gbit/in2 has been demonstrated, and advanced tunneling magnetoresistive heads can reach 311 Gbit/in2. Today, the

  10. Classical and quantum routes to linear magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jingshi

    The transverse, positive magnetoresistance of suitably doped silver chalcogenides and indium antimonides changes linearly with magnetic field by thousands of percent, with no sign of saturation up to MegaGauss. A precise characterization of these unexpected observations has led to two very different, yet equally interesting magnetotransport mechanisms: the classical inhomogeneity-induced current jetting, and quantum linear magnetoresistance. The inhomogeneous distribution of excess/deficient silver atoms lies behind the anomalous magnetoresistive response of silver chalcogenides, introducing spatial conductivity fluctuations with length scales independent of the cyclotron radius. We show that a systematic investigation of the resistivity tensor in longitudinal field could be used to identify the spatial inhomogeneities and determine the associated length scale of the current distortion. By contrast, the linear magnetoresistance observed in single-crystalline InSb presents a spectacular manifestation of magnetotransport in the extreme quantum limit, when only one Landau band is partially filled. Harnessing both the classical and quantum effects opens the gate to artificial fabrication of conducting networks with micron scale unit size for enhanced magnetoresistive sensitivity.

  11. Exchange bias and bistable magneto-resistance states in amorphous TbFeCo thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaopu Ma, Chung T.; Poon, S. Joseph; Lu, Jiwei; Devaraj, Arun; Spurgeon, Steven R.; Comes, Ryan B.

    2016-01-04

    Amorphous TbFeCo thin films sputter deposited at room temperature on thermally oxidized Si substrate are found to exhibit strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Atom probe tomography, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping have revealed two nanoscale amorphous phases with different Tb atomic percentages distributed within the amorphous film. Exchange bias accompanied by bistable magneto-resistance states has been uncovered near room temperature by magnetization and magneto-transport measurements. The exchange anisotropy originates from the exchange interaction between the ferrimagnetic and ferromagnetic components corresponding to the two amorphous phases. This study provides a platform for exchange bias and magneto-resistance switching using single-layer amorphous ferrimagnetic thin films that require no epitaxial growth.

  12. Exchange bias and bistable magneto-resistance states in amorphous TbFeCo thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaopu; Ma, Chung T.; Lu, Jiwei; Devaraj, Arun; Spurgeon, Steven R.; Comes, Ryan B.; Poon, S. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous TbFeCo thin films sputter deposited at room temperature on thermally oxidized Si substrate are found to exhibit strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Atom probe tomography, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping have revealed two nanoscale amorphous phases with different Tb atomic percentages distributed within the amorphous film. Exchange bias accompanied by bistable magneto-resistance states has been uncovered near room temperature by magnetization and magneto-transport measurements. The exchange anisotropy originates from the exchange interaction between the ferrimagnetic and ferromagnetic components corresponding to the two amorphous phases. This study provides a platform for exchange bias and magneto-resistance switching using single-layer amorphous ferrimagnetic thin films that require no epitaxial growth.

  13. Spin Hall magnetoresistance at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Ken-ichi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Kikkawa, Takashi; Iguchi, Ryo; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-02-02

    The temperature dependence of spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in Pt/Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YIG) bilayer films has been investigated in a high temperature range from room temperature to near the Curie temperature of YIG. The experimental results show that the magnitude of the magnetoresistance ratio induced by the SMR monotonically decreases with increasing the temperature and almost disappears near the Curie temperature. We found that, near the Curie temperature, the temperature dependence of the SMR in the Pt/YIG film is steeper than that of a magnetization curve of the YIG; the critical exponent of the magnetoresistance ratio is estimated to be 0.9. This critical behavior of the SMR is attributed mainly to the temperature dependence of the spin-mixing conductance at the Pt/YIG interface.

  14. Reflective HTS switch

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.

    1994-09-27

    A HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time. 6 figs.

  15. Reflective HTS switch

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1994-01-01

    A HTS switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time.

  16. Magnetoresistive Sensors in Biological Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondra, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic beads or nanoparticles can be used as ``labels'' in biochemical assays by attaching the beads to the biospecies of interest using a bio-specific attachment. Once the labels are attached, they can be used to manipulate, capture, and detect the species to be analyzed. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors may be used to detect and count these labels, and thus make an inference about the concentration of the species of interest. MR technology is especially promising for biosensor applications where making the detector small and integrated with related sample handling tools to form a ``lab-on-a-chip'' miniaturized system. The function of the MR sensors is to detect stray magnetic fields from the beads while they are exposed to a magnetic excitation field. Generally, the stray fields from beads and clusters of beads are complicated functions of geometry, so some care is required to relate the detected magnetic signal to the number and location of the bead labels. This presentation will begin with a broad overview of results from many groups working in this area. For convenience, the applications are divided into three categories, detection of: flowing magnetic beads, immobilized beads, and scanned samples. Next will be some discussion of how the choice of spintronic sensor technology might affect detection capabilities (AMR, GMR, TMR, Hall effect, etc). Then, challenges relating to integration of MR sensors into microfluidic products will be discussed. This is the focus of the presenter's current day-to-day work on developing and producing MR-based biosensors. And finally, a description of possible future avenues of study and development will be presented.

  17. Anomalous Magnetoresistance in Dirty Magnetic Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroszyński, J.; Andrearczyk, T.; Karczewski, G.; Wojtowicz, T.; Wróbel, J.; Popović, Dragana; Dietl, T.

    2006-09-01

    We report on magnetotransport in a 2D modulation doped (Cd,Mn)Te diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS). The quantum Hall effect is observed in applied perpendicular magnetic fields, as one would expect in a high mobility 2D system. It is surprising, however, that the application of an in-plane B reveals features commonly observed in colossal magnetoresistant (CMR) materials, such as a strong negative magnetoresistance as well as dramatic and nonmonotonic changes in the zero-field resistance which coincide with the ferromagnetic ordering. These analogies suggest that the phenomena observed in DMS and manganites have a common origin — the formation of microscopic clusters.

  18. Giant magnetoresistance in granular FeSiO 2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, B.; Yan, X.

    1997-02-01

    We studied resistivity, magnetoresistivity and magnetization in granular FeSiO 2 films. In the hopping region, magnetoresistance was found to be as large as -5%, and is isotropic for different measurement geometry, which is the signature of giant magnetoresistance due to a spin-dependent conduction process. Temperature dependence of magnetoresistance could be described qualitatively but not quantitatively by two specific spin-dependent tunnelling models. We found that resistivity ϱ changes five orders of magnitude by altering measurement temperature, annealing temperature or metal volume fraction, and that magnetoresistivity -Δϱ increases with ϱ monotonously.

  19. Monte Carlo calculations of the magnetoresistance in magnetic multilayer structures with giant magnetoresistance effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, V. V.; Prudnikov, P. V.; Romanovskiy, D. E.

    2016-06-01

    A Monte Carlo study of trilayer and spin-valve magnetic structures with giant magnetoresistance effects is carried out. The anisotropic Heisenberg model is used for description of magnetic properties of ultrathin ferromagnetic films forming these structures. The temperature and magnetic field dependences of magnetic characteristics are considered for ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations of these multilayer structures. The methodology for determination of the magnetoresistance by the Monte Carlo method is introduced; this permits us to calculate the magnetoresistance of multilayer structures for different thicknesses of the ferromagnetic films. The calculated temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance agrees very well with the experimental results measured for the Fe(0 0 1)-Cr(0 0 1) multilayer structure and CFAS-Ag-CFAS-IrMn spin-valve structure based on the half-metallic Heusler alloy Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5.

  20. Large magnetoresistance in non-magnetic silver chalcogenides and new class of magnetoresistive compounds

    DOEpatents

    Saboungi, Marie-Louis; Price, David C. L.; Rosenbaum, Thomas F.; Xu, Rong; Husmann, Anke

    2001-01-01

    The heavily-doped silver chalcogenides, Ag.sub.2+.delta. Se and Ag.sub.2+.delta. Te, show magnetoresistance effects on a scale comparable to the "colossal" magnetoresistance (CMR) compounds. Hall coefficient, magnetoconductivity, and hydrostatic pressure experiments establish that elements of narrow-gap semiconductor physics apply, but both the size of the effects at room temperature and the linear field dependence down to fields of a few Oersteds are surprising new features.

  1. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, J.P.; Emin, D.

    1983-12-21

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and metallic states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  2. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, John P.; Emin, David

    1986-01-01

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and insulating states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  3. Distortion of Magnetic Domain Wall Measured by Magneto-Resistance Changes in a Co Nanoring.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chunghee

    2015-01-01

    The electrical anisotropic magneto-resistance (AMR) measurements were performed to see the formation of a 360 degree magnetic domain wall (360 DW) and distortion of the magnetic moments in a Co nanoring structure. Since the 360 DW is consisted of two 180 degree DWs, a decrease of the resistance was found in the switching process from the vortex to reverse onion state by the AMR effects, which is consistent with micromagnetic simulations. In addition, a decrease of the resistance in the switching process from the onion to vortex state was observed by the distortion of the local magnetic moments due to an applied magnetic field. The stochastic behavior in the switching process is caused by thermally induced magnetic moments changes.

  4. Magnetoresistance in a strongly interacting two-dimensional metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. P.

    1992-07-01

    Using a gauge-theory formulation of the fluxless metallic phase of the t-J model in two dimensions, it is shown that the soft chiral spin fluctuations existing in this phase are suppressed by the introduction of a small transverse magnetic field, while soft charge fluctuations are enhanced. This effect results in the reduction of the predicted linear-in-temperature resistance by an amount proportional to the square of the Hall conductance in the strong-correlation limit near half filling. However, away from this limit, the magnetoresistance may be positive. A similar effect is also shown to exist for the thermal resistance and the specific heat. A comparison with available data on the oxide superconductors is made.

  5. Data center coolant switch

    DOEpatents

    Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-06

    A data center cooling system is operated in a first mode; it has an indoor portion wherein heat is absorbed from components in the data center, and an outdoor heat exchanger portion wherein outside air is used to cool a first heat transfer fluid (e.g., water) present in at least the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the cooling system during the first mode. The first heat transfer fluid is a relatively high performance heat transfer fluid (as compared to the second fluid), and has a first heat transfer fluid freezing point. A determination is made that an appropriate time has been reached to switch from the first mode to a second mode. Based on this determination, the outdoor heat exchanger portion of the data cooling system is switched to a second heat transfer fluid, which is a relatively low performance heat transfer fluid, as compared to the first heat transfer fluid. It has a second heat transfer fluid freezing point lower than the first heat transfer fluid freezing point, and the second heat transfer fluid freezing point is sufficiently low to operate without freezing when the outdoor air temperature drops below a first predetermined relationship with the first heat transfer fluid freezing point.

  6. Negative tunneling magneto-resistance in quantum wires with strong spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seungju; Serra, Llorenç; Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2015-06-01

    We consider a two-dimensional magnetic tunnel junction of the FM/I/QW(FM+SO)/I/N structure, where FM, I and QW(FM+SO) stand for a ferromagnet, an insulator and a quantum wire with both magnetic ordering and Rashba spin-orbit (SOC), respectively. The tunneling magneto-resistance (TMR) exhibits strong anisotropy and switches sign as the polarization direction varies relative to the quantum-wire axis, due to interplay among the one-dimensionality, the magnetic ordering, and the strong SOC of the quantum wire.

  7. Magnetoresistance in Co /Pt based magnetic tunnel junctions with out-of-plane magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducruet, C.; Carvello, B.; Rodmacq, B.; Auffret, S.; Gaudin, G.; Dieny, B.

    2008-04-01

    Submicron magnetic tunnel junctions exhibiting perpendicular magnetic anisotropy have been prepared by sputtering. They associate a hard and a soft electrode based on Co /Pt multilayers, separated by an amorphous alumina barrier. The soft electrode is either free or exchange biased by an antiferromagnetic layer. The magnetoresistance ratio reaches 8% at room temperature after patterning junctions with diameter down to 200nm. The macroscopic magnetic properties were investigated by extraordinary Hall effect and conventional magnetometry measurements. The magnetic moments of both electrodes are out of plane. Two well-separated switching fields allow the realization of well-defined parallel and antiparallel configurations of the magnetizations.

  8. Spatially resolving variations in giant magnetoresistance, undetectable with four-point probe measurements, using infrared microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, C. S.; Thompson, S. M.; Illman, M. D.; LeFrancois, S.; Dumas, P.

    2012-10-15

    Magnetorefractive infrared (IR) microspectroscopy is demonstrated to resolve spatial variations in giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and, by modelling, provide an insight into the origin of the variations. Spatial variations are shown to be masked in conventional four-point probe electrical or IR spectral measurements. IR microspectroscopy was performed at the SMIS beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron, modified to enable measurements in magnetic fields. A GMR gradient was induced in a CoFe/Cu multilayer sample by annealing in a temperature gradient. Modelling revealed that variations in GMR at 900 Oe could be attributed to local variations in interlayer coupling locally changing the switching field.

  9. Dirac State in Giant Magnetoresistive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Jo, N. H.; Ochi, M.; Huang, L.; Mou, D.; Kong, T.; Mun, E.; Wang, L.; Lee, Y.; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Trivedi, N.; Arito, R.; Kaminski, A.

    We use ultrahigh resolution, tunable, vacuum ultraviolet laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the electronic properties of materials that recently were discovered to display titanic magnetoresistance. We find that that several of these materials have Dirac-like features in their band structure. In some materials those features are ``ordinary'' Dirac cones, while in others the linear Dirac dispersion of two crossing bands forms a linear object in 3D momentum space. Our observation poses an important question about the role of Dirac dispersion in the unusually high, non-saturating magnetoresistance of these materials. Research was supported by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358; Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation EPiQS Initiative (Grant No. GBMF4411); CEM, a NSF MRSEC, under Grant No. DMR-1420451.

  10. Modeling anisotropic magnetoresistance in layered antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, D. L. R.; Pinheiro, F. A.; Velev, J.; Chshiev, M.; Castro, J. d.'Albuquerque e.; Lacroix, C.

    2017-06-01

    We have investigated the electronic transport and the anisotropic magnetoresistance in systems consisting of pairs of antiferromagnetically aligned layers separated by a non-magnetic layer, across which an antiferromagnetic coupling between the double layers is established. Calculations have been performed within the framework of the tight-binding model, taking into account the exchange coupling within the ferromagnetic layers and the Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Conductivities have been evaluated in the ballistic regime, based on Kubo formula. We have systematically studied the dependence of the conductivity and of the anisotropic magnetoresistance on several material and structural parameters, such as the orientation of the magnetic moments relative to the crystalline axis, band filling, out-of-plane hopping and spin-orbit parameter.

  11. Anisotropic giant magnetoresistance in NbSb₂

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Kefeng; Graf, D.; Li, Lijun; ...

    2014-12-05

    We report large transverse magnetoreistance (the magnetoresistant ratio ~ 1.3 × 10⁵% in 2 K and 9 T field, and 4.3 × 10⁶% in 0.4 K and 32 T field, without saturation) and field-induced metal semiconductor-like transition in NbSb₂. Magnetoresistance is significantly suppressed but the metal-semiconductor-like transition persists when the current is along the ac-plane. The sign reversal of the Hall resistivity and Seebeck coefficient in the field, plus the electronic structure reveal the coexistence of a small number of holes with very high mobility and a large number of electrons with low mobility. The large MR is attributed tomore » the change of the Fermi surface induced by the magnetic field in addition to the high mobility metal.« less

  12. Switching time in laser pulse heat-assisted magnetic recording using L1{sub 0}-FePt nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lyberatos, A.; Weller, D.; Parker, G. J.

    2015-04-07

    Atomistic spin model simulations using Langevin dynamics are performed to study the factors that determine the thermomagnetic recording time window in FePt media. The onset of thermomagnetic writing occurs at a temperature T{sub o} larger than the Curie temperature T{sub c} as a result of the finite time of relaxation of the magnetization by the linear reversal mode. The Bloch relaxation rate of magnetization growth during cooling below T{sub c} is independent on the write field, provided the field is stronger than some threshold value. Application of a strong write field reduces switching time through better spin alignment in the paramagnetic regime. Finite size effects on the probability distribution of freezing temperatures T{sub f} and the free energy provide insight on the thermomagnetic reversal mechanism. Constraints on the “pulse-mode” of recording when the head field reverses direction during cooling are also considered.

  13. Joule-heat-driven high-efficiency electronic-phase switching in freestanding VO2/TiO2 nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Yoshiyuki; Kanki, Teruo; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrated that an insulator-to-metal transition is driven by a low electric power using freestanding structures with two different sizes. The critical power (P C) required to induce the insulator-to-metal transition was measured with clamped and freestanding nanowires. The required P C for 400-nm-wide freestanding nanowires was 483 nW at a temperature 2 K lower than the temperature of the insulator-to-metal transition. This P C value is approximately 1 order of magnitude smaller than that for freestanding microwires with a width of 1 µm. The thermal dissipation model explains the changes in P C. These results provide guidelines for achieving significant reductions in P C in two-terminal VO2 phase-switching devices.

  14. An analytic approach to tunnelling magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eames, M. E.; Inkson, J. C.

    2009-08-01

    We present an analytic model for the barrier transmission coefficient that can be used to calculate the tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR) for metal-insulator-metal systems. It removes the approximations inherent in the Simmons' and Brinkman models currently used to fit experimental systems that give much lower predictions of the barrier height than would be expected. The model is accurate enough to directly relate to the experiment and hence device optimisation by predicting junction parameters that are in line with bulk properties.

  15. Large hysteretic magnetoresistance of silicide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Naser, B.; Chamberlin, R. V.; Schilfgaarde, M. V.; Bennett, P. A.; Bird, J. P.

    2007-11-01

    We demonstrate a large (as much as 100%) and strongly hysteretic magnetoresistance (MR) in nominally nonferromagnetic silicide films and nanowires. This unusual MR is quenched above a few kelvins, where conventional behavior due to weak antilocalization is recovered. The dynamic characteristics of this effect are suggestive of weakly interacting, localized paramagnetic moments that form at the surface oxide of the silicide nanostructures, with dramatic consequences for transport when the system size is reduced to the nanoscale.

  16. First Order Colossal Magnetoresistance Transitions in the Two-Orbital Model for Manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Cengiz; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Dagotto, Elbio R

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale Monte Carlo simulation results for the two-orbital model for manganites, including Jahn- Teller lattice distortions, are presented here. At hole density x 1=4 and in the vicinity of the region of competition between the ferromagnetic metallic and spin-charge-orbital ordered insulating phases, the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) phenomenon is observed with a magnetoresistance ratio 10 000%. Our main result is that this CMR transition is found to be of first order in some portions of the phase diagram, in agreement with early results from neutron scattering, specific heat, and magnetization, thus solving a notorious discrepancy between experiments and previous theoretical studies. The first order characteristics of the transition survive, and are actually enhanced, when weak quenched disorder is introduced.

  17. Ultra-Sensitive Magnetoresistive Displacement Sensing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olivas, John D. (Inventor); Lairson, Bruce M. (Inventor); Ramesham, Rajeshuni (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An ultrasensitive displacement sensing device for use in accelerometers, pressure gauges, temperature transducers, and the like, comprises a sputter deposited, multilayer, magnetoresistive field sensor with a variable electrical resistance based on an imposed magnetic field. The device detects displacement by sensing changes in the local magnetic field about the magnetoresistive field sensor caused by the displacement of a hard magnetic film on a movable microstructure. The microstructure, which may be a cantilever, membrane, bridge, or other microelement, moves under the influence of an acceleration a known displacement predicted by the configuration and materials selected, and the resulting change in the electrical resistance of the MR sensor can be used to calculate the displacement. Using a micromachining approach, very thin silicon and silicon nitride membranes are fabricated in one preferred embodiment by means of anisotropic etching of silicon wafers. Other approaches include reactive ion etching of silicon on insulator (SOI), or Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of silicon nitride films over silicon substrates. The device is found to be improved with the use of giant magnetoresistive elements to detect changes in the local magnetic field.

  18. Tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance at La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3}-graphene interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, L. C. Yan, W.; Kar-Narayan, S.; Mathur, N. D.; Lombardo, A.; Barbone, M.; Milana, S.; Ferrari, A. C.; Ghidini, M.

    2016-03-14

    Using ferromagnetic La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} electrodes bridged by single-layer graphene, we observe magnetoresistive changes of ∼32–35 MΩ at 5 K. Magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy at the same temperature reveals that the magnetoresistance arises from in-plane reorientations of electrode magnetization, evidencing tunnelling anisotropic magnetoresistance at the La{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3}-graphene interfaces. Large resistance switching without spin transport through the non-magnetic channel could be attractive for graphene-based magnetic-sensing applications.

  19. Temporal niche switching and reduced nest attendance in response to heat dissipation limits in lactating common voles (Microtus arvalis).

    PubMed

    van der Vinne, Vincent; Simons, Mirre J P; Reimert, Inonge; Gerkema, Menno P

    2014-04-10

    According to the heat dissipation limit theory, maximum metabolic turnover is limited by the capacity of the body to dissipate excess heat. Small mammals, including common voles (Microtus arvalis), face a heat dissipation limitation during lactation. Pup growth and milk production are reduced under higher ambient temperatures. Heat dissipation problems might in part be alleviated by modifying behavior, such as reducing nest attendance and being active at energetically optimal times of day. According to the circadian thermo-energetics hypothesis, animals can make use of daily ambient temperature fluctuations to alter their energetic expenditure. In this study we test whether heat challenged (housing at 30 °C compared to 21 °C) lactating common voles allocate their time differently among behaviors and whether their ultradian and circadian behavioral rhythmicity are altered. Behavior was scored every 13 min from automated picture recordings, while general locomotor activity was measured by passive infrared detectors to assess ultradian and circadian organization. The effects of ambient temperature on the ultradian organization of behavior were assessed by determining the ultradian period length and the distribution of activity within the ultradian bout. Changes in circadian organization were assessed by the distribution of activity over the light and dark phase. As a complementary measure nest temperature recordings were used to quantify nest attendance distribution between day and night. Lactating dams at 30 °C reduced the fraction of time spent on the nest while increasing the fraction of time resting without pups away from the nest. The ultradian period of locomotor activity was longer in voles housed at 30 °C during pregnancy and lactation, but not after weaning when the pups were removed. No differences in the distribution of activity within the ultradian bout could be detected. The circadian organization was also modulated by ambient temperature. Lactating

  20. Modifying magnetic switching in permalloy film nanostructures using the native oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojem, A.; Bassett, D.; Wesenberg, D.; Mason, S. J.; Avery, A. D.; Zink, B. L.

    2014-03-01

    Thin films of nickel-iron alloys of the nominal concentration near 80% Ni, are very commonly used in applications and in fundamental studies of spin, charge and heat transport in nanomagnetic systems. These permalloy (Py) films are straightforward to grow by various techniques and typically produce predictable, controllable and repeatable magnetic properties, including small coercivity, low magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and low magnetostriction. We have found that greater complexity can be added to the switching behavior of thin films of permalloy by oxidation of thin (~4 nm) layers followed by subsequent growth of Py. Under some circumstances, this can cause apparent negative coercivity in the switching observed in anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of micromachined strips with an expected shape anisotropy. Here we will present results on growth and AMR measurements of the effects in various oxidized Py-Py layered samples. It is not yet clear if the effects are reproducible enough to be used for intentional manipulation of switching behavior in Py nanostructures. We acknowledge support from the NSF CAREER award (DMR-0847796).

  1. Magnetoresistive phenomena in nanoscale magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, John D.

    Nanomagnetic materials are playing an increasingly important role in modern technologies. A particular area of interest involves the interplay between magnetism and electric transport, i.e. magnetoresistive properties. Future generations of field sensors and memory elements will have to be on a length scale of a few nanometers or smaller. Magnetoresistive properties of such nanoscale objects exhibit novel features due to reduced dimensionality, complex surfaces and interfaces, and quantum effects. In this dissertation theoretical aspects of three such nanoscale magnetoresistive phenomena are discussed. Very narrow magnetic domain walls can strongly scatter electrons leading to an increased resistance. Specifically, this dissertation will cover the newly predicted effect of magnetic moment softening in magnetic nanocontacts or nanowires. Atomically thin domain walls in Ni exhibit a reduction, or softening, of the local magnetic moments due to the noncollinearity of the magnetization. This effect leads to a strong enhancement of the resistance of a domain wall. Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) consist of two ferromagnetic electrodes separated by a thin layer of insulating material through which current can be carried by electron tunneling. The resistance of an MTJ depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the two ferromagnetic layers, an effect known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). A first-principles analysis of CoFeB|MgO|CoFeB MTJs will be presented. Calculations reveal that it is energetically favorable for interstitial boron atoms to reside at the interface between the electrode and MgO tunneling barrier, which can be detrimental to the TMR effect. Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) is the change in resistance of a ferromagnetic system as the orientation of the magnetization is altered. In this dissertation, the focus will be on AMR in the tunneling regime. Specifically we will present new theoretical results on tunneling AMR (TAMR) in two

  2. Magnetoresistance reversal in antiperovskite compound Mn{sub 3}Cu{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}N

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. H.; Yin, Y.; Yuan, Q.; Han, J. C.; Zhang, Z. H.; Jian, J. K.; Zhao, J. G. E-mail: songbo@hit.edu.cn; Song, B. E-mail: songbo@hit.edu.cn

    2014-03-28

    We report detailed investigations of the structure, magnetic properties, electronic transport, and specific heat in Mn-based antiperovskite compounds Mn{sub 3}Cu{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}N. Most strikingly, there are several fascinating features: (i) The magnetoresistance at 30 kOe (40 kOe) exceeds ∼1% (∼2%) over a temperature span of ∼70 K (∼25 K) from 5 to 140 K; (ii) magnetoresistance fluctuates at temperatures of 100–200 K, including an obvious sign reversal from negative to positive at ∼140 K. Analysis of the specific heat reveals that the magnetoresistance reversal may originate from the reconstruction of the Fermi surface accompanying an antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic transition.

  3. Dramatically decreased magnetoresistance in non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yang-Yang; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Li, Xiao; Pang, Bin; Zhang, Fan; Lin, Da-Jun; Zhou, Jian; Yao, Shu-Hua; Chen, Y. B.; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Lu, Minghui; Liu, Zhongkai; Chen, Yulin; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Recently, the layered semimetal WTe2 has attracted renewed interest owing to the observation of a non-saturating and giant positive magnetoresistance (~105%), which can be useful for magnetic memory and spintronic devices. However, the underlying mechanisms of the giant magnetoresistance are still under hot debate. Herein, we grew the stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals to test the robustness of giant magnetoresistance. The stoichiometric WTe2 crystals have magnetoresistance as large as 3100% at 2 K and 9-Tesla magnetic field. However, only 71% and 13% magnetoresistance in the most non-stoichiometry (WTe1.80) and the highest Mo isovalent substitution samples (W0.7Mo0.3Te2) are observed, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic-field dependent magnetoresistance of non-stoichiometric WTe2 crystals substantiates that both the large electron-hole concentration asymmetry and decreased carrier mobility, induced by non-stoichiometry, synergistically lead to the decreased magnetoresistance. This work sheds more light on the origin of giant magnetoresistance observed in WTe2.

  4. Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance driven by magnetic phase transition.

    PubMed

    Chen, X Z; Feng, J F; Wang, Z C; Zhang, J; Zhong, X Y; Song, C; Jin, L; Zhang, B; Li, F; Jiang, M; Tan, Y Z; Zhou, X J; Shi, G Y; Zhou, X F; Han, X D; Mao, S C; Chen, Y H; Han, X F; Pan, F

    2017-09-06

    The independent control of two magnetic electrodes and spin-coherent transport in magnetic tunnel junctions are strictly required for tunneling magnetoresistance, while junctions with only one ferromagnetic electrode exhibit tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance dependent on the anisotropic density of states with no room temperature performance so far. Here, we report an alternative approach to obtaining tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance in α'-FeRh-based junctions driven by the magnetic phase transition of α'-FeRh and resultantly large variation of the density of states in the vicinity of MgO tunneling barrier, referred to as phase transition tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance. The junctions with only one α'-FeRh magnetic electrode show a magnetoresistance ratio up to 20% at room temperature. Both the polarity and magnitude of the phase transition tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance can be modulated by interfacial engineering at the α'-FeRh/MgO interface. Besides the fundamental significance, our finding might add a different dimension to magnetic random access memory and antiferromagnet spintronics.Tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance is promising for next generation memory devices but limited by the low efficiency and functioning temperature. Here the authors achieved 20% tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature in magnetic tunnel junctions with one α'-FeRh magnetic electrode.

  5. Hall effect and magnetoresistivity in the ternary molybdenum sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Haugland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Hall coefficient and magnetoresistance of sputtered films of Cu(x)Mo6S8 and PbMo6S8 have been measured, as well as the magnetoresistance in sintered samples of the same materials. Assuming a single band model, net carrier densities and mean mobilities are determined

  6. Hall effect and magnetoresistivity in the ternary molybdenum sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Haugland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    The Hall coefficient and magnetoresistance of sputtered films of Cu(x)Mo6S8 and PbMo6S8 have been measured, as well as the magnetoresistance in sintered samples of the same materials. Assuming a single band model, net carrier densities and mean mobilities are determined

  7. Huge magnetoresistive effects using space charge limited current in ZnO /SiO2 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyanishi, Shintaro; Yagura, Motoji; Teraguchi, Nobuaki; Shirakawa, Kazuhiko; Sakuno, Keiichi; Murakami, Yoshiteru; Kojima, Kunio; Takahashi, Akira; Ohta, Kenji

    2007-11-01

    Huge magnetoresistive effects were observed in a metal/insulator current-in-plane (CIP) diode feeding space charge limited (SCL) current. The insulator laterally toward opposite gold (Au) electrodes was fabricated on a SiO2 substrate by the standard photolithography method using dry etching. The insulator consisted of a SiO2/ZnO /SiO2/ZnO multilayer sputtered on the substrate. Current-voltage curves showed Ohmic property and SCL current characteristics accompanied by Child-Langmuir and Mott-Gurney laws derived from first order differential calculus. Current-magnetic field curves indicated the huge magnetoresistive effects up to 1010% under the magnetic field of 0.3T at room temperature. The current-magnetic field curves have even symmetry for the applied magnetic field. The Au/insulator CIP diode is abruptly switched between a conducting state and an insulating state by the applied magnetic field.

  8. Measurement system for temperature dependent noise characterization of magnetoresistive sensors.

    PubMed

    Nording, F; Weber, S; Ludwig, F; Schilling, M

    2017-03-01

    Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors and sensor systems are used in a large variety of applications in the field of industrial automation, automotive business, aeronautic industries, and instrumentation. Different MR sensor technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistive, giant magnetoresistive, and tunnel magnetoresistive sensors show strongly varying properties in terms of magnetoresistive effect, response to magnetic fields, achievable element miniaturization, manufacturing effort, and signal-to-noise ratio. Very few data have been reported so far on the comparison of noise performance for different sensor models and technologies, especially including the temperature dependence of their characteristics. In this paper, a stand-alone measurement setup is presented that allows a comprehensive characterization of MR sensors including sensitivity and noise over a wide range of temperatures.

  9. Measurement system for temperature dependent noise characterization of magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nording, F.; Weber, S.; Ludwig, F.; Schilling, M.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors and sensor systems are used in a large variety of applications in the field of industrial automation, automotive business, aeronautic industries, and instrumentation. Different MR sensor technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistive, giant magnetoresistive, and tunnel magnetoresistive sensors show strongly varying properties in terms of magnetoresistive effect, response to magnetic fields, achievable element miniaturization, manufacturing effort, and signal-to-noise ratio. Very few data have been reported so far on the comparison of noise performance for different sensor models and technologies, especially including the temperature dependence of their characteristics. In this paper, a stand-alone measurement setup is presented that allows a comprehensive characterization of MR sensors including sensitivity and noise over a wide range of temperatures.

  10. Origin of the extremely large magnetoresistance in the semimetal YSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Ghimire, N. J.; Jiang, J. S.; Xiao, Z. L.; Botana, A. S.; Wang, Y. L.; Hao, Y.; Pearson, J. E.; Kwok, W. K.

    2017-08-01

    Electron-hole (e -h ) compensation is a hallmark of multiband semimetals with extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) and has been considered to be the basis for XMR. Recent spectroscopic experiments, however, reveal that YSb with nonsaturating magnetoresistance is uncompensated, questioning the e -h compensation scenario for XMR. Here we demonstrate with magnetoresistivity and angle-dependent Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) quantum oscillation measurements that YSb does have nearly perfect e -h compensation, with a density ratio of ˜0.95 for electrons and holes. The density and mobility anisotropy of the charge carriers revealed in the SdH experiments allow us to quantitatively describe the magnetoresistance with an anisotropic multiband model that includes contributions from all Fermi pockets. We elucidate the role of compensated multibands in the occurrence of XMR by demonstrating the evolution of calculated magnetoresistances for a single band and for various combinations of electron and hole Fermi pockets.

  11. Technology Trend of Sputtering System for Magnetoresistive Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunekawa, Koji

    Magnetoresistive films used for read-heads of hard disc drives, magnetic random access memory devices, and magnetic sensors are fabricated by magnetron sputtering method. Since giant magnetoresistive and tunnel magnetoresistive films are composed of multilayered films, in which the thickness of each layer is in the nanometer range, high accuracy in thickness control and thickness uniformity is required for the sputtering systems. Film properties are also influenced by the quality of the vacuum during the fabrication process. This article addresses such issues on the deposition of magnetoresistive films, and introduces mass-production sputtering technologies capable of fabricating high quality multilayers. Furthermore, fabrication methods of the tunnel barrier in tunnel magnetoresistive devices are also described.

  12. Large magnetoresistance effect in nitrogen-doped silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Yang, Zhaolong; Wang, Wei; Si, Mingsu; Yang, Dezheng; Liu, Huiping; Xue, Desheng

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we reported a large magnetoresistance effect in silicon by ion implantation of nitrogen atoms. At room temperature, the magnetoresistance of silicon reaches 125 % under magnetic field 1.7 T and voltage bias -80 V. By applying an alternating magnetic field with a frequency (f) of 0.008 Hz, we find that the magnetoresistance of silicon is divided into f and 2f two signal components, which represent the linear and quadratic magnetoresistance effects, respectively. The analysis based on tuning the magnetic field and the voltage bias reveals that electric-field-induced space-charge effect plays an important role to enhance both the linear and quadratic magnetoresistance effects. Observation as well as a comprehensive explanation of large MR in silicon, especially based on semiconductor CMOS implantation technology, will be an important progress towards magnetoelectronic applications.

  13. Ge-on-GaAs film resistance thermometers: Low-temperature conduction and magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitin, V. F.; Kholevchuk, V. V.; Kolodych, B. P.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated and generalized the resistance temperature and magnetic field dependences for various versions of cryogenic resistance thermometers based on Ge films on semi-insulating GaAs substrates. It is shown that, at low temperatures, the conductivity mechanism that is responsible for Ge film heat and magnetic field sensitivity is variable-range hopping (VRH). We found that the exponent x in VRH-type temperature law may take different values (fall between 0.25 and 0.67) for different versions of Ge-on-GaAs film thermometers. The magnetoresistance of Ge films depends strongly on the nature of hopping conductivity. It may be positive and negative as well as high and low. We found that, in the 1.8-4.2 K temperature range studied, the Ge films with x≅0.25 (that corresponds to nonzero constant density of states at the Fermi level) demonstrate high positive magnetoresistance. The films with x > 0.4 (that corresponds to presence of a gap in the density of states at the Fermi level) have negative magnetoresistance component that predominates at magnetic induction up to 3-5 Т. The parameters describing VRH conductivity in the Ge-on-GaAs films thermometers were determined. From practical point of view for thermometry, the possibility to describe the R = f( T) dependence by an analytical equation (VRH-type temperature law) does not require the fitting procedure and makes calibration and thermometry more simple and convenient.

  14. Diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires exhibiting magnetoresistance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; Choi, Heonjin; Lee, Sangkwon; He, Rongrui; Zhang, Yanfeng; Kuykendal, Tevye; Pauzauskie, Peter

    2011-08-23

    A method for is disclosed for fabricating diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) nanowires by providing a catalyst-coated substrate and subjecting at least a portion of the substrate to a semiconductor, and dopant via chloride-based vapor transport to synthesize the nanowires. Using this novel chloride-based chemical vapor transport process, single crystalline diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires Ga.sub.1-xMn.sub.xN (x=0.07) were synthesized. The nanowires, which have diameters of .about.10 nm to 100 nm and lengths of up to tens of micrometers, show ferromagnetism with Curie temperature above room temperature, and magnetoresistance up to 250 Kelvin.

  15. Giant magnetoresistance in organic spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Da-Li; Yin, Lifeng; Sun, Chengjun; Guo, Hangwen; Gai, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Ward, Thomas Z; Cheng, Zhaohua; Shen, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Interfacial diffusion between magnetic electrodes and organic spacer layers is a serious problem in the organic spintronics which complicates attempts to understand the spin-dependent transport mechanism and hurts the achievement of a desirably high magnetoresistance (MR). We deposit nanodots instead of atoms onto the organic layer using buffer layer assist growth. Spin valves using this method exhibit a sharper interface and a giant MR of up to {approx}300%. Analysis of the current-voltage characteristics indicates that the spin-dependent carrier injection correlates with the observed MR.

  16. Giant magnetoresistance in bilayer graphene nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farghadan, Rouhollah; Farekiyan, Marzieh

    2016-09-01

    Coherent spin transport through bilayer graphene (BLG) nanoflakes sandwiched between two electrodes made of single-layer zigzag graphene nanoribbon was investigated by means of Landauer-Buttiker formalism. Application of a magnetic field only on BLG structure as a channel produces a perfect spin polarization in a large energy region. Moreover, the conductance could be strongly modulated by magnetization of the zigzag edge of AB-stacked BLG, and the junction, entirely made of carbon, produces a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) up to 100%. Intestinally, GMR and spin polarization could be tuned by varying BLG width and length. Generally, MR in a AB-stacked BLG strongly increases (decreases) with length (width).

  17. Heat shock protein 90-mediated inactivation of nuclear factor-κB switches autophagy to apoptosis through becn1 transcriptional inhibition in selenite-induced NB4 cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qian; Wang, Yuhan; Li, Tianjiao; Shi, Kejian; Li, Zhushi; Ma, Yushi; Li, Feng; Luo, Hui; Yang, Yang; Xu, Caimin

    2011-04-15

    Autophagy can protect cells while also contributing to cell damage, but the precise interplay between apoptosis and autophagy and the contribution of autophagy to cell death are still not clear. Previous studies have shown that supranutritional doses of sodium selenite promote apoptosis in human leukemia NB4 cells. Here, we report that selenite treatment triggers opposite patterns of autophagy in the NB4, HL60, and Jurkat leukemia cell lines during apoptosis and provide evidence that the suppressive effect of selenite on autophagy in NB4 cells is due to the decreased expression of the chaperone protein Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90), suggesting a novel regulatory function of Hsp90 in apoptosis and autophagy. Excessive or insufficient expression indicates that Hsp90 protects NB4 cells from selenite-induced apoptosis, and selenite-induced decreases in the expression of Hsp90, especially in NB4 cells, inhibit the activities of the IκB kinase/nuclear factor-κB (IKK/NF-κB) signaling pathway, leading to less nuclear translocation and inactivation of NF-κB and the subsequent weak binding of the becn1 promoter, which facilitates the transition from autophagy to apoptosis. Taken together, our observations provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the balance between apoptosis and autophagy, and we also identified Hsp90-NF-κB-Beclin1 as a potential biological pathway for signaling the switch from autophagy to apoptosis in selenite-treated NB4 cells.

  18. Systematic study of doping dependence on linear magnetoresistance in p-PbTe

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J. M.; Chitta, V. A.; Oliveira, N. F.; Peres, M. L. Castro, S. de; Soares, D. A. W.; Wiedmann, S.; Zeitler, U.; Abramof, E.; Rappl, P. H. O.; Mengui, U. A.

    2014-10-20

    We report on a large linear magnetoresistance effect observed in doped p-PbTe films. While undoped p-PbTe reveals a sublinear magnetoresistance, p-PbTe films doped with BaF{sub 2} exhibit a transition to a nearly perfect linear magnetoresistance behaviour that is persistent up to 30 T. The linear magnetoresistance slope ΔR/ΔB is to a good approximation, independent of temperature. This is in agreement with the theory of Quantum Linear Magnetoresistance. We also performed magnetoresistance simulations using a classical model of linear magnetoresistance. We found that this model fails to explain the experimental data. A systematic study of the doping dependence reveals that the linear magnetoresistance response has a maximum for small BaF{sub 2} doping levels and diminishes rapidly for increasing doping levels. Exploiting the huge impact of doping on the linear magnetoresistance signal could lead to new classes of devices with giant magnetoresistance behavior.

  19. Linearization strategies for high sensitivity magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ana V.; Leitao, Diana C.; Valadeiro, João; Amaral, José; Freitas, Paulo P.; Cardoso, Susana

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasensitive magnetic field sensors envisaged for applications on biomedical imaging require the detection of low-intensity and low-frequency signals. Therefore linear magnetic sensors with enhanced sensitivity low noise levels and improved field detection at low operating frequencies are necessary. Suitable devices can be designed using magnetoresistive sensors, with room temperature operation, adjustable detected field range, CMOS compatibility and cost-effective production. The advent of spintronics set the path to the technological revolution boosted by the storage industry, in particular by the development of read heads using magnetoresistive devices. New multilayered structures were engineered to yield devices with linear output. We present a detailed study of the key factors influencing MR sensor performance (materials, geometries and layout strategies) with focus on different linearization strategies available. Furthermore strategies to improve sensor detection levels are also addressed with best reported values of ˜40 pT/√Hz at 30 Hz, representing a step forward the low field detection at room temperature.

  20. Magnetoresistive Flux Focusing Eddy Current Flaw Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil s longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multi-layer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  1. Magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current flaw detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil's longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multilayer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  2. Advanced giant magnetoresistance technology for measurement applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Roland; Mattheis, Roland; Reiss, Günter

    2013-08-01

    Giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors are considered one of the first real applications of nanotechnology. They consist of nm-thick layered structures where ferromagnetic metals are sandwiched by nonmagnetic metals. Such multilayered films produce a large change in resistance (typically 10 to 20%) when subjected to a magnetic field, compared with a maximum change of a few per cent for other types of magnetic sensors. This technology has been intensively used in read heads for hard disk drives and now increasingly finds applications due to the high sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally these sensors are compatible with miniaturization and thus offer a high spatial resolution combined with a frequency range up to the 100 MHz regime and simple electronic conditioning. In this review, we first discuss the basics of the underlying magnetoresistance effects in layered structures and then present three prominent examples for future applications: in the field of current sensing the new GMR sensors offer high bandwidth and good accuracy in a space-saving open loop measurement configuration. In rotating systems they can be used for multiturn angle measurements, and in biotechnology the detection of magnetic particles enables the quantitative measurement of biomolecule concentrations.

  3. Nonlocal Magnetoresistance Mediated by Spin Superfluidity.

    PubMed

    Takei, So; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2015-10-09

    The electrical response of two diffusive metals is studied when they are linked by a magnetic insulator hosting a topologically stable (superfluid) spin current. We discuss how charge currents in the metals induce a spin supercurrent state, which in turn generates a magnetoresistance that depends on the topology of the electrical circuit. This magnetoresistance relies on phase coherence over the entire magnet and gives direct evidence for spin superfluidity. We show that driving the magnet with an ac current allows coherent spin transport even in the presence of U(1)-breaking magnetic anisotropy that can preclude dc superfluid transport. Spin transmission in the ac regime shows a series of resonance peaks as a function of frequency. The peak locations, heights, and widths can be used to extract static interfacial properties, e.g., the spin-mixing conductance and effective spin Hall angle, and to probe dynamic properties such as the spin-wave dispersion. Thus, ac transport may provide a simpler route to realizing nonequilbrium coherent spin transport and a useful way to characterize the magnetic system, serving as a precursor to the realization of dc superfluid spin transport.

  4. Spin Seebeck measurements of current-induced switching in YIG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartell, Jason; Jermain, Colin; Aradhya, Sriharsha; Wang, Hailong; Buhrman, Robert; Yang, Fengyuan; Ralph, Daniel; Fuchs, Gregory

    Quantifying spin torques generated at the interface between a normal metal (NM) and a ferromagnetic insulator (FI) is an important step in understanding the spin hall effect without charge transport. Measuring magnetization in NM/FI devices is challenging, however, because both magnetoresistive and magneto-optical signals are tiny in thin-film bilayers. We show that a promising alternative measurement approach is the use of picosecond thermal gradients to study spin torques in Pt/Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) bilayers. Recently, we demonstrated the application of heat to stroboscopically transduce a local magnetic moment into an electrical signal via the time resolved anomalous Nernst effect (TRANE) in ferromagnetic metals. Using a similar geometry the spin Seebeck effect of YIG combined with the inverse spin Hall effect of Pt enables measurement of local magnetization. Here we describe our study using this technique to study current-induced switching in Pt/YIG with sub-10 nm thick YIG films We acknowledge support from AFOSR.

  5. Non-local magnetoresistance in YIG/Pt nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B. Pernpeintner, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf; Huebl, Hans; Schlitz, Richard; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Althammer, Matthias

    2015-10-26

    We study the local and non-local magnetoresistance of thin Pt strips deposited onto yttrium iron garnet. The local magnetoresistive response, inferred from the voltage drop measured along one given Pt strip upon current-biasing it, shows the characteristic magnetization orientation dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance. We simultaneously also record the non-local voltage appearing along a second, electrically isolated, Pt strip, separated from the current carrying one by a gap of a few 100 nm. The corresponding non-local magnetoresistance exhibits the symmetry expected for a magnon spin accumulation-driven process, confirming the results recently put forward by Cornelissen et al. [“Long-distance transport of magnon spin information in a magnetic insulator at room temperature,” Nat. Phys. (published online 14 September 2015)]. Our magnetotransport data, taken at a series of different temperatures as a function of magnetic field orientation, rotating the externally applied field in three mutually orthogonal planes, show that the mechanisms behind the spin Hall and the non-local magnetoresistance are qualitatively different. In particular, the non-local magnetoresistance vanishes at liquid Helium temperatures, while the spin Hall magnetoresistance prevails.

  6. Nanotesla magnetoresistance in π-conjugated polymer devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Philippe; Bange, Sebastian; Pöllmann, Agnes; Boehme, Christoph; Lupton, John M.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate submicrotesla sensitivity of organic magnetoresistance in thin-film diodes made of the conducting polymer poly(styrene sulfonate)-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT:PSS). The magnetoresistance sensitivity is shown to be better than 20 parts per billion (ppb). As for other conjugated polymers, magnetoresistance can be separated into two regimes of field strength: the nonmonotonic ultrasmall magnetic field effect on magnetic field scales below 2 mT, and the monotonic intermediate magnetic field effect on scales over several tens of mT. The former gives the PEDOT:PSS magnetoresistance curve a characteristic W-shaped functionality, with inverted turning points compared to those found in conventional organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices. We succeed in resolving the ultrasmall magnetic field effect of the PEDOT:PSS layer incorporated within an OLED structure, which is responsible for an additional magnetoresistive feature on the ppm scale. Such a device shows unprecedented complexity in magnetoresistance with a total of four extrema within a field range of ±1 mT. We propose that these unique characteristics arise from spin-spin interactions in the weakly bound carrier pairs responsible for the spin-dependent recombination probed in magnetoresistance.

  7. Exciter switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeak, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new exciter switch assembly has been installed at the three DSN 64-m deep space stations. This assembly provides for switching Block III and Block IV exciters to either the high-power or 20-kW transmitters in either dual-carrier or single-carrier mode. In the dual-carrier mode, it provides for balancing the two drive signals from a single control panel located in the transmitter local control and remote control consoles. In addition to the improved switching capabilities, extensive monitoring of both the exciter switch assembly and Transmitter Subsystem is provided by the exciter switch monitor and display assemblies.

  8. Switch wear leveling

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  9. Spin-tunneling magnetoresistive elements based on multilayered nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelichev, V. V.; Belyakov, P. A.; Vasil'ev, D. V.; Zhukov, D. A.; Kazakov, Yu. V.; Kostyuk, D. V.; Orlov, E. P.; Kasatkin, S. I.; Krikunov, A. I.

    2017-08-01

    The results of studies of characteristics of spin-tunneling magnetoresistive (STMR) elements fabricated from multilayered nanostructures using a mask technique have been considered. The parameters of magnetic annealing of STMR elements have experimentally been obtained. The results of these experiments have shown that a magnitude of the magnetoresistive effect can increase by four to five or more times. The test samples of STMR elements, which have a magnitude of the giant magnetoresistive effect up to 50% and a resistance of 30-35 kΩ, have been studied in the absence of a magnetic field.

  10. Magnetoresistance and Hall resistivity of semimetal WTe2 ultrathin flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin; Fang, Chi; Wan, Caihua; Cai, Jialin; Liu, Yong; Han, Xiufeng; Lu, Zhihong; Shi, Wenhua; Xiong, Rui; Zeng, Zhongming

    2017-04-01

    This article reports the characterization of WTe2 thin flake magnetoresistance and Hall resistivity. We found it does not exhibit magnetoresistance saturation when subject to high fields, in a manner similar to their bulk characteristics. The linearity of Hall resistivity in our devices confirms the compensation of electrons and holes. By relating experimental results to a classic two-band model, the lower magnetoresistance values in our samples is demonstrated to be caused by decreased carrier mobility. The dependence of mobility on temperature indicates the main role of optical phonon scattering at high temperatures. Our results provide more detailed information on carrier behavior and scattering mechanisms in WTe2 thin films.

  11. Using magnetoresistance to probe reversal asymmetry in exchange biased bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Leighton, C.; Song, M.; Nogues, J.; Cyrille, M. C.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2000-07-01

    We have measured the anisotropic magnetoresistance of Fe films exchange coupled to antiferromagnetic MnF{sub 2} layers. Exchange bias and coercivity obtained from magnetoresistance are in close agreement with superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry data. In addition the magnetoresistance reveals an asymmetry in the magnetization reversal process, despite the fact that the magnetization hysteresis loops show little shape asymmetry. These results correlate well with an earlier study of magnetization reversal asymmetry by polarized neutron reflectometry. The data imply that the magnetization reverses by coherent rotation on one side of the loop and by nucleation and propagation of domain walls on the other. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Large magnetoresistance of insulating silicon films with superconducting nanoprecipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heera, V.; Fiedler, J.; Skorupa, W.

    2016-10-01

    We report on large negative and positive magnetoresistance in inhomogeneous, insulating Si:Ga films below a critical temperature of about 7 K. The magnetoresistance effect exceeds 300 % at temperatures below 3 K and fields of 8 T. The comparison of the transport properties of superconducting samples with that of insulating ones reveals that the large magnetoresistance is associated with the appearance of local superconductivity. A simple phenomenological model based on localized Cooper pairs and hopping quasiparticles is able to describe the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the sheet resistance of such films.

  13. Magnetoresistance and Hall resistivity of semimetal WTe2 ultrathin flakes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Fang, Chi; Wan, Caihua; Cai, Jialin; Liu, Yong; Han, Xiufeng; Lu, Zhihong; Shi, Wenhua; Xiong, Rui; Zeng, Zhongming

    2017-04-07

    This article reports the characterization of WTe2 thin flake magnetoresistance and Hall resistivity. We found it does not exhibit magnetoresistance saturation when subject to high fields, in a manner similar to their bulk characteristics. The linearity of Hall resistivity in our devices confirms the compensation of electrons and holes. By relating experimental results to a classic two-band model, the lower magnetoresistance values in our samples is demonstrated to be caused by decreased carrier mobility. The dependence of mobility on temperature indicates the main role of optical phonon scattering at high temperatures. Our results provide more detailed information on carrier behavior and scattering mechanisms in WTe2 thin films.

  14. Resistance switching memory in perovskite oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.B. Liu, J.-M.

    2015-07-15

    The resistance switching behavior has recently attracted great attentions for its application as resistive random access memories (RRAMs) due to a variety of advantages such as simple structure, high-density, high-speed and low-power. As a leading storage media, the transition metal perovskite oxide owns the strong correlation of electrons and the stable crystal structure, which brings out multifunctionality such as ferroelectric, multiferroic, superconductor, and colossal magnetoresistance/electroresistance effect, etc. The existence of rich electronic phases, metal–insulator transition and the nonstoichiometric oxygen in perovskite oxide provides good platforms to insight into the resistive switching mechanisms. In this review, we first introduce the general characteristics of the resistance switching effects, the operation methods and the storage media. Then, the experimental evidences of conductive filaments, the transport and switching mechanisms, and the memory performances and enhancing methods of perovskite oxide based filamentary RRAM cells have been summarized and discussed. Subsequently, the switching mechanisms and the performances of the uniform RRAM cells associating with the carrier trapping/detrapping and the ferroelectric polarization switching have been discussed. Finally, the advices and outlook for further investigating the resistance switching and enhancing the memory performances are given.

  15. Railway switch transport model.

    PubMed

    Horvat, Martin; Prosen, Tomaž; Benenti, Giuliano; Casati, Giulio

    2012-11-01

    We propose a simple model of coupled heat and particle transport based on zero-dimensional classical deterministic dynamics, which is reminiscent of a railway switch whose action is a function only of the particle's energy. It is shown that already in the minimal three-terminal model, where the second terminal is considered as a probe with zero net particle and heat currents, one can find extremely asymmetric Onsager matrices as a consequence of time-reversal symmetry breaking of the model. This minimalistic transport model provides a better understanding of thermoelectric heat engines in the presence of time-reversal symmetry breaking.

  16. Magnetic mesocrystal-assisted magnetoresistance in manganite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jan-Chi; He, Qing; Zhu, Yuan-Min; Lin, Jheng-Cyuan; Liu, Heng-Jui; Hsieh, Ying-Hui; Wu, Ping-Chun; Chen, Yen-Lin; Lee, Shang-Fan; Chin, Yi-Ying; Lin, Hong-Ji; Chen, Chien-Te; Zhan, Qian; Arenholz, Elke; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2014-11-12

    Mesocrystal, a new class of crystals as compared to conventional and well-known single crystals and polycrystalline systems, has captured significant attention in the past decade. Recent studies have been focused on the advance of synthesis mechanisms as well as the potential on device applications. In order to create further opportunities upon functional mesocrystals, we fabricated a self-assembled nanocomposite composed of magnetic CoFe2O4 mesocrystal in Sr-doped manganites. This combination exhibits intriguing structural and magnetic tunabilities. Furthermore, the antiferromagnetic coupling of the mesocrystal and matrix has induced an additional magnetic perturbation to spin-polarized electrons, resulting in a significantly enhanced magnetoresistance in the nanocomposite. Our work demonstrates a new thought toward the enhancement of intrinsic functionalities assisted by mesocrystals and advanced design of novel mesocrystal-embedded nanocomposites.

  17. Low field magnetoresistance of gadolinium nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravorty, Manotosh Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2014-02-07

    We report low field (μ{sub 0}H < 0.2 T) magnetoresistance (MR) studies on a single Gd nanowire patterned from a nano-structured film (average grain size ∼ 35 nm) by focused ion beam. For comparison, we did similar MR measurements on a polycrystalline sample with large crystallographic grains (∼4 μm). It is observed that in the low field region where the MR is due to motion of magnetic domains, the MR in the large grained sample shows a close relation to the characteristic temperature dependent magnetocrystalline anisotropy including a sharp rise in MR at the spin reorientation transition at 235 K. In stark contrast, in the nanowire, the MR shows complete suppression of the above behaviours and it shows predominance of the grain boundary and spin disorder controlling the domain response.

  18. Antiferromagnetic anisotropy determination by spin Hall magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua; Hou, Dazhi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Kikkawa, Takashi; Saitoh, Eiji; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2017-08-01

    An electric method for measuring magnetic anisotropy in antiferromagnetic insulators (AFIs) is proposed. When a metallic film with strong spin-orbit interactions, e.g., platinum (Pt), is deposited on an AFI, its resistance should be affected by the direction of the AFI Néel vector due to the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR). Accordingly, the direction of the AFI Néel vector, which is affected by both the external magnetic field and the magnetic anisotropy, is reflected in resistance of Pt. The magnetic field angle dependence of the resistance of Pt on AFI is calculated by considering the SMR, which indicates that the antiferromagnetic anisotropy can be obtained experimentally by monitoring the Pt resistance in strong magnetic fields. Calculations are performed for realistic systems such as Pt/Cr2O3, Pt/NiO, and Pt/CoO.

  19. Giant Magnetoresistive Sensors for DNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Yu, Heng; Han, Shu-Jen; Osterfeld, Sebastian; White, Robert L.; Pourmand, Nader; Wang, Shan X.

    2009-01-01

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors are developed for a DNA microarray. Compared with the conventional fluorescent sensors, GMR sensors are cheaper, more sensitive, can generate fully electronic signals, and can be easily integrated with electronics and microfluidics. The GMR sensor used in this work has a bottom spin valve structure with an MR ratio of 12%. The single-strand target DNA detected has a length of 20 bases. Assays with DNA concentrations down to 10 pM were performed, with a dynamic range of 3 logs. A double modulation technique was used in signal detection to reduce the 1/f noise in the sensor while circumventing electromagnetic interference. The logarithmic relationship between the magnetic signal and the target DNA concentration can be described by the Temkin isotherm. Furthermore, GMR sensors integrated with microfluidics has great potential of improving the sensitivity to 1 pM or below, and the total assay time can be reduced to less than 1 hour. PMID:20824116

  20. Negative Magnetoresistance in Amorphous Indium Oxide Wires

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    We study magneto-transport properties of several amorphous Indium oxide nanowires of different widths. The wires show superconducting transition at zero magnetic field, but, there exist a finite resistance at the lowest temperature. The R(T) broadening was explained by available phase slip models. At low field, and far below the superconducting critical temperature, the wires with diameter equal to or less than 100 nm, show negative magnetoresistance (nMR). The magnitude of nMR and the crossover field are found to be dependent on both temperature and the cross-sectional area. We find that this intriguing behavior originates from the interplay between two field dependent contributions. PMID:27876859

  1. Negative Magnetoresistance in Amorphous Indium Oxide Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C.; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-11-01

    We study magneto-transport properties of several amorphous Indium oxide nanowires of different widths. The wires show superconducting transition at zero magnetic field, but, there exist a finite resistance at the lowest temperature. The R(T) broadening was explained by available phase slip models. At low field, and far below the superconducting critical temperature, the wires with diameter equal to or less than 100 nm, show negative magnetoresistance (nMR). The magnitude of nMR and the crossover field are found to be dependent on both temperature and the cross-sectional area. We find that this intriguing behavior originates from the interplay between two field dependent contributions.

  2. A new class of magnetoresistive compounds ^1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, R.; Husmann, A.; Rosenbaum, T. F.; Saboungi, M.-L.; Enderby, J. E.; Price, D. L.

    1997-03-01

    We have measured a significant magnetoresistance (MR) in some silver selenide and silver telluride compounds from 4.5 K up to room termperature; the composition is such that these compounds are narrow gap self-doped degenerate n-type semiconductors. Our results show no evidence of saturation up to at least 5.5 T for transverse MR and the field dependences are rather linear ^2. A comparison is being made with that of other traditional and novel materials. Studies are under way to determine the origin of this phenomenom and the physical factors which may further enhance the MR. Supported by NSF-MRSEC at Chicago and by U.S.DOE contrac W-31-109-ENG-38 at ANL. R. Xu, A. Husmann, T.F. Rosenbaum, M.-L. Saboungi, D.L. Price, J.E. Enderby, in preparation.

  3. Magnetocardiography with sensors based on giant magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannetier-Lecoeur, M.; Parkkonen, L.; Sergeeva-Chollet, N.; Polovy, H.; Fermon, C.; Fowley, C.

    2011-04-01

    Biomagnetic signals, mostly due to the electrical activity in the body, are very weak and they can only be detected by the most sensitive magnetometers, such as Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). We report here biomagnetic recordings with hybrid sensors based on Giant MagnetoResistance (GMR). We recorded magnetic signatures of the electric activity of the human heart (magnetocardiography) in healthy volunteers. The P-wave and QRS complex, known from the corresponding electric recordings, are clearly visible in the recordings after an averaging time of about 1 min. Multiple recordings at different locations over the chest yielded a dipolar magnetic field map and allowed localizing the underlying current sources. The sensitivity of the GMR-based sensors is now approaching that of SQUIDs and paves way for spin electronics devices for functional imaging of the body.

  4. Hyperfine interaction and magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y.; Nguyen, T. D.; Veeraraghavan, G.; Mermer, Ö.; Wohlgenannt, M.; Qiu, S.; Scherf, U.

    2006-07-01

    We explore the possibility that hyperfine interaction causes the recently discovered organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) effect. We deduce a simple fitting formula from the hyperfine Hamiltonian that relates the saturation field of the OMAR traces to the hyperfine coupling constant. We compare the fitting results to literature values for this parameter. Furthermore, we apply an excitonic pair mechanism model based on hyperfine interaction, previously suggested by others to explain various magnetic-field effects in organics, to the OMAR data. Whereas this model can explain a few key aspects of the experimental data, we uncover several fundamental contradictions as well. By varying the injection efficiency for minority carriers in the devices, we show experimentally that OMAR is only weakly dependent on the ratio between excitons formed and carriers injected, likely excluding any excitonic effect as the origin of OMAR.

  5. Molecular hyperfine fields in organic magnetoresistance devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giro, Ronaldo; Rosselli, Flávia P.; dos Santos Carvalho, Rafael; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Cremona, Marco; Achete, Carlos A.

    2013-03-01

    We calculate molecular hyperfine fields in organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) devices using ab initio calculations. To do so, we establish a protocol for the accurate determination of the average hyperfine field Bhf and apply it to selected molecular ions: NPB, TPD, and Alq3. Then, we make devices with precisely the same molecules and perform measurements of the OMAR effect, in order to address the role of hole-transport layer in the characteristic magnetic field B0 of OMAR. Contrary to common belief, we find that molecular hyperfine fields are not only caused by hydrogen nuclei. We also find that dipolar contributions to the hyperfine fields can be comparable to the Fermi contact contributions. However, such contributions are restricted to nuclei located in the same molecular ion as the charge carrier (intramolecular), as extramolecular contributions are negligible.

  6. Anomalous magnetoresistance in magnetized topological insulator cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, Zhuo Bin; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2015-05-07

    The close coupling between the spin and momentum degrees of freedom in topological insulators (TIs) presents the opportunity for the control of one to manipulate the other. The momentum can, for example, be confined on a curved surface and the spin influenced by applying a magnetic field. In this work, we study the surface states of a cylindrical TI magnetized in the x direction perpendicular to the cylindrical axis lying along the z direction. We show that a large magnetization leads to an upwards bending of the energy bands at small |k{sub z}|. The bending leads to an anomalous magnetoresistance where the transmission between two cylinders magnetized in opposite directions is higher than when the cylinders are magnetized at intermediate angles with respect to each other.

  7. Permalloy and Co50Pd50 as ferromagnetic contacts for magnetoresistance measurements in carbon nanotube-based transport structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Caitlin; Schneider, Claus M.; Meyer, Carola

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, magnetoresistance (MR) measurements on carbon nanotube (CNT) 2-terminal spin-valve devices are presented. Results from samples with both permalloy (Py) and CoPd contacts show repeatable MR switching. In performing gate-dependent MR measurements on the Py-contacted CNTs, two distinct transport regimes are identified, and their transport behavior is discussed with respect to optimizing MR. Results from the first CoPd-contacted CNTs indicate a stable magnetic response with a higher magnitude than that of a Py-contacted nanotube in the same transport regime.

  8. Structural and Magnetoresistive Properties of Nanometric Films Based on Iron and Chromium Oxides on the Si Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Aleksey B.; Kryvyi, Serhii B.; Mulenko, Sergii A.; Sadovnikova, Maria L.; Savkina, Rada K.; Stefan, Nicolaie

    2016-10-01

    Ultraviolet photons of KrF laser (248 nm) was used for the synthesis of nanometric films based on iron and chromium oxides (Fe2O3 - X (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) and Cr3 - X O3 - Y (0 ≤ x ≤ 2; 0 ≤ y ≤ 2)) with variable thickness, stoichiometry, and electrical properties. Film deposition was carried out on the silicon substrate Si < 100 > at the substrate's temperature T S = 293 K. X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectometry analysis were used for the obtained structure characterization. Such a combined investigation reveals the composition and texture for samples investigated and provides useful information about layer thickness and roughness. Fe2O3 - X (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) nanometric films demonstrate the negative magnetoresistance in magnetic fields up 7 kOe. At the same time, for hybrid systems of the alternate layers Fe2O3 - X (0 ≤ x ≤ 1)/Cr3 - X O3 - Y (0 ≤ x ≤ 2; 0 ≤ y ≤ 2), the positive magnetoresistance as well as the magnetic hysteresis and magnetoresistivity switching effect in the low magnetic fields were observed.

  9. Giant magnetoresistance and anomalous transport in phosphorene-based multilayers with noncollinear magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Moslem; Majidi, Leyla; Asgari, Reza

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically investigate the unusual features of the magnetotransport in a monolayer phosphorene ferromagnetic/normal/ferromagnetic (F/N/F) hybrid structure. We find that the charge conductance can feature a minimum at parallel (P) configuration and a maximum near the antiparallel (AP) configuration of magnetization in the F/N/F structure with n -doped F and p -doped N regions and also a finite conductance in the AP configuration with the N region of n -type doping. In particular, the proposed structure exhibits giant magnetoresistance, which can be tuned to unity. This perfect switching is found to show strong robustness with respect to increasing the contact length and tuning the chemical potential of the N region with a gate voltage. We also explore the oscillatory behavior of the charge conductance or magnetoresistance in terms of the size of the N region. We further demonstrate the penetration of the spin-transfer torque into the right F region and show that, unlike graphene structure, the spin-transfer torque is very sensitive to the chemical potential of the N region as well as the exchange field of the F region.

  10. Spin-controlled negative magnetoresistance resulting from exchange interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrinskaya, N. V.; Kozub, V. I.; Mikhailin, N. Yu.; Shamshur, D. V.

    2017-04-01

    We studied conductivity of AlGaAs-GaAs quantum well structures (where centers of the wells were doped by Be) at temperatures higher than 4 K in magnetic fields up 10 T. Throughout all the temperature region considered the conductivity demonstrated activated behavior. At moderate magnetic fields 0.1 T < H < 1 T, we observed negative isotropic magnetoresistance, which was linear in magnetic field while for magnetic field normal with respect to the plane of the wells the magnetoresistance was positive at H > 2T. To the best of our knowledge, it was the first observation of linear negative magnetoresistance, which would be isotropic with respect to the direction of magnetic field. While the isotropic character of magnetoresistance apparently evidences role of spins, the existing theoretical considerations concerning spin effects in conductance fail to explain our experimental results. We believe that such a behavior can be attributed to spin effects supported by exchange interactions between localized states.

  11. Magnetoresistive properties of nanostructured magnetic metals, manganites, and magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solin, N. I.; Romashev, L. N.; Naumov, S. V.; Saranin, A. A.; Zotov, A. V.; Olyanich, D. A.; Kotlyar, V. G.; Utas, O. A.

    2016-02-01

    We consider methods for controlling magnetoresistive parameters of magnetic metal superlattices, manganites, and magnetic semiconductors. By reducing the thickness of ferromagnetic layers in superlattices (e.g., Fe layers in Fe/Cr superlattices), it is possible to form superparamagnetic clustered-layered nanostructures with a magnetoresistance weakly depending on the direction of the external magnetic field, which is very important for applications of such type of materials. Producing Mn vacancies and additionally annealing lanthanum manganites in the oxygen atmosphere, it is possible to increase their magnetoresistance by more than four orders of magnitude. By changing the thickness of p- n junction in the structure of ferromagnetic semiconductors, their magnetoresistance can be increased by 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  12. Linear magnetoresistance in a topological insulator Ru2Sn3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, Y.; Saitoh, E.

    2017-03-01

    We have studied magnetotransport properties of a topological insulator material Ru2Sn3. Bulk single crystals of Ru2Sn3 were grown by a Bi flux method. The resistivity is semiconducting at high temperatures above 160 K, while it becomes metallic below 160 K. Nonlinear field dependence of Hall resistivity in the metallic region shows conduction of multiple carriers at low temperatures. In the high-temperature semiconducting region, magnetoresistance exhibits a conventional quadratic magnetic-field dependence. In the low-temperature metallic region, however, high-field magnetoresistance is clearly linear with magnetic fields, signaling a linear dispersion in the low-temperature electronic structure. Small changes in the magnetoresistance magnitude with respect to the magnetic field angle indicate that bulk electron carriers are responsible mainly for the observed linear magnetoresistance.

  13. Effect of quantum tunneling on spin Hall magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ok, Seulgi; Chen, Wei; Sigrist, Manfred; Manske, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    We present a formalism that simultaneously incorporates the effect of quantum tunneling and spin diffusion on the spin Hall magnetoresistance observed in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator bilayers (such as Pt/Y3Fe5O12) and normal metal/ferromagnetic metal bilayers (such as Pt/Co), in which the angle of magnetization influences the magnetoresistance of the normal metal. In the normal metal side the spin diffusion is known to affect the landscape of the spin accumulation caused by spin Hall effect and subsequently the magnetoresistance, while on the ferromagnet side the quantum tunneling effect is detrimental to the interface spin current which also affects the spin accumulation. The influence of generic material properties such as spin diffusion length, layer thickness, interface coupling, and insulating gap can be quantified in a unified manner, and experiments that reveal the quantum feature of the magnetoresistance are suggested.

  14. Recent Developments of Magnetoresistive Sensors for Industrial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jogschies, Lisa; Klaas, Daniel; Kruppe, Rahel; Rittinger, Johannes; Taptimthong, Piriya; Wienecke, Anja; Rissing, Lutz; Wurz, Marc Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The research and development in the field of magnetoresistive sensors has played an important role in the last few decades. Here, the authors give an introduction to the fundamentals of the anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) and the giant magnetoresistive (GMR) effect as well as an overview of various types of sensors in industrial applications. In addition, the authors present their recent work in this field, ranging from sensor systems fabricated on traditional substrate materials like silicon (Si), over new fabrication techniques for magnetoresistive sensors on flexible substrates for special applications, e.g., a flexible write head for component integrated data storage, micro-stamping of sensors on arbitrary surfaces or three dimensional sensing under extreme conditions (restricted mounting space in motor air gap, high temperatures during geothermal drilling). PMID:26569263

  15. Theory of organic magnetoresistance in disordered organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Nicholas J.; Flatté, Michael E.

    2012-10-01

    The understanding of spin transport in organics has been challenged by the discovery of large magnetic field effects on properties such as conductivity and electroluminescence in a wide array of organic systems. To explain the large organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) phenomenon, we present and solve a model for magnetoresistance in positionally disordered organic materials using percolation theory. The model describes the effects of singlettriplet spin transitions on hopping transport by considering the role of spin dynamics on an effective density of hopping sites. Faster spin transitions open up `spin-blocked' pathways to become viable conduction channels and hence produce magnetoresistance. We concentrate on spin transitions under the effects of the hyperfine (isotropic and anisotropic), exchange, and dipolar interactions. The magnetoresistance can be found analytically in several regimes and explains several experimental observations

  16. Effect of quantum tunneling on spin Hall magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Ok, Seulgi; Chen, Wei; Sigrist, Manfred; Manske, Dirk

    2017-02-22

    We present a formalism that simultaneously incorporates the effect of quantum tunneling and spin diffusion on the spin Hall magnetoresistance observed in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator bilayers (such as Pt/Y3Fe5O12) and normal metal/ferromagnetic metal bilayers (such as Pt/Co), in which the angle of magnetization influences the magnetoresistance of the normal metal. In the normal metal side the spin diffusion is known to affect the landscape of the spin accumulation caused by spin Hall effect and subsequently the magnetoresistance, while on the ferromagnet side the quantum tunneling effect is detrimental to the interface spin current which also affects the spin accumulation. The influence of generic material properties such as spin diffusion length, layer thickness, interface coupling, and insulating gap can be quantified in a unified manner, and experiments that reveal the quantum feature of the magnetoresistance are suggested.

  17. Recent Developments of Magnetoresistive Sensors for Industrial Applications.

    PubMed

    Jogschies, Lisa; Klaas, Daniel; Kruppe, Rahel; Rittinger, Johannes; Taptimthong, Piriya; Wienecke, Anja; Rissing, Lutz; Wurz, Marc Christopher

    2015-11-12

    The research and development in the field of magnetoresistive sensors has played an important role in the last few decades. Here, the authors give an introduction to the fundamentals of the anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) and the giant magnetoresistive (GMR) effect as well as an overview of various types of sensors in industrial applications. In addition, the authors present their recent work in this field, ranging from sensor systems fabricated on traditional substrate materials like silicon (Si), over new fabrication techniques for magnetoresistive sensors on flexible substrates for special applications, e.g., a flexible write head for component integrated data storage, micro-stamping of sensors on arbitrary surfaces or three dimensional sensing under extreme conditions (restricted mounting space in motor air gap, high temperatures during geothermal drilling).

  18. Electric-field-assisted switching in magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Gang; Li, Mingen; Hageman, Stephen; Chien, C L

    2011-11-13

    The advent of spin transfer torque effect accommodates site-specific switching of magnetic nanostructures by current alone without magnetic field. However, the critical current density required for usual spin torque switching remains stubbornly high around 10(6)-10(7) A cm(-2). It would be fundamentally transformative if an electric field through a voltage could assist or accomplish the switching of ferromagnets. Here we report electric-field-assisted reversible switching in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions with interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, where the coercivity, the magnetic configuration and the tunnelling magnetoresistance can be manipulated by voltage pulses associated with much smaller current densities. These results represent a crucial step towards ultralow energy switching in magnetic tunnel junctions, and open a new avenue for exploring other voltage-controlled spintronic devices.

  19. Femtosecond switching of magnetism via strongly correlated spin-charge quantum excitations.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianqi; Patz, Aaron; Mouchliadis, Leonidas; Yan, Jiaqiang; Lograsso, Thomas A; Perakis, Ilias E; Wang, Jigang

    2013-04-04

    The technological demand to push the gigahertz (10(9) hertz) switching speed limit of today's magnetic memory and logic devices into the terahertz (10(12) hertz) regime underlies the entire field of spin-electronics and integrated multi-functional devices. This challenge is met by all-optical magnetic switching based on coherent spin manipulation. By analogy to femtosecond chemistry and photosynthetic dynamics--in which photoproducts of chemical and biochemical reactions can be influenced by creating suitable superpositions of molecular states--femtosecond-laser-excited coherence between electronic states can switch magnetic order by 'suddenly' breaking the delicate balance between competing phases of correlated materials: for example, manganites exhibiting colossal magneto-resistance suitable for applications. Here we show femtosecond (10(-15) seconds) photo-induced switching from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic ordering in Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3, by observing the establishment (within about 120 femtoseconds) of a huge temperature-dependent magnetization with photo-excitation threshold behaviour absent in the optical reflectivity. The development of ferromagnetic correlations during the femtosecond laser pulse reveals an initial quantum coherent regime of magnetism, distinguished from the picosecond (10(-12) seconds) lattice-heating regime characterized by phase separation without threshold behaviour. Our simulations reproduce the nonlinear femtosecond spin generation and underpin fast quantum spin-flip fluctuations correlated with coherent superpositions of electronic states to initiate local ferromagnetic correlations. These results merge two fields, femtosecond magnetism in metals and band insulators, and non-equilibrium phase transitions of strongly correlated electrons, in which local interactions exceeding the kinetic energy produce a complex balance of competing orders.

  20. Coaxial Switch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-23

    08-2015 Publication Coaxial Switch David J. Bamford et al Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell Street, Bldg 102T, Code 00L...Distribution A A coaxial switch having a housing and a shaft extending through and rotatably mounted to the housing. The shaft extends from opposite...conductor members are electrically connected together. When the coaxial switch is engaged, the conductor members are inserted into the connector body

  1. Optimization of magnetoresistive sensor current for on-chip magnetic bead detection using the sensor self-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, Anders Dahl; Rizzi, Giovanni; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the self-heating of magnetoresistive sensors used for measurements on magnetic beads in magnetic biosensors. The signal from magnetic beads magnetized by the field due to the sensor bias current is proportional to the bias current squared. Therefore, we aim to maximize the bias current while limiting the sensor self-heating. We systematically characterize and model the Joule heating of magnetoresistive sensors with different sensor geometries and stack compositions. The sensor heating is determined using the increase of the sensor resistance as function of the bias current. The measured temperature increase is in good agreement with a finite element model and a simple analytical thermal model. The heat conductance of our system is limited by the 1 μm thick electrically insulating silicon dioxide layer between the sensor stack and the underlying silicon wafer, thus the heat conductance is proportional to the sensor area and inversely proportional to the oxide thickness. This simple heat conductance determines the relationship between bias current and sensor temperature, and we show that 25 μm wide sensor on a 1 μm oxide can sustain a bias current of 30 mA for an allowed temperature increase of 5 °C. The method and models used are generally applicable for thin film sensor systems. Further, the consequences for biosensor applications of the present sensor designs and the impact on future sensor designs are discussed.

  2. Graphene magnetoresistance device in van der Pauw geometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianming; Zhang, Haijing; Shi, Wu; Wang, Zhe; Zheng, Yuan; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Ning; Tang, Zikang; Sheng, Ping

    2011-07-13

    We have fabricated extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) device, comprising a monolayer graphene with an embedded metallic disk, that exhibits large room temperature magnetoresistance (MR) enhancement of up to 55,000% at 9 T. Finite element simulations yield predictions in excellent agreement with the experiment and show possibility for even better performance. Simplicity, ease of implementation and high sensitivity of this device imply great potential for practical applications.

  3. Sign control of magnetoresistance through chemically engineered interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ciudad, David; Gobbi, Marco; Kinane, Christy J; Eich, Marius; Moodera, Jagadeesh S; Hueso, Luis E

    2014-12-03

    Chemically engineered interfaces are shown to produce inversions of the magnetoresistance in spintronic devices including lithium fluoride interlayers. This behavior is explained by the formation of anti-ferromagnetic difluoride layers. By changing the order of deposition of the different materials, the sign of the magnetoresistance can be deterministically controlled both in organic spin valves and in inorganic magnetic tunnel junctions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. A two-site bipolaron model for organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagemans, W.; Bloom, F. L.; Bobbert, P. A.; Wohlgenannt, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2008-04-01

    The recently proposed bipolaron model for large "organic magnetoresistance" (OMAR) at room temperature is extended to an analytically solvable two-site scheme. It is shown that even this extremely simplified approach reproduces some of the key features of OMAR, viz., the possibility to have both positive and negative magnetoresistance, as well as its universal line shapes. Specific behavior and limiting cases are discussed. Extensions of the model, to guide future experiments and numerical Monte Carlo studies, are suggested.

  5. Magnetoresistive polyaniline-silicon carbide metacomposites: plasma frequency determination and high magnetic field sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hongbo; Guo, Jiang; Khan, Mojammel Alam; Young, David P; Shen, T D; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2016-07-20

    The Drude model modified by Debye relaxation time was introduced to determine the plasma frequency (ωp) in the surface initiated polymerization (SIP) synthesized β-silicon carbide (β-SiC)/polyaniline (PANI) metacomposites. The calculated plasma frequency for these metacomposites with different loadings of β-SiC nanoparticles was ranging from 6.11 × 10(4) to 1.53 × 10(5) rad s(-1). The relationship between the negative permittivity and plasma frequency indicates the existence of switching frequency, at which the permittivity was changed from negative to positive. More interestingly, the synthesized non-magnetic metacomposites, observed to follow the 3-dimensional (3-D) Mott variable range hopping (VRH) electrical conduction mechanism, demonstrated high positive magnetoresistance (MR) values of up to 57.48% and high MR sensitivity at low magnetic field regimes.

  6. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-06-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice.

  7. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-01-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice. PMID:27279139

  8. Optical switches and switching methods

    DOEpatents

    Doty, Michael

    2008-03-04

    A device and method for collecting subject responses, particularly during magnetic imaging experiments and testing using a method such as functional MRI. The device comprises a non-metallic input device which is coupled via fiber optic cables to a computer or other data collection device. One or more optical switches transmit the subject's responses. The input device keeps the subject's fingers comfortably aligned with the switches by partially immobilizing the forearm, wrist, and/or hand of the subject. Also a robust nonmetallic switch, particularly for use with the input device and methods for optical switching.

  9. FAST ACTING CURRENT SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Cummings, D.B.; Ryan, J.F.

    1962-05-22

    A high-current, fast-acting switch is designed for utilization as a crowbar switch in a high-current circuit such as used to generate the magnetic confinement field of a plasma-confining and heat device, e.g., Pyrotron. The device particularly comprises a cylindrical housing containing two stationary, cylindrical contacts between which a movable contact is bridged to close the switch. The movable contact is actuated by a differential-pressure, airdriven piston assembly also within the housing. To absorb the acceleration (and the shock imparted to the device by the rapidly driven, movable contact), an adjustable air buffer assembly is provided, integrally connected to the movable contact and piston assembly. Various safety locks and circuit-synchronizing means are also provided to permit proper cooperation of the invention and the high-current circuit in which it is installed. (AEC)

  10. Resistivity dependence of magnetoresistance in Co/ZnO films.

    PubMed

    Quan, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Li; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Hao; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2014-01-06

    We report the dependence of magnetoresistance effect on resistivity (ρ) in Co/ZnO films deposited by magnetron sputtering at different sputtering pressures with different ZnO contents. The magnitude of the resistivity reflects different carrier transport regimes ranging from metallic to hopping behaviors. Large room-temperature magnetoresistance greater than 8% is obtained in the resistivity range from 0.08 to 0.5 Ω · cm. The magnetoresistance value decreases markedly when the resistivity of the films is less than 0.08 Ω · cm or greater than 0.5 Ω · cm. When 0.08 Ω · cm < ρ < 0.5 Ω · cm, the conduction contains two channels: the spin-dependent tunneling channel and the spin-independent second-order hopping (N = 2). The former gives rise to a high room-temperature magnetoresistance effect. When ρ > 0.5 Ω · cm, the spin-independent higher-order hopping (N > 2) comes into play and decreases the tunneling magnetoresistance value. For the samples with ρ < 0.08 Ω · cm, reduced magnetoresistance is mainly ascribed to the formation of percolation paths through interconnected elongated metallic Co particles. This observation is significant for the improvement of room-temperature magnetoresistance value for future spintronic devices.

  11. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  12. Stability of standing spin wave in permalloy thin film studied by anisotropic magnetoresistance effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanoi, K.; Yokotani, Y.; Cui, X.; Yakata, S.; Kimura, T.

    2015-12-21

    We have investigated the stability for the resonant spin precession under the strong microwave magnetic field by a specially developed detection method using the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect. The electrically separated excitation and detection circuits enable us to investigate the influence of the heating effect and the nonuniform spin dynamics independently. The large detecting current is found to induce the field shift of the resonant spectra because of the Joule heating. From the microwave power dependence, we found that the linear response regime for the standing spin wave is larger than that for the ferromagnetic resonance. This robust characteristic of the standing spin wave is an important advantage for the high power operation of the spin-wave device.

  13. Giant magnetoresistance materials for magnetic recording technology

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, R.H.; Adams, C.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This work focused on a class of transition-metal-oxide (TMO) materials (LaMnO{sub 3} doped with Ca, Ba, or Sr) that exhibits an insulator-to-metal transition near a ferromagnetic phase transition temperature. This yields a very large magnetoresistance; thus these materials may have important uses as magnetic sensors in a variety of applications, ranging from automobiles to read heads for magnetic storage. In addition, the transport current in the ferromagnetic state is likely to be very highly polarized, which means that additional device applications using the phenomena of spin-polarized tunneling can be envisioned. Use of these materials as magnetic sensors depends upon learning to control the synthesis parameters (principally temperature, pressure and composition) to achieve a specific carrier concentration and/or mobility. A second challenge is the high magnetic fields ({ge}1 Tesla) currently required to achieve a large change in resistance. The authors began an investigation of two novel approaches to this field-sensitivity problem, involving the development of multilayer structures of the TMO materials. Finally, they began to explore the use of epitaxial strain as a means of changing the transport properties in thin-film multilayers.

  14. Linear unsaturating magnetoresistance in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ying Tong; Lara, Silvia; Love, Cameron; Ramakrishnan, Navneeth; Adam, Shaffique

    Theoretical works have shown that disordered systems exhibit classical magnetoresistance (MR). In this talk, we examine a variety of experimental systems that observe linear MR at high magnetic fields, including silver chalcogenides, graphene, graphite and Weyl semimetals. We show that a careful analysis of the magnitude of the MR, as well as the field strength at which the MR changes from quadratic to linear, reveal important properties of the system, such as the ratio of the root-mean-square fluctuations in the carrier density and the average carrier density. By looking at other properties such as the zero-field mobility, we show that this carrier density inhomogeneity is consistent with what is known about the microscopic impurities in these experiments. The application of this disorder-induced MR to a variety of different experimental scenarios underline the universality of these theoretical models. This work is supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF-NRFF2012-01) and the Singapore Ministry of Education and Yale-NUS College through Grant Number R-607-265-01312.

  15. Giant magnetoresistance of copper/permalloy multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holody, P.; Chiang, W. C.; Loloee, R.; Bass, J.; Pratt, W. P., Jr.; Schroeder, P. A.

    1998-11-01

    Current perpendicular (CPP) and current in-plane (CIP) magnetoresistances (MR) have been measured on sputtered Cu/Py (Py=Permalloy) multilayers at 4.2 K. The CPP-MR is several times larger than the CIP-MR. For fixed Py layer thickness, tPy=1.5 nm, both the CPP and CIP MR's show oscillations with increasing tCu with a period similar to that previously reported for the CIP-MR. The CPP data for Cu thicknesses large enough that exchange interactions between Py layers are small are analyzed using the two spin-current model for both infinite and finite spin-diffusion length in Py. The very low coercive field of Py leads to a larger than usual uncertainty in the derived parameters, because of the uncertainty in the degree of antiparallel alignment required for the analysis. Three alternative analyses give bulk and interface spin-dependent anisotropy parameters, β, and γ, of comparable size, so that both must be considered in determining the CPP-MR. Our preferred values, based upon an assumed IPysf=5.5+/-1 nm, are β=0.65+/-0.1 and γ=0.76+/-0.1. These values produce good fits to the CPP-MR's of Co/Cu/Py/Cu multilayers.

  16. Positive magnetoresistance in Ca-doped cobaltites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, S. M. Li, Y.; Guo, Y. Q.; Zhao, J. Y.; Shi, L.

    2014-12-08

    Transport properties of polycrystalline La{sub 1−x}Ca{sub x}CoO{sub 3} (0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.25) are systemically studied in this work. Three types of magnetoresistance (MR) effects are found in the Ca-doped cobaltites. Two negative MRs appear around high-temperature ferromagnetic transition and at low temperatures, which correspond to the conventional MR due to the field-induced suppression of spin-disorder scattering and the intergranular giant-MR due to spin-dependent transport between the ferromagnetic clusters, respectively. More interestingly, another exotic positive MR emerges at intermediate temperature region, which had not been previously reported in Sr- and Ba-doped cobaltites. It is found that this positive MR is associated with an abnormally magnetic transition and increases with the increase of x. For x = 0.25, the MR at low temperatures is dominated by the positive one, which is isotropic and nearly linear with the magnetic field. The possible origin of the positive MR in the Ca-doped cobaltites is discussed.

  17. Controlling organic magnetoresistance via interface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, C. A.; Jang, H.-J.; Pookpanratana, S. J.; Basham, J. I.; Hacker, C. A.; Kirillov, O. A.; Kline, R. J.; Jurchescu, O. D.; Gundlach, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of experiments in which we manipulate organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in devices based on Alq3 (tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum) and TPD (N,N '-Bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N '-diphenylbenzidine) by adding a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The results of OMAR measurements on this OLED-like architecture are correlated with impedance spectroscopy results to elucidate charge carrier transport and accumulation. We observe competing OMAR mechanisms in these devices, the relative strength of which can be tuned by adding SAMs at electrode interfaces. To determine how the interfacial and structural properties of these organic devices effect the OMAR, we obtained a complete picture of the interfacial, topological, and crystalline properties of these devices by performing UPS (Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy), XPS (X-ray PS), XRD (X-ray diffraction), and AFM (atomic force microscopy). To verify our understanding of how interfacial changes affect OMAR, we characterized simple Alq3-only devices: one with a SAM and one without it. Despite having the same current density at room temperature, the latter shows a negative MR while the former displays a positive MR.

  18. Organic magnetoresistance under resonant ac drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, R. C.; Raikh, M. E.

    2013-09-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment, we develop a theory of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in the presence of a resonant ac drive. To this end, we perform a thorough analysis of the dynamics of ac-driven electron-hole polaron pair in magnetic field, which is a sum of external and random hyperfine fields. Resonant ac drive affects the OMAR by modifying the singlet content of the eigenmodes. This, in turn, leads to the change of recombination rate, and ultimately, to the change of the spin-blocking that controls the current. Our analysis demonstrates that, upon increasing the drive amplitude, the blocking eigenmodes of the triplet type acquire a singlet admixture and become unblocking. Most surprisingly, the opposite process goes in parallel: new blocking modes emerge from nonblocking precursors as the drive increases. These emergent blocking modes are similar to subradiant modes in the Dicke effect. A nontrivial evolution of eigenmodes translates into a nontrivial behavior of OMAR with the amplitude of the ac drive: it is initially linear, then passes through a maximum, drops, and finally saturates.

  19. Noncontact vibration measurements using magnetoresistive sensing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassini, R.; Rossi, G.

    2016-06-01

    Contactless instrumentations is more and more used in turbomachinery testing thanks to the non-intrusive character and the possibility to monitor all the components of the machine at the same time. Performances of blade tip timing (BTT) measurement systems, used for noncontact turbine blade vibration measurements, in terms of uncertainty and resolution are strongly affected by sensor characteristics and processing methods. The sensors used for BTT generate pulses, used for precise measurements of turbine blades time of arrival. Nowadays proximity sensors used in this application are based on optical, capacitive, eddy current and microwave measuring principle. Pressure sensors has been also tried. This paper summarizes the results achieved using a novel instrumentation based on the magnetoresistive sensing elements. The characterization of the novel probe has been already published. The measurement system was validated in test benches and in a real jet-engine comparing different sensor technologies. The whole instrumentation was improved. The work presented in this paper focuses on the current developments. In particular, attention is given to the data processing software and new sensor configurations.

  20. Hopping magnetoresistance in ion irradiated monolayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlimak, I.; Zion, E.; Butenko, A. V.; Wolfson, L.; Richter, V.; Kaganovskii, Yu.; Sharoni, A.; Haran, A.; Naveh, D.; Kogan, E.; Kaveh, M.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR) of ion irradiated monolayer graphene samples with a variable-range hopping (VRH) mechanism of conductivity was measured at temperatures down to T=1.8 K in magnetic fields up to B=8 T. It was observed that in perpendicular magnetic fields, hopping resistivity R decreases, which corresponds to negative MR (NMR), while parallel magnetic field results in positive MR (PMR) at low temperatures. NMR is explained on the basis of the "orbital" model in which perpendicular magnetic field suppresses the destructive interference of many paths through the intermediate sites in the total probability of the long-distance tunneling in the VRH regime. At low fields, a quadratic dependence (| ΔR / R | ∼ B2) of NMR is observed, while at B > B*, the quadratic dependence is replaced by the linear one. It was found that all NMR curves for different samples and different temperatures could be merged into common dependence when plotted as a function of B/B*. It is shown that B* ∼ T1/2 in agreement with predictions of the "orbital" model. The obtained values of B* also allowed us to estimate the localization radius ξ of charge carriers for samples with a different degree of disorder. PMR in parallel magnetic fields is explained by suppression of hopping transitions via double occupied states due to alignment of electron spins.

  1. Planar Hall magnetoresistive aptasensor for thrombin detection.

    PubMed

    Sinha, B; Ramulu, T S; Kim, K W; Venu, R; Lee, J J; Kim, C G

    2014-09-15

    The use of aptamer-based assays is an emerging and attractive approach in disease research and clinical diagnostics. A sensitive aptamer-based sandwich-type sensor is presented to detect human thrombin using a planar Hall magnetoresistive (PHR) sensor in cooperation with superparamagnetic labels. A PHR sensor has the great advantages of a high signal-to-noise ratio, a small offset voltage and linear response in the low-field region, allowing it to act as a high-resolution biosensor. In the system presented here, the sensor has an active area of 50 µm × 50 µm with a 10-nm gold layer deposited onto the sensor surface prior to the binding of thiolated DNA primary aptamer. A polydimethylsiloxane well of 600-µm radius and 1-mm height was prepared around the sensor surface to maintain the same specific area and volume for each sensor. The sensor response was traced in real time upon the addition of streptavidin-functionalized magnetic labels on the sensor. A linear response to the thrombin concentration in the range of 86 pM-8.6 µM and a lower detection limit down to 86 pM was achieved by the proposed present method with a sample volume consumption of 2 µl. The proposed aptasensor has a strong potential for application in clinical diagnosis.

  2. Anomalous Magnetoresistance Phenomena in Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeson, Jeremy D.; Lincoln, Derek M.; Shima Edelstein, Ruth; Prigodin, Vladimir N.; Epstein, Arthur J.

    2006-03-01

    We report magnetoresistance (MR) phenomena with temperature and bias dependence in organic semiconductor thin films with either nonmagnetic or magnetic contacts through high field reaching 9T. For nonmagnetic organic thin films such as Alq3 we find a low field MR up to 15%. A similar magnetic field effect has been reported earlier^1 but, as noted, the mechanism remains unclear. We propose a model of the anomalous MR where charge transport is space-charge limited. The current is determined by the e-h recombination rate. The recombination rate is field dependent, analogous to the chemical yield for radical pairs^2. Using an organic- based magnetic semiconductor^3, V[TCNE]x, and Co as magnetic contacts, with a nonmagnetic organic semiconductor (α-6T) leads to an order-of-magnitude broader zero-centered MR peak superimposed on a spin-valve effect. Possible origins of this broader MR will be discussed. 1. Francis, et al., New J. Phys. 6 185 (2004); Frankevich, et al., Phys. Rev. B 53 4498 (1996) 2. Steiner and Ulrich, Chem. Rev. 89 51 (1989) 3. Pokhodnya, et al., Adv. Mater. 12 410 (2000); Prigodin, et al., Adv. Mater. 14 1230 (2002); Shima Edelstein, et al., Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 871E I7.3 (2005)

  3. Tunneling magnetoresistance phenomenon utilizing graphene magnet electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, T.; Kamikawa, S.; Haruyama, J.; Soriano, D.; Pedersen, J. G.; Roche, S.

    2014-11-03

    Using magnetic rare-metals for spintronic devices is facing serious problems for the environmental contamination and the limited material-resource. In contrast, by fabricating ferromagnetic graphene nanopore arrays (FGNPAs) consisting of honeycomb-like array of hexagonal nanopores with hydrogen-terminated zigzag-type atomic structure edges, we reported observation of polarized electron spins spontaneously driven from the pore edge states, resulting in rare-metal-free flat-energy-band ferromagnetism. Here, we demonstrate observation of tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) behaviors on the junction of cobalt/SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA electrode, serving as a prototype structure for future rare-metal free TMR devices using magnetic graphene electrodes. Gradual change in TMR ratios is observed across zero-magnetic field, arising from specified alignment between pore-edge- and cobalt-spins. The TMR ratios can be controlled by applying back-gate voltage and by modulating interpore distance. Annealing the SiO{sub 2}/FGNPA junction also drastically enhances TMR ratios up to ∼100%.

  4. Lateral flow immunoassay using magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taton, Kristin; Johnson, Diane; Guire, Patrick; Lange, Erik; Tondra, Mark

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic particles have been adapted for use as labels in biochemical lateral flow strip tests. Standard gold particle lateral flow assays are generally qualitative; however, with magnetic particles, quantitative results can be obtained by using electronic detection systems with giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors. As described here, these small integrated sensor chips can detect the presence of magnetic labels in capture spots whose volume is approximately 150 μm×150 μm×150 μm. The range of linear detection is better than two orders of magnitude; the total range is up to four orders of magnitude. The system was demonstrated with both indirect and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for protein detection of rabbit IgG and interferon-γ, respectively, achieving detection of 12 pg/ml protein. Ultimately, the goal is for the detector to be fully integrated into the lateral flow strip backing to form a single consumable item that is interrogated by a handheld electronic reader.

  5. Nodal Quasiparticle in Pseudogapped Colossal Magnetoresistive Manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Mannella, N.

    2010-06-02

    A characteristic feature of the copper oxide high-temperature superconductors is the dichotomy between the electronic excitations along the nodal (diagonal) and antinodal (parallel to the Cu-O bonds) directions in momentum space, generally assumed to be linked to the d-wave symmetry of the superconducting state. Angle-resolved photoemission measurements in the superconducting state have revealed a quasiparticle spectrum with a d-wave gap structure that exhibits a maximum along the antinodal direction and vanishes along the nodal direction. Subsequent measurements have shown that, at low doping levels, this gap structure persists even in the high-temperature metallic state, although the nodal points of the superconducting state spread out in finite Fermi arcs. This is the so-called pseudogap phase, and it has been assumed that it is closely linked to the superconducting state, either by assigning it to fluctuating superconductivity or by invoking orders which are natural competitors of d-wave superconductors. Here we report experimental evidence that a very similar pseudogap state with a nodal-antinodal dichotomous character exists in a system that is markedly different from a superconductor: the ferromagnetic metallic groundstate of the colossal magnetoresistive bilayer manganite La{sub 1.2}Sr{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Our findings therefore cast doubt on the assumption that the pseudogap state in the copper oxides and the nodal-antinodal dichotomy are hallmarks of the superconductivity state.

  6. Magnetoresistance in paramagnetic heavy fermion metals.

    PubMed

    Parihari, D; Vidhyadhiraja, N S

    2009-10-07

    A theoretical study of magnetic field (h) effects on single-particle spectra and the transport quantities of heavy fermion metals in the paramagnetic phase is carried out. We have employed a non-perturbative local moment approach (LMA) to the asymmetric periodic Anderson model within the dynamical mean field framework. The lattice coherence scale ω(L), which is proportional within the LMA to the spin-flip energy scale, and has been shown in earlier studies to be the energy scale at which crossover to single-impurity physics occurs, increases monotonically with increasing magnetic field. The many body Kondo resonance in the density of states at the Fermi level splits into two, with the splitting being proportional to the field itself. For h≥0, we demonstrate adiabatic continuity from the strongly interacting case to a corresponding non-interacting limit, thus establishing Fermi liquid behaviour for heavy fermion metals in the presence of a magnetic field. In the Kondo lattice regime, the theoretically computed magnetoresistance is found to be negative in the entire temperature range. We argue that such a result could be understood at [Formula: see text] by field-induced suppression of spin-flip scattering and at [Formula: see text] through lattice coherence. The coherence peak in the heavy fermion resistivity diminishes and moves to higher temperatures with increasing field. Direct comparison of the theoretical results to the field dependent resistivity measurements in CeB(6) yields good agreement.

  7. Effects of Cigarette Smoke, Cessation, and Switching to Two Heat-Not-Burn Tobacco Products on Lung Lipid Metabolism in C57BL/6 and Apoe-/- Mice-An Integrative Systems Toxicology Analysis.

    PubMed

    Titz, Bjoern; Boué, Stéphanie; Phillips, Blaine; Talikka, Marja; Vihervaara, Terhi; Schneider, Thomas; Nury, Catherine; Elamin, Ashraf; Guedj, Emmanuel; Peck, Michael J; Schlage, Walter K; Cabanski, Maciej; Leroy, Patrice; Vuillaume, Gregory; Martin, Florian; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Veljkovic, Emilija; Ekroos, Kim; Laaksonen, Reijo; Vanscheeuwijck, Patrick; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2016-02-01

    The impact of cigarette smoke (CS), a major cause of lung diseases, on the composition and metabolism of lung lipids is incompletely understood. Here, we integrated quantitative lipidomics and proteomics to investigate exposure effects on lung lipid metabolism in a C57BL/6 and an Apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe(-/-)) mouse study. In these studies, mice were exposed to high concentrations of 3R4F reference CS, aerosol from potential modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) or filtered air (Sham) for up to 8 months. The 2 assessed MRTPs, the prototypical MRTP for C57BL/6 mice and the Tobacco Heating System 2.2 for Apoe(-/-) mice, utilize "heat-not-burn" technologies and were each matched in nicotine concentrations to the 3R4F CS. After 2 months of CS exposure, some groups were either switched to the MRTP or underwent cessation. In both mouse strains, CS strongly affected several categories of lung lipids and lipid-related proteins. Candidate surfactant lipids, surfactant proteins, and surfactant metabolizing proteins were increased. Inflammatory eicosanoids, their metabolic enzymes, and several ceramide classes were elevated. Overall, CS induced a coordinated lipid response controlled by transcription regulators such as SREBP proteins and supported by other metabolic adaptations. In contrast, most of these changes were absent in the mice exposed to the potential MRTPs, in the cessation group, and the switching group. Our findings demonstrate the complex biological response of the lungs to CS exposure and support the benefits of cessation or switching to a heat-not-burn product using a design such as those employed in this study.

  8. Arterial switch.

    PubMed

    Planche, C; Lacour-Gayet, F; Serraf, A

    1998-01-01

    A relatively large spectra of anatomic variations are found within the unifying features of discordant ventriculoarterial connections. Variants that lend themselves to anatomic repair by the arterial switch operation are discussed, these include transposition of the great arteries with intact ventricular septum (TGA IVS), TGA associated with a ventricular septal defect (TGA VSD), double-outlet right ventricle with subpulmonary VSD (DORV VSD), and TGA or DORV with VSD associated with coarctation. Double discordance with VSD, which is currently treated by double switch or Rastelli and atrial switch and which probably represents, in our department, the only remaining indication for atrial switch, is not discussed. Also, we exclude TGA associated with pulmonary stenosis, which is treated by Rastelli or REV operation.

  9. Magnetic switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirbie, H. C.

    1989-04-01

    Magnetic switching is a pulse compression technique that uses a saturable inductor (reactor) to pass pulses of energy between two capacitors. A high degree of pulse compression can be achieved in a network when several of these simple, magnetically switched circuits are connected in series. Individual inductors are designed to saturate in cascade as a pulse moves along the network. The technique is particularly useful when a single-pulse network must be very reliable or when a multi-pulse network must operate at a high pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Today, magnetic switches trigger spark gaps, sharpen the risetimes of high energy pulses, power large lasers, and drive high PRF linear induction accelerators. This paper will describe the technique of magnetic pulse compression using simple networks and design equations. A brief review of modern magnetic materials and of their role in magnetic switch design will be presented.

  10. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  11. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  12. Logic-Controlled Radical Polymerization with Heat and Light: Multiple-Stimuli Switching of Polymer Chain Growth via a Recyclable, Thermally Responsive Gel Photoredox Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mao; Deng, Shihong; Gu, Yuwei; Lin, Jun; MacLeod, Michelle J; Johnson, Jeremiah A

    2017-02-15

    Strategies for switching polymerizations between "ON" and "OFF" states offer new possibilities for materials design and fabrication. While switching of controlled radical polymerization has been achieve using light, applied voltage, allosteric effects, chemical reagents, pH, and mechanical force, it is still challenging to introduce multiple external switches using the same catalyst to achieve logic gating of controlled polymerization reactions. Herein, we report an easy-to-synthesize thermally responsive organo-/hydro-gel that features covalently bound 10-phenylphenothiazine (PTH). With this "Gel-PTH", we demonstrate switching of controlled radical polymerization reactions using temperature "LOW"/"HIGH", light "ON"/"OFF", and catalyst presence "IN"/"OUT". Various iniferters/initiators and a wide range of monomers including acrylates, methacrylates, acrylamides, vinyl esters, and vinyl amides were polymerized by RAFT/iniferter and ATRP methods using Gel-PTH and a readily available compact fluorescent light (CFL) source. In all cases, polymer molar masses increased linearly with conversion, and narrow molar mass distributions were obtained. To further highlight the utility of Gel-PTH, we achieved "AND" gating of controlled radical polymerization wherein various combinations of three stimuli were required to induce polymer chain growth. Finally, block copolymer synthesis and catalyst recycling were demonstrated. Logic-controlled polymerization with Gel-PTH offers a straightforward approach to achieve multiplexed external switching of polymer chain growth using a single catalyst without the need for addition of exogenous reagents.

  13. Magnetoresistance of heavy and light metal/ferromagnet bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Avci, Can Onur; Garello, Kevin; Mendil, Johannes; Ghosh, Abhijit; Blasakis, Nicolas; Gabureac, Mihai; Trassin, Morgan; Fiebig, Manfred; Gambardella, Pietro

    2015-11-09

    We studied the magnetoresistance of normal metal (NM)/ferromagnet (FM) bilayers in the linear and nonlinear (current-dependent) regimes and compared it with the amplitude of the spin-orbit torques and thermally induced electric fields. Our experiments reveal that the magnetoresistance of the heavy NM/Co bilayers (NM = Ta, W, and Pt) is phenomenologically similar to the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) of YIG/Pt, but has a much larger anisotropy of the order of 0.5%, which increases with the atomic number of the NM. This SMR-like behavior is absent in light NM/Co bilayers (NM = Ti and Cu), which present the standard anisotropic magnetoresistance expected from polycrystalline FM layers. In the Ta, W, and Pt/Co bilayers, we find an additional magnetoresistance directly proportional to the current and to the transverse component of the magnetization. This so-called unidirectional SMR, of the order of 0.005%, is largest in W and correlates with the amplitude of the antidamping spin-orbit torque. The unidirectional SMR is below the accuracy of our measurements in YIG/Pt.

  14. The Effects of Fringe Fields on Organic Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, Nicholas; Macià, Ferran; Wang, Fujian; Wohlgenannt, Markus; Kent, Andrew; Flatté, Michael

    2013-03-01

    The importance of random hyperfine fields is now widely acknowledged as a vital ingredient for the phenomena of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR). Recent experiments (Phys. Rev. X 2 021013 (2012)) have shown that another type of random field - fringe fields due to a nearby ferromagnet - can also dramatically affect magnetoconductivity. A theoretical analysis of the fringe field OMAR is challenging due to the different properties of the fringe fields when compared to the hyperfine fields. For instance, the range of fringe field strengths is 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than that of the hyperfine couplings. The correlation length between fringe fields is also larger by the same degree. We use a recent theory of OMAR that is well-suited to numerically calculate the magnetoresistance with both hyperfine and fringe fields present. We find agreement with key features of experimental fringe-field magnetoresistance dependences on applied magnetic field, including the field values of extrema of the magnetoresistance, the region of large magnetoresistance effects from the fringe fields, and the sign of the effect. This work was supported by an ARO MURI.

  15. Nucleosome Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David J.; Bruinsma, Robijn F.; Rudnick, Joseph; Widom, Jonathan

    2008-06-01

    We present a statistical-mechanical model for the positioning of nucleosomes along genomic DNA molecules as a function of the strength of the binding potential and the chemical potential of the nucleosomes. We show that a significant section of the DNA is composed of two-level nucleosome switching regions where the nucleosome distribution undergoes a localized, first-order transition. The location of the nucleosome switches shows a strong correlation with the location of gene-regulation regions.

  16. Nucleosome switches.

    PubMed

    Schwab, David J; Bruinsma, Robijn F; Rudnick, Joseph; Widom, Jonathan

    2008-06-06

    We present a statistical-mechanical model for the positioning of nucleosomes along genomic DNA molecules as a function of the strength of the binding potential and the chemical potential of the nucleosomes. We show that a significant section of the DNA is composed of two-level nucleosome switching regions where the nucleosome distribution undergoes a localized, first-order transition. The location of the nucleosome switches shows a strong correlation with the location of gene-regulation regions.

  17. Origin of the Inverse spin-switch behavior in manganite/cuprate/manganite trilayers.

    SciTech Connect

    Nemes, N. M.; Garcia-Hernandez, M.; Visani, C.; Garcia-Barriocanal, J.; Pena, V.; Arias, D.; Sefrioui, Z.; Leon, C.; Santamaria, J.; te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Materials Science Division; Inst. de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid; Univ. Complutense de Madrid

    2008-01-01

    We studied ferromagnet/superconductor/ferromagnet trilayers based on La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} manganite and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) high-T{sub c} cuprate with magnetoresistance and magnetization measurements. We find an inverse superconducting spin-switch behavior, where superconductivity is favored for parallel alignment of the magnetization in the ferromagnetic layers. We argue that this inverse superconducting spin switch originates from the transmission of spin-polarized carriers into the superconductor. In this picture, the thickness dependence of the magnetoresistance yields the spin-diffusion length in YBCO as 13 nm. A comparison of bilayers and trilayers allows ruling out the effect of the stray fields of the domain structure of the ferromagnet as the source of the inverse superconducting spin switch.

  18. Huge positive magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic double perovskite metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nand Singh, Viveka; Majumdar, Pinaki

    2014-07-01

    Metals with large positive magnetoresistance are rare. We demonstrate that antiferromagnetic metallic states, as have been predicted for the double perovskites, are excellent candidates for huge positive magnetoresistance. An applied field suppresses long range antiferromagnetic order leading to a state with short range antiferromagnetic correlations and strong electronic scattering. The field induced resistance ratio can be more than tenfold, at moderate field, in a structurally ordered system, and continues to be almost twofold even in systems with ˜25% antisite disorder. Although our explicit demonstration is in the context of a two- dimensional spin-fermion model of the double perovskites, the mechanism we uncover is far more general, complementary to the colossal negative magnetoresistance process, and would operate in other local moment metals that show a field driven suppression of non-ferromagnetic order.

  19. Magnetoresistive junctions based on epitaxial graphene and h-BN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazyev, Oleg; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2009-03-01

    Using a first-principles approach, we investigate the structural, magnetic and transport properties of interfaces based on epitaxially grown monolayer graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) in combination with ferromagnetic transition metals (Fe, Co and Ni). Such structurally well defined interfaces based on (111) fcc or (0001) hcp transition metals can be produced using simple manufacturing processes. Our calculations predict magnetoresistance ratios over 100% for certain junction compositions. In addition, such systems feature strong antiparallel (Fe and Co) and parallel (Ni) exchange coupling across the interface combined with low junction resistance. The predicted properties position such magnetoresistive junctions as an interesting alternative to the currently used giant and tunneling magnetoresistance systems and make them suitable for practical applications.

  20. Huge positive magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic double perovskite metals.

    PubMed

    Singh, Viveka Nand; Majumdar, Pinaki

    2014-07-23

    Metals with large positive magnetoresistance are rare. We demonstrate that antiferromagnetic metallic states, as have been predicted for the double perovskites, are excellent candidates for huge positive magnetoresistance. An applied field suppresses long range antiferromagnetic order leading to a state with short range antiferromagnetic correlations and strong electronic scattering. The field induced resistance ratio can be more than tenfold, at moderate field, in a structurally ordered system, and continues to be almost twofold even in systems with ∼ 25% antisite disorder. Although our explicit demonstration is in the context of a two- dimensional spin-fermion model of the double perovskites, the mechanism we uncover is far more general, complementary to the colossal negative magnetoresistance process, and would operate in other local moment metals that show a field driven suppression of non-ferromagnetic order.

  1. Ballistic Anisotropic Magnetoresistance of Single-Atom Contacts.

    PubMed

    Schöneberg, J; Otte, F; Néel, N; Weismann, A; Mokrousov, Y; Kröger, J; Berndt, R; Heinze, S

    2016-02-10

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance, that is, the sensitivity of the electrical resistance of magnetic materials on the magnetization direction, is expected to be strongly enhanced in ballistic transport through nanoscale junctions. However, unambiguous experimental evidence of this effect is difficult to achieve. We utilize single-atom junctions to measure this ballistic anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). Single Co and Ir atoms are deposited on domains and domain walls of ferromagnetic Fe layers on W(110) to control their magnetization directions. They are contacted with nonmagnetic tips in a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope to measure the junction conductances. Large changes of the magnetoresistance occur from the tunneling to the ballistic regime due to the competition of localized and delocalized d-orbitals, which are differently affected by spin-orbit coupling. This work shows that engineering the AMR at the single atom level is feasible.

  2. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-01-01

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions. PMID:27271852

  3. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; ...

    2016-01-01

    We report that the change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. In conclusion, density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [Z2 invariant (0;111)] withoutmore » Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.« less

  4. Electronic structure basis for the extraordinary magnetoresistance in WTe2

    DOE PAGES

    Pletikosić, I.; Ali, Mazhar N.; Fedorov, A. V.; ...

    2014-11-19

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered non-magnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at the Fermi level, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic, quasi one-dimensional Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. As a result, a change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior ofmore » the magnetoresistance in WTe₂ was identified.« less

  5. Shubnikov - de Haas oscillations, weak antilocalization effect and large linear magnetoresistance in the putative topological superconductor LuPdBi

    PubMed Central

    Pavlosiuk, Orest; Kaczorowski, Dariusz; Wiśniewski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    We present electronic transport and magnetic properties of single crystals of semimetallic half-Heusler phase LuPdBi, having theoretically predicted band inversion requisite for nontrivial topological properties. The compound exhibits superconductivity below a critical temperature Tc = 1.8 K, with a zero-temperature upper critical field Bc2 ≈ 2.3 T. Although superconducting state is clearly reflected in the electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility data, no corresponding anomaly can be seen in the specific heat. Temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity suggests existence of two parallel conduction channels: metallic and semiconducting, with the latter making negligible contribution at low temperatures. The magnetoresistance is huge and clearly shows a weak antilocalization effect in small magnetic fields. Above about 1.5 T, the magnetoresistance becomes linear and does not saturate in fields up to 9 T. The linear magnetoresistance is observed up to room temperature. Below 10 K, it is accompanied by Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. Their analysis reveals charge carriers with effective mass of 0.06 me and a Berry phase very close to π, expected for Dirac-fermion surface states, thus corroborating topological nature of the material. PMID:25778789

  6. Dielectric barrier formation and tunneling magnetoresistance effect in strontium iron molybdate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dem'yanov, S. E.; Kalanda, N. A.; Kovalev, L. V.; Avdeev, M. V.; Zheludkevich, M. L.; Garamus, V. M.; Willumeit, R.

    2013-06-01

    A comparative X-ray diffraction study of the initial single-phase metal-oxide compound-strontium iron molybdate Sr2FeMoO6 - δ (SFMO)-and that subjected to additional isothermal annealing shows that this heat treatment leads to the appearance of a SrMoO4 (SMO) phase. Small-angle neutron scattering measurements indicate that the SMO phase forms a dielectric shell surrounding SFMO grains, which has a characteristic thickness of 2-4 nm and extends above 120 nm. The character of the temperature dependence of the electric resistance corresponds to the metal-type conduction in single-phase SFMO and changes to a semiconductor type in the material with SMO dielectric shells, which is evidence of a tunneling mechanism of charge transfer. This conclusion is confirmed by an increase in the absolute value of the negative magnetoresistance of SFMO due to the appearance of a tunneling magnetoresistance component of the same sign.

  7. Effect of interface-induced exchange fields on cuprate-manganite spin switches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaohua; Visani, C; Nemes, N M; Fitzsimmons, M R; Zhu, L Y; Tornos, J; Garcia-Hernandez, M; Zhernenkov, M; Hoffmann, A; Leon, C; Santamaria, J; te Velthuis, S G E

    2012-05-18

    We examine the anomalous inverse spin switch behavior in La0.7Ca0.3MnO3(LCMO)/YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO)/LCMO trilayers by combined transport studies and polarized neutron reflectometry. Measuring magnetization profiles and magnetoresistance in an in-plane rotating magnetic field, we prove that, contrary to many accepted theoretical scenarios, the relative orientation between the two LCMO's magnetizations is not sufficient to determine the magnetoresistance. Rather the field dependence of magnetoresistance is explained by the interplay between the applied magnetic field and the (exponential tail of the) induced exchange field in YBCO, the latter originating from the electronic reconstruction at the LCMO/YBCO interfaces.

  8. Structural and giant magnetoresistance characterization of Ag sbnd Co multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelakeris, M.; Poulopoulos, P.; Valassiades, O.; Stoemenos, J.; Kalogirou, O.; Niarchos, D.; Flevaris, N. K.

    1997-01-01

    Ag sbnd Co multilayers were prepared on various substrates (Si, polyimide and glass) by e-beam evaporation under ultra high vacuum. X-ray diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy studies showed a deterioration of multilayer structure upon reducing the individual Co-layer thickness to 0.5 nm. Furthermore, the saturation field in the parallel field geometry increases, as SQUID magnetometry revealed, while magnetoresistance reaches 16% at room temperature and exceeds 30% at 30 K. Magnetoresistance values were found to depend strongly on individual layer thicknesses as well as on the total film thickness.

  9. Magnetoresistance oscillations in superconducting granular niobium nitride nanowires.

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, U.; Xiao, Z. L.; Gurevich, A.; Avci, S.; Hua, J.; Divan, R.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W. K.; Northern Illinois Univ.; National High Magnetic Field Lab.

    2009-01-01

    We report on magnetoresistance oscillations in superconducting NbN{sub x} nanowires synthesized through ammonia gas annealing of NbSe{sub 3} precursor nanostructures. Even though the transverse dimensions of the nanowires are much larger than the superconducting coherence length, the voltage-current characteristics of these nanowires at low temperatures are reminiscent of one-dimensional superconductors where quantum phase slips are associated with the origin of dissipation. We show that both the magnetoresistance oscillations and voltage-current characteristics observed in this work result from the granular structure of our nanowires.

  10. Analog isolated electronic dynamometer based on a magnetoresistive current sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcos Carrasco, C.; Ramírez Muñoz, D.; Ravelo Arias, S. I.; Sánchez Moreno, J.; Maset Sancho, E.; Garrigós Sirvent, A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, an electronic system is presented to measure the force applied by a solenoid. The originality of the work is focused on the use of a magnetoresistive current sensor to provide the isolation barrier needed in the actual industrial plant where the solenoids are working. The design of the electronic system is presented as well as experimental measurements as a result of a calibration process showing a negligible hysteresis with that specific sensor. The magnetoresistive current sensor is used to develop transmission functions rather than playing its usual sensing roles.

  11. Rectification magnetoresistance device: Experimental realization and theoretical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Huang, Qikun; Yan, Yi; Wang, Xiaolin; Wang, Jing; Kang, Shishou; Tian, Yufeng

    2016-11-01

    A unique technique has been proposed to realize rectification magnetoresistance (RMR) by combining a commercial diode and a magnetoresistance component in parallel. The observed RMR could be greatly tuned in a wide range by applying direct current and alternating current simultaneously to the device. Moreover, a quantitative theoretical model has been established, which well explained both the observed RMR and the electrical manipulation behavior. The highly tunable RMR and the correlated magnetoelectric functionalities provide an alternative route for developing multi-functional spintronics devices.

  12. Detection of magnetic resonance signals using a magnetoresistive sensor

    DOEpatents

    Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander; Xu, Shoujun; Hilty, Christian; Ledbetter, Micah P; Bouchard, Louis S

    2013-10-01

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a micro sample of a fluidic material may be assayed without sample contamination using NMR techniques, in combination with magnetoresistive sensors. The fluidic material to be assayed is first subject to pre-polarization, in one embodiment, by passage through a magnetic field. The magnetization of the fluidic material is then subject to an encoding process, in one embodiment an rf-induced inversion by passage through an adiabatic fast-passage module. Thereafter, the changes in magnetization are detected by a pair of solid-state magnetoresistive sensors arranged in gradiometer mode. Miniaturization is afforded by the close spacing of the various modules.

  13. Evaluation of the tobacco heating system 2.2. Part 9: Application of systems pharmacology to identify exposure response markers in peripheral blood of smokers switching to THS2.2.

    PubMed

    Martin, Florian; Talikka, Marja; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Haziza, Christelle; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2016-11-30

    As part of current harm reduction strategies, candidate modified risk tobacco products (MRTP) are developed to offer adult smokers who want to continue using tobacco product an alternative to cigarettes while potentially reducing individual risk and population harm compared to smoking cigarettes. One of these candidate MRTPs is the Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2 which does not burn tobacco, but instead heats it, thus producing significantly reduced levels of harmful and potentially harmful constituents (HPHC) compared with combustible cigarettes (CC). A controlled, parallel group, open-label clinical study was conducted with subjects randomized to three monitored groups: (1) switching from CCs to THS2.2; (2) continuous use of non-menthol CC brand (CC arm); or (3) smoking abstinence (SA arm) for five days. Exposure response was assessed by measuring biomarkers of exposure to selected HPHCs. To complement the classical exposure response measurements, we have used the previously reported whole blood derived gene signature that can distinguish current smokers from either non-smokers or former smokers with high specificity and sensitivity. We tested the small signature consisting of only 11 genes on the blood transcriptome of subjects enrolled in the clinical study and showed a reduced exposure response in subjects that either stopped smoking or switched to a candidate MRTP, the THS2.2, compared with subjects who continued smoking their regular tobacco product.

  14. Room temperature electrically tunable rectification magnetoresistance in Ge-based Schottky devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qi-Kun; Yan, Yi; Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-Huan; Kang, Shishou; Tian, Yu-Feng

    2016-11-01

    Electrical control of magnetotransport properties is crucial for device applications in the field of spintronics. In this work, as an extension of our previous observation of rectification magnetoresistance, an innovative technique for electrical control of rectification magnetoresistance has been developed by applying direct current and alternating current simultaneously to the Ge-based Schottky devices, where the rectification magnetoresistance could be remarkably tuned in a wide range. Moreover, the interface and bulk contribution to the magnetotransport properties has been effectively separated based on the rectification magnetoresistance effect. The state-of-the-art electrical manipulation technique could be adapt to other similar heterojunctions, where fascinating rectification magnetoresistance is worthy of expectation.

  15. Room temperature electrically tunable rectification magnetoresistance in Ge-based Schottky devices

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qi-kun; Yan, Yi; Zhang, Kun; Li, Huan-huan; Kang, Shishou; Tian, Yu-feng

    2016-01-01

    Electrical control of magnetotransport properties is crucial for device applications in the field of spintronics. In this work, as an extension of our previous observation of rectification magnetoresistance, an innovative technique for electrical control of rectification magnetoresistance has been developed by applying direct current and alternating current simultaneously to the Ge-based Schottky devices, where the rectification magnetoresistance could be remarkably tuned in a wide range. Moreover, the interface and bulk contribution to the magnetotransport properties has been effectively separated based on the rectification magnetoresistance effect. The state-of-the-art electrical manipulation technique could be adapt to other similar heterojunctions, where fascinating rectification magnetoresistance is worthy of expectation. PMID:27876868

  16. Magnetoresistive performance and comparison of supermagnetic nanoparticles on giant magnetoresistive sensor-based detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Tu, Liang; Feng, Yinglong; Klein, Todd; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensors have emerged as powerful tools for ultrasensitive, multiplexed, real-time electrical readout, and rapid biological/chemical detection while combining with magnetic particles. Finding appropriate magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and its influences on the detection signal is a vital aspect to the GMR bio-sensing technology. Here, we report a GMR sensor based detection system capable of stable and convenient connection, and real-time measurement. Five different types of MNPs with sizes ranging from 10 to 100 nm were investigated for GMR biosensing. The experiments were accomplished with the aid of DNA hybridization and detection architecture on GMR sensor surface. We found that different MNPs markedly affected the final detection signal, depending on their characteristics of magnetic moment, size, and surface-based binding ability, etc. This work may provide a useful guidance in selecting or preparing MNPs to enhance the sensitivity of GMR biosensors, and eventually lead to a versatile and portable device for molecular diagnostics.

  17. Magnetoresistive performance and comparison of supermagnetic nanoparticles on giant magnetoresistive sensor-based detection system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Tu, Liang; Feng, Yinglong; Klein, Todd; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-07-21

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensors have emerged as powerful tools for ultrasensitive, multiplexed, real-time electrical readout, and rapid biological/chemical detection while combining with magnetic particles. Finding appropriate magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and its influences on the detection signal is a vital aspect to the GMR bio-sensing technology. Here, we report a GMR sensor based detection system capable of stable and convenient connection, and real-time measurement. Five different types of MNPs with sizes ranging from 10 to 100 nm were investigated for GMR biosensing. The experiments were accomplished with the aid of DNA hybridization and detection architecture on GMR sensor surface. We found that different MNPs markedly affected the final detection signal, depending on their characteristics of magnetic moment, size, and surface-based binding ability, etc. This work may provide a useful guidance in selecting or preparing MNPs to enhance the sensitivity of GMR biosensors, and eventually lead to a versatile and portable device for molecular diagnostics.

  18. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  19. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.

    1987-11-10

    An optical switching device is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber or a second glass fiber may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber. Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system. In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber is reflected by a planar mirror into the third glass fiber. In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber passes directly into the third glass fiber. The planar mirror is attached to a rotatable table which is rotated to provide the optical switching. 3 figs.

  20. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.

    1985-01-18

    An optical switching device is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber or a second glass fiber may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber. Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system. In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber is reflected by a planar mirror into the third glass fiber. In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber passes directly into the third glass fiber. The planar mirror is attached to a rotatable table which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  1. Spin-induced anomalous magnetoresistance at the (100) surface of hydrogen-terminated diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahide, Yamaguchi; Sasama, Yosuke; Tanaka, Masashi; Takeya, Hiroyuki; Takano, Yoshihiko; Kageura, Taisuke; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    We report magnetoresistance measurements of hydrogen-terminated (100)-oriented diamond surfaces wherein an ionic-liquid-gated field-effect-transistor technique was used to make hole carriers accumulate. Unexpectedly, the observed magnetoresistance is positive within the range of 2 magnetoresistance previously detected for similar devices with (111)-oriented diamond surfaces. Furthermore, we find that (1) the magnetoresistance is orders of magnitude larger than that of the classical orbital magnetoresistance; (2) the magnetoresistance is nearly independent of the direction of the applied magnetic field; and (3) for the in-plane field, the magnetoresistance ratio, defined as [ρ (B )-ρ (0 )]/ρ (0 ) , follows a universal function of B /T . These results indicate that the spin degree of freedom of hole carriers plays an important role in the surface conductivity of hydrogen-terminated (100) diamond.

  2. "Bottle-Brush" Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tward, E.; Gatewood, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Heat exchanger consists of a metal tube with wires extending inward from wall. Conduction of heat along wires improves heat transfer to gas or other filling. Fluid is heated throughout the cross section of tube. Suggested applications are refrigerators, heat engines, thermal instrumentation, and heat switches.

  3. Switching Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation's D60T transistors are used primarily as switching devices for controlling high power in electrical circuits. It enables reduction in the number and size of circuit components and promotes more efficient use of energy. Wide range of application from a popcorn popper to a radio frequency generator for solar cell production.

  4. Tuning spin transport properties and molecular magnetoresistance through contact geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana; Delin, Anna

    2014-01-28

    Molecular spintronics seeks to unite the advantages of using organic molecules as nanoelectronic components, with the benefits of using spin as an additional degree of freedom. For technological applications, an important quantity is the molecular magnetoresistance. In this work, we show that this parameter is very sensitive to the contact geometry. To demonstrate this, we perform ab initio calculations, combining the non-equilibrium Green's function method with density functional theory, on a dithienylethene molecule placed between spin-polarized nickel leads of varying geometries. We find that, in general, the magnetoresistance is significantly higher when the contact is made to sharp tips than to flat surfaces. Interestingly, this holds true for both resonant and tunneling conduction regimes, i.e., when the molecule is in its “closed” and “open” conformations, respectively. We find that changing the lead geometry can increase the magnetoresistance by up to a factor of ∼5. We also introduce a simple model that, despite requiring minimal computational time, can recapture our ab initio results for the behavior of magnetoresistance as a function of bias voltage. This model requires as its input only the density of states on the anchoring atoms, at zero bias voltage. We also find that the non-resonant conductance in the open conformation of the molecule is significantly impacted by the lead geometry. As a result, the ratio of the current in the closed and open conformations can also be tuned by varying the geometry of the leads, and increased by ∼400%.

  5. Low temperature magnetoresistance measurements on bismuth nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Ch; Weiss, G; Cornelius, T W; Toimil-Molares, M E; Neumann, R

    2009-05-20

    We present low temperature resistance R(T) and magnetoresistance measurements for Bi nanowires with diameters between 100 and 500 nm, which are close to being single-crystalline. The nanowires were fabricated by electrochemical deposition in pores of polycarbonate membranes. R(T) varies as T(2) in the low temperature range 1.5 Kmagnetoresistance. The transverse magnetoresistance of all samples shows a clear B(1.5) variation. Its size depends strongly on the diameter of the wires but only weakly on temperature. Finally, a steplike increase in the magnetoresistance of our sample with a wire diameter of 100 nm was found and this might be attributed to a transition from one-dimensional to three-dimensional localization.

  6. Giant Magnetoresistance: Basic Concepts, Microstructure, Magnetic Interactions and Applications.

    PubMed

    Ennen, Inga; Kappe, Daniel; Rempel, Thomas; Glenske, Claudia; Hütten, Andreas

    2016-06-17

    The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect is a very basic phenomenon that occurs in magnetic materials ranging from nanoparticles over multilayered thin films to permanent magnets. In this contribution, we first focus on the links between effect characteristic and underlying microstructure. Thereafter, we discuss design criteria for GMR-sensor applications covering automotive, biosensors as well as nanoparticular sensors.

  7. Giant Magnetoresistive (GMR) Sensor Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, R.

    1999-01-01

    The measurement of acceleration has been accomplished using several technologies in high-reliability applications such as guidance control, detonation, and shock/vibration measurement. Electromechanical, piezoelectric, piezoresistive, and capacitive acceleration sensors are available and the literature pertinent to giant magnetoresistive sensors (GMR) for the above applications are scanty.

  8. Giant Magnetoresistance: Basic Concepts, Microstructure, Magnetic Interactions and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ennen, Inga; Kappe, Daniel; Rempel, Thomas; Glenske, Claudia; Hütten, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect is a very basic phenomenon that occurs in magnetic materials ranging from nanoparticles over multilayered thin films to permanent magnets. In this contribution, we first focus on the links between effect characteristic and underlying microstructure. Thereafter, we discuss design criteria for GMR-sensor applications covering automotive, biosensors as well as nanoparticular sensors. PMID:27322277

  9. EDITORIAL: Molecular switches at surfaces Molecular switches at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinelt, Martin; von Oppen, Felix

    2012-10-01

    In nature, molecules exploit interaction with their environment to realize complex functionalities on the nanometer length scale. Physical, chemical and/or biological specificity is frequently achieved by the switching of molecules between microscopically different states. Paradigmatic examples are the energy production in proton pumps of bacteria or the signal conversion in human vision, which rely on switching molecules between different configurations or conformations by external stimuli. The remarkable reproducibility and unparalleled fatigue resistance of these natural processes makes it highly desirable to emulate nature and develop artificial systems with molecular functionalities. A promising avenue towards this goal is to anchor the molecular switches at surfaces, offering new pathways to control their functional properties, to apply electrical contacts, or to integrate switches into larger systems. Anchoring at surfaces allows one to access the full range from individual molecular switches to self-assembled monolayers of well-defined geometry and to customize the coupling between molecules and substrate or between adsorbed molecules. Progress in this field requires both synthesis and preparation of appropriate molecular systems and control over suitable external stimuli, such as light, heat, or electrical currents. To optimize switching and generate function, it is essential to unravel the geometric structure, the electronic properties and the dynamic interactions of the molecular switches on surfaces. This special section, Molecular Switches at Surfaces, collects 17 contributions describing different aspects of this research field. They analyze elementary processes, both in single molecules and in ensembles of molecules, which involve molecular switching and concomitant changes of optical, electronic, or magnetic properties. Two topical reviews summarize the current status, including both challenges and achievements in the field of molecular switches on

  10. Switched power workshop. [Switched power electron guns

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of a switched power electron gun. Particular topics discussed are: vacuum photodiode switch; laser switched solid state diodes; gun performance; charging supply; and laser requirements. (LSP)

  11. A multi-state memory device based on the unidirectional spin Hall magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avci, Can Onur; Mann, Maxwell; Tan, Aik Jun; Gambardella, Pietro; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2017-05-01

    We report on a memory device concept based on the recently discovered unidirectional spin Hall magnetoresistance (USMR), which can store multiple bits of information in a single ferromagnetic heterostructure. We show that the USMR with possible contribution of Joule heating-driven magnetothermal effects in ferromagnet/normal metal/ferromagnet (FM/NM/FM) trilayers gives rise to four different 2nd harmonic resistance levels corresponding to four magnetization states ( ⇉, ⇄, ⇆, ⇇) in which the system can be found. Combined with the possibility of controlling the individual FMs by spin-orbit torques, we propose that it is possible to build an all-electrical lateral two-terminal multi-bit-per-cell memory device.

  12. The development of alkoxy-based sol-gel processing for magnetoresistive manganite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clothier, Brent Allen

    This dissertation presents, for the first time, the successful development of an all-alkoxy based, sol-gel process for integrating thin films of magnetoresistive doped-lanthanide manganites onto silicon-based substrates. Crystallization of the requisite perovskite phase at temperatures below 650°C resulted from the incorporation of all-alkoxide precursors, and in particular, Mn[OC(CH 3)3)]2. This latter precursor, when combined with the polyfunctional solvent, 2-methoxyethanol, exhibited high solubility and hydrolytic reactivity. This accomplishment represents a significant new contribution because low carbon-content manganese(II) alkoxides are stable, insoluble coordinate polymers. Orange and pinkish-orange solutions, also synthesized for the first time, were free from products of aerobic oxidation, and hence, contained no brown discoloration. A partial hydrolysis of h = 0.25 produced a polymeric sol system, conferring both spinnable viscosities and excellent sol longevity. Post-coating hydrolysis via humidified air proved essential to yield transparent, dense, and defect-free amorphous coatings. Conversion into a fine-grain, polycrystalline microstructure occurred above 600°C on platinized-Si(100) and above 650°C on Si(100). The cubic lattice parameters of the films (i.e., a = ˜ 3.90 A) were in excellent agreement with values published in the literature for bulk, polycrystalline powders. Typical grain sizes started at 10--15 nm, increasing to 20--25 nm by 750°C. For films deposited on Si(100), magnetoresistance was observed in specimens heat treated at 700°C and 750°C, and for platinized-Si(100), 650°C, 700°C, and 750°C. Magnetoresistive response improved with heat-treatment temperature for the more refractory La0.67Ba0.33MnO3 composition. The lead-doped counterpart offered the best property evolution, with TC = 320 K and TIM = 254 K by 750°C on platinized-Si(100). All corresponding transport curves were symmetric, demonstrating clear metal

  13. A randomised, controlled, two-Centre open-label study in healthy Japanese subjects to evaluate the effect on biomarkers of exposure of switching from a conventional cigarette to a tobacco heating product.

    PubMed

    Gale, Nathan; McEwan, Mike; Eldridge, Alison C; Sherwood, Neil; Bowen, Edward; McDermott, Simon; Holmes, Emma; Hedge, Andrew; Hossack, Stuart; Camacho, Oscar M; Errington, Graham; McAughey, John; Murphy, James; Liu, Chuan; Proctor, Christopher J; Fearon, Ian M

    2017-08-22

    Smoking is a leading cause of numerous human disorders including lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The development of modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) has been suggested as a possible way to reduce the risks of tobacco smoking by reducing exposure to cigarette smoke toxicants. This study is designed to investigate whether biomarkers of such exposure are reduced when smokers switch from smoking commercial cigarettes to using either a novel or a commercially-available tobacco heating product (THP). This study will assess biomarkers of exposure in current smokers who either remain smoking, switch to THP use, or quit all tobacco use completely, for 5 days. The study is an in-clinic (confinement) two-centre, randomised controlled clinical study with a forced-switching design. Subjects of either gender will be aged 23-55 years (minimum legal smoking age plus 3 years), of Japanese origin and with a verified smoking status (assessed by exhaled breath carbon monoxide and urinary cotinine levels). Subjects will have a usual brand cigarette within the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) tar band of 6-8 mg and will be judged to be healthy by medical history, physical examination, vital signs, electrocardiography (ECG), clinical biochemistry and lung function tests. The primary objective of this study is to assess changes within groups in selected biomarkers of exposure (BoE) and of biological effect (BoBE) after a forced switch from a commercial control cigarette to either a menthol or a non-menthol THP. Secondary objectives are to assess between-group differences, to determine nicotine pharmacokinetics for cigarettes and THPs, to assess subject's satisfaction with the study products, and to monitor additional endpoints related to safety and product use. Data from this study will advance our scientific understanding of the changes in exposure to cigarette smoke toxicants in smokers who

  14. Effect of diffusive scattering on giant magnetoresistance in magnetic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Derek Alan

    2001-07-01

    Dramatic changes in resistance due to external magnetic fields or giant magnetoresistance (GMR) have provided revolutionary advances in disciplines ranging from computer memory to land mine detection. This thesis explores the crucial role of interfaces in producing GMR in systems such as magnetic multilayers and spin valves where magnetic layers (Co or Fe) are separated by simple metal layers of Cu or Cr. A semi-classical Boltzmann transport model is used to model GMR in Co|Cu magnetic multilayers. Parameters required to fit experimental results indicate minority carriers in Co have a very small mean free path and experience enhanced diffusive scattering at layer interfaces. Parameters fitted for magnetic multilayers (>100 layers) are used to calculate the GMR in corresponding spin valve systems. The model provides GMR and resistivity values in good agreement with current experimental results for spin valves. Scattering at a single interface is examined using two techniques to provide a better theoretical basis for treatment of interfaces in semi-classical calculations. An analytical Green's function approach is developed that treats the interface as a sheet of randomly placed point scatterers. This formalism provides closed forms for interface specularity parameters that depend on electron momentum and interface roughness. The specularity parameters for transmission and reflection differ in functional form, a fact neglected in current Boltzmann models. The layered Korringa Kohn Rostoker method (LKKR) is also used to examine transport across free electron and Co|Cu interfaces. The interdiffused region is treated as an alloy layer under the Coherent Potential Approximation (CPA). Specularity parameters found using this technique for free electrons agree well with analytical Green's function results. The LKKR also provides the first energy dependent specularity parameters for a real material interface. The electronic properties of FeCr alloys are examined using the

  15. A Mechanical Thermal Switch for Conduction-cooled Cryogenic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Monan; Li, Lifeng; Xu, Dong

    2017-09-01

    A mechanical thermal switch is designed and fabricated to shorten the cool-down time of a conduction-cooled cryogenic system in which several copper heat loads are selected as experimental object. It is the first try of mechanical thermal switch for this application. Compared with the behavior of gas-gap thermal switch, the mechanical thermal switch is easy to manufacture, able to turn off at any temperature. The heat leak is little when it turns off. The drawback is that mechanical thermal switch need people to operate. The result shows that gas-gap thermal switch reduces the cooling time of our experimental system from 41.15 hours to 35.16 hours, while mechanical thermal switch reduces the time to 30.9 hours. In the situations for which frequent switches not needed, mechanical thermal switch is a competitive choice.

  16. Enhancement of Spin-transfer torque switching via resonant tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterji, Niladri; Tulapurkar, Ashwin A.; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran

    2014-12-08

    We propose the use of resonant tunneling as a route to enhance the spin-transfer torque switching characteristics of magnetic tunnel junctions. The proposed device structure is a resonant tunneling magnetic tunnel junction based on a MgO-semiconductor heterostructure sandwiched between a fixed magnet and a free magnet. Using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism coupled self consistently with the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Slonczewski equation, we demonstrate enhanced tunnel magneto-resistance characteristics as well as lower switching voltages in comparison with traditional trilayer devices. Two device designs based on MgO based heterostructures are presented, where the physics of resonant tunneling leads to an enhanced spin transfer torque thereby reducing the critical switching voltage by up to 44%. It is envisioned that the proof-of-concept presented here may lead to practical device designs via rigorous materials and interface studies.

  17. Analysis of the Distribution of Magnetic Fluid inside Tumors by a Giant Magnetoresistance Probe

    PubMed Central

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Kurnicki, Adam; Yamada, Sotoshi; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas C.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) therapy uses the magnetic component of electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency spectrum to couple energy to magnetic nanoparticles inside tumors. In MFH therapy, magnetic fluid is injected into tumors and an alternating current (AC) magnetic flux is applied to heat the magnetic fluid- filled tumor. If the temperature can be maintained at the therapeutic threshold of 42°C for 30 minutes or more, the tumor cells can be destroyed. Analyzing the distribution of the magnetic fluid injected into tumors prior to the heating step in MFH therapy is an essential criterion for homogenous heating of tumors, since a decision can then be taken on the strength and localization of the applied external AC magnetic flux density needed to destroy the tumor without affecting healthy cells. This paper proposes a methodology for analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid in a tumor by a specifically designed giant magnetoresistance (GMR) probe prior to MFH heat treatment. Experimental results analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid suggest that different magnetic fluid weight densities could be estimated inside a single tumor by the GMR probe. PMID:24312280

  18. Analysis of the distribution of magnetic fluid inside tumors by a giant magnetoresistance probe.

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, Chinthaka P; Kurnicki, Adam; Yamada, Sotoshi; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas C; Kosel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) therapy uses the magnetic component of electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency spectrum to couple energy to magnetic nanoparticles inside tumors. In MFH therapy, magnetic fluid is injected into tumors and an alternating current (AC) magnetic flux is applied to heat the magnetic fluid- filled tumor. If the temperature can be maintained at the therapeutic threshold of 42 °C for 30 minutes or more, the tumor cells can be destroyed. Analyzing the distribution of the magnetic fluid injected into tumors prior to the heating step in MFH therapy is an essential criterion for homogenous heating of tumors, since a decision can then be taken on the strength and localization of the applied external AC magnetic flux density needed to destroy the tumor without affecting healthy cells. This paper proposes a methodology for analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid in a tumor by a specifically designed giant magnetoresistance (GMR) probe prior to MFH heat treatment. Experimental results analyzing the distribution of magnetic fluid suggest that different magnetic fluid weight densities could be estimated inside a single tumor by the GMR probe.

  19. Temperature-Dependent Asymmetry of Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in Silicon p-n Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, D. Z.; Wang, T.; Sui, W. B.; Si, M. S.; Guo, D. W.; Shi, Z.; Wang, F. C.; Xue, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    We report a large but asymmetric magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions, which contrasts with the fact of magnetoresistance being symmetric in magnetic metals and semiconductors. With temperature decreasing from 293 K to 100 K, the magnetoresistance sharply increases from 50% to 150% under a magnetic field of 2 T. At the same time, an asymmetric magnetoresistance, which manifests itself as a magnetoresistance voltage offset with respect to the sign of magnetic field, occurs and linearly increases with magnetoresistance. More interestingly, in contrast with other materials, the lineshape of anisotropic magnetoresistance in silicon p-n junctions significantly depends on temperature. As temperature decreases from 293 K to 100 K, the width of peak shrinks from 90° to 70°. We ascribe these novel magnetoresistance to the asymmetric geometry of the space charge region in p-n junction induced by the magnetic field. In the vicinity of the space charge region the current paths are deflected, contributing the Hall field to the asymmetric magnetoresistance. Therefore, the observed temperature-dependent asymmetry of magnetoresistance is proved to be a direct consequence of the spatial configuration evolution of space charge region with temperature. PMID:26323495

  20. Magneto-resistive coefficient enhancement observed around Verwey-like transition on spinel ferrites XFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (X = Mn, Zn)

    SciTech Connect

    López Maldonado, K. L. Vazquez Zubiate, L.; Elizalde Galindo, J. T.; Presa, P. de la; Matutes Aquino, J. A.

    2014-05-07

    Manganese and Zinc ferrites were prepared by solid state reaction. The resulting powders were pressed into pellets and heat treated at 1100 °C. The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, pure phases of zinc ferrite (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and manganese ferrite (MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) were obtained. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a good contact between particles. A drop of electrical resistance was found in both samples, MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, with values going from 2750 to 130 Ω and from 1100 to 55 Ω, respectively. Transition temperatures were determined to be T{sub V} = 225 K for MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and T{sub V} = 130 K for ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Magnetoresistance measurements were carried out in the temperature range where R showed the transition, defined as the Verwey-like transition temperature range, ΔT{sub V}. No magnetoresistive effect was observed out of it. The magnetoresistive coefficient (MRC) observed at ΔT{sub V} reached its maximum values of 1.1% for MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and 6.68% for ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The differences between MRC values are related to the divalent metal element used. Finally, the magnetoresistive response indicates that the electrical transition observed is strongly influencing the magnetoresistance; where the underlying responsible for this behavior could be a charge reordering occurring at the Verwey-like transition temperature.

  1. Bimetal switches in an AND logic gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubrica, Joel V.; Lubrica, Quantum Yuri B.

    2016-09-01

    In this frontline, we use bimetal switches to provide inputs in an electrical AND logic gate. These switches can be obtained from the pre-heat starters of fluorescent lamps, by safely removing the glass enclosure. They may be activated by small open flames. This frontline has a historical aspect because fluorescent lamps, together with pre-heat starters, are now being replaced by compact fluorescent, halogen, and LED lamps.

  2. Neutron activated switch

    DOEpatents

    Barton, David M.

    1991-01-01

    A switch for reacting quickly to a neutron emission. A rod consisting of fissionable material is located inside a vacuum tight body. An adjustable contact is located coaxially at an adjustable distance from one end of the rod. Electrical leads are connected to the rod and to the adjustable contact. With a vacuum drawn inside the body, a neutron bombardment striking the rod causes it to heat and expand longitudinally until it comes into contact with the adjustable contact. This circuit closing occurs within a period of a few microseconds.

  3. Magnetoresistance effects and spin-valve like behavior of an arrangement of two MnAs nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M.; Klar, P. J.; Elm, M. T.; Sakita, S.; Hara, S.

    2015-01-19

    We report on magnetotransport measurements on a MnAs nanocluster arrangement consisting of two elongated single-domain clusters connected by a metal spacer. The arrangement was grown on GaAs(111)B-substrates by selective-area metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. Its structural properties were investigated using scanning-electron microscopy and atomic-force microscopy, while its magnetic domain structure was analyzed by magnetic-force microscopy. The magnetoresistance of the arrangement was investigated at 120 K for two measurement geometries with the magnetic field oriented in the sample plane. For both geometries, discrete jumps of the magnetoresistance of the MnAs nanocluster arrangement were observed. These jumps can be explained by magnetic-field induced switching of the relative orientation of the magnetizations of the two clusters which affects the spin-dependent scattering in the interface region between the clusters. For a magnetic field orientation parallel to the nanoclusters' elongation direction a spin-valve like behavior was observed, showing that ferromagnetic nanoclusters may be suitable building blocks for planar magnetoelectronic devices.

  4. Quantum and Classical Magnetoresistance in Ambipolar Topological Insulator Transistors with Gate-tunable Bulk and Surface Conduction

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jifa; Chang, Cuizu; Cao, Helin; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qikun; Chen, Yong P.

    2014-01-01

    Weak antilocalization (WAL) and linear magnetoresistance (LMR) are two most commonly observed magnetoresistance (MR) phenomena in topological insulators (TIs) and often attributed to the Dirac topological surface states (TSS). However, ambiguities exist because these phenomena could also come from bulk states (often carrying significant conduction in many TIs) and are observable even in non-TI materials. Here, we demonstrate back-gated ambipolar TI field-effect transistors in (Bi0.04Sb0.96)2Te3 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on SrTiO3(111), exhibiting a large carrier density tunability (by nearly 2 orders of magnitude) and a metal-insulator transition in the bulk (allowing switching off the bulk conduction). Tuning the Fermi level from bulk band to TSS strongly enhances both the WAL (increasing the number of quantum coherent channels from one to peak around two) and LMR (increasing its slope by up to 10 times). The SS-enhanced LMR is accompanied by a strongly nonlinear Hall effect, suggesting important roles of charge inhomogeneity (and a related classical LMR), although existing models of LMR cannot capture all aspects of our data. Our systematic gate and temperature dependent magnetotransport studies provide deeper insights into the nature of both MR phenomena and reveal differences between bulk and TSS transport in TI related materials. PMID:24810663

  5. Magnetoresistive polyaniline/multi-walled carbon nanotube nanocomposites with negative permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hongbo; Guo, Jiang; He, Qingliang; Jiang, Yuan; Huang, Yudong; Haldolaarachige, Neel; Luo, Zhiping; Young, David P.; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2013-12-01

    Contrary to the observed positive giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in as-received multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), pure polyaniline (PANI) synthesized with Cr(vi) as oxidant and MWNTs/PANI nanocomposites with ammonium persulfate (APS) as oxidant, a room temperature negative GMR of around -2% was reported in MWNTs/PANI nanocomposites with Cr(vi) as oxidant. Different from a frequency switch of permittivity from negative to positive in MWNTs/PANI nanocomposites with APS as oxidant, unique negative permittivity was observed in MWNTs/PANI nanocomposites with Cr(vi) as oxidant within the measured frequency range from 20 to 2 × 106 Hz. The obtained unique negative permittivity was explained by the plasma frequency from the Drude model, at which the permittivity changes from negative to positive and the material changes from a metamaterial to an ordinary dielectric medium. The observed positive and negative GMR behaviors in these disordered systems as verified by the temperature dependent resistivity exploration were well explained through a wave-function shrinkage model and orbital magnetoconductivity theory by calculating the changed localization length (a0).Contrary to the observed positive giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in as-received multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), pure polyaniline (PANI) synthesized with Cr(vi) as oxidant and MWNTs/PANI nanocomposites with ammonium persulfate (APS) as oxidant, a room temperature negative GMR of around -2% was reported in MWNTs/PANI nanocomposites with Cr(vi) as oxidant. Different from a frequency switch of permittivity from negative to positive in MWNTs/PANI nanocomposites with APS as oxidant, unique negative permittivity was observed in MWNTs/PANI nanocomposites with Cr(vi) as oxidant within the measured frequency range from 20 to 2 × 106 Hz. The obtained unique negative permittivity was explained by the plasma frequency from the Drude model, at which the permittivity changes from negative to positive and the material

  6. Exploring the soluble proteome of Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cells at the switch towards different cell fates in response to heat shocks.

    PubMed

    Marsoni, Milena; Cantara, Carlo; De Pinto, Maria Concetta; Gadaleta, Cosimo; De Gara, Laura; Bracale, Marcella; Vannini, Candida

    2010-07-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 (TBY-2) cells undergo different fates when exposed for 10 minutes to heat stresses of different severity. A 35 degrees C treatment causes a homeostatic response (HRE) allowing cells to cope with the stress; 55 degrees C triggers processes leading to programmed cell death (PCD), which is complete after 72 h. We have used a proteomic approach to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms defining the fate of TBY-2 cells induced by these two heat stresses. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis revealed little overlap of differentially-accumulated proteins: the different severities of heat treatment induced the modulation of specific proteins, some of which are responsible for different cell fates. When the imposed heat shock is beyond a certain threshold, the overall reduced metabolism may be the result of a series of events involving gene expression and oxidative damage that would lead to PCD. Our data suggest that the down-accumulation of several proteins involved in cellular redox homeostasis could provide, until now, an unappreciated contribution to understanding how many partners are involved in promoting the redox impairment leading to PCD. Moreover post-translational modifications seem to play important regulatory roles in the adaptation of TBY-2 cells to different intensities of heat stress.

  7. Selenium bond decreases ON resistance of light-activated switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Vitrified amorphous selenium bond decreases the ON resistance of a gallium arsenide-silicon light-activated, low-level switch. The switch is used under a pulse condition to prolong switch life and minimize errors due to heating, devitrification, and overdrawing.

  8. Quasilinear quantum magnetoresistance in pressure-induced nonsymmorphic superconductor chromium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Q.; Yu, W. C.; Yip, K. Y.; Lim, Z. L.; Kotegawa, H.; Matsuoka, E.; Sugawara, H.; Tou, H.; Yanase, Y.; Goh, Swee K.

    2017-06-01

    In conventional metals, modification of electron trajectories under magnetic field gives rise to a magnetoresistance that varies quadratically at low field, followed by a saturation at high field for closed orbits on the Fermi surface. Deviations from the conventional behaviour, for example, the observation of a linear magnetoresistance, or a non-saturating magnetoresistance, have been attributed to exotic electron scattering mechanisms. Recently, linear magnetoresistance has been observed in many Dirac materials, in which the electron-electron correlation is relatively weak. The strongly correlated helimagnet CrAs undergoes a quantum phase transition to a nonmagnetic superconductor under pressure. Here we observe, near the magnetic instability, a large and non-saturating quasilinear magnetoresistance from the upper critical field to 14 T at low temperatures. We show that the quasilinear magnetoresistance may arise from an intricate interplay between a nontrivial band crossing protected by nonsymmorphic crystal symmetry and strong magnetic fluctuations.

  9. Dual source heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.; Pietsch, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

  10. Heat recovery method

    SciTech Connect

    Richarts, F.

    1985-04-16

    Heat is recovered by combining a heat transfer system including heat exchangers interconnected in a circulatory system, with a heat pump system. The heat pump system is preferably operated in accordance with the Lorenz-Principle. It is not necessary to divide the heat carrier circuit of the heat pump into two or three separate circulatory circuits. The heat carrier circuit of the heat pump can thus continue to operate unchanged even if the heat pump is switched off. For this purpose the warm heat carrier coming from a discharge fluid cooler, is heated further in a condenser of the heat pump and the cold heat carrier coming from a preheater or cooler group, is cooled further in an evaporator of the heat pump.

  11. Photoinduced magnetoresistance and magnetic-field-modulated photoelectric response in BiFeO3/Si heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Jianfeng; Ni, Hao; Zhao, Kun; Lu, Huibin; Guo, Erjia; He, Meng; Jin, Kuijuan; Zhou, Yueliang; Yang, Guozhen; Xiao, Lizhi; Zhang, Zhenwei

    2016-05-01

    The BiFeO3 film grown on Si substrate without template exhibits a diode-like effect, and the forward direction of the diode can be switched by external electric fields. The laser irradiation and the magnetic field can induce polarization, thus modulating the photovoltaic effect. The magnetoresistance values change from -1.19 to -5.79 and to -35.48 % dramatically under 50 μA current in 770 Oe when the junction is irradiated by 532 and 1064 nm lasers, respectively. These results reveal unusual and interesting charge conduction behavior in leaky ferroelectrics and should promote the study of BiFeO3 based on multifunctional materials.

  12. Lateral electric-field control of giant magnetoresistance in Co/Cu/Fe/BaTiO{sub 3} multiferroic heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Savitha Pillai, S.; Kojima, H.; Itoh, M.; Taniyama, T.

    2015-08-17

    We report lateral electric-field-driven sizable changes in the magnetoresistance of Co/Cu/Fe tri-layered wires on BaTiO{sub 3} single crystal. While the observed change is marginal in the tetragonal phase of BaTiO{sub 3}, it reaches over 40% in the orthorhombic and rhombohedral phases with an electric field of 66 kV/cm. We attribute it to possible electric-field-induced variations of the spin-dependent electronic structures, i.e., spin polarization, of the Fe via interfacial strain transfer from BaTiO{sub 3}. The contrasting results for the different phases of BaTiO{sub 3} are discussed, associated with the distinct aspects of the ferroelectric polarization switching processes in each phase.

  13. Temperature-controlled colossal magnetoresistance and perfect spin Seebeck effect in hybrid graphene/boron nitride nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Li, Ruimin; Yao, Kailun

    2017-02-01

    Thermal spin transport properties of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbon heterojunctions have been investigated using density functional theory calculations combined with the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function approach. The results showed that the perfect spin Seebeck effect and analogy negative differential thermoelectric resistance occurred in the device under a temperature difference without a gate or bias voltage. An intriguing thermally induced colossal magnetoresistance without gate regulation was also observed, which can be switched between a positive and negative value with temperature control. It was also found that the unit number of zigzag graphene nanoribbons and boron nitride nanoribbons can tune the electronic band structure and the energy gap of the heterostructure, and then modulate the thermal spin transport properties. The results suggest that graphene and hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbon heterostructures may have potential applications in graphene-based nanodevices.

  14. Electronic structure, tunneling magnetoresistance and spin polarization of amorphous ferromagnetic storage layer used in magnetic tunneling junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, See-Hun; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Hughes, Brian; Guo, Jinghua; Augustsson, Andreas; Rotenberg, Eli

    2003-03-01

    Recently amorphous ferromagnetic materials such as boron doped Co-Fe alloys have received much attention because of their potential use as storage layers in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) for non-volatile magnetic memory cells. The primary reason for this is that amorphous ferromagnetic alloys lack crystalline anisotropy and exhibit low coercivities. These properties significantly improve the magnetic switching characteristics of MTJ devices. We have demonstrated that MTJs with amorphous ferromagnetic storage layer have improved magneto-transport properties and superior thermal stabilities compared to similar structures with crystalline storage layers. To understand the origin of these improvements we have performed high energy resolution soft x-ray emission and resonant photoemission spectroscopy experiments on amorphous ferromagnet layers. We have observed that the tunneling magnetoresistance depends not only on the spin polarization of the ferromagnet but also depends critically on the detailed electronic structure in the valence band.

  15. Magnetoresistance in organic light-emitting diode structures under illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, P.; Shakya, P.; Kreouzis, T.; Gillin, W. P.

    2007-12-01

    We have investigated the effect of illumination on the organic magnetoresistance (OMR) in organic light-emitting diode (OLED) structures. The results show that it is possible to obtain OMR at voltages below “turn-on,” where no OMR was visible for devices operated in the dark. The photoinduced OMR has a field dependence that is identical to that obtained for OLEDs containing very thin layers, where triplet dissociation at the cathode was a major component of the OMR. At voltages around the open circuit voltage, where the current through the device is very small, very large OMRs of ˜300% can be observed. The results support our proposed model for organic magnetoresistance as being caused in part by the interaction of free carriers with triplet excitons within the device. The results suggest that the introduction of a low field magnet could provide a simple means of improving the efficiency of organic photovoltaic cells.

  16. Insensitivity of tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance to non-magnetic electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. Y.; Song, C. Wang, G. Y.; Zeng, F.; Pan, F.

    2013-11-11

    Ferromagnetic electrodes play a crucial role in magnetoresistance effect and spin injection, whereas the essential features of non-magnetic metal electrodes in spintronics are commonly ignored except for their electrical conductivity. Here, we verify that the room-temperature tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) behavior in antiferromagnet-based [Pt/Co]/IrMn/AlO{sub x}/metal (metal = Pt, Au, Cu, Al) junctions is insensitive to the top metal electrodes. Similar out-of-plane signals are detected for different electrodes, in contrast to the varied shapes of in-plane TAMR curves which are most likely attributed to the differences in the multidomain structure of the magnetic electrode. This would add a different dimension to spintronics.

  17. Geometrically enhanced extraordinary magnetoresistance in semiconductor-metal hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, T. H.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2010-12-01

    Extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) arises in hybrid systems consisting of semiconducting material with an embedded metallic inclusion. We have investigated such systems with the use of finite-element modeling, with our results showing good agreement to existing experimental data. We show that this effect can be dramatically enhanced by over four orders of magnitude as a result of altering the geometry of the conducting region. The significance of this result lies in its potential application to EMR magnetic field sensors utilizing more familiar semiconducting materials with nonoptimum material parameters, such as silicon. Our model has been extended further with a geometry based on the microstructure of the silver chalcogenides, consisting of a randomly sized and positioned metallic network with interspersed droplets. This model has shown a large and quasilinear magnetoresistance analogous to experimental findings.

  18. Giant magnetoresistance in the variable-range hopping regime

    SciTech Connect

    Ioffe, L. B.; Spivak, B. Z.

    2013-09-15

    We predict the universal power-law dependence of the localization length on the magnetic field in the strongly localized regime. This effect is due to the orbital quantum interference. Physically, this dependence shows up in an anomalously large negative magnetoresistance in the hopping regime. The reason for the universality is that the problem of the electron tunneling in a random media belongs to the same universality class as the directed polymer problem even in the case of wave functions of random sign. We present numerical simulations that prove this conjecture. We discuss the existing experiments that show anomalously large magnetoresistance. We also discuss the role of localized spins in real materials and the spin polarizing effect of the magnetic field.

  19. Large magnetoresistance and Fermi surface topology of PrSb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, F.; Guo, C. Y.; Smidman, M.; Zhang, J. L.; Yuan, H. Q.

    2017-09-01

    We report magnetotransport measurements of PrSb in high magnetic fields. Our results show that PrSb exhibits large magnetoresistance at low temperatures. Meanwhile angle-dependent magnetoresistance measurements were used to probe the Fermi surface via Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. We found that the angular dependence of the oscillation frequency of the α branch can be explained well by a model for a two-dimensional-like Fermi surface, whereas the effective mass of this branch as a function of angle shows a fourfold signature. The evolution of the Fermi surface with increasing magnetic field also was studied up to 32 T. A continuous increase in the oscillation frequency up to 14 T is observed before it becomes constant at higher fields. Meanwhile our analysis of the residual Landau index from the high-field data reveals a zero Berry phase and therefore trivial topology of the Fermi surface.

  20. Development of eddy current probes based on magnetoresistive sensors arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva-Chollet, N.; Decitre, J.-M.; Fermon, C.; Pelkner, M.; Reimund, V.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2014-02-01

    Eddy Current Technique is a powerful method for detection of surface notches and of buried flaws during inspection of metallic parts. Recent EC array probes have demonstrated a fast and efficient control of large surfaces. Nevertheless, when the size of flaws decreases or the defect is rather deep, traditional winding coil probes turn out to be useless. Magnetoresistive sensors present the advantages of flat frequency response and micron size. These sensors are hence very attractive for the detection of buried defects that require low frequencies because of skin depth effect. An optimization of the probe with magnetoresistive sensors as receivers has been made by simulations using CIVA software and finite elements methods with OPERA. EC probes for buried flaw detection have been designed. Experimental results have been compared with simulations.

  1. Separating Positive and Negative Magnetoresistance in Organic Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, F. L.; Wagemans, W.; Kemerink, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2007-12-01

    We study the transition between positive and negative organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in tris-(8 hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3), in order to identify the elementary mechanisms governing this phenomenon. We show how the sign of OMAR changes as function of the applied voltage and temperature. The transition from negative to positive magnetoresistance (MR) is found to be accompanied by an increase in slope of log⁡(I) versus log⁡(V). ac admittance measurements show this transition coincides with the onset of minority charge (hole) injection in the device. All these observations are consistent with two simultaneous contributions with opposite sign of MR, which may be assigned to holes and electrons having different magnetic field responses.

  2. Coexistence of tunneling magnetoresistance and Josephson effects in SFIFS junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vávra, O.; Soni, R.; Petraru, A.; Himmel, N.; Vávra, I.; Fabian, J.; Kohlstedt, H.; Strunk, Ch.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate an integration of tunneling magnetoresistance and the Josephson effects within one tunneling junction. Several sets of Nb-Fe-Al-Al2O3-Fe-Nb wafers with varying Al and Fe layers thickness were prepared to systematically explore the competition of TMR and Josephson effects. A coexistence of the critical current IC(dFe) and the tunneling magnetoresistance ratio T M R(dFe) is observed for iron layer dFe thickness range 1.9 and 2.9 nm. Further optimization such as thinner Al2O3 layer leads to an enhancement of the critical current and thus to an extension of the coexistence regime up to dFe≃3.9 nm Fe.

  3. A Magnetoresistive Tactile Sensor for Harsh Environment Applications

    PubMed Central

    Alfadhel, Ahmed; Khan, Mohammed Asadullah; Cardoso, Susana; Leitao, Diana; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A magnetoresistive tactile sensor is reported, which is capable of working in high temperatures up to 140 °C. Hair-like bioinspired structures, known as cilia, made out of permanent magnetic nanocomposite material on top of spin-valve giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors are used for tactile sensing at high temperatures. The magnetic nanocomposite, consisting of iron nanowires incorporated into the polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), is very flexible, biocompatible, has high remanence, and is also resilient to antagonistic sensing ambient. When the cilia come in contact with a surface, they deflect in compliance with the surface topology. This yields a change of the GMR sensor signal, enabling the detection of extremely fine features. The spin-valve is covered with a passivation layer, which enables adequate performance in spite of harsh environmental conditions, as demonstrated in this paper for high temperature. PMID:27164113

  4. Enhancing magnetoresistance in tetrathiafulvalene carboxylate modified iron oxide nanoparticle assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhong-Peng; Luan, Zhong-Zhi; Cai, Pei-Yu; Wang, Tao; Li, Cheng-Hui; Wu, Di; Zuo, Jing-Lin; Sun, Shouheng

    2016-06-01

    We report a facile approach to stabilize Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) by using tetrathiafulvalene carboxylate (TTF-COO-) and to control electron transport with an enhanced magnetoresistance (MR) effect in TTF-COO-Fe3O4 NP assemblies. This TTF-COO-coating is advantageous over other conventional organic coatings, making it possible to develop stable Fe3O4 NP arrays for sensitive spintronics applications.We report a facile approach to stabilize Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) by using tetrathiafulvalene carboxylate (TTF-COO-) and to control electron transport with an enhanced magnetoresistance (MR) effect in TTF-COO-Fe3O4 NP assemblies. This TTF-COO-coating is advantageous over other conventional organic coatings, making it possible to develop stable Fe3O4 NP arrays for sensitive spintronics applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details; supplementary figures and tables. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03311c

  5. Anomalies of magnetoresistance in Ce-based heavy fermion compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluchanko, N. E.; Bogach, A. V.; Anisimov, M. A.; Glushkov, V. V.; Demishev, S. V.; Samarin, N. A.; Chistyakov, O. D.; Burkhanov, G. S.; Gabani, S.; Flachbart, K.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetoresistance Δρ(H,T) of several heavy-fermion compounds, CeAl2, CeAl3 and CeCu6, substitutional solid solutions with quantum critical behavior CeCu6-xAux (x = 0.1, 0.2) and alloys with magnetic ground state Ce(Al1-xMx)2 (M = Co, Ni, x ≤ 0.8) was studied in a wide range of temperatures (1.8-40 K) in magnetic fields up to 80 kOe. It was shown that a consistent interpretation of the field dependences of the resistance for both non-magnetic and magnetically ordered cerium-based intermetallic compounds with strong electron correlations can be achieved within the framework of an approach that accounts for scattering of charge carriers by localized magnetic moments in a metal matrix. Within this approach, three different components of the magnetoresistance of cerium intermetallic compounds were identified: the negative Brillouin contribution proportional to the local magnetization ( -Δρ/ρ˜Mloc2 ), the alternating linear contribution ( Δρ/ρ˜H ) and the magnetic component, saturating in magnetic fields below 15 kOe. In the framework of the Yosida model for the cerium alloys under study, estimates of the local magnetic susceptibility χloc(H, T0) were obtained from the magnetoresistance data. Numerical differentiation of the magnetoresistance with respect to the magnetic field and analysis of the obtained d (Δρ/ρ)/d H =f (H ,T ) dependences allowed us to reconstruct the H-T magnetic phase diagrams of the strongly correlated electron systems under study as well as to examine the effects of spin polarization and renormalization of the electronic states on charge transport both in the regime of quantum critical behavior and in the magnetically ordered state.

  6. Highly Sensitive Flexible Magnetic Sensor Based on Anisotropic Magnetoresistance Effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiguang; Wang, Xinjun; Li, Menghui; Gao, Yuan; Hu, Zhongqiang; Nan, Tianxiang; Liang, Xianfeng; Chen, Huaihao; Yang, Jia; Cash, Syd; Sun, Nian-Xiang

    2016-11-01

    A highly sensitive flexible magnetic sensor based on the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect is fabricated. A limit of detection of 150 nT is observed and excellent deformation stability is achieved after wrapping of the flexible sensor, with bending radii down to 5 mm. The flexible AMR sensor is used to read a magnetic pattern with a thickness of 10 μm that is formed by ferrite magnetic inks.

  7. Vanadium dioxide phase change switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, M.; Hillman, C.; Stupar, P.; Hacker, J.; Griffith, Z.; Lee, K.-J.

    2015-05-01

    The thermally driven metal insulator transition in vanadium dioxide (VO2) is used to create a low loss millimeter wave switch which operates up to and beyond W-band frequencies. We have built RF switches using vanadium dioxide thin films fabricated within a section of inverted transmission line with integrated on chip heaters to provide local thermal control. On heating the films above the metal insulator transition we obtain record low switch insertion loss of 0.13 dB at 50 GHz and 0.5 dB at 110 GHz. The switch cut-off frequency is high, fc ~ 45 THz, due to the low on state resistance and off state capacitance. We have investigated the device physics of these switches including self-latching of the devices under high RF powers, and demonstrated their integration with silicon germanium RF circuits where the switch heater current sources and control logic are also integrated into the same silicon germanium circuit.

  8. Negative huge magnetoresistance in high-mobility 2D electron gases: DC-current dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iñarrea, J.; Bockhorn, L.; Haug, R. J.

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases with very high mobility show a huge or giant negative magnetoresistance at low temperatures and low magnetic fields. We present an experimental and theoretical work on the influence of the applied current on the negative huge magnetoresistance of these systems. We obtain an unexpected and strong nonlinear behavior consisting in an increase of the negative huge magnetoresistance with increasing current, in other words, for increasing current the magnetoresistance collapses at small magnetic fields. This nonlinearity is explained by the subtle interplay of elastic scattering within Landau levels and between Landau levels.

  9. Magnetoresistance Associated with Antiferromagnetic Interlayer Coupling Spaced by a Semiconductor in Fe /Si Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, K.; Yusu, K.; Saito, Y.

    1995-03-01

    Multilayer Fe/Si films with constant Fe thickness (2.6 nm) and variable Si thickness are investigated. Negative magnetoresistance is observed and two different temperature dependences are found as a function of Si thickness. For tSi = 1.2 nm, the magnetoresistance decreases with temperature decrease. For tSi>1.5 nm, the magnetoresistance increases (weakly) with temperature decrease. The magnetoresistance is attributed to spin-dependent scattering caused by antiferromagnetic layer coupling across a semiconducting spacer: narrow gap iron silicide for thin Si spacer layers and amorphous Si for thicker spacer layers.

  10. Flat magnetic exchange springs as mechanism for additional magnetoresistance in magnetic nanoisland arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltaev, A. P.; Pudonin, F. A.; Sherstnev, I. A.; Egorov, D. A.; Kozmin, A. M.

    2017-04-01

    Process of magnetization and magnetoresistance have been studied in nanoisland bilayer systems of FeNi-Co. Hysteresis loops show characteristic features (steps) most clearly observed in certain orientations of the sample in a magnetic field. To explain these features the concept of flat magnetic exchange spring has been introduced for nanoisland bilayers. It has been proposed that additional magnetoresistance can be the result of spin-dependent scattering of electrons in the area of flat magnetic exchange spring. Magnetoresistance studies of bilayer systems has shown that additional magnetoresistance occurs at the same magnetic fields as steps on hysteresis loops.

  11. Domain wall magnetoresistance in BiFeO3 thin films measured by scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, N.; Farokhipoor, S.; Santiso, J.; Noheda, B.; Catalan, G.

    2017-08-01

    We measure the magnetotransport properties of individual 71° domain walls in multiferroic BiFeO3 by means of conductive—atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) in the presence of magnetic fields up to one Tesla. The results suggest anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature, with the sign of the magnetoresistance depending on the relative orientation between the magnetic field and the domain wall plane. A consequence of this finding is that macroscopically averaged magnetoresistance measurements for domain wall bunches are likely to underestimate the magnetoresistance of each individual domain wall.

  12. Domain wall magnetoresistance in BiFeO3 thin films measured by scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Domingo, N; Farokhipoor, S; Santiso, J; Noheda, B; Catalan, G

    2017-08-23

    We measure the magnetotransport properties of individual 71° domain walls in multiferroic BiFeO3 by means of conductive-atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) in the presence of magnetic fields up to one Tesla. The results suggest anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature, with the sign of the magnetoresistance depending on the relative orientation between the magnetic field and the domain wall plane. A consequence of this finding is that macroscopically averaged magnetoresistance measurements for domain wall bunches are likely to underestimate the magnetoresistance of each individual domain wall.

  13. Isothermal anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic metallic IrMn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galceran, R.; Fina, I.; Cisneros-Fernández, J.; Bozzo, B.; Frontera, C.; López-Mir, L.; Deniz, H.; Park, K.-W.; Park, B.-G.; Balcells, Ll.; Martí, X.; Jungwirth, T.; Martínez, B.

    2016-10-01

    Antiferromagnetic spintronics is an emerging field; antiferromagnets can improve the functionalities of ferromagnets with higher response times, and having the information shielded against external magnetic field. Moreover, a large list of aniferromagnetic semiconductors and metals with Néel temperatures above room temperature exists. In the present manuscript, we persevere in the quest for the limits of how large can anisotropic magnetoresistance be in antiferromagnetic materials with very large spin-orbit coupling. We selected IrMn as a prime example of first-class moment (Mn) and spin-orbit (Ir) combination. Isothermal magnetotransport measurements in an antiferromagnetic-metal(IrMn)/ferromagnetic-insulator thin film bilayer have been performed. The metal/insulator structure with magnetic coupling between both layers allows the measurement of the modulation of the transport properties exclusively in the antiferromagnetic layer. Anisotropic magnetoresistance as large as 0.15% has been found, which is much larger than that for a bare IrMn layer. Interestingly, it has been observed that anisotropic magnetoresistance is strongly influenced by the field cooling conditions, signaling the dependence of the found response on the formation of domains at the magnetic ordering temperature.

  14. Low-temperature magnetoresistance of GaSb whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, A.; Ostrovskii, I.; Khoverko, Yu.; Liakh-Kaguy, N.

    2017-06-01

    Transverse and longitudinal magnetoresistancies in n-type GaSb whiskers with different doping concentration (Te) in the vicinity to the metal-insulator transition (MIT) from metal side of the transition were studied in the temperature range 1.5-60 K and magnetic field 0-14 T. Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in GaSb whiskers at low temperatures were revealed in magnetic field range 2-12 T. The oscillation period 0.025T-1 was found at various doping concentration in GaSb whiskers. The effective mass of electrons mc = 0.041m0 and Dingle temperature of about 7.5 K were found in GaSb whiskers with impurity concentration in the vicinity to MIT. The presence of negative magnetoresistance in GaSb whiskers with the impurity concentration in the nearest approximation to MIT with resistivity ρ300 K = 0.0053 Ω cm was observed and associated with weak localization. Besides for the whiskers a resistance minimum was observed at temperature about 16 K that is connected with Kondo effect. Magnetoresistance studies of n-type conductivity for GaSb whiskers revealed the crossover from weak localization to antilocalization in the temperature range of 1.4-4.2 K and magnetic fields below 1 T.

  15. Negative magnetoresistance in Dirac semimetal Cd3As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; He, Hongtao; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Zhang, Huachen; Liu, Hongchao; Ma, Rong; Fan, Zhiyong; Shen, Shun-Qing; Wang, Jiannong

    2016-01-01

    A large negative magnetoresistance (NMR) is anticipated in topological semimetals in parallel magnetic fields, demonstrating the chiral anomaly, a long-sought high-energy-physics effect, in solid-state systems. Recent experiments reveal that the Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 has the record-high mobility and positive linear magnetoresistance in perpendicular magnetic fields. However, the NMR has not yet been unveiled. Here we report the observation of NMR in Cd3As2 microribbons in parallel magnetic fields up to 66% at 50 K and visible at room temperatures. The NMR is sensitive to the angle between magnetic and electrical fields, robust against temperature and dependent on the carrier density. The large NMR results from low carrier densities in our Cd3As2 samples, ranging from 3.0 × 1017 cm-3 at 300 K to 2.2 × 1016 cm-3 below 50 K. We therefore attribute the observed NMR to the chiral anomaly. In perpendicular magnetic fields, a positive linear magnetoresistance up to 1,670% at 14 T and 2 K is also observed.

  16. Isothermal anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic metallic IrMn.

    PubMed

    Galceran, R; Fina, I; Cisneros-Fernández, J; Bozzo, B; Frontera, C; López-Mir, L; Deniz, H; Park, K-W; Park, B-G; Balcells, Ll; Martí, X; Jungwirth, T; Martínez, B

    2016-10-20

    Antiferromagnetic spintronics is an emerging field; antiferromagnets can improve the functionalities of ferromagnets with higher response times, and having the information shielded against external magnetic field. Moreover, a large list of aniferromagnetic semiconductors and metals with Néel temperatures above room temperature exists. In the present manuscript, we persevere in the quest for the limits of how large can anisotropic magnetoresistance be in antiferromagnetic materials with very large spin-orbit coupling. We selected IrMn as a prime example of first-class moment (Mn) and spin-orbit (Ir) combination. Isothermal magnetotransport measurements in an antiferromagnetic-metal(IrMn)/ferromagnetic-insulator thin film bilayer have been performed. The metal/insulator structure with magnetic coupling between both layers allows the measurement of the modulation of the transport properties exclusively in the antiferromagnetic layer. Anisotropic magnetoresistance as large as 0.15% has been found, which is much larger than that for a bare IrMn layer. Interestingly, it has been observed that anisotropic magnetoresistance is strongly influenced by the field cooling conditions, signaling the dependence of the found response on the formation of domains at the magnetic ordering temperature.

  17. Isothermal anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic metallic IrMn

    PubMed Central

    Galceran, R.; Fina, I.; Cisneros-Fernández, J.; Bozzo, B.; Frontera, C.; López-Mir, L.; Deniz, H.; Park, K.-W.; Park, B.-G.; Balcells, Ll.; Martí, X.; Jungwirth, T.; Martínez, B.

    2016-01-01

    Antiferromagnetic spintronics is an emerging field; antiferromagnets can improve the functionalities of ferromagnets with higher response times, and having the information shielded against external magnetic field. Moreover, a large list of aniferromagnetic semiconductors and metals with Néel temperatures above room temperature exists. In the present manuscript, we persevere in the quest for the limits of how large can anisotropic magnetoresistance be in antiferromagnetic materials with very large spin-orbit coupling. We selected IrMn as a prime example of first-class moment (Mn) and spin-orbit (Ir) combination. Isothermal magnetotransport measurements in an antiferromagnetic-metal(IrMn)/ferromagnetic-insulator thin film bilayer have been performed. The metal/insulator structure with magnetic coupling between both layers allows the measurement of the modulation of the transport properties exclusively in the antiferromagnetic layer. Anisotropic magnetoresistance as large as 0.15% has been found, which is much larger than that for a bare IrMn layer. Interestingly, it has been observed that anisotropic magnetoresistance is strongly influenced by the field cooling conditions, signaling the dependence of the found response on the formation of domains at the magnetic ordering temperature. PMID:27762278

  18. Anisotropic giant magnetoresistance in NbSb2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kefeng; Graf, D.; Li, Lijun; Wang, Limin; Petrovic, C.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic field response of the transport properties of novel materials and then the large magnetoresistance effects are of broad importance in both science and application. We report large transverse magnetoreistance (the magnetoresistant ratio ~ 1.3 × 105% in 2 K and 9 T field, and 4.3 × 106% in 0.4 K and 32 T field, without saturation) and field-induced metal-semiconductor-like transition, in NbSb2 single crystal. Magnetoresistance is significantly suppressed but the metal-semiconductor-like transition persists when the current is along the ac-plane. The sign reversal of the Hall resistivity and Seebeck coefficient in the field, plus the electronic structure reveal the coexistence of a small number of holes with very high mobility and a large number of electrons with low mobility. The large MR is attributed to the change of the Fermi surface induced by the magnetic field which is related to the Dirac-like point, in addition to orbital MR expected for high mobility metals. PMID:25476239

  19. Negative magnetoresistance in Dirac semimetal Cd3As2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; He, Hongtao; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Zhang, Huachen; Liu, Hongchao; Ma, Rong; Fan, Zhiyong; Shen, Shun-Qing; Wang, Jiannong

    2016-01-01

    A large negative magnetoresistance (NMR) is anticipated in topological semimetals in parallel magnetic fields, demonstrating the chiral anomaly, a long-sought high-energy-physics effect, in solid-state systems. Recent experiments reveal that the Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 has the record-high mobility and positive linear magnetoresistance in perpendicular magnetic fields. However, the NMR has not yet been unveiled. Here we report the observation of NMR in Cd3As2 microribbons in parallel magnetic fields up to 66% at 50 K and visible at room temperatures. The NMR is sensitive to the angle between magnetic and electrical fields, robust against temperature and dependent on the carrier density. The large NMR results from low carrier densities in our Cd3As2 samples, ranging from 3.0 × 1017 cm−3 at 300 K to 2.2 × 1016 cm−3 below 50 K. We therefore attribute the observed NMR to the chiral anomaly. In perpendicular magnetic fields, a positive linear magnetoresistance up to 1,670% at 14 T and 2 K is also observed. PMID:26744088

  20. Origin of the extremely large magnetoresistance in the semimetal YSb

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, J.; Ghimire, N. J.; Jiang, J. S.; ...

    2017-08-29

    Extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) was recently discovered in YSb but its origin, along with that of many other XMR materials, is an active subject of debate. Here we demonstrate that YSb, with a cubic crystalline lattice and anisotropic bulk electron Fermi pockets, can be an excellent candidate for revealing the origin of XMR. We carried out angle dependent Shubnikov – de Haas quantum oscillation measurements to determine the volume and shape of the Fermi pockets. In addition, by investigating both Hall and longitudinal magnetoresistivities, we reveal that the origin of XMR in YSb lies in its carrier high mobility withmore » a diminishing Hall factor that is obtained from the ratio of the Hall and longitudinal magentoresistivities. The high mobility leads to a strong magnetic field dependence of the longitudinal magnetoconductivity while a diminishing Hall factor reveals the latent XMR hidden in the longitudinal magnetoconductivity whose inverse has a nearly quadratic magnetic-field dependence. The Hall factor highlights the deviation of the measured magnetoresistivity from its full potential value and provides a general formulation to reveal the origin of XMR behavior in high mobility materials and of nonsaturating MR behavior as a whole. Our approach can be readily applied to other XMR materials.« less

  1. Preparation and magnetoresistance of silver and copper chalcogenide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuprakov, Ilya; Watts, Steven; Wirth, Steffen; von Molnár, Stephan; Dahmen, Klaus-Hermann

    1998-03-01

    An unexpected giant positive magnetoresitance was recently discovered in non-stoichiometric crystals of Ag_2Te and Ag_2Se [1]. There, a linear magnetoresistance effect as high as 120% was observed in fields of 4 T at room temperature. Here we report on thin films of copper and silver chalcogenides prepared by a vapor phase transport method. A prefered grain orientation is found in the films after annealing. Resistance, magnetoresistance and Hall effect were measured. Typically, the resistivity is temperature independent below 70 K with a value of 1 mΩ cm. As in the crystals, there is a large positive magnetoresistance, but the field dependence is non-linear with a typical value of 50% at room temperature and 200% at temperatures below 100 K for applied fields of 6 T. Variations of the deposition techniques are explored in order to establish the relationship between the deposition conditions and transport properties. [0.25cm] [1] R. Xu, A. Husmann, T.F. Rosenbaum, M.-L. Saboungi, E.J. Enderby and P.B. Littlewood, Nature 390, 57 (1997).

  2. Metal-Controlled Magnetoresistance at Room Temperature in Single-Molecule Devices.

    PubMed

    Aragonès, Albert C; Aravena, Daniel; Valverde-Muñoz, Francisco J; Real, José Antonio; Sanz, Fausto; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Ruiz, Eliseo

    2017-03-03

    The appropriate choice of the transition metal complex and metal surface electronic structure opens the possibility to control the spin of the charge carriers through the resulting hybrid molecule/metal spinterface in a single-molecule electrical contact at room temperature. The single-molecule conductance of a Au/molecule/Ni junction can be switched by flipping the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic electrode. The requirements of the molecule include not just the presence of unpaired electrons: the electronic configuration of the metal center has to provide occupied or empty orbitals that strongly interact with the junction metal electrodes and that are close in energy to their Fermi levels for one of the electronic spins only. The key ingredient for the metal surface is to provide an efficient spin texture induced by the spin-orbit coupling in the topological surface states that results in an efficient spin-dependent interaction with the orbitals of the molecule. The strong magnetoresistance effect found in this kind of single-molecule wire opens a new approach for the design of room-temperature nanoscale devices based on spin-polarized currents controlled at molecular level.

  3. Effects of Magnetic Domain Walls on the Anisotropic Magnetoresistance in NiFe Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Nam, Chunghee

    2015-10-01

    We show that a type of magnetic domain walls (DWs) can be monitored by anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) measurements due to a specific DW volume depending on the DW type in NiFe magnetic wires. A circular DW injection pad is used to generate DWs at a low magnetic field, resulting in reliable DW introduction into magnetic wires. DW pinning is induced by a change of DW energy at an asymmetric single notch. The injection of DW from the circular pad and its pinning at the notch is observed by using AMR and magnetic force microscope (MFM) measurements. A four-point probe AMR measurement allows us to distinguish the DW type in the switching process because DWs are pinned at the single notch, where voltage probes are closely placed around the notch. Two types of AMR behavior are observed in the AMR measurements, which is owing to a change of DW structures. MFM images and micromagnetic simulations are consistent with the AMR results.

  4. Magnetic switching

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.; Cook, E.; Hawkins, S.; Poor, S.; Reginato, L.; Schmidt, J.; Smith, M.

    1983-06-01

    The paper discusses the development program in magnetic switching which was aimed at solving the rep-rate and reliability limitations of the ATA spark gaps. The end result has been a prototype physically very similar to the present Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) pulse power unit but vastly superior in performance. This prototype, which is easily adaptable to the existing systems, has achieved a burst rep-rate of 20 kHz and an output voltage of 500 kV. A one-on-one substitution of the existing pulse power module would result in a 100 MeV accelerator. Furthermore, the high efficiency of the magnetic pulse compression stages has allowed CW operation of the prototype at one kilohertz opening up other applications for the pulse power. Performance and design details will be described.

  5. Effectis of Lattice Distortion, Polaron Sonduction and Double-Exchange Interaction on the Physical Properties of Magnetoresistive Manganites and Cobaltites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, N. C.; Vasquez, R. P.; Wei, J. Y. T.; Fu, C. C.; Beach, G.; Huynh, J.; Samoilov, A. V.; Boris, A. V.; Kovaleva, N. N.; Bazhenov, A. V.

    1997-01-01

    The relevance of lattice distortion, polaron conduction, and double-exchange interaction to the occurrence of colossal magnetoresistance (SMR) is investigated by comparing the physical properties of magnetoresistive manganites and cobaltites.

  6. Method of making active magnetic refrigerant, colossal magnetostriction and giant magnetoresistive materials based on Gd-Si-Ge alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Alexandra O.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2003-07-08

    Method of making an active magnetic refrigerant represented by Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4 alloy for 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.0 comprising placing amounts of the commercially pure Gd, Si, and Ge charge components in a crucible, heating the charge contents under subambient pressure to a melting temperature of the alloy for a time sufficient to homogenize the alloy and oxidize carbon with oxygen present in the Gd charge component to reduce carbon, rapidly solidifying the alloy in the crucible, and heat treating the solidified alloy at a temperature below the melting temperature for a time effective to homogenize a microstructure of the solidified material, and then cooling sufficiently fast to prevent the eutectoid decomposition and improve magnetocaloric and/or the magnetostrictive and/or the magnetoresistive properties thereof.

  7. Structure-dependent magnetoresistance and spin-transfer torque in antiferromagnetic Fe |MgO |FeMn |Cu tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xingtao; Tang, Huimin; Wang, Shizhuo; Qin, Minghui

    2017-02-01

    We predict large magnetoresistance (MR) and spin transfer torque (STT) in antiferromagnetic Fe |MgO |FeMn |Cu tunnel junctions based on first-principles scattering theory. MR as large as ˜100 % is found in one junction. Magnetic dynamic simulations show that STT acting on the antiferromagnetic order parameter dominates the spin dynamics, and an electronic bias of order 10-1mV and current density of order 105Acm-2 can switches a junction of three-layer MgO, they are about one order smaller than that in Fe |MgO |Fe junction with the same barrier thickness, respectively. The multiple scattering in the antiferromagnetic region is considered to be responsible for the enhanced spin torque and smaller switching current density.

  8. Resistive switching via the converse magnetoelectric effect in ferromagnetic multilayers on ferroelectric substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertsev, N. A.; Kohlstedt, H.

    2010-11-01

    A voltage-controlled resistive switching is predicted for ferromagnetic multilayers and spin valves mechanically coupled to a ferroelectric substrate. The switching between low- and high-resistance states results from the strain-driven magnetization reorientations by about 90°, which are shown to occur in ferromagnetic layers with a high magnetostriction and weak cubic magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Such reorientations, not requiring external magnetic fields, can be realized experimentally by applying moderate electric field to a thick substrate (bulk or membrane type) made of a relaxor ferroelectric having ultrahigh piezoelectric coefficients. The proposed multiferroic hybrids exhibiting giant magnetoresistance may be employed as electric-write nonvolatile magnetic memory cells with nondestructive readout.

  9. Plasma Switch Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-08

    switch :9 (1) the low-pressure gas switch 17 (2) the surface flashover switch ,18 (3) the thyrtron,’ŕ (4) the high pressure...spark gap, (5) the magnetic switch .’ 9 20 and (6) the ECS. The ongoing research for both the low pressure gas and surface flashover closing- switches has... investigations into optimizing gas mixtures for opening switch applications 1 ’"’"’’’a𔃻 ; and a preliminary study of the discharge stabili-

  10. Multiple source heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

  11. Magnetoresistance of nanoscale molecular devices based on Aharonov-Bohm interferometry.

    PubMed

    Hod, Oded; Baer, Roi; Rabani, Eran

    2008-09-24

    Control of conductance in molecular junctions is of key importance in the growing field of molecular electronics. The current in these junctions is often controlled by an electric gate designed to shift conductance peaks into the low bias regime. Magnetic fields, on the other hand, have rarely been used due to the small magnetic flux captured by molecular conductors (an exception is the Kondo effect in single-molecule transistors). This is in contrast to a related field, electronic transport through mesoscopic devices, where considerable activity with magnetic fields has led to a rich description of transport. The scarcity of experimental activity is due to the belief that significant magnetic response is obtained only when the magnetic flux is of the order of the quantum flux, while attaining such a flux for molecular and nanoscale devices requires unrealistic magnetic fields. Here we review recent theoretical work regarding the essential physical requirements necessary for the construction of nanometer-scale magnetoresistance devices based on an Aharonov-Bohm molecular interferometer. We show that control of the conductance properties using small fractions of a magnetic flux can be achieved by carefully adjusting the lifetime of the conducting electrons through a pre-selected single state that is well separated from other states due to quantum confinement effects. Using a simple analytical model and more elaborate atomistic calculations we demonstrate that magnetic fields which give rise to a magnetic flux comparable to 10(-3) of the quantum flux can be used to switch a class of different molecular and nanometer rings, ranging from quantum corrals, carbon nanotubes and even a molecular ring composed of polyconjugated aromatic materials. The unique characteristics of the magnetic field as a gate is further discussed and demonstrated in two different directions. First, a three-terminal molecular router devices that can function as a parallel logic gate, processing

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Magnetoresistance of nanoscale molecular devices based on Aharonov Bohm interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Oded; Baer, Roi; Rabani, Eran

    2008-09-01

    Control of conductance in molecular junctions is of key importance in the growing field of molecular electronics. The current in these junctions is often controlled by an electric gate designed to shift conductance peaks into the low bias regime. Magnetic fields, on the other hand, have rarely been used due to the small magnetic flux captured by molecular conductors (an exception is the Kondo effect in single-molecule transistors). This is in contrast to a related field, electronic transport through mesoscopic devices, where considerable activity with magnetic fields has led to a rich description of transport. The scarcity of experimental activity is due to the belief that significant magnetic response is obtained only when the magnetic flux is of the order of the quantum flux, while attaining such a flux for molecular and nanoscale devices requires unrealistic magnetic fields. Here we review recent theoretical work regarding the essential physical requirements necessary for the construction of nanometer-scale magnetoresistance devices based on an Aharonov-Bohm molecular interferometer. We show that control of the conductance properties using small fractions of a magnetic flux can be achieved by carefully adjusting the lifetime of the conducting electrons through a pre-selected single state that is well separated from other states due to quantum confinement effects. Using a simple analytical model and more elaborate atomistic calculations we demonstrate that magnetic fields which give rise to a magnetic flux comparable to 10-3 of the quantum flux can be used to switch a class of different molecular and nanometer rings, ranging from quantum corrals, carbon nanotubes and even a molecular ring composed of polyconjugated aromatic materials. The unique characteristics of the magnetic field as a gate is further discussed and demonstrated in two different directions. First, a three-terminal molecular router devices that can function as a parallel logic gate, processing

  13. Superconductivity emerging from a suppressed large magnetoresistant state in tungsten ditelluride

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Defen; Zhou, Yazhou; Yi, Wei; Yang, Chongli; Guo, Jing; Shi, Youguo; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Sheng; Li, Aiguo; Yang, Ke; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Guangming; Sun, Liling; Zhao, Zhongxian

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in tungsten ditelluride provides a unique playground to find new phenomena and significant perspective for potential applications. The large magnetoresistance effect originates from a perfect balance of hole and electron carriers, which is sensitive to external pressure. Here we report the suppression of the large magnetoresistance and emergence of superconductivity in pressurized tungsten ditelluride via high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction, electrical resistance, magnetoresistance and alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements. Upon increasing pressure, the positive large magnetoresistance effect is gradually suppressed and turned off at a critical pressure of 10.5 GPa, where superconductivity accordingly emerges. No structural phase transition is observed under the pressure investigated. In situ high-pressure Hall coefficient measurements at low temperatures demonstrate that elevating pressure decreases the population of hole carriers but increases that of the electron ones. Significantly, at the critical pressure, a sign change of the Hall coefficient is observed. PMID:26203807

  14. Systematic Angular Study of Magnetoresistance in Permalloy Connected Kagome Artificial Spin Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungsik; Le, Brian; Watts, Justin; Leighton, Chris; Samarth, Nitin; Schiffer, Peter

    Artificial spin ices are nanostructured two-dimensional arrays of ferromagnetic elements, where frustrated interactions lead to unusual collective magnetic behavior. Here we report a room-temperature magnetoresistance study of connected permalloy (Ni81Fe19) kagome artificial spin ice networks, wherein the direction of the applied in-plane magnetic field is systematically varied. We measure both the longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistance in these structures, and we find certain transport geometries of the network show strong angular sensitivity - even small variations in the applied field angle lead to dramatic changes of the magnetoresistance response. We also investigate the magnetization reversal of the networks using magnetic force microscopy (MFM), demonstrating avalanche behavior in the magnetization reversal. The magnetoresistance features are analyzed using an anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) model. Supported by the US Department of Energy. Work at the University of Minnesota was supported by Seagate Technology, NSF MRSEC, and a Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Programme.

  15. Magnetoresistance in nanostructured Tb/Ti and Tb/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Svalov, A. V.; Kurlyandskaya, G. V.; Vas'kovskiy, V. O.; Sorokin, A. N.; Diercks, D.

    2011-01-15

    Magnetic, magnetoresistive and structural properties were studied for [Tb/Ti]{sub n} and [Tb/Si]{sub n} multilayers which were prepared by rf-sputtering. The thickness of the Tb layers varied from 1.5 to 12 nm. The thickness of 2 nm nonmagnetic spacers of Ti or Si was kept constant. Both anisotropic and isotropic magnetoresistance was observed in [Tb/Ti]{sub n} and [Tb/Si]{sub n} multilayers. A decrease in the thickness of the terbium layers led to a decrease in the anisotropic contribution to the total magnetoresistance. The negative isotropic magnetoresistanse in [Tb/Ti]{sub n} and [Tb/Si]{sub n} multilayers can be attributed to the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and/or high field isotropic magnetoresistance. The structure of the samples of both types enabled the existence of the GMR effect.

  16. Superconductivity emerging from a suppressed large magnetoresistant state in tungsten ditelluride.

    PubMed

    Kang, Defen; Zhou, Yazhou; Yi, Wei; Yang, Chongli; Guo, Jing; Shi, Youguo; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Sheng; Li, Aiguo; Yang, Ke; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Guangming; Sun, Liling; Zhao, Zhongxian

    2015-07-23

    The recent discovery of large magnetoresistance in tungsten ditelluride provides a unique playground to find new phenomena and significant perspective for potential applications. The large magnetoresistance effect originates from a perfect balance of hole and electron carriers, which is sensitive to external pressure. Here we report the suppression of the large magnetoresistance and emergence of superconductivity in pressurized tungsten ditelluride via high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction, electrical resistance, magnetoresistance and alternating current magnetic susceptibility measurements. Upon increasing pressure, the positive large magnetoresistance effect is gradually suppressed and turned off at a critical pressure of 10.5 GPa, where superconductivity accordingly emerges. No structural phase transition is observed under the pressure investigated. In situ high-pressure Hall coefficient measurements at low temperatures demonstrate that elevating pressure decreases the population of hole carriers but increases that of the electron ones. Significantly, at the critical pressure, a sign change of the Hall coefficient is observed.

  17. Enhanced magnetoresistance and pinning-depinning processes of vortex domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soledade, P. R.; Brandão, J.; Mello, A.; Sampaio, L. C.

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the pinning-depinning processes of vortex domain walls (VDW) in Permalloy nanowires with asymmetric triangular notches by means of magnetoresistance measurements and micromagnetic simulations. Through a model based on the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) and the magnetization structure obtained from simulations, the magnetoresistance when the VDW passes stretched through the notch was calculated. Besides the depinning field, as it is known, also the magnetoresistance drop depends on the domain wall chirality. Measurements show that the resistance drop for clockwise (CW) chirality is  ≈180 m Ω (38%) larger than for the counterclockwise (CCW) chirality. From the VDW resistance calculations it becomes clear which domain wall parameters, like domain wall structure, chirality and wall width, play a role on the magnetoresistance. These results offer an additional route to better controlling the VDW motion, which can be beneficial to applications.

  18. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  19. Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, weak antilocalization effect and large linear magnetoresistance in the putative topological superconductor LuPdBi.

    PubMed

    Pavlosiuk, Orest; Kaczorowski, Dariusz; Wiśniewski, Piotr

    2015-03-17

    We present electronic transport and magnetic properties of single crystals of semimetallic half-Heusler phase LuPdBi, having theoretically predicted band inversion requisite for nontrivial topological properties. The compound exhibits superconductivity below a critical temperature Tc = 1.8 K, with a zero-temperature upper critical field Bc2 ≈ 2.3 T. Although superconducting state is clearly reflected in the electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility data, no corresponding anomaly can be seen in the specific heat. Temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity suggests existence of two parallel conduction channels: metallic and semiconducting, with the latter making negligible contribution at low temperatures. The magnetoresistance is huge and clearly shows a weak antilocalization effect in small magnetic fields. Above about 1.5 T, the magnetoresistance becomes linear and does not saturate in fields up to 9 T. The linear magnetoresistance is observed up to room temperature. Below 10 K, it is accompanied by Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. Their analysis reveals charge carriers with effective mass of 0.06 me and a Berry phase very close to π, expected for Dirac-fermion surface states, thus corroborating topological nature of the material.

  20. The physical mechanism of magnetic field controlled magnetocaloric effect and magnetoresistance in bulk PrGa compound

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X. Q.; Wu, H.; Chen, J.; Zhang, B.; Li, Y. Q.; Hu, F. X.; Sun, J. R.; Huang, Q. Z.; Shen, B. G.

    2015-01-01

    The PrGa compound shows excellent performance on the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) and magnetoresistance (MR). The physical mechanism of MCE and MR in PrGa compound was investigated and elaborated in detail on the basis of magnetic measurement, heat capacity measurement and neutron powder diffraction (NPD) experiment. New types of magnetic structure and magnetic transition are found. The results of the NPD along with the saturation magnetic moment (MS) and magnetic entropy (SM) indicate that the magnetic moments are randomly distributed within the equivalent conical surface in the ferromagnetic (FM) temperature range. PrGa compound undergoes an FM to FM transition and an FM to paramagnetic (PM) transition as temperature increases. The magnetizing process was discussed in detail and the physical mechanism of the magnetic field controlled magnetocaloric effect (MCE) and the magnetoresistance (MR) was studied. The formation of the plateau on MCE curve was explained and MR was calculated in detail on the basis of the magnetic structure and the analysis of the magnetizing process. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the calculations. Finally, the expression of MR = β(T)X2 and its application conditions were discussed, where X is M(H)/Meff, and Meff is the paramagnetic effective moment. PMID:26455711

  1. Evolution of the GMR-effect amplitude in copper/Permalloy-multilayered thin films[Giant Magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Huetten, A.; Mrozek, S.; Heitmann, S.; Hempel, T.; Brueckl, H.; Reiss, G.

    1999-11-12

    The evolution of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect in thin film multilayers based on {l{underscore}brace}Cu/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19}{r{underscore}brace}{sub N} has been investigated. The maximum effect amplitude at room temperature reaches about 20% and about 10% in first and second antiferromagnetic maximum, respectively. The magnetoresistance vs field dependence does not show a hysteresis. A simple magnetization reversal model has been applied to separate contributions of bilinear and biquadratic exchange energies to the magnetic coupling. It is shown, that this model can also be used to predict saturation fields for different systems. Multilayers with Cu layer thickness corresponding to the second maximum of the antiferromagnetic coupling survive heat spikes of up to 200 C retaining their sensitivity of {gt}0.16%/Oe. Investigations of multilayers comprised of blocks of first and second antiferromagnetic coupling maximum revealed the field dependence of the coupling between these blocks and it is shown that the GMR effect is simply additive.

  2. Angular dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Zhang, Shufeng

    2014-05-01

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), whose physical origin is attributed to the combination of spin dependent scattering and spin orbital coupling (SOC), usually displays simple angular dependence for polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. By including generic spin dependent scattering and spin Hall (SH) terms in the Ohm's law, we explicitly show that various magneto-transport phenomena such as anomalous Hall (AH), SH, planar Hall (PH) and AMR could be quantitatively related for bulk polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. We also discuss how AMR angular dependence is affected by the presence of interfacial SOC in magnetic layered structure.

  3. Distinct electronic structure for the extreme magnetoresistance in YSb

    DOE PAGES

    He, Junfeng; Zhang, Chaofan; Ghimire, Nirmal J.; ...

    2016-12-23

    An extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) has recently been observed in several nonmagnetic semimetals. Increasing experimental and theoretical evidence indicates that the XMR can be driven by either topological protection or electron-hole compensation. Moreover, by investigating the electronic structure of a XMR material, YSb, we present spectroscopic evidence for a special case which lacks topological protection and perfect electron-hole compensation. Further investigations reveal that a cooperative action of a substantial difference between electron and hole mobility and a moderate carrier compensation might contribute to the XMR in YSb.

  4. Angular dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in magnetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Steven S.-L. Zhang, Shufeng

    2014-05-07

    Anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), whose physical origin is attributed to the combination of spin dependent scattering and spin orbital coupling (SOC), usually displays simple angular dependence for polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. By including generic spin dependent scattering and spin Hall (SH) terms in the Ohm's law, we explicitly show that various magneto-transport phenomena such as anomalous Hall (AH), SH, planar Hall (PH) and AMR could be quantitatively related for bulk polycrystalline ferromagnetic metals. We also discuss how AMR angular dependence is affected by the presence of interfacial SOC in magnetic layered structure.

  5. Giant Magnetoresistive Biochips for Biomarker Detection and Genotyping: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shan X.

    2008-06-01

    Giant magnetoresistive biochips based on spin valve sensor arrays and magnetic nanoparticle labels have been successfully applied to the detection of biological events in the form of both protein and DNA assays with great speed, sensitivity, selectivity and economy. The technology is highly scalable to deep multiplex detection of biomarkers in a complex disease, and amenable to integration of microfluidics and CMOS electronics for portable applications. The results suggest that a magneto-nano biochip holds great promises in biomedicine, particularly for point of care molecular diagnostics of cancer, infectious diseases, radiation injury, cardiac and other diseases.

  6. Magnetoresistance of polycrystalline gadolinium with varying grain size

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravorty, Manotosh Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2015-01-21

    In this paper, we report a study of evolution of low field magnetoresistance (MR) of Gadolinium as the grain size in the sample is changed from few microns (∼4 μm) to the nanoscopic regime (∼35 nm). The low field MR has a clear effect on varying grain size. In large grain sample (few μm), the magnetic domains are controlled by local anisotropy field determined mainly by the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The low field MR clearly reflects the temperature dependence of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. For decreasing gain size, the contribution of spin disorder at the grain boundary increases and enhances the local anisotropy field.

  7. Magnetoresistance of galfenol-based magnetic tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobaut, B.; Vinai, G.; Castán-Guerrero, C.; Krizmancic, D.; Rafaqat, H.; Roddaro, S.; Rossi, G.; Panaccione, G.; Eddrief, M.; Marangolo, M.; Torelli, P.

    2015-12-01

    The manipulation of ferromagnetic layer magnetization via electrical pulse is driving an intense research due to the important applications that this result will have on memory devices and sensors. In this study we realized a magnetotunnel junction in which one layer is made of Galfenol (Fe1-xGax) which possesses one of the highest magnetostrictive coefficient known. The multilayer stack has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy and e-beam evaporation. Optical lithography and physical etching have been combined to obtain 20x20 micron sized pillars. The obtained structures show tunneling conductivity across the junction and a tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect of up to 11.5% in amplitude.

  8. Distinct electronic structure for the extreme magnetoresistance in YSb

    SciTech Connect

    He, Junfeng; Zhang, Chaofan; Ghimire, Nirmal J.; Liang, Tian; Jia, Chunjing; Jiang, Juan; Tang, Shujie; Chen, Sudi; He, Yu; Mo, S. -K.; Hwang, C. C.; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Chen, Y. L.; Mitchell, J. F.; Shen, Z. -X.

    2016-12-23

    An extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) has recently been observed in several nonmagnetic semimetals. Increasing experimental and theoretical evidence indicates that the XMR can be driven by either topological protection or electron-hole compensation. Moreover, by investigating the electronic structure of a XMR material, YSb, we present spectroscopic evidence for a special case which lacks topological protection and perfect electron-hole compensation. Further investigations reveal that a cooperative action of a substantial difference between electron and hole mobility and a moderate carrier compensation might contribute to the XMR in YSb.

  9. Angular magnetoresistance in semiconducting undoped amorphous carbon thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Rizwan Ur Rehman; Saleemi, Awais Siddique; Zhang, Xiaozhong

    2015-05-07

    Thin films of undoped amorphous carbon thin film were fabricated by using Chemical Vapor Deposition and their structure was investigated by using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy. Angular magnetoresistance (MR) has been observed for the first time in these undoped amorphous carbon thin films in temperature range of 2 ∼ 40 K. The maximum magnitude of angular MR was in the range of 9.5% ∼ 1.5% in 2 ∼ 40 K. The origin of this angular MR was also discussed.

  10. Ultrahigh magnetoresistance at room temperature in molecular wires.

    PubMed

    Mahato, R N; Lülf, H; Siekman, M H; Kersten, S P; Bobbert, P A; de Jong, M P; De Cola, L; van der Wiel, W G

    2013-07-19

    Systems featuring large magnetoresistance (MR) at room temperature and in small magnetic fields are attractive owing to their potential for applications in magnetic field sensing and data storage. Usually, the magnetic properties of materials are exploited to achieve large MR effects. Here, we report on an exceptionally large (>2000%), room-temperature, small-field (a few millitesla) MR effect in one-dimensional, nonmagnetic systems formed by molecular wires embedded in a zeolite host crystal. This ultrahigh MR effect is ascribed to spin blockade in one-dimensional electron transport. Its generic nature offers very good perspectives to exploit the effect in a wide range of low-dimensional systems.

  11. Towards a magnetoresistive platform for neural signal recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P. P.; Gervasoni, G.; Albisetti, E.; D'Ercoli, F.; Monticelli, M.; Moretti, D.; Forte, N.; Rocchi, A.; Ferrari, G.; Baldelli, P.; Sampietro, M.; Benfenati, F.; Bertacco, R.; Petti, D.

    2017-05-01

    A promising strategy to get deeper insight on brain functionalities relies on the investigation of neural activities at the cellular and sub-cellular level. In this framework, methods for recording neuron electrical activity have gained interest over the years. Main technological challenges are associated to finding highly sensitive detection schemes, providing considerable spatial and temporal resolution. Moreover, the possibility to perform non-invasive assays would constitute a noteworthy benefit. In this work, we present a magnetoresistive platform for the detection of the action potential propagation in neural cells. Such platform allows, in perspective, the in vitro recording of neural signals arising from single neurons, neural networks and brain slices.

  12. Scattering anisotropy and giant magnetoresistance in magnetic multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, J.; Zahn, P.; Mertig, I.

    2001-06-01

    We present full ab initio calculations of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in Co/Cu (001) multilayers including self-consistent impurity scattering potentials. Starting from density functional theory the electronic structure of the multilayer and the scattering at impurities are described by means of a new Green function method. It will be demonstrated that impurity scattering in magnetic multilayers is strongly anisotropic in comparison to impurity scattering in bulk systems. Concerning transport the anisotropy of scattering leads to a formation of highly conducting channels which give rise to short circuits and cause strong variation of GMR as a function of the impurity position in the multilayer. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Percolation Blocking as the Origin of Organic Magneto-resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun-Qing; Sun, Ling-Ling; Wang, Ting

    2016-05-01

    In order to identify the elementary mechanisms governing the organic magneto-resistance (OMAR) phenomenon, we demonstrated how the applied magnetic field acts on the variable hopping mobility. Based on a percolation model of hopping between localized states, we introduced an analytic expression for magneto-mobility and thus the OMAR, and discussed the influence of inter-site electronic interaction, operating bias, film thickness, temperature, and material parameters on the OMAR. The double occupied states and the spin selection rules play a major role in the mechanism.

  14. Negative magnetoresistance in a low-k dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    McGowan, B. T.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2014-12-22

    We observed negative magnetoresistance in amorphous SiCOH, a low-k dielectric, applying modest magnetic fields (<150 Gauss) at room temperature. The conductivity increases with increasing magnetic field. The change in conductivity due to the applied magnetic field increases with electric field and has little or no temperature dependence over the range studied. The magnitude of the effect is independent of the orientation of magnetic field relative to the direction of current flow. The effect is attributed to spin constraints associated with double occupancy of a trap site under the assumption that trap sites which have double occupancy have lower hopping frequencies than traps that have single occupancy.

  15. The electrical conductivity and longitudinal magnetoresistance of metallic nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraga, Luis; Henriquez, Ricardo; Bravo, Sergio; Solis, Basilio

    2017-03-01

    Proceeding from exact solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation, we present formulas for the electrical conductivity and longitudinal magnetoresistance of single-crystalline cylindrical nanotubes. The effects of surface scattering are taken into account by introducing different specularity parameters at the inner and outer surfaces. For small values of the inner diameter, these formulas reduce to the respective expressions for cylindrical nanowires. It is found that the existing measurements of the resistivity of nanotubes (Venkata Kamalakar and Raychaudhuri, New J. Phys. 14, 043032 (2012)) can be accurately described by this formalism.

  16. Switching of ± 360° domain wall states in a nanoring by an azimuthal Oersted field.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, N R; Licht, A S; Li, Y; Sun, Y; Tuominen, M T; Aidala, K E

    2011-12-02

    We demonstrate magnetic switching between two 360° domain wall vortex states in cobalt nanorings, which are candidate magnetic states for robust and low power magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) devices. These 360° domain wall (DW) or 'twisted onion' states can have clockwise or counterclockwise circulation, the two states for data storage. Reliable switching between the states is necessary for any realistic device. We accomplish this switching by applying a circular Oersted field created by passing current through a metal atomic force microscope tip placed at the center of the ring. After initializing in an onion state, we rotate the DWs to one side of the ring by passing a current through the center, and can switch between the two twisted states by reversing the current, causing the DWs to split and meet again on the opposite side of the ring. A larger current will annihilate the DWs and create a perfect vortex state in the rings.

  17. All-Optical Switching of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with Single Subpicosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Yang; He, Li; Wang, Jian-Ping; Li, Mo

    2017-02-01

    The magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) is one of the most important building blocks of spintronic logic and memory components for beyond-CMOS computation and communication. Although switching of MTJs without magnetic field has been achieved by charge and spin current injection, the operation speed is limited fundamentally by the spin-precession time to many picoseconds. We report the demonstration of ultrafast all-optical switching of an MTJ using single subpicosecond infrared laser pulses. This optically switchable MTJ uses ferrimagnetic Gd(Fe,Co) as the free layer and its switching is read out by measuring its tunneling magnetoresistance with a Δ R /R ratio of 0.6%. A switching repetition rate at MHz has been demonstrated, but the fundamental upper limit should be higher than tens of GHz rate. This result represents an important step toward integrated optospintronic devices that combines spintronics and photonics technologies to enable ultrafast conversion between fundamental information carriers of electron spins and photons.

  18. Latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

  19. Metal vapor arc switch electromagnetic accelerator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mongeau, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    A multielectrode device housed in an insulator vacuum vessel, the metal vapor vacuum switch has high power capability and can hold off voltages up to the 100 kilovolt level. Such switches can be electronically triggered and can interrupt or commutate at a zero current crossing. The physics of arc initiation, arc conduction, and interruption are examined, including material considerations; inefficiencies; arc modes; magnetic field effects; passive and forced extinction; and voltage recovery. Heating, electrode lifetime, device configuration, and external circuit configuration are discussed. The metal vapor vacuum switch is compared with SCRs, GTOs, spark gaps, ignitrons, and mechanical breakers.

  20. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-03-06

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  1. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  2. Magnetoresistance of Tl_2Mo_6Se_6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuh, Jayong; Mengistu, E. H.; McCarten, J. C.; Tessema, G. X.; Skove, M. J.; Saffar, Hugo

    1997-03-01

    We present results of high precision R vs T and magnetoresistance measurements on Tl_2Mo_6Se_6. The high precision resistance results corroborate the thermopwer and Hall results which indicate that an electronic instability of a density wave type develops in this compound around 80 K^1. This is further confirmed by the high field, up to 20T, magnetoresistance for 2K

  3. Large Magnetoresistance in Nanostructured Armchair Graphene Nanoribbon Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suchun; Son, Young-Woo; Quek, Su Ying

    2014-03-01

    The prospect of all-carbon nanoelectronics has motivated significant interest in the transport of electrons through graphene and graphene nanoribbon (GNR) based junctions.... The weak intrinsic spin-orbit coupling in graphene also makes graphene an attractive candidate for replacing conventional materials in spintronics applications. Several interesting spin transport properties, such as giant magnetoresistance and half-metallicity, have been predicted. Most of these predictions have centered on GNRs with zigzag atomic edges (ZGNRs). On the other hand, significant progress has been made in the controlled atomic-scale synthesis of GNRs with armchair edges (AGNRs), all with specific widths.... Yet, to date, little is known about the potential of such well-defined AGNRs in electronics or spintronics. In this work, we use first principles transport calculations to predict the electron and spin transport properties of nanostructured AGNR junctions. We predict a large magnetoresistance of ~ 900%, related to resonant transmission channels close to the Fermi energy. We gratefully acknowledge helpful discussions with YP Feng and CK Gan, funding from Singapore NRF and A*STAR, Korea MEST NRF, and HJ Choi for use of the SCARLET code (PRB 76, 155420, 2007).

  4. Magnetoresistance of thick-film chip resistors at millikelvin temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, K.

    Data are presented for the magnetoresistance of two types of commercial thick-film chip resistors in the millikelvin temperature regime (1 kΩ Dale RCW-575 and 2.7 kΩ Philips RC-01). Chip resistors, which are intended for use in microcircuit electronics, have become an important tool in low temperature research due to their applicability as reliable secondary thermometers. They have good reproducibility and fast thermal response, are small and are easy to mount. The temperature range covered in this work is between 1 K and 25 mK, and the magnetic field range is from 0 to 7 T. For both resistors, the magnetoresistance (MR) is negative for low magnetic fields, and positive for high fields. The transition point from negative to positive MR and the magnitude of the MR are strongly temperature dependent. At 25 mK and 7 T, which are the lowest temperature and the highest field measured, the MR value is a few per cent. On average, the MR of the Philips resistor is ≈50% lower than that of the Dale resistor.

  5. Theory of the negative magnetoresistance in magnetic metallic multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, R.Q.; Falicov, L.M. |

    1993-04-01

    The Boltzman equation is solved for a system consisting of alternating ferromagnetic normal metallic layers. The in-plane conductance of the film is calculated for two configurations: successive ferromagnetic layers aligned parallel and antiparallel to each other. Results explain the giant negative magnetoresistance encountered in these systems when an initial antiparallel arrangement is changed into a parallel configuration by application of an extemal magnetic field. The calculation depends on geometric parameters (the thicknesses of the layers); intrinsic metal parameters (number of conduction electrons, magnetization and effective masses in the layers); bulk sample properties (conductivity relaxation times); and interface scattering properties (diffuse scattering versus potential scattering at the interfaces). It is found that a large negative magnetoresistance requires, in general, considerable asymmetry in the interface scattering for the two spin orienmtions. All qualitative features of the experiments are reproduced. Quantitative agreement can be achieved with sensible values of the parameters. The effect can be conceptually explained based on considerations of phase-space availability for an electron of a given spin orientation as it travels through the multilayer sample in the various configurations and traverses the interfaces.

  6. Δ B mechanism for fringe-field organic magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, M.; Kersten, S. P.; Veerhoek, J. M.; Bobbert, P.; Koopmans, B.

    2015-04-01

    Fringe fields emanating from magnetic domain structures can give rise to magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors. In this article, we explain these magnetic-field effects in terms of a Δ B mechanism. This mechanism describes how variations in magnetic-field strength between two polaron hopping sites can induce a difference in precessional motion of the polaron spins, leading to mixing of their spin states. In order to experimentally explore the fringe-field effects, polymer thin-film devices on top of a rough in-plane magnetized cobalt layer are investigated. The cobalt layer can be described by a distribution of out-of-plane magnetic anisotropies, most likely induced by thickness variations in the cobalt. With a magnetic field perpendicular to the cobalt layer, fringe fields are created because some domains are magnetized out of plane whereas the magnetization of other domains remains approximately in plane. By varying the distance between the polymer layer and the cobalt layer, we find that the magnetoresistance arising from these fringe fields reduces with the gradient in the fringe fields, in agreement with the Δ B mechanism.

  7. Frequency dependence of magnetoresistance in MEH-PPV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdem Djidjou, Thaddee; Nguyen, Tho; Valy Vardeny, Z.; Rogachev, Andrey

    2012-02-01

    The organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) made of MEH-PPV was investigated by means of DC transport and the admittance spectroscopy in the range of 1 Hz to 10 MHz at room temperature. The measurements were carried out on unipolar and bipolar OLEDs made of pristine MEH-PPV as well as MEH-PPV with traps introduced by the UV light irradiation. We found that in bipolar, UV-exposed OLEDs, the magnitude of magnetoresistance effect in real part of admittance increases with DC bias, reaches very high value of 35 % (in the field 30mT) at bias 4.8 V and decreases at higher bias voltages. Also, we observed that the cutoff frequency of OMAR effect monotonically increases with DC bias voltage. The cutoff has extrinsic origin and is likely caused by a dissipative process related to the reorientation of permanent dipoles. At the highest tested bias voltage 6.7 V, we were able to detect the OMAR at the highest frequency of our system, 10 MHz. We have found that imaginary part of the admittance is also affected by magnetic field. The effect of magnetic field on dynamical capacitance of the device at low frequencies is very strong and opens up a possibility of using these devices as magnetic field sensors.

  8. Exchange biased anisotropic magnetoresistance in Co/CoO bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S.; Polisetty, S.; Wang, Yi; Mukherjee, T.; He, Xi; Binek, Ch.

    2008-03-01

    We measured the anisotropic magnetoresistance of a Co(11nm)/CoO bilayer in exchange biased and unbiased states. The bilayer was fabricated on a-Al2O3 substrate maintained at 300^oC by molecular beam epitaxy at a base pressure of 10-11mbar. θ-2θ X-ray diffraction scans reveal hcp (001) texture of the Co film. No peak associated with the naturally formed CoO top layer was identified. Small angle X-ray reflectivity scans yield the Co and CoO thicknesses as 11 and 2.4nm, respectively. Exchange bias was obtained from field cooled magnetoresistance measurements at various temperatures carried out in a closed cycle cryostat. Exchange bias varies quasi linearly with temperature and vanishes at the blocking temperature, TB=97K. The latter is less than 2/3 of the bulk N'eel temperature allowing to estimate the T=0 antiferromagnetic correlation length of CoO to be 1.84 nm in accordance with the geometrical confinement.

  9. Advanced Magnetoresistance Sensing of Rotation Rate for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avram, Marioara; Volmer, Marius; Avram, Andrei

    2008-06-01

    We propose to build a non-Newtonian fluids viscosimeter, in order to measure the viscosity of biological fluids such as blood. The system is based on a rotating microgear wheel and a magnetoresistive sensor with a non-contacting transduction mechanism to transform the rotor rotation rate into an electrical signal. As the rotor turns, the field from this microscopic magnet will modulate the resistance of a bar of a low coercitivity material such as Permalloy, with an in-plane uniaxial magnetization, placed nearby, close to the rotor flanges. The change in resistivity provides an electrical signal with frequency proportional to the rotation rate, and hence the fluid velocity. The rotor is fabricated from polysilicon and coated with a soft magnetic material. The magnetoresistive sensor is formed of two Wheatstone bridges orientated on the X and Y axes. As the microgear wheel rotates, a tooth passing by the sensing GMR of the Wheatstone bridge changes the magnetic field, thus enabling us to measure the velocity of the gear wheel. The gear wheel has the outer diameter of 200 μm and is obtained by using the cut and refill technique. The basis for fabrication of movable parts is the use of sacrificial layers that act both as spacers and also to keep the parts attached to the silicon wafer during fabrication.

  10. Butterfly magnetoresistance, quasi-2D Dirac Fermi surface and topological phase transition in ZrSiS.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mazhar N; Schoop, Leslie M; Garg, Chirag; Lippmann, Judith M; Lara, Erik; Lotsch, Bettina; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2016-12-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR), the change of a material's electrical resistance in response to an applied magnetic field, is a technologically important property that has been the topic of intense study for more than a quarter century. We report the observation of an unusual "butterfly"-shaped titanic angular magnetoresistance (AMR) in the nonmagnetic Dirac material, ZrSiS, which we find to be the most conducting sulfide known, with a 2-K resistivity as low as 48(4) nΩ⋅cm. The MR in ZrSiS is large and positive, reaching nearly 1.8 × 10(5) percent at 9 T and 2 K at a 45° angle between the applied current (I || a) and the applied field (90° is H || c). Approaching 90°, a "dip" is seen in the AMR, which, by analyzing Shubnikov de Haas oscillations at different angles, we find to coincide with a very sharp topological phase transition unlike any seen in other known Dirac/Weyl materials. We find that ZrSiS has a combination of two-dimensional (2D) and 3D Dirac pockets comprising its Fermi surface and that the combination of high-mobility carriers and multiple pockets in ZrSiS allows for large property changes to occur as a function of angle between applied fields. This makes it a promising platform to study the physics stemming from the coexistence of 2D and 3D Dirac electrons as well as opens the door to creating devices focused on switching between different parts of the Fermi surface and different topological states.

  11. Butterfly magnetoresistance, quasi-2D Dirac Fermi surface and topological phase transition in ZrSiS

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mazhar N.; Schoop, Leslie M.; Garg, Chirag; Lippmann, Judith M.; Lara, Erik; Lotsch, Bettina; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR), the change of a material’s electrical resistance in response to an applied magnetic field, is a technologically important property that has been the topic of intense study for more than a quarter century. We report the observation of an unusual “butterfly”-shaped titanic angular magnetoresistance (AMR) in the nonmagnetic Dirac material, ZrSiS, which we find to be the most conducting sulfide known, with a 2-K resistivity as low as 48(4) nΩ⋅cm. The MR in ZrSiS is large and positive, reaching nearly 1.8 × 105 percent at 9 T and 2 K at a 45° angle between the applied current (I || a) and the applied field (90° is H || c). Approaching 90°, a “dip” is seen in the AMR, which, by analyzing Shubnikov de Haas oscillations at different angles, we find to coincide with a very sharp topological phase transition unlike any seen in other known Dirac/Weyl materials. We find that ZrSiS has a combination of two-dimensional (2D) and 3D Dirac pockets comprising its Fermi surface and that the combination of high-mobility carriers and multiple pockets in ZrSiS allows for large property changes to occur as a function of angle between applied fields. This makes it a promising platform to study the physics stemming from the coexistence of 2D and 3D Dirac electrons as well as opens the door to creating devices focused on switching between different parts of the Fermi surface and different topological states. PMID:28028541

  12. Theory of magnetoresistance due to lattice dislocations in face-centred cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; Niewczas, M.

    2016-06-01

    A theoretical model to describe the low temperature magneto-resistivity of high purity copper single and polycrystals containing different density and distribution of dislocations has been developed. In the model, magnetoresistivity tensor is evaluated numerically using the effective medium approximation. The anisotropy of dislocation-induced relaxation time is considered by incorporating two independent energy bands with different relaxation times and the spherical and cylindrical Fermi surfaces representing open, extended and closed electron orbits. The effect of dislocation microstructure is introduced by means of two adjustable parameters corresponding to the length and direction of electron orbits in the momentum space, which permits prediction of magnetoresistance of FCC metals containing different density and distribution of dislocations. The results reveal that dislocation microstructure influences the character of the field-dependent magnetoresistivity. In the orientation of the open orbits, the quadratic variation in magnetoresistivity changes to quasi-linear as the density of dislocations increases. In the closed orbit orientation, dislocations delay the onset of magnetoresistivity saturation. The results indicate that in the open orbit orientations of the crystals, the anisotropic relaxation time due to small-angle dislocation scattering induces the upward deviation from Kohler's rule. In the closed orbit orientations Kohler's rule holds, independent of the density of dislocations. The results obtained with the model show good agreement with the experimental measurements of transverse magnetoresistivity in deformed single and polycrystal samples of copper at 2 K.

  13. Temporal switching jitter in photoconductive switches

    SciTech Connect

    GAUDET,JOHN A.; SKIPPER,MICHAEL C.; ABDALLA,MICHAEL D.; AHERN,SEAN M.; MAR,ALAN; LOUBRIEL,GUILLERMO M.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.; O'MALLEY,MARTIN W.; HELGESON,WESLEY D.; ROMERO,SAMUEL P.

    2000-04-13

    This paper reports on a recent comparison made between the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) gallium arsenide, optically-triggered switch test configuration and the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) gallium arsenide, optically-triggered switch test configuration. The purpose of these measurements was to compare the temporal switch jitter times. It is found that the optical trigger laser characteristics are dominant in determining the PCSS jitter.

  14. Huge magnetoresistance in graphene-based magnetic tunnel junctions with superlattice barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H.; Chao, B. S.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2015-08-01

    Combining the features of graphene, spintronics and superlattices, this study reports huge tunnel magnetoresistance achieved using graphene-based magnetic tunnel junctions with superlattice barriers. Our calculation results show that the tunnel magnetoresistance of as much as 107% is obtained using a magnetic tunnel junction with a six-cell superlattice barrier. This magnetoresistance increases as the number of cells in the superlattice barrier increases. This remarkable value can be linked to the artificially tailored band structures of the superlattice barriers. This generic nature provides new opportunities for other spintronics applications, using graphene superlattices.

  15. Spin-current-induced magnetoresistance in trilayer structure with nonmagnetic metallic interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Ryo; Sato, Koji; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Saitoh, Eiji

    2017-04-01

    We have theoretically investigated the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) and Rashba–Edelstein magnetoresistance (REMR), mediated by spin currents, in a ferrimagnetic insulator/nonmagnetic metal/heavy metal system in the diffusive regime. The magnitude of both SMR and REMR decreases with increasing thickness of the interlayer because of the current shunting effect and the reduction in spin accumulation across the interlayer. The latter contribution is due to driving a spin current and persists even in the absence of spin relaxation, which is essential for understanding the magnetoresistance ratio in trilayer structures.

  16. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Magnetoresistance of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Lei-Mei; Gao, Wei; Cao, Shi-Xun; Zhang, Jin-Cang

    2008-09-01

    We measure zero-Geld resistivity and magnetoresistance of multiwalled carbon nanotube yarns (CNTYs). The CNTYs are drawn from superaligned multiwalled carbon nanotube arrays synthesized by the low-pressure chemical vapour deposition method. The zero-Geld resistivity shows a logarithmic decrease from 2K to 300 K. In the presence of a magnetic Geld applied perpendicular to the yarn axis, a pronounced negative magnetoresistance is observed. A magnetoresistance ratio of 22% is obtained. These behaviours can be explained by the weak localization effect.

  17. Enhancement of tunnel magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junction by a superlattice barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. H.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2014-01-27

    Tunnel magnetoresistance of magnetic tunnel junction improved by a superlattice barrier composed of alternate layers of a nonmagnetic metal and an insulator is proposed. The forbidden band of the superlattice is used to predict the low transmission range in the superlattice barrier. By forbidding electron transport in the anti-parallel configuration, the tunnel magnetoresistance is enhanced in the superlattice junction. The results show that the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio for a superlattice magnetic tunnel junction is greater than that for traditional single or double barrier junctions.

  18. Multiple-stable anisotropic magnetoresistance memory in antiferromagnetic MnTe

    PubMed Central

    Kriegner, D.; Výborný, K.; Olejník, K.; Reichlová, H.; Novák, V.; Marti, X.; Gazquez, J.; Saidl, V.; Němec, P.; Volobuev, V. V.; Springholz, G.; Holý, V.; Jungwirth, T.

    2016-01-01

    Commercial magnetic memories rely on the bistability of ordered spins in ferromagnetic materials. Recently, experimental bistable memories have been realized using fully compensated antiferromagnetic metals. Here we demonstrate a multiple-stable memory device in epitaxial MnTe, an antiferromagnetic counterpart of common II–VI semiconductors. Favourable micromagnetic characteristics of MnTe allow us to demonstrate a smoothly varying zero-field antiferromagnetic anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) with a harmonic angular dependence on the writing magnetic field angle, analogous to ferromagnets. The continuously varying AMR provides means for the electrical read-out of multiple-stable antiferromagnetic memory states, which we set by heat-assisted magneto-recording and by changing the writing field direction. The multiple stability in our memory is ascribed to different distributions of domains with the Néel vector aligned along one of the three magnetic easy axes. The robustness against strong magnetic field perturbations combined with the multiple stability of the magnetic memory states are unique properties of antiferromagnets. PMID:27279433

  19. Crystal growth of Dirac semimetal ZrSiS with high magnetoresistance and mobility.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Raman; Peramaiyan, G; Muthuselvam, I Panneer; Butler, Christopher J; Dimitri, Klauss; Neupane, Madhab; Rao, G Narsinga; Lin, M-T; Chou, F C

    2017-01-18

    High quality single crystal ZrSiS as a theoretically predicted Dirac semimetal has been grown successfully using a vapor phase transport method. The single crystals of tetragonal structure are easy to cleave into perfect square-shaped pieces due to the van der Waals bonding between the sulfur atoms of the quintuple layers. Physical property measurement results including resistivity, Hall coefficient (RH), and specific heat are reported. The transport and thermodynamic properties suggest a Fermi liquid behavior with two Fermi pockets at low temperatures. At T = 3 K and magnetic field of Hǁc up to 9 Tesla, large magneto-resistance up to 8500% and 7200% for Iǁ(100) and Iǁ(110) were found. Shubnikov de Haas (SdH) oscillations were identified from the resistivity data, revealing the existence of two Fermi pockets at the Fermi level via the fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis. The Hall coefficient (RH) showed hole-dominated carriers with a high mobility of 3.05 × 10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 3 K. ZrSiS has been confirmed to be a Dirac semimetal by the Dirac cone mapping near the X-point via angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with a Dirac nodal line near the Fermi level identified using scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS).

  20. Multiple-stable anisotropic magnetoresistance memory in antiferromagnetic MnTe.

    PubMed

    Kriegner, D; Výborný, K; Olejník, K; Reichlová, H; Novák, V; Marti, X; Gazquez, J; Saidl, V; Němec, P; Volobuev, V V; Springholz, G; Holý, V; Jungwirth, T

    2016-06-09

    Commercial magnetic memories rely on the bistability of ordered spins in ferromagnetic materials. Recently, experimental bistable memories have been realized using fully compensated antiferromagnetic metals. Here we demonstrate a multiple-stable memory device in epitaxial MnTe, an antiferromagnetic counterpart of common II-VI semiconductors. Favourable micromagnetic characteristics of MnTe allow us to demonstrate a smoothly varying zero-field antiferromagnetic anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) with a harmonic angular dependence on the writing magnetic field angle, analogous to ferromagnets. The continuously varying AMR provides means for the electrical read-out of multiple-stable antiferromagnetic memory states, which we set by heat-assisted magneto-recording and by changing the writing field direction. The multiple stability in our memory is ascribed to different distributions of domains with the Néel vector aligned along one of the three magnetic easy axes. The robustness against strong magnetic field perturbations combined with the multiple stability of the magnetic memory states are unique properties of antiferromagnets.

  1. Crystal growth of Dirac semimetal ZrSiS with high magnetoresistance and mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Raman; Peramaiyan, G.; Muthuselvam, I. Panneer; Butler, Christopher J.; Dimitri, Klauss; Neupane, Madhab; Rao, G. Narsinga; Lin, M.-T.; Chou, F. C.

    2017-01-01

    High quality single crystal ZrSiS as a theoretically predicted Dirac semimetal has been grown successfully using a vapor phase transport method. The single crystals of tetragonal structure are easy to cleave into perfect square-shaped pieces due to the van der Waals bonding between the sulfur atoms of the quintuple layers. Physical property measurement results including resistivity, Hall coefficient (RH), and specific heat are reported. The transport and thermodynamic properties suggest a Fermi liquid behavior with two Fermi pockets at low temperatures. At T = 3 K and magnetic field of Hǁc up to 9 Tesla, large magneto-resistance up to 8500% and 7200% for Iǁ(100) and Iǁ(110) were found. Shubnikov de Haas (SdH) oscillations were identified from the resistivity data, revealing the existence of two Fermi pockets at the Fermi level via the fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis. The Hall coefficient (RH) showed hole-dominated carriers with a high mobility of 3.05 × 104 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 at 3 K. ZrSiS has been confirmed to be a Dirac semimetal by the Dirac cone mapping near the X-point via angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with a Dirac nodal line near the Fermi level identified using scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS).

  2. Magnetic glass state and magnetoresistance in SrLaFeCoO6 double perovskite.

    PubMed

    Pradheesh, R; Nair, Harikrishnan S; Haripriya, G R; Senyshyn, Anatoliy; Chatterji, Tapan; Sankaranarayanan, V; Sethupathi, K

    2017-03-08

    Unusual features in magnetization resembling the kinetic arrest of a magnetic glass state are observed in the La-doped double perovskite, SrLaFeCoO6. Neutron powder diffraction experiments confirm the presence of antisite disorder as well as a lack of long-range magnetic order down to 4 K in this double perovskite which displays spin glass-like features in dc and ac susceptibilities. Magnetic relaxation observed through cooling and heating under unequal fields (CHUF) point towards unusual domain dynamics which is supported by a broad memory effect. Among the two anomalies that are observed at [Formula: see text] 75 K and at [Formula: see text] 250 K in the magnetic measurements, the former is associated with a spin-freezing temperature below which the magnetic glass state is experimentally verified. The magnetometric experiments detailed in the paper bring out the non-equilibrium metastable magnetic states in this disordered magnetic system. The magnetic glass state described above manifests in the electrical resistivity [Formula: see text] through the formation of a 'hard gap' because of the spin-exchange energy following the formation of magnetic glass. It is observed that the combination of disorder and magnetic glass state leads to a large, negative magnetoresistance (MR) of  ≈47[Formula: see text] at 5 K in 8 T.

  3. Crystal growth of Dirac semimetal ZrSiS with high magnetoresistance and mobility

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Raman; Peramaiyan, G.; Muthuselvam, I. Panneer; Butler, Christopher J.; Dimitri, Klauss; Neupane, Madhab; Rao, G. Narsinga; Lin, M.-T.; Chou, F. C.

    2017-01-01

    High quality single crystal ZrSiS as a theoretically predicted Dirac semimetal has been grown successfully using a vapor phase transport method. The single crystals of tetragonal structure are easy to cleave into perfect square-shaped pieces due to the van der Waals bonding between the sulfur atoms of the quintuple layers. Physical property measurement results including resistivity, Hall coefficient (RH), and specific heat are reported. The transport and thermodynamic properties suggest a Fermi liquid behavior with two Fermi pockets at low temperatures. At T = 3 K and magnetic field of Hǁc up to 9 Tesla, large magneto-resistance up to 8500% and 7200% for Iǁ(100) and Iǁ(110) were found. Shubnikov de Haas (SdH) oscillations were identified from the resistivity data, revealing the existence of two Fermi pockets at the Fermi level via the fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis. The Hall coefficient (RH) showed hole-dominated carriers with a high mobility of 3.05 × 104 cm2 V−1 s−1 at 3 K. ZrSiS has been confirmed to be a Dirac semimetal by the Dirac cone mapping near the X-point via angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with a Dirac nodal line near the Fermi level identified using scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). PMID:28098209

  4. Magnetoresistance in i-R-Cd icosahedral quasicrystals (R=Y, Gd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswat, Garima; Popović, Dragana; Kong, Tai; Bud'Ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    We use magnetoresistance (MR) to probe the electronic properties of the recently discovered binary quasicrystals (QCs) i-Gd-Cd and i-Y-Cd, with and without local magnetic moments, respectively. DC magnetization has revealed spin-glass freezing in i-Gd-Cd at a temperature Tf = 4 . 6 K. MR was measured at 1 . 6 <= T (K) <= 300 and in magnetic fields H up to 12 T. The most interesting behavior is observed in i-Gd-Cd, in which the MR exhibits thermo-magnetic history dependence at low T. In particular, there is a clear difference between the ZFC and FC values of the low-field positive MR. In contrast, the i-Y-Cd MR does not depend on magnetic history. The onset of the history dependent MR at T ~ 20 K >Tf , when the QC with local magnetic moments is cooled in a high field of 12 T, may be related to the formation of magnetic clusters above Tf, as inferred from the magnetization and specific heat studies. Possible mechanisms responsible for the striking coupling between charge transport and local magnetic environment observed in the MR will be discussed. Work at the NHMFL supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1307075, the NSF Cooperative Agreement No. DMR-0654118 and the State of Florida. Work at Ames Lab (TK, SLB and PCC) supported by the U.S. D.O.E / B.E.S under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  5. Magnetic glass state and magnetoresistance in SrLaFeCoO6 double perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradheesh, R.; Nair, Harikrishnan S.; Haripriya, G. R.; Senyshyn, Anatoliy; Chatterji, Tapan; Sankaranarayanan, V.; Sethupathi, K.

    2017-03-01

    Unusual features in magnetization resembling the kinetic arrest of a magnetic glass state are observed in the La-doped double perovskite, SrLaFeCoO6. Neutron powder diffraction experiments confirm the presence of antisite disorder as well as a lack of long-range magnetic order down to 4 K in this double perovskite which displays spin glass-like features in dc and ac susceptibilities. Magnetic relaxation observed through cooling and heating under unequal fields (CHUF) point towards unusual domain dynamics which is supported by a broad memory effect. Among the two anomalies that are observed at {{T}\\text{a1}}≈ 75 K and at {{T}\\text{a2}}≈ 250 K in the magnetic measurements, the former is associated with a spin-freezing temperature below which the magnetic glass state is experimentally verified. The magnetometric experiments detailed in the paper bring out the non-equilibrium metastable magnetic states in this disordered magnetic system. The magnetic glass state described above manifests in the electrical resistivity ρ (T) through the formation of a ‘hard gap’ because of the spin-exchange energy following the formation of magnetic glass. It is observed that the combination of disorder and magnetic glass state leads to a large, negative magnetoresistance (MR) of  ≈47 % at 5 K in 8 T.

  6. Latching micro optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

  7. A Wireless Magnetoresistive Sensing System for an Intraoral Tongue-Computer Interface

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hangue; Kiani, Mehdi; Lee, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jeonghee; Block, Jacob; Gosselin, Benoit; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a tongue-operated, minimally invasive, unobtrusive, and wireless assistive technology (AT) that infers users’ intentions by detecting their voluntary tongue motion and translating them into user-defined commands. Here we present the new intraoral version of the TDS (iTDS), which has been implemented in the form of a dental retainer. The iTDS system-on-a-chip (SoC) features a configurable analog front-end (AFE) that reads the magnetic field variations inside the mouth from four 3-axial magnetoresistive sensors located at four corners of the iTDS printed circuit board (PCB). A dual-band transmitter (Tx) on the same chip operates at 27 and 432 MHz in the Industrial/Scientific/Medical (ISM) band to allow users to switch in the presence of external interference. The Tx streams the digitized samples to a custom-designed TDS universal interface, built from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components, which delivers the iTDS data to other devices such as smartphones, personal computers (PC), and powered wheelchairs (PWC). Another key block on the iTDS SoC is the power management integrated circuit (PMIC), which provides individually regulated and duty-cycled 1.8 V supplies for sensors, AFE, Tx, and digital control blocks. The PMIC also charges a 50 mAh Li-ion battery with constant current up to 4.2 V, and recovers data and clock to update its configuration register through a 13.56 MHz inductive link. The iTDS SoC has been implemented in a 0.5-μm standard CMOS process and consumes 3.7 mW on average. PMID:23853258

  8. A wireless magnetoresistive sensing system for an intraoral tongue-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Park, Hangue; Kiani, Mehdi; Lee, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jeonghee; Block, Jacob; Gosselin, Benoit; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2012-12-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a tongue-operated, minimally invasive, unobtrusive, and wireless assistive technology (AT) that infers users' intentions by detecting their voluntary tongue motion and translating them into user-defined commands. Here we present the new intraoral version of the TDS (iTDS), which has been implemented in the form of a dental retainer. The iTDS system-on-a-chip (SoC) features a configurable analog front-end (AFE) that reads the magnetic field variations inside the mouth from four 3-axial magnetoresistive sensors located at four corners of the iTDS printed circuit board (PCB). A dual-band transmitter (Tx) on the same chip operates at 27 and 432 MHz in the Industrial/Scientific/Medical (ISM) band to allow users to switch in the presence of external interference. The Tx streams the digitized samples to a custom-designed TDS universal interface, built from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components, which delivers the iTDS data to other devices such as smartphones, personal computers (PC), and powered wheelchairs (PWC). Another key block on the iTDS SoC is the power management integrated circuit (PMIC), which provides individually regulated and duty-cycled 1.8 V supplies for sensors, AFE, Tx, and digital control blocks. The PMIC also charges a 50 mAh Li-ion battery with constant current up to 4.2 V, and recovers data and clock to update its configuration register through a 13.56 MHz inductive link. The iTDS SoC has been implemented in a 0.5-μm standard CMOS process and consumes 3.7 mW on average.

  9. A high-resolution tunneling magneto-resistance sensor interface circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangyu; Yin, Liang; Chen, Weiping; Gao, Zhiqiang; Liu, Xiaowei

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a chopper instrumentation amplifier and a high-precision and low-noise CMOS band gap reference in a standard 0.5 μm CMOS technology for a tunneling magneto-resistance (TMR) sensor is presented. The noise characteristic of TMR sensor is an important factor in determining the performance of the sensor. In order to obtain a larger signal to noise ratio (SNR), the analog front-end chip ASIC weak signal readout circuit of the sensor includes the chopper instrumentation amplifier; the high-precision and low-noise CMOS band gap reference. In order to achieve the low noise, the chopping technique is applied in the first stage amplifier. The low-frequency flicker noise is modulated to high-frequency by chopping switch, so that the modulator has a better noise suppression performance at the low frequency. The test results of interface circuit are shown as below: At a single 5 V supply, the power dissipation is 40 mW; the equivalent offset voltage is less than 10 uV; the equivalent input noise spectral density 30 nV/Hz1/2(@10 Hz), the equivalent input noise density of magnetic is 0.03 nTHz1/2(@10 Hz); the scale factor temperature coefficient is less than 10 ppm/∘C, the equivalent input offset temperature coefficient is less than 70 nV/∘C; the gain error is less than 0.05%, the common mode rejection ratio is greater than 120 dB, the power supply rejection ratio is greater than 115 dB; the nonlinear is 0.1% FS.

  10. Better Gas-Gap Thermal Switches For Sorption Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Rodriguez, Jose

    1995-01-01

    Gas-gap thermal switches associated with sorption compressors of some heat pumps and cryogenic systems designed for higher performance, according to proposal, by introducing controlled turbulent flows into gas gaps. Utilizes convection in turbulent flow to transfer heat at greater rate. Design takes advantage of flow of working fluid. Working fluid also serve as heat transfer medium in gas gap.

  11. Space magnetometer based on an anisotropic magnetoresistive hybrid sensor.

    PubMed

    Brown, P; Whiteside, B J; Beek, T J; Fox, P; Horbury, T S; Oddy, T M; Archer, M O; Eastwood, J P; Sanz-Hernández, D; Sample, J G; Cupido, E; O'Brien, H; Carr, C M

    2014-12-01

    We report on the design and development of a low resource, dual sensor vector magnetometer for space science applications on very small spacecraft. It is based on a hybrid device combining an orthogonal triad of commercial anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensors with a totem pole H-Bridge drive on a ceramic substrate. The drive enables AMR operation in the more sensitive flipped mode and this is achieved without the need for current spike transmission down a sensor harness. The magnetometer has sensitivity of better than 3 nT in a 0-10 Hz band and a total mass of 104 g. Three instruments have been launched as part of the TRIO-CINEMA space weather mission, inter-calibration against the International Geomagnetic Reference Field model makes it possible to extract physical signals such as field-aligned current deflections of 20-60 nT within an approximately 45,000 nT ambient field.

  12. Chiral magnetoresistance in the Weyl semimetal NbP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, Anna Corinna; Gooth, Johannes; Wu, Shu-Chun; Bäßler, Svenja; Sergelius, Philip; Hühne, Ruben; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Shekhar, Chandra; Süß, Vicky; Schmidt, Marcus; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2017-03-01

    NbP is a recently realized Weyl semimetal (WSM), hosting Weyl points through which conduction and valence bands cross linearly in the bulk and exotic Fermi arcs appear. The most intriguing transport phenomenon of a WSM is the chiral anomaly-induced negative magnetoresistance (NMR) in parallel electric and magnetic fields. In intrinsic NbP the Weyl points lie far from the Fermi energy, making chiral magneto-transport elusive. Here, we use Ga-doping to relocate the Fermi energy in NbP sufficiently close to the W2 Weyl points, for which the different Fermi surfaces are verified by resultant quantum oscillations. Consequently, we observe a NMR for parallel electric and magnetic fields, which is considered as a signature of the chiral anomaly in condensed-matter physics. The NMR survives up to room temperature, making NbP a versatile material platform for the development of Weyltronic applications.

  13. Ballistic Anisotropic Magnetoresistance of Single-Atom Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, F.; Schöneberg, J.; Weismann, A.; Berndt, R.; Heinze, S.; Néel, N.; Kröger, J.; Mokrousov, Y.

    2015-03-01

    It has been predicted that the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) is greatly enhanced in the ballistic transport regime. Results from break junctions in a magnetic field can be explained in terms of this ballistic AMR (BAMR), although the interpretation is controversal due to the unknown atomic geometry of the junction. Here, we demonstrate the emergence of BAMR in single-atom contacts. Single Co and Ir atoms are deposited on domains and domain walls of ferromagnetic Fe layers on W(110), which is used to control their magnetization directions. They are contacted with nonmagnetic tips in a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope to measure the junction conductances. AMR is observed and changes drastically between tunneling and the ballistic regime. First-principles calculations and tight-binding modeling demonstrate that this change is due to a competition of delocalized and localized d states of different orbital symmetry.

  14. Magnetoresistance measurement of permalloy thin film rings with triangular fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Mei-Feng; Hsu, Chia-Jung; Liao, Chun-Neng; Chen, Ying-Jiun; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2010-01-01

    Magnetization reversals in permalloy rings controlled by nucleation sites using triangular fins at the same side and diagonal with respect to the field direction are demonstrated by magnetoresistance measurement and micromagnetic simulation. In the ring with triangular fins at the same side, there exists two-step reversal from onion to flux-closure state (or vortex state) and then from flux-closure (or vortex state) to reverse onion state; in the ring with diagonal triangular fins, one-step reversal occurs directly from onion to reverse onion state. The reversal processes are repeatable and controllable in contrast to an ideal ring without triangular fins where one-step and two-step reversals occur randomly in sweep-up and sweep-down processes.

  15. Anomalously large anisotropic magnetoresistance in a perovskite manganite.

    PubMed

    Li, Run-Wei; Wang, Huabing; Wang, Xuewen; Yu, X Z; Matsui, Y; Cheng, Zhao-Hua; Shen, Bao-Gen; Plummer, E Ward; Zhang, Jiandi

    2009-08-25

    The signature of correlated electron materials (CEMs) is the coupling between spin, charge, orbital and lattice resulting in exotic functionality. This complexity is directly responsible for their tunability. We demonstrate here that the broken symmetry, through cubic to orthorhombic distortion in the lattice structure in a prototype manganite single crystal, La(0.69)Ca(0.31)MnO(3), leads to an anisotropic magneto-elastic response to an external field, and consequently to remarkable magneto-transport behavior. An anomalous anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect occurs close to the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in the system, showing a direct correlation with the anisotropic field-tuned MIT in the system and can be understood by means of a simple phenomenological model. A small crystalline anisotropy stimulates a "colossal" AMR near the MIT phase boundary of the system, thus revealing the intimate interplay between magneto- and electronic-crystalline couplings.

  16. Magnetoresistance anisotropy of a one-dimensional superconducting niobium strip.

    PubMed

    Hua, J; Xiao, Z L; Imre, A; Yu, S H; Patel, U; Ocola, L E; Divan, R; Koshelev, A; Pearson, J; Welp, U; Kwok, W K

    2008-08-15

    We investigated confinement effects on the resistive anisotropy of a superconducting niobium strip with a rectangular cross section. When its transverse dimensions are comparable to the superconducting coherence length, the angle dependent magnetoresistances at a fixed temperature can be scaled as R(theta,H) = R(H/Hctheta) where Hctheta =Hc0(cos2theta + gamma(-2)sin2theta)(-1/2) is the angular dependent critical field, gamma is the width to thickness ratio, and Hc0 is the critical field in the thickness direction at theta=0 degrees . The results can be understood in terms of the anisotropic diamagnetic energy for a given field in a one-dimensional superconductor.

  17. Magnetoresistance anisotropy of a one-dimensional superconducting niobium strip.

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, J.; Xiao, Z. L.; Imre, A.; Yu, S. H.; Patel, U.; Ocola, L. E.; Divan, R.; Koshelev, A.; Pearson, J.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W. K.; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated confinement effects on the resistive anisotropy of a superconducting niobium strip with a rectangular cross section. When its transverse dimensions are comparable to the superconducting coherence length, the angle dependent magnetoresistances at a fixed temperature can be scaled as R({theta},H) = R(H/H{sub c{theta}}) where H{sub c{theta}} = H{sub c0}(cos{sup 2} {theta} + {gamma}{sup -2} sin{sup 2}{theta}){sup -1/2} is the angular dependent critical field, {gamma} is the width to thickness ratio, and H{sub c0} is the critical field in the thickness direction at {theta} = 0{sup o}. The results can be understood in terms of the anisotropic diamagnetic energy for a given field in a one-dimensional superconductor.

  18. Chiral magnetoresistance in the Weyl semimetal NbP

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Anna Corinna; Gooth, Johannes; Wu, Shu-Chun; Bäßler, Svenja; Sergelius, Philip; Hühne, Ruben; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Shekhar, Chandra; Süß, Vicky; Schmidt, Marcus; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2017-01-01

    NbP is a recently realized Weyl semimetal (WSM), hosting Weyl points through which conduction and valence bands cross linearly in the bulk and exotic Fermi arcs appear. The most intriguing transport phenomenon of a WSM is the chiral anomaly-induced negative magnetoresistance (NMR) in parallel electric and magnetic fields. In intrinsic NbP the Weyl points lie far from the Fermi energy, making chiral magneto-transport elusive. Here, we use Ga-doping to relocate the Fermi energy in NbP sufficiently close to the W2 Weyl points, for which the different Fermi surfaces are verified by resultant quantum oscillations. Consequently, we observe a NMR for parallel electric and magnetic fields, which is considered as a signature of the chiral anomaly in condensed-matter physics. The NMR survives up to room temperature, making NbP a versatile material platform for the development of Weyltronic applications. PMID:28262790

  19. Space magnetometer based on an anisotropic magnetoresistive hybrid sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, P.; Whiteside, B. J.; Beek, T. J.; Fox, P.; Horbury, T. S.; Oddy, T. M.; Archer, M. O.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sanz-Hernández, D.; Sample, J. G.; Cupido, E.; O'Brien, H.; Carr, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the design and development of a low resource, dual sensor vector magnetometer for space science applications on very small spacecraft. It is based on a hybrid device combining an orthogonal triad of commercial anisotropic magnetoresistive (AMR) sensors with a totem pole H-Bridge drive on a ceramic substrate. The drive enables AMR operation in the more sensitive flipped mode and this is achieved without the need for current spike transmission down a sensor harness. The magnetometer has sensitivity of better than 3 nT in a 0-10 Hz band and a total mass of 104 g. Three instruments have been launched as part of the TRIO-CINEMA space weather mission, inter-calibration against the International Geomagnetic Reference Field model makes it possible to extract physical signals such as field-aligned current deflections of 20-60 nT within an approximately 45 000 nT ambient field.

  20. Anomalously large anisotropic magnetoresistance in a perovskite manganite

    PubMed Central

    Li, Run-Wei; Wang, Huabing; Wang, Xuewen; Yu, X. Z.; Matsui, Y.; Cheng, Zhao-Hua; Shen, Bao-Gen; Plummer, E. Ward; Zhang, Jiandi

    2009-01-01

    The signature of correlated electron materials (CEMs) is the coupling between spin, charge, orbital and lattice resulting in exotic functionality. This complexity is directly responsible for their tunability. We demonstrate here that the broken symmetry, through cubic to orthorhombic distortion in the lattice structure in a prototype manganite single crystal, La0.69Ca0.31MnO3, leads to an anisotropic magneto-elastic response to an external field, and consequently to remarkable magneto-transport behavior. An anomalous anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect occurs close to the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in the system, showing a direct correlation with the anisotropic field-tuned MIT in the system and can be understood by means of a simple phenomenological model. A small crystalline anisotropy stimulates a “colossal” AMR near the MIT phase boundary of the system, thus revealing the intimate interplay between magneto- and electronic-crystalline couplings. PMID:19706504

  1. Magnetic-proximity-induced magnetoresistance on topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Takahiro; Takahashi, Saburo; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically study the magnetoresistance (MR) of two-dimensional massless Dirac electrons as found on the surface of three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs) that are capped by a ferromagnetic insulator (FI). We calculate charge and spin transport by Kubo and Boltzmann theories, taking into account the ladder-vertex correction and the in-scattering due to normal and magnetic disorder. The induced exchange splitting is found to generate an electric conductivity that depends on the magnetization orientation, but its form is very different from both the anisotropic and the spin Hall MR. The in-plane MR vanishes identically for nonmagnetic disorder, while out-of-plane magnetizations cause a large MR ratio. On the other hand, we do find an in-plane MR and planar Hall effect in the presence of magnetic disorder aligned with the FI magnetization. Our results may help us understand recent transport measurements on TI |FI systems.

  2. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, J.J.; Thomas, G.; Huetten, A.R.

    1998-10-20

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by (a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and (b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties. 7 figs.

  3. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, J.J.; Thomas, G.; Huetten, A.R.

    1999-03-16

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by (a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and (b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties. 7 figs.

  4. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, Johannes J.; Thomas, Gareth; Huetten, Andreas R.

    1998-01-01

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties.

  5. Giant magnetoresistive heterogeneous alloys and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, Johannes J.; Thomas, Gareth; Huetten, Andreas R.

    1999-01-01

    The inventive material exhibits giant magnetoresistance upon application of an external magnetic field at room temperature. The hysteresis is minimal. The inventive material has a magnetic phase formed by eutectic decomposition. The bulk material comprises a plurality of regions characterized by a) the presence of magnetic lamellae wherein the lamellae are separated by a distance smaller than the mean free path of the conduction electrons, and b) a matrix composition having nonmagnetic properties that is interposed between the lamellae within the regions. The inventive, rapidly quenched, eutectic alloys form microstructure lamellae having antiparallel antiferromagnetic coupling and give rise to GMR properties. The inventive materials made according to the inventive process yielded commercially acceptable quantities and timeframes. Annealing destroyed the microstructure lamellae and the GMR effect. Noneutectic alloys did not exhibit the antiparallel microstructure lamellae and did not possess GMR properties.

  6. Impact of the skyrmion spin texture on magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubetzka, André; Hanneken, Christian; Wiesendanger, Roland; von Bergmann, Kirsten

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the impact of the local spin texture on the differential conductance by scanning tunneling microscopy. In the focus is the previously found noncollinear magnetoresistance (NCMR), which originates from spin mixing effects upon electron hopping between adjacent sites with canted magnetic moments. In the present work, NCMR is studied with lateral resolution both for the zero magnetic field spin spiral state as well as for individual magnetic skyrmions at different magnetic field values. We analyze in detail the response of the differential conductance and find different dependencies of peak energy and peak intensity on the local properties of the noncollinear spin texture. We find that in the center of a skyrmion, the peak energy and intensity scale roughly linearly with the angle between nearest-neighbor moments. Elsewhere in the skyrmion, where the noncollinearity is not isotropic and the magnetization quantization axis varies, the behavior of the peak energy is more complex.

  7. Gamma irradiation of magnetoresistive sensors for planetary exploration.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Ruy; Fernández, Ana B; Dominguez, Jose A; Martín, Boris; Michelena, Marina D

    2012-01-01

    A limited number of Anisotropic Magnetoresistive (AMR) commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) magnetic sensors of the HMC series by Honeywell, with and without integrated front-end electronics, were irradiated with gamma rays up to a total irradiation dose of 200 krad (Si), following the ESCC Basic Specification No. 22900. Due to the magnetic cleanliness required for these tests a special set-up was designed and successfully employed. Several parameters of the sensors were monitored during testing and the results are reported in this paper. The authors conclude that AMR sensors without front-end electronics seem to be robust against radiation doses of up to 200 krad (Si) with a dose rate of 5 krad (Si)/hour and up to a resolution of tens of nT, but sensors with an integrated front-end seem to be more vulnerable to radiation.

  8. Magic angle effects and angular magnetoresistance oscillations as dimensional crossovers.

    PubMed

    Lebed, A G; Bagmet, N N; Naughton, M J

    2004-10-08

    Interference effects between velocity and density of states, which occur as electrons move along open orbits in the extended Brillouin zone in anisotropic conductors, result in a change of wave functions' dimensionality at magic angle (MA) directions of a magnetic field. In particular, these 1D-->2D dimensional crossovers result in the appearance of sharp minima in a resistivity component rho perpendicular (H,alpha), perpendicular to conducting layers. This explains the main qualitative features of MA and angular magnetoresistance oscillations' phenomena observed due to the existence of quasi-one-dimensional sheets of Fermi surface in (TMTSF)2X, (DMET-TSeF)2X, and kappa-(ET)2Cu(NCS)(2) conductors.

  9. Compensated Semimetal LaSb with Unsaturated Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, L.-K.; Lou, R.; Wu, D.-S.; Xu, Q. N.; Guo, P.-J.; Kong, L.-Y.; Zhong, Y.-G.; Ma, J.-Z.; Fu, B.-B.; Richard, P.; Wang, P.; Liu, G. T.; Lu, L.; Huang, Y.-B.; Fang, C.; Sun, S.-S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, L.; Shi, Y.-G.; Weng, H. M.; Lei, H.-C.; Liu, K.; Wang, S.-C.; Qian, T.; Luo, J.-L.; Ding, H.

    2016-09-01

    By combining angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and quantum oscillation measurements, we performed a comprehensive investigation on the electronic structure of LaSb, which exhibits near-quadratic extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR) without any sign of saturation at magnetic fields as high as 40 T. We clearly resolve one spherical and one intersecting-ellipsoidal hole Fermi surfaces (FSs) at the Brillouin zone (BZ) center Γ and one ellipsoidal electron FS at the BZ boundary X . The hole and electron carriers calculated from the enclosed FS volumes are perfectly compensated, and the carrier compensation is unaffected by temperature. We further reveal that LaSb is topologically trivial but shares many similarities with the Weyl semimetal TaAs family in the bulk electronic structure. Based on these results, we have examined the mechanisms that have been proposed so far to explain the near-quadratic XMR in semimetals.

  10. Magnetoresistance of galfenol-based magnetic tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Gobaut, B.; Vinai, G.; Castán-Guerrero, C.; Krizmancic, D.; Panaccione, G.; Torelli, P.; Rafaqat, H.; Roddaro, S.; Rossi, G.; Eddrief, M.; Marangolo, M.

    2015-12-15

    The manipulation of ferromagnetic layer magnetization via electrical pulse is driving an intense research due to the important applications that this result will have on memory devices and sensors. In this study we realized a magnetotunnel junction in which one layer is made of Galfenol (Fe{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}) which possesses one of the highest magnetostrictive coefficient known. The multilayer stack has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy and e-beam evaporation. Optical lithography and physical etching have been combined to obtain 20x20 micron sized pillars. The obtained structures show tunneling conductivity across the junction and a tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) effect of up to 11.5% in amplitude.

  11. Fast and low power Michelson interferometer thermo-optical switch on SOI.

    PubMed

    Song, Junfeng; Fang, Q; Tao, S H; Liow, T Y; Yu, M B; Lo, G Q; Kwong, D L

    2008-09-29

    We designed and fabricated silicon-on-insulator based Michelson interferometer (MI) thermo-optical switches with deep etched trenches for heat-isolation. Switch power was reduced approximately 20% for the switch with deep etched trenches, and the MI saved approximately 50% power than that of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. 10.6 mW switch power, approximately 42 micros switch time for the MI with deep trenches, 13.14 mW switch power and approximately 34 micros switch time for the MI without deep trenches were achieved.

  12. Large spin Hall magnetoresistance and its correlation to the spin-orbit torque in W/CoFeB/MgO structures

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soonha; Baek, Seung-heon Chris; Lee, Kyeong-Dong; Jo, Younghun; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    The phenomena based on spin-orbit interaction in heavy metal/ferromagnet/oxide structures have been investigated extensively due to their applicability to the manipulation of the magnetization direction via the in-plane current. This implies the existence of an inverse effect, in which the conductivity in such structures should depend on the magnetization orientation. In this work, we report a systematic study of the magnetoresistance (MR) of W/CoFeB/MgO structures and its correlation with the current-induced torque to the magnetization. We observe that the MR is independent of the angle between the magnetization and current direction but is determined by the relative magnetization orientation with respect to the spin direction accumulated by the spin Hall effect, for which the symmetry is identical to that of so-called the spin Hall magnetoresistance. The MR of ~1% in W/CoFeB/MgO samples is considerably larger than those in other structures of Ta/CoFeB/MgO or Pt/Co/AlOx, which indicates a larger spin Hall angle of W. Moreover, the similar W thickness dependence of the MR and the current-induced magnetization switching efficiency demonstrates that MR in a non-magnet/ferromagnet structure can be utilized to understand other closely correlated spin-orbit coupling effects such as the inverse spin Hall effect or the spin-orbit spin transfer torques. PMID:26423608

  13. Magneto-Resistance Anisotropy in Uncompensated Ca:YIG Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Donglei; Wigen, Philip E.

    2000-03-01

    : A magneto-resistance (MR) in an uncompensated p-type Ca:YIG film having a bulk resistivity of 400 ohm.cm at 300K has been observed using an AC signal modulating method. For the geometry of the magnetic field (H) in the plane of the film and parallel to the current, the resistivity increases by 4 parts in 10000 where H varies from 0 to ±10G without hysteresis. The dependence of the MR as a function of the angle (theta) between the direction of the current and the applied H varies as cos2theta. At the perpendicular orientation the MR initially increases up to 6 pts in 10000 as H varies from 0 to ±300G, and then reverses sign and changes by -12 parts per 10000 at H=±2000G where the film magnetization is saturated. For higher H the resistance increases by 4 pts in 10000 at H=±4000G. The origin of the conductivity in these Ca doped garnets is due to a hopping of small polarons along various spin channels in the garnet structure [1,2]. The MR is then consistent with a hopping mechanism being more favorable when the magnetization is oriented perpendicular to the current. The temperature dependence between 240 K and 320 K will be reviewed. Any magneto-resistance present in n-type Si:YIG or Ge:YIG was too small to detect. A small variation in the amplitude and phase of the MR response with the AC frequency will be discussed. [1] G.B. Turpin, Ph.D. Thesis, The Ohio State University (1996). [2] S. Batra, Andrea Lehman-Szweykowska, and P.E. Wigen, J. Appl. Phys., 61, 3274 (1987).

  14. Electromotive force and huge magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Pham, Nam Hai; Ohya, Shinobu; Tanaka, Masaaki; Barnes, Stewart E; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2009-03-26

    The electromotive force (e.m.f.) predicted by Faraday's law reflects the forces acting on the charge, -e, of an electron moving through a device or circuit, and is proportional to the time derivative of the magnetic field. This conventional e.m.f. is usually absent for stationary circuits and static magnetic fields. There are also forces that act on the spin of an electron; it has been recently predicted that, for circuits that are in part composed of ferromagnetic materials, there arises an e.m.f. of spin origin even for a static magnetic field. This e.m.f. can be attributed to a time-varying magnetization of the host material, such as the motion of magnetic domains in a static magnetic field, and reflects the conversion of magnetic to electrical energy. Here we show that such an e.m.f. can indeed be induced by a static magnetic field in magnetic tunnel junctions containing zinc-blende-structured MnAs quantum nanomagnets. The observed e.m.f. operates on a timescale of approximately 10(2)-10(3) seconds and results from the conversion of the magnetic energy of the superparamagnetic MnAs nanomagnets into electrical energy when these magnets undergo magnetic quantum tunnelling. As a consequence, a huge magnetoresistance of up to 100,000 per cent is observed for certain bias voltages. Our results strongly support the contention that, in magnetic nanostructures, Faraday's law of induction must be generalized to account for forces of purely spin origin. The huge magnetoresistance and e.m.f. may find potential applications in high sensitivity magnetic sensors, as well as in new active devices such as 'spin batteries'.

  15. Resistance transition assisted geometry enhanced magnetoresistance in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Zhaochu; Zhang, Xiaozhong

    2015-05-07

    Magnetoresistance (MR) reported in some non-magnetic semiconductors (particularly silicon) has triggered considerable interest owing to the large magnitude of the effect. Here, we showed that MR in lightly doped n-Si can be significantly enhanced by introducing two diodes and proper design of the carrier path [Wan, Nature 477, 304 (2011)]. We designed a geometrical enhanced magnetoresistance (GEMR) device whose room-temperature MR ratio reaching 30% at 0.065 T and 20 000% at 1.2 T, respectively, approaching the performance of commercial MR devices. The mechanism of this GEMR is: the diodes help to define a high resistive state (HRS) and a low resistive state (LRS) in device by their openness and closeness, respectively. The ratio of apparent resistance between HRS and LRS is determined by geometry of silicon wafer and electrodes. Magnetic field could induce a transition from LRS to HRS by reshaping potential and current distribution among silicon wafer, resulting in a giant enhancement of intrinsic MR. We expect that this GEMR could be also realized in other semiconductors. The combination of high sensitivity to low magnetic fields and large high-field response should make this device concept attractive to the magnetic field sensing industry. Moreover, because this MR device is based on a conventional silicon/semiconductor platform, it should be possible to integrate this MR device with existing silicon/semiconductor devices and so aid the development of silicon/semiconductor-based magnetoelectronics. Also combining MR devices and semiconducting devices in a single Si/semiconductor chip may lead to some novel devices with hybrid function, such as electric-magnetic-photonic properties. Our work demonstrates that the charge property of semiconductor can be used in the magnetic sensing industry, where the spin properties of magnetic materials play a role traditionally.

  16. Magnetoresistance manipulation and sign reversal in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Chen, Weimin; Maloney, F. Scott; Poudyal, Uma; Wang, Wenyong

    2016-10-14

    We report magnetoresistance (MR) manipulation and sign reversal induced by carrier concentration modulation in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires. At low temperatures positive magnetoresistance was initially observed. When the carrier concentration was increased through the application of a gate voltage, the magnetoresistance also increased and reached a maximum value. However, further increasing the carrier concentration caused the MR to decrease, and eventually an MR sign reversal from positive to negative was observed. An MR change from a maximum positive value of 25% to a minimum negative value of 7% was observed at 5 K and 50 KOe. The observed MR behavior was modeled by considering combined effects of quantum correction to carrier conductivity and bound magnetic polarons. Finally, this work could provide important insights into the mechanisms that govern magnetotransport in dilute magnetic oxides, and it also demonstrated an effective approach to manipulating magnetoresistance in these materials that have important spintronic applications.

  17. Hanle Magnetoresistance in Thin Metal Films with Strong Spin-Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, Saül; Golovach, Vitaly N.; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Isasa, Miren; Sagasta, Edurne; Abadia, Mikel; Rogero, Celia; Hueso, Luis E.; Bergeret, F. Sebastian; Casanova, Fèlix

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of a new type of magnetoresistance in Pt and Ta thin films. The spin accumulation created at the surfaces of the film by the spin Hall effect decreases in a magnetic field because of the Hanle effect, resulting in an increase of the electrical resistance as predicted by Dyakonov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 126601 (2007)]. The angular dependence of this magnetoresistance resembles the recently discovered spin Hall magnetoresistance in Pt /Y3Fe5O12 bilayers, although the presence of a ferromagnetic insulator is not required. We show that this Hanle magnetoresistance is an alternative simple way to quantitatively study the coupling between charge and spin currents in metals with strong spin-orbit coupling.

  18. The tunneling magnetoresistance current dependence on cross sectional area, angle and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. H. Bai, Lihui; Hu, C.-M.; Hemour, S.; Wu, K.; Fan, X. L.; Xue, D. S.; Houssameddine, D.

    2015-03-15

    The magnetoresistance of a MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) was studied experimentally. The magnetoresistance as a function of current was measured systematically on MTJs for various MgO cross sectional areas and at various temperatures from 7.5 to 290.1 K. The resistance current dependence of the MTJ was also measured for different angles between the two ferromagnetic layers. By considering particle and angular momentum conservation of transport electrons, the current dependence of magnetoresistance can be explained by the changing of spin polarization in the free magnetic layer of the MTJ. The changing of spin polarization is related to the magnetoresistance, its angular dependence and the threshold current where TMR ratio equals zero. A phenomenological model is used which avoid the complicated barrier details and also describes the data.

  19. Theory of unidirectional spin Hall magnetoresistance in heavy-metal/ferromagnetic-metal bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    Recent experiments have revealed nonlinear features of the magnetoresistance in metallic bilayers consisting of a heavy metal (HM) and a ferromagnetic metal (FM). A small change in the longitudinal resistance of the bilayer has been observed when reversing the direction of either the applied in-plane current or the magnetization. We attribute such nonlinear transport behavior to the spin-polarization dependence of the electron mobility in the FM layer acting in concert with the spin accumulation induced in that layer by the spin Hall current originating in the bulk of the HM layer. An explicit expression for the nonlinear magnetoresistance is derived based on a simple drift-diffusion model, which shows that the nonlinear magnetoresistance appears at the first order of the spin Hall angle, and changes sign when the current is reversed, in agreement with the experimental observations. We also discuss possible ways to control sign of the nonlinear magnetoresistance and to enhance the magnitude of the effect.

  20. Magnetoresistance manipulation and sign reversal in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Chen, Weimin; Maloney, F. Scott; Poudyal, Uma; Wang, Wenyong

    2016-10-14

    We report magnetoresistance (MR) manipulation and sign reversal induced by carrier concentration modulation in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires. At low temperatures positive magnetoresistance was initially observed. When the carrier concentration was increased through the application of a gate voltage, the magnetoresistance also increased and reached a maximum value. However, further increasing the carrier concentration caused the MR to decrease, and eventually an MR sign reversal from positive to negative was observed. An MR change from a maximum positive value of 25% to a minimum negative value of 7% was observed at 5 K and 50 KOe. The observed MR behavior was modeled by considering combined effects of quantum correction to carrier conductivity and bound magnetic polarons. This work could provide important insights into the mechanisms that govern magnetotransport in dilute magnetic oxides, and it also demonstrated an effective approach to manipulating magnetoresistance in these materials that have important spintronic applications.

  1. GMR sensors: magnetoresistive behaviour optimization for biological detection by means of superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manteca, A; Mujika, M; Arana, S

    2011-04-15

    An immunomagnetic method for the selective and quantitative detection of biological species by means of a magnetoresistive biosensor and superparamagnetic particles has been optimized. In order to achieve this, a giant magnetoresistive [Co (5.10nm)/Cu (2.47 nm)](20) multilayer structure has been chosen as the sensitive material, showing a magnetoresistance of 3.60% at 215 Oe and a sensitivity up to 0.19 Ω/Oe between 145 Oe and 350 Oe. The outward gold surface of the sensor is biofunctionalized with a Self-Assembled Monolayer (SAM). In addition, three different types of magnetic labels have been tested. 2 μm diameter magnetic carriers (7.68 pg ferrite/particle) have shown the best response and they have induced a shift in the magnetoresistive hysteresis loops up to 9% at 175 Oe.

  2. A simple formulation for magnetoresistance in metal-insulator granular films with increased current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boff, M. A. S.; Canto, B.; Baibich, M. N.; Pereira, L. G.

    2013-02-01

    We studied the tunnel magnetoresistance in metal/insulator granular films when the applied current is varied. The tunnel magnetoresistance shows a strong modification related to a non-Ohmic behaviour of theses materials. It was verified that spin-dependent tunnelling is the main mechanism for magnetoresistance at low applied current. However, when the current is high, another mechanism gets to be important: it is independent of the magnetization and is associated to variable range hopping between metallic grains. In this work, we propose a simple modification of Inoue and Maekawa's model for tunnelling magnetoresistance in granulars, rewriting the expression for resistance as a function of magnetic field and temperature, also taking into account the two different contributions.

  3. Magnetoresistance manipulation and sign reversal in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Chen, Weimin; Maloney, F. Scott; Poudyal, Uma; Wang, Wenyong

    2016-01-01

    We report magnetoresistance (MR) manipulation and sign reversal induced by carrier concentration modulation in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires. At low temperatures positive magnetoresistance was initially observed. When the carrier concentration was increased through the application of a gate voltage, the magnetoresistance also increased and reached a maximum value. However, further increasing the carrier concentration caused the MR to decrease, and eventually an MR sign reversal from positive to negative was observed. An MR change from a maximum positive value of 25% to a minimum negative value of 7% was observed at 5 K and 50 KOe. The observed MR behavior was modeled by considering combined effects of quantum correction to carrier conductivity and bound magnetic polarons. This work could provide important insights into the mechanisms that govern magnetotransport in dilute magnetic oxides, and it also demonstrated an effective approach to manipulating magnetoresistance in these materials that have important spintronic applications. PMID:27739442

  4. Magnetoresistance manipulation and sign reversal in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Keshab R; Chen, Weimin; Maloney, F Scott; Poudyal, Uma; Wang, Wenyong

    2016-10-14

    We report magnetoresistance (MR) manipulation and sign reversal induced by carrier concentration modulation in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires. At low temperatures positive magnetoresistance was initially observed. When the carrier concentration was increased through the application of a gate voltage, the magnetoresistance also increased and reached a maximum value. However, further increasing the carrier concentration caused the MR to decrease, and eventually an MR sign reversal from positive to negative was observed. An MR change from a maximum positive value of 25% to a minimum negative value of 7% was observed at 5 K and 50 KOe. The observed MR behavior was modeled by considering combined effects of quantum correction to carrier conductivity and bound magnetic polarons. This work could provide important insights into the mechanisms that govern magnetotransport in dilute magnetic oxides, and it also demonstrated an effective approach to manipulating magnetoresistance in these materials that have important spintronic applications.

  5. Magnetoresistance manipulation and sign reversal in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Chen, Weimin; Maloney, F. Scott; Poudyal, Uma; Wang, Wenyong

    2016-10-01

    We report magnetoresistance (MR) manipulation and sign reversal induced by carrier concentration modulation in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires. At low temperatures positive magnetoresistance was initially observed. When the carrier concentration was increased through the application of a gate voltage, the magnetoresistance also increased and reached a maximum value. However, further increasing the carrier concentration caused the MR to decrease, and eventually an MR sign reversal from positive to negative was observed. An MR change from a maximum positive value of 25% to a minimum negative value of 7% was observed at 5 K and 50 KOe. The observed MR behavior was modeled by considering combined effects of quantum correction to carrier conductivity and bound magnetic polarons. This work could provide important insights into the mechanisms that govern magnetotransport in dilute magnetic oxides, and it also demonstrated an effective approach to manipulating magnetoresistance in these materials that have important spintronic applications.

  6. Achieving large magnetoresistance in Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.H.; Park, J.-H.; Jeong, Y.H.

    2005-02-15

    In order to find a way to achieve large magnetoresistance in thin films of Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6}, structural, magnetic, and transport properties were systematically investigated for the films grown on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates under different conditions. Crystallinity, morphology, resistivity, and magnetization of the films depended sensitively on the growth temperature and post-anneal treatment. The film grown at 935 deg. C and post-annealed at the same temperature for an hour displayed both large resistance and magnetoresistance; the low-field magnetoresistance, in particular, was as large as that of a polycrystalline bulk. Structural analysis revealed that the film possessed large grains, and the large magnetoresistance is accounted for in terms of spin-polarized tunneling between these grains.

  7. Magnetoresistance manipulation and sign reversal in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Chen, Weimin; Maloney, F. Scott; ...

    2016-10-14

    We report magnetoresistance (MR) manipulation and sign reversal induced by carrier concentration modulation in Mn-doped ZnO nanowires. At low temperatures positive magnetoresistance was initially observed. When the carrier concentration was increased through the application of a gate voltage, the magnetoresistance also increased and reached a maximum value. However, further increasing the carrier concentration caused the MR to decrease, and eventually an MR sign reversal from positive to negative was observed. An MR change from a maximum positive value of 25% to a minimum negative value of 7% was observed at 5 K and 50 KOe. The observed MR behavior wasmore » modeled by considering combined effects of quantum correction to carrier conductivity and bound magnetic polarons. Finally, this work could provide important insights into the mechanisms that govern magnetotransport in dilute magnetic oxides, and it also demonstrated an effective approach to manipulating magnetoresistance in these materials that have important spintronic applications.« less

  8. Hybrid Molecular and Spin Dynamics Simulations for Ensembles of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetoresistive Systems.

    PubMed

    Teich, Lisa; Schröder, Christian

    2015-11-13

    The development of magnetoresistive sensors based on magnetic nanoparticles which are immersed in conductive gel matrices requires detailed information about the corresponding magnetoresistive properties in order to obtain optimal sensor sensitivities. Here, crucial parameters are the particle concentration, the viscosity of the gel matrix and the particle structure. Experimentally, it is not possible to obtain detailed information about the magnetic microstructure, i.e., orientations of the magnetic moments of the particles that define the magnetoresistive properties, however, by using numerical simulations one can study the magnetic microstructure theoretically, although this requires performing classical spin dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations simultaneously. Here, we present such an approach which allows us to calculate the orientation and the trajectory of every single magnetic nanoparticle. This enables us to study not only the static magnetic microstructure, but also the dynamics of the structuring process in the gel matrix itself. With our hybrid approach, arbitrary sensor configurations can be investigated and their magnetoresistive properties can be optimized.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of multilayer magnetic structures and calculation of the magnetoresistance coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, V. V.; Prudnikov, P. V.; Romanovskii, D. E.

    2015-11-01

    The Monte Carlo study of three-layer and spin-valve magnetic structures with giant magnetoresistance effects has been performed with the application of the Heisenberg anisotropic model to the description of the magnetic properties of thin ferromagnetic films. The dependences of the magnetic characteristics on the temperature and external magnetic field have been obtained for the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations of these structures. A Monte Carlo method for determining the magnetoresistance coefficient has been developed. The magnetoresistance coefficient has been calculated for three-layer and spin-valve magnetic structures at various thicknesses of ferromagnetic films. It has been shown that the calculated temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance coefficient is in good agreement with experimental data obtained for the Fe(001)/Cr(001) multilayer structure and the CFAS/Ag/CFAS/IrMn spin valve based on the Co2FeAl0.5Si0.5 (CFAS) Heusler alloy.

  10. Remote switch actuator

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Edwin Gerard; Beauman, Ronald; Palo, Jr., Stefan

    2013-01-29

    The invention provides a device and method for actuating electrical switches remotely. The device is removably attached to the switch and is actuated through the transfer of a user's force. The user is able to remain physically removed from the switch site obviating need for protective equipment. The device and method allow rapid, safe actuation of high-voltage or high-current carrying electrical switches or circuit breakers.

  11. Apollo Ring Optical Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Maestas, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    An optical switch was designed, built, and installed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to facilitate the integration of two Apollo computer networks into a single network. This report presents an overview of the optical switch as well as its layout, switch testing procedure and test data, and installation.

  12. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  13. Origin of variation in switching voltages in threshold-switching phenomena of VO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. B.; Kim, K.; Oh, J. S.; Kahng, B.; Lee, J. S.

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the origin of the variation in switching voltages in threshold-switching of VO2 thin films. When a triangular-waveform voltage signal was applied, the current changed abruptly at two switching voltages, i.e., VON (insulator-to-metal) and VOFF (metal-to-insulator). VON and VOFF were measured by changing the period of the voltage signal, the temperature of the environment, and the load resistance. We observed that either VON or VOFF varied significantly and had different dependences with respect to the external parameters. Based on the mechanism of the metal-insulator transition induced by Joule heating, numerical simulations were performed, which quantitatively reproduced all of the experimental results. From the simulation analysis, the variation in the switching voltages for threshold-switching was determined to be thermal in origin.

  14. Influence of Domain Structure on Magnetoresistance in Perovskite Manganite Grain Boundary Jnctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    Perovskite Manganite Grain Boundary Jnctions DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report...Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 674 © 2001 Materials Research Society Influence of Domain Structure on Magnetoresistance in Perovskite Manganite Grain...INTRODUCTION Since the discovery of colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) [I I in perovskite manganites these materials have attracted a lot of scientific

  15. Interaction Effects and its Influence on Magnetoresistances in Two-Dimensional Hole Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Houzhi

    Magnetoresistances of two-dimensional holes in GaAs/p-AlzGal-zAs heterostructures have been investigated in the context of particle-hole (p-h) Hartree interactions. Aplication of a magnetic field is to suppress the Hartree contribution between two different heavy holes, hh+ and hh-, and leads to an orbit-related magnetoresistence with a proper functional form and a positive sign in consistence with experiments.

  16. Large magnetoresistance induced by crystallographic defects in FexTaS2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Morosan, Emilia; Morosan's Group Team

    The search for the materials that show large magnetoresistance and the mechanisms that induce it remains challenging in both experimental and theoretical aspects. The giant magnetoresistance in one class of materials, ferromagnetic conductors, is generally attributed to the misalignments of magnetic moments, which cause spin disorder scattering. Recently, very large magnetoresistance (>60 %) was discovered in the ferromagnetic Fe-intercalated transition metal dichalcogenide, Fe0.28TaS2 [Phys. Rev. B 91, 054426(2015)]. The mechanism that led to this large magnetoresistance was suggested to be due to the deviation of Fe concentration from commensurate values (1/4 or 1/3), which caused magnetic moments' misalignments. Here we report a study of FexTaS2 crystals with x close to the commensurate values. Our results qualitatively demonstrate that crystallographic defects significantly affect magnetoresistance in FexTaS2. This provides a way to search for large magnetoresistance in more intercalated transition metal dichalcogenides. This work is supported by the Department of Defense PECASE.

  17. Quantum and classical contributions to linear magnetoresistance in topological insulator thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sourabh; Gopal, R. K.; Sarkar, Jit; Mitra, Chiranjib

    2016-05-01

    Three dimensional topological insulators possess backscattering immune relativistic Dirac fermions on their surface due to nontrivial topology of the bulk band structure. Both metallic and bulk insulating topological insulators exhibit weak-antilocalization in the low magnetic field and linear like magnetoresistance in higher fields. We explore the linear magnetoresistance in bulk insulating topological insulator Bi2-xSbxTe3-ySey thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition technique. Thin films of Bi2-xSbxTe3-ySey were found to be insulating in nature, which conclusively establishes the origin of linear magnetoresistance from surface Dirac states. The films were thoroughly characterized for their crystallinity and composition and then subjected to transport measurements. We present a careful analysis taking into considerations all the existing models of linear magnetoresistance. We comprehend that the competition between classical and quantum contributions to magnetoresistance results in linear magnetoresistance in high fields. We observe that the cross-over field decreases with increasing temperature and the physical argument for this behavior is explained.

  18. Quantum and classical contributions to linear magnetoresistance in topological insulator thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sourabh; Gopal, R. K.; Sarkar, Jit; Mitra, Chiranjib

    2016-05-06

    Three dimensional topological insulators possess backscattering immune relativistic Dirac fermions on their surface due to nontrivial topology of the bulk band structure. Both metallic and bulk insulating topological insulators exhibit weak-antilocalization in the low magnetic field and linear like magnetoresistance in higher fields. We explore the linear magnetoresistance in bulk insulating topological insulator Bi{sub 2-x}Sb{sub x}Te{sub 3-y}Se{sub y} thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition technique. Thin films of Bi{sub 2-x}Sb{sub x}Te{sub 3-y}Se{sub y} were found to be insulating in nature, which conclusively establishes the origin of linear magnetoresistance from surface Dirac states. The films were thoroughly characterized for their crystallinity and composition and then subjected to transport measurements. We present a careful analysis taking into considerations all the existing models of linear magnetoresistance. We comprehend that the competition between classical and quantum contributions to magnetoresistance results in linear magnetoresistance in high fields. We observe that the cross-over field decreases with increasing temperature and the physical argument for this behavior is explained.

  19. Switching-type regulator circuit has increased efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapp, W. M.

    1967-01-01

    Switching series regulator circuit uses an inductive network to feed most of the current applied to the control circuit to the load. This circuit eliminates resistive losses and the need for heat sinks.

  20. Anisotropic magnetoresistance and current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance in epitaxial NiMnSb-based multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, B.; Sakuraba, Y.; Sukegawa, H.; Li, S.; Qu, G.; Furubayashi, T.; Hono, K.

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated (001)-oriented C1b-NiMnSb epitaxial films on MgO substrate by a magnetron sputtering system and systematically investigated the structure, magnetic property, and anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect. NiMnSb film was deposited using a stoichiometric NiMnSb target which has Mn-deficient (Mn ˜ 28.7 at. %) off-stoichiometric composition ratio. We have investigated bulk spin-polarization in NiMnSb films by measuring AMR on the basis of recent study for half-metallic L21-Heusler compounds. Although the negative sign of AMR ratio, which is indicative of half-metallic nature, was observed in the single layer NiMnSb films, the magnitude of AMR ratio (-0.10% at RT) was about half of the largest value reported for half-metallic L21-Heusler compounds. The current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) giant magnetoresistance (GMR) devices of NiMnSb/Ag/NiMnSb show MR ratio of 13.2% at 10 K and 4.2% at 300 K, which is higher than the previous result for NiMnSb/Cu/NiMnSb CPP-GMR devices [Caballero et al., J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 198-199, 55 (1999)], but much less than the CPP-GMR using L21-Heusler electrodes. The reduction of intrinsic bulk spin-polarization originating from the Mn-deficiency in NiMnSb layer is expected to be the main reason for small MR values.