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Sample records for magnetospheric substorms occurring

  1. Observations of magnetospheric substorms occurring with no apparent solar wind/IMF trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.G.; Reeves, G.D.; Belian, R.D.; Murphree, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    An outstanding topic in magnetospheric physics is whether substorms are always externally triggered by disturbances in either the interplanetary magnetic field or solar wind, or whether they can also occur solely as the result of an internal magnetospheric instability. Over the past decade, arguments have been made on both sides of this issue. Horwitz and McPherron have shown examples of substorm onsets which they claimed were not externally triggered. However, as pointed out by Lyons, there are several problems associated with these studies that make their results somewhat inconclusive. In particular, in the McPherron et al. study, fluctuations in the B{sub y} component were not considered as possible triggers. Furthermore, Lyons suggests that the sharp decreases in the AL index during intervals of steady IMF/solar wind, are not substorms at all but rather that they are just enhancements of the convection driven DP2 current system that are often observed to occur during steady magnetospheric convection events. In the present study, we utilize a much more comprehensive dataset (consisting of particle data from the Los Alamos energetic particle detectors at geosynchronous orbit, IMP 8 magnetometer and plasma data, Viking UV auroral imager data, mid-latitude Pi2 pulsation data, ground magnetometer data and ISEE1 magnetic field and energetic particle data) to show as unambiguously as possible that typical substorms can indeed occur in the absence of an identifiable trigger in the solar wind/IMF.

  2. Onset of magnetospheric substorms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B.; Bogott, F.

    1972-01-01

    An examination of the onset of magnetospheric substorms is made by using ATS 5 energetic particles, conjugate balloon X rays and electric fields, all-sky camera photographs, and auroral-zone magnetograms. It is shown that plasma injection to ATS distances, conjugate 1- to 10-keV auroral particle precipitation, energetic electron precipitation, and enhancements of westward magnetospheric electric-field component all occur with the star of slowly developing negative magnetic bays. No trapped or precipitating energetic-particle features are seen at ATS 5 when later sharp negative magnetic-bay onsets occur at Churchill or Great Whale River.

  3. Magnetospheric Substorm Electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.

    1998-01-01

    It was proposed that the expansion phase of substorms results from a reduction in the large-scale electric field imparted to the magnetosphere from the solar wind, following a greater than or equal to 30 min growth phase due to an enhancement in this electric field. The reduction in the electric field is assumed to propagate anti-sunward within the magnetosphere. Triggering by a reduction in the electric field is suggested by the observation that substorms are often triggered by northward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). However, under the theory presented here, substorms may be triggered by anything that causes an electric field reduction such as a reduction in the magnitude of the y-component of the IMF. A reduction in the large-scale electric field disrupts both the inward motion and energization of plasma sheet particles that occurs during the growth phase. It is suggested here that this can lead to formation of the expansion-phase current wedge and active aurora. The current wedge results from the magnetic drift of ions, which has a speed proportional to particle energy, and a large azimuthal gradient in mean particle energy that is expected to develop in the vicinity of magnetic midnight during the growth phase. Current wedge formation will most likely be initiated near the radial distance (approx. 6- 10 R(sub E)) of the peak in the growth-phase plasma pressure distribution, and then propagate tailward from that region. Order-of-magnitude calculations show that the above proposal can account for the rapid development of the expansion phase relative to the growth phase, the magnitude of the reduction in the cross-tail current within the current wedge, the speeds of tailward and westward expansion of the current reduction region, the speeds of poleward and westward motion of active aurora in the ionosphere, and the magnitude of wedge field-aligned currents that connect the ionospheric region of active auroral to the divergent cross

  4. A mechanism for magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, G. M.; Heinemann, M.

    1994-01-01

    Energy-principle analysis performed on two-dimensional, self-consistent solutions for magnetospheric convection indicates that the magnetosphere is unstable to isobaric (yet still frozen-in) fluctuations of plasma-sheet flux tubes. Normally, pdV work associated with compression maintains stability of the inward/outward oscillating normal mode. However, if Earth's ionosphere can provide sufficient mass flux, isobaric expansion of flux tubes can occur. The growth of a field-aligned potential drop in the near-Earth, midnight portion of the plasma sheet, associated with upward field-aligned currents responsible for the Harang discontinuity, redistributes plasma along field lines in a manner that destabilizes the normal mode. The growth of this unstable mode results in an out-of-equilibrium situation near the inner edge. When this occurs over a downtail extent comparable to the half-thickness of the plasma sheet, collapse ensues and forces thinning of the plasma sheet whereby conditions favorable to reconnection occur. This scenario for substorm onset is consistent with observed upward fluxes of ions, parallel potential drops, and observations of substorm onset. These observations include near Earth onset, pseudobreakups, the substorm current wedge, and local variations of plasma-sheet thickness.

  5. Convection and Substorms - Paradigms of Magnetospheric Phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennel, Charles F.

    The magnetosphere is the region where cosmic rays and the solar wind interact with the Earth's magnetic field, creating such phenomena as the northern lights and other aurorae. The configuration and dynamics of the magnetosphere are of interest to planetary physicists, geophysicists, plasma astrophysicists, and to scientists planning space missions. The circulation of solar wind plasma in the magnetosphere and substorms have long been used as the principle paradigms for studying this vital region. Charles F. Kennel, a leading scientist in the field, here presents a synthesis of the convection and substorm literatures, and an analysis of convection and substorm interactions; he also suggests that the currently accepted steady reconnection model may be advantageously replaced by a model of multiple tail reconnection events, in which many mutually interdependent reconnections occur. Written in an accessible, non-mathematical style, this book introduces the reader to the exciting discoveries in this fast-growing field.

  6. Magnetospheric Substorms and Tail Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    This grant funded several studies of magnetospheric substorms and their effect on the dynamics of the earth's geomagnetic tail. We completed an extensive study of plasmoids, plasma/magnetic field structures that travel rapidly down the tail, using data from the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft. This study formed the PhD thesis of Mark Moldwin. We found that magnetically plasmoids are better described as flux-ropes (twisted magnetic flux tubes) rather than plasma bubbles, as had been generally regarded up to that point (Moldwin and Hughes, 1990; 1991). We published several examples of plasmoids observed first in the near tail by IMP 8 and later in the distant tail by ISEE 3, confirming their velocities down tail. We showed how the passage of plasmoids distorts the plasma sheet. We completed the first extensive statistical survey of plasmoids that showed how plasmoids evolve as they move down tail from their formation around 30 RE to ISEE 3 apogee at 240 RE. We established a one-to-one correspondence between the observation of plasmoids in the distant tail and substorm onsets at earth or in the near tail. And we showed that there is a class of plasmoid-like structures that move slowly earthward, especially following weak substorms during northward IMF. Collectively this work constituted the most extensive study of plasmoids prior to the work that has now been done with the GEOTAIL spacecraft. Following our work on plasmoids, we turned our attention to signatures of substorm onset observed in the inner magnetosphere near geosynchronous orbit, especially signatures observed by the CRRES satellite. Using data from the magnetometer, electric field probe, plasma wave instrument, and low energy plasma instrument on CRRES we were able to better document substorm onsets in the inner magnetosphere than had been possible previously. Detailed calculation of the Poynting flux showed energy exchange between the magnetosphere and ionosphere, and a short burst of tailward convective

  7. Communications Magnetospheric Substorms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-17

    increases with either an increase in solar wind velocity or a decrease in the angle of the interplanetary magnetic field with respect to the earth- sun ...symmetry produced by changes in the j orientation of the dipole with respect to the earth- sun line. Paper (46) showed very clearly that the synchronous field...57 (12), 993, 1976. - 36 - 34. Barfield, J.N. and R.1L. Mc:l’herron, MuItiple-synchrolous satellite observations of substorm-associ’ated field- aliged

  8. Substorms - Future of magnetospheric substorm-storm research

    SciTech Connect

    Akasofu, S.I. )

    1989-04-01

    Seven approaches and/or areas of magnetospheric substorm and storm science which should be emphasized in future research are briefly discussed. They are: the combining of groups of researchers who study magnetic storms and substorms in terms of magnetic reconnection with those that do not, the possible use of a magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling model to merge the groups, the development of improved input-output relationships, the complementing of satellite and ground-based observations, the need for global imaging of the magnetosphere, the complementing of observations with computer simulations, and the need to study the causes of changes in the north-south component of the IMF. 36 refs.

  9. Evidence for particle acceleration during magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Ramon E.; Baker, Daniel N.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetospheric substorms represent the episodic dissipation of energy stored in the geomagnetic tail that was previously extracted from the solar wind. This energy release produces activity throughout the entire magnetosphere-ionosphere system, and it results in a wide variety of phenomena such as auroral intensifications and the generation of new current systems. All of these phenomena involve the acceleration of particles, sometimes up to several MeV. We present a brief overview of substorm phenomenology. We then review some of the evidence for particle acceleration in Earth's magnetosphere during substorms. Such in-situ observations in this most accessible of all cosmic plasma domains may hold important clues to understanding acceleration processes in more distant astrophysical systems.

  10. Extremely Intense Magnetospheric Substorms : External Triggering? Preconditioning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Echer, Ezequiel; Hajra, Rajkumar

    2016-07-01

    We study particularly intense substorms using a variety of near-Earth spacecraft data and ground observations. We will relate the solar cycle dependences of events, determine whether the supersubstorms are externally or internally triggered, and their relationship to other factors such as magnetospheric preconditioning. If time permits, we will explore the details of the events and whether they are similar to regular (Akasofu, 1964) substorms or not. These intense substorms are an important feature of space weather since they may be responsible for power outages.

  11. Midday auroras and magnetospheric substorms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S. I.

    1972-01-01

    Auroral activity in the midday sector is examined in some detail on the basis of all-sky photographs taken from Pyramida, Spitzbergen. The equatorward motion of the midday auroras observed during substorms and the subsequent poleward shift during the recovery phase are discussed.

  12. The relationship between the magnetosphere and magnetospheric/auroral substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    2013-03-01

    On the basis of auroral and polar magnetic substorm studies, the relationship between the solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo (the DD dynamo) current and the substorm dynamo (the UL dynamo) current is studied. The characteristics of both the DD and UL currents reveal why auroral substorms consist of the three distinct phases after the input power ɛ is increased above 1018 erg s-1. (a) The growth phase; the magnetosphere can accumulate magnetic energy for auroral substorms, when the ionosphere cannot dissipate the power before the expansion phase. (b) The expansion phase; the magnetosphere releases the accumulated magnetic energy during the growth phase in a pulse-like manner in a few hours, because it tries to stabilize itself when the accumulated energy reaches to about 1023 erg s-1. (c) The recovery phase; the magnetosphere becomes an ordinary dissipative system after the expansion phase, because the ionosphere becomes capable of dissipating the power with the rate of 1018 ~ 1019 erg s-1. On the basis of the above conclusion, it is suggested that the magnetosphere accomplishes the pulse-like release process (resulting in spectacular auroral activities) by producing plasma instabilities in the current sheet, thus reducing the current. The resulting contraction of the magnetic field lines (expending the accumulated magnetic energy), together with break down of the "frozen-in" field condition at distances of less than 10 RE, establishes the substorm dynamo that generates an earthward electric field (Lui and Kamide, 2003; Akasofu, 2011). It is this electric field which manifests as the expansion phase. A recent satellite observation at a distance of as close as 8.1 RE by Lui (2011) seems to support strongly the occurrence of the chain of processes suggested in the above. It is hoped that although the concept presented here is very crude, it will serve in providing one way of studying the three phases of auroral substorms. In turn, a better understanding of auroral

  13. The earth's magnetosphere under continued forcing - Substorm activity during the passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Freeman, M. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Takahashi, K.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic field and energetic particle observations from six spacecraft in the near-earth magnetotail are described and combined with ground magnetograms to document for the first time the magnetospheric substorm activity during a 30-hour long transit of an interplanetary cloud at 1 AU. During an earlier 11-hr interval when B(z) was continuously positive, the magnetosphere was quiescent, while in a later 18-hr interval when B(z) was uninterruptedly negative a large magnetic storm was set off. In the latter interval the substorm onsets recurred on average every 50 min. Their average recurrence frequency remained relatively undiminished even when the magnetic cloud B(z) and other measures of the interplanetary energy input decreased considerably. These results concur with current models of magnetospheric substorms based on deterministic nonlinear dynamics. The substorm onset occurred when the cloud's magnetic field had a persistent northward component but was predominantly westward pointing.

  14. Origins and Transport of Ions during Magnetospheric Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; El-Alaoui, Mostafa; Peroomian, Vahe; Raeder, Joachim; Walker, Ray J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the origins and the transport of ions observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet during the growth and expansion phases of a magnetospheric substorm that occurred on November 24, 1996. Ions observed at Geotail were traced backward in time in time-dependent magnetic and electric fields to determine their origins and the acceleration mechanisms responsible for their energization. Results from this investigation indicate that, during the growth phase of the substorm, most of the ions reaching Geotail had origins in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) and had alread@, entered the magnetosphere when the growth phase began. Late in the growth phase and in the expansion phase a higher proportion of the ions reaching Geotail had their origin in the plasma mantle. Indeed, during the expansion phase more than 90% of the ions seen by Geotail were from the mantle. The ions were accelerated enroute to the spacecraft; however, most of the ions' energy gain was achieved by non-adiabatic acceleration while crossing the equatorial current sheet just prior to their detection by Geotail. In general, the plasma mantle from both southern and northern hemispheres supplied non-adiabatic ions to Geotail, whereas the LLBL supplied mostly adiabatic ions to the distributions measured by the spacecraft.

  15. Equatorward shift of the cleft during magnetospheric substorms as observed by Isis 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasuhara, F.; Akasofu, S.-I.; Winningham, J. D.; Heikkila , W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Isis 1 satellite observations of the cleft position during magnetospheric substorms show that the cleft shifts equatorward as the interplanetary B sub z component turns southward and substorm activity increases and that it shifts back toward higher latitudes as substorm activity subsides and B sub z returns northward. Also, unusually low latitudes for the cleft (less than 70 deg invariant latitude) were found during geomagnetic storms with significant Dst values and large negative B sub z values. Significant shifts occur in the cleft location with no accompanying effect seen in the AE index; however, B sub z is observed to be southward during these periods.

  16. Quantitative Simulation of a Magnetospheric Substorm. 2. Comparison with Observations,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-23

    we overestimated the polar-boundary potential drop; consequently the p) asma -sheet ions were injected deeper into the magnetosphere than was the case...Magnetospheric Substorms and Related Plasma Processes, Los Alamos, New Mexico , October 1978 and to be published in Astrophysics and Space Science Library...and Related Plasma Processes, Los Alamos, New Mexico , October 1978, published in Astrophysics and Space Science Library Series,p.14 3, Yasuhara, F., and

  17. Magnetospheric substorms in the distant magnetotail observed by Imp 3.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, C. I.; Akasofu, S.; Kawasaki, K.; Hones, E. W., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Study of variations of the magnetic field and plasma sheet in the distant magnetotail (20 to 40 earth radii) during magnetospheric substorms on the basis of the Imp 3 magnetic-field and particle data. Depending on the locations of the satellite with respect to the boundary of the plasma sheet, the variations differ greatly. However, the present results and the results of other workers give a clear indication of an increase of the magnitude of the field outside the plasma sheet and of the simultaneous ?thinning' of the plasma sheet during an early phase of substorms. At about the maximum epoch or during the recovery phase of substorms, the plasma sheet expands and appears to be inflated to at least the presubstorm level. Furthermore, a large excessive flux of the magnetic (approximately equal to Z component) field, as compared with the flux of the original dipole field, appears across the neutral sheet.

  18. Energy Coupling Between the Ionosphere and Inner Magnetosphere Related to Substorm Onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nelson C.

    1999-01-01

    The investigation of substorm effects in the inner magnetosphere with CRRES data looked in detail at over 50 substorms relative to signatures of onset and early expansion phases. The accomplishments of the project are: Determined perpendicular Poynting flux at CRRES in the inner magnetosphere at substorm onset, including primary direction is azimuthal, not radial, indicating a local source, no obvious signal from the magnetotail to trigger onset, strongly supports substorm onset location near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and process is local and a strong function of Magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI) coupling. We also developed near geosynchronous onset (NGO) model for substorm onset and expansion.

  19. Association of Energetic Neutral Atom Bursts and Magnetospheric Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Kepko, L.; Henderson, M. G.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Frank, L. A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present evidence that short-lived bursts of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) observed with the Comprehensive Energetic Particle and Pitch Angle Distribution/Imaging Proton Spectrometer (CEPPAD/IPS) instrument on the Polar spacecraft are signatures of substorms. The IPS was designed primarily to measure ions in situ, with energies between 17.5 and 1500 keV. However, it has also proven to be a very capable ENA imager in the range 17.5 keV to a couple hundred keV. It was expected that some ENA signatures of the storm time ring current would be observed. Interestingly, IPS also routinely measures weaker, shorter-lived, and more spatially confined bursts of ENAs with duration from a few tens of minutes to a few hours and appearing once or twice a day. One of these bursts was quickly associated with magnetospheric and auroral substorm activity and has been reported in the literature [Henderson et al., 19971. In this paper we characterize ENA bursts observed from Polar and establish statistically their association with classic substorm signatures (global auroral onsets, electron and ion injections, AL drops, and Pi2 onsets). We conclude that -90% of the observed ENA bursts are associated with classic substorms and thus represent a new type of substorm signature.

  20. Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    This chapter deals with the essence of the magnetospheric substorm, the return of magnetic flux into the magnetosphere after disconnection from the solar wind magnetic field. There are three fundamental transport processes involved: (1) thinning of the tail plasma sheet and accompanying recession of the outer boundary of the dipolar magnetosphere during the growth phase, (2) flux transport along the tail toward that boundary after onset of tail reconnection, and (3) penetration of plasma and magnetic flux into the dipolar magnetosphere. The chapter then looks at corresponding processes in the Jupiter and Saturn magnetospheres and tails, which are strongly dominated by the fast planetary rotations. It elucidates some key aspects of the entry problem, albeit from a personal vantage point, and addresses the still open questions. Finally, the chapter addresses the correlation between solar wind ram pressure and auroral activity and brightness on Jupiter and Saturn.

  1. The Earth's magnetosphere under continued forcing: Substorm activity during the passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Farrugia, C.J.; Burlaga, L.F.; Lepping, R.P. ); Freeman, M.P. ); Takahashi, K. )

    1993-05-01

    This is the third of three papers dealing with the interaction of an interplanetary magnetic field with the earth's magnetosphere in Jan 1988. Here the authors report on substorm observations made during this time period. They sampled information from six spacecraft and a larger number of ground based systems to serve as signals for the initiation of substorm behavior. They relate the interplanetary magnetic field and plasma conditions to the time of observation of substorm initiation. Current models tie substorm occurrence to magnetic reconnection in the magnetosphere. The IMF B[sub y] and B[sub z] components varied slowly over a range of 20 nT on both sides of zero during this observation period. During the period of northward IMF the magnetosphere was quiescent, but during the period of southward IMF a large magnetic storm was initiated. During this interval substorms were observed roughly every 50 minutes.

  2. A comparison of substorms occurring during magnetic storms with those occurring during quiet times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T.-S.

    2002-09-01

    It has been suggested that there may be a fundamental difference between substorms that occur during magnetic storms and those that occur at other times. [1996] presented evidence that there is no obvious change in lobe field in "quiet time" substorms but that "storm time" substorms exhibit the classic pattern of storage and release of lobe field energy. This result led them to speculate that the former are caused by current sheet disruption, while the latter are caused by reconnection of lobe flux. In this paper we examine their hypothesis with a much larger data set using definitions of the two types of substorms similar to theirs, as well as additional more restrictive definitions of these classes of events. Our results show that the only differences between the various classes are the absolute value of the lobe field and the size of the changes. When the data are normalized to unit field amplitude, we find that the percent change during storm time and non-storm time substorms is nearly the same. The above conclusions are demonstrated with superposed epoch analysis of lobe field (Bt and Bz) for four classes of substorms: active times (Dst < -50 nT, mostly recovery phase), main phase substorms, non-storm times (Dst > -25 nT), and quiet time substorms (no evidence of storm in Dst). Epoch zero for the analysis was taken as the main substorm onset (Pi2 onset closest to sharp break in AL index). Our results suggest that there is no qualitative distinction between the various classes of substorms, and so they are all likely to be caused by the same mechanism.

  3. Energetic Electron Transport in the Inner Magnetosphere During Geomagnetic Storms and Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, D. L.; Anderson, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    We propose to examine the relationship of geomagnetic storms and substorms and the transport of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere using measurements of the auroral X-ray emissions by PIXIE. PIXIE provides a global view of the auroral oval for the extended periods of time required to study stormtime phenomena. Its unique energy response and global view allow separation of stormtime particle transport driven by strong magnetospheric electric fields from substorm particle transport driven by magnetic-field dipolarization and subsequent particle injection. The relative importance of substorms in releasing stored magnetospheric energy during storms and injecting particles into the inner magnetosphere and the ring current is currently hotly debated. The distribution of particles in the inner magnetosphere is often inferred from measurements of the precipitating auroral particles. Thus, the global distributions of the characteristics of energetic precipitating particles during storms and substorms are extremely important inputs to any description or model of the geospace environment and the Sun-Earth connection. We propose to use PIXIE observations and modeling of the transport of energetic electrons to examine the relationship between storms and substorms.

  4. Energy supply processes for magnetospheric substorms and solar flares - Tippy bucket model or pitcher model?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    1985-01-01

    In the past, both magnetospheric substorms and solar flares have almost exclusively been discussed in terms of explosive magnetic reconnection. Such a model may conceptually be illustrated by the so-called 'tippy-bucket model', which causes sudden unloading processes, namely a sudden (catastrophic, stochastic, and unpredictable) conversion of stored magnetic energy. However, recent observations indicate that magnetospheric substorms can be understood as a result of a directly driven process which can conceptually be illustrated by the 'pitcher model' in which the output rate varies in harmony with the input rate. It is also possible that solar flare phenomena are directly driven by a photospheric dynamo. Thus, explosive magnetic reconnection may simply be an unworkable hypothesis and may not be a puzzle to be solved as the primary energy supply process for magnetospheric substorms and solar flares.

  5. Changes in Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling and FACs Associated with Substorm Onset (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. R.; Mann, I. R.; Rae, I. J.; Waters, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Milling, D. K.; Singer, H. J.; Frey, H. U.

    2013-12-01

    Field aligned currents (FACs) are crucial for the communication of information between the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Utilising in-situ observations from the Iridium constellation and Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) we provide detailed observations of the FAC topology through the substorm growth and expansion phases. In particular, for an isolated substorm on 16 February 2010 we demonstrate a clear and localized reduction in the FACs at least 6 minutes prior to auroral onset. A new auroral arc forms in the region of reduced FAC on closed field lines and initially expands azimuthally in wave like fashion. This newly formed arc continues to brighten and expands poleward signifying the start of the substorm expansion phase. We argue that the change in FACs observed prior to onset is the result of a change in the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling in a region local to the subsequent auroral onset. Such a change implies an important role for M-I coupling in destabilising the near-Earth tail during magnetospheric substorms and perhaps more importantly in selecting the location in the ionosphere where auroral onset begins. Further, we provide, a comprehensive in-situ two-dimensional view of the FAC topology associated with the substorm current wedge and westward traveling surge during the substorm expansion phase. We demonstrate that these current structures, when integrated with latitude to produce a net FAC as a function of MLT, have the same structure as the equivalent line current system comprising the SCW. Moreover, regions of upward FAC are associated with discrete auroral forms during the substorm expansion phase.

  6. The Physical Elements of Onset of the Magnetospheric Substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary M.

    1997-01-01

    During this reporting period effort continued in the areas: (1) understanding the mechanisms responsible for substorm onset, and (2) application of a fundamental description of field-aligned currents and parallel electric fields to the plasma-sheet boundary layer.

  7. What Might We Learn About Magnetospheric Substorms at the Earth from the MESSENGER Measurements at Mercury?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Satellite observations at the Earth, supported by theory and modeling, have established a close connection between the episodes of intense magnetospheric convection termed substorms and the occurrence of magnetic reconnection. Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause results in strong energy input to the magnetosphere. This energy can either be stored or used immediately to power the magnetospheric convection that produces the phenomena that collectively define the 'substorm.' However, many aspects of magnetic reconnection and the dynamic response of the coupled solar wind - magnetosphere - ionosphere system at the Earth during substorms remain poorly understood. For example, the rate of magnetic reconnection is thought to be proportional to the local Alfven speed, but the limited range of changes in this solar wind parameter at 1 AU have made it difficult to detect its influence over energy input to the Earth's magnetosphere. In addition, the electrical conductance of the ionosphere and how it changes in response to auroral charged particle precipitation are hypothesized to play a critical role in the development of substorms, but the nature of this electrodynamic interaction remain difficult to deduce from Earth observations alone. The amount of energy the terrestrial magnetosphere can store in its tail, the duration of the storage, and the trigger(s) for its dissipation are all thought to be determined by not only the microphysics of the cross-tail current layer, but also the properties of the coupled magnetosphere - ionosphere system. Again, the separation of microphysics effects from system response has proved very difficult using measurements taken only at the Earth. If MESSENGER'S charged particle and magnetic field measurements confirm the occurrence of terrestrial-style substorms in Mercury's miniature magnetosphere, then it may be possible to determine how magnetospheric convection, field-aligned currents, charged particle acceleration

  8. Event study combining magnetospheric and ionospheric perspectives of the substorm current wedge modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, V. A.; Nikolaev, A. V.; Kubyshkina, M. V.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Singer, H. J.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Nakamura, R.; Milan, S. E.; Coxon, J. C.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2014-12-01

    Unprecedented spacecraft and instrumental coverage and the isolated nature and distinct step-like development of a substorm on 17 March 2010 has allowed validation of the two-loop substorm current wedge model (SCW2L). We find a close spatiotemporal relationship of the SCW with many other essential signatures of substorm activity in the magnetotail and demonstrate its azimuthally localized structure and stepwise expansion in the magnetotail. We confirm that ground SCW diagnostics makes it possible to reconstruct and organize the azimuthal spatiotemporal substorm development pattern with accuracy better than 1 h magnetic local time (MLT) in the case of medium-scale substorm. The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE)-based study of global field-aligned current distribution indicates that (a) the SCW-related field-aligned current system consists of simultaneously activated R1- and R2-type currents, (b) their net currents have a R1-sense, and (c) locations of net current peaks are consistent with the SCW edge locations inferred from midlatitude variations. Thanks to good azimuthal coverage of four GOES and three Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms spacecraft, we evaluated the intensities of the SCW R1- and R2-like current loops (using the SCW2L model) obtained from combined magnetospheric and ground midlatitude magnetic observations and found the net currents consistent (within a factor of 2) with the AMPERE-based estimate. We also ran an adaptive magnetospheric model and show that SCW2L model outperforms it in predicting the magnetic configuration changes during substorm dipolarizations.

  9. Distinct Magnetospheric Responses to Southward IMF in Two Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Alaoui, Mostafa; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Richard, R. L.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Sigwarth, J. B.

    2003-01-01

    Solar wind plasma parameters and the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) observed by the WIND spacecraft upstream of the bow shock were used as input to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of two substorm events. The power deposited into the ionosphere due to electron precipitation was calculated both from VIS observations and from the simulations.

  10. Theoretical magnetograms based on quantitative simulation of a magnetospheric substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.-K.; Wolf, R. A.; Karty, J. L.; Harel, M.

    1982-01-01

    Substorm currents derived from the Rice University computer simulation of the September 19, 1976 substorm event are used to compute theoretical magnetograms as a function of universal time for various stations, integrating the Biot-Savart law over a maze of about 2700 wires and bands that carry the ring, Birkeland and horizontal ionospheric currents. A comparison of theoretical results with corresponding observations leads to a claim of general agreement, especially for stations at high and middle magnetic latitudes. Model results suggest that the ground magnetic field perturbations arise from complicated combinations of different kinds of currents, and that magnetic field disturbances due to different but related currents cancel each other out despite the inapplicability of Fukushima's (1973) theorem. It is also found that the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the horizontal magnetic field disturbance component at low latitudes is due to a net downward Birkeland current at noon, a net upward current at midnight, and, generally, antisunward-flowing electrojets.

  11. Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Processes in the Ionospheric Trough Region During Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, S.; Moldwin, M.; Nicolls, M. J.; Ridley, A. J.; Coster, A. J.; Yizengaw, E.; Lyons, L. R.; Donovan, E.

    2013-12-01

    The ionospheric troughs are regions of remarkable electron density depression at the subauroral and auroral latitudes, and are categorized into the mid-latitude trough or high-latitude trough, depending on their relative location to the auroral oval. Substorms are one fundamental element of geomagnetic activity, during which structured field-aligned currents (FACs) and convection flows develop in the subauroral and auroral ionosphere. The auroral/trough region is expected to experience severe electron density variations during substorms. Accurate specification of the trough dynamics during substorms and understanding its relationship with the structured FACs and convection flows are of important practical purpose, including providing observational foundations for assessing the attendant impact on navigation and communication. In addition, troughs are important since they map to magnetospheric boundaries allowing the remote sensing of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. In this talk, we discuss the dynamics of the mid-latitude and high-latitude troughs during substorms based on multi-instrument observations. Using GPS total electron content (TEC) data, we characterize the location and width of the mid-latitude trough through the substorm lifecycle and compare them with existing trough empirical models. Using a combination of incoherent scattering radar (ISR), GPS TEC, auroral imager and a data assimilative model, we investigate the relationship between the high-latitude trough and FACs as well as convection flows. The high-latitude trough is found to be collocated with a counter-clockwise convection flow vortex east of the Harang reversal region, and downward FACs as part of the substorm current system are suggested to be responsible for the high-latitude trough formation. In addition, complex ionospheric electron temperature within the high-latitude trough is found, i.e., increase in the E region while decrease in the F region. We discuss possible

  12. Computer simulation of a geomagnetic substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, J. G.; Brecht, S. H.; Huba, J. D.; Fedder, J. A.; Palmadesso, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    A global two-dimensional simulation of a substormlike process occurring in earth's magnetosphere is presented. The results are consistent with an empirical substorm model - the neutral-line model. Specifically, the introduction of a southward interplanetary magnetic field forms an open magnetosphere. Subsequently, a substorm neutral line forms at about 15 earth radii or closer in the magnetotail, and plasma sheet thinning and plasma acceleration occur. Eventually the substorm neutral line moves tailward toward its presubstorm position.

  13. Spatial structure and temporal evolution of energetic particle injections in the inner magnetosphere during the 14 July 2013 substorm event

    DOE PAGES

    Gkioulidou, Matina; Ohtani, S.; Mitchell, D. G.; ...

    2015-03-20

    Recent results by the Van Allen Probes mission showed that the occurrence of energetic ion injections inside geosynchronous orbit could be very frequent throughout the main phase of a geomagnetic storm. Understanding, therefore, the formation and evolution of energetic particle injections is critical in order to quantify their effect in the inner magnetosphere. We present a case study of a substorm event that occurred during a weak storm (Dst ~ –40 nT) on 14 July 2013. Van Allen Probe B, inside geosynchronous orbit, observed two energetic proton injections within 10 min, with different dipolarization signatures and duration. The first onemore » is a dispersionless, short-timescale injection pulse accompanied by a sharp dipolarization signature, while the second one is a dispersed, longer-timescale injection pulse accompanied by a gradual dipolarization signature. We combined ground magnetometer data from various stations and in situ particle and magnetic field data from multiple satellites in the inner magnetosphere and near-Earth plasma sheet to determine the spatial extent of these injections, their temporal evolution, and their effects in the inner magnetosphere. Our results indicate that there are different spatial and temporal scales at which injections can occur in the inner magnetosphere and depict the necessity of multipoint observations of both particle and magnetic field data in order to determine these scales.« less

  14. Spatial structure and temporal evolution of energetic particle injections in the inner magnetosphere during the 14 July 2013 substorm event

    SciTech Connect

    Gkioulidou, Matina; Ohtani, S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Reeves, G. D.; Turner, D. L.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Nosé, M.; Koga, K.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2015-03-20

    Recent results by the Van Allen Probes mission showed that the occurrence of energetic ion injections inside geosynchronous orbit could be very frequent throughout the main phase of a geomagnetic storm. Understanding, therefore, the formation and evolution of energetic particle injections is critical in order to quantify their effect in the inner magnetosphere. We present a case study of a substorm event that occurred during a weak storm (Dst ~ –40 nT) on 14 July 2013. Van Allen Probe B, inside geosynchronous orbit, observed two energetic proton injections within 10 min, with different dipolarization signatures and duration. The first one is a dispersionless, short-timescale injection pulse accompanied by a sharp dipolarization signature, while the second one is a dispersed, longer-timescale injection pulse accompanied by a gradual dipolarization signature. We combined ground magnetometer data from various stations and in situ particle and magnetic field data from multiple satellites in the inner magnetosphere and near-Earth plasma sheet to determine the spatial extent of these injections, their temporal evolution, and their effects in the inner magnetosphere. Our results indicate that there are different spatial and temporal scales at which injections can occur in the inner magnetosphere and depict the necessity of multipoint observations of both particle and magnetic field data in order to determine these scales.

  15. Modeling substorm dynamics of the magnetosphere: from self-organization and self-organized criticality to nonequilibrium phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Sitnov, M I; Sharma, A S; Papadopoulos, K; Vassiliadis, D

    2002-01-01

    Earth's magnetosphere during substorms exhibits a number of characteristic features such as the signatures of low effective dimension, hysteresis, and power-law spectra of fluctuations on different scales. The largest substorm phenomena are in reasonable agreement with low-dimensional magnetospheric models and in particular those of inverse bifurcation. However, deviations from the low-dimensional picture are also quite considerable, making the nonequilibrium phase transition more appropriate as a dynamical analog of the substorm activity. On the other hand, the multiscale magnetospheric dynamics cannot be limited to the features of self-organized criticality (SOC), which is based on a class of mathematical analogs of sandpiles. Like real sandpiles, during substorms the magnetosphere demonstrates features, that are distinct from SOC and are closer to those of conventional phase transitions. While the multiscale substorm activity resembles second-order phase transitions, the largest substorm avalanches are shown to reveal the features of first-order nonequilibrium transitions including hysteresis phenomena and a global structure of the type of a temperature-pressure-density diagram. Moreover, this diagram allows one to find a critical exponent, that reflects the multiscale aspect of the substorm activity, different from the power-law frequency and scale spectra of autonomous systems, although quite consistent with second-order phase transitions. In contrast to SOC exponents, this exponent relates input and output parameters of the magnetosphere. Using an analogy to the dynamical Ising model in the mean-field approximation, we show the connection between the data-derived exponent of nonequilibrium transitions in the magnetosphere and the standard critical exponent beta of equilibrium second-order phase transitions.

  16. Energetic Electron Populations in the Magnetosphere During Geomagnetic Storms and Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David L.; Anderson, Phillip C.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the scientific work performed by the Aerospace Corporation under NASA Grant NAG5-10278, 'Energetic Electron Populations in the Magnetosphere during Geomagnetic Storms and Subsisting.' The period of performance for the Grant was March 1, 2001 to February 28, 2002. The following is a summary of the Statement of Work for this Grant. Use data from the PIXIE instrument on the Polar spacecraft from September 1998 onward to derive the statistical relationship between particle precipitation patterns and various geomagnetic activity indices. We are particularly interested in the occurrence of substorms during storm main phase and the efficacy of storms and substorms in injecting ring-current particles. We will compare stormtime simulations of the diffuse aurora using the models of Chen and Schulz with stormtime PIXIE measurements.

  17. On the relative importance of magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during substorm onset and expansion: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Ramon E.

    1992-01-01

    The question of whether substorm onset is triggered in the magnetotail or the ionosphere is presented. The possible influence of the ionosphere in the subsequent development of a substorm is discussed. Theoretical considerations involved are reviewed and a case study to address this question is examined. The evidence indicates that magnetotail processes initiate the sequence of events called a substorm, while the ionosphere appears to play a critical role in the subsequent evolution of the substorm expansion phase. However, the necessary observations, in particular high time resolution coordinated observations in the ionosphere and magnetotail are relatively rare. Continued examination of existing ground and space based data sets, in particular underutilized observations such as the Scatha data, may provide a more solid foundation for clarifying this issue and determining the relative importance of magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during substorms.

  18. Rapid enhancement of energetic oxygen ions in the inner magnetosphere during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite observations show that energetic (>100 keV) O+ ions are rapidly increased in the inner magnetosphere during substorms. The ultimate source of O+ ions is the Earth's ionosphere, so that O+ ions must be accelerated from ~eV to 100s keV somewhere in the magnetosphere. A fundamental question still arise regarding why O+ ions are accelerated and transported to the inner magnetosphere. We simulated substorms under two different solar wind conditions by using the global MHD simulation developed by Tanaka et al. (2010, JGR). The solar wind speed is set to be 372 km/s for Case I, and 500 km/s for Case II. In both cases, the MHD simulation result shows that the dawn to dusk electric field is enhanced in the night side tail region at >7 Re just after the substorm onset. In particular, the electric field in the inner region (~7 Re) is highly enhanced by the tension force because of relatively strong magnetic field together with curved field lines. The strongest electric field takes place near the region where the plasma pressure is high. We performed test particle simulation under the electric and magnetic fields for Cases I and II. O+ ions are released from two planes located at ±2 Re in the Z direction in the tail region. O+ ions released at the two planes represent outflowing stream of O+ ions escaping from the Earth. The distribution function at the planes is assumed to be drifting Kappa distribution with temperature of 10 eV, the density of 105 m-3, and the parallel velocity given by the MHD simulation. In total, around a billion of particles are traced. Each test particle carries the real number of particles in accordance with the Liouville theorem. After tracing particles, we reconstructed 6-dimensional phase space density of O+ ions. We obtained the following results. (1) Just after substorm onset, the differential flux of O+ ions is almost simultaneously enhanced in the region where the electric field is strong. (2) The kinetic energy increases rapidly to

  19. Substorms on Mercury?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siscoe, G. L.; Ness, N. F.; Yeates, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Qualitative similarities between some of the variations in the Mercury encounter data and variations in the corresponding regions of the earth's magnetosphere during substorms are pointed out. The Mariner 10 data on Mercury show a strong interaction between the solar wind and the plant similar to a scaled down version of that for the earth's magnetosphere. Some of the features observed in the night side Mercury magnetosphere suggest time dependent processes occurring there.

  20. Plasma Entry from Tail into the Dipolar Magnetosphere During Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    Plasma entering the dipolar magnetosphere from the tail has to overcome the obstacle presented by the conductivity enhancements caused by the poleward arc(s). While the arcs move poleward, the plasma proceeds equatorward as testified by the existence of a westward electric field. The arcs break into smaller-scale structures and loops with a tendency of eastward growth and expansion, although the basic driving force is directed earthward/equatorward. The likely reason is that the arc-related conductivity enhancements act as flow barriers and convert normal into shear stresses. The energy derived from the release of the shear stresses and dissipated in the arcs lowers the entropy content of the flux tubes and enables their earthward progression. In addition, poleward jumps of the breakup arcs are quite common. They result from refreshments of the generator plasma by the sequential arrival of flow bursts from the near-Earth neutral line. Once inside the oval, the plasma continues to move equatorward as manifested through north-south aligned auroral forms. Owing to the existence of an inner border of the oval, marked by the Region 2 currents, all flows are eventually diverted sunward.

  1. Electric fields, electron precipitation, and VLF radiation during a simultaneous magnetospheric substorm and atmospheric thunderstorm

    SciTech Connect

    Bering, E.A.; Rosenberg, T.J.; Benbrook, J.R.; Detrick, D.; Matthews, D.L.; Rycroft, M.J.; Saunders, M.A.; Sheldon, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    A balloon payload instrumented with a double-probe electric field detector and an X ray scintillation counter was launched from Roberval, Quebec, Canada (L=4.1) at 0828 UT (0328 LT) on July 9, 1975. A magnetospheric substorm was observed locally between 0815 and 1100 UT, which produced a maximum ..delta..B of approx.500 nT at approx.0930 UT. A single-cell atmospheric thunderstorm developed northeast of Roberval beginning around 0925 UT which was most intense from approx.1000 to 1035 UT. Detailed study of the electrical properties of the thunderstorm, the X ray precipitation data, and VLF spheric data leads to three conclusions. First, the electrical coupling from the thunderstorm to the magnetosphere increases with frequency from dc to the VLF; for the observed storm the amplitude at the ionosphere of thunderstorm produced electric fields was not significant at frequencies below 0.1 Hz. Second, the atmospheric conductivity above the thunderstorm was observed to be about one-half the fair weather value prior to 1000 UT; decreased to about one-quarter the fair weather value at about 1000 UT; and remained depressed after the end of the thunderstorm. This result was contrary to that expected on the basis of previous work and is one which merits considerably more investigation. Third, the data show a high probability that half-hop whistlers initiated by sferics from the thunderstorm triggered energetic electron precipitation from the magnetosphere.

  2. Temporal and Spatial Evolution of Energetic Ion Injections in the Inner Magnetosphere: Multi-Point Observations of a Substorm Event.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkioulidou, M.; Ohtani, S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Turner, D. L.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Nose, M.; Koga, K.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    Plasma transport and energization of ions in the magnetotail has been shown to largely occur in the form of injections of hot plasma, localized in MLT, associated with bursty bulk flows and sharp dipolarizations of the magnetic field. However, the relationship of these transient tail phenomena to energetic particle injections into the inner magnetosphere is not well understood. Recent results by the RBSPICE instrument of the Van Allen Probes mission showed that the occurrence of energetic ion injections inside geosynchronous orbit can be very frequent throughout the main phase of a geomagnetic storm, and indicated that the contribution of such injections to the ring current buildup could be substantial. Understanding the formation and evolution of energetic ion injections in the inner magnetosphere and their relationship to transient phenomena in the tail is, therefore, of great importance. In order to differentiate between temporal and spatial variations, it is essential to investigate injections via multi-point observations. We study a substorm event that occurred during a small storm (Dst ~-40 nT), where two injections of energetic ions (50 - 300 keV), 10 minutes apart, were observed by RBSPICE instrument inside geosynchronous orbit, and six LANL and two GOES spacecraft at geosynchronous orbit. Geosynchronous spacecraft ETS-8, at a similar MLT with Van Allen Probe B, also observed the dipolarization signatures associated with these two injections. At the same time, two THEMIS spacecraft were monitoring the night-side magnetosphere at ~ 10 RE. Using ground-based magnetometer data, we are able to identify the eastward and westward edges of the current wedge associated with each one of these injections. The two injections, as observed in the inner magnetosphere, exhibit distinct differences in their dipolarization signatures as well as their duration. With all the above data at hand, we investigate the inward propagation of the injections into the inner

  3. A Mechanism for the Loading-Unloading Substorm Cycle Missing in MHD Global Magnetospheric Simulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.; Uritsky, V.; Vassiliadis, D.; Baker, D. N.

    2005-01-01

    Loading and consequent unloading of magnetic flux is an essential element of the substorm cycle in Earth's magnetotail. We are unaware of an available global MHD magnetospheric simulation model that includes a loading- unloading cycle in its behavior. Given the central role that MHD models presently play in the development of our understanding of magnetospheric dynamics, and given the present plans for the central role that these models will play in ongoing space weather prediction programs, it is clear that this failure must be corrected. A 2-dimensional numerical driven current-sheet model has been developed that incorporates an idealized current- driven instability with a resistive MHD system. Under steady loading, the model exhibits a global loading- unloading cycle. The specific mechanism for producing the loading-unloading cycle will be discussed. It will be shown that scale-free avalanching of electromagnetic energy through the model, from loading to unloading, is carried by repetitive bursts of localized reconnection. Each burst leads, somewhat later, to a field configuration that is capable of exciting a reconnection burst again. This process repeats itself in an intermittent manner while the total field energy in the system falls. At the end of an unloading interval, the total field energy is reduced to well below that necessary to initiate the next unloading event and, thus, a loading-unloading cycle results. It will be shown that, in this model, it is the topology of bursty localized reconnection that is responsible for the appearance of the loading-unloading cycle.

  4. On the cause of thin current sheets in the near-Earth magnetotail and their possible significance for magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, K.; Birn, J.

    1993-01-01

    The formation of thin current sheets in the near-Earth magnetotail during substorm growth phases is addressed in terms of a simple model. An appropriate part of the unperturbed magnetotail is represented by a plane sheet model. Perturbations are applied to the upper and to the left boundaries, representing the magnetopause and the near-Earth tail boundary, where the perturbation at the latter models the interaction between the tail and the inner magnetosphere. Treating the perturbation as ideal (dissipation-free), we found that singular current sheets develop in the midplane of the tail. The analytical results are explored numerically. Using realistic dimensions of the domain considered, the influence of the earthward boundary on current sheet formation dominates. It is argued that current sheet formation of this type plays an important role in the processes associated with the onset of magnetospheric substorms.

  5. Multiple-satellite studies of magnetospheric substorms: Plasma sheet recovery and the poleward leap of auroral-zone activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pytte, T.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Kivelson, M. G.; West, H. I., Jr.; Hones, E. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Particle observations from pairs of satellites (Ogo 5, Vela 4A and 5B, Imp 3) during the recovery of plasma sheet thickness late in substorms were examined. Six of the nine events occurred within about 5 min in locations near the estimated position of the neutral sheet, but over wide ranges of east-west and radial separations. The time of occurrence and spatial extent of the recovery were related to the onset (defined by ground Pi 2 pulsations) and approximate location (estimated from ground mid-latitude magnetic signatures) of substorm expansions. It was found that the plasma sheet recovery occurred 10 - 30 min after the last in a series of Pi bursts, which were interpreted to indicate that the recovery was not due directly to a late, high latitude substorm expansion. The recovery was also observed to occur after the substorm current wedge had moved into the evening sector and to extend far to the east of the center of the last preceding substorm expansion.

  6. The problem of the acceleration of electrons of the outer radiation belt and magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, E. E.; Stepanova, M. V.

    2015-09-01

    Predicting of the location of the maximum in high-energy electron fluxes filling a new radiation belt is an endeavor being carried out by physicists studying the magnetosphere. We analyzed the data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites and ground-based magnetometers obtained during geomagnetic storm on 8-9 October 2012. The minimum value of the disturbance storm time (Dst) was -111 nT, and the maximum in high-energy electron fluxes that appeared during the recovery phase was observed at L = 4 Re. At the same time, we analyzed the motion of the auroral oval toward lower latitudes and related substorm activity using the data of the low-orbiting DMSP satellites and the IMAGE magnetic meridian network. It was found from the DMSP satellites' measurements that the maximum of the energy density of precipitating ions, the maximum of the plasma pressure, and the most equatorial part of the westward auroral electrojet are all located at the 60° geomagnetic latitude. This value corresponds to L = 4 Re, i.e., it coincides with the location of the maximum in high-energy electron fluxes. This L-value also agrees with the predictions of the Tverskaya relation between the minimum in Dst variation and the location of the maximum of the energetic electron fluxes, filling a new radiation belt. The obtained results show that the location of this maximum could be predicted solely from the data of the auroral particle precipitations and/or ground-based magnetic observations.

  7. Solar and Interplanetary Causes of Extremely Intense Substorms During Superstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Hajra, Rajkumar; Echer, Ezequiel; Gjerloev, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    We have begun a study of particularly intense substorms that occur during superstorms. We will relate the solar cycle dependences of events, whether they are externally or internally triggered, and their relationship to other factors such as magnetospheric preconditioning. If time permits, we will explore the details of the events and whether they are similar to regular (Akasofu, 1964) substorms or not. These intense substorms are an important feature of space weather since they may be responsible for power outages.

  8. A multi-instrumental case study of the substorm event occurring 2002-09-08

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palin, Laurianne; Ågren, Karin; zivkovic, Tatjana; Opgenoorth, Hermann; Fasckó, Gabor; Sergeev, Victor; Kubyshkina, Marina; Nikolaev, Alexander; Milan, Steve; Imber, Suzanne; Kauristie, Kirsti; Palmroth, Minna; van de Kamp, Max; Nakamura, Rumi; Boakes, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Multi-instrumental data mining and interpretation can be tricky. In this context, the ECLAT (European Cluster Assimilation Technology) project was created to « provide a novel and unique data base and tools for space scientists, by providing an upgrade of the European Space Agency's Cluster Active Archive (CAA). » How can this new tool help the space plasma physics community? Here we demonstrate the power of coordinated global and meso-scale ground-based data to put satellite data into the proper context. We re-analyse a well-isolated substorm with a strong growth phase, which starts right overhead the Scandinavian network of instruments. This event was previously studied in detail by Sergeev et al (2005), based on a THEMIS-like configuration near-midnight using a unique radial constellation of LANL (~6.6Re), Geotail and Polar (~9Re), and Cluster (~16Re). In this new study we add detailed IMAGE spacecraft and ground-based network data. Several magnetospheric models are specially adapted using solar wind conditions and in-situ observations. Simulation results are compared to the in-situ observations and discussed.

  9. Comment on "Tail reconnection triggering substorm onset".

    PubMed

    Lui, A T Y

    2009-06-12

    Angelopoulos et al. (Research Articles, 15 August 2008, p. 931) reported that magnetic reconnection in Earth's magnetotail triggered the onset of a magnetospheric substorm. We provide evidence that (i) near-Earth current disruption, occurring before the conventional tail reconnection signatures, triggered the onset; (ii) the observed auroral intensification and tail reconnection are not causally linked; and (iii) the onset they identified is a continuation of earlier substorm activities.

  10. PC index as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere: 2. Relation to the interplanetary electric field E KL before substorm onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, OA; Sormakov, DA

    2015-10-01

    This paper (the second of a series) presents the results of statistical investigation of relationship between the interplanetary electric field E KL and the Polar Cap (PC) index in case of magnetic substorms (1998-2001), which have been analyzed in Troshichev et al. (J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 119, 2014). The PC index is directly related to the E KL field variations on interval preceding the substorm sudden onset (SO): correlation R > 0.5 is typical of more than 90 % of isolated substorms, 80 % of expanded substorms, and 99 % of events with coordinated E KL and PC jumps. The low or negative correlation observing in ~10 % of examined substorms suggests that the solar wind flow measured by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft in the Lagrange point L1 did not encounter the magnetosphere in these cases. Examination of the delay times Δ T in the response of PC index to E KL variations provides the following results: (1) delay times do not depend on separate solar wind parameters, such as solar wind speed V X and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B Z component, contrary to general conviction, (2) the Δ T value is best controlled by the E KL field growth rate (d E KL/dt), (3) the lower Δ T limit (5-7 min is attained under conditions of the higher E KL growth rate, and (4) the PC index provides the possibility to verify the solar wind flow transportation time from ACE position (where the solar wind speed is estimated) to magnetosphere. These results, in combination with data testifying that the substorm onsets are related to the PC precursors, demonstrate that the PC index is an adequate ground-based indicator of the solar wind energy incoming into the magnetosphere.

  11. Generation of large-amplitude electric field and subsequent enhancement of O+ ion flux in the inner magnetosphere during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-06-01

    Energetic O+ ions are rapidly enhanced in the inner magnetosphere because of abrupt intensification of the dawn-to-dusk electric field and significantly contribute to the ring current during substorms. Here we examine the generation mechanism of the dawn-to-dusk electric field that accelerates the O+ ions and the spatial and temporal evolution of the differential flux of the O+ ions by using a test particle simulation in the electric and magnetic fields that are provided by a global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation. In the MHD simulation, strong dawn-to-dusk electric field appears in the near-Earth tail region by a joint action of the earthward tension force and pileup of magnetic flux near an onset of substorm expansion. The peak of the electric field is ~9-13 mV/m and is located ~1-2 RE earthward of the peak of the plasma bulk speed because of the pileup. O+ ions coming from the lobe are accelerated from ~eV to >100 keV in ~10 min. The reconstructed flux of the O+ ions shows that at ~7 RE near midnight, the flux has a peak near a few tens of keV and the flux below ~10 keV is small. This structure, called a "void" structure, is consistent with the Polar observation and can be regarded as a manifestation of the acceleration of unmagnetized ions perpendicular to the magnetic field. In the inner magnetosphere (at 6.0 RE), reconstructed energy-time spectrograms show the nose dispersion structure that is also consistent with satellite observations.

  12. Substorm aurorae and their connection to the inner magnetosphere. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, R.E.; Meng, C.I.; Spence, H.E.

    1994-04-15

    In this report the authors present evidence from the low-altitude DMSP F7 satellite that the poleward edge of auroral luminosity in the nightside auroral zone does not necessarily correspond to the boundary between plasma-filled flux tubes and flux tubes devoid of plasma. Assuming that the low-altitude boundary corresponds to the boundary between the lobe and the plasma sheet, this implies that the boundary between open and closed field lines may lie poleward of the most poleward auroral luminosity. Thus the assumption that the poleward boundary of auroral luminosity is a good indicator of the open-closed boundary may not always be correct. Furthermore, they show clear evidence that an auroral surge may also be located equatorward of the open-closed boundary. Therefore, tailward of the region of the plasma sheet to which the surge is connected there may exist undisturbed plasma sheet that has not yet been disconnected from the ionosphere. This means that substorm-associated reconnection does not necessarily begin to reconnect lobe field lines at the onset of a substorm. Moreover, available evidence strongly suggests that the arc that brightens at the onset of a substorm and that develops into a surge maps to the inner magnetotail, to that region at the inner edge of the plasma sheet where the magnetic field changes from a dipolar to a tail-like configuration. This would be consistent with recent studies that connect auroral breakup to the near-Earth (

  13. Crossover behavior of multiscale fluctuations in Big Data: Langevin model and substorm time-scales in Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. S.; Setty, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    Multiscale fluctuations in large and complex data are usually characterized by a power law with a scaling exponent but many systems require more than one exponent and thus exhibit crossover behavior. The scaling exponents, such as Hurst exponents, represent the nature of correlation in the system and the crossover shows the presence of more than one type of correlation. An accurate characterization of the crossover behavior is thus needed for a better understanding of the inherent correlations in the system, and is an important method of Big Data analysis. A multi-step process is developed for accurate computation of the crossover behavior. First the detrended fluctuation analysis is used to remove the trends in the data and the scaling exponents are computed. The crossover point is then computed by a Hyperbolic regression technique, with no prior assumptions. The time series data of the magnetic field variations during substorms in the Earth's magnetosphere is analyzed with these techniques and yields a crossover behavior with a time scale of ~4 hrs. A Langevin model derived from the data provides an excellent fit to the crossover in the scaling exponents and a good model of magnetospheric dynamics. The combination of fluctuation analysis and mathematical modeling thus yields a comprehensive approach in the analysis of Big Data.

  14. Relationship between the growth of the ring current and the interplanetary quantity. [solar wind energy-magnetospheric coupling parameter correlation with substorm AE index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    1979-01-01

    Akasofu (1979) has reported that the interplanetary parameter epsilon correlates reasonably well with the magnetospheric substorm index AE; in the first approximation, epsilon represents the solar wind coupled to the magnetosphere. The correlation between the interplanetary parameter, the auroral electrojet index and the ring current index is examined for three magnetic storms. It is shown that when the interplanetary parameter exceeds the amount that can be dissipated by the ionosphere in terms of the Joule heat production, the excess energy is absorbed by the ring current belt, producing an abnormal growth of the ring current index.

  15. Solar Wind-Magnetosphere Coupling During an Isolated Substorm Event: A Multispacecraft ISTP Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Baker, D. N.; Turner, N. E.; Singer, H. J.; Frank, L. A.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Scudder, J.; Anderson, R.; Kokubun, S.; Mukai, T.; Nakamura, R.; Blake, J. B.; Russell, C. T.; Kawano, H.; Mozer, F.; Slavin, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Multispacecraft data from the upstream solar wind, polar cusp, and inner magnetotail are used to show that the polar ionosphere responds within a few minutes to a southward IMF turning, whereas the inner tail signatures are visible within ten min from the southward turning. Comparison of two subsequent substorm onsets, one during southward and the other during northward IMF, demonstrates the dependence of the expansion phase characteristics on the external driving conditions. Both onsets are shown to have initiated in the midtail, with signatures in the inner tail and auroral oval following a few minutes later.

  16. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Substorm Recovery Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Chua, D H.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous statistical observations have shown that the recovery time scales of substorms occurring in the winter and near equinox (when the nighttime auroral zone was in darkness) are roughly twice as long as the recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the summer (when the nighttime auroral region was sunlit). This suggests that auroral substorms in the northern and southern hemispheres develop asymmetrically during solstice conditions with substorms lasting longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere than in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. Additionally, this implies that more energy is deposited by electron precipitation in the winter hemisphere than in the summer one during substorms. This result, coupled with previous observations that have shown that auroral activity is more common when the ionosphere is in darkness and is suppressed when the ionosphere is in daylight, strongly suggests that the ionospheric conductivity plays an important role governing how magnetospheric energy is transferred to the ionosphere during substorms. Therefore, the ionosphere itself may dictate how much energy it will accept from the magnetosphere during substorms rather than this being an externally imposed quantity. Here, we extend our earlier work by statistically analyzing the recovery time scales for a large number of substorms observed in the conjugate hemispheres simultaneously by two orbiting global auroral imagers: Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV. Our current results are consistent with previous observations. The recovery time scales are observed to be longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere while the auroral activity has a shorter duration in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. This leads to an asymmetric energy input from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere with more energy being deposited in the winter hemisphere than in the summer hemisphere.

  17. Energy limits of electron acceleration in the plasma sheet during substorms: A case study with the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Drew Lawson; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Mauk, B. H.; Cohen, I. J.; Jaynes, A. N.; Craft, J. V.; Wilder, F. D.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Gershman, D. J.; Avanov, L. A.; Dorelli, J. C.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Schmid, D.; Nakamura, R.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Artemyev, A. V.; Runov, A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we present multipoint observations of earthward moving dipolarization fronts and energetic particle injections from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission with a focus on electron acceleration. From a case study during a substorm on 02 August 2015, we find that electrons are only accelerated over a finite energy range, from a lower energy threshold at ~7–9 keV up to an upper energy cutoff in the hundreds of keV range. At energies lower than the threshold energy, electron fluxes decrease, potentially due to precipitation by strong parallel electrostatic wavefields or initial sources in the lobes. Electrons at energies higher than the threshold are accelerated cumulatively by a series of impulsive magnetic dipolarization events. This case demonstrates how the upper energy cutoff increases, in this case from ~130 keV to >500 keV, with each dipolarization/injection during sustained activity. We also present a simple model accounting for these energy limits that reveals that electron energization is dominated by betatron acceleration.

  18. Energy limits of electron acceleration in the plasma sheet during substorms: A case study with the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission

    DOE PAGES

    Turner, Drew Lawson; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; ...

    2016-08-01

    Here, we present multipoint observations of earthward moving dipolarization fronts and energetic particle injections from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission with a focus on electron acceleration. From a case study during a substorm on 02 August 2015, we find that electrons are only accelerated over a finite energy range, from a lower energy threshold at ~7–9 keV up to an upper energy cutoff in the hundreds of keV range. At energies lower than the threshold energy, electron fluxes decrease, potentially due to precipitation by strong parallel electrostatic wavefields or initial sources in the lobes. Electrons at energies higher than the thresholdmore » are accelerated cumulatively by a series of impulsive magnetic dipolarization events. This case demonstrates how the upper energy cutoff increases, in this case from ~130 keV to >500 keV, with each dipolarization/injection during sustained activity. We also present a simple model accounting for these energy limits that reveals that electron energization is dominated by betatron acceleration.« less

  19. Energy limits of electron acceleration in the plasma sheet during substorms: A case study with the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Mauk, B. H.; Cohen, I. J.; Jaynes, A. N.; Craft, J. V.; Wilder, F. D.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Gershman, D. J.; Avanov, L. A.; Dorelli, J. C.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Schmid, D.; Nakamura, R.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Artemyev, A. V.; Runov, A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    We present multipoint observations of earthward moving dipolarization fronts and energetic particle injections from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission with a focus on electron acceleration. From a case study during a substorm on 02 August 2015, we find that electrons are only accelerated over a finite energy range, from a lower energy threshold at 7-9 keV up to an upper energy cutoff in the hundreds of keV range. At energies lower than the threshold energy, electron fluxes decrease, potentially due to precipitation by strong parallel electrostatic wavefields or initial sources in the lobes. Electrons at energies higher than the threshold are accelerated cumulatively by a series of impulsive magnetic dipolarization events. This case demonstrates how the upper energy cutoff increases, in this case from 130 keV to >500 keV, with each dipolarization/injection during sustained activity. We also present a simple model accounting for these energy limits that reveals that electron energization is dominated by betatron acceleration.

  20. The solar wind and magnetospheric dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The dynamic processes involved in the interaction between the solar wind and the earth's magnetosphere are reviewed. The evolution of models of the magnetosphere is first surveyed. The existence of the auroral substorm and the cyclical polar magnetic substorm is evidence that the magnetosphere is a dynamic system. The dynamic changes occurring in the magnetosphere, including erosion of the magnetopause, changes in the size of the polar cap, variations in the flaring angle of the tail, neutral point formation, plasma sheet motions, and the inward collapse of the midnight magnetosphere, are discussed. The cyclical variations of geomagnetic activity are explained in terms of the control of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction by the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field. Present phenomenological models allow prediction of geomagnetic activity from interplanetary measurements, but modeling of detailed magnetospheric processes is still in its infancy.

  1. Storm-Substorm Relations Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Joe

    2006-06-01

    Magnetic storms in the magnetosphere can cause damage to communication satellites and large-scale power outages. The concept that a magnetic storm is a compilation of a series of substorms was proposed by Akasofu [1968]. However, Kamide [1992] showed that substorms are not a necessary condition for the occurrence of a magnetic storm. This controversy initiated a new era of research on the storm-substorm relation, which was the subject of a recent workshop in Banff, Alberta, Canada. The main topics discussed during the meeting included a brief overview of what a substorm is, how quasiperiodic substorm events and steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) events without substorms contribute to storms, and how plasma flows enhanced by magnetic reconnection in the plasma sheet contribute to substorms and storms.

  2. PC index and magnetic substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, Oleg; Janzhura, Alexander; Sormakov, Dmitry; Podorozhkina, Nataly

    PC index is regarded as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere as distinct from the AL and Dst indices, which are regarded as characteristics of the energy that realize in the magnetosphere in form of substorm and magnetic storms. This conclusion is based on results of analysis of relationships between the polar cap magnetic activity (PC-index) and parameters of the solar wind, on the one hand, relationships between changes of PC and development of magnetospheric substorms (AL-index) and magnetic storms (Dst-index), on the other hand. This paper describes in detail the following main results which demonstrate a strong connection between the behavior of PC and development of magnetic disturbances in the auroral zone: (1) magnetic substorms are preceded by the РС index growth (isolated and extended substorms) or long period of stationary PC (postponed substorms), (2) the substorm sudden onsets are definitely related to such PC signatures as leap and reverse, which are indicative of sharp increase of the PC growth rate, (3) substorms generally start to develop when the PC index exceeds the threshold level ~ 1.5±0.5 mV/m, irrespective of the substorm growth phase duration and type of substorm, (4) linear dependency of AL values on PC is typical of all substorm events irrespective of type and intensity of substorm.

  3. Substorm recurrence during steady and variable solar wind driving: Evidence for a normal mode in the unloading dynamics of the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.; Baker, D. N.; Vassiliadis, D.; Roberts, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    Farrugia et al (1993) have recently studied substorm activity driven by the passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud during which the interplanetary magnetic field turned southward for approximately 18 hours. It was shown that both the epsilon and the VB(sub s) parameters varied slowly on the timescale of a substorm but changed considerably over the interval as a whole. The substorm occurrence rate did not reflect the variation in magnetospheric energy loading rate as measured by these parameters but, rather, remained roughly constant with a 50-min average period. Klimas et al. (1992) showed that the Faraday loop analog model of geomagnetic activity predicts this single unloading rate under various constant loading rates. However, various model parameters were adjusted to yield a 1-hour unloading period in agreement with the Bargatze et al. (1985) linear prediction filters and in approximate agreement with the Farrugia et al. (1993) results. It has since been found necessary to add a slow relaxation mechanism to the Faraday loop model to allow for its approach to a ground state during long periods of inactivity. It is proposed that the relaxation mechanism is provided by slow convection of magnetic flux out of the magnetotail to the dayside magnetosphere. In addition, a rudimentary representation of magnetotail-ionosphere coupling has been added to enable comparison of model output to measured AL. The present study is of the modified Faraday loop model response to solar wind input from the Bargatze et al. data set with comparison of its output to concurrent AL. This study has removed the degree of freedom in parameter choice that had earlier allowed adjustments toward the 1-hour unloading period and has, instead, yielded the 1-hour unloading period under various constant loading rates. It is demonstrated that the second peak of the bimodal Bargatze et al. linear prediction filters at approximately equal 1-hour lag and the approximately constant substorm

  4. Investigation of the Triggering Mechanism of Magnetospheric Substorm via 2-1/2 D Full-Particle Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, H.; Machida, S.

    2012-12-01

    A physical process of the substorm triggering in the Earth's Magnetotail is thought to be closely related to the magnetic reconnection and the tearing instability. Recently we proposed a new scheme of the substorm onset called "Catapult Current Sheet Relaxation (CCSR) Model " to physically understand the results from GEOTAIL and THEMIS data. The CCSR Model has characters that are the decrease of the total pressure and thinning of the current sheet at the distance about -12Re in the magnetotail a few minutes before the substorm onset, and the simultaneous occurrence of the dipolarization at X~-10Re and the magnetic reconnection at X~-20Re at the time of the onset. In this study, we investigate a stability of the current sheet and the particle acceleration via particle simulation in order to assess the validity of the CCSR model and to clarify the mechanism of substorm onset. We give an initial magnetic field structure which is akin to the Earth's dipole magnetic field together with a stretched magnetic field by thin current sheet, and further add a weak northward magnetic field at the place where Near-Earth Neutral Line is expected to be formed. The results of simulation contain similar features that characterize the CCSR Model. A physically interpretation of the simulation result with the linear instability theory as well as comparison with observations will be given.

  5. Electrodynamics of solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, Joseph R.; Akasofu, Syun-Ichi

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents a coherent picture of fundamental physical processes in three basic elements of the solar-wind/magnetosphere/ionosphere coupling system: (1) the field-aligned potential structure which leads to the formation of auroral arcs, (2) the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling which leads to the onset of magnetospheric substorms, and (3) the solar-wind/magnetosphere dynamo which supplies the power driving various magnetospheric processes. Process (1) is forced into existence by the loss-cone constriction effect when the upward field-aligned current density exceeds the loss-cone thermal flux limit. Substorm onset occurs when the ionosphere responds fully to the enhanced magnetospheric convection driven by the solar wind. Energy is transferred from the solar wind to the magnetosphere by a dynamo process, primarily on open field lines.

  6. Is energy storage and release part of the substorm process?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    Models for magnetospheric substorms were considered. A modified model which includes the growth phase, a time interval prior to the onset of the expansion phase, during which energy was transferred from a solar wind to the magnetosphere and stored for subsequent release, is discussed. Evidence for energy storage in the tail prior to substorm expansion for both isolated and moderate substorm activity is reviewed.

  7. Space weather and the safety of ground infrastructures. Numerical simulation and prediction of electromagnetic effects induced by real magnetospheric substorms in the Earth's models with real three-dimensional distribution of electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvshinov, Alexey; Filippov, Sergey; Kalegaev, Vladimir; Sidorova, Larisa; Mukhametdinova, Ludmila; Pankratov, Oleg; Alexeev, Dmitry

    Strong eruptions at Sun’s surface produce large release of matter (plasma), which, with a speed of 800-1000 km/s (the solar wind), flows into interplanetary space. If the Earth appears to be on the way of the solar wind the interaction of the wind with the Earth's magnetosphere and the ionosphere leads to abnormal disturbance of fluctuating geomagnetic field. In the middle latitudes, the disturbances (geomagnetic storms) last a few days and have amplitudes up to 400 nT. At high latitudes, these perturbations (magnetospheric substorms) last a few hours and have amplitudes up to 3000 nT. According to Faraday’s law of induction, the fluctuating magnetic field in turn generates a electric field. The electric field for intense substorms can reach hundreds of volts/km in the polar region and generate very high, the so-called geomagnetic induced currents in the ground-based systems, such as power grids and pipelines. These currents are one of the most dangerous factors affecting the operation of the above systems. Thus extremely topical task in the field of "space weather" is the quantification and prediction of spatio-temporal distribution of the electric field during substorm activity. Despite the abundance of works carried out in this direction, the problem is still far from a satisfactory solution. In the field of modeling, researchers are still working with highly simplified models of both the source and the conducting Earth. As for prediction the situation is even worse. In this presentation we discuss a general formalism which allows for simulating the electric fields induced by real magnetospheric substorms in the spherical model of the Earth with real three-dimensional distribution of conductivity. We show the first results of such simulations. We also discuss a concept to predict substorm spatio-temporal pattern of the electric field.

  8. Substorm Current Wedge Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, L.; McPherron, R. L.; Amm, O.; Apatenkov, S.; Baumjohann, W.; Birn, J.; Lester, M.; Nakamura, R.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Sergeev, V.

    2015-07-01

    Almost 40 years ago the concept of the substorm current wedge was developed to explain the magnetic signatures observed on the ground and in geosynchronous orbit during substorm expansion. In the ensuing decades new observations, including radar and low-altitude spacecraft, MHD simulations, and theoretical considerations have tremendously advanced our understanding of this system. The AMPTE/IRM, THEMIS and Cluster missions have added considerable observational knowledge, especially on the important role of fast flows in producing the stresses that generate the substorm current wedge. Recent detailed, multi-spacecraft, multi-instrument observations both in the magnetosphere and in the ionosphere have brought a wealth of new information about the details of the temporal evolution and structure of the current system. While the large-scale picture remains valid, the new details call for revision and an update of the original view. In this paper we briefly review the historical development of the substorm current wedge, review recent in situ and ground-based observations and theoretical work, and discuss the current active research areas. We conclude with a revised, time-dependent picture of the substorm current wedge that follows its evolution from the initial substorm flows through substorm expansion and recovery.

  9. Identification of critical substorm-expansion-phase phenomena: Problems addressable with GEM observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    Understanding the physics of the substorm process is currently a crucial topic in magnetospheric physics. Fundamental to this understanding is the determination of what phenomena occur in the magnetosphere during the expansion phase, where these phenomena occur, and how they propagate during the expansion phase. Satellite observations have given researchers important point measurements of what happens; however there is potential for enhancing the use of ground-based observations to study the substorm phenomena. Such enhanced use of ground-based measurements is already taking place as part of the GEM (Geospace Environment Modeling) boundary-layer campaign and is planned to continue throughout the tail/substorm campaign. This report identifies expansion-phase phenomena observed locally within the nightside magnetosphere and from the ground, believed to be of fundamental importance for understanding large-scale substorm processes. The phenomena observed in situ are related to the phenomena observed from the ground. The primary goal is to identify outstanding questions that could be addressed during the GEM tail/substorm campaign using ground-based data from GEM observing periods in coordination with available satellite observations.

  10. Substorm Current Wedge at Earth and Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, L.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Slavin, J. A.; Sundberg, T.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews magnetospheric substorms and dipolarizations observed at both Earth and Mercury. It briefly discusses new insights into the physics of the substorm current wedge (SCW) that have been revealed the past few years. The formation and evolution of the SCW are closely tied to the braking of flows convecting flux away from the reconnection site and the resultant near-planet flux pileup that creates the dipolarization. At Earth, the SCW plays a critical role in substorms, coupling magnetospheric to ionospheric motions, deflecting incoming plasma flows, and regulating the dissipation of pressure built up in the near-Earth magnetosphere during dipolarization. The lack of a conducting boundary at Mercury provides a natural experiment to examine the role of an ionosphere on regulating magnetospheric convection. Energetic particles may play a much greater role within substorms at Mercury than at Earth, providing another opportunity for comparative studies.

  11. The Role of Self-Organized Criticality in the Substorm Phenomenon and its Relation to Localized Reconnection in the Magnetospheric Plasma Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, Alex J.; Valdivia, J. A.; Vassiliadis, D.; Baker, D. N.; Hesse, M.; Takalo, J.

    1999-01-01

    Evidence is presented that suggests there is a significant self-organized criticality (SOC) component in the dynamics of substorms in the magnetosphere. Observations of BBFs, fast flows, localized dipolarizations, plasma turbulence, etc. are taken to show that multiple localized reconnection sites provide the basic avalanche phenomenon in the establishment of SOC in the plasma sheet. First results are presented from a continuing plasma physical study of this avalanche process. A one-dimensional resistive MHD model of a magnetic field reversal is discussed. Resistivity, in this model, is self-consistently generated in response to the excitation of an idealized current-driven instability. When forced by convection of magnetic flux into the field reversal region, the model yields rapid magnetic field annihilation through a dynamic behavior that is shown to exhibit many of the characteristics of SOC. Over a large range of forcing strengths, the annihilation rate is shown to self-adjust to balance the rate at which flux is convected into the reversal region. Several analogies to magnetotail dynamics are discussed: (1) It is shown that the presence of a localized criticality in the model produces a remarkable stability in the global configuration of the field reversal while simultaneously exciting extraordinarily dynamic internal evolution. (2) Under steady forcing, it is shown that a loading-unloading cycle may arise that, as a consequence of the global stability, is quasi-periodic and, therefore, predictable despite the presence of internal turbulence in the field distribution. Indeed, it is shown that the global loading-unloading cycle is a consequence of the internal turbulence. (3) It is shown that, under steady, strong forcing the loading-unloading cycle vanishes. Instead, a recovery from a single unloading persists indefinitely. The field reversal is globally very steady while internally it is very dynamic as field annihilation goes on at the rate necessary to

  12. Comparative study on dynamics associated with terrestrial and Jovian substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yasong

    Terrestrial substorms have been studied for over four decades and our understanding about this phenomenon has improved through those studies. However, many issues regarding substorms are still controversial, especially the initiation mechanism of substorm onset. To understand the initiation mechanism, we have to first answer some important questions. What is the substorm expansion onset? What is the physics behind its phenomenological definition? Where does the initiation start? What is the relation of tail reconnection with near-Earth onsets? Where does tail reconnection occur? While one way to understand better the physics of substorms is to increase the number of spacecraft and the resolution of ground observations, another way is to compare substorm phenomena between different planets. In this study, we investigate the different phases of substorms both on the Earth and Jupiter. For Jovian dynamic event, we need to know if they are substorms? How are they driven? How can we better understand terrestrial substorms through studying Jovian substorms? We used Polar, GOES, Cluster and ground-station observations to study terrestrial substorms and used the Galileo observations to study Jovian dynamic events. A 3-day growth phase of Jovian substorm is discovered, which is also found driven by the internal processes including mass-loading at Io instead of the solar wind. This discovery establishes the substorm nature of those dynamics events which have counterparts of key elements of terrestrial substorms, including the connection of those events with the Jupiter's polar auroral activity. Near-planet dipolarization caused by the mid-tail reconnection is also investigated. In the near-Earth tail region, dipolarizations appear to be associated with mid-tail reconnections, near-tail flow braking and formation of substorm current wedge. In both magnetospheres, major onsets of substorms are found to be due to the major tail reconnection which can globally release the loaded

  13. Relation of the auroral substorm to the substorm current wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, Robert L.; Chu, Xiangning

    2016-12-01

    The auroral substorm is an organized sequence of events seen in the aurora near midnight. It is a manifestation of the magnetospheric substorm which is a disturbance of the magnetosphere brought about by the solar wind transfer of magnetic flux from the dayside to the tail lobes and its return through the plasma sheet to the dayside. The most dramatic feature of the auroral substorm is the sudden brightening and poleward expansion of the aurora. Intimately associated with this expansion is a westward electrical current flowing across the bulge of expanding aurora. This current is fed by a downward field-aligned current (FAC) at its eastern edge and an upward current at its western edge. This current system is called the substorm current wedge (SCW). The SCW forms within a minute of auroral expansion. FAC are created by pressure gradients and field line bending from shears in plasma flow. Both of these are the result of pileup and diversion of plasma flows in the near-earth plasma sheet. The origins of these flows are reconnection sites further back in the tail. The auroral expansion can be explained by a combination of a change in field line mapping caused by the substorm current wedge and a tailward growth of the outer edge of the pileup region. We illustrate this scenario with a complex substorm and discuss some of the problems associated with this interpretation.

  14. Occurrence frequencies of IMF triggered and nontriggered substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Tung-Shin; McPherron, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of triggered and nontriggered substorm are examined in light of current interest in such issues as substorm identification, IMF By variations, and potentially undetected small-scale solar wind perturbation. Global substorms are identified using a sudden, persistent decrease in the AL index. The onset of this global expansion is taken to be the time of the Pi 2 burst nearest in time to the beginning of the AL, decrease. IMF triggers were identified both subjectively through visual scanning of the data and automatically with a computer algorithm. Both northward turnings of the IMF Bz and decreases in the amplitude of the By component were considered as possible triggers. Two different solar wind monitors were used in the investigation: IMP-8 in a circular orbit with a distance 12 to approx.35 Re to the Earth-Sun line and ISEE-2 in an elliptical orbit with a distance only 5 to approx.10 Re to the Earth-Sun line. The IMP-8 results show that the triggering probability does not depend on the distance of the monitor from the Earth-Sun line in the range 12-35 Re. The ISEE dataset shows that closer than 12 Re the triggering probability is the same as it is in the IMP-8 data set. Thus there appears to be no dependence of triggering on the location of the monitor provided it is within 35 Re of the Earth. We also demonstrate that including the By component does not significantly increase the probability of substorm triggering. Approximately 60% of all substorms appear to be triggered. Of the 40% for which we could not identify a trigger, 10% occurred while the IMF was northward. The data suggest that substorm onset is a consequence of an internal magnetospheric instability that is highly sensitive to changes in magnetospheric convection induced by a sudden change in the IMF, but that these changes are not always necessary.

  15. Predictions of Substorms and Intensifications Following Northward Turnings of the IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, G. T.; Lyons, L. R.; Spann, J.

    1999-01-01

    Substorms are often observed to occur at the end of intervals of Southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), i.e. following the northward turning. Despite the significant correlation between northward turning and substorms, no direct causal relationship between northward turnings and substorms has been demonstrated. Assuming such a causal relationship, we predict that substorms will occur within a particular interval following the observation of a northward turning in the IMF. We observe 16 northward turnings following steady, southward IMF in data taken by the WIND spacecraft magnetic field instrument (MFI). To ensure that the northward turning was observed at the magnetosphere, we require that the northward turning also be observed by instruments on either one of Geotail or IMP-8 while the separation of the second spacecraft from WIND was more that 10 R(sub E). These two-spacecraft observations also allow us to predict more accurately the arrival time of the northward turning at the Earth. Of the predictions substorms, 10 predictions were clearly successful to within +/- 12 min. Five predictions failed, but the failures reveal clear shortcomings in the criteria for a northward turning that we correct. The failures were caused by an increase in the absolute value of B(sub YGSM) simultaneous with the northward turning in 3 cases, and a weak southward IMF preceding the northward turning in 2 cases. The final northward turning arrived in the recovery phase of an ongoing substorm, and resulted in unusual auroral activity. The implication of the predictability of substorms following sharp northward turnings is that the postulated causal relationship between northward turnings and substorm onset exists. The effect of increases in the absolute value of B(sub YGSM) to negate the triggering ability of northward turnings suggests that the triggering mechanism involves sharp reductions in the magnetospheric convection electric field.

  16. Planetary magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.; Ness, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    A concise overview is presented of our understanding of planetary magnetospheres (and in particular, of that of the Earth), as of the end of 1981. Emphasis is placed on processes of astrophysical interest, e.g., on particle acceleration, collision-free shocks, particle motion, parallel electric fields, magnetic merging, substorms, and large scale plasma flows. The general morphology and topology of the Earth's magnetosphere are discussed, and important results are given about the magnetospheres of Jupiter, Saturn and Mercury, including those derived from the Voyager 1 and 2 missions and those related to Jupiter's satellite Io. About 160 references are cited, including many reviews from which additional details can be obtained.

  17. A Bright Future for Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissinger, J.; McPherron, R. L.

    2010-09-01

    Tenth International Conference on Substorms; San Luis Obispo, California, 22-26 March 2010; Intense auroral displays are caused by substorms, events in the Earth's magnetosphere consisting of an abundance of plasma physics processes. More than 120 scientists gathered to discuss the latest findings on this phenomenon at a conference organized by Vassilis Angelopoulos, Larry R. Lyons, and Robert L. McPherron of the University of California, Los Angeles. Just as a thunderstorm cannot be properly analyzed with a single weather station, substorms cannot be properly studied with a single satellite in the vastness of space. Recent satellite missions now provide several simultaneous observations of key processes. Extensive networks of ionospheric radars, magnetometers, and all-sky imagers extend around the world. This has resulted in unprecedented coverage and conjunctions, brightening scientists' understanding of substorms.

  18. Correlative comparison of geomagnetic storms and auroral substorms using geomagnetic indeces. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cade, W.B.

    1993-06-01

    Partial contents include the following: (1) Geomagnetic storm and substorm processes; (2) Magnetospheric structure; (3) Substorm processes; (4) Data description; (5) Geomagnetic indices; and (6) Data period and data sets.

  19. Substorm electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, David P.

    1990-01-01

    The present one-dimensional model analysis of substorm electrodynamics proceeds from the standard scenario in which the plasma sheet collapses into a neutral sheet, and magnetic merging occurs between the two tail lobes; plasma flows into the neutral sheet from the lobes and the sides, undergoing acceleration in the dawn-dusk direction. The process is modified by the tendency of the accelerated plasma to unbalance charge neutrality, leading to an exchange of electrons with the ionosphere in order to maintain neutrality. The cross-tail current is weakened by the diversion: this reduces the adjacent lobe-field intensity, but without notable effects apart from a slight expansion of the tail boundary.

  20. The roles of direct input of energy from the solar wind and unloading of stored magnetotail energy in driving magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostoker, G.; Akasofu, S. I.; Baumjohann, W.; Kamide, Y.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions to the substorm expansive phase of direct energy input from the solar wind and from energy stored in the magnetotail which is released in an unpredictable manner are considered. Two physical processes for the dispensation of the energy input from the solar wind are identified: (1) a driven process in which energy supplied from the solar wind is directly dissipated in the ionosphere; and (2) a loading-unloading process in which energy from the solar wind is first stored in the magnetotail and then is suddenly released to be deposited in the ionosphere. The pattern of substorm development in response to changes in the interplanetary medium has been elucidated for a canonical isolated substorm.

  1. Proton aurora and substorm intensifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. C.; Xu, B.; Lyons, L. R.; Newell, P. T.; Creutzberg, F.

    1993-01-01

    Ground based measurements from the CANOPUS array of meridian scanning photometers and precipitating ion and electron data from the DMSP F9 satellite show that the electron arc which brightens to initiate substorm intensifications is formed within a region of intense proton precipitation that is well equatorward (approximately four to six degrees) of the nightside open-closed field line boundary. The precipitating protons are from a population that is energized via earthward convection from the magnetotail into the dipolar region of the magnetosphere and may play an important role in the formation of the electron arcs leading to substorm intensifications on dipole-like field lines.

  2. The Substorm Current Wedge Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, Larry; McPherron, Robert; Apatenkov, Sergey; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Birn, Joachim; Lester, Mark; Nakamura, Rumi; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Sergeev, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Almost 40 years ago the concept of the substorm current wedge was developed to explain the magnetic signatures observed on the ground and in geosynchronous orbit during substorm expansion. In the ensuing decades new observations, including radar and low-altitude spacecraft, MHD simulations, and theoretical considerations have tremendously advanced our understanding of this system. The AMPTE/IRM, THEMIS and Cluster missions have added considerable observational knowledge, especially on the important role of fast flows in producing the stresses that generate the substorm current wedge. Recent detailed, multi-spacecraft, multi-instrument observations both in the magnetosphere and in the ionosphere have brought a wealth of new information about the details of the temporal evolution and structure of the current system. In this paper, we briefly review recent in situ and ground-based observations and theoretical work that have demonstrated a need for an update of the original picture. We present a revised, time-dependent picture of the substorm current wedge that follows its evolution from the initial substorm flows through substorm expansion and recovery, and conclude by identifying open questions.

  3. Substorm theories: United they stand, divided they fall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary M.

    1995-01-01

    Consensus on the timing and mapping of substorm features has permitted a synthesis of substorm models. Within the synthesis model the mechanism for onset of substorm expansion is still unknown. Possible mechanisms are: growth of an ion tearing mode, current disruption by a cross-field current instability, and magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. While the synthesis model is consistent with overall substorm morphology, including near-Earth onset, none of the onset theories, taken individually, appear to account for substorm expansion onset. A grand synthesis with unification of the underlying onset theories appears necessary.

  4. Current understanding of magnetic storms: Storm-substorm relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Kamide, Y.; Gonzalez, W.D.; Baumjohann, W.; Daglis, I.A.; Grande, M.; Joselyn, J.A.; Singer, H.J.; McPherron, R.L.; Phillips, J.L.; Reeves, E.G.; Rostoker, G.; Sharma, A.S.; Tsurutani, B.T.

    1998-08-01

    the storm-time ring current. An apparently new controversy regarding the relative importance of the two processes is thus created. It is important to identify the role of substorm occurrence in the large-scale enhancement of magnetospheric convection driven by solar wind electric fields. (3) Numerical schemes for predicting geomagnetic activity indices on the basis of solar/solar wind/interplanetary magnetic field parameters continue to be upgraded, ensuring reliable techniques for forecasting magnetic storms under real-time conditions. There is a need to evaluate the prediction capability of geomagnetic indices on the basis of physical processes that occur during storm time substorms. (4) It is crucial to differentiate between storms and nonstorm time substorms in terms of energy transfer/conversion processes, i.e., mechanical energy from the solar wind, electromagnetic energy in the magnetotail, and again, mechanical energy of particles in the plasma sheet, ring current, and aurora. To help answer the question of the role of substorms in energizing ring current particles, it is crucial to find efficient magnetospheric processes that heat ions up to some minimal energies so that they can have an effect on the strength of the storm time ring current. (5) The question of whether the {ital Dst} index is an accurate and effective measure of the storm time ring-current is also controversial. In particular, it is demonstrated that the dipolarization effect associated with substorm expansion acts to reduce the {ital Dst} magnitude, even though the ring current may still be growing. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  5. Spatially Resolved Substorm Dynamical Model with Internal and External Substorm Triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Crabtree, C.; Weigel, R. S.; Vassiliadis, D.; Doxas, I.

    2002-12-01

    A spatially-resolved nonlinear dynamics model of the coupled solar wind driven magnetosphere-ionosphere system is developed for the purpose of determining the electrical power flow from the solar wind through the nightside magnetosphere into the ionosphere. The model is derived from Maxwell equations and nonlinear plasma dynamics and focuses on the key conservation laws of mass, charge and energy in the power transfer elements in this complex dynamical system. The models has numerous feedback and feedforward loops for six forms of the distributed energy storage in the M-I system. In contrast to neural networks, the model delineates physically realizable time ordered sequence of energetic events in substorm dynamics. Three types of energy releases are observed in the substorm data and studied with the model. Type I events occur for solar wind conditions that lead to the creation of a near Earth neutral line (NENL) in the geomagnetic tail. Other solar wind conditions lead dominantly to the onset of convection in flux tubes with foot points in the auroral region that produced enhanced field aligned currents (FACs) closing in the ionosphere. These are the type II and type III events. In type II events a sudden northward turning of the IMF produces a transient mis-alignment of the pressure gradient with the gradient of the flux volumes as in the Lyons model. Large transient substorm current wedge and auroral region 1 sense currents are driven by the steep near-Earth pressure gradient in these events type II events. In type III events the slower evolving IMF field directly drives the nightside M-I system. This is the directly driven auroral substorm. We use physics-based filters to classify events in historical databases, and we use the 2-1/2D transport model to simulate the events for model solar wind inputs. The results of the research stress the need for more accurate determinations of the day-side magnetopause arrival times of structures in the solar wind required

  6. Using MMS measurements to validate models of reconnection-driven magnetotail reconfiguration and particle acceleration during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-04-01

    New data from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission confirms and greatly extends the view that substorms are a configurational instability driven by magnetic reconnection. We have studied in detail a powerful storm period in June 2015 which shows that substorm events seen sequentially by the four MMS spacecraft subsequently feed the powerful enhancement of the radiation belts observed by the Van Allen Probes mission. Several sequences of significant southward IMF along with a period of high (VSW≥500 km/s) solar wind speed occurred following a strong interplanetary shock wave impact on the magnetosphere. We see that substorms provide a "seed" population, while high-speed solar wind drives the acceleration to relativistic energies in this two-step geomagnetic activity scenario. Thus, MMS data help validate models that invoke reconnection as a fundamental driver of magnetospheric particle acceleration. The data for several separate events on 22 June 2015 show that the magnetosphere progresses through a specific, well-observed sequence of energy-loading and stress-developing states until the entire system suddenly reconfigures. Energetic electron fluxes measured by the several MMS spacecraft reveal the clear temporal occurrence characteristics and the obvious relationships to concurrently measured solar wind drivers. This shows that enhancements in substorms are a key first step in the acceleration of radiation belt electrons to high energies as observed subsequently by the Van Allen Probes instrumentation. Thus, this high-resolution observational evidence along with the accompanying modeling has demonstrated that magnetospheric substorms are an important acceleration component within the coupled near-Earth system.

  7. Continuous Lobe Reconnection in the Mid-Tail: Observational Signatures and Relation to Substorm onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Pu, Z.; Cao, X.; Xiao, C.; Fu, S.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetospheric substorms represent a global interaction between the solar wind, the magnetosphere, and the ionosphere. Energy extracted from the solar wind is mainly stored in the form of excess magnetic flux in the magnetotail lobes. There is little doubt that reconnection occurs in the magnetotail at some point during substorms. However, whether or not explosive release of this energy is required to cause the substorm and whether reconnection precedes or succeeds expansion onset are still subjects of big debate and controversy. In past three years (2001-2003) Cluster constellation passed through the plasma sheet more than one hundred times. Base on survey of the three yearAƒÆ'A+â_TAƒâ_sA,AøAƒÆ'A,AøAƒAøAøâ_sA¬A.A¡Aƒâ_sA,A¬AƒÆ'A,AøAƒAøAøâ_sA¬A.A_Aƒâ_sA,Aøs four spacecraft data, we have selected 39 continues lobe reconnection (CLR) events. A careful study of these events indicates that the CLR and plasma sheet closed field line reconnection manifest quite differently. The CLR occurs when the IMF is persistently southward (say, for more than a few tens of minutes) and maintains for more than about 20 minutes. It creates a low-density and low-temperature structure with high-speed plasma flows near the central plasma sheet. Quite often the CLRs appear quasi-periodically and in association with the presence of a magnetic storm. Comprehensive investigations have been made in this paper on the relationship between the occurrence of CLRs in the mid-tail and the substorm onsets in the near-Earth region. The 39 CLRs are all found to be corresponding to the appearance of intense substorms. In 37 events the CLRs precede substorms expansion onsets, while other two are opposite. These suggest that tail lobe unloading via CLR is a critical issue for the expansion onset of substorms occurring in persistently southward IMF periods. Nevertheless, this study does not exclude that substorms of other types may have different causes and that dynamical

  8. Dynamics of the outer radiation belts in relation to polar substorms and hot plasma injections at geostationary altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauvaud, J. A.; Winckler, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Geostationary satellite and ground measurements of dynamic variations of the outer radiation belts and their relations with the development of auroral structures during magnetospheric substorms are analyzed. A comparison of measurements of the H or X geomagnetic field components made by seven auroral stations with ATS-6 low-energy and high-energy particle measurements during the multiple-onset substorm of Aug. 16, 1974 is presented which demonstrates that while the decrease in energetic particle fluxed ends only at the time of a strong substorm onset, rapid motions of the outer radiation belts may occur during the flux decrease. All-sky photographs of auroral phenomena taken at Fort Yukon and College, Alaska are then compared with ATS-1 energetic particle flux measurements in order to demonstrate the relation between flux decreases and increases and distinct substorm phases. Results support the hypothesis of a magnetospheric substorm precursor which appears to be an instability growing at the inner boundary of the plasma layer and approaching the earth, and underline the importance of current and magnetic field variations in charged particle dynamics.

  9. The three dimensional current system during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerloev, Jesper; Hoffman, Robert

    2013-04-01

    We present results from a comprehensive statistical study of the ionospheric current system and it's coupling to the magnetosphere during classical bulge type substorms. We identified 116 substorms and determined the global ionospheric current system before and during the substorm using the SuperMAG initiative and global auroral images obtained by the Polar VIS Earth camera. The westward electrojet (WEJ) is centered around 65 / 72 deg magnetic latitude post-midnight / pre-midnight. Thus, we find a distinct latitudinal shift between the locations of the westward electrojet at these local times. The spatiotemporal behavior of the WEJ differs at these two local times. Attempting to explain this significant finding we propose two possible simple current systems. 1) The classical substorm current wedge, which is a single 3D current system. The distinct poleward kink and the different spatiotemporal behavior, however, present considerable complications for this solution. 2) A new 3D current system that consists of 2 wedge type systems: the classical substorm current wedge in the pre-midnight region and another current wedge in the post-midnight region. The latter maps to the inner magnetosphere. To support the empirical modeling we performed Biot and Savart integrations to simulate the ground perturbations. We present results of the statistical study, show typical events, results from the simulations, and discuss the implications for our understanding of the 3D current system associated with substorms.

  10. An Analysis of Conjugate Ground-based and Space-based Measurements of Energetic Electrons during Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivadas, N.; Semeter, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Substorms within the Earth's magnetosphere release energy in the form of energetic charged particles and several kinds of waves within the plasma. Depending on their strength, satellite-based navigation and communication systems are adversely affected by the energetic charged particles. Like many other natural phenomena, substorms can have a severe economic impact on a technology-driven society such as ours. Though energization of charged particles is known to occur in the magnetosphere during substorms, the source of this population and its relation to traditional acceleration region dynamics, are not completely understood. Combining measurements of energetic charged particles within the plasmasheet and that of charged particles precipitated in to the ionosphere will provide a better understanding of the role of processes that accelerate these charged particles. In the current work, we present energetic electron flux measured indirectly using data from ground-based Incoherent Scatter Radar and that measured directly at the plasmasheet by the THEMIS spacecraft. Instances of low-altitude-precipitation observed from ground suggest electrons of energy greater than 300 keV, possibly arising from particle injection events during substorms at the magnetically conjugate locations in the plasmasheet. The differences and similarities in the measurements at the plasmasheet and the ionosphere indicate the role different processes play in influencing the journey of these energetic particles form the magnetosphere to the ionosphere. Our observations suggest that there is a lot more to be understood of the link between magnetotail dynamics and energetic electron precipitation during substorms. Understanding this may open up novel and potentially invaluable ways of diagnosing the magnetosphere from the ground.

  11. Observations in the vicinity of substorm onset: Implications for the substrom process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphinstone, R. D.; Hearn, D. J.; Cogger, L. L.; Murphree, J. S.; Singer, H.; Sergeev, V.; Mursula, K.; Klumpar, D. M.; Reeves, G. D.; Johnson, M.

    1995-01-01

    Multi-instrument data sets from the ground and satellites at both low and high altitude have provided new results concerning substorm onset and its source region in the magnetosphere. Twenty-six out of 37 substorm onset events showed evidence of azimuthally spaced auroral forms (AAFs) prior to the explosive poleward motion associated with optical substorm onset. AAFs can span 8 hours of local time prior to onset and generally propagate eastward in the morning sector. Onset itself is, however, more localized spanning only about 1 hour local time. AAF onset occur during time periods when the solar wind pressure is relatively high. AAFs brighten in conjunction with substorm onset leading to the conclusion that they are a growth phase activity casually related to substorm onset. Precursor activity associated with these AAFs is also seen near geosynchronous orbit altitude and examples show the relationship between the various instrumental definitions of substorm onset. The implied mode number (30 to 135) derived from this work is inconsistent with cavity mode resonances but is consistent with a modified flute/ballooning instability which requires azimuthal pressure gradients. The extended source region and the distance to the open-closed field line region constrain reconnection theory and local mechanisms for substorm onset. It is demonstrated that multiple onset substorms can exist for which localized dipolarizations and the Pi 2 occur simultaneously with tail stretching existing elsewhere. These pseudobreakups can be initiated by auroral streamers which originate at the most poleward set of arc systems and drift to the more equatorward main UV oval. Observations are presented of these AAFs in conjunction with low- and high-altitutde particle and magnetic field data. These place the activations at the interface between dipolar and taillike field lines probably near the peak in the cross-tail current. These onsets are put in the context of a new scenario for substorm

  12. Response of the Earth's Magnetosphere to Changes in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherron, Robert L.; Weygand, James M.; Hsu, Tung-Shin

    2007-01-01

    The solar wind couples to the magnetosphere via dynamic pressure and electric field. Pressure establishes the size and shape of the system, while the electric field transfers energy, mass, and momentum to the magnetosphere. When the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is antiparallel to the dayside magnetic field, magnetic reconnection connects the IMF to the dipole field. Solar wind transport of the newly opened field lines to the nightside creates an internal convection system. These open field lines must ultimately be closed by reconnection on the nightside. For many decades, it was thought that a magnetospheric substorm was the process for accomplishing this and that all magnetic activity was a consequence of substorms. It is now recognized that there are a variety of modes of response of the magnetosphere to the solar wind. In this paper, we briefly describe these modes and the conditions under which they occur. They include substorms, pseudo-breakups, poleward boundary intensifications (PBI), steady magnetospheric convection (SMC), sawtooth injection events, magnetic storms, high-intensity long-duration continuous AE activities (HILDCAAs), and storm-time activations. There are numerous explanations for these different phenomena, some of which do not involve magnetic reconnection. However, we speculate that it is possible to interpret each mode in terms of differences in the way magnetic reconnection occurs on the nightside.

  13. Interaction of Substorm Injections with the Subauroral Geospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    The subauroral geospace includes the ring current (RC), innermost part of the outer radiation belt, and plasmasphere adjacent to the electron plasma sheet boundary and conjugate ionosphere. The purpose of this paper is to extend understanding of the active subauroral geospace by exploring subauroral events in the near-equatorial magnetosphere and conjugate ionosphere soon after the onsets of individual substorms. Their fast appearance is consistent with the propagation of substorm injections. The documented features in the premidnight sector are described in terms of the effect of a short circuit of substorm-injected plasma jets over the plasmapause. The short-circuiting occurs when the cold plasma density exceeds a critical value of 5-10 c.c. As the polarization field at the front of the hot plasma jet is shorten out, the hot electrons are arrested, while the hot ions yet move inward. This provides a natural explanation of the long-known dispersionless auroral electron precipitation boundary and the SAID location just interior to the plasmapause. Enhanced plasma turbulence provides anomalous circuit resistivity and magnetic diffusion leading to a turbulent boundary layer adjacent to the plasmapause. The hot ions' inward motion stops when their pressure gradient is balanced by the polarization electric field. Then, the ions experiencing gradient-curvature drift move westward and their interaction with the plasmasphere creates strong wave structures on the duskside.

  14. Substorm evolution of auroral structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partamies, N.; Juusola, L.; Whiter, D.; Kauristie, K.

    2015-07-01

    Auroral arcs are often associated with magnetically quiet time and substorm growth phases. We have studied the evolution of auroral structures during global and local magnetic activity to investigate the occurrence rate of auroral arcs during different levels of magnetic activity. The ground-magnetic and auroral conditions are described by the magnetometer and auroral camera data from five Magnetometers — Ionospheric radars — All-sky cameras Large Experiment stations in Finnish and Swedish Lapland. We identified substorm growth, expansion, and recovery phases from the local electrojet index (IL) in 1996-2007 and analyzed the auroral structures during the different phases. Auroral structures were also analyzed during different global magnetic activity levels, as described by the planetary Kp index. The distribution of auroral structures for all substorm phases and Kp levels is of similar shape. About one third of all detected structures are auroral arcs. This suggests that auroral arcs occur in all conditions as the main element of the aurora. The most arc-dominated substorm phases occur in the premidnight sector, while the least arc-dominated substorm phases take place in the dawn sector. Arc event lifetimes and expectation times calculated for different substorm phases show that the longest arc-dominated periods are found during growth phases, while the longest arc waiting times occur during expansion phases. Most of the arc events end when arcs evolve to more complex structures. This is true for all substorm phases. Based on the number of images of auroral arcs and the durations of substorm phases, we conclude that a randomly selected auroral arc most likely belongs to a substorm expansion phase. A small time delay, of the order of a minute, is observed between the magnetic signature of the substorm onset (i.e., the beginning of the negative bay) and the auroral breakup (i.e., the growth phase arc changing into a dynamic display). The magnetic onset was

  15. Strong induction effects during the substorm on 27 August 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, V. V.; Mishin, V. M.; Lunyushkin, S. B.; Pu, Z.; Wang, C.

    2015-10-01

    We report on strong induction effects notably contributing to the cross polar cap potential drop and the energy balance during the growth and active phases of the substorm on 27 August 2001. The inductance of the magnetosphere is found to be crucial for the energy balance and electrical features of the magnetosphere in the course of the substorm. The inductive response to the switching on and off of the solar wind-magnetosphere generator exceeds the effect of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) variation. The induction effects are most apparent during the substorm expansion onset when the rapid growth of the ionospheric conductivity is accompanied by the fast release of the magnetic energy stored in the magnetotail during the growth phase. Using the magnetogram inversion technique, we estimated the magnetospheric inductance and effective ionospheric conductivity during the loading and unloading phases.

  16. 3D PIC Simulation of the Magnetosphere during IMF Rotation from North to South: Signatures of Substorm Triggering in the Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Cao. D/ S/; Lembege, B.

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional PIC simulations are performed in order to analyse the dynamics of the magnetotail as the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) rotates from northward to southward direction. This dynamics reveals to be quite different within meridian/equatorial planes over two successive phases of this rotation. First, as IMF rotates from North to Dawn-Dusk direction, the X-Point (magnetic reconnection) evidenced in the magnetotail (meridian plane) is moving earthward (from x=-35 Re to x=-17.5 ) distance at which it stabilizes. This motion is coupled with the formation of "Crosstail-S" patterns (within the plane perpendicular to the Sun-Earth mine) through the neutral sheet in the nearby magnetotail. Second, as IMF rotates from dawn-dusk to South, the minimum B field region is expanding within the equatorial plane and forms a ring. This two-steps dynamics is analyzed in strong association with the cross field magnetotail current Jy, in order to recover the signatures of substorms triggering.

  17. Substorm probabilities are best predicted from solar wind speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, P. T.; Liou, K.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Sotirelis, T.; Wing, S.; Mitchell, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Most measures of magnetospheric activity - including auroral power (AP), magnetotail stretching, and ring current intensity - are best predicted by solar wind-magnetosphere coupling functions which approximate the frontside magnetopause merging rate. However radiation belt fluxes are best predicted by a simpler function, namely the solar wind speed, v. Since most theories of how these high energy electrons arise are associated with repeated rapid dipolarizations such as associated with substorms, this apparent discrepancy could be reconciled under the hypothesis that the frequency of substorms tracks v rather than the merging rate - despite the necessity of magnetotail flux loading prior to substorms. Here we investigate this conjecture about v and substorm probability. Specifically, a continuous list of substorm onsets compiled from SuperMAG covering January 1, 1997 through December 31, 2007 are studied. The continuity of SuperMAG data and near continuity of solar wind measurements minimize selection bias. In fact v is a much better predictor of onset probability than is the overall merging rate, with substorm odds rising sharply with v. Some loading by merging is necessary, and frontside merging does increase substorm probability, but nearly as strongly as does v taken alone. Likewise, the effects of dynamic pressure, p, are smaller than simply v taken by itself. Changes in the solar wind matter, albeit modestly. For a given level of v (or Bz), a change in v (or Bz) will increase the odds of a substorm for at least 2 h following the change. A decrease in driving elevates substorm probabilities to a greater extent than does an increase, partially supporting external triggering. Yet current v is the best single predictor of subsequently observing a substorm. These results explain why geomagnetically quiet years and active years are better characterized by low or high v (respectively) than by the distribution of merging estimators. It appears that the flow of energy

  18. Magnetosphere-Regolith/Exosphere Coupling: Differences and Similarities to the Earth Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gjerleov, J. W.; Slavin, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Of the three Mercury passes made by Mariner 10, the first and third went through the Mercury magnetosphere. The third encounter which occurred during northward IMF (interplanetary magnetic field) showed quiet time magnetic fields. In contrast the third encounter observed clear substorm signatures including dipolarization, field-aligned currents (FACs) and injection of energetic electrons at geosynchronous orbit. However, the determined cross-tail potential drop and the assumed height integrated conductance indicate that the FAC should be 2-50 times weaker than observed. We address this inconsistency and the fundamental problem of FAC closure whether this takes place in the regolith or in the exosphere. The current state of knowledge of the magnetosphere-exosphere/regolith coupling is addressed and similarities and differences to the Earth magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling are discussed.

  19. Tests of Substorm Models' Predictions Using ISTP Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Ennio R.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides progress to test the predictions of substorm models using ISTP observations. During the first year, two investigations were initiated in collaboration with a number of ISTP researchers. Both investigations use a combination of simultaneous measurements from high-, low-, and ground-altitude instruments to: (1) explore the role of MHD resonances in the onset and evolution of substorms, and (2) establish the timing of events in the magnetosphere and ionosphere during the substorm evolution beginning with the growth phase and ending with the recovery phase.

  20. Magnetic substorms and northward IMF turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, Oleg; Podorozhkina, Nataly

    To determine the relation of the northward IMF turnings to substorm sudden onsets, we separated all events with sharp northward IMF turnings observed in years of solar maximum (1999-2002) and solar minimum (2007-2008). The events (N=261) have been classified in 5 groups in accordance with average magnetic activity in auroral zone (low, moderate or high levels of AL index) at unchanged or slightly changed PC index and with dynamics of PC (steady distinct growth or distinct decline) at arbitrary values of AL index. Statistical analysis of relationships between the IMF turning and changes of PC and AL indices has been fulfilled separately for each of 5 classes. Results of the analysis showed that, irrespective of geophysical conditions and solar activity epoch, the magnetic activity in the polar caps and in the auroral zone demonstrate no response to the sudden northward IMF turning, if the moment of northward turning is taken as a key date. Sharp increases of magnetic disturbance in the auroral zone are observed only under conditions of the growing PC index and statistically they are related to moment of the PC index exceeding the threshold level (~1.5 mV/m), not to northward turnings timed, as a rule, after the moment of sudden onset. Magnetic disturbances observed in these cases in the auroral zone (magnetic substorms) are guided by behavior of the PC index, like to ordinary magnetic substorms or substorms developed under conditions of the prolonged northward IMF impact on the magnetosphere. The evident inconsistency between the sharp IMF changes measured outside of the magnetosphere and behavior of the ground-based PC index, the latter determining the substorm development, provides an additional argument in favor of the PC index as a ground-based proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into magnetosphere.

  1. Extremely intense (SML ≤-2500 nT) substorms: isolated events that are externally triggered?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Hajra, R.; Echer, E.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2015-05-01

    We examine particularly intense substorms (SML ≤-2500 nT), hereafter called "supersubstorms" or SSS events, to identify their nature and their magnetic storm dependences. It is found that these intense substorms are typically isolated events and are only loosely related to magnetic storms. SSS events can occur during super (Dst ≤-250 nT) and intense (-100 nT ≥ Dst >-250) magnetic storms. SSS events can also occur during nonstorm (Dst ≥-50 nT) intervals. SSSs are important because the strongest ionospheric currents will flow during these events, potentially causing power outages on Earth. Several SSS examples are shown. SSS events appear to be externally triggered by small regions of very high density (~30 to 50 cm-3) solar wind plasma parcels (PPs) impinging upon the magnetosphere. Precursor southward interplanetary magnetic fields are detected prior to the PPs hitting the magnetosphere. Our hypothesis is that these southward fields input energy into the magnetosphere/magnetotail and the PPs trigger the release of the stored energy.

  2. Dynamics of the 1054 UT March 22, 1979, substorm event - CDAW 6. [Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.; Manka, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW 6) has the primary objective to trace the flow of energy from the solar wind through the magnetosphere to its ultimate dissipation in the ionosphere. An essential role in this energy transfer is played by magnetospheric substorms, however, details are not yet completely understood. The International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) has provided an ideal data base for the study conducted by CDAW 6. The present investigation is concerned with the 1054 UT March 22, 1979, substorm event, which had been selected for detailed examination in connection with the studies performed by the CDAW 6. The observations of this substorm are discussed, taking into account solar wind conditions, ground magnetic activity on March 22, 1979, observations at synchronous orbit, observations in the near geomagnetic tail, and the onset of the 1054 UT expansion phase. Substorm development and magnetospheric dynamics are discussed on the basis of a synthesis of the observations.

  3. Solar cycle dependence of substorm occurrence and duration: Implications for onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiangning; McPherron, Robert L.; Hsu, Tung-Shin; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2015-04-01

    Magnetospheric substorms represent a major energy release process in Earth's magnetosphere. Their duration and intensity are coupled to solar wind input, but the precise way the solar wind energy is stored and then released is a matter of considerable debate. Part of the observational difficulty has been the gaps in the auroral electrojet index traditionally used to study substorm properties. In this study, we created a midlatitude positive bay (MPB) index to measure the strength of the substorm current wedge. Because this index is based on midlatitude magnetometer data that are available continuously over several decades, we can assemble a database of substorm onsets lasting 31 years (1982-2012). We confirmed that the MPB onsets have a good agreement (±2 min) with auroral onsets as determined by optical means on board the IMAGE mission and that the MPB signature of substorms is robust and independent of the stations' position relative to ionospheric currents. Using the MPB onset, expansion, and recovery as a proxy of the respective substorm quantities, we found that the solar cycle variation of substorm occurrence depends on solar wind conditions and has a most probable value of 80 min. In contrast, the durations of substorm expansion and recovery phases do not change with the solar cycle. This suggests that the frequency of energy unloading in the magnetosphere is controlled by solar wind conditions through dayside reconnection, but the unloading process related to flux pileup in the near-Earth region is controlled by the magnetosphere and independent of external driving.

  4. The Cross-field Current Instability for Substorm Expansion Onset

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, A. T. Y.

    2011-01-04

    A challenging problem in the topic of the nonlinear dynamics of the magnetosphere is the physical process responsible for the onset of magnetospheric substorms. The early collaboration with Dr. K. Papadopoulos has led to the proposal of a kinetic plasma instability, called the cross-field current instability, as the onset process. This has developed into a full-blown research effort, supplementing the initial theoretical analysis with in-depth data analysis and particle simulations. Several theoretical predictions based on this instability are successfully verified in observations. Data from the present NASA THEMIS mission provide some evidence for its validity. Further investigations for this substorm onset process are also discussed.

  5. Theory of substorm onset and dipolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. Z.; Zaharia, S.

    2003-04-01

    We present a theory of substorm onset and dipolarization. At the end of the substorm growth phase, the plasma pressure profile steepens and a thin current sheet is formed in the near-Earth plasma sheet around the local midnight with a finite radial and azimuthal domain. In the current sheet the plasma beta becomes about 50 or larger and magnetic field curvature is enhanced, and the kinetic ballooning instability (KBI) is excited with amplitude localized at the maximum plasma beta region. The KBI explains the low frequency (about 1 min period) instability observed by AMPTE/CCE with period on the order of 1 min is observed about 2-3 minutes before the substorm onset [Cheng and Lui, GRL, 1998]. The KBI is responsible for substorm onset because as it grows to a large amplitude with Δ B/B > 01, it causes an enhanced westward ion drift during the explosive growth phase that lasts about 30 sec. The KBI then excites higher frequency instabilities, and the plasma and magnetic field become strongly turbulent. The plasma transport in both radial and azimuthal direction caused by the turbulence relaxes the steep plasma pressure profile during the expansion phase. As the plasma pressure profile relaxes, the magnetic field configuration dipolarizes and returns to the pre-substorm more dipole-like geometry. Theories of current sheet formation, KBI mechanism and dipolarization will be presented along with numerical solutions of 3D magnetospheric structure.

  6. Pressure changes in the plasma sheet during substorm injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, L. M.; Moebius, E.; Baumjohann, W.; Paschmann, G.; Hamilton, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    Data from the CHEM instrument on AMPTE CCE, data from the 3D plasma instrument and the SULEICA instrument on AMPTE IRM, and magnetometer data from both spacecraft are used to determine the particle pressure and total pressure as a function of radial distance in the plasma sheet for periods before and after the onset of substorm-associated ion enhancements over the range 7-19 RE. Events were chosen that occurred during times of increasing magnetospheric activity, as determined by an increasing AE index, in which a sudden increase, or 'injection', of energetic particle flux is observed. It is shown that the simultaneous appearance of energetic particles and changes in the magnetic field results naturally from pressure balance and does not necessarily indicate that the local changing field is accelerating the particles.

  7. The Origin of the Near-Earth Plasma Population During a Substorm on November 24, 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; El-Alaoui, M.; Peroomian, V.; Walker, R. J.; Raeder, J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the origins and the transport of ions observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet during the growth and expansion phases of a magnetospheric substorm that occurred on November 24, 1996. Ions observed at Geotail were traced backward in time in time-dependent magnetic and electric fields to determine their origins and the acceleration mechanisms responsible for their energization. Results from this investigation indicate that, during the growth phase of the substorm, most of the ions reaching Geotail had origins in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) and had already entered the magnetosphere when the growth phase began. Late in the growth phase and in the expansion phase a higher proportion of the ions reaching Geotail had their origin in the plasma mantle. Indeed, during the expansion phase more than 90% of the ions seen by Geotail were from the mantle. The ions were accelerated enroute to the spacecraft; however, most of the ions' energy gain was achieved by non-adiabatic acceleration while crossing the equatorial current sheet just prior to their detection by Geotail. In general, the plasma mantle from both southern and northern hemispheres supplied non-adiabatic ions to Geotail, whereas the LLBL supplied mostly adiabatic ions to the distributions measured by the spacecraft. Distribution functions computed at the ion sources indicate that ionospheric ions reaching Geotail during the expansion phase were significantly heated. Plasma mantle source distributions indicated the presence of a high-latitude reconnection region that allowed ion entry into the magnetosphere when the IMF was northward. These ions reached Geotail during the expansion phase. Ions from the traditional plasma mantle had access to the spacecraft throughout the substorm.

  8. Periodic substorm activity in the geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Williams, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    On 19 May 1978 an anusual series of events is observed with the Quadrispherical LEPEDEA on board the ISEE-1 satellite in the Earth's geomagnetic tail. For 13 hours periodic bursts of both ions and electrons are seen in all the particle detectors on the spacecraft. On this day periodic activity is also seen on the ground, where multiple intensifications of the electrojets are observed. At the same time the latitudinal component of the interplanetary magnetic field shows a number of strong southward deflections. It is concluded that an extended period of substorm activity is occurring, which causes repeated thinnings and recoveries of the plasma sheet. These are detected by ISEE, which is situated in the plasma sheet boundary layer, as periodic dropouts and reappearances of the plasma. Comparisons of the observations at ISEE with those at IMP-8, which for a time is engulfed by the plasma sheet, indicate that the activity is relatively localized in spatial extent. For this series of events it is clear that a global approach to magnetospheric dynamics, e.g., reconnection, is inappropriate.

  9. MESSENGER Observations of Substorm Activity at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Fu, S.; Raines, J. M.; Zong, Q. G.; Poh, G.; Jia, X.; Sundberg, T.; Gershman, D. J.; Pu, Z.; Zurbuchen, T.; Shi, Q.

    2015-12-01

    MErcury Surface, Space ENviroment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) magnetic field and plasma measurements taken during crossings of Mercury's magnetotail from 2011 to 2014 have been investigated for substorms. A number of events with clear Earth-like growth phase and expansion phase signatures were found. The thinning of the plasma sheet and the increase of magnetic field intensity in the lobe were observed during the growth phase and plasma sheet was observed to thicken during the expansion phase, which are similar to the observations at Earth. But the time scale of Mercury's substorm is only several minutes comparing with the several hours at Earth [Sun et al., 2015a]. Detailed analysis of magnetic field fluctuations during the substorm expansion phase have revealed low frequency plasma waves, e.g. Pi2-like pulsations. The By fluctuations accompanying substorm dipolarizations are consistent with pulses of field-aligned currents near the high latitude edge of the plasma sheet. Further study shows that they are near-circularly polarized electromagnetic waves, most likely Alfvén waves. Soon afterwards the plasma sheet thickened and MESSENGER detected a series of compressional waves. We have also discussed their possible sources [Sun et al., 2015b]. Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015a), MESSENGER observations of magnetospheric substorm activity in Mercury's near magnetotail. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 3692-3699. doi: 10.1002/2015GL064052.Sun, W.-J., J. A. Slavin, S. Y. Fu, et al. (2015b), MESSENGER observations of Alfvénic and compressional waves during Mercury's substorms. Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, in press. doi: 10.1002/ 2015GL065452.

  10. SAPS onset timing during substorms and the westward traveling surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Evgeny, V.

    2016-07-01

    We present multispacecraft observations in the magnetosphere and conjugate ionosphere of the onset time of subauroral polarization streams (SAPS) and tens of keV ring current injections on the duskside in three individual substorms. This is probably the first unequivocal determination of the substorm SAPS onset timing. The time lag between the SAPS and substorm onsets is much shorter than the gradient-curvature drift time of ˜10 keV ions in the plasmasphere. It seemingly depends on the propagation time of substorm-injected plasma from the dipolarization onset region to the plasmasphere, as well as on the SAPS position. These observations suggest that fast onset SAPS and ring current injections are causally related to the two-loop system of the westward traveling surge.

  11. Evolution of magnetic configurations in the plasma sheet during a substorm on March 19, 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W.; Kan, J.R.; Akasofu, S.I. )

    1991-09-01

    Evolution of the magnetic field configuration in the plasma sheet is modeled for an intense substorm event on March 19, 1978. The model is based on the idea that the substorm enhanced field-aligned currents are initiated in the ionosphere in response to an enhanced magnetospheric convection. The field-aligned currents in the model are determined from the ground-based magnetometer data with a time resolution of 5 min. The substorm field-aligned currents are assumed to close in the plasma sheet to complete the substorm current circuit. It is shown that the magnetic field produced by the substorm current system in the model can reproduce several important substorm signatures observed in the plasma sheet. These signatures include the taillike reconfiguration in the plasma sheet during the growth phase, the dipolarization of the plasma sheet associated with the substorm expansion onset, and the formation of a new X line. A shortcoming of the model is that the plasma dynamics in the plasma sheet have been ignored. In spite of this shortcoming, however, the model demonstrates that the ionosphere, in response to an enhanced magnetospheric convection, can cause the plasma sheet to change its magnetic configuration to result in the substorm signatures observed in the plasma sheet. The present study shows that it is possible for the ionosphere to play an active role in causing the observed reconfigurations of the plasma sheet during substorms.

  12. Inertial magnetic field reconnection and magnetospheric substorms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.; Cross, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    We describe and calculate the growth rate of a magnetohydrodynamic neutral-sheet instability due to electron-inertia terms in the infinite-conductivity Ohm's law. The results are compared with an approximate Vlasov-equation calculation, and are shown to be particularly germane to the geomagnetic-tail instability.

  13. Solar Wind-Magnetosphere Coupling Influences on Pseudo-Breakup Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Brittnacher, M.; Parks, G. K.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.

    1998-01-01

    Pseudo-breakups are brief, localized aurora[ arc brightening, which do not lead to a global expansion, are historically observed during the growth phase of substorms. Previous studies have demonstrated that phenomenologically there is very little difference between substorm onsets and pseudo-breakups except for the degree of localization and the absence of a global expansion phase. A key open question is what physical mechanism prevents a pseudo-breakup form expanding globally. Using Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) images, we identify periods of pseudo-breakup activity. Foe the data analyzed we find that most pseudo-breakups occur near local midnight, between magnetic local times of 21 and 03, at magnetic latitudes near 70 degrees, through this value may change by several degrees. While often discussed in the context of substorm growth phase events, pseudo-breakups are also shown to occur during prolonged relatively inactive periods. These quiet time pseudo-breakups can occur over a period of several hours without the development of a significant substorm for at least an hour after pseudo-breakup activity stops. In an attempt to understand the cause of quiet time pseudo-breakups, we compute the epsilon parameter as a measure of the efficiency of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. It is noted that quiet time pseudo-breakups occur typically when epsilon is low; less than about 50 GW. We suggest that quiet time pseudo-breakups are driven by relatively small amounts of energy transferred to the magnetosphere by the solar wind insufficient to initiate a substorm expansion onset.

  14. Fast ionospheric feedback instability and substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysak, Robert L.; Grieger, John; Song, Yan

    1992-01-01

    A study suggesting that the Alfven resonator can play an important role in modifying the ionosphere on the time and space scales required to play a significant role in substorm formation is presented. Although the effect of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling on the onset of substorms has been studied, the effects due to gradients of the Alfven speed along auroral field line were neglected. The large increase of the Alfven speed with altitude above the ionosphere creates an effective resonant cavity, which can lead to fluctuations in the electric and magnetic fields as well as in particle fluxes in the range 0.1 to 1 Hz. Such fluctuations can be observed from the ground as PiB pulsations associated with substorm onset. These fluctuations can be excited by a fast feedback instability, which can grow on time scales much less than the Alfven travel time between the ionosphere and the plasma sheet. The instability enhances the value of both the Pedersen and Hall conductivity, and may play a role in preparing the ionosphere for substorm onset.

  15. Auroral Substorm Time Scales: Seasonal and IMF Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The time scales and phases of auroral substorm, activity are quantied in this study using the hemispheric power computed from Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) images. We have applied this technique to several hundred substorm events and we are able to quantify how the characterist act, of substorms vary with season and IMF Bz orientation. We show that substorm time scales vary more strongly with season than with IMF Bz orientation. The recovery time for substorm. activity is well ordered by whether or not the nightside oral zone is sunlit. The recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the winter and equinox periods are similar and are both roughly a factor of two longer than in summer when the auroral oval is sunlit. Our results support the hypothesis that the ionosphere plays an active role in governing the dynamics of the aurora.

  16. Magnetospheric Sawtooth Oscillations Induced by Ionospheric Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambles, O. J.; Lotko, W.; Zhang, B.; Lyon, J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    This paper aims to address why sawtooth oscillations occur and what factors affect their periodicity. We use a multifluid version of the LFM global simulation model, driven by a steady solar wind to examine the effects of ion outflow on convection in the magnetosphere. In the simulation model, the properties of cusp and auroral region O+ outflow are causally regulated by electron precipitation and electromagnetic power flowing into the ionosphere. It is found that when ion outflow is included in the simulation, the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction can generate periodic substorms which appear as sawtooth-like oscillations in the geostationary magnetic field. The ion outflow enhances plasma pressure in the inner magnetosphere and the associated diamagnetic ring current stretches the field lines throughout the nightside, essentially from dawn to dusk. If the field lines are sufficiently stretched they reconnect and dipolarize, ejecting a plasmoid downtail. This cycle repeats forming multiple sawtooth oscillations. The periodicity of the sawtooth oscillation depends largely upon the strength of the outflow. The strength of outflow is varied in the simulation by changing both the driving conditions (which affects the power flowing into the ionosphere) and through direct modification of the constants in the empirical relationships. Higher outflow fluences produce oscillations with shorter periods. The period of the oscillation is found to vary in the simulations from approximately 2 hours to 6 hours depending upon the strength of the outflow. For a smaller solar wind electric field the outflow fluence is not large enough to stretch the nightside field lines enough for sawtooth oscillations to form and the magnetosphere goes into a steady magnetosphere convection (SMC) mode. As the solar wind electric field increases the outflow fluence becomes sufficiently large to affect the convection in the magnetosphere and generate sawtooth oscillations. The strength

  17. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. Mercury's magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed dri-fi paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts; the characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short possibly coupling kinetic and fluid modes; magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to directly impact the dayside regolith; inductive currents in Mercury's interior should act to modify the solar In addition, Mercury's magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionosphere. This lack of an ionosphere is thought to be the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short lived, approx. 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 in Mercury's magnetic tail. In this seminar, we review what we think we know about Mercury's magnetosphere and describe the MESSENGER science team's strategy for obtaining answers to the outstanding science questions surrounding the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury and its small, but dynamic magnetosphere.

  18. Storm-Time Substorms and Sawtooth Events: Test for Substorm Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Tanskanen, E. I.; Reeves, G. D.; Donovan, E.; Singer, H. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    A substorm search engine is used to identify substorm onsets that occur during magnetic storms in the period 2001-2004. Each substorm is analyzed in detail using several parameters to classify the events. Peak amplitude of the substorm is defined from the AL-index. Existence and type of energetic particle injections are determined from the LANL energetic ion and electron data. Tail magnetic field measurements (GOES, Cluster, Geotail) are used to infer whether a thin current sheet was formed prior to the substorm onset. Latitudinal magnetometer chains (CANOPUS, IMAGE) are used to determine whether the main expansion direction was poleward or equatorward. Possible triggers for the onset and intensity of the driving electric field are identified from the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field measurements (ACE, WIND). The goal of the study is to statistically examine to what extent the stormtime substorms show signatures typically associated classical non-storm substorms and to what extent the activity is characteristic only of storm periods. Furthermore, the goal is to identify the "sawtooth events" from the data set, and examine whether the activation characteristics differ from the other stormtime activations.

  19. Statistical properties of substorm auroral onset beads/rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Yang, J.; Pritchett, P. L.; Coroniti, F. V.; Donovan, E. F.; Lyons, L. R.; Wolf, R. A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Mende, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    Auroral substorms are often associated with optical ray or bead structures during initial brightening (substorm auroral onset waves). Occurrence probabilities and properties of substorm onset waves have been characterized using 112 substorm events identified in Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) all-sky imager data and compared to Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) and kinetic instability properties. All substorm onsets were found to be associated with optical waves, and thus, optical waves are a common feature of substorm onset. Eastward propagating wave events are more frequent than westward propagating wave events and tend to occur during lower-latitude substorms (stronger solar wind driving). The wave propagation directions are organized by orientation of initial brightening arcs. We also identified notable differences in wave propagation speed, wavelength (wave number), period, and duration between westward and eastward propagating waves. In contrast, the wave growth rate does not depend on the propagation direction or substorm strength but is inversely proportional to the wave duration. This suggests that the waves evolve to poleward expansion at a certain intensity threshold and that the wave properties do not directly relate to substorm strengths. However, waves are still important for mediating the transition between the substorm growth phase and poleward expansion. The relation to arc orientation can be explained by magnetotail structures in the RCM-E, indicating that substorm onset location relative to the pressure peak determines the wave propagation direction. The measured wave properties agree well with kinetic ballooning interchange instability, while cross-field current instability and electromagnetic ion cyclotron instability give much larger propagation speed and smaller wave period.

  20. Small substorms: Solar wind input and magnetotail dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrukovich, A. A.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Mukai, T.; Troshichev, O. A.

    We investigated properties of 43 small magnetospheric substorms. Their general signatures were found to be consistent with the so-called contracted oval or northern Bz substorms. Small but clear pressure changes in the tail corresponding to growth and expansion phases detected in about a half of cases testify that these substorms follow the same loading-unloading scheme as the larger ones. However, rate of the solar wind energy accumulation in the magnetosphere was low due to azimuthal IMF orientation with dominating IMFBy and small fluctuating IMFBz. Plasma sheet signatures could be very strong and likely were localized in their cross-tail size. Negative bays in auroral X magnetograms were of order of 100-300 nT, with maxima at Bear Island station (71° geomagnetic latitude) and in few cases were delayed after magnetotail onsets by tens of minutes. Small substorms probably differ from their larger counterparts in a way that coherency of the magnetotail reconfiguration in the inner and middle-tail regions and across the tail is lost in smaller substorms.

  1. Empirical evidence for two nightside current wedges during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from a comprehensive statistical study of the ionospheric current system and its coupling to the magnetosphere during classical bulge type substorms. We identified 116 substorms and determined the global ionospheric current system before and during the substorm using the SuperMAG initiative and global auroral images obtained by the Polar VIS Earth camera. The westward electrojet (WEJ) display a distinct latitudinal shift between the pre- and post-midnight region and we find evidence that the two WEJ regions are disconnected. This, and other observational facts, led us to propose a new 3D current system configuration that consists of 2 wedge type systems: a current wedge in the pre-midnight region (substorm current wedge), and another current wedge system in the post-midnight region (oval current wedge). There is some local time overlap between the two systems. The former maps to the region inside the near Earth neutral line and is associated with structured BPS type electron precipitation. The latter maps to the inner magnetosphere and is associated with diffuse electron precipitation. We present results of the statistical study, show typical events, results from Biot-Savart simulations, and discuss the implications for our understanding of the 3D current system associated with substorms.

  2. What effect do substorms have on the content of the radiation belts?

    PubMed Central

    Rae, I. J.; Murphy, K. R.; Freeman, M. P.; Huang, C.‐L.; Spence, H. E.; Boyd, A. J.; Coxon, J. C.; Jackman, C. M.; Kalmoni, N. M. E.; Watt, C. E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Substorms are fundamental and dynamic processes in the magnetosphere, converting captured solar wind magnetic energy into plasma energy. These substorms have been suggested to be a key driver of energetic electron enhancements in the outer radiation belts. Substorms inject a keV “seed” population into the inner magnetosphere which is subsequently energized through wave‐particle interactions up to relativistic energies; however, the extent to which substorms enhance the radiation belts, either directly or indirectly, has never before been quantified. In this study, we examine increases and decreases in the total radiation belt electron content (TRBEC) following substorms and geomagnetically quiet intervals. Our results show that the radiation belts are inherently lossy, shown by a negative median change in TRBEC at all intervals following substorms and quiet intervals. However, there are up to 3 times as many increases in TRBEC following substorm intervals. There is a lag of 1–3 days between the substorm or quiet intervals and their greatest effect on radiation belt content, shown in the difference between the occurrence of increases and losses in TRBEC following substorms and quiet intervals, the mean change in TRBEC following substorms or quiet intervals, and the cross correlation between SuperMAG AL (SML) and TRBEC. However, there is a statistically significant effect on the occurrence of increases and decreases in TRBEC up to a lag of 6 days. Increases in radiation belt content show a significant correlation with SML and SYM‐H, but decreases in the radiation belt show no apparent link with magnetospheric activity levels. PMID:27656336

  3. What effect do substorms have on the content of the radiation belts?

    PubMed

    Forsyth, C; Rae, I J; Murphy, K R; Freeman, M P; Huang, C-L; Spence, H E; Boyd, A J; Coxon, J C; Jackman, C M; Kalmoni, N M E; Watt, C E J

    2016-07-01

    Substorms are fundamental and dynamic processes in the magnetosphere, converting captured solar wind magnetic energy into plasma energy. These substorms have been suggested to be a key driver of energetic electron enhancements in the outer radiation belts. Substorms inject a keV "seed" population into the inner magnetosphere which is subsequently energized through wave-particle interactions up to relativistic energies; however, the extent to which substorms enhance the radiation belts, either directly or indirectly, has never before been quantified. In this study, we examine increases and decreases in the total radiation belt electron content (TRBEC) following substorms and geomagnetically quiet intervals. Our results show that the radiation belts are inherently lossy, shown by a negative median change in TRBEC at all intervals following substorms and quiet intervals. However, there are up to 3 times as many increases in TRBEC following substorm intervals. There is a lag of 1-3 days between the substorm or quiet intervals and their greatest effect on radiation belt content, shown in the difference between the occurrence of increases and losses in TRBEC following substorms and quiet intervals, the mean change in TRBEC following substorms or quiet intervals, and the cross correlation between SuperMAG AL (SML) and TRBEC. However, there is a statistically significant effect on the occurrence of increases and decreases in TRBEC up to a lag of 6 days. Increases in radiation belt content show a significant correlation with SML and SYM-H, but decreases in the radiation belt show no apparent link with magnetospheric activity levels.

  4. Interball substorm observations: Christmas for space scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandahl, Ingrid; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Budnik, Elena Yu.; Dubinin, Edouard M.; Eklund, Ulrik; Hughes, Terence J.; Kokubun, Susumu; Koskinen, Hannu; Kudela, Karel; Lepping, Ronald P.; Lin, Robert P.; Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Lutsenko, Volt; Mostroem, Arne; Nozdrachev, Michail; Pissarenko, Novomir, F.; Prokhorenko, Victoria; Sauvaud, Jean-Andre; Yermolaev, Yuri I.; Zakharov, Alexander V.

    1996-01-01

    Observational results from the Interball Tail Probe spacecraft are presented. One of the main objectives of the Interball project is to study the dynamic processes in the magnetosphere. Three events observed by the spacecraft's instruments are investigated: a pseudobreakup during which earthward streaming ions were observed in the vicinity of a thin current sheet; a substorm in which the magnetic signatures in the lobe and on the ground were preceeded by northward re-orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component; and a magnetic storm at the beginning of which extreme deformation of the magnetotail was observed.

  5. Decay of the Dst field of geomagnetic disturbance after substorm onset and its implication to storm-substorm relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyemori, T.; Rao, D. R. K.

    1996-06-01

    In order to investigate the causal relationship between magnetic storms and substorms, variations of the mid-latitude geomagnetic indices, ASY (asymmetric part) and SYM (symmetric part), at substorm onsets are examined. Substorm onsets are defined by three different phenomena; (1) a rapid increase in the mid-latitude asymmetric-disturbance indices, ASY-D and ASY-H, with a shape of so-called `mid-latitude positive bay\\'; (2) a sharp decrease in the AL index; (3) an onset of Pi2 geomagnetic pulsation. The positive bays are selected using eye inspection and a pattern-matching technique. The 1-min-resolution SYM-H index, which is essentially the same as the hourly Dst index except in terms of the time resolution, does not show any statistically significant development after the onset of substorms; it tends to decay after the onset rather than to develop. It is suggested by a simple model calculation that the decay of the magnetospheric tail current after substorm onset is responsible for the decay of the Dst field. The relation between the IMF southward turning and the development of the Dst field is re-examined. The results support the idea that the geomagnetic storms and substorms are independent processes; that is, the ring-current development is not the result of the frequent occurrence of substorms, but that of enhanced convection caused by the large southward IMF. A substorm is the process of energy dissipation in the magnetosphere, and its contribution to the storm-time ring-current formation seems to be negligible. The decay of the Dst field after a substorm onset is explained by a magnetospheric energy theorem. Acknowledgements. This study is supported in part by the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports, and Culture in Japan, under a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Category B). Topical Editor D. Alcaydé thanks M. Lockwood and N. J. Fox for their help in evaluating this paper.-> Correspondence to: Y. Kamide->

  6. The aurora and the magnetosphere - The Chapman Memorial Lecture. [dynamo theory development, 1600-present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    1974-01-01

    Review of recent progress in magnetospheric physics, in particular, in understanding the magnetospheric substorm. It is shown that a number of magnetospheric phenomena can now be understood by viewing the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction as an MHD dynamo; auroral phenomena are powered by the dynamo. Also, magnetospheric responses to variations of the north-south and east-west components of the interplanetary magnetic field have been identified. The magnetospheric substorm is entirely different from the responses of the magnetosphere to the southward component of the interplanetary magnetic field. It may be associated with the formation of a neutral line within the plasma sheet and with an enhanced reconnection along the line. A number of substorm-associated phenomena can be understood by noting that the new neutral line formation is caused by a short-circuiting of a part of the magnetotail current.

  7. Auroral Acceleration, Solar Wind Driving, and Substorm Triggering (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, P. T.; Liou, K.

    2010-12-01

    We use a data base of 4861 substorms identified by global UV images to investigate the substorm cycle dependence of various types of aurora, and to obtain new results on substorm triggering by external driving. Although all types of aurora increase at substorm onset, broadband (Alfvénic) aurora shows a particular association with substorms, and, especially, substorm onset. While diffuse electron and monoenergetic auroral precipitating power rises by 79% and 90% respectively following an onset, broadband aurora rises by 182%. In the first 10-15 minutes following onset, the power associated with Alfvénic acceleration is comparable to monoenergetic acceleration (also called “inverted-V” events). In general, this is not the case prior to onset, or indeed, during recovery. The rise time of the electron diffuse aurora following onset is much slower, about 50 minutes, and thus presumably extends into recovery. We also re-investigate the issue of solar wind triggering of substorms by considering not just changes in the solar wind prior to onset, but how the pattern of changes differs from random and comparable epochs. We verify that a preonset reduction of solar wind driving (“northward turning” in the simplest case of IMF Bz) holds for the superposed epoch mean of the ensemble. Moreover, this reduction is not the result of a small number of substorms with large changes. The reduction starts about 20 min prior to substorm onset, which, although a longer delay than previously suggested, is appropriate given the various propagation time delays involved. Next, we compare the IMF to random solar wind conditions. Not surprisingly, solar wind driving prior to onset averages somewhat higher than random. Although about a quarter of substorms occur for steady northward IMF conditions, more general coupling functions such as the Kan-Lee electric field, the Borovosky function, or our dΦMP/dt, show very few substorms occur following weak dayside merging. We assembled a data

  8. Magnetotail energy dissipation during an auroral substorm.

    PubMed

    Panov, E V; Baumjohann, W; Wolf, R A; Nakamura, R; Angelopoulos, V; Weygand, J M; Kubyshkina, M V

    2016-12-01

    Violent releases of space plasma energy from the Earth's magnetotail during substorms produce strong electric currents and bright aurora. But what modulates these currents and aurora and controls dissipation of the energy released in the ionosphere? Using data from the THEMIS fleet of satellites and ground-based imagers and magnetometers, we show that plasma energy dissipation is controlled by field-aligned currents (FACs) produced and modulated during magnetotail topology change and oscillatory braking of fast plasma jets at 10-14 Earth radii in the nightside magnetosphere. FACs appear in regions where plasma sheet pressure and flux tube volume gradients are non-collinear. Faster tailward expansion of magnetotail dipolarization and subsequent slower inner plasma sheet restretching during substorm expansion and recovery phases cause faster poleward then slower equatorward movement of the substorm aurora. Anharmonic radial plasma oscillations build up displaced current filaments and are responsible for discrete longitudinal auroral arcs that move equatorward at a velocity of about 1km/s. This observed auroral activity appears sufficient to dissipate the released energy.

  9. Magnetotail energy dissipation during an auroral substorm

    PubMed Central

    Panov, E.V.; Baumjohann, W.; Wolf, R.A.; Nakamura, R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Weygand, J. M.; Kubyshkina, M.V.

    2016-01-01

    Violent releases of space plasma energy from the Earth’s magnetotail during substorms produce strong electric currents and bright aurora. But what modulates these currents and aurora and controls dissipation of the energy released in the ionosphere? Using data from the THEMIS fleet of satellites and ground-based imagers and magnetometers, we show that plasma energy dissipation is controlled by field-aligned currents (FACs) produced and modulated during magnetotail topology change and oscillatory braking of fast plasma jets at 10-14 Earth radii in the nightside magnetosphere. FACs appear in regions where plasma sheet pressure and flux tube volume gradients are non-collinear. Faster tailward expansion of magnetotail dipolarization and subsequent slower inner plasma sheet restretching during substorm expansion and recovery phases cause faster poleward then slower equatorward movement of the substorm aurora. Anharmonic radial plasma oscillations build up displaced current filaments and are responsible for discrete longitudinal auroral arcs that move equatorward at a velocity of about 1km/s. This observed auroral activity appears sufficient to dissipate the released energy. PMID:27917231

  10. Magnetotail energy dissipation during an auroral substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, E. V.; Baumjohann, W.; Wolf, R. A.; Nakamura, R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Weygand, J. M.; Kubyshkina, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    Violent releases of space plasma energy from the Earth's magnetotail during substorms produce strong electric currents and bright aurora. But what modulates these currents and aurora and controls dissipation of the energy released in the ionosphere? Using data from the THEMIS fleet of satellites and ground-based imagers and magnetometers, we show that plasma energy dissipation is controlled by field-aligned currents (FACs) produced and modulated during magnetotail topology change and oscillatory braking of fast plasma jets at 10-14 Earth radii in the nightside magnetosphere. FACs appear in regions where plasma sheet pressure and flux tube volume gradients are non-collinear. Faster tailward expansion of magnetotail dipolarization and subsequent slower inner plasma sheet restretching during substorm expansion and recovery phases cause faster poleward then slower equatorward movement of the substorm aurora. Anharmonic radial plasma oscillations build up displaced current filaments and are responsible for discrete longitudinal auroral arcs that move equatorward at a velocity of about 1 km s-1. This observed auroral activity appears sufficient to dissipate the released energy.

  11. Investigation of isolated substorms: Generation conditions and characteristics of different phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobjev, V. G.; Yagodkina, O. I.; Zverev, V. L.

    2016-11-01

    Characteristics of isolated substorms selected by variations in the 1-min values of the AL index are analyzed. The substorms were divided into several types with respect to the behavior of the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) during the expansion phase. The probability of observations of substorms associated with the northward turn of the Bz component of IMF was 19%, while the substorms taking place at Bz < 0 were observed in 53% of cases. A substantial number of events in which no substorm magnetic activity was observed in the auroral zone after a long (>30 min) period of the southward IMF and a following sharp turn of the Bz component of IMF before the north was detected. The data suggest that a northward IMF turn is neither a necessary nor sufficient condition for generating substorms. It has been shown for substorms of the both types that the average duration of the southward IMF to moment T 0 and the average intensity of the magnetic perturbation in the maximum are approximately the same and amount to 80 min and-650 nT, respectively. However, for substorms at Bz < 0, their mean duration, including the expansive and recovery phases, is on average 30 min longer than that at a northward turn of IMF. Correlations between the loading-unloading processes in the magnetosphere in the periods of magnetospheric substorms were investigated with different functions that determine the efficiency of the energy transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere. It has been shown that the highest correlation coefficient ( r = 0.84) is observed when the function suggested by Newell et al. (2007) is used. It has been detected that a simple function VB S yields a high correlation coefficient ( r = 0.75).

  12. Magnetotail energy storage and release during the CDAW 6 substorm analysis intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Fritz, T. A.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Fairfield, D. H.; Kamide, Y.; Baumjohann, W.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) grew out of the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) program. According to this concept, data are to be pooled from a wide variety of spacecraft and ground-based sources for limited time intervals. These data are to provide the basis for the performance of very detailed correlative analyses, usually with fairly limited physical problems in mind. However, in the case of the CDAW 6 truly global goals are involved. The primary goal is to trace the flow of energy from the solar wind through the magnetosphere to its ultimate dissipation by substorm processes. The present investigation has the specific goal to examine the evidence for the storage of solar wind energy in the magnetotail prior to substorm expansion phase onsets. Of particular interest is the determination, in individual substorm cases, of the time delays between the loading of energy into the magnetospheric system and the subsequent unloading of this energy.

  13. Configuration and Generation of Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiangning

    The substorm current wedge (SCW), a core element of substorm dynamics coupling the magnetotail to the ionosphere, is crucial in understanding substorms. It has been suggested that the field-aligned currents (FACs) in the SCW are caused by either pressure gradients or flow vortices, or both. Our understanding of FAC generations is based predominately on numerical simulations, because it has not been possible to organize spacecraft observations in a coordinate system determined by the SCW. This dissertation develops an empirical inversion model of the current wedge and inverts midlatitude magnetometer data to obtain the parameters of the current wedge for three solar cycles. This database enables statistical data analysis of spacecraft plasma and magnetic field observations relative to the SCW coordinate. In chapter 2, a new midlatitude positive bay (MPB) index is developed and calculated for three solar cycles of data. The MPB index is processed to determine the substorm onset time, which is shown to correspond to the auroral breakup onset with at most 1-2 minutes difference. Substorm occurrence rate is found to depend on solar wind speed while substorm duration is rather constant, suggesting that substorm process has an intrinsic pattern independent of external driving. In chapter 3, an SCW inversion technique is developed to determine the strength and locations of the FACs in an SCW. The inversion parameters for FAC strength and location, and ring current strength are validated by comparison with other measurements. In chapter 4, the connection between earthward flows and auroral poleward expansion is examined using improved mapping, obtained from a newly-developed dynamic magnetospheric model by superimposing a standard magnetospheric field model with substorm current wedge obtained from the inversion technique. It is shown that the ionospheric projection of flows observed at a fixed point in the equatorial plane map to the bright aurora as it expands poleward

  14. Statistical comparison of inter-substorm timings in global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haiducek, J. D.; Welling, D. T.; Morley, S.; Ozturk, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetospheric substorms are events in which energy stored in the magnetotail is released into the auroral zone and into the downstream solar wind. Because of the complex, nonlinear, and possibly chaotic nature of the substorm energy release mechanism, it may be extremely difficult to forecast individual substorms in the near term. However, the inter-substorm timing (the amount of time elapsed between substorms) can be reproduced in a statistical sense, as was demonstrated by Freeman and Morley (2004) using their Minimal Substorm Model (MSM), a simple solar-wind driven model with the only free parameter being a recurrence time. The goal of the present work is to reproduce the observed distribution of inter-substorm timings with a global MHD model. The period of 1-31 January 2005 was simulated using the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), driven by solar wind observations. Substorms were identified in the model output by synthesizing surface magnetometer data and by looking for tailward-moving plasmoids. Substorms identified in the MHD model are then compared with observational data from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) geostationary satellite energetic particle data, and surface magnetometer data. For each dataset (MHD model and observations), we calculate the substorm occurrence rate, and for the MHD model we additionally calculate the timing error of the substorm onsets relative to the observed substorms. Finally, we calculate distribution functions for the inter-substorm timings in both the observations and the model. The results of this analysis will guide improvements to the MHD-based substorm model, including the use of Hall MHD and embedded particle in cell (EPIC), leading to a better reproduction of the observed inter-substorm timings and an improved understanding of the underlying physical processes. ReferencesM. P. Freeman and S. K. Morley. A minimal substorm model that

  15. Phenomenological and Theoretical Studies on Magnetic Indicators of Substorm Activity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-21

    docummeni-we report results of studies made on substorm de- tection, behavior, and irelationship to magnetospheric processes . A scheme is developed whereby...regard. Field aligned currents drive ionospheric current systems on a global scale. A model is developed to describe this process for quiet and disturbed...currents and ionospheric closure currents., This process is discussed and estimates are developed for the relative ’c6ntributions of Pederson and

  16. A statistical relationship between the geosynchronous magnetic field and substorm electrojet magnitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Ramon E.; Von Rosenvinge, Tycho

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between the geosynchronous magnetic field variations during substorms measured by GOES 5 and the auroral electroject as measured by AE and Poste de la Baleine is examined. It is found that the more taillike the field prior to the local onset, the greater the dipolarization of the field during the substorm. The greater the deviation of the field from a dipolar configuration, the larger the change in AE during the event. It is inferred that stronger cross-tail currents prior to the substorm are associated with larger substorm-associated westward electrojets and thus more intense substorms. Since the westward electroject is the ionospheric leg of the substorm current wedge, it is inferred that the substorm-associated westward electrojet is drawn from the near-earth region. Most of the current diversion is found to occur in the near-earth magnetotail.

  17. Dynamics of Mars' magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, C.F.; Coroniti, F.V. ); Zelenyi, L.M. ); Moses, S.L.

    1989-08-01

    If Mars has a small intrinsic magnetic moment, Mars' magnetosphere could vary on time scales of a few minutes due to reconnection with the solar wind magnetic field. The day-side magnetopause will be one or two reflected-ion Larmor radii from the bow shock. Substorms will have scale-times of about six minutes. Mars' high ionospheric conductance will virtually stop polar cap convection, and create a magnetic topological crisis unless convecting magnetic flux finds a dissipative way to return to the day-side. The strong magnetic hear induced by magnetospheric convection above the ionosphere could be tearing unstable. The magnetic field might diffusively percolate through the tearing layer. This shearing also draws field aligned currents from the ionosphere which could inject few KeV heavy ionospheric ions into the magnetotail.

  18. Growth-phase thinning of the near-Earth current sheet during the CDAW 6 substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanny, Jeff; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.; Baker, D. N.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Nishida, A.

    1994-01-01

    The thinning of the near-Earth current sheet during the growth phase of the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) 6 magnetospheric substorm is studied. The expansion onset of the substorm occurred at 1054 UT, March 22, 1979. During the growth phase, two spacecraft, International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) 1 and ISEE 2, were within the current sheet approximately 13 R(sub E) from the Earth and obtained simultaneous high-resolution magnetic data at two points in the current sheet. Plasma data were also provided by the ISEE spacecraft and solar wind data by IMP 8. To facilitate the analysis, the GSM magnetic field data are transformed to a 'neutral sheet coordinate system' in which the new x axis is parallel to the average magnetic field above and below the neutral sheet and the new y axis lies in the GSM equatorial plane. A model based on the assumption that the current sheet is a time-invariant structure fails to predict neutral sheet crossing times. Consequently, the Harris sheet model, which allows one to remove the restriction of time invariancy, is used instead. It is found that during the growth phase, a model parameter corresponding to the thickness of the current sheet decreased exponentially from about 5 R(sub E) to 1 R(sub E) with a time constant of about 14 min. In addition, the ISEE 1 and ISEE 2 neutral sheet crossings after expansion onset indicate that the neutral sheet was moving upward at 7 km/s relative to the spacecraft. Since both crossings occurred in approximately 80 s, the current sheet thickness is estimated to be about 500 km. These results demonstrate that the near-Earth current sheet undergoes dramatic thinning during the substorm growth phase and expansion onset.

  19. Magnetospheric particle injection and the upstream ion event of September 5, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Krimigis, S.M.; Sibeck, D.G.; McEntire, R.W.

    1986-12-01

    Energetic particle data from the AMPTE Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft in the outer dayside magnetosphere are examined during the period of an upstream ion event observed by AMPTE Ion Release Module (IRM) spacecraft on September 5, 1984 (Moebius et al., this issue). The CCE data reveal the following: (a) an ion enhancement was observed at --0040 UT in near coincidence with a substorm onset at --0035 UT, approximately 15 minutes prior to the onset of the event upstream of the shock; (b) ions of both solar wind (He/sup + +/, Fe-group) and ionospheric (O/sup +/) origin over a broad energy range (--20 keV to >1350 keV) were injected at substorm onset; (c) the time evolution of the H/sup +/, He/sup + +/, and O/sup +/ pitch angle distributions markedly differed, with O/sup +/ exhibiting mostly enhancements at off-90/sup 0/ angles for the first hour after injection; (d) an enhancement in the Fe-group ions inside the magnetosphere at L--6.4 occurred simultaneously with the appearance of an O/sup +/ burst upstream of the shock. The CCE observations, taken together with the simultaneously observed IRM ion event, suggest that a plausible explanation for the appearence of upstream ions is leakage from the magnetosphere into the upstream region, rather than the alternate explanation which requires in-situ acceleration of solar wind ions via the Fermi mechanism.

  20. Magnetospheric particle injection and the upstream ion event of September 5, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Mcentire, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Energetic particle data from the AMPTE Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft in the outer dayside magnetosphere are examined during the period of an upstream ion event observed by the AMPTE Ion Release Module (IRM) spacecraft on September 5, 1984. The CCE data reveal the following: (1) an ion enhancement was observed at about 0040 UT in near coincidence with a substorm onset at about 0035 UT, approximately 15 minutes prior to the onset of the event upstream of the shock; (b) ions of both solar-wind - H(2+) Fe-group - and ionospheric O(+) - origin over a broad energy range (about 20 keV to greater than 1350 keV) were injected at substorm onset; (3) the time evolution of the H(+), He(2+), and O(+) pitch angle distributions markedly differed, with O(+) exhibiting mostly enhancements at off-90-deg angles for the first hour after injection; (4) an enhancement in the Fe-group ions inside the magnetosphere at L = about 6.4 occurred simultaneously with the appearance of an O(+) burst upstream of the shock. The CCE observations, taken together with the simultaneously observed IRM ion event, suggest that a plausible explanation for the appearance of upstream ions is leakage from the magnetosphere into the upstream region, rather than the alternative explanation which requires in situ acceleration of solar wind ions via the Fermi Mechanims.

  1. Global Remote Sensing of Precipitating Electron Energies: A Comparison of Substorms and Pressure Pulse Related Intensifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chua, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    The Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) observes aurora responses to incident solar wind pressure pulses and interplanetary shocks such its those associated with coronal mass ejections. Previous observations have demonstrated that the arrival of it pressure pulse at the front of the magnetosphere results in highly disturbed geomagnetic conditions and a substantial increase in both dayside and nightside aurora precipitations. Our observations show it simultaneous brightening over bread areas of the dayside and nightside auroral in response to a pressure pulse, indicating that more magnetospheric regions participate as sources for auroral precipitation than during isolate substorm. We estimate the characteristic energies of incident auroral electrons using Polar UVI images and compare the precipitation energies during pressure pulse associated event to those during isolated substorms. We estimate the characteristic energies of incident auroral electrons using Polar UVI images and compare the precipitation energies during pressure pulse associated events to those during isolated auroral substorms. Electron precipitation during substorms has characteristic energies greater than 10 KeV and is structured both in local time and in magnetic latitude. For auroral intensifications following the arrival of'a pressure pulse or interplanetary shock. Electron precipitation is less spatially structured and has greater flux of lower characteristic energy electrons (Echar less than 7 KeV) than during isolated substorm onsets. These observations quantify the differences between global and local auroral precipitation processes and will provide a valuable experimental check for models of sudden storm commencements and magnetospheric response to perturbations in the solar wind.

  2. Reconnection in substorms and solar flares: analogies and differences

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is the crucial process in the release of magnetic energy associated with magnetospheric substorms and with solar flares. On the basis of three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations we investigate similarities and differences between the two scenarios. We address in particular mechanisms that lead to the onset of reconnection and on energy release, transport, and conversion mechanisms. Analogous processes might exist in the motion of field line footpoints on the sun and in magnetic flux addition to the magnetotail. In both cases such processes might lead to a loss of neighboring equilibrium, characterized by the formation of very thin embedded current sheet, which acts as trigger for reconnection. We find that Joule (or ohmic) dissipation plays only a minor role in the overall energy transfer associated with reconnection. The dominant transfer of released magnetic energy occurs to electromagnetic energy (Poynting) flux and to thermal energy transport as enthalpy flux. The former dominates in low-beta, specifically initially force-free current sheets expected for the solar corona, while the latter dominates in high-beta current sheets, such as the magnetotail. In both cases the outflow from the reconnection site becomes bursty, i.e. spatially and temporally localized, yet carrying most of the outflow energy. Hence an analogy might exist between bursty bulk flows (BBFs) in the magnetotail and pulses of Poynting flux in solar flares.

  3. Diurnal double maxima patterns in the F region ionosphere: Substorm-related aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Pi, X.; Mendillo, M.; Fox, M.W.; Anderson, D.N.

    1993-08-01

    Daytime double maxima (twin peaks or bite-outs) in the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) at middle and lower latitudes are found to be related to substorm signatures shown in both auroral electrojet and ring current variations. Case studies reveal that during substorm onset and recovery phases, the penetration of magnetospheric convection electric fields and their subsequent {open_quotes}overshielding{close_quotes} effects may be the major dynamical sources of these events. A theoretical low-latitude ionospheric model is used to simulate the dynamical effects of electric field disturbances on F region electron density and TEC. It is demonstrated that the diurnal double maxima in TEC can be created by a combined effect of E x B drift and altitude-dependent F region chemical loss. The required zonal electric fields are found to have greater penetration efficiency in the early evening sector and their latitudinal requirements appear to change with local time. The time scales for the modeled penetration and overshielding effects are 2-3 hours. Modeling results also show that considerable structuring in the local time variation of the ionospheric {open_quotes}equatorial anomaly{close_quotes} can occur due to the interplay of convection electric field penetration and overshielding effects. The possible cause of the midday bite-out ionospheric disturbances by the meridional winds associated with traveling atmospheric disturbances (TADs) is also addressed in modeling studies, but the specialized nature of the required TADs makes this a less well understood substorm-related mechanism. 64 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Substorm occurrence during quiet solar wind driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Partamies, N.; Kilpua, E. K. J.

    2014-04-01

    We examine the OMNI database and International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects (IMAGE) magnetometer chain records to study the substorm occurrence and characteristics during quiet solar driving periods, especially during the solar minimum period in 2009. We define substorm-like activations as periods where the hourly average AL is below -200 nT. Using the OMNI data set, we demonstrate that there are limiting solar wind speed, interplanetary magnetic field magnitude, and driving electric field values below which substorm-like activations (AL < 200 nT, intensification and decay of the electrojet) do not occur. These minimum parameter values are V < 266 km/s, B < 1.4 nT, and E < 0.025 mV/m such low values are observed less than 1% of the time. We also show that for the same level of driving solar wind electric field, the electrojet intensity is smaller (by few tens of nT), and the electrojet resides farther poleward (by over 1°) during extended quiet solar driving in 2009 than during average solar activity conditions. During the solar minimum period in 2009, we demonstrate that substorm-like activations can be identified from the IMAGE magnetometer chain observations during periods when the hourly average IL index is below -100 nT. When the hourly IL activity is smaller than that, which covers 87% of the nighttime observations, the electrojet does not show coherent behavior. We thus conclude that substorm recurrence time during very quiet solar wind driving conditions is about 5-8 h, which is almost double that of the average solar activity conditions.

  5. Solar Wind Drivers for Steady Magnetospheric Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherron, Robert L.; O'Brien, T. Paul; Thompson, Scott; Lui, A. T. Y. (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    Steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) also known as convection bays, is a particular mode of response of the magnetosphere to solar wind coupling. It is characterized by convection lasting for times longer than a typical substorm recovery during which no substorms expansions can be identified. It is generally believed that the solar wind must be unusually steady for the magnetosphere to enter this state. However, most previous studies have assumed this is true and have used such conditions to identify events. In a preliminary investigation using only the AE and AL indices to select events we have shown that these expectations are generally correct. SMC events seem to be associated with slow speed solar wind and moderate, stable IMF Bz. In this report we extend our previous study including additional parameters and the time variations in various statistical quantities. For the intervals identified as SMCs we perform a detailed statistical analysis of the properties of different solar wind variables. We compare these statistics to those determined from all data, and from intervals in which substorms but not SMCs are present. We also consider the question of whether substorms are required to initiate and terminate an SMC. We conclude that the intervals we have identified as SMC are likely to be examples of the original Dungey concept of balanced reconnection at a pair of x-lines on the day and night side of the Earth.

  6. Observing the magnetosphere through auroral imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mende, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    Although the terrestrial aurora is often regarded as 2 dimensional projection of the 3 dimensional magnetosphere there are fundamental limitations in observing magnetospheric processes through their auroral footprints. It has been shown that most electron auroras are produced in the auroral acceleration region at lower altitudes (<2Re) in the last steps of processing the auroral particles. From FAST, IMAGE , Cluster and THEMIS data we can distinguish between four fundamentally different types of auroral acceleration regions. A primary task is to distinguish (1) the upward current, (2) downward current, (3) diffuse aurora and (4) Alfven wave accelerated types of auroral acceleration regions. Type (1) contains the "inverted V" type electron precipitation distinguishable by several keV mono-energetic electron spectra, and low number flux consistent with the source population in the plasma sheet. Our understanding of how these auroras relate to magnetospheric processes is still vague, probably associated with convection sheer. Alfven wave electron auroras (4) are of low average energy (<2 keV) high electron flux consistent with ionospheric electron source predominantly occurring during substorms, and they are generated by wave energy carried from the magnetosphere into the ionosphere, where it is converted into electron energy. These are most promising candidates for observing the footprints of source regions associated with reconnection sites or magnetospheric dB/dt events. Optical measuring techniques of electron energy use the atmosphere as a spectrometer, obtaining the penetration altitude as a proxy for energy, that can be obtained from atmospheric composition, quenching lifetime of the emitters, UV absorption pass-length of O2 to the source or the local atmospheric temperature. Precipitating protons are usually an order of magnitude more energetic and less affected by fields in the low altitude auroral acceleration region. Energetic proton precipitation is a more

  7. Estimates of magnetic flux, and energy balance in the plasma sheet during substorm expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Pulkkinen, Tuija

    1996-01-01

    The energy and magnetic flux budgets of the magnetotail plasma sheet during substorm expansion are investigated. The possible mechanisms that change the energy content of the closed field line region which contains all the major dissipation mechanisms of relevance during substorms, are considered. The compression of the plasma sheet mechanism and the diffusion mechanism are considered and excluded. It is concluded that the magnetic reconnection mechanism can accomplish the required transport. Data-based empirical magnetic field models are used to investigate the magnetic flux transport required to account for the observed magnetic field dipolarizations in the inner magnetosphere. It is found that the magnetic flux permeating the current sheet is typically insufficient to supply the required magnetic flux. It is concluded that no major substorm-type magnetospheric reconfiguration is possible in the absence of magnetic reconnection.

  8. Magnetospheric electric fields and currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Zanetti, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    The progress made in the years 1983-1986 in understanding the character and operation of magnetospheric electric fields and electric currents is discussed, with emphasis placed on the connection with the interior regions. Special attention is given to determinations of global electric-field configurations, measurements of the response of magnetospheric particle populations to the electric-field configurations, and observations of the magnetospheric currents at high altitude and during northward IMF. Global simulations of current distributions are discussed, and the sources of global electric fields and currents are examined. The topics discussed in the area of impulsive and small-scale phenomena include substorm current systems, impulsive electric fields and associated currents, and field-aligned electrodynamics. A key finding of these studies is that the electric fields and currents are interrelated and cannot be viewed as separate entities.

  9. Electric currents of a substorm current wedge on 24 February 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, Martin; McPherron, Robert L.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Russell, Christopher T.; Chu, Xiangning

    2014-07-01

    The three-dimensional "substorm current wedge" (SCW) was postulated by McPherron et al. (1973) to explain substorm magnetic perturbations. The origin and coherence as a physical system of this important paradigm of modern space physics remained unclear, however, with progress hindered by gross undersampling, and uniqueness problems in data inversion. Complementing AMPERE (Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment) space-derived radial electric currents with ground magnetic data allowing us to determine currents from the ionosphere up, we overcome problems of uniqueness identified by Fukushima (1969, 1994). For a substorm on 24 February 2010, we quantify SCW development consistently from ground and space data. Its westward electrojet carries 0.5 MA in the more poleward part of the auroral oval, in Region 1 (R1) sense spanning midnight. The evening sector electrojet also feeds into its upward current. We thus validate the SCW concept and obtain parameters needed for quantitative study of substorms.

  10. Studies of Westward Electrojets and Field-Aligned Currents in the Magnetotail during Substorms: Implications for Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Our studies elucidated the relationship between the auroral arcs and magnetotail phenomena. One paper examined particle energization in the source region of the field-aligned currents that intensify at substorm onset when the arc brightens to form the westward electrojet. A second paper examined the relationship between the precipitating particles in the arcs, the location of the westward electrojet, and magnetospheric source regions. Two earlier papers also investigated the roles that field aligned currents and particle acceleration have during substorms.

  11. CDAW 7 revisited - Further evidence for the creation of a near-earth substorm neutral line. [Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kettmann, G.; Fritz, T. A.; Hones, E. W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Eastman et al. (1988) have interpreted the CDAW 7 substorm of April 24, 1979, previously taken as unambiguously supporting the near-earth neutral line model of magnetospheric substorms, in terms of spatial movements of a preexisting plasma-sheet boundary layer (PSBL) and its associated current sheets across the observing ISEE 1 and 2 spacercraft. It is presently noted that, by contrast, a reinvestigation of ISEE 1 and 2 energetic particle measurements around substorm onset on short time-scales shows the observed flux pattern to require the formation of a particle source eastward of the ISEE spacecraft, well within the plasma sheet, associated with the substorm onset. Strong flows were absent prior to substorm onset, indicating the temporal nature of the event, as opposed to an encounter with a preexisting PSBL containing large flows.

  12. A nonlinear dynamic analogue model of substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimas, A. J.; Baker, D. N.; Roberts, D. A.; Fairfield, D. H.; Büchner, J.

    Linear prediction filter studies have shown that the magnetospheric response to energy transfer from the solar wind contains both directly driven and unloading components. These studies have also shown that the magnetospheric response is significantly nonlinear and, thus, the linear prediction filtering technique and other correlative techniques which assume a linear magnetospheric response cannot give a complete deacription of that response. Here, the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction is discussed within the framework of deterministic nonlinear dynamics. An earlier dripping faucet mechanical analogue to the magnetosphere is first reviewed and then the plasma physical counterpart to the mechanical model is constructed. A Faraday loop in the magnetotail is considered and the relationship of electric potentials on the loop to changes in the magnetic flux threading the loop is developed. This approach leads to a model of geomagnetic activity which is similar to the earlier mechanical model but described in terms of the geometry and plasma contents of the magnetotail. This Faraday loop response model contains analogues to both the directly driven and the storage-release magnetospheric responses and it includes, in a fundamental way, the inherent nonlinearity of the solar wind-magnetosphere system. It can be chancterized as a nonlinear, damped harmonic oscillator that is driven by the loading-unloading substorm cycle. The model is able to explain many of the features of the linear prediction filter results. In particular, at low geomagnetic activity levels the model exbibits the "regular dripping" response which provides an explanation for the unloading component at 1 hour lag in the linear prediction filters. Further, the model suggests that the disappearance of the unloading component in the linear prediction filters at high geomagnetic activity levels is due to a chaotic transition beyond which the loading-unloading mechanism becomes aperiodic. The model predicts

  13. Electrodynamics of convection in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiro, R. W.; Wolf, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    During the past ten years, substantial progress has been made in the development of quantitative models of convection in the magnetosphere and of the electrodynamic processes that couple that magnetosphere and ionosphere. Using a computational scheme first proposed by Vasyliunas, the convection models under consideration separate the three-dimensional problem of convection in the inner magnetosphere/ionosphere into a pair of two-dimensional problems coupled by Birkeland currents flowing between the two regions. The logic, development, and major results of the inner magnetosphere convection model are reviewed with emphasis on ionospheric and magnetospheric currents. A major theoretical result of the models has been the clarification of the relationship between the region 1/region 2 picture of field-aligned currents and the older partial ring current/tail current interruption picture of substorm dynamics.

  14. In-situ measurement of the substorm onset instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, K. R.; Rae, J.; Watt, C.; Forsyth, C.; Mann, I. R.; Yao, Z.; Kalmoni, N.

    2015-12-01

    The substorm is arguably the major mode of variability in near-Earth Space which unpredictably dissipates a considerable and variable amount of energy into the near-Earth magnetosphere and ionosphere. What process or processes determine when this energy is released is uncertain, although it is evident that both near-Earth plasma instability and magnetotail reconnection play a role in this energy release. Much emphasis has recently been placed on the role of magnetic reconnection in substorms, we focus here on observations of the unmistakeable signs of a plasma instability acting at substorm onset. Using data from the THEMIS spacecraft, we show that electromagnetic waves grow in the magnetotail at the expense of the local electron and ion thermal energy. The wave growth in space is the direct counterpart to the wave growth seen at the substorm onset location at the ionosphere, as measured by the CARISMA and THEMIS magnetometers and THEMIS all-sky-imagers. We present evidence that the free energy source for the instability is associated with the electron and ion thermal energy, and not the local electron or ion flow energy.

  15. Nuclear burst plasma injection into the magnetosphere and resulting spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, A. L.; Cipolla, J. A.; Silevitch, M. B.; Golden, K. I.

    1977-01-01

    The passage of debris from a high altitude ( 400 km) nuclear burst over the ionospheric plasma is found to be capable of exciting large amplitude whistler waves which can act to structure a collisionless shock. This instability will occur in the loss cone exits of the nuclear debris bubble, and the accelerated ambient ions will freestream along the magnetic field lines into the magnetosphere. Using Starfish-like parameters and accounting for plasma diffusion and thermalization of the propagating plasma mass, it is found that synchronous orbit plasma fluxes of high temperature electrons (near 10 keV) will be significantly greater than those encountered during magnetospheric substorms. These fluxes will last for sufficiently long periods of time so as to charge immersed bodies to high potentials and arc discharges to take place.

  16. Multipoint observations of a small substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Anderson, B. J.; Newell, P. T.; Mcentire, R. W.; Luehr, H.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of multipoint observations of a small substorm which occurred at about 0110 UT on April 25, 1985, carried out by AMPTE CCE, AMPTE IRM, DMSP F6, and DMSP F7, as well as by ground auroral stations and midlatitude stations. These data yield information on the latitudinal extent of the polar cap and provide visual identification of substorm aurorae, magnetic perturbations produced directly beneath aurorae, and the situ magnetic field. In addition, they provide magnetic-particle observations of the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet and observations concerning the spatial expansion of the current disruption region. Evidence is presented that the current sheet disruption observed by CCE in the neutral sheet was located on field lines which mapped to the westward traveling surge observed directly overhead of the ground station at Syowa.

  17. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, James A.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Acuña, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Koehn, Patrick L.; Korth, Haje; Livi, Stefano; Mauk, Barry H.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2007-08-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet’s miniature magnetosphere since the brief flybys of Mariner 10. Mercury’s magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is among the smallest in the solar system; its magnetic field typically stands off the solar wind only ˜1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed drift paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts. Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere, allowing solar wind ions to impact directly the regolith. Inductive currents in Mercury’s interior may act to modify the solar wind interaction by resisting changes due to solar wind pressure variations. Indeed, observations of these induction effects may be an important source of information on the state of Mercury’s interior. In addition, Mercury’s magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted beneath the solid surface as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionospheric layer. This lack of an ionosphere is probably the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short-lived, ˜1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 during its first traversal of Mercury’s magnetic tail. Because of Mercury’s proximity to the sun, 0.3-0.5 AU, this magnetosphere experiences the most extreme driving forces in the solar system. All of these factors are expected to produce complicated interactions involving the exchange and recycling of neutrals and ions among the solar wind, magnetosphere, and regolith. The electrodynamics of Mercury’s magnetosphere are expected to be equally complex, with strong forcing by the solar wind, magnetic reconnection, and pick-up of planetary ions all playing roles in the generation of field-aligned electric currents. However, these field

  18. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Koehn, Patrick L.; Korth, Haje; Levi, Stefano; Mauk, Barry H.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet s miniature magnetosphere since the brief flybys of Mariner 10. Mercury s magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is among the smallest in the solar system; its magnetic field typically stands off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed drift paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts. The characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short and kinetic and fluid modes may be coupled. Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to impact directly the regolith. Inductive currents in Mercury s interior may act to modify the solar wind interaction by resisting changes due to solar wind pressure variations. Indeed, observations of these induction effects may be an important source of information on the state of Mercury s interior. In addition, Mercury s magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionospheric layer. This lack of an ionosphere is probably the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short-lived, - 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 during its first traversal of Mercury s magnetic tail. Because of Mercury s proximity to the sun, 0.3 - 0.5 AU, this magnetosphere experiences the most extreme driving forces in the solar system. All of these factors are expected to produce complicated interactions involving the exchange and re-cycling of neutrals and ions between the solar wind, magnetosphere, and regolith. The electrodynamics of Mercury s magnetosphere are expected to be equally complex, with strong forcing by the solar wind, magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause and in the tail, and the pick-up of planetary ions all

  19. Time development of high-altitude auroral acceleration region plasma, potentials, and field-aligned current systems observed by Cluster during a substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, A. J.; Chaston, C. C.; Fillingim, M. O.; Mozer, F.; Frey, H. U.

    2013-12-01

    The auroral acceleration region is an integral link in the chain of events that transpire during substorms, and the currents, plasma and electric fields undergo significant changes driven by complex dynamical processes deep in the magnetotail. These auroral acceleration processes in turn accelerate and heat the plasma that ultimately leads to some of the most intense global substorm auroral displays. The complex interplay between field-aligned current system formation, the development of parallel electric fields, and resultant changes in the plasma constituents that occur during substorms within or just above the auroral acceleration zone remain unclear. We present Cluster multi-point observations within the high-altitude acceleration region (> 3 Re altitude) at key instances during the development of a substorm. Of particular emphasis is on the time-development of the plasma, potentials and currents that occur therein with the aim of ascertaining high-altitude drivers of substorm active auroral acceleration processes and auroral emission consequences. Preliminary results show that the initial onset is dominated by Alfvenic activity as evidenced by the sudden occurrence of relatively intense, short-spatial scale Alfvenic currents and attendant energy dispersed, counterstreaming electrons poleward of the growth-phase arc. The Alfvenic currents are locally planar structures with characteristic thicknesses on the order of a few tens of kilometers. In subsequent passages by the other spacecraft, the plasma sheet region became hotter and thicker via the injection of new hot, dense plasma of magnetospheric origins poleward of the pre-existing growth phase arc. In association with the heating and/or thickening of the plasma sheet, the currents appeared to broaden to larger scales as Alfven dominated activity gave way to either inverted-V dominated or mixed inverted-V and Alfvenic behavior depending on location. The transition from Alfven dominated to inverted-V dominated

  20. Flow Pattern relative to the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetospheric substorms play a key role in the coupling of the solar wind and the magnetosphere. The Substorm Current Wedge (SCW) is a key element in the present physical model of substorms. It is widely accepted that the SCW is created by earthward busty flows, but the generation mechanism is still unknown. Previous studies suggest pressure gradients and magnetic vortices are possible candidates. Due to the sparse coverage of satellites in space, these studies were strongly dependent on the assumption that the satellites were in the generation region of the field-aligned currents (FAC) forming the SCW. In this work, we take advantage of an inversion technique that determines the parameters describing the SCW and perform a statistical study on the plasma and magnetic field parameters of the flow pattern relative to the SCW. The inversion technique finds the location and the intensity of the SCW from midlatitude magnetic data. The technique has been validated using auroral observations, Equivalent Ionospheric Currents (EIC), SYM-H index from SuperMAG, and magnetic perturbations at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES satellite. A database of substorm events has been created using midlatitude positive bays, which are the ground signature of the SCW at lower latitudes. The inversion technique is applied to each event in the database to determine the location of the origin of the SCW. The inversion results are also used to find conjunction events with space observations from VAP (RBSP), THEMIS and GOES. The plasma and magnetic field parameters such as the pressure gradient and magnetic vorticity are then categorized as a function of their location relative to the origin of the SCW. How the distribution/pattern of the pressure gradient and vorticity are related to the properties of the SCW (locations and intensity of the FAC), and flows (entropy, velocity and density) will be determined.

  1. The electric field and global electrodynamics of the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    The conception of the electrodynamics of the quiet-time magnetosphere obtained during the last four years of magnetospheric study is presented. Current understandings of the open magnetosphere, convective plasma flows in the plasma sheet, the shielding of the inner magnetosphere from the convective magnetospheric electric field, the space charge produced when injected electrons drift towards dawn and injected ions drift towards dusk, the disruption of the flow of the Birkeland current by plasma instabilities and the shielding of the convective electric field by the dayside magnetopause are discussed. Attention is also given to changes of magnetic field line topology magnetic storms and substorms. Unresolved questions and new tools which may play a role in the further understanding of magnetospheric electrodynamics and the role of the magnetospheric electric field are presented.

  2. Magnetospheric dynamics from a low-dimensional nonlinear dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doxas, I.; Horton, W.

    1999-05-01

    A physics based model for the coupled solar WIND-Magnetosphere-Ionosphere system (WINDMI) is described. The model is based on truncated descriptions of the collisionless microscopic energy transfer processes occurring in the quasineutral layer, and includes a thermal flux limit neglected in the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) closure of the moment equations. All dynamically relevant parameters of the model can be computed analytically. The system is both Kirchhoffian and Hamiltonian, ensuring that the power input from the solar wind is divided into physically realizable energy sub-components, a property not shared by data-based filters. The model provides a consistent mathematical formalism in which different models of the solar wind driver, ionospheric dissipation, global field configuration, and substorm trigger mechanism can be inserted, and the coupling between the different parts of the system investigated.

  3. Relative Order of Auroral Transient Structure During Substorm Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozelov, B. V.; Rypdal, K.

    2007-12-01

    Variability of auroral structures is a manifestation of the magnetosphere-ionosphere plasma dynamics. During the last decade the complexity of magnetosphere-ionosphere plasma has been widely discussed in numerous papers. The most popular approaches are based on turbulence or/and self-organized criticality paradigms. However, there is no clear evidence that the dynamics during the discussed events is really organization, and not disorganization. The problem is that the magnetosphere-ionosphere system is an open non-equilibrium system, therefore classical thermodynamics is not directly applicable. Here we use an approach based on the S-theorem by Yu.L. Klimontovich. This approach allows us to compare the ordering which characterize the current (non- equilibrium) state of the system with experimental data. The considered characteristic is an analogy of entropy which has been extended to non- equilibrium states. Television observations of the auroral structure during substorm activation at the Barentsburg observatory (Svalbard) have been used as a data set. Dependence of the ordering on the spatial scale has been analyzed. We found that the ordering of the aurora increases during the substorm development. The same approach has been applied to data sets generated by cellular automata models. Evolution of the systems in time and dependence on external control parameters are compared and discussed. Acknowledgements. This work was supported by grant No 171076/V30 of the Norwegian Research Council and partly by the Division of Physical Sciences of Russian Academy of Science.

  4. Response of plasmaspheric configuration to substorms revealed by Chang’e 3

    PubMed Central

    He, Han; Shen, Chao; Wang, Huaning; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Chen, Bo; Yan, Jun; Zou, Yongliao; Jorgensen, Anders M.; He, Fei; Yan, Yan; Zhu, Xiaoshuai; Huang, Ya; Xu, Ronglan

    2016-01-01

    The Moon-based Extreme Ultraviolet Camera (EUVC) of the Chang’e 3 mission provides a global and instantaneous meridian view (side view) of the Earth’s plasmasphere. The plasmasphere is one inner component of the whole magnetosphere, and the configuration of the plasmasphere is sensitive to magnetospheric activity (storms and substorms). However, the response of the plasmaspheric configuration to substorms is only partially understood, and the EUVC observations provide a good opportunity to investigate this issue. By reconstructing the global plasmaspheric configuration based on the EUVC images observed during 20–22 April 2014, we show that in the observing period, the plasmasphere had three bulges which were located at different geomagnetic longitudes. The inferred midnight transit times of the three bulges, using the rotation rate of the Earth, coincide with the expansion phase of three substorms, which implies a causal relationship between the substorms and the formation of the three bulges on the plasmasphere. Instead of leading to plasmaspheric erosion as geomagnetic storms do, substorms initiated on the nightside of the Earth cause local inflation of the plasmasphere in the midnight region. PMID:27576944

  5. Response of plasmaspheric configuration to substorms revealed by Chang’e 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Han; Shen, Chao; Wang, Huaning; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Chen, Bo; Yan, Jun; Zou, Yongliao; Jorgensen, Anders M.; He, Fei; Yan, Yan; Zhu, Xiaoshuai; Huang, Ya; Xu, Ronglan

    2016-08-01

    The Moon-based Extreme Ultraviolet Camera (EUVC) of the Chang’e 3 mission provides a global and instantaneous meridian view (side view) of the Earth’s plasmasphere. The plasmasphere is one inner component of the whole magnetosphere, and the configuration of the plasmasphere is sensitive to magnetospheric activity (storms and substorms). However, the response of the plasmaspheric configuration to substorms is only partially understood, and the EUVC observations provide a good opportunity to investigate this issue. By reconstructing the global plasmaspheric configuration based on the EUVC images observed during 20–22 April 2014, we show that in the observing period, the plasmasphere had three bulges which were located at different geomagnetic longitudes. The inferred midnight transit times of the three bulges, using the rotation rate of the Earth, coincide with the expansion phase of three substorms, which implies a causal relationship between the substorms and the formation of the three bulges on the plasmasphere. Instead of leading to plasmaspheric erosion as geomagnetic storms do, substorms initiated on the nightside of the Earth cause local inflation of the plasmasphere in the midnight region.

  6. Dependence of poleward auroral and equatorward motion on substorm current wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T. S.; Angelopoulos, V.; Pu, Z.; Yao, Z.; Zhang, H.; Connors, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Flux pileup from fast flows and dipolarization, physical processes in the magnetotail, cause auroral evolution (brightening, poleward expansion, and equatorward motion) in the ionosphere during substorms. Although such flows have been shown to produce auroral brightening, the causes of auroral poleward expansion and equatorward motion remain unclear. Two mechanisms, tailward movement of the pileup region and dipolarization of the substorm current wedge (SCW), are thought to contribute to auroral poleward expansion, but no study has addressed which mechanism makes the dominant contribution. The hypothesis that auroral poleward expansion is caused by the tailward-moving pileup region is based on the assumption of a steady magnetosphere. This assumption is not necessarily true during substorms, however, because dipolarization of the SCW changes magnetospheric configuration and thus ionospheric footprints (and mapping) of the flows. Because they lack a dynamic SCW, previous magnetospheric models are statistical and static. We evaluated the dynamic effect of the SCW using a dynamic magnetospheric model in which the SCW is superimposed on Tsyganenko model. The current wedge is obtained from a recently developed inversion model using only ground magnetic field data as input, and model parameters are updated every minute. Applying our dynamic magnetospheric model to data from an isolated substorm observed by THEMIS and GOES 10 spacecraft and ground ASIs on 13 February 2008, we found that 1) our model predicts dipolarization at GOES 10 (it can predict near-Earth magnetic variations with ground data alone); 2) there is a good temporal correlation between successive auroral brightenings and flows; 3) flow footprints from our model are collocated with auroral poleward expansion and equatorward motion. These results suggest that in this event, auroral poleward expansion and equatorward motion are mainly caused by mapping changes in the dynamic magnetosphere by the SCW.

  7. Force Balance and Substorm Effects in the Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, Richard L.; Larson, Douglas J.; Kontodinas, Ioannis D.; Ball, Bryan M.

    1997-01-01

    A model of the quiet time middle magnetotail is developed using a consistent orbit tracing technique. The momentum equation is used to calculate geocentric solar magnetospheric components of the particle and electromagnetic forces throughout the current sheet. Ions generate the dominant x and z force components. Electron and ion forces almost cancel in the y direction because the two species drift earthward at comparable speeds. The force viewpoint is applied to a study of some substorm processes. Generation of the rapid flows seen during substorm injection and bursty bulk flow events implies substantial force imbalances. The formation of a substorm diversion loop is one cause of changes in the magnetic field and therefore in the electromagnetic force. It is found that larger forces are produced when the cross-tail current is diverted to the ionosphere than would be produced if the entire tail current system simply decreased. Plasma is accelerated while the forces are unbalanced resulting in field lines within a diversion loop becoming more dipolar. Field lines become more stretched and the plasma sheet becomes thinner outside a diversion loop. Mechanisms that require thin current sheets to produce current disruption then can create additional diversion loops in the newly thinned regions. This process may be important during multiple expansion substorms and in differentiating pseudoexpansions from full substorms. It is found that the tail field model used here can be generated by a variety of particle distribution functions. However, for a given energy distribution the mixture of particle mirror or reflection points is constrained by the consistency requirement. The study of uniqueness also leads to the development of a technique to select guiding center electrons that will produce charge neutrality all along a flux tube containing nonguiding center ions without the imposition of a parallel electric field.

  8. The detailed spatial structure of field-aligned currents comprising the substorm current wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Kyle R.; Mann, Ian R.; Rae, I. Jonathan; Waters, Colin L.; Frey, Harald U.; Kale, Andy; Singer, Howard J.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje

    2013-12-01

    We present a comprehensive two-dimensional view of the field-aligned currents (FACs) during the late growth and expansion phases for three isolated substorms utilizing in situ observations from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment and from ground-based magnetometer and optical instrumentation from the Canadian Array for Realtime Investigations of Magnetic Activity and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms ground-based arrays. We demonstrate that the structure of FACs formed during the expansion phase and associated with the substorm current wedge is significantly more complex than a simple equivalent line current model comprising a downward FAC in the east and upward FAC in the west. This two-dimensional view demonstrates that azimuthal bands of upward and downward FACs with periodic structuring in latitude form across midnight and can span up to 8 h of magnetic local time. However, when averaged over latitude, the overall longitudinal structure of the net FACs resembles the simpler equivalent line current description of the substorm current wedge (SCW). In addition, we demonstrate that the upward FAC elements of the structured SCW are spatially very well correlated with discrete aurora during the substorm expansion phase and that discrete changes in the FAC topology are observed in the late growth phase prior to auroral substorm expansion phase onset. These observations have important implications for determining how the magnetosphere and ionosphere couple during the late growth phase and expansion phase, as well as providing important constraints on the magnetospheric generator of the FACs comprising the SCW.

  9. Energy storage and dissipation in the magnetotail during substorms. 1. Particle simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Winglee, R.M. ); Steinolfson, R.S. )

    1993-05-01

    The authors present a simulation study of the particle dynamics in the magnetotail during the development of substorms. They look at how energy flows into the magnetotail under external magnetospheric conditions, and study the energy storage and dissipation in the magnetic field, and the role of particle dynamics in this process. They consider two primary external influences in their model. First is the pressure exerted by the magnetospheric boundary layer, on the nightside magnetopause. This pressure is expected to grow in response to solar wind penetration into the magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field becomes southward in the initial phases of substorm growth. Second is the dawn to dusk electric field. This field is expected to grow as the current sheet thins and energy stored in the magnetic field rises. The authors argue that the simultaneous increase in both the magnetic pressure and electric field can better model magnetotail response. One sees strong earthward flows in conjunction with increased energy storage in the tail, and at substorm onset one sees the ejection of plasmoids in a tailward direction with increased particle heating. The clumping of particles in the current sheet due to the opposing effects of the magnetic pressure and electric field could be responsible for substorm onset, rather than instabilities such as the tearing mode.

  10. Features of the planetary distribution of auroral precipitation characteristics during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobjev, V. G.; Yagodkina, O. I.; Starkov, G. V.; Feldstein, Ya. I.

    2007-04-01

    A planetary pattern of substorm development in auroral precipitation has been constructed on the basis of the F6 and F7 satellite observations. The behavior of the auroral injection boundaries and characteristics of precipitating electrons in various precipitation regions during all phases of a statistically mean magnetospheric substorm with an intensity of AL ˜ -400 nT at a maximum is considered in detail. It is shown that during a substorm, the zone of structured auroral oval precipitation AOP and the diffuse auroral zone DAZ are the widest in the nighttime and daytime sectors, respectively. In the daytime sector, all precipitation regions synchronously shift equatorward not only at the origination phase but during the substorm development phase. The strongest shift to low latitudes of the daytime AOP region is observed at a maximum of the development phase. As a result of this shift, the area of the polar cap increases during the phases of substorm origination and development. It is shown that the average position of the precipitation boundaries and the energy fluxes of precipitating electrons at each phase are linearly related to the intensity of a magnetic disturbance. This makes it possible to develop a model of auroral precipitation development during each phase of substorms of any intensity.

  11. Plasma and magnetic field variations in the distant magnetotail associated with near-earth substorm effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Mccomas, D. J.; Zwickl, R. D.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Examination of many individual event periods in the ISEE 3 deep-tail data set has suggested that magnetospheric substorms produce a characteristic pattern of effects in the distant magnetotail. During the growth, or tail-energy-storage phase of substorms, the magnetotail appears to grow diametrically in size, often by many earth radii. Subsequently, after the substorm expansive phase onset at earth, the distant tail undergoes a sequence of plasma, field, and energetic-particle variations as large-scale plasmoids move rapidly down the tail following their disconnection from the near-earth plasma sheet. ISEE 3 data are appropriate for the study of these effects since the spacecraft remained fixed within the nominal tail location for long periods. Using newly available auroral electrojet indices (AE and AL) and Geo particle data to time substorm onsets at earth, superposed epoch analyses of ISEE 3 and near-earth data prior to, and following, substorm expansive phase onsets have been performed. These analyses quantify and extend substantially the understanding of the deep-tail pattern of response to global substorm-induced dynamical effects.

  12. Contributions of substorm injections to SYM-H depressions in the main phase of storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaohai; Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; Zhang, Lingqian; Chen, Tao; Roth, I.

    2016-12-01

    Substorm injections bring energetic particles to the inner magnetosphere. But the role of the injected population in building up the storm time ring current is not well understood. By surveying Los Alamos National Laboratory geosynchronous data during 34 storm main phases, we show evidence that at least some substorm injections can contribute to substorm-time scale SYM-H/Dst depressions in the main phase of storms. For event studies, we analyze two typical events in which the main-phase SYM-H index exhibited stepwise depressions that are correlated with particle flux enhancement due to injections and with AL index. A statistical study is performed based on 95 storm time injection events. The flux increases of the injected population (50-400 keV) are found proportional to the sharp SYM-H depressions during the injection interval. By identifying dispersionless and dispersive injection signals, we estimate the azimuthal extent of the substorm injection. Statistical results show that the injection regions of these storm time substorms are characterized with an azimuthal extent larger than 06:00 magnetic local time. These results suggest that at least some substorm injections may mimic the large-scale enhanced convection and contribute to sharp decreases of Dst in the storm main phase.

  13. Propagating substorm injection fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Feynman, J.; Hardy, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    It is argued that a series of two-satellite observations leads to a clarification of substorm plasma injection, in which boundary motion plays a major role. Emphasis is put on a type of event characterized by abrupt, dispersionless changes in electron intensity and a coincident perturbation that consists of both a field magnitude increase and a small rotation toward more dipolar orientation. Comparing plasma observations at two points, it is found that in active, preinjection conditions the two most important features of the plasma sheet are: (1) the low-energy convection boundary for near-zero energy particles, determined by the magnitude of the large-scale convection electric field; and (2) the precipitation-flow boundary layer between the hot plasma sheet and the atmospherically contaminated inner plasma sheet.

  14. Coupling between pre-onset flows and substorm onset waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, T.; Lyons, L. R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E.; Mende, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    A critical, long-standing problem in substorm research is identification of the sequence of events leading to substorm expansion phase onset. Recent THEMIS all-sky imager (ASI) array observations have shown a repeatable pre-onset sequence, which is initiated by a poleward boundary intensification (PBI) and is followed by auroral streamers moving equatorward (earthward flow in the plasma sheet) and then by substorm onset. On the other hand, substorm onset is also preceded by azimuthally propagating waves, indicating a possible importance of wave instability for triggering substorm onset. However, it has been difficult to identify the link between fast flows and waves. We have found an isolated substorm event that was well-instrumented with the Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar (PFISR), THEMIS white-light ASI, and multi-spectral ASI, where the auroral onset occurred within the PFISR and ASI fields-of-view. This substorm onset was preceded by a PBI, and ionospheric flows propagated equatorward from the polar cap, crossed the PBI and reached the growth phase arc. This sequence provides evidence that flows from open magnetic field lines propagate across the open-closed boundary and reach the near-Earth plasma sheet prior to the onset. Quasi-stable oscillations in auroral luminosity and ionospheric density are found along the growth phase arc. These pre-onset auroral waves amplified abruptly at the onset time, soon after the equatorward flows reached the onset region. This sequence suggests a coupling process where pre-existing stable waves in the near-Earth plasma sheet interact with flows from further downtail and then evolve to onset instability.

  15. On the Predictability of Substorms Following Sharp Northward Turnings of the IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, G. T.; Lyons, Larry R.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Reeves, G. D.

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that there is an association between changes of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) that are expected to lead to a reduction in magnetospheric convection (northward turnings, reductions) and the onset of the expansion phase of substorms. This has been previously demonstrated by analyses of IMF data during time intervals associated with identified substorm onsets. Here we examine whether observations of northward turnings of the IMF can be used to predict the occurrence of substorms. We first identified sharp northward turnings that follow an interval of steady, southward IMF using measurements from the Wind spacecraft during the first 180 days of 1997. We also required that the northward turning be observed by either IMP-8 or GEOTAIL, in addition to Wind, and that one of the observing satellites be sufficiently close to the Earth-Sun line, or that the two observing satellites be sufficiently separated, that we are reasonably certain that the northward turning affected the magnetosphere. We also used the dual observations to estimate the arrival of the northward turning at the Earth. Using these criteria, we predicted 17 substorms. We then searched for the following signatures of substorm onset around the time of the predicted onset: auroral brightening followed by auroral bulge expansion observed by Polar UVI, geosynchronous particle injection, geosynchronous magnetic field dipolarization, and an appropriate magnetic disturbance at the surface of the Earth. Of the 17 predictions of substorms, 10 were successful in that a substorm onset was observed within 12 min of the predicted onset, 1 is indeterminate due to a lack of data at the Earth, 1 had unusual activity that we have not been able to identify, and 5 were unsuccessful. The failure of these last 5 predictions is explicable. Two of the northward turnings that failed to produce substorms were preceded by the lowest average of the set. The remaining 3 were the only cases in which the

  16. Equatorial counterelectrojets during geomagnetic storms and their possible dynamos in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Hashimoto, K. K.; Ebihara, Y.; Tsuji, Y.; Veenadhari, B.; Nishimura, T.; Tanaka, T.; Fujita, S.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2012-12-01

    During the substorm growth phase and storm main phase, the high pressure plasma accumulated in the cusp and mantle regions activates a dynamo for the dawn-to-dusk convection electric field and the Region-1 field-aligned currents (R1 FACs) [Tanaka, 1995]. The electric field and FACs are conveyed by the shear Alfven waves to the polar ionosphere and the electric field extends promptly to low latitude through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide [Kikuchi and Araki, 1979]. The electric field drives the DP2 currents at mid latitudes [Wilson et al., 2001; Tsuji et al., 2012] and intensifies the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) [Kikuchi et al., 1996, 2008]. The convection electric field extends to the inner magnetosphere promptly [Nishimura et al., 2009] and energizes the plasma in the partial ring current region with the help of the gradient and curvature drift [Ebihara and Ejiri, 2000], which in turn works as a dynamo for the dusk-to-dawn electric field and the R2 FACs. The dusk-to-dawn electric field causes the counterelectrojet (CEJ) at the equator when the IMF turns northward [Rastogi, 1975]. The CEJ often appears during substorms [Kobea et al., 2000; Kikuchi et al., 2000]. Both the R1 and R2 FACs are intensified by the substorm expansion, with the R2 FACs strong enough to cause the CEJ [Hashimoto et al., 2011]. The CEJ often occurs during the recovery phase of geomagnetic storms [Kikuchi et al., 2008; Tsuji et al., 2012], while the CEJ also appears during the storm main phase under the relatively stable southward IMF [Fejer et al., 2007; Veenadhari et al., 2010]. In this paper, we analyzed several storm events to identify the dynamo for the stormtime CEJ. The disturbance dynamo is a commonly accepted dynamo for the long lasting stormtime CEJ [Blanc and Richmond, 1980; Fejer and Scherliess 1997]. However, the observed rapid and periodic development of the CEJ should be attributed to the R2 FACs generated in the inner magnetosphere. Based on the magnetometer and radar

  17. A Unified Scenario of Near-Earth Substorm Onset: Analysis of THEMIS Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P.; Raeder, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.; Hegna, C.

    2008-12-01

    We propose an alternative scenario for the substorm onset process, based on ideal ballooning stability analysis of the near-Earth plasma sheet during recent THEMIS substorm events. In this scenario, the ballooning instability is initiated by the magnetic reconnection in the near-Earth plasma sheet, which in turn directly contributes to the trigger of a full onset. Using the solar wind data from WIND satellite observation for the substorm event as an input at dayside, we reconstructed a sequence of global magnetospheric configurations around the substorm onset by means of OpenGGCM simulation. These simulations have reproduced most of the salient features, including the onset timing, observed in the THEMIS substorm events [Raeder et al, 2008]. The ballooning instability criterion and growth rate are evaluated for the near-Earth plasma sheet region where the configuration satisfies a quasi-static equilibrium condition. Our analysis of the evolution of the near-Earth magnetotail region during the substorm events reveals a correlation between the breaching of the ballooning stability condition and the substorm onset in both temporal and spatial domains. The analysis suggests that the Earthward bulk plasma flow induced by the reconnection event in the near- Earth plasma sheet, leads to the pressure build-up and creates a favorable condition for the initiation of the ballooning instability in that same region. This new alternative scenario further elaborates earlier conjectures on the roles of reconnection and ballooning instability [Bhattacharjee et al, 1998], and has the potential to integrate both the near-Earth neutral-line model [McPherron et al, 1973] and the near-Earth current-sheet- disruption model [Lui et al, 1988] into a unified model of the near-Earth substorm onset. Research supported by U.S. NSF Grant No. ATM-0542954.

  18. Isolated nighttime substorms and morning geomagnetic Pc5 pulsations from ground-based and satellite (THEMIS) observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauristie, K.; Uspensky, M. V.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Kozyreva, O. V.; Dubyagin, S. V.; Vlasov, A. A.

    2013-09-01

    The analysis results of a complex of phenomena that were developing in the evening and morning magnetospheric and ionospheric sectors during two events (January 18 and February 19, 2008) are presented. The analysis is based on the observation data in the magnetotail from the THEMIS satellites and ground-based observations in the morning (MIRACLE network) and nighttime (THEMIS ground-based network) sectors. The events with moderate substorms in the nighttime sector were preceded by strong geomagnetic Pc5 pulsations in the morning sector, the regime of which changed during the development of auroral disturbances. The substorms were accompanied by dipolizations in the magnetotail at distances of ~10 Re and unexpected jump-like fluxes of ˜200-keV electrons. The fluxes appeared within several minutes after a breakup at three central THEMIS satellites simultaneously spaced up to 1.7 Re. According with the ASC data at the NAL observatory (3 frames/min) and with the THEMIS network of ASC data, onset of auroral activations in the night and morning sectors occurred simultaneously. Probable reasons for the sudden suppression or intensification of Pc5 pulsations are discussed.

  19. The Bursts Series of Long-period Irregular Ipcl-type Geomagnetic Pulsations As A Element of Substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurazhkovskaya, N. A.; Klain, B. I.

    The investigation of simultaneous observations of bursts series of pulsations ipcl in a frequency band 2.1-5.5 mHz during moderate geomagnetic activity (Kp ~ 2-3), ob- served in the dayside polar cusp and of long-period irregular pulsations apparent in a nightside of an auroral oval was carried out. For the analysis the records of a magnetic field in observatories Mirny (invariant geomagnetic latitude -76,93; longitude 122,92) and Yellownife (invariant geomagnetic latitude 69,94; longitude 294,38), located ap- proximately on one meridian noon - midnight, were used. It was revealed, that regime burst of pulsations ipcl is observed on a substorm phase recovery. The beginning of bursts series of pulsations ipcl on the dayside of a magnetosphere corresponds to the moment of a final stage of substorm expansion phase in night sector. Besides regime burst ipcl begins in 60 minutes after change of a direction vertical component IMF with southward on northward. In dominant number of cases the excitation beginning of bursts series of pulsations ipcl lags from a oscillation beginning of pulsations of a type Pi3, accompanying development substorms, on 40-60 of minutes. Thus, the anal- ysed bursts series of pulsations ipcl are an essential element of substorm. The delay of bursts series ipcl in relation to time of pulsations Pi3-type occurrence and substorm expansion phase can be explained within the framework of magnetospheric substorm model, in which the current across a tail is made through plasma mantle of a magneto- sphere, which field lines are project in dayside polar cusp and entry layes. The release of energy in a tail of magnetosphere in a substorm phase recovery subsequently leads to intensification of long-period perturbations in dayside polar cusp.

  20. Electric and magnetic field observations during a substorm of 24 February 1970

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Akasofu, S. I.

    1974-01-01

    A series of electric field measurements is reported which was obtained from the Injun 5 satellite along with a simultaneous magnetic disturbance observed in the interplanetary medium and on the ground during a magnetic substorm. The substorm analyzed took place on February 24, 1970. Prior to the onset of the substorm a greatly enhanced anti-sunward plasma flow was observed over the polar cap. The enhanced plasma flow occurred about 30 minutes after a switch in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field from northward to southward. The electric fields across the polar cap immediately before and during the substorm were essentially unchanged indicating that an enhancement in the ionospheric conductivity rather than the electric field must be responsible for the large increase in the auroral electrojet current during the substorm.

  1. Energetics of the magnetosphere, revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    The approximate magnitudes of power inputs and energies associated with the Earth's magnetosphere were derived. The nearest 40 R sub E of the plasma sheet current receive some 3.10 to the 11th power watt, and much of this goes to the Birkeland currents, which require 1-3 10 to the 11th power watt. Of that energy, about 30% appears as the energy of auroral particles and most of the rest as ionosphere joule heating. The ring current contains about 10 to the 15th power joule at quiet times, several times as much during magnetic storms, and the magnetic energy stored in the tail lobes is comparable. Substorm energy releases may range at 1.5 to 30 10 to the 11th power watt. Compared to these, the local energy release rate by magnetic merging in the magnetosphere is small. Merging is essential for the existence of open field lines, which make such inputs possible. Merging also seems to be implicated in substorms: most of the released energy only becomes evident far from the merging region, though some particles may gain appreciable energy in that region itself, if the plasma sheet is squeezed out completely and the high latitude lobes interact directly.

  2. Bursty bulk flows at different magnetospheric activity levels: Dependence on IMF conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. Q.; Baumjohann, W.; Wang, C.; Dai, L.; Tang, B. B.

    2016-09-01

    Based on concurrent observations of the ACE and Geotail satellites from 1998 to 2005, we statistically analyzed and compared the earthward bursty bulk flows (BBFs) with local positive Bz under different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. Four different magnetospheric activity levels (MALs), including quiet times and substorm growth/expansion/recovery phases, are considered. The properties of the BBFs, including their ion temperature (T), Vx component, x component of the energy flux density (Qx), and the solar wind dawn-dusk electric field Ey (observed at 1 AU), are analyzed. Main observations include the following: (1) BBF tends to have less penetration distance for northward IMF (NW-IMF) than for southward IMF (SW-IMF). Inward of 15 RE the BBFs for SW-IMF are dominant. Few BBFs for NW-IMF occur within 15 RE. (2) The occurrence probabilities of the BBFs at each MAL depend highly on the orientations of the IMF. During quiet times, the BBFs for NW-IMF are dominant. Reversely, during the growth and expansion phases of a substorm, the BBFs for SW-IMF are dominant. (3) The strengths of the BBF have significant evolution with substorm development. For SW-IMF condition, the strengths of the BBFs are the lowest for quiet times. The strength of the BBFs tends to increase during the growth phase and reaches to the strongest value during the expansion phase, then, decays during the recovery phase. For NW-IMF condition, the strengths of the BBFs evolve with the substorm development in a similar way as for SW-IMF condition. (4) For SW-IMF, the solar wind Ey evolves with the substorm development in a similar way to the strength of the BBFs. However, no clear evolution is found for NW-IMF. (5) The strengths of the BBF Qx and solar wind Ey are closely related. Both tend to be stronger for growth phase than for quite time, reach the strongest for expansion phase, then decay for recovery phase. It appears that to trigger a substorm, the strength of the BBFs should

  3. Substorm onset: A switch on the sequence of transport from decreasing entropy to increasing entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. X.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we propose a scenario about the trigger for substorm onset. In a stable magnetosphere, entropy is an increasing function tailward. However, in the growth phase of a substorm, a later born bubble has lower entropy than earlier born bubbles. When a bubble arrives at its final destination in the near-Earth region, it will spread azimuthally because of its relatively uniform entropy. The magnetic flux tubes of a dying bubble, which cause the most equatorward aurora thin arc, would block the later coming bubble tailward of them, forming an unstable domain. Therefore, an interchange instability develops, which leads to the collapse of the unstable domain, followed by the collapse of the stretched plasma sheet. We regard the substorm onset as a switch on the sequence of transport, i.e., from a decreasing entropy process to an increasing entropy process. We calculated the most unstable growth rates and the wavelengths of instability, and both are in agreement with observations.

  4. Energy dissipation in substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Loretta A.; Reiff, P. H.; Moses, J. J.; Heelis, R. A.; Moore, B. D.

    1992-01-01

    The energy dissipated by substorms manifested in several ways is discussed: the Joule dissipation in the ionosphere; the energization of the ring current by the injection of plasma sheet particles; auroral election and ion acceleration; plasmoid ejection; and plasma sheet ion heating during the recovery phase. For each of these energy dissipation mechanisms, a 'rule of thumb' formula is given, and a typical dissipation rate and total energy expenditure is estimated. The total energy dissipated as Joule heat (approximately) 2 x 10(exp 15) is found about twice the ring current injection term, and may be even larger if small scale effects are included. The energy expended in auroral electron precipitation, on the other hand, is smaller than the Joule heating by a factor of five. The energy expended in refilling and heating the plasma sheets is estimated to be approximately 5 x 10(exp 14)J, while the energy lost due to plasmoid ejection is between (approximately) (10 exp 13)(exp 14)J.

  5. A Double-Disruption Substorm Model - The Growth Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofko, G. J.; McWilliams, K. A.; Hussey, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    When the IMF turns from Bz- to Bz+, dayside merging forms open lobe field lines at low latitudes. These lobe lines are populated with shocked solar wind and dayside magnetospheric plasma from the reconnection inflow. As those lobe flux tubes pass tailward over the polar caps, they are also populated with outflow from the north and south polar cap ionospheres. As the lobe lines move tailward, they acquire a convex curvature that blocks the westward-flowing cross-tail current (XTJ). This constitutes the first stage of XTJ disruption, and it begins less than 10 min after the frontside merging.The disrupted XTJ closes dawn-to-dusk in the transition plasmasheet (TPS), where it produces a downward FAC to the ionosphere. This causes the proton arc, which is seen for the period from about 10 - 80 min after frontside merging begins at time t=0. The lobe lines eventually reconnect well downtail at about t=30 minutes. The middle section that closes the lobe lines has concave curvature and is called the Neutral Sheet (NSh). The resulting stretched field lines thus have a central NSh which separates the two convex-curvature regions to the north and south, regions which are called the Disruption Zones (DZs); the overall combination of the NDZ, NSh and SDZ is called the Stretched Plasmasheet (SPS). As the SPS continues to grow and the stretched lines are pulled earthward to relieve the magnetic tension, the filling of the NSh occurs both from the DTNL with the higher energy magnetospheric particle population on the lobe lines, but eventually also at about 25 earth radii when the polar cap ionospheric outflow (PCO) component finally reaches the NSh. A NSh FAC system forms, from which electrons flow down to the auroral ionosphere to create the pre-onset arc, starting at about t=65 min. At the same time, the Lyons-Speiser mechanism is initiated in the inner NSh, causing the PCO ions to become trapped and accelerated in the inner NSh region. Eventually, when the SPS grows earthward

  6. Bursty reconnection modulating the substorm current wedge, a substorm case study re-analysed by ECLAT tools.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opgenoorth, Hermann; Palin, Laurianne; Ågren, Karin; Zivkovic, Tatjana; Facsko, Gabor; Sergeev, Victor; Kubyshkina, Marina; Nikolaev, Alexander; Milan, Steve; Imber, Suzanne; Kauristie, Kirsti; Palmroth, Minna; van de Kamp, Max; Nakamura, Rumi; Boakes, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Multi-instrumental data mining and interpretation can be tedious and complicated. In this context, the ECLAT (European Cluster Assimilation Technology) project was created to « provide a novel and unique data base and tools for space scientists, by providing an upgrade of the European Space Agency's Cluster Active Archive (CAA). » How can this new tool help the space plasma physics community? Here we demonstrate the power of coordinated global and meso-scale ground-based data to put satellite data into the proper context. We re-analyse a well-isolated substorm with a strong growth phase, which starts right overhead the Scandinavian network of instruments on 8 September 2002. This event was previously studied in detail by Sergeev et al (2005), based on a THEMIS-like configuration near-midnight using a unique radial constellation of LANL (~6.6Re), Geotail and Polar (~9Re), and Cluster (~16Re). In this new study we add detailed IMAGE spacecraft and ground-based network data. Magnetospheric models are specially adapted using solar wind conditions and in-situ observations. Simulation results are compared to the in-situ observations and discussed. We show how - both before and after substorm onset - bursty reconnection in the tail modulates the localised field aligned current flow associated with the substorm current wedge.

  7. Charged Particle Energization and Transport in the Magnetotail during Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qingjiang

    This dissertation addresses the problem of energization of particles (both electrons and ions) to tens and hundreds of keV and the associated transport process in the magnetotail during substorms. Particles energized in the magnetotail are further accelerated to even higher energies (hundreds of keV to MeV) in the radiation belts, causing space weather hazards to human activities in space and on ground. We develop an analytical model to quantitatively estimate flux changes caused by betatron and Fermi acceleration when particles are transported along narrow high-speed flow channels from the magnetotail to the inner magnetosphere. The model shows that energetic particle flux can be significantly enhanced by a modest compression of the magnetic field and/or shrinking of the distance between the magnetic mirror points. We use coordinated spacecraft measurements, global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations driven by measured upstream solar wind conditions, and large-scale kinetic (LSK) simulations to quantify electron local acceleration in the near-Earth reconnection region and nonlocal acceleration during plasma earthward transport. Compared to the analytical model, application of the LSK simulations is much less restrictive because trajectories of millions of test particles are calculated in the realistically determined global MHD fields and the results are statistical. The simulation results validated by the observations show that electrons following a power law distribution at high energies are generated earthward of the reconnection site, and that the majority of the energetic electrons observed in the inner magnetosphere are caused by adiabatic acceleration in association with magnetic dipolarizations and fast flows during earthward transport. We extend the global MHD+LSK simulations to examine ion energization and compare it with electron energization. The simulations demonstrate that ions in the magnetotail are first nonadiabatically accelerated in the weak

  8. The Four-Part Field-Aligned Current System in the Ionosphere at Substorm Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, K. A.; Sofko, G. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Hussey, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Whereas the plasma circulation in the ionosphere is driven by convective drift which is the same for ions and electrons, the magnetospheric plasma circulation includes curvature and gradient drifts, which are charge-dependent. There is even a region of the Neutral Sheet in which the ions, but not the electrons, are "unmagnetized" and where charge separation can occur even for convective drift, which the electrons execute but the ions do not. Due to the charge separations in the magnetosphere, field-aligned currents are generated. The FACs and the associated electric fields play an important role in producing the convection pattern in the ionosphere. Here we argue that there are two pairs of FACs near substorm onset. One pair involves the auroral zone portion of the convection. There, a downward D FAC occurs in the poleward part of the auroral zone and an upward U FAC occurs in the equatorward part. We show that the D-U auroral FAC pair results from the odd situation in the INSh, where the electrons can convect earthward while the unmagnetized ions do not and so remain further tailward of the electrons. The equatorward edge of the auroral zone is marked by a convection reversal, because the auroral zone flows have an eastward velocity component, whereas subauroral flows have a westward component. At the convection reversal, the flow is strictly southward and the electric field strictly westward. The subauroral zone maps out to the outer radiation belt, where the high-energy electrons precipitate tailward of the energetic electron trapping boundary,and high-energy ions precipitate tailward of the energetic ion trapping boundary, the latter being earthward of the former. As a result, another FAC pair forms on field lines in the ORB/subauroral regions. The U FAC of the latter region is adjacent but earthward of the U FAC of the auroral zone pair. The D-U auroral zone pair is poleward of the U-D subauroral (Radiation Belt) pair. Finally, we note that the electric field

  9. Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.; Behannon, K. W.; Carbary, J. F.; Eviatar, A.; Lepping, R. P.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Similarities between the Saturnian and terrestrial outer magnetosphere are examined. Saturn, like Earth, has a fully developed magnetic tail, 80 to 100 RS in diameter. One major difference between the two outer magnetospheres is the hydrogen and nitrogen torus produced by Titan. This plasma is, in general, convected in the corotation direction at nearly the rigid corotation speed. Energies of magnetospheric particles extend to above 500 keV. In contrast, interplanetary protons and ions above 2 MeV have free access to the outer magnetosphere to distances well below the Stormer cutoff. This access presumably occurs through the magnetotail. In addition to the H+, H2+, and H3+ ions primarily of local origin, energetic He, C, N, and O ions are found with solar composition. Their flux can be substantially enhanced over that of interplanetary ions at energies of 0.2 to 0.4 MeV/nuc.

  10. Modeling Magnetospheric Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Raymond J.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Ogino, Tatsuki; Peroomian, Vahe; Richard, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    We have used global magnetohydrodynamic, simulations of the interaction between the solar wind and magnetosphere together with single particle trajectory calculations to investigate the sources of plasma entering the magnetosphere. In all of our calculations solar wind plasma primarily enters the magnetosphere when the field line on which it is convecting reconnects. When the interplanetary magnetic field has a northward component the reconnection is in the polar cusp region. In the simulations plasma in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) can be on either open or closed field lines. Open field lines occur when the high latitude reconnection occurs in only one cusp. In the MHD calculations the ionosphere does not contribute significantly to the LLBL for northward IMF. The particle trajectory calculations show that ions preferentially enter in the cusp region where they can be accelerated by non-adiabatic motion across the high latitude electric field. For southward IMF in the MHD simulations the plasma in the middle and inner magnetosphere comes from the inner (ionospheric) boundary of the simulation. Solar wind plasma on open field lines is confined to high latitudes and exits the tailward boundary of the simulation without reaching the plasma sheet. The LLBL is populated by both ionospheric and solar wind plasma. When the particle trajectories are included solar wind ions can enter the middle magnetosphere. We have used both the MHD simulations and the particle calculations to estimate source rates for the magnetosphere which are consistent with those inferred from observations.

  11. Observational evidence for an inside-out substorm onset scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    We present observations which provide strong support for a substorm onset scenario in which a localized inner magnetospheric instability developed first and was later followed by the development of a Near Earth Neutral Line (NENL) farther down-tail. Specifically, we find that the onset began as a localized brightening of an intensified growth phase arc which developed as a periodic series of arc-aligned (i.e. azimuthally arrayed) bright spots. As the disturbance grew, it evolved into vortical structures that propagated poleward and eventually morphed into an east-west aligned arc system at the poleward edge of the auroral substorm bulge. The auroral intensification shows an exponential growth with an estimated e-folding time of around 188 seconds (linear growth rate, {gamma} of 5.33 x 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}). During the initial breakup, no obvious distortions of auroral forms to the north were observed. However, during the expansion phase, intensifications of the poleward boundary of the expanding bulge were observed together with the equatorward ejection of auroral streamers into the bulge. A strong particle injection was observed at geosynchronous orbit, but was delayed by several minutes relative to onsel. Ground magnetometer data also shows a two phase development of mid-latitude positive H-bays, with a quasi-linear increase in H between the onset and the injection. We conclude that this event provides strong evidence in favor of the so-called 'inside-out' substorm onset scenario in which the near Earth region activates first followed at a later time by the formation of a near-to-mid tail substorm X-line. The ballooning instability is discussed as a likely mechanism for the initial onset.

  12. Identification of substorm onset location and pre-onset sequence using Reimei, THEMIS GBO, PFISR and Geotail (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, S.; Moldwin, M.; Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L. R.; Hirahara, M.; Sakanoi, T.; Asamura, K.; Nicolls, M. J.; Miyashita, Y.; Mende, S. B.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    One of the most important questions puzzling the substorm community is the location of the breakup arc relative to general auroral morphology, ionospheric convection, and particle precipitation, which are ionospheric signatures of dynamic processes in the magnetosphere. We present a state-of-the-art ground and space-based imaging study of a substorm that occurred on 12 October 2007. The auroral breakup was observed simultaneously by the Reimei satellite, THEMIS all-sky imager and PFISR radar. The magnetic field footprint of the Geotail spacecraft was also near the ionospheric location of the substorm onset. We report unique spaceborne high-spatial and temporal resolution images of a portion of a breakup arc and of a wave-like auroral enhancement captured by cameras onboard Reimei. This substorm was isolated and occurred in a thin, only ~1.5° wide, auroral oval. Observations from PFISR and Geotail suggest a sudden plasma sheet thinning initiated ~10 min prior to the onset. Wave-like auroral enhancements were observed twice along the most equatorward preexisting auroral arc about 3 min and 1 min before the auroral expansion. This most equatorward wavy arc did not initiate the auroral spatial expansion, but remained almost stable until being engulfed after onset by auroral equatorward expansion from slightly higher latitudes. The wave-like auroral enhancement was associated with three fine inverted-V structures and fully embedded within energetic ion precipitation and westward flows. Following this enhancement, an arc formed at higher latitude just adjacent to the PSBL, and was likely a poleward boundary intensification (PBI). This arc then extended southwestward and initiated the spatial expansion. The breakup arc, i.e., the arc initiated the spatial expansion, was located poleward of and separated from the wave-like auroral enhancement. Assuming longitudinal homogeneity of proton precipitation over one degree in geographic longitude, this breakup arc was located

  13. Particle energization by a substorm dipolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabin, K.; Kalugin, G.; Donovan, E.; Spanswick, E.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetotail dipolarizations, often associated with substorms, produce significant energetic particle enhancements in the nighttime magnetosphere. In this paper, we apply our recently developed magnetotail dipolarization model to the problem of energizing electrons and ions. Our model is two-dimensional in the meridional plane and is characterized by the ability to precisely control the location of the transition from the dipole-like to tail-like magnetic fields. Both magnetic and electric fields are calculated, self-consistently, as the transition zone retreats farther into the tail and the area around the Earth occupied by dipole-like lines increases in size. These fields are used to calculate the motion of electrons and ions and changes in their energies. We consider the energizing effects of the fields restricted to ±15° and ±30° sectors around the midnight meridian, as well the axisymmetric case. Energies of some electrons increase by a factor of 25, which is more than enough to produce observable ionospheric signatures. Electrons are treated using the Guiding Center approximation, while protons and heavier particles generally require description based on the Lorentz equations.

  14. Modeling of substorm development with a kinematic effect by the global MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den, Mitsue; Fujita, Shigeru; Tanaka, Takashi; Horiuchi, Ritoku

    Magnetic reconnection is considered to play an important role in space phenomena such as substorm in the Earth's magnetosphere. Recently, Tanaka and Fujita reproduced substorm evoution process by numerical simulation with the global MHD code. In the MHD framework, the dissipation model is used for modeling of the kinetic effects. They found that the normalized reconnection viscosity, one of the dessipation model employed there, gave a large effect for the substorm development though that viscosity was assumed to be a constant parameter. It is well known that magnetric reconnection is controlled by microscopic kinetic mechanism. Horiuchi et al. investigated the roles of microscopic plasma instabilities on the violation of the frozen-in condition by examining the force balance equation based on explicit electromagnetic particle simulation for an ion-scale current sheet, and concluded that the growth of drift kink instability can create anomalous resistivity leading to the excitation of collisionless reconnection. They estimated the effective resistivity based on the particle simulation data. In this paper, we perform substorm simulation by using the global MHD code with this anomalous resistivity obtained in their microscopic approach istead of the emprical resistivity model, and investigate the relationship between the substorm development and the anomalous resistivity model.

  15. Simultaneous observations of the near-earth and distant geomagnetic tail during a substorm by ISEE-1, ISEE-3 and geostationary spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Scholer, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Daly, P. W.; Baker, D. N.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the geomagnetic tail during a substorm is investigated by combining plasma, magnetic field, and energetic particle data from the ISEE-3 spacecraft in the deep tail with similar near-earth observations from ISEE-1 and geostationary spacecraft. The observations can be interpreted in terms of the neutral-line model of substorms and indicate the formation of a closed-loop field region (plasmoid) following substorm onset, which is ejected down the tail. The plasmoid is observed to have a double-loop field strucure. This may be the result of a second substorm onset occurring about 25 min after the first, producing a further near-earth neutral line and closed field loop. During the substorm recovery phase, the substorm neutral line moves tailward to beyond 130 earth radii from earth by some 3 h after substorm onset.

  16. Solar wind control of magnetospheric pressure (CDAW 6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    The CDAW 6 data base is used to compare solar wind and magnetospheric pressures. The flaring angle of the tail magnetopause is determined by assuming that the component of solar wind pressure normal to the tail boundary is equal to the total pressure within the tail. Results indicate an increase in the tail flaring angle from 18 deg to 32 deg prior to the 1055 substorm onset and a decrease to 25 deg after the onset. This behavior supports the concept of tail energy storage before the substorm and subsequent release after the onset.

  17. Flow bursts, breakup arc, and substorm current wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Energy liberated by the reconnection process in the near-Earth tail is transported via flow bursts toward the dipolar magnetosphere during substorms. The breakup arc is a manifestation of the arrival of the bursts under flow braking and energy deposition. Its structure and behavior is analyzed on the basis of five striking spatial, temporal, and energetic properties, qualitatively and in part also quantitatively. A key element is the formation of stop layers. They are thin layers, of the width of an ion gyro radius, in which the magnetic field makes a transition from tail to near-dipolar magnetosphere configurations and in which the kinetic energy of fast flows is converted into electromagnetic energy of kinetic Alfvén waves. The flows arise from the relaxation of the strong magnetic shear stresses in the leading part of the flow bursts. The bright narrow arcs of less than 10 km width inside the broad poleward expanding breakup arc, Alfvénic in nature and visually characterized by erratic short-lived rays, are seen as traces of the stop layers. The gaps between two narrow and highly structured arcs are filled with more diffuse emissions. They are attributed to the relaxation of the less strained magnetic field of the flow bursts. Eastward flows along the arcs are linked to the shrinking gaps between two successive arcs and the entry of auroral streamers into the dipolar magnetosphere in the midnight sector. Flow braking in the stop layers forms multiple pairs of narrow balanced currents and cannot be behind the formation of the substorm current wedge. Instead, its origin is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the high-beta plasma, after the high magnetic shears have relaxed and the fast flows and stop layer process have subsided, in other words, to the "dying flow bursts."

  18. Studies of Westward Electrojets and Field-Aligned Currents in the Magnetotail During Substorms: Implications for Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spence, Harlan E.

    1996-01-01

    discrete features in the context of the global picture. We reported on our initial study at national and international meetings and published the results of our predictions of the low-altitude signatures of the plasma sheet. In addition, the PI was invited to contribute a publication to the so-called 'Great Debate in Space Physics' series that is a feature of EOS. The topic was on the nature of magnetospheric substorms. Specific questions of the when and where a substorm occurs and the connection between the auroral and magnetospheric components were discussed in that paper. This paper therefore was derived exclusively from the research supported by this grant. Attachment: Empirical modeling of the quite time nightside magnetosphere.' 'CRRES observations of particle flux dropout event.' The what, where, when, and why of magnetospheric substorm triggers'. and 'Low altitude signature of the plasma sheet: model prediction of local time dependence'.

  19. Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral-Atom Spectrometers and Interstellar Boundary Explorer energetic neutral atom imaging of the 5 April 2010 substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComas, D. J.; Buzulukova, N.; Connors, M. G.; Dayeh, M. A.; Goldstein, J.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S.; Schwadron, N. A.; Valek, P.

    2012-03-01

    This study is the first to combine energetic neutral atom (ENA) observations from Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral-Atom Spectrometers (TWINS) and Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). Here we examine the arrival of an interplanetary shock and the subsequent geomagnetically effective substorm on 5 April 2010, which was associated with the Galaxy 15 communications satellite anomaly. IBEX shows sharply enhanced ENA emissions immediately upon compression of the dayside magnetosphere at 08:26:17+/-9 s UT. The compression drove a markedly different spectral shape for the dayside emissions, with a strong enhancement at energies >1 keV, which persisted for hours after the shock arrival, consistent with the higher solar wind speed, density, and dynamic pressure (˜10 nPa) after the shock. TWINS ENA observations indicate a slower response of the ring current and precipitation of ring current ions as low-altitude emissions ˜15 min later, with the >50 keV ion precipitation leading the <10 keV precipitation by ˜20 min. These observations suggest internal magnetospheric processes are occurring after compression of the magnetosphere and before the ring current ions end up in the loss cone and precipitate into the ionosphere. We also compare MHD simulation results with both the TWINS and IBEX ENA observations; while the overall fluxes and distributions of emissions were generally similar, there were significant quantitative differences. Such differences emphasize the complexity of the magnetospheric system and importance of the global perspective for macroscopic magnetospheric studies. Finally, Appendix A documents important details of the TWINS data processing, including improved binning procedures, smoothing of images to a given level of statistical accuracy, and differential background subtraction.

  20. Energy density of ionospheric and solar wind origin ions in the near-Earth magnetotail during substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daglis, Loannis A.; Livi, Stefano; Sarris, Emmanuel T.; Wilken, Berend

    1994-01-01

    Comprehensive energy density studies provide an important measure of the participation of various sources in energization processes and have been relatively rare in the literature. We present a statistical study of the energy density of the near-Earth magnetotail major ions (H(+), O(+), He(++), He(+)) during substorm expansion phase and discuss its implications for the solar wind/magnetosphere/ionosphere coupling. Our aim is to examine the relation between auroral activity and the particle energization during substorms through the correlation between the AE indices and the energy density of the major magnetospheric ions. The data we used here were collected by the charge-energy-mass (CHEM) spectrometer on board the Active Magnetospheric Particle Trace Explorer (AMPTE)/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) satellite in the near-equatorial nightside magnetosphere, at geocentric distances approximately 7 to 9 R(sub E). CHEM provided the opportunity to conduct the first statistical study of energy density in the near-Earth magnetotail with multispecies particle data extending into the higher energy range (greater than or equal to 20 keV/E). the use of 1-min AE indices in this study should be emphasized, as the use (in previous statistical studies) of the (3-hour) Kp index or of long-time averages of AE indices essentially smoothed out all the information on substorms. Most distinct feature of our study is the excellent correlation of O(+) energy density with the AE index, in contrast with the remarkably poor He(++) energy density - AE index correlation. Furthermore, we examined the relation of the ion energy density to the electrojet activity during substorm growth phase. The O(+) energy density is strongly correlated with the pre-onset AU index, that is the eastward electrojet intensity, which represents the growth phase current system. Our investigation shows that the near-Earth magnetotail is increasingly fed with energetic ionospheric ions during periods of enhanced

  1. GEOTAIL and POLAR Observations of Auroral Kilometric Radiation and Terrestrial Low Frequency Bursts and their Relationship to Energetic Particles, Auroras, and Other Substorm Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R . R.; Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.; Thomsen, Michelle F.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Imhoff, W. L.; Mobilia, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    Terrestrial low frequency (LF) bursts are plasma wave phenomena that appear to be a part of the low frequency end of the auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) spectrum and are observed during strong substorms, GEOTAIL and POLAR plasma wave observations from within the magnetosphere show that the AKR increases in intensity and its lower frequency limits decrease when LF bursts are observed. The first is expected as it is shows substorm onset and the latter indicates that the AKR source region is expanding to higher altitudes. Images from the POLAR VIS Earth Camera operating in the far-UV range and the POLAR UVI experiment usually feature an auroral brightening and an expansion of the aurora to higher latitudes at the time of the LF bursts. Enhanced fluxes of X-rays from precipitating electrons have also been observed by POLAR PIXIE. High resolution ground Abstract: magnetometer data from the CANOPUS and IMAGE networks show that the LF bursts occur when the expansive phase onset signatures are most intense. The ground magnetometer data and the CANOPUS meridian scanning photometer data sometimes show that during the LF burst events the expansive phase onset starts at unusually low latitudes and moves poleward. Large injections of energetic protons and electrons have also been detected by the GOES and LANL geosynchronous satellites during LF burst events. While most of the auroral brightenings and energetic particle injections associated with the LF bursts occur near local midnight, several have been observed as early as mid-afternoon. From these various measurements, we are achieving a better understanding of the plasma and particle motions during substorms that are associated with the generation and propagation of terrestrial LF bursts

  2. Eastward electrojet enhancements during substorm activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onofrio, M.; Partamies, N.; Tanskanen, E.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we use a semi-automatic routine to identify negative and positive bays in the IMAGE magnetometer data during seven months in 2003. The IMAGE stations have been divided into three latitude regions to monitor the time evolution and temporal relationship between the regions during substorms. In particular, we focus on the events where both positive and negative ground magnetic deflections are observed in different latitude regions. We found 101 events in total. We examine separately a subset of 32 events, for which the local electrojet index values are larger than the global ones, suggesting that the strongest activity at that time takes place within or very close to the local time sector of IMAGE. We systematically analyze the temporal difference and the intensity of the positive and negative bays. Our results show that the magnitude of the positive bay is on average about half of that of the negative bay. Two thirds of the positive bays within the IMAGE network peak earlier than the negative bays. Because the positive and negative bays occur meridionally very close together, we suggest that the enhancements of the westward current at the poleward part of the auroral oval and the eastward current within the return flow are very tightly coupled through field-aligned currents and closing horizontal currents. The substorm current system appears as a superposition on the large-scale current pattern in the vicinity of the evening sector shear flow region.

  3. Ground and satellite observations of the low-latitude onsets of auroral substorm during a major magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ievenko, Igor; Parnikov, Stanislav; Alexeyev, Valeriy

    It is known that the first onset of auroral substorm expansion is connected with the brightness increase and breakup of the most equatorial arc. The subsequent substorm activizations can be observed in the intensification of auroral arcs at higher latitudes. As a result a formation of auroral bulge and poleward shift of a westward electrojet maximum takes place. The development of auroral bulge maps the precipitation dynamics of energetic particles during magnetospheric substorms. In this work the research results of auroral substorm during the major magnetic storm on March 20, 2001 (Dst =-150 nT) are submitted. The aurorae were registered at the Yakutsk meridian (130ºE; 200ºE, geom.) by the meridian-scanning and zenith photometers in the 630, 557.7 [OI], 427.8 (N2+) and 486.1 nm (H beta) emissions. Before the substorm onset the equatorial arc is observed at low geomagnetic latitudes of 55-57ºN (the dipole L=3.0-3.3). The zenith photometer registers an intense H beta emission in the arc (~400 R). The fast increase of the 427.8, 557.7 nm emission intensity during two equatorial arc breakups is accompanied by the decrease of H beta intensity by a factor of ~5. The aurora dynamics is compared with the measurements of precipitating flux of electrons and protons aboard DMSP F15 satellite, substorm injections at a geosynchronous orbit, variations in the solar wind and IMF and also images of the auroral oval from the IMAGE satellite. The ground and satellite observations are considered from a position of change of the magnetic field configuration during the low-latitude substorm. We assume that the sharp drop of H beta emission intensity (precipitating protons flux) during the breakups of equatorial arc may testify to a connection of its location with a proton isotropic boundary in the inner magnetosphere.

  4. Effects of substorm electrojet on declination along concurrent geomagnetic latitudes in the northern auroral zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edvardsen, Inge; Johnsen, Magnar G.; Løvhaug, Unni P.

    2016-10-01

    The geomagnetic field often experiences large fluctuations, especially at high latitudes in the auroral zones. We have found, using simulations, that there are significant differences in the substorm signature, in certain coordinate systems, as a function of longitude. This is confirmed by the analysis of real, measured data from comparable locations. Large geomagnetic fluctuations pose challenges for companies involved in resource exploitation since the Earth's magnetic field is used as the reference when navigating drilling equipment. It is widely known that geomagnetic activity increases with increasing latitude and that the largest fluctuations are caused by substorms. In the auroral zones, substorms are common phenomena, occurring almost every night. In principle, the magnitude of geomagnetic disturbances from two identical substorms along concurrent geomagnetic latitudes around the globe, at different local times, will be the same. However, the signature of a substorm will change as a function of geomagnetic longitude due to varying declination, dipole declination, and horizontal magnetic field along constant geomagnetic latitudes. To investigate and quantify this, we applied a simple substorm current wedge model in combination with a dipole representation of the Earth's magnetic field to simulate magnetic substorms of different morphologies and local times. The results of these simulations were compared to statistical data from observatories and are discussed in the context of resource exploitation in the Arctic. We also attempt to determine and quantify areas in the auroral zone where there is a potential for increased space weather challenges compared to other areas.

  5. Current sheet thinning, reconnection onset, and auroral morphology during geomagnetic substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, A.; Hsieh, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic substorms represent a fundamental energy release mechanism for the terrestrial magnetosphere. Specifically, the evolution of thin currents sheets during the substorm growth phase plays a key role for substorms because such current sheets present a much lower threshold for the onset of tearing modes and magnetic reconnection than the usually thick magnetotail current sheet. Here we examine and compare two basic processes for current sheet thinning in the Earth's magnetotail: Current sheet thinning (1) through closed magnetic flux depletion (MFD) in the near Earth magnetotail caused by divergent flux transport to replace closed flux on the dayside and (2) through accumulation of open flux magnetic flux in the tail lobes also caused by dayside reconnection. Both processes are expected to operate during any period of enhanced dayside reconnection. It is demonstrated that closed magnetic flux depletion (MFD) in the near Earth magnetotail and the increase of open lobe magnetic flux can lead to the evolution of two separate thin current sheets in the near Earth and the mid tail regions of the magnetosphere. While the auroral morphology associated with MFD and near Earth current sheet formation is well consistent with typical substorm growth observation, midtail current sheet formation through lobe flux increase shows only a minor influence on the auroral ionosphere. We discuss the physics of the dual current sheet formation and local and auroral properties of magnetic reconnection in either current sheet. It is suggested that only reconnection onset in the near Earth current sheet may be consistent with substorm expansion because the flux tube entropy depletion of mid tail reconnection appears insufficient to cause geosynchronous particle injection and dipolarization. Therefore reconnection in the mid tail current sheet is more likely associated with bursty bulk flows or dipolarization fronts which stop short of geosynchronous distances.

  6. ``Polar'' and ``high-latitude'' substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despirak, Irina; Lubchich, Andris; Kleimenova, Natalia

    All substorms observed at high latitudes can be divided into 2 types - "polar" (observed only at > 70º latitudes in the absence of substorms at <70º latitudes during the day) and "high-latitude" substorms (propagating from auroral (<70º) to polar (> 70º) geomagnetic latitudes). The aim of this study was to compare solar wind conditions during these two types of substorms. For this purpose, we used the data of IMAGE magnetometers and OMNI solar wind data for 1995, 2000, 2006-2011 periods. There were selected 105 "polar" and 55 "high-latitude" substorms. It is shown that "polar" substorms observed during the late recovery phase of a geomagnetic storm, after passing of the high speed stream of the solar wind (when the velocity is reduced from high to low values). "High-latitude" substorms, on the contrary, are observed during passing of the recurrent high-speed stream of the solar wind, increased values of the southward B _{Z }component of the IMF and E _{Y} component of the electric field, increased temperature and pressure of the solar wind. Also, it is noted that variability of these solar wind parameters for the “high-latitude” substorms is stronger than for “polar” substorms.

  7. Is Mercury's Magnetosphere Driven By Flux Transfer Events?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury's magnetosphere closely resembles that of Earth in terms of its topology and structure, but major differences are found when their dynamics are compared. The strong interplanetary magnetic fields at 0.3 to 0.5 AU result in low Alfven Mach numbers, weak bow shocks and low plasma β magnetosheaths at Mercury. These conditions support the development of strong plasma depletion layers adjacent to the magnetopause and intense magnetopause reconnection. MESSENGER observations indicate that reconnection occurs for all non-zero shear angles across the magnetopause with magnetosheat β being the primary factor controlling its rate. Flux transfer events (FTEs) with ~ 1-2 s durations and flux rope topology are observed during nearlly all magnetopause crossings. In contrast with the Earth where FTEs are typically observed every ~ 8 min, FTE ecounters at Mercury are separated on average by only ~ 10 s. At lower altitudes near the cusp MESSENGER observes ~1-2-s-long strong decreases in mgnetic field intensity that are termed cusp plasma filaments. These filaments are beleived to be formed by the inflow of magnetosheath plasma associated with flux transfer events. Mercury's magnetotail exhibits magnetic flux loading/unloading events similar to those observed at Earth during substorms. The Dungey cycle durations and lobe flux loading amplitudes are ~ 2 - 3 min and ~ 30 to 50% at Mercury as compared to ~ 1 - 2 hr and ~ 10 to 25% at Earth. However, FTEs at Earth account for only a few per cent of the magnetic flux carried by the Dungey cycle, while the contribution of FTEs at Mercury is estimated to be ~ 30 to 50%. Mercury also differs from Earth in that it lacks an ionosphere, but possesses a large, highly conducting iron core. The strong IMF and lack of an ionosphere results in a relatively large dawn-to-dusk cross-magnetosphere potential drop of ~ 30 kV at Mercury. Inductive coupling between Mercury's magnetosphere and its large iron core stiffens the dayside

  8. Traveling compression region observed in the mid-tail lobes near substorm expansion phase onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taguchi, S.; Slavin, J. A.; Lepping, R. P.; Nose, M.

    1996-01-01

    The characteristics of traveling compression regions (TCRs) in the midtail lobes are examined. Through the use of the AL index, isolated substorm events with well developed expansion phases are selected. The TCR events which feature a field compression coincident with modified Bz variations are categorized into different types, and the magnetic variations are interpreted in terms of the relative location of the point of observation to the plasmoid at the time of release and the effects of tail flaring. In order to understand the relationship between the plasmoid release time and the substorm onset time, the time difference between the different types of TCR and the substorm onset determined by Pi 2 pulsations at mid-latitude ground stations, is examined. The results suggest that the downtail release of most of the plasmoids created earthwards of -38 earth radii occurs at almost the same distance as the substorm onset.

  9. Substorms observations over Apatity during geomagnetic storms in the period 2012 - 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guineva, Veneta; Werner, Rolf; Despirak, Irina; Kozelov, Boris

    2016-07-01

    In this work we studied substorms, generated during enhanced geomagnetic activity in the period 2012 - 2016. Observations of the Multiscale Aurora Imaging Network (MAIN) in Apatity have been used. Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field parameters were judged by the 1-min sampled OMNI data base. Substorm onset and further development were verified by the 10-s sampled data of IMAGE magnetometers and by data of the all-sky camera at Apatity. Subject of the study were substorms occurred during geomagnetic storms. The so-called "St. Patrick's day 2015 event" (17-21 March 2015), the events on 17-18 March 2013 and 7-17 March 2012 (a chain of events generated four consecutive storms) which were among the events of strongest geomagnetic activity during the current solar cycle 24, were part of the storms under consideration. The behavior of the substorms developed during different phases of the geomagnetic storms was discussed.

  10. Plasma Circulation in the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Fok, Mei-Ching; Delcourt, D. C.; Slinker, S.; Fedder, J. A.; Buenfil, M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the global structure and dynamics of plasma circulation produced by prototypical solar wind disturbances of the interplanetary magnetic field and dynamic pressure. We track the global circulation and energization of solar wind, polar wind, and auroral wind plasmas throughout the magnetosphere, until they precipitate or escape into the downstream solar wind. We use the full equations of motion of the plasma ions within fields produced by a global MHD simulation of the dynamic solar wind interaction. We use the dynamic hot plasma density and Poynting energy flux specified at the inner boundary of the MHD simulation as drivers of conjugate ion outflow fluxes using local empirical relations obtained from the FAST and Polar missions. Birkeland currents computed by the MHD code are used to derive a field-parallel potential drop from a Knight-like relation [as modified by Lyons and Evans, 1980]. This potential drop is applied to each ion as an initial bulk energy, added to a thermal heating driven by the locally incident Poynting flux. The solar wind pressure increase case (B(sub Y) = 5; B(sub z) = 0 nT) produces an immediate substorm owing to compression of pre-existing plasmas. The SB(sub z), interval (embedded in NB(sub z)) produces a substorm after about one hour of development. Both disturbances enhance the auroral wind flux and heavy ion pressure of the magnetosphere substantially, with complex dynamic structuring by auroral acceleration vortexes and dynamic reconnection. Comparisons are made with observations during disturbed periods including the Halloween 2003 super-storm and other periods.

  11. Anthropogenic trigger of substorms and energetic particles precipitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. D.; Ruzhin, Yu. Ya.

    2014-12-01

    The high-frequency (HF) emission in near-Earth space from various powerful transmitters (radio communications, radars, broadcasting, universal time and navigation stations, etc.) form an integral part of the modern world that it cannot do without. In particular, special-purpose research facilities equipped with powerful HF transmitters are used successfully for plasma experiments and local modification of the ionosphere. In this work, we are using the results of a complex space-ground experiment to show that exposure of the subauroral region to HF emission can not only cause local changes in the ionosphere, but can also trigger processes in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system that result in intensive substorm activity (precipitations of high-energy particles, aurorae, significant variations in the ionospheric parameters and, as a consequence, in radio propagation conditions).

  12. Substorm simulation: Formation of westward traveling surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-12-01

    Auroral substorm expansion is characterized by initial brightening of aurora, followed by a bulge expanding in all directions, and a westward traveling surge (WTS). On the basis of the result obtained by a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation, we propose a scenario for the onset and the subsequent formation of WTS. (1) Near-Earth neutral line releases magnetic tension in the near-Earth plasma sheet to compress plasma and accelerate it earthward. (2) Earthward, perpendicular flow is converted to parallel flow in the near-Earth tail region. (3) Plasma moves earthward parallel to a field line. The plasma pressure is additionally enhanced at off-equator with an expanding slow-mode variation. (4) Flow vorticities coexist near the off-equatorial high-pressure region. Resultant field-aligned current (FAC) is connected to the ionosphere, which may manifest initial brightening. (5) Due to continued earthward flow, the high-plasma pressure region continues to expand to the east and west. (6) The ionospheric conductivity continues to increase in the upward FAC region, and the conductivity gradient becomes steeper. (7) The convergence of the Hall current gives rise to divergent electric field near the steep gradient of the conductivity. (8) Due to the divergent electric field, magnetospheric plasma moves counterclockwise at low altitude (in the Northern Hemisphere). (9) The additional flow vorticity generates a localized upward FAC at low altitudes, which may manifest WTS, and redistributes the ionospheric current and conductivity. Thus, WTS may be maintained in a self-consistent manner, and be a natural consequence of the overflow of the Hall current.

  13. The Aurora at Quiet Magnetospheric Conditions: Repeatability and Dipole Tilt Angle Dependence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    A tial to variation of the dipole tilt angle. Wu et al. [1991] images of the aurora borealis obtained by Polar BEAR at studied the substorm westward... Aurora at Quiet Magnetospheric Conditions: SRepeatability and Dipole Tilt Angle Dependence PE 62101F _PR 4643 6. AUTHCR(S) TA 11 I. Oznovich*, R.W...tilt angle at quiet magnetospheric conditions? In order to address these questions, northern hemisphere images of the aurora at 1356 A, obtained by

  14. Magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling during plasmoid evolution: First results

    SciTech Connect

    Hesse, M.; Birn, J. )

    1991-07-01

    The influence of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling on the dynamic evolution of the magnetotail is investigated by a three-dimensional resistive MHD code that includes the effects of the closure of field-aligned currents in a simple resistive model ionosphere. Particular emphasis is on the role of this coupling during substorm evolution and the modification of the latter by the convection driven by the ionospheric electric fields. For comparison, the authors present results from a simulation which uses an infinitely conducting ionosphere but is otherwise identical. Comparison of the two simulations shows that the major impact of magnetosphere-ionosphere communication is an acceleration of magnetotail evolution. Otherwise, phenomena in the two models are qualitatively similar. They conclude that ionospheric effects do not significantly affect substorm associated magnetotail dynamics.

  15. On the relationship between the energetic particle flux morphology and the change in the magnetic field magnitude during substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Sibeck, D. G.; Takahashi, K.; Mcentire, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the morphology of energetic particle substorm injections and the change in the magnetic field magnitude over the course of the event is examined. Using the statistical relationships between the magnetic field during the growth phase and the change in the field magnitude during substorms calculated by Lopez et al. (1988), a limited number of dispersionless ion injections observed by AMPTE CCE are selected. It is argued that this limited set is representative of a large set of events and that the conclusions drawn from examining those events are valid for substorms in general in the inner magnetosphere. It is demonstrated that in an event when CCE directly observed the disruption of the current sheet, the particle and field data show that the region of particle acceleration was highly turbulent and was temporally, and perhaps spatially, limited and that the high fluxes of energetic particles are qualitatively associated with intense inductive electric fields.

  16. Simulation of the westward traveling surge and Pi 2 pulsations during substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, J. R.; Sun, W.

    1985-01-01

    The westward traveling surge and the Pi2 pulsations are simulated as a consequence of an enhanced magnetospheric convection in a model of magnetosphere coupling. The coupling is characterized by the bouncing of Alfven waves launched by the enhanced convection. The reflection of Alfven waves from the ionosphere is treated in which the height-integrated conductivity is allowed to be highly nonuniform and fully anisotropic. The reflection of Alfven waves from the magnetosphere is characterized by the coefficient Rm, depending on whether the field lines are open or closed. The conductivity in the model is self-consistently enhanced with increasing upward field-aligned current density. The results of the simulation, including the convection pattern, the electrojets, the field-aligned current, the conductivity enhancement, the oscillation of the westward electrojet, and the average speed of the westward surge are in reasonable agreement with the features of the westward traveling surge and the Pi 2 pulsations observed during substorms.

  17. A Catapult (Slingshot) Current Sheet Relaxation Model for Substorm Triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.

    2010-12-01

    Based on the results of our superposed epoch analysis of Geotail data, we have proposed a catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation model in which earthward flows are produced in the central plasma sheet (CPS) due to the catapult (slingshot) current sheet relaxation, together with the rapid enhancement of Poynting flux toward the CPS in the lobe around X ~ -15 Re about 4 min before the substrom onset. These earthward flows are characterized by plasma pressure decrease and large amplitude magnetic field fluctuations. When these flows reach X ~ 12Re in the magnetotail, they give significant disturbances to the inner magnetosphere to initiate some instability such as a ballooning instability or other instabilities, and the substorm starts in the inner magnetosphere. The occurrence of the magnetic reconnection is a natural consequence of the initial convective earthward flows, because the relaxation of a highly stretched catapult current sheet produces a very thin current at its tailward edge being surrounded by intense magnetic fields which were formerly the off-equatorial lobe magnetic fields. Recently, Nishimura et al. [2010] reported that the substorm onset begins when faint poleward discrete arcs collide with equatorward quiet arcs. The region of earthward convective flows correlatively moves earthward prior to the onset. Thus, this region of the earthward convective flows seems to correspond to the faint poleward discrete arcs. Interestingly, our statistical analysis shows that the earthward convective flows are not produced by the magnetic reconnection, but they are attributed to the dominance of the earthward JxB force over the tailward pressure associated with the progress of the plasma sheet thinning.

  18. Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Among the major discoveries made by the Mariner 10 mission to the inner planets was the existence of an intrinsic magnetic field at Mercury with a dipole moment of approx. 300 nT R(sup 3, sub M). This magnetic field is sufficient to stand off the solar wind at an altitude of about 1 R(sub M) (i.e. approx. 2439 km). Hence, Mercury possesses a 'magnetosphere' from which the so]ar wind plasma is largely excluded and within which the motion of charged particles is controlled by the planetary magnetic field. Despite its small size relative to the magnetospheres of the other planets, a Mercury orbiter mission is a high priority for the space physics community. The primary reason for this great interest is that Mercury unlike all the other planets visited thus far, lacks a significant atmosphere; only a vestigial exosphere is present. This results in a unique situation where the magnetosphere interacts directly with the outer layer of the planetary crust (i.e. the regolith). At all of the other planets the topmost regions of their atmospheres become ionized by solar radiation to form ionospheres. These planetary ionospheres then couple to electrodynamically to their magnetospheres or, in the case of the weakly magnetized Venus and Mars, directly to the solar wind. This magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling is mediated largely through field-aligned currents (FACs) flowing along the magnetic field lines linking the magnetosphere and the high-latitude ionosphere. Mercury is unique in that it is expected that FACS will be very short lived due to the low electrical conductivity of the regolith. Furthermore, at the earth it has been shown that the outflow of neutral atmospheric species to great altitudes is an important source of magnetospheric plasma (following ionization) whose composition may influence subsequent magnetotail dynamics. However, the dominant source of plasma for most of the terrestrial magnetosphere is the 'leakage'of solar wind across the magnetopause and more

  19. On the Lévy-Nature of Magnetic Field Fluctuations During Magnetospheric Tail Current Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolini, G.; Lui, A. T.; Zimbardo, G.

    2002-12-01

    One of the most relevant phenomena occurring at the substorm onset is the development of a current wedge, which is responsible for the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling during magnetic substorms. This current wedge is generally associated with the diversion or disruption of the near cross-tail current system [Lui, 1996]. In the last years this near-Earth dipolarization phenomenon has been the subject of several observation, as well as, simulation studies, which suggested a multiscale and a non-MHD nature of the phenomenon [Sitnov et al., 2000; Malova et al., 2000; Zelenyi et al., 2000; Miura, 2000]. Here, using magnetic field data relative to 3 current disruption (CD) events as observed by AMPTEE/CCE spacecraft, we investigate the statistical features of magnetic field fluctuations. In the kinetic domain (i.e. above the ion cyclotron frequency during CD) the distribution function of magnetic field fluctuations shows non Gaussian tails and the probability of return Pt(0) scales as t-α with α !=q 1/2 which is compatible with a Lévy-statistics. Conversely, in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) region CD magnetic fluctuations are compatible with a classical Brownian motion. These findings seem to indicate that the near-Earth dipolarization process, associated with CD, is a non-MHD phenomenon, during which fast kinetic processes in collisionless plasmas take place.

  20. Global Simulation of Proton Precipitation Due to Field Line Curvature During Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilson, M. L.; Raeder, J.; Donovan, E.; Ge, Y. S.; Kepko, L.

    2012-01-01

    The low latitude boundary of the proton aurora (known as the Isotropy Boundary or IB) marks an important boundary between empty and full downgoing loss cones. There is significant evidence that the IB maps to a region in the magnetosphere where the ion gyroradius becomes comparable to the local field line curvature. However, the location of the IB in the magnetosphere remains in question. In this paper, we show simulated proton precipitation derived from the Field Line Curvature (FLC) model of proton scattering and a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation during two substorms. The simulated proton precipitation drifts equatorward during the growth phase, intensifies at onset and reproduces the azimuthal splitting published in previous studies. In the simulation, the pre-onset IB maps to 7-8 RE for the substorms presented and the azimuthal splitting is caused by the development of the substorm current wedge. The simulation also demonstrates that the central plasma sheet temperature can significantly influence when and where the azimuthal splitting takes place.

  1. Pulsars Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timokhin, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    Current density determines the plasma flow regime. Cascades are non-stationary. ALWAYS. All flow regimes look different: multiple components (?) Return current regions should have particle accelerating zones in the outer magnetosphere: y-ray pulsars (?) Plasma oscillations in discharges: direct radio emission (?)

  2. Particle Energization During Magnetic Storms with Steady Magnetospheric Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissinger, J.; Kepko, L.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Li, W.; McPherron, R. L.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic electrons pose a space weather hazard to satellites in the radiation belts. Although about half of all geomagnetic storms result in relativistic electron flux enhancements, other storms decrease relativistic electron flux, even under similar solar wind drivers. Radiation belt fluxes depend on a complex balance between transport, loss, and acceleration. A critically important aspect of radiation belt enhancements is the role of the 'seed' population--plasma sheet particles heated and transported Earthward by magnetotail processes--which can become accelerated by wave-particle interactions with chorus waves. While the effect of substorms on seed electron injections has received considerable focus, in this study we explore how quasi-steady convection during steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) events affects the transport and energization of electrons. SMC events are long-duration intervals of enhanced convection without any substorm expansions, and are an important mechanism in coupling magnetotail plasma populations to the inner magnetosphere. We detail the behavior of the seed electron population for stormtime SMC events using the Van Allen Probes in the outer radiation belt and THEMIS in the plasma sheet and inner magnetosphere. Together, the two missions provide the ability to track particle transport and energization from the plasma sheet into the radiation belts. We present SMC events with Van Allen Probes/THEMIS conjunctions and compare plasma sheet fast flows/enhanced transport to radiation belt seed electron enhancements. Finally we utilize statistical analyses to quantify the relative importance of SMC events on radiation belt electron acceleration in comparison to isolated substorms.

  3. Effects of Finite Element Resolution in the Simulation of Magnetospheric Particle Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Richard

    2006-01-01

    This document describes research done in conjunction with a degree program. The purpose of the research was to compare particle trajectories in a specified set of global electric and magnetic fields; to study the effect of mesh spacing, resulting in an evaluation of adequate spacing resolution; and to study time-dependent fields in the context of substorm dipolarizations of the magnetospheric tail.

  4. Multipoint observations of a small substorm

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, R.E. Applied Research Corp., Landover, MD ); Luehr, H. ); Anderson, B.J.; Newell, P.T.; McEntire, R.W. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper the authors present multipoint observations of a small substorm which occurred just after 0110 UT on April 25, 1985. The observations were made by spacecraft (AMPTE CCE, AMPTE IRM, DMSP F6, and DMSP F7), ground auroral stations (EISCAT magnetometer cross, Syowa, Narssarssuaq, Great Whale River, and Fort Churchill), and mid-latitude stations (Furstenfeldbruck, Toledo, and Argentine Island). These data provide them with a broad range of observations, including the latitudinal extent of the polar cap, visual identification of substorm aurorae and the magnetic perturbations produced directly beneath them, in situ magnetic field and energetic particle observations of the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet, and observations concerning the spatial expansion of the current disruption region from two radially aligned spacecraft. The DMSP data indicate that the event took place during a period when the polar cap was relatively contracted, yet the disruption of the current sheet was observed by CCE at 8.56 R{sub E}. They have been able to infer a considerable amount of detail concerning the structure and westward expansion of the auroral features associated with the event, and they show that those auroral surges were located more than 10{degree} equatorward of the boundary between open and closed field lines. Moreover, they present evidence that the current sheet disruption observed by CCE in the neutral sheet was located on field lines which mapped to the westward traveling surge observed directly overhead of the ground station at Syowa. Furthermore, the observations strongly imply that disruption of the cross-tail current began in the near-Earth region and that it had a component of expansion which was radially antisunward.

  5. Coordinated ionospheric observations indicating coupling between preonset flow bursts and waves that lead to substorm onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L. R.; Nicolls, M. J.; Hampton, D. L.; Michell, R. G.; Samara, M.; Bristow, W. A.; Donovan, E. F.; Spanswick, E.; Angelopoulos, V.; Mende, S. B.

    2014-05-01

    A critical, long-standing problem in substorm research is identification of the sequence of events leading to substorm expansion phase onset. Recent Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) all-sky imager (ASI) array observations have shown a repeatable preonset sequence, which is initiated by a poleward boundary intensification (PBI) and is followed by auroral streamers moving equatorward (earthward flow in the plasma sheet) and then by substorm onset. On the other hand, substorm onset is also preceded by azimuthally propagating waves, indicating a possible importance of wave instability for triggering substorm onset. However, it has been difficult to identify the link between fast flows and waves. We have found an isolated substorm event that was well instrumented with the Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar (PFISR), THEMIS white-light ASI, and multispectral ASI, where the auroral onset occurred within the PFISR and ASI fields of view. This substorm onset was preceded by a PBI, and ionospheric flows propagated equatorward from the polar cap, crossed the PBI, and reached the growth phase arc. This sequence provides evidence that flows from open magnetic field lines propagate across the open-closed boundary and reach the near-Earth plasma sheet prior to the onset. Quasi-stable oscillations in auroral luminosity and ionospheric density are found along the growth phase arc. These preonset auroral waves amplified abruptly at the onset time, soon after the equatorward flows reached the onset region. This sequence suggests a coupling process where preexisting stable waves in the near-Earth plasma sheet interact with flows from farther downtail and then evolve to onset instability.

  6. Substorm onset: Current sheet avalanche and stop layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2015-03-01

    A new scenario is presented for the onset of a substorm and the nature of the breakup arc. There are two main components, current sheet avalanche and stop layer. The first refers to an earthward flow of plasma and magnetic flux from the central current sheet of the tail, triggered spontaneously or by some unknown interaction with an auroral streamer or a suddenly appearing eastward flow at the end of the growth phase. The second offers a mechanism to stop the flow abruptly at the interface between magnetosphere and tail and extract momentum and energy to be partially processed locally and partially transmitted as Poynting flux toward the ionosphere. The stop layer has a width of the order of the ion inertial length. The different dynamics of the ions entering freely and the magnetized electrons create an electric polarization field which stops the ion flow and drives a Hall current by which flow momentum is transferred to the magnetic field. A simple formalism is used to describe the operation of the process and to enable quantitative conclusions. An important conclusion is that by necessity the stop layer is also highly structured in longitude. This offers a natural explanation for the coarse ray structure of the breakup arc as manifestation of elementary paths of energy and momentum transport. The currents aligned with the rays are balanced between upward and downward directions. While the avalanche is invoked for explaining the spontaneous substorm onset at the inner edge of the tail, the expansion of the breakup arc for many minutes is taken as evidence for a continued formation of new stop layers by arrival of flow bursts from the near-Earth neutral line. This is in line with earlier conclusions about the nature of the breakup arc. Small-scale structure, propagation speed, and energy flux are quantitatively consistent with observations. However, the balanced small-scale currents cannot constitute the substorm current wedge. The source of the latter must be

  7. A current disruption mechanism in the neutral sheet - A possible trigger for substorm expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Mankofsky, A.; Chang, C.-L.; Papadopoulos, K.; Wu, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    A linear analysis is performed to investigate the kinetic cross-field streaming instability in the earth's magnetotail neutral sheet region. Numerical solution of the dispersion equation shows that the instability can occur under conditions expected for the neutral sheet just prior to the onset of substorm expansion. The excited waves are obliquely propagating whistlers with a mixed polarization in the lower hybrid frequency range. The ensuing turbulence of this instability can lead to a local reduction of the cross-tail current causing it to continue through the ionosphere to form a substorm current wedge. A substorm expansion onset scenario is proposed based on this instability in which the relative drift between ions and electrons is primarily due to unmagnetized ions undergoing current sheet acceleration in the presence of a cross-tail electric field. The required electric field strength is within the range of electric field values detected in the neutral sheet region during substorm intervals. The skew in local time of substorm onset location and the three conditions under which substorm onset is observed can be understood on the basis of the proposed scenario.

  8. Magnetospheric Storms at Saturn and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, P. C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Carbary, J.; Rymer, A.; Hill, M. E.; Paranicas, C.; Dougherty, M. K.; Young, D. T.

    2007-12-01

    The terrestrial magnetospheric storms are a well-known phenomenon in which plasma from the solar wind and the ionosphere is convected into the inner magnetosphere ("ring current") and energized by betatron acceleration and rapid changes in the magnetic field (substorms). Here we compare terrestrial storm characteristics with similar, newly found characteristics of Saturn's magnetosphere. We characterize Saturn's magnetospheric response to solar wind variability by using remote energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements with simultaneous in-situ solar wind measurements when Cassini was outside the Saturnian magnetosphere. The Ion and Neutral Camera on board the Cassini spacecraft have obtained global energetic neutral atom (ENA) images of the hot plasma of Saturn's magnetosphere since February 2004. INCA obtains ENA images in the ~3-200 keV/nuc of protons and O+. The typical observations show hot plasma distributed roughly between 6 to 30 RS orbiting the planet with a period around the 10h45min rotation period depending on energy and species. However, some observations show how ENA intensity builds up on the nightside during intervals longer than the rotation period which indicates a gradual source of plasma. The intervals are often ended by a dramatic ENA intensification followed by a rotation of the newly injected plasma around the planet. We have selected a few of such intervals when Cassini was in the solar wind and could obtain solar wind parameters and simulataneous ENA image sequences. We use the Magnetic Field Experiment (MAG), the Cassini Charge Energy Mass Spectrometer (CHEMS), and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer Subsystem (CAPS) to study the IMF, solar wind speed and density during these events and find that Saturn's magnetospheric activity most likely depends more on solar wind pressure than magnetic field orientation.

  9. Association of plasma sheet variations with auroral changes during substorms

    SciTech Connect

    Hones, E.W. Jr.; Craven, J.D.; Frank, L.A.; Parks, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    Images of the southern auroral oval taken by the University of Iowa auroral imaging instrumentation on the Dynamics Explorer 1 satellite during an isolated substorm are correlated with plasma measurements made concurrently by the ISEE 1 satellite in the magnetotail. Qualitative magnetic field configuration changes necessary to relate the plasma sheet boundary location to the latitude of the auroras are discussed. Evidence is presented that the longitudinal advances of the auroras after expansive phase onset are mappings of a neutral line lengthening across the near-tail. We observe a rapid poleward auroral surge, occurring about 1 hour after expansive phase onset, to coincide with the peak of the AL index and argue that the total set of observations at that time is consistent with the picture of a /open quotes/poleward leap/close quotes/ of the electrojet marking the beginning of the substorm's recovery. 9 refs. 3 figs.

  10. Transport and acceleration of plasma in the magnetospheres of Earth and Jupiter and expectations for Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, M. G.

    The first comparative magnetospheres conference was held in Frascati, Italy thirty years ago this summer, less than half a year after the first spacecraft encounter with Jupiter's magnetosphere (Formisano, V. (Ed.), The Magnetospheres of the Earth and Jupiter, Proceedings of the Neil Brice Memorial Symposium held in Frascati, Italy, May 28-June 1, 1974. D. Reidel Publishing Co., Boston, USA, 1975). Disputes highlighted various issues still being investigated, such as how plasma transport at Jupiter deviates from the prototypical form of transport at Earth and the role of substorms in Jupiter's dynamics. Today there is a wealth of data on which to base the analysis, data gathered by seven missions that culminated with Galileo's 8-year orbital tour. We are still debating how magnetic flux is returned to the inner magnetosphere following its outward transport by iogenic plasma. We are still uncertain about the nature of sporadic dynamical disturbances at Jupiter and their relation to terrestrial substorms. At Saturn, the centrifugal stresses are not effective in distorting the magnetic field, so in some ways the magnetosphere appears Earthlike. Yet the presence of plasma sources in the close-in equatorial magnetosphere parallels conditions at Jupiter. This suggests that we need to study both Jupiter and Earth when thinking about what to anticipate from Cassini's exploration of Saturn's magnetosphere. This paper addresses issues relevant to plasma transport and acceleration in all three magnetospheres.

  11. Introduction to the special issue on history development of solar terrestrial sciences including auroral sub-storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Parks, G.; Svalgaard, L.; Kamide, Y.; Lui, T.

    2016-12-01

    Solar terrestrial (ST) sciences started centuries ago and branched into different disciplines. Starting with naked eye to highly sophisticated novel experimental techniques, observations have revealed the secrets of the Sun, heliosphere, magnetosphere, plasmasphere, and ionosphere-atmosphere components of the ST system. Theories and theoretical models have been developed for the different components independently and together. World-wide efforts under different umbrella are being persuaded to understand the challenges of the ST system. The onset problem and role of O+ ions in sub-storm physics are two issues that are hotly debated. The onset problem is whether sub-storm is triggered by magnetic reconnection in the tail region at 15-20 Re or by a current disruption at ~12 Re. The issue on O+ role is whether O+ ions affect the dynamics of sub-storms under magnetic storm and non-storm conditions differently. This special issue of Geoscience Letters contains a collection of 15 papers on the history and development of solar terrestrial sciences including auroral sub-storms. Over half of the papers are based on the presentations in a session on the same topic organized at the AOGS (Asia Oceania geosciences Society) General Assembly held in Singapore during 02-07 August 2015. The rest of the papers from outside the assembly also falls within the theme of the special issue. The papers are organized in the order of history and development of ST coupling, sub-storms, and outer heliosphere.

  12. Characterizing the Magnetospheric State for Sawtooth Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, S. F.; Tepper, J. A.; Cai, X.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetospheric sawtooth events, first identified in the early 1990's, are named for their characteristic appearance of multiple quasi-periodic intervals of slow decrease followed by sharp increase of proton energy fluxes in the geosynchronous region. The successive proton flux decrease-and-increase intervals have been interpreted as recurrences of stretching and dipolarization, respectively, of the nightside geomagnetic field [Reeves et al., 2003]. Due to their often-extended intervals with 2- 10 cycles, sawteeth occurrences are sometimes referred to as a magnetospheric mode [Henderson et al., 2006]. Studies over the past two decades of sawtooth events (both event and statistical) have yielded a wealth of information on the conditions for the onset and occurrence of sawtooth events, but the occurrences of sawtooth events during both storm and non-storm periods suggest that we still do not fully understand the true nature of sawtooth events [Cai et al., 2011]. In this study, we investigate the characteristic magnetospheric state conditions [Fung and Shao, 2008] associated with the beginning, during, and ending intervals of sawtooth events. Unlike previous studies of individual sawtooth event conditions, magnetospheric state conditions consider the combinations of both magnetospheric drivers (solar wind) and multiple geomagnetic responses. Our presentation will discuss the most probable conditions for a "sawtooth state" of the magnetosphere. ReferencesCai, X., J.-C. Zhang, C. R. Clauer, and M. W. Liemohn (2011), Relationship between sawtooth events and magnetic storms, J. Geophys. Res., 116, A07208, doi:10.1029/2010JA016310. Fung, S. F. and X. Shao, Specification of multiple geomagnetic responses to variable solar wind and IMF input, Ann. Geophys., 26, 639-652, 2008. Henderson, M. G., et al. (2006), Magnetospheric and auroral activity during the 18 April 2002 sawtooth event, J. Geophys. Res., 111, A01S90, doi:10.1029/2005JA011111. Reeves, G. D., et al. (2004), IMAGE

  13. Contribution of Latin-American scientists to the study of the magnetosphere of the Earth. A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, M.; Valdivia, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    Since the very beginning of the space era, Latin-American scientists have been contributing to the understanding of the magnetosphere of the Earth. This review summarizes some significant contributions in this field with emphasis on results obtained during the last decade. Special attention is paid to most important topics of the magnetosphere of the Earth such as geomagnetic storms and substorms and possible relations between them, interplanetary origin of storms, role of turbulent processes in the magnetosphere dynamics, and analysis of the dynamics of the magnetosphere as a complex self-organized non-linear system.

  14. Elements of M-I Coupling in Repetitive Substorm Activity Driven by Interplanetary CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Sandholt, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    By means of case studies we explore key elements of the magnetosphere-ionosphere current system associated with repetitive substorm activity during persistent strong forcing by ICMEs. Our approach consists of a combination of the magnetospheric and ionospheric perspectives on the substorm activity. The first aspect is the near-Earth plasma sheet with its repetitive excitations of the substorm current wedge, as monitored by spacecraft GOES-10 when it traversed the 2100-0300 MLT sector, and its coupling to the westward auroral electrojet (WEJ) centered near midnight during the stable interplanetary (IP) conditions. The second aspect is the excitation of Bostrom type II currents maximizing at dusk and dawn and their associated ionospheric Pedersen current closure giving rise to EEJ (WEJ) events at dusk (dawn). As documented in our study, this aspect is related to the braking phase of Earthward-moving dipolarization fronts-bursty bulk flows. We follow the magnetospheric flow/field events from spacecraft Geotail in the midtail (X = - 11 Re) lobe to geostationary altitude at pre-dawn MLTs (GOES 10). The associated M-I coupling is obtained from ground-satellite conjunctions across the double auroral oval configuration along the meridian at dusk. By this technique we distinguish between ionospheric manifestations in three latitude regimes: (i) auroral oval south, (ii) auroral oval north, and (iii) polar cap. Regime (iii) is characterized by events of enhanced antisunward convection near the polar cap boundary (flow channel events) and in the central polar cap (PCN-index events). The repetitive substorm activity is discussed in the context of the level of IP driving as given by the geoeffective IP electric field (E_KL), magnetotail reconnection (inferred from the PCN-index and spacecraft Wind at X = - 77 Re) and the storm SYM-H index. We distinguish between different variants of the repetitive substorm activity, giving rise to electrojet (AL)-plasma convection (PCN) events

  15. Plasmasphere pulsations observed simultaneously by midlatitude SuperDARN radars, ground magnetometers and THEMIS spacecraft during an auroral substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Shi, X.; Baker, J. B. H.; Frissell, N. A.; Hartinger, M.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present simultaneous ground and space-based observations of ultra-low frequency (ULF) pulsations which occurred during an auroral substorm on September 25th, 2014. Expansion phase onset began at 06:04 UT at which time three midlatitude SuperDARN radars observed strong pulsations in the Pi2 frequency range with peak to peak amplitude reaching as high as 1km/s. Similar pulsations occurred during a later auroral intensification which started at 06:20 UT. Both sets of pulsations were detected in a region of radar backscatter located inside the subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) equatorward of the auroral oval specified by THEMIS all sky imagers and inside the midlatitude density trough as mapped by GPS/TEC measurements. The amplitude of the pulsations was large enough to reverse the direction of the SAPS flow from westward to eastward. Similar pulsations were detected by electric field instrument aboard the THEMIS probe D located inside the plasmasphere. Simultaneous observations from several low-latitude ground magnetometers (some located on the dayside) further illustrate the global nature of the pulsations and suggest they may have been associated with a plasmaspheric cavity resonance (PCR). Pulsed tailward plasma flow observed by THEMIS probe E at the geosynchronous orbit suggests that the compressional energy to generate the PCR was from the Bursty Bulk Flows (BBFs) braking against the magnetospheric dipolar region.

  16. The energy coupling function and the power generated by the solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, J. R.; Lee, L. C.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1980-01-01

    A solar wind parameter epsilon, known as the energy coupling function, has been shown to correlate with the power consumption in the magnetosphere. It is shown in the present paper that the parameter epsilon can be identified semi-quantitatively as the dynamo power delivered from the solar wind to an open magnetosphere. This identification not only provides a theoretical basis for the energy coupling function, but also constitutes an observational verification of the solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo along the magnetotail. Moreover, one can now conclude that a substorm results when the dynamo power exceeds 10 to the 18th erg/s.

  17. The Differences in Onset Time of Conjugate Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weygand, J. M.; Zesta, E.; McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    The auroral electrojet (AE) index is traditionally calculated from 13 ground magnetometer stations located around the typical northern auroral oval location. Similar coverage in the Southern Hemisphere index (SAE) does not exist, so the AE calculation has only been performed using Northern Hemisphere data. In the present study, we use seven southern auroral region ground magnetometers as well as their conjugate Northern Hemisphere data to calculate conjugate AE indices for 274 days covering all four seasons. With this dataset over 1200 substorm onsets have been identified in the SAE index using the technique of Hsu et al. [2012]. A comparison of the SAE index with the world data center standard AE index shows that the substorm onsets do not always occur at the same time with differences on the order of several minutes. In this study we examine the differences in the onset time and the reason for those differences using our conjugate AE indices and using pairs of conjugate ground magnetometer stations. Specifically, we used the pair of stations at West Antarctica Ice Sheet Divide and Sanikiluaq, Canada and Syowa, Antarctica and Tjörnes, Iceland. The largest differences in onset time appear to be related to the IMF Bz and magnetic field line length. Differences on the order of minutes for the onset time of conjugate substorms have serious implications for substorm theories. The problem is that waves from a current disruption region to the mid tail, or flows from the mid tail to the current disruption region take the same amount of time (~2 minutes), which makes it difficult to decide where the onset disturbance is initiated, particularly when onset indicators have differences on the order of minutes.

  18. A Seasonal Study of Uranus' Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X.; Paty, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetospheres of the ice giant planets Uranus and Neptune are distinct from those of other major planets, including Earth, Jupiter or Saturn, because of their unique magnetic geometry: large obliquity, off-centered dipole moment, highly tilted angel between rotational axis and magnetic axis, and rapid rotation. We investigate the locations and shapes of critical boundary layers within these magnetospheres, specifically the bow shock, magnetopause and magnetotail, in order to more fully understand the complex interaction of the solar wind with these planets. To perform this study, we implement a multifluid MHD simulation capable of modeling the interplanetary solar wind interaction with the intrinsic magnetic field of the ice giant planets. These simulations are useful in that they can track individual fluids for electrons and different ion species and sources, which is important for understanding the interaction at the ice giant planets where differentiating between natively sourced ionospheric ions and externally sourced solar wind ions may be necessary due to their inherently different temperatures and compositions. Our simulations demonstrate that Uranus has an asymmetric and dynamic magnetosphere during solstice conditions, and that the asymmetry of magnetosphere might be quasi-periodic with rotation. We also investigate the magnetic structure and current systems in the magnetotail region, which can be used to understanding the global transport of plasma within the magnetosphere and hence dynamic responses to solar wind forcing and substorms. We will also present new simulations of Uranus' global magnetosphere for equinox conditions, and provide predictions for auroral locations which we will then place in the context of recent Hubble Space Telescope observations.

  19. Dynamic Particle Injections in the Magnetospheres of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B.

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of dynamic, planetward injections of plasma and energetic particles on the nightside magnetosphere is one of the defining characteristics of magnetospheric substorms at Earth. And yet, with the exploration of the solar system with planetary probes, it has become clear that dynamic planetward injections are if fact a ubiquitous characteristic of most strongly magnetized planets; only Neptune did not reveal the signatures of such processes when visited. But, within this diversity of magnetospheric environments, it is clear that the driving forces associated with injections can be very different from those at Earth. Jupiter, for example, is known to be powered by planetary rotation rather than the solar wind. Saturn has injections that are clearly powered by rotations, but it also has nightside injections that are, at minimum, triggered by solar wind events if not powered by the solar wind. Even for those magnetospheres clearly powered by rotation, there appears to be substantial similarity between the physical processes involved with the extraterrestrial planetary injections and recent formulations of injections within Earth's near-Earth magnetotail. With a focus on comparisons between Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, I here review the state of understanding generally of injections within extraterrestrial planets and what the comparisons might tell us about our understanding of substorm phenomena at Earth.

  20. Particle acceleration and transport in the tail and at the front side of the magnetosphere, task 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, Lynn M.; Moebius, Eberhard; Lee, Martin A.

    1994-01-01

    The work under this grant involved studies of: (1) the acceleration and heating of ions in the course of magnetospheric substorms and the spatial distributions of the ion populations in the magnetotail; and (2) the comparison in in-situ acceleration at the bow shock and the leakage of energetic particles from the magnetosphere as source of energetic ions upstream of the Earth's bow shock.

  1. Dynamics of the Auroral Luminosity Boundary of the Polar Cap During Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittnacher, M. J.; Chua, D.; Fillingim, M. O.; Parks, G. K.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Germany, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    The area of the polar cap during substorms has been measured using images from the Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) for different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. Changes in the poleward boundary of auroral luminosity have been analyzed in relation to substorm phase and IMF orientation. Reconnection models of flux transport into the polar cap during the substorm growth phase, and loss from the polar cap during the expansion phase, provide a framework by which these UVI observations can be analyzed. By comparison of the observations with the model predictions we can determine to what extent these models accurately predict the polar cap dynamics, and also where anomalous behavior calls for a new understanding of the dynamics beyond what these models provide. It was found that the polar cap boundary near noon and midnight usually shifted down in latitude by 1-2 degrees and 3-4 degrees respectively, increasing the area of the polar cap during the substorm growth phase as predicted. However, this growth phase phenomenon also unexpectedly occurs independently of the IMF Bz component, as shown for a substorm on January 9, 1997. The polar cap area also increased due to motion of the dawn and dusk aurora to lower latitudes, although the latitudinal shifts were asymmetric, not always concurrent, and continued well into the substorm expansion phase. The polar cap area decreased immediately following the expansion phase due to the poleward motion of the aurora on the nightside, consistent with the model prediction. What is not explained by the models is that the poleward auroral boundary in the nightside region sometimes reached very high latitudes (greater than 80 degrees MLat) greatly decreasing the polar cap area, independent of the magnitude of the substorm.

  2. Non-triggered auroral substorms and long-period (1-4 mHz) geomagnetic and auroral luminosity pulsations in the polar cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagova, Nadezda; Nosikova, Natalia; Baddeley, Lisa; Kozyreva, Olga; Lorentzen, Dag A.; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Johnsen, Magnar G.

    2017-03-01

    A study is undertaken into parameters of the polar auroral and geomagnetic pulsations in the frequency range 1-4 mHz (Pc5/Pi3) during quiet geomagnetic intervals preceding auroral substorms and non-substorm background variations. Special attention is paid to substorms that occur under parameters of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions typical for undisturbed days (non-triggered substorms). The spectral parameters of pulsations observed in auroral luminosity as measured by a meridian scanning photometer (Svalbard) in the polar cap and near the polar boundary of the auroral oval are studied and compared with those for the geomagnetic pulsations measured by the magnetometer network IMAGE in the same frequency range. It is found that Pc5/Pi3 power spectral density (PSD) is higher during pre-substorm time intervals than for non-substorm days and that specific variations of pulsation parameters (substorm precursors) occur during the last 2-4 pre-substorm hours.

  3. On the role of ground-based observations in substorm research: Can one recognize the beast from its foot prints?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauristie, K.

    2003-04-01

    The first coordinated efforts of ground-based auroral observations were carried out already during the International Geophysical Year (IGY) 1957-1958, during which all-sky camera pictures and magnetometer data were collected from several stations in the northern polar regions. This huge amount of data were later organized by Syun-Ichi Akasofu to describe the original auroral substorm concept, main parts of which belong also to the wider magnetospheric substorm schema which started to build up when satellite observations became available. Also the IGY concept is still living strong as versatile networks of ground-based instruments support the ambitious international satellite missions (like Cluster or ILWS) investigating the different solar-terrestrial coupling processes. Many magnetospheric substorm processes have their own specific ionospheric signatures. Consequently, ground-based observations are often used to provide the background context that helps the interpretation of the localized magnetospheric satellite observations. The possibility to analyse phenomena of very different scale sizes is a further advantage. With the modern high-resolution imagers auroral structures of less than kilometer-scale can be analysed. On the other hand, with the combination of the data of the global SuperDARN network and several magnetometer networks the entire polar cap convection and current pattern can be monitored. The development of various data analysis tools and assimilation methods has pushed the interpretation of ground-based data towards more quantitative analysis and resulted in several important findings. In the presentation we will discuss the benefits and pitfalls of ground-based observations, review the most important contributions to substorm research, and envisage some of the future challenges.

  4. Physics of Substorm Growth Phase, Onset, and Dipolarization

    SciTech Connect

    C.Z. Cheng

    2003-10-22

    A new scenario of substorm growth phase, onset, and depolarization during expansion phase and the corresponding physical processes are presented. During the growth phase, as a result of enhanced plasma convection, the plasma pressure and its gradient are continued to be enhanced over the quiet-time values in the plasma sheet. Toward the late growth phase, a strong cross-tail current sheet is formed in the near-Earth plasma sheet region, where a local magnetic well is formed, the plasma beta can reach a local maximum with value larger than 50 and the cross-tail current density can be enhanced to over 10nA/m{sup 2} as obtained from 3D quasi-static magnetospheric equilibrium solutions for the growth phase. The most unstable kinetic ballooning instabilities (KBI) are expected to be located in the tailward side of the strong cross-tail current sheet region. The field lines in the most unstable KBI region map to the transition region between the region-1 and region-2 currents in the ionosphere, which is consistent with the observed initial brightening location of the breakup arc in the intense proton precipitation region. The KBI explains the AMPTE/CCE observations that a low-frequency instability with a wave period of 50-75 seconds is excited about 2-3 minutes prior to substorm onset and grows exponentially to a large amplitude at the onset of current disruption (or current reduction). At the current disruption onset higher frequency instabilities are excited so that the plasma and electromagnetic field fluctuations form a strong turbulent state. Plasma transport takes place due to the strong turbulence to relax the ambient plasma pressure profile so that the plasma pressure and current density are reduced and the ambient magnetic field intensity increases by more than a factor of 2 in the high-beta(sub)eq region and the field line geometry recovers from tail-like to dipole-like dipolarization.

  5. A multisatellite case study of the expansion of a substorm current wedge in the near-earth magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Lui, A. T. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on observations from four satellites (GOES 5, GOES 6, AMPTE CCE, and AMPTE IRM) and two ground stations (San Juan and Tucson) on a substorm that occurred on April 19, 1985 at about 0830 UT. The four spacecraft were arrayed in a configuration that made it possible to separate the effects arising from the longitudinal versus the radial expansion of the substorm current wedge and thus to examine its spatial evolution. The sequence of events that was observed suggests that, during this substorm, the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet, the formation of the substorm current wedge, and the expansion of the plasma sheet began in the near-earth region, and subsequently spread tailward as well as longitudinally.

  6. Plasmas in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, L. A.; Burek, B. G.; Ackerson, K. L.; Wolfe, J. H.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The solar wind plasma analyzer on board Pioneer 2 provides first observations of low-energy positive ions in the magnetosphere of Saturn. Measurable intensities of ions within the energy-per-unit charge (E/Q) range 100 eV to 8 keV are present over the planetocentric radial distance range about 4 to 16 R sub S in the dayside magnetosphere. The plasmas are found to be rigidly corotating with the planet out to distances of at least 10 R sub S. At radial distances beyond 10 R sub S, the bulk flows appear to be in the corotation direction but with lesser speeds than those expected from rigid corotation. At radial distances beyond the orbit of Rhea at 8.8 R sub S, the dominant ions are most likely protons and the corresponding typical densities and temperatures are 0.5/cu cm and 1,000,000 K, respectively, with substantial fluctuations. It is concluded that the most likely source of these plasmas in the photodissociation of water frost on the surface of the ring material with subsequent ionization of the products and radially outward diffusion. The presence of this plasma torus is expected to have a large influence on the dynamics of Saturn's magnetosphere since the pressure ratio beta of these plasmas approaches unity at radial distances as close to the planet as 6.5 R sub S. On the basis of these observational evidences it is anticipated that quasi-periodic outward flows of plasma, accompanied with a reconfiguration of the magnetosphere beyond about 6.5 R sub S, will occur in the local night sector in order to relieve the plasma pressure from accretion of plasma from the rings.

  7. Analysis of Auroral Morphology: Substorm Precursor and Onset on January 10, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germany, G. A.; Parks, G. K.; Ranganath, H.; Elsen, R.; Richards, P. G.; Swift, W.; Spann, J. F., Jr.; Brittnacher, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    The solar wind interaction with the geomagnetic field is studied using global auroral images obtained by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on Polar. We study the dynam,cs of the poleward and equatorward boundaries of the auroral oval in response to the solar wind IMF on January 10, 1997 using a neural network algorithm to perform an automated morphological analysis. Poleward and equatorward boundaries identified by the algorithm demonstrate a clear growth motion with the southward turning of the IMF and growth and poleward expansion at substorm onset. The area poleward of the oval (polar cap) is found to increase in size coincident with the'southward turning of the IMF Bz component at 0220 UT and peaks at substorm onset at 0334 UT. The area of the oval, however, decreases continuously throughout the period of the polar cap area increase with a slight recovery observed during the substorm onset. These observations are consistent with the concept that magnetospheric dynamics are directly driven by the solar wind-geomagnetic field interactions.

  8. Multi-Scale Modeling of Magnetospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Toth, G.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a key element in many phenomena in space plasma, e.g. Coronal mass Ejections, Magnetosphere substorms. One of the major challenges in modeling the dynamics of large-scale systems involving magnetic reconnection is to quantifY the interaction between global evolution of the magnetosphere and microphysical kinetic processes in diffusion regions near reconnection sites. Recent advances in small-scale kinetic modeling of magnetic reconnection significantly improved our understanding of physical mechanisms controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site in collisionless plasma. However the progress in studies of small-scale geometries was not very helpful for large scale simulations. Global magnetosphere simulations usually include non-ideal processes in terms of numerical dissipation and/or ad hoc anomalous resistivity. Comparative studies of magnetic reconnection in small scale geometries demonstrated that MHD simulations that included non-ideal processes in terms of a resistive term 11 J did not produce fast reconnection rates observed in kinetic simulations. In collisionless magnetospheric plasma, the primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site is nongyrotropic pressure effects with spatial scales comparable with the particle Larmor radius. We utilize the global MHD code BATSRUS and replace ad hoc parameters such as "critical current density" and "anomalous resistivity" with a physically motivated model of dissipation. The primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site in incorporated into MHD description in terms of non-gyrotropic corrections to the induction equation. We will demonstrate that kinetic nongyrotropic effects can significantly alter the global magnetosphere evolution. Our approach allowed for the first time to model loading/unloading cycle in response to steady southward IMF driving. The role of solar wind parameters and

  9. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetosphere: What Have We Learned from MESSENGER?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2016-04-01

    Mercury's magnetosphere is created by the solar wind interaction with its dipolar, spin-axis aligned, northward offset intrinsic magnetic field. Structurally it resembles that of the Earth in many respects, but the magnetic field intensities and plasma densities are all higher at Mercury due to conditions in the inner solar system. Magnetospheric plasma at Mercury appears to be primarily of solar wind origin, i.e. H+ and He++, but with 10% Na+ derived from the exosphere. Solar wind sputtering and other processes promote neutrals from the regolith into the exosphere where they may be ionized and incorporated into the magnetospheric plasma population. At this point in time, about one year after MESSENGER's impact and one year prior to BepiColombo's launch, we review MESSENGER's observations of magnetospheric dynamics and structure. In doing so we will provide our best answers to the following six questions: Question #1: How do magnetosheath conditions at Mercury differ from what is found at the other planets? Question #2: How do conditions in Mercury's magnetosheath contribute to the dynamic nature of Mercury's magnetosphere? How does magnetopause reconnection at Mercury differ from what is seen at Earth? Are flux transfer events (FTEs) a major driver of magnetospheric convection at Mercury? Question #3: Does reconnection ever erode the dayside magnetosphere to the point where the subsolar region of the surface is exposed to direct solar wind impact? To what extent do induction currents driven in Mercury's interior limit the solar wind flux to the surface? Do FTEs contribute significantly to the solar wind flux reaching the surface? Question #4: What effects do heavy planetary ions have on Mercury's magnetosphere? Question #5: Does Mercury's magnetotail store and dissipate magnetic energy in a manner analogous to substorms at Earth? How is the process affected by the lack of an ionosphere and the expected high electrical resistivity of the crust? Question #6: How

  10. DYNAMICS OF STRONGLY TWISTED RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Parfrey, Kyle; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Hui, Lam

    2013-09-10

    Magnetar magnetospheres are believed to be strongly twisted due to shearing of the stellar crust by internal magnetic stresses. We present time-dependent axisymmetric simulations showing in detail the evolution of relativistic force-free magnetospheres subjected to slow twisting through large angles. When the twist amplitude is small, the magnetosphere moves quasi-statically through a sequence of equilibria of increasing free energy. At some twist amplitude the magnetosphere becomes tearing-mode unstable to forming a resistive current sheet, initiating large-scale magnetic reconnection in which a significant fraction of the magnetic free energy can be dissipated. This ''critical'' twist angle is insensitive to the resistive length scale. Rapid shearing temporarily stabilizes the magnetosphere beyond the critical angle, allowing the magnetosphere of a rapidly differentially rotating star to store and dissipate more free energy. In addition to these effects, shearing the surface of a rotating star increases the spindown torque applied to the star. If shearing is much slower than rotation, the resulting spikes in spindown rate can occur on timescales anywhere from the long twisting timescale to the stellar spin period or shorter, depending both on the stellar shear distribution and the existing distribution of magnetospheric twists. A model in which energy is stored in the magnetosphere and released by a magnetospheric instability therefore predicts large changes in the measured spindown rate before soft gamma repeater giant flares.

  11. Inferences Concerning the Magnetospheric Source Region for Auroral Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.

    1992-01-01

    It is argued that the magnetospheric source region for auroral arc breakup and substorm initiation is along boundary plasma sheet (BPS) magnetic field lines. This source region lies beyond a distinct central plasma sheet (CPS) region and sufficiently far from the Earth that energetic ion motion violates the guiding center approximation (i.e., is chaotic). The source region is not constrained to any particular range of distances from the Earth, and substorm initiation may be possible over a wide range of distances from near synchronous orbit to the distant tail. It is also argued that the layer of low-energy electrons and velocity dispersed ion beams observed at low altitudes on Aureol 3 is not a different region from the region of auroral arcs. Both comprise the BPS. The two regions occasionally appear distinct at low altitudes because of the effects of arc field-aligned potential drops on precipitating particles.

  12. Magnetospheric Convection as a Global Force Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, G.

    2007-12-01

    Since 1959 when Thomas Gold showed that motions in the magnetosphere were possible despite plasma being frozen to the magnetic field, magnetospheric convection as a subject of study has gone through several stages (to be reviewed) leading to a recent one that integrates convection into a global system of balance of forces. This area of research has opened by focusing on the region 1 current system as a carrier of force between the solar wind and the ionosphere/thermosphere fluid. An important result to emerge from it is the realization that the force that the solar wind delivers to the magnetosphere in being transferred by the region 1 current system to the ionosphere/thermosphere fluid is amplified by about an order of magnitude. (Vasyliunas refers to this as "leveraging.") The apparent violation of Newton's Third Law results from the main participants in the force balance being not the solar wind force but the JxB force on the ionosphere/thermosphere fluid and the mu-dot-grad-B force on the Earth's dipole. This talk extends the study by considering the global force-balance problem separately for the Pedersen current (a completion of the region 1 problem), the Hall current (thus introducing the region 2 current system), and the Cowling current (bringing in the substorm current wedge). The approach is through representing the ionosphere/thermosphere fluid by the shallow water equations. Novelties that result include force balance by means of tidal bulges and tidal bores.

  13. Lower thermospheric wind variations in auroral patches during the substorm recovery phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Hosokawa, Keisuke; Watkins, Brenton J.; Kurihara, Junichi; Tsuda, Takuo T.; Fallen, Christopher T.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the lower thermospheric wind with a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) at Tromsø, Norway, found the largest wind variations in a night during the appearance of auroral patches at the substorm recovery phase. Taking into account magnetospheric substorm evolution of plasma energy accumulation and release, the largest wind amplitude at the recovery phase is a fascinating result. The results are the first detailed investigation of the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupled system at the substorm recovery phase using comprehensive data sets of solar wind, geomagnetic field, auroral pattern, and FPI-derived wind. This study used three events in November 2010 and January 2012, particularly focusing on the wind signatures associated with the auroral morphology, and found three specific features: (1) wind fluctuations that were isolated at the edge and/or in the darker area of an auroral patch with the largest vertical amplitude up to about 20 m/s and with the longest oscillation period about 10 min, (2) when the convection electric field was smaller than 15 mV/m, and (3) wind fluctuations that were accompanied by pulsating aurora. This approach suggests that the energy dissipation to produce the wind fluctuations is localized in the auroral pattern. Effects of the altitudinal variation in the volume emission rate were investigated to evaluate the instrumental artifact due to vertical wind shear. The small electric field values suggest weak contributions of the Joule heating and Lorentz force processes in wind fluctuations. Other unknown mechanisms may play a principal role at the recovery phase.

  14. Substorms and polar cap convection: the 10 January 2004 interplanetary CME case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andalsvik, Y.; Sandholt, P. E.; Farrugia, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    The expansion-contraction model of Dungey cell plasma convection has two different convection sources, i.e. reconnections at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail. The spatial-temporal structure of the nightside source is not yet well understood. In this study we shall identify temporal variations in the winter polar cap convection structure during substorm activity under steady interplanetary conditions. Substorm activity (electrojets and particle precipitations) is monitored by excellent ground-satellite DMSP F15 conjunctions in the dusk-premidnight sector. We take advantage of the wide latitudinal coverage of the IMAGE chain of ground magnetometers in Svalbard - Scandinavia - Russia for the purpose of monitoring magnetic deflections associated with polar cap convection and substorm electrojets. These are augmented by direct observations of polar cap convection derived from SuperDARN radars and cross-track ion drift observations during traversals of polar cap along the dusk-dawn meridian by spacecraft DMSP F13. The interval we study is characterized by moderate, stable forcing of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system (EKL = 4.0-4.5 mV m-1; cross polar cap potential (CPCP), Φ (Boyle) = 115 kV) during Earth passage of an interplanetary CME (ICME), choosing an 4-h interval where the magnetic field pointed continuously south-west (Bz < 0; By < 0). The combination of continuous monitoring of ground magnetic deflections and the F13 cross-track ion drift observations in the polar cap allows us to infer the temporal CPCP structure on time scales less than the ~10 min duration of F13 polar cap transits. We arrived at the following estimates of the dayside and nightside contributions to the CPCP (CPCP = CPCP/day + CPCP/night) under two intervals of substorm activity: CPCP/day ~110 kV; CPCP/night ~50 kV (45% CPCP increase during substorms). The temporal CPCP structure during one of the substorm cases resulted in a dawn-dusk convection asymmetry measured by DMSP F13 which

  15. Dynamics of the 1054 UT March 22, 1979, substorm event: CDAW 6

    SciTech Connect

    McPherron, R.L.; Manka, R.H.

    1985-02-01

    The physical processes involved in the transfer of energy from the solar wind to the magnetosphere, and release associated with substorms, have been examined in a sequence of Coordinated Data Analysis Workshops (CDAW 6). Magnetic storms of March 22 and 31, 1979, were chosen to study the problem, using a data base from 13 spacecraft and about 130 ground-based magnetometers. This paper describes the March 22 storm, in particular the large, isolated substorm at 1054 UT which followed an interval of magnetic calm. We summarize the observations in the solar wind, in various regions of the magnetosphre, and at the ground, synthesizing these observations into a description of the substorn development. We then give our interpretation of these observations and test their consistency with the reconnection model. The substorm appears to have been generated by a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field associated with a current sheet crossing. Models of ionospheric currents derived from ground data show the substorm had three phases of development. During the first phase, a two-celled convection current system developed in the polar cap as synchronous spacecraft on the nightside recorded an increasingly tailike field and the ISEE measurements show that the near-earth plasma sheet thinned. In the second phase, possibly triggered by sudden changes in the solar wind, a one-celled current system was added to the first, enhancing the westward electrojet. During this phase the synchronous orbit field became more dipolar, and the plasma sheet magnetic field turned strongly southward as rapid tailward flow developed soon after expansion onset, suggesting that a neutral line formed in the near-earth plasma sheet with subsequent plasmoid ejection.

  16. Dynamical effects of substorms in the middle and lower latitude ionosphere. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pi, Xiaoqing

    1995-01-01

    The Earth`s ionosphere, a region of the the upper atmosphere spanning altitudes from approximately 100 to 1000 km, contains a complex pattern of electron densities produced by solar emissions, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical processes. In this dissertation, a plasma disturbance effect is identified in long-term observations, characterized statistically, and analyzed using numerical modeling. Results drawn from the model are subjected to verification using a dedicated observational campaign. The distinctive feature treated is a pattern of diurnal double maxima (DDM) in total electron content (TEC) observations. The observed DDM events have a clear relationship with geomagnetic disturbances known as substorms. A time-dependent ionospheric model is used to simulate observed DDM events over a latitudinal range of +/- 38 deg. (dip latitude), and in two longitude sectors (75 deg. W and 7 deg. E). Modeling results show that TEC DDM patterns can be created by a combined effect of ionospheric F region plasma vertical drifts and highly altitude-dependent chemical loss mechanisms. Modeling studies explore two possible substorm-related dynamical sources for these perturbation: magnetospheric electric field penetration and overshielding effects, or traveling disturbances in the neutral atmosphere. Local time, latitudinal, and longitudinal characteristics of these dynamical perturbations are investigated in order to define global-scale signatures of the ionosphere`s response to substorms. An observational campaign was formulated and conducted to verify model predictions. The techniques included: magnetometer in the auroral zone for indications of substorm activity; incoherent scatter radars, from high to low latitudes near 75 deg. W longitude, to measure ionospheric electron densities, plasma drifts and meridional neutral winds; and all sky CCD cameras and a Fabry-Perot interferometer for 6300 A airglow and neutral winds at a sub-auroral site.

  17. Integrated Observations of ICME - Driven Substorm - Storm Evolution on 7 August 1998: Traditional and Non-Traditional Aspects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Sandholt, P. E.; Torbert, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to obtain an integrated view of substorm-storm evolution in relation to well-defined interplanetary (IP) conditions, and to identify traditional and non-traditional aspects of the DP1 and DP2 current systems during substorm activity. Specifically, we report a case study of substorm/storm evolution driven by an ICME from ground observations around the oval in relation to geoeffective IP parameters (Kan-Lee electric field, E-KL, and dynamic pressure, Pdyn), geomagnetic indices (AL, SYM-H and PCN) and satellite observations (from DMSP F13 and F14, Geotail, and GOES spacecraft). A sudden enhancement of E-KL at a southward turning of the IMF led to an initial transient phase (PCN-enhancement) followed by a persistent stage of solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. The persistent phase terminated abruptly at a steep E-KL reduction when the ICME magnetic field turned north after a 3-hour-long interval of enhanced E-KL. The persistent phase consisted of (i) a 45-min-long substorm growth phase (DP2 current) followed by (ii) a classical substorm onset (DP1 current) in the 0100 - 0300 MLT sector, (ii) a 30-min-long expansion phase, maximizing in the same sector, and (iii) a phase lasting for 1.5 hr of 10-15 min-long DP1 events in the 2100 - 2300 and 0400 - 0600 MLT sectors. In the morning sector the expansion phase was characterized by Ps6 pulsations and omega bands. The SYM-H evolution reached the level of a major storm after a 2.5-hour-long interval of E-KL ˜5 mV/m and elevated Pdyn in the substorm expansion phase. Magetosphere - Ionosphere (M - I) coupling during a localized electrojet event at 0500 MLT in the late stage of the substorm expansion is studied by ground - satellite conjunction data (Iceland - Geotail). The DP1 and DP2 components of geomagnetic activity are discussed in relation to M - I current systems and substorm current wedge morphology.

  18. Substorm effects in auroral spectra. [electron spectrum hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eather, R. H.; Mende, S. B.

    1973-01-01

    A substorm time parameter is defined and used to order a large body of photometric data obtained on aircraft expeditions at high latitudes. The statistical analysis demonstrates hardening of the electron spectrum at the time of substorm, and it is consistent with the accepted picture of poleward expansion of aurora at the time of substorm and curvature drift of substorm-injected electrons. These features are not evident from a similar analysis in terms of magnetic time. We conclude that the substorm time concept is a useful ordering parameter for auroral data.

  19. Formation of a very thin current sheet in the near-earth magnetotail and the explosive growth phase of substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Zhang, L.; Choe, G. S.; Cai, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    A magnetofricional method is used to construct two-dimensional MHD equilibria of the Earth's magnetosphere for a given distribution of entropy functions(S = pV(exp gamma), where p is the plasma pressure and V is the tube volume per unit magnetic flux. It is found that a very thin current sheet with B (sub zeta) is less than 0.5 nu T and thickness less than 1000 km can be formed in the near-earth magnetotail (x is approximately -8 to -20R(sub e) during the growth phase of substorm. The tail current sheets are found to become thinner as the entropy or the entropy gradient increases. It is suggested that the new entropy anti-diffusion instability associated with plasma transport across field lines leads to magnetic field dipolarization and accelerates the formation of thin current sheet, which may explain the observed explosive growth phase of substorms.

  20. Dying Flow Bursts as Generators of the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    Many theories or conjectures exist on the driver of the substorm current wedge, e.g. rerouting of the tail current, current disruption, flow braking, vortex formation, and current sheet collapse. Magnitude, spatial scale, and temporal development of the related magnetic perturbations suggest that the generator is related to the interaction of the flow bursts with the dipolar magnetosphere after onset of reconnection in the near-Earth tail. The question remains whether it is the flow energy that feeds the wedge current or the internal energy of the arriving plasma. In this presentation I argue for the latter. The current generation is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the preceding layer of high-beta plasma after flow braking. The generator current is the grad-B current at the outer boundary of the compressed high-beta plasma layers. It needs the sequential arrival of several flow bursts to account for duration and magnitude of the ionospheric closure current.

  1. Dying Flow Bursts as Generators of the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, G.

    2015-12-01

    Many theories or conjectures exist on the driver of the substorm current wedge, e.g. rerouting of the tail current, current disruption, flow braking, vortex formation, and current sheet collapse. Magnitude, spatial scale, and temporal development of the related magnetic perturbations suggest that the generator is related to the interaction of the flow bursts with the dipolar magnetosphere after onset of reconnection in the near-Earth tail. The question remains whether it is the flow energy that feeds the wedge current or the internal energy of the arriving plasma. In this presentation I argue for the latter. The current generation is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the preceding layer of high-beta plasma after flow braking. The generator current is the grad-B current at the outer boundary of the compressed high-beta plasma layers. It needs the sequential arrival of several flow bursts to account for duration and magnitude of the ionospheric closure current.

  2. Van Allen Probes observations of dipolarization and its associated O+ flux variations in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nose, M.; Keika, K.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; MacDowall, R. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent study employing the MDS-1 satellite reveals that magnetic field dipolarization in the deep inner magnetosphere is not unusual. When the MDS-1 satellite was located at L=3.5-5.0 near the auroral onset longitude (MLT difference of ≤2.5 h), the occurrence probability of local dipolarization was about 16%. Surprisingly, an event was found at L~3.6, far inside the geosynchronous altitude. It was also shown that after the dipolarization, the oxygen ENA flux in the nightside ring current region measured by the IMAGE satellite was predominantly enhanced by a factor of 2-5 and stayed at an enhanced level for more than 1 h, while clear enhancement was scarcely seen in the hydrogen ENA flux. To better understand mechanisms of the selective acceleration of O+ ions during dipolarization, an in-situ measurement of ion fluxes is needed. However, there are few studies investigating H+ and O+ flux variations during dipolarization in the deep inner magnetosphere. In this study we investigate magnetic field dipolarization and its associated ion flux variations in the deep inner magnetosphere, using magnetic field and ion flux data obtained by the Van Allen Probes. From the magnetic field data recorded on the nightside (1800-0600 MLT) in the inner magnetosphere (L=3.0-6.6) in VDH coordinates, we select substorm-related dipolarization events in which the H component increases by more than 20 nT and the absolute value of the V component decreases by more than 8 nT in 5 minutes. About 150 dipolarization events are identified from 1 October 2012 to 30 June 2015. We find that the dipolarization mostly occurs at L=4.5-6.5 in the premidnight sector (2100-0000 MLT). No events are found at L<4.0. Some dipolarization events are accompanied by O+ flux enhancements in the energy range higher than a few keV, which have the pitch angle distribution peaked around 45 or 135 degrees. We also find that low energy O+ ions often appear after dipolarization with an energy dispersion starting from

  3. Magnetotail Current Sheet Thinning and Magnetic Reconnection Dynamics in Global Modeling of Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Toth, G.; DeZeeuw, D. L.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetotail current sheet thinning and magnetic reconnection are key elements of magnetospheric substorms. We utilized the global MHD model BATS-R-US with Adaptive Mesh Refinement developed at the University of Michigan to investigate the formation and dynamic evolution of the magnetotail thin current sheet. The BATSRUS adaptive grid structure allows resolving magnetotail regions with increased current density up to ion kinetic scales. We investigated dynamics of magnetotail current sheet thinning in response to southwards IMF turning. Gradual slow current sheet thinning during the early growth phase become exponentially fast during the last few minutes prior to nightside reconnection onset. The later stage of current sheet thinning is accompanied by earthward flows and rapid suppression of normal magnetic field component $B-z$. Current sheet thinning set the stage for near-earth magnetic reconnection. In collisionless magnetospheric plasma, the primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site is non-gyrotropic effects with spatial scales comparable with the particle Larmor radius. One of the major challenges in global MHD modeling of the magnetotail magnetic reconnection is to reproduce fast reconnection rates typically observed in smallscale kinetic simulations. Bursts of fast reconnection cause fast magnetic field reconfiguration typical for magnetospheric substorms. To incorporate nongyritropic effects in diffusion regions we developed an algorithm to search for magnetotail reconnection sites, specifically where the magnetic field components perpendicular to the local current direction approaches zero and form an X-type configuration. Spatial scales of the diffusion region and magnitude of the reconnection electric field are calculated self-consistently using MHD plasma and field parameters in the vicinity of the reconnection site. The location of the reconnection sites and spatial scales of the diffusion region are updated

  4. An influence of long-lasting and gradual magnetic flux transport on fate of magnetotail fast plasma flows: An energetic particle injection substorm event study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowada, Motoharu; Fu, Suiyan; Parks, George K.; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.; Pu, Zuyin

    2014-10-01

    Based on multi-satellite and ground observations, we investigated an influence of long-lasting and gradual enhancements of magnetic flux transport rate on the magnetotail fast flow duration. On March 10th, 2009, THEMIS-B, which was located in the central plasma sheet of middle distant magnetotail (XGSM ~-25.8 RE), observed the fast flows with the velocity exceeding 300 km/s, lasting over 3 h for intense southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) period. During long-lasting fast flows, AL index variations were very extensive and their recovery was much slow. Pi 2 waves were observed at the ground observatories around the THEMIS's footpoints and at low-/mid-latitudes. The aspect for these AL variations suggests Steady Magnetospheric Convection (SMC), but clear substorm signatures were also observed. Further magnetic dipolarization was detected by THEMIS-A at XGSM ~-8.2 RE and its nearby THEMIS-E. Only THEMIS-A observed the associated energetic electron flux enhancements. Therefore, the fast flows occurred during substorm with energetic particle injections at “imitative” SMC, which would be driven by prolonged intense southward IMF. The cumulative transport rates of magnetic and Poynting fluxes consecutively and gradually enhanced. On the other hand, THEMIS-C detected much shorter fast flows with the duration of 37 min at XGSM ~-18.1 RE and weak/gradual substorm-associated dipolarization. However, the cumulative magnetic flux transport rate was enhanced only during the fast flow interval and was saturated after the fast flows. From different magnetic transport rate profiles at THEMIS-B and THEMIS-C, the realms of dipolar-configured field lines expanded to near THEMIS-C's position responsible for long-lasting fast flow-associated consecutive and gradual magnetic flux pileup. Because the resultant “high-speed flow braking” region was retreated into a few RE tailward direction, long-lasting fast flows were almost stemmed. These results suggest that the

  5. Statistical visualization of the Earth's magnetotail based on Geotail data and the implied substorm model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Nosé, M.; Nagata, D.; Liou, K.; Obara, T.; Nishida, A.; Saito, Y.; Mukai, T.

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the temporal and spatial development of the near-Earth magnetotail during substorms based on multi-dimensional superposed-epoch analysis of Geotail data. The start time of the auroral break-up (t=0) of each substorm was determined from auroral data obtained by the Polar and IMAGE spacecraft. The key parameters derived from the plasma, magnetic-field, and electric-field data from Geotail were sorted by their meridional X(GSM)-Z(proxy) coordinates. The results show that the Poynting flux toward the plasma-sheet center starts at least 10 min before the substorm onset, and is further enhanced at X~-12 RE (Earth radii) around 4 min before the onset. Simultaneously, large-amplitude fluctuations occurred, and earthward flows in the central plasma sheet between X~-11 RE and X~-19 RE and a duskward flow around X=-10 RE were enhanced. The total pressure starts to decrease around X=-16 RE about 4 min before the onset of the substorm. After the substorm onset, a notable dipolarization is observed and tailward flows commence, characterised by southward magnetic fields in the form of a plasmoid. We confirm various observable-parameter variations based on or predicted by the relevant substorm models; however, none of these can explain our results perfectly. Therefore, we propose a catapult (slingshot) current-sheet relaxation model, in which an earthward convective flow produced by catapult current-sheet relaxation and a converted duskward flow near the Earth are enhanced through flow braking around 4 min before the substorm onset. These flows induce a ballooning instability or other instabilities, causing the observed current disruption. The formation of the magnetic neutral line is a natural consequence of the present model, because the relaxation of a highly stretched catapult current-sheet produces a very thin current at its tailward edge being surrounded by intense earthward and tailward magnetic fields which were formerly the off-equatorial lobe magnetic

  6. Particle acceleration and transport in the tail and at the front side of the magnetosphere, task 1 and 2. Final report, 19 February 1991-30 September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kistler, L.M.; Moebius, E.; Lee, M.A.

    1994-12-01

    The work under this grant involved studies of: (1) the acceleration and heating of ions in the course of magnetospheric substorms and the spatial distributions of the ion populations in the magnetotail; and (2) the comparison in in-situ acceleration at the bow shock and the leakage of energetic particles from the magnetosphere as source of energetic ions upstream of the Earth's bow shock.

  7. Electron precipitation pattern and substorm morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Burch, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Patterns of the precipitation of low energy electrons observed by polar satellites were examined as functions of substorm phase. Precipitation boundaries are generally identifiable at the low latitude edge of polar cusp electron precipitation and at the poleward edge of precipitation in the premidnight sector. Both of these boundaries move equatorward when the interplanetary magnetic field turns southward.

  8. Energy cascade in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeter, J. L.; Dahlgren, H.; Akbari, H.; Swoboda, J.; Hampton, D. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Dyrud, L. P.; Fentzke, J.

    2013-12-01

    Common to all geomagnetic storms and substorms is the phenomenon of energy cascade, wherein an impulsive change in magnetospheric free energy is dissipated in a hierarchy of spatial and temporal scales at the ionospheric footprint, extending down to the fundamental scales available in the system (electron gyro-radius, electron inertial length). This paper investigates energy cascade through a synthesis of multi-scale measurements of a particular substorm (onset at ~10 UT on 01 March 2011). Fortuitous space-based measurements from the AMPERE experiment document the regional intensification of field-aligned currents. Conjugate ground-optical measurements of the subsequent auroral breakup are found to represent the optical manifestation of time-energy dispersive field-aligned electron bursts (FABs) [Dahlgren et al., 2013]. The 449-MHz Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar connects these features with ion-acoustic turbulence at the expanding edge of the substorm. The connection of large scale substorm currents with decameter-scale ionospheric turbulence fills an important observational gap in our understanding of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling under disturbed conditions.

  9. A Statistical Study of EMIC Waves Observed at THEMIS Probes in the Outer (L > 7) Magnetosphere Under Quiet Geomagnetic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. J.; Kim, K. H.; Park, J. S.; Lee, E.; Lee, D. H.

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can be generated in the equatorial magnetosphere by an anisotropic temperature distribution (T⊥>T∥) of energetic (10-100 keV) ions. They are typically observed in the afternoon sector with a wide L range (L > 7) and occur near the plasmapause. Thus, it has been suggested that the distribution of EMIC wave occurrence in the afternoon sector is associated with the plasmaspheric expansion (i.e., plasmapsheric bulge or plume). Since the plasmapause is further away the earth during times of low geomagnetic activity, it is expected that EMIC wave's spatial distribution under quiet geomagnetic conditions could be different from that under averaged geomagnetic conditions. In our study we investigate the spatial distribution of EMIC waves during quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp ≤ 1) in the outer magnetosphere (L > 7) using the magnetic field data from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft from 2008 to 2009. We also examine the spatial distribution of cold plasma density estimated from THEMIS spacecraft potential data and compare it with EMIC wave occurrence during quiet geomagnetic conditions.

  10. Electric Fields Associated with Deep Injections of 10s to 100s keV Electrons in the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Califf, S.; Li, X.; Jaynes, A. N.; Zhao, H.; Malaspina, D.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations by HOPE and MagEIS onboard the Van Allen Probes show frequent penetration of 10s to 100s keV electrons through the slot region and into the inner belt, resulting in an abundant electron population below L=3. The conventional picture is that the source populations of these 10s to 100s keV electrons originate in the plasma sheet and are injected (along with plasma sheet ions) into the inner magnetosphere either through enhancements in the large-scale convection electric field and/or through earthward propagating dipolarization fronts associated with substorms. In such cases the inward radial limit of the injections should coincide with the plasmapause. However, these electron injections often extend inside the plasmasphere, are observed far earthward of the typically accepted "flow-braking" region for dipolarization fronts, and occur at much lower L shells than injections of ions with similar energies. We investigate the electric fields associated with these deep electron injections using data from the Van Allen Probes and THEMIS in order to shed light on the underlying mechanisms that allow them to penetrate so far into the inner magnetosphere.

  11. Enabling Global Kinetic Simulations of the Magnetosphere via Petascale Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Vu, H. X.; Omelchenko, Y. A.; Tatineni, M.; Majumdar, A.; Catalyurek, U. V.; Saule, E.

    2009-11-01

    The ultimate goal in magnetospheric physics is to understand how the solar wind transfers its mass, momentum and energy to the magnetosphere. This problem has turned out to be much more complex intellectually than originally thought. MHD simulations have proven useful in predicting eminent features of substorms and other global events. Given the complexity of solar wind-magnetosphere interactions, hybrid (electron fluid, kinetic ion) simulations have recently been emerging in the studies of the global dynamics of the magnetosphere with the goal of accurately predicting the energetic particle transport and structure of plasma boundaries. We take advantage of our recent innovations in hybrid simulations and the power of massively parallel computers to make breakthrough 3D global kinetic simulations of the magnetosphere. The preliminary results reveal many major differences with global MHD simulations. For example, the hybrid simulations predict the formation of the quadruple structure associated with reconnection events, ion/ion kink instability in the tail, turbulence in the magnetosheath, and formation of the ion foreshock region.

  12. Is Jupiter's magnetosphere like a pulsar's or earth's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1975-01-01

    Two possible models of Jupiter's magnetosphere are compared: a pulsar-like radial-outflow model and an earth-like convection model. For the radial-outflow model, Pioneer 10 data are used to estimate the total particle and energy fluxes which must be provided by Jupiter (or its magnetosphere within the Alfven radius) to power the outflow. The convection model is considered with emphasis on field-line reconnection, convection flow time, and the location of Jupiter's magnetopause and plasmapause. The imposition of corotation on Jupiter's ionosphere, magnetosphere, and upper atmosphere is investigated in terms of an aligned rotator with either type of magnetosphere. It is concluded that: (1) Jupiter's convection flow is likely to be super-Alfvenic in its outer magnetosphere, (2) Jupiter may have earth-like magnetopauses near local dawn during substorms, (3) the angular-momentum flux that can diffuse upward through Jupiter's polar-cap atmospheres seems insufficient to impose corotation upon a radial outflow or convective return flow, and (4) neither model can be definitively accepted.

  13. A set of satellite experiments for studying the magnetosphere-ionosphere communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gringauz, K. I.

    1978-01-01

    Magnetospheric substorms are one of the basic problems in the physics of near earth space. They appear as magnetic and ionospheric perturbations, disturbances in radio communication, polar auroras and electromagnetic radiation in different frequency ranges. These phenomena were studied from single satellites. However, it is impossible to study these phenomena adequately without simultaneous measurements from at least two different positions with identical instruments. A suitable program can be developed based on the Interkosmos work using new achievements in electronics.

  14. Electric field variations during substorms: OGO-6 measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    The OGO-6 electric field measurements make it clear that the general pattern of high latitude electric fields in magnetic time-invariant latitude coordinates is not highly variable and that when unusual variations, or field distributions, occur they are relatively isolated in time and spatial extent. Thus, electric field changes on a global scale cannot, in general, be evoked as a direct cause of substorms. Polar traverses along the 18(h) to 6(h) magnetic time meridian show that the sum of potential drops across the evening auroral belt and morning auroral belt approximately equals the potential drop across the polar cap. The integrated polar cap potential drop ranges from 20 to 100 keV and values in the center of this range are most common under conditions of moderate magnetic disturbance. Roughly near 18(h) magnetic local time, a latitudinally narrow strip at the transition between auroral belt and polar cap fields exhibits unusually large field fluctuations immediately following the sudden onset of a negative bay at later magnetic local times. It appears likely that this spatially isolated correlation is related to an effect rather than a cause of substorm enhancement.

  15. Dynamic Agents of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Rowland, Douglas E.; Moore, Thomas E.; Collier, Michael

    2011-01-01

    VISIONS sounding rocket mission (VISualizing Ion Outflow via Neutral atom imaging during a Substorm) has been awarded to NASA/GSFC (PI Rowland) in order to provide the first combined remote sensing and in situ measurements of the regions where ion acceleration to above 5 e V is occurring, and of the sources of free energy and acceleration mechanisms that accelerate the ions. The key science question of VISIONS is how, when, and where, are ions accelerated to escape velocities in the auroral zone below 1000 km, following substorm onset? Sources of free energy that power this ion acceleration process include (but not limited) electron precipitation, field-aligned currents, velocity shears, and Alfvenic Poynting flux. The combine effect of all these processes on ionospheric ion outflows will be investigated in a framework of the kinetic model that has been developed by Khazanov et al. in order to study the polar wind transport in the presence of photoelectrons.

  16. Modeling the Inner-Magnetosphere Ionosphere with the CIMI Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, M. C. H.; Buzulukova, N.; Chen, S. H.; Glocer, A.; Nagai, T.; Valek, P. W.; Perez, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    We have combined two well developed models, the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) and the Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model to form a Comprehensive Inner-Magnetosphere Ionosphere (CIMI) model. CIMI predicts ion and electron fluxes in the radiation belts and ring current, particle density in the plasmasphere, Region 2 current, subauroal electric field and particle precipitation in the ionosphere, and their responses to solar wind condition. CIMI considers important cross-energy interactions in the inner magnetosphere and is able to identify the physical processes that are responsible for ring current, radiation belt enhancements and losses, such as, particle injection, adiabatic acceleration, wave-particle interactions and magnetopause shadowing. We demonstrate the capability of CIMI by simulating a magnetic storm on 5-9 April 2010 and a MHD substorm. We also illustrate that CIMI is an excellent tool for analyzing and interpreting global energetic neutral atom data from TWINS and the in-situ measurements from the Van Allen Probes mission.

  17. New Understanding of Mercury's Magnetosphere from MESSENGER'S First Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho, George C.; Killen, M.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Raines, James M.; Schriver, David; Somomon, Sean C.; Starr, Richard; Travnicek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    Observations by the MESSENGER spacecraft on 14 January 2008 have revealed new features of the solar system's smallest planetary magnetosphere. The interplanetary magnetic field orientation was unfavorable for large inputs of energy from the solar wind and no evidence of magnetic substorms, internal magnetic reconnection, or energetic particle acceleration was detected. Large-scale rotations of the magnetic field were measured along the dusk flank of the magnetosphere and ultra-tow frequency waves were frequently observed beginning near closest approach. Outbound the spacecraft encountered two current-sheet boundaries across which the magnetic field intensity decreased in a step-like manner. The outer current sheet is the magnetopause boundary. The inner current sheet is similar in structure, but weaker and -1000 km closer to the planet. Between these two current sheets the magnetic field intensity is depressed by the diamagnetic effect of planetary ions created by the photo-ionization of Mercury's exosphere.

  18. Freja Studies of the Current-Voltage Relation in Substorm-Related Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsson, A.; Andersson, Laila; Eriksson, A. I.; Clemmons, J.; Erlandsson, R. E.; Reeves, G.; Hughes, T.; Murphee, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    Field-aligned currents and electrostatic potentials play important roles in the coupling between the magnetosphere and the ionosphere. If one assumes that the ionosphere-magnetosphere potential difference is mainly due to the mirror force, one can use the single particle adiabatic kinetic theory to describe the system. From this theory, a linear relationship j(sub II) = KV between field-aligned current density j(sub II) and potential drop V along the same field line can be derived, provided that the potential drop is not too large and not too small. With rare exceptions, observational tests of this relation have mainly concentrated on quiet magnetospheric situations, with acceleration voltages V approx. less than 5 kV. Here we use observations from the Freja satellite of precipitating auroral electrons at 1.700 km altitude to study substorm related events, with acceleration voltages up to 20 keV. The observations are found to be consistent with a linear current-voltage relation even i n these conditions, although with values of the field aligned K lower than previously reported (1-5 x 10(exp 11 S/sq m). This can be explained by lower densities and higher characteristic electron energies in the magnetospheric source region of the precipitating electrons. We analyze the data by three different methods, which are all found to be in general agreement. The results are in agreement with a previous study, where the spectra of precipitating electrons --were indirectly inferred by inversion of data from the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar, thereby validating the use of radar data for studies of auroral electrons. Comparisons with previous studies are made, emphasizing the dependence of the results on the type of auroral structure and magnetospheric conditions.

  19. Correlated observations of substorm effects in the near-earth region and the deep magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Baumjohann, W.; Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of energetic particle measurements from the geosynchronous satellite 1982-019 and magnetic field, electron plasma, and energetic proton and electron measurements obtained with ISEE 3 in the deep tail are presented. The data are supplemented by ground magnetograms. A substorm occurred on March 22, 1983, close to 0300 UT as identified in the ground magnetograms and by a particle injection at geosynchronous orbit. About 10 min later, ISEE 3 observed (at a distance of approximately 130 RE in the deep tail) magnetic field, plasma, and energetic particle signatures consistent with the passage of a plasmoid. After the passage of the plasmoid the satellite enters shortly into a lobelike environment, in which an energetic proton beam is observed. High-resolution magnetic field data are indicative of small-scale structures in the postplasmoid plasma sheet. From the plasma sheet flow speed during the plasmoid's passage it is concluded that the 0300 UT substorm is responsible for its origin. This allows an approximate timing of the plasmoid release at a near-earth neutral line and of the plasma sheet recovery after substorm onset, and it indicates a close relationship between processes in the near-earth plasma sheet and the deep tail during substorms.

  20. Substorm Onset and the Possible Role of O+ IONS Flowing out during Pseudo-Breakup Auroras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; Fillingim, M. O.; Fu, S.; Cui, Y.; Hong, J.

    2014-12-01

    An isolated substorm onset event that occurred on 14 February 2001 was recorded by the WIC on IMAGE. WIC observed an enhanced electron precipitation region that grew out of a pseudo-breakup auroral spot at the poleward boundary that moved southward and activitated an aurora. An isolated substorm onset was triggered when the pseudo-breakup region connected to the activitated aurora at the lower boundary. This observation is a global scale phenomenon, whose behavior is similar but also different from observations of north-south motion at smaller localized scales that precede the onset of substorms (Nishimura et al., 2010). Fortuitously, Cluster during this pseudo-break auroral activity, detected escape of low energy (20-50 eV) field-aligned O+ ions. The triggered onset was accompanied by the escape of more energetic O+ (80 eV -300 eV) ions. Our observations suggest that the escaping O+ ions during pseudo-breakup auroras may be the seed for the onset of isolated substorms needed in some simulation models (Winglee and Harnett, 2010).

  1. Nonadiabatic heating of the central plasma sheet at substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Frank, L. A.; Rostoker, G.; Fennell, J.; Mitchell, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    Heating events in the plasma sheet boundary layer and central plasma sheet are found to occur at the onset of expansive phase activity. The main effect is a dramatic increase in plasma temperature, coincident with a partial dipolarization of the magnetic field. Fluxes of energetic particles increase without dispersion during these events which occur at all radial distances up to 23 RE, the apogee of the ISEE spacecraft. A major difference between these heating events and those observed at geosynchronous distances lies in the heating mechanism which is nonadiabatic beyond 10 RE but may be adiabatic closer to earth. The energy required to account for the increase in plasma thermal energy is comparable with that required for Joule heating of the ionosphere. The plasma sheet must be considered as a major sink in the energy balance of a substorm. Lobe magnetic pressures during these events are estimated. Change in lobe pressure are generally not correlated with onsets or intensifications of expansive phase activity.

  2. ULF Waves above the Nightside Auroral Oval during Substorm Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, I. J.; Watt, C. E. J.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter reviews historical ground-based observations of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves tied to substorms, and highlights new research linking these ULF waves explicitly to substorm onset itself. There are several robust methods that can be used to determine the characteristics of a nonstationary time series such as the ULF magnetic field traces observed in the auroral zone during substorms. These include the pure state filter, the Hilbert-Huang transform, and wavelet analysis. The first indication of a substorm is a sudden brightening of one of the quiet arcs lying in the midnight sector of the oval. The chapter focuses on the properties of ULF waves that are seen in two-dimensional images of auroral intensity near substorm expansion phase onset. It also discusses a wider range of magnetotail instabilities that could be responsible for the azimuthally structured auroral forms at substorm onset.

  3. The role of random fluctuations in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system: a dynamic stochastic model for AE-index variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, A.; Klimas, A.; Vassiliadis, D.; Uritsky, V.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding the evolution of bursts of activity in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system has been one of the central challenges in space physics since, and even prior to the introduction of the term "substorm". An extensive amount of work has been put to the characterization of the average near-space plasma environment behavior during substorms and several more or less deterministic models have been introduced to explain the observations. However, although most of substorms seem to have some common characteristics (otherwise any classification would be completely meaningless), like intensification of auroral electric currents, dipolarization of the magnetotail and injections of plasma sheet charged particles, each substorm has its distinct features in terms of strong fluctuations around the average "typical" behavior. This highly complex nature of individual substorms suggests that stochastic processes may play a role, even a central one in the evolution of substorms. In this work, we develop a simple stochastic model for the AE-index variations to investigate the role of random fluctuations in the substorm phenomenon. We show that by the introduction of a stochastic component, we are able to capture some fundamental features of the AE-index variations. More specifically, complex variations associated with individual bursts are a central part of the model. It will be demonstrated that by analyzing the structure of the constructed stochastic model some presently open questions about substorm-related bursts of the AE-index can be addressed quantitatively. First and foremost, it will be shown that the stochastic fluctuations are a fundamental part of the AE-index evolution and cannot be neglected even when the average properties of the index are of interest.

  4. Observations of ion streaming during substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Williams, D. J.; Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    The ion beam phenomenon at the plasma sheet boundary is examined for individually identifiable substorms, and the substorm-associated particle phenomena are evaluated in terms of the energy-angle distributions of the plasma population and three-dimensional energetic ion distributions. In all seven cases studied it is found that ion beams streaming earthward and/or tailward are always present at the edge of the plasma sheet adjacent to the tail lobe. Ion beams penetrating into the plasma sheet region with no detectable density gradient are also observed. Beams at tens to hundreds of eV often stream tailward and are often long lasting, suggesting that they may be related to ionospheric sources. Both tailward and earthward streaming beams are detected for ion beams above 1 keV, consistent with an origin from the distant tail, propagation toward earth, and mirroring back under single particle motions.

  5. CDAW 9 analysis of magnetospheric events on May 3, 1986 - Event C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Craven, J. D.; Frank, L. A.; Elphinstone, R. D.; Murphree, J. S.; Fennell, J. F.; Lopez, R. E.; Nagai, T.

    1993-01-01

    An intense geomagnetic substorm event on May 3, 1986, occurring toward the end of a strong storm period, is studied. The auroral electrojet indices and global imaging data from both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres clearly revealed the growth phase and expansion phase development for a substorm with an onset at 0111 UT. An ideally located constellation of four spacecraft allowed detailed observation of the substorm growth phase in the near-tail region. A realistic time-evolving magnetic field model provided a global representation of the field configuration throughout the growth and early expansion phase of the substorm. Evidence of a narrowly localized substorm onset region in the near-earth tail is found. This region spread rapidly eastward and poleward after the 0111 UT onset. The results are consistent with a model of late growth phase formation of a magnetic neutral line. This reconnection region caused plasma sheet current diversion before the substorm onset and eventually led to cross-tail current disruption at the time of the substorm onset.

  6. Substorm auroral onset triggering by flow-wave interaction detected with high-resolution radar and imager measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, T.; Lyons, L. R.; Zou, Y.; Bristow, W. A.; Hampton, D. L.; Nicolls, M. J.; Michell, R.; Samara, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E.; Spanswick, E.

    2013-12-01

    A critical, long-standing problem in substorm research is identification of the sequence of events leading to substorm auroral onset. THEMIS all-sky imager (ASI) array observations have revealed a repeatable pre-onset sequence that begins with a poleward boundary intensification (PBI) followed by a north-south oriented streamer moving equatorward. Substorm auroral onset occurs soon after the streamer reaches near the substorm onset location. Since fast magnetotail flows are linked to PBIs and streamers, this sequence indicates that onset is preceded by enhanced earthward plasma flows associated with a localized reconnection region near the pre-existing open-closed field line boundary. On the other hand, THEMIS satellite and ASIs also show that substorms are preceded by azimuthally propagating waves of ~1-2 min periodicity, indicating that a wave mode within the near-Earth plasma sheet is important for triggering substorm onset. However, it has been difficult to identify the link between fast earthward flows and these near-Earth waves. We have found a substorm event for which there is excellent coverage from the Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar (PFISR), THEMIS white light and multi-spectral ASIs, where the auroral onset occurred within the PFISR field of view near the zenith of the ASIs. The substorm onset was preceded by a PBI, and one of the radar beams going through the PBI detected equatorward flows and reaching the growth phase arc. The flows appear to propagate from open magnetic field lines across the open-closed boundary, leading to the PBI and then to onset soon after they reach the near-Earth plasma sheet. We also identified oscillations of auroral luminosity along the growth phase arc with a ~1 min period. These waves were propagating westward with only small intensity variations. Soon after the equatorward flows reached the growth phase arc, the wave luminosity amplified abruptly, denoting the onset of a substorm. Based on this sequence, we suggest

  7. On the formation and origin of substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs inferred from conjugate space-ground observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoba, T.; Ohtani, S.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Shiokawa, K.; Connors, M. G.; Kletzing, C.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotail processes and structures related to substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs remain poorly understood mostly due to the lack of adequate observations. In this study we make a comparison between ground-based optical measurements of the premidnight growth phase/onset arcs at subauroral latitudes and magnetically conjugate measurements made by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) at ~780 km in altitude and by the Van Allen Probe-B spacecraft crossing L values of ~5.0-5.6 in the premidnight inner tail region. The conjugate observations offer a unique opportunity to examine the detailed features of the arc location relative to large-scale Birkeland currents and of the magnetospheric counterpart. The observations strongly suggest that the premidnight arc is connected to highly localized pressure gradients embedded in the near-tail R2 source region via a local upward FAC.

  8. Investigation of solar wind and magnetospheric forcing effects on the outer Van Allen belt through multi-point measurements in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, I. A.; Katsavrias, C.; Georgiou, M.; Turner, D. L.; Sandberg, I.; Balasis, G.; Papadimitriou, K.

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated the response of the outer Van Allen belt electrons to various types of solar wind and internal magnetospheric forcing - in particular to Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs), to geospace magnetic storms of different intensities and to intense magnetospheric substorms. We have employed multi-point particle and field observations in the inner magnetosphere (both in-situ and through ground-based remote sensing), including the Cluster, THEMIS, Van Allen Probes and GOES constellations, the XMM and INTEGRAL spacecraft, and the CARISMA and IMAGE ground magnetometer arrays. The data provide a broad range of particle energies and a wide radial and azimuthal spatial coverage. This work has received support from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7-SPACE-2011-1) under grant agreement no. 284520 for the MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analysing and Assessing Radiation Belt Energization and Loss) collaborative research project.

  9. Generation mechanism of L-value dependence of oxygen flux enhancements during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Ohtani, S.; Gkioulidou, M.; Takahashi, K.; Kistler, L. M.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) instrument measures charged particles with an energy range from ~eV to ~ tens of keV. The observation shows that the energy flux of the particles increases inside the geosynchronous orbit during substorms. For some night-side events around the apogee, the energy flux of O+ ion enhances below ~10 keV at lower L shell, whereas the flux below ~8 keV sharply decreases at higher L shells. This structure of L-energy spectrogram of flux is observed only for the O+ ions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the generation mechanism of the structure by using numerical simulations. We utilized the global MHD simulation developed by Tanaka et al (2010, JGR) to simulate the electric and magnetic fields during substorms. We performed test particle simulation under the electric and magnetic fields by applying the same model introduced by Nakayama et al. (2015, JGR). In the test particle simulation each test particle carries the real number of particles in accordance with the Liouville theorem. Using the real number of particles, we reconstructed 6-dimensional phase space density and differential flux of O+ ions in the inner magnetosphere. We obtained the following results. (1) Just after the substorm onset, the dawn-to-dusk electric field is enhanced to ~ 20 mV/m in the night side tail region at L > 7. (2) The O+ ions are accelerated and transported to the inner region (L > ~5.5) by the large-amplitude electric field. (3) The reconstructed L-energy spectrogram shows a similar structure to the Van Allen Probes observation. (4) The difference in the flux enhancement between at lower L shell and higher L shells is due to two distinct acceleration processes: adiabatic and non-adiabatic. We will discuss the relationship between the particle acceleration and the structure of L-energy spectrogram of flux enhancement in detail.

  10. Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the orbits of Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, a Solar-Terrestrial Probe mission comprising of four identically instrumented spacecraft that will study the Earth's magn...

  11. Magnetospheric convection at Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    The unusual configuration of the Uranian magnetosphere leads to differences in the relative effects of solar wind induced magnetospheric convection and plasma corotation from those at the other planets. At the present epoch the orientation of the rotation axis of Uranus with respect to the solar wind flow direction leads to a decoupling of the convective and corotational flows, allowing plasma from the tail to move unimpeded through the inner magnetosphere. As Uranus progresses in its orbit around the sun, corotation plays a gradually more important role and the plasma residence times within the magnetosphere increase. When the rotation axis finally becomes perpendicular to the solar wind flow, corotation is dominant.

  12. Simulations of Dynamic Relativistic Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfrey, Kyle Patrick

    Neutron stars and black holes are generally surrounded by magnetospheres of highly conducting plasma in which the magnetic flux density is so high that hydrodynamic forces are irrelevant. In this vanishing-inertia—or ultra-relativistic—limit, magnetohydrodynamics becomes force-free electrodynamics, a system of equations comprising only the magnetic and electric fields, and in which the plasma response is effected by a nonlinear current density term. In this dissertation I describe a new pseudospectral simulation code, designed for studying the dynamic magnetospheres of compact objects. A detailed description of the code and several numerical test problems are given. I first apply the code to the aligned rotator problem, in which a star with a dipole magnetic field is set rotating about its magnetic axis. The solution evolves to a steady state, which is nearly ideal and dissipationless everywhere except in a current sheet, or magnetic field discontinuity, at the equator, into which electromagnetic energy flows and is dissipated. Magnetars are believed to have twisted magnetospheres, due to internal magnetic evolution which deforms the crust, dragging the footpoints of external magnetic field lines. This twisting may be able to explain both magnetars' persistent hard X-ray emission and their energetic bursts and flares. Using the new code, I simulate the evolution of relativistic magnetospheres subjected to slow twisting through large angles. The field lines expand outward, forming a strong current layer; eventually the configuration loses equilibrium and a dynamic rearrangement occurs, involving large-scale rapid magnetic reconnection and dissipation of the free energy of the twisted magnetic field. When the star is rotating, the magnetospheric twisting leads to a large increase in the stellar spin-down rate, which may take place on the long twisting timescale or in brief explosive events, depending on where the twisting is applied and the history of the system

  13. Magnetospheric electric fields deduced from drifting whistler paths.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, D. L.; Stone, K.; Siren, J. C.; Crystal, T. L.

    1972-01-01

    Results of a study in which the amplitude of the E-W component E sub w of the convection electric field in the nightside magnetosphere has been inferred from the observed cross-L motions of whistler ducts within the plasmasphere, and several ducts distributed over 1 to 2 earth radii in L space and over plus or minus deg 15 around the longitude of the Eights, Antarctica, whistler station have been tracked simultaneously. The method appears capable of resolving fluctuations in E sub w with period T equal to approximately 15 min and rms amplitude as low as 0.05 mV/m. For variations with T greater than 1 hour the method has a sensitivity of the order of 0.01 mV/m. Three case studies are presented, two of which illustrate convection activity associated with relatively isolated substorms. In these two cases E sub w reversed from westward to eastward for a period following the decay of substorm bay activity. In the third case the substorm bay activity was prolonged, and E sub w remained westward and at enhanced levels until local dawn. Evidence was found that, at least in a limited longitudinal sector, perturbing substorm E sub w fields can penetrate deep within the plasmasphere. In two of the case studies comparisons of E sub w and the interplanetary magnetic-field theta component show evidence of a possible relation based on brief (less than or equal to 1 hour) southward excursions but not on long preceding southward events.

  14. Substorm effects in MHD and test particle simulations of magnetotail dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    1998-12-31

    Recent magnetohydrodynamic simulations demonstrate that a global tail instability, initiated by localized breakdown of MHD, can cause plasmoid formation and ejection as well as dipolarization and the current diversion of the substorm current wedge. The connection between the reconnection process and the current wedge signatures is provided by earthward flow from the reconnection site. Its braking and diversion in the inner magnetosphere causes dipolarization and the magnetic field distortions of the current wedge. The authors demonstrate the characteristic properties of this process and the current systems involved. The strong localized electric field associated with the flow burst and the dipolarization is also the cause of particle acceleration and energetic particle injections. Test particle simulations of orbits in the MHD fields yield results that are quite consistent with observed injection signatures.

  15. MESSENGER Observations of Extreme Magnetic Tail Loading and Unloading During its Third Flyby of Mercury: Substorms?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Gloeckler, George; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury on September 29, 2009, a variable interplanetary magnetic field produced a series of several minute enhancements of the tail magnetic field hy factors of approx. 2 to 3.5. The magnetic field flaring during these intervals indicates that they result from loading of the tail with magnetic flux transferred from the dayside magnetosphere. The unloading intervals were associated with plasmoids and traveling compression regions, signatures of tail reconnection. The peak tail magnetic flux during the smallest loading events equaled 30% of the magnetic flux emanating from Mercury, and may have reached 100% for the largest event. In this case the dayside magnetic shielding is reduced and solar wind flux impacting the surface may be greatly enhanced. Despite the intensity of these events and their similarity to terrestrial substorm magnetic flux dynamics, no energetic charged particles with energies greater than 36 keV were observed.

  16. Near-earth Thin Current Sheets and Birkeland Currents during Substorm Growth Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Sorin Zaharia; C.Z. Cheng

    2003-04-30

    Two important phenomena observed during the magnetospheric substorm growth phase are modeled: the formation of a near-Earth (|X| {approx} 9 R{sub E}) thin cross-tail current sheet, as well as the equatorward shift of the ionospheric Birkeland currents. Our study is performed by solving the 3-D force-balance equation with realistic boundary conditions and pressure distributions. The results show a cross-tail current sheet with large current (J{sub {phi}} {approx} 10 nA/m{sup 2}) and very high plasma {beta} ({beta} {approx} 40) between 7 and 10 R{sub E}. The obtained region-1 and region-2 Birkeland currents, formed on closed field lines due to pressure gradients, move equatorward and become more intense (J{sub {parallel}max} {approx} 3 {micro}A/m{sup 2}) compared to quiet times. Both results are in agreement with substorm growth phase observations. Our results also predict that the cross-tail current sheet maps into the ionosphere in the transition region between the region-1 and region-2 currents.

  17. Observing the magnetosphere through global auroral imaging: 1. Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mende, Stephen B.

    2016-10-01

    Over the years, it has become clear that there are fundamental limitations in observing magnetospheric processes through their auroral footprints. Most electron auroras are formed in the auroral acceleration region relatively close to the Earth at altitudes (<2 RE). There are four distinct auroral types: (1) downward field-aligned current (FAC) regions where ion precipitation is dominant, (2) pitch angle diffusion aurora (or briefly "diffusion aurora") region without significant FAC, (3) upward FAC regions of precipitating electrons and monoenergetic auroral arc formations, and (4) Alfvénic auroral regions, where low-energy electrons from the ionosphere are accelerated by incoming Alfvén waves. Alfvénic auroras are the footprints of magnetospheric regions where waves are produced by dynamic events such as reconnection, substorm onset initiation, and magnetic field dipolarization. Based on the mean energy and density of the precipitating electrons, ground-based and spacecraft-based optical observations can be used to distinguish between auroras where the source is the plasma sheet (types 1, 2, and 3) and Alfvénic auroras, where the source is the ionosphere (type 4). Imaging of the Alfvénic auroral region could be used to map the dynamically active regions of the magnetosphere. The energy distribution of the most significant precipitating ions, protons, can be measured from the Doppler profile of the hydrogen emission lines. Mapping of the time dependent global energy distribution of proton precipitation would allow the observation of the associated magnetospheric boundaries.

  18. On the presence and properties of cold ions near Earth's equatorial magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Justin H.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2014-03-01

    Plasma flows related to magnetospheric convection or ULF waves often increase cold ions' kinetic energy sufficiently above the spacecraft potential energy so that these ions can be detected by charged particle instrumentation. Other detection methods also reveal the presence of cold ions even in the absence of flows. By applying such methods to complementary data sets obtained from particle, electric field, and magnetic field measurements by the multiple Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms spacecraft, we study the occurrence rates of cold ions and properties—composition, densities, and temperatures—of the dominant species (H+, He+, and O+) near the equatorial magnetosphere. As plasma flows occur at all magnetic local time (MLT) sectors, predominantly outside the plasmasphere, they enable studies of cold ion occurrence and properties as functions of geocentric distance (up to 13 RE) and MLT. Of the dominant cold ions, protons are most abundant on the dayside and coldest almost everywhere. By comparison, the heavier ions show evidence of larger abundance on the nightside and higher temperatures at most locations: median nHe+/nH+ is ≤0.1 in the afternoon, ≥1.0 on the nightside, and near 0.5 at dawn; median nO+/nH+ exceeds 1 throughout the nightside and around dawn at smaller geocentric distances but varies from 0.0 to 0.1 in the afternoon; and TO+ > THe+ everywhere. By isolating the convective particle drift component of measured ion flows, we deduce that nightside/dawn/prenoon cold ions are components of the warm plasma cloak while cold ions near noon/afternoon are likely of mixed origin, including nightside/cusp outflow, plasmaspheric plumes, and the solar wind.

  19. Thinning and expansion of the substorm plasma sheet: Cluster PEACE timing analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewhurst, J.; Owen, C.; Fazakerley, A.; Balogh, A.

    2004-12-01

    The storage and subsequent removal of magnetic flux in the magnetotail during a geomagnetic substorm has a dramatic effect on the thickness of the cross-tail plasma sheet. The near-Earth plasma sheet is thought to thin during the growth phase and then rapidly expand after onset of the substorm. The direction of propagation, whether earthward or tailward along the GSM-X direction in the near-Earth tail, may suggest the time ordering of current-disruption and near-Earth reconnection, both of which are key to the substorm process. Cluster's Plasma Electron And Current Experiment (PEACE) allows 4-point observations of electrons at the plasma sheet - lobe boundary as this interface passes over the Cluster tetrahedron. The relative timings of the boundary passage at each spacecraft allow a determination of this boundary's speed and direction of motion, assuming this is planar on the scale of the Cluster separation scale. For those boundaries corresponding to the expansion of the plasma sheet, this direction is fundamental to determining the direction of expansion. We present an example of isolated thinning and expansion of the plasma sheet, as well as a multiple thinning-expansion event that occurs during a more active substorm. Data from the 2001 and 2002 tail passes have been analysed and the average plasma sheet - lobe boundary normal vectors and normal component velocities have been calculated. A total of 77 crossings, typically between 10 and 20 RE downtail, correspond to substorm associated expansion of the plasma sheet over the spacecraft. These had normal vectors predominantly in the GSM-YZ plane and provided no clear evidence for the formation of the near-Earth neutral line occurring before current disruption or vice versa. The expansions of the plasma sheet generally exhibit the appropriate GSM-Z direction expected for the given lobe, and tend to have GSM-Y components that support onset occurring near the origin of the GSM-YZ plane. This result is noteworthy in

  20. Role of dayside transients in a substorm process: Results from the global kinetic simulation Vlasiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmroth, M.; Hoilijoki, S.; Pfau-Kempf, Y.; Hietala, H.; Nishimura, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Ganse, U.; Hannuksela, O.; von Alfthan, S.; Battarbee, M. C.; Vainio, R. O.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the dayside-nightside coupling of the magnetospheric dynamics in a global kinetic simulation displaying the entire magnetosphere. We use the newly developed Vlasiator (http://vlasiator.fmi.fi), which is the world's first global hybrid-Vlasov simulation modelling the ions as distribution functions, while electrons are treated as a charge-neutralising fluid. Here, we run Vlasiator in the 5-dimensional (5D) setup, where the ordinary space is presented in the 2D noon-midnight meridional plane, embedding in each grid cell the 3D velocity space. This approach combines the improved physical solution with fine resolution, allowing to investigate kinetic processes as a consequence of the global magnetospheric evolution. The simulation is during steady southward interplanetary magnetic field. We observe dayside reconnection and the resulting 2D representations of flux transfer events (FTE). FTE's move tailwards and distort the magnetopause, while the largest of them even modify the plasma sheet location. In the nightside, the plasma sheet shows bead-like density enhancements moving slowly earthward. The tailward side of the dipolar field stretches. Strong reconnection initiates first in the near-Earth region, forming a tailward-moving magnetic island that cannibalises other islands forming further down the tail, increasing the island's volume and complexity. After this, several reconnection lines are formed again in the near-Earth region, resulting in several magnetic islands. At first, none of the earthward moving islands reach the closed field region because just tailward of the dipolar region exists a relatively stable X-line, which is strong enough to push most of the magnetic islands tailward. However, finally one of the tailward X-lines is strong enough to overcome the X-line nearest to Earth, forming a strong surge into the dipolar field region as there is nothing anymore to hold back the propagation of the structure. We investigate this substorm

  1. "Zipper-like" periodic magnetosonic waves: Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, and magnetospheric multiscale observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Bortnik, J.; Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Wygant, J.; Breneman, A.; Thaller, S.; Funsten, H. O.; Mitchell, D. G.; Manweiler, J. W.; Torbert, R. B.; Le Contel, O.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Torkar, K.; Nakamura, R.; Andriopoulou, M.; Russell, C. T.

    2017-02-01

    An interesting form of "zipper-like" magnetosonic waves consisting of two bands of interleaved periodic rising-tone spectra was newly observed by the Van Allen Probes, the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), and the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) missions. The two discrete bands are distinct in frequency and intensity; however, they maintain the same periodicity which varies in space and time, suggesting that they possibly originate from one single source intrinsically. In one event, the zipper-like magnetosonic waves exhibit the same periodicity as a constant-frequency magnetosonic wave and an electrostatic emission, but the modulation comes from neither density fluctuations nor ULF waves. A statistical survey based on 3.5 years of multisatellite observations shows that zipper-like magnetosonic waves mainly occur on the dawnside to noonside, in a frequency range between 10 fcp and fLHR. The zipper-like magnetosonic waves may provide a new clue to nonlinear excitation or modulation process, while its cause still remains to be fully understood.

  2. Study of plasma pressure distribution in the inner magnetosphere using the low-altitude satellite data as one of important elements of the magnetospheric dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, M.; Antonova, E. E.; Bosqued, J. M.

    Plasma pressure distribution in the inner magnetosphere is one of the key parameters for understanding the main magnetospheric processes including geomagnetic storms and substorms Therefore during the last decades many efforts were concentrated on the study of pressure distribution in the inner magnetosphere However the pressure profiles obtained from in-situ particle measurements by the high-altitude satellites inside the plasma sheet and other regions of the magnetosphere do not allow the tracking the pressure variations related to the magnetospheric dynamics because a time interval neaded to do this generally exceeds the characteristic times of the main magnetospheric processes On contrary fast movement of low-altitude satellites makes it possible to catch quasi-instantaneous radial or azimuthal profiles of plasma pressure along the satellite trayectory using the precipitating particle flux data in the regions of isotropic plasma pressure The low-altitude polar-orbiting Aureol-3 satellite was used for this study IGRF Tsyganenko 2001 and Tsyganenko 2004 storm time geomagnetic field models were used for the pressure mapping into the equatorial plane and also to evaluate the corresponding volume of the magnetic flux tube and the magnetic pressure Study of azumuthal plasma pressure gradients showed that these gradients can be a source of the Iijima and Potemra s field-aligned current system Study of radial plasma gradients showed that during quiet geomagnetic condition the profiles obtained coincide with the results obtained previously from the high-altitude

  3. Magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vondrak, R. R.; Chiu, Y. T.; Evans, D. S.; Patterson, V. G.; Romick, G. J.; Stasiewicz, K.

    1979-01-01

    The present understanding of magnetosphere ionosphere interactions is described, and present and future predictive capabilities are assessed. Ionospheric features directly coupled to the magnetosphere to a significant degree are considered, with emphasis given to those phenomena of major interest to forecasters and users.

  4. Multipoint measurements of substorm timing and activations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuyin, Pu; Cao, X.; Zhang, H.; Ma, Z. W.; Mishin, M. V.; Kubyshkina, M. V.; Pulkkinen, T.; Reeves, G. D.; Escoubet, C. Philippe

    Substorm timing and activations are studied based on Double Star TC1, Cluster, Polar, IM- AGE, LANL satellites and ground-based Pi2 measurements. Substorm expansion onset is found to begin in the near-Earth tail around X= -(8-9) Re, then progresses both earthward and tailward. About 8-10 minutes before aurora breakup, Cluster measured an earthward flow associated with plasma sheet thinning. A couple of minutes after the breakup, TC1 first detects plasma sheet expansion and then LANL satellites near the midnight measure energetic electron injections, or vise versus. About 20 minutes (or more) later, Cluster and Polar observe plasma sheet expansion successively. Of interest are also the following findings. Auroral bulge is found to quickly broaden and expand poleward when the open magnetic flux of the polar cap is rapidly dissipated, indicating the role of tail lobe reconnection of open field lines in the development of the expansion phase. In addition, poleward expansion of auroral bulges and tailward progression of substorm expansion are shown to be closely related. An initial dipolarization in the near-Earth eventually evolve to enable disruption of the cross-tail current in a wide range of the magnetotail, until the open magnetic flux of the polar cap reaches its minimum. Acknowledgements This work is supported by the NSFC Grants 40390152 and 40536030 and Chinese Key Research Project Grant 2006CB806300. The authors acknowledge all PIs of instruments onboard Double Star and Cluster spacecraft. We also appreciate the useful discussions with R. L. McPherron and A. T. Y. Lui.

  5. Statistical visualization of the Earth's magnetotail and the implied mechanism of substorm triggering based on superposed-epoch analysis of THEMIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Nosé, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the physical mechanism responsible for substorm triggering, we performed a superposed-epoch analysis using plasma and magnetic-field data from THEMIS probes. Substorm onset timing was determined based on auroral breakups detected by all-sky imagers at the THEMIS ground-based observatories. We found earthward flows associated with north-south auroral streamers during the substorm growth phase. At around X = -12 Earth radii (RE), the northward magnetic field and its elevation angle decreased markedly approximately 4 min before substorm onset. Moreover, a northward magnetic-field increase associated with pre-onset earthward flows was found at around X = -17 RE. This variation indicates that local dipolarization occurs. Interestingly, in the region earthwards of X = -18 RE, earthward flows in the central plasma sheet (CPS) reduced significantly approximately 3 min before substorm onset, which was followed by a weakening of dawn-/duskward plasma-sheet boundary-layer flows (subject to a 1 min time lag). Subsequently, approximately 1 min before substorm onset, earthward flows in the CPS were enhanced again and at the onset, tailward flows started at around X = -20 RE. Following substorm onset, an increase in the northward magnetic field caused by dipolarization was found in the near-Earth region. Synthesizing these results, we confirm our previous results based on GEOTAIL data, which implied that significant variations start earlier than both current disruption and magnetic reconnection, at approximately 4 min before substorm onset roughly halfway between the two regions of interest; i.e. in the catapult current sheet.

  6. Hot plasma and energetic particles in the earth's outer magnetosphere: new understandings during the IMS

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.N.; Fritz, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper we review the major accomplishments made during the IMS period in clarifying magnetospheric particle variations in the region from roughly geostationary orbit altitudes into the deep magnetotail. We divide our review into three topic areas: (1) acceleration processes; (2) transport processes; and (3) loss processes. Many of the changes in hot plasmas and energetic particle populations are often found to be related intimately to geomagnetic storm and magnetospheric substorm effects and, therefore, substantial emphasis is given to these aspects of particle variations in this review. The IMS data, taken as a body, allow a reasonably unified view as one traces magnetospheric particles from their acceleration source through the plasma sheet and outer trapping regions and, finally, to their loss via ionospheric precipitation and ring current formation processes. It is this underlying, unifying theme which is pursued here. 52 references, 19 figures.

  7. Magnetospheres in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Mcnutt, R.L.

    1984-11-01

    Intrinsic and induced magnetospheres of planets, moons, and comets in the solar system are described. Magnetospheric electric fields, the plasmasphere, rotational effects, and corotation and convection dominated intrinsic magnetospheres are considered. Supersonic and subsonic interactions in induced magnetospheres are discussed. (ESA)

  8. Magnetospheric Image Unfolding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Grant was a three year grant funded under the Space Physics Supporting Research and Technology and Suborbital Program. Our objective was to develop automated techniques needed to unfold or "invert" global images of the magnetospheric ion populations obtained by the new magnetospheric imaging techniques (ENA, EUV) in anticipation of future missions such as the Magnetospheric Imager and, now, IMAGE. Our focus on the present three year grant is to determine the degree to which such images can quantitatively constrain the global electromagnetic properties of the magnetosphere. In a previous three year grant period we successfully automated a forward modeling inversion algorithm, demonstrated that these inversions are robust in the face of realistic instrumental considerations such as counting statistics and backgrounds, applied error analysis techniques to the extracted parameters using variational procedures, implemented very realistic magnetospheric test images to test the inversion algorithms using the Rice University Magnetospheric Specification Model, and began the process of generating parametric models with the flexibility to handle the realistic magnetospheric images (e.g. Roelof et al, 1992; 1993). Our plan for the present 3 year grant period was to complete the development of the inversion tools needed to handle realistic magnetospheric images, assess the degree to which global electrodynamics is quantitatively constrained by ENA images of the magnetosphere, and bring the inversion of EUV images up to the maturity that we will have achieved for the ENA imaging. Below the accomplishments of our three year effort are present followed by a list of our presentations and publications. The accomplishments of all three years are presented here, and thus some of these items appeared on interim progress reports.

  9. A current disruption mechanism in the neutral sheet for triggering substorm expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Mankofsky, A.; Chang, C.-L.; Papadopoulos, K.; Wu, C. S.

    1989-01-01

    Two main areas were addressed in support of an effort to understand mechanism responsible for the broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) observed in the magnetotail. The first area concerns the generation of BEN in the boundary layer region of the magnetotail whereas the second area concerns the occassional presence of BEN in the neutral sheet region. For the generation of BEN in the boundary layer region, a hybrid simulation code was developed to perform reliable longtime, quiet, highly resolved simulations of field aligned electron and ion beam flow. The result of the simulation shows that broadband emissions cannot be generated by beam-plasma instability if realistic values of the ion beam parameters are used. The waves generated from beam-plasma instability are highly discrete and are of high frequencies. For the plasma sheet boundary layer condition, the wave frequencies are in the kHz range, which is incompatible with the observation that the peak power in BEN occur in the 10's of Hz range. It was found that the BEN characteristics are more consistent with lower hybrid drift instability. For the occasional presence of BEN in the neutral sheet region, a linear analysis of the kinetic cross-field streaming instability appropriate to the neutral sheet condition just prior to onset of substorm expansion was performed. By solving numerically the dispersion relation, it was found that the instability has a growth time comparable to the onset time scale of substorm onset. The excited waves have a mixed polarization in the lower hybrid frequency range. The imposed drift driving the instability corresponds to unmagnetized ions undergoing current sheet acceleration in the presence of a cross-tail electric field. The required electric field strength is in the 10 mV/m range which is well within the observed electric field values detected in the neutral sheet during substorms. This finding can potentially account for the disruption of cross-tail current and its diversion to

  10. Magnetospheric-ionospheric Poynting flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thayer, Jeffrey P.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past three years of funding SRI, in collaboration with the University of Texas at Dallas, has been involved in determining the total electromagnetic energy flux into the upper atmosphere from DE-B electric and magnetic field measurements and modeling the electromagnetic energy flux at high latitudes, taking into account the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system. This effort has been very successful in establishing the DC Poynting flux as a fundamental quantity in describing the coupling of electromagnetic energy between the magnetosphere and ionosphere. The DE-B satellite electric and magnetic field measurements were carefully scrutinized to provide, for the first time, a large data set of DC, field-aligned, Poynting flux measurement. Investigations describing the field-aligned Poynting flux observations from DE-B orbits under specific geomagnetic conditions and from many orbits were conducted to provide a statistical average of the Poynting flux distribution over the polar cap. The theoretical modeling effort has provided insight into the observations by formulating the connection between Poynting's theorem and the electromagnetic energy conversion processes that occur in the ionosphere. Modeling and evaluation of these processes has helped interpret the satellite observations of the DC Poynting flux and improved our understanding of the coupling between the ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  11. The magnetosphere of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schardt, A. W.

    1982-01-01

    Information about the magnetosphere of Saturn is provided: the magnetic dipole moment is axisymmetric, the bow shock stand-off distance is about 22 R sub S. The satellites Titan, Dione, and Tethys are probably the primary sources of magnetospheric plasma. Outside of approx. 4 R sub S, energetic particles are energized by diffusing inward while conserving their first and second adiabatic invariants. Particles are lost by satellite sweep-out, absorption byt the E ring and probably also by plasma interactions. The inner magnetosphere is characterized.

  12. Polar and high latitude substorms and solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despirak, I. V.; Lyubchich, A. A.; Kleimenova, N. G.

    2014-09-01

    All substorm disturbances observed in polar latitudes can be divided into two types: polar, which are observable at geomagnetic latitudes higher than 70° in the absence of substorms below 70°, and high latitude substorms, which travel from auroral (<70°) to polar (>70°) geomagnetic latitudes. The aim of this study is to compare conditions in the IMF and solar wind, under which these two types of substorms are observable on the basis of data from meridional chain of magnetometers IMAGE and OMNI database for 1995, 2000, and 2006-2011. In total, 105 polar and 55 high latitude substorms were studied. It is shown that polar substorms are observable at a low velocity of solar wind after propagation of a high-speed recurrent stream during the late recovery phase of a magnetic storm. High latitude substorms, in contrast, are observable with a high velocity of solar wind, increased values of the Bz component of the IMF, the Ey component of the electric field, and solar wind temperature and pressure, when a high-speed recurrent stream passes by the Earth.

  13. Energy storage and dissipation in the magnetotail during substorms. 2. MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Steinolfson, R.S. ); Winglee, R.M. )

    1993-05-01

    The authors present a global MHD simulation of the magnetotail in an effort to study magnetic storm development. They address the question of energy storage in the current sheet in the early phases of storm growth, which previous simulations have not shown. They address this problem by dealing with the variation of the resistivity throughout the magnetosphere. They argue that MHD theory should provide a suitable representation to this problem on a global scale, even if it does not handle all details adequately. For their simulation they use three different forms for the resistivity. First is a uniform and constant resistivity. Second is a resistivity proportional to the current density, which is related to argument that resistivity is driven by wave-particle interactions which should be strongest in regions where the current is the greatest. Thirdly is a model where the resistivity varies with the magnetic field strength, which was suggested by previous results from particle simulations of the same problem. The simulation then gives approximately the same response of the magnetosphere for all three of the models. Each results in the formation and ejection of plasmoids, but the energy stored in the magnetotail, the timing of substorm onset in relation to the appearance of a southward interplanetary magnetic field, and the speed of ejection of the plasmoids formed differ with the resistivity models.

  14. 0.5-4 Å X-RAY BRIGHTENINGS IN THE MAGNETOSPHERE OBSERVED BY THE GEOSTATIONARY OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya T.; Miyoshi, Y.

    2013-10-01

    We found 217 X-ray brightening events in Earth's magnetosphere. These events occur in the high-energy band (0.5-4 Å) of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) X-ray light curves, although GOES X-ray light curves are frequently used as indices of solar flare magnitudes. We found that (1) brightening events are absent in the low-energy band (1-8 Å), unlike those associated with solar flares; and (2) the peak fluxes, durations, and onset times of these events depend on the magnetic local time (MLT). The events were detected in 2006, 2010, and 2011 at around 19-10 MLT, that is, from night to morning. They typically lasted for 2-3 hr. Their peak fluxes are less than 3 × 10{sup –8} W m{sup –2} in the 0.5-4 Å band and are maximized around 0-5 MLT. From these MLT dependencies, we constructed an MLT time profile of X-ray brightening events. Because 0.5-4 and 1-8 Å fluxes were observed and had the same order of magnitude when GOES 14 passed through Earth's shadow, we expected that X-ray brightening events in the 1-8 Å band are obscured by high-background X-ray fluxes coming from the Sun. We also found coincidence between X-ray brightening events and aurora substorms. In the majority of our events, the minimum geomagnetic field values (AL index) are below –400 nT. From these results and consideration of the GOES satellite orbit, we expect that these X-ray brightening events occur in the magnetosphere. We cannot, however, clarify the radiative process of the observed X-ray brightening events.

  15. LANL Studies Earth's Magnetosphere

    ScienceCinema

    Daughton, Bill

    2016-07-12

    A new 3-D supercomputer model presents a new theory of how magnetic reconnection works in high-temperature plasmas. This Los Alamos National Laboratory research supports an upcoming NASA mission to study Earth's magnetosphere in greater detail than ever.

  16. Solar and magnetospheric science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, A. F.; Schmerling, E. R.; Chapman, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    The current status of the Solar Physics Program and the Magnetospheric Physics Program is discussed. The scientific context for each of the programs is presented, then the current programs and future plans are outlined.

  17. LANL Studies Earth's Magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Daughton, Bill

    2011-04-15

    A new 3-D supercomputer model presents a new theory of how magnetic reconnection works in high-temperature plasmas. This Los Alamos National Laboratory research supports an upcoming NASA mission to study Earth's magnetosphere in greater detail than ever.

  18. Enabling Breakthrough Kinetic Simulations of the Magnetosphere Using Petascale Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, H. X.; Karimabadi, H.; Omelchenko, Y.; Tatineni, M.; Majumdar, A.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Dorelli, J.

    2009-12-01

    Currently global magnetospheric simulations are predominantly based on single-fluid magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). MHD simulations have proven useful in studies of the global dynamics of the magnetosphere with the goal of predicting eminent features of substorms and other global events. But it is well known that the magnetosphere is dominated by ion kinetic effects, which is ignored in MHD simulations, and many key aspects of the magnetosphere relating to transport and structure of boundaries await global kinetic simulations. We are using our recent innovations in hybrid (electron fluid, kinetic ions) simulations, as being developed in our Hybrid3D (H3D) code, and the power of massively parallel machines to make, breakthrough 3D global kinetic simulations of the magnetosphere. The innovations include (i) multi-zone (asynchronous) algorithm, (ii) dynamic load balancing, and (iii) code adaptation and optimization to large number of processors. In this presentation we will show preliminary results of our progress to date using from 512 to over 8192 cores. In particular, we focus on what we believe to be the first demonstration of the formation of a flux rope in 3D global hybrid simulations. As in the MHD simulations, the resulting flux rope has a very complex structure, wrapping up field lines from different regions and appears to be connected on at least one end to Earth. Magnetic topology of the FTE is examined to reveal the existence of several separators (3D X-lines). The formation and growth of this structure will be discussed and spatial profile of the magnetic and plasma variables will be compared with those from MHD simulations.

  19. Geosynchronous Electron Fluxes and Chorus Generation During an MHD Substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodroffe, J. R.; Jordanova, V.; Henderson, M. G.; Welling, D. T.; Vernon, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from a numerical study of electron dynamics and whistler generation during an idealized substorm simulated using the Space Weather Modeling Framework. The time-dependent electric and magnetic fields from this simulated substorm are used to drive a new backwards particle tracing model, and the results from this model are used to identify the regions responsible for populating geosynchronous orbit during and after the substorm. Liouville mapping is then used to obtain electron fluxes at geosynchronous orbit as well as to assess the development of anisotropy during the earthward propagation of the electron injection.

  20. On the Magnetospheric Engine Behind Kilometric Radiation at Earth and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Pontus; Mitchell, Donald

    2014-05-01

    The planets of the solar system display a range of different space environments and solar interaction regimes, from non/weakly magnetized, to magnetized with convective- versus rotation-dominated magnetospheres. All magnetized planets with an appreciable magnetosphere are immersed in a dynamic energetic particle (hot plasma), as well as cold plasma, environment. These five planetary magnetospheres (Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune) are also significant emitters of low-frequency radio waves that are consistent with a cyclotron-maser instability set up in a field-aligned current region. Radio observations in the <200 MHz range is so far the only technique that shows promise to provide constraints on the magnetospheric processes of exoplanets and their stellar-wind interaction. The thrust of this presentation is therefore to understand the relation between radio emissions and magnetospheric acceleration processes in our own solar system as a laboratory to determine what remote radio observations of exoplanets may tell us about magnetospheric processes. Terrestrial Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR) emissions in the ~30-800 kHz range have long been known to be associated with auroral intensifications and magnetospheric substorms. In a similar fashion, recent remote imaging using Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) obtained by the Cassini mission have revealed that the periodic Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) emission from Saturn's high-latitude magnetosphere is highly correlated with simultaneous large-scale injections of energetic particles in the night side magnetosphere. These observations imply that the engine behind the AKR and SKR is current system associated with the planet ward fast plasma flows during an injection and/or the resulting plasma pressure gradients of the heated plasma.

  1. The Pulsating Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, K. H.

    2015-06-01

    Following the basic principles of a charge-separated pulsar magnetosphere, we consider the magnetosphere to be stationary in space, instead of corotating, and the electric field to be uploaded from the potential distribution on the pulsar surface, set up by the unipolar induction. Consequently, the plasma of the magnetosphere undergoes guiding center drifts of the gyromotion due to the forces transverse to the magnetic field. These forces are the electric force, magnetic gradient force, and field line curvature force. Since these plasma velocities are of drift nature, there is no need to introduce an emf along the field lines, which would contradict the {{E}\\parallel }={\\boldsymbol{E}} \\cdot {\\boldsymbol{B}} =0 plasma condition. Furthermore, there is also no need to introduce the critical field line separating the electron and ion open field lines. We present a self-consistent description where the magnetosphere is described in terms of electric and magnetic fields and also in terms of plasma velocities. The fields and velocities are then connected through the space-charge densities self-consistently. We solve the pulsar equation analytically for the fields and construct the standard steady-state pulsar magnetosphere. By considering the unipolar induction inside the pulsar and the magnetosphere outside the pulsar as one coupled system, and under the condition that the unipolar pumping rate exceeds the Poynting flux in the open field lines, plasma pressure can build up in the magnetosphere, in particular, in the closed region. This could cause a periodic opening up of the closed region, leading to a pulsating magnetosphere, which could be an alternative to pulsar beacons. The closed region can also be opened periodically by the build up of toroidal magnetic field through a positive feedback cycle.

  2. Principal component analysis of Birkeland currents determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Principal component analysis is performed on Birkeland or field-aligned current (FAC) measurements from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment. Principal component analysis (PCA) identifies the patterns in the FACs that respond coherently to different aspects of geomagnetic activity. The regions 1 and 2 current system is shown to be the most reproducible feature of the currents, followed by cusp currents associated with magnetic tension forces on newly reconnected field lines. The cusp currents are strongly modulated by season, indicating that their strength is regulated by the ionospheric conductance at the foot of the field lines. PCA does not identify a pattern that is clearly characteristic of a substorm current wedge. Rather, a superposed epoch analysis of the currents associated with substorms demonstrates that there is not a single mode of response, but a complicated and subtle mixture of different patterns.

  3. Principle Component Analysis of Birkeland Currents Determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Principle Component Analysis is performed on northern and southern hemisphere Birkeland or field-aligned current (FAC) measurements from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE). PCA identifies the patterns in the FACs that respond coherently to different aspects of geomagnetic activity. The region 1 and 2 current system is shown to be the most reproducible feature of the currents, followed by cusp currents associated with magnetic tension forces on newly-reconnected field lines. The cusp currents are strongly modulated by season, indicating that their strength is regulated by the ionospheric conductance at the foot of the field lines. PCA does not identify a pattern that is clearly characteristic of a substorm current wedge. Rather, a superposed epoch analysis of the currents associated with substorms demonstrates that there is not a single mode of response, but a complicated and subtle mixture of different patterns. Other interhemispheric differences are discussed.

  4. Transient composite electric field disturbances near dip equator associated with auroral substorms

    SciTech Connect

    Hanumath Sastri, J.; Ramesh, K.B.; Ranganath Rao, H.N. )

    1992-07-24

    Ionosonde data of Kodaikanal and Huancayo are used to show the simultaneous occurrence of a transient disturbance in F region height of composite polarity in day and night sectors near the dip equator during the auroral substorm activity on 20 August 1979. At Kodaikanal which is on the nightside at the time of the substorm activity, h[prime]F first underwent an abrupt and rapid decrease (80km in 1 hr) followed by a much larger increase (120km in 1 hr). Perturbation in hpF2 of exactly opposite polarity was simultaneously seen at Huancayo which is on the dayside. The decrease in h[prime]F at Kodaikana (increase in hpF2 at Huancayo) occurred in association with an increase in polar cap potential drop, [phi] (estimated from IMF parameters), and the subsequent increase (decrease at Huancayo) with a decrease in polar cap potential. The F-region height disturbance is interpreted as the manifestation of a global transient composite disturbance in equatorial zonal electric field caused by the prompt penetration of substorm-related high latitude electric fields into the equatorial ionosphere. The polarity pattern of the electric field disturbance is consistent with the global convection models which predict westward (eastward) electric fields at night (by day) near the geomagnetic equator in response to an increase in polar cap potential drop, and fields of opposite signs for a decrease in polar cap potential.

  5. Kinetic PIC simulations of reconnection signal propagation parallel to magnetic field lines: Implifications for substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, M. A.; Drake, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    In a recent substorm case study using THEMIS data [1], it was inferred that auroral intensification occurred 96 seconds after reconnection onset initiated a substorm in the magnetotail. These conclusions have been the subject of some controversy [2,3]. The time delay between reconnection and auroral intensification requires a propagation speed significantly faster than can be explained by Alfvén waves. Kinetic Alfvén waves, however, can be much faster and could possibly explain the time lag. To test this possiblity, we simulate large scale reconnection events with the kinetic PIC code P3D and examine the disturbances on a magnetic field line as it propagates through a reconnection region. In the regions near the separatrices but relatively far from the x-line, the propagation physics is expected to be governed by the physics of kinetic Alfvén waves. Indeed, we find that the propagation speed of the magnetic disturbance roughly scales with kinetic Alfvén speeds. We also examine energization of electrons due to this disturbance. Consequences for our understanding of substorms will be discussed. [1] Angelopoulos, V. et al., Science, 321, 931, 2008. [2] Lui, A. T. Y., Science, 324, 1391-b, 2009. [3] Angelopoulos, V. et al., Science, 324, 1391-c, 2009.

  6. Mageis Observations in the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Roeder, J. L.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    We examine two aspects of the 10's of keV to MeV electron conditions in the inner magnetosphere. First is the observation of wave-particle interactions associated with substorm injections in the midnight to dawn region of the magnetosphere. Second is the electron content of the inner radiation zone and slot regions prior to and during storm times using background corrected MagEIS data. The wave-particle observations take advantage of the MagEIS high rate data mode in conjuction with the HOPE and EMFISIS burst mode data to show the tight relationship between the <70 keV electron fluxes and chorus waves. Both electron flux enhancements and flux depletions are observed during temporally localized chorus wave events. The ability to remove the penetrating backgrounds caused by energetic protons in the inner zone and electron generated bremsstrahlung in the slot and outer zone allows one to put limits on the electron fluxes in these regions, especially for energies greater than a few hundred keV. We find that deep in the inner zone the electrons fluxes at >800 keV are very low or non-existent while there are significant fluxes of electrons at lower energies, down to MagEIS limit of ~30 keV. The more dynamic slot region fluxes have been similarly dominated by such lower energy electron fluxes thus far during the Van Allen Probes mission. We will also show evidence that during storm times the seed population electrons, <200 keV, can penetrate deep into the slot region and, at times, even into the inner zone.

  7. Ground-based observations during the period between two strong November 2004 storms attributed to steady magnetospheric convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, J.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Kozyreva, O. V.; Ranta, A.; Kauristie, K.; MäKinen, S.; Kornilova, T. A.

    2008-03-01

    Strong geomagnetic storms are of great scientific interest because they drive the magnetosphere to an extreme state and result in nontypical magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. The present study examines the ground-based signatures of the magnetosphere-ionosphere disturbances during the recovery phase of the very intense storm on 7-8 November 2004. The recovery phase took place under steady and slightly negative (˜-5 nT) values of the IMF Bz. We compare this event with previously documented storm recovery phases occurring under positive IMF Bz and accompanied by morning Pc5 geomagnetic pulsations. During the period studied in this article the strongest pulsation activity was recorded in the evening and midnight sectors of the Earth. We analyze observations from the Scandinavian multipoint ground-based instrumentation: (1) geomagnetic variations and pulsations, (2) auroras in visual wavelengths, and (3) energetic particle precipitation (riometer data). We show that several enhancements in electrojet, auroral, and energetic precipitation activity were recorded at auroral latitudes. The activations lasted 0.5-2 hours, and the associated negative magnetic field deviations were often more than 1000 nT. Only one of these activations shows typical substorm behavior (poleward expansion and geostationary particle injection). We demonstrate remarkably good correlation between the magnetic variations and cosmic noise absorption variations (in pulsations and slower variations) as well as between the optical auroras and cosmic noise absorption (Imaging Riometer for Ionospheric Studies riometer system) both in time and in space. Thus the auroral precipitation revealed a very coherent behavior over a wide energy range (˜1-40 keV) during the analyzed period. The images acquired by the network of MIRACLE all-sky cameras show that the auroral distribution exhibited double oval configuration during our event. Double oval is often observed during so-called Steady Magnetospheric

  8. Poleward arcs of the auroral oval during substorms and the inner edge of the plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2009-06-01

    An analytical model for the connection between the near-Earth edge of the plasma sheet at substorm onset and the auroral arcs at the poleward edge of the auroral oval is presented. The connection is established through the existence of a Boström type I current system. Its generator is assumed to be constituted by a narrow high-beta plasma layer located at the interface between the near-Earth plasma sheet and the outer edge of the near-dipolar field of the magnetosphere. The energy balance between the downward Poynting flux and the energy conversion in the auroral acceleration region and ionosphere provides a relation for the electric fields as a function of the upward field-aligned current. Only the upward current region is being considered in this work. An interesting effect, incorporated in the energy balance, is the feedback of the auroral electrojet on the magnetospheric plasma by dragging the latter eastward from below under the action of a Hall generator. Thereby a relation arises between the westward electric field, tangential to the arc, and the equatorward polarization field. Quantitative solution of the energy equation is achieved by using the empirical relations between auroral energy flux and electron energy and the integrated Hall and Pedersen conductivities. Accommodation of the downward energy flux requires the existence of a minimum arc length. The resulting quantities are consistent with typical auroral data sets. Relating the downward energy flux to the parameters of the generator reveals a strong dependence of polarization electric field, overall energy dissipation, and total current strength on the plasma beta of the generator. The dumping of excess energy from the high-beta plasma layer into the auroral arc(s) allows the stretched tail field lines to transform into dipolar field lines. It opens, so-to-speak, the gate into the outer magnetosphere.

  9. Solar wind-magnetosphere coupling and the distant magnetotail - ISEE-3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Baker, D. N.; Zwickl, R. D.; Akasofu, S.-I.; Lepping, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    ISEE-3 Geotail observations are used to investigate the relationship between the interplanetary magnetic field, substorm activity, and the distant magnetotail. Magnetic field and plasma observations are used to present evidence for the existence of a quasi-permanent, curved reconnection neutral line in the distant tail. The distance to the neutral line varies from absolute value of X = 120 to 140 R/sub e near the center of the tail to beyond absolute value of X = 200 R/sub e at the flanks. Downstream of the neutral line the plasma sheet magnetic field is shown to be negative and directly proportional to negative B/sub z in the solar wind as observed by IMP-8. V/sub x in the distant plasma sheet is also found to be proportional to IMF B/sub z with southward IMF producing the highest anti-solar flow velocities. A global dayside reconnection efficiency of 20 + or - 5 percent is derived from the ISEE-3/IMP-8 magnetic field comparisons. Substorm activity, as measured by the AL index, produces enhanced negative B/sub z and tailward V/sub x in the distant plasma sheet in agreement with the basic predictions of the reconnection-based models of substorms. The rate of magnetic flux transfer out of the tail as a function of AL is found to be consistent with previous near-earth studies. Similarly, the mass and energy fluxes carried by plasma sheet flow down the tail are consistent with theoretical mass and energy budgets for an open magnetosphere. In summary, the ISEE-3 Geotail observations appear to provide good support for reconnection models of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling and substorm energy rates.

  10. Solar wind-magnetosphere coupling and the distant magnetotail: ISEE-3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Baker, D. N.; Zwickl, R. D.; Akasofu, S. I.; Lepping, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    ISEE-3 Geotail observations are used to investigate the relationship between the interplanetary magnetic field, substorm activity, and the distant magnetotail. Magnetic field and plasma observations are used to present evidence for the existence of a quasi-permanent, curved reconnection neutral line in the distant tail. The distance to the neutral line varies from absolute value of X = 120 to 140 R/sub e near the center of the tail to beyond absolute value of X = 200 R/sub e at the flanks. Downstream of the neutral line the plasma sheet magnetic field is shown to be negative and directly proportional to negative B/sub z in the solar wind as observed by IMP-8. V/sub x in the distant plasma sheet is also found to be proportional to IMF B/sub z with southward IMF producing the highest anti-solar flow velocities. A global dayside reconnection efficiency of 20 +- 5% is derived from the ISEE-3/IMP-8 magnetic field comparisons. Substorm activity, as measured by the AL index, produces enhanced negative B/sub z and tailward V/sub x in the distant plasma sheet in agreement with the basic predictions of the reconnection-based models of substorms. The rate of magnetic flux transfer out of the tail as a function of AL is found to be consistent with previous near-Earth studies. Similarly, the mass and energy fluxes carried by plasma sheet flow down the tail are consistent with theoretical mass and energy budgets for an open magnetosphere. In summary, the ISEE-3 Geotail observations appear to provide good support for reconnection models of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling and substorm energy rates.

  11. Comparison of substorms near two solar cycle maxima: (1999-2000 and 2012-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despirak, I.; Lubchich, A.; Kleimenova, N.

    2016-05-01

    We present the comparative analysis of the substorm behavior during two solar cycle maxima. The substorms, observed during the large solar cycle maximum (1999- 2000, with Wp> 100) and during the last maximum (2012-2013 with Wp~60), were studied. The considered substorms were divided into 3 types according to auroral oval dynamic. First type - substorms which are observed only at auroral latitudes ("usual" substorms); second type - substorms which propagate from auroral latitudes (<70?) to polar geomagnetic latitudes (>70°) ("expanded" substorms, according to expanded oval); third type - substorms which are observed only at latitudes above ~70° in the absence of simultaneous geomagnetic disturbances below 70° ("polar" substorms, according to contracted oval). Over 1700 substorm events have been analyzed. The following substorm characteristics have been studied: (i) the seasonal variations, (ii) the latitudinal range of the occurrence, (iii) solar wind and IMF parameters before substorm onset, (iiii) PC-index before substorm onset. Thus, the difference between two solar activity maxima could be seen in the difference of substorm behavior in these periods as well.

  12. Implications of the 1100 UT March 22, 1979 CDAW 6 substorm event for the role of magnetic reconnection in the geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, T.A.; Baker, D.N.; McPherron, R.L.; Lennartsson, W.

    1983-01-01

    The event of March 22, 1979 has been the object of a concentrated study effort as a part of the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop activity designated CDAW-6. Energetic electron and magnetic field measurements from a set of four satellites aligned from 6.6 to 13 R/sub E/ at the 0200 LT meridian at the time of the magnetospheric substorm event of 1100 UT are presented. These data are used to show that a magnetic X-line formed spontaneously in the vicinity of 7 R/sub E/ in response to a steady build-up of magnetic stress in the geomagnetic tail.

  13. Deformation of Polar Cap Patches During Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, S.; Ridley, A. J.; Nicolls, M. J.; Coster, A. J.; Thomas, E. G.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Hampton, D.

    2015-12-01

    Polar cap patches refer to the islands of high F-region plasma density within the polar cap. Their formation on the dayside and deformation on the nightside are not well understood. The F-layer ionosphere density is strongly influenced by electric field, thermospheric wind as well as soft particle precipitation. This study combines observations from multiple instruments, including Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar, GPS TEC and optical instruments, as well as the Global Ionosphere and Thermosphere Model (GITM), to investigate the effects of highly structured electric fields and winds on the deformation of polar cap patches during substorms. We will also discuss variations of the auroral emissions associated with the patch evolution.

  14. Magnetospheric Magnetic Reconnection with Southward IMF by a 3D EMPM Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Yan, X. Y.; Cai, D. S.; Lembege, B.

    2004-01-01

    We report our new simulation results on magnetospheric magnetic reconnection with southward IMF using a 3D EMPM model, with greater resolution and more particles using the parallelized 3D HPF TRISTAN code on VPP5000 supercomputer. Main parameters used in the new simulation are: domain size is 215 x 145 x 145, grid size = 0.5 Earth radius, initial particle number is 16 per cell, the IMF is southward. Arrival of southward IMF will cause reconnection in the magnetopause, thus allowing particles to enter into the inner magnetosphere. Sunward and tailward high particle flow are observed by satellites, and these phenomena are also observed in the simulation near the neutral line (X line) of the near-Earth magnetotail. This high particle flow goes along with the reconnected island. The magnetic reconnection process contributes to direct plasma entry between the magnetosheath to the inner magnetosphere and plasma sheet, in which the entry process eats the magnetosheath plasma to plasma sheet temperatures. We investigate magnetic, electric fields, density, and current during this magnetic reconnection with southward IMF. Further investigation with this simulation will provide insight into unsolved problems, such as the triggering of storms and substorms, and the storm-substorm relationship. New results will be presented at the meeting.

  15. Field-Aligned Current Reconfiguration and Magnetospheric Response to an Impulse in the Interplanetary Magnetic Field BY Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, F. D.; Eriksson, S.; Korth, H.; Hairston, M. R.; Baker, J. B.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    When the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is dawnward or duskward, magnetic merging between the IMF and the geomagnetic field occurs near the cusp on the dayside flanks of the magnetosphere. During these intervals, flow channels in the ionosphere with velocities in excess of 2 km/s have been observed, which can deposit large amounts of energy into the high-latitude thermosphere. In this study, we analyze an interval on 5 April 2010 where there was a strong dawnward impulse in the IMF, followed by a gradual decay in IMF magnitude at constant clock angle. Data from the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar and the DMSP spacecraft were used to investigate ionospheric convection during this interval, and data from the Active Magnetospheric and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) were used to investigate the associated Field-Aligned Current (FAC) system. Additionally, data from AMPERE were used to investigate the time response of the dawn-side FAC pair. We find there is a delay of approximately 1.25 hours between the arrival of the dawnward IMF impulse at the magnetopause and strength of the dawnward FAC pair, which is comparable to substorm growth and expansion time scales under southward IMF. Additionally, we find at the time of the peak FAC, there is evidence of a reconfiguring four-sheet FAC system in the morning local time sector of the ionosphere. Additionally, we find an inverse correlation between the dawn FAC strength and both the solar wind Alfvénic Mach number and the SYM-H index. No statistically significant correlation between the FAC strength and the solar wind dynamic pressure was found.

  16. Ion observations at Mercury's Magnetospheric Cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, Jamie; Raines, Jim; Slavin, James

    2016-04-01

    The magnetospheric cusp is a region of direct entry for solar wind mass, energy and momentum into a planetary magnetosphere. Dayside magnetic reconnection between the interplanetary magnetic field and the planetary field allows shocked solar wind plasma to flow down open magnetospheric field lines. Whilst this is occurring these magnetic field lines convect poleward. For a spacecraft travelling through the high latitudes, this causes a velocity filter effect to be observed in the ion data, whereby higher energy ions are observed at lower latitudes. Here we present the ion observations from the MESSENGER spacecraft at Mercury's cusp, specifically focusing on ions latitudinally dispersed in energy. From these dispersions, the distance to the reconnection site is calculated and used to better understand the process of reconnection at Mercury's dayside magnetopause.

  17. Plasmasphere formation in arbitrarily oriented magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Richardson, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The formation of plasmaspheres in planetary magnetospheres with arbitrary orientations of the rotation and magnetic dipole axes is investigated. A traditional plasmasphere with closed orbits inside the plasmapause and open trajectories outside it only occurs for the limiting case of aligned rotation and dipole axes. A time-variable plasmapause exists if the rotation axis is perpendicular to the solar win flow direction. In any other case, no definite plasmapause exists. Solar wind-driven convection transports plasma throughout the magnetosphere with an effectiveness which increases as the orientation goes further from one of the two limiting cases of strict plasmapause formation. The present analysis is applied to earth and Uranus using the actual orientations of the rotation and dipole axes. Particle trajectories at earth deviate only slightly from those obtained with traditional models. Uranus has no plasmasphere, and plasma convects sunwards throughout the inner magnetosphere.

  18. Characteristics of magnetospheric radio noise spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Magnetospheric radio noise spectra (30 kHz to 10 MHz) taken by IMP-6 and RAE-2 exhibit time-varying characteristics which are related to spacecraft position and magnetospheric processes. In the mid-frequency range (100-1,000 kHz) intense noise peaks rise by a factor of 100 or more above background; 80% of the peak frequencies are within the band 125 kHz to 600 kHz, and the peak occurs most often (18% of the time) at 280 kHz. This intense mid-frequency noise has been detected at radial distances from 1.3 Re to 60 Re on all sides of the Earth during magnetically quiet as well as disturbed periods. Maximum occurrence of the mid-frequency noise is in the evening to midnight hours where splash-type energetic particle precipitation takes place. ""Magnetospheric lightning'' can be invoked to explain the spectral shape of the observed spectra.

  19. Global electric field determination in the Earth's outer magnetosphere using energetic charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, Timothy E.; Sheldon, R.; Hamilton, D.

    1995-01-01

    Although many properties of the Earth's magnetosphere have been measured and quantified in the past 30 years since it was discovered, one fundamental measurement (for zeroth order MHD equilibrium) has been made infrequently and with poor spatial coverage - the global electric field. This oversight is due in part to the neglect of theorists. However, there is renewed interest in the convection electric field because it is now realized to be central to many magnetospheric processes, including the global MHD equilibrium, reconnection rates, Region 2 Birkeland currents, magnetosphere ionosphere coupling, ring current and radiation belt transport, substorm injections, and several acceleration mechanisms. Unfortunately the standard experimental methods have not been able to synthesize a global field (excepting the pioneering work of McIlwain's geostationary models) and we are left with an overly simplistic theoretical field, the Volland-Stern electric field model. Single point measurements of the plasmapause were used to infer the appropriate amplitudes of this model, parameterized by K(sub p). Although this result was never intended to be the definitive electric field model, it has gone nearly unchanged for 20 years. The analysis of current data sets requires a great deal more accuracy than can be provided by the Volland-Stern model. The variability of electric field shielding has not been properly addressed although effects of penetrating magnetospheric electric fields has been seen in mid-and low-latitude ionospheric data sets. The growing interest in substorm dynamics also requires a much better assessment of the electric fields responsible for particle injections. Thus we proposed and developed algorithms for extracting electric fields from particle data taken in the Earth's magnetosphere. As a test of the effectiveness of these new techniques, we analyzed data taken by the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft in equatorial orbit from 1984 to 1989.

  20. Magnetosphere of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siscoe, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    Models of the Saturnian magnetosphere based on the application of magnetospheric scaling relations to a spin-aligned planetary magnetic dipole, that produces a surface equatorial field strength in the range 0.5 to 2 gauss, exhibit the following properties: (1) The orbit of Titan lies inside of the magnetosphere essentially all of the time, even when variations in the size of the magnetosphere resulting from solar wind pressure changes are taken into account; (2) the Brice-type planetary plasmasphere reaches a peak density of about 10 protons cm/3 at L approximately 7 (L = planetocentric distance in units of planetary radii); (3) Saturn's rings have a profound effect on the energetic particle population and the plasmaspheres derived from interstellar neutrals and Titan's torus; (4) the model calculation suggests that the Titan-derived plasmasphere may be self-amplifying with a feed-back factor greater than unity, which implies the possibility of a non-linearly saturated, highly inflated Saturnian magnetosphere; and (5) this same source can have important eroding effects on the outer edge of the rings determined by Brown-Lauzerotti sputtering rates.

  1. Geospace Magnetospheric Dynamics Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Kluever, C.; Burch, J. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Hack, K.; Hillard, G. B.; Kurth, W. S.; Lopez, R. E.; Luhmann, J. G.; Martin, J. B.; Hanson, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    The Geospace Magnetospheric Dynamics (GMD) mission is designed to provide very closely spaced, multipoint measurements in the thin current sheets of the magnetosphere to determine the relation between small scale processes and the global dynamics of the magnetosphere. Its trajectory is specifically designed to optimize the time spent in the current layers and to minimize radiation damage to the spacecraft. Observations are concentrated in the region 8 to 40 R(sub E) The mission consists of three phases. After a launch into geostationary transfer orbit the orbits are circularized to probe the region between geostationary orbit and the magnetopause; next the orbit is elongated keeping perigee at the magnetopause while keeping the line of apsides down the tail. Finally, once apogee reaches 40 R(sub E) the inclination is changed so that the orbit will match the profile of the noon-midnight meridian of the magnetosphere. This mission consists of 4 solar electrically propelled vehicles, each with a single NSTAR thruster utilizing 100 kg of Xe to tour the magnetosphere in the course of a 4.4 year mission, the same thrusters that have been successfully tested on the Deep Space-1 mission.

  2. Magnetic field drift shell splitting - Cause of unusual dayside particle pitch angle distributions during storms and substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Mcentire, R. W.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Lopez, R. E.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a magnetic field drift shell-splitting model for the unusual butterfly and head-and-shoulder energetic (E greater than 25 keV) particle pitch angle distributions (PADs) which appear deep within the dayside magnetosphere during the course of storms and substorms. Drift shell splitting separates the high and low pitch angle particles in nightside injections as they move to the dayside magnetosphere, so that the higher pitch angle particles move radially away from earth. Consequently, butterfly PADs with a surplus of low pitch angle particles form on the inner edge of the injection, but head-and-shoulder PADs with a surplus of high pitch angle particles form on the outer edge. A similar process removes high pitch angle particles from the inner dayside magnetosphere during storms, leaving the remaining lower pitch angle particles to form butterfly PADs on the inner edge of the ring current. A detailed case and statistical study of Charge Composition Explorer/Medium-energy Particle Analyzer observations, as well as a review of previous work, shows most examples of unusual PADs to be consistent with the model.

  3. Building a Coupled Kinetic Framework for the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Plasmasphere-Polar Wind-Superthermal Electron System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelchenko, Y.; Karimabadi, H.; Schunk, R. W.; Barakat, A. R.; Gardner, L. C.; Khazanov, G. V.; Glocer, A.; Kistler, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    Recent spacecraft observations have revealed that the critical plasma processes regulating mass and energy transfer in the magnetosphere take place at relatively thin ion-scale regions (e.g., bow shock, magnetopause, magnetotail) where kinetic ions control the physics. All parts of the magnetosphere are strongly coupled: the ionosphere's finite conductivity affects the field line tying as well as the size of the magnetosphere; multi-species ionospheric outflows limit the cross-polar cap potential, provide a sink for the energy flowing into the auroral region, modify the open/closed boundary during storms and substorms and determine the distribution of energetic particles in the ring current and plasma sheet. We propose to develop the next generation global modeling framework which will, for the first time, retain full ion kinetic effects throughout the entire magnetosphere. This will be achieved through coupling independent hybrid models for two separate parts of the magnetosphere: (i) the outer magnetosphere, modeled with a new asynchronous (event-driven) global hybrid code, HYPERS, and (ii) the ionosphere-plasmasphere-polar-wind (IPPW) system, modeled with a different hybrid code coupled with a new superthermal electron (SE) transport model. Thus, in our asynchronous framework the HYPERS code will provide self-consistent electric field and ion flows (sinks) to the IPPW-SE model which will self-consistently compute ionospheric kinetic ion flows (sources) and conductivity to enable seamless continuation of the kinetic-ion physics towards the outer magnetosphere.

  4. Kinetic Simulation and Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced simulation tools and measurement techniques have been developed to study the dynamic magnetosphere and its response to drivers in the solar wind. The Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) is a kinetic code that solves the 3D distribution in space, energy and pitch-angle information of energetic ions and electrons. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imagers have been carried in past and current satellite missions. Global morphology of energetic ions were revealed by the observed ENA images. We have combined simulation and ENA analysis techniques to study the development of ring current ions during magnetic storms and substorms. We identify the timing and location of particle injection and loss. We examine the evolution of ion energy and pitch-angle distribution during different phases of a storm. In this talk we will discuss the findings from our ring current studies and how our simulation and ENA analysis tools can be applied to the upcoming TRIO-CINAMA mission.

  5. Slow-mode shocks in the earth's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    The locations and structure of slow-mode shocks in the earth's magnetosphere are reviewed. To date, such shocks have only been identified along the high latitude portions of the lobe-plasma sheet boundary of the geomagnetic tail. Although their intrinsic thickness is of the order of the upstream ion inertial length, they affect the internal state of a relatively much larger volume of surrounding plasma. In particular, they support a well-developed foreshock very similar to that observed upstream of the earth's bow shock, and a turbulent, strongly convecting downstream flow. They also figure importantly in the energy budget of geomagnetic substorms and produce effects which are closely analogous to much of the phenomenology known from solar observations to be associated with two-ribbon flares. 74 refs., 14 figs.

  6. Dione's Magnetospheric Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Schippers, P.; Moncuquet, M.; Lecacheux, A.; Crary, F. J.; Khurana, K. K.; Mitchell, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini has executed four close flybys of Dione during its mission at Saturn with one additional flyby planned as of this writing. The Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument observed the plasma wave spectrum during each of the four encounters and plans to make additional observations during the 17 August 2015 flyby. These observations are joined by those from the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS), Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI), and the Magnetometer instrument (MAG), although neither CAPS nor MAG data were available for the fourth flyby. The first and fourth flybys were near polar passes while the second and third were near wake passes. The second flyby occurred during a time of hot plasma injections which are not thought to be specifically related to Dione. The Dione plasma wave environment is characterized by an intensification of the upper hybrid band and whistler mode chorus. The upper hybrid band shows frequency fluctuations with a period of order 1 minute that suggest density variations of up to 10%. These density variations are anti-correlated with the magnetic field magnitude, suggesting a mirror mode wave. Other than these periodic density fluctuations there appears to be no local plasma source which would be observed as a local enhancement in the density although variations in the electron distribution are apparent. Wake passages show a deep density depletion consistent with a plasma cavity downstream of the moon. Energetic particles show portions of the distribution apparently absorbed by the moon leading to anisotropies that likely drive both the intensification of the upper hybrid band as well as the whistler mode emissions. We investigate the role of electron anisotropies and enhanced hot electron fluxes in the intensification of the upper hybrid band and whistler mode emissions.

  7. Saturn's variable magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Gombosi, Tamas I; Hansen, Kenneth C

    2005-02-25

    Since the Cassini spacecraft reached Saturn's orbit in 2004, its instruments have been sending back a wealth of data on the planet's magnetosphere (the region dominated by the magnetic field of the planet). In this Viewpoint, we discuss some of these results, which are reported in a collection of reports in this issue. The magnetosphere is shown to be highly variable and influenced by the planet's rotation, sources of plasma within the planetary system, and the solar wind. New insights are also gained into the chemical composition of the magnetosphere, with surprising results. These early results from Cassini's first orbit around Saturn bode well for the future as the spacecraft continues to orbit the planet.

  8. Is the Current Disruption Region the Genesis Region for the Substorm X-Line?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, G. M.; Maynard, N. C.; Wilson, G. R.

    2002-12-01

    The nominal location for the substorm near-Earth X-line (NEXL) has been found to be outside but near 20RE in the tail. The modified Near-Earth Neutral Line (NENL) model postulates that braking of fast, earthward flows and pile up of magnetic flux accounts for the initiation of the substorm current wedge and dipolarization within 10RE, and its tailward expansion. Current disruption (CD) and CD-like magnetic activity accompanies dipolarization in the 8--12RE range and commences in close temporal proximity to auroral onset. We report here, based on Geotail observations, that 70% of CD-like activity in the 9 (perigee) to 12 RE range of the pre-midnight and midnight plasma sheet begins in the absence of earthward flow. In only 20% of the cases does CD-like activity start coincident with arrival of earthward flow. Indeed, in a like number of cases, CD-like activity starts coincident with a clear signal (tailward Poynting flux) arriving from nearer Earth. When auroral coverage is adequate, we have shown that these substorms proceed in two stages, with reconnection occurring during the second stage. But this is not the entire story. We note three pieces of evidence that lead us to suggest that the CD region is the genesis region for the NEXL. (1) In 10% of CD-like events, magnetic fluctuations commence like typical CD events, but rather than dipolarizing, the magnetic field diminishes. Whereas the distribution for the typical CD signature shows a strong peak near 10RE, these hybrid events are more uniformly distributed between 9 and 19 RE, and from 13--19RE represent 30% of all CD-like activity. (2) Signatures of a substorm NEXL earthward of Geotail can be found as near Earth as 13RE on occasion. (3) A minimum in equatorial magnetic field strength is believed to evolve during the substorm growth phase near 10RE. Hau and Wolf [JGR, 92, 4745, 1987] discuss how, in the presence of resistivity, the B-minimum structure diffuses tailward, and the minimum deepens, until a NEXL

  9. Motion of magnetospheric particle clouds in a time-dependent electric field model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roederer, J. G.; Hones, E. H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to study quantitatively the drift motion of magnetospheric particles in a time-dependent electric field. These calculations were applied to the case of proton and electron injections from the plasma sheet during substorms; the model predictions were checked against observations on board the geosynchronous satellite ATS 5 by DeForest and McIlwain (1971). It was found that it is possible to simulate the observed proton spectrograms with an adequate choice of a time-dependent electric field model. The resulting kinematics is physically quite simple and in its gross features does not depend too strongly on the particular fine structure of the model.

  10. Midtail plasma flows and the relationship to near-Earth substorm activity: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Goodrich, C. C.; Reeves, G. D.; Belian, R. D.; Taktakishvili, A.

    1994-01-01

    Recent simulations of magnetotail reconnection have pointed to a link between plasma flows, dipolarization, and the substorm current wedge. In particular, Hesse and Birn (1991) have proposed that earthward jetting of plasma from the reconnection region transports flux into the near-Earth region. At the inner edge of the plasma sheet this flux piles up, producing a dipolarization of the magnetic field. The vorticity produced by the east-west deflection of the flow at the inner edge of the plasma sheet gives rise to field-aligned currents that have region 1 polarity. Thus in this scenario the earthward flow from the reconnection region produces the dipolarization ad the current wedge in a self-consistent fashion. In this study we examine observations made on April 8, 1985 by the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE)/Ion Release Module (IRM), the geosynchronous satellites 1979-053, 1983-019, and 1984-037, and Syowa station, as well as AE. This event is unique because IRM was located near the neutral sheet in the midnight sector for am extended period of time. Ground data show that there was ongoing activity in the IRM local time sector for several hours, beginning at 1800 UT and reaching a crescendo at 2300 UT. This activity was also accompanied by energetic particle variations, including injections, at geosynchronous orbit in the nighttime sector. Significantly, there were no fast flows at the neutral sheet until the great intensification of activity at 2300 UT. At that time, IRM recorded fast eartheard flow simultaneous with a dipolatization of the magetic field. We conclude that while the aforementioned scenario for the creation of the current wedge encounters serious problems explaining the earlier activity, the observations at 2300 UT are consistent with the scenario of Hesse and Birn (1191). On that basis it is argued that the physics of substorms is not exclusively rooted in the development of a global tearing mode. Processes at the inner edge

  11. Seasonal dependence of the substorm overshielding at the subauroral latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K. K.; Kikuchi, T.

    2012-12-01

    We have shown that the equatorial counter electrojet (CEJ) is observed on the dayside when the overshielding electric field is dominant at subauroral latitudes on the dusk during substorm expansion phase. In this study, we examine if all the equatorial CEJs are accompanied by overshielding at subauroral latitudes by using ground magnetometer networks, IMAGE and INTERMAGNET during the period from 2000 to 2003. We selected 469 CEJ events from magnetometer data at Huancayo in Peru observed with the positive bay at Kakioka, Japan on the nightside. Overshielding was observed at subauroral stations of the IMAGE for 263 CEJ events, while it was not observed for 206 events. We found that the occurrence of the overshielding at subauroral latitudes significantly depends on the season; they tend to occur in the winter period from November to February. On the other hand, the convection electric field is dominant at the subauroral latitude during the northern summer period from April to August. Overshielding electric field that causes the CEJ during the northern summer should be originated from the southern hemisphere. Our results suggest that the overshielding electric field is stronger in winter than in summer if the convection electric field does not depend on the season. These features would be explained by assuming that the dynamo for the Region-1 field-aligned currents (R1 FACs) is the voltage generator, while that for the R2 FACs is the current generator.

  12. Magnetospheric conditions near the equatorial footpoints of proton isotropy boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, V. A.; Chernyaev, I. A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Ganushkina, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Data from a cluster of three THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) spacecraft during February-March 2009 frequently provide an opportunity to construct local data-adaptive magnetospheric models, which are suitable for the accurate mapping along the magnetic field lines at distances of 6-9 Re in the nightside magnetosphere. This allows us to map the isotropy boundaries (IBs) of 30 and 80 keV protons observed by low-altitude NOAA POES (Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites) to the equatorial magnetosphere (to find the projected isotropy boundary, PIB) and study the magnetospheric conditions, particularly to evaluate the ratio KIB (Rc/rc; the magnetic field curvature radius to the particle gyroradius) in the neutral sheet at that point. Special care is taken to control the factors which influence the accuracy of the adaptive models and mapping. Data indicate that better accuracy of an adaptive model is achieved when the PIB distance from the closest spacecraft is as small as 1-2 Re. For this group of most accurate predictions, the spread of KIB values is still large (from 4 to 32), with the median value KIB ~13 being larger than the critical value Kcr ~ 8 expected at the inner boundary of nonadiabatic angular scattering in the current sheet. It appears that two different mechanisms may contribute to form the isotropy boundary. The group with K ~ [4,12] is most likely formed by current sheet scattering, whereas the group having KIB ~ [12,32] could be formed by the resonant scattering of low-energy protons by the electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) waves. The energy dependence of the upper K limit and close proximity of the latter event to the plasmapause locations support this conclusion. We also discuss other reasons why the K ~ 8 criterion for isotropization may fail to work, as well as a possible relationship between the two scattering mechanisms.

  13. Electron pitch angle distributions throughout the magnetosphere as observed on Ogo 5.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, H. I., Jr.; Buck, R. M.; Walton, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of the equatorial pitch angle distributions of energetic electrons is provided for all local times out to radial distances of 20 earth radii on the night side of the earth and to the magnetopause on the day side of the earth. In much of the inner magnetosphere and in the outer magnetosphere on the day side of the earth, the normal loss cone distribution prevails. The effects of drift shell splitting - i.e., the appearance of pitch angle distributions with minimums at 90 deg, called butterfly distributions - become apparent in the early afternoon magnetosphere at extended distances, and the distribution is observed in to 5.5 earth radii in the nighttime magnetosphere. Inside about 9 earth radii the pitch angle effects are quite energy-dependent. Beyond about 9 earth radii in the premidnight magnetosphere during quiet times the butterfly distribution is often observed. It is shown that these electrons cannot survive a drift to dawn without being considerably modified. The role of substorm activity in modifying these distributions is identified.

  14. Global impact of collisionless magnetic reconnection on the structure of planetary magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorelli, J.; Glocer, A.; Collinson, G.; Toth, G.

    2014-12-01

    While the local physics of collisionless magnetic reconnection has been well studied, the consequences for global magnetospheric structure remain largely unexplored. It is well known, for example, that Hall electric fields generate a new system of field-aligned currents propagating from the reconnection site along the magnetic separatrices; but it is not known how these currents contribute to the global region 1 and region 2 current systems or to auroral substorm features. In this presentation, we show that collisionless reconnection has a significant impact on the large scale structure of planetary magnetospheres. Using global Hall MHD simulations, we demonstrate that field-aligned currents generated at the reconnection sites (and carried by whistler or kinetic Alfven waves) extend all the way down to the surface of the magnetized body and must therefore be included in the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling physics (e.g., Harang-like discontinuities in the ionospheric convection pattern -- absent in MHD -- are introduced, and the current densities are large enough to produce auroral emission). More surprisingly, ions and electrons pick up magnetic drifts (due to JxB forces in the ion diffusion regions) that significantly alter the global magnetospheric convection pattern. Ions in the plasma sheet drift duskward while electrons drift dawnward, producing large asymmetries in the plasma sheet structure even in the absense of solar wind asymmetry, asymmetric ionospheric conductance or co-rotation. We discuss the implications of these effects for the reconnection-driven magnetospheres of Ganymede, Mercury and Earth.

  15. Unveiling the solar wind - Earth's magnetic field coupling and storm/substorm relationship by information-theoretic multivariate causality measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Jakob; Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Donner, Reik; Daglis, Ioannis; Kurths, Juergen

    2016-04-01

    The identification of directed interdependencies between variables related to causal relationships in various geoscientific processes is necessary for an improved process-based understanding of the coupling between different variables or even systems. Especially in geomagnetism, the time-dependent coupling between solar wind and the Earth's magnetic field as well as the relationship between magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms are of paramount importance for the development of appropriate numerical simulation models of space weather. Here we utilize an information-theoretic method of directional, multivariate causality measures using graphical models that goes beyond bivariate transfer entropy approaches and allows for the identification and statistical evaluation of linear as well as nonlinear causality between variables. In this study, we present and discuss results from an application of this method to the time series of various solar wind parameters as well as the AE and SYM-H geomagnetic activity indices.

  16. Transient, small-scale field-aligned currents in the plasma sheet boundary layer during storm time substorms.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, R; Sergeev, V A; Baumjohann, W; Plaschke, F; Magnes, W; Fischer, D; Varsani, A; Schmid, D; Nakamura, T K M; Russell, C T; Strangeway, R J; Leinweber, H K; Le, G; Bromund, K R; Pollock, C J; Giles, B L; Dorelli, J C; Gershman, D J; Paterson, W; Avanov, L A; Fuselier, S A; Genestreti, K; Burch, J L; Torbert, R B; Chutter, M; Argall, M R; Anderson, B J; Lindqvist, P-A; Marklund, G T; Khotyaintsev, Y V; Mauk, B H; Cohen, I J; Baker, D N; Jaynes, A N; Ergun, R E; Singer, H J; Slavin, J A; Kepko, E L; Moore, T E; Lavraud, B; Coffey, V; Saito, Y

    2016-05-28

    We report on field-aligned current observations by the four Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft near the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) during two major substorms on 23 June 2015. Small-scale field-aligned currents were found embedded in fluctuating PSBL flux tubes near the separatrix region. We resolve, for the first time, short-lived earthward (downward) intense field-aligned current sheets with thicknesses of a few tens of kilometers, which are well below the ion scale, on flux tubes moving equatorward/earthward during outward plasma sheet expansion. They coincide with upward field-aligned electron beams with energies of a few hundred eV. These electrons are most likely due to acceleration associated with a reconnection jet or high-energy ion beam-produced disturbances. The observations highlight coupling of multiscale processes in PSBL as a consequence of magnetotail reconnection.

  17. Ion Dynamics during Substorm Events Modeled with Coupled Global MHD and Kinetic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, G.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Walker, R. J.; El-Alaoui, M.

    2014-12-01

    We have studied ion dynamics during a substorm by using a coupled fluid-kinetic approach. The UCLA global magnetospheric model was applied first and its results in a region encompassing a magnetotail reconnection site and earthward propagating dipolarization fronts was selected as input state for a full kinetic simulation based on the iPic3D code [1]. The coupling is one-way: the MHD result is used to create a full kinetic initial state by using the approach described by [2] and to force the boundary conditions. The kinetic results are not fed back into the MHD run. This approach previously has been shown [3] to provide correctly the large scale picture for a kinetic approach when the duration of the kinetic run is not so long as to alter significantly the macroscopic state captured by MHD. Here we focus especially on the ions. The electrons were described in [3]. Three aspects are analyzed. First, the ions are accelerated during the event and we track the localization of the energy exchanged, separating the contributions to the directed energy and those to the thermal energy. Second, we consider the ion motion to identify the regions where the finite Larmor radius effects violate the drift approximation and the frozen-in condition, thereby identifying the ion diffusion region. Our approach follows individual electrons and ions fully kinetically and no approximation is made in the particle orbit, so our code is equipped to study accurately the regions where the drift approximation is valid. Finally, we consider the ion distribution as a possible source of instabilities, focusing especially on temperature anisotropy instabilities and on the firehose instability. The novelty of the approach is this kinetic study is done for a specific substorm by using the global state of the magnetosphere as provided by a global MHD simulation. This differs sharply from previous approaches based on analytical approximations such as the Harris or the (quasi)-parabolic equilibria. [1

  18. Ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Principal results are presented for the four papers that were supported from this grant. These papers include: 'Mapping and Energization in the Magnetotail. 1. Magnetospheric Boundaries; 'Mapping and Energization in the Magnetotail. 2. Particle Acceleration'; 'Cross-Tail Current: Resonant Orbits'; and 'Cross-Tail Current, Field-Aligned Current, and B(sub y)'.

  19. Origins of magnetospheric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.E. )

    1991-01-01

    A review is given of recent (1987-1990) progress in understanding of the origins of plasmas in the earth's magnetosphere. In counterpoint to the early supposition that geomagnetic phenomena are produced by energetic plasmas of solar origin, 1987 saw the publication of a provocative argument that accelerated ionospheric plasma could supply all magnetospheric auroral and ring current particles. Significant new developments of existing data sets, as well as the establishment of entirely new data sets, have improved the ability to identify plasma source regions and to track plasma through the magnetospheric system of boundary layers and reservoirs. These developments suggest that the boundary between ionospheric and solar plasmas, once taken to lie at the plasmapause, actually lies much nearer to the magnetopause. Defining this boundary as the surface where solar wind and ionosphere contribute equally to the plasma, it is referred to herein as the 'geopause'. It is now well established that the infusion of ionospheric O(+) plays a major role in the storm-time distention of the magnetotail and inflation of the inner magnetosphere. After more than two decades of observation and debate, the question remains whether magnetosheric are protons of solar or terrestrial origin. 161 refs.

  20. DR-current intensity variations during substorm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitseva, S. A.; Drobinina, T. A.; Pudovkin, M. I.

    2003-04-01

    According to the concept dominated by the last time, the intensification of the DR-current takes place during the polar substorm development. In the recent papers Iyemori and Rao claim that geomagnetic storms and substorms are independent processes, and SYM-index (essentially the same as Dst-index) tends to decay after the onset of substorms. In this paper we tried to clear up the cause of this contradiction by studying the connection of ring current development with polar substorms basing on the new data: ASY-, SYM-indices describing asymmetric and symmetric parts of DR-current correspondingly and AL-index as a measure of polar disturbances. It is shown that the hourly-mean SYM- and ASY-indices correlate with AL-index (r=0.63 and 0.69 correspondingly), and the connection between these values becomes worse for strong storms. Besides, at the substorm expansive phase onset, the energy can put mainly to the asymmetric part rather than into symmetric part of DR-current. Empirical Q-index based on solar wind parameters describes the energy input into DR-current; Q correlates rather well with SYM, ASY and AL-indices. Thus the intensifications of polar disturbances and DR-current take place simultaneously and have the same source.At the same time, the proportion in which the solar wind energy is distributed between the DR-current, polar ionosphere and magnetotail depends on the Dst variation phase.

  1. Polar Cap Area and Boundary Motion During Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brittnacher, M.; Germany, G. A.; Fillingim, M. O.; Parks, G. K.; Spann, James F., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The area of the polar cap as a function of local time and substorm phase was measured using images from the Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) for different interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations during three substorms in January 1997. We measured changes in the polar cap area and motion of the poleward and equatorward boundary of the auroral oval as determined by UVI images. It was found that the polar cap boundary is strongly influenced by thinning of the oval, decrease in polar cap structures, the poleward expansion of the substorm at midnight and the fading of luminosity below the instrument sensitivity threshold. Generally these effects dominate over the latitudinal motion of the auroral oval at its equatorward edge. A new feature is that the polar cap region clears of precipitation during the substorm growth phase, which expands the size of the polar cap but may not necessarily be related to an expansion of the open flux. We present a new finding that the increase in polar cap area prior to onset and the decrease in the area following it are independent of the strength of the southward IMF component. For one case the polar cap area increased while the southward component of the IMF was no less than -0.5 nT. These observations have strong implications for models that use the polar cap area to estimate the magnitude of energy storage in the lobe magnetic field and loss during substorms.

  2. Examination of time-variable input effects in a nonlinear analogue magnetosphere model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Klimas, A. J.; Roberts, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    The plasma physical analog model (an extension of the damped, harmonic-oscillator dripping faucet model) is employed to consider explicitly the effect of time-varying the inputs. This work is equivalent to considering the effects of northward and southward turnings of the interplanetary magnetic field for various periods of time. It is found that relatively extended episodes (not less than 2 hours) of turned-on input with shorter (about 1 hour) periods of turned-off input lead to model behavior much like the continuously driven case. Going to short input intervals with longer periods of zero input leads to highly irregular and dramatically fluctuating episodes of magnetotail unloading. These results give an insight into the diversity of apparent magnetospheric responses during relatively isolated substorm conditions. This work shows the absolutely critical interdependence (in a nonlinear dynamical system) of input phasing and internal magnetospheric response cycles.

  3. Mini Magnetospheric Plasma Propulsion (M2P2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis; Winglee, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The M2P2 concept is based on the transfer of momentum from the solar wind to an artificial magnetic field structure like that naturally occurs at all magnetized planets in the Solar System, called the magnetosphere. The objectives of this program include the following: (1) Demonstrate artificial magnetospheric inflation through cold plasma filling in vacuum; (2) Demonstrate deflection of a surrogate solar wind by an artificial magnetosphere in the laboratory vacuum chamber; (3) Compare theoretical calculations for thrust forces with laboratory measurements; (4) Develop flight control algorithms for planning mission specific trajectories; and (5) Develop M2P2 system concept.

  4. Effect of magnetic storms (substorms) on HF propagation: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskii, D. V.

    2013-07-01

    The manifestations of the so-called main ionospheric effect during geomagnetic storms (substorms) in the character of decameter-wave propagation are analyzed. On HF radio paths, the main effect is observed as variations in the signal amplitude and the MOF-LOF working frequency band similarly to the critical frequency of the ionospheric F2 layer. Specifically, these parameters increase before the disturbance active phase, decrease during the active phase, and increase again after this phase. The propagation outside the great circle arc, the change in the propagation processes, and the HF radio noise behavior were also considered on these paths during storms (substorms). It is assumed that the storm (substorm) development onset can be predicted.

  5. Inner magnetosphere coupling: Recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanova, M. E.; Shprits, Y. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of the inner magnetosphere is strongly governed by the interactions between different plasma populations that are coupled through large-scale electric and magnetic fields, currents, and wave-particle interactions. Inner magnetospheric plasma undergoes self-consistent interactions with global electric and magnetic fields. Waves excited in the inner magnetosphere from unstable particle distributions can provide energy exchange between different particle populations in the inner magnetosphere and affect the ring current and radiation belt dynamics. The ionosphere serves as an energy sink and feeds the magnetosphere back through the cold plasma outflow. The precipitating inner magnetospheric particles influence the ionosphere and upper atmospheric chemistry and affect climate. Satellite measurements and theoretical studies have advanced our understanding of the dynamics of various plasma populations in the inner magnetosphere. However, our knowledge of the coupling processes among the plasmasphere, ring current, radiation belts, global magnetic and electric fields, and plasma waves generated within these systems is still incomplete. This special issue incorporates extended papers presented at the Inner Magnetosphere Coupling III conference held 23-27 March 2015 in Los Angeles, California, USA, and includes modeling and observational contributions addressing interactions within different plasma populations in the inner magnetosphere (plasmasphere, ring current, and radiation belts), coupling between fields and plasma populations, as well as effects of the inner magnetosphere on the ionosphere and atmosphere.

  6. The pulsating magnetosphere and flux transfer events

    SciTech Connect

    Potemra, T.A.; Zanetti, L.J. ); Elphinstone, R.; Murphree, J.S. ); Klumpar, D.M. )

    1992-08-03

    A unique positioning of the GOES 5, GOES 6, AMPTE/CCE, and Viking satellites on the dayside of the magnetosphere has provided the opportunity to study the relationship of periodic variations in magnetic fields, energetic particle fluxes, and images of UV auroral forms. On March 25, 1986, at about 1725 UT, two cycles of 10-min-period magnetic field oscillations were observed by all four satellites and by the Huancayo magnetic ground station. The UV images acquired by Viking showed intense emissions in a wide area near noon at 1730 UT, but near dawn 11 min. later. The authors interpret these observations as being associated with anti-sunward-moving periodic compressions of the magnetopause, which precipitated low-energy electrons that produced the enhanced UV emissions. In the midst of the longer-period variations, the magnetic field intensity measured by CCE near the magnetopause decreased sharply for a 105-sec period. This may be interpreted as being due to a flux transfer event that occurred during the longer (10-min) periodic compressions of the magnetosphere. These observations support the view that the magnetosphere often varies in a periodic way because of its own resonant processes and processes driven by the solar wind. A wide range of phenomena is associated with these variations including dayside auroral emissions, magnetic field variations throughout the magnetosphere and on the Earth's surface, and flux transfer events.

  7. Magnetosheath control of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Dimmock, A. P.; Lakka, A.; Osmane, A.; Kilpua, E.; Myllys, M.; Tanskanen, E. I.; Viljanen, A.

    2016-09-01

    We examine the role of the magnetosheath in solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling using the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms plasma and magnetic field observations in the magnetosheath together with OMNI solar wind data and auroral electrojet recordings from the International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects (IMAGE) magnetometer chain. We demonstrate that the electric field and Poynting flux reaching the magnetopause are not linear functions of the electric field and Poynting flux observed in the solar wind: the electric field and Poynting flux at the magnetopause during higher driving conditions are lower than those predicted from a linear function. We also show that the Poynting flux normal to the magnetopause is linearly correlated with the directly driven part of the auroral electrojets in the ionosphere. This indicates that the energy entering the magnetosphere in the form of the Poynting flux is directly responsible for driving the electrojets. Furthermore, we argue that the polar cap potential saturation discussed in the literature is associated with the way solar wind plasma gets processed during the bow shock crossing and motion within the magnetosheath.

  8. Is the magnetosphere a lens for MHD waves?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Sharma, A. S.; Valdivia, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    A viewpoint of the magnetosphere as a lens for MHD waves is presented. Using a simple model of the variation of the Alfven speed as proportional to the local magnetic value given by the Earth's dipole field and that due to the magnetopause currents represented by a current loop, it is found that the near-Earth magnetotail, in the range 8-16 R(sub E), is the focus of the magnetospheric lens. This location is found to be quite insensitive to a wide variation of parameters. By using simple diffraction theory analysis it is found that the focal region extends about 1 R(sub E) about the neutral sheet in the north-south plane and 0.2 - 0.5 R(sub E) along the Sun-Earth line. Compressive MHD waves carried by the solar wind or created by the interaction of the wind with the magnetopause can be amplified by a factor of about 100 in the focal region and this has potentially important implications to substorm activity.

  9. Substorm Evolution in the Near-Earth Plasma Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary M.

    2004-01-01

    This grant represented one-year, phase-out funding for the project of the same name (NAG5-9110 to Boston University) to determine precursors and signatures of local substorm onset and how they evolve in the plasma sheet using the Geotail near-Earth database. We report here on two accomplishments: (1) Completion of an examination of plasma velocity signature at times of local onsets in the current disruption (CD) region. (2) Initial investigation into quantification of near-Earth flux-tube contents of injected plasma at times of substorm injections.

  10. The Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmingham, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    Research on Jovian magnetospheric physics from 1979 through 1982 is surveyed, with a focus on the observations of Voyagers 1 and 2. Jovian fields and plasmas are characterized in the order of their distance from the planet, and special emphasis is given to the Io plasma torus (IPT) in the 4.9-8-Jovian-radius region and to the extended Jovian magnetotail. Topics reviewed include synchrotron radiation, magnetic-field models, Na and S emissions in the IPT, aurora, the magnetic-anomaly model, IPT plasma diffusion-convection, Io-generated Alfven wave, plasma configuration beyond the IPT, low-energy charged particles, cosmic-ray-energy particles, particle acceleration, magnetic configuration, tail current sheet and plasma disc, magnetopause and magnetosheath, interplanetary ions of Jovian origin, and the Jovian magnetosphere at Saturnian distances.

  11. Currents in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1983-01-01

    A model of Saturn's magnetospheric magnetic field is obtained from the Voyager 1 and 2 observations. A representation consisting of the Z sub 3 zonal harmonic model of Saturn's planetary magnetic field together with an explicit model of Saturn's planetary magnetic field and a model of the equatorial ring current fits the observations well within r 20 R sub S, with the exception of data obtained during the Voyager 2 inbound pass.

  12. Electrodynamics of Pulsar Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Benoît; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2016-12-01

    We review electrodynamics of rotating magnetized neutron stars, from the early vacuum model to recent numerical experiments with plasma-filled magnetospheres. Significant progress became possible due to the development of global particle-in-cell simulations which capture particle acceleration, emission of high-energy photons, and electron-positron pair creation. The numerical experiments show from first principles how and where electric gaps form, and promise to explain the observed pulsar activity from radio waves to gamma-rays.

  13. Mercury's magnetosphere: another look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Irene M.

    1997-01-01

    The measurements made of Mercury's magnetic field during the Mercury I flyby and the Mereury III flyby have been incorporated into models of the Hermean magnetosphere-magnetotail system. When the magnetic field data for the first half of the Mereury I flyby and all of the Mercury III flyby were incorporated into a single fit of a scaled version of the Beard ( J. Geophys. Res.84, 2118-2122, 1979) Earth magnetosphere-magnetotail system, a r.m.s. deviation of 9.3 nT for the magnetic field vector was obtained (Bergan and Engle, J. Geophys. Res.86, 1617-1620, 1981). This paper presents results of a study that employs an adaptation of that Beard model but also adopts the assumption that the incident solar wind pressure was different at the times of the two Mercury magnetosphere encounters. Resulting different stand-off distances and scaling factors for the data of the two respective flybys result directly from that single assumption. The study yields a comparable fit of reduced r.m.s. deviation of 7.1 nT and a strength of the Mercury planetary dipole moment D (before any displacement effects are incorporated) between 154 nT RM3 (Merc 1) and 182 nT RM3 (Merc 3). The corresponding standoff distances are 1.31 RM for the Merc 3 encounter and 1.08 RM for the Merc 1 encounter.

  14. The magnetospheric trough

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, M.F.; McComas, D.J.; Elphic, R.C.; Borovsky, J.E.

    1997-03-04

    The authors review the history of the concepts of the magnetospheric cold-ion trough and hot-electron trough and conclude that the two regions are actually essentially the same. The magnetospheric trough may be viewed as a temporal state in the evolution of convecting flux tubes. These flux tubes are in contact with the earth`s upper atmosphere which acts both as a sink for precipitating hot plasma sheet electrons and as a source for the cold ionospheric plasma leading to progressive depletion of the plasma sheet and refilling with cold plasma. Geosynchronous plasma observations show that the rate of loss of plasma-sheet electron energy density is commensurate with the precipitating electron flux at the low-latitude edge of the diffuse aurora. The rate at which geosynchronous flux tubes fill with cold ionospheric plasma is found to be consistent with previous estimates of early-time refilling. Geosynchronous observations further indicate that both Coulomb collisions and wave-particle effects probably play a role in trapping ionospheric material in the magnetosphere.

  15. Solar wind influence on Jupiter's magnetosphere and aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Marissa; Gyalay, Szilard; Withers, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Jupiter's magnetosphere is often said to be rotationally driven, with strong centrifugal stresses due to large spatial scales and a rapid planetary rotation period. For example, the main auroral emission at Jupiter is not due to the magnetosphere-solar wind interaction but is driven by a system of corotation enforcement currents that arises to speed up outflowing Iogenic plasma. Additionally, processes like tail reconnection are also thought to be driven, at least in part, by processes internal to the magnetosphere. While the solar wind is generally expected to have only a small influence on Jupiter's magnetosphere and aurora, there is considerable observational evidence that the solar wind does affect the magnetopause standoff distance, auroral radio emissions, and the position and brightness of the UV auroral emissions. We will report on the results of a comprehensive, quantitative study of the influence of the solar wind on various magnetospheric data sets measured by the Galileo mission from 1996 to 2003. Using the Michigan Solar Wind Model (mSWiM) to predict the solar wind conditions upstream of Jupiter, we have identified intervals of high and low solar wind dynamic pressure. We can use this information to quantify how a magnetospheric compression affects the magnetospheric field configuration, which in turn will affect the ionospheric mapping of the main auroral emission. We also consider whether there is evidence that reconnection events occur preferentially during certain solar wind conditions or that the solar wind modulates the quasi-periodicity seen in the magnetic field dipolarizations and flow bursts.

  16. Ultra-low-frequency wave power in the magnetotail lobes. I - Relation to substorm onsets and the auroral electrojet index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.; Goertz, C. K.; Harrold, B. G.; Goldstein, M. L.; Lepping, R. P.; Fitch, C. A.; Sands, M. R.

    1990-01-01

    Time-series observations of the magnetotail-lobe magnetic field have been Fourier analyzed to compute the frequency-weighted energy density Pfz in the range 1-30 mHz. Pfz is generally observed in the range 0.0001-0.01 gamma-squared Hz with a mean value of 0.0012 during substorm growth phases and 0.001 in the comparison intervals. No strong correlation of Pfz is found with the auroral electrojet index in either set of intervals, but during substorm growth phases Pfz may vary by an order of magnitude over time scales of 30 min, with a tendency for higher power levels to occur later in the growth phase. Increases in Pfz precede by about 10 min localized expansive phase activity observed in individual magnetograms.

  17. Observations of field-aligned currents, waves, and electric fields at substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, D. P.; Hughes, W. J.; Cattell, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    Substorm onsets, identified Pi 2 pulsations observed on the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory Magnetometer Network, are studied using magnetometer and electric field data from ISEE 1 as well as magnetometer data from the geosynchronous satellites GOES 2 and 3. The mid-latitude magnetometer data provides the means of both timing and locating the substorm onset so that the spacecraft locations with respect to the substorm current systems are known. During two intervals, each containing several onsets or intensifications, ISEE 1 observed field-aligned current signatures beginning simultaneously with the mid-latitude Pi 2 pulsation. Close to the earth broadband bursts of wave noise were observed in the electric field data whenever field-aligned currents were detected. One onset occurred when ISEE 1 and GOES 2 were on the same field line but in opposite hemispheres. During this onset ISEE 1 and GOES 2 saw magnetic signatures which appear to be due to conjugate field-aligned currents flowing out of the western end of the westward auroral electrojets. The ISEE 1 signature is of a line current moving westward past the spacecraft. During the other interval, ISEE 1 was in the near-tail region near the midnight meridian. Plasma data confirms that the plasma sheet thinned and subsequently expanded at onset. Electric field data shows that the plasma moved in the opposite direction to the plasma sheet boundary as the boundary expanded which implies that there must have been an abundant source of hot plasma present. The plasma motion was towards the center of the plasma sheet and earthwards and consisted of a series of pulses rather than a steady flow.

  18. Non-thermal ISR scatter and auroral forms associated with a substorm expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlgren, H.; Marshall, R. A.; Akbari, H.; Semeter, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Ground-based observations of a poleward substorm expansion using a high-resolution CMOS camera (50 frames/sec, 50 m spatial) and the electronically steerable Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) have clarified the relationship between fine scale auroral structure and the development of non-thermal ISR echoes commonly referred to as NEIALs (Naturally Enhanced Ion Acoustic Lines). The measurements provide an unprecedented view into the temporal development of auroral forms and the decameter scale irregularities responsible for NEIALs. The highly structured auroral forms present during this event provide insight into the filamentary current systems associated with dispersive Alfvén waves, which determine the spatial dynamics of the aurora. There are existing models of the production of NEIALs that are dependent on a large current density, which has been observed in fine scale aurora, whereas other models are dependent on beams of precipitating electrons with low energy. Explanations in terms of true density enhancements have also been suggested. The results in this paper suggest that multiple mechanisms may be required to explain the observed spectral distortions. Speculations are provided concerning the mode of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling underlying the optical and ISR features.

  19. Formation of the stable auroral arc that intensifies at substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Samson, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    In a companion paper, we present observational evidence that the stable, growth-phase auroral arc that intensifies at substorm expansion phase onset often forms on magnetic field lines that map to within approximately 1 to 2 R(sub e) of synchronous. The equatorial plasma pressure is 1 to 10 nPa in this region, which can give a cross-tail current greater than 0.1 A/m. In this paper, we propose that the arc is formed by a perpendicular magnetospheric-current divergence that results from a strong dawn-to-dusk directed pressure gradient in the vicinity of magnetic midnight. We estimate that the current divergence is sufficiently strong that a is greater than 1 kV field-aligned potential drop is required to maintain ionospheric-current continuity. We suggest that the azimuthal pressure gradient results from proton drifts in the vicinity of synchronous orbit that are directed nearly parallel to the cross-tail electric field.

  20. Plasma sheet oscillations and their relation to substorm development: Cluster and double star TC1 case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, T.; Nakamura, R.; Asano, Y.; Baumjohann, W.; Runov, A.; Volwerk, M.; Zhang, T. L.; Vörös, Z.; Keika, K.; Klecker, B.; Rème, H.; Lucek, E. A.; Carr, C.; Frey, H. U.

    We examined two consecutive plasma sheet oscillation and dipolarization events observed by Cluster in the magnetotail, which are associated with a pseudo-breakup and a small substorm monitored by the IMAGE spacecraft. Energy input from the solar wind and an associated enhancement of the cross-tail current lead to current sheet thinning and plasma sheet oscillations of 3 5 min periods, while the pseudo-breakups occur during the loading phase within a spatially limited area, accompanied by a localized dipolarization observed by DSP TC1 or GOES 12. That is, the so-called “growth phase” is a preferable condition for both pseudo-breakup and plasma sheet oscillations in the near-Earth magnetotail. One of the plasma sheet oscillation events occurs before the pseudo-breakup, whereas the other takes place after pseudo-breakup. Thus there is no causal relationship between the plasma sheet oscillation events and pseudo-breakup. As for the contribution to the subsequent small substorm, the onset of the small substorm took place where the preceding plasma sheet oscillations can reach the region.

  1. Method to locate the polar cap boundary in the nightside ionosphere and application to a substorm event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikio, A. T.; Pitkänen, T.; Kozlovsky, A.; Amm, O.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we describe a new method to be used for the polar cap boundary (PCB) determination in the nightside ionosphere by using the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR) field-aligned measurements by the 42-m antenna and southward directed low-elevation measurements by the ESR 32 m antenna or northward directed low-elevation measurements by the EISCAT VHF radar at Tromsø. The method is based on increased electron temperature (Te) caused by precipitating particles on closed field lines. Since the Svalbard field-aligned measurement provides the reference polar cap Te height profile, the method can be utilised only when the PCB is located between Svalbard and the mainland. Comparison with the Polar UVI images shows that the radar-based method is generally in agreement with the PAE (poleward auroral emission) boundary from Polar UVI.

    The new technique to map the polar cap boundary was applied to a substorm event on 6 November 2002. Simultaneous measurements by the MIRACLE magnetometers enabled us to put the PCB location in the framework of ionospheric electrojets. During the substorm growth phase, the polar cap expands and the region of the westward electrojet shifts gradually more apart from the PCB. The substorm onset takes place deep within the region of closed magnetic field region, separated by about 6-7° in latitude from the PCB in the ionosphere. We interpret the observations in the framework of the near-Earth neutral line (NENL) model of substorms. After the substorm onset, the reconnection at the NENL reaches within 3 min the open-closed field line boundary and then the PCB moves poleward together with the poleward boundary of the substorm current wedge. The poleward expansion occurs in the form of individual bursts, which are separated by 2-10 min, indicating that the reconnection in the magnetotail neutral line is impulsive. The poleward expansions of the PCB are followed by latitude dispersed intensifications in the westward

  2. Substorm simulation: Insight into the mechanisms of initial brightening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-09-01

    Initial brightening of the aurora is an optical manifestation of the beginning of a substorm expansion and is accompanied by large-amplitude upward field-aligned currents (FACs). Based on global magnetohydrodynamic simulation, we suggest the possible generation mechanism of the upward FAC that may manifest the initial brightening. (1) A formation of the near-Earth neutral line (NENL) releases the tension force that accelerates plasma earthward. (2) The earthward (perpendicular) flow is converted to a field-aligned flow when flow braking takes place. (3) A high-pressure region propagates earthward along a field line. (4) The off-equatorial high-pressure region pulls in and discharges ambient plasma, which generates a flow vorticity around it. (5) Region 1-sense FAC is generated in the upper part of the off-equatorial high-pressure region. (6) The upward FAC is connected with the ionosphere in the center of the Harang discontinuity, causing the initial brightening. Additional dynamo is generated in the near-Earth region, which transmits electromagnetic energy. Upward FAC that manifests the initial brightening seems to be necessarily originated in the near-Earth off-equatorial region where the magnitude of the perpendicular (diamagnetic) current is relatively small in comparison with that of the FAC. Near the equatorial plane, the perpendicular current is comparable to or larger than FAC so that a current line is diverted from a magnetic field line and that the FAC generated near the equatorial plane is not necessarily connected with the ionosphere. The proposed mechanism occurs regardless of the location of the NENL and may explain some of auroral forms.

  3. Overview - Electric fields. [in magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauffman, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    The electric fields session is designed to review progress in observation, theory, and modeling of magnetospheric electric fields, and to expose important new results. The present report comments on the state and prospects of electric field research, with particular emphasis on relevance to quantitative modeling of the magnetospheric processes. Attention is given to underlying theories and models. Modeling philosophy is discussed relative to explanatory models and representative models. Modeling of magnetospheric electric fields, while in its infancy, is developing rapidly on many fronts employing a variety of approaches. The general topic of magnetospheric electric fields is becoming of prime importance in understanding space plasmas.

  4. Saturn: atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Gombosi, Tamas I; Ingersoll, Andrew P

    2010-03-19

    The Cassini spacecraft has been in orbit around Saturn since 30 June 2004, yielding a wealth of data about the Saturn system. This review focuses on the atmosphere and magnetosphere and briefly outlines the state of our knowledge after the Cassini prime mission. The mission has addressed a host of fundamental questions: What processes control the physics, chemistry, and dynamics of the atmosphere? Where does the magnetospheric plasma come from? What are the physical processes coupling the ionosphere and magnetosphere? And, what are the rotation rates of Saturn's atmosphere and magnetosphere?

  5. Coupled response of the inner magnetosphere and ionosphere on 17 April 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, J.; Burch, J. L.; Sandel, B. R.; Mende, S. B.; C:Son Brandt, P.; Hairston, M. R.

    2005-03-01

    We present an observational study of the global dynamics of the plasmasphere, aurora, ring current, and subauroral ionosphere on 17 April 2002 during a substorm. Global observations by the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) and in situ observations by DMSP F13 provide a comprehensive view of the coupled response of the inner magnetosphere and ionosphere. At 1900 UT a substorm onset initiated a sunward convective impulse, which caused a ring current injection. The motion of this impulse past the plasmasphere caused ripples to propagate along the plasmapause, eastward and westward from premidnight magnetic local time (MLT). The motion of the ripples agrees exceptionally well with the motion of the aurora and the ring current, implying strong coupling. The westward moving ripple (on the duskside) participated in a two-phase plasmapause undulation effect. In the first phase (1915 UT to 1936 UT), a mild 0.4-0.5 RE bulge formed near 2000 MLT, probably caused by an E-field induced by local reduction of the magnetic field by the ring current pressure increase. In the second phase (1936 UT to 2037 UT) this mild bulge was removed by a subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) westward flow that stripped away the outer 1 RE of the duskside plasmasphere. The SAPS effect was observed in the ionosphere by DMSP between about 1930 UT and 2000 UT and is evident in vector E-fields inferred from plasmapause motion. All the observations of this event suggest strong coupling among the plasma populations of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. This event represents the first identification of the directly observed global plasmaspheric effects of a substorm-driven impulse, the SAPS flow channel, and the ring-current magnetic field reduction.

  6. Substorm observations of magnetic perturbations and ULF waves at synchronous orbit by ATS-1 and ATS-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, P. J., Jr.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    In the empirical study of the geomagnetic cavity, the synchronous equatorial orbit has been shown to be a most advantageous site for scientific measurements. Satellites in this orbit are fixed in the earth's main magnetic field so that the records are not dominated by changes due to satellite motion through this field. Also, the satellites traverse the same geometric region of space daily, thus facilitating statistical studies of magnetospheric phenomena. Thirdly, the magnetic field lines leaving the earth's surface near the auroral zone cross the equatorial plane close to this orbit, thus subjecting the region to a number of such phenomena. Previous observations at synchronous orbit with the UCLA fluxgate magnetometers on ATS-1 and ATS-6 have revealed a variety of substorm-associated field variations. These effects may be divided tentatively into two classes, those resulting from instabilities (ULF waves) and those produced by changes in macroscopic current systems. The data and their interpretations will be reviewed in order to illustrate the potential importance of observations in the synchronous orbit during the International Magnetospheric Study.

  7. Relativistic electron response to the combined magnetospheric impact of a coronal mass ejection overlapping with a high-speed stream: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, W.; Fennell, J. F.; Zheng, Y.; Richardson, I. G.; Jones, A.; Ali, A. F.; Elkington, S. R.; Jaynes, A.; Li, X.; Blake, J. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2015-09-01

    During early November 2013, the magnetosphere experienced concurrent driving by a coronal mass ejection (CME) during an ongoing high-speed stream (HSS) event. The relativistic electron response to these two kinds of drivers, i.e., HSS and CME, is typically different, with the former often leading to a slower buildup of electrons at larger radial distances, while the latter energizing electrons rapidly with flux enhancements occurring closer to the Earth. We present a detailed analysis of the relativistic electron response including radial profiles of phase space density as observed by both Magnetic Electron and Ion Sensor (MagEIS) and Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope instruments on the Van Allen Probes mission. Data from the MagEIS instrument establish the behavior of lower energy (<1 MeV) electrons which span both intermediary and seed populations during electron energization. Measurements characterizing the plasma waves and magnetospheric electric and magnetic fields during this period are obtained by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science instrument on board Van Allen Probes, Search Coil Magnetometer and Flux Gate Magnetometer instruments on board Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, and the low-altitude Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites. These observations suggest that during this time period, both radial transport and local in situ processes are involved in the energization of electrons. The energization attributable to radial diffusion is most clearly evident for the lower energy (<1 MeV) electrons, while the effects of in situ energization by interaction of chorus waves are prominent in the higher-energy electrons.

  8. Relativistic Electron Response to the Combined Magnetospheric Impact of a Coronal Mass Ejection Overlapping with a High-Speed Stream: Van Allen Probes Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, W.; Fennell, J. F.; Zheng, Y.; Richardson, I. G.; Jones, A.; Ali, A. F.; Elkington, S. R.; Jaynes, A.; Li, X.; Blake, J. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    During early November 2013, the magnetosphere experienced concurrent driving by a coronal mass ejection (CME) during an ongoing high-speed stream (HSS) event. The relativistic electron response to these two kinds of drivers, i.e., HSS and CME, is typically different, with the former often leading to a slower buildup of electrons at larger radial distances, while the latter energizing electrons rapidly with flux enhancements occurring closer to the Earth. We present a detailed analysis of the relativistic electron response including radial profiles of phase space density as observed by both Magnetic Electron and Ion Sensor (MagEIS) and Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope instruments on the Van Allen Probes mission. Data from the MagEIS instrument establish the behavior of lower energy (<1 MeV) electrons which span both intermediary and seed populations during electron energization. Measurements characterizing the plasma waves and magnetospheric electric and magnetic fields during this period are obtained by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science instrument on board Van Allen Probes, Search Coil Magnetometer and Flux Gate Magnetometer instruments on board Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, and the low-altitude Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites. These observations suggest that during this time period, both radial transport and local in situ processes are involved in the energization of electrons. The energization attributable to radial diffusion is most clearly evident for the lower energy (<1 MeV) electrons, while the effects of in situ energization by interaction of chorus waves are prominent in the higher-energy electrons.

  9. Comparison of the open-closed separatrix in a global magnetospheric simulation with observations: The role of the ring current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, I. J.; Kabin, K.; Lu, J. Y.; Rankin, R.; Milan, S. E.; Fenrich, F. R.; Watt, C. E. J.; Zhang, J.-C.; Ridley, A. J.; Gombosi, T. I.; Clauer, C. R.; Tóth, G.; DeZeeuw, D. L.

    2010-08-01

    The development of global magnetospheric models, such as Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), which can accurately reproduce and track space weather processes has high practical utility. We present an interval on 5 June 1998, where the location of the polar cap boundary, or open-closed field line boundary (OCB), can be determined in the ionosphere using a combination of instruments during a period encompassing a sharp northward to southward interplanetary field turning. We present both point- and time-varying comparisons of the observed and simulated boundaries in the ionosphere and find that when using solely the coupled ideal magnetohydrodynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere model, the rate of change of the OCB to a southward turning of the interplanetary field is significantly faster than that computed from the observational data. However, when the inner magnetospheric module is incorporated, the modeling framework both qualitatively, and often quantitatively, reproduces many elements of the studied interval prior to an observed substorm onset. This result demonstrates that the physics of the inner magnetosphere is critical in shaping the boundary between open and closed field lines during periods of southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and provides significant insight into the 3-D time-dependent behavior of the Earth's magnetosphere in response to a northward-southward IMF turning. We assert that during periods that do not include the tens of minutes surrounding substorm expansion phase onset, the coupled SWMF model may provide a valuable and reliable tool for estimating both the OCB and magnetic field topology over a wide range of latitudes and local times.

  10. Magnetospheric state of sawtooth events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Tepper, Julia A.; Cai, Xia

    2016-08-01

    Magnetospheric sawtooth events, first identified in the early 1990s, are named for their characteristic appearance of multiple quasiperiodic intervals of slow decrease followed by sharp increase of proton differential energy fluxes in the geosynchronous region. The successive proton flux oscillations have been interpreted as recurrences of stretching and dipolarization of the nightside geomagnetic field. Due to their often extended intervals with 2-10 cycles, sawteeth occurrences are sometimes referred to as a magnetospheric mode. While studies of sawtooth events over the past two decades have yielded a wealth of information about such events, the magnetospheric state conditions for the occurrence of sawtooth events and how sawtooth oscillations may depend on the magnetospheric state conditions remain unclear. In this study, we investigate the characteristic magnetospheric state conditions (specified by Psw interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Btot, IMF Bz Vsw, AE, Kp and Dst, all time shifted with respect to one another) associated with the intervals before, during, and after sawteeth occurrences. Applying a previously developed statistical technique, we have determined the most probable magnetospheric states propitious for the development and occurrence of sawtooth events, respectively. The statistically determined sawtooth magnetospheric state has also been validated by using out-of-sample events, confirming the notion that sawtooth intervals might represent a particular global state of the magnetosphere. We propose that the "sawtooth state" of the magnetosphere may be a state of marginal stability in which a slight enhancement in the loading rate of an otherwise continuous loading process can send the magnetosphere into the marginally unstable regime, causing it to shed limited amount of energy quickly and return to the marginally stable regime with the loading process continuing. Sawtooth oscillations result as the magnetosphere switches between the marginally

  11. Magnetospheric State of Sawtooth Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Tepper, Julia A.; Cai, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Magnetospheric sawtooth events, first identified in the early 1990s, are named for their characteristic appearance of multiple quasiperiodic intervals of slow decrease followed by sharp increase of proton differential energy fluxes in the geosynchronous region. The successive proton flux oscillations have been interpreted as recurrences of stretching and dipolarization of the nightside geomagnetic field. Due to their often extended intervals with 210 cycles, sawteeth occurrences are sometimes referred to as a magnetospheric mode. While studies of sawtooth events over the past two decades have yielded a wealth of information about such events, the magnetospheric state conditions for the occurrence of sawtooth events and how sawtooth oscillations may depend on the magnetospheric state conditions remain unclear. In this study, we investigate the characteristic magnetospheric state conditions (specified by Psw interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Btot, IMF Bz Vsw, AE, Kp and Dst, all time shifted with respect to one another) associated with the intervals before, during, and after sawteeth occurrences. Applying a previously developed statistical technique, we have determined the most probable magnetospheric states propitious for the development and occurrence of sawtooth events, respectively. The statistically determined sawtooth magnetospheric state has also been validated by using out-of-sample events, confirming the notion that sawtooth intervals might represent a particular global state of the magnetosphere. We propose that the sawtooth state of the magnetosphere may be a state of marginal stability in which a slight enhancement in the loading rate of an otherwise continuous loading process can send the magnetosphere into the marginally unstable regime, causing it to shed limited amount of energy quickly and return to the marginally stable regime with the loading process continuing. Sawtooth oscillations result as the magnetosphere switches between the marginally

  12. Nitrogen In Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. T.; Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; McComas, D. J.; Reisenfeld, D.; Shappirio, M. D.; Baragiola, R.; Michael, M.; Shematovich, V. I.; Crary, F.; Young, D. T.

    2004-12-01

    We are analyzing CAPS instrument data on Cassini to look for nitrogen ions in Saturn's magnetosphere. Because Voyager could not separate oxygen and nitrogen, there has been considerable controversy on nitrogen's presence and relative importance. Two principal sources have been suggested: Titan's atmosphere and nitrogen species trapped in Saturn's icy satellite surfaces (Sittler et al 2004). The latter may be primordial nitrogen, likely as NH3 in ice (Stevenson 1982; Squyers et al. 1983) or nitrogen ions that have been implanted in the surface (Delitsky and Lane 2002). We will present the results of Saturnian nitrogen cloud modeling and relevant CAPS observations. We recently described the Titan source (Michael, et al. 2004; Shematovich et al. 2003; Smith et al. 2004; Sittler et al. 2004) in preparation for Cassini's Saturnian plasma measurements. Two components were identified: energetic nitrogen ions formed near Titan and energized as they diffused inward (Sittler et al. 2004) and neutrals in orbits with small perigee that became ionized in the inner magnetosphere (Smith et al 2004). The latter component would be a source of lower energy, co-rotating nitrogen ions in the inner magnetosphere. Such a component would have an energy spectrum similar to nitrogen species sputtered from the icy satellite surfaces (Johnson and Sittler 1990). However, the mass spectrum would differ, likely containing NHx and NOx species also, and, hence, may be separated from the Titan source. Our preliminary analysis for nitrogen species in the CAPS data will be compared to our models. Of interest will be the energy spectra, which can indicate whether any nitrogen present is formed locally or near Titan's orbit and diffused inward. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres, NASA Graduate Student Research, Virginia Space Grant Consortium Graduate Research Fellowship and CAPS Cassini instrument team programs.

  13. The Role of Solar and Solar Wind Forcing of Magnetospheric Particle Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    Observational and numerical modeling results demonstrate that solar wind streams and coronal mass ejections drive coherent processes within the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system. The magnetosphere progresses through a specific sequence of energy-loading and stress-developing states until the entire system suddenly reconfigures. Long-term studies of high-energy particle fluxes in the Earth's magnetosphere have revealed many of their temporal occurrence characteristics and their relationships to solar wind drivers. In order to observe major energetic particle enhancements, there must typically be a significant interval of southward IMF along with a period of high (VSW≥500 km/s) solar wind speed. This has led to the view that enhancements in geomagnetic activity are normally a key first step in the acceleration of magnetospheric particles to high energies. A second step is suggested to be a period of powerful low-frequency waves that is closely related to high values of VSW or higher frequency ("chorus") waves that rapidly heat and accelerate electrons. Hence, magnetospheric storms and substorms provide a "seed" population, while high-speed solar wind drives the acceleration to relativistic energies in this two-step geomagnetic activity scenario. This picture seems to apply to most events examined whether associated with high-speed streams or with CME-related changes, but not all. In this work, we address transient solar wind phenomena as they pertain to high-energy particle acceleration and transport. We also discuss various models of particle energization that have recently been advanced. We present remarkable new results from the Van Allen Probes mission and the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission that confirm and greatly extend these key ideas.

  14. Plasma in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, A.

    1984-01-01

    The spatial and compositional distribution of the thermal plasma in the magnetosphere of Saturn is described in the light of the Voyager encounters. Theoretical considerations are applied to the elucidation of the structure, including two external and two internal boundaries. The outer boundary is a magnetohydrodynamic entity, while the inner boundary of locally created thermal plasma is a result of the dissociative recombination of corotating molecular ions. The internal boundaries, which separate plasmas of different composition, are explained as a charge exchange quasi-resonance phenomenon.

  15. Characteristics of the near-Earth magnetotail variations at the time of substorm onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Saito, Y.

    2013-12-01

    From the result of our statistical analysis with GEOTAIL and THEMIS data, we confirmed that tailward plasma flows are created in association with the plasma flows that propagate from X ~ -12 Re toward the earth at the time of substorm onset. To understand the physical mechanism of the formation of such tailward flows, we have performed a case study of substorm event occurred at 10:46 UT on June 22, 1997 when the GEOTAIL was located at (X, Y) ~ (-9, 6) Re and encountered with the flow bursts. The event started with earthward flows for about 2 min with the northward magnetic field enhancement, followed by slow tailward flows. Such an earthward and tailward flow sequence repeated three times. By calculating the electric current from electron and ion moment data, we found the variation in the X-component of JxB force that can be interpreted to have close relationship with the enhancement of earthward flows. Namely, the flows are not simply generated at a distant location and reach the GEOTAIL, but they are still under acceleration at X ~ -10 Re. After the passage of the flow front, the (JxB)x term takes negative values. The time derivative of Vx does not necessarily correspond to (JxB)x/mn. This inconsistency might be due to the contribution of the terms such as -grad P or (Vgrad) V. It is also necessary to check the possibility of the decoupling between electrons and ions as well as the effect of anomalous resistivity.

  16. Minimal Joule dissipation models of magnetospheric convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    This paper gives a topical review of theoretical models of magnetospheric convection based on the concept of minimal Joule dissipation. A two-dimensional slab model of the ionosphere featuring an enhanced conductivity auroral oval is used to compute high-latitude electric fields and currents. Mathematical methods used in the modeling include Fourier analysis, fast Fourier transforms, and variational calculus. Also, conformal transformations are introduced in the analysis, which enable the auroral oval to be represented as a nonconcentric, crescent-shaped figure. Convection patterns appropriate to geomagnetic quiet and disturbed conditions are computed, the differentiating variable being the relative amount of power dissipated in the magnetospheric ring current. When ring current dissipation is small, the convection electric field is restricted to high latitudes (shielding regime), and when it is large, a significant penetration of the field to low latitudes occurs, accompanied by an increase in the ratio of the region I current to the region 2 current.

  17. Minimal Joule dissipation models of magnetospheric convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper gives a topical review of theoretical models of magnetospheric convection based on the concept of minimal Joule dissipation. A two-dimensional slab model of the ionosphere featuring an enhanced conductivity auroral oval is used to compute high-latitude electric fields and currents. Mathematical methods used in the modeling include Fourier analysis, fast Fourier transforms, and variational calculus. Also, conformal transformations are introduced in the analysis, which enable the auroral oval to be represented as a nonconcentric, crescent-shaped figure. Convection patterns appropriate to geomagnetic quiet and disturbed conditions are computed, the differentiating variable being the relative amount of power dissipated in the magnetospheric ring current. When ring current dissipation is small, the convection electric field is restricted to high latitudes (shielding regime), and when it is large, a significant penetration of the field to low latitudes occurs, accompanied by an increase in the ratio of the region I current to the region 2 current.

  18. Black hole magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Nathanail, Antonios; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2014-06-20

    We investigate the structure of the steady-state force-free magnetosphere around a Kerr black hole in various astrophysical settings. The solution Ψ(r, θ) depends on the distributions of the magnetic field line angular velocity ω(Ψ) and the poloidal electric current I(Ψ). These are obtained self-consistently as eigenfunctions that allow the solution to smoothly cross the two singular surfaces of the problem, the inner light surface inside the ergosphere, and the outer light surface, which is the generalization of the pulsar light cylinder. Magnetic field configurations that cross both singular surfaces (e.g., monopole, paraboloidal) are uniquely determined. Configurations that cross only one light surface (e.g., the artificial case of a rotating black hole embedded in a vertical magnetic field) are degenerate. We show that, similar to pulsars, black hole magnetospheres naturally develop an electric current sheet that potentially plays a very important role in the dissipation of black hole rotational energy and in the emission of high-energy radiation.

  19. Magnetospheric Multiscale Overview and Science Objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, J. L.; Moore, T. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. L.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS), a NASA four-spacecraft constellation mission launched on March 12, 2015, will investigate magnetic reconnection in the boundary regions of the Earth's magnetosphere, particularly along its dayside boundary with the solar wind and the neutral sheet in the magnetic tail. The most important goal of MMS is to conduct a definitive experiment to determine what causes magnetic field lines to reconnect in a collisionless plasma. The significance of the MMS results will extend far beyond the Earth's magnetosphere because reconnection is known to occur in interplanetary space and in the solar corona where it is responsible for solar flares and the disconnection events known as coronal mass ejections. Active research is also being conducted on reconnection in the laboratory and specifically in magnetic-confinement fusion devices in which it is a limiting factor in achieving and maintaining electron temperatures high enough to initiate fusion. Finally, reconnection is proposed as the cause of numerous phenomena throughout the universe such as comet-tail disconnection events, magnetar flares, supernova ejections, and dynamics of neutron-star accretion disks. The MMS mission design is focused on answering specific questions about reconnection at the Earth's magnetosphere. The prime focus of the mission is on determining the kinetic processes occurring in the electron diffusion region that are responsible for reconnection and that determine how it is initiated; but the mission will also place that physics into the context of the broad spectrum of physical processes associated with reconnection. Connections to other disciplines such as solar physics, astrophysics, and laboratory plasma physics are expected to be made through theory and modeling as informed by the MMS results.

  20. Titan Ion Composition at Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Transition Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, Edward C.; Hartle, R. E.; Shappirio, M.; Simpson, D. J.; COoper, J. F.; Burger, M. H.; Johnson, R. E.; Bertucci, C.; Luhman, J. G.; Ledvina, S. A.; Szego, K.; Coates, A. J.; Young, D. T.

    2006-01-01

    Using Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) ion composition data, we will investigate the compositional changes at the transition region between Saturn's magnetospheric flow and Titan's upper ionosphere. It is this region where scavenging of Titan's upper ionosphere can occur, where it is then dragged away by the magnetospheric flow as cold plasma for Saturn's magnetosphere. This cold plasma may form plumes as originally proposed by (1) during the Voyager 1 epoch. This source of cold plasma may have a unique compositional signature such as methane group ions. Water group ions that are observed in Saturn's outer magnetosphere (2,3) are relatively hot and probably come from the inner magnetosphere where they are born from fast neutrals escaping Enceladus (4) and picked up in the outer magnetosphere as hot plasma (5). This scenario will be complicated by pickup methane ions within Titan's mass loading region, as originally predicted by (6) based on Voyager 1 data and observationally confirmed by (3,7) using CAPS IMS data. But, CH4(+) ions or their fragments can only be produced as pickup ions from Titan's exosphere which can extend beyond the transition region of concern here, while CH5(+) ions can be scavenged from Titan's ionosphere. We will investigate these possibilities.

  1. Alfven Waves in the Solar Wind, Magnetosheath, and Outer Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.

    2007-01-01

    Alfven waves Propagating outward from the Sun are ubiquitous in the solar wind and play a major role in the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction. The passage of the waves generally occurs in the form of a series of discrete steepened discontinuities, each of which results in an abrupt change in the interplanetary magnetic field direction. Some orientations of the magnetic field permit particles energized at the Earth's bow shock to gain access to the foreshock region immediately upstream from the Earth's bow shock. The thermal pressure associated with these particles can greatly perturb solar wind plasma and magnetic field parameters shortly prior to their interaction with the Earth's bow shock and magnetosphere. The corresponding dynamic pressure variations batter the magnetosphere, driving magnetopause motion and transient compressions of the magnetospheric magnetic field. Alfven waves transmit information concerning the dynamic pressure variations applied to the magnetosphere to the ionosphere, where they generate the traveling convection vortices (TCVs) seen in high-latitude ground magnetograms. Finally, the sense of Alfvenic perturbations transmitted into the magnetosheath reverses across local noon because magnetosheath magnetic field lines drape against the magnetopause. The corresponding change in velocity perturbations must apply a weak torque to the Earth's magnetosphere.

  2. The magnetospheres of the outer planets

    SciTech Connect

    Mcnutt, R.L., Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on the magnetospheres of all of the outer planets including Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto is reviewed for the 1987-1990 time period. Particular attention is given to magnetospheric structure, plasma transport, Jovian aurora, Io and the plasma torus, Titan and its magnetospheric interactions, rings and dusty plasmas, magnetospheric convection, and satellite interactions.

  3. Energetic Nitrogen Ions within the Inner Magnetosphere of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; Richardson, J. D.; Jurac, S.; Moore, M.; Cooper, J. F.; Mauk, B. H.; Smith, H. T.; Michael, M.; Paranicus, C.; Armstrong, T. P.; Tsurutani, B.; Connerney, J. E. P.

    2003-05-01

    results using composition data at energies greater than 200 keV/nucl., showed that heavy ions within Saturn's inner magnetosphere dominated over protons, but that contrary to original suggestions that these ions were O+ , we now argue that they are instead N+ ions. With energetic N+ ions bombarding the icy satellite surfaces chemical reactions can occur at the end of the ion tracks and produce nitrogen oxides or other nitrogen containing molecules such that the radiology within the icy surfaces is driven by the impacting energetic nitrogen ions. These can accumulate over the lifetime of the Saturn system.

  4. The Magnetospheric Multiscale Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooley, C. R.; Black, R. K.; Robertson, B. P.; Stone, J. M.; Pope, S. E.; Davis, G. T.

    2016-03-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is the fourth mission of the Solar Terrestrial Probe (STP) program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The MMS mission was launched on March 12, 2015. The MMS mission consists of four identically instrumented spin-stabilized observatories which are flown in formation to perform the first definitive study of magnetic reconnection in space. The MMS mission was presented with numerous technical challenges, including the simultaneous construction and launch of four identical large spacecraft with 100 instruments total, stringent electromagnetic cleanliness requirements, closed-loop precision maneuvering and pointing of spinning flexible spacecraft, on-board GPS based orbit determination far above the GPS constellation, and a flight dynamics design that enables formation flying with separation distances as small as 10 km. This paper describes the overall mission design and presents an overview of the design, testing, and early on-orbit operation of the spacecraft systems and instrument suite.

  5. Magnetosphere of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, N.F.

    1986-12-01

    The magnetosphere and magnetic field of Uranus are analyzed using Voyager 2 data. It is observed that the magnetic axis of Uranus is tilted 60 deg from its rotation axis; the magnetic dipole center is displaced almost 7700 km from the center of the planet; the magnetic field intensity varies over its surface between 24,000-69,000 gammas; and the rotation rate of the planet is 17.24 hours. The dynamo generation of the planetary magnetic field is examined. Consideration is given to the auroral activity, magnetic tails, moons, and radiation belts of charged particles of Uranus. The significance of the large tilt and offset magnetic axis for the interior of Uranus is discussed.

  6. The Extended Pulsar Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinos, Kalapotharakos; Demosthenes, Kazanas; Ioannis, Contopoulos

    2012-01-01

    We present the structure of the 3D ideal MHD pulsar magnetosphere to a radius ten times that of the light cylinder, a distance about an order of magnitude larger than any previous such numerical treatment. Its overall structure exhibits a stable, smooth, well-defined undulating current sheet which approaches the kinematic split monopole solution of Bogovalov 1999 only after a careful introduction of diffusivity even in the highest resolution simulations. It also exhibits an intriguing spiral region at the crossing of two zero charge surfaces on the current sheet, which shows a destabilizing behavior more prominent in higher resolution simulations. We discuss the possibility that this region is physically (and not numerically) unstable. Finally, we present the spiral pulsar antenna radiation pattern.

  7. M-I coupling across the Harang reversal during storm--substorm activity driven by an interplanetry ICMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Sandholt, P. E.; Denig, W. F.

    2013-12-01

    By ground - satellite conjunctions across the auroral oval at dusk we study events of dynamical magnetosphere--ionosphere (M-I) coupling from the plasma sheet - ring current system via R1 and R2 field-aligned currents (FACs) during auroral electrojet activations appearing on the poleward and equatorward sides of the Harang reversal (HR), respectively. The interval of ICME passage at Earth we study is characterized by repetitive substorm activity appearing as a series of westward expansions--eastward retreats of the westward electrojet (WEJ) across the 1800 MLT meridian. Harang region-north (HR-N) is characterized by R1 FAC closure, WEJ activity, poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs) - equatorward - moving auroral streamers (inverted V - arcs), and (at different times) poleward auroral expansions. Harang region-south (HR-S) is characterized by R2 FAC closure leading to eastward electrojet (EEJ) activity and precipitation in the southern auroral branch. Using this approach we documented the detailed temporal evolution of polar cap convection, as derived from the PCN index, in relation to direct observations of the dynamical behaviour of the two basic branches of the substorm current system, i. e. the R2 FAC coupling from the partial ring current (PRC) and the R1 FAC coupling from the plasma sheet. We distinguish between two activity levels: (i) major AL-excursions beyond -1000 nT (accompanied by large-scale field dipolarizations in the inner magnetotail), followed by SYM-H dips (plasma injections enhancing the PRC) and R2 FAC - EEJ enhancements, and (ii) partial AL - recovery (AL within -300 to -600 nT) characterized by a series of M - I coupling events with manifestations on both sides of the HR, including streamer events in HR-N, leading to equatorward/poleward motions of the HR boundary.

  8. Spectacular ionospheric flow structures associated with substorm auroral onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo-Lacourt, B. I.; Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L. R.; Zou, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E.; Mende, S. B.; Ruohoniemi, J.; McWilliams, K. A.; Nishitani, N.

    2013-12-01

    Auroral observations have shown that brightening at substorm auroral onset consists of azimuthally propagating beads forming along a pre-existing arc. However, the ionospheric flow structure related to this wavy auroral structure has not been previously identified. We present 2-d line-of-sight flow observations and auroral images from the SuperDARN radars and the THEMIS ground-based all-sky-imager array to investigate the ionospheric flow pattern associated with the onset. We have selected events where SuperDARN was operating in the THEMIS mode, which provides measurements along the northward looking radar beam that have time resolution (6 s) comparable to the high time resolution of the imagers and gives us a unique tool to detect properties of flows associated with the substorm onset instability. We find very fast flows (~1000 m/s) that initiated simultaneously with the onset arc beads propagating across the THEMIS-mode beam meridian. The flows show oscillations at ~9 mHz, which corresponds to the periodicity of the auroral beads propagating across the radar beam. 2-d radar measurements also show a wavy pattern in the azimuthal direction with a wavelength of ~74 km, which is close to the azimuthal separation of individual beads, although this determination is limited by the 2 minute radar scan period. These strong correlations (in time and space) between auroral beading and the fast ionospheric flows suggest that these spectacular flows are an important feature of the substorm onset instability within the inner plasma sheet. Also, a clockwise flow shear was observed in association with individual auroral beads, suggesting that such flow shear is a feature of the unstable substorm onset waves.

  9. The Large-Scale Current System During Auroral Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerloev, Jesper

    2015-04-01

    The substorm process has been discussed for more than four decades and new empirical large-scale models continue to be published. The continued activity implies both the importance and the complexity of the problem. We recently published a new model of the large-scale substorm current system (Gjerloev and Hoffman, JGR, 2014). Based on data from >100 ground magnetometers (obtained from SuperMAG), 116 isolated substorms, global auroral images (obtained by the Polar VIS Earth Camera) and a careful normalization technique we derived an empirical model of the ionospheric equivalent current system. Our model yield some unexpected features that appear inconsistent with the classical single current wedge current system. One of these features is a distinct latitudinal shift of the westward electrojet (WEJ) current between the pre- and post-midnight region and we find evidence that these two WEJ regions are quasi disconnected. This, and other observational facts, led us to propose a modified 3D current system configuration that consists of 2 wedge type systems: a current wedge in the pre-midnight region (bulge current wedge), and another current wedge system in the post-midnight region (oval current wedge). The two wedge systems are shifted in latitude but overlap in local time in the midnight region. Our model is at considerable variance with previous global models and conceptual schematics of the large-scale substorm current system. We speculate that the data coverage, the methodologies and the techniques used in these previous global studies are the cause of the differences in solutions. In this presentation we present our model, compare with other published models and discuss possible causes for the differences.

  10. Cellular automata model of magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozelov, B. V.; Kozelova, T. V.

    2003-09-01

    We propose a cellular automata model (CAM) to describe the substorm activity of the magnetospheric-ionospheric system. The state of each cell in the model is described by two numbers that correspond to the energy content in a region of the current sheet in the magnetospheric tail and to the conductivity of the ionospheric domain that is magnetically connected with this region. The driving force of the system is supposed to be provided by the solar wind that is convected along the two boundaries of the system. The energy flux inside is ensured by the penetration of the energy from the solar wind into the array of cells (magnetospheric tail) with a finite velocity. The third boundary (near to the Earth) is closed and the fourth boundary is opened, thereby modeling the flux far away from the tail. The energy dissipation in the system is quite similar to other CAM models, when the energy in a particular cell exceeds some pre-defined threshold, and the part of the energy excess is redistributed between the neighbouring cells. The second number attributed to each cell mimics ionospheric conductivity that can allow for a part of the energy to be shed on field-aligned currents. The feedback between ionosphere and magnetospheric tail is provided by the change in a part of the energy, which is redistributed in the tail when the threshold is surpassed. The control parameter of the model is the z-component of the interplanetary magnetic field (Bz IMF), frozen into the solar wind. To study the internal dynamics of the system at the beginning, this control parameter is taken to be constant. The dynamics of the system undergoes several bifurcations, when the constant varies from - 0.6 to - 6.0. The Bz IMF input results in the periodic transients (activation regions) and the inter-transient period decreases with the decrease of Bz. At the same time the onset of activations in the array shifts towards the Earth . When the modulus of the Bz IMF exceeds some threshold value, the

  11. Global Magnetospheric Modeling of 3D Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicer, Daniel S.

    1999-01-01

    A review of approaches to the global modeling of the terrestrial magnetosphere, how these approaches are utilized to interpret satellite data, and how these approaches have been successful at predicting magnetospheric phenomena will be presented. In addition, the importance of the ionospheric boundary and its effect on the globally topology of the magnetospheric magnetic field will be reviewed. In particular, numerical results that are rapidly changing our view of magnetospheric reconnection within the magnetospheric magnetic field will be discussed.

  12. MESSENGER observations of substorm activity in Mercury's near magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei-Jie; Slavin, James; Fu, Suiyan; Raines, Jim; Zong, Qiu-Gang; Yao, Zhonghua; Pu, Zuyin; Shi, Quanqi; Poh, Gangkai; Boardsen, Scott; Imber, Suzanne; Sundberg, Torbjörn; Anderson, Brian; Korth, Haje; Baker, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    MESSENGER magnetic field and plasma measurements taken during crossings of Mercury's magnetotail from 2011 to 2014 have been examined for evidence of substorm activity. A total of 32 events were found during which an Earth-like growth phase was followed by clear near-tail expansion phase signatures. During the growth phase, the lobe of the tail loads with magnetic flux while the plasma sheet thins due to the increased lobe magnetic pressure. MESSENGER is often initially in the plasma sheet and then moves into the lobe during the growth phases. The averaged time scale of the loading is around 1 min, consistent with previous observations of Mercury's Dungey cycle. The dipolarization front that marks the initiation of the substorm expansion phase is only a few seconds in duration. The spacecraft then abruptly enters the plasma sheet due to the plasma sheet expansion as reconnection-driven flow from the near-Mercury neutral line encounters the stronger magnetic fields closer to the planet. Substorm activity in the near tail of Mercury is quantitatively very similar to the Earth despite the very compressed time scale.

  13. Propagation of electric fields during Pi2 pulsations based on multi­ple magnetospheric satellites and ionospheric radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Kasaba, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Teramoto, M.; Hori, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Miyoshi, Y.; Nishitani, N.

    2015-12-01

    Pi2 pulsations are irregular oscillations having 40-150 s periods, and their source lies in the nightside magnetosphere. Electromagnetic disturbances associated with Pi2 pulsations propagate through the magnetosphere by magnetohydrodynamic waves. The compressional fast mode waves are launched by localized plasma sheet fast flows and propagate into the inner magnetosphere. On the other hand, the velocity shears at the edge of these flows excite shear Alfven waves, which transport magnetic shear and carry field-aligned currents along field lines. These propagation processes have been proposed based on several previous studies using magnetic field observations and numerical simulations. However, there have been few results by electric field observations although the electric field is an important quantity for detecting Pi2 pulsations than magnetic field. In addition, Pi2 pulsations are known to be associated with substorms. Nishimura et al. [2012] shows evolution of auroral streamers at the substorm onset time followed by Pi2 pulsations after a few minutes, using ground-based observations. It suggests that Pi2 pulsations are driven by multiple plasma sheet flow bursts to earthward, and reflects the nature of the current wedge and plasma sheet flow bursts. However, it is unknown whether Pi2 pulsations in the magnetosphere are caused by the oscillating current wedge or induced by a cavity mode. Therefore, simultaneous spacecraft and ground-based observations need to investigate this issue. In this study, we investigate the evolution and propagation of the electric field during Pi2 pulsations using THEMIS, Van Allen Probes, GOES 13 and 15, SuperDARN and HF Doppler radars. Pi2 events are identified by the low-latitude geomagnetic field detected at Kakioka and AL index. We will investigate several events that satellites and radars have the same local time, and evaluate the possible propagation process of the electromagnetic energy associated with Pi2 pulsations.

  14. Physics of magnetospheric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    This final report was concerned with the ideas that: (1) magnetospheric boundary layers link disparate regions of the magnetosphere-solar wind system together; and (2) global behavior of the magnetosphere can be understood only by understanding its internal linking mechanisms and those with the solar wind. The research project involved simultaneous research on the global-, meso-, and micro-scale physics of the magnetosphere and its boundary layers, which included the bow shock, the magnetosheath, the plasma sheet boundary layer, and the ionosphere. Analytic, numerical, and simulation projects were performed on these subjects, as well as comparisons of theoretical results with observational data. Other related activity included in the research included: (1) prediction of geomagnetic activity; (2) global MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) simulations; (3) Alfven resonance heating; and (4) Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) effect. In the appendixes are list of personnel involved, list of papers published; and reprints or photocopies of papers produced for this report.

  15. A quiescent magnetosphere for Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessler, A. J.; Sandel, B. R.

    1989-08-01

    It is argued that, if Neptune has a large magnetic moment, a weak supply of plasma for its magnetosphere, and a magnetic moment that is in near alignment with the planetary spin axis, the Neptunian magnetosphere is almost completely quiescent except for a region near the magnetopause. There are two magnetic power sources: the flowing, magnetized solar wind, and the kinetic energy of planetery spin. It is predicted that Neptune has a magnetic moment of at least 1 G-RN to the 3rd, the sum of ionospheric and Triton injections of plasma into Neptune's magnetosphere is less than 1 kg/sec, and Neptune's dipole is aligned with the spin axis and located close to the center of the planet. The criterion for Neptune to be a quiescent magnetosphere is defined by the expenditure of less than 10 to the 9th Watts from all power sources.

  16. A quiescent magnetosphere for Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessler, A. J.; Sandel, B. R.

    1989-01-01

    It is argued that, if Neptune has a large magnetic moment, a weak supply of plasma for its magnetosphere, and a magnetic moment that is in near alignment with the planetary spin axis, the Neptunian magnetosphere is almost completely quiescent except for a region near the magnetopause. There are two magnetic power sources: the flowing, magnetized solar wind, and the kinetic energy of planetery spin. It is predicted that Neptune has a magnetic moment of at least 1 G-RN to the 3rd, the sum of ionospheric and Triton injections of plasma into Neptune's magnetosphere is less than 1 kg/sec, and Neptune's dipole is aligned with the spin axis and located close to the center of the planet. The criterion for Neptune to be a quiescent magnetosphere is defined by the expenditure of less than 10 to the 9th Watts from all power sources.

  17. Dayside magnetospheric and ionospheric responses to solar wind pressure increase: Multispacecraft and ground observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, A. M.; Shen, X. C.; Shi, Q. Q.; Tang, B. B.; Nowada, M.; Zong, Q. G.; Fu, S. Y.

    2016-11-01

    We provide in situ observations of the transient phenomena in the dayside magnetosphere during the preliminary impulse (PI) and main impulse (MI) event on 30 September 2008. The PI and MI geomagnetic signals are induced by twin traveling convection vortices with opposite polarities in the equivalent ionospheric currents due to a sudden increase of the solar wind dynamic pressure. The two PI-associated ionospheric current vortices centered at 07 magnetic local time (MLT), 67° magnetic latitude (MLAT) in the dawnside and 14 MLT, 73°MLAT in the duskside, respectively. The dawnside MI current vortex centered at 68° MLAT and 6 MLT, while the duskside vortex center was traveling poleward from 67° MLAT to 75° MLAT at a speed of 5.6-7.4 km/s around 14 MLT. It is found that both dawnside PI- and MI-related current vortices were azimuthally seen up to 4 MLT. Following the magnetosphere sudden impulse, a clockwise flow vortex with a radial scale larger than 3 RE, associated with positive field-aligned current (FAC), was observed by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft in the outer dayside magnetosphere. The flow vortex expanded and traveled tailward in the magnetosphere, also being reproduced with global MHD simulations. Based on both observation and simulation technique, we show that the MI-related FACs are correlated with the large-scale flow vortex. The PI FACs are partially provided by the mode conversion of fast mode waves into the Alfvén waves near the equatorial plane, while most of it may be generated at a higher-latitude region in the magnetosphere.

  18. Jupiter's magnetosphere and radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1979-01-01

    Radioastronomy and Pioneer data reveal the Jovian magnetosphere as a rotating magnetized source of relativistic particles and radio emission, comparable to astrophysical cosmic ray and radio sources, such as pulsars. According to Pioneer data, the magnetic field in the outer magnetosphere is radially extended into a highly time variable disk-shaped configuration which differs fundamentally from the earth's magnetosphere. The outer disk region, and the energetic particles confined in it, are modulated by Jupiter's 10 hr rotation period. The entire outer magnetosphere appears to change drastically on time scales of a few days to a week. In addition to its known modulation of the Jovian decametric radio bursts, Io was found to absorb some radiation belt particles and to accelerate others, and most importantly, to be a source of neutral atoms, and by inference, a heavy ion plasma which may significantly affect the hydrodynamic flow in the magnetosphere. Another important Pioneer finding is that the Jovian outer magnetosphere generates, or permits to escape, fluxes of relativistic electrons of such intensities that Jupiter may be regarded as the dominant source of 1 to 30 MeV cosmic ray electrons in the heliosphere.

  19. Physics of the Jovian Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessler, A. J.

    2002-08-01

    List of tables; Foreword James A. Van Allen; Preface; 1. Jupiter's magnetic field and magnetosphere Mario H. Acuña, Kenneth W. Behannon and J. E. P. Connerney; 2. Ionosphere Darrell F. Strobel and Sushil K. Atreya; 3. The low-energy plasma in the Jovian magnetosphere J. W. Belcher; 4. Low-energy particle population S. M. Krimigis and E. C. Roelof; 5. High-energy particles A. W. Schardt and C. K. Goertz; 6. Spectrophotometric studies of the Io torus Robert A. Brown, Carl B. Pilcher and Darrell F. Strobel; 7. Phenomenology of magnetospheric radio emissions T. D. Carr, M. D. Desch and J. K. Alexander; 8. Plasma waves in the Jovian magnetosphere D. A. Gurnett and F. L. Scarf; 9. Theories of radio emissions and plasma waves Melvyn L. Goldstein and C. K. Goertz; 10. Magnetospheric models T. W. Hill, A. J. Dessler and C. K. Goertz; 11. Plasma distribution and flow Vytenis M. Vasyliunas; 12. Microscopic plasma processes in the Jovian magnetosphere Richard Mansergh Thorne; Appendixes; References; Index.

  20. The Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, James

    Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS), a NASA four-spacecraft mission scheduled for launch in November 2014, will investigate magnetic reconnection in the boundary regions of the Earth’s magnetosphere, particularly along its dayside boundary with the solar wind and the neutral sheet in the magnetic tail. Among the important questions about reconnection that will be addressed are the following: Under what conditions can magnetic-field energy be converted to plasma energy by the annihilation of magnetic field through reconnection? How does reconnection vary with time, and what factors influence its temporal behavior? What microscale processes are responsible for reconnection? What determines the rate of reconnection?
In order to accomplish its goals the MMS spacecraft must probe both those regions in which the magnetic fields are very nearly antiparallel and regions where a significant guide field exists. From previous missions we know the approximate speeds with which reconnection layers move through space to be from tens to hundreds of km/s. For electron skin depths of 5 to 10 km, the full 3D electron population (10 eV to above 20 keV) has to be sampled at rates greater than 10/s. The MMS Fast-Plasma Instrument (FPI) will sample electrons at greater than 30/s. Because the ion skin depth is larger, FPI will make full ion measurements at rates of greater than 6/s. 3D E-field measurements will be made by MMS once every ms. MMS will use an Active Spacecraft Potential Control device (ASPOC), which emits indium ions to neutralize the photoelectron current and keep the spacecraft from charging to more than +4 V. Because ion dynamics in Hall reconnection depend sensitively on ion mass, MMS includes a new-generation Hot Plasma Composition Analyzer (HPCA) that corrects problems with high proton fluxes that have prevented accurate ion-composition measurements near the dayside magnetospheric boundary. Finally, Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) measurements of electrons and

  1. A case study of lightning, whistlers, and associated ionospheric effects during a substorm particle injection event

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.V.; Inan, U.S. ); Li, Y.Q.; Holzworth, R.H. ); Smith, A.J. , Cambridge ); Orville, R.E. ); Rosenberg, T.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Simultaneous ground-based observations of narrowband and broadband VLF radio waves and of cloud-to-ground lightning were made at widely spaced locations during the 1987 Wave-Induced Particle Precipitation (WIPP) campaign, conducted from Wallops Island, Virginia. Based on these observations, the first case study has been made of the relationships among located cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes, whistlers, and associated ionospheric effects during a substorm particle injection event. This event took place 2 days after the strongest geomagnetic storm of 1987, during a reintensification in geomagnetic activity that did not affect the high rate of whistlers observed at Faraday Station, Antarctica. At the time of the injection event, several intense nighttime thunderstorms were located over Long Island and the coast of New England, between 400 km northwest and 600 km north of the region geomagnetically conjugate to Faraday. About two thirds of the CG flashes that were detected in these thunderstorms during the hour following the injection event onset were found to be causatively associated with whistlers received at Faraday. During the same period the amplitude of the 24.0-kHz signal from the NAA transmitter in Cutler, Maine, propagating over the thunderstorm centers toward Wallops Island was repeatedly perturbed in a manner characteristic of previously reported VLF signatures of transient and localized ionization enhancements at D region altitudes. Though such enhancements may have been caused by whistler-induced bursts electron precipitation from the magnetosphere, the data in this case are insufficient to establish a clear connection between the NAA amplitude perturbations and the Faraday Station whistlers. In view of the proximity of the NAA great circle path to the storm center, having the lower ionosphere by intense radiation from lightning may also have played a role in the observed VLF perturbations.

  2. On the origin of falling-tone chorus elements in Earth's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuillard, H.; Agapitov, O.; Artemyev, A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Le Contel, O.; Cully, C. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Zaliznyak, Y.; Rolland, G.

    2014-12-01

    Generation of extremely/very low frequency (ELF/VLF) chorus waves in Earth's inner magnetosphere has received increased attention recently because of their significance for radiation belt dynamics. Though past theoretical and numerical models have demonstrated how rising-tone chorus elements are produced, falling-tone chorus element generation has yet to be explained. Our new model proposes that weak-amplitude falling-tone chorus elements can be generated by magnetospheric reflection of rising-tone elements. Using ray tracing in a realistic plasma model of the inner magnetosphere, we demonstrate that rising-tone elements originating at the magnetic equator propagate to higher latitudes. Upon reflection there, they propagate to lower L-shells and turn into oblique falling tones of reduced power, frequency, and bandwidth relative to their progenitor rising tones. Our results are in good agreement with comprehensive statistical studies of such waves, notably using magnetic field measurements from THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) spacecraft. Thus, we conclude that the proposed mechanism can be responsible for the generation of weak-amplitude falling-tone chorus emissions.

  3. Predominance of ECH wave contribution to diffuse aurora in Earth's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jia; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Ni, Binbin; Thorne, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    to its importance for global energy dissipation in the ionosphere, the diffuse aurora has been intensively studied in the past 40 years. Its origin (precipitation of 0.5-10 keV electrons from the plasma sheet without potential acceleration) has been generally attributed to whistler-mode chorus wave scattering in the inner magnetosphere (R < ~8 RE), while the scattering mechanism beyond that distance remains unresolved. By modeling the quasi-linear diffusion of electrons with realistic parameters for the magnetic field, loss cone size, and wave intensity (obtained from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations as a function of magnetospheric location), we estimate the loss cone filling ratio and electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) wave-induced electron precipitation systematically throughout the entire data set, from 6 RE out to 31 RE (the THEMIS apogee). By comparing the wave-induced precipitation directly with the equatorially mapped energy flux distribution of the diffuse aurora from ionospheric observations (OVATION Prime model) at low altitudes, we quantify the contribution of auroral energy flux precipitated due to ECH wave scattering. Although the wave amplitudes decrease, as expected, with distance from the Earth, due to the smaller loss cone size and stretched magnetic field topology, ECH waves are still capable of causing sufficient scattering of plasma sheet electrons to account for the observed diffuse auroral dissipation. Our results demonstrate that ECH waves are the dominant driver of the diffuse aurora in the outer magnetosphere, beyond ~8 RE.

  4. Joule Heating as a Signature of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceren Kalafatoglu Eyiguler, Emine; Kaymaz, Zerefsan

    2016-07-01

    Since its first proposal by Birkeland in the early 1900s, the link between magnetosphere and ionosphere (M-I) has been immensely studied but there are still great variety of unsolved problems ranging from how to correctly balance the field aligned current (FAC) closure in the ionosphere to the resulting interactions between ions and neutrals in the ionosphere, and how the ionospheric conductivity and neutral wind control the M-I feedback to the mapping of the ionospheric regions to the magnetotail. It is now well known that during magnetically disturbed periods, the energy deposited to the magnetosphere by the solar wind is partitioned mainly between three domains: the ring current, ionosphere (via auroral particle precipitation and Joule heating) and the plasmoid release in the magnetotail. It is previously found that large part of this transferred energy is in the form of Joule heating which is the increase in ion-neutral collisions due to the increased energy input. However, Joule heating is also affected by the enhanced neutral wind motion during geomagnetic storms and substorms. Thus, it is one of the key manifestations of the M-I-T coupling. In this talk, we first give a through review of the present studies and recent advancements in the M-I-T research area then show the link between the magnetosphere and ionosphere by investigating the activity-time Joule heating variations as well as paying special attention to the neutral wind effects on Joule heating.

  5. An RCM-E simulation of a steady magnetospheric convection event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Toffoletto, F.; Wolf, R.; Song, Y.

    2009-12-01

    We present simulation results of an idealized steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) event using the Rice Convection Model coupled with an equilibrium magnetic field solver (RCM-E). The event is modeled by placing a plasma distribution with substantially depleted entropy parameter PV5/3 on the RCM's high latitude boundary. The calculated magnetic field shows a highly depressed configuration due to the enhanced westward current around geosynchronous orbit where the resulting partial ring current is stronger and more symmetric than in a typical substorm growth phase. The magnitude of BZ component in the mid plasma sheet is large compared to empirical magnetic field models. Contrary to some previous results, there is no deep BZ minimum in the near-Earth plasma sheet. This suggests that the magnetosphere could transfer into a strong adiabatic earthward convection mode without significant stretching of the plasma-sheet magnetic field, when there are flux tubes with depleted plasma content continuously entering the inner magnetosphere from the mid-tail. Virtual AU/AL and Dst indices are also calculated using a synthetic magnetogram code and are compared to typical features in published observations.

  6. Interplanetary Studies: Propagation of Disturbances Between the Sun and the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryer, Murray

    1994-09-01

    This review is concerned with the interplanetary ‘transmission line’ between the Sun and the Earth's magnetosphere. It starts with comments about coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that are associated with various forms of solar activities. It then continues with some of the current views about their continuation through the heliosphere to Earth and elsewhere. The evolution of energy, mass, and momentum transfer is of prime interest since the temporal/spatial/magnitude behavior of the interplanetary electric field and transient solar wind dynamic pressure is relevant to the magnetospheric response (the presence or absence of geomagnetic storms and substorms) at Earth. Energetec particle flux predictions are discussed in the context of solar activity (flares, prominence eruptions) at various positions on the solar disk relative to Earth's central meridian. A number of multi-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models, applied to the solar, near-Sun, and interplanetary portions of the ‘transmission line’, are discussed. These model simulations, necessary to advancing our understanding beyond the phenomenological or morphological stages, are directed to deceptively simple questions such as the following: can one-to-one associations be made between specific forms of solar activity and magnetosphere response?

  7. First Observations of a Foreshock Bubble at Earth: Implications for Magnetospheric Activity and Energetic Particle Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. L.; Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D. G.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2011-01-01

    Earth?s foreshock, which is the quasi-parallel region upstream of the bow shock, is a unique plasma region capable of generating several kinds of large-scale phenomena, each of which can impact the magnetosphere resulting in global effects. Interestingly, such phenomena have also been observed at planetary foreshocks throughout our solar system. Recently, a new type of foreshock phenomena has been predicted: foreshock bubbles, which are large-scale disruptions of both the foreshock and incident solar wind plasmas that can result in global magnetospheric disturbances. Here we present unprecedented, multi-point observations of foreshock bubbles at Earth using a combination of spacecraft and ground observations primarily from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission, and we include detailed analysis of the events? global effects on the magnetosphere and the energetic ions and electrons accelerated by them, potentially by a combination of first and second order Fermi and shock drift acceleration processes. This new phenomena should play a role in energetic particle acceleration at collisionless, quasi-parallel shocks throughout the Universe.

  8. A magnetospheric magnetic field model with flexible current systems driven by independent physical parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilmer, Robert V.; Voigt, Gerd-Hannes

    1995-01-01

    A tilt-dependent magnetic field model of the Earth's magnetosphere with variable magnetopause standoff distance is presented. Flexible analytic representations for the ring and cross-tail currents, each composed of the elements derived from the Tsyganenko and Usmanov (1982) model, are combined with the fully shielded vacuum dipole configurations of Voigt (1981). Although the current sheet does not warp in the y-z plane, changes in the shape and position of the neutral sheet with dipole tilt are consistent with both MHD equilibrium theory and observations. In addition, there is good agreement with observed Delta B profiles and the average equatorial contours of magnetic field magnitude. While the dipole field is rigorously shielded within the defined magnetopause, the ring and cross-tails currents are not similarly confined, consequently, the model's region of validity is limited to the inner magnetosphere. The model depends on four independent external parameters. We present a simple but limited method of simulating several substorm related magnetic field changes associated with the disrupion of the near-Earth cross-tail current sheet and collapse of the midnight magnetotail field region. This feature further facilitates the generation of magnetic field configuration time sequences useful in plasma convection simulations of real magnetospheric events.

  9. Signatures of Self-Organized Criticality in Low-Latitude Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanliss, J.; Uritsky, V.

    2007-05-01

    In a series of previous publications (see e.g. Consolini, 1997; Uritsky and Pudovkin, 1998; Uritsky et al., 2002, 2006; Lui et al., 2000; Chapman and Watkins, 2001) it has been shown that spatiotemporal activity in high-latitude magnetosphere exhibits signatures of self-organized criticality (SOC) - a robust multiscale stochastic regime observed in driven nonlinear systems with many couple degrees of freedom. This regime has been identified by a set of mutually consistent scaling laws describing dynamical and statistical properties of magnetospheric substorms. Here, we report the existence of SOC in the dynamics of SYM-H index, whish is a marker of space storms and other types of low-latitude geomagnetic disturbances. The ensemble average dynamics of activity bursts in the SYM-H index are scale-free and are characterized by spreading critical scaling exponents whose values are consistent with the shape of the scaling of burst sizes versus bust lifetimes. The probability distributions for the lifetime and the size of the SYM-H bursts show robust power laws which are essentially independent of the lower activity threshold used to detect the bursts, and they extend over many orders of magnitude. The avalanche distribution exponents are also in agreement with theoretical predictions for SOC systems. All of these results, together with previous studies (Wanliss and Weygand, [2007]), begin to paint a coherent picture of critical state in the inner magnetosphere possibly associated with SOC dynamics of the ring current and other constituents of low-latitude activity.

  10. A unified approach to inner magnetospheric state prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortnik, J.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-03-01

    This brief technique paper presents a method of reconstructing the global, time-varying distribution of some physical quantity Q that has been sparsely sampled at various locations within the magnetosphere and at different times. The quantity Q can be essentially any measurement taken on the satellite including a variety of waves (chorus, hiss, magnetosonic, and ion cyclotron), electrons of various energies ranging from cold to relativistic, and ions of various species and energies. As an illustrative example, we chose Q to be the electron number density (inferred from spacecraft potential) measured by three Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) probes between 2008 and 2014 and use the SYM-H index, taken at a 5 min cadence for the 5 h preceding each observed data point as the main regressor, although the predictor can also be any suitable geomagnetic index or solar wind parameter. Results show that the equatorial electron number density can be accurately reconstructed throughout the whole of the inner magnetosphere as a function of space and time, even capturing the dynamics of elementary plasmaspheric plume formation and corotation, suggesting that the dynamics of various other physical quantities could be similarly captured. For our main model, we use a simple, fully connected feedforward neural network with two hidden layers having sigmoidal activation functions and an output layer with a linear activation function to perform the reconstruction. The training is performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and gives typical RMS errors of ~1.7 and regression of >0.93, which is considered excellent. We also present a discussion on the different applications and future extensions of the present model, for modeling various physical quantities.

  11. The "Alfvénic surge" at substorm onset/expansion and the formation of "Inverted Vs": Cluster and IMAGE observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, A. J.; Chaston, C. C.; Frey, H. U.; Fillingim, M. O.; Goldstein, M. L.; Bonnell, J. W.; Mozer, F. S.

    2016-05-01

    From multipoint, in situ observations and imaging, we reveal the injection-powered, Alfvénic nature of auroral acceleration during onset and expansion of a substorm. It is shown how Alfvénic variations over time dissipate to form large-scale, inverted-V structures characteristic of quasistatic aurora. This characterization is made possible through the fortuitous occurrence of a substorm onset and expansion phase on field lines traversed by Cluster in the high-altitude acceleration region. Substorm onset was preceded by the occurrence of multiple poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs) and subsequent development/progression of a streamer toward the growth phase arc indicating that this is of the PBI-/streamer-triggered class of substorms. Onset on Cluster is marked by the injection of hot, dense magnetospheric plasma in a region tied to one of the preexisting PBI current systems. This was accompanied by a surge of Alfvénic activity and enhanced inverted-V acceleration, as the PBI current system intensified and striated to dispersive scale Alfvén waves. The growth of Alfvén wave activity was significant (up to a factor of 300 increase in magnetic field power spectral density at frequencies 20 mHz ≲f≲ few hertz) and coincided with moderate growth (factor 3-5) in the background PBI current. This sequence is indicative of a cascade process whereby small-scale/dispersive Alfvén waves are generated from large-scale Alfvén waves or current destabilization. It also demonstrates that the initial PBIs and their subsequent evolution are an intrinsic part of the global auroral substorm response to injection and accompanying wave energy input from the magnetotail. Alfvénic activity persisted poleward of the PBI currents composing a broad Alfvén wave-dominated region extending to the polar cap edge. These waves have transverse scales ranging from a few tens of kilometers to below the ion gyroradius and are associated with large electric fields (up to 200 mV/m) and

  12. Simultaneous observation of the poleward expansion of substorm electrojet activity and the tailward expansion of current sheet disruption in the near-earth magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Koskinen, H. E. J.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Bosinger, T.; Mcentire, R. W.; Potemra, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    A substorm that occurred on 7 June 1985 at 2209 UT for which simultaneous measurements from ground stations and CCE are available is considered. The event occurred during a close conjunction between CCE, the EISCAT magnetometer cross, and the STARE radar, allowing a detailed comparison of satellite and ground-based data. Two discrete activations took place during the first few minutes of this substorm: the expansion phase onset at 2209 UT and an intensification at 2212 UT, corresponding to a poleward expansion of activity. The energetic particle data indicate that the active region of the magnetotail during the 2212 UT intensification was located tailward of the active region at 2209 UT. This is direct evidence for a correspondence between tailward expansion of localized activity in the near-earth magnetotail (current disruption and particle energization) and poleward expansion of activity (electrojet formation) in the ionosphere.

  13. Response of the PC index to the solar wind influence and it's availability for nowcasting of storm and substorm activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, O. A.

    2003-04-01

    The PC index has been put forward with a general aim to find a key parameter that (1) would estimate the current state of the global magnetospheric activity, and (2) would be readily calculated from routine ground-based measurements. The PC index has been derived as the dimensionless quantity parameterized by season, UT, and hemisphere, and calculated for interplanetary electric field coupling with the magnetosphere (Em). Response of the PC index to the solar wind influence is examined using the data on solar wind parameters observed by ACE spacecraft in the point of libration L1. It is shown that the PC index in range PC=0-12 is proportional to value of the interplanetary electric field Em and, correspondingly, to the polar cap voltage and the polar cap ionospheric electric field Ei. If the magnetic activity within the polar cap is extremely high (PC>12), the interplanetary and ionospheric electric fields tend to approach an asymptotic (effect of electric field saturation). In these conditions, apart from the interplanetary electric field Em determining the regular level of the antisunward convection in the polar cap, the PC index is affected either by (1) unusual enhancement of the ionospheric conductivity in the polar cap in association with bombardment of the ionosphere by solar protons (E=1-10 MeV) in time of strong polar cap absorption events, or by (2) the solar wind pressure pulses those strongly enhance the antisunward convection (positive PC) under Bz<0, and sunward convection (negative PC) under Bz>0. It means that the PC index adequately estimates the solar wind energy coming into the high-latitude magnetosphere and, therefore, can be used to evaluate the current state of the magnetosphere. It is shown that sharp increase of the PC index indicates conclusively that the auroral substorm will be developed in a matter of minutes. Correlation between the PC index and AE indices turned out to be much higher in absence of Dst variation (R=0.74) than in course

  14. Origins of magnetospheric physics

    SciTech Connect

    Van Allen, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The history of the scientific investigation of the earth magnetosphere during the period 1946-1960 is reviewed, with a focus on satellite missions leading to the discovery of the inner and outer radiation belts. Chapters are devoted to ground-based studies of the earth magnetic field through the 1930s, the first U.S. rocket flights carrying scientific instruments, the rockoon flights from the polar regions (1952-1957), U.S. planning for scientific use of artificial satellites (1956), the launch of Sputnik I (1957), the discovery of the inner belt by Explorers I and III (1958), the Argus high-altitude atomic-explosion tests (1958), the confirmation of the inner belt and discovery of the outer belt by Explorer IV and Pioneers I-V, related studies by Sputniks II and III and Luniks I-III, and the observational and theoretical advances of 1959-1961. Photographs, drawings, diagrams, graphs, and copies of original notes and research proposals are provided. 227 references.

  15. Neutron Star - Magnetosphere Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, Marcelo; Anderson, Matthew; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2012-03-01

    In this work we report results of the interaction of a neutron star magnetosphere in both collapsing and moving scenarios interacting with an ambient magnetic field. In recent works [1,2], it has been shown the important role and realism associated with studies of electromagnetic environments in some particular regimes, such as: ideal-MHD, force-free, and electro-vacuum. Motivated by this and their astrophysical implications for BBH and hybrid BH-NS mergers [3,4], we study the following cases: collapse of a magnetized NS, head-on collision of a BH-NS, and orbiting merger of a BH-NS. Based in the results from our simulations, we draw some relevant conclusions to the production of jets as described within the force-free formalism. [4pt] [1] C.Palenzuela, L.Lehner and S.Liebling, Science 329, 927 (2010).[0pt] [2] C.Palenzuela, T.Garrett, et al., Phys.Rev.D 82, 044045 (2010).[0pt] [3] L.Lehner, C.Palenzuela, et al., 2011.[0pt] [4] S.Liebling, L.Lehner, et al., Phys.Rev.D 81, 124023 (2010).

  16. The Magnetospheric Multiscale Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Anderson, B. J.; Baumjohann, W.; Bromund, K. R.; Dearborn, D.; Fischer, D.; Le, G.; Leinweber, H. K.; Leneman, D.; Magnes, W.; Means, J. D.; Moldwin, M. B.; Nakamura, R.; Pierce, D.; Plaschke, F.; Rowe, K. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, R. J.; Torbert, R.; Hagen, C.; Jernej, I.; Valavanoglou, A.; Richter, I.

    2016-03-01

    The success of the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission depends on the accurate measurement of the magnetic field on all four spacecraft. To ensure this success, two independently designed and built fluxgate magnetometers were developed, avoiding single-point failures. The magnetometers were dubbed the digital fluxgate (DFG), which uses an ASIC implementation and was supplied by the Space Research Institute of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the analogue magnetometer (AFG) with a more traditional circuit board design supplied by the University of California, Los Angeles. A stringent magnetic cleanliness program was executed under the supervision of the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory. To achieve mission objectives, the calibration determined on the ground will be refined in space to ensure all eight magnetometers are precisely inter-calibrated. Near real-time data plays a key role in the transmission of high-resolution observations stored on board so rapid processing of the low-resolution data is required. This article describes these instruments, the magnetic cleanliness program, and the instrument pre-launch calibrations, the planned in-flight calibration program, and the information flow that provides the data on the rapid time scale needed for mission success.

  17. A study of atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitt, W. J.; Paris, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The properties of low energy plasma in the magnetosphere were predicted. The effects of wave particle interactions involving the concept of plasmons are studied, and quantum mechanical formulations are used for the processes occurring and bulk energization of the low energy plasma are investigated through the concept of the energy momentum tensor for the plasma and its electromagnetic environment.

  18. Modeling of the Convection and Interaction of Ring Current, Plasmaspheric and Plasma Sheet Plasmas in the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Buzulukova, Natalia; Glocer, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Distinctive sources of ions reside in the plasmasphere, plasmasheet, and ring current regions at discrete energies constitute the major plasma populations in the inner/middle magnetosphere. They contribute to the electrodynamics of the ionosphere-magnetosphere system as important carriers of the global current system, in triggering; geomagnetic storm and substorms, as well as critical components of plasma instabilities such as reconnection and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetospheric boundaries. Our preliminary analysis of in-situ measurements shoves the complexity of the plasmas pitch angle distributions at particularly the cold and warm plasmas, vary dramatically at different local times and radial distances from the Earth in response to changes in solar wind condition and Dst index. Using an MHD-ring current coupled code, we model the convection and interaction of cold, warm and energetic ions of plasmaspheric, plasmasheet, and ring current origins in the inner magnetosphere. We compare our simulation results with in-situ and remotely sensed measurements from recent instrumentation on Geotail, Cluster, THEMIS, and TWINS spacecraft.

  19. Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction: energy transfer pathways and their predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliadis, D.

    2001-09-01

    The coupling of the solar wind to planets has been studied for several decades now. Much of the recent progress in understanding the complexity of the interaction is due to the variability of the magnetospheres in the solar system. The interaction with the terrestrial system is evidently the best known, although by far not the simplest one. The geospace and the surrounding solar wind constitute an input-output system where the various parts of the energy budget are measured simultaneously by a fleet of spacecraft. We integrate these measurements by combining plasma physics and simulation models with system analysis methods. The large-scale energy transfer is dominated by magnetic reconnection and its effects which supply electromagnetic and kinetic energy at the rate of ~10^15 W to the magnetosphere with part of it eventually dissipating at the ionospheric boundary. The storage-release of magnetic energy and its transformation to kinetic energy takes place continually through convection and more explosively during magnetospheric substorms. Long known from its effects, ranging from auroral displays to the more recent disruptions of electric power grid operation, this interaction involves many spatial and temporal pathways: The overall disturbance levels are represented by regional and global magnetic indices. Index time series were the first to be reproduced accurately by nonlinear dynamical systems driven by solar wind parameter data. The models have subsequently been used in prediction of the indices based on real-time interplanetary field and plasma parameters from the ACE and WIND spacecraft (http://lep694.gsfc.nasa.gov/RTSM/). The model time scales represent the physical responses, namely the directly driven convection and the less predictable substorm. Currently the approach has been extended to modeling the spatial distribution as well as temporal variations. Data from ground magnetometer arrays have replaced the scalar indices to provide magnetic field maps

  20. MESSENGER Observations of Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's second and third flybys of Mercury on October 6, 2008 and September 29, 2009, respectively, southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) produced intense reconnection signatures in the dayside and nightside magnetosphere and markedly different system-level responses. The IMF during the second flyby was continuously southward and the magnetosphere appeared very active, with large magnetic field components normal to the magnetopause and the generation of flux transfer events at the magnetopause and plasmoids in the tail current sheet every 30 to 90 s. However, the strength and direction of the tail magnetic field was stable. In contrast, the IMF during the third flyby varied from north to south on timescales of minutes. Although the MESSENGER measurements were limited during that encounter to the nightside magnetosphere, numerous examples of plasmoid release in the tail were detected, but they were not periodic. Instead, plasmoid release was highly correlated with four large enhancements of the tail magnetic field (i.e. by factors > 2) with durations of approx. 2 - 3 min. The increased flaring of the magnetic field during these intervals indicates that the enhancements were caused by loading of the tail with magnetic flux transferred from the dayside magnetosphere. New analyses of the second and third flyby observations of reconnection and its system-level effects provide a basis for comparison and contrast with what is known about the response of the Earth s magnetosphere to variable versus steady southward IMF.

  1. RESISTIVE SOLUTIONS FOR PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jason; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2012-02-10

    The current state of the art in the modeling of pulsar magnetospheres invokes either the vacuum or force-free limits for the magnetospheric plasma. Neither of these limits can simultaneously account for both the plasma currents and the accelerating electric fields that are needed to explain the morphology and spectra of high-energy emission from pulsars. To better understand the structure of such magnetospheres, we combine accelerating fields and force-free solutions by considering models of magnetospheres filled with resistive plasma. We formulate Ohm's law in the minimal velocity fluid frame and construct a family of resistive solutions that smoothly bridges the gap between the vacuum and the force-free magnetosphere solutions. The spin-down luminosity, open field line potential drop, and the fraction of open field lines all transition between the vacuum and force-free values as the plasma conductivity varies from zero to infinity. For fixed inclination angle, we find that the spin-down luminosity depends linearly on the open field line potential drop. We consider the implications of our resistive solutions for the spin-down of intermittent pulsars and sub-pulse drift phenomena in radio pulsars.

  2. Investigation of triggering mechanism of substorm through the analysis of Geotail and Themis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Nose, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.; Auster, H.

    2011-12-01

    In our previous study, we have adopted a superposed epoch analysis method to the Geotail data to understand the triggering mechanism of substorm. Further, we have proposed a new scheme of substorm called "Catapult Current Sheet Relaxation Model" to explain our results. As an extension of these works, we adopted the same method of analysis to the Themis spacecraft data, and found that there are both the same and different characteristics between the results of Themis and Geotail. It is of interest that clear differences are present even if we use the same data set of Themis but adopting different lists of auroral breakups, i.e., substorm onsets. These differences seem to be attributed to the intensity of substorm. Large substorms tend to have southward magnetic field variations related to the plasma sheet thinning which is known as a notable characteristic during a growth phase, near the Earth compared to small substorms. However, the convective earthward flows are weakened just for a few minutes prior to the onset, followed by notable enhancement of the earthward flows after the onset. On the other hand, the southward variations in the magnetic field for small substorms can be seen in the tailward side compared to large substorms. While, the northward magnetic field variations after the onset can be also seen in the tailward side. Furthermore, the earthward convective flows which are not produced by magnetic reconnection seem to develop for moderate class of substorms just prior to the onset. Those differences can be a crucial clue to solve the issue of substorm triggering.

  3. Quantitative maps of geomagnetic perturbation vectors during substorm onset and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Pothier, N M; Weimer, D R; Moore, W B

    2015-01-01

    We have produced the first series of spherical harmonic, numerical maps of the time-dependent surface perturbations in the Earth's magnetic field following the onset of substorms. Data from 124 ground magnetometer stations in the Northern Hemisphere at geomagnetic latitudes above 33° were used. Ground station data averaged over 5 min intervals covering 8 years (1998–2005) were used to construct pseudo auroral upper, auroral lower, and auroral electrojet (AU*, AL*, and AE*) indices. These indices were used to generate a list of substorms that extended from 1998 to 2005, through a combination of automated processing and visual checks. Events were sorted by interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation (at the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite), dipole tilt angle, and substorm magnitude. Within each category, the events were aligned on substorm onset. A spherical cap harmonic analysis was used to obtain a least error fit of the substorm disturbance patterns at 5 min intervals up to 90 min after onset. The fits obtained at onset time were subtracted from all subsequent fits, for each group of substorm events. Maps of the three vector components of the averaged magnetic perturbations were constructed to show the effects of substorm currents. These maps are produced for several specific ranges of values for the peak |AL*| index, IMF orientation, and dipole tilt angle. We demonstrate an influence of the dipole tilt angle on the response to substorms. Our results indicate that there are downward currents poleward and upward currents just equatorward of the peak in the substorms' westward electrojet. Key Points Show quantitative maps of ground geomagnetic perturbations due to substorms Three vector components mapped as function of time during onset and recovery Compare/contrast results for different tilt angle and sign of IMF Y-component PMID:26167445

  4. Distribution in magnetotail of O sup + ions from Cusp/Cleft ionosphere: A possible substorm trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Cladis, J.B.; Francis, W.E. )

    1992-01-01

    The transport of O{sup +} ions from the cusp/cleft ionosphere to the magnetotail during highly disturbed times was determined by computing the guiding-center trajectories of the ions to a distance of 6 R{sub E} from the ionosphere and the full-motion trajectories at later times. Case histories were tallied in six planes perpendicular to the X{sub GSM} axis, three planes perpendicular to the Y{sub GSM} axis, and in the center plane of the tail. At various times relatives to the enhancement of the convection electric field, the following ion properties were constructed from the case histories; number density, mean energy, energy and pitch angle distributions of the flux, and ion pressure components parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. It was found that after about 1.7 hours the ion flux in the near-Earth magnetotail increased dramatically and the spectrum hardened, much as observed during periods just preceding substorms. This increase is attributed to (1) the increase in the O{sup +} outflux from the ionosphere, (2) the increased energization of the ions by the convection electric field, and (3) ion trapping, which generally occurs because the ion magnetic generally increase after the ions first cross the geomagnetotail center plane. Moreover, the parallel pressure of the ions exceeds the energy density of the magnetic field at X{sub GSM} < {minus}8 R{sub E}. On the basis of the expected alterations of the magnetic and electric fields in response to this O{sup +} pressure, a substorm trigger mechanism is suggested.

  5. On the formation and origin of substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs inferred from conjugate space-ground observations

    DOE PAGES

    Motoba, T.; Ohtani, S.; Anderson, B. J.; ...

    2015-10-27

    In this study, magnetotail processes and structures related to substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs remain poorly understood mostly due to the lack of adequate observations. In this study we make a comparison between ground-based optical measurements of the premidnight growth phase/onset arcs at subauroral latitudes and magnetically conjugate measurements made by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) at ~780 km in altitude and by the Van Allen Probe B (RBSP-B) spacecraft crossing L values of ~5.0–5.6 in the premidnight inner tail region. The conjugate observations offer a unique opportunity to examine the detailed features of the arcmore » location relative to large-scale Birkeland currents and of the magnetospheric counterpart. Our main findings include (1) at the early stage of the growth phase the quiet auroral arc emerged ~4.3° equatorward of the boundary between the downward Region 2 (R2) and upward Region 1 (R1) currents; (2) shortly before the auroral breakup (poleward auroral expansion) the latitudinal separation between the arc and the R1/R2 demarcation narrowed to ~1.0°; (3) RBSP-B observed a magnetic field signature of a local upward field-aligned current (FAC) connecting the arc with the near-Earth tail when the spacecraft footprint was very close to the arc; and (4) the upward FAC signature was located on the tailward side of a local plasma pressure increase confined near L ~5.2–5.4. These findings strongly suggest that the premidnight arc is connected to highly localized pressure gradients embedded in the near-tail R2 source region via the local upward FAC.« less

  6. On the formation and origin of substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs inferred from conjugate space-ground observations

    SciTech Connect

    Motoba, T.; Ohtani, S.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Mitchell, D.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Shiokawa, K.; Connors, M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-10-27

    In this study, magnetotail processes and structures related to substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs remain poorly understood mostly due to the lack of adequate observations. In this study we make a comparison between ground-based optical measurements of the premidnight growth phase/onset arcs at subauroral latitudes and magnetically conjugate measurements made by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) at ~780 km in altitude and by the Van Allen Probe B (RBSP-B) spacecraft crossing L values of ~5.0–5.6 in the premidnight inner tail region. The conjugate observations offer a unique opportunity to examine the detailed features of the arc location relative to large-scale Birkeland currents and of the magnetospheric counterpart. Our main findings include (1) at the early stage of the growth phase the quiet auroral arc emerged ~4.3° equatorward of the boundary between the downward Region 2 (R2) and upward Region 1 (R1) currents; (2) shortly before the auroral breakup (poleward auroral expansion) the latitudinal separation between the arc and the R1/R2 demarcation narrowed to ~1.0°; (3) RBSP-B observed a magnetic field signature of a local upward field-aligned current (FAC) connecting the arc with the near-Earth tail when the spacecraft footprint was very close to the arc; and (4) the upward FAC signature was located on the tailward side of a local plasma pressure increase confined near L ~5.2–5.4. These findings strongly suggest that the premidnight arc is connected to highly localized pressure gradients embedded in the near-tail R2 source region via the local upward FAC.

  7. Analysis of EMIC waves in relation to magnetospheric heavy ion density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Kim, E. H.; Johnson, J.; Lee, D. H.; Clauer, C. R.; Lessard, M.; Engebretson, M. J.; Xu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    This study presents observations of EMIC wave events and their relation to heavy ion density in the magnetosphere. It is well known that EMIC waves play an important role in particle acceleration and loss via wave-particle interaction. It is critical to know the ion composition in the plasma with which EMIC waves interact in order to understand wave generation and propagation because it controls ion cyclotron resonance frequencies of EMIC waves. The presence of heavy ions (He+ and O+) causes the wave modes to be more complex with two additional resonance (ion-ion hybrid and Buchsbaum resonances) and polarization changes, making it challenging to analyze wave generation and propagation. In this study, we show wave polarization and Poynting flux using data from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) and Van Allen Probes (VAP) satellites and their ground conjunctions and compare them with the heavy ion density estimated by a wave model.

  8. Acceleration of charged particles in magnetic reconnection Solar flares, the magnetosphere, and solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Ambrosiano, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    A possible source of free energy available for accelerating charged particles is conversion of magnetic energy to particle energy in reconnecting magnetic fields. Recent simulations using test particles suggests that reconnection may efficiently accelerate particles to the maximum energies that are observed in several astrophysical contexts. A simple analytic formula is used in conjunction with the simulation results to predict the maximum energy achievable in a particular plasma environment with the result that in solar flares reconnection is capable of accelerating particles to several GeV. In magnetospheric substorms the predicted maximum can reach several hundred keV, and near magnetic sector crossings in the solar wind the maximum energy can approach 100 keV.

  9. Magnetospheres of the outer planets. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Allen, J.A.

    1985-04-01

    The physical conditions that are necessary for the existence of a planetary magnetosphere are reviewed. These general considerations and some specific evidence are then combined to make forecasts of the probable existence and nature of magnetospheres of Uranus and Neptune.

  10. Self-Consistent Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling and Associated Plasma Energization Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Magnetosphere-Ionosphere (MI) coupling and associated with this process electron and ion energization processes have interested scientists for decades and, in spite of experimental and theoretical research efforts, are still ones of the least well known dynamic processes in space plasma physics. The reason for this is that the numerous physical processes associated with MI coupling occur over multiple spatial lengths and temporal scales. One typical example of MI coupling is large scale ring current (RC) electrodynamic coupling that includes calculation of the magnetospheric electric field that is consistent with the ring current (RC) distribution. A general scheme for numerical simulation of such large-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes has been presented earlier in many works. The mathematical formulation of these models are based on "modified frozen-in flux theorem" for an ensemble of adiabatically drifting particles in the magnetosphere. By tracking the flow of particles through the inner magnetosphere, the bounce-averaged phase space density of the hot ions and electrons can be reconstructed and the magnetospheric electric field can be calculated such that it is consistent with the particle distribution in the magnetosphere. The new a self-consistent ring current model has been developed that couples electron and ion magnetospheric dynamics with calculation of electric field. Two new features were taken into account in addition to the RC ions, we solve an electron kinetic equation in our model, self-consistently including these results in the solution. Second, using different analytical relationships, we calculate the height integrated ionospheric conductances as the function of precipitated high energy magnetospheric electrons and ions as produced by our model. This results in fundamental changes to the electric potential pattern in the inner magnetosphere, with a smaller Alfven boundary than previous potential formulations would predict but

  11. Io's volcanism influences Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-02-01

    Volcanic emissions from Jupiter's moon Io supply plasma to the planet's magnetosphere and lead to its main auroral emissions. New observations show that the main auroral oval expanded and outer emissions brightened in spring 2007. Some studies have suggested that magnetospheric changes such as these could be caused by changes in the incoming solar wind. Bonfond et al. present several lines of evidence—including images from the Hubble Space Telescope and observations of a volcanic plume on Io from the New Horizons probe along with measurements of increased emissions from Jupiter's sodium cloud—that indicate that Io's volcanism controls changes in Jupiter's magnetosphere. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2011GL050253, 2012)

  12. The magnetospheric currents - An introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that the scientific discipline concerned with magnetospheric currents has grown out from geomagnetism and, in particular, from geomagnetic storm studies. The International Geophysical Year (IGY) introduced a new area for this discipline by making 'man-made satellites' available for the exploration of space around the earth. In this investigation, a brief description is provided of the magnetospheric currents in terms of eight component current systems. Attention is given to the Sq current, the Chapman-Ferraro current, the ring current (the symmetric component), the current systems driven by the solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo (SMD), the cross-tail current system, the average ionospheric current pattern, an example of an instantaneous current pattern, field-aligned currents, and driving mechanisms and models.

  13. Solar wind entry into the high-latitude terrestrial magnetosphere during geomagnetically quiet times.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q Q; Zong, Q-G; Fu, S Y; Dunlop, M W; Pu, Z Y; Parks, G K; Wei, Y; Li, W H; Zhang, H; Nowada, M; Wang, Y B; Sun, W J; Xiao, T; Reme, H; Carr, C; Fazakerley, A N; Lucek, E

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the transport of solar wind plasma into and throughout the terrestrial magnetosphere is crucial to space science and space weather. For non-active periods, there is little agreement on where and how plasma entry into the magnetosphere might occur. Moreover, behaviour in the high-latitude region behind the magnetospheric cusps, for example, the lobes, is poorly understood, partly because of lack of coverage by previous space missions. Here, using Cluster multi-spacecraft data, we report an unexpected discovery of regions of solar wind entry into the Earth's high-latitude magnetosphere tailward of the cusps. From statistical observational facts and simulation analysis we suggest that these regions are most likely produced by magnetic reconnection at the high-latitude magnetopause, although other processes, such as impulsive penetration, may not be ruled out entirely. We find that the degree of entry can be significant for solar wind transport into the magnetosphere during such quiet times.

  14. Transient events in the outer magnetosphere - Boundary waves of flux transfer events?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    Simultaneous solar wind and magnetospheric observations are presented for a series of flux transfer events (FTEs) observed by the UKS and IRM spacecraft in the outer prenoon magnetosphere on October 28, 1984. The CCE satellite, located near local noon, observed an enhancement in the magnetospheric magnetic field strength 4 min prior to each IRM/UKS event, suggesting the antisunward propagation of a compression in the magnetopause surface. It is suggested that these compressions resulted from wavy magnetopause motion driven by variations in the solar wind dynamic pressure applied to the magnetosphere, rather than the motion of FTEs formed by magnetic merging. This hypothesis is confirmed by the fact that the events previously identified as FTEs occurred during a sequence of quasi-periodic (5-6 min) oscillations in the magnetospheric plasma velocity and magnetic field.

  15. Charge States of O Ions Injected at Substorm Onset and Estimation of the O+/O6+ Flux Ratio: Geotail/EPIC Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, T.; Nose, M.; Keika, K.; Christon, S. P.

    2004-12-01

    Oxygen ions in the Earth's magnetosphere are supplied from two sources, that is, the ionosphere and the solar wind. The charge states of oxygen from the ionosphere are generally low such as O+, while those from the solar wind are highly charged (mainly O6+). Investigating the amount of oxygen with each charge state in various energy ranges in the magnetosphere and its source region gives us information how it is energized during travel from its origin to the magnetosphere. This would be a clue to know the acceleration mechanisms of oxygen in the magnetosphere. However, only a few satellites carried instruments which can measure the ions' charge states. Furthermore, they are not sensitive enough in the high energy range (more than 100 keV) because the number of ions in this energy range is small. It is also difficult to analyze a phenomenon in a short time scale such as ion injection from the near-Earth tail into the inner magnetosphere at substorm onset. In this study, we estimate the charge state of injected oxygen in various energy ranges by using the method of Sibeck et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett., 15, 1287 - 1290, 1988] with the flux data from the EPIC/ICS instrument on Geotail; it can measure mass of ion in the energy range of 50 keV - 3 MeV but not charge state. This method uses the energy dispersion of flux enhancements of injected ions, which is dependent on the charge state of them. This dispersion is responsible for the drift velocity of ions in the inner magnetosphere depending on their energy and charge state. We analyzed the ICS data statistically to estimate charge state of oxygen ions for the period of 1996 and October 2000 to September 2001. We also used data from the Geotail/EPIC STICS sensor, which can measure charge state and ion mass, so that the O+/O6+ ratios were given for a few cases where STICS provided enough ion flux to be analyzed for these events. From the analysis we found that (1)In the 50 to 150 keV energy range, the amount of injected O

  16. Near-horizon Kerr magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gralla, Samuel E.; Lupsasca, Alexandru; Strominger, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    We exploit the near-horizon conformal symmetry of rapidly spinning black holes to determine universal properties of their magnetospheres. Analytic expressions are derived for the limiting form of the magnetosphere in the near-horizon region. The symmetry is shown to imply that the black hole Meissner effect holds for free Maxwell fields but is generically violated for force-free fields. We further show that in the extremal limit, near-horizon plasma particles are infinitely boosted relative to accretion flow. Active galactic nuclei powered by rapidly spinning black holes are therefore natural sites for high-energy particle collisions.

  17. Particle transport in planetary magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Birmingham, T.J.

    1984-11-01

    Particle energization in Earth's and Jupiter's magnetospheres is discussed. Understanding of the large scale magnetic and electric fields in which charged particles move is reviewed. Orbit theory in the adiabatic approximation is sketched. General conditions for adiabatic breakdown at each of three levels of periodicity are presented. High energy losses and lower energy sources argue for the existence of magnetospheric accelerations. Nonadiabatic acceleration processes are mentioned. Slow diffusive energization by particle interactions with electromagnetic fluctuations is outlined. This mechanism seems adequate at Earth but, operating alone, is unconvincing for Jupiter. Adding spatial diffusion in the radially distended Jovian magnetodisk may resolve the difficulty. (ESA)

  18. The Inner Magnetosphere Imager Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Inner Magnetosphere Imager (IMI) mission will carry instruments to globally image energetic neutral atoms, far and extreme ultraviolet light, and X rays. These imagers will see the ring current inner plasmasheet, plasmasphere, aurora, and geocorona. With these observations it will be possible, for the first time, to develop an understanding of the global shape of the inner magnetosphere and the interrelationships between its parts. Seven instruments are currently envisioned on a single spinning spacecraft with a despun platform. IMI will be launched into an elliptical, polar orbit with an apogee of approximately 7 Earth radii altitude and perigee of 4800 km altitude.

  19. The Inner Magnetosphere Imager mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Inner Magnetosphere Imager (IMI) mission will carry instruments to globally image energetic neutral atoms, far and extreme ultraviolet light, and X-rays. These imagers will see the ring current, inner plasmasheet, plasmasphere, aurora, and geocorona. With these observations it will be possible, for the first time, to develop an understanding of the global shape of the inner magnetosphere and the interrelationships between its parts. Seven instruments are currently envisioned on a single spinning spacecraft with a despun platform. IMI will be launched into an elliptical, polar orbit with an apogee of approximately 7 Earth radii altitude and perigee of 4800 km altitude.

  20. Plasma convection in Neptune's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selesnick, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    The magnetosphere of Neptune changes its magnetic configuration continuously as the planet rotates, leading to a strong modulation of the convection electric field. Even though the corotation speed is considerably larger, the modulation causes the small convection speed to have a cumulative effect, much like the acceleration of particles in a cyclotron. A model calculation shows that plasma on one side of the planet convects out of the magnetosphere in a few planetary rotations, while on the other side it convects slowly planetward. The observation of nitrogen ions from a Triton plasma torus may provide a critical test of the model.

  1. Energetic aspects of Enceladus' magnetospheric interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, S.; Kriegel, H.; Saur, J.; Wennmacher, A.

    2013-12-01

    We present an analytical model of the Poynting flux that is generated by the interaction between the plume of Enceladus and Saturn's magnetospheric plasma. Our purpose is to analyze the influence of two key elements of Enceladus' magnetospheric interaction on the electromagnetic energy radiated away in the moon's Alfven wings. First, the north-south asymmetry of the obstacle generates a system of hemisphere coupling currents which allows a transport of electromagnetic energy into Saturn's northern hemisphere, even if the field-aligned currents connecting to the plume are completely blocked at the non-conducting icy crust of Enceladus. Second, the presence of electron-absorbing dust grains within the plume was recently found to drastically modify the electromagnetic field configuration within Enceladus' Alfven wings (Anti-Hall effect), thereby also altering the energy flux radiated away from the interaction region. By systematically studying the impact of varying strengths of the hemisphere coupling currents and varying electron absorption fractions on the energy flux, we come to the following conclusions: (1) The integrated Poynting flux into Saturn's southern hemisphere always exceeds the integrated flux into the northern hemisphere. In particular, the power transmitted towards the south may become several orders of magnitude larger than the power transmitted towards the north. (2) The search for Enceladus' auroral footprint has so far mainly focused on Saturn's northern hemisphere. However, based on the Poynting fluxes radiated away by the interaction, detections of the footprint should occur more likely in the giant planet's southern hemisphere, if no other far-field effects play a role. (3) Electron absorption by the dust grains within the plume makes a measurable contribution to the energy flux. Thus, changes in the brightness of the observed footprints cannot exclusively be ascribed to variations in the incident magnetospheric flow conditions or the neutral

  2. Multipoint spacecraft observations of long-lasting poloidal Pc4 pulsations in the dayside magnetosphere on 1-2 May 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotova, Galina; Sibeck, David; Engebretson, Mark; Wygant, John; Thaller, Scott; Spence, Harlan; Kletzing, Craig; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Redmon, Robert

    2016-11-01

    We use magnetic field and plasma observations from the Van Allen Probes, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES) spacecraft to study the spatial and temporal characteristics of long-lasting poloidal Pc4 pulsations in the dayside magnetosphere. The pulsations were observed after the main phase of a moderate storm during low geomagnetic activity. The pulsations occurred during various interplanetary conditions and the solar wind parameters do not seem to control the occurrence of the pulsations. The most striking feature of the Pc4 magnetic field pulsations was their occurrence at similar locations during three of four successive orbits. We used this information to study the latitudinal nodal structure of the pulsations and demonstrated that the latitudinal extent of the magnetic field pulsations did not exceed 2 Earth radii (RE). A phase shift between the azimuthal and radial components of the electric and magnetic fields was observed from ZSM = 0.30 RE to ZSM = -0.16 RE. We used magnetic and electric field data from Van Allen Probes to determine the structure of ULF waves. We showed that the Pc4 magnetic field pulsations were radially polarized and are the second-mode harmonic waves. We suggest that the spacecraft were near a magnetic field null during the second orbit when they failed to observe the magnetic field pulsations at the local times where pulsations were observed on previous and successive orbits. We investigated the spectral structure of the Pc4 pulsations. Each spacecraft observed a decrease of the dominant period as it moved to a smaller L shell (stronger magnetic field strength). We demonstrated that higher frequencies occurred at times and locations where Alfvén velocities were greater, i.e., on Orbit 1. There is some evidence that the periods of the pulsations increased during the plasmasphere refilling following the storm.

  3. Global MHD model of the earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    A global MHD model of the earth's magnetosphere is defined. An introduction to numerical methods for solving the MHD equations is given with emphasis on the shock-capturing technique. Finally, results concerning the shape of the magnetosphere and the plasma flows inside the magnetosphere are presented.

  4. Interplanetary Magnetic Field Control of the Entry of Solar Energetic Particles into the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, R. L.; El-Alaoui, M.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Walker, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the entry of energetic ions of solar origin into the magnetosphere as a function of the interplanetary magnetic field orientation. We have modeled this entry by following high energy particles (protons and 3 He ions) ranging from 0.1 to 50 MeV in electric and magnetic fields from a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of the magnetosphere and its interaction with the solar wind. For the most part these particles entered the magnetosphere on or near open field lines except for some above 10 MeV that could enter directly by crossing field lines due to their large gyroradii. The MHD simulation was driven by a series of idealized solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. It was found that the flux of particles in the magnetosphere and transport into the inner magnetosphere varied widely according to the IMF orientation for a constant upstream particle source, with the most efficient entry occurring under southward IMF conditions. The flux inside the magnetosphere could approach that in the solar wind implying that SEPs can contribute significantly to the magnetospheric energetic particle population during typical SEP events depending on the state of the magnetosphere.

  5. Overview of Results from the Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) During the First Year of Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Hamilton, D. C.; Krupp, N.; Livi, S.; Roelof, E. C.; Dandouras, J.; Mauk, B. H.; Brandt, J. P.; Paranicas, C.

    2005-01-01

    The MIMI investigation comprises three sensors covering the indicated energy ranges: the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) -- 7 keV/nuc Magnetospheric Measurement System (LEMMS) 0.02 3 Mev) and protons (1.6 < E < 160 Mev) from the back end of the dual field-of-view telescope. The Saturn observation sequences began in January, 2004 and culminated in Saturn Orbit Insertion on July 1, 2004. The MIMI sensors observed substantial activity in interplanetary space for several months prior to SOI, including several interplanetary shocks associated with corotating interaction regions, numerous increases most likely originating from particle streams in the vicinity of the Saturnian bow shock and energetic neutral atoms (ENA) emanating from Saturn s magnetosphere. Results following SOI revealed: a dynamical magnetosphere with a day-night asymmetry and an 11-hour periodicity; several water-product ions (O+, OH+, H2O+), but little N+; inferred quantities of neutral gas sufficient to cause major losses in the trapped ions and electrons in the middle and inner magnetosphere; a Titan exosphere that is a copious source of ENA; INCA imaging through ENA has also revealed a previously unknown radiation belt residing inward of the D-ring that is most likely the result of double charge-exchange between the main radiation belt and the upper layers of Saturn s exosphere. Finally, there is ample evidence for the presence of substorm-like injections of plasma that subsequently corotates for a number of days before dissipating on the night-side magnetotail. The observations will be presented and discussed in the context of current theoretical models.

  6. Relativistic Electron Enhancements at GEO: Magnetic Storms vs. Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Kim, H. J.; Pinto, V. A.; Wang, C. P.; Kim, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    We find evidence that magnetic storms are not only unnecessary for relativistic electron enhancements at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) but also not directly relevant to the electron enhancements at GEO even if the enhancements are accompanied by magnetic storms. What is crucial for electron enhancements at GEO are sustained south-oriented or north-south fluctuating IMF Bz that drives sufficiently large substorm activity and small solar wind density Nsw that likely leads to low loss rate of relativistic electrons to the ionosphere and/or to the magnetopause for an extended time period. Specifically, almost all the abrupt, large electron increases in our data set took place under the condition of average AE > 235 nT and average Nsw ≤ 5 cm-3. Examination of detailed time profiles clearly shows that electron flux at GEO starts to increase quite immediately with arrival of the right IMF and solar wind conditions, regardless of a magnetic storm, leaving the accompanied magnetic storms merely co-incident, while the prolonged, intense substorms are critical.

  7. Prompt enhancement of the Earth's outer radiation belt due to substorm electron injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. L.; Zhang, J.-C.; Reeves, G. D.; Su, Z. P.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    We present multipoint simultaneous observations of the near-Earth magnetotail and outer radiation belt during the substorm electron injection event on 16 August 2013. Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms A in the near-Earth magnetotail observed flux-enhanced electrons of 300 keV during the magnetic field dipolarization. Geosynchronous orbit satellites also observed the intensive electron injections. Located in the outer radiation belt, RBSP-A observed enhancements of MeV electrons accompanied by substorm dipolarization. The phase space density (PSD) of MeV electrons at L* 5.4 increased by 1 order of magnitude in 1 h, resulting in a local PSD peak of MeV electrons, which was caused by the direct effect of substorm injections. Enhanced MeV electrons in the heart of the outer radiation belt were also detected within 2 h, which may be associated with intensive substorm electron injections and subsequent local acceleration by chorus waves. Multipoint observations have shown that substorm electron injections not only can be the external source of MeV electrons at the outer edge of the outer radiation belt (L* 5.4) but also can provide the intensive seed populations in the outer radiation belt. These initial higher-energy electrons from injection can reach relativistic energy much faster. The observations also provide evidence that enhanced substorm electron injections can explain rapid enhancements of MeV electrons in the outer radiation belt.

  8. ISEE 3 plasmoid and TCR observations during an extended interval of substorm activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Smith, M. F.; Mazur, E. L.; Baker, D. N.; Iyemori, T.; Singer, H. J.; Greenstadt, E. W.

    1992-01-01

    On April 9-11, 1983, the ISEE 3 spacecraft was continuously located within the earth's magnetotail for more than 36 hours at downstream distances of X = -76 to -80 R(e). During this span of time, 12 major intervals of substorm activity were observed in the AL index with good ISEE 3 telemetry coverage for 11 of them. In addition, there were two small substorms outside of these intervals, both with complete observations in the distant tail. This unusual ISEE 3 data set provides a unique opportunity to test the predictions of the near-earth neutral line model. In particular, the hypothesis that energy stored in the tail lobes during the growth phase is later dissipated, in part, through the release of one or more plasmoids following expansion phase onset is examined. Clear growth phase enhancements in the lobe magnetic field intensity preceded the onsets of nine of the substorms. Plasmoids, or their lobe signatures, traveling compression regions (TCRs), were observed at ISEE 3 in association with all 11 of the major substorm intervals for which there were ISEE observations, as well as for the two small substorms. No plasmoids or TCRs were observed in the absence of substorm activity. If these ISEE 3 observations are representative, then the release of plasmoids down the tail may be a feature common to all substorms.

  9. Auroral medium frequency burst radio emission associated with the 23 March 2007 THEMIS study substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, N. L.; Labelle, J.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Hughes, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Auroral medium frequency (MF) burst is an impulsive auroral radio emission associated with substorm onset detected by ground-based instruments between 1.3 and 4.5 MHz. On 23 March 2007 an MF burst emission was detected by the Dartmouth radio interferometer located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. This emission temporally coincides with the onset of the 23 March 2007 Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) study substorm. Directions of arrival computed using the Dartmouth radio interferometer for this event also coincide spatially with the location of the expanding auroral arcs to the south observed by the all-sky imager at Fort Yukon, Alaska. This observation represents the first example of a direction of arrival measurement for MF burst. It strongly supports the association of MF burst with intense auroral arcs accompanying substorm onset. The direction of arrival of the MF burst is consistent with the direction to the eastern edge of the substorm onset location determined by multiple data sets during this substorm and suggests that location of MF burst radio emissions may be an effective method of locating substorm onsets, much as radio atmospherics are used to locate lightning.

  10. Quantitative maps of geomagnetic perturbation vectors during substorm onset and recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothier, N. M.; Weimer, D. R.; Moore, W. B.

    2015-02-01

    We have produced the first series of spherical harmonic, numerical maps of the time-dependent surface perturbations in the Earth's magnetic field following the onset of substorms. Data from 124 ground magnetometer stations in the Northern Hemisphere at geomagnetic latitudes above 33° were used. Ground station data averaged over 5 min intervals covering 8 years (1998-2005) were used to construct pseudo auroral upper, auroral lower, and auroral electrojet (AU*, AL*, and AE*) indices. These indices were used to generate a list of substorms that extended from 1998 to 2005, through a combination of automated processing and visual checks. Events were sorted by interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation (at the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite), dipole tilt angle, and substorm magnitude. Within each category, the events were aligned on substorm onset. A spherical cap harmonic analysis was used to obtain a least error fit of the substorm disturbance patterns at 5 min intervals up to 90 min after onset. The fits obtained at onset time were subtracted from all subsequent fits, for each group of substorm events. Maps of the three vector components of the averaged magnetic perturbations were constructed to show the effects of substorm currents. These maps are produced for several specific ranges of values for the peak |AL*| index, IMF orientation, and dipole tilt angle. We demonstrate an influence of the dipole tilt angle on the response to substorms. Our results indicate that there are downward currents poleward and upward currents just equatorward of the peak in the substorms' westward electrojet.

  11. Physics of magnetospheric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The central ideas of this grant are that the magnetospheric boundary layers link disparate regions of the magnetosphere together, and the global behavior of the magnetosphere can be understood only by understanding the linking mechanisms. Accordingly the present grant includes simultaneous research on the global, meso-, and micro-scale physics of the magnetosphere and its boundary layers. These boundary layers include the bow shock, magnetosheath, the plasma sheet boundary layer, and the ionosphere. Analytic, numerical and simulation projects have been performed on these subjects, as well as comparison of theoretical results with observational data. Very good progress has been made, with four papers published or in press and two additional papers submitted for publication during the six month period 1 June - 30 November 1993. At least two projects are currently being written up. In addition, members of the group have given papers at scientific meetings. The further structure of this report is as follows: section two contains brief accounts of research completed during the last six months, while section three describes the research projects intended for the grant's final period.

  12. Magnetospheric structures: Uranus and Neptune

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, T.W.

    1984-10-01

    Magnetospheric structures that might be encountered at Uranus and Neptune are described. Statistics indicate a sufficiently high probability to warrant consideration of their likely properties in advance of the Voyager encounters. Because the spin axis of Uranus lies nearly in the ecliptic and presently points approximately sunward, Voyager is likely to encounter the unique pole on configuration that has special theoretical significance. Corotation in the magnetospheres of Uranus and Neptune would probably exclude solar wind drive convection as an important driver of global magnetospheric dynamics, as it does at Jupiter and Saturn. The magnetospheres of Uranus and Neptune probably lack sufficient internal sources of plasma to produce significant levels of rotationally driven convection. The reported observation of auroral emission from Uranus has therefore motivated the development of an alternative model in which solar wind motion is coupled directly to the rotation of the ionosphere to establish a dynamo circuit which generates Birkeland currents and polar cap aurora. This model predicts the strength and configuration of the aurora as functions of the magnitude and polarity, respectively, of the planetary magnetic moment.

  13. Magnetosphere of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    Scaling laws for possible outer planet magnetospheres are derived. These suggest that convection and its associated auroral effects will play a relatively smaller role than at earth, and that there is a possibility that they could have significant radiation belts of energetic trapped particles.

  14. Global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Raymond J.; Ogino, Tatsuki

    1989-04-01

    The use of a global MHD simulation to study the magnetospheric configuration is demonstrated by reviewing some of the results obtained with the model of Ogino (1986). The steady-state configuration of the magnetosphere in the absence of an IMF is considered, and it is demonstrated that this configuration is changed when a northward or southward IMF is introduced. It is noted that the magnetosphere is very dynamic, and that, since global MHD simulations are intrinsically time-dependent, they offer the possibility of modeling the time sequence of events in the magnetosphere. Results are presented from a calculation in which a magnetospheric substrom is modeled.

  15. Global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Raymond J.; Ogino, Tatsuki

    1989-01-01

    The use of a global MHD simulation to study the magnetospheric configuration is demonstrated by reviewing some of the results obtained with the model of Ogino (1986). The steady-state configuration of the magnetosphere in the absence of an IMF is considered, and it is demonstrated that this configuration is changed when a northward or southward IMF is introduced. It is noted that the magnetosphere is very dynamic, and that, since global MHD simulations are intrinsically time-dependent, they offer the possibility of modeling the time sequence of events in the magnetosphere. Results are presented from a calculation in which a magnetospheric substrom is modeled.

  16. Magnetosphere imager science definition team interim report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. P.; Johnson, C. L.

    1995-01-01

    For three decades, magnetospheric field and plasma measurements have been made by diverse instruments flown on spacecraft in may different orbits, widely separated in space and time, and under various solar and magnetospheric conditions. Scientists have used this information to piece together an intricate, yet incomplete view of the magnetosphere. A simultaneous global view, using various light wavelengths and energetic neutral atoms, could reveal exciting new data nd help explain complex magnetospheric processes, thus providing a clear picture of this region of space. This report documents the scientific rational for such a magnetospheric imaging mission and provides a mission concept for its implementation.

  17. Magnetosphere imager science definition team: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. P.; Gallagher, D. L.; Johnson, C. L.

    1995-01-01

    For three decades, magnetospheric field and plasma measurements have been made by diverse instruments flown on spacecraft in many different orbits, widely separated in space and time, and under various solar and magnetospheric conditions. Scientists have used this information to piece together an intricate, yet incomplete view of the magnetosphere. A simultaneous global view, using various light wavelengths and energetic neutral atoms, could reveal exciting new data and help explain complex magnetospheric processes, thus providing a clear picture of this region of space. This report summarizes the scientific rationale for such a magnetospheric imaging mission and outlines a mission concept for its implementation.

  18. Pulsar Magnetospheres: Beyond the Flat Spacetime Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gralla, Samuel E.; Lupsasca, Alexandru; Philippov, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Most studies of the pulsar magnetosphere have assumed a pure magnetic dipole in flat spacetime. However, recent work suggests that the effects of general relativity are in fact of vital importance and that realistic pulsar magnetic fields will have a significant nondipolar component. We introduce a general analytical method for studying the axisymmetric force-free magnetosphere of a slowly rotating star of arbitrary magnetic field, mass, radius, and moment of inertia, including all the effects of general relativity. We confirm that spacelike current is generically present in the polar caps (suggesting a pair production region), irrespective of the stellar magnetic field. We show that general relativity introduces a ∼ 60 % correction to the formula for the dipolar component of the surface magnetic field inferred from spindown. Finally, we show that the location and shape of the polar caps can be modified dramatically by even modestly strong higher moments. This can affect emission processes occurring near the star and may help explain the modified beam characteristics of millisecond pulsars.

  19. Characteristics of magnetospheric radio noise spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Magnetospheric radio noise spectra (30 kHz to 10 MHz) taken by IMP-6 and RAE-2 exhibit time varying characteristics which are related to spacecraft position and magnetospheric processes. In the midfrequency range (100-1000 kHz) intense noise peaks rise a factor of 100 or more above background; 80% of the peak frequencies are within the band 125 kHz to 600 kHz, and the peak occurs most often (18% of the time) at 280 kHz. Bandwidths of the peaks range from about 100 kHz to more than 500 kHz; most often the lower cutoff is at about 100 kHz and the upper at 380 kHz for a total bandwidth of 280 kHz. This intense mid-frequency noise was detected at radial distances from 1.3 Re to 60 Re on all sides of the earth (i.e., all local times) during magnetically quiet as well as disturbed periods. Maximum occurrence of the mid-frequency noise is in the evening to midnight hours where splash-type energetic particle precipitation takes place.

  20. Poleward leaping auroras, the substorm expansive and recovery phases and the recovery of the plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Hones, E.W.

    1992-05-01

    The auroral motions and geomagnetic changes the characterize the substorm`s expansive phase, maximum epoch, and recovery phase are discussed in the context of their possible associations with the dropout and, especially, the recovery of the magnetotail plasma sheet. The evidence that there may be an inordinately sudden large poleward excursion or displacement (a poleward leap) of the electrojet and the auroras at the expansive phase-recovery phase transition is described. The close temporal association of these signatures with the recovery of the plasma sheet, observed on many occasions, suggests a causal relationship between substorm maximum epoch and recovery phase on the one hand and plasma sheet recovery on the other.

  1. Behaviour of the 5577Å, 6300Å emissions and the 38.2 MHz absorption during substorms associated with recurrent solar wind streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guineva, Veneta; Despirak, Irina; Werner, Rolf; Trondsen, Espen; Honary, Farideh; Marple, Steve; Stauning, Peter; Dahle, Kolbjorn

    The behaviour of the auroral emissions 5577˚ and 6300˚, the ratio I6300/I5577 and the ab-A A sorption at 38.2 MHz during substorms occurred at the time of recurrent streams (RS) has been examined. The development of the substorm bulge is followed up. The variations of the emissions and the absorption at 38.2 MHZ depending on the different locations of the substorm bulge with respect to the point of observation have been studied. Estimations of the particle precipitation spectra at the polar edge of the auroral bulge and inside it have been obtained. For the study, data from the All-Sky Imagers at Andøya Rocket Range (ARR), Andenes, Nor-way (69.3N, 16.03E) and at the Auroral Observatory, Longyearbyen, Svalbard (78.20N, 15.83E) from the observational season 2005-2006 have been used, and simultaneous measurements from the ALOMAR Imaging Riometer for Ionospheric Studies (AIRIS), 64-beam Imaging Riome-ter at the Auroral Observatory, Longyearbyen, Svalbard (78.20N, 15.83E); IRIS at Kilpisjürvi, a Finland (69.05N, 20.79E).. Additional data concerning the solar wind parameters, IMF, the precipitating particles and the magnetic field are used from the WIND and DMSP satellites and the IMAGE magnetometer network to determine the recurrent streams, the substorms during RS and the boundaries of the precipitating electrons. Data access has been provided under the Project "ALOMAR eARI" (RITA-CT-2003-506208), Andenes, Norway. This Project received research funding from the European Community's 6th Framework Program.

  2. On plasma convection in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livi, Roberto

    10-19 RS and from July 1st, 2004 to . Hot electron densities peak near 9 RS and decrease radially at a rate of 1/r3, which suggests a source in the inner magnetosphere. We also observe a decrease in electron energy at a rate of 1/r3 due to the conservation of the first adiabatic invariant, consistent with radial transport through a magnetic dipole. Data from the magnetic field instrument is used to derive the magnetic moment of hot electrons which shows a constant value of 103.4 kgm2s-2 nT-1 +/-10 between 10-19 RS, indicating a loss-free adiabatic transport with minor fluctuations. Plasma transport at Saturn can occur through flux tube interchange instabilities within the magnetosphere, where cold dense plasma is transported radially outward while hot tenuous plasma from the outer magnetosphere moves radially inward. Gradient-curvature drifts cause these hot electrons leave the injection and superimpose on the ambient cold plasma, consequently forcing it to move radially outward. This implies flux-tube interchange to be the main source for hot electrons. Hot electrons are part of the plasma analysis for which CAPS was designed, while the MIMI-LEMMS instrument measures higher energy electrons. Taking into account the penetrating background radiation, we are able to derive information for these energetic particles using our plasma instruments. We present CAPS-IMS background measurements derived from plasma data and show strong correlation with high energy particle data from MIMI-LEMMS. IMS background is generated via two main processes: 1) Collisions between the instrument walls and ambient energetic particles, which cause X-rays to trigger count signals in the instrument optics, and 2) backscatter of energetic particles in the electrostatic analyzer. We quantify these effects and use the results to identify Saturn's radiation belt peaks and nadirs, and magnetospheric regions of depleted particle fluxes, or microsignatures, which are formed through interactions with

  3. Electrodynamic parameters in the nighttime sector during auroral substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujii, R.; Hoffman, R. A.; Anderson, P. C.; Craven, J. D.; Sugiura, M.; Frank, L. A.; Maynard, N. C.

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of the large-scale electrodynamic parameters, field-aligned currents (FACs), electric fields, and electron precipitation, which are associated with auroral substorm events in the nighttime sector, have been obtained through a unique analysis which places the ionospheric measurements of these parameters into the context of a generic substorm determined from global auroral images. A generic bulge-type auroral emission region has been deduced from auroral images taken by the Dynamics Explorer 1 (DE 1) satellite during a number of isolated substorms, and the form has been divided into six sectors, based on the peculiar emission characteristics in each sector: west of bulge, surge horn, surge, middle surge, eastern bulge, and east of bulge. By comparing the location of passes of the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) satellite to the simultaneously obtained auroral images, each pass is placed onto the generic aurora. The organization of DE 2 data in this way has systematically clarified peculiar characteristics in the electrodynamic parameters. An upward net current mainly appears in the surge, with little net current in the surge horn and the west of bulge. The downward net current is distributed over wide longitudinal regions from the eastern bulge to the east of bulge. Near the poleward boundary of the expanding auroral bulge, a pair of oppositely directed FAC sheets is observed, with the downward FAC on the poleward side. This downward FAC and most of the upward FAC in the surge and the middle surge are assoc iated with narrow, intense antisunwqard convection, corresponding to an equatorward directed spikelike electric field. This pair of currents decreases in amplitude and latitudinal width toward dusk in the surge and the west of bulge, and the region 1 and 2 FACs become embedded in the sunward convection region. The upward FAC region associated with the spikelike field on the poleward edge of the bulge coincides well with intense electron

  4. Signatures of the nightside open closed magnetic field-line boundary during moderately disturbed conditions and ionospheric substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, M. L.; Pinnock, M.; Dyson, P. L.; Devlin, J. C.

    The comparatively low latitude of the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER) (147.2°E, 43.4°S, geographic; -54.6°Λ), a Southern Hemisphere HF SuperDARN radar, facilitates the observation of extensive backscatter from decametre-scale irregularities drifting in the auroral and polar cap ionosphere in the midnight sector. The radar often detects a persistent, sharp increase over ˜90 km of range in line-of-sight Doppler velocity spread, or spectral width, from <50 m s -1 at lower latitude to >200 m s -1 at higher latitude. It was previously shown that for moderately disturbed conditions in the pre-midnight sector, the location of the spectral width boundary (SWB) corresponds to the poleward edge of the auroral oval, as determined from energy spectra of precipitating particles measured on board Defense Meteorology Satellite Program satellites. This implies the radar SWB is a proxy for the open-closed magnetic field-line boundary (OCB) under these particular conditions. Here we investigate whether the radar SWB is aligned with the satellite OCB u