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Sample records for magnetotelluric method mmt

  1. Magnetotellurics as a multiscale geophysical exploration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonari, Rolando; D'Auria, Luca; Di Maio, Rosa; Petrillo, Zaccaria

    2016-04-01

    Magnetotellurics (MT) is a geophysical method based on the use of natural electromagnetic signals to define subsurface electrical resistivity structure through electromagnetic induction. MT waves are generated in the Earth's atmosphere and magnetosphere by a range of physical processes, such as magnetic storms, micropulsations, lightning activity. Since the underground MT wave propagation is of diffusive type, the longer is the wavelength (i.e. the lower the wave frequency) the deeper will be the propagation depth. Considering the frequency band commonly used in MT prospecting (10-4 Hz to 104 Hz), the investigation depth ranges from few hundred meters to hundreds of kilometers. This means that magnetotellurics is inherently a multiscale method and, thus, appropriate for applications at different scale ranging from aquifer system characterization to petroleum and geothermal research. In this perspective, the application of the Wavelet transform to the MT data analysis could represent an excellent tool to emphasize characteristics of the MT signal at different scales. In this note, the potentiality of such an approach is studied. In particular, we show that the use of a Discrete Wavelet (DW) decomposition of measured MT time-series data allows to retrieve robust information about the subsoil resistivity over a wide range of spatial (depth) scales, spanning up to 5 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the application of DWs to MT data analysis has proven to be a flexible tool for advanced data processing (e.g. non-linear filtering, denoising and clustering).

  2. Two dimension magnetotelluric modeling using finite element method, incomplete lu preconditioner and biconjugate gradient stabilized technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zukir, Muhammad; Srigutomo, Wahyu

    2016-08-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) method is a passive geophysical exploration technique utilizing natural electromagnetic source to obtain variation of the electric field and magnetic field on the surface of the earth. The frequency range used in this modeling is 10-4 Hz to 102 Hz. The two-dimensional (2D) magnetotelluric modeling is aimed to determine the value of electromagnetic field in the earth, the apparent resistivity, and the impedance phase. The relation between the geometrical and physical parameters used are governed by the Maxwell's equations. These equations are used in the case of Transverse Electric polarization (TE) and Transverse Magnetic polarization (TM). To calculate the solutions of electric and magnetic fields in the entire domain, the modeling domain is discretized into smaller elements using the finite element method, whereas the assembled matrix of equation system is solved using the Biconjugate Gradient Stabilized (BiCGStab) technique combined with the Incomplete Lower - Upper (ILU) preconditioner. This scheme can minimize the iteration process (computational cost) and is more effective than the Biconjugate Gradient (BiCG) technique with LU preconditions and Conjugate Gradient Square (CGS).

  3. Update of MMT assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) is added to gasoline to increase its octane rating. As a metal additive with potential for widespread use and manganese (Mn) exposure implications, MMT has been the focus of numerous analyses and debates about its potential publi...

  4. Efficient computational methods for electromagnetic imaging with applications to 3D magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordy, Michal Adam

    The motivation for this work is the forward and inverse problem for magnetotellurics, a frequency domain electromagnetic remote-sensing geophysical method used in mineral, geothermal, and groundwater exploration. The dissertation consists of four papers. In the first paper, we prove the existence and uniqueness of a representation of any vector field in H(curl) by a vector lying in H(curl) and H(div). It allows us to represent electric or magnetic fields by another vector field, for which nodal finite element approximation may be used in the case of non-constant electromagnetic properties. With this approach, the system matrix does not become ill-posed for low-frequency. In the second paper, we consider hexahedral finite element approximation of an electric field for the magnetotelluric forward problem. The near-null space of the system matrix for low frequencies makes the numerical solution unstable in the air. We show that the proper solution may obtained by applying a correction on the null space of the curl. It is done by solving a Poisson equation using discrete Helmholtz decomposition. We parallelize the forward code on multicore workstation with large RAM. In the next paper, we use the forward code in the inversion. Regularization of the inversion is done by using the second norm of the logarithm of conductivity. The data space Gauss-Newton approach allows for significant savings in memory and computational time. We show the efficiency of the method by considering a number of synthetic inversions and we apply it to real data collected in Cascade Mountains. The last paper considers a cross-frequency interpolation of the forward response as well as the Jacobian. We consider Pade approximation through model order reduction and rational Krylov subspace. The interpolating frequencies are chosen adaptively in order to minimize the maximum error of interpolation. Two error indicator functions are compared. We prove a theorem of almost always lucky failure in the

  5. Manufacturing Methods and Technology (MMT) Program for FY 80, Large Caliber Weapons System Laboratory, ARRADCOM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    composition explosive there- of, such as Cartridge 165 mm: HEP Projectile, 155 mm: HE, ADAM Rocket, 66 mm: HEAT, 1 LAW (VIPER) Mine, Ground...adaptable to the manufacture of PBX compositions at mobili- zation levels. This project will include the investigation of present processing methods, as...well as the application of new tech- nology to coating, drying, and furnishing PBX compositions . Items Supported Warhead Guided Missiles Torpedo

  6. Manufacturing Methods and Technology (MM&T) Program. 10.6 Micrometer Carbon Dioxide TEA (Transverely Excited Atmospheric) Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Analysis for ZnSe-to-Kovar Seal 57 1.14 Structural Analysis 61 1.14.1 Discussion 61 1.14.2 Results 64 1.14.3 Conclusions 70 1.15 Optics 71 1.16 Resonator...APPENDIX I ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT FOR LIFE TESTS 1-1 APPENDIX J SEALED CO2 LASER TU . TEST - r4ARY J-1 APPENDIX K MM&T GENERATION BREAKn’AN K-1 x - - ’ ’S...9 4 Equivalent Circuit of Flashboard 10 5 Parallel Flashboard Installed in a Demountable Tube 11 6 Permanent Seal Laser 13 7 Laser Plumbing 16 8

  7. Imaging Fluid-Rich Zones by Magnetotelluric Method at South Marmara Region, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cengiz, Özlem; Bülent Tank, Sabri; Tolak Çiftçi, Elif; Kaya, Tülay; Ogawa, Yasuo; Honkura, Yoshimori; Kemal Tunçer, Mustafa; Matsushima, Masaki; Oshiman, Naoto; Çelik, Cengiz

    2013-04-01

    After the mainshock of 1999 İzmit (Turkey) earthquake, scientists have undertaken various kinds of observations in the Marmara region in order to increase understanding of crustal properties of North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). Most of these studies focused on the east Marmara region since the destructive earthquakes were occurring there. Considering the westward migration of significant earthquakes on the North Anatolian Fault (NAF), the next destructive earthquake is likely to occur beyond the westernmost part of 1999 İzmit earthquake epicenter, in or around Marmara Sea. For this reason, south of Marmara Sea was chosen as the survey area. Wide-band (320-0.0005 Hz) magnetotelluric (MT) data at sixteen sounding locations along two parallel profiles at south Marmara region were collected to improve the understanding of the crustal electrical conductivity structure. Both profiles are crossing several branches of North Anatolian Fault. The results were achieved by performing two-dimensional (2D) inversions of MT data with the transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes. These results show a relatively complex structure down to 4 km depth. The electrical resistivity pattern below this depth indicates a simpler structure with conductors (10 Ωm) beneath the northern ends of both profiles. While these deep conductive zones are attributed to partially melting in the crust, the highly resistive zones are associated with low fluid condition and high rigidity. In addition, the features characterized in geo-electric models correlate well with known faults in the survey area. The South Marmara Fault (SMF) possibly corresponds to a lateral resistive-conductive interface between Manyas-Karacabey basin and Bandirma-Karada uplift on the west (PW) and Uluabat uplift and Mudanya uplift on the east (PE) profiles.

  8. A Study of Static Shift Removal Methods in a 3D Magnetotelluric Survey at Pisagua Fault, Chile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bascur, J.; Comte, D.; Dias, D.; Siripunvaraporn, W.

    2014-12-01

    The static shift is one of the main problems that cause misleads in the magnetotellurics (MT) interpretation. This work presents a study comparing methods for removing the static shift effect from MT data acquired around the Pisagua Fault in Chile (2014). This evaluation considers the methods based on the joint inversion of the subsurface resistivity with the static shift effect and the calibration based on the TDEM data.First, it was developed a formulation in the data space, following the work of W. Siripunvaraporn (2005), that allows the joint inversion of the resistivity model and the static shift effect. That formulation makes it possible to use any linear representation for removing the static shift in the MT stations. This property permits compare the representation proposed by Sasaki (2004) and the static shift tensor, which use a 2x2 matrix to correct the effect. The last one is suggested to be a better model for 3D MT responses, because it can reproduce the distortion on the phase of MT data.Twenty one stations, measuring MT and TDEM methods, were acquired at the east side of the Pisagua town in the North of Chile (figure). In this place, there is an evident scarp on the topography that reveals the existence of an important fault (Pisagua Fault). Also, the Chilean desert at this location is characterized by the presence of shallow nitrate deposits (called "caliche"), whose have an elevated electrical resistance and can produce the static shift effect in the MT stations. For those reasons it was expected that the sector around the Pisagua Fault was an adequate place to evaluate static correction methods, because the data certainly would be distorted by the static shift and a successful correction method should reveal the fault observed at surface.The MT data acquired have mostly a 3D dimensionality (using A. Marti criteria, 2009) and show signs of being static shifted. A 3D inversion of this data, without considering the static shift, results in a poor

  9. Fuel Additives: Canada bans MMT

    SciTech Connect

    Sissell, K.

    1997-04-16

    The Canadian Senate voted late last week to ban use of the manganese-based fuel additive MMT, produced only in the US by Ethyl. MMT, which has been sold in Canada for the past 20 years and accounts for about half of Ethyl`s Canadian sales, has been criticized by environmentalists, who have raised public health concerns, and automakers, who say it harms emission control systems. {open_quotes}Canada`s vote is a great victory for public health and the environment,{close_quotes} says Environmental Defense Fund executive director Fred Krupp. {open_quotes}The US should move swiftly to follow suit and suspend sales of MMT until adequate toxicity testing on the additive is completed.{close_quotes} EPA had refused to approve MMT for sale because of health concerns but was compelled to do so by a December 1995 court ruling. Ethyl asserts the ban violates Canada`s obligations under Nafta and says it will file a damage claim with the Nafta arbitration panel.

  10. Parallel three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion using adaptive finite-element method. Part I: theory and synthetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayver, Alexander V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a distributed magnetotelluric inversion scheme based on adaptive finite-element method (FEM). The key novel aspect of the introduced algorithm is the use of automatic mesh refinement techniques for both forward and inverse modelling. These techniques alleviate tedious and subjective procedure of choosing a suitable model parametrization. To avoid overparametrization, meshes for forward and inverse problems were decoupled. For calculation of accurate electromagnetic (EM) responses, automatic mesh refinement algorithm based on a goal-oriented error estimator has been adopted. For further efficiency gain, EM fields for each frequency were calculated using independent meshes in order to account for substantially different spatial behaviour of the fields over a wide range of frequencies. An automatic approach for efficient initial mesh design in inverse problems based on linearized model resolution matrix was developed. To make this algorithm suitable for large-scale problems, it was proposed to use a low-rank approximation of the linearized model resolution matrix. In order to fill a gap between initial and true model complexities and resolve emerging 3-D structures better, an algorithm for adaptive inverse mesh refinement was derived. Within this algorithm, spatial variations of the imaged parameter are calculated and mesh is refined in the neighborhoods of points with the largest variations. A series of numerical tests were performed to demonstrate the utility of the presented algorithms. Adaptive mesh refinement based on the model resolution estimates provides an efficient tool to derive initial meshes which account for arbitrary survey layouts, data types, frequency content and measurement uncertainties. Furthermore, the algorithm is capable to deliver meshes suitable to resolve features on multiple scales while keeping number of unknowns low. However, such meshes exhibit dependency on an initial model guess. Additionally, it is demonstrated

  11. Theoretical assessment of 3-D magnetotelluric method for oil and gas exploration: Synthetic examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Wei, Wenbo; Lu, Qingtian; Dong, Hao; Li, Yanqing

    2014-07-01

    In petroleum explorations, seismic reflection technique has been almost always the preferred method for its high exploration depth and resolution. However, with the development of three dimensional (3D) inversion and interpretation schemes, much potential has been shown in MT method dealing with complex geological structures as in oil and gas exploration. In this study, synthetic geophysical models of petroleum reservoir structures are modeled and utilized to demonstrate that feasibility of 3-D MT technique for hydrocarbon exploration. A series of typical reservoir structure models are constructed and used to generate synthetic MT and seismic data to test the capabilities of 2-D/3-D MT and 2-D seismic inversion techniques. According to the inversion comparison, in addition to correctly retrieve the original forward model, the 3-D MT method also has some advantages over the reflective seismology method, which suffered from the lack of reflection wave and multiple wave problems. With the presented 3-D high resolution MT inversion method, MT techniques should be employed as one of the first choices for petroleum explorations.

  12. 2-D magnetotelluric modeling using finite element method incorporating unstructured quadrilateral elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarakorn, Weerachai

    2017-04-01

    In this research, the finite element (FE) method incorporating quadrilateral elements for solving 2-D MT modeling was presented. The finite element software was developed, employing a paving algorithm to generate the unstructured quadrilateral mesh. The accuracy, efficiency, reliability, and flexibility of our FE forward modeling are presented, compared and discussed. The numerical results indicate that our FE codes using an unstructured quadrilateral mesh provide good accuracy when the local mesh refinement is applied around sites and in the area of interest, with superior results when compared to other FE methods. The reliability of the developed codes was also confirmed when comparing both analytical solutions and COMMEMI2D model. Furthermore, our developed FE codes incorporating an unstructured quadrilateral mesh showed useful and powerful features such as handling irregular and complex subregions and providing local refinement of the mesh for a 2-D domain as closely as unstructured triangular mesh but it requires less number of elements in a mesh.

  13. Characterizing a large shear-zone with seismic and magnetotelluric methods: The case of the Dead Sea Transform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maercklin, N.; Bedrosian, P.A.; Haberland, C.; Ritter, O.; Ryberg, T.; Weber, M.; Weckmann, U.

    2005-01-01

    Seismic tomography, imaging of seismic scatterers, and magnetotelluric soundings reveal a sharp lithologic contrast along a ???10 km long segment of the Arava Fault (AF), a prominent fault of the southern Dead Sea Transform (DST) in the Middle East. Low seismic velocities and resistivities occur on its western side and higher values east of it, and the boundary between the two units coincides partly with a seismic scattering image. At 1-4 km depth the boundary is offset to the east of the AF surface trace, suggesting that at least two fault strands exist, and that slip occurred on multiple strands throughout the margin's history. A westward fault jump, possibly associated with straightening of a fault bend, explains both our observations and the narrow fault zone observed by others. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Determination of the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB) beneath the Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field by combined geophysical (magnetotellurics) and geochemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Attila; Klébesz, Rita; Szabó, Csaba; Patkó, Levente; Liptai, Nóra; Kovács, Zoltán; Wesztergom, Viktor; Ádám, Antal; Lemperger, István; Kis, Árpád; Molnár, Csaba; Szendrői, Judit

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the fundamental role of LAB is substantial for the investigation of the geodynamic evolution of the Earth. The LAB depths can be estimated by different geophysical methods (seismology, magnetotellurics), however these depths are controversial. It has been emphasized in the literature that combined geophysical and geochemical approach may lead to better understanding of these depths. The magnetotellurics (MT) is very powerful method because it indicates the sudden increase in conductivity at the LAB. The mantle xenoliths (small fragments of the lithospheric mantle) provide the information to reconstruct their P-T paths. In the Carpathian-Pannon region (CPR) five, well-studied occurrences of mantle xenoliths-bearing Plio-Pleistocene alkali basalts are known, which makes the CPR a very promising area for investigating the inconsistency in the LAB estimates. As a test area Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field (NGVF) has been chosen. The host basalt erupted at the NGVF collected mantle xenoliths from a small volume of the upper mantle in a depth of about 40-50 km. The major element geochemistry of the studied xenoliths indicates that most of them represent common lherzolitic mantle, whereas others show strong wehrlitisation process. This metasomatism is supposed to be caused by a migrating mafic melt agent, resulting in the transformation of a large portion of lherzolite to wehrlite beneath the NGVF, possibly just below the crust mantle boundary. In aim to detect the LAB at the research area and find the correlation with petrologic and geochemical results we carried out MT deep soundings. The campaign contained 12 long period MT stations with 3-5 km average spacing along 60 km long profile SSE to NNW direction. This presentation summarizes the preliminary results of the combined geophysical and geochemical approaches to determine the LAB depths.

  15. Magnetotelluric fieldwork adventures in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaler, K. A.

    2006-04-01

    The magnetotelluric (MT) method is a way of probing the electrical resistivity (or its inverse, electrical conductivity) distribution of the subsurface. It is based on the principle of electromagnetic induction, in which natural magnetic field sources external to the Earth induce eddy currents within it whose geometry and decay depend on the subsurface resistivity structure. The method is therefore entirely passive, and it can be employed in environmentally sensitive areas. The resistivity of the subsurface depends on its temperature, mineralogy and fluid content, both interstitial and partial melt, and is sensitive to even small amounts of melt and residual fluids and its connectivity. Thus it can be a good discriminant between different rock types, and complements information available from other geophysical methods. Here, I outline the basics of the MT method, indicate how data acquisition, processing and modelling are undertaken, and illustrate the uses of MT to investigate tectonic and structural problems through three case studies from Africa.

  16. A MATLAB GUI based algorithm for modelling Magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timur, Emre; Onsen, Funda

    2016-04-01

    The magnetotelluric method is an electromagnetic survey technique that images the electrical resistivity distribution of layers in subsurface depths. Magnetotelluric method measures simultaneously total electromagnetic field components such as both time-varying magnetic field B(t) and induced electric field E(t). At the same time, forward modeling of magnetotelluric method is so beneficial for survey planning purpose, for comprehending the method, especially for students, and as part of an iteration process in inverting measured data. The MTINV program can be used to model and to interpret geophysical electromagnetic (EM) magnetotelluric (MT) measurements using a horizontally layered earth model. This program uses either the apparent resistivity and phase components of the MT data together or the apparent resistivity data alone. Parameter optimization, which is based on linearized inversion method, can be utilized in 1D interpretations. In this study, a new MATLAB GUI based algorithm has been written for the 1D-forward modeling of magnetotelluric response function for multiple layers to use in educational studies. The code also includes an automatic Gaussian noise option for a demanded ratio value. Numerous applications were carried out and presented for 2,3 and 4 layer models and obtained theoretical data were interpreted using MTINV, in order to evaluate the initial parameters and effect of noise. Keywords: Education, Forward Modelling, Inverse Modelling, Magnetotelluric

  17. Magnetotelluric Data, Stable Distributions and Stable Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chave, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    The author has noted for many years that the residuals from robust or bounded influence estimates of the magnetotelluric response function are systematically long tailed compared to a Gaussian or Rayleigh distribution. Consequently, the standard statistical model of a Gaussian core contaminated by a fraction of outlying data is not really valid. However, the typical result is an improvement on ordinary least squares, and has become standard in the electromagnetic induction community. A recent re-evaluation of the statistics of magnetotelluric response function estimation has shown that, in almost all cases, the residuals are alpha stable rather than Gaussian. Alpha stable distributions are characterized by four parameters: a shape parameter lying on (0, 2], a skewness parameter, a scale parameter and a location parameter, and cannot be expressed in closed form except for a few special cases. When the shape parameter is 2, the result is Gaussian, but when it is smaller the resulting distribution has infinite variance. Typical magnetotelluric residuals are alpha stable with a shape parameter lying between 1 and 2. This suggests that robust methods improve response function estimates by eliminating data corresponding to the largest stable residuals while leaving the bulk of the population alone. A better statistical approach is based on stable regression that directly accommodates the actual residual distribution without eliminating the most extreme ones. This paper will introduce such an algorithm, and illustrate its functionality with a variety of magnetotelluric data. Further work remains to produce a robust stable regression algorithm that will eliminate real outliers such as lightning strikes or instrument problems without affecting the bulk stable population. Stable distributions are intimately associated with fractional derivative physical processes. Since the Maxwell equations and the constitutive relations pertaining to the earth do not contain any fractional

  18. Magnetotelluric measurements in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, N. B.; Padilha, A. L.; Barbosa, M. J. F.

    1986-11-01

    In the period of 2/14/86 to 3/7/86, during the 4th Brazilian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica, organized through the CIRM (Comissao Interministerial para Recursos do Mar), Station Commander Ferraz, (62 deg 5 min S, 58 deg 23.5 min W), magnetotelluric measurements were accomplished in 120 second intervals for DC. This measurement complemented the former, accomplished in the preceeding year between 20 and 400 seconds and although it presented excellent agreement in the overlapping intervals, it was a difficult interpretation. A Hilbert transformation technique was utilized for solving this problem, which brought to mind similar obtained resistivity values. The preliminary results encountered were presented and discussed.

  19. Determination of near-surface, crustal and lithospheric structures in the Canadian Precambrian Shield using time-domain electromagnetic and magnetotelluric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xianghong

    Two electromagnetic methods were used to analyse the geoelectric structure of the subsurface of regions of the Precambrian Shield in Canada: the magnetotelluric (MT) and time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) methods. Magnetotelluric soundings were made at 60 sites in the southwestern Northwest Territories, Canada, along the LITHOPROBE SNORCLE Transect Corridor 1 and 1A, in the summer of 1996. The sites are located in southwestern Northwest Territories, Canada, between latitudes 60°--65°N and longitudes 110°--125°W, and cross the Archean Slave Province, the Proterozoic Buffalo Head, Great Bear Magmatic Arc, Hottah, Fort Simpson and Nahanni terranes, and the Great Slave Lake Shear Zone. Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks overlie the Proterozoic terranes. The main object of this project is to map the fracture zones and fresh/saline water interface in Precambrian granitic rocks using the surface TEM method. The TEM surveys were completed at Sites B, D, URL and A. A GEONICS PROTEM47 system with a 100 m transmitter loop was used. The data were collected for receiver offsets ranging from 0--280 m on four sides of transmitter loop. Analysis of the TEM and borehole log data indicates a basic three-layer structure: a thin conductive surface layer, a thick resistive second layer with an embedded conductive layer at some stations, and a conductive bottom layer. The results of this study show the TEM method can be used to investigate the fracture zones and groundwater salinity distribution in the Precambrian granitic rocks and contribute to site investigations for nuclear waste deposit. The TEM study in the Lac du Bonnet Batholith was successful in demonstrating the potential of the TEM methods in mapping groundwater salinity in granitic batholith. The PROTEM47 instrument, in combination with a 100 m transmitter loop, provides a suitable TEM system for mapping the resistivity structure of the Lac du Bonnet batholith down to a depth of 300--400 m. For deeper penetration and more

  20. Continuous profiling of magnetotelluric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Verdin, C.T.

    1991-05-01

    The magnetotelluric (MT) method of mapping ground electrical conductivity is traditionally based on measurement of the surface impedance at widely spaced stations to infer models of the subsurface through a suitable pseudo 1-D inverse or with linearized least-squares inversion for 2- or 3-D geoelectric media. It is well known that small near-surface inhomogeneities can produce spatial discontinuities in the measured electric fields over a wide frequency range and may consequently bias the impedance on a very local scale. Inadequate station spacing effectively aliases the electric field measurements and results in distortions that cannot be removed in subsequent processing or modelling. In order to fully exploit the benefits of magnetotellurics in complex geological environments, closely spaced measurements must be used routinely. This thesis entertains an analysis of MT data taken along continuous profiles and is a first step that will allow more encompassing 2-D sampling techniques to become viable in the years to come. The developments presented here are to a large extent motivated by the physical insight gained from low-contrast solutions to the forward MT problem. These solutions describe the relationship between a perturbation in the electrical conductivity of the subsurface and the ensuing perturbation of the MT response as the output of a linear system. Albeit strictly accurate in a limited subset of practical exploration problems, the linearized solutions allow one to pursue a model independent study of the response characteristics of MT data. In fact, these solutions yield simple expressions for 1-,2-, and 3-D resistivity models which are here examined in progressive sequence.

  1. Geophysical characterization of areas prone to quick-clay landslides using radio-magnetotelluric and seismic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shunguo; Malehmir, Alireza; Bastani, Mehrdad

    2016-05-01

    Landslides attributed to quick clays have not only considerable influences on surface geomorphology, they have caused delays in transportation systems, environmental problems and human fatalities, especially in Scandinavia and North America. If the subsurface distributions of quick clays are known, potential damages can be mitigated and the triggers of landslides can better be studied and understood. For this purpose, new radio-magnetotelluric (RMT) and seismic data were acquired in an area near the Göta River in southwest Sweden that contains quick clays and associated landslides. High-resolution data along 4 new lines, in total 3.8 km long, were acquired and merged with earlier acquired data from the site. Velocity and resistivity models derived from first breaks and RMT data were used to delineate subsurface geology, in particular the bedrock surface and coarse-grained materials that overlay the bedrock. The latter often are found underlying quick clays at the site. Comparably high-resistivity and sometimes high-velocity regions within marine clays are attributed to a combination of leached salt from marine clays or potential quick clays and coarse-grained materials. The resistivity and tomographic velocity models suggest a much larger role of the coarse-grained materials at the site than previously thought, but they also suggest two different scenarios for triggering quick-clay landslides at the site. These scenarios are related to the erosion of the riverbank, increased pore-pressure and surface topography when close to the river and human activity when away from the river and where bowl-shaped bedrock surrounds the sediments.

  2. Microstructure changes of polyimide/MMT-AlN composite hybrid films under corona aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Bu, W. B.; Liu, X. X.; Su, B.; Lei, Q. Q.

    2012-12-01

    A novel method using montmorillonite-AlN (MMT-AlN) composite particles as dopants in polyimide (PI) has been proposed and tested. We choose MMT-AlN as dopants in PI for lamellar structure of MMT and globular structure of AlN and hope such mixed micro- and nano-particles can enhance PI's resistance to corona aging. Our corona aging test result has confirmed our method and a 7% doped PI/MMT-AlN film has corona aging time extended more than 40 times compared with pure PI film. The microstructure changes of PI/MMT-AlN films due to corona aging have been analyzed by multiple surface analysis techniques. The analysis result shows coexistence of mass fractal and surface fractal in the sample films of PI/MMT-AlN. A dense inorganic block layer of MMT-AlN formed on the surface of doped PI films during corona aging is believed to be the mechanism of providing the protection against further corona aging.

  3. REGIONAL MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYS IN HYDROCARBON EXPLORATION, PARANA BASIN, BRAZIL.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, William D.; Saad, Antonio; Ohofugi, Walter

    1985-01-01

    The mangetotelluric geophysical method has been used effectively as a hydrocarbon exploration tool in the intracratonic Parana basin of South America. The 1-2 km thick surface basalts and buried diabase sills pose no problem for the magnetotelluric method because the natural electromagnetic fields used as the energy source pass easily through the basalt. Data for the regional study were taken on six profiles with sounding spaced 8 to 15 km apart. The magnetotelluric sounding data outline a linear uplift known as the Ponta Grossa arch. This major structural feature cuts across the northeast-trending intracratonic basin almost perpendicularly, and is injected with numerous diabase dikes. Significant electrical contrasts occur between the Permian sediments and older units, so that magnetotelluric measurements can give an indication of the regional thickness of the Permian and younger sediments to aid in interpreting hydrocarbon migration patterns and possible trap areas. Refs.

  4. Tectonic framework of the southern portion of the Paraná Basin based on magnetotelluric method: a contribution to the understanding of unconventional reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolim, S.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of the tectonic framework of Paleozoic terrains is crucial for the investigation of unconventional fractured volcanic reservoirs. In recent years, the need for exploitation of these areas showed the value of the non-seismic methods in Brazil. Here we present the results of a magnetotelluric imaging (MT) to identify and characterize the structural framework of the southern portion of the Paraná Basin, southern Brazil. We carried out a SW-NE ,1200 km-long MT profile, with 68 stations spaced between 5-15 km on the southernmost states in Brazil. The observation of the PSI profile highlights the presence of large scale NW-SE faults and emphasize the presence of two major regional structures: (i) the Rio Grande Arc in the southern portion, and (ii) the Torres Syncline in the northern portion. The Rio Grande Arc is a horst highlighted by the basement uplift and the thicker layers of sedimentary rocks in the extremes south and north of this structure. The fault system observed along the profile suggests simultaneously uplifting of the basement and deposition of the sedimentary sequences of the Paraná Basin. This hypothesis is in agreement with stratigraphic, borehole and geochronological data, which have shown that the Rio Grande arc is contemporaneous with the deposition of the Triassic to Early Jurassic sediments. The Torres Syncline is a structure characterized by the increasing thickness of sedimentary layers in the north section of our MT profile. The continuity of the layers is interrupted by large regional fault systems, which also affect the volcanic rocks of the Serra Geral Formation, indicating that the faults were active after the Cretaceous. The results show that the MT modeling brings a distinct contribution to the understanding of the present structural architecture of the Paraná basin and the construction of a model for potential fractured volcanic reservoirs.

  5. The Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) top box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Daniel R.; Janes, Clinton C.; Montgomery, John W.; Ouellette, David B.; Sharp, Frank H.

    1986-01-01

    So named because it resides on top of the focal plane instrument, the MMT top box is a two-level optical bench with many remotely controlled features which can be configured for experimental use of the MMT. It houses the relay optics and television cameras for focusing, coaligning and guiding the six telescopes of the MMT, as well as the integrating sphere, filter wheel, Hartmann mask wheel, and relay optics of the comparison source for instrumental calibration. It also provides a rigid mounting platform for research instruments as well as special fixtures for telescope tests and collimation. In accommodating these tasks the top box incorporates several novel features which may interest designers of other large telescopes.

  6. Making Metadata Better with CMR and MMT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, Jason Arthur; Shum, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring complete, consistent and high quality metadata is a challenge for metadata providers and curators. The CMR and MMT systems provide providers and curators options to build in metadata quality from the start and also assess and improve the quality of already existing metadata.

  7. Regional magnetotelluric surveys in hydrocarbon exploration, Parana' Basin, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, W.D.; Ohofugi, W.; Saad, A.R.

    1985-03-01

    The magnetotelluric geophysical method has been used effectively as a hydrocarbon exploration tool in the intracratonic Parana basin of South America. The 1-2 km thick surface basalts and buried diabase sills pose no problem for the magnetotelluric method because the natural electromagnetic fields used as the energy source pass easily through the basalt. Data for the regional study were taken on six profiles with soundings spaced 8 to 15 km apart. The magnetotelluric sounding data outline a linear uplift known as the Ponta Grossa arch. This major structural feature cuts across the northeast-trending intracratonic basin almost perpendicularly, and is injected with numerous diabase dikes. In the survey area, MT interpretations show that basalts have aggregate thicknesses of as much as 2 km (6,600 ft), and basement may be as much as 6 km (20,000 ft) below the surface. Over most of the basin, the basalts are covered by Upper Cretaceous to Holocene continental sediments of a few hundred meters thickness and are underlain by 2 to 4 km (6,600 to 13,100 ft) thick Paleozoic sediments with possible hydrocarbon potential. Significant electrical contrasts occur between the Permian sediments and older units, so that magnetotelluric measurements can give an indication of the regional thickness of the Permian and younger sediments to aid in interpreting hydrocarbon migration patterns and possible trap areas.

  8. The MMT-POL Instrument Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, C.; Packham, C.; Jones, T. J.; Varosi, F.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Dewahl, K.; Krejny, M.

    2011-07-01

    Instrument control system (ICS) suites are a continually evolving class of software packages that are highly dependent upon the design choices and application programming interfaces (APIs) of the observatory control system (OCS), as well as the hardware choices for motors and electronics. We present the ICS for MMT-POL, a 1-5 μm polarimeter for the MMT telescope, in the context of being a transitional step between the software packages developed for facility class instruments at the University of Florida (UF), such as Flamingos-II and CanariCam, and in preparation for 30 m-class instruments. Our goals for improving ICS suites are to make them (a) portable (compile once, run anywhere), (b) highly modular and extensible (through the re-use of common libraries), (c) multi-threaded (to allow multiple tasks to be performed in parallel), (d) smart, and (e) easy to use and maintain. An ICS should also be well-defined and use mature languages (we choose Java and Python) and common standards (such as XML and the FITS file format). We also note that as hardware moves away from serial communications to ethernet, the use of TCP sockets makes communication faster and easier. Below, we present our design choices for the MMT-POL ICS and discuss our reasons for these choices and potential issues that must be addressed for future ICS suites ready for thirty meter class instruments.

  9. Manufacturing Methods & Technology (MMT) Project Execution Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    Resnic AV: 995-4926 ATTN: DRSEL-PC-I-IP-1, Mr. Leon Field C: 201 532-4035 Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703 AV: 992-4035 ERADCOM US Army Electronics R&D Command...Spalsbury CECOM: Cdr, Attn: DRSEL Cdr, Attn: DRSEL-PC-I-IP-1, Mr. Leon Field Cdr, Attn: DRSEL-POD-P-G, Messrs. Feddeler, Esposito, Resnic (I cy ea) RD&E

  10. New approaches to estimation of magnetotelluric parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Egbert, G.D.

    1991-01-01

    Fully efficient robust data processing procedures were developed and tested for single station and remote reference magnetotelluric (Mr) data. Substantial progress was made on development, testing and comparison of optimal procedures for single station data. A principal finding of this phase of the research was that the simplest robust procedures can be more heavily biased by noise in the (input) magnetic fields, than standard least squares estimates. To deal with this difficulty we developed a robust processing scheme which combined the regression M-estimate with coherence presorting. This hybrid approach greatly improves impedance estimates, particularly in the low signal-to-noise conditions often encountered in the dead band'' (0.1--0.0 hz). The methods, and the results of comparisons of various single station estimators are described in detail. Progress was made on developing methods for estimating static distortion parameters, and for testing hypotheses about the underlying dimensionality of the geological section.

  11. MMT Survey for Intervening Mg II Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestor, Daniel B.; Turnshek, David A.; Rao, Sandhya M.

    2006-05-01

    We present the results from a spectroscopic survey for intervening Mg II absorption in the spectra of 381 background QSOs conducted at the MMT telescope. This survey complements our earlier SDSS EDR Mg II survey, extending our results to lower redshift (z~=0.15) and weaker Mg II λ2796 rest equivalent width (Wλ27960~=0.1 Å). We confirm two major results from that survey: the transition in the Wλ27960 distribution at Wλ27960~0.3 Å, and the Wλ27960-dependent evolution of the incidence of systems. The nature of ∂2N/∂z∂Wλ27960 is consistent with the idea that multiple physically distinct components/processes contribute to the incidence of Mg II absorption systems in a W0-dependent manner and evolve at different rates. A significant decrease in the total proper absorption cross section is detected in our MMT data for systems as weak as 1.0 Å<=Wλ27960<1.5 Å at z<~0.4. We discuss this W0-dependent evolution in the context of the evolution of galaxy structures, processes including superwinds and interactions, and damped-Lyα absorbers. We also consider the possibility that the observed redshift and Wλ27960 dependence of the incidence of absorption in spectroscopic surveys for low-ionization/neutral gas results from the effects of dust-induced extinction. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  12. STS-114: Discovery Post MMT Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This press conference focuses on the outcome of the Mission Management Team (MMT) meeting. The launch and status of the Space Shuttle Discovery is discussed. George Diller from NASA Public Affairs introduces the panel which consists of: Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Program Deputy Manager and Mike Wetmore, Director of Space Shuttle Processing at Nasa Kennedy Space Center. The news media asks questions about the history of the low level sensors in the hydrogen tank, the cryogenic atmosphere around the sensors, troubleshooting, astronaut activities, possible rollback procedures.

  13. Magnetotelluric pilot study in the Rio Grande Rift, southwest USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feucht, D. W.; Bedrosian, P. A.; Sheehan, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    A magnetotelluric (MT) pilot study consisting of approximately 25 stations distributed in and around the Rio Grande Rift of the southwest United States was carried out in the summer of 2012. Both broadband (100 Hz to 1000 s) and long-period (up to 10 000 s) MT data were collected across two profiles that run perpendicular to the rift axis near Denver, Colorado and Taos, New Mexico, respectively. Time-domain EM data was also collected at each site to account for galvanic distortion in the near-surface. The tectonic forces and rheologic properties behind the initiation and propagation of the rift are poorly understood. Surface mapping of volcanism, normal faulting and sedimentary basins reveals a narrow band of crustal deformation confined to a region in close proximity to the rift axis while geophysical results suggest that deformation is distributed across a much broader and deeper region of the lithosphere. In particular, seismic tomography shows low seismic wave speeds into the lower crust and upper mantle. The magnetotelluric technique is a well-proven passive electromagnetic method that allows for the detection of apparent resistivity at a wide range of depth scales. Complimenting the seismic results with MT data will provide important new information on the geologic and geophysical properties that control the rifting process in this low-strain rate environment. Properties to which the MT method is particular sensitive include temperature, fluid content, and mineral alteration. Preliminary results from this most recent survey are encouraging, showing good data quality up to 10 000 s. In an important precursor to full 2D modeling, the magnetotelluric phase tensor has been used to assess the dimensionality of the electrical resistivity structure at depth. This pilot study provides proof of concept for a much larger magnetotelluric experiment planned to take place in the Rio Grande Rift in 2013.

  14. Cooperative inversion of magnetotelluric and seismic data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, M.; Santos, F.

    2012-04-01

    Cooperative inversion of magnetotelluric and seismic data sets Milenko Markovic,Fernando Monteiro Santos IDL, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa 1749-016 Lisboa Inversion of single geophysical data has well-known limitations due to the non-linearity of the fields and non-uniqueness of the model. There is growing need, both in academy and industry to use two or more different data sets and thus obtain subsurface property distribution. In our case ,we are dealing with magnetotelluric and seismic data sets. In our approach,we are developing algorithm based on fuzzy-c means clustering technique, for pattern recognition of geophysical data. Separate inversion is performed on every step, information exchanged for model integration. Interrelationships between parameters from different models is not required in analytical form. We are investigating how different number of clusters, affects zonation and spatial distribution of parameters. In our study optimization in fuzzy c-means clustering (for magnetotelluric and seismic data) is compared for two cases, firstly alternating optimization and then hybrid method (alternating optimization+ Quasi-Newton method). Acknowledgment: This work is supported by FCT Portugal

  15. Magnetotelluric inversion based on mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolesi, Eric; Jones, Alan G.

    2014-10-01

    Joint inversion of different geophysical data sets is becoming a more popular and powerful tool, and it has been performed on data sensitive both to the same physical parameter and to different physical parameters. Joint inversion is undertaken to reduce acceptable model space and to increase sensitivity to model parameters that one method alone is unable to resolve adequately. We examine and implement a novel hybrid joint inversion approach. In our inversion scheme a model-the reference model-is fixed, and the information shared with the subsurface structure obtained from another method will be maximized; in our case conductivity structures from magnetotelluric (MT) inversion. During inversion, the joint probability distribution of the MT and the specified reference model is estimated and its entropy minimized in order to guide the inversion result towards a solution that is statistically compatible with the reference model. The powerful feature of this technique is that no explicit relationships between estimated model parameters and reference model ones are presumed: if a link exists in data then it is highlighted in the estimation of the joint probability distribution, if no link is required, then none is enforced. Tests performed verify the robustness of this method and the advantages of it in a 1-D anisotropic scenario are demonstrated. A case study was performed with data from Central Germany, effectively fitting an MT data set from a single station within as minimal an amount of anisotropy as required.

  16. A final report on computed magneto-telluric curves for hypothetical models of crustal structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pritchard, J.I.

    1965-01-01

    Several mathematical models were investigated to determine the capa-bilities of the magneto-telluric method for determining the resistivity structure of the earth's crust. The model parameters were based on the crust model proposed by Keller (1963). The mathematical technique used was developed by Cagniard (1953). The investigations indicate that a three-layer model approximation of the crust and mantle is the most detailed model warranted in inter-preting the information provided by the magneto-telluric method about the lower crust. Only the thickness of the lower crust can be determined, and not the resistivity.

  17. 2-D Versus 3-D Magnetotelluric Data Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledo, Juanjo

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, the number of publications dealing with the mathematical and physical 3-D aspects of the magnetotelluric method has increased drastically. However, field experiments on a grid are often impractical and surveys are frequently restricted to single or widely separated profiles. So, in many cases we find ourselves with the following question: is the applicability of the 2-D hypothesis valid to extract geoelectric and geological information from real 3-D environments? The aim of this paper is to explore a few instructive but general situations to understand the basics of a 2-D interpretation of 3-D magnetotelluric data and to determine which data subset (TE-mode or TM-mode) is best for obtaining the electrical conductivity distribution of the subsurface using 2-D techniques. A review of the mathematical and physical fundamentals of the electromagnetic fields generated by a simple 3-D structure allows us to prioritise the choice of modes in a 2-D interpretation of responses influenced by 3-D structures. This analysis is corroborated by numerical results from synthetic models and by real data acquired by other authors. One important result of this analysis is that the mode most unaffected by 3-D effects depends on the position of the 3-D structure with respect to the regional 2-D strike direction. When the 3-D body is normal to the regional strike, the TE-mode is affected mainly by galvanic effects, while the TM-mode is affected by galvanic and inductive effects. In this case, a 2-D interpretation of the TM-mode is prone to error. When the 3-D body is parallel to the regional 2-D strike the TE-mode is affected by galvanic and inductive effects and the TM-mode is affected mainly by galvanic effects, making it more suitable for 2-D interpretation. In general, a wise 2-D interpretation of 3-D magnetotelluric data can be a guide to a reasonable geological interpretation.

  18. Semiautomatic and Automatic Cooperative Inversion of Seismic and Magnetotelluric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Cuong V. A.; Harris, Brett D.; Pethick, Andrew M.; Takam Takougang, Eric M.; Howe, Brendan

    2016-09-01

    Natural source electromagnetic methods have the potential to recover rock property distributions from the surface to great depths. Unfortunately, results in complex 3D geo-electrical settings can be disappointing, especially where significant near-surface conductivity variations exist. In such settings, unconstrained inversion of magnetotelluric data is inexorably non-unique. We believe that: (1) correctly introduced information from seismic reflection can substantially improve MT inversion, (2) a cooperative inversion approach can be automated, and (3) massively parallel computing can make such a process viable. Nine inversion strategies including baseline unconstrained inversion and new automated/semiautomated cooperative inversion approaches are applied to industry-scale co-located 3D seismic and magnetotelluric data sets. These data sets were acquired in one of the Carlin gold deposit districts in north-central Nevada, USA. In our approach, seismic information feeds directly into the creation of sets of prior conductivity model and covariance coefficient distributions. We demonstrate how statistical analysis of the distribution of selected seismic attributes can be used to automatically extract subvolumes that form the framework for prior model 3D conductivity distribution. Our cooperative inversion strategies result in detailed subsurface conductivity distributions that are consistent with seismic, electrical logs and geochemical analysis of cores. Such 3D conductivity distributions would be expected to provide clues to 3D velocity structures that could feed back into full seismic inversion for an iterative practical and truly cooperative inversion process. We anticipate that, with the aid of parallel computing, cooperative inversion of seismic and magnetotelluric data can be fully automated, and we hold confidence that significant and practical advances in this direction have been accomplished.

  19. Ethyl brings MMT to market with aggressive sales efforts

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Wasting no time in seizing a market opportunity that has been on hold for nearly two decades, Ethyl Corp. recently delivered MMT to refiners across the US immediately after the US EPA decided on Dec. 4, 1995, not to appeal court decisions giving Ethyl the right to market the gasoline additive in conventional gasoline. Among the refiners reportedly taking deliveries of MMT were Texaco and Marathon, though spokepersons from each company would not comment. With the last immediate roadblock to the sale of MMT in the US removed, Ethyl anticipates achieving a market penetration of 8 million-10 million lb annually. With MMT allowed in conventional gasoline at 1/32 gram per gallon, 10 million lb would represent blending the octane enhancer into 948,000 b/d of gasoline. Blending MMT into nearly a million b/d of gasoline would represent a market share of about 20% of the eligible gasoline-i.e., the 5.5 million b/d that is not RFG. That 20% figure also corresponds to the approximate share of the gasoline market controlled by independent refiners.

  20. Magnetotelluric Sensor Development for Planetary Subsurface Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuqua, H.; Delory, G. T.; De Pater, I.; Grimm, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) Sounding is a powerful geophysical investigation technique capable of constraining planetary subsurface structure, including core size, mantle and crustal temperature profiles, and the distribution of electrical conductivity at depth. Natural sources of EM activity, including solar wind turbulence and plasma waves, can induce electric and magnetic fields in the Moon and other small bodies. These induced fields respond according to the electrical conductivity as a function of skin depth of the body in question. In a branch of EM Sounding known as Magnetotellurics (MT), measurements of the horizontal electric and magnetic fields at the planetary surface are inverted to produce constraints on the interior. MT is particularly worthwhile in that geophysically meaningful results can be obtained from a single station, thus avoiding network mission architectures. While surface magnetic field measurements were taken on the Moon during the Apollo era, to date no measurements of the surface horizontal electric field have been attempted. However electric field measurements on the lunar surface should be feasible given their long successful history on spacecraft missions in similar environments. Building upon the heritage of electric field sensor technology at the UC Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory, we describe a development plan for this instrument from component level to a fully functional instrument assembly for use in EM sounding, highlighting operational requirements, science capabilities, required testing, anticipated results and challenges to overcome. Upon development, this lander electric field sensor will enable future MT surveys on the Moon, and will provide a new exploration method for other small airless bodies from a single station.

  1. Improving of electrical channels for magnetotelluric sounding instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prystai, A. M.; Pronenko, V. O.

    2015-07-01

    The study of the deep structure of the Earth's crust is of great interest for both applied (e.g. mineral exploration) and scientific research. For this the electromagnetic (EM) studies which enable one to construct the distribution of electrical conductivity in the Earth's crust are of great use. The most common method of EM exploration is magnetotelluric sounding (MT). This passive method of research uses a wide range of natural geomagnetic variations as a powerful source of electromagnetic induction in the Earth, producing telluric current variations there. It includes the measurements of variations of natural electric and magnetic fields in orthogonal directions at the surface of the Earth. By this, the measurements of electric fields are much more complicated metrological processes, and, namely, they limit the precision of MT prospecting. This is especially complicated at deep sounding when measurements of long periods are of interest. The increase in the accuracy of the electric field measurement can significantly improve the quality of MT data. Because of this, the development of a new version of an instrument for the measurements of electric fields at MT - both electric field sensors and the electrometer - with higher levels relative to the known instrument parameter level - was initiated. The paper deals with the peculiarities of this development and the results of experimental tests of the new sensors and electrometers included as a unit in the long-period magnetotelluric station LEMI-420 are given.

  2. Improving of electrical channels for magnetotelluric sounding instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prystai, A. M.; Pronenko, V. O.

    2015-04-01

    The study of deep structure of the Earth's crust is of great interest for both applied (e.g. mineral exploration) and scientific research. For this the electromagnetic (EM) studies which enable to construct the distribution of electrical conductivity in the Earth's crust are of great use. The most common method of EM exploration is magnetotelluric sounding (MT). This passive method of research uses a wide range of natural geomagnetic variations as a powerful source of electromagnetic induction in the Earth, producing there telluric currents variations. It includes the measurements of variations of natural electric and magnetic fields in orthogonal directions at the surface of the Earth. By this, the measurements of electric field are much more complicated metrological process, and namely they are limiting the precision of MT prospecting. This is especially complicated at deep sounding when measurements of long periods are of interest. The increase of the accuracy of the electric field measurement can significantly improve the quality of MT data. Because of this the development of new version of instrument for the measurements of electric field at MT - both electric field sensors and the electrometer - with higher relative to the known instruments parameters level were initiated. The paper deals with the peculiarities of this development and the results of experimental tests of the new sensors and electrometer included as a unit in the long-period magnetotelluric station LEMI-420 are given.

  3. The characterizations of rheological, electrokinetical and structural properties of ODTABr/MMT and HDTABr/MMT organoclays

    SciTech Connect

    Isci, S. Uslu, Y.O.; Ece, O.I.

    2009-05-15

    In the present paper, we have investigated as a function of surfactant concentration the rheological (yield value, plastic viscosity) and electrokinetic (mobility, zeta potential) properties of montmorillonite (MMT) dispersions. The influence of surfactants (Octadeccyltrimethylammonium bromide, ODTABr and Hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, HDTABr) on dispersions of Na-activated bentonite was evaluated by rheological and electrokinetic measurements, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The interactions between clay minerals and surfactants in water-based Na-activated MMT dispersions (2 wt.%) were examined in detail using rheologic parameters, such as viscosity, yield point, apparent and plastic viscosity, hysteresis area, and electrokinetic parameters of mobility and zeta potentials, and XRD also analyses helped to determine swelling properties of d-spacings. MMT and organoclay dispersions showed Bingham Plastic flow behavior. The zeta potential measurements displayed that the surfactant molecules hold on the clay particle surfaces and the XRD analyses displayed that they get into the basal layers.

  4. The Lithospheric Structure of Southern Africa from Magnetotelluric Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R. L.; Jones, A. G.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of mantle electrical conductivity, made through the magnetotelluric method, offer considerable insight into the structure of cratonic lithosphere. A particularly expansive data set has been collected in Southern Africa, started through the Southern Africa Magnetotelluric Experiment (SAMTEX) experiment, now continuing north through Zambia as part of the Project for Rift Initiation Development and Evolution (PRIDE) experiment. The combined data set highlights large variability in lithospheric structure that broadly correlates with surface geology: cratonic lithosphere is generally thick and electrically resistive, while much thinner lithosphere is seen beneath mobile belts. In areas of relatively uniform resistivity structure, we have constructed resistivity-depth profiles and use new laboratory data to place constraints on the water content of lithospheric mantle. Uncertainty in our estimates arises from differences between different laboratory results, but our data are generally consistent with a slightly damp upper lithospheric mantle above a dry and strong cratonic root. Other areas show complexity of structure that is difficult to understand using current knowledge of conductivity -the Bushveld complex, where the mantle is highly conductive, is one such example. In southwestern Zambia, the lithosphere is seen to be very thin (around 50km) beneath mobile belt terrain, as was inferred nearly 40 years ago on the basis of high heatflow. The mantle is highly conductive, most likely due to a combination of elevated temperatures, water content and perhaps a trace amount of melting. This anomalous structure may be linked to the southwest propagation of the East African Rift system.

  5. Magnetotelluric Response Function Estimation Based on Hilbert-Huang Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jian-hua

    2013-11-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) data series are non-stationary random signals that do not meet the basic requirements of conventional methods based on the Fourier transform. To minimize the estimation bias errors brought about by the non-stationary characteristics of MT data, a new method, based on the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), is proposed for the first time for estimating the MT response functions from a time series of electromagnetic field variations. With the HHT method, the amplitude of data series are expressed as a function of frequency and time and then response functions are estimated statistically from the time-frequency spectrum. Mathematical model and calculation processes are introduced and some simulated data are analyzed to verify the correctness of the method. Finally, the measured MT data is facilitated by applying the HHT to assess the ability of HHT method to quantify meaningful geologic information.

  6. A layer stripping approach for monitoring resistivity variations using surface magnetotelluric responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaya, Xènia; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Jones, Alan G.; Marcuello, Álex

    2016-09-01

    The resolution of surface-acquired magnetotelluric data is typically not sufficiently high enough in monitoring surveys to detect and quantify small resistivity variations produced within an anomalous structure at a given depth within the subsurface. To address this deficiency we present an approach, called "layer stripping", based on the analytical solution of the one-dimensional magnetotelluric problem to enhance the sensitivity of surface magnetotelluric responses to such subtle subsurface temporal variations in resistivity within e.g. reservoirs. Given a well-known geoelectrical baseline model of a reservoir site, the layer stripping approach aims to remove the effect of the upper, unchanging structures in order to simulate the time-varying magnetotelluric responses at depth. This methodology is suggested for monitoring all kinds of reservoirs, e.g. hydrocarbons, gas, geothermal, compress air storage, etc., but here we focus on CO2 geological storage. We study one-dimensional and three-dimensional resistivity variations in the reservoir layer and the feasibility of the method is appraised by evaluating the error of the approach and defining different detectability parameters. The geoelectrical baseline model of the Hontomín site (Spain) for CO2 geological storage in a deep saline aquifer is taken as our exemplar for studying the validity of the 1D assumption in a real scenario. We conclude that layer stripping could help detect resistivity variations and locate them in the space, showing potential to also sense unforeseen resistivity variations at all depths. The proposed approach constitutes an innovative contribution to take greater advantage of surface magnetotelluric data and to use the method as a cost-effective permanent monitoring technique in suitable geoelectrical scenarios.

  7. Automation and control of the MMT thermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. D.; Porter, Dallan; Goble, William

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the software automation and control framework for the MMT thermal system. Thermal-related effects on observing and telescope behavior have been considered during the entire software development process. Regression analysis of telescope and observatory subsystem data is used to characterize and model these thermal-related effects. The regression models help predict expected changes in focus and overall astronomical seeing that result from temperature variations within the telescope structure, within the primary mirror glass, and between the primary mirror glass and adjacent air (i.e., mirror seeing). This discussion is followed by a description of ongoing upgrades to the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system and the associated software controls. The improvements of the MMT thermal system have two objectives: 1) to provide air conditioning capabilities for the MMT facilities, and 2) to modernize and enhance the primary mirror (M1) ventilation system. The HVAC upgrade necessitates changes to the automation and control of the M1 ventilation system. The revised control system must factor in the additional requirements of the HVAC system, while still optimizing performance of the M1 ventilation system and the M1's optical behavior. An industry-standard HVAC communication and networking protocol, BACnet (Building Automation and Control network), has been adopted. Integration of the BACnet protocol into the existing software framework at the MMT is discussed. Performance of the existing automated system is evaluated and a preliminary upgraded automated control system is presented. Finally, user interfaces to the new HVAC system are discussed.

  8. Peculiarities of electric field measurements in magnetotelluric sounding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronenko, Vira; Prystai, Andrii; Korepanov, Valery

    2014-05-01

    The study of deep structure of the Earth is of great interest for both applied (e. g., mineral exploration) and scientific research. For this the electromagnetic (EM) studies which enable to construct the distribution of electrical conductivity in the Earth's crust are of great use. The most common method of EM exploration is magnetotelluric sounding (MTS). This method is a passive method of research, which uses a wide range of natural geomagnetic variations as a powerful source of electromagnetic induction in the Earth. MTS technique includes first the measurements of variations of natural electric and magnetic fields in orthogonal directions at the surface of the Earth, and then the conductivity structure of the Earth's crust is determined by the obtained data processing and as a result the geoelectric cross-section for the depths of several tens of meters to several hundred kilometres is constructed. Like other methods, MTS has its limitations. The mmeasurements of electric field are the most complicated metrological process mostly limiting the accuracy of magnetotelluric prospecting. We believe that the increase of the accuracy of the electric field measurement can significantly improve the quality of magnetotelluric data. It is known that the measurement of the electric field is the biggest problem during the MTS. First of all, this is due to quite small values of the measured variations of the electric field compared to the so-called contact potential arising at the interface of the contact of the electrode with the environment. The shortcomings of a construction of different kind of non-polarized electrode were studied and in the result a new improved design of non-polarized LEMI-701 electrode based on the combination of Cu - CuSO4 is proposed. A number of specific requirements should be taken into account at electric field meter design because it must measure signals with periods ranging from fractions of seconds to about 100.000 second with minimal error

  9. Magnetotelluric inversion via reverse time migration algorithm of seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Taeyoung . E-mail: tyha@math.snu.ac.kr; Shin, Changsoo . E-mail: css@model.snu.ac.kr

    2007-07-01

    We propose a new algorithm for two-dimensional magnetotelluric (MT) inversion. Our algorithm is an MT inversion based on the steepest descent method, borrowed from the backpropagation technique of seismic inversion or reverse time migration, introduced in the middle 1980s by Lailly and Tarantola. The steepest descent direction can be calculated efficiently by using the symmetry of numerical Green's function derived from a mixed finite element method proposed by Nedelec for Maxwell's equation, without calculating the Jacobian matrix explicitly. We construct three different objective functions by taking the logarithm of the complex apparent resistivity as introduced in the recent waveform inversion algorithm by Shin and Min. These objective functions can be naturally separated into amplitude inversion, phase inversion and simultaneous inversion. We demonstrate our algorithm by showing three inversion results for synthetic data.

  10. Magnetotelluric inversion via reverse time migration algorithm of seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Taeyoung; Shin, Changsoo

    2007-07-01

    We propose a new algorithm for two-dimensional magnetotelluric (MT) inversion. Our algorithm is an MT inversion based on the steepest descent method, borrowed from the backpropagation technique of seismic inversion or reverse time migration, introduced in the middle 1980s by Lailly and Tarantola. The steepest descent direction can be calculated efficiently by using the symmetry of numerical Green's function derived from a mixed finite element method proposed by Nédélec for Maxwell's equation, without calculating the Jacobian matrix explicitly. We construct three different objective functions by taking the logarithm of the complex apparent resistivity as introduced in the recent waveform inversion algorithm by Shin and Min. These objective functions can be naturally separated into amplitude inversion, phase inversion and simultaneous inversion. We demonstrate our algorithm by showing three inversion results for synthetic data.

  11. The Estimation and Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data with Static Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zhou, J.; Zhang, J.; Min, G.; Xia, S.

    2015-12-01

    IntroductionIn magnetotelluric sounding data processing, the static shift correction is one of the most important steps. Due to the complexity of near-surface inhomogeneous bodies distribution, it is difficult to estimate the static shift of measured data. For this problem, we put forward on the basis of the inversion model for static shift estimation, and reconstructed the initial model with using the original data for 2D or 3D inversion. Estimation and Inversion methodThe magnetotelluric impedance phase has the characteristics of not influenced by the static shift in Two-dimensional electrical structure. The objective function for static shift estimation can be constructed based on impedance phase data. On the basis of normal inversion, utilizing one-dimensional linear search algorithm, combined with the forward modeling, the MT static shift can be estimated.Using estimation results for translation of anomaly measured curve. According to the inversion(1-D) of these translated curve, the initial model for two-dimensional or two-dimensional inversion can be reconstructed. On this basis, we do inversion for the original data, which not only can effectively eliminate the influence of static shift on the deep structure of inversion model, but also can get the right shallow electrical structure in the inversionConclusionThe estimation value of static shift based on impedance phase can be close to the true value. This estimation results can be used to modify the initial model, which makes the deep electric structure of the model more reasonable. On this basis, the inversion of the original data can ensure the correctness of the final inversion results (including shallow and deep).Acknowledgement This paper is supported by National Natural Science Foundation (41274078) and National 863 High Technology Research and Development Program (2014AA06A612).Reference[1] deGroot-Hedlin C. Removal of static shift in two dimensions by regularized inversion[J]. Geophysics, 1991, 56

  12. MM&T: Bibliography on Optical Testing with Appendix.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-26

    I963-A ITI to TECHNICAL REPORT RH-CR-82-6’.-4 MM&T: BIBLIOGRAPHY ON OPTICAL TESTING WITH APPENDIX A. Comejo-Rodriguez Apdo..Postal 216 Puebla , Puebla ...15 Refs.). Descriptors: LENSES; OPTICAL TESTING; INTERFEROMETERS; LIGHT REFRACTION; VISION Identifiers: TALBOT INTERFEROMETERS; MOIRE FRINGES; LENS...here described. MARTIN, S. "INFLUENCE OF SURFACE DEFECTS ON THE GLARE CHARACTERISTICS OF A NIGHT VISION SYSTEM WITH REFRACTIVE OPTICS" Opt. Acta, 25

  13. CuO-MMT nanocomposite: effective photocatalyst for the discoloration of methylene blue in the absence of H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabnezhad, Sh.; Pourahmad, A.; Salavatiyan, T.

    2016-02-01

    Copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles are of particular interest because of their interesting properties and promising applications in photocatalysis and purification of water. In this work, CuO-montmorillonite (CuO-MMT) nanocomposite was synthesized by a thermal decomposition method and characterized by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The resultant particles were nearly spherical, and particle size in MMT was in the range of ˜3-5 nm. The powder X-ray reflection patterns indicate that MMT has a d-spacing higher (1.22 nm) than CuO-MMT nanocomposite (0.97 nm). The shrinkage probably is related to the conformation of CuO nanoparticles on the clay surface. The diffuse reflectance spectrum of CuO-MMT showed band around 340-360 nm corresponding to presence of [Cu-O-Cu] n -type clusters over the support surface. The band gaps of the resulting CuO nanoparticles and CuO-MMT nanocomposite were widened from 1.70 to 1.80 eV for an indirect allowed band gap and from 3.70 to 3.82 eV for a direct allowed inter band transition owing to the quantum size effect, respectively. The nanocomposite exhibited an enhanced and stable photoactivity for the discoloration of methylene blue (MB) aqueous solution under visible light. The result showed that MB discoloration was observed after 20 min light irradiation in the absence of H2O2. The several parameters were examined, such as the catalyst amount, pH and initial concentration of MB. The mechanism of separation of the photogenerated electrons and holes of the CuO-MMT nanocomposite was discussed.

  14. A practical, low-noise coil system for magnetotellurics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, William D.; Tinkler, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Magnetotellurics is a geophysical technique which was developed by Cagnaird (1953) and Tikhonov (1950) and later refined by other scientists worldwide. The technique is a method of electromagnetic sounding of the Earth and is based upon the skin depth effect in conductive media. The electric and magnetic fields arising from natural sources are measured at the surface of the earth over broad frequency bands. An excellent review of the technique is provided in the paper by Vozoff (1972). The sources of the natural fields are found in two basic mechanisms. At frequencies above a few hertz, most of the energy arises from lightning in thunderstorm belts around the equatorial regions. This energy is propagated in a wave-guide formed by the earthionospheric cavity. Energy levels are higher at fundamental modes for this cavity, but sufficient energy exists over most of the audio range to be useful for sounding at these frequencies, in which case the technique is generally referred to as audio-magnetotellurics or AMT. At frequencies lower than audio, and in general below 1 Hz, the source of naturally occuring electromagnetic energy is found in ionospheric currents. Current systems flowing in the ionosphere generate EM waves which can be used in sounding of the earth. These fields generate a relatively complete spectrum of electromagnetic energy that extends from around 1 Hz to periods of one day. Figure 1 shows an amplitude spectrum characteristic of both the ionospheric and lightning sources, covering a frequency range from 0.0001 Hz to 1000 Hz. It can be seen that there is a minimum in signal levels that occurs at about 1 Hz, in the gap between the two sources, and that signal level increases with a decrease in frequency.

  15. Data Reduction Pipeline for the MMT Magellan Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, I.; Brown, W.; Fabricant, D.; McLeod, B.; Roll, J.; Szentgyorgyi, A.

    2013-10-01

    We describe principal components of the new spectroscopic data pipeline for the multi-object MMT/Magellan Infrared Spectrograph (MMIRS). The pipeline is implemented in IDL and C++. The performance of the data processing algorithms are sufficient to reduce a single dataset in 2-3 min on a modern PC workstation, so that one can use the pipeline as a quick-look tool during the observations. We provide an example of the spectral data processed by our pipeline and demonstrate that the sky subtraction quality get close to the limits set by the Poisson photon statistics.

  16. Making Interoperability Easier with NASA's Metadata Management Tool (MMT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shum, Dana; Reese, Mark; Pilone, Dan; Baynes, Katie

    2016-01-01

    While the ISO-19115 collection level metadata format meets many users' needs for interoperable metadata, it can be cumbersome to create it correctly. Through the MMT's simple UI experience, metadata curators can create and edit collections which are compliant with ISO-19115 without full knowledge of the NASA Best Practices implementation of ISO-19115 format. Users are guided through the metadata creation process through a forms-based editor, complete with field information, validation hints and picklists. Once a record is completed, users can download the metadata in any of the supported formats with just 2 clicks.

  17. A magnetotelluric profile across Central Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, O.; Hoffmann-Rothe, A.; Müller, A.; Dwipa, S.; Arsadi, E. M.; Mahfi, A.; Nurnusanto, I.; Byrdina, S.; Echternacht, F.; Haak, V.

    1998-12-01

    Along a N30°E striking profile in central Java, Indonesia we recorded broadband magnetotelluric data at 8 sites in the period range 0.01 s-10000s. A preliminary analysis of apparent resistivity, phase and magnetic transfer function data favours a one-dimensional interpretation of most sites for the upper 3-5 km of the crust and a two- or three- dimensional structure for the lower crust. Several conductive features can be distinguished: (i) a strong “ocean effect” at the southern most site, (ii) a zone of very high conductivity in the central part of the profile, and (iii) a conductor in the north that cannot be caused by the shallow Java sea. We discuss tentatively causes for these anomalies. The conductor in the central part of the profile is probably connected with volcanic or geothermal activity, while the anomaly in the north could be an expression of processes associated with an active fault zone.

  18. Functional copolymer/organo-MMT nanoarchitectures. VI. Synthesis and characterization of novel nanocomposites by interlamellar controlled/living radical copolymerization via preintercalated RAFT-agent/organoclay complexes.

    PubMed

    Rzayev, Zakir M O; Söylemez, A Ernur

    2011-04-01

    We have developed a new approach for the synthesis of polymer nanocomposites using a bifunctional reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) agent, two types of organo-montmorillonites, such as a non-reactive dimethyldodecyl ammonium (DMDA)-MMT and a reactive octadecylamine (ODA)-MMT organoclays, and a radical initiator. The method includes the following stages: (1) synthesis of RAFT intercalated O-MMTs by a physical or chemical interaction of the RAFT agent having two pendant carboxylic groups [S,S-bis(alpha,alpha'-dimethyl-alpha"-acetic acid)trithiocarbonate] with surface alkyl amines of O-MMT containing tertiary ammonium cation or primary amine groups through strong H-bonding and complexing/amidization reactions, respectively, and (2) utilization of these well-dispersed and intercalated RAFT ... O-MMT complexes and their amide derivatives as new modified RAFT agents in radical-initiated interlamellar controlled/living copolymerization of itaconic acid (IA)-n-butylmethacrylate (BMA) monomer pair. The structure and compositions of the synthesized RAFT ... O-MMT complexes and functional copolymer/O-MMT hybrids were confirmed by FTIR, XRD, thermal (DSC-TGA), SEM and TEM morphology analyses. It was demonstrated that the degree of interaction/exfoliation, morphology and thermal behavior of nanocomposites significantly depended on the type of organoclay and in situ interaction, as well as on the content of flexible butyl-ester linkages as a internal plasticizer. The results of the comparative analysis of the nanocomposites structure-composition-property relations show that the functional copolymer-organoclay hybrids prepared with reactive RAFT ... ODA-MMT complex and containing a combination of partially intercalated and predominantly exfoliated nano-structures exhibit relatively higher thermal stability and fine dispersed morphology. These effects were explained by in situ interfacial chemical reactions through amidization of RAFT with surface alkyl amine

  19. Magnetotelluric inversion for anisotropic conductivities in layered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pek, Josef; Santos, Fernando A. M.

    2006-10-01

    Electrical anisotropy in the Earth's crust and upper mantle has recently gained attention as a significant linking factor between electrical models and underlying structural and tectonic patterns. This interest has also motivated new methodological studies into the modelling and inversion for electrically anisotropic structures. We present an algorithm for the inversion of magnetotelluric data over layered anisotropic conductors which is a straightforward extension of the standard Occam 1-D inversion to anisotropic models. Owing to the essential limitation of magnetotellurics to resolve the complete conductivity tensor, we formulate the inversion for azimuthal anisotropy only. We treat the non-linear inverse problem as a multi-criterion minimization of the structure complexity, data misfit and anisotropy. To constrain the structure complexity, we employ the standard roughness penalty as well as non-quadratic penalties of the total variation and gradient support type that produce more focused model sections and thus conform better to the idea about sharp, non-diffuse boundaries of anisotropic structures in the Earth. Application of the anisotropy penalty is crucial for suppressing spurious anisotropy in the inverse models. We use a 2-D extension of the heuristic L-curve method to estimate the quasi-optimal penalty weights. With two non-linear iteration solvers, specifically the reweighted conjugate gradient method and the lagged diffusivity iteration, we can arrive at the minimum of the target functional, for one selected pair of regularization weights, typically after a few tens of iteration steps. To demonstrate the inverse solution, we present two simple yet not completely trivial synthetic examples, the first one based on data generated by a model with two anisotropic layers with discordant strikes, and the other showing possible misinterpretations in case a 1-D inversion with anisotropy is formally applied to data produced by simple 2-D block structures. Field

  20. Adaptive beam-combining mirror for the MMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird M.; Brusa, Guido; Bruns, Donald G.; Lloyd-Hart, Michael; McCarthy, Donald W.

    1995-08-01

    We present a novel, high performance, and economical design for tip-tilt mirrors. The two- dimensional tilt of each mirror is sensed through capacitive displacement sensors sensitive to approximately 1 nm rms out to 10 KHz. An analogue PID circuit utilizes this positional feedback to lock the mirrors to the commanded tilt via voice coil drivers. These mirrors achieve a 10 - 90% risetime of 3.0 ms and have a critically damped response at 100 - 150 Hz update rates. We have incorporated six of these tip-tilt mirrors to adaptively combine all six beams from the MMT. During first light of the instrument in April 1995, individual beams improved from 1.1 inch to 0.6 inch FWHM in 60 s exposures corrected with 60 Hz update rates.

  1. Observations Of The LCROSS Impact From The MMT Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastie, Morag Ann; Bailey, V.; Hinz, P.; Callahan, S.; Vaitheeswaran, V.; Gibson, D.; Porter, D.; Vilas, F.

    2010-01-01

    On the night of UT 9 Oct 2009, the MMT Observatory 6.5-m telescope watched with multiple ‘eyes’ as NASA crashed the two LCROSS spacecraft into the Cabeus crater near the south pole of the Moon. The primary goal of the observations was to address the LCROSS mission’s first science goal: “Confirm the presence or absence of water ice in a permanently shadowed region on the Moon”. Using the MMT in conjunction with CLIO, a thermal infrared camera coupled with a low-resolution prism covering a spectral range of 2.5 - 4.5 µm, we obtained spectra across Cabeus crater throughout the event. These spectra bracket 3 µm to identify the 3-µm absorption feature caused by adsorbed or interlayer water or both in minerals created by the process of aqueous alteration, which could be present in plume dust if water ice is present in the impacted crater. Additionally, we trained three optical cameras with varying FOVs at the impact area, in particular, one fast temporal camera with a 0.7-µm medium band filter with the hope to follow the growth of expected plume development with time. As an observatory we used this unique observing night to reach out to the public and give them a glimpse of the professional astronomy world. We streamed the live images coming from three of our science cameras and web cams around the observatory on the internet and got thousands of viewers from around the world. We present a snapshot of the night and initial results from our observations.

  2. 1-Dimension magnetotelluric data inversion using MOEA/D algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramudiana; Sungkono

    2017-01-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) data is used to derive resistivity imaging of subsurface. The subsurface resistivity is obtained by inversion of MT data. Generally, MT data contains two parts, namely: apparent resistivity and phase or real and imaginary parts. Inversion of MT data for reconstructing resistivity value of each layer is to minimize single objective (combination two parameters MT data) which used global or local optimization method. Nerveless, single objective optimization method has several disadvantages, such as; (1) weight value to combine two parameters of MT data is needed, where this weigh value depend on the amplitude of both MT data; (2) there is no validation of the inversion results. In this research, Inversion MT data to estimate 1D resistivity of subsurface uses multi-objective evolutionary algorithm based on decomposition (MOEA/D)to minimize root mean square error (RMSE) of calculated and observed data for apparent resistivity and phase data simultaneously. The algorithm has applied to synthetic and field data. This result shows that MOEA/D algorithm is robust and accurate to determine subsurface resistivity and lithology.

  3. Low Power Long Period Magnetotelluric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narod, B. B.; Bennest, J. R.; Booker, J. R.

    2001-12-01

    We have constructed a new MT system for periods longer than 1 second that uses substantially less power and is considerably easier to deploy than predecessors, such as the Geological Survey of Canada [GSC] Long Period Intelligent Magnetotelluric System [LIMS]. Technical aspects of these new systems include: Fully watertight; light weight [5 kg w/o magnetometer head], Eurocard card cage, 1.7 watt power consumption - 140mA @ 12vdc, built-in solar panel charge controller, GPS-disciplined timekeeping accurate to 1ms, 24-bit 8 Hz Analog to Digital conversion, data storage on a PCMCIA flash disk [85M and up], magnetic field: +/- 80,000 nT range with 10pT resolution, electric field ch: +/- 200 mv with sub-microvolt useful resolution. A setup program automatically handles most deployment tasks including recording site location and data start time. Data are logged in files that begin at hour marks and are of one-hour duration. They are thus automatically synchronous at an array of instruments. Data retrieval consists of moving a PCMCIA card from the data logger to a laptop computer. A revision of this system is already in progress. It will feature PC104 card formats and will be lighter, smaller and have even lower power consumption. Ten of these systems were deployed for the first time during August and September 2001, in Argentina. Sample data from these deployments will be shown.

  4. Magnetotelluric investigations at Mount Hood, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Mozley, E.C.; Goldstein, N.E.; Morrison, H.F.

    1986-10-01

    Magnetotelluric data, with both electric and magnetic field references for noise cancellation, were collected at accessible locations around and as close as possible to the Mount Hood andesite-dacite volcano. The purpose of the study was to identify and map conductive features and to relate them to the thermal regime of the region. Several conductors could be discerned. The shallowest, at a depth of around 500 m below the surface, was identified as a flow of heated water moving away from the summit: the deepest (--50 km) might be a melt zone in the upper mantle. Of particular interest is an elongate conductor that strikes N 10/sup 0/ W and extends from a depth of 12 km down to 22 km. Because the conductor strike is close to the trend of the chain of Cascade volcanoes and because of the high conductive thermal gradients reported for the area, this feature was initially believed to be a zone of partial melt following the volcanic axis. However, because no teleseismic P wave velocity anomaly has been found, the cause of the conductor is more problematic. While the existence of small zones of melt cannot be ruled out, it is possible that the conductor is caused by a large volume of intensely deformed rocks with brine-filled microfractures.

  5. Magnetotelluric Data, San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.; Williams, Jackie M.

    2008-01-01

    The San Luis Valley region population is growing. Water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depend on accurate assessment and protection of the region?s ground-water resources. An important issue in managing the ground-water resources is a better understanding of the hydrogeology of the Santa Fe Group and the nature of the sedimentary deposits that fill the Rio Grande rift, which contain the principal ground-water aquifers. The shallow unconfined aquifer and the deeper confined Santa Fe Group aquifer in the San Luis Basin are the main sources of municipal water for the region. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin located in southern Colorado. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, an electromagnetic survey (called magnetotellurics, or MT), and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifers. The MT survey primary goal is to map changes in electrical resistivity with depth that are related to differences in rock types. These various rock types help control the properties of aquifers. This report does not include any data interpretation. Its purpose is to release the MT data acquired at 24 stations. Two of the stations were collected near Santa Fe, New Mexico, near deep wildcat wells. Well logs from those wells will help tie future interpretations of this data with geologic units from the Santa Fe Group sediments to Precambrian basement.

  6. Magnetotelluric Data, Southern San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Jackie M.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The population of the San Luis Valley region is growing rapidly. The shallow unconfined and the deeper confined Santa Fe Group aquifer in the San Luis Basin is the main sources of municipal water for the region. Water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depend on accurate assessment and protection of the region's ground-water resources. An important issue in managing the ground-water resources is a better understanding of the hydrogeology of the Santa Fe Group and the nature of the sedimentary deposits that fill the Rio Grande rift, which contain the principal ground-water aquifers. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin located in southern Colorado. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, an electromagnetic survey, called magnetotellurics (MT), and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifer systems. The primary goal of the MT survey is to map changes in electrical resistivity with depth that are related to differences in rock type. These various rock types help control the properties of aquifers in the region. This report does not include any interpretation of the data. Its purpose is to release the MT data acquired at the 22 stations shown in figure 1.

  7. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE Magnetotelluric Inversion

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-05-16

    The Coso Magnetotelluric (MT) dataset of which the West Flank FORGE MT data is a subset, was collected by Schlumberger / WesternGeco and initially processed by the WesternGeco GeoSolutions Integrated EM Center of Excellence in Milan, Italy. The 2011 data was based on 99 soundings that were centered on the West Flank geothermal prospect. The new soundings along with previous data from 2003 and 2006 were incorporated into a 3D inversion. Full impedance tensor data were inverted in the 1-3000 Hz range. The modelling report notes several noise sources, specifically the DC powerline that is 20,000 feet west of the survey area, and may have affected data in the 0.02 to 10 Hz range. Model cell dimensions of 450 x 450 x 65 feet were used to avoid computational instability in the 3D model. The fit between calculated and observed MT values for the final model run had an RMS value of 1.807. The included figure from the WesternGeco report shows the sounding locations from the 2011, 2006 and 2003 surveys.

  8. Using magnetotellurics in regional hydrocarbon exploration of Parana basin, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, W.D.; Saad, R.A.; Ohofugi, W.

    1984-04-01

    The magnetotelluric (MT) method has been utilized in a multidisciplinary exploration program recently completed in the Parana basin by the State of Sao Paulo. In the deeper portions of the Parana basin, MT interpretations show that basalts have thicknesses of up to 2 km (6500 ft) and that basement may be as much as 6 km (19,700 ft) below the surface. In most of the basin, the basalts are covered by thin units of Upper Cretaceous to Holocene continental sediments and are underlain by 2-4 km (6500-13,000 ft) of prospective Paleozoic sediments. In addition, interpretation of the MT sounding data with layered and fault-dike models outlines a linear uplift known as the Ponta Grossa arch. Permian Irati sediments are an important source unit classified as mostly in the oil window. Good electrical contrasts occur between the Permian sediments and older units, so that MT measurements can indicate the regional thickness of the Permian and younger sediments for use in interpretation of migration patterns and possible traps. In addition to providing this stratigraphic information, MT and aeromagnetic surveys have delineated the influence of the Sao Francisco craton in truncating uplift and tensional features of the Ponta Grossa arch.

  9. A layer stripping approach for monitoring CO2 storage sites using surface magnetotelluric responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaya, X.; Ledo, J.; Queralt, P.; Jones, A. G.; Marcuello, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present an approach, called "layer stripping", to enhance the sensitivity of surface magnetotelluric responses to subtle subsurface temporal variations in electrical resistivity. The proposed methodology is based on the analytical solution of the one-dimensional magnetotelluric problem, and that both resolution and sensitivity to resistivity changes produced at a given depth increase when the data are acquired closer to the depth where the resistivity changes are taking place. Thus, given a well-known geoelectrical baseline model of a reservoir site, the layer stripping approach aims to remove the effects of the upper, unchanging, structures in order to obtain the time-varying magnetotelluric responses at the target depth. The layer stripping methodology is suggested for monitoring all types of reservoirs but in this work we focus on its application on CO2 geological storage sites. Different injections of CO2 are studied simulating one-dimensional and three-dimensional resistivity variations in the reservoir layer, and the feasibility of the method is appraised evaluating the error of the approach. The geoelectrical baseline model of the Hontomín site (Spain) for CO2 geological storage in a deep saline aquifer is used to assess how this methodology could be implemented in an actual monitoring survey. The resistivity model of the site defines the subsurface in the pre-injection state and allows applying the layer stripping approach to remove the effect of the upper structures not affected by injection of the CO2 gas from the surface MT responses. The proposed approach constitutes an innovative contribution to detect resistivity variations and locate them more precisely in the space. The obtained results show the potential of the method also to sense any possible leakage.

  10. Fine-particle Mn and other metals linked to the introduction of MMT into gasoline in Sydney, Australia: Results of a natural experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, D. D.; Gulson, B. L.; Davis, J. M.; Stelcer, E.; Garton, D.; Hawas, O.; Taylor, A.

    Using a combination of accelerator-based ion beam methods we have analysed PM 2.5 particulates for a suite of 21 species (H, C, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Pb) to evaluate the contribution to Sydney (New South Wales, Australia) air associated with the introduction of MMT as a replacement for lead. MMT was discontinued in 2004. Teflon filters representing continuous sampling for a 7 year period from 1998 to 2004 were analysed from two sites: one from Mascot, a suburb close to the Central Business District [CBD ( n=718)] and a high trafficked area, and the other, a relatively rural (background) setting at Richmond, ˜20 km west of the CBD ( n=730). Manganese concentrations in air at the background site increased from a mean of 1.5-1.6 ng m -3 to less than 2 ng m -3 at the time of greatest MMT use whereas those at Mascot increased from about 2 to 5 ng m -3. From the maximum values, the Mn showed a steady decrease at both sites concomitant with the decreasing use of MMT. Lead concentrations in air at both sites decreased from 1998 onwards, concomitant with the phase out of leaded gasoline, attained in 2002. Employing previously determined elemental signatures it was possible to adjust effects from season along with auto emissions and soil. A high correlation was obtained for the relationship between Mn in air and lead replacement gasoline use ( R2 0.83) and an improved correlation for Mn/ Al+Si+K and lead replacement gasoline use ( R2 0.93). In addition, using Mn concentrations normalized to background values of Al+Si+K or Ti to account for the lithogenically derived Mn, the proportion of anthropogenic Mn was approximately 70%. The changes for Mn and Pb detected in the particulates are attributed to the before-during-after use of MMT and decreasing use of lead in gasoline. The values measured in Sydney air are well below the reference concentration of 50 ng Mn m -3. The incremental increases in air, however, are larger than

  11. STS-114: Discovery Day 5 Post MMT Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Wayne Hill, Space Shuttle Deputy Program Manager, and Chair of the Mission Management Team, reports the following: the testing of the thermal protection system in space, on orbit was successful; the MMT meeting formally approved the mission extension for one day; image analysis from the launch phase has been completed; tile and blankets had been formally cleared by the Engineering team; additional inspection of the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC); gap filler, heat shield and small black spot phenomenon are carefully inspected and evaluated to prepare the safe return of the Discovery. Bill Gerstenmaier, ISS Program Manager reports on the extra vehicular activities (EVA): replaced the GPS antenna; prepared the airlock to attach the ESP2; re-powered CMG2; transfer of CWCs; and the MISSE packages were wrapped around thru at the end of the air lock. He mentioned the high currents problem seen on CMG3, which they will have to take off line to check and understand the problem. Consumables, engineering performance of the three sensors (LCS, LDRI, ITVC), CMG removal and replacement, EVA2 and EVA3, gap fillers, RCC, hydrogen tank pre-press cycles, thermal protection system, inspection, ISS supply maintenance, and projection of next flight are topics covered with the News Media.

  12. MMT hypervelocity star survey. III. The complete survey

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-05-20

    We describe our completed spectroscopic survey for unbound hypervelocity stars (HVSs) ejected from the Milky Way. Three new discoveries bring the total number of unbound late B-type stars to 21. We place new constraints on the nature of the stars and on their distances using moderate resolution MMT spectroscopy. Half of the stars are fast rotators; they are certain 2.5-4 M {sub ☉} main sequence stars at 50-120 kpc distances. Correcting for stellar lifetime, our survey implies that unbound 2.5-4 M {sub ☉} stars are ejected from the Milky Way at a rate of 1.5 × 10{sup –6} yr{sup –1}. These unbound HVSs are likely ejected continuously over the past 200 Myr and do not share a common flight time. The anisotropic spatial distribution of HVSs on the sky remains puzzling. Southern hemisphere surveys like SkyMapper will soon allow us to map the all-sky distribution of HVSs. Future proper motion measurements with Hubble Space Telescope and Gaia will provide strong constraints on origin. Existing observations are all consistent with HVS ejections from encounters with the massive black hole in the Galactic center.

  13. Magnetotelluric studies at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Goubau, W.M.; Goldstein, N.E.; Clarke, J.

    1981-01-01

    During three years of magnetotelluric surveying, data were acquired at 26 sites distributed over 190 km/sup 2/ around the production area. A relatively well-defined strike of N27W +- 1.5/sup 0/ (magnetic) was established. The simple model shown suggests a lateral discontinuity in the vicinity of Nueva Leon.

  14. Magnetotelluric signature of anticlines in Iran's Sehqanat oil field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansoori, Isa; Oskooi, Behrooz; Pedersen, Laust B.

    2015-07-01

    The magnetotelluric (MT) method has proved to be an effective tool in hydrocarbon exploration especially in areas with geological structures/formations where seismic reflection provides neither good quality data nor images. The Sehqanat oil field located in the sedimentary zone of Zagros in SW of Iran is a typical example. It is covered by the high velocity and heterogeneous formation of Gachsaran, which is exposed at the surface and has a thickness varying from 500 m to more than 2 km in the region. Gachsaran is composed mainly of salt and evaporites overlying, as a cap rock, the Asmari limestone formation which is the main reservoir in all oil fields of Iran along the Zagros range. The main geological interface which is targeted to be imaged with the MT method is the contact between the highly conductive evaporites of the Gachsaran formation and the underlying more resistive carbonates of the Asmari formation. MT data at more than 600 stations along five parallel SW-NE profiles crossing the main geological trend of the study area and transient electromagnetic data over 400 stations to be used for static shift corrections of the MT data were available. Dimensionality and strike analysis of the MT data show dominant two-dimensional (2-D) conditions in almost all sites and periods. The 2-D resistivity models resolved the boundary between Gachsaran and Asmari formations as a transition zone from highly conductive to resistive structures. The Sehqanat anticline has also been delineated throughout the 2-D resistivity sections as a resistive dome-shaped body located in the middle part of the MT profiles. There is a considerable correlation between the 2-D resistivity models and the adjacent 2-D reflection seismic sections so that a more reliable interpretation on the hydrocarbon trap of the Sehqanat anticline can be obtained.

  15. Magnetotelluric experiment over the ROSE area

    SciTech Connect

    Filloux, J.H.

    1982-10-10

    Seafloor observations in natural electromagnetic fluctuations diffusing into the earth have been made in the vicinity of the Pacific Rise at 12/sup 0/N and 21/sup 0/N to gather information on the electrical conductivity structure of the oceanic basement near a spreading ridge. At 21/sup 0/N the close proximity of land (Baja California) introduces a noticeable distortion of the EM fields, and consequently the magnetotelluric sounding for this area must be interpreted with caution. At both locations the conductance of the upper 200 km appears exceptionally high and the conductivity rises rapidly below, reaching 1 S m/sup -1/ or more at 350 km. The statistical significance of a prominent conductivity increase near a depth of 22.5 km detected in the inverted data from 12/sup 0/N and of a less developed one at 30 km in the case of 21/sup 0/N is discussed. Records of the magnetic variations of 21/sup 0/N taken above the spreading center, compared to records from 40 and 120 km to the west, reveal a conspicuous enhancement of the high-frequency horizontal variations in a direction slightly west of magnetic north. We interpret this distinctive feature as the signature of an electric current sheet concentrated in an extremely high conductance, relatively shallow layer electrically bridging the two seafloor areas adjacent to the spreading center. An approximate calculation suggests a conductance in excess of 3000 S per meter of ridge crest in the close vicinity of the accretion center, equivalent to 1 to 8 km of molten basalt, depending on temperature (1000/sup 0/-1200/sup 0/C.) and depth (2-10 km.). This structure is consistent with seismic refraction information for the same area and with stratigraphic reconstruction of a fossil accretion center in Samail ophiolite. An interpretation in terms of a well-developed magma chamber is irresistable, although confirmation of the existence of this feature as well as improvement of its resolution by means of additional EM data would

  16. Environmental effects and exposures to manganese from use of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) in gasoline.

    PubMed

    Lynam, D R; Roos, J W; Pfeifer, G D; Fort, B F; Pullin, T G

    1999-01-01

    Methylcyclopentadienyl Manganese Tricarbonyl (MMT) has been used since the 1970s in the U.S. as a gasoline octane enhancer Extensive testing of the effects of MMT on regulated gaseous emissions carried out on a wide variety of automobiles showed that use of MMT resulted in significantly lower NOx emissions Tests showed that less than 15% of the manganese from MMT combustion was emitted from the tailpipe, mostly in the PM2.5 fraction as manganese phosphate, with some manganese sulfate and a very small amount of manganese oxide. MMT has been used in Canada in virtually all unleaded gasoline for about 20 years. A probability-based study involving over 900 personal exposure samples in Toronto confirmed exposures to airborne PM2.5 Mn in the general population are quite low (.008 microgram/m3-median). Ambient levels of airborne manganese in Toronto are about the same as those in areas where MMT is not used. Exposures to manganese among the general population in Toronto are well within safe limits determined by the U.S. EPA and other standard setting bodies around the world.

  17. Surface modification of PMMA/O-MMT composite microfibers by TiO 2 coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingqing; Wang, Xin; Li, Xuejia; Cai, Yibing; Wei, Qufu

    2011-10-01

    In the present work, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/organically modified montmorillonite (O-MMT) composite microfibers were firstly prepared by emulsion polymerization combined with electrospinning, and then coated by nanosize titanium dioxide (TiO 2) using RF magnetron sputter technique. The modified surfaces of PMMA/O-MMT composite microfibers were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis spectroscopy and drop shape analyzer. Finally, the photocatalytic properties of TiO 2 coated PMMA/O-MMT composite microfiber membranes were evaluated by degradation of methylene blue(MB) under UV illumination. The experimental results revealed that anatase-TiO 2 and rutile-TiO 2 nanoparticles were well spread and physically deposited on the surface of PMMA/O-MMT microfibers, and the wettability of the PMMA/O-MMT composite microfibers was improved after surface modification by sputter coating. Furthermore, the PMMA/O-MMT microfibers membrane coated with TiO 2 performed well in photocatalytic degradation of MB.

  18. MTpy - Python Tools for Magnetotelluric Data Processing and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, Lars; Peacock, Jared; Thiel, Stephan; Inverarity, Kent; Kirkby, Alison; Robertson, Kate; Soeffky, Paul; Didana, Yohannes

    2014-05-01

    We present the Python package MTpy, which provides functions for the processing, analysis, and handling of magnetotelluric (MT) data sets. MT is a relatively immature and not widely applied geophysical method in comparison to other geophysical techniques such as seismology. As a result, the data processing within the academic MT community is not thoroughly standardised and is often based on a loose collection of software, adapted to the respective local specifications. We have developed MTpy to overcome problems that arise from missing standards, and to provide a simplification of the general handling of MT data. MTpy is written in Python, and the open-source code is freely available from a GitHub repository. The setup follows the modular approach of successful geoscience software packages such as GMT or Obspy. It contains sub-packages and modules for the various tasks within the standard work-flow of MT data processing and interpretation. In order to allow the inclusion of already existing and well established software, MTpy does not only provide pure Python classes and functions, but also wrapping command-line scripts to run standalone tools, e.g. modelling and inversion codes. Our aim is to provide a flexible framework, which is open for future dynamic extensions. MTpy has the potential to promote the standardisation of processing procedures and at same time be a versatile supplement for existing algorithms. Here, we introduce the concept and structure of MTpy, and we illustrate the workflow of MT data processing, interpretation, and visualisation utilising MTpy on example data sets collected over different regions of Australia and the USA.

  19. Interpretation of magnetotelluric measurements over an electrically dispersive one-dimensional earth

    SciTech Connect

    Patella, D.

    1987-01-01

    Frequency dispersion of electromagnetic parameters of earth materials has been widely documented in recent years. It is claimed that magnetotellurics (MT)may be significantly affected by dispersion. This paper studies the MT plane-wave interpretative problem for a one-dimensional earth characterized by the presence of dispersive layers. The theoretical properties of the MT field under the dispersion hypothesis, and the main features of the dispersion phenomenon are synthetically reviewed. The examination of previously published MT curve responses over some models of dispersive earth section shows that ambiguity can arise when interpreting MT data with no other source of information. Thus it maybe almost impossible to distinguish between the response of a dispersive section and an equally probable dispersion-free section. The dispersion magnetotelluric (DMT) method is proposed as a means to resolve the ambiguity. The DMT method is based on the execution, at the same site, of an MT sounding and of an always dispersion-free dc geoelectric deep sounding.

  20. Detection of Deep Fluid Flow in Subduction Zones with Magnetotelluric Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, O.; Araya, J.

    2014-12-01

    After the 1995 Mw 8 Antofagasta earthquake, Husen and Kissling (2001) interpreted alterations observed in the seismic velocity structure as large-scale fluid distribution changes, deep within the subduction zone. Such large scale fluid relocation would cause similar modifications of the associated deep electrical resistivity structure. In this paper, we examine feasibility to detect such changes in the deep hydraulic system with magnetotelluric monitoring. Continuous magnetotelluric (MT) data have been recorded above the subduction zone in northern Chile as part of the Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile (IPOC) with an array of 9 stations since 2007. With the MT method, electrical resistivity and lateral changes of the resistivity structure are estimated from so called transfer functions (TF). If the subsurface resistivity structure is stable, these TFs vary only within their statistical significance intervals over time. Any statistically significant deviations, particularly when observed over the network of sites, must be originated from a change in the subsurface resistivity structure. We simulate the effects of such changes on the TFs using 3D forward modelling studies. The background model is based on 3D inversion of the IPOC MT stations. The results show that detectable differences in the TFs are obtained if the resistivity decreases by 5 times of its original value in the lower continental crust over the rupture zone. The implications of these results are compared with observed changes in the TFs after the 2007 Mw 7.7 Tocopilla and 2014 Mw 8.2 Pisagua earthquakes.

  1. Denoising of magnetotelluric signals by polarization analysis in the discrete wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonari, R.; D'Auria, L.; Di Maio, R.; Petrillo, Z.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetotellurics (MT) is one of the prominent geophysical methods for underground deep exploration and, thus, appropriate for applications to petroleum and geothermal research. However, it is not completely reliable when applied in areas characterized by intense urbanization, as the presence of cultural noise may significantly affect the MT impedance tensor estimates and, consequently, the apparent resistivity values that describe the electrical behaviour of the investigated buried structures. The development of denoising techniques of MT data is thus one of the main objectives to make magnetotellurics reliably even in urban or industrialized environments. In this work we propose an algorithm for filtering of MT data affected by temporally localized noise. It exploits the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) that, thanks to the possibility to operates in both time and frequency domain, allows to detect transient components of the MT signal, likely due to disturbances of anthropic nature. The implemented filter relies on the estimate of the ellipticity of the polarized MT wave. The application of the filter to synthetic and field MT data has proven its ability in detecting and removing cultural noise, thus providing apparent resistivity curves more smoothed than those obtained by using raw signals.

  2. Probabilistic 3-D time-lapse inversion of magnetotelluric data: application to an enhanced geothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Carbajal, M.; Linde, N.; Peacock, J.; Zyserman, F. I.; Kalscheuer, T.; Thiel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Surface-based monitoring of mass transfer caused by injections and extractions in deep boreholes is crucial to maximize oil, gas and geothermal production. Inductive electromagnetic methods, such as magnetotellurics, are appealing for these applications due to their large penetration depths and sensitivity to changes in fluid conductivity and fracture connectivity. In this work, we propose a 3-D Markov chain Monte Carlo inversion of time-lapse magnetotelluric data to image mass transfer following a saline fluid injection. The inversion estimates the posterior probability density function of the resulting plume, and thereby quantifies model uncertainty. To decrease computation times, we base the parametrization on a reduced Legendre moment decomposition of the plume. A synthetic test shows that our methodology is effective when the electrical resistivity structure prior to the injection is well known. The centre of mass and spread of the plume are well retrieved. We then apply our inversion strategy to an injection experiment in an enhanced geothermal system at Paralana, South Australia, and compare it to a 3-D deterministic time-lapse inversion. The latter retrieves resistivity changes that are more shallow than the actual injection interval, whereas the probabilistic inversion retrieves plumes that are located at the correct depths and oriented in a preferential north-south direction. To explain the time-lapse data, the inversion requires unrealistically large resistivity changes with respect to the base model. We suggest that this is partly explained by unaccounted subsurface heterogeneities in the base model from which time-lapse changes are inferred.

  3. Imaging the Mount St. Helens Magmatic Systems using Magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, G. J.; Caldwell, T. G.; Heise, W.; Bibby, H. M.; Chertkoff, D. G.; Burgess, M. K.; Cull, J. P.; Cas, R. A.

    2009-05-01

    A detailed magnetotelluric survey of Mount St. Helens shows that a conduit like zone of high electrical conductivity beneath the volcano is connected to a larger zone of high conductivity at 15 km depth that extends eastward to Mount Adams. We interpret this zone to be a region of connected melt that acts as the reservoir for the silicic magma being extruded at the time of the magnetotelluric survey. This interpretation is consistent with a mid-crustal origin for the silicic component of the Mount St. Helens' magmas and provides an elegant explanation for a previously unexplained feature of the seismicity observed at the time of the catastrophic eruption in 1980. This zone of high mid-crustal conductivity extends northwards to near Mount Rainier suggesting a single region of connected melt comparable in size to the largest silicic volcanic systems known.

  4. Induction of chromosomal aberrations by the fuel additive methylcyclopentadienyl-manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Blakey, D.H.; Bayley, J.M.

    1995-11-01

    Methylcyclopentadienyl-manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) is a fuel additive used throughout Canada as replacement for lead-based antiknock compounds in gasoline and as an anti-smoking compound in other fuels. Because of the widespread use of MMT in Canadian gasoline, it is important to determine whether MMT is a safe alternative to alkyllead as a fuel additive. Although environmental exposure to MMT is unlikely because it is almost completely consumed during combustion and any MMT exhaust emissions would be degraded rapidly, human contact can occur occupationally through accidental exposure, or incidentally while refuelling gasoline-powered engines. In order to determine the intrinsic mutagenicity of MMT, an in vitro chromosomal aberration assay was performed using Chinese hamster ovary cells. In the presence of metabolic activation, MMT was a potent inducer of structural chromosomal aberrations. There was significant (p{le}0.0114), reproducible increase in chromosomal aberrations at concentrations as low as 0.02 {mu}l/ml (0.12 mM). Without metabolic activation, MMT failed to induce a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations following either a 3 hr (p = 0.412) or continuous (p = 0.178) exposure. In order to determine whether the intrinsic mutagenicity identified in vitro is expressed in vivo, a mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay will be performed. In addition, the mutagenicity of MMT combustion byproducts will be evaluated.

  5. Resistivity Changes of Sakurajima Volcano by Magnetotelluric Continuous Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, K.; Kanda, W.; Ogawa, Y.; Iguchi, M.; Yokoo, A.

    2009-12-01

    In order to predict volcano eruptions and to contribute to hazard mitigation, monitoring of subsurface magma movement is the most essential approach. Recent study of time change of seismic structure (4D tomography) in Etna volcano clearly imaged time change of Vp/Vs structure, [Patanè et al., 2006]. They showed that structure changes not only on the location of magma intrusion but widely around the intrusion. They attributed Vp/Vs change to subsurface magma movement and fluids migration from the intrusion zone. Another method using seismic noise records are proposed to monitor the subsurface seismic structure [Brenguier et al., 2008]. These seismic methods have a great potential to reliable prediction of volcano eruption, though the method need densely deployed seismometer network. Monitoring electric resistivity structure is also the promising tools for imaging the subsurface magma movement, because magma and degassed volatile is highly conductive. Indeed, by repeated DC electric measurement using active source field, significant resistivity change is detected before and after the 1986 eruption of Izu-Oshima volcano, and the subsurface magma movement is deduced [Yukutake et al., 1990; Utada, 2003]. In this study, we show the first results of the long term continuous magnetotellurics (MT) observation to monitor the resistivity structure. Because MT impedance is stable and high time resolution [Eisel and Egbert, 2001; Hanekop and Simpson, 2006], the continuous MT observation is suitable to detect subsurface resistivity changes. We conducted long-term MT continuous measurements since May, 2008 to July, 2009 at Sakurajima, which is the most active volcano in Japan. Two observation sites were set up at 3.3km east, and 3km WNW of the summit crater. The obtained MT impedance shows significant apparent resistivity changes, which continues 20~50 days, in the frequency range between 300-1 Hz at the both observation sites. This frequency range corresponds to the depth

  6. Superabsorbent nanocomposite (alginate-g-PAMPS/MMT): synthesis, characterization and swelling behavior.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Mithilesh; Rhee, Kyong Yop

    2012-09-01

    A superabsorbent composite (alginate-g-PAMPS/MMT) was prepared by graft copolymerization from alginate, 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) and Na+ montmorillonite (MMT) in an inert atmosphere. Effects of polymerization variables on water absorbency, including the content of Na+ montmorillonite, sodium alginate, N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide and AMPS, were studied. The introduced montmorillonite formed a loose and porous surface and improved the water absorbency of the alginate-g-PAMPS/MMT superabsorbent composite. Swelling behaviors of the superabsorbent composites in various cationic salt solutions (NaCl, CaCl2 and FeCl3) and anionic salt solutions (NaCl and Na2SO4) were also systematically investigated. The superabsorbent composite was further characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), rheology, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) taking alginate-g-PAMPS as a reference.

  7. The Skellefte Ore District as seen with magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de los Ángeles García Juanatey, María; Hübert, Juliane; Tryggvason, Ari; Juhlin, Christopher; Pedersen, Laust B.; Bauer, Tobias E.; Dehghannejad, Mahdieh; Weihed, Pär

    2013-04-01

    The Skellefte District is one of the richest metallogenic mining areas in Sweden. The main deposits consist of volcanic-hosted massive sulphides (VHMS) rich in zinc, copper, lead, gold and silver, that have been explored and mined for more than a century. Considering that technological advancements allow deeper mining, and that today new discoveries occur less often, new efforts have been directed at locating targets at greater depths. Thus, current exploration strategies need to be adjusted, and a better understanding of regional scale structures is necessary. Following this approach the project "VINNOVA 4D modeling of the Skellefte District" was launched. Its main purpose was to unravel the regional structures and tectonic setting of the Skellefte District and construct a 3D geological model of two key localities within the district. To help accomplish this, magnetotelluric (MT) data were acquired throughout the district together with seismic reflection, geoelectric (ERT and IP) and potential field data. The MT data set consists of 120 stations that were mainly acquired along existing seismic lines. Time series processing yielded MT transfer functions in the frequency range between 700 Hz and 200 s. These data were inverted into 2D resistivity depth sections and subsequently analyzed to identify robust features. Additionally, 3D inversions were computed and compared with the standard 2D results to assess their reliability and better locate conductive bodies. The resistivity features deemed trustworthy were then interpreted in geological terms. For this task, results from the other geophysical methods were considered. The achieved penetration depth varied between 10 and 20 km. The main findings include: (1) conductive hydrothermally altered zones are present within the otherwise resistive rocks of the ore-bearing volcanic units, (2) the depth extension of early and post-orogenic intrusions are depicted as high resistivity features, (3) several prominent conductive

  8. Enhanced mechanical and thermal properties of CNT/HDPE nanocomposite using MMT as secondary filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Mohsin, M. E.; Arsad, Agus; Fouad, H.; Jawaid, M.; Alothman, Othman Y.

    2014-05-01

    This study explains the influence of secondary filler on the dispersion of carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) nanocomposites (CNT/HDPE). In order to understand the mixed-fillers system, Montmorillonite (MMT) was added to CNT/HDPE nanocomposites. It was followed by investigating their effect on the thermal, mechanical and XRD properties of the aforesaid nanocomposite. Incorporation of 3 wt% each of MMT into CNT/HDPE nanocomposite resulted to the increased values for the tensile and flexural strength, as compared to the pure HDPE matrix. The thermal analysis result showed improved thermal stability of the formulated nanocomposites.

  9. The IRETHERM Project: How Can We Characterize Geothermal Reservoirs in Ireland using Magnetotelluric Surveying?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhaye, R. P.; Jones, A. G.; Rath, V.; Brown, C.; Reay, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from two geophysical investigations of the north of Ireland, one of a concealed sedimentary basin and the other of an area of pre- to mid-Cambrian metasedimentary material with local microseismicity in Donegal. Magnetotelluric data have been acquired over each area as part of the IRETHERM Project in order to assess potential low-enthalpy geothermal resources. In addition, airborne frequency-domain EM response data have been used to assist in the definition of near-surface electrical structure and constraint of magnetotelluric modeling. The Rathlin Basin in Northern Ireland was identified as a potential geothermal resource due both an elevated geothermal gradient (observed in two deep boreholes) and favorable hydraulic properties in thick successions of Permian and Triassic sandstones (measured from core samples). Prior seismic experiments failed to fully image the sediments beneath the overlying flood basalt. A new experiment applying the magnetotelluric method has had more success, as the MT signal is not dissipated by the crystalline overburden. MT data were acquired at 69 sites across the north-eastern portion of the onshore Rathlin Basin and on nearby Rathlin Island in order to image the thickness, depth, and lateral continuity of the target sediments. Analyses and modeling of the data have determined a resistivity model that maps the variation in thickness of the sediment fill and the truncation of the sediments against the structurally-controlling Tow Valley Fault. Further testing of the model sensitivity to variations of the thickness of the Sherwood Sandstone Group within the sediment fill has also been performed, as the overlying sediments have lower porosities and permeabilities from core sampling. Microseismicity in a metasedimentary area of northern Donegal suggests that secondary porosity distributions along fracture planes may have been augmented, leading to elevated electrical conductivity. MT data were acquired over the epicenter

  10. Pareto Joint Inversion of 2D Magnetotelluric and Gravity Data — Towards Practical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, Katarzyna; Bogacz, Adrian; Kozubal, Adam; Danek, Tomasz; Wojdyła, Marek

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a Pareto inversion based global optimization approach, to obtain results of joint inversion of two types of geophysical data sets, is formulated. 2D magnetotelluric and gravity data were used for tests, but presented solution is flexible enough to be used for combination of any kind of two or more target functions, as long as misfits can be calculated and forward problems solved. To minimize dimensionality of the solution, space and introduce straightforward regularization Sharp Boundary Interface (SBI) method was applied. As a main optimization engine, Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) was used. Synthetic examples based on a real geological model were used to test proposed approach and show its usefulness in practical applications.

  11. APPLICATION OF AUDIO-MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYS ON SAO MIGUEL ISLAND, AZORES PORTUGAL.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoover, Donald; Rodrigues Da Silva, A.; Pierce, Herbert A.; Amaral, Roberto

    1984-01-01

    Geothermal exploration and development has been under way on Sao Miguel Island, Azores since 1975. This work had been restricted to the Fogo volcano, one of three dormant silicic volcanic centers on the island. The USGS in 1982 and 1983 conducted reconnaissance natural-source audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) surveys of all three silicic centers to evaluate the potential for geothermal systems at each and to demonstrate the utility of the method in areas of difficult terrain. Results on Fogo showed a low resistivity trend extending from the present production area upslope to the caldera boundary. The upper part of this trend is the upwelling zone of a thermal plume which supplies the production area. Further exploration and drilling are now planned for this area.

  12. West Flank Coso FORGE Magnetotelluric 3D Data

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-01-01

    This is the 3D version of the MT data for the West Flank FORGE area.The Coso geothermal field has had three Magnetotelluric (MT) datasets collected including surveys in 2003, 2006, and 2011. The final collection, in 2011, expanded the survey to the west and covers the West Flank of FORGE area.This most recent data set was collected by Schlumberger/WesternGeco and inverted by the WesternGeco GeoSolutions Integrated EM Center of Excellence in Milan, Italy; the 2003 and 2006 data were integrated for these inversions in the present study.

  13. A data variance technique for automated despiking of magnetotelluric data with a remote reference

    SciTech Connect

    Kappler, K.

    2011-02-15

    The magnetotelluric method employs co-located surface measurements of electric and magnetic fields to infer the local electrical structure of the earth. The frequency-dependent 'apparent resistivity' curves can be inaccurate at long periods if input data are contaminated - even when robust remote reference techniques are employed. Data despiking prior to processing can result in significantly more reliable estimates of long period apparent resistivities. This paper outlines a two-step method of automatic identification and replacement for spike-like contamination of magnetotelluric data; based on the simultaneity of natural electric and magnetic field variations at distant sites. This simultaneity is exploited both to identify windows in time when the array data are compromised, and to generate synthetic data that replace observed transient noise spikes. In the first step, windows in data time series containing spikes are identified via intersite comparison of channel 'activity' - such as the variance of differenced data within each window. In the second step, plausible data for replacement of flagged windows is calculated by Wiener filtering coincident data in clean channels. The Wiener filters - which express the time-domain relationship between various array channels - are computed using an uncontaminated segment of array training data. Examples are shown where the algorithm is applied to artificially contaminated data, and to real field data. In both cases all spikes are successfully identified. In the case of implanted artificial noise, the synthetic replacement time series are very similar to the original recording. In all cases, apparent resistivity and phase curves obtained by processing the despiked data are much improved over curves obtained from raw data.

  14. Probabilistic 3-D time-lapse inversion of magnetotelluric data: Application to an enhanced geothermal system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosas-Carbajal, Marina; Linde, Nicolas; Peacock, Jared R.; Zyserman, F. I.; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Thiel, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Surface-based monitoring of mass transfer caused by injections and extractions in deep boreholes is crucial to maximize oil, gas and geothermal production. Inductive electromagnetic methods, such as magnetotellurics, are appealing for these applications due to their large penetration depths and sensitivity to changes in fluid conductivity and fracture connectivity. In this work, we propose a 3-D Markov chain Monte Carlo inversion of time-lapse magnetotelluric data to image mass transfer following a saline fluid injection. The inversion estimates the posterior probability density function of the resulting plume, and thereby quantifies model uncertainty. To decrease computation times, we base the parametrization on a reduced Legendre moment decomposition of the plume. A synthetic test shows that our methodology is effective when the electrical resistivity structure prior to the injection is well known. The centre of mass and spread of the plume are well retrieved.We then apply our inversion strategy to an injection experiment in an enhanced geothermal system at Paralana, South Australia, and compare it to a 3-D deterministic time-lapse inversion. The latter retrieves resistivity changes that are more shallow than the actual injection interval, whereas the probabilistic inversion retrieves plumes that are located at the correct depths and oriented in a preferential north-south direction. To explain the time-lapse data, the inversion requires unrealistically large resistivity changes with respect to the base model. We suggest that this is partly explained by unaccounted subsurface heterogeneities in the base model from which time-lapse changes are inferred.

  15. Magnetotelluric Data, Southern Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Williams; B.D. Rodriguez, and T.H. Asch

    2005-11-23

    Nuclear weapons are integral to the defense of the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as the steward of these devices, must continue to gauge the efficacy of the individual weapons. This could be accomplished by occasional testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, northwest of Las Vegas. Yucca Flat Basin is one of the testing areas at the NTS. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area subsequent to a nuclear test. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and processed Magnetotelluric (MT) and Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to help characterize this pre-Tertiary geology. That work will help to define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU) in the Yucca Flat area. Interpretation will include a three-dimensional (3-D) character analysis and two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data for Southern Yucca Flat, Profile 4, as shown in Figure 1. No interpretation of the data is included here.

  16. Inversion of magnetotelluric data in a sparse model domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittinger, Christian G.; Becken, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The inversion of magnetotelluric data into subsurface electrical conductivity poses an ill-posed problem. Smoothing constraints are widely employed to estimate a regularized solution. Here, we present an alternative inversion scheme that estimates a sparse representation of the model in a wavelet basis. The objective of the inversion is to determine the few non-zero wavelet coefficients which are required to fit the data. This approach falls into the class of sparsity constrained inversion schemes and minimizes the combination of the data misfit in a least-squares ℓ2 sense and of a model coefficient norm in an ℓ1 sense (ℓ2-ℓ1 minimization). The ℓ1 coefficient norm renders the solution sparse in a suitable representation such as the multiresolution wavelet basis, but does not impose explicit structural penalties on the model as it is the case for ℓ2 regularization. The presented numerical algorithm solves the mixed ℓ2-ℓ1 norm minimization problem for the nonlinear magnetotelluric inverse problem. We demonstrate the feasibility of our algorithm on synthetic 2-D MT data as well as on a real data example. We found that sparse models can be estimated by inversion and that the spatial distribution of non-vanishing coefficients indicates regions in the model which are resolved.

  17. Magnetotelluric Data, Northern Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Williams; B.D. Rodriguez, and T. H. Asch

    2005-11-23

    Nuclear weapons are integral to the defense of the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as the steward of these devices, must continue to gauge the efficacy of the individual weapons. This could be accomplished by occasional testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, northwest of Las Vegas. Yucca Flat Basin is one of the testing areas at the NTS. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area subsequent to a nuclear test. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and processed Magnetotelluric (MT) and Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to help characterize this pre-Tertiary geology. That work will help to define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU) in the Yucca Flat area. Interpretation will include a three-dimensional (3-D) character analysis and two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data for Frenchman Flat Profile 3, as shown in Figure 1. No interpretation of the data is included here.

  18. Magnetotelluric Data, Central Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Williams; B.D. Rodriguez, and T.H. Asch

    2005-11-23

    Nuclear weapons are integral to the defense of the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as the steward of these devices, must continue to gauge the efficacy of the individual weapons. This could be accomplished by occasional testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, northwest of Las Vegas. Yucca Flat Basin is one of the testing areas at the NTS. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area subsequent to a nuclear test. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and processed Magnetotelluric (MT) and Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to help characterize this pre-Tertiary geology. That work will help to define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU) in the Yucca Flat area. Interpretation will include a three-dimensional (3-D) character analysis and two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data for Central Yucca Flat, Profile 1, as shown in figure 1. No interpretation of the data is included here.

  19. Two dimensional joint inversion of direct current resistivity, radio-magnetotelluric and seismic refraction data: An application from Bafra Plain, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, İsmail; Candansayar, Mehmet Emin; Vafidis, Antonis; Soupios, Pantelis

    2017-04-01

    Direct current resistivity, radio-magnetotelluric and seismic refraction methods are widely used in the identification of near surface structures with collected data generally being interpreted separately. In recent decades, the use of joint inversion algorithms in geosciences has become widespread to identify near surface structures. However, there is no developed joint inversion algorithm using direct current resistivity, radio-magnetotelluric and seismic refraction methods. In this study, we developed a new two-dimensional joint inversion algorithm for direct current resistivity, radio-magnetotelluric and seismic refraction data based on a cross gradient approach. In addition, we proposed a new data weighting matrix to stabilize the convergence behavior of the joint inversion algorithms. We used synthetic data to show the advantage of the algorithm. The developed joint inversion algorithm found resistivity and velocity models that are better than the individual inversion of each data set. We also tested an algorithm with the field data collected in the Bafra Plain (Samsun, Turkey) to investigate saltwater intrusion. In comparing the field data inversion results with the sounding log, it can be seen that the developed joint inversion algorithm with the proposed data weighting matrix recovered the resistivity and velocity model better than the individual inversion and classical joint inversion of each data set. Our results showed that a more unique hydrogeological scenario might be obtained, especially in highly conductive media, with the joint usage of these methods.

  20. Structures of Mid-Polish Trough in the light of regional magnetotelluric survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefaniuk, M.; Pokorski, J.; Wojdyla, M.; Klitynski, W.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction The magnetotelluric survey at three long regional profiles crossing the Mid-Polish Trough in north-western part of Poland was made during 2005-2008 period. Two of the profiles pass across the Pomeranian section of the Trough and the third one cuts its Kujawy section. The task of the survey was to recognize the geological structure of the contact zone of Precambrian East European Craton and Paleozoic Platform of Western Europe. The profiles crossed major geological structures of central and north-western Poland, including the Variscan Externides and Varscian Foredeep, the Transeuropean Suture Zone and the marginal zone of the East European Craton. The main objectives of the project included evaluation of resistivity distribution and identification of structures of sub-Zechstein sedimentary and metamorphic complexes.The screening of seismic energy by high reflective Zechstein evaporates is the main problem in identifying the sub-Zechstein complexes in the Polish Lowlands area. Since evaporates do not screen the electromagnetic waves, the magnetotelluric method can be advantageously applied. The sub-Zechstein complexes and structures are commonly considered as hydrocarbon prospective. A lot of gas deposits have been discovered in Rotliegend sediments in central and Western Europe. A number offshore and onshore oil fields were found in Cambrian sandstones in the Baltic Sea area. Techniques and methodology of surveys Magnetotelluric measurements were taken with the use of MT-1 system of Electromagnetic Instruments Incorporation (EMI), Richmond, California, USA and System 2000.net based on V8 receiver of Phoenix Geophysics Ltd., Ottawa, Canada. An average spacing of sounding sites was about 4 km. The components of natural electromagnetic field were recorded over a broad range of frequencies, ranging from 0.0003 Hz to 575 Hz (MT-1) and 0,0003 HZ to 10 000,0 HZ (System 2000.net). This frequency band allowed information on the geology from a depth range of a

  1. Multistation magnetotellurics. Final report, 1 January 1996--30 June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Egbert, G.D.

    1997-12-31

    The author has developed the foundations of a practical multivariate approach to processing magnetotelluric array data. Compared to current standards for magnetotelluric data processing, the multivariate approach is unique in that all available data channels are used simultaneously. The approach is outlined in this report. Using Multmtrn, a program for multiple station analysis of magnetotelluric data, the author achieved significant improvements in apparent resistivity and phase estimates in initial tests. Examples of the use of this approach are given including: Carrizo Plain and Parkfield electromagnetic profiling data; sea floor magnetotelluric (MT) data from the Gulf of Mexico; MT survey in a culturally noisy area of Bavaria; and Parkfield/Hollister earthquake monitoring array data. Experience with these projects has resulted in an improved program. The new version of the code is available at http://www.cg.NRCan.gc.ca/mtnet/mtnet.html or by contacting egbert{at}oce.orst.edu. Appendices of this report present documentation for Multmtrn.

  2. The 6.5-m MMT Telescope: status and plans for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. Grant; Ortiz, R.; Goble, W.; Gibson, J. D.

    2016-08-01

    The MMT Observatory, a joint venture of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona, operates the 6.5-m MMT telescope on the summit of Mount Hopkins approximately 45 miles south of Tucson, AZ. The upgraded telescope has been in routine operation for nearly fifteen years and, as such, is a very reliable and productive general purpose astronomical instrument. The telescope can be configured with one of three secondary mirrors that feed more than ten instruments at the Cassegrain focus. In this paper we provide an overview of the the telescope, its current capabilities, and its performance. We will review the existing suite of instruments and their different modes of operation. We will describe some of the general operations challenges and strategies for the Observatory. Finally, we will discuss plans for the near-term future including technical upgrades, new instrumentation and routine queue operation of MMIRS and Binospec.

  3. Two and three dimensional magnetotelluric inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J.

    1993-01-01

    Electrical conductivity depends on properties such as the presence of ionic fluids in interconnected pores that are difficult to sense with other remote sensing techniques. Thus improved imaging of underground electrical structure has wide practical importance in exploring for groundwater, mineral and geothermal resources, and in assessing the diffusion of fluids in oil fields and waste sites. Because the electromagnetic inverse problem is fundamentally multi-dimensional, most imaging algorithms saturate available computer power long before they can deal with the complete data set. We have developed an algorithm to directly invert large multi-dimensional data sets that is orders of magnitude faster than competing methods. We have proven that a two-dimensional (2D) version of the algorithm is highly effective for real data and have made substantial progress towards a three-dimensional (3D) version. We are proposing to cure identified shortcomings and substantially expand the utility of the existing 2D program, overcome identified difficulties with extending our method to three-dimensions (3D) and embark on an investigation of related EM imaging techniques which may have the potential for even further increasing resolution.

  4. HISTORY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF THE US EPA'S SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) MONITORING AND MEASUREMENT (MMT) PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript presents the history and evolution of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Monitoring and Measurement Technology (MMT) Program. This includes a discussion of how the fundamental concepts of a performanc...

  5. Magnetotelluric Data, Across Quartzite Ridge, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Williams; B.D. Rodriguez, and T.H. Asch

    2005-11-23

    Nuclear weapons are integral to the defense of the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as the steward of these devices, must continue to gauge the efficacy of the individual weapons. This could be accomplished by occasional testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, northwest of Las Vegas. Yucca Flat Basin is one of the testing areas at the NTS. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area subsequent to a nuclear test. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and processed Magnetotelluric (MT) and Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to help characterize this pre-Tertiary geology. That work will help to define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU) in the Yucca Flat area. Interpretation will include a three-dimensional (3-D) character analysis and two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model. The purpose of this report is to release the MT soundings across Quartzite Ridge, Profiles 5, 6a, and 6b, as shown in Figure 1. No interpretation of the data is included here.

  6. Magnetotelluric Data, Northern Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Williams; B.D. Rodriguez, and T.H. Asch

    2005-11-23

    Nuclear weapons are integral to the defense of the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as the steward of these devices, must continue to gauge the efficacy of the individual weapons. This could be accomplished by occasional testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, northwest of Las Vegas. Yucca Flat Basin is one of the testing areas at the NTS. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area subsequent to a nuclear test. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and processed Magnetotelluric (MT) and Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to help characterize this pre-Tertiary geology. That work will help to define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU) in the Yucca Flat area. Interpretation will include a three-dimensional (3-D) character analysis and two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data for Profile 2, (fig. 1), located in the northern Yucca Flat area. No interpretation of the data is included here.

  7. Magnetotelluric Data, North Central Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Williams; B.D. Rodriguez, and T.H. Asch

    2005-11-23

    Nuclear weapons are integral to the defense of the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as the steward of these devices, must continue to gauge the efficacy of the individual weapons. This could be accomplished by occasional testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, northwest of Las Vegas. Yucca Flat Basin is one of the testing areas at the NTS. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area subsequent to a nuclear test. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and processed Magnetotelluric (MT) and Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to help characterize this pre-Tertiary geology. That work will help to define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU) in the Yucca Flat area. Interpretation will include a three-dimensional (3-D) character analysis and two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data for north central Yucca Flat, Profile 7, as shown in Figure 1. No interpretation of the data is included here.

  8. Concerning Shot-term Earthquake Forecasting Through Magnetotelluric Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerimov, K. M.; Agaguliyev, G. B.; Biagi, F. P.; Abdullayev, A. A.; Mammadhasanov, K. G.

    It is recognized, each earthquake event is a unique phenomena and there is no similarity in its paradigm multiplicity, this event just bears information on a series of identical aspects. and therefore, several aspects, such as structure and peculiarities of geotectonical development, geologic setting, monitoring station location and monitoring technology should be considered while shot-term forecasting of strong earthquakes. In this context available data picked up from Earth's magnetic field magnetotelluric sounding (MTS) conducted within the major Caucasus sout hern slope in Azerbaijan is suggested to be of particular interest. Acquired data analysis made it possible to reveal a systematic trend in magnetotelluric field behavior while preceding period, at the moment of and after strong earthquakes. This effect is def initely reflected by MTS data acquired while two catastrophic earthquakes ­ Spitac (Armenia, 1988) and Zandjan (Iran, 1990). It has been identified that prior to this events, there were abrupt variations observed in electromagnetic field component intensity. These variations were recorded about 10 - 12 hour prior to event first case, and 5-6 hour prior ­ in the second case. Maximum values of MT-fields components had been recorded at the moment of events. Important implication of this study is the fact, that magnetic field vector prior to event becomes gaining direct ion towards the focus of up coning event. Intersection point detected from monitoring stations can provide the useful data on the coordinates of the upcoming event focus. So, MT-field components, intensity and vector trend abnormal variation observed prior to event, may probably elucidate all three required criteria (time, location and magnitude) of up coming event. Moreover, such kind of approach make it possible to forecast earthquakes in the area about 600-700 km away from observation point. Acquired data has been corroborated by further investigations. This is especially important

  9. MM&T: Bibliography on optical testing with appendix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo-Rodriguez, A.; Caulfield, H. J.; Friday, W.

    1982-02-01

    The following is a major expansion of 'Bibliography on Various Optical Testing Methods,' by Daniel Malacara, Alejandro Cornejo, and M. V. R. K. Murty which appeared in Applied Optica, 14, 1065 - 1080(1975). It is computerized to allow for easy update and correction. The last update was in September 1979. For availability information, please contact either of the authors. The present bibliography occupies 321 pages and includes the work of Cornejo, et al. as an appendix.

  10. Multi-site magnetotelluric measurement system with real-time data analysis. Final technical report No. 210

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.D.; Bostick, F.X. Jr.; Smith, H.W.

    1981-09-01

    A magnetotelluric measurement system has been designed to provide a more cost effective electrical method for geothermal and mineral exploration. The theoretical requirements and sensitivities of the magnetotelluric inversion process were specifically addressed in determining system performance requirements. Significantly reduced instrument noise levels provide improved data quality, and simultaneous measurement at up to six locations provides reduced cost per site. Remotely located, battery powered, instrumentation packages return data to a central controlling site through a 2560 baud wire-line or radio link. Each remote package contains preamplifiers, data conditioning filters, and a 12-bit gain ranging A-D converter for frequencies from 0.001 Hz to 8 Hz. Data frequencies above 8 Hz are processed sequentially by a heterodyne receiver to reduce bandwidth to within the limits of the 2560 baud data link. The central data collection site provides overall control for the entire system. The system operator interacts with the system through a CRT terminal, and he receives hard copy from a matrix graphics printer. Data from the remote packages may be recorded in time sequence on a magnetic tape cartridge system, or an optional Hewlett-Packard 21MX minicomputer can be used to perform real-time frequency analysis. The results of this analysis provide feedback to the operator for improved evaluation of system performance and for selection of future measurement sites.

  11. 2-D Magnetotellurics at the geothermal site at Soultz-sous-Forêts: Resistivity distribution to about 3000 m depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiermann, Johannes; Schill, Eva

    2010-07-01

    With the aim of investigating the possibilities of magnetotelluric methods for the exploration of potential Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) sites in the Upper Rhine valley, a 2-D magnetotelluric (MT) survey has been carried out on a 13 km long profile across the thermal anomaly in the area of the geothermal power plant of Soultz-sous-Forêts in the winter 2007/08. Despite strong artificial noise, processing using remote referencing and Sutarno phase consistent smoothing revealed significant results from 10 out of 16 sites. Indication for 1-D structures was found in the shortest periods, 2-D effects in the periods up to 40 s, and 3-D effects in the long period range. Since 3-D effects were found in the longer periods, 2-D inversion was carried out for periods smaller than 40 s. The results of the inversion are consistent with the geology of the geothermal site and distinguish well the sediments from the granitic basement including the structures given by the faults. A conductive anomaly with a resistivity of about 3 Ωm has been found at a depth down to 2000 m in the area of the Soultz and Kutzenhausen faults, which is attributed to geothermal processes.

  12. Joint interpretation of magnetotelluric, seismic, and well-log data in Hontomín (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogaya, Xènia; Alcalde, Juan; Marzán, Ignacio; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Marcuello, Alex; Martí, David; Saura, Eduard; Carbonell, Ramon; Benjumea, Beatriz

    2016-06-01

    Hontomín (N of Spain) hosts the first Spanish CO2 storage pilot plant. The subsurface characterization of the site included the acquisition of a 3-D seismic reflection and a circumscribed 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) survey. This paper addresses the combination of the seismic and MT results, together with the available well-log data, in order to achieve a better characterization of the Hontomín subsurface. We compare the structural model obtained from the interpretation of the seismic data with the geoelectrical model resulting from the MT data. The models correlate well in the surroundings of the CO2 injection area with the major structural differences observed related to the presence of faults. The combination of the two methods allowed a more detailed characterization of the faults, defining their geometry, and fluid flow characteristics, which are key for the risk assessment of the storage site. Moreover, we use the well-log data of the existing wells to derive resistivity-velocity relationships for the subsurface and compute a 3-D velocity model of the site using the 3-D resistivity model as a reference. The derived velocity model is compared to both the predicted and logged velocity in the injection and monitoring wells, for an overall assessment of the computed resistivity-velocity relationships. The major differences observed are explained by the different resolution of the compared geophysical methods. Finally, the derived velocity model for the near surface is compared with the velocity model used for the static corrections in the seismic data. The results allowed extracting information about the characteristics of the shallow unconsolidated sediments, suggesting possible clay and water content variations. The good correlation of the velocity models derived from the resistivity-velocity relationships and the well-log data demonstrate the potential of the combination of the two methods for characterizing the subsurface, in terms of its physical properties

  13. Joint Audio-Magnetotelluric and Passive Seismic Imaging of the Cerdanya Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabàs, A.; Macau, A.; Benjumea, B.; Queralt, P.; Ledo, J.; Figueras, S.; Marcuello, A.

    2016-09-01

    The structure of Cerdanya Basin (north-east of Iberian Peninsula) is partly known from geological cross sections, geological maps and vintage geophysical data. However, these data do not have the necessary resolution to characterize some parts of Cerdanya Basin such as the thickness of soft soil, geometry of bedrock or geometry of geological units and associated faults. For all these reasons, the main objective of this work is to improve this deficiency carrying out a detailed study in this Neogene basin applying jointly the combination of passive seismic methods ( H/V spectral ratio and seismic array) and electromagnetic methods (audio-magnetotelluric and magnetotelluric method). The passive seismic techniques provide valuable information of geometry of basement along the profile. The maximum depth is located near Alp village with a bedrock depth of 500 m. The bedrock is located in surface at both sites of profile. The Neogene sediments present a shear-wave velocity between 400 and 1000 m/s, and the bedrock basement presents a shear-wave velocity values between 1700 and 2200 m/s. These results are used as a priori information to create a 2D resistivity initial model which constraints the inversion process of electromagnetic data. We have obtained a 2D resistivity model which is characterized by (1) a heterogeneous conductivity zone (<40 Ohm m) that corresponds to shallow part of the model up to 500 m depth in the centre of the profile. These values have been associated with Quaternary and Neogene sediments formed by silts, clays, conglomerates, sandstones and gravels, and (2) a deeper resistive zone (1000-3000 Ohm m) interpreted as Palaeozoic basement (sandstones, limestones and slates at NW and conglomerates and microconglomerates at SE). The resistive zone is truncated by a discontinuity at the south-east of the profile which is interpreted as the Alp-La Tet Fault. This discontinuity is represented by a more conductive zone (600 Ohm m approx.) and is explained

  14. Hunting for extremely metal-poor emission-line galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: MMT and 3.5 m APO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Thuan, T. X.; Guseva, N. G.

    2012-10-01

    We present 6.5-m MMT and 3.5 m APO spectrophotometry of 69 H ii regions in 42 low-metallicity emission-line galaxies, selected from the data release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to have mostly [O iii]λ4959/Hβ ≲ 1 and [N ii]λ6583/Hβ ≲ 0.1. The electron temperature-sensitive emission line [O iii] λ4363 is detected in 53 H ii regions allowing a direct abundance determination. The oxygen abundance in the remaining 16 H ii regions is derived using a semi-empirical method. The oxygen abundance of the galaxies in our sample ranges from 12 + log O/H ~ 7.1 to ~7.9, with 14 H ii regions in 7 galaxies with 12 + log O/H ≤ 7.35. In 5 of the latter galaxies, the oxygen abundance is derived here for the first time. Including other known extremely metal-deficient emission-line galaxies from the literature, e.g. SBS 0335-052W, SBS 0335-052E and I Zw 18, we have compiled a sample of the 17 most metal-deficient (with 12 + log O/H ≤ 7.35) emission-line galaxies known in the local universe. There appears to be a metallicity floor at 12 + log O/H ~ 6.9, suggesting that the matter from which dwarf emission-line galaxies formed was pre-enriched to that level by e.g. Population III stars. Based on observations with the Multiple Mirror telescope (MMT) and the 3.5 m Apache Point Observatory (APO). The MMT is operated by the MMT Observatory (MMTO), a joint venture of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona. The Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium.Figures 1-3 and Tables 2-8 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Magnetotelluric investigation of the geothermal anomaly in Hailin, Mudanjiang, northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lili; Hao, Tianyao; Xiao, Qibin; Wang, Jie; Zhou, Liang; Qi, Min; Cui, Xiangpan; Cai, Ningxiao

    2015-07-01

    To study the occurrence conditions and locations of geothermal bodies in Hailin, Mudanjiang, northeastern China, we conducted a magnetotelluric investigation to delineate the electrical conductivity structure of the area on three parallel profiles. The area to the west of the Mudanjiang Fault lies in the Hailang sag of the Ning'an Basin. The data were processed using the mutual reference technique, static shift correction, and structural strike and dimensionality analysis based on tensor decomposition. Moreover, a modified anisotropic-diffusion-based method was used to suppress noise for the magnetotelluric time series data. This method retains the advantages of conventional anisotropic diffusion and is superior in its discrimination ability. The method is characteristic not only of the inherited features such as intra-region smoothing and edge preservation, but also of the adaptive selection of the diffusion coefficient. Data analysis revealed that the electrical resistivity structure can be approximated by a two-dimensional characterization. Two-dimensional inversion and rendering visualization show that a highly resistive granite basement is covered with conductive sedimentary layers and that a relatively low-resistivity anomalous structure with a resistivity of approximately 100-600 Ω·m is imbedded in the high-resistivity background. The anomalous structure has a narrow top and a wide bottom (the bottom depth is at least 3500 m). The shape and electrical features of the structure indicate favorable storage space for hot subsurface water. Fault activities and magma intrusion may result in the fractures of the basement, which are filled with hot water and thus produce the relatively low resistivity. Based on a comprehensive analysis, we infer that the structure is indicative of a geothermal reservoir. An exploratory well drilled near the structure confirms the occurrence of high temperatures. Several geological factors (cap rock, basement, and major faults

  16. Lithology-derived structure classification from the joint interpretation of magnetotelluric and seismic models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedrosian, P.A.; Maercklin, N.; Weckmann, U.; Bartov, Y.; Ryberg, T.; Ritter, O.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetotelluric and seismic methods provide complementary information about the resistivity and velocity structure of the subsurface on similar scales and resolutions. No global relation, however, exists between these parameters, and correlations are often valid for only a limited target area. Independently derived inverse models from these methods can be combined using a classification approach to map geologic structure. The method employed is based solely on the statistical correlation of physical properties in a joint parameter space and is independent of theoretical or empirical relations linking electrical and seismic parameters. Regions of high correlation (classes) between resistivity and velocity can in turn be mapped back and re-examined in depth section. The spatial distribution of these classes, and the boundaries between them, provide structural information not evident in the individual models. This method is applied to a 10 km long profile crossing the Dead Sea Transform in Jordan. Several prominent classes are identified with specific lithologies in accordance with local geology. An abrupt change in lithology across the fault, together with vertical uplift of the basement suggest the fault is sub-vertical within the upper crust. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  17. Long regional magnetotelluric profile crossing geotectonic structures of central Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefaniuk, M.; Pokorski, J.; Wojdyla, M.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction The magnetotelluric survey was made along a regional profile, which runs across Poland from south-west to north-east during 2005-2006 years. The profile crosses major geological structures of Central Poland, including the Variscan Externides and Variscan foredeep, the Transeuropean Suture Zone and the marginal zone of East European Craton. The main objectives of the project include identification of sub-Zechstein sedimentary structures and evaluation of resistivity distribution within the deep crust, especially at the contact of East European Precambrian Craton and Central Europe Paleozoic structures. The length of the profile is about 700 km; 161 deep magnetotelluric sounding sites were made with a medium spacing of about 4 km. Data acquisition and processing The recording of the components of natural electromagnetic field was made with a broad range of frequencies, varying from 0.0003 Hz up to 575 Hz with use of MT-1 system of Electromagnetic Instruments Incorporation. This frequency band allowed obtaining the information about geology ranging from a few dozen meters to approximately 100 km, depending on the vertical distribution of the resistivity inside geological medium. To reduce the electromagnetic noise, magnetic and electric remote reference was applied. A remote reference site was located at a distance of over 100 km of field sites. Processing of the recorded data included the estimation of the components of impedance tensor (Zxx, Zxy, Zyx and Zyy ), with use of robust type procedures. The components of the impedance tensor allowed in a subsequent step for calculation of field curves for two orientations of the measurement system (XY - described further as the TM mode and YX - TE mode) and additional parameters of the medium like skew, strike, pole diagrams etc. Recording of the vertical component of electromagnetic field (Hz) allowed calculation of tipper parameter T. Magnetotelluric soundings interpretation Geophysical interpretation of MT

  18. Combining ZTEM and Magnetotelluric Data to Enhance Three-dimensional Conductivity Models of Porphyry Copper Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B.; Huebert, J.; Abbassi, B.; Liu, L.; Unsworth, M. J.; Richards, J. P.; Cheng, L.; Oldenburg, D.

    2013-12-01

    The airborne Z-Axis Tipper Electromagnetic (ZTEM) method uses natural low frequency electromagnetic signals to determine subsurface electrical conductivity from the surface to a depth of 2 km. It measures the ratio of vertical magnetic field to the horizontal magnetic field with signals in the frequency range 30 -720 Hz. ZTEM is highly effective at determining lateral changes in subsurface conductivity, but does not give the same vertical resolution as the ground-based magnetotelluric (MT) method that measures the ratio of electric to magnetic fields. However, MT surveys require ground contact to measure electric fields and as a consequence are slower to deploy and provide a coarser sampling of conductive features. Since both methods derive the tipper from measured vertical and horizontal magnetic fields, these techniques can be used in a joint approach to create electrical conductivity models. Synthetic MT inversions show that the technique is sensitive to the vertical depth of conductors, complementing the lateral sensitivity of ZTEM. A key application of ZTEM is that metallic sulfide-bearing ore bodies can be resolved because of their high electrical conductivity relative to the host rock. Porphyry copper deposits contain a less distinct geophysical response though, and require additional geologic information. Here we present conductivity models from the Morrison porphyry copper deposit in British Columbia, Canada where the implementation of MT data provides background conductivity and vertical constraints for the three-dimensional ZTEM models.

  19. Application of Mixture of Gaussian Clustering on Joint Facies Interpretation of Seismic and Magnetotelluric Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrabi, Mohammad Ali; Hashemi, Hosein; Hafizi, Mohammad Kazem

    2016-02-01

    Seismic and magnetotelluric (MT) methods are the most applicable geophysical methods in exploration of hydrocarbon resources. In this paper, mixture of Gaussian clustering is used to combine seismic and MT images under the scheme of Expectation/Maximization (EM) algorithm. Pre-Stack Depth Migration (PSDM) velocity, Root Mean Square (RMS) velocity and vertical gradient of RMS velocity of seismic and resistivity model of MT along 19.3 km MUN-21 profile in Munir Block that has been located in Southwest of Iran in Dezful embayment over the Seh-Qanat anticline are applied. The anticline is the most important oil trap of this area. The Expectation/Maximization (EM) method that has been applied includes: (1) creation of data vectors from the seismic and MT images using image processing techniques, (2) normalizing and mapping using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) procedure (3) unsupervised learning of dataset matrix, (4) setting the matrix in Expectation/Maximization (EM) iteration algorithm (5) remapping to physical space. The final model consists fof six classes which could be given to eight formations that belong to Eocene to Neocomian geological age. Pre-Stack Depth Migration (PSDM) velocity model obtained from seismic study on Seh-Qanat anticline only detected 2 horizons of formations, Asmari and Sarvak Formations; however, the current methodology introduces subdivision anticline into six classes by matching it to the log information of Seh-Qanat Deep-1 (SQD-1) borehole where it was excavated over the anticline with total depth of 2876 m.

  20. Magnetotelluric Data, Mid Valley, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Jackie M.; Wallin, Erin L.; Rodriguez, Brian D.; Lindsey, Charles R.; Sampson, Jay A.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at their Nevada Site Office (NSO) are addressing ground-water contamination resulting from historical underground nuclear testing through the Environmental Management (EM) program and, in particular, the Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the DOE and NNSA-NSO, collected and processed data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat (YF) to help define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of the pre-Tertiary confining units. We collected 51 magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT), stations for that research. In early 2005 we extended that research with 26 additional MT data stations, located on and near Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain (RM-SM). The new stations extended the area of the hydrogeologic study previously conducted in Yucca Flat. This work was done to help refine what is known about the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal was to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU). The UCCU is comprised of late Devonian to Mississippian siliciclastic rocks assigned to the Eleana Formation and Chainman Shale. The UCCU underlies the Yucca Flat area and extends westward towards Shoshone Mountain, southward to Buckboard Mesa, and northward to Rainier Mesa. Late in 2005 we collected another 14 MT stations in Mid Valley and in northern Yucca Flat basin. That work was done to better determine the extent and thickness of the UCCU near

  1. Magnetotelluric Data, Mid Valley, Nevada Test Site, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect

    Jackie M. Williams; Erin L. Wallin; Brian D. Rodriguez; Charles R. Lindsay; and Jay A. Sampson

    2007-08-15

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at their Nevada Site Office (NSO) are addressing ground-water contamination resulting from historical underground nuclear testing through the Environmental Management (EM) program and, in particular, the Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit (CAU) (Bechtel Nevada, 2006). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the DOE and NNSA-NSO, collected and processed data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat (YF) to help define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of the pre-tertiary confining units. We collected 51 magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT), stations for that research (Williams and others, 2005a, 2005b, 2005c, 2005d, 2005e, 2005f). In early 2005 we extended that research with 26 additional MT data stations (Williams and others, 2006), located on and near Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain (RM-SM). The new stations extended the area of the hydrogeologic study previously conducted in Yucca Flat. This work was done to help refine what is known about the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal was to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU). The UCCU is comprised of late Devonian to Mississippian siliciclastic rocks assigned to the Eleana Formation and Chainman Shale. The UCCU underlies the Yucca Flat area and extends westward towards Shoshone Mountain, southward to Buckboard Mesa, and northward to Rainier Mesa. Late in 2005 we collected another 14 MT stations in Mid Valley and in

  2. MM/T program for three color light emitting diode display modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, R. F.; Lewis, G. W.

    1981-10-01

    This report provides a complete description of the LED panel, along with a discussion of the processes and tooling required for its production at reasonable cost. An 'LED Panel Exerciser' (test system) which was delivered to the government is described. Suggested changes to ERADCOM TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS NO. MMT-799938 are presented based on analysis and present practice. Sample processes, operator's manuals, and drawings are included. Problems involving the quality of procurred light emitting diodes and collimators are discussed, along with actions which are being taken to resolve them.

  3. The application of artificial neural networks to magnetotelluric time-series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoj, C.; Nagarajan, Nandini

    2003-05-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) signals are often contaminated with noise from natural or man-made processes that may not fit a normal distribution or are highly correlated. This may lead to serious errors in computed MT transfer functions and result in erroneous interpretation. A substantial improvement is possible when the time-series are presented as clean as possible for further processing. Cleaning of MT time-series is often done by manual editing. Editing of magnetotelluric time-series is subjective in nature and time consuming. Automation of such a process is difficult to achieve by statistical methods. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are widely used to automate processes that require human intelligence. The objective here is to automate MT long-period time-series editing using ANN. A three-layer feed-forward artificial neural network (FANN) was adopted for the problem. As ANN-based techniques are computationally intensive, a novel approach was made, which involves editing of five simultaneously measured MT time-series that have been subdivided into stacks (a stack=5 × 256 data points). Neural network training was done at two levels. Signal and noise patterns of individual channels were taught first. Five channel parameters along with interchannel correlation and amplitude ratios formed the input for a final network, which predicts the quality of a stack. A large database (5000 traces for pattern training and 900 vectors for interchannel training) was prepared to train the network. There were two error parameters to minimize while training: training error and testing error. Training was stopped when both errors were below an acceptable level. The sensitivity of the neural network to the signal-to-noise ratio and the relative significance of its inputs were tested to ensure that the training was correct. MT time-series from four stations with varying degrees of noise contamination were used to demonstrate the application of the network. The application brought out

  4. Oxygen and water vapor barrier properties of MMT nanocomposites from low density polyethylene or EPM with grafted succinic groups.

    PubMed

    Passaglia, Elisa; Bertoldo, Monica; Ceriegi, Silvia; Sulcis, Roberta; Narducci, Piero; Conzatti, Lucia

    2008-04-01

    LDPE, EPM and their derivatives containing a moderate amount (0.08-1.8 by mol) of diethylsuccinate or succinic anhydryde groups were used as matrices in blending with different amount of organophilic montmorillonites and the resulting composite morphology and structure (by XRD, SEM, TEM microscopy, DSC analysis and selective solvent extraction) were studied with reference to the polar groups/MMT ratio. Exfoliated, intercalated and mixed morphologies were achieved. High concentrations of polar groups grafted to the polyolefin and montmorillonite loading not larger than 5% wt were favourable for obtaining high exfoliation degree. Particularly in the exfoliated MMT composite LDPE had lower crystallinity degree, while EPM showed increased glass transition temperature and reduced solubility in hot toluene. Moreover, oxygen and water vapor barrier property improvement was observed in films where MMT exhibits either exfoliated or intercalated morphologies. Strong interactions with the montmorillonite particle surface through the polar groups grafted to the polyolefin seems to be the basic effect responsible for the morphology and peculiar properties. A model based on the reduced mobility of the polymer located near the particle surface or inside the MMT gallery (confined phase) was proposed to explain the observed oxygen permeability reduction, the T(g) increase and solubility of poly(ethylene-ran-propylene)/MMT nanocomposites.

  5. Whey acidic protein (WAP) depresses the proliferation of mouse (MMT) and human (MCF-7) mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Nukumi, Naoko; Iwamori, Tokuko; Naito, Kunihiko; Tojo, Hideaki

    2005-10-01

    We previously reported that the enforced expression of exogenous whey acidic protein (WAP) significantly inhibited the proliferation of mouse mammary epithelial cells (HC11 and EpH4/H6 cells). This paper presents the first evidence that WAP also depresses the proliferation of mammary tumor cells from mouse (MMT cells) and human (MCF-7 cells). We established WAP-clonal MMT and MCF-7 cell lines, and confirmed the secretion of WAP from the WAP-clonal cells into culture medium. The enforced expression of WAP significantly inhibited the proliferation of MMT and MCF-7 cells in in vitro culture. FACScan analyses revealed that G0/G1 phase cell-cycle progression was disordered and elongated in the WAP-clonal MMT and MCF-7 cells compared to that of the control cells. The expression of cyclin D1 was significantly decreased in the WAP-clonal MMT and MCF-7 cells, suggesting that progression from the G1 to the S phase was delayed in the WAP-clonal cells. The present results indicate that WAP plays a negative regulatory role in the cell-cycle progression of mammary tumor cells via a paracrine mechanism.

  6. Magnetotelluric data, Taos Plateau Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ailes, Chad E.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    The population of the San Luis Basin region of northern New Mexico is growing. Water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depend on accurate assessment and protection of the region's groundwater resources. An important issue in managing the groundwater resources is a better understanding of the hydrogeology of the Santa Fe Group and the nature of the sedimentary deposits that fill the Rio Grande rift, which contain the principal groundwater aquifers. The shallow unconfined aquifer and the deeper confined Santa Fe Group aquifer in the San Luis Basin are the main sources of municipal water for the region. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, an electromagnetic survey called magnetotellurics (MT), and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifers. This report describes a regional east-west MT sounding profile acquired in late July 2009 across the Taos Plateau Volcanic Field where drillhole data are sparse. Resistivity modeling of the MT data can be used to help map changes in electrical resistivity with depths that are related to differences in rock types. These various rock types help control the properties of aquifers. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data collected along the east-west profile. No interpretation of the data is included.

  7. Magnetotelluric Exploration of the Sipoholon Geothermal Field, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niasari, S. W.; Muñoz, G.; Kholid, M.; Suhanto, E.; Ritter, O.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) measurements have been carried out at 96 sites around the Sipoholon Geothermal field, in the province of North Sumatra, Indonesia. The Sipoholon geothermal field is a low enthalpy geothermal system located in a pull-apart basin controlled by the Sumatra fault system. One of the main difficulties in understanding this system is an apparently random distribution of temperatures in 15 hot springs in the area. High levels of electromagnetic noise with several high voltage power lines in a densely populated area is challenging for natural source MT measurements. Noise at long periods and in the dead band (1s to 10s) could be removed with robust remote reference processing and high frequency noise could be suppressed with a delay line filter. After dimensionality and directionality analysis of the data, we found a regional strike direction consistent with the Sumatra fault. We present results of 2D inversion of the data along several profiles perpendicular to the main strike direction. Modeling results indicate a shallow (< 1000 m) low resistivity layer, zones of high resistivity at intermediate depths (approximately 500 to 5000 m), and regions of low resistivity in the depth range of 2 to 4 km. These deep zones of low resistivity could be caused by hydrothermal alteration or hydrothermal fluids. The shallow low resistivity correlates spatially with the graben areas of the pull-apart system and is likely associated with (unconsolidated) sedimentary fill.

  8. Three-dimensional inversion for Network-Magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siripunvaraporn, W.; Uyeshima, M.; Egbert, G.

    2004-09-01

    Three-dimensional inversion of Network-Magnetotelluric (MT) data has been implemented. The program is based on a conventional 3-D MT inversion code (Siripunvaraporn et al., 2004), which is a data space variant of the OCCAM approach. In addition to modifications required for computing Network-MT responses and sensitivities, the program makes use of Massage Passing Interface (MPI) software, with allowing computations for each period to be run on separate CPU nodes. Here, we consider inversion of synthetic data generated from simple models consisting of a 1 W-m conductive block buried at varying depths in a 100 W-m background. We focus in particular on inversion of long period (320-40,960 seconds) data, because Network-MT data usually have high coherency in these period ranges. Even with only long period data the inversion recovers shallow and deep structures, as long as these are large enough to affect the data significantly. However, resolution of the inversion depends greatly on the geometry of the dipole network, the range of periods used, and the horizontal size of the conductive anomaly.

  9. Magnetotelluric monitoring of a fluid injection: Example from an enhanced geothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, J. R.; Thiel, S.; Reid, P.; Heinson, G.

    2012-09-01

    Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) are on the verge of becoming commercially viable for power production, where advancements in subsurface characterization are imperative to develop EGS into a competitive industry. Theory of an EGS is simple, pump fluids into thermally enhanced lithology and extract the hot fluids to produce energy. One significant complication in EGS development is estimating where injected fluids flow in the subsurface. Micro-seismic surveys can provide information about where fractures opened, but not fracture connectivity nor fluid inclusion. Electromagnetic methods are sensitive to conductivity contrasts and can be used as a supplementary tool to delineate reservoir boundaries. In July, 2011, an injection test for a 3.6 km deep EGS at Paralana, South Australia was continuously monitored by both micro-seismic and magnetotellurics (MT). Presented are the first results from continuous MT measurements suggesting transient variations in subsurface conductivity structure generated from the introduction of fluids at depth can be measured. Furthermore, phase tensor representation of the time dependent MT response suggests fluids migrated in a NE direction from the injection well. Results from this experiment supports the extension of MT to a monitoring tool for not only EGS but other hydraulic stimulations.

  10. Three-dimensional Magnetotelluric Modeling of the Pohukuloa Training Area, Hawaii Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. M.; Lienert, B. R.; Wallin, E.

    2015-12-01

    We report the results of 3D modeling of magnetotelluric (MT) data collected in the Pohakuloa Training Area (PTA) on the saddle between Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea volcanoes on Hawaii Island. We have previously used lower frequency MT data to construct 1D and 2D resistivity profiles in this area and confirmed the presence of a low-resistivity region at depths of about 2 km. One of our drill holes in PTA had previously encountered temperatures of 150 C at a similar depth. However, our 1D and 2D models were unable to fit features of the data that we suspected were due to 3D variations in subsurface resistivity. For the 3D modeling, we reprocessed the higher frequency data (1 kHz sampling rate) which were available at all 20 sites. We were then able to obtain complex impedances at frequencies of 0.5-500 Hz to use for the 3D inversion. We used Siripunvaraporn's 3D inversion method to obtain resistivities in a rectangular array of 0.5x0.5x0.25 km blocks spanning the areal extent of the stations down to a depth of 2.5 km. The results confirmed that much of the anomalous data could be explained by near-surface 3D variations in resistivity. The underlying conductor of 5-10 ohm-m at 2 km depth now appears to extend over the entire survey area.

  11. Fabrication of durable fluorine-free superhydrophobic polyethersulfone (PES) composite coating enhanced by assembled MMT-SiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiguang; Wang, Huaiyuan; Liu, Zhanjian; Zhu, Yixing; Wu, Shiqi; Wang, Chijia; Zhu, Yanji

    2017-02-01

    A durable fluorine-free polyethersulfone (PES) superhydrophobic composite coating with excellent wear-resistant and anti-corrosion properties has been successfully fabricated by combining sol-gel and spray technology. The robust micro/nano-structures of the prepared surface were established by introducing binary montmorillonite-silica (MMT-SiO2) assembled composite particles, which were formed by in-situ growth of SiO2 on MMT surfaces via sol-gel. Combined with the low surface energy of amino silicon oil (APDMS), the fluorine-free superhydrophoic PES coating was obtained with high water contact angle 156.1 ± 1.1° and low sliding angle 4.8 ± 0.7°. The anti-wear of the final PES/APDMS/MMT-SiO2 superhydrophobic coating can reach up to 60,100 cycles, which is outdistancing the pure PES coating (6800 cycles) and the PES/MMT/SiO2 coating prepared by simple physical mixture (18,200 cycles). The enhanced wear resistance property can be mainly attributed to the lubrication performance of APDMS and stable interface bonding force between the MMT surface and SiO2. Simultaneously, potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy exhibited the outstanding anti-corrosion property of PES/APDMS/MMT-SiO2 composite coating, with low corrosion current (1.6 × 10-10 A/cm2) and high protection efficiency (99.999%) even after 30 d immersion process. These test results show that this durable superhydrophobic PES composite coating can be hopefully to provide the possibility of industrial application.

  12. Magnetotelluric survey to characterize the Sunnyside porphyry copper system in the Patagonia Mountains, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.; Sampson, Jay A.

    2010-01-01

    The Sunnyside porphyry copper system is part of the concealed San Rafael Valley porphyry system located in the Patagonia Mountains of Arizona. The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies as part of the Assessment Techniques for Concealed Mineral Resources project. To help characterize the size and resistivity of the mineralized area beneath overburden, a regional east-west magnetotelluric sounding profile was acquired. This is a data release report of the magnetotelluric sounding data collected along the east-west profile; no interpretation of the data is included.

  13. Audio-magnetotelluric survey to characterize the Sunnyside porphyry copper system in the Patagonia Mountains, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sampson, Jay A.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    The Sunnyside porphyry copper system is part of the concealed San Rafael Valley porphyry system located in the Patagonia Mountains of Arizona. The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies as part of the Assessment Techniques for Concealed Mineral Resources project. To help characterize the size, resistivity, and skin depth of the polarizable mineral deposit concealed beneath thick overburden, a regional east-west audio-magnetotelluric sounding profile was acquired. The purpose of this report is to release the audio-magnetotelluric sounding data collected along that east-west profile. No interpretation of the data is included.

  14. Magnetotelluric data collected to characterize aquifers in the San Luis Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ailes, Chad E.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin as part of the Geologic Framework of Rio Grande Basins project. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, magnetotelluric surveys, and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifers in the San Luis Basin. This report describes one north-south and two east-west regional magnetotelluric sounding profiles, acquired in June of 2010 and July and August of 2011, across the San Luis Basin in northern New Mexico. No interpretation of the data is included.

  15. Magnetotelluric Investigation of Melt Storage Beneath Okmok Caldera, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, N. L.; Bedrosian, P.; Key, K.; Zelenak, G.

    2015-12-01

    Alaska accounts for nearly 99% of the seismic moment release within the US. Much of this is associated with the Aleutian volcanic arc, the most tectonically active region in North America, and an ideal location for studying arc magmatism. Okmok is an active volcano located in the central Aleutian arc, defined by a pair of nested, 10 km diameter calderas. The subdued topography of Okmok, relative to other Aleutian volcanoes, improves access and permits dense sampling within the caldera closer to the underlying magmatic system. Okmok volcano was selected as the site of study for this project due to frequent volcanic activity and the presence of a crustal magma reservoir as inferred from previous coarse resolution seismic studies. In June-July 2015, we carried out an amphibious geophysical field deployment at Okmok. Onshore work in and around the volcano included collection of an array of magnetotelluric (MT) stations and installation of a temporary, year-long seismic array. A ring of 3D offshore MT deployments made around the island augments the onshore array. An additional 2D tectonic-scale profile spans the trench, volcanic arc, and backarc. This new geophysical data will be used to gain a greater understanding of Aleutian arc melt generation, migration, and storage beneath an active caldera. We present results from the analysis of the newly collected amphibious 3D MT data. This data will be used to model the distribution and migration of melt within Okmok's crustal magma reservoir. Initial processing of the data shows strong MT signal levels, in particular from a geomagnetic storm that occurred from June 21-23, 2015. A companion abstract discussing the 2D tectonic scale MT profile, which constrains the mantle and deep crust beneath Okmok volcano, is discussed by Zelenak et al.

  16. Coupling Magnetotellurics and Hydrothermal Modeling to Further Understand Geothermal Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folsom, M.; Pepin, J.; Kelley, S.; Person, M. A.; Blom, L.; Love, D.

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive knowledge of the groundwater flow patterns associated with geothermal resources is critical to sustainable resource management and to discovering blind geothermal systems. Magnetotellurics (MT), which provides subsurface electrical conductivity information to substantial depths, has the ability to image geothermal reservoir features, such as conductive clay caps and hot, saline groundwater circulating within geothermal systems. We have used MT data along with 2D hydrothermal modeling, constrained by temperature, salinity and carbon-14 data, to explore possible deep groundwater circulation scenarios near the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, in the Rio Grande Rift, central New Mexico. The area is underlain by a 100 to 150-m thick molten sill emplaced approximately 19 km below the surface. This sill is referred to locally as the Socorro Magma Body (SMB). Previous studies by Mailloux et al. (1999) and Pepin et al. (2015) suggest that the crystalline basement rocks in this region of the Rio Grande Rift can be significantly fractured to depths of 4-8 km and have permeabilities as high as 10-14 to 10-12 m2. The combination of high permeability conditions and the presence of the SMB makes this particular region a promising candidate for discovering a blind geothermal system at depth. We constructed a 2D hydrothermal model that traverses a 64-km zone of active uplift that is associated with the SMB. We also completed a 12-km long, 9-station MT transect across a portion of this profile, where land access was permitted and electromagnetic noise was minimal. Preliminary results suggest a deep convection-dominated system is a possibility, although further analysis of the MT data is necessary and ongoing. We hypothesize that using hydrothermal modeling in conjunction with MT surveys may prove to be an effective approach to discovering and managing deep regional hydrothermal resources.

  17. Comparison of In Situ Polymerization and Solution-Dispersion Techniques in the Preparation of Polyimide/Montmorillonite (MMT) Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Gharayebi, Yadollah; Salit, Mohd. Sapuan; Hussein, Mohd. Zobir; Shameli, Kamyar

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, Polyimide/Montmorillonite Nanocomposites (PI/MMT NCs), based on aromatic diamine (4-Aminophenyl sulfone) (APS) and aromatic dianhydride (3,3′,4,4′-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride) (BTDA) were prepared using in situ polymerization and solution-dispersion techniques. The prepared PI/MMT NCs films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The XRD results showed that at the content of 1.0 wt % Organo Montmorillonite (OMMT) for two techniques and 3.0 wt % OMMT for the in situ polymerization technique, the OMMT was well-intercalated, exfoliated and dispersed into polyimide matrix. The OMMT agglomerated when its amount exceeded 10 wt % and 3.0 wt % for solution-dispersion and in situ polymerization techniques respectively. These results were confirmed by the TEM images of the prepared PI/MMT NCs. The TGA thermograms indicated that thermal stability of prepared PI/MMT NCs were increased with the increase of loading that, the effect is higher for the samples prepared by in situ polymerization technique. PMID:22016643

  18. Using seismically constrained magnetotelluric inversion to recover velocity structure in the shallow lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorkamp, M.; Fishwick, S.; Jones, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    Typical surface wave tomography can recover well the velocity structure of the upper mantle in the depth range between 70-200km. For a successful inversion, we have to constrain the crustal structure and assess the impact on the resulting models. In addition,we often observe potentially interesting features in the uppermost lithosphere which are poorly resolved and thus their interpretationhas to be approached with great care.We are currently developing a seismically constrained magnetotelluric (MT) inversion approach with the aim of better recovering the lithospheric properties (and thus seismic velocities) in these problematic areas. We perform a 3D MT inversion constrained by a fixed seismic velocity model from surface wave tomography. In order to avoid strong bias, we only utilize information on structural boundaries to combine these two methods. Within the region that is well resolved by both methods, we can then extract a velocity-conductivity relationship. By translating the conductivitiesretrieved from MT into velocities in areas where the velocity model is poorly resolved, we can generate an updated velocity model and test what impactthe updated velocities have on the predicted data.We test this new approach using a MT dataset acquired in central Botswana over the Okwa terrane and the adjacent Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe Cratons togetherwith a tomographic models for the region. Here, both datasets have previously been used to constrain lithospheric structure and show some similarities.We carefully asses the validity of our results by comparing with observations and petrophysical predictions for the conductivity-velocity relationship.

  19. Imaging the conductivity anomalies at the vicinity of Ganos Fault, northwest Turkey by magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaş, Mustafa; Tank, Bülent; Özaydın, Sinan

    2016-04-01

    Audio-frequency magnetotelluric (AMT: 10400 Hz. - 1 Hz.) data were collected across Ganos Fault, near Mürefte, at the western part of North Anatolian Fault, Turkey. The twelve observation points were densely distributed to form a north - south aligned continuous profile that aims to reveal the electrical resisitivity structure to a depth of 1500 m. Ganos Fault is inactive since 1912 Mürefte Earthquake (Ms: 7.4) and acts as a locked segment with the potential to generate a significant event in the near future. Preliminary dimensionality analyses of the AMT data were performed by using three approaches; strike angle determination following Groom and Bailey decomposition (N70°E), phase tensor analyses (N70°E) and induction vectors (N60°E). All of these methods gave results that are in good agreement with present geological (N70°E) and seismological (N70°E) values. Following the dimensionality analyses, two- and three- dimensional numerical modeling routines were utilized to perform inverse modeling. The inversions were performed by different methods such as Rodi and Mackie, WinGLink, (2001) and Ogawa and Uchida, ABIC, (1996) for 2D and Siripunvaraporn et al., WSINV3DMT (2005) and Egbert and Kelbert, ModEM (2012) for 3D. All modeling attempts ended up with similar models suggesting that: (i) A significant low resistivity anomaly was detected just below the fault's trace representing the so-called "fault zone conductor" with 400 m width and 500 m depth, (ii) An asymmetric damage zone is present involving the fault's core concentrated to the south, (iii) A resistivity contrast between the two sides of the fault, representing a geological boundary between Eocene aged Keşan Formation in the north and Miocene aged Çengelli Formation in the south (iv) Opiholitic basement appears as a high resistivity block at a depth of 800 m.

  20. Broadband signal generator for the approximation of a magnetotelluric source for indoor testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shuang-chao; Deng, Ming; Chen, Kai; Shi, Xin-yu

    2016-08-01

    To test the frequency response of a magnetotelluric (MT) receiver, a broadband source, especially white noise is more efficient and intuitive than single frequency signals. In view of the absence of an appropriate source generator for MT receiver indoor testing, we designed a broadband signal generator based on a pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS). Firstly, we divided the whole MT band into two segments to avoid data redundancy and simplify calculation in data processing and designed a generator composed of several modules: a clock module, a PRBS logic module, and a voltage level conversion module. We conducted a detailed analysis of the optimal parameter selection methods for each module, and key parameters including clock frequency, order, the primitive polynomial and the original states of the linear registers were determined. The generator provides four-channel PRBS signals with two effective bandwidths of 5  ×  10-4-714 Hz and 0.1 Hz-14 kHz which are broad enough to cover the frequency range for different MT methods. These four-channel signals were used to simulate two modes of sources (xy and yx) with strong auto-correlation and weak cross-correlation. The power spectral density is quite stable in the whole passband. The new generator is characterized by broadband output in low-frequency bands, low power consumption, simple operation and reliable performance. Indoor and field tests indicated that the generator can provide an analog MT source and is a practical tool for MT receiver indoor testing.

  1. Shallow water radio-magnetotelluric (RMT) measurements in urban environment: A case study from Stockholm city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Suman; Bastani, Mehrdad; Malehmir, Alireza; Wang, Shunguo; Pedersen, Laust

    2014-05-01

    of the impedance tensor were obtained by the parametric representation combined with a Truncated Singular Value Decomposition (TSVD) regularization of Bastani and Pedersen (2001). The processed data were then inverted to obtain 2D resistivity models. The resulting models along 23 lines correlate well and image variation of water depth, thickness of subaqueous sediments as well as the depth to crystalline bedrock. Low resistivity zones observed in the bedrock coincide well with the low velocity zones identified in refraction seismic surveys available along the RMT lines, indicating the presence of possible fracture zones in the bedrock. The experiment illustrates that the RMT methods can be well adapted to this type of environment; it is fast and cost-effective in shallow water especially in urban settings. Acknowledgments: Formas, SGU, BeFo, SBUF, Skanska, Boliden, FQM and NGI References: Bastani, M., 2001, EnviroMT - a new Controlled Source/Radio Magnetotelluric System: Ph.D. thesis, ISBN 91-554-5051-2, Uppsala University. Bastani, M. and Pedersen, L. B., 2001, Estimation of magnetotelluric transfer functions from radio transmitters. GEOPHYSICS, 66, 1038-1051.

  2. Mode separation of magnetotelluric responses in three-dimensional environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becken, M.; Ritter, O.; Burkhardt, H.

    2008-01-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) responses in complex, 3-D terrains are in general characterized by (i) elliptical polarization states of horizontal electric and magnetic fields; (ii) the non-orthogonality of electric and magnetic fields and (iii) a coupling of the anomalous tangential-electric (TE) and tangential-magnetic (TM) modes, giving rise to a mode-mixed anomalous electric field at the surface. These 3-D effects are propagated into the MT impedance tensor, which is derived from horizontal electric and magnetic fields, recorded at the earth's surface. The 2 × 2 impedance tensor is in general fully occupied, and each of its elements is a mode-mixed quantity. To study 3-D effects of MT (impedance) data, the TE and TM mode contributions must be separated. This becomes possible with the inclusion of the single-mode vertical magnetic transfer function (the ratio of vertical to horizontal magnetic fields). Then, the individual modes can be resolved without prior knowledge of the underlying 3-D conductivity structure. For this purpose, we consider (i) the spatial relations between electromagnetic field components recorded in an array of sites (Faraday's law) and (ii) that the magnetic TE mode and electric TM mode fields are potential fields within the insulating air half-space above the earth's surface. Based on these two dependencies, it is possible to reconstruct the entire electromagnetic field from (measured) mixed-mode impedances and vertical magnetic transfer functions and to separate it into TE and TM modes, and into normal and anomalous parts. Hereby, we cannot only study the contribution of the two modes on the observed impedance tensor but also quantify the influence of 3-D effects at each location and frequency of a particular data set. Results of a modelling study suggest, that (i) none of the elements of a 3-D impedances tensor can be regarded as favourable for a 2-D interpretation (only 3-D models can explain 3-D data), (ii) a heterogeneous crust can strongly

  3. Seafloor magnetotelluric soundings in the Mariana Island Arc area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filloux, J. H.

    Two seafloor magnetotelluric soundings have been performed in the Mariana Island arc and subduction area, the first (station 1) in the Mariana Trough near International Phase of Oceanic Drilling (IPOD) hole 454 (position 18° 01'N, 144° 32'E, depth 3770 m), the second (station 2) in the fore arc basin near IPOD hole 458 (position 18° 06'N, 146° 45'E, depth 3602 m). The electrical conductivity beneath the postulated spreading zone of the Mariana Trough appears to be unexpectedly low in the upper 40 km, increasing slowly and monotonically downward, to 1 S m-1 at 700 km. It does not display any significant feature such as lithosphere-asthenosphere or phase transition boundaries. The character of this profile differs considerably from those obtained near the Pacific Rise, suggesting deep as well as shallow structures, generally cooler, and implying less active magmatic processes. Cooler structures may in turn contribute in part to the greater depth versus age of the Mariana Trough compared to that of the main oceanic basins. No indication of the existence of extensive magma concentration of the kind detected on the Pacific Rise at 21°N is recognizable in the magnetic data. This fact, however, may simply result from the distance between station 1 and the spreading axis (˜30 km). A cautious speculation on the cause of the implied overall low conductivity values is presented. The MT sounding from the fore arc basin points to (1) very high conductance in the upper zone (0-10 km), accountable for by the sediment blanket, (2) moderate to high conductance in the fore arc upper mantle wedge below, possibly indicative of a moderately high temperature (composition and hydration by water subducted with sediments may also play a role, (3) a large cross section (300-400 km) of unusually little conducting materials, believed to represent the sinking slab and the cooled down environment adjacent to it, and (4) a 20-fold conductivity increase around 420 km depth, sustained over

  4. Magnetotelluric data, stable distributions and impropriety: an existential combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chave, Alan D.

    2014-07-01

    The robust statistical model of a Gaussian core contaminated by outlying data that underlies robust estimation of the magnetotelluric (MT) response function has been re-examined. The residuals from robust estimators are systematically long tailed compared to a distribution based on the Gaussian, and hence are inconsistent with the robust model. Instead, MT data are pervasively described by the alpha stable distribution family whose variance and sometimes mean are undefined. A maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) that exploits the stable nature of MT data is formulated, and its two-stage implementation in which stable parameters are first fit to the data and then the MT responses are solved for is described. The MLE is shown to be inherently robust, but differs from the conventional robust estimator because it is based on a model derived from the data, while robust estimators are ad hoc, being based on the robust model that is inconsistent with actual data. Propriety versus impropriety of the complex MT response was investigated, and a likelihood ratio test for propriety and its null distribution was established. The Cramér-Rao lower bounds for the covariance matrix of proper and improper MT responses were specified. The MLE was applied to exemplar long period and broad-band data sets from South Africa. Both are shown to be significantly stably distributed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness of fit and Ansari-Bradley non-parametric dispersion tests. Impropriety of the MT responses at both sites is pervasive, hence the improper Cramér-Rao bound was used to estimate the MLE covariance. The MLE is shown to be nearly unbiased and well described by a Gaussian distribution based on bootstrap simulation. The MLE was compared to a conventional robust estimator, establishing that the standard errors of the former are systematically smaller than for the latter and that the standardized differences between them exhibit excursions that are both too frequent and too large to

  5. A magnetotelluric study of the sensitivity of an area to seismoelectric signals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balasis, G.; Bedrosian, P.A.; Eftaxias, K.

    2005-01-01

    During recent years, efforts at better understanding the physical properties of precursory ultra-low frequency pre-seismic electric signals (SES) have been intensified. Experiments show that SES cannot be observed at all points of the Earth's surface but only at certain so-called sensitive sites. Moreover, a sensitive site is capable of collecting SES from only a restricted number of seismic areas (selectivity effect). Tberefore the installation of a permanent station appropriate for SES collection should necessarily be preceded by a pilot study over a broad area and for a long duration. In short, a number of temporary stations are installed and, after the occurrence of several significant earthquakes (EQs) from a given seismic area, the most appropriate (if any) of these temporary stations, in the sense that they happen to collect SES, can be selected as permanent. Such a long experiment constitutes a serious disadvantage in identifying a site as SES sensitive. However, the SES sensitivity of a site should be related to the geoelectric structure of the area that hosts the site as well as the regional geoelectric structure between the station and the seismic focal area. Thus, knowledge of the local and regional geoelectric structure can dramatically reduce the time involved in identifying SES sites. hi this paper the magnetotelluric method is used to investigate the conductivity structure of an area where a permanent SES station is in operation. Although general conclusions cannot be drawn, the area surrounding an SES site near Ioannina, Greece is characterized by: (1) major faults in the vicinity; (2) highly resistive structure flanked by abrupt conductivity contrasts associated with large-scale geologic contacts, and (3) local inhomogeneities in conductivity structure. The above results are consistent with the fact that electric field amplitudes from remotely-generated signals should be appreciably stronger at such sites when compared to neighboring sites

  6. Crosswell electromagnetic and magnetotelluric imaging of geothermal reservoirs - evaluation and case studies from Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samrock, F.

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal energy resources are considered important contributors to any future energy mix, as they are renewable and can potentially provide a constant (i.e., baseload) and long-term energy output. However, most regions worldwide are lacking natural, convective hydrothermal resources. As a result, when relatively high subsurface temperatures exist in low-permeability rocks ("hot-dry" rocks), it has been suggested to artificially increase permeability to enable deep fluid circulation and associated advective heat transfer to a production well. One technique to enhance permeability, and thus the ability to extract geothermal heat, is hydraulic stimulation, creating (permeability) enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). In the "Deep Underground Geothermal (DUG)" laboratory in Switzerland, a meso-scale field experiment is planned, where pre-existing fault systems are hydraulically sheared. The aim of this experiment is to better understand the processes occurring during artificial reservoir creation. We present our 3D numerical modeling study evaluating the capability of low-frequency crosswell electromagnetic (EM) tomography using magnetic dipole sources to map stimulation-induced changes in electrical conductivity. This geophysical parameter is affected by several subsurface properties including temperature, interconnected porosity, permeability, and the presence of fluids. Electrical conductivity thus provides important information on the effectiveness of geothermal reservoir creation. Besides numerical modeling studies, we report on the current status of instrumentation and realization of crosswell EM measurements at the DUG laboratory. Furthermore, we present preliminary results of a magnetotelluric (MT) survey conducted at a prominent heat flow anomaly in Northern Switzerland. Here, we test methods to improve data quality of MT measurements in regions that exhibit substantial electromagnetic noise. We also discuss how information on the electrical conductivity

  7. Processing of noisy magnetotelluric data using digital filters and additional data selection criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, S. L.; Harinarayana, T.; Dawes, G. J. K.; Hutton, V. R. S.

    1988-10-01

    Although the magnetotelluric (MT) method is known to be effective and fast in probing the electrical conductivity structure of the Earth at crustal depths, the results are often degraded by industrial and cultural noise. To obtain reliable processed results for modelling, it is first necessary to extract or select the natural signals from the contaminated time series. Various noise-reduction techniques based on digital filters are discussed with special reference to persistent noise signals, e.g. from power lines, DC-operated railways and electrical fences. Both previously suggested techniques (delay-line and notch filtering) and two other procedures (maximum entropy extension and deconvolution filtering) are applied to both synthetic data and to field observations from southern Scotland and the Italian Alps. Better quality data sets and more geophysically acceptable Earth models are shown to result. Noise of a more intermittent nature has recently been observed in MT observations near the development site of the geothermal power station on Milos, Greece. Large highly coherent electromagnetic field signals were observed to coincide with the opening and closure of the valves on the test wells. In this case, meaningful apparent resistivity curves could be obtained from an undisturbed subset of the previously accepted data, which had been selected mainly on the basis of signal power. Delay-line filtering is shown to be superior to notch filtering in eliminating non-sinusoidal noise, while both the MEM extension and the window deconvolution techniques are found to be useful in spike removal. These studies illustrate that use of an automatic data selection procedure should only be undertaken with great care in areas where the cultural noise is high. In such cases, continuous time-domain monitoring of the MT signals is recommended. The appropriate techniques of noise reduction can then be applied.

  8. A novel method for fabricating hybrid biobased nanocomposites film with stable fluorescence containing CdTe quantum dots and montmorillonite-chitosan nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yawen; Ge, Xuesong; Guan, Jing; Wu, Lin; Zhao, Fuhua; Li, Hui; Mu, Xindong; Jiang, Yijun; Chen, Aibing

    2016-07-10

    A method was presented for fabricating the fluorescent nanocomposites containing CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and montmorillonite (MMT)-chitosan (CS). MMT-CS/CdTe QDs nanocomposites were prepared via a simple, versatile and robust approach combination of covalent and electrostatic assembly methods (Scheme 1). The negatively charged MMT was initially modified with positively charged CS through electrostatic assembly, followed by incorporation of CdTe-QDs into the MMT-CS nanosheets by covalent connections between the amino groups of CS and the carboxylic acid groups of thioglycollic acid (TGA). The X-ray diffraction (XRD), High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the FTIR were used to prove the QDs have intercalated into the MMT-CS matrix. The fluorescence emission spectra showed that the MMT-CS/CdTe QDs nanocomposites had the best fluorescence intensity compared with the bare CdTe QDs and CS-QDs.

  9. High resolution imaging of the Methana volcanic complex, Greece, with magnetotelluric and aeromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, A.; Tzanis, A.; Chailas, S.; Lagios, E.; Stamatakis, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Methana calc-alkaline volcanic complex is located off the NE coast of Argolis Peninsula (Peloponnesus, Greece) at the NW terminus of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). It consists of approximately 32 domes, with the most recent eruptive episodes dated to 258 BCE and 1700 CE. Herein, we report the results an attempt to investigate the volcano's interior with joint interpretation of Magnetotelluric and Aeromagnetic data. The aeromagnetic data was inverted with the UBC-GIF 3D magnetic inversion suite, constrained by several in-situ susceptibility measurements. At depths to 2 km, the inversion resolves individual intrusions corresponding to known phases of volcanic activity (domes), with susceptibilities >0.1. At depths greater than 4.5 km, a more weakly magnetized domain is detected (~0.025); its ceiling is well resolved; its floor cannot be placed with certainty but extends to at least 7 km. The depths are comparable to those of magma chambers. Based on the palaeomagnetic analysis of nearby volcanic rocks, it may be safely suggested that its temperature should not be higher than 550-600°C, but also not considerably lower. It may comprise a magma chamber, inasmuch as it compares well with the temperatures and locations of known magma chambers along the HVA. Finally, there's exists evidence of the location of the vents through which the extrusive activity has taken place. A Magnetotelluric survey comprising 14 stations was conducted IN 1992, as part of a geothermal project. Herein, this data is reevaluated with modern analysis methods and re-interpreted with 2D inversion. The results indicate the presence of conductors at depths of 1500-2500 m beneath the centre of the Peninsula, extensive horizontal conductors at, or just below sea level and conductive protrusions above sea level. The joint interpretation of the susceptibility and geoelectric images is based on the premise that they both are generated by hydrothermal circulation which depresses resistivity and

  10. Manufacturing Methods and Technology (MM&T) Measure for Fabrication of Silicon Transcalent Transistor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    chips, CVD metallizing, edge con-- touring and a vacuum envelope that includes a high-- strength, high alumina ceramic insulator designed to hold-off...severely degrade the blocking voltage capa- bility of the junction. The three implanted levels of doping were 9 x 1013, 1 x 1014 and 2 x 1014 atoms/cc. Of...coating prevented corona at the high voltage insulator specifically at the base pin area. A -81- AD-A092 o179 OCA CORP LANCASTER PA SSD-ELECTRO-OPTICS

  11. MM&T Manufacturing Methods for Gradient Furnace Processing of Ceramic Armor and Structural Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    designated by other authorized documents. Mention of any trade names or manufacturers in this report shall not be construed as advertising nor as an...single crystal materials opens up many possi- bilities for new applications of ceramics, such as in the case of trans- parent armor, lasers, and...possibilities for new applications of ceramics such as in the case of transparent armor, lasers, and laser windows. With the increase in size of single

  12. Advances in thermal control and performance of the MMT M1 mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. D.; Williams, G. G.; Callahan, S.; Comisso, B.; Ortiz, R.; Williams, J. T.

    2010-07-01

    Strategies for thermal control of the 6.5-meter diameter borosilicate honeycomb primary (M1) mirror at the MMT Observatory have included: 1) direct control of ventilation system chiller setpoints by the telescope operator, 2) semiautomated control of chiller setpoints, using a fixed offset from the ambient temperature, and 3) most recently, an automated temperature controller for conditioned air. Details of this automated controller, including the integration of multiple chillers, heat exchangers, and temperature/dew point sensors, are presented here. Constraints and sanity checks for thermal control are also discussed, including: 1) mirror and hardware safety, 2) aluminum coating preservation, and 3) optimization of M1 thermal conditions for science acquisition by minimizing both air-to-glass temperature differences, which cause mirror seeing, and internal glass temperature gradients, which cause wavefront errors. Consideration is given to special operating conditions, such as high dew and frost points. Precise temperature control of conditioned ventilation air as delivered to the M1 mirror cell is also discussed. The performance of the new automated controller is assessed and compared to previous control strategies. Finally, suggestions are made for further refinement of the M1 mirror thermal control system and related algorithms.

  13. Development of novel composite membranes using quaternized chitosan and Na+-MMT clay for the pervaporation dehydration of isopropanol.

    PubMed

    Choudhari, Santosh K; Kariduraganavar, Mahadevappa Y

    2009-10-01

    Novel polymer-clay-based composite membranes were prepared by incorporating sodium montmorillonite (Na(+)-MMT) clay into quaternized chitosan. The resulting membranes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WXAD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effect of membrane swelling was studied by varying the water concentration in the feed. The membranes were employed for the pervaporation dehydration of isopropanol in terms of feed composition and Na(+)-MMT clay loading. The experimental results demonstrated that membrane containing 10 mass% of Na(+)-MMT clay showed the highest separation selectivity of 14,992 with a flux of 14.23x10(-2) kg/m(2) h at 30 degrees C for 10 mass% of water in the feed. The total flux and flux of water are found to be overlapping each other particularly for clay-incorporated membranes, signifying that the composite membranes developed in the present study involving quaternized chitosan and Na(+)-MMT clay are highly selective toward water. From the temperature-dependent diffusion and permeation values, the Arrhenius activation parameters were estimated. The resulting activation energy values obtained for water permeation (E(pw)) are much lower than those of isopropanol permeation (E(pIPA)), suggesting that the developed composite membranes have higher separation efficiency for the water-isopropanol system. The estimated E(p) and E(D) values ranged between 8.97 and 11.89, and 7.56 and 9.88 kJ/mol, respectively. The positive heat of sorption (DeltaH(s)) values were obtained for all the membranes, suggesting that Henry's mode of sorption is predominant in the process.

  14. An automated aircraft detection system to prevent illumination from the laser guide star beacons at the MMT and LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kevin; Hart, Michael

    2011-10-01

    High powered guide star laser beams are a potential hazard for aircraft. Currently at the MMT telescope located on Mt. Hopkins in Southern Arizona, five Rayleigh guide stars create a total of 25 W of power at 532 nm wavelength. The ARGOS laser guide star for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) located on Mt. Graham in Southern Arizona will generate six Rayleigh guide stars with a total of 108 W at 532 nm. We present an automated system for use at the MMT and the LBT designed to detect aircraft and shutter the lasers when aircraft illumination is pending. The detection system at the MMT uses a single wide-angle CCD camera mounted to the optical support structure of the telescope. The LBT system employs two of the same CCD cameras, and an additional bore-sighted thermal infrared camera. The visible cameras integrate frames for 0.5 s to produce streaks from anti-collision beacons required for all aircraft. The IR camera serves as a backup and to protect unlighted aircraft. In each case, adjacent frames are compared using image processing software to detect streaks and movement in the field. If an aircraft is detected, the position and projected trajectory are calculated and compared to the position of the laser beams. If an aircraft illumination appears likely, the laser safety shutter is closed and a message is sent to the laser operator. As a safety precaution, a heartbeat signal from the control computer is required to keep the laser shutter open.

  15. Wide-field optical monitoring with Mini-MegaTORTORA (MMT-9) multichannel high temporal resolution telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, G. M.; Karpov, S. V.; Biryukov, A. V.; Bondar, S. F.; Ivanov, E. A.; Katkova, E. V.; Orekhova, N. V.; Perkov, A. V.; Sasyuk, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the properties of Mini-MegaTORTORA (MMT-9) nine-channel wide-field optical sky monitoring system with subsecond temporal resolution. This instrument can observe sky areas as large as 900 deg2, perform photometry in three filters close to Johnson BV R system and polarimetry of selected objects or areas with 100-300 deg2 sizes. The limiting magnitude of the system is up to V = 11m for 0.1 s temporal resolution, and reaches V = 15m in minute-long exposures. The system is equipped with a powerful computing facility and dedicated software pipeline allowing it to perform automatic detection, real-time classification, and investigation of transient events of different nature located both in the near- Earth space and at extragalactic distances. The objects routinely detected by MMT-9 include faint meteors and artificial Earth satellites.We discuss astronomical tasks that can be solved using MMT-9, and present the results of the first two years of its operation. In particular, we report the parameters of the optical flare detected on June 25, 2016, which accompanied the gamma-ray burst GRB160625B.

  16. Hydrothermal System of the Lastarria Volcano (Central Andes) Imaged by Magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, D.

    2015-12-01

    Lazufre volcanic complex, located in the central Andes, is recently undergoing an episode of uplift, conforming one of the most extensive deforming volcanic systems worldwide. Recent works have focused on the subsurface of this volcanic system at different scales, using surface deformation data, seismic noise tomography and magnetotellurics. Here we image the electrical resistivity structure of the Lastarria volcano, one of the most important features in the Lazufre area, using broadband magnetotelluric data at 30 locations around the volcanic edifice. Results from 3-D modeling show a conductive zone at 6 km depth south of the Lastarria volcano interpreted as a magmatic heat source, which is connected to a shallower conductive area beneath the volcanic edifice and its close vicinity. This shallow highly conductive zone fits with geochemical analysis results of thermal fluid discharges, related to fumaroles present in this area, in terms of depth extent and possible temperatures of fluids, and presents also a good correlation with seismic tomography results. The horizontal extension of this shallow conductive zone, related to the hydrothermal system of Lastarria, suggests that it has been draining one of the lagoons in the area (Laguna Azufrera), forming a sulfur rich area which can be observed at the southern side of this lagoon. Joint modeling of the hydrothermal system using magnetotellurics and seismic data is part of the current work.

  17. Relationship of Medication Management Test-Revised (MMT-R) performance to neuropsychological functioning and antiretroviral adherence in adults with HIV.

    PubMed

    Patton, Doyle E; Woods, Steven Paul; Franklin, Donald; Cattie, Jordan E; Heaton, Robert K; Collier, Ann C; Marra, Christina; Clifford, David; Gelman, Benjamin; McArthur, Justin; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David; McCutchan, J Allen; Grant, Igor

    2012-11-01

    While performance-based tests of everyday functioning offer promise in facilitating diagnosis and classification of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), there remains a dearth of well-validated instruments. In the present study, clinical correlates of performance on one such measure (i.e., Medication Management Test-Revised; MMT-R) were examined in 448 HIV+ adults who were prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Significant bivariate relationships were found between MMT-R scores and demographics (e.g., education), hepatitis C co-infection, estimated premorbid IQ, neuropsychological functioning, and practical work abilities. MMT-R scores were not related to HIV disease severity, psychiatric factors, or self-reported adherence among participants with a broad range of current health status. However, lower MMT-R scores were strongly and uniquely associated with poorer adherence among participants with CD4 T cell counts <200. In multivariate analyses, MMT-R scores were predicted by practical work abilities, estimated premorbid functioning, attention/working memory, learning, and education. Findings provide overall mixed support for the construct validity of the MMT-R and are discussed in the context of their clinical and research implications for evaluation of HAND.

  18. Case histories of electrical resistivity and controlled-source magnetotelluric surveys for the site investigation of tunnel construction

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, H.S.; Song, Y.; Yi, M.J.; Chung, H.J.; Kim, K.S.

    2006-12-15

    In tunnel construction, the information regarding rock mass quality and the distribution of weak zones is crucial for economical tunnel design and to ensure safety. Usually, the rock mass grade is estimated by observing recovered cores obtained by drilling or by physical parameters calculated in a laboratory using core samples. However, the high drilling cost limits the number of boreholes; furthermore, rough terrains can reduce the access of drilling machines to the survey sites. In such situations, surface geophysical methods such as electrical resistivity or controlled-source magnetotelluric (CSMT) can provide a rough estimate of the rock mass condition over the planned tunnel route. These methods can also map weak zones (faults, fractures, coal bearing zones, and cavities), which are characterized by a lower resistivity than the surrounding fresh rock mass. We present two successful applications of the electrical resistivity and CSMT methods to the site investigation of tunnel construction over a rough terrain. The first example demonstrates that the boundary of the bedrock and weak zones related to the distribution of coaly shale and coal seams were estimated to extend beyond a few hundred meters below the rough surface. The second example shows that the developing direction and depth of cavities, which are mainly related to the weak zones in limestone, were successfully interpreted by a three-dimensional (3-D) electrical resistivity survey with the aid of borehole test results.

  19. Software framework for the upcoming MMT Observatory primary mirror re-aluminization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. Duane; Clark, Dusty; Porter, Dallan

    2014-07-01

    Details of the software framework for the upcoming in-situ re-aluminization of the 6.5m MMT Observatory (MMTO) primary mirror are presented. This framework includes: 1) a centralized key-value store and data structure server for data exchange between software modules, 2) a newly developed hardware-software interface for faster data sampling and better hardware control, 3) automated control algorithms that are based upon empirical testing, modeling, and simulation of the aluminization process, 4) re-engineered graphical user interfaces (GUI's) that use state-of-the-art web technologies, and 5) redundant relational databases for data logging. Redesign of the software framework has several objectives: 1) automated process control to provide more consistent and uniform mirror coatings, 2) optional manual control of the aluminization process, 3) modular design to allow flexibility in process control and software implementation, 4) faster data sampling and logging rates to better characterize the approximately 100-second aluminization event, and 5) synchronized "real-time" web application GUI's to provide all users with exactly the same data. The framework has been implemented as four modules interconnected by a data store/server. The four modules are integrated into two Linux system services that start automatically at boot-time and remain running at all times. Performance of the software framework is assessed through extensive testing within 2.0 meter and smaller coating chambers at the Sunnyside Test Facility. The redesigned software framework helps ensure that a better performing and longer lasting coating will be achieved during the re-aluminization of the MMTO primary mirror.

  20. The Role of the Impedivity in the Magnetotelluric Response of 1D and 2D Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Roberta; Giulia Di Giuseppe, Maria; Troiano, Antonio; Patella, Domenico; Mariano Castelo Branco, Raimundo

    2014-05-01

    The influence of the resistivity dispersion on the magnetotelluric (MT) response is analyzed. MT uses the natural electromagnetic (EM) field to determine the electrical resistivity of the subsoil and retrieve the geometry of lithospheric structures, revealing the presence of bodies as metallic deposits, hydrocarbons reservoirs, geothermal fluids. The frequency range of the EM field used varies from 10-4 to 104 Hz. If the soil is polarizable, the dispersion of the resistivity, whose characteristic frequency interval is between 10-2 and 102 Hz, may affect MT responses. Resistivity dispersion is a known phenomenology, which constitutes the basis of the Induced Polarization (IP) prospecting method. In the frequency domain (FD), the dispersion consists in a variation of the resistivity parameter as the frequency of the exciting current is changed. The dispersive resistivity, called impedivity, is a complex function of the frequency. At vanishing frequency, however, the impedivity is real and coincides with the classical resistivity parameter used in DC geoelectrical methods. A real asymptote is also approached as the frequency tends to infinity. The complex physical and chemical fluid-metal-rock interactions may produce induced polarization effects, which are related to the dispersion in rocks. This is manifested on the MT response, creating a distortion on the experimental curves. Disregarding the distortion effect may lead to misleading interpretation of the surveyed structures. We show the results from simulation of the MT responses, when dispersion is assumed to characterize the electrical properties of a region of the explored half-space. Initially, a 1D-layered earth is considered, with intermediate layer assumed to be dispersive. The influence of the dispersion amplitude on the shape of the MT responses is evaluated. The dispersion alters the shape of the curves in a way that, without any external constraints, may make the interpretation of the curves quite

  1. Synthesis, characterization and cure kinetics of polyaniline modified MMT clay/epoxy nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aykanat, Aydin

    bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy prepolymer crosslinked with tri ethylene tetra amine (TETA) was analyzed by DSC. The tensile, flexural and impact tests of carbon fiber epoxy micro composites showed that PANi coated carbon fiber epoxy systems have higher modulus, toughness and mechanical strengths compared to unmodified carbon fiber epoxy composites. In the second part of the research work, conducting polyaniline (PANi) montmorillonite (MMT) clay nanocomposites were synthesized by using in-situ polymerization. The X-Ray diffraction patterns showed that polyaniline was intercalated between clay galleries in the order of nanoscale. From the SEM micrographs, it was revealed that, in-situ polymerization of aniline took place both in and out of the clay galleries. Polyaniline surface modified clay nanoparticles were then dispersed in diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy prepolymer using high shear mixing and ultrasonication. The viscosity measurements of modified and unmodified clay dispersed in epoxy prepolymer systems showed that PANi modified clay has lower viscosity than the pristine clay that provides easiness during processing. Infrared spectroscopy data proves that reactive secondary and tertiary amine groups on the fully dispersed polyaniline modified clay platelets react with epoxy resin resulting a strong chemical and physical interaction between nanoparticles and polymeric matrix. The effect of PANi surface modified nano particles on the curing reaction and kinetics of epoxy with tri-ethylene tetra amine (TETA) was analyzed by using DSC and explained by modified Avrami equation. The X-Ray diffraction pattern of fully cured 5% (w/w) PANi-MMT clay epoxy nanocomposites showed exfoliation behavior. Thermal analysis showed that for 5% (w/w) PANi-MMT filled epoxy nanocomposites has higher thermal stability than both fully cured pristine epoxy and 5% (w/w) clay epoxy nanocomposite. With the addition and exfoliation of 5% (w/w) PANi modified clay an increase of 8°C in

  2. Structure of a low-enthalpy geothermal system inferred from magnetotellurics - A case study from Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimalsiri, Thusitha Bandara; Suriyaarachchi, Nuwan Buddhika; Hobbs, Bruce; Manzella, Adele; Fonseka, Morrel; Dharmagunawardena, H. A.; Subasinghe, Nalaka Deepal

    2015-06-01

    First comprehensive geothermal exploration in Sri Lanka was conducted in 2010 encompassing seven thermal springs, of which Kapurella records the highest temperature. The study consisted of passive magnetotelluric (MT) soundings, in which static shifts were corrected using time domain electromagnetic method (TDEM). A frequency range of 12,500-0.001 Hz was used for MT acquisition and polar diagrams were employed for dimensionality determination. MT and TDEM data were jointly inverted and 2D models were created using both transverse electric and transverse magnetic modes. A conductive southeast dipping structure is revealed from both phase pseudosections and the preferred 2D inversion model. A conductive formation starting at a depth of 7.5 km shows a direct link with the dipping structure. We suggest that these conductive structures are accounted for deep circulation and accumulation of groundwater. Our results show the geothermal reservoir of Kapurella system with a lateral extension of around 2.5 km and a depth range of 3 km. It is further found that the associated dolerite dike is not the source of heat although it could be acting as an impermeable barrier to form the reservoir. The results have indicated the location of the deep reservoir and the possible fluid path of the Kapurella system, which could be utilized to direct future geothermal studies. This pioneering study makes suggestions to improve future MT data acquisition and to use boreholes and other geophysical methods to improve the investigation of structures at depth.

  3. MARE2DEM: a 2-D inversion code for controlled-source electromagnetic and magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key, Kerry

    2016-10-01

    This work presents MARE2DEM, a freely available code for 2-D anisotropic inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) data and frequency-domain controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) data from onshore and offshore surveys. MARE2DEM parametrizes the inverse model using a grid of arbitrarily shaped polygons, where unstructured triangular or quadrilateral grids are typically used due to their ease of construction. Unstructured grids provide significantly more geometric flexibility and parameter efficiency than the structured rectangular grids commonly used by most other inversion codes. Transmitter and receiver components located on topographic slopes can be tilted parallel to the boundary so that the simulated electromagnetic fields accurately reproduce the real survey geometry. The forward solution is implemented with a goal-oriented adaptive finite-element method that automatically generates and refines unstructured triangular element grids that conform to the inversion parameter grid, ensuring accurate responses as the model conductivity changes. This dual-grid approach is significantly more efficient than the conventional use of a single grid for both the forward and inverse meshes since the more detailed finite-element meshes required for accurate responses do not increase the memory requirements of the inverse problem. Forward solutions are computed in parallel with a highly efficient scaling by partitioning the data into smaller independent modeling tasks consisting of subsets of the input frequencies, transmitters and receivers. Non-linear inversion is carried out with a new Occam inversion approach that requires fewer forward calls. Dense matrix operations are optimized for memory and parallel scalability using the ScaLAPACK parallel library. Free parameters can be bounded using a new non-linear transformation that leaves the transformed parameters nearly the same as the original parameters within the bounds, thereby reducing non-linear smoothing effects. Data

  4. Crustal and lithospheric imaging of the Atlas Mountains of Morocco inferred from magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyan, D.; Jones, A. G.; Fullea, J.; Hogg, C.; Ledo, J.; Sinischalchi, A.; Campanya, J.; Picasso Phase II Team

    2010-12-01

    The Atlas System of Morocco is an intra-continental mountain belt extending for more than 2,000 km along the NW African plate with a predominant NE-SW trend. The System comprises three main branches: the High Atlas, the Middle Atlas, and the Anti Atlas. We present the results of a very recent multi-institutional magnetotelluric (MT) experiment across the Atlas Mountains region that started in September, 2009 and ended in February, 2010, comprising acquisition of broadband and long-period MT data. The experiment consisted of two profiles: (1) a N-S oriented profile crossing the Middle Atlas through the Central High Atlas to the east and (2) a NE-SW profile crossing the western High Atlas towards the Anti Atlas to the west. The MT measurements are part of the PICASSO (Program to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) and the concomitant TopoMed (Plate re-organization in the western Mediterranean: Lithospheric causes and topographic consequences - an ESF EUROCORES TOPO-EUROPE project) projects, to develop a better understanding of the internal structure and evolution of the crust and lithosphere of the Atlas Mountains. The MT data have been processed with robust remote reference methods and submitted to comprehensive strike and dimensionality analysis. Two clearly depth-differentiated strike directions are apparent for crustal (5-35 km) and lithospheric (50-150 km) depth ranges. These two orientations are roughly consistent with the NW-SE Africa-Eurasia convergence acting since the late Cretaceous, and the NNE-SSW Middle Atlas, where Miocene to recent Alkaline volcanism is present. Two-dimensional (2-D) smooth electrical resistivity models were computed independently for both 50 degrees and 20 degrees E of N strike directions. At the crustal scale, our preliminary results reveal a middle to lower-crustal conductive layer stretching from the Middle Atlas southward towards the High Moulouya basin. The most resistive (and therefore potentially thickest

  5. 3-D Magnetotelluric studies of Pre-Cambrian basement beneath southern Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuis, G.; Unsworth, M.; Pana, D.; Craven, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Pre-Cambrian basement rocks beneath Alberta record the tectonic events that led to the assembly of Laurentia in the Proterozoic. Since these rocks are covered with younger sedimentary rocks, they must be investigated with geophysical methods. In the 1990s, these basement rocks were studied with a number of long-period magnetotelluric (MT) profiles collected by the Lithoprobe project. Dimensionality analysis of these data show that they appear to be two dimensional (2-D) in the period band 1-1000 s. However 2-D inversion models were unable to reproduce these MT data with a realistic resistivity model. The inversion models were very rough and characterized by many closely spaced conductors. Since the Lithoprobe data gave indications of 3-D resistivity structure, especially in the Archean Loverna block, additional MT data were collected by the University of Alberta from 2006-2010 using NIMS instruments. The goal was to develop an array that would constrain a fully 3-D model of crustal and upper mantle resistivity. The data at periods 1-10,000 s were inverted using a 3-D inversion algorithm. Comparisons between 2-D and 3-D inversions show that both models fit the measured MT data equally well. The 3-D model shows that the structure is dominated by an upper mantle conductor beneath the Loverna Block (the Loverna conductor). This conductor was previously imaged by the 2-D inversion of the Lithoprobe data. Our 3-D model shows that the Loverna conductor extends throughout the Archean Loverna block (part of the Hearne Domain) and is bounded to the south by a potential field anomaly known as the Vulcan Structure. Initial interpretations of the Vulcan Structure explained it as an intracontinental rift zone, while more recent studies show that it is more likely a north dipping subduction zone between two Archean blocks. This interpretation is supported by our 3-D resistivity model, which shows a good correlation between north dipping reflectors and the top of conductivity

  6. The impact of ultra-low amounts of amino-modified MMT on dynamics and properties of densely cross-linked cyanate ester resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bershtein, Vladimir; Fainleib, Alexander; Egorova, Larisa; Gusakova, Kristina; Grigoryeva, Olga; Kirilenko, Demid; Konnikov, Semen; Ryzhov, Valery; Yakushev, Pavel; Lavrenyuk, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    Thermostable nanocomposites based on densely cross-linked cyanate ester resins (CER), derived from bisphenol E and doped by 0.01 to 5 wt. % amino-functionalized 2D montmorillonite (MMT) nanoparticles, were synthesized and characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), far-infrared (Far-IR), and creep rate spectroscopy (CRS) techniques. It was revealed that ultra-low additives, e.g., 0.025 to 0.1 wt. %, of amino-MMT nanolayers covalently embedded into CER network exerted an anomalously large impact on its dynamics and properties resulting, in particular, in some suppression of dynamics, increasing the onset of glass transition temperature by 30° to 40° and twofold rise of modulus in temperature range from 20°C to 200°C. Contrarily, the effects became negligibly small or even negative at increased amino-MMT contents, especially at 2 and 5 wt. %. That could be explained by TEM/EDXS data displaying predominance of individual amino-MMT nanolayers and their thin (2 to 3 nanolayers) stacks over more thick tactoids (5 to 10 nanolayers) and the large amino-MMT aggregates (100 to 500 nm in thickness) reversing the composite structure produced with increasing of amino-MMT content within CER matrix. The revealed effect of ultra-low amino-MMT content testifies in favor of the idea about the extraordinarily enhanced long-range action of the `constrained dynamics' effect in the case of densely cross-linked polymer networks.

  7. MT2DInvMatlab—A program in MATLAB and FORTRAN for two-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong Kon; Kim, Hee Joon; Song, Yoonho; Lee, Choon-Ki

    2009-08-01

    MT2DInvMatlab is an open-source MATLAB® software package for two-dimensional (2D) inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) data; it is written in mixed languages of MATLAB and FORTRAN. MT2DInvMatlab uses the finite element method (FEM) to compute 2D MT model responses, and smoothness-constrained least-squares inversion with a spatially variable regularization parameter algorithm to stabilize the inversion process and provide a high-resolution optimal earth model. It is also able to include terrain effects in inversion by incorporating topography into a forward model. This program runs under the MATLAB environment so that users can utilize the existing general interface of MATLAB, while some specific functions are written in FORTRAN 90 to speed up computation and reuse pre-existing FORTRAN code in the MATLAB environment with minimal modification. This program has been tested using synthetic models, including one with variable topography, and on field data. The results were assessed by comparing inverse models obtained with MT2DInvMatlab and with a non-linear conjugate gradient (NLCG) algorithm. In both tests the new inversion software reconstructs the subsurface resistivity structure very closely and provides an improvement in both resolution and stability.

  8. Current channelling and three-dimensional effects detected from magnetotelluric data from a sedimentary basin in Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomposiello, C.; Osella, A.; Favetto, A.; Sainato, C.; Martinelli, P.; Aprea, C.

    1998-11-01

    Aquifer-bearing intermontane sedimentary basins of the Sierras Pampeanas in the northwest of Argentina are in general very deep and narrow and contain economically important deposits of Tertiary sediments. This paper presents the results of a study to characterize the sedimentary basin bounded to the west by Sierra de Famatina and to the east by Sierra de Velasco, where an electromagnetic sensing technique, the magnetotelluric (MT) method, was applied. 12 MT sites were deployed along a 30 km E-W transect. Some of the data collected were used to derive a 2-D resistivity model of the basin. The model shows a subsurface trough with a thick (approximately 8 km) sedimentary sequence above it. Anomalous behaviour of the E-W electric-field component (Ey) was detected in the period range 1-100 s, where the amplitude of this component was below the instrumental noise level. The cause of this anomaly is not known, but it might be due to the presence of an embedded conducting body between 8 and 10 km, which would give rise to N-S current channelling.

  9. Audio-magnetotelluric investigation of allochthonous iron formations in the Archaean Reguibat shield (Mauritania): structural and mining implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronner, G.; Fourno, J. P.

    1992-11-01

    The M'Haoudat range, considered as an allochthonous unit amid the strongly metamorphosed Archaean basement (Tiris Group), belongs to the Lower Proterozoic Ijil Group, weakly metamorphosed, constituted mainly by iron quartzites including red jaspers and high grade iron ore. Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) soundings (frequency range 1-7500 HZ) were performed together with the systematic survey of the range (SNIM mining company). The non-linear least squares method was used to perform a smoothness-constrained data model. The obvious AMT resistivity contrasts between the M'Haoudat Unit (150-3500 ohm. m) and the Archaean basement (20 000 ohm. m) allow to state precisely that the two thrust surfaces, on both sides of the range, join together at a depth which increases from North-West to South-East, as the ore bodies. Inside the steeply dipping M'Haoudat Unit, the main beds of iron quartzites (1500-3500 ohm. m), schists (1000-1500 ohm. m) and hematite ores (150-300 ohm. m) were distinguished when their thickness exceeded 30 to 50 m. The existence of an hydrostatic level (1-50 ohm. m) and the steeply dipping architecture, very likely responsible for the lack of resistivity contrast on the upper part of some profiles, complicate the interpretation at high frequencies the thin layers being poorly defined.

  10. A deep survey for transiting hot planets in the open cluster M37 with the MMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Joel David

    This thesis presents the results of a deep (14.5 [Special characters omitted.] the intermediate age open cluster M37 (NGC 2099) using the 6.5m MMT. We combine spectroscopic and photometric observations of the cluster to refine estimates of the cluster fundamental parameters, identify variable stars, study stellar rotation, and place limits on the fraction of stars with planets as small as Neptune. We determine new estimates of the fundamental cluster parameters: t 550 ± 30 Myr, E ( B - V ) = 0.227 ± 0.038, ( m - M ) v = 11.57 ± 0.13 and [ M/ H ] = +0.045 ± 0.044. We obtain light curves for ~ 23,000 stars and identify 1445 variable stars, 99% of which are new discoveries. These variables include 575 rotational variables that are potential cluster members. Using this rich sample we investigate a number of relations between rotation period, color and the amplitude of photometric variability, and we combine these results with published observations of other open clusters to test the standard theory of lower-main sequence stellar angular momentum evolution. Notably we find that the period of the Sun and the periods of solar mass stars in M37, and the Hyades do not follow the "Skumanich law", i.e. they cannot be related by a simple model invoking solid-body rotation with a standard wind angular momentum-loss law. Finally, we do not detect any transiting planets among the ~ 1450 observed cluster members. We do, however, identify a ~ 1 R J candidate planet transiting a Galactic field star. We use this null result to place 95% confidence upper limits on the fraction of cluster members and field stars with planets as a function of planetary radius and orbital period. We find that < 25% of cluster members have 0.35 R J planets with periods shorter than 1 day, and < 16% of field stars have 0.3 R J planets with periods shorter than 1 day. This is the first transit survey to place limits on the fraction of stars with planets as small as Neptune.

  11. 1D and 2D Occam's Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data Applied in Volcano-Geothermal Area In Central Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariani, Elsi; Srigutomo, Wahyu

    2016-08-01

    One-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) magnetotelluric data inversion were conducted to reveal the subsurface resistivity structure beneath the eastern part of a volcano in Central Java, Indonesia. Fifteen magnetotelluric sounding data spanning two lines of investigation were inverted using Occam's inversion scheme. The result depict that there are extensively conductive layer (2-10 ohm meter) below the volcanic overburden. This conductive layer is interpreted as the clay cap resulted from thermal alteration. A higher resistivity layer (10-80 ohm meter) underlies the clay cap and is interpreted as the reservoir whose top boundaries vary between 1000 m above and 2000 m below sea level.

  12. Magnetotellurics with long distance remote reference to reject DC railway noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanstein, T.; Jiang, J.; Strack, K.; Ritter, O.

    2014-12-01

    Some parts of railway network in Europe is electrified by DC current. The return current in the ground is varying in space, time and power when the train is moving. Since the train traffic is active 24 hours, there is no quite time. The train signal is dominating for periods longer than 1 s and is a near field source. The transfer function of the magnetotelluric sounding (MT) is influenced by this near field source, the phase is going to zero and amplitude increase with slope 1 for longer periods. Since this dominating noise is present all day robust magnetotelluric processing technique to identify and remove outliers are not applicable and sufficient. The remote reference technique has successfully been applied for magnetotelluric soundings Combining an disturbed local MT data set with the data of the remote station, which is recording simultaneously the horizontal magnetic fields, can improve the data quality. Finding a good remote station during field survey is difficult and expensive. There is a permanent MT remote reference station in Germany. The set up and maintance is done by the GFZ - Helmholtz Centre Potsdam - GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences. The location is near Wittstock and has good signal-to-noise-ratio with low cutural noise, the ground is almost lD and recording since May 2010. The electric and magnetic field is continously recorded with 250 Hz sampling and induction coils. The magnetic field is also recorded with fluxgate magnetometers and 5 Hz sampling. The distance to the local MT site is about 600 km.

  13. New facilities for magnetotelluric sounding and electromagnetic sounding with active sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klymovych, Y.; Rakhlin, L.; Tregubenko, V.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) sounding and investigations that use electromagnetic sounding with active sources (SAS) are wide spread in many branch of geophysics. The main goal of their application is Earth geoelectric cross-section parameters definition. For MT sounding it was possible to carry out it mostly till the time intervals less, than 10000 sec, that does not permitted to get the sections for the depth more than some first kilometres. Last years in LCISR the new generation of MT and facilities for deep electromagnetic sounding in ultra-low frequencies periods up to 200,000 sec were designed. It became possible after the development of highly stable devices for DC magnetic and telluric measurements. The long term stability of newly created magnetometers now is better than 0.5 nT per month and temperature stability about 0.1 nT/oC. For telluric currents measurements highly stable non-polarized electrodes with long term stability better than 60 mV per month, and temperature stability about 10 mV/oC were designed. Implementation of such facilities made it possible to realize the magnetotelluric sounding to the depth 400-600 km and the experimental results have good agreement with global magnetotelluric curve. Such MT stations (LEMI-404 model) were used in BEAR (Baltic Electromagnetic Array Research) and several others projects. Their use made it possible also to prove with very high probability the existence of low-depth astenosphere in Dnepre-Donetsk Basin (Ukraine). Now a batch of these MT stations is manufactured and used in Ukrainian magnetotelluric net. This net was intended firstly for investigation of electromagnetic earthquake precursors, but after its further development - for geoelectric section circular changes too. Recently two new MT stations are developed. First one low-frequency (DC 1 Hz) inexpensive station LEMI-411 which, having as high metrological parameters as the wide-band one, costs considerebly lower. Second one is multifunctional SAS station

  14. A SEARCH FOR OCCULTATIONS OF BRIGHT STARS BY SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS USING MEGACAM ON THE MMT

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, F. B.; Lehner, M. J.; Protopapas, P.; McLeod, B. A.; Alcock, C. R.; Holman, M. J.

    2009-08-15

    We conducted a search for occultations of bright stars by Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) to estimate the density of subkilometer KBOs in the sky. We report here the first results of this occultation survey of the outer solar system conducted in 2007 June and 2008 June/July at the MMT Observatory using Megacam, the large MMT optical imager. We used Megacam in a novel shutterless continuous-readout mode to achieve high-precision photometry at 200 Hz, which with point-spread function convolution results in an effective sampling of {approx}30 Hz. We present an analysis of 220 star hours of data at a signal-to-noise ratio of 25 or greater, taken from images of fields within 3 deg. of the ecliptic plane. The survey efficiency is greater than 10% for occultations by KBOs of diameter d {>=} 0.7 km, and we report no detections in our data set. We set a new 95% confidence level upper limit for the surface density {sigma} {sub N}(d) of KBOs larger than 1 km: {sigma} {sub N}(d {>=} 1 km) {<=} 2.0 x 10{sup 8} deg{sup -2}, and for KBOs larger than 0.7 km {sigma} {sub N}(d {>=} 0.7 km) {<=} 4.8 x 10{sup 8} deg{sup -2}.

  15. An automated airplane detection system for the safeguard against airplane illumination from the laser guide star beacons at the MMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Miguel; Lloyd-Hart, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Laser beams for guide star generation are a potential hazard for aircraft. At the MMT telescope located on Mt. Hopkins in Southern Arizona, a constellation of five Rayleigh guide stars is created with a total of 25 W of projected power at 532 nm wavelength. We report operational results from an automatic system deployed at the MMT that is designed to detect aircraft and shut down the lasers if a collision with the beams appears likely. The system, building on a previous prototype, uses a wide-angle CCD camera mounted with a minimally unobstructed view to the optical support structure at the top of the telescope. A computer program reads the camera once every two seconds and calculates the difference between adjacent image pairs. The anti-collision beacons required on all aircraft by the Federal Aviation Administration appear as streaks in the field. If an airplane is detected, it is located in the field relative to the laser beam and its path is projected. If aircraft are detected near or appear that they will approach the beam, the laser's safety shutter is closed and warning messages are sent to the laser operator. Failsafe operation is assured by a "heart beat" signal continuously sent from the detection system to the laser controller, and by the fact that the safety shutter must be energized to open. In the event of a power failure, the system must be manually reset by the Laser Safety Officer before the laser beam can again be propagated.

  16. Topographic effect on Radio-Magnetotelluric and Slingram signals: application to a levee along the Loire river, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, Rodolphe; Fauchard, Cyrille; Antoine, Raphael

    2014-05-01

    We study the influence of the topography of a levee on the electric and magnetic signals obtained with the Radio-Magnetotelluric method (RMT) and the Slingram method, respectively. For the RMT method, field measurements have been modelled with a finite element commercial software (AC/DC and Radio-Frequency modules of Comsol Multiphysics). A levee situated in Orléans (France) along the Loire river has been considered in order to design a model taking into account the skin depth and the incident wavelength. The effect of the incident electromagnetic field direction has been assessed with two different incident wave directions: BBC 5 from Salford (UK) and France-Inter from Allouis (France). The simulations highlight the tri-dimensional effects of the topography in the apparent resistivity, observed on the crest of the levee, depending on the incident field direction and topography. For the Slingram method, the magnetic field has been simulated using the AC/DC module of Comsol. The ratio of the primary magnetic field on the secondary one, received in a loop is determined above a straight levee. The study aims to show the various responses obtained in function of both vertical and horizontal coil configurations. We show that the signal also depends on the topography and the right configuration of the coils alignment with respect to the levee stretch direction. In this study, a buried gas pipe is also characterized by the two methods. Numerical modelling of 3D electromagnetic effects on geophysical signals helps to interpret the field measurements and offers to the stakeholder an optimized methodology for geophysical surveys on levees.

  17. Assembly of luminescent ordered multilayer thin-films based on oppositely-charged MMT and magnetic NiFe-LDHs nanosheets with ultra-long lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Meitang; Wang, Tianlei; Ma, Hongwen; Fu, Yu; Hu, Kunran; Guan, Chao

    2014-11-01

    In this present report, luminescent ordered multilayer thin films (OMFs) based on oppositely-charged inorganic nanosheets and the different oppositely-charged chromophores were fabricated via layer-by-layer assembly method. Exfoliated layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and montmorillonite (MMT) nanosheets with opposite charges can be expected to provide a pseudo electronic microenvironment (PEM) which has not been declared in previous literatures, and transition metal-bearing LDHs nanosheets can offer an additional ferromagnetic effect (FME) for the chromophores at the same time. Surprisingly, the luminescent lifetimes of those OMFs with PEM and FME are significantly prolonged compared with that of the pristine chromophores, even much longer than those of OMFs without oppositely-charged and ferromagnetic architecture. Therefore, it is highly expected that the PEM and FME formed by oppositely-charged and transition metal-bearing inorganic nanosheets have remarkable influence on obtaining better optical property, which suggests a new potential way to manipulate, control and develop the novel light-emitting materials and optical devices.

  18. Assembly of luminescent ordered multilayer thin-films based on oppositely-charged MMT and magnetic NiFe-LDHs nanosheets with ultra-long lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meitang; Wang, Tianlei; Ma, Hongwen; Fu, Yu; Hu, Kunran; Guan, Chao

    2014-11-21

    In this present report, luminescent ordered multilayer thin films (OMFs) based on oppositely-charged inorganic nanosheets and the different oppositely-charged chromophores were fabricated via layer-by-layer assembly method. Exfoliated layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and montmorillonite (MMT) nanosheets with opposite charges can be expected to provide a pseudo electronic microenvironment (PEM) which has not been declared in previous literatures, and transition metal-bearing LDHs nanosheets can offer an additional ferromagnetic effect (FME) for the chromophores at the same time. Surprisingly, the luminescent lifetimes of those OMFs with PEM and FME are significantly prolonged compared with that of the pristine chromophores, even much longer than those of OMFs without oppositely-charged and ferromagnetic architecture. Therefore, it is highly expected that the PEM and FME formed by oppositely-charged and transition metal-bearing inorganic nanosheets have remarkable influence on obtaining better optical property, which suggests a new potential way to manipulate, control and develop the novel light-emitting materials and optical devices.

  19. Synthesis of the very acid-sensitive Fmoc-Cys(Mmt)-OH and its application in solid-phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Barlos, K; Gatos, D; Hatzi, O; Koch, N; Koutsogianni, S

    1996-03-01

    S-4-methoxytrityl cysteine was synthesized and converted into the corresponding Fmoc-Cys(Mmt)-OH by its reaction with Fmoc-OSu. As compared to the corresponding Fmoc-Cys(Trt)-OH, the S-Mmt-function was found to be considerably more acid labile. Quantitative S-Mmt-removal occurs selectively in the presence of groups of the tert butyl type and S-Trt by treatment with 0.5-1.0% TFA. The new derivative was successfully utilized in the SPPS of Tyr1-somatostatin on 2-chlorotrityl resin. In this synthesis groups of the Trt-type were exclusively used for amino acid side-chain protection. Quantitative cleavage from the resin and complete deprotection was performed by treatment with 3% TFA in DCM-TES (95:5) for 30 min at RT. We observed no reduction of tryptophan under these conditions.

  20. Magnetotelluric Data, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Jackie M.; Sampson, Jay A.; Rodriguez, Brian D.; Asch, Theodore H.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at their Nevada Site Office (NSO) are addressing ground-water contamination resulting from historical underground nuclear testing through the Environmental Management (EM) program and, in particular, the Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. During 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the DOE and NNSA-NSO, collected and processed data from twenty-six magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) sites at the Nevada Test Site. The 2005 data stations were located on and near Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain to assist in characterizing the pre-Tertiary geology in those areas. These new stations extend the area of the hydrogeologic study previously conducted in Yucca Flat. The MT data presented in this report will help refine what is known about the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre Tertiary confining units. Subsequent interpretation will include a three dimensional (3 D) character analysis and a two-dimensional (2 D) resistivity model. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data. No interpretation of the data is included here.

  1. Magnetotellurics and Transient Electromagnetics to Investigate the Geoelectric Structure of Southern Aegean, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makris, J. P.; Kalisperi, D.; Smirnov, M.; Rigakis, H.; Romano, G.; Kokologiannakis, A.; Pentes, G.; Pentaris, F.; Skoulakis, A.; Perrone, A.; Kouli, M.; Vallianatos, F.

    2014-12-01

    Since 2012 a great number of onshore magnetotelluric (MT) and Transient Electromagnetic (TEM) measurements have been conducted in Southern Aegean, Greece. The survey included Crete, almost all the islands of Dodecanese and Southern Cyclades, Southern Peloponnese, and the islands Kithira, Antikithira and Gavdos. Southern Aegean Sea, featuring the Southern Hellenic Arc (HA) of the Hellenic Subduction Zone (HSZ) and the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA), depicts complex geotectonics and the most intense seismicity and geodynamics of Western Eurasia. In this work we summarize the most important results of the MT and TEM combined analysis and modelling. Furthermore, two permanent telemetric MT stations were installed and operated in Western Crete and Rhodes, respectively, to be used as remote reference and to investigate possible transient seismoelectromagnetic signals. The case of the October 12, 2013 strong earthquake (Mb6.4) is discussed. The research was conducted in the framework of the project entitled "MagnetoTellurics in studying Geodynamics of the hEllenic Arc (MT-GEAR)", co-funded by the European Social Fund (ESF) and National Resources within the context of the Action "Supporting Postdoctoral Researchers" of the Operational Programme 'Education and Lifelong Learning'.

  2. Crustal rheology of the Himalaya and Southern Tibet inferred from magnetotelluric data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Unsworth, M.J.; Jones, A.G.; Wei, W.; Marquis, G.; Gokarn, S.G.; Spratt, J.E.; Bedrosian, P.; Booker, J.; Leshou, C.; Clarke, G.; Shenghui, L.; Chanhong, L.; Ming, D.; Sheng, J.; Solon, K.; Handong, T.; Ledo, J.; Roberts, B.

    2005-01-01

    The Cenozoic collision between the Indian and Asian continents formed the Tibetan plateau, beginning about 70 million years ago. Since this time, at least 1,400 km of convergence has been accommodated by a combination of underthrusting of Indian and Asian lithosphere, crustal shortening, horizontal extrusion and lithospheric delamination. Rocks exposed in the Himalaya show evidence of crustal melting and are thought to have been exhumed by rapid erosion and climatically forced crustal flow. Magnetotelluric data can be used to image subsurface electrical resistivity, a parameter sensitive to the presence of interconnected fluids in the host rock matrix, even at low volume fractions. Here we present magnetotelluric data from the Tibetan-Himalayan orogen from 77??E to 92??E, which show that low resistivity, interpreted as a partially molten layer, is present along at least 1,000 km of the southern margin of the Tibetan plateau. The inferred low viscosity of this layer is consistent with the development of climatically forced crustal flow in Southern Tibet. ?? 2005 Nature Publishing Group.

  3. New application of wavelets in magnetotelluric data processing: reducing impedance bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larnier, Hugo; Sailhac, Pascal; Chambodut, Aude

    2016-04-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) data consist of the sum of several types of natural sources including transient and quasiperiodic signals and noise sources (instrumental, anthropogenic) whose nature has to be taken into account in MT data processing. Most processing techniques are based on a Fourier transform of MT time series, and robust statistics at a fixed frequency are used to compute the MT response functions, but only a few take into account the nature of the sources. Moreover, to reduce the influence of noise in the inversion of the response functions, one often sets up another MT station called a remote station. However, even careful setup of this remote station cannot prevent its failure in some cases. Here, we propose the use of the continuous wavelet transform on magnetotelluric time series to reduce the influence of noise even for single site processing. We use two different types of wavelets, Cauchy and Morlet, according to the shape of observed geomagnetic events. We show that by using wavelet coefficients at clearly identified geomagnetic events, we are able to recover the unbiased response function obtained through robust remote processing algorithms. This makes it possible to process even single station sites and increase the confidence in data interpretation.

  4. Magnetotelluric evidence for crustal suture zones bounding the southern Great Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.K.; Biasi, G.P. ); Mackie, R.L.; Madden T.R. )

    1991-01-10

    A geoelectric section inferred from a regional magnetotelluric study across the Coast Ranges, the Great Valley, and the Sierra Nevada reveals significant variations in electrical resistivity. Zones of lower resistivity interpreted at depths from 10 km to at least 30 km lie near mapped geologic boundaries between the Coast Ranges and the Great Valley and beneath the eastern side of the Great Valley. The former boundary is inferred by others to separate the subduction complex of the Coast Ranges from the mafic basement of the Great Valley. The lower resistivities are most likely associated with metasediments trapped between the Coast Ranges ophiolite and the former oceanic crust beneath the Great Valley. The latter boundary is problematic, but may be evidence for a deep metasedimentary section trapped between the ophiolites beneath the Great Valley and granitic rocks of the Sierra Nevada. The lack of change in the magnetotelluric phase across the Great Valley indicates that a suture zone marked by lower resistivities is unlikely to be present beneath the valley. However, this does not preclude the existence of a resistive suture zone.

  5. Water exploration using Magnetotelluric and gravity data analysis; Wadi Nisah, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboud, Essam; Saud, Ramzi; Asch, Theodore; Aldamegh, Khaled; Mogren, Saad

    2014-12-01

    Saudi Arabia is a desert country with no permanent rivers or lakes and very little rainfall. Ground water aquifers are the major source of water in Saudi Arabia. In the Riyadh region, several Wadies including Wadi Nisah store about 14 × 106 m3 of water, which is extracted for local irrigation purposes. In such areas, the water wells are as shallow as 200-300 m in depth. The importance of Wadi Nisah is because the subsurface water aquifers that are present there could support the region for many years as a water resource. Accordingly, in this study, we performed a Magnetotelluric survey using a portable broadband sounding system (MT24/LF) to evaluate the ground water aquifer at great depths. We collected 10 broadband Magnetotelluric sounding stations (1 station/day) with an interval of about 2-3 km reaching a profile length of about 25-30 km along Wadi Nisah. Additionally, we used available gravity data to image the subsurface structure containing the aquifer. MT results indicated a low resistivity layer, associated with alluvium deposits, which was defined at a depth of about 1-2 km and extended horizontally about 15 km. Gravity data analysis was used to model this resistivity layer indicating a basement surface at 3-4 km depth.

  6. Magnetotelluric survey to locate the Archean-Proterozoic suture zone in the northeastern Great Basin, Nevada, Utah, and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sampson, Jay A.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    North-central Nevada contains a large amount of gold in linear belts, the origin of which is not fully understood. During July 2008, September 2009, and August 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey, as part of the Assessment Techniques for Concealed Mineral Resources project, collected twenty-three magnetotelluric soundings along two profiles in Box Elder County, Utah; Elko County, Nevada; and Cassia, Minidoka, and Blaine Counties, Idaho. The main twenty-sounding north-south magnetotelluric profile begins south of Wendover, Nev., but north of the Deep Creek Range. It continues north of Wendover and crosses into Utah, with the north profile terminus in the Snake River Plain, Idaho. A short, three-sounding east-west segment crosses the main north-south profile near the northern terminus of the profile. The magnetotelluric data collected in this study will be used to better constrain the location and strike of the concealed suture zone between the Archean crust and the Paleoproterozoic Mojave province. This report releases the magnetotelluric sounding data that was collected. No interpretation of the data is included.

  7. Finite Element Modeling of the Magnetotelluric Phase Tensor Response to Evaluate Sensitivity to Lateral and Vertical Resistivity Contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, S.; McClain, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Phase tensor analysis of magnetotelluric data is a relatively new technique introduced by Caldwell et. al. (2004) and requires substantial research efforts to evaluate the capabilities of the method. We have conducted finite element (FE) modeling using the AC/DC module of Comsol Multiphysics to determine the effect of resistivity structure on the phase tensor response. Measurements are made at eleven frequencies from 10-104 Hz at points on a 5x5 grid above various simple model geometries. Phase tensor plotting methods are adapted from Booker (2013) and involve displaying data graphically as stacks of colored ellipses. This allows for interpretation across the frequency spectrum vertically as well as laterally between stations. Two types of plot are presented for each model, a "ϕmin plot" where the ellipses are colored according to the minimum principle phase and a "delta plot" where the ellipses are colored according to the difference between the principle phases (ϕmax - ϕmin), which provides a quantification of the phase anisotropy. Results suggest that the principle phases ϕmin and ϕmax are sensitive to vertical resistivity contrasts but not lateral resistivity contrasts. Conversely, delta plots reveal sensitivity to lateral resistivity contrasts but not vertical resistivity contrasts. A clear distance relationship is observed with proximity to the boundary controlling the frequency range that senses a lateral resistivity contrast. Rotation of the phase tensor ellipses and increased skew values occur in the presence of resistivity contrasts that strike nonparallel to the source field, with the effect increasing towards lower frequencies. The total phase tensor response is confirmed to be sensitive to both vertical and lateral resistivity contrasts and can be used effectively to interpret subsurface resistivity structure.

  8. Three-dimensional resistivity structure of Asama Volcano revealed by data-space magnetotelluric inversion using unstructured tetrahedral elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Yoshiya; Ogawa, Yasuo; Aizawa, Koki; Kanda, Wataru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Koyama, Takao; Yamaya, Yusuke; Kagiyama, Tsuneomi

    2017-03-01

    Asama Volcano is an andesitic composite volcano and one of the most active volcanoes in Japan. In order to reveal electrical resistivity structure beneath the volcano accurately, we performed a 3-D inversion of dense magnetotelluric survey data. In order to prevent misinterpretation of the subsurface resistivity due to the steep topography around Asama Volcano, we used an unstructured tetrahedral mesh to represent the topography. Furthermore, we reduced the calculation time by transforming the inverse problem from the model space into the data space. Comparison of the new data-space method to the original model-space method showed that the calculation time required to update the model parameters was reduced as a result of the transformation, whereas the resistivity structure obtained remained unchanged. In the subsurface resistivity structure around Asama Volcano that was estimated from the inversion, resistive bodies were discovered to be located under the old eruption centres. In particular, under the 24 ka collapse caldera to the west of the presently active crater, a spherical resistive body was found to exist in isolation. In addition, there was a widespread conductive layer below the resistive surface layer. By comparison with previous hydrological and geochemical studies, the conductive layer was interpreted as being a high-water-content layer and an overlying layer rich in altered clay minerals. Because the western part of the volcanic conduit was considered to be the resistive area, which is inferred to consist of unfractured rocks with lower permeability than their surroundings, it would appear that the area obstructs the westward flow of the hydrothermal fluid beneath the summit, thereby contributing to higher concentrations of SO42- and Cl- in the spring water at the northern and eastern feet as well as the uneven location of a diffuse CO2 anomaly.

  9. Joint Interpretation of Magnetotellurics and Airborne Electromagnetics in the Rathlin Basin, Northern Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhaye, Robert; Rath, Volker; Jones, Alan G.; Reay, Derek; The Iretherm Team

    2015-04-01

    In this study we present results from geophysical investigation of the sedimentary Rathlin Basin in Northern Ireland in order to assess the potential for low-to-medium enthalpy geothermal aquifers within the porous Permian and Triassic sandstone groups. The area and groups were identified as a potential geothermal resource due to the presence of both an elevated geothermal gradient (observed in two deep boreholes onshore) and favourable hydraulic properties (measured on core samples in the offshore part of the basin). Previous seismic experiments were not able to fully characterise the sediments beneath the overlying flood basalt. Complementing these earlier results, magnetotelluric data were acquired on a grid of 56 sites across the north-eastern portion of the onshore Rathlin Basin, and an additional 12 sites on the nearby Rathlin Island, in order to image the thickness, depth, and lateral continuity of the target sediments. Analysis and 3D modelling, including the effects of the highly conducting ocean, has been successful in deriving a resistivity model that maps the variation in the top of the sediments (base of the basalts) and the truncation of the basin sediments against the Tow Valley Fault, and gives a reasonable estimate of the thickness of the sediment fill. However, the resulting models show significant effects from distortion caused by near-surface inhomogeneities in the responses that cannot be resolved using the given frequency range and site density. Fortunately, for the area of Rathlin Basin, airborne electromagnetic data from the TELLUS project (http://www.bgs.ac.uk/gsni/tellus/contact/index.html) are available. These data were measured at four frequencies between 0.9 kHz and 25 kHz in a verical-coplanar loop configuration, with the dipole axis in flight direction. The spatial sampling distance was less than 25 m, with about 200 m distance between flight lines. Survey altitudes vary between 56 m and 244 m. Thus, for the top ˜100 m penetrated by

  10. A new co-operative inversion strategy via fuzzy clustering technique applied to seismic and magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong Kieu, Duy; Kepic, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical inversion produces very useful images of earth parameters; however, inversion results usually suffer from inherent non-uniqueness: many subsurface models with different structures and parameters can explain the measurements. To reduce the ambiguity, extra information about the earth's structure and physical properties is needed. This prior information can be extracted from geological principles, prior petrophysical information from well logs, and complementary information from other geophysical methods. Any technique used to constrain inversion should be able to integrate the prior information and to guide updating inversion process in terms of the geological model. In this research, we have adopted fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering technique for this purpose. FCM is a clustering method that allows us to divide the model of physical parameters into a few clusters of representative values that also may relate to geological units based on the similarity of the geophysical properties. This exploits the fact that in many geological environments the earth is comprised of a few distinctive rock units with different physical properties. Therefore FCM can provide a platform to constrain geophysical inversion, and should tend to produce models that are geologically meaningful. FCM was incorporated in both separate and co-operative inversion processing of seismic and magnetotelluric (MT) data with petrophysical constraints. Using petrophysical information through FCM assists the inversion to build a reliable earth model. In this algorithm, FCM plays a role of guider; it uses the prior information to drive the model update process, and also forming an earth model filled with rocks units rather than smooth transitions when the boundary is in doubt. Where petrophysical information from well logs or core measurement is not locally available the cluster petrophysics may be solved for in inversion as well if some knowledge of how many distinctive geological exist. A

  11. Two and three dimensional magnetotelluric inversion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J.

    1993-05-01

    Electrical conductivity depends on properties such as the presence of ionic fluids in interconnected pores that are difficult to sense with other remote sensing techniques. Thus improved imaging of underground electrical structure has wide practical importance in exploring for groundwater, mineral and geothermal resources, and in assessing the diffusion of fluids in oil fields and waste sites. Because the electromagnetic inverse problem is fundamentally multi-dimensional, most imaging algorithms saturate available computer power long before they can deal with the complete data set. We have developed an algorithm to directly invert large multi-dimensional data sets that is orders of magnitude faster than competing methods. We have proven that a two-dimensional (2D) version of the algorithm is highly effective for real data and have made substantial progress towards a three-dimensional (3D) version. We are proposing to cure identified shortcomings and substantially expand the utility of the existing 2D program, overcome identified difficulties with extending our method to three-dimensions (3D) and embark on an investigation of related EM imaging techniques which may have the potential for even further increasing resolution.

  12. High-resolution magnetotelluric studies of the Archaean-Proterozoic border zone in the Fennoscandian Shield, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaittinen, K.; Korja, T.; Kaikkonen, P.; Lahti, I.; Smirnov, M. Yu.

    2012-03-01

    The Archaean-Proterozoic collisional zone is a complex mixture of the Archaean complexes [e.g. Iisalmi Complex (IC)], Proterozoic supracrustal belts [e.g. Kainuu Belt (KB) and Savo Belt (SB)] and oceanic arc lithologies in the central Fennoscandian Shield. The zone was formed in the Savo orogeny when the Keitele microcontinent collided with the Archaean Karelian craton in the Palaeoproterozoic time. The crustal architecture of this palaeosuture is studied using new broad-band magnetotelluric data from 104 sites. 2-D conductivity models across the border zone between the Palaeoproterozoic Svecofennian Domain and the Archaean Karelian province are constrained using the recent, partly collocated reflection seismic data from the Finnish Reflection Experiment (FIRE). Dimensionality analyses, in particular the Q-function analysis, show that magnetotelluric data represent reasonably well regional 2-D structure at periods <100 s, which is the longest period used in this study. Strike determinations gave a stable strike of N15W. For the inversions, the data are projected into three parallel profiles with an azimuth of N75E. The determinant inversion is selected as the most suitable method for the data set. Especially the phase data are useable only from the determinant since one of the polarizations have the out-of-quadrant phase at several sites. The interpreted final, geological more appropriate models, where smoother thick conductive areas are replaced by thinner layers, are constructed from the results of the unconstrained smooth inversions with the help of forward modelling, synthetic and prior model inversions and reflection seismic models. The two major sets of crustal conductors are identified. They have an opposite dip and together they form a bowl-shaped conductor. In the west, the eastward dipping SB conductors are located at the bottom of the formation underlain by the Keitele microcontinent. The SB conductors extend to the east possibly cutting the westward

  13. Magnetotelluric imaging of a fossil paleozoic intraoceanic subduction zone in western Junggar, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yixian; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Sheng; Liu, Ying; Zhu, Lupei; Huang, Rong; Chen, Chao; Li, Yongtao; Luo, Yinhe

    2016-06-01

    The fate of subducted oceanic slabs can provide important clues to plate reconstruction through Earth history. Since oceanic slabs in continental collision zones are typically not well preserved, ancient subduction zones have rarely been imaged by geophysical techniques. Here we present an exception from the Darbut belt in the Junggar accretionary collage in the southern Altaids of Asia. We deployed a 182 km long magnetotelluric (MT) profile including 60 broadband sounding sites across the belt. Quality off-diagonal impedances were inverted by a three-dimensional scheme to image resistivities beneath the profile. The resistivity model along with MT impedance phase ellipses and induction vectors were tested and interpreted in detail. Combining geological and geophysical observations, mineral physical experiment, and geodynamic modeling results, the MT transect suggests a fossil intraoceanic subduction zone during the Late Paleozoic in the western Junggar that has been well preserved due to lack of significant subsequent tecto-thermal events.

  14. Indication of meta-anthracite by magnetotellurics in the Köszeg-Rechnitz Penninic window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Attila; Ádám, Antal; Prácser, Ernő

    2013-04-01

    In the Eastern end of the Eastern Alps - at the Austrian-Hungarian border - there are Pennninic Nappes among them the Köszeg-Rechnitz tectonic window having complicated metamorphic history from the Jurassic time. The organic material of the Penninic Ocean transformed to meta-anthracite. Its amount in the calc-phyllite has been estimated by the geochemists to 0.2 percent. Magnetotelluric soundings have been carried out to determine: - the resistivity decrease due to the above amount of conductive material, - the different EM distortions in E and B polarization caused by the conductor near and far from it, - the asthenospheric depth in the area of the tectonic window stepping out from the shallow asthenosphere of the Pannonian Basin, - looking for relation between geoelectric and seismic crustal structures.

  15. Magnetotelluric sounding data, stations 1 to 22, Southern San Luis Valley, Colorado, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    This dataset includes the locations of magnetotelluric (MT) stations collected in 2006 in the Southern San Luis Valley, Colorado. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a series of multidisciplinary studies, including MT surveys, in the San Luis Valley to improve understanding of the hydrogeology of the Santa Fe Group and the nature of the sedimentary deposits comprising the principal groundwater aquifers of the Rio Grande rift. The shallow unconfined and the deeper confined Santa Fe Group aquifers in the San Luis Basin are the main sources of municipal water for the region. The population of the San Luis Valley region is growing rapidly and water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depend on accurate assessment and protection of the region's groundwater resources.

  16. Seismic and magneto-telluric imaging for geothermal exploration at Jemez pueblo in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Albrecht, Michael

    2011-01-25

    A shallow geothermal reservoir in the Pueblo of Jemez in New Mexico may indicate a commercial-scale geothermal energy potential in the area. To explore the geothermal resource at Jemez Pueblo, seismic surveys are conducted along three lines for the purpose of imaging complex subsurface structures near the Indian Springs fault zone. A 3-D magneto-telluric (MT) survey is also carried out in the same area. Seismic and MT imaging can provide complementary information to reveal detailed geologic formation properties around the fault zones. The high-resolution seismic images will be used together with MT images, geologic mapping, and hydrogeochemistry, to explore the geothermal resource at Jemez Pueblo, and to determine whether a conunercial-scale geothermal resource exists for power generation or direct use applications after drilling and well testing.

  17. High-resolution lithosphere viscosity and dynamics revealed by magnetotelluric imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Hasterok, Derrick

    2016-09-30

    An accurate viscosity structure is critical to truthfully modeling lithosphere dynamics. Here, we report an attempt to infer the effective lithospheric viscosity from a high-resolution magnetotelluric (MT) survey across the western United States. The high sensitivity of MT fields to the presence of electrically conductive fluids makes it a promising proxy for determining mechanical strength variations throughout the lithosphere. We demonstrate how a viscosity structure, approximated from electrical resistivity, results in a geodynamic model that successfully predicts short-wavelength surface topography, lithospheric deformation, and mantle upwelling beneath recent volcanism. We further show that this viscosity is physically consistent with and better constrained than that derived from laboratory-based rheology. We conclude that MT imaging provides a practical observational constraint for quantifying the dynamic evolution of the continental lithosphere.

  18. Magnetotelluric investigations of the lithosphere beneath the central Rae craton, mainland Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, Jessica E.; Skulski, Thomas; Craven, James A.; Jones, Alan G.; Snyder, David B.; Kiyan, Duygu

    2014-03-01

    New magnetotelluric soundings at 64 locations throughout the central Rae craton on mainland Nunavut constrain 2-D resistivity models of the crust and lithospheric mantle beneath three regional transects. Responses determined from colocated broadband and long-period magnetotelluric recording instruments enabled resistivity imaging to depths of > 300 km. Strike analysis and distortion decomposition on all data reveal a regional trend of 45-53°, but locally the geoelectric strike angle varies laterally and with depth. The 2-D models reveal a resistive upper crust to depths of 15-35 km that is underlain by a conductive layer that appears to be discontinuous at or near major mapped geological boundaries. Surface projections of the conductive layer coincide with areas of high grade, Archean metasedimentary rocks. Tectonic burial of these rocks and thickening of the crust occurred during the Paleoproterozoic Arrowsmith (2.3 Ga) and Trans-Hudson orogenies (1.85 Ga). Overall, the uppermost mantle of the Rae craton shows resistivity values that range from ~3000 Ω m in the northeast (beneath Baffin Island and the Melville Peninsula) to ~10,000 Ω m beneath the central Rae craton, to >50,000 Ω m in the south near the Hearne Domain. Near-vertical zones of reduced resistivity are identified within the uppermost mantle lithosphere that may be related to areas affected by mantle melt or metasomatism associated with emplacement of Hudsonian granites. A regional decrease in resistivities to values of ~500 Ω m at depths of 180-220 km, increasing to 300 km near the southern margin of the Rae craton, is interpreted as the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary.

  19. Association between improvement in depression, reduced benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse, and increased psychotropic medication use in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) patients.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Shaul; Peles, Einat; Adelson, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    We had evaluated the depressive symptoms severity of 75 former heroin addicts in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) using the 21-item Hamilton rating scale for depression (21-HAM-D) and re-assessed 63 of them 1.6+/-0.3 years later. The second mean 21-HAM-D score was lower than the first (11.8+/-8.4 versus 17.4+/-6.2, p<0.0005). Benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse was lower although not significantly (p=0.06) during the month preceding the second analysis (32/63, 50.8%) than the month preceding the first one (40/63, 63.5%). Psychotropic medication usage was higher at the second assessment than at the first one (50/63, 79.4% versus 27/63, 42.9%, p<0.0005). 21-HAM-D score reduced significantly over time among 13 "no psychotropic medication" patients (13.5+/-6.3 versus 6.8+/-6.8, p=0.005) and in 27 who started medication following the first assessment (19.3+/-3.8 versus 11.0+/-8.4, p<0.0005), but not in those who were already taking any medication before the first assessment (17.7+/-7.0 versus 15.0+/-8.0, p=n.s). 21-HAM-D score reduced in all BDZ groups but scores were still highest in the 32 patients who continued BDZ abuse (19.4+/-5.6 versus 15.2+/-7.7) followed by 14 who stopped it (16.8+/-6.4 versus 9.6+/-9.1) and were lowest in 17 patients who never abused BDZ (14.2+/-5.2 versus 7.2+/-6.4) (repeated measured, time and group effect, each p<0.0005). Predictors for being depressed at follow-up were pre-existing depression only. Stopping BDZ abuse and starting psychotropic treatment was associated with a reduction of depressive symptoms among MMT patients.

  20. INTERPRETATION OF SHALLOW ELECTRICAL FEATURES FROM ELECTROMAGNETIC AND MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYS AT MOUNT HOOD, OREGON

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, M.; Goldstein, N.E.; Mozley, E.

    1981-04-01

    A magnetotelluric survey, with a reference magnetometer for noise cancellation, was conducted at accessible locations around Mount Hood, Oregon. Thirty-eight tensor magnetotelluric (MT) and remote telluric stations were set up in clusters around the volcano except for the northwest quadrant, a wilderness area. Because of limited access, station locations were restricted to elevations below 1829 m, or no closer than 5 km from the 3424-m summit. On the basis of the MT results, three areas were later investigated in more detail using a large-moment, controlled-source electromagnetic (EM) system developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley. One-dimensional interpretations of EM and MT data on the northeast flank of the mountain near the Cloud Cap eruptive center and on the south flank near Timberline Lodge show a similar subsurface resistivity pattern: a resistive surface layer 400-700 m thick, underlain by a conductive layer with variable thickness and resistivity of <20 ohm m. It is speculated that the surface layer consists of volcanics partially saturated with cold meteoric water. The underlying conductive zone is presumed to be volcanics saturated with water heated within the region of the central conduit and, possibly, at the Cloud Cap side vent. This hypothesis is supported by the existence of warm springs at the base of the mountain, most notably Swim Warm Springs on the south flank, and by several geothermal test wells, one of which penetrates the conductor south of Timberline Lodge. The MT data typically gave a shallower depth to the conductive zone than did the EM data. This is attributed, in part, to the error inherent in one-dimensional MT interpretations of geologically or topographically complex areas. On the other hand, MT was better for resolving the thickness of the conductive layer and deeper structure. The MT data show evidence for a moderately conductive north-south structure on the south flank below the

  1. An Amphibious Magnetotelluric Investigation of the Cascadian Seismogenic and ETS zones.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parris, B. A.; Livelybrooks, D.; Bedrosian, P.; Egbert, G. D.; Key, K.; Schultz, A.; Cook, A.; Kant, M.; Wogan, N.; Zeryck, A.

    2015-12-01

    The amphibious Magnetotelluric Observations of Cascadia using a Huge Array (MOCHA) experiment seeks to address unresolved questions about the seismogenic locked zone and down-dip transition zone where episodic tremor and slip (ETS) originates. The presence of free fluids is thought to be one of the primary controls on ETS behavior within the Cascadia margin. Since the bulk electrical conductivity in the crust and mantle can be greatly increased by fluids, magnetotelluric(MT) observations can offer unique insights on the fluid distribution and its relation to observed ETS behavior. Here we present preliminary results from the 146 MT stations collected for the MOCHA project. MOCHA is unique in that it is the first amphibious array of MT stations occupied to provide for 3-D interpretation of conductivity structure of a subduction zone. The MOCHA data set comprises 75 onshore stations and 71 offshore stations, accumulated over a two-year period, and located on an approximate 25km grid, spanning from the trench to the Eastern Willamette Valley, and from central Oregon into middle Washington. We present the results of a series of east-west (cross-strike) oriented, two-dimensional inversions created using the MARE2DEM software that provide an initial picture of the conductivity structure of the locked and ETS zones and its along strike variations. Our models can be used to identify correlations between ETS occurrence rates and inferred fluid concentrations. Our modeling explores the impact of various parameterizations on 2-D inversion results, including inclusion of a smoothness penalty reduction along the inferred slab interface. This series of 2-D inversions can then be used collectively to help make and guide an a priori 3-D inversion. In addition we will present a preliminary 3-D inversion of the onshore stations created using the ModEM software. We are currently working on modifying ModEM to support inversion of offshore data. The more computationally intensive 3-D

  2. Magnetotelluric Data, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect

    Jackie M. Williams; Jay A. Sampson; Brian D. Rodriguez; and Theodore H. Asch.

    2006-11-03

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) at their Nevada Site Office (NSO) are addressing ground-water contamination resulting from historical underground nuclear testing through the Environmental Management (EM) program and, in particular, the Underground Test Area (UGTA) project. From 1951 to 1992, 828 underground nuclear tests were conducted at the Nevada Test Site northwest of Las Vegas. Most of these tests were conducted hundreds of feet above the ground-water table; however, more than 200 of the tests were near or within the water table. This underground testing was limited to specific areas of the Nevada Test Site, including Pahute Mesa, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Frenchman Flat, and Yucca Flat. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology, and its effects on ground-water flow. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit (Bechtel Nevada, 2006). During 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the DOE and NNSA-NSO, collected and processed data from twenty-six magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) sites at the Nevada Test Site. The 2005 data stations were located on and near Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain to assist in characterizing the pre-Tertiary geology in those areas. These new stations extend the area of the hydrogeologic study previously conducted in Yucca Flat. This work will help refine what is known about the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU – late Devonian to Mississippian-age siliciclastic rocks assigned to the Eleana Formation and Chainman Shale) from the Yucca Flat area and west towards

  3. XML Storage for Magnetotelluric Transfer Functions: Towards a Comprehensive Online Reference Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelbert, A.; Blum, C.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotelluric Transfer Functions (MT TFs) represent most of the information about Earth electrical conductivity found in the raw electromagnetic data, providing inputs for further inversion and interpretation. To be useful for scientific interpretation, they must also contain carefully recorded metadata. Making these data available in a discoverable and citable fashion would provide the most benefit to the scientific community, but such a development requires that the metadata is not only present in the file but is also searchable. The most commonly used MT TF format to date, the historical Society of Exploration Geophysicists Electromagnetic Data Interchange Standard 1987 (EDI), no longer supports some of the needs of modern magnetotellurics, most notably accurate error bars recording. Moreover, the inherent heterogeneity of EDI's and other historic MT TF formats has mostly kept the community away from healthy data sharing practices. Recently, the MT team at Oregon State University in collaboration with IRIS Data Management Center developed a new, XML-based format for MT transfer functions, and an online system for long-term storage, discovery and sharing of MT TF data worldwide (IRIS SPUD; www.iris.edu/spud/emtf). The system provides a query page where all of the MT transfer functions collected within the USArray MT experiment and other field campaigns can be searched for and downloaded; an automatic on-the-fly conversion to the historic EDI format is also included. To facilitate conversion to the new, more comprehensive and sustainable, XML format for MT TFs, and to streamline inclusion of historic data into the online database, we developed a set of open source format conversion tools, which can be used for rotation of MT TFs as well as a general XML <-> EDI converter (https://seiscode.iris.washington.edu/projects/emtf-fcu). Here, we report on the newly established collaboration between the USGS Geomagnetism Program and the Oregon State University to gather

  4. Application of magnetotelluric in the modeling of underlying structure of Gour Oumelalen (Egere-Aleksod terrane, Central Hoggar, South of Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhalfa, Zakaria; Abderrezak, Bouzid; Khadidja, Ouzegane; Abderrahmane, Bendaoud; Mohamed, Hamoudi; Abdeslam, Abtout; Abdelhamid, Bendekken; Sofiane Said, Bougchiche; Walid, Boukhlouf; Abdelgharfour, Boukar; Aboubakr, Deramchi; Mohamed, Bendali; Abdenaceur, Lemgharbi; Mohammed, Djeddi

    2016-04-01

    The results of a magnetotelluric experiment crossing Ounane granodiorite to the east until the Amadror Wadi to the West, passing through Adrar Ounane in our study area are presented. The magnetotelluric field survey was carried out in the Gour Oumelalen (GO) area during March 2015. We deployed 34 magnetotelluric sites along two parallel EW profiles of a hundred km long. Time series were collected using a V5 system 2000® of Phoenix Geophysics. The first profile located to the north is composed of 18 braodband measurement sites obtained from merging magnetotelluri with audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data. The second one located 10 km south of the first, is composed of 15 MT sites. An inter-station distance of ~5 km provides good lateral resolution. The MT time series were recorded during about 20 hours which allows to reach a depth of 100 km or more and the AMT data 30 minutes. This allows to get broadband magnetotelluric soundings with good quality data in period range from 0.001 s to 3000 s. In this study we will use the south profile data for modeling the underlying structure of GO. The crustal part of the model shows a resistance bloc, divided by conductive parts which can be interpreted as faults, as regards the lithospheric part it less resistant the upper part, the transition crust / mantle corresponding to MOHO is estimated at more or less 35 km.

  5. Pre-dispersed organo-montmorillonite (organo-MMT) nanofiller: Morphology, cytocompatibility and impact on flexibility, toughness and biostability of biomedical ethyl vinyl acetate (EVA) copolymer.

    PubMed

    Osman, Azlin F; M Fitri, Tuty Fareyhynn; Rakibuddin, Md; Hashim, Fatimah; Tuan Johari, Syed Ahmad Tajudin; Ananthakrishnan, Rajakumar; Ramli, Rafiza

    2017-05-01

    Polymer-clay based nanocomposites are among the attractive materials to be applied for various applications, including biomedical. The incorporation of the nano sized clay (nanoclay) into polymer matrices can result in their remarkable improvement in mechanical, thermal and barrier properties as long as the nanofillers are well exfoliated and dispersed throughout the matrix. In this work, exfoliation strategy through pre-dispersing process of the organically modified montmorillonite (organo-MMT) nanofiller was done to obtain ethyl vinyl acetate (EVA) nanocomposite with improved flexibility, toughness, thermal stability and biostability. Our results indicated that the degree of organo-MMT exfoliation affects its cytotoxicity level and the properties of the resulting EVA nanocomposite. The pre-dispersed organo-MMT by ultrasonication in water possesses higher degree of exfoliation as compared to its origin condition and significantly performed reduced cytotoxicity level. Beneficially, this nanofiller also enhanced the EVA flexibility, thermal stability and biostability upon the in vitro exposure. We postulated that these were due to plasticizing effect and enhanced EVA-nanofiller interactions contributing to more stable chemical bonds in the main copolymer chains. Improvement in copolymer flexibility is beneficial for close contact with human soft tissue, while enhancement in toughness and biostability is crucial to extend its life expectancy as insulation material for implantable device.

  6. 2D stochastic inversion of radio magnetotelluric and electrical resistivity tomography data: the importance of model regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas Carbajal, Marina; Linde, Niklas; Kalscheurer, Thomas; Vrugt, Jasper

    2013-04-01

    Stochastic inversions based on Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods help to characterize the inherent non-uniqueness of non-linear inverse problems. By stating the inverse problem as an inference problem, the emphasis is placed on sampling the posterior probability density function (PDF) of the model parameters, which comprise all possible models that explain the data and satisfy a priori information. The drawback is that for non-linear problems involving many model parameters, MCMC algorithms may take great time to converge. This is why most geophysical applications based on MCMC rely on 1D assumptions. We present here the first fully 2D MCMC inversion of radio magnetotelluric (RMT) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data, using up to 300 model parameters. We demonstrate that stochastic inversion of high-dimensional problems necessitates prior constraints on the model structure to yield meaningful results. In particular, we focus on two popular types of regularization: smoothly varying model parameters and compact anomalies. To do so, we invert not only for the PDF of each model parameter, but also for two hyper-parameters: the variance of the data errors and a trade-off between data fit and model structure. The derived model uncertainties are compared with deterministic most-squares inversions and we analyze how these uncertainties evolve when jointly inverting RMT and ERT data. Finally, we present a field application to characterize the geometry of an aquifer in Sweden. The numerical examples illustrate that model regularization not only decreases the uncertainty of the model parameters, but also accelerates the convergence of the MCMC algorithm. A drawback is that the regularization may lead to posterior PDFs that do not contain features in the true model that are insensitive to data. We also find that joint inversion of different types of geophysical data helps to better constrain the subsurface models. Results of the field data inversions are in

  7. Distribution of melt beneath Mount St Helens and Mount Adams inferred from magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Graham J.; Caldwell, T. Grant; Heise, Wiebke; Chertkoff, Darren G.; Bibby, Hugh M.; Burgess, Matt K.; Cull, James P.; Cas, Ray A. F.

    2009-11-01

    Three prominent volcanoes that form part of the Cascade mountain range in Washington State (USA)-Mounts St Helens, Adams and Rainier-are located on the margins of a mid-crustal zone of high electrical conductivity. Interconnected melt can increase the bulk conductivity of the region containing the melt, which leads us to propose that the anomalous conductivity in this region is due to partial melt associated with the volcanism. Here we test this hypothesis by using magnetotelluric data recorded at a network of 85 locations in the area of the high-conductivity anomaly. Our data reveal that a localized zone of high conductivity beneath this volcano extends downwards to join the mid-crustal conductor. As our measurements were made during the recent period of lava extrusion at Mount St Helens, we infer that the conductivity anomaly associated with the localized zone, and by extension with the mid-crustal conductor, is caused by the presence of partial melt. Our interpretation is consistent with the crustal origin of silicic magmas erupting from Mount St Helens, and explains the distribution of seismicity observed at the time of the catastrophic eruption in 1980 (refs 9, 10).

  8. Weighted Least Squares Estimates of the Magnetotelluric Transfer Functions from Nonstationary Data

    SciTech Connect

    Stodt, John A.

    1982-11-01

    Magnetotelluric field measurements can generally be viewed as sums of signal and additive random noise components. The standard unweighted least squares estimates of the impedance and tipper functions which are usually calculated from noisy data are not optimal when the measured fields are nonstationary. The nonstationary behavior of the signals and noises should be exploited by weighting the data appropriately to reduce errors in the estimates of the impedances and tippers. Insight into the effects of noise on the estimates is gained by careful development of a statistical model, within a linear system framework, which allows for nonstationary behavior of both the signal and noise components of the measured fields. The signal components are, by definition, linearly related to each other by the impedance and tipper functions. It is therefore appropriate to treat them as deterministic parameters, rather than as random variables, when analyzing the effects of noise on the calculated impedances and tippers. From this viewpoint, weighted least squares procedures are developed to reduce the errors in impedances and tippers which are calculated from nonstationary data.

  9. Extensional extrusion: Insights into south-eastward expansion of Tibetan Plateau from magnetotelluric array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hao; Wei, Wenbo; Jin, Sheng; Ye, Gaofeng; Zhang, Letian; Jing, Jian'en; Yin, Yaotian; Xie, Chengliang; Jones, Alan G.

    2016-11-01

    Despite extensive effort over many decades to understand the tectonic evolution of the Tibetan Plateau, the geodynamic processes creating the iconic south-eastward expansion of the plateau at the Eastern Himalayan Syntaxis (EHS) are still unclear and are hotly debated. Two popular (but not necessarily exclusive) geodynamic models, namely crustal flow at mid-to-lower crustal depths and coherent deformation between the crust and lithospheric mantle, are commonly invoked to explain the expansion mechanism. However, neither of these is able to reconcile all of the abundant geological and geophysical data. Here we present a three-dimensional (3D) geo-electrical model, derived from new SINOPROBE magnetotelluric (MT) array data, that reveals the geo-electrical, and by inference rheological, structure of southeast Tibet. Instead of NW-SE conductive channels proposed in prior two-dimensional (2D) MT studies, distinct NNE-SSW directed quasi-linear conductive anomalies are identified in the mid-to-lower crust, which are separated by a large-scale electrically resistive structure that extends from the crust to the upper mantle. This argues against the prior proposed model of south-eastward conductive anomalies, and hence against the southeast lower crust flow of material. To interpret our observations and resultant model, a new mechanism of "extensional extrusion" is proposed to address the lithospheric deformation of the south-eastward expansion of Tibetan Plateau.

  10. Preliminary Results of a Magnetotelluric Survey in the Center of Hawaii Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienert, B. R.; Thomas, D. M.; Wallin, E.

    2014-12-01

    From 2013 up to the present we have been recording magnetotelluric (MT) data at 25 sites in a 35x25 km region (elev. 1943 m) on the saddle between the active volcano of Mauna Loa (4169 m) and the dormant volcano of Mauna Kea (4205 m) on Hawai'i Island. The MT data, particularly the electric fields, are frequently contaminated by spurious components that are not due to the plane-wave magnetic signals required for derivation of the MT impedance tensor. We therefore developed interactive graphical software (MTPlot) to plot and analyze the MT signals in the field. MTPlot allows us to quickly examine records in both the time and frequency domain to in order to judge their quality. It also transforms the data into estimates of apparent resistivity and their error in the frequency range 0.001-500 Hz. This has proved very useful for selecting suitable records for subsequent analysis. We then use multi-taper remote reference processing to obtain our final apparent resistivity estimates and their errors. We present preliminary results of one and two dimensional modeling of these estimates to obtain the three-dimensional distribution of subsurface resistivities down to depths of 5 km. The results are compared to temperatures and properties of cores obtained when we drilled a research hole to a depth of 1760 m in this same region. We shall discuss how our results relate to the extent of the fresh-water and geothermal energy reservoirs that we discovered during drilling.

  11. Analysis of 3d Magnetotelluric Measurements Over the Coso Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, G. A.; Gasperikova, E.; Hoversten, M.

    2007-12-01

    We have carried out an investigation of the Coso Geothermal field utilizing a dense grid of magnetotelluric (MT) stations plus a single line of contiguous bipole array profiling over the east flank of the field. Motivation for this study is that electrical resistivity/conductivity mapping can contribute to better understanding of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) by imaging the geometry, bounds and controlling structures in existing production, and by monitoring changes in the underground resistivity properties in the vicinity of injection due to fracture porosity enhancement. Initial analysis of the Coso MT data was carried out using 2D MT imaging technology to construct a starting 3D resistivity model from a series of 2D resistivity images obtained using the inline electric field measurements (Zxy impedance elements) along different measurement transects. This model was then refined through a 3D inversion process. The 3D resisitivity model clearly showed the controlling geological structures influencing well production at Coso and shows correlations with mapped surface features such as faults and regional geoelectric strike. We have also correlated the model with an acoustic and shear velocity model of the field to show that the near-vertical high conductivity (low resistivity) structure on the eastern flank of the producing field is also a zone of increase acoustic velocity and increased Vp/Vs ratio.

  12. Web-based application for inverting one-dimensional magnetotelluric data using Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanto, Wiwit; Irnaka, Theodosius Marwan

    2016-11-01

    One-dimensional modeling of magnetotelluric (MT) data has been performed using an online application on a web-based virtual private server. The application was developed with the Python language using the Django framework with HTML and CSS components. The input data, including the apparent resistivity and phase as a function of period or frequency with standard deviation, can be entered through an interactive web page that can be freely accessed at https://komputasi.geofisika.ugm.ac.id. The subsurface models, represented by resistivity as a function of depth, are iteratively improved by changing the model parameters, such as the resistivity and the layer depth, based on the observed apparent resistivity and phase data. The output of the application displayed on the screen presents resistivity as a function of depth and includes the RMS error for each iteration. Synthetic and real data were used in comparative tests of the application's performance, and it is shown that the application developed accurate subsurface resistivity models. Hence, this application can be used for practical one-dimensional modeling of MT data.

  13. Magnetotelluric tensors, electromagnetic field scattering and distortion in three-dimensional environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Colin

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes how subsurface resistivity distributions can be estimated directly from the magnetotelluric (MT) tensor relationship between electric and magnetic fields observed on a three-dimensional (3-D) half-space. It presents an inhomogeneous plane wave analogy where relationships between horizontal electric and magnetic fields, and an apparent current density define an apparent resistivity tensor constructed from a quadratic function of the MT tensor. An extended-Born relationship allows the electric field to be normalized with respect to an apparent background current density. The model is generalized by including the vertical magnetic field in a 3 by 3 MT response tensor. A complex apparent wave number tensor, constructed from this tensor, has eigenvalues which, using the plane wave analogy, are the vertical wave numbers associated with the eigenpolarizations of propagating waves in the model half space. The elements associated with the vertical magnetic field transfer function define the horizontal wave numbers. An extended 3 by 3 phase tensor contains four elements of the conventional 2 by 2 phase tensor and two elements associated with the vertical magnetic transfer function. The extended phase tensor and a single real distortion tensor with six independent elements can be used to quantify static electric and magnetic field distortions. The approach provides a theoretical basis for visualization and migration of MT data, in comparison with results from other electrical and EM techniques, a starting point for constrained 3-D inversions, and an assessment of results with other geophysical and geological data.

  14. Distribution of melt beneath Mount St Helens and Mount Adams inferred from magnetotelluric data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, G.J.; Caldwell, T.G.; Heise, W.; Chertkoff, D.G.; Bibby, H.M.; Burgess, M.K.; Cull, J.P.; Cas, Ray A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Three prominent volcanoes that form part of the Cascade mountain range in Washington State (USA)Mounts StHelens, Adams and Rainierare located on the margins of a mid-crustal zone of high electrical conductivity1,5. Interconnected melt can increase the bulk conductivity of the region containing the melt6,7, which leads us to propose that the anomalous conductivity in this region is due to partial melt associated with the volcanism. Here we test this hypothesis by using magnetotelluric data recorded at a network of 85 locations in the area of the high-conductivity anomaly. Our data reveal that a localized zone of high conductivity beneath thisvolcano extends downwards to join the mid-crustal conductor. As our measurements were made during the recent period of lava extrusion at Mount St Helens, we infer that the conductivity anomaly associated with the localized zone, and by extension with the mid-crustal conductor, is caused by the presence of partial melt. Our interpretation is consistent with the crustal origin of silicic magmas erupting from Mount St Helens8, and explains the distribution of seismicity observed at the time of the catastrophic eruption in 1980 (refs9, 10). ?? 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  15. Joint Interpretation of Magnetotelluric and Gravimetric Data from the South American Paraná Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, E. B.; Santos, H. B.; Vitorello, I.; Pádua, M. B.

    2013-05-01

    The Paraná Basin is a large sedimentary basin in central-eastern South America that extends through Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentina. Evolved completely over the South American continental crust, this Paleozoic basin is filled with sedimentary and volcanic rocks deposited from the Silurian to the Cretaceous, when a significant basaltic effusion covered almost the entire area of the basin. A series of superposed sedimentary and volcanic rock layers were laid down under the influence of different tectonic settings, probably originated from distant collisional dynamics of continental boards that led to the amalgamation of Gondwanaland. The current boundaries of the basin can be the result of issuing erosional or of tectonic origin, such as the building up of large arches and faults. To evaluate the deep structural architecture of the lithosphere under a sedimentary basin is a great challenge, requiring the integration of different geophysical and geological studies. In this paper, we present the resulting Paraná Basin lithospheric model, obtained from processing and inversion of broadband and long-period magnetotelluric soundings along an E-W profile across the central part of the basin, complemented by a qualitative joint interpretation of gravimetric data, in order to obtain a more precise geoelectric model of the deep structure of the region.

  16. 2-D magnetotelluric inversion of the central part of Paraná Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, E. B.; Santos, H. B.; Vitorello, I.; Pádua, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Paraná Basin is a large sedimentary basin in central-eastern South America that extends through Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay and Argentina. Evolved completely over the South American continental crust, this Paleozoic basin is filled with sedimentary and volcanic rocks deposited from the Silurian to the Cretaceous, when a significant basaltic effusion covered almost the entire area of the basin. A series of superposed sedimentary and volcanic rock layers were laid down under the influence of different tectonic settings, probably originated from distant collisional dynamics of continental boards that led to the amalgamation of Gondwanaland. The current boundaries of the basin can be the result of issuing erosional or of tectonic origin, such as the building up of large arches and faults. To evaluate the deep structural architecture of the lithosphere under a sedimentary basin is a great challenge, requiring the integration of different geophysical and geological studies. In this paper, we present the resulting Paraná Basin lithospheric model, obtained from processing and inversion of broadband and long-period magnetotelluric soundings along an E-W profile across the central part of the basin, complemented by a qualitative joint interpretation of gravimetric data, in order to obtain a more precise geoelectric model of the deep structure of the region.

  17. Testing Magnetotelluric Constraints on the Physical State of the Yellowstone Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B. S.; Egbert, G. D.; Humphreys, E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent inversions of long-period magnetotelluric (MT) datasets (Kelbert et al., 2012; Meqbel et al., 2014) have suggested that the mantle lithosphere directly beneath the modern Yellowstone caldera is electrically resistive. This observation implies that the uppermost mantle does not contain significant quantities of melt and therefore seems to contradict seismic tomography studies that find a major low-velocity plume-like feature directly beneath Yellowstone. Our ongoing investigation of the long-period Earthscope MT data suggests that these data are relatively insensitive to the conductivity structure in the upper mantle due to screening of deeper features by the modern electrically conductive magma chamber(s). Hence, at present we cannot conclude that the uppermost mantle directly beneath Yellowstone is electrically resistive. However, we do resolve a major electrically conductive anomaly that dips generally to the west at approximately 30 degrees from the vicinity of the seismically imaged magma reservoir(s) beneath the Yellowstone. The MT data therefore may indicate that the flow of melt is at least partially influenced by structures to the west of the modern caldera, specifically ancient (Paleoproterozoic) structures at the edge of the Wyoming Craton. While the geochemistry of Yellowstone eruptive products remains ambiguous with regards to source, radiogenic isotope model ages could be interpreted as supporting this possibility.

  18. Midcontinent Rift and Remnants of Initiating Mantle Plume Imaged With Magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles-martinez, E.; Schultz, A.

    2015-12-01

    Geologic evidence has long suggested that the Midcontinent Rift (MCR) was initiated by a mantle plume 1.1 Ga in the western Lake Superior region. EarthScope magnetotelluric data has been inverted to create a 3D resistivity model that shows remnants of the plume to depths of at least 150 km. The mantle plume remnants are imaged as a body of highly conductive material in the lithosphere. It is focused below western Lake Superior and northwestern Wisconsin, and elongated in a NW-SE direction, consistent with plate motion vectors. Recent seismic velocity models from EarthScope data also show an anomaly at this location. The presence of a plume after so much time has passed invites many questions regarding the long-term stability of conductive materials, the thickness of the lithosphere, and the stability of sub-craton mantle over long time periods. The resistivity model also shows features defining the length of the MCR as well as the Grenville orogeny. New data being collected this summer is incorporated into the model, extending it southeast across Grenville.

  19. Magnetotelluric imaging beneath the Taiwan orogen: An arc-continent collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Edward A.; Unsworth, Martyn J.; Chiang, Chih-Wen; Chen, Chow-Son; Chen, Chien-Chih; Wu, Francis T.; TürkoǧLu, Ersan; Hsu, Han-Lun; Hill, Graham J.

    2012-01-01

    The Taiwan orogen has formed since the late Miocene by oblique collision between the Luzon Volcanic Arc on the Philippine Sea Plate, and the Eurasian continental margin. This oblique collision has produced an orogen that decreases in age from north to south, and permits study of the temporal evolution of an arc-continent collision. These factors make Taiwan a favorable location to study the process of arc-continent collision. The first long-period magnetotelluric (MT) measurements were recorded in Taiwan as part of the Taiwan Integrated Geodynamics Research (TAIGER) project in 2006-7. Measurements were made at 82 sites on three transects across south, central and north Taiwan, that span the breadth of the orogen and cross all major tectonic boundaries. Robust, remote reference processing of the MT time series data resulted in high-quality soundings that were modeled in both 2 and 3-dimensions. These MT models support predictions of lithospheric deformation (i.e., thick-skinned tectonics) beneath the Central Ranges in south and central Taiwan, but are inconsistent with predictions of orogen-scale thin-skinned models. The MT resistivity model for northern Taiwan is consistent with dewatering of the subducting Philippine slab, and with deformation described by the subducting-indenter tectonic model. Modeling the TAIGER MT data has definitively shown that conductive, and seismically active crustal structures, exist to 30+ km beneath the orogen. These conductive regions, interpreted as interconnected fluid, map pervasive zones of collisional deformation that are lithospheric in scale.

  20. 3D inversion based on multi-grid approach of magnetotelluric data from Northern Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevatova, M.; Smirnov, M.; Korja, T. J.; Egbert, G. D.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we investigate the geoelectrical structure of the cratonic margin of Fennoscandian Shield by means of magnetotelluric (MT) measurements carried out in Northern Norway and Sweden during summer 2011-2012. The project Magnetotellurics in the Scandes (MaSca) focuses on the investigation of the crust, upper mantle and lithospheric structure in a transition zone from a stable Precambrian cratonic interior to a passive continental margin beneath the Caledonian Orogen and the Scandes Mountains in western Fennoscandia. Recent MT profiles in the central and southern Scandes indicated a large contrast in resistivity between Caledonides and Precambrian basement. The alum shales as a highly conductive layers between the resistive Precambrian basement and the overlying Caledonian nappes are revealed from this profiles. Additional measurements in the Northern Scandes were required. All together data from 60 synchronous long period (LMT) and about 200 broad band (BMT) sites were acquired. The array stretches from Lofoten and Bodo (Norway) in the west to Kiruna and Skeleftea (Sweden) in the east covering an area of 500x500 square kilometers. LMT sites were occupied for about two months, while most of the BMT sites were measured during one day. We have used new multi-grid approach for 3D electromagnetic (EM) inversion and modelling. Our approach is based on the OcTree discretization where the spatial domain is represented by rectangular cells, each of which might be subdivided (recursively) into eight sub-cells. In this simplified implementation the grid is refined only in the horizontal direction, uniformly in each vertical layer. Using multi-grid we manage to have a high grid resolution near the surface (for instance, to tackle with galvanic distortions) and lower resolution at greater depth as the EM fields decay in the Earth according to the diffusion equation. We also have a benefit in computational costs as number of unknowns decrease. The multi-grid forward

  1. IRETHERM: Magnetotelluric studies of Irish radiothermal granites and their geothermal energy potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, T. F.; Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Feely, M.

    2013-12-01

    The IRETHERM project seeks to develop a strategic understanding of Ireland's deep geothermal energy potential through integrated modeling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. One aspect of IRETHERM's research focuses on Ireland's radiothermal granites, where increased concentrations of radioelements provide elevated heat-production (HP), heat-flow (HF) and subsurface temperatures. An understanding of the contribution of granites to the thermal field of Ireland is of key importance in assessing the geothermal energy potential of this low-enthalpy setting. This study focuses on the Leinster granite, the Galway granite and the buried Kentstown granite. Shallow (<250 m) boreholes were drilled into the exposed Caledonian Leinster and Galway granites as part of an early 1980's EU-funded geothermal project. These studies yielded HP = 2-3 μWm-3 and HF = 80 mWm-2 at the Sally Gap borehole in the Northern Units of the Leinster granite. In the Galway granite batholith, the Costelloe-Murvey granite returned HP = 7 μWm-3 and HF = 77 mWm-2, measured at the Ros a Mhil borehole. The lower heat-flow encountered at the Ros a Mhil borehole suggests that the associated high heat production does not extend to great depth. The buried Kentstown granite has associated with it a significant negative Bouguer anomaly and was intersected by two mineral exploration boreholes at depths of 660 m and 485 m. Heat production has been measured at 2.4 μWm-3 in core samples taken from the weathered top 30m of the granite. The core of this study consists of an ambitious program of magnetotelluric (MT) and audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data acquisition across the three granite bodies, extending over three fieldwork seasons. MT and AMT data were collected at 59 locations along two profiles over the Leinster granite. Preliminary results show that the northern units of the Leinster granite extend to depths of 2-5 km. Over the Galway granite, MT and AMT data have been collected at a total

  2. Synthesis and characterization of silver/montmorillonite/chitosan bionanocomposites by chemical reduction method and their antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Shameli, Kamyar; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Zargar, Mohsen; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Shabanzadeh, Parvaneh; Moghaddam, Mansour Ghaffari

    2011-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) of a small size were successfully synthesized using the wet chemical reduction method into the lamellar space layer of montmorillonite/chitosan (MMT/Cts) as an organomodified mineral solid support in the absence of any heat treatment. AgNO3, MMT, Cts, and NaBH4 were used as the silver precursor, the solid support, the natural polymeric stabilizer, and the chemical reduction agent, respectively. MMT was suspended in aqueous AgNO3/Cts solution. The interlamellar space limits were changed (d-spacing = 1.24–1.54 nm); therefore, AgNPs formed on the interlayer and external surface of MMT/Cts with d-average = 6.28–9.84 nm diameter. Characterizations were done using different methods, ie, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Silver/montmorillonite/chitosan bionanocomposite (Ag/MMT/Cts BNC) systems were examined. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs in MMT/Cts was investigated against Gram-positive bacteria, ie, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria, ie, Escherichia coli, E. coli O157:H7, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the disc diffusion method using Mueller Hinton agar at different sizes of AgNPs. All of the synthesized Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs were found to have high antibacterial activity. These results show that Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs can be useful in different biological research and biomedical applications, including surgical devices and drug delivery vehicles. PMID:21499424

  3. 3-D joint inversion of the magnetotelluric phase tensor and vertical magnetic transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Kristina; Ritter, Oliver; Egbert, Gary D.

    2015-11-01

    With advancing computational resources, 3-D inversion techniques have become feasible in recent years and are now a more widely used tool for magnetotelluric (MT) data interpretation. Galvanic distortion caused by small-scale near-surface inhomogeneities remains an obstacle for 3-D MT inversion which so far has experienced little attention. If not considered properly, the effect on 3-D inversion can be immense and result in erroneous subsurface models and interpretations. To tackle the problem we implemented inversion of the distortion-free phase tensor into the ModEM inversion package. The dimensionless phase tensor components describe only variations of the conductivity structure. When inverting these data, particular care has to be taken of the conductivity structure in the a priori model, which provides the reference frame when transferring the information from phase tensors into absolute conductivity values. Our results obtained with synthetic data show that phase tensor inversion can recover the regional conductivity structure in presence of galvanic distortion if the a priori model provides a reasonable assumption for the regional resistivity average. Joint inversion of phase tensor data and vertical magnetic transfer functions improves recovery of the absolute resistivity structure and is less dependent on the prior model. We also used phase tensor inversion for a data set of more than 250 MT sites from the central San Andreas fault, California, where a number of sites showed significant galvanic distortion. We find the regional structure of the phase tensor inversion results compatible with previously obtained models from impedance inversion. In the vicinity of distorted sites, phase tensor inversion models exhibit more homogeneous/smoother conductivity structures.

  4. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion with distortion correction, practical experience and solution recipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorkamp, Max; Avdeeva, Anna

    2016-04-01

    The static distortion of magnetotelluric (MT) impedances is a common problem that can prevent detailed imaging of the subsurface. The effect of distortion on the undistorted impedance Z can be described as a multiplication with an unknown, real-valued matrix C. Inverting the observed impedance Zobs = C ṡ Z without any consideration of distortion can result in strong artefacts, particularly in the near-surface. As a consequence, a variety of approaches have been developed to remove as much of the distortion effects as possible or compensate for them in the inversion. However, these either reduce the number of data and thus potentially reduce resolution, or make assumptions about the properties of the matrices C and Z which might not be generally valid. Recently we developed a new 3D inversion approach that includes the four unknown elements of C as parameters in the inversion and showed encouraging result with different synthetic test cases. In this presentation we will focus on the practical aspects of inverting real data with this approach. We will use a combined MT and transient electromagnetic (TEM) dataset acquired over the Kemaliye geothermal field in Turkey. We will demonstrate the improvements in imaging that can be obtained by incorporating distortion in the inversion. Having TEM data at each site, gives us some indication of the amount of distortion and we will compare our recovered distortion values with these measurements. Finally, we will also show in how far the inversion approach is robust in the presence of noise and present recipes for successful inversion with distortion correction.

  5. First amphibian magnetotelluric experiment at the passive continental margin in northern Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapinos, G.; Weckmann, U.; Ritter, O.; Jegen, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    An amphibian magnetotelluric (MT) study across the passive continental margin of northern Namibia was conducted in December/January 2010/2011 and October/November 2011 to image the subsurface electrical conductivity structure. The MT experiment is part of the interdisciplinary SAMPLE project (South Atlantic Margin Processes and Links with onshore Evolution) which focusses on imaging and understanding processes related to rifting and the breakup history of the supercontinent Gondwana, in particular the opening of the South Atlantic and the post breakup evolution of the continental passive margins of Africa and South America. The onshore MT data were acquired in the Kaoko Mobile Belt at 167 sites in a ~140 km wide and ~260 km long EW extending corridor, from the Atlantic Ocean onto the Congo Craton. The Kaoko Mobile Belt is a transpressional strike slip orogen with NNW striking sinistral shear zones, folds and thrusts, which was formed during the Pan-African orogeny and the amalgamation of West Gondwana. This onshore network is extended offshore with MT measurements along 2 transects parallel and perpendicular to the Walvis Ridge - an approximately 3400km long seamount volcanic chain, trending NE-SW, from Africa to the Middle Atlantic Ridge, thought to be formed by the volcanic activity of the Tristan da Cunha Plume since the early Cretaceous. The onshore impedances and vertical magnetic transfer functions are generally of excellent quality but indicate significant three-dimensional structures in the crust and upper mantle, particularly in the Western Kaoko Zone, in the vicinity of the prominent shear zones. 2-D inversion of a sub-section of the entire data set, where two-dimensional modeling is consistent with the MT data revealed spatial correlations of a resistive zone and the Archean Congo Craton as well as of conductive structures and surface expressions of prominent faults.

  6. Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data in Anisotropic Media Using Maximization of Mutual Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolesi, E.; Jones, A. G.

    2011-12-01

    Regularization in inverse geophysics problems has been used extensively, due to the necessity to constrain the model space and to reduce the ill-posedness of several problems. Magnetotelluric (MT) problems suffer from severe non-linearity and ill-posedness, which makes MT inversions extremely challenging. The use of a reference model has been used by many authors in order to drive the inversion process to converge on a model that shares features with the reference, as a result reducing non-uniqueness and improving the model resolution. In our work the reference model drives the inversion keeping the conductivity distribution close to that of the velocity using variation of information as measure of distance between the two pictures. In this way the electrical conductivity and seismic velocity can be compared from a statistical point of view, without the necessity of a common parameterization or a strict geometrical similarity. Our work involves the inversion of MT long-period data, which are sensitive to electrical conductivity, using shear wave velocity maps as reference model in a 1D anisotropic domain. Computation of variation of information is performed through the generation of the joint probability distribution, which allows exploration of the relation between models that fit seismic data and models that fit electrical properties. An approximate agreement between geoelectric strike direction and seismic fast axis have been recognized in different continental lithospheric areas, suggesting a common cause for both the seismic and electric anisotropic behavior. We present an application of this inversion approach to a real dataset from Central Germany, discussing pros and cons of this approach in relation to similar studies on the same area. Due to the minimal assumptions required by this approach, it highlights the possibility of application to different tomography techniques.

  7. Magnetotelluric investigation of the Vestfold Hills and Rauer Group, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, J. R.; Selway, K.

    2016-04-01

    The Vestfold Hills and Rauer Group in East Antarctica have contrasting Archean to Neoproterozoic geological histories and are believed to be juxtaposed along a suture zone that now lies beneath the Sørsdal Glacier. Exact location and age of this suture zone are unknown, as is its relationship to regional deformation associated with the amalgamation of East Gondwana. To image the suture zone, magnetotelluric (MT) data were collected in Prydz Bay, East Antarctica, mainly along a profile crossing the Sørsdal Glacier and regions inland of the Vestfold Hills and Rauer Group islands. Time-frequency analysis of the MT time series yielded three important observations: (1) Wind speeds in excess of ˜8 m/s reduce coherence between electric and magnetic fields due to charged wind-blown particles of ice and snow. (2) Estimation of the MT transfer function is best between 1000 and 1400 UT when ionospheric Hall currents enhance the magnetic source field. (3) Nonplanar source field effects were minimal but detectable and removed from estimation of the MT transfer function. Inversions of MT data in 2-D and 3-D produce similar resistivity models, where structures in the preferred 3-D resistivity model correlate strongly with regional magnetic data. The electrically conductive Rauer Group is separated from the less conductive Vestfold Hills by a resistive zone under the Sørsdal Glacier, which is interpreted to be caused by oxidation during suturing. Though a suture zone has been imaged, no time constrains on suturing can be made from the MT data.

  8. Multi-dimensional Crustal and Lithospheric Structure of the Atlas Mountains of Morocco by Magnetotelluric Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyan, D.; Jones, A. G.; Fullea, J.; Ledo, J.; Siniscalchi, A.; Romano, G.

    2014-12-01

    The PICASSO (Program to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) project and the concomitant TopoMed (Plate re-organization in the western Mediterranean: Lithospheric causes and topographic consequences - an ESF EUROSCORES TOPO-EUROPE project) project were designed to collect high resolution, multi-disciplinary lithospheric scale data in order to understand the tectonic evolution and lithospheric structure of the western Mediterranean. The over-arching objectives of the magnetotelluric (MT) component of the projects are (i) to provide new electrical conductivity constraints on the crustal and lithospheric structure of the Atlas Mountains, and (ii) to test the hypotheses for explaining the purported lithospheric cavity beneath the Middle and High Atlas inferred from potential-field lithospheric modeling. We present the results of an MT experiment we carried out in Morocco along two profiles: an approximately N-S oriented profile crossing the Middle Atlas, the High Atlas and the eastern Anti-Atlas to the east (called the MEK profile, for Meknes) and NE-SW oriented profile through western High Atlas to the west (called the MAR profile, for Marrakech). Our results are derived from three-dimensional (3-D) MT inversion of the MT data set employing the parallel version of Modular system for Electromagnetic inversion (ModEM) code. The distinct conductivity differences between the Middle-High Atlas (conductive) and the Anti-Atlas (resistive) correlates with the South Atlas Front fault, the depth extent of which appears to be limited to the uppermost mantle (approx. 60 km). In all inverse solutions, the crust and the upper mantle show resistive signatures (approx. 1,000 Ωm) beneath the Anti-Atlas, which is the part of stable West African Craton. Partial melt and/or exotic fluids enriched in volatiles produced by the melt can account for the high middle to lower crustal and uppermost mantle conductivity in the Folded Middle Atlas, the High Moulouya Plain and the

  9. Gravity and Magnetotelluric Modeling of the Santo Domingo Basin, Northern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamudio, K. D.; Keithline, N.; Blum, C.; Cunningham, E.; Fromont, A.; Jorgensen, M.; Lee, R.; McBride, K.; Saez Berrios, P.; Harper, C.; Pellerin, L.; McPhee, D.; Ferguson, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Santo Domingo Basin, one of a series of basins within the Rio Grande Rift, is located between Santa Fe and Albuquerque, NM, and has been the focus of research by the Summer of Geophysical Experience (SAGE) program since 2000. Gravity, magnetotelluric (MT), and seismic data have been collected throughout the region, although we are concentrating on gravity and MT data collected during SAGE 2014 and 2015. The study area is located in the center of the Santo Domingo basin, an extensional, Miocene age, rift basin, in an area that was minimally involved in the preceding local Laramide orogenic activity. Rift sediments (~3.5 km thick) are underlain by Eocene age sediments that were shed from adjacent uplifts. Up to 3 km of Mesozoic and Paleozoic sediments are preserved above the Precambrian basement. Geologic outcrop, borehole and seismic reflection data, and known density values were used in the construction of a ~100 km-long, generalized geologic cross section from which a gravity response was calculated. The modeled gravity response makes fairly definitive predictions about the geometry of the basin as well as the stratigraphy and faulting within and bounding the basin. MT data was collected at ten stations within the basin. The MT sounding curves exhibit one-dimensional behavior at short periods (<10 s), not surprisingly considering the relatively flat local structure in the area. Layered-earth MT models, without geologic constraints, show a conductive (<10 ohm-m) layer at ~1.5 km above a more resistive layer (>1000 ohm-m) at ~ 3.5-4 km. Conductivities of the major stratigraphic units have been determined from well logs and previous MT modeling. Forward and inverse MT models constrained by the gravity-modeled geologic cross section are used to develop a conductivity model consistent with the geology, and are a step towards a better unified treatment of MT, seismic and gravity data.

  10. Imaging Ancient Sutures with EarthScope Transportable Array Magnetotelluric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egbert, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetotellurics (MT) provides a powerful geophysical tool for imaging of ancient suture zones, which are frequently marked by elongated zones of very low resistivity. These conductive anomalies, which can extend to great depths and have apparently persisted for several billion years, most likely result from graphite and sulfides deeply emplaced and remobilized, through subduction, accretion and orogenesis. The Earthscope MT transportable array provides a unique broad-scale view of sutures in the continental US. In the northwestern US subvertical conductive features bound all of the major cratonic blocks. These can be identified with the Cheyenne Belt between the Wyoming Craton (WC) and Yavapai Terranes (YT), the Great Falls Tectonic Zone between WC and the Medicine Hat Block (MHB), and the Vulcan Structure of southern Alberta between MHB and the Hearne Craton. In all cases the conductive anomalies extend well into the mantle lithosphere. The more recent MT TA footprint in the north-central US (surrounding the Mid-Continent Rift (MCR)) also reveals conductive signatures of ancient sutures. The most prominent lies south of Lake Superior, just north of the Niagara Fault (NF), and can be associated with the Penokean Orogeny (~1.85 Ga). A second, further south beneath Iowa and western Wisconsin, just south of the Spirit Lake tectonic zone (SLtz), can be identified with YT accretion (~1.75 Ga). Both of these sutures are cleanly cut by the MCR. The break in the anomalies is narrow (comparable to the surface expression of the MCR) indicating that rifting impacts on the entire crustal section were highly localized. The south-dipping NF conductive anomaly extends from surface outcrop to at least the Moho. The SLtz anomaly is north-dipping, extending from mid-crust through the Moho. In both cases there is some evidence for a modestly conductive layer (likely carbon) thrust to mid-lithospheric depths within the overriding terrane.

  11. 3D magnetotelluric modelling of the Alnö alkaline and carbonatite ring complex, central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ping; Andersson, Magnus; Kalscheuer, Thomas; García Juanatey, María A.; Malehmir, Alireza; Shan, Chunling; Pedersen, Laust B.; Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.

    2016-06-01

    Thirty-four broadband magnetotelluric stations were deployed across the Alnö alkaline and carbonatite ring intrusion in central Sweden. The measurements were designed such that both 2D models along existing seismic profiles and a 3D model can be constructed. Alnö Island and surrounding areas are densely populated and industrialized and in order to reduce the effect of noise, the remote reference technique was utilized in time series processing. Strike and dimensionality analyses together with the induction arrows show that there is no homogeneous regional strike direction in this area. Therefore, only the determinant of the impedance tensor was used for 2D inversion whereas all elements of the impedance tensor were used for 3D inversion. Representative rock samples were collected from existing outcrops and their resistivities were measured in the laboratory to facilitate interpretation of the inversion models. The results from these measurements show that coarse-grained (sövite, white color) and fine-grained (dark color) carbonatites are the most conductive and resistive rock types, respectively. In accordance with the interpretation of the reflection seismic images, the 2D and 3D resistivity models depict the caldera-related ring-type fault system and updoming faulted and fractured systems as major 10-500 Ωm conductors, extending down to about 3 km depth. A central ~ 4000 Ωm resistive unit at about 3 km depth appears to correspond to a solidified fossil magma chamber as speculated from the reflection seismic data and earlier field geological studies.

  12. Magnetotelluric investigation of the Vestfold Hills and Rauer Group, East Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peacock, Jared R.; Selway, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The Vestfold Hills and Rauer Group in East Antarctica have contrasting Archean to Neoproterozoic geological histories and are believed to be juxtaposed along a suture zone that now lies beneath the Sørsdal Glacier. Exact location and age of this suture zone are unknown, as is its relationship to regional deformation associated with the amalgamation of East Gondwana. To image the suture zone, magnetotelluric (MT) data were collected in Prydz Bay, East Antarctica, mainly along a profile crossing the Sørsdal Glacier and regions inland of the Vestfold Hills and Rauer Group islands. Time-frequency analysis of the MT time series yielded three important observations: (1) Wind speeds in excess of ∼8 m/s reduce coherence between electric and magnetic fields due to charged wind-blown particles of ice and snow. (2) Estimation of the MT transfer function is best between 1000 and 1400 UT when ionospheric Hall currents enhance the magnetic source field. (3) Nonplanar source field effects were minimal but detectable and removed from estimation of the MT transfer function. Inversions of MT data in 2-D and 3-D produce similar resistivity models, where structures in the preferred 3-D resistivity model correlate strongly with regional magnetic data. The electrically conductive Rauer Group is separated from the less conductive Vestfold Hills by a resistive zone under the Sørsdal Glacier, which is interpreted to be caused by oxidation during suturing. Though a suture zone has been imaged, no time constrains on suturing can be made from the MT data.

  13. Three-dimensional audio-magnetotelluric sounding in monitoring coalbed methane reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Zhao, Shanshan; Hui, Jian; Qin, Qiming

    2017-03-01

    Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) sounding is widely employed in rapid resistivity delineation of objective geometry in near surface exploration. According to reservoir patterns and electrical parameters obtained in Qinshui Basin, China, two-dimensional and three-dimensional synthetic ;objective anomaly; models were designed and inverted with the availability of a modular system for electromagnetic inversion (ModEM). The results revealed that 3-D full impedance inversion yielded the subsurface models closest to synthetic models. One or more conductive targets were correctly recovered. Therefore, conductive aquifers in the study area, including hydrous coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs, were suggested to be the interpretation signs for reservoir characterization. With the aim of dynamic monitoring of CBM reservoirs, the AMT surveys in continuous years (June 2013-May 2015) were carried out. 3-D inversion results demonstrated that conductive anomalies accumulated around the producing reservoirs at the corresponding depths if CBM reservoirs were in high water production rates. In contrast, smaller conductive anomalies were generally identical with rapid gas production or stopping production of reservoirs. These analyses were in accordance with actual production history of CBM wells. The dynamic traces of conductive anomalies revealed that reservoir water migrated deep or converged in axial parts and wings of folds, which contributed significantly to formations of CBM traps. Then the well spacing scenario was also evaluated based on the dynamic production analysis. Wells distributed near closed faults or flat folds, rather than open faults, had CBM production potential to ascertain stable gas production. Therefore, three-dimensional AMT sounding becomes an attractive option with the ability of dynamic monitoring of CBM reservoirs, and lays a solid foundation of quantitative evaluation of reservoir parameters.

  14. Mapping Electrical Structures in the Jarud Basin, Northeast China through Magnetotelluric Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, China Geological Survey (CGS) has launched 3D geological mapping programs from regional to local scales. The project Deep geological survey at the periphery of the Songliao Basin funded by CGS was implemented from 2012 to 2014. Its main goals are to reveal the tectonic framework of the Jarud Basin (JB) as well as to identify the strata distribution of Permian Linxi Formation by integrating new electromagnetic data with existing geophysical and geological data since black mudstones in the Linxi Formation have shown the potential of shale gas. The study area covered dominantly with Cretaceous-Jurassic igneous rocks with exception of the southeast part is situated in Jarud Banner and Ar Horqin Banner, Inner Mongolia, China. It tectonically lies in the southern Great Khingan Range, western margin of the Songliao Basin, and north of Xar Moron Fault. Over the period of 2012 to 2014, a magnetotelluric survey was carried out at the JB. A total of 926 MT sites with nominal spacing 1 km was acquired in the effective frequency range of 0.01 Hz ~ 300 Hz on six NW and five NE profiles, covering area that exceeds 10, 000 km2. After dimensionality analysis and static shift removal, the nonlinear conjugate algorithm was used to conduct 2D inversion for TM and TE modes. The resistivity models underwent examination using sensitivity tests. The optimal resistivity models revealed numerous large faults, some of which constitute the boundaries of the JB, and modified the tectonic framework. Integrated with well logging and geological mapping data, the strata of Linxi Formation were identified and classified into three depressions: Depressions Arituguri, Gadasu and Wufen. Attention should be paid to Depression Gadasu with area of around 500 km2 since it contains reasonably thick conductive sediments exceeding 4 km in depth which are inferred to be black mudstones pertaining to shale gas.

  15. 3-D analysis and interpretation of magnetotelluric data from the Aluto-Langano geothermal field, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samrock, F.; Kuvshinov, A.; Bakker, J.; Jackson, A.; Fisseha, S.

    2015-09-01

    The Main Ethiopian Rift Valley encompasses a number of volcanoes, which are known to be actively deforming with reoccurring periods of uplift and setting. One of the regions where temporal changes take place is the Aluto volcanic complex. It hosts a productive geothermal field and the only currently operating geothermal power plant of Ethiopia. We carried out magnetotelluric (MT) measurements in early 2012 in order to identify the source of unrest. Broad-band MT data (0.001-1000 s) have been acquired at 46 sites covering the expanse of the Aluto volcanic complex with an average site spacing of 1 km. Based on this MT data it is possible to map the bulk electrical resistivity of the subsurface down to depths of several kilometres. Resistivity is a crucial geophysical parameter in geothermal exploration as hydrothermal and magmatic reservoirs are typically related to low resistive zones, which can be easily sensed by MT. Thus by mapping the electrical conductivity one can identify and analyse geothermal systems with respect to their temperature, extent and potential for production of energy. 3-D inversions of the observed MT data from Aluto reveal the typical electrical conductivity distribution of a high-enthalpy geothermal system, which is mainly governed by the hydrothermal alteration mineralogy. The recovered 3-D conductivity models provide no evidence for an active deep magmatic system under Aluto. Forward modelling of the tippers rather suggest that occurrence of melt is predominantly at lower crustal depths along an off-axis fault zone a few tens of kilometres west of the central rift axis. The absence of an active magmatic system implies that the deforming source is most likely situated within the shallow hydrothermal system of the Aluto-Langano geothermal field.

  16. Analysis and 3D inversion of magnetotelluric crooked profile data from central Svalbard for geothermal application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beka, Thomas I.; Smirnov, Maxim; Birkelund, Yngve; Senger, Kim; Bergh, Steffen G.

    2016-08-01

    Broadband (0.001-1000 s) magnetotelluric (MT) data along a crooked profile collected to investigate the geothermal potential on Spitsbergen could not be fully explained by two-dimensional (2D) models; hence we interpret the data with three-dimensional (3D) inversion herein. To better accommodate 3D features and nearby off profile resistivity structures, the full MT impedance tensor data together with the tipper were inverted. As a model control, a detailed bathymetry is systematically incorporated in the inversion. Our results from testing different inversion settings emphasised that appropriately choosing and tuning the starting model, data error floor and the model regularization together are crucial to obtain optimum benefit from MT field data. Through the 3D inversion, we reproduced out of quadrant impedance components and obtained an overall satisfactory data fit (RMS = 1.05). The final 3D resistivity model displays a complex geology of the near surface region (< 1.5 km), which suggests fractures, localized and regional fault systems and igneous intrusions in the Mesozoic platform cover deposits. The Billefjorden fault zone is revealed as a consistent and deep rooted (> 2 km) conductive anomaly, confirming the regional nature of the fault. The fault zone is positioned between two uplifted basement blocks (> 1000 Ωm) of presumably pre-Devonian (Caledonian) metamorphic rocks, and the fault may have been responsible for deformation in the overlying Paleozoic-Mesozoic unit. Upper crustal conductive anomalies (< 10 Ωm) below the Paleozoic-Mesozoic succession in the western part of the 3D model are interpreted as part of a Devonian basin fill. These conductors are laterally and vertically bounded by resistive rocks, suggesting a conducive environment for deep geothermal heat storage. Having this scenario in an area of a known high heat-flow, deep faults and a thinned lithosphere makes the hypothesis on finding a technologically exploitable geothermal resource

  17. Imaging the magmatic and hydrothermal systems of Long Valley Caldera, California with magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, J.; Mangan, M.; McPhee, D.; Ponce, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Long Valley Caldera (LVC) in Eastern California contains active hydrothermal systems, areas of episodic seismicity, and areas of elevated gas emissions, all of which are related to a deeper magmatic system that is not well characterized. To better image the Long Valley magmatic system, 60 full-tensor broadband magnetotelluric (MT) stations were collected in LVC and modeled in three-dimensions to constrain the subsurface electrical resistivity structure down to 30 km. Three conductive zones are imaged in the preferred resistivity model. The most prominent conductive zone (<7 Ohm-m) is located 5 km beneath the resurgent dome (near the center of Long Valley Caldera), where it elongates in a north-south direction, and has westward connection to the surface close to well 44-16 near Deer Mountan. This conductive zone is interpreted to be an accumulation zone of hydrothermal fluids originating from a deeper magmatic source. The shape of the conductive body suggests that the fluids pool under the resurgent dome and migrate westward, upwelling just south of well 44-16 to feed the near surface geothermal system. A second conductive zone (<10 Ohm-m) is 4 km southeast of the resurgent dome and 5 km deep and coincident with the seismic swarm of 2014. This is another zone of fluid accumulation, where the source could be the fluid accumulation zone to the west or an independent deeper source. The third conductive anomaly (<10 Ohm-m) is a few kilometers south of the resurgent dome below a depth of 15 km, and collocated with a low p- and s-wave velocity zone, and directly beneath a GPS inflation area, all of which advocate for a magma mush zone of as much as 30% interstitial melt. The preferred resistivity model suggests an accumulation of hydrothermal fluids 5 km below the resurgent dome that originates from a deeper magmatic source at 15 km depth.

  18. Lithospheric geometries revealed through electromagnetic imaging: SAMTEX (Southern Africa MagnetoTelluric Experiment) observations and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Evans, R. L.; Miensopust, M. P.; Khoza, D. T.; Samtex Team

    2011-12-01

    The Southern African Magnetotelluric Experiment (SAMTEX) is imaging the properties and geometries of the lithosphere below southern Africa to depths of 200+ km. Electrical conductivity is highly sensitive to ambient temperature, and to the presence of an interconnected conducting phase, such as a solid phase like graphite or sulphides, a fluid phase like partial melt, or bound water through hydrogen diffusion. Thus, primary geometrical information can be readily obtained from lithospheric-scale MT experiments about the three-dimensional variation in conductivity that can be related to formation and deformation processes. One important piece of information easily obtained from MT data is the depth to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), due to the sensitivity of conductivity to small fractions (<1%) of partial melt and/or of some hundreds of ppm of bound water. SAMTEX measurements have been made at a total of more than 750 MT sites over an area in excess of a million square kilometres, making it by far the largest-ever regional MT project undertaken. One of the most significant results from SAMTEX is the mapping of the LAB beneath the Archean cratons and bounding mobile belts of Southern Africa, particularly of the previously unknown regions of Namibia and Botswana. The LAB is shallow (150 km) beneath the mobile belts, deep (250 km) in the centres of the cratons, and transitional at the edges. Diamondiferous kimberlites are located primarily where lithosphere is transitional in thickness, or where there is a change in its anisotropy properties, both of which are craton edge effects. The electrical properties of the continental mantle derived from SAMTEX data can be compared with seismic ones derived from data from the South African Seismic Experiment (SASE) of the Kaapvaal Project. Generally there is very good predictive linear agreement between seismic velocity and log(conductivity), indicative of both being influenced by the same bulk property factors

  19. Characterization of a Crustal Transition Zone in Northern Tibet using Magnetotelluric Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pape, Florian; Jones, Alan G.; Vozar, Jan; Wei, Wenbo; Dong, Hao; Unsworth, Martyn J.; Jin, Sheng; Ye, Gaofeng; Jing, Jianen; Zhang, Letian; Xie, Chengliang

    2013-04-01

    The overall objective of the final phase of the INDEPTH (International Deep Profiling of Tibet and Himalaya) project has been to develop a better understanding of the structure and evolution of the northern margins of the Tibetan plateau, namely the Kunlun and Altyn Tagh faults. For the Kunlun Fault, both INDEPTH Phase III and new Phase IV magnetotelluric (MT) data were investigated using 2D isotropic and anisotropic modelling, as well as 3D modelling. The resulting resistivity models characterize a northwards penetrative extension of the partially molten Tibetan middle crust, crossing the subvertical Kunlun Fault. Furthermore, the anisotropic observations highlighted by the INDEPTH MT modelling define progressive finger-like melt intrusion beneath the Kunlun Shan. However, this intrusion may not be homogeneous along the whole of the northern Tibetan border along the Kunlun Fault, as its depth and horizontal extension are likely to vary. The partial melt associated with the anisotropic anomaly observed on the INDEPTH resistivity models may have been triggered by strain heating associated with heat production during ductile deformation in a mid-crustal shear zone located beneath the Kunlun fault in the southern Kunlun ranges. This shear zone might be characterized by different levels of strain along the whole of the northern Tibetan border and may have developed into separated channels where the Songpan-Ganzi partially molten crust flows to the north, mechanically weakening the Kunlun crust. Melt penetration across the Kunlun Fault through intrusive channels likely accommodates crustal shortening in northern Tibet, but may also characterize a transition zone between the weak partially molten crust of the plateau and the more rigid Qaidam lithosphere, associated with the growth of the plateau to the north.

  20. Combined structural and magnetotelluric investigation across the West Fault Zone in northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann-Rothe, Arne

    2002-08-01

    The characterisation of the internal architecture of large-scale fault zones is usually restricted to the outcrop-based investigation of fault-related structural damage on the Earth's surface. A method to obtain information on the downward continuation of a fault is to image the subsurface electrical conductivity structure. This work deals with such a combined investigation of a segment of the West Fault, which itself is a part of the more than 2000 km long trench-linked Precordilleran Fault System in the northern Chilean Andes. Activity on the fault system lasted from Eocene to Quaternary times. In the working area (22°04'S, 68°53'W), the West Fault exhibits a clearly defined surface trace with a constant strike over many tens of kilometers. Outcrop condition and morphology of the study area allow ideally for a combination of structural geology investigation and magnetotelluric (MT) / geomagnetic depth sounding (GDS) experiments. The aim was to achieve an understanding of the correlation of the two methods and to obtain a comprehensive view of the West Fault's internal architecture. Fault-related brittle damage elements (minor faults and slip-surfaces with or without striation) record prevalent strike-slip deformation on subvertically oriented shear planes. Dextral and sinistral slip events occurred within the fault zone and indicate reactivation of the fault system. Youngest deformation increments mapped in the working area are extensional and the findings suggest a different orientation of the extension axes on either side of the fault. Damage element density increases with approach to the fault trace and marks an approximately 1000 m wide damage zone around the fault. A region of profound alteration and comminution of rocks, about 400 m wide, is centered in the damage zone. Damage elements in this central part are predominantly dipping steeply towards the east (70-80°). Within the same study area, the electrical conductivity image of the subsurface was

  1. Green synthesis of silver/montmorillonite/chitosan bionanocomposites using the UV irradiation method and evaluation of antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Shameli, Kamyar; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Rustaiyan, Abdolhossein; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Zargar, Mohsen; Abdollahi, Yadollah

    2010-01-01

    In this study, silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) were synthesized using a green physical synthetic route into the lamellar space of montmorillonite (MMT)/chitosan (Cts) utilizing the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation reduction method in the absence of any reducing agent or heat treatment. Cts, MMT, and AgNO3 were used as the natural polymeric stabilizer, solid support, and silver precursor, respectively. The properties of Ag/MMT/Cts bionanocomposites (BNCs) were studied as the function of UV irradiation times. UV irradiation disintegrated the Ag-NPs into smaller sizes until a relatively stable size and size distribution were achieved. Meanwhile, the crystalline structure and d-spacing of the MMT interlayer, average size and size distribution, surface morphology, elemental signal peaks, functional groups, and surface plasmon resonance of Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs were determined by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared, and UV-visible spectroscopy. The antibacterial activity of Ag-NPs in MMT/Cts was investigated against Gram-positive bacteria, ie, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria (ie, Escherichia coli) by the disk diffusion method on Muller–Hinton Agar at different sizes of Ag-NPs. All of the synthesized Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs were found to have high antibacterial activity. These results show that Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs can be useful in different biologic research and biomedical applications, such as surgical devices and drug delivery vehicles. PMID:21116328

  2. Lithostratigraphic interpretation from joint analysis of seismic tomography and magnetotelluric resistivity models using self-organizing map techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, K.; Muñoz, G.; Moeck, I.

    2012-12-01

    The combined interpretation of different models as derived from seismic tomography and magnetotelluric (MT) inversion represents a more efficient approach to determine the lithology of the subsurface compared with the separate treatment of each discipline. Such models can be developed independently or by application of joint inversion strategies. After the step of model generation using different geophysical methodologies, a joint interpretation work flow includes the following steps: (1) adjustment of a joint earth model based on the adapted, identical model geometry for the different methods, (2) classification of the model components (e.g. model blocks described by a set of geophysical parameters), and (3) re-mapping of the classified rock types to visualise their distribution within the earth model, and petrophysical characterization and interpretation. One possible approach for the classification of multi-parameter models is based on statistical pattern recognition, where different models are combined and translated into probability density functions. Classes of rock types are identified in these methods as isolated clusters with high probability density function values. Such techniques are well-established for the analysis of two-parameter models. Alternatively we apply self-organizing map (SOM) techniques, which have no limitations in the number of parameters to be analysed in the joint interpretation. Our SOM work flow includes (1) generation of a joint earth model described by so-called data vectors, (2) unsupervised learning or training, (3) analysis of the feature map by adopting image processing techniques, and (4) application of the knowledge to derive a lithological model which is based on the different geophysical parameters. We show the usage of the SOM work flow for a synthetic and a real data case study. Both tests rely on three geophysical properties: P velocity and vertical velocity gradient from seismic tomography, and electrical resistivity

  3. Two-dimensional magnetotelluric model of deep resistivity structure in the Bodie-Aurora district of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sampson, Jay A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Magnetotelluric data were acquired during October 2001 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of a study to examine the structural nature of basins in the transition zone between the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California and the Basin and Range province of Nevada. Magnetotelluric (MT) geophysical studies assist the mapping of geologic structure and the inference of lithologic packages that are concealed beneath the Earth's surface. The Basin and Range province has a complicated geologic history, which includes extension and compression of the Earth's crust to form the basins and ranges that blanket much of Nevada. The basins and ranges in the vicinity of this study trend northeastward and are bounded by steeply dipping strike slip faults. Interestingly, deep east-west magnetic trends occur in the aeromagnetic data of this study area indicating that the northeast-trending basins and ranges represent only thin-skinned deformation at the surface with an underlying east-west structure. To investigate this issue, MT data were acquired at seven stations in eastern California, 20 km east of Mono Lake. The purpose of this report is to present a two-dimensional apparent resistivity model of the MT data acquired for this study.

  4. A feasible research of rock porosity and water saturation impact on audio-magnetotelluric propagation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Z.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Although various factors have impact on the resistivity of subsurface rock formation, in depth range of general electrical prospecting, the conductive actions of rocks are basically realized relying on the aqueous solutions filled in the pores. Therefore, quantitatively studying the impact of the water level on rock resistivity is important to analyze and classify strata, investigate the underground structures. In this research, we proposed a feasible research on building electric property rock formation models with different porosity and water saturation based on theories of two-phase media. The propagation of audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) waves is simulated by using finite-difference (FD) scheme, and theoretic resistivity distribution is calculated on account of the response of AMT. According to a sequence of synthetic examples, through comparing and analyzing the simulated results with various porosity and water saturation respectively, we discuss the impact on layers resistivity while porosity and water saturation of rock stratum are changing. The results shows the extent that the mentioned factors can have impact on the propagation of AMT waves. Key words: audio-magnetotelluric modeling, two-phase media, porosity, water saturation, finite-difference

  5. Fabrication and characterization of PVA/ODA-MMT-poly(MA-alt-1-octadecene)-g-graphene oxide e-spun nanofiber electrolytes and their response to bone cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rzayev, Zakir M O; Salimi, Kouroush; Bunyatova, Ulviya; Acar, Selim; Salamov, Bahtiyar; Turk, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a new approach to fabrication and characterization of novel polymer nanofiber electrolytes from intercalated PVA/ODA-MMT nanocomposite as a matrix polymer and encapsulated graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets with amphiphilic reactive copolymer as partner polymers using electrospinning method. The chemical and physical structures, surface morphology, thermal behaviors and electric conductivity of nanocomposites and nanofibers were investigated using analyses methods including FTIR, XRD, SEM, DSC-TGA and conductivity analysis. Significant improvements in nanofiber morphology and size distribution were observed when GO and reactive organoclay were incorporated as reinforcement fillers into various matrix/partner solution blends. The structural factors of matrix-partner polymer nanocomposite particles with higher zeta-potential play important roles in both chemical and physical interfacial interactions and phase separation processing and also lead to the formation of nanofibers with unique surface morphologies and good conductivities. The cytotoxic, necrotic and apoptotic effects of chosen nanofibers on osteocarcinoma cells were also investigated. These multifunctional, self-assembled, nanofibrous surfaces can serve as semi-conductive and bioactive platforms in various electrochemical and bio-engineering processes, as well as reactive matrices used for the immobilization of various biopolymer precursors.

  6. Full waveform time domain solutions for source and induced magnetotelluric and controlled-source electromagnetic fields using quasi-equivalent time domain decomposition and GPU parallelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, N.; Schultz, A.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a full waveform time domain solution has been developed for the magnetotelluric (MT) and controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) methods. The ultimate goal of this approach is to obtain a computationally tractable direct waveform joint inversion for source fields and earth conductivity structure in three and four dimensions. This is desirable on several grounds, including the improved spatial resolving power expected from use of a multitude of source illuminations of non-zero wavenumber, the ability to operate in areas of high levels of source signal spatial complexity and non-stationarity, etc. This goal would not be obtainable if one were to adopt the finite difference time-domain (FDTD) approach for the forward problem. This is particularly true for the case of MT surveys, since an enormous number of degrees of freedom are required to represent the observed MT waveforms across the large frequency bandwidth. It means that for FDTD simulation, the smallest time steps should be finer than that required to represent the highest frequency, while the number of time steps should also cover the lowest frequency. This leads to a linear system that is computationally burdensome to solve. We have implemented our code that addresses this situation through the use of a fictitious wave domain method and GPUs to speed up the computation time. We also substantially reduce the size of the linear systems by applying concepts from successive cascade decimation, through quasi-equivalent time domain decomposition. By combining these refinements, we have made good progress toward implementing the core of a full waveform joint source field/earth conductivity inverse modeling method. From results, we found the use of previous generation of CPU/GPU speeds computations by an order of magnitude over a parallel CPU only approach. In part, this arises from the use of the quasi-equivalent time domain decomposition, which shrinks the size of the linear system dramatically.

  7. Multifunctional electroactive electrospun nanofiber structures from water solution blends of PVA/ODA-MMT and poly(maleic acid-alt-acrylic acid): effects of Ag, organoclay, structural rearrangement and NaOH doping factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şimşek, Murat; Rzayev, Zakir M. O.; Bunyatova, Ulviya

    2016-06-01

    Novel multifunctional colloidal polymer nanofiber electrolytes were fabricated by green reactive electrospinning nanotechnology from various water solution/dispersed blends of poly (vinyl alcohol-co-vinyl acetate) (PVA)/octadecyl amine-montmorillonite (ODA-MMT) as matrix polymer nanocomposite and poly(maleic acid-alt-acrylic acid) (poly(MAc-alt-AA) and/or its Ag-carrying complex as partner copolymers. Polymer nanofiber electrolytes were characterized using FTIR, XRD, thermal (DSC, TGA-DTG), SEM, and electrical analysis methods. Effects of partner copolymers, organoclay, in situ generated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), and annealing procedure on physical and chemical properties of polymer composite nanofibers were investigated. The electrical properties (resistance, conductivity, activation energy) of nanofibers with/without NaOH doping agent were also evaluated. This work presented a structural rearrangement of nanofiber mats by annealing via decarboxylation of anhydride units with the formation of new conjugated double bond sites onto partner copolymer main chains. It was also found that the semiconductor behaviors of nanofiber structures were essentially improved with increasing temperature and fraction of partner copolymers as well as presence of organoclay and AgNPs in nanofiber composite.

  8. Magnetotelluric Studies of the Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field, Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordell, D. R.; Unsworth, M. J.; Diaz, D.; Pavez, M.; Blanco, B.

    2015-12-01

    Geodetic data has shown that the surface of the Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in central Chile has been moving upwards at rates >20 cm/yr since 2007 over a 200 km2 area. It has been hypothesized that this ground deformation is due to the inflation of a magma body at ~5 km depth beneath the lake (2.8 km b.s.l.). This magma body is a likely source for the large number of rhyolitic eruptions at this location over the last 25 ka. A dense broadband magnetotelluric (MT) array was collected from 2009 to 2015 and included data from a geothermal exploration project. MT phase tensor analysis indicates that the resistivity structure of the region is largely three-dimensional for signals with periods longer than 1 s, which corresponds to depths >5 km. The MT data were inverted using the ModEM inversion algorithm to produce a three-dimensional electrical resistivity model which included topography. Four primary features were identified in the model: 1) A north-south striking, 10 km by 5 km, low-resistivity zone (<5 Ωm) northwest of the inflation centre at a depth of ~5 km (2.8 km b.s.l.) is interpreted as a zone of partial melt which may be supplying material via conduits to account for the observed ground deformation; 2) A shallow low-resistivity feature ~400 m beneath the lake surface (1.8 km a.s.l.) and spatially coincident with the inflation centre is interpreted to be a zone of hydrothermal alteration; 3) A thin, low-resistivity feature to the west of LdM at a depth of ~250 m (2.2 km a.s.l.) is interpreted to be the clay cap of a potential geothermal prospect; 4) A large, low-resistivity zone beneath the San Pedro-Tatara Volcanic Complex to the west of LdM at a depth of ~10 km (8 km b.s.l.) is interpreted to be a zone of partial melt. Further MT data collection is planned for 2016 which will expand the current grid of MT stations to better constrain the lateral extent of the observed features and give greater insight into the dynamics of this restless magma system.

  9. Magnetotelluric study of the Pahute Mesa and Oasis Valley regions, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenkel, Clifford J.; Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; Dixon, Gary L.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetotelluric data delineate distinct layers and lateral variations above the pre-Tertiary basement. On Pahute Mesa, three resistivity layers associated with the volcanic rocks are defined: a moderately resistive surface layer, an underlying conductive layer, and a deep resistive layer. Considerable geologic information can be derived from the conductive layer which extents from near the water table down to a depth of approximately 2 km. The increase in conductivity is probably related to zeolite zonation observed in the volcanic rock on Pahute Mesa, which is relatively impermeable to groundwater flow unless fractured. Inferred faults within this conductive layer are modeled on several profiles crossing the Thirsty Canyon fault zone. This fault zone extends from Pahute Mesa into Oasis Valley basin. Near Colson Pond where the basement is shallow, the Thirsty Canyon fault zone is several (~2.5) kilometers wide. Due to the indicated vertical offsets associated with the Thirsty Canyon fault zone, the fault zone may act as a barrier to transverse (E-W) groundwater flow by juxtaposing rocks of different permeabilities. We propose that the Thirsty Canyon fault zone diverts water southward from Pahute Mesa to Oasis Valley. The electrically conductive nature of this fault zone indicates the presence of abundant alteration minerals or a dense network of open and interconnected fractures filled with electrically conductive groundwater. The formation of alteration minerals require the presence of water suggesting that an extensive interconnected fracture system exists or existed at one time. Thus, the fractures within the fault zone may be either a barrier or a conduit for groundwater flow, depending on the degree of alteration and the volume of open pore space. In Oasis Valley basin, a conductive surface layer, composed of alluvium and possibly altered volcanic rocks, extends to a depth of 300 to 500 m. The underlying volcanic layer, composed mostly of tuffs, fills the

  10. Identification of kimberlite bodies in Brazil from a 3D audio-magnetotelluric survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lugao, P. P.; Eric, C. D. O.; Loureiro, F. O.; Arantes, P. R.; Pastana, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    We report on a succesfull identification of kimberlite bodies in Brazil through the use of the electromagnetic technique audio-magnetotelluric (AMT). Macnae (1979) writes that "In one large survey in South Africa, electromagnetic (EM) techniques have proven to be remarkably effective in detecting the presence of weathered clays or epiclastic kimberlite contained within the pipes." Full tensor AMT data were acquired at 65 points (stations) in a 3D configuration with frequencies ranging from 10kHz to 1Hz. The survey was located in the NW portion of the Mato Grosso state, Brazil, in na area of thick jungle coverage. During the AMT survey, few outcrops were seen because of the dense forest cover. Usually, the occurrences found were of sand deposits, indicating the occurence of Fazenda Casa Branca and Utiariti Formations and gravel from Salto das Nuvens Formation, widely used in paving trails n this region. In the area of the survey, three main targets were confirmed/identified: Kimberlite Area 1 - a classic kimberlite in the region, with the crater facies with different clasts and distinct size. We noted the occurrence of a red-brown soil and an unusual vegetation in this area. The resistivity model provided confirmed the presence of Kimberlite Area 1 and was used to identify other two areas. Area of Interest 1 - area with atypical vegetation along a trail. There is an excavation that displays soil of white color with several blocks present, there are small quartz crystal agglomerates in these blocks. The resistivity model cleary shows a conductive body here, indicative of the presence of a kimberlite. Area of Interest 2 - the presence of a kimberlite was confirmed, not exactly where the targeted Area 2 was, but the southwest of it. Close to this area, there was a very fine rock and a few blocks of pure silica, probably indicating a kimberlitic intrusion. In summary, the 3D resistivity model in depth obtained from inversion of the AMT data confirmed and identified

  11. Magnetotelluric investigation of the Alnö alkaline and carbonatite ring complex, central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ping; Andersson, Magnus; Garcia Juanatey, Maria A.; Shan, Chunling; Malehmir, Alireza; Pedersen, Laust B.

    2014-05-01

    Alnö complex, 553-590 Ma, located in central Sweden, is one of the largest of few known alkaline and carbonatite ring intrusions in the world. The complex primarily consists of alkaline silicate rocks (ijolite, nepheline-syenite and pyroxenite) and a wide range of carbonatite dykes with different compositions (e.g., sövite). To better understand the intrusion mechanism(s) and the deeper structure of the intrusion, three high-resolution reflection seismic, gravity and magnetic profiles, crossing the main intrusion, were acquired in winter 2010. Together with these, petrophysical measurements on various rock samples have also been carried out. These data not only successfully showed the lateral extension of the intrusion at depth but also suggested a solidified saucer-shaped magma chamber at about 3 km depth that is associated with caldera-related ring-type fault systems. To further elucidate these interpretations, magnetotelluric (MT) data were acquired in summer 2013. The MT data were measured at 34 stations across the intrusion and designed so that a 3D conductivity model can be obtained. Most of the sites are located along the seismic profiles, while the rest is distributed over the intrusion area, to provide lateral and off-profile information. The time series were recorded with four broadband MT instruments simultaneously. The used sampling rates were 1000 Hz (two hours after midnight) and 20 Hz (a full day). The collected MT data are highly influenced by noise from cultural sources. Luckily, higher frequencies are less influenced providing a good coverage of the interest depth of about 5 km. Therefore, the data processing and analysis focused solely on the high frequency data. To decrease the effect of noise, the best quality site in one day was chosen for remote referencing the other three. Even if the sites were only 500 to 1000 m apart, better results were obtained, indicating very localized noise sources in the area. The strike analysis of the obtained

  12. Three-Dimensional Resistivity Model of the Mono Craters Region in Eastern California from Magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, J.; Mangan, M.; McPhee, D.; Ponce, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Long Valley volcanic region in eastern California contains three magmatic foci; Long Valley Caldera (760-50 ka), Mammoth Mountain (120-8 ka), and Mono-Inyo Craters (60-0.3 ka). Zones of partial melt and/or hydrothermal fluids are known to exist under all three systems, but are not well constrained. In 2013-2014, we collected 110 magnetotelluric stations within a 40km x 45km grid, from Mono Craters through Long Valley Caldera. To date, a 3-D resistivity model has been created for Mono Craters showing three distinct features. Best constrained is a 150±50 km3, near vertical conductive anomaly (0.1-3 Ω·m) located under the southeast margin of Mono Craters at depths from 10km to >35km, which may reflect the deep, partially molten source region for Holocene eruptions. Electrical resistivity calculations suggest temperatures of 775°C±50 and a partial melt fraction 0.2 ±0.1. The location, melt fraction, and volume estimated in this study are consistent with those from teleseismic experiments conducted by Archauer (1986) and Dawson et al. (1990). A second conductive anomaly (0.5-5 Ω·m) at 12km to >35km depths was found 10km west of the Mono Craters near the eastern front of the Sierra Nevada. This anomaly coincides with a zone of sporadic, long-period earthquakes interpreted as "fluid-driven" by Pitt et al. (1994). This anomaly may reflect a zone of hydrothermal fluid infiltration originating from the aforementioned magmatic region. The third feature identified in this study is a resistive anomaly (103-104 Ω·m) under Aeolian Buttes, a Cretaceous quartz monzanite outcropping within the Bishop Tuff between Mono Craters and the Sierran front. The anomaly, which fills a crustal volume of 1500 ±500 km3, balloons upward from a deep root at >30 km to within 2 km of the surface and is interpreted as a cold, granitic pluton as supported by gravity and magnetic data. Future work will extend our three-dimensional resistivity model southwards to Inyo Craters and Long

  13. Magnetotelluric imaging of the subducting slab in Cascadia with constraints from seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Egbert, G. D.; Kelbert, A.; Humphreys, E.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from three-dimensional (3D) inversion of long-period magnetotelluric (MT) data from Cascadia, using seismological constraints on plate geometry and back-arc structure, to refine 3D images of electrical resistivity across this subduction zone. For this study we employed the impedances and vertical transfer functions from 144 sites from the EarthScope Transportable Array, along with data from previous higher density MT profiles from Cascadia (EMSLAB, CAFE-MT etc.). Morphological parameters for the subducting Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates (e.g. upper boundary and thickness) were extracted from McCrory et al (2012) and Schmandt and Humphreys (2010) seismological models and used to define a resistive subducting slab structure in 3D. This was then either used as a prior model, or fixed (both resistivity and geometry) during the MT inversion. By imposing constraints on the geometry of the slab (which is otherwise imaged as an amorphous broad resistive zone) we improve recovery and resolution of subduction related conductivity features. The constrained inversions also allowed us to test sensitivity of the MT data to variants on slab geometry, such as the proposed slab "tear" near the Oregon-Washington border suggested by some seismic tomography models, and to explore consistency of the MT data with seismic models, which suggest segmentation of back-arc upwelling. Three zones of substantially reduced resistivity were found, all exhibiting significant along-strike variability. In the forearc, an N-S stripe of high conductivity (10 ohm-m or less) was found just above the plate interface, near the tip of the mantle wedge. This conductive feature is spatially coincident with mapped locations of episodic tremor and slip, and likely represents aqueous fluids associated with slab dehydration. To the east, a second, clearly separated, N-S elongate zone of similarly high conductivity occurs in the mid-lower crust and upper mantle beneath the modern arc, again

  14. Distribution of melt beneath the Altiplano-Puna volcanic complex from magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unsworth, M. J.; Comeau, M.; Ticona, F.

    2013-12-01

    The Central Andes is magmatically very active and characterized by both a well defined volcanic arc and an igmimbrite flare-up over the last 10 million years. Recent geophysical and geodetic studies have shown that this region remains magmatically very active. The Altiplano-Puna magma body (APMB) is recognized as one of the largest magma bodies on Earth and is spatially associated with the major ignimbrite eruptions of the Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC). Volcan Uturuncu in Southern Bolivia is located near the centre of the APMB and has been inflating over the past two decades at rates of 1-2 cm/year. It has been suggested that this represents a location where pluton formation may be occurring in real time. The PLUTONS project is making a comprehensive set of geological and geophysical measurements to define the distribution of magma beneath Volcan Uturuncu, and also to understand how this is related to the APMB. This has included geological studies, seismic monitoring, and detailed geodetic measurements. Magnetotelluric (MT) data use passive electromagnetic signals to image subsurface resistivity from the surface to the upper mantle. Electrical resistivity is an important property because it is sensitive to the presence of partial melt and hydrothermal fluids in the crust. An extensive MT data set was collected at Volcan Uturuncu in 2011 and 2012. Broadband MT data in the frequency band 0.001-300 Hz were collected at 149 stations. These data have been used to generate both 2-D and 3-D resistivity models of the subsurface. The resistivity model shows a pronounced mid-crustal low resistivity layer that can be clearly identified with the APMB. Shallower zones of low resistivity connect this layer with the surface in the vicinity of Volcan Uturuncu. There is considerable non-uniqueness in interpreting zones of low resistivity in volcanic environments, as they can be due to aqueous fluids, partial melt or hydrothermal alteration. To address this problem, the

  15. Physical properties of volcanic lightning: Constraints from magnetotelluric and video observations at Sakurajima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Koki; Cimarelli, Corrado; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel A.; Yokoo, Akihiko; Dingwell, Donald B.; Iguchi, Masato

    2016-06-01

    The lightning generated by explosive volcanic eruptions is of interest not only as a promising technique for monitoring volcanic activity, but also for its broader implications and possible role in the origin of life on Earth, and its impact on the atmosphere and biosphere of the planet. However, at present the genetic mechanisms and physical properties of volcanic lightning remain poorly understood, as compared to our understanding of thundercloud lightning. Here, we present joint magnetotelluric (MT) data and video imagery that were used to investigate the physical properties of electrical discharges generated during explosive activity at Sakurajima volcano, Japan, and we compare these data with the characteristics of thundercloud lightning. Using two weeks of high-sensitivity, high-sample-rate MT data recorded in 2013, we detected weak electromagnetic signals radiated by volcanic lightning close to the crater. By carefully inspecting all MT waveforms that synchronized with visible flashes, and comparing with high-speed (3000 frame/s) and normal-speed (30 frame/s) videos, we identified two types of discharges. The first type consists of impulses (Type A) and is interpreted as cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning. The second type is characterized by weak electromagnetic variations with multiple peaks (Type B), and is interpreted as intra-cloud (IC) lightning. In addition, we observed a hybrid MT event wherein a continuous weak current accompanied Type A discharge. The observed features of volcanic lightning are similar to thunderstorm lightning, and the physical characteristics show that volcanic lightning can be treated as a miniature version of thunderstorm lightning in many respects. The overall duration, length, inter-stroke interval, peak current, and charge transfer all exhibit values 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than those of thunderstorm lightning, thus suggesting a scaling relation between volcanic and thunderstorm lightning parameters that is independent of

  16. Imaging the magmatic system of Mono Basin, California with magnetotellurics in three--dimensions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peacock, Jared R.; Mangan, Margaret T.; McPhee, Darcy K.; Ponce, David A.

    2015-01-01

    A three–dimensional (3D) electrical resistivity model of Mono Basin in eastern California unveils a complex subsurface filled with zones of partial melt, fluid–filled fracture networks, cold plutons, and regional faults. In 2013, 62 broadband magnetotelluric (MT) stations were collected in an array around southeastern Mono Basin from which a 3D electrical resistivity model was created with a resolvable depth of 35 km. Multiple robust electrical resistivity features were found that correlate with existing geophysical observations. The most robust features are two 300 ± 50 km3 near-vertical conductive bodies (3–10 Ω·m) that underlie the southeast and north-eastern margin of Mono Craters below 10 km depth. These features are interpreted as magmatic crystal–melt mush zones of 15 ± 5% interstitial melt surrounded by hydrothermal fluids and are likely sources for Holocene eruptions. Two conductive east–dipping structures appear to connect each magma source region to the surface. A conductive arc–like structure (< 0.9 Ω·m) links the northernmost mush column at 10 km depth to just below vents near Panum Crater, where the high conductivity suggests the presence of hydrothermal fluids. The connection from the southernmost mush column at 10 km depth to below South Coulée is less obvious with higher resistivity (200 Ω·m) suggestive of a cooled connection. A third, less constrained conductive feature (4–10 Ω·m) 15 km deep extending to 35 km is located west of Mono Craters near the eastern front of the Sierra Nevada escarpment, and is coincident with a zone of sporadic, long–period earthquakes that are characteristic of a fluid-filled (magmatic or metamorphic) fracture network. A resistive feature (103–105 Ω·m) located under Aeolian Buttes contains a deep root down to 25 km. The eastern edge of this resistor appears to structurally control the arcuate shape of Mono Craters. These observations have been combined to form a new conceptual model

  17. The IRETHERM project: Magnetotelluric assessment of the Rathlin Basin as a possible geothermal aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhaye, Robert; Jones, Alan; Reay, Derek

    2014-05-01

    IRETHERM (www.iretherm.ie) is a collaborative, SFI-funded research project to identify and evaluate sites within Ireland possessing the greatest potential for deep, low-enthalpy, geothermal energy provision. Possible areas for geothermal potential include the Permian and Triassic sedimentary basins in Northern Ireland, which contain groups with relatively high primary porosity, with viability depending largely on the permeability distribution, which controls fluid flow and heat-exchange. The most promising of these is the Triassic Sherwood Sandstone Group, which has measured porosities and permeabilities of 8-24% and 2-1000 mD respectively from borehole core samples. The subject of the work presented here, the Rathlin Basin in County Antrim, is one of three onshore basins in Northern Ireland, where measurements in two independent boreholes show geothermal gradients of between 36 and 43 °C/km to depths of 1481 m. Previously published interpretations of gravity models across the basin attribute a thickness of 2000 m to the Sherwood Sandstone Group, with a maximum depth to the Permo-Triassic basement of 4000 m. Magnetotelluric data were acquired onshore in June 2012 across a 2-D grid of 57 sites with a 2 km site spacing, and on the nearby Rathlin Island on two profiles totalling 12 sites with an 800 m site spacing in April 2013 in order to image the thickness and continuity of the sediments in the north-eastern portion of the basin. In the modelling results presented here, the Permo-Triassic sediment fill has a well-imaged resistivity contrast to the surrounding basal Dalradian metasediments. The data have been analysed and modelled to determine a resistivity model that maps the variation in thickness of the sediment fill and the truncation of the basin sediments against the Tow Valley Fault. Further synthetic testing of the model sensitivity to variation of the thickness of the Sherwood Sandstone Group within the sediment fill has also been performed, as the

  18. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric exploration of Tenerife geothermal field (Canary Islands, Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña-Varas, Perla; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Marcuello, Alex; Bellmunt, Fabián; Hidalgo, Raúl

    2013-04-01

    Several magnetotelluric (MT) surveys have been carried out to investigate the geothermal system in Tenerife Island (Canary Islands, Spain). These data have been acquired since 1987 till 2012 by different agencies and institutions. In 1987 and 1991, two MT surveys were carried out by the Spanish Geological Survey (IGME). These data in paper format (129 MT sites in total) were collected and digitized. In October 2009, 83 stations were acquired for Petratherm Ltd., and 25 stations in March 2012 by the University of Barcelona. In total, 237 MT stations distributed around the island center are available for this study. A simplified conceptual model of the island using known geological and geophysical data has been created to identify the ocean and topography effects on the MT data. The typical conceptual model of a generic high temperature volcanic geothermal system (Cumming, 2009a; Pellerin, 1996) and the 1D models from the MT data have played a key role for the correct construction of this conceptual model. Synthetic forward modeling was performed on a set of models to determine the effect of topography and of the conductive Atlantic Ocean. Finally, a 3D resistivity model of Tenerife Island has been computed with modEM code (Egbert and Kelbert, 2012). Out of the 237 MT sites available, 87 stations were discarded because of computational capability problems. Thus, for this new 3D model, 150 MT sites have been taking into account from the different field surveys. The model is discrtized on 94x65x133-layer grid and the inversions are undertaken using the off-diagonal components (Zxy, Zyx) of the impedance tensor for 16 periods in the frequency range from 1000 to 0.1 Hz. In the inversion processing we assumed a 5% error floor in the impedance components and the final RMS is 3.5. The 3D inversion model shows the typical layered pattern expected from a volcanic complex (andesite, basalt) with a possible geothermal overprint; a resistive fresh volcanic structure near the

  19. Regional conductivity structure of Cascadia from 3D inversion of USArray magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egbert, G. D.; Patro, P. K.

    2008-12-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) data are being acquired in a series of temporary arrays deployed across the continental US through EMScope, a part of the USArray component of EarthScope. Initial deployments in 2006 and 2007 acquired data at 110 sites covering the US Pacific Northwest. The MT sites, distributed with the same nominal spacing as the USArray seismic transportable array (~75 km), produced data in the period range 10- 20,000s of very good to excellent quality. The most striking and robust feature revealed by 3D inversion of this dataset is an extensive lower crustal conductor covering most of the study area southeast of a line running from the California border at the coast to the Blue Mountains of Northeastern Oregon. The conductance of this layer, which is about 15 km thick with a top at roughly 20 km depth, exceeds 3000 S beneath the he Northwest Basin and Range (BR) province of southeastern Oregon. The high conductivity in this region is inferred to result from fluids - including possibly partial melt at depth - associated with magmatic underplating and BR extension. The lower crust is much more resistive beneath the Coast Range, Willamette Valley and Puget Lowlands of Western Washington and Oregon, and beneath the Columbia Plateau. This area of resistive crust, which was derived from a large fragment of thickened oceanic lithosphere that was accreted to North America at approximately 48 Ma ("Siletzia"), is revealed by geological and geodetic studies to be strong, accommodating tectonic stresses through rigid block rotations. In contrast, the area to the southeast characterized by high conductivity in the lower crust is actively deforming, consistent with an important role for fluids in weakening of continental crust. The resistive Siletzia crust is broken by an elongated N-S zone of high conductivity beneath the Cascade volcanoes. High conductivities beneath the volcanoes also most likely reflect the presence of interconnected fluids, in this case released

  20. Geoelectric structure estimated from magnetotelluric data from the Uttarakhand Himalaya, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglani, Rohit; Shahrukh, M.; Israil, M.; Gupta, Pravin K.; Varshney, S. K.; Elena, Sokolova

    2014-12-01

    Geoelectric strike and resistivity structure of the crust have been estimated from 37 magnetotelluric (MT) data sites along a profile from Roorkee to Gangotri in Uttarakhand Himalaya. Impedance decomposition schemes based on Bahr's, Groom Bailey and Phase tensor were implemented in a MATLAB code for the average strike estimation. Geoelectric strike direction varies with period as well as in different litho-tectonic units along the profile. In the period band from 1 to 100 s average geoelectric strike in the southern end of the profile (Indo-Gangetic Plains) is N79°W, which is slightly rotated to the north in the Lesser Himalayan region and becomes N68°W whereas it is N81°W in the Higher Himalayan region. However, average strike is stabilized to N77°W for the entire profile in the long period band (100-1000 s). Geoelectrical structure of the crust has been obtained along the profile by 2D inversion of MT data. Major features of 2D resistivity model are: (i) southern part of the model is a low resistivity (<50 Om) zone at shallow depth (5-7 km) representing the loose sediments of the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP), whose thickness increases in the south; (ii) highly resistive (>1000 Om) layer below the IGP sediments is the basement rock, representing the resistivity of the top of the subducting Indian Plate; (iii) the Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) and the Main Central Thrust (MCT) zones can be seen in the electrical image. However, the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) could not be resolved and (iv) a low resistivity (<10 Om) feature in the MCT zone extending to the depth of 30 km is delineated. This low resistivity could be due to fluid-filled fractured rock matrix or partial melt zone. Hypocenters of many earthquakes are concentrated along the boundary of this low resistivity zone and relatively high resistivity blocks around it. The resulted model supports flat-ramp-flat geometry of the Main Himalayan Thrust along which the Indian Plate is subducting.

  1. Magnetotelluric survey to locate the Archean/Proterozoic suture zone north of Wells, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Jackie M.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2006-01-01

    , three regional north-south magnetotelluric (MT) sounding profiles were acquired in western Utah and northeastern Nevada (Williams and Rodriguez, 2003; 2004; 2005), and one east-west MT sounding profile (fig. 1) MT sounding profile was acquired in northeastern Nevada. Resistivity modeling of the MT data can be used to investigate buried structures or sutures that may have influenced subsequent regional fluid flow and localized mineralization. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data collected along the east-west profile in northeastern Nevada; no interpretation of the data is included.

  2. Prediction of DC current flow between the Otjiwarongo and Katima Mulilo regions, using 3D DC resistivity forward modelling and magnetotelluric and audio-magnetotelluric data recorded during SAMTEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Share, P.; Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Miensopust, M. P.; Khoza, D. T.; Fourie, S.; Webb, S. J.; Thunehed, H.

    2009-12-01

    SAMTEX (Southern African Magnetotelluric Experiment) is a multinational project initiated in 2003 to study the regional-scale electrical conductivity substructure of southern Africa and to infer from it the tectonic processes involved in the formation and deformation of the southern African subcontinental lithosphere. As an additional opportunistic component to SAMTEX, audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data were acquired during the most recent phase of the experiment (Phase IV) to investigate the local-scale conductivity substructure in the Otjiwarongo and Katima Mulilo regions (northern and north-eastern Namibia), where in future the installation of high-voltage direct current (HVDC) earth electrodes will commence. Both of the AMT surveys are situated close to the edge of the orogenic Neo-Proterozoic Ghanzi-Chobe/Damara belts (collectively termed the Damara Mobile Belt, DMB), which represents in part the collision between the Congo and Kalahari cratons during the amalgamation of South Gondwana. Previous studies using magnetotellurics (MT), magnetometer arrays and geomagnetic observatory data all point to the existence of a highly conductive mid-crustal zone which correlates well with the spatial location of the DMB. Preliminary modelling of the Otjiwarongo AMT data confirms the existence of a high conductive zone at mid-crustal depths (10-15 km), whereas in Katima Mulilo insufficient penetration of electromagnetic energy in the AMT frequency band, due to conductive sediment cover, prevents information being obtained of the conductivity at mid-crustal depths. However, at Katima Mulilo there are sparser broadband MT (BBMT) and long period MT (LMT) measurements that can be incorporated. The high conductivity of the DMB is explained by the presence of conductive materials (graphites, sulphides). In contrast, the lithospheric structure of the neighbouring Archaean cratons, the Congo and Kalahari, are generally found to be electrically resistive and therefore it is

  3. Crustal properties in the continuum Baltic Shield-Scandinavian Mountains from seismic ambient noise and magnetotelluric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Mansour, Walid; England, Richard W.; Fishwick, Stewart; Köhler, Andreas; Moorkamp, Max; Ottemøller, Lars; Smirnov, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    The Scandinavian passive margin is a good example of a region where a Precambrian shield is directly in contact with a younger mountain belt. Located along the Atlantic coast, the Scandinavian mountains, formed 440 Ma ago, show high peaks (> 1 km from the sea level) due to an uplift event 12 Ma ago. This topography contrasts strongly with the low topography of the Baltic shield (around 500 m from the sea level). If the mountain shows high topography compared to the shield, P-receiver functions analysis indicates that the Moho is deeper beneath the shield than beneath the orogenic belt. This result is surprising, as simple crustal isostasy would produce the opposite result. It is therefore likely that there is further variation in crustal and lithospheric properties between the shield and the mountain belt. In this perspective, several geophysical experiments (SCANLIPS2, POLENET-LAPNET, SCANLIPS3D, Norwegian National Seismic Network) have been deployed in the region in order to better understand the lateral variation in the crustal properties. From these different seismic arrays, we used the technique of ambient noise cross correlation in order to reconstruct the Rayleigh wave Green's function (R-R and Z-Z components) and produced a new Vs model of the upper crust in the transition between the Scandinavian mountains and Baltic Shield. In addition of this study, a magnetotelluric survey was done in the framework of MaSCa (MAgnetotellurics in the SCandes) project between 2011 and 2013 in the same area of broadband seismic network (Northern Scandinavia Mountains and the Baltic Shield). This project shows higher resistivity in the crust beneath the Baltic shield than beneath the orogenic belt. The results of this study are used in a joint inversion with seismic ambient noise in order to improve existing models. We used the multi objective genetic algorithms (GA) to inverse in the same time seismological data (receiver functions and dispersion curves from seismic ambient

  4. Receiver function and magnetotelluric analysis to understand the first stage of a continental lithospheric break-up : case of the North Tanzanian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasman, M.; Tiberi, C.; Tarits, P.; Hautot, S.; Gautier, S.; Ebinger, C. J.; Mulibo, G. D.; Khalfan, M.

    2015-12-01

    First stage of continental break-up, though intensively studied, is yet poorly understood. This is partly because actual rifting areas are either too mature (more than 10 My) or not easily accessible (thick sediment cover or under water). The North Tanzania part of the East African Rift is the place of a lithosphere's early break-up (less than 5My) in response to a combination of regional pulling forces and mantle upwelling. Deformation there results from complex interactions between magmatic intrusions, faulting, asthenospheric dynamics and far field stresses. CoLiBrEA (ANR) and CRAFTI (NSF) are two multidisciplinary projects which collaboratively focus on this area to understand the interactions between faults and magma, the role of inherited structures and rheological heterogeneities of the lithosphere. For that purpose, we deployed 38 broadband seismic stations in the Natron and Ngorongoro areas from January 2013 to December 2014 and carried out a 120 km East-West magnetotelluric (MT) profile to image the crustal and mantle structures. The 3D resistivity model, obtained from the inversion of the MT data along the profile, shows an highly heterogeneous crust with three-dimensional structures over a more homogeneous upper mantle. The first inversion result from the receiver function (RF) by the Zhu and Kanamori's inversion method show a thick crust (~35 km) with important variations (maximum 15km) especially in the Ngorongoro area, and an average Vp/Vs ratio of 1.75. We then completed this study by combining the MT data and the RF at the 11 sites of the EW profile. For each site, we built a 1D velocity model (Vs and VpVs) obtained by combining the Sambridge forward solution with a non linear descent research algorithm and constrained by the resistivity structure. The inversion shows an heterogeneous crust obviously dominated by the Moho interface at different depths, with low velocity layers mainly corresponding to low resistivity features.

  5. Magnetotelluric observations over the Rhine Graben, France: a simple impedance tensor analysis helps constrain the dominant electrical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareschal, M.; Jouanne, V.; Menvielle, M.; Chouteau, M.; Grandis, H.; Tarits, P.

    1992-12-01

    A simple impedance tensor analysis of four magnetotelluric soundings recorded over the ECORS section of the Rhine Graben shows that for periods shorter than about 30 s, induction dominates over channelling. For longer periods, 2-D induction galvanically distorted by surface heterogeneities and/or current chanelled in the Graben can explain the observations; the role of chanelling becomes dominant at periods of the order of a few hundred seconds. In the area considered, induction appears to be controlled by inclusions of saline water in a porous limestone layer (Grande Oolithe) and not by the limits of the Graben with its crystalline shoulder (Vosges). The simple analysis is supported by tipper analyses and by the results of schematic 2-D modelling.

  6. Three-dimensional electrical resistivity model of the hydrothermal system in Long Valley Caldera, California, from magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, J. R.; Mangan, M. T.; McPhee, D.; Wannamaker, P. E.

    2016-08-01

    Though shallow flow of hydrothermal fluids in Long Valley Caldera, California, has been well studied, neither the hydrothermal source reservoir nor heat source has been well characterized. Here a grid of magnetotelluric data were collected around the Long Valley volcanic system and modeled in 3-D. The preferred electrical resistivity model suggests that the source reservoir is a narrow east-west elongated body 4 km below the west moat. The heat source could be a zone of 2-5% partial melt 8 km below Deer Mountain. Additionally, a collection of hypersaline fluids, not connected to the shallow hydrothermal system, is found 3 km below the medial graben, which could originate from a zone of 5-10% partial melt 8 km below the south moat. Below Mammoth Mountain is a 3 km thick isolated body containing fluids and gases originating from an 8 km deep zone of 5-10% basaltic partial melt.

  7. Mapping fractures using 1D anisotropic modelling of magnetotelluric data: a case study from the Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, A.; Heinson, G.; Holford, S.; Thiel, S.

    2015-06-01

    We present 1D anisotropic inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) data as a potential tool for mapping structural permeability in sedimentary basins. Using 1D inversions of a 171 site, broadband MT data set from the Koroit region of the Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia, we have delineated an electrically anisotropic layer at approximately 2.5 to 3.5 km depth. The anisotropy strike is consistent between stations at approximately 160° east of north. The depth of anisotropy corresponds to the top depth of the Lower Cretaceous Crayfish Group, and the anisotropy factor increases from west to east. We interpret the anisotropy as resulting from north-northwest oriented, fluid-filled fractures resulting in enhanced electrical and hydraulic conductivity. This interpretation is consistent with permeability data from well formation tests. It is also consistent with the orientation of mapped faults in the area, which are optimally oriented for reactivation in the current stress field.

  8. 3-D inversion of synthetic marine magnetotelluric data: resolution and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, N.; Baba, K.; Siripunvaraporn, W.; Uyeshima, M.; Utada, H.

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, seafloor magnetotelluric (MT) observation is carried out by using an increasing number of ocean bottom electromagnetometers (OBEMs) not only along a line but also in 2-D array. Thus, imaging electrical conductivity structures under the seafloor in 3-D is now feasible. A 3-D approach is indispensable especially for marine MT data, because the electric and magnetic fields observed at the seafloor are heavily distorted by the rugged seafloor topography and the distribution of land and sea which are generally 3-D. It is very important to incorporate the topography in a 3-D model for an accurate estimation of the conductivity structure beneath seafloor that is generally more resistive than seawater by several orders of magnitude. WSINV3DMT (Siripunvaraporn et al., 2005) is one of 3-D inversion codes that are now of practical use, but the original WSINV3DMT is not applicable to marine MT data because of two reasons. 1) MT responses are calculated only at the boundary corresponding to the Earth surface. 2) We have to use fine mesh design because an observation site must locate exactly at the center of the top surface of a block, which needs large memory that even a highest performance computer can not handle. We propose an extended version of the WSINV3DMT by solving the two problems shown above so that it can be applied to the marine MT data. The extended version of the WSINV3DMT is tested using synthetic models including a 3-D anomaly, seawater and topographic variation. Here shown is an example of a checkerboard test by using a model in which 10 ohm-m and 100 ohm-m blocks are put alternately in both horizontal and vertical directions. The model is composed of 5 blocks in horizontal directions and of 4 blocks in vertical direction with a background of a 31.6 ohm-m half-space below actual topography. The calculation area in the inversion is 7440 × 7440 × 1008 km, and is discretized at 35 blocks in the x and y directions, and 69 blocks in the z

  9. Magnetotelluric studies in and adjacent to the Northumberland Basin, Northern England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parr, R. S.; Hutton, V. R. S.

    1993-12-01

    During the past decade broadband magnetotelluric (MT) soundings, with d.c. resistivity soundings at some sites, have been undertaken in three separate field studies in and around the Northumberland Basin, a region of great interest to earth scientists on account of the proposed location there of the Iapetus Suture. As a result of an increase in cultural noise during this period, the data from the last two studies have been processed using a new robust constrained impedance tensor estimation program. The resulting apparent resistivity and phase data from these studies, together with those from the first broadband study and some earlier MT responses from the region, have now all been modelled using an interpretative modelling procedure. New information has been provided by the MT models on basement depths and, by integrating these new estimates with those from gravity modelling and seismic studies both on land and offshore, a detailed basement topography map has been compiled for the region. The deep eletrical resistivity structure has been modelled along a NW-SE traverse from the Weardale Granite of the Alston Block across the Northumberland Basin to the Southern Uplands of Scotland. Underlying the more conductive sedimentary rocks, the basement rock is found to have resistivities which range from about 100 μ m in the Northumberland Basin to more than 1000 μ m in the Alston Block and probably of the same order in the Southern Uplands. A mid-crustal conductor exists along the whole traverse, which is well resolved and has a southward dip beneath the Weardale Granite. Under the Northumberland Basin, the conductor is less well resolved and thus an apparent northward dip can only be regarded as tentative. Comparison of the pseudo-2D and full 2D models resulting from this study and from earlier MT and magnetovariational (MV) studies in Southern Scotland with new MT and joint MT and MV inversions of Livelybrooks et al. (Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 81: 67-84 (1993)) for

  10. AMBIENT AIR CONCENTRATIONS OF FINE (PM2.5) MANGANESE IN U.S. NATIONAL PARKS AND IN CALIFORNIA AND CANADIAN CITIES: THE POSSIBLE IMPACT OF ADDING MMT TO UNLEADED GASOLINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The October 1995 court decision allowing Ethyl Corporation to offer methylcylopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) for sale to refiners for introduction into unleaded gasoline as an octane enhancer is likely to result in increased fine (PM2.5) manganese (Mn) concentrations in ...

  11. Teaching Research Methods Courses in Human Geography: Critical Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crooks, Valorie A.; Castleden, Heather; Tromp-van Meerveld, Ilja

    2010-01-01

    The authors reflect critically on their experiences of teaching research methods/methodology/techniques (MMT) courses in human geography for the first time. Through a highly reflexive process involving journaling, they engage with the broader scholarship of teaching and learning approach. Three themes characterize commonalities in their…

  12. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements, direct solvers and data space Gauss-Newton, parallelized on SMP computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordy, M. A.; Wannamaker, P. E.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed an algorithm for 3D simulation and inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) responses using deformable hexahedral finite elements that permits incorporation of topography. Direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP), single-chassis workstations with large RAM are used for the forward solution, parameter jacobians, and model update. The forward simulator, jacobians calculations, as well as synthetic and real data inversion are presented. We use first-order edge elements to represent the secondary electric field (E), yielding accuracy O(h) for E and its curl (magnetic field). For very low frequency or small material admittivity, the E-field requires divergence correction. Using Hodge decomposition, correction may be applied after the forward solution is calculated. It allows accurate E-field solutions in dielectric air. The system matrix factorization is computed using the MUMPS library, which shows moderately good scalability through 12 processor cores but limited gains beyond that. The factored matrix is used to calculate the forward response as well as the jacobians of field and MT responses using the reciprocity theorem. Comparison with other codes demonstrates accuracy of our forward calculations. We consider a popular conductive/resistive double brick structure and several topographic models. In particular, the ability of finite elements to represent smooth topographic slopes permits accurate simulation of refraction of electromagnetic waves normal to the slopes at high frequencies. Run time tests indicate that for meshes as large as 150x150x60 elements, MT forward response and jacobians can be calculated in ~2.5 hours per frequency. For inversion, we implemented data space Gauss-Newton method, which offers reduction in memory requirement and a significant speedup of the parameter step versus model space approach. For dense matrix operations we use tiling approach of PLASMA library, which shows very good scalability. In synthetic

  13. ON THE PHYSICS OF GALVANIC SOURCE ELECTROMAGNETIC GEOPHYSICAL METHODS FOR TERRESTRIAL AND MARINE EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect

    David Alumbaugh and Evan Um

    2007-06-27

    A numerical study was conducted to investigate the governing physics of galvanic source electromagnetic (EM) methods for terrestrial and marine exploration scenarios. The terrestrial exploration scenario involves the grounded electric dipole source EM (GESTEM) method and the examination of how the GESTEM method can resolve a thin resistive layer representing underground gas and/or hydrocarbon storage. Numerical modeling studies demonstrate that the loop transient EM (TEM) and magnetotelluric (MT) methods are insensitive to a thin horizontal resistor at depth because they utilize horizontal currents. In contrast to these standard EM methods, the GESTEM method generates both vertical and horizontal transient currents. The vertical transient current interacts with a thin horizontal resistor and causes charge buildup on its surface. These charges produce a measurable perturbation in the surface electric field at early time. The degree of perturbation depends on source waveform. When the GESTEM method is energized with step-off waveform, the perturbation due to a thin horizontal resistor is small. This is because the step-off waveform mainly consists of low frequency signals. An alternative is taking the time-derivative of the step-off responses to approximate the impulse response which includes higher frequency signals. In order to improve degree of perturbation especially due to a localized small 3-D resistor, the diffusion angle of the vertical transient current, 45 should be considered to make vertical currents coupled to a resistive target efficiently. The major drawback of the GESTEM method lies in the fact that GESTEM sounding can not be interpreted using 1-D inversion schemes if there is near-surface inhomogeneity. The marine exploration scenario investigates the physics of marine frequency-domain controlled source EM (FDCSEM) and time-domain controlled source EM (TDCSEM) methods to explore resistive hydrocarbon reservoirs in marine environments. Unlike the

  14. Constraining the location of the Archean--Proterozoic suture in the Great Basin based on magnetotelluric soundings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.; Sampson, Jay A.

    2012-01-01

    It is important to understand whether major mining districts in north-central Nevada are underlain by Archean crust, known to contain major orogenic gold deposits, or, alternatively, by accreted crust of the Paleoproterozoic Mojave province. Determining the location and orientation of the Archean-Proterozoic suture zone between the Archean crust and Mojave province is also critical because it may influence subsequent patterns of sedimentation, deformation, magmatism, and hydrothermal activity. In the Great Basin, the attitude of the suture zone is unknown because it is concealed below cover. A regional magnetotelluric sounding profile along the Utah-Nevada State line reveals a deeply penetrating, broad electrical conductor that may be the Archean-Proterozoic suture zone in the northwest corner of Utah. This major crustal conductor's strike direction is northwest, where it broadens to about 80 km wide below about 3-km depth. These results suggest that the southwestern limit of intact Archean crust in this part of the Great Basin is farther north than previously reported. These results also suggest that the major gold belts in north-central Nevada are located over the Paleoproterozoic Mojave province, and the Archean terrain lies northeast in the northwest corner of Utah. Rifted Archean crust segments south and west of the suture suggest that future mineral exploration northeast of current mineral trends may yield additional gold deposits.

  15. Lithospheric reworking at the Proterozoic-Phanerozoic transition of Australia imaged using AusLAMP Magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Kate; Heinson, Graham; Thiel, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Seventy-four stations from the long-period Australia-wide AusLAMP (Australian Lithospheric Architecture Magnetotelluric Project) dataset were used to image the electrical resistivity beneath the Neoproterozoic Ikara-Flinders Ranges and adjacent Palaeo-Mesoproterozoic Curnamona Province. Results from 3D inversions using ModEM software show a relatively resistive Ikara-Flinders Ranges, with two parallel arcuate conductors at 20 to 80 km depth in the Nackara Arc. There is a good correlation of diamondiferous kimberlites occurring over conductors, which we interpret as evidence for these conductors to be residing on large lithospheric structures that have been conduits for partial melt and volatile movement in the Jurassic. The Curnamona Province is remarkably conductive for a region that is thought to have a cratonic core, with Delamerian reworking only at its edges. The conductor covers most of the province at depths of 10-40 km, and its presence at lower crustal depths suggests that conductive sediments can not entirely explain it. Fluids associated with subduction may have pervasively modified the crust in the past, resulting in an enrichment of carbon, enhancing the conductivity. Additionally, we conclude that the notion of a single continuous arcuate Flinders Conductivity Anomaly is unlikely and that the anomalous response observed is instead a result of the combined response of three separate anomalies; the Curnamona Province Conductor and the two Nackara Arc Conductors.

  16. A large hydrothermal reservoir beneath Taal Volcano (Philippines) revealed by magnetotelluric observations and its implications to the volcanic activity.

    PubMed

    Alanis, Paul K B; Yamaya, Yusuke; Takeuchi, Akihiro; Sasai, Yoichi; Okada, Yoshihiro; Nagao, Toshiyasu

    2013-01-01

    Taal Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Philippines. The magnetotelluric 3D forward analyses indicate the existence of a large high resistivity anomaly (∼100 Ω·m) with a volume of at least 3 km×3 km×3 km, which is capped by a conductive layer (∼10 Ω·m), beneath the Main Crater. This high resistivity anomaly is hypothesized to be a large hydrothermal reservoir, consisting of the aggregate of interconnected cracks in rigid and dense host rocks, which are filled with hydrothermal fluids coming from a magma batch below the reservoir. The hydrothermal fluids are considered partly in gas phase and liquid phase. The presence of such a large hydrothermal reservoir and the stagnant magma below may have influences on the volcano's activity. Two possibilities are presented. First, the 30 January 1911 explosion event was a magmatic hydrothermal eruption rather than a base-surge associated with a phreato-magmatic eruption. Second, the earlier proposed four eruption series may be better interpreted by two cycles, each consisting of series of summit and flank eruptions.

  17. The buried southern continuation of the Oaxaca-Juarez terrane boundary and Oaxaca Fault, southern Mexico: Magnetotelluric constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Enriquez, J. O.; Corbo-Camargo, F.; Arzate-Flores, J.; Keppie, J. D.; Arango-Galván, C.; Unsworth, M.; Belmonte-Jiménez, S. I.

    2013-04-01

    Thirty magnetotelluric soundings were made along two NW-SE profiles to the north and south of Oaxaca City in southern Mexico. The profiles crossed the N-S Oaxaca Fault and the Oaxaca-Juarez terrane boundary defined by the Juarez mylonitic complex. Dimensionality analysis of the MT data showed that the subsurface resistivity structure is 2D or 3D. The Oaxaca and correlative Guichicovi terranes consist of ca. 1-1.4 Ga granulitic continental crust overlain by Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks, characterized by high and low resistivities, respectively. The Juarez terrane consists of oceanic Mesozoic metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks, characterized by a low to medium resistivity layer, that is approximately 10 km thick. The Oaxaca Fault is a Cenozoic aged, normal fault that reactivated the dextral and thrust Juarez mylonitic complex north of Oaxaca City: its location south of Oaxaca City is uncertain. In the southern profile, the MT data show a ca. 20-50 km wide, west-dipping, relatively low resistivity zone material that extends through the entire crust. This is inferred to be the Juarez terrane bounded on either side by the ca. 1-1.4 Ga granulites. The Oaxaca Fault is imaged only by a major electrical resistivity discontinuity (low to the west, high to the east) along both the western border of the Juarez mylonitic complex (northern profile) and the San Miguel de la Cal mountains (southern profile) suggesting continuity.

  18. PDE-based geophysical modelling using finite elements: examples from 3D resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, R.; Gross, L.; du Plessis, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a general finite-element solver, escript, tailored to solve geophysical forward and inverse modeling problems in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) with suitable boundary conditions. Escript’s abstract interface allows geoscientists to focus on solving the actual problem without being experts in numerical modeling. General-purpose finite element solvers have found wide use especially in engineering fields and find increasing application in the geophysical disciplines as these offer a single interface to tackle different geophysical problems. These solvers are useful for data interpretation and for research, but can also be a useful tool in educational settings. This paper serves as an introduction into PDE-based modeling with escript where we demonstrate in detail how escript is used to solve two different forward modeling problems from applied geophysics (3D DC resistivity and 2D magnetotellurics). Based on these two different cases, other geophysical modeling work can easily be realized. The escript package is implemented as a Python library and allows the solution of coupled, linear or non-linear, time-dependent PDEs. Parallel execution for both shared and distributed memory architectures is supported and can be used without modifications to the scripts.

  19. Magnetotelluric observations around the focal region of the 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake ( M j 6.9), Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Ryokei; Oshiman, Naoto; Uyeshima, Makoto; Ogawa, Yasuo; Mishina, Masaaki; Toh, Hiroaki; Sakanaka, Shin'ya; Ichihara, Hiroshi; Shiozaki, Ichiro; Ogawa, Tsutomu; Miura, Tsutomu; Koyama, Shigeru; Fujita, Yasuyoshi; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Takagi, Yu; Imai, Mikihiro; Honda, Ryo; Yabe, Sei; Nagaoka, Shintaro; Tada, Mitsuhiro; Mogi, Toru

    2008-02-01

    On 25 March 2007, a damaging earthquake ( M j 6.9) occurred near the west coast of the Noto Peninsula, Central Japan. A wideband magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out in the onshore area of the source region immediately after the mainshock, with the aim of imaging the heterogeneity of the crustal resistivity structure. The final observation network had consisted of 26 sites. As a preparatory step for imaging three-dimensional features of the resistivity around the focal region, we constructed two-dimensional resistivity models along five profiles using only the TM mode responses, in order to reduce three-dimensional effects. Four profiles are perpendicular to the fault strike, and a fifth profile is parallel to the strike through the mainshock epicenter. Significant characteristics of the resistivity models are: (1) beneath the mainshock hypocenter, there is a conductive body which spreads to the eastern edge of the active aftershock region; (2) a resistive zone is located in the gap of the aftershock distribution between the mainshock hypocenter and the largest eastern aftershock; (3) one of the largest aftershock occurred at the boundary of the resistive zone described above. These results suggest that the deep conductors represent fluid-filled zones and that the lateral heterogeneity could have controlled the slip distribution on the fault plane.

  20. Structures and geometries of the Tajo Basin crust, Spain: Results of a magnetotelluric investigation compared to seismic and thermal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoldt, J.-P.; Jones, A. G.; Rosell, O.

    2014-09-01

    The Tajo Basin and Betic Mountain Chain in the south central region of the Iberian Peninsula were chosen for investigation in the first phase of the magnetotelluric (MT) component of the PICASSO (Program to Investigate the Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) project. The MT results provide information about the electrical conductivity distribution in previously unprobed subsurface regions, as well as complimenting and enhancing results of prior geological and geophysical investigations thereby enabling the definition of a petrological subsurface model and a comprehensive understanding about the tectonic setting. Two-dimensional (2-D) inversion of the MT data provides enhanced insight into Iberian subsurface geology in the crust. The most striking features of the final model are (i) a distinct vertical interface within the Variscan basement beneath the center of the Tajo Basin that is spatially associated with the boundary between regions with and without substantial Alpine deformation, and (ii) a middle to lower crustal conductive anomaly that can be related to remnants of asthenospheric intrusion in connection with Pliocene volcanic events in the Calatrava Volcanic Province. For the latter, effects of hydrous phases are inferred that may originate from dehydration processes within the subducting slab beneath Alboran Domain and Betic Mountain Chain.

  1. A large hydrothermal reservoir beneath Taal Volcano (Philippines) revealed by magnetotelluric observations and its implications to the volcanic activity

    PubMed Central

    ALANIS, Paul K. B.; YAMAYA, Yusuke; TAKEUCHI, Akihiro; SASAI, Yoichi; OKADA, Yoshihiro; NAGAO, Toshiyasu

    2013-01-01

    Taal Volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in the Philippines. The magnetotelluric 3D forward analyses indicate the existence of a large high resistivity anomaly (∼100 Ω·m) with a volume of at least 3 km × 3 km × 3 km, which is capped by a conductive layer (∼10 Ω·m), beneath the Main Crater. This high resistivity anomaly is hypothesized to be a large hydrothermal reservoir, consisting of the aggregate of interconnected cracks in rigid and dense host rocks, which are filled with hydrothermal fluids coming from a magma batch below the reservoir. The hydrothermal fluids are considered partly in gas phase and liquid phase. The presence of such a large hydrothermal reservoir and the stagnant magma below may have influences on the volcano’s activity. Two possibilities are presented. First, the 30 January 1911 explosion event was a magmatic hydrothermal eruption rather than a base-surge associated with a phreato-magmatic eruption. Second, the earlier proposed four eruption series may be better interpreted by two cycles, each consisting of series of summit and flank eruptions. PMID:24126286

  2. Three-dimensional electrical resistivity model of the hydrothermal system in Long Valley Caldera, California, from magnetotellurics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peacock, Jared R.; Mangan, Margaret T.; McPhee, Darcy K.; Wannamaker, Phil E.

    2016-01-01

    Though shallow flow of hydrothermal fluids in Long Valley Caldera, California, has been well studied, neither the hydrothermal source reservoir nor heat source has been well characterized. Here a grid of magnetotelluric data were collected around the Long Valley volcanic system and modeled in 3-D. The preferred electrical resistivity model suggests that the source reservoir is a narrow east-west elongated body 4 km below the west moat. The heat source could be a zone of 2–5% partial melt 8 km below Deer Mountain. Additionally, a collection of hypersaline fluids, not connected to the shallow hydrothermal system, is found 3 km below the medial graben, which could originate from a zone of 5–10% partial melt 8 km below the south moat. Below Mammoth Mountain is a 3 km thick isolated body containing fluids and gases originating from an 8 km deep zone of 5–10% basaltic partial melt.

  3. Modeling the physical properties and composition of the mantle lithosphere using magnetotellurics combined with other information (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    There are but two ways of directly sensing the physical properties of the lithosphere, rather than by inference from modeling, and these are seismological techniques and electromagnetic ones. The former primarily yield information on bulk, vibrational properties of the medium, namely compressional and shear velocities, whereas the latter primarily yield information on transport properties of the medium, often dictated by a well-interconnected minor phase, namely electrical conductivity. As such, they are highly complementary and taken together, either informally in co-operative modelling/inversion or formally in joint modelling/inversion, are far more powerful than each in isolation. Further than this, there is a wealth of additional data available virtually everywhere that can be utilized to constrain the thermal structure and composition of the lithosphere, namely gravity, geoid, surface heat flow, and elevation. Examples will be shown of studies in cratons (Southern Africa, Canada) and active regions (Atlas Mountains, Tibet) where magnetotellurics combined with seismological and other information is able to provide firm constraints on the thermal structure, physical properties and composition of the mantle lithosphere. In particular, MT can map the presence or absence of water in the lithospheric column, which is important for the debate on rheological properties and deformation.

  4. X-ray fluorescence mapping and micro-XANES spectroscopic characterization of exhaust particulates emitted from auto engines burning MMT-added gasoline.

    PubMed

    Mölders, N; Schilling, P J; Wong, J; Roos, J W; Smith, I L

    2001-08-01

    The elemental distribution and compositional homogeneity in auto exhaust particulates emitted from methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl-(MMT-)added gasoline engines have been investigated using a newly installed synchrotron X-ray microprobe. Two representative groups of exhaust particulate matter, as defined in a recent bulk X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopic study at the Mn K-edge, were studied. The micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra indicate a relatively homogeneous distribution of phases within a given particulate sample, down to a spatial extent of 40 microm (the resolution of microprobe). The micro-XANES also enabled analysis of several areas which displayed compositions different from the bulk sample, supporting the general theory describing manganese species formation in the exhaust. The ability to evaluate small regions also enabled direct verification of manganese sulfate from the S XANES despite the vast excess of sulfur present in other forms. The presence of a chloride compound, introduced through the sample dilution air and engine intake air, was also revealed. The study demonstrates the value of the combined X-ray microfluorescence with excitation by polychromatic radiation for elemental mapping and micro-XANES spectroscopy for chemical speciation in the study of dilute environmental materials containing low-Z constituents such as Cl, S, and P.

  5. New geoelectrical characterisation of a continental collision zone in the West-Central Pyrenees: Constraints from long period and broadband magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanyà, Joan; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Marcuello, Alex; Liesa, Montserrat; Muñoz, Josep A.

    2012-06-01

    Continental collision dominates the development of a large number of mountain ranges on Earth. Although the geological evolution of these regions is highly studied, lithospheric-scale physical processes are less well characterised and their interpretations frequently differ. A new magnetotelluric profile crossing the West-Central Pyrenees with broadband and long period magnetotelluric data constrains the geoelectrical features of this continental collision zone confining the geological and physical processes that take place at a lithospheric scale. Three geoelectrical structures associated with partial melting and its melt migration are imaged for the first time in the West-Central Pyrenees suggesting an Iberian subducted lower crust reaching the depth of 70 km. This result, supported by an analysis of the thermal evolution of the Iberian subducted lower crust, reinforces the hypothesis of partial melting in this region. From the long period magnetotelluric data, the asthenosphere has been imaged as a geoelectrical structure with electrical resistivity values between 20 Ω m and 70 Ω m. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary close to the collision zone has been constrained between 90 km and 110 km depth below the Iberian plate and between 120 km and 160 km depth below the transition zone between plates and the European plate, in agreement with the previous geophysical data. Additionally, other geoelectrical anomalies imaged have been associated with an unexpected major Variscan boundary located below the Ebro basin, Silurian sediments and free fluids in the Gavarnie thrust, and with a thick sequence of Jurassic and Early Cretaceous sediments situated below the North Pyrenean Thrust Sheet.

  6. IRECCSEM: Evaluating Clare Basin potential for onshore carbon sequestration using magnetotelluric data (Preliminary results). New approaches applied for processing, modeling and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanya i Llovet, J.; Ogaya, X.; Jones, A. G.; Rath, V.

    2014-12-01

    The IRECCSEM project (www.ireccsem.ie) is a Science Foundation Ireland Investigator Project that is funded to evaluate Ireland's potential for onshore carbon sequestration in saline aquifers by integrating new electromagnetic data with existing geophysical and geological data. The main goals of the project are to determine porosity-permeability values of the potential reservoir formation as well as to evaluate the integrity of the seal formation. During the Summer of 2014 a magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out at the Clare basin (Ireland). A total of 140 sites were acquired including audiomagnetotelluric (AMT), broadband magnetotelluric (BBMT) and long period magnetotelluric (LMT) data. The nominal space between sites is 0.6 km for AMT sites, 1.2 km for BBMT sites and 8 km for LMT sites. To evaluate the potential for carbon sequestration of the Clare basin three advances on geophysical methodology related to electromagnetic techniques were applied. First of all, processing of the MT data was improved following the recently published ELICIT methodology. Secondly, during the inversion process, the electrical resistivity distribution of the subsurface was constrained combining three different tensor relationships: Impedances (Z), induction arrows (TIP) and multi-site horizontal magnetic transfer-functions (HMT). Results from synthetic models were used to evaluate the sensitivity and properties of each tensor relationship. Finally, a computer code was developed, which employs a stabilized least squares approach to estimate the cementation exponent in the generalized Archie law formulated by Glover (2010). This allows relating MT-derived electrical resistivity models to porosity distributions. The final aim of this procedure is to generalize the porosity - permeability values measured in the boreholes to regional scales. This methodology will contribute to the evaluation of possible sequestration targets in the study area.

  7. Cryptic signatures of Neoproterozoic accretionary events in northeast Brazil imaged by magnetotellurics: Implications for the assembly of West Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilha, Antonio L.; Vitorello, Icaro; Pádua, Marcelo B.; Fuck, Reinhardt A.

    2017-03-01

    The Borborema Province, in northeast Brazil, is a complex orogenic system severely affected by deformational, metamorphic, and magmatic processes mostly during the Gondwana convergence in late Neoproterozoic-early Phanerozoic Brasiliano/Pan-African Orogeny. New magnetotelluric (MT) data collected along the northwestern part of the province and eastern part of the contiguous Parnaíba Basin are combined with previous MT data to assess the regional deep electrical resistivity structure. Dimensionality analysis shows that a 3D electrical structure predominates in the subsurface and thus 3D inversion was carried out. The final geoelectric model allows delineating the geometry and variation in physical properties of different lithospheric blocks bounded by major electrical discontinuities. These lithospheric blocks constitute a coalesced mosaic made up of four main terrane compartments: a resistive cratonic keel detected along the western part of the study area, currently hidden beneath the Parnaíba Basin (Parnaíba block); two complex domains in the center characterized by several resistive and conductive zones throughout the crust and upper mantle (Ceará Central and Rio Grande do Norte domains); and a conductive block in the east, with the geoelectric response being controlled by possible remains of late Neoproterozoic subduction activity to the south (Central sub-province). The interfaces between these blocks are interpreted as suture zones correlated to their Neoproterozoic collage, one curved conductor concealed by the sediments of the Parnaíba Basin and bordering the eastern margin of the basin, another huge conductor corresponding to the location of the Orós-Jaguaribe subdomain on the surface, and a third interface coinciding with the position of the Patos shear zone. The presence of these proposed sutures could be a conspicuous evidence of a Neoproterozoic accretion system in northeast Brazil and would support tectonic evolution models for the West Gondwana

  8. Crustal metamorphic fluid flux beneath the Dead Sea Basin: constraints from 2-D and 3-D magnetotelluric modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meqbel, Naser; Weckmann, Ute; Muñoz, Gerard; Ritter, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    We report on a study to explore the deep electrical conductivity structure of the Dead Sea Basin (DSB) using magnetotelluric (MT) data collected along a transect across the DSB where the left lateral strike-slip Dead Sea transform (DST) fault splits into two fault strands forming one of the largest pull-apart basins of the world. A very pronounced feature of our 2-D inversion model is a deep, subvertical conductive zone beneath the DSB. The conductor extends through the entire crust and is sandwiched between highly resistive structures associated with Precambrian rocks of the basin flanks. The high electrical conductivity could be attributed to fluids released by dehydration of the uppermost mantle beneath the DSB, possibly in combination with fluids released by mid- to low-grade metamorphism in the lower crust and generation of hydrous minerals in the middle crust through retrograde metamorphism. Similar high conductivity zones associated with fluids have been reported from other large fault systems. The presence of fluids and hydrous minerals in the middle and lower crust could explain the required low friction coefficient of the DST along the eastern boundary of the DSB and the high subsidence rate of basin sediments. 3-D inversion models confirm the existence of a subvertical high conductivity structure underneath the DSB but its expression is far less pronounced. Instead, the 3-D inversion model suggests a deepening of the conductive DSB sediments off-profile towards the south, reaching a maximum depth of approximately 12 km, which is consistent with other geophysical observations. At shallower levels, the 3-D inversion model reveals salt diapirism as an upwelling of highly resistive structures, localized underneath the Al-Lisan Peninsula. The 3-D model furthermore contains an E-W elongated conductive structure to the northeast of the DSB. More MT data with better spatial coverage are required, however, to fully constrain the robustness of the above

  9. Magnetotelluric data collected near geophysically logged boreholes in the Espa?ola and Middle Rio Grande basins, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Jackie M.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2006-01-01

    The Santa Fe region is growing rapidly. The Santa Fe Group aquifer in the Espa?ola Basin is the main source of municipal water for the region, and water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depend on accurate assessment and protection of the region's ground-water resources. An important issue in managing the ground-water resources is a better understanding of the hydrogeology of the Tertiary Santa Fe Group. The Santa Fe Group includes the sedimentary deposits that fill the Rio Grande rift and contain the principal ground-water aquifers. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the Espa?ola Basin in northern New Mexico. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, electromagnetic surveys, and hydrologic, lithologic, and hydro-geochemical data are being used to better understand the aquifer systems. Magnetotelluric (MT) surveys were completed as part of these studies. The primary purpose of the MT surveys was to map changes in electrical resistivity with depth that are related to differences in various rock types that help control the properties of aquifers in the region. Resistivity modeling of the MT data can be used to investigate buried structures related to the basic geologic framework of the study area. The purpose of this report is to release MT sounding data collected near geophysically logged boreholes in the study area, including the nearby Middle Rio Grande Basin. This MT data can be used in subsequent resistivity modeling. No interpretation of the data is included in this report.

  10. Joint Inversion of Seismic and Magnetotelluric Data in the Parkfield Region of California Using the Normalized Cross-Gradient Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, Ninfa L.; Zhang, Haijiang; Thurber, Clifford H.; Bedrosian, Paul A.

    2015-05-01

    We present jointly inverted models of P-wave velocity (Vp) and electrical resistivity for a two-dimensional profile centered on the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). Significant structural similarity between main features of the separately inverted Vp and resistivity models is exploited by carrying out a joint inversion of the two datasets using the normalized cross-gradient constraint. This constraint favors structurally similar Vp and resistivity images that adequately fit the seismic and magnetotelluric (MT) datasets. The new inversion code, tomoDDMT, merges the seismic inversion code tomoDD and the forward modeling and sensitivity kernel subroutines of the MT inversion code OCCAM2DMT. TomoDDMT is tested on a synthetic dataset and demonstrates the code's ability to more accurately resolve features of the input synthetic structure relative to the separately inverted resistivity and velocity models. Using tomoDDMT, we are able to resolve a number of key issues raised during drilling at SAFOD. We are able to infer the distribution of several geologic units including the Salinian granitoids, the Great Valley sequence, and the Franciscan Formation. The distribution and transport of fluids at both shallow and great depths is also examined. Low values of velocity/resistivity attributed to a feature known as the Eastern Conductor (EC) can be explained in two ways: the EC is a brine-filled, high porosity region, or this region is composed largely of clay-rich shales of the Franciscan. The Eastern Wall, which lies immediately adjacent to the EC, is unlikely to be a fluid pathway into the San Andreas Fault's seismogenic zone due to its observed higher resistivity and velocity values.

  11. A Cross-Gradient Constrained Inversion of Seismic and Magnetotelluric Data in the Parkfield Region of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, N. L.; Thurber, C. H.; Bedrosian, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    Model nonuniqueness and imperfect resolution are pervasive problems in the inversion of geophysical data. We are exploring the utility of structural constraints employing a cross-gradients penalty function to improve models of fault zone structure along the San Andreas fault in the Parkfield, California area. Previously, individual seismic and resistivity models at SAFOD were completed that showed significant spatial similarity between main features. We will capitalize on this likeness by developing a joint inversion scheme that uses the cross gradient penalty function to achieve structurally similar images that fit both the resistivity and seismic models without forcing model similarity where none exists. The new inversion code, tomoDDMT, which merges the seismic inversion code, tomoDD, and the magnetotelluric (MT) inversion code, Occam2DMT, will be used to carry out the inversion. Due to resolution differences, seismic and resistivity models are inverted for under varying gridding schemes. This difference in gridding will be overcome by projecting model values for both onto a regular, much finer grid thereby linking the two models. Calculation of the cross-gradient constraint will be completed on this “common” grid and these values will be projected back to the seismic and resistivity model spaces. A simultaneous solution will then be carried out for the seismic and resistivity models under application of the cross-gradient constraint. Inversions in Occam2DMT are solved using Cholesky factorization. To increase the speed of the inversion, tomoDDMT will employ the LSQR algorithm for the simultaneous solution of both models.

  12. Broad band and long period magnetotellurics for imaging the onshore portion of Santos basin and orogenic belts of southeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solon, F. F.; Fontes, S. L.; Miquelutti, L. G.; La Terra, E. F.

    2012-12-01

    Between October 2011 and April 2012, we carried out 81 broad band and 40 long period magnetotelluric soundings covering the frequency range 1000 Hz - 0.0001 Hz. These soundings are distributed into two parallel 210km long profiles, approximately 50 km apart, spaced 5 km with EM field components oriented to the magnetic north and east directions. Both ADU07 (Metronix) and LEMI 417 (Lviv) systems were used. Typically, three to four MT soundings were measured simultaneously for this study. Both profiles initiate at the coast and continues to the continent direction. These profiles crossed two major Neoproterozoic Orogenic Belts, Brasilia and Ribeira, as well as several geosutures in the basement of the marginal basins of southeastern Brazil. The geophysical survey associated with the available geological information brought important contributions to the understanding of the main geosutures presents in the area. One located at the southeast end of the MT profiles, separating the tectonic domains of Ribeira Belt from the Pre-cambrian lands of Santos Basin. The other one situated in the extreme northwest of the MT profiles, limiting the Ribeira and Brasilia Belts. Data were processed using a robust remote-reference technique. Strike and dimensionality analysis along with G-B decomposition support a general 2-D regional character of the conductivity distribution in the area, allowing us to create a 2-D inversion model. Good misfit can be observed between the measured and calculated transfer functions projected onto the profile direction. Very preliminary results imaged the two main suture zones between the orogenics belts and allow inferences about the geographic position of their lateral limits.

  13. Three-dimensional audio-frequency magnetotelluric imaging of Akebasitao granitic intrusions in Western Junggar, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Zhang, Anqi; Zhang, Sheng; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Shengye; Li, Yongtao; Xu, Yixian; Wang, Qinyan

    2016-12-01

    An audio-frequency magnetotelluric (AMT) array was deployed here to map the resistivity structure of the Akebasitao intrusions and the surrounding area in Western Junggar, China. High quality AMT data were acquired at 463 sites that covered the whole Akebasitao intrusions. The latest 3D electromagnetic inversion system, ModEM, was employed to invert the AMT dataset. A high resolution resistivity model was recovered by using a nonlinear conjugate-gradient scheme. The Akebasitao intrusions, the most pronounced resistive features in the preferred model, are clearly imaged from shallow depths to more than 10 km, with some conductive zones and spots in and surrounding it. The shape of the Akebasitao pluton is asymmetrical mushroom-like, suggesting an extension stress environment at its forming age (the Late Carboniferous to the Early Permian) in Western Junggar. Our explanation is consistent with the subducting spreading ridge tectonic model for Western Junggar in the Late Carboniferous, with a paleo-Asia ocean plate subducting northwestward beneath Karamay arc, as former studies proposed. The upwelling channel of the Akebasitao pluton seems to be located at its center. The Darbut Fault has been clearly imaged as a subvertical narrow conductive zone extending from the surface to 3-5 km or deeper. The most prominent conductors are two elongate zones in depths deeper than 500 m. Other conductive zones can also be identified surrounding the boundaries of the Akebasitao pluton, which can be interpreted as pyrometasomatic metamorphism relating to magmatic activities. Because the ophiolitic rocks outcrop as some lens along these two boundaries, and as previous studies showed that the serpentine metamorphosed from peridotite with well-connected magnetite possessing high conductivity, the conductors may therefore also represent their sources in depth.

  14. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion in practice—the electrical conductivity structure of the San Andreas Fault in Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Kristina; Ritter, Oliver

    2013-10-01

    3-D inversion techniques have become a widely used tool in magnetotelluric (MT) data interpretation. However, with real data sets, many of the controlling factors for the outcome of 3-D inversion are little explored, such as alignment of the coordinate system, handling and influence of data errors and model regularization. Here we present 3-D inversion results of 169 MT sites from the central San Andreas Fault in California. Previous extensive 2-D inversion and 3-D forward modelling of the data set revealed significant along-strike variation of the electrical conductivity structure. 3-D inversion can recover these features but only if the inversion parameters are tuned in accordance with the particularities of the data set. Based on synthetic 3-D data we explore the model space and test the impacts of a wide range of inversion settings. The tests showed that the recovery of a pronounced regional 2-D structure in inversion of the complete impedance tensor depends on the coordinate system. As interdependencies between data components are not considered in standard 3-D MT inversion codes, 2-D subsurface structures can vanish if data are not aligned with the regional strike direction. A priori models and data weighting, that is, how strongly individual components of the impedance tensor and/or vertical magnetic field transfer functions dominate the solution, are crucial controls for the outcome of 3-D inversion. If deviations from a prior model are heavily penalized, regularization is prone to result in erroneous and misleading 3-D inversion models, particularly in the presence of strong conductivity contrasts. A `good' overall rms misfit is often meaningless or misleading as a huge range of 3-D inversion results exist, all with similarly `acceptable' misfits but producing significantly differing images of the conductivity structures. Reliable and meaningful 3-D inversion models can only be recovered if data misfit is assessed systematically in the frequency

  15. Geometry and faults tectonic activity of the Okavango Rift Zone, Botswana: Evidence from magnetotelluric and electrical resistivity tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufford, Kelsey Mosley; Atekwana, Estella A.; Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Shemang, Elijah; Atekwana, Eliot A.; Mickus, Kevin; Moidaki, Moikwathai; Modisi, Motsoptse P.; Molwalefhe, Loago

    2012-04-01

    We used Magnetotelluric (MT) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) to investigate the geometry and nature of faults activity of the Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ) in Botswana, an incipient rift at the southern tip of the Southwestern Branch of the East African Rift System. The ORZ forms a subtle topographic depression filled with Quaternary lacustrine and fluvio-deltaic sediments and is bounded by NE-trending normal faults that are more prominent in the southeastern portion of the rift basin. An MT model from a regional (˜140 km) NW-SE trending MT transect shows that much of the rift basin is underlain by a broad asymmetrical low resistivity anomaly that slopes gently (˜1°) from NW to SE reaching a depth of ˜300 m. This anomaly suggests that faults in the southeastern part of the rift form a NW-dipping border fault zone and that the lacustrine and fluvio-deltaic sediments contain brackish to saline water filling the broad half-graben structure. Furthermore, MT and ERT models from detailed (4-13 km long) MT transects and resistivity profiles show that one border fault (Thamalakane) and two within-basin faults (Lecha and Tsau) in the southeastern part of the ORZ are characterized by a localized high conductivity anomaly while another border fault (Kunyere) lacks such an anomaly. These localized anomalies are attributed to channelized fresh surface water and saline groundwater percolating through these faults forming "fault zone conductors" and suggest actively displacing faults. The lack of a "fault zone conductor" in the Kunyere fault is interpreted as indicating diminishing displacement on this fault, and that strain was transferred to the Thamalakane fault further to the east. The fluids provide lubricant for the ORZ faults, hence preventing infrequent large magnitude earthquakes, but favoring frequent micro-seismicity.

  16. Making it and breaking it in the Midwest: Continental assembly and rifting from modeling of EarthScope magnetotelluric data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedrosian, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional lithospheric-scale resistivity model of the North American mid-continent has been estimated based upon EarthScope magnetotelluric data. Details of the resistivity model are discussed in relation to lithospheric sutures, defined primarily from aeromagnetic and geochronologic data, which record the southward growth of the Laurentian margin in the Proterozoic. The resistivity signature of the 1.1 Ga Mid-continent Rift System is examined in detail, in particular as relates to rift geometry, extent, and segmentation. An unrecognized expanse of (concealed) Proterozoic deltaic deposits in Kansas is identified and speculated to result from axial drainage along the southwest rift arm akin to the Rio Grande delta which drains multiple rift basins. A prominent conductor traces out Cambrian rifting in Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, and Kentucky; this linear conductor has not been imaged before and suggests that the Cambrian rift system may have been more extensive than previously thought. The highest conductivity within the mid-continent is imaged in Minnesota, Michigan, and Wisconsin where it is coincident with Paleoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks. The high conductivity is attributed to metallic sulfides, and in some cases, graphite. The former is a potential source of sulfur for multiple mineral deposits types, occurrences of which are found throughout the region. Finally, the imprint left within the mantle following the 1.1 Ga rifting event is examined. Variations in lithospheric mantle conductivity are observed and are interpreted to reflect variations in water content (depleted versus metasomatized mantle) imprinted upon the mantle by the Keweenawan mantle plume.

  17. Crustal imaging of a mobile belt using magnetotellurics: An example of the Fowler Domain in South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Stephan; Heinson, Graham

    2010-06-01

    A long-period magnetotelluric data set was obtained in 2005 along a two-dimensional profile across the western part of the late Archaean-early Proterozoic Gawler Craton, South Australia. The study is aimed at delineating the electrical conductivity structure of the crust and upper mantle underneath an east-west trending profile extending from the Gawler Range Volcanics in the east, crossing the Nuyts Domain and the highly prospective Meso-Proterozoic Fowler Domain, and terminating in the Eucla Basin to the west. The resistivity model shows a very electrically resistive crust and upper mantle underneath the Nuyts and Fowler Domain, possibly representing the cratonic root of the Gawler Craton extending to depths of ˜160 km. The resistive cratonic root is closer to the surface underneath the Fowler Domain compared to the Nuyts Domain which supports findings from outcrops of metasediments of higher metamorphic grade in the Fowler Domain. A subvertical conductor marks the western terminus of the Fowler Domain and is imaged to upper mantle depths. On the eastern side of the Fowler Domain, another subvertical conductor extends to similar depths. These features spatially coincide with the Tallacootra and Coorabie shear zone at the surface, respectively, and their higher conductivity is likely due to a reduction in grain size of olivine associated with an increase in influence of grain boundary diffusion and thus enhanced conductivity. A comparison of the results with other surveys across mobile belts worldwide shows a more resistive response of the interpreted mobile belt of the Fowler Domain raising questions as to the nature of the domain.

  18. Models of fluid saturated zones according magnetotellurics and seismics data on Tien-Shan crust and mantle along transect MANAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bataleva, E.; Rybin, A.; Batalev, V.; Matyukov, V.

    2009-04-01

    Recognized as one of the highest, youngest, and most active orogenic systems on the Earth the Tien Shan is situated internal to the Eurasian continent. New deep seismic data acquired from 2004 to 2007 constitute an -400 km lithospheric transect located from the northwestern Tarim Basin in China to the northern Tien Shan in Kyrgyzstan. This seismic profile consists of 40 seismic stations "Quanterra" containing STS-2 (Streckeisen, Switzerland) and CMG - 3T (Güralp Systems Ltd) broadband seismic receivers. Registration of the seismic data in each station was conducted with sampling frequency of 40 Hz. Time service based on GPS clock was applied on each station. Average distance between the seismic stations along the profile is 10-15 km. Observations were held on 30 stations in Kyrgyzstan and on 10 of them in China. As a result of seismic investigations wave speeds cross-section was calculated. A 450 km long north-south magnetotelluric profile spanning the Tien Shan from Kazakhstan to western China reveals lateral variations in the resistivity of the Earth crust and mantle lithosphere to depths of 140 km. MT profile consisting of 19 long period MT soundings (20-20,000 s periods) were combined with 30 broadband stations (0.1-1600 s periods). Broadband measurements (0.001-100 s periods) were also acquired at the 14 long period sites in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. [Bielinski, et al 2003] Conductivity changes of up to one order of magnitude are a result from variations in temperature or composition, or both. Previous magneto telluric (MT) studies [Trapeznikov et al., 1997] partly show that some low velocity layers also have low resistivity, lending support to the fluid hypothesis. Studies of wave speeds reveal sections of the crust that have pronounced low velocity zones in the thicker portions of the crust which are attributed to crustal metasomatism [Ghose et al., 1998] or fluid filled fractures in pervasively deformed rocks [Vinnik et al., 2002]. Comparing an obtained

  19. A Combined Subaru/VLT/MMT 1-5 Micrometer Study of Planets Orbiting HR 8799: Implications For Atmospheric Properties, Masses and Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Burrows, Adam; Itoh, Yoichi; Matsumura, Soko; Fukagawa, Misato; Apai, Daniel; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Hinz, Philip M.; Rodigas, T. J.; Kasper, Markus; Pyo, T.-S.; Ogino, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    We present new 1-1.25 micron (z and J band) Subaru/IRCS and 2 micron (K band) VLT/NaCo data for HR 8799 and a rereduction of the 3-5 micron MMT/Clio data first presented by Hinz et al. Our VLT/NaCo data yield a detection of a fourth planet at a projected separation of approximately 15 AU--"HR 8799e ." We also report new, albeit weak detections of HR 8799b at 1.03 micron and 3.3 micron. Empirical comparisons to field brown dwarfs show that at least HR 8799b and HR 8799c, and possibly HR 8799d, have near-to-mid-IR colors/ magnitudes significantly discrepant from the L/T dwarf sequence. Standard cloud deck atmosphere models appropriate for brown dwarfs provide only (marginally) statistically meaningful fits to HR 8799b and c for unphysically small radii. Models with thicker cloud layers not present in brown dwarfs reproduce the planets' spectral energy distributions far more accurately and without the need for resealing the planets' radii. Our preliminary modeling suggests that HR 8799b has log(g) = 4-4.5, T(sub eff) = 900 K. while HR 8799c, d, and (by inference) e have log(g) = 4-4.5, T(sub eff) = 1000-1200 K. Combining results from planet evolution models and new dynamical stability limits implies that the masses of HR 8799b, c, d, and e are 6-7 M(sub j), 7-10 M(sub j), 7-10 M(sub j), and 7-10 M(sub j). "Patchy" cloud prescriptions may provide even better fits to the data and may lower the estimated surface gravities and masses. Finally, contrary to some recent claims, forming the HR 8799 planets by core accretion is still plausible, although such systems are likely rare.

  20. Electrical resistivity structure under the western Cosmonauts Sea at the continental margin of East Antarctica inferred via a marine magnetotelluric experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, Tetsuo; Nogi, Yoshifumi; Seama, Nobukazu

    2015-06-01

    The western Cosmonauts Sea, off the coast of East Antarctica, was a site of rifting of the Gondwana supercontinent and subsequent early seafloor spreading. To improve our understanding of the breakup of Gondwana, we conducted a marine magnetotelluric experiment to determine the electrical resistivity structure within the uppermost several hundred kilometers beneath the western Cosmonauts Sea. Magnetotelluric response functions at two sites, obtained after considering possible influences of non-plane magnetic field sources, suggest that these responses include distortions by topographic variations and conductive anomalies around the observation sites. Three-dimensional forward modeling confirmed that these distortions due to topographic variations and a thin (∼2-km thick) conductive layer immediately under the sites (mostly sediments) are severe. Furthermore, three-dimensional forward modeling to investigate the resistivity structure at deeper depths revealed an upper resistive layer (≥300 Ω-m), with a thickness of <100 km, and an underlying conductive half-space (∼10 Ω-m). The upper resistive layer and the underlying conductive structure most likely represent dry and water/melt-rich oceanic upper mantle, respectively. The upper resistive layer may be thinner than anticipated under the old seafloor of the study area (likely >90 Ma), and may suggest a conductive anomaly in the upper mantle produced by mantle convection and/or upwelling.

  1. Manufacturing Methods and Technology Project Summary Reports.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Abstracts E-1 Project 276 9746 - MM& T Engineering Measure for the E-3 Production of Thin Film Aluminum Oxide Ion Barrier for 18mm Microchannel Plates...Project 277 9811 - Reduction of Manufacturing Cost E-6 for Microwave Power Transistors and In-Process Tuning ’..--’.= Project 580 1003 - MMT, Low Cost...3604 - Development of E-15 Manufacturing Methods and Technology for a Solid State Power Switch .... Project H80 3012 - Infrared Source for AN/ALQ-144 E

  2. Imaging the Roots of Geothermal Systems: 3-D Inversion of Magnetotelluric Array Data in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, E. A.; Caldwell, G.; Bannister, S. C.; Hill, G.; Bennie, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), located in the central North Island of New Zealand, is a rifted arc that contains more than 20 liquid-dominated high-temperature geothermal systems, which together discharge ~4.2 GW of heat at the surface. The shallow (upper ~500 m) extent of these geothermal systems is marked by low-resistivity, mapped by tens-of-thousands of DC resistivity measurements collected throughout the 1970's and 80's. Conceptual models of heat transport through the brittle crust of the TVZ link these low-resistivity anomalies to the tops of vertically ascending plumes of convecting hydrothermal fluid. Recently, data from a 40-site array of broadband seismometers with ~4 km station spacing, and an array of 270 broadband magnetotelluric (MT) measurements with ~2 km station spacing, have been collected in the south-eastern part of the TVZ in an experiment to image the deep structure (or roots) of the geothermal systems in this region. Unlike DC resistivity, these MT measurements are capable of resolving the resistivity structure of the Earth to depths of 10 km or more. 2-D and 3-D models of subsets of these MT data have been used to provide the first-ever images of quasi-vertical low-resistivity zones (at depths of 3-7 km) that connect with the near-surface geothermal fields. These low-resistivity zones are interpreted to represent convection plumes of high-temperature fluids ascending within fractures, which supply heat to the overlying geothermal fields. At the Rotokawa, Ngatamariki and Ohaaki geothermal fields, these plumes extend to a broad layer of low-resistivity, inferred to represent a magmatic, basal heat source located below the seismogenic zone (at ~7-8 km depth) that drives convection in the brittle crust above. Little is known about the mechanisms that transfer heat into the hydrothermal regime. However, at Rotokawa, new 3-D resistivity models image a vertical low-resistivity zone that lies directly beneath the geothermal field. The top of this

  3. Magmatic Chimney Beneath Telaga Bodas Revealed by Magnetotellurics Profiling: A Case Study at the Karaha Bodas Geothermal System, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raharjo, I.; Wannamaker, P.; Moore, J. N.; Allis, R.; Chapman, D.

    2002-12-01

    Karaha-Telaga Bodas is a partially vapor-dominated geothermal system located on the flanks of Galunggung Volcano in Java, Indonesia. Fumaroles, hot springs and a shallow acid lake occur at the southern (Telaga Bodas) end of the geothermal area. Enrichments in chloride, fluoride, and sulfur in the lake water and the presence of tourmaline, fluorite, and native sulfur at depth are related to the flux of magmatic gases. Here, temperatures as high as 350 degree C are found at depths of about 2 km. A magnetotellurics profile crossing the Telaga Bodas area is used to test for presence of a magmatic chimney, which is believed to be the source of the magmatic components. The profile was modeled on a grid having 248x48 cells with 46 closely spaced stations aligned along NW-SE direction. The TM mode and vertical H-field data were rotated to strike of 10 degree east and inverted with a 2-D algorithm which damps model departures from an a-priori 1-D structure. The dataset consists of 25 periods running from 0.01024 to 1024 seconds yielding an RMS of 2.3. Five distinctive resistivity features are recognized: (1) resistive thin layer at the surface (about 1.5 km asl); (2)conductive layers sloping to the NW and SE; (3) a slightly resistive region in the center encapsulated by the conductive layers; (4) a vertical conductive structure inside the slightly resistive region; and (5) a resistive basement starting from 2 km below sea level. The sloping conductive layers (< 10 Ohm.m) are interpreted as representing clay-rich and/or weathered layers that exist for cap rock over the geothermal system whereas the slightly resistive region in the center corresponds to altered volcanic rocks and the underlying intrusives. The width of these volcanic rocks varies from about 2 km at their top to about 5 km at their base. The chimney is represented by a vertical conductive structure (< 10 ohm-m) inside this slightly resistive region. The size of the chimney is about 1 km wide and 2.5 km high

  4. Broadband Magnetotelluric Investigations of Crustal Resistivity Structure in North-Eastern Alberta: Implications for Engineered Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddell, M. V.; Unsworth, M. J.; Nieuwenhuis, G.

    2013-12-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from hydrocarbon consumption produce profound changes in the global climate, and the implementation of alternative energy sources is needed. The oilsands industry in Alberta (Canada) is a major producer of greenhouse gases as natural gas is burnt to produce the heat required to extract and process bitumen. Geothermal energy could be utilized to provide this necessary heat and has the potential to reduce both financial costs and environmental impacts of the oilsands industry. In order to determine the geothermal potential the details of the reservoir must be understood. Conventional hydrothermal reservoirs have been detected using geophysical techniques such as magnetotellurics (MT) which measures the electrical conductivity of the Earth. However, in Northern Alberta the geothermal gradient is relatively low, and heat must be extracted from deep inside the basement rocks using Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) and therefore an alternative exploration technique is required. MT can be useful in this context as it can detect fracture zones and regions of elevated porosity. MT data were recorded near Fort McMurray with the goal of determining the geothermal potential by understanding the crustal resistivity structure beneath the Athabasca Oilsands. The MT data are being used to locate targets of significance for geothermal exploration such as regions of low resistivity in the basement rocks which can relate to in situ fluids or fracture zones which can facilitate efficient heat extraction or het transport. A total of 93 stations were collected ~500m apart on two profiles stretching 30 and 20km respectively. Signals were recorded using Phoenix Geophysics V5-2000 systems over frequency bands from 1000 to 0.001 Hz, corresponding to depths of penetration approximately 50m to 50km. Groom-Bailey tensor decomposition and phase tensor analysis shows a well defined geoelectric strike direction that varied along the profile from N60°E to N45

  5. 3D structures of the crust and upper mantle in Atlas Mountains of Morocco from magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyan, D.; Jones, A.; Ledo, J.; Fullea, J.; Sinischalchi, A.; Romano, G.; Campanya, J.

    2012-04-01

    As a part of the PICASSO (Program to Investigate Convective Alboran Sea System Overturn) and concomitant TopoMed (Plate re-organization in the western Mediterranean: Lithospheric causes and topographic consequences - an ESF EUROCORES TOPO-EUROPE project) projects, a multi-institutional magnetotelluric (MT) experiment across the Atlas Mountains initiated in September 2009 and ended in February 2010. The overarching objective of the project is to provide new constrains on the lithospheric structure of the Atlas Mountains, and to aid in discriminating between competing models describing the tectonics of the region. The experiment comprised acquisition of broad-band (crustal probing) and long period (mantle probing) MT data along two profiles: a N-S oriented profile crossing the Middle Atlas through the Central High Atlas to the east (profile MEK) and a NE-SW oriented profile crossing the western High Atlas towards the Anti Atlas in the west (profile MAR). Our MT inversion results from the MEK profile (Ledo et al., 2011), assuming that the Earth can be validly represented by two-dimensional (2D) structures, reveal two major mid- to lower crustal scale conductive features. The first anomaly is stretching from the Middle Atlas southward towards the High Moulouya basin and the second one is located beneath the Anti Atlas. There is a gradual increase in mantle resistivity to the south which may indicate a thickening lithosphere beneath the Anti Atlas. To validate the 2D inversion results, the MT data on the same profile were inverted for 3D electrical resistivity structure using both WSINV3DMT (Siripunvaraporn et al., 2005a) and ModEM (Egbert et al., 2011). We ran inversions with the full impedance tensor and also with only the off-diagonal components. Following the paper of Patro and Egbert (2011), we are testing the effect of using different length scales in the along-strike and across strike directions. As expected, the 3D inversion results provide a better fit to the

  6. Deep electrical resistivity structure of the northwestern U.S. derived from 3-D inversion of USArray magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meqbel, Naser M.; Egbert, Gary D.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Kelbert, Anna; Schultz, Adam

    2014-09-01

    Long period (10-20,000 s) magnetotelluric (MT) data are being acquired across the continental USA on a quasi-regular grid of ˜70 km spacing as an electromagnetic component of the National Science Foundation EarthScope/USArray Program. These data are sensitive to fluids, melts, and other orogenic indicators, and thus provide a valuable complement to other components of EarthScope. We present and interpret results of 3-D MT data inversion from 325 sites acquired from 2006-2011 to provide a regional scale view of electrical resistivity from the middle crust to nearly the mantle transition zone, covering an area from NW Washington to NW Colorado. Beneath the active extensional subprovinces in the south-central region, on average we see a resistive upper crust, and then extensive areas of low resistivity in the lower crust and uppermost mantle. Further below, much of the upper half of the upper mantle appears moderately resistive, then subsequently the lower upper mantle becomes moderately conductive. This column suggests a dynamic process of moderately hydrated and fertile deeper upper mantle upwelling during extension, intersection of that material with the damp solidus causing dehydration and melting, and upward exodus of generated mafic melts to pond and exsolve saline fluids near Moho levels. Lithosphere here is very thin. To the east and northeast, thick sections of resistive lithosphere are imaged under the Wyoming and Medicine Hat Cratons. These are punctuated with numerous electrically conductive sutures presumably containing graphitic or sulfide-bearing meta-sediments deeply underthrust and emplaced during ancient collisions. Below Cascadia, the subducting Juan de Fuca and Gorda lithosphere appears highly resistive. Suspected oceanic lithosphere relicts in the central NW part of the model domain also are resistive, including the accreted “Siletzia” terrane beneath the Coast Ranges and Columbia Embayment, and the seismically fast “slab curtain” beneath

  7. Magnetotelluric imaging of anisotropic crust near Fort McMurray, Alberta: implications for engineered geothermal system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddell, Mitch; Unsworth, Martyn; Pek, Josef

    2016-06-01

    Viability for the development of an engineered geothermal system (EGS) in the oilsands region near Fort McMurray, Alberta, is investigated by studying the structure of the Precambrian basement rocks with magnetotellurics (MT). MT data were collected at 94 broad-band stations on two east-west profiles. Apparent resistivity and phase data showed little variation along each profile. The short period MT data detected a 1-D resistivity structure that could be identified as the shallow sedimentary basin underlain by crystalline basement rocks to a depth of 4-5 km. At lower frequencies a strong directional dependence, large phase splits, and regions of out-of-quadrant (OOQ) phase were detected. 2-D isotropic inversions of these data failed to produce a realistic resistivity model. A detailed dimensionality analysis found links between large phase tensor skews (˜15°), azimuths, OOQ phases and tensor decomposition strike angles at periods greater than 1 s. Low magnitude induction vectors, as well as uniformity of phase splits and phase tensor character between the northern and southern profiles imply that a 3-D analysis is not necessary or appropriate. Therefore, 2-D anisotropic forward modelling was used to generate a resistivity model to interpret the MT data. The preferred model was based on geological observations of outcropping anisotropic mylonitic basement rocks of the Charles Lake shear zone, 150 km to the north, linked to the study area by aeromagnetic and core sample data. This model fits all four impedance tensor elements with an rms misfit of 2.82 on the southern profile, and 3.3 on the northern. The conductive phase causing the anisotropy is interpreted to be interconnected graphite films within the metamorphic basement rocks. Characterizing the anisotropy is important for understanding how artificial fractures, necessary for EGS development, would form. Features of MT data commonly interpreted to be 3-D (e.g. out of OOQ phase and large phase tensor skew) are

  8. Magnetotelluric and Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of Regional and Local Variability of Deep Saline Permafrost in Adventdalen, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V.; Binley, A. M.; Keating, K.; Van Dam, R. L.; Christiansen, H. H.; Cohen, S.; McGuffy, C.

    2014-12-01

    In most Arctic areas the interplay between permafrost and parameters such as climate variability and geological history is not well understood or documented. Nevertheless, knowledge on the thermal state of permafrost, its thickness and ice/water content is crucial for a credible assessment of the impacts of surface warming on a suite of environmental processes such as groundwater flow to riverbeds and the release of methane from areas of degrading permafrost. We carried out geophysical surveys using non-invasive Magnetotelluric (MT) and Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNMR) techniques to map permafrost occurrence in Adventdalen, Svalbard, a river valley in a typical coastal Arctic landscape. MT, which is sensitive to changes in the electrical conductivity and can be used to distinguish saline, fresh, and frozen soils, was used to determine the total thickness of permafrost (potentially several 100s of meters). SNMR, which is directly sensitive the volume of liquid water, was used to determine the unfrozen water content and the heterogeneity of permafrost at depths of up to ~100 m. We collected measurements in transects across and along the valley which is filled with Holocene estuarine sediments. MT observations suggest that permafrost thickens substantially to up to several hundreds of meters along the ~12 km long transect from the coastal area inland. The electrical resistivities observed are relatively low (~200-400 Ωm) when compared to permafrost environments in Alpine settings, which is most likely attributed to a high salinity of pore waters in our study area. In the parts of the valley above the marine limit (~70 m above sea-level) SNMR did not detect any unfrozen water content. However, closely spaced SNMR transects across the valley several kilometers from the coast show a substantial signal, potentially due to unfrozen water content in supra-permafrost taliks near the main river channel. This is the first study to illustrate the ability of combining

  9. Deep electrical conductivity structure of the Rio Grande Rift in Colorado and New Mexico: Early results from a two-year magnetotelluric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feucht, D. W.; Bedrosian, P.; Sheehan, A. F.

    2013-12-01

    A wideband and long-period magnetotelluric experiment is underway across the Rio Grande Rift in Colorado and New Mexico in order to provide constraints on the thermal and rheological state of the lithosphere beneath this region of intra-continental extension. Magnetotellurics is a passive source electromagnetic technique that at long periods has depth penetration into the deep crust and upper mantle. Important questions about continental rifting remain unresolved, including the role of magmatism, volatiles and inherited lithospheric structure in the initiation and development of rifting. Recent seismic imaging studies show thinned crust and low seismic wavespeeds in the crust and upper mantle beneath the Rio Grande Rift. New and ongoing geodetic work confirms the low strain-rate environment of the region yet shows surprisingly uniform deformation over an area far wider than the rift's physiographic expression. Electrical conductivity models from this experiment will provide information complementary to these studies and can be used to determine the relative contributions of thermal and compositional heterogeneity in the crust and upper mantle to processes of continental extension. Over the past two years, magnetotelluric data has been collected at ~100 site locations along three 450 km long east-west transects of the rift axis. These three profiles extend across the northern, central, and southern portions of the rift and include sites in the High Plains, Colorado Front Range, southern Rocky Mountains, San Juan Basin, Sangre de Cristo Mountains, and southern Basin and Range along the New Mexico/Mexico border. A comparison of results from these segments will be used to examine along-strike variation in the spatial extent of rifting and associated modification of the lithosphere. Data assessment shows high-quality signal to periods in excess of 10 000 s, which corresponds to upper-mantle depths in this region of high upper-crustal conductivity and low crustal

  10. Joint interpretation of seismic tomography and new magnetotelluric results provide evidence for support of high topography in the Southern Rocky Mountains and High Plains of eastern Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feucht, D. W.; Sheehan, A. F.; Bedrosian, P.

    2015-12-01

    A recent magnetotelluric (MT) survey in central Colorado, USA, when interpreted alongside existing seismic tomography, reveals potential mechanisms of support for high topography both regionally and locally. Broadband and long period magnetotelluric data were collected at twenty-three sites along a 330 km E-W profile across the Southern Rocky Mountains and High Plains of central North America as part of the Deep RIFT Electrical Resistivity (DRIFTER) experiment. Remote-reference data processing yielded high quality MT data over a period range of 100 Hz to 10,000 seconds. A prominent feature of the regional geo-electric structure is the Denver Basin, which contains a thick package of highly conductive shales and porous sandstone aquifers. One-dimensional forward modeling was performed on stations within the Denver Basin to estimate depth to the base of this shallow conductor. Those estimates were then used to place a horizontal penalty cut in the model mesh of a regularized two-dimensional inversion. Two-dimensional modeling of the resistivity structure reveals two major anomalous regions in the lithosphere: 1) a high conductivity region in the crust under the tallest peaks of the Rocky Mountains and 2) a lateral step increase in lithospheric resistivity beneath the plains. The Rocky Mountain crustal anomaly coincides with low seismic wave speeds and enhanced heat flow and is thus interpreted as evidence of partial melt and/or high temperature fluids emplaced in the crust by tectonic activity along the Rio Grande Rift. The lateral variation in the mantle lithosphere, while co-located with a pronounced step increase in seismic velocity, appears to be a gradational boundary in resistivity across eastern Colorado and could indicate a small degree of compositional modification at the edge of the North American craton. These inferred conductivity mechanisms, namely crustal melt and modification of mantle lithosphere, likely contribute to high topography locally in the

  11. 2D Magnetotelluric interpretation of the crust electrical resistivity across the Pampean terrane Río de la Plata suture, in central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favetto, Alicia; Pomposiello, Cristina; López de Luchi, Mónica G.; Booker, John

    2008-11-01

    Magnetotelluric data were obtained along a 450 km, almost west-east profile at approximately 31.5° S, which extends from La Rioja to Santa Fé provinces in central Argentina. The profile crosses two main crustal domains that were juxtaposed during the Early-Middle Cambrian Pampean Orogeny: the Pampean terrane to the west and the Río de la Plata craton to the east. The electrical resistivity structure of the crustal domains together with their boundary is presented. Through dimensionality analysis of the data, it was demonstrated that regional-scale electrical structures are mainly two-dimensional with a strike direction oriented parallel to the surface geological strike. The resistivity model shows a subvertical limit approximately along the eastern border of the Sierra Chica de Córdoba. To the east, the shallower structure is the Chaco-Paranense basin extending to a depth of 6 km with resistivities between 1 and 30 Ohm-m, whereas below the basin the ca 2.1-2.3 Ga Río de la Plata craton shows resistivities in a range of 300-10,000 Ohm-m. The Pampean terrane presents a 6 km layer with a resistivity higher than 10,000 Ohm-m whereas below this layer the resistivity values range from 50 to 200 Ohm-m. Based on both the geological information and the magnetotelluric results, the sharp lateral discontinuity observed in the resistivity model to the east of the Sierras de Córdoba is conjectured to represent the boundary between the Río de la Plata craton and the Pampean terrane which may correspond to the Early Cambrian suture.

  12. Electrical conductivity structure from inversion analysis of magnetotelluric data acquired in northern Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong Kon; Jong Lee, Tae; Uchida, Toshihiro; Park, In Hwa; Dennis, Zara; Song, Yoonho; Cull, Jim

    2010-05-01

    Two campaigns of MT soundings were carried out successively in 2007 and 2008, in central Victoria, Australia, as a collaboration research between Republic of Korea, Australia, and Japan. The main purpose of these surveys are to investigate electrical conductivity and thus help understanding of tectonic structure in central Victoria, which is believed to be closely linked to mineralization and magmatic processes of this region. The strategy of MT surveys is to firstly acquire MT data along a seismic surveyed line and then compare electromagnetic and seismic survey results each other to check if the two data set produce the compatible results and/or how much they are correlated and see if we could identify structural similarity in the subsurface apart from the first line by successive MT survey. For this purposes, the first MT survey was done in 2007 along the seismic transect of 2006 done by Geoscience Victoria, and obtained compatible images between electromagnetic (EM) and seismic methods. As a second stage, the second MT survey was done in 2008 to investigate geological structure of northern part of the first survey line. The survey areas are located in western Lachlan Fold Belts, which is the part of Tasman Fold Belts in southeastern Australia. In both surveys, we locate MT stations in west-east direction considering regional geological strike is in N-S direction. An MT profile of 2008 is almost parallel to the one of 2007 and approximately 50 km away. We operated remote reference (RR) sites in both surveys. We acquired two electric field components and three magnetic field components of MT band from 0.00034 ~ 317 Hz, and extracted impedances of good quality via remote reference processing. Two-dimensional inversions with various algorithms were done along survey lines. The first MT survey line, which was established along the seismic survey line, shows that the positions of conductivity discontinuity near surface are well matched with the positions of major

  13. On comparison between 2-D magnetotelluric FEM modering using triangular and rectangular elements along sea-land array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, T.; Toh, H.; Oshiman, N.

    2010-12-01

    The San-in region of SW Japan is classified as an area of high seismicity/volcanic activity, and thus many magneto-telluric (MT) and seismic observations have been conducted. Below this region, the Philippine Sea plate and the Pacific Sea plate are subducting into shallow and deep parts respectively, which makes the subsurface electrical structures very complicated. For example, Adakite rocks from Mt. Daisen, which is the biggest volcano made in the Quaternary, appeared penetrating the alkari rocks of theTertiary(Kimura et al., 2003) In addition the epicenters shallower than 30km in this region was broad planely in the west of Daisen and along about a east-west line in the east of Daisen (Shiozaki et al., 2003). In the San-in region, such seismic/volcanic properties have been studied only using land surveys. However, the studies based on land surveys are not enough to understand the epicenter distributions and where the edge of Philippine Sea plate reaches now, because Mt. Daisen and the distributed epicenters are located near the coastline. Our group, therefore, started seafloor electromagnetic (EM) observations off the San-in region in 2006. As a result, we have obtained seafloor EM data at 10 sites to date. In this study, we compared the accuracy of EM responses calculated by different two-dimensional (2-D) FEM codes using triangular and rectangular elements in order to make a new 2-D inversion code available along sea-land array. That’s why because there are few 2-D MT inversion codes available in a region with coastline. We used Ogawa and Uchida’s (1996) code for rectangular elements and Utada’s (1987) code for triangular ones. We worked on a bathymetry with a constant inclination between the land-sea boundary whose horizontal-to-vertical ratio is 25 up to 4km depth. Using this bathymetry, we conducted 2-D transverse magnetic (TM) forward modeling for both elements and compared the apparent resistivities and phases of MT impedances. As for triangular

  14. IRETHERM: Magnetotelluric Assessment of Geothermal Energy Potential of Hydrothermal Aquifer, Radiothermal Granite and Warm Spring Targets in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Alan G.; Muller, Mark; Fullea, Javier; Vozar, Jan; Blake, Sarah; Delhaye, Robert; Farrell, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    IRETHERM (www.iretherm.ie) is an academic-government-industry, collaborative research project, funded by Science Foundation Ireland, with the overarching objective of developing a holistic understanding of Ireland's low-enthalpy geothermal energy potential through integrated modelling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. With the exception of Permo-Triassic basins in Northern Ireland, hosting geothermal aquifers of promising but currently poorly-defined potential, rocks with high primary porosity have not been identified elsewhere. Whether any major Irish shear zones/faults might host a geothermal aquifer at depth is also unknown, although clusters of warm-springs in the vicinity of two major shear zones are promising. IRETHERM's objectives over a four-year period are to: (i) Develop multi-parameter geophysical modelling and interpretation software tools that will enhance our ability to explore for and assess deep aquifers and granitic intrusions. (ii) Model and understand temperature variations in the upper-crust. Firstly, by building a 3-D model of crustal heat-production based on geochemical analysis of surface, borehole and mid- to lower-crustal xenolith samples. Secondly, by modelling, using a fully self-consistent 3-D approach, observed surface heat-flow variation as a function of variation in the structure and thermal properties of the crust and lithosphere, additionally constrained by surface elevation, geoid, gravity, seismic and magnetotelluric (MT) data. (iii) Test a strategic set of eight "type" geothermal targets with a systematic program of electromagnetic surveys (MT, CSEM) across ten target areas. During 2012, IRETHERM collected over 220 MT/AMT sites in the investigation of a range of different geothermal target types. Here we present preliminary electrical resistivity modelling results for each target investigated and discuss the implications of the models for geothermal energy potential: 1. Rathlin Basin The only sedimentary strata

  15. Three dimensional electrical conductivity model of the Northwestern US derived from 3-D inversion of USArray magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meqbel, N. M.; Egbert, G. D.; Kelbert, A.

    2011-12-01

    Long period (10-20,000 s) magnetotelluric (MT) data are being acquired in a series of temporary arrays deployed across the continental United States through the EMScope component of EarthScope. MT deployments in 2006-2011 have acquired data at 325 sites on an approximately regular grid, with the same nominal spacing as the USArray broadband seismic transportable array (~70 km). The MT sites span a rectangular area from NW Washington to NW Colorado. Here we present results of a 3-D inversion of the full data set. A number of conductive and resistive features appear consistently in the crust and upper mantle in essentially all of a large suite of 3-D inverse solutions. Extensive areas of high conductivity are found in the lower crust (up to a depth of ~ 40 km) beneath the Basin & Range in southeastern Oregon, as imaged by Patro and Egbert (2008). In our new model, this feature extends further to the south and to the east, where it merges with somewhat deeper (uppermost mantle) conductivities beneath the Yellowstone-Snake River Plain. This deeper feature, which extends from Yellowstone to the SW into northeastern Nevada, coincides with the track of the Yellowstone hotspot discussed e.g., in Smith et. al. (2008). The lower crust and the uppermost mantle in the northeastern part of the domain, covering the area from eastern Washington to Montana and continuing south to Wyoming, is generally resistive, with a few localized exceptions. This resistive zone coincides with high velocities discussed and interpreted, e.g., by Yang et. al. (2008) as thick, stable Proterozoic lithosphere. A number of large-scale anomalous features also appear consistently in the upper mantle, at depths of ~ 50 km to 300 km. Most striking is a zone of high resistivity on the western edge of the domain, beneath western Oregon, Washington and northern California in the area occupied by oceanic lithosphere of the Juan de Fuca Plate, which has subducted beneath the relatively more conductive

  16. Deep electrical resistivity structure of the Northwestern U. S. derived from 3-D inversion of USArray Magnetotelluric data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meqbel, N. M.; Egbert, G. D.; Wannamaker, P. E.; Kelbert, A.; Schultz, A.

    2013-12-01

    Long period (10-20,000 s) magnetotelluric (MT) data are being acquired across the continental USA on a quasi-regular grid of ~70 km spacing as an electromagnetic component of the National Science Foundation EarthScope/USArray Program. These data are sensitive to fluids, melts, and other orogenic indicators, and thus provide a valuable complement to other components of EarthScope. We present and interpret results of 3-D MT data inversion from 325 sites acquired from 2006-2011 to provide a regional scale view of electrical resistivity from the middle crust to nearly the mantle transition zone, covering an area from NW Washington to NW Colorado. Extensive areas of low resistivity are imaged in the lower crust and uppermost mantle beneath the extensional provinces, most plausibly explained by underplated, hybridized magmas and associated exsolved highly saline fluids. These pervasive low resistivities show aligned or 'streaky' textures roughly parallel to seismic fast-axes, possibly reflecting widespread flow induced alignment of melt in this area. Thick sections of resistive lithosphere imaged in the eastern and northeastern part of the domain coincide spatially with the Wyoming and Medicine Hat Cratons. Sutures bounding these cratonic blocks are electrically conductive most likely due to meta-sediments emplaced during ancient collisions. Below the Cascadia forearc, the subducting Juan de Fuca and Gorda lithosphere appears highly resistive. Other resistive zones in the NW part of the domain may denote relict oceanic lithosphere: the accreted 'Siletzia' terrane beneath the Coast Ranges and Columbia Embayment, and the seismically fast 'slab curtain' beneath eastern Idaho interpreted by others as stranded Farallon lithosphere. Quasi-horizontal patches of low resistivity in the deep crust beneath the Cascade volcanic arc and fore-arc likely represent fluids evolved from breakdown of hydrous minerals in the down-going slab. In the backarc, low resistivities concentrate in

  17. Analysis of magnetotelluric profile data from the Ruby Mountains metamorphic core complex and southern Carlin Trend region, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wannamaker, Philip E.; Doerner, William M.; Stodt, John A.; Sodergen, Timothy L.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    We have collected about 150 magnetotelluric (MT) soundings in northeastern Nevada in the region of the Ruby Mountains metamorphic core complex uplift and southern Carlin mineral trend, in an effort to illuminate controls on core complex evolution and deposition of world-class gold deposits. The region has experienced a broad range of tectonic events including several periods of compressional and extensional deformation, which have contributed to the total expression of electrical resistivity. Most of the soundings are in three east-west profiles across increasing degrees of core uplift to the north (Bald Mountain, Harrison Pass and Secret Pass latitudes). Two shorter lines cross a prominent east-west structure to the north of the northern profile. MT impedance tensor and vertical magnetic field rotations imply a N-NNE average regional geoelectric strike, similar to surface geologic trends. Model resistivity cross sections were derived using a 2-D inversion algorithm, which damps departures of model parameters from an a priori structure, emphasizing the transverse magnetic (TM) mode and vertical magnetic field data. Geological interpretation of the resistivity combines previous seismic, potential field and isotope models, structural and petrological models for regional compression and extension, and detailed structural/stratigraphic interpretations incorporating drilling for petroleum and mineral exploration. To first order, the resistivity structure is one of a moderately conductive, Phanerozoic sedimentary section fundamentally disrupted by intrusion and uplift of resistive crystalline rocks. Late Devonian and early Mississippian shales of the Pilot and Chainman Formations together form an important conductive marker sequence in the stratigraphy and show pronounced increases in conductance (conductivity-thickness product) from east to west. These increases in conductance are attributed to graphitization caused by Elko-Sevier era compressional shear deformation and

  18. Combined magnetotelluric and petrologic constrains for the nature of the magma storage system beneath the Late Pleistocene Ciomadul volcano (SE Carpathians)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harangi, S.; Novák, A.; Kiss, B.; Seghedi, I.; Lukács, R.; Szarka, L.; Wesztergom, V.; Metwaly, M.; Gribovszki, K.

    2015-01-01

    The Ciomadul is the youngest volcano of the Carpathian-Pannonian region, which erupted last time at 32 ka. It produced high-K dacitic lava domes and pumiceous pyroclastic rocks. The dacite is crystal-rich and contains plagioclase, amphibole in addition to biotite, titanite, apatite, zircon and occasionally quartz, K-feldspar as well as olivine, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene. There are two groups of amphiboles, characterized by low-Al and high-Al, respectively. They occur in the same samples and also as different zones of the same crystals. Thermobarometric calculations suggest that the low-Al amphiboles were formed from a low temperature (< 800 °C) silicic magma, whereas the high-Al amphiboles crystallized at about 950 °C from a more mafic melt. A near-solidus silicic crystal mush body was stored at 7-14 km depth, where an eruptible magma batch was produced by major reheating (about 200 °C temperature increase) due to the intrusion of hot mafic magma into the silicic magma reservoir. A magnetotelluric survey was performed to reveal whether any melt-bearing magma body could presently reside beneath the volcano. Both the 2D and 3D inversion modeling calculations indicate low electric resistivity values in the depth interval of 5-25 km, just beneath the volcanic centers. This can be interpreted as implying a partially melted zone, i.e. a crystal mush body containing about 5-15% melt fraction. In addition, the 2D modeling calculation indicates also a deeper low resistivity anomaly at 30-40 km depth. The consistent petrologic and magnetotelluric constrains on the magma storage beneath Ciomadul are corroborated by the recent seismic tomography result, which pointed out a low-velocity anomaly at 8-20 km depth zone. Thus, results of independent models suggest the presence of a melt-bearing crystal mush body beneath the seemingly inactive volcano. Since there are implications for long repose periods during the lifetime of the volcano as well as for effective and rapid

  19. An emerging view of the crust and mantle of tectonic North America from EMScope: a mid- term progress review of Earthscope's magnetotelluric program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, A.; Bedrosian, P.; Evans, R.; Egbert, G.; Kelbert, A.; Mickus, K.; Livelybrooks, D.; Park, S.; Patro, P.; Peery, T.; Wannamaker, P.; Unsworth, M.; Weiss, C.; Woodward, B.

    2008-12-01

    EMScope, the MT component of the Earthscope project has completed its final year of infrastructure construction, and its third annual campaign of regional magnetotelluric array operations in the western USA. Seven semi-permanent "backbone" MT observatories have been installed in California, Oregon, Montana, New Mexico, Minnesota, Missouri and Virginia, designed through installation in 2 m deep, insulated underground vaults and with long, buried electric dipole detectors using stable electrodes, to provide extremely long-period magnetotelluric data meant to provide a set of regional, deep structural "anchor points" penetrating into the mid-mantle, in which a series of denser and more uniform regional, transportable MT networks can be tied. A total of 160 "transportable array" MT stations have been occupied in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, northernmost-California, and Montana. These were located on a 70 km quasi-regular grid, with coverage of Cascadia, parts of the Basin and Range, the Rockies and the Snake River Plain, the zone above a putative mantle plume that is hypothesized to serve as the magma source for both the Yellowstone supervolcano and a chain of volcanic features extending westward into Oregon. It is anticipated that in 2009 the transportable array will sweep eastward through the Yellowstone region, following which a set of regional transects at sites of special geodynamic interest will be staged. The transportable array stations are typically occupied for three weeks, providing MT response functions extending from 2-10,000 s or in cases as great as 20,000 s period. These stations are anchored at longer periods (extending as close to 100,000 s periods as possible) by the network of 7 backbone stations, to be operated continuously for up to five years. We present an initial set of 3-d inverse models from the EMScope data sets There is substantial coherence between the resulting 3-d conductivity model and the known boundaries of major physiographic provinces

  20. New Insights into the Structure of the Northern Margin of the India-Asia Collision from Magnetotelluric Data across the Central Altyn Tagh Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Unsworth, M. J.; Jin, S.; Wei, W.; Ye, G.; Jones, A. G.; Jing, J.; Dong, H.; Xie, C.; Le Pape, F.; Vozar, J.; Fang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Altyn Tagh Fault (ATF) is a left-lateral, strike-slip fault that forms the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau and plays a significant role in accommodating the convergence between the colliding Indian and Eurasian plates. As a part of the fourth phase of the INDEPTH project, magnetotelluric (MT) data were collected across the central segment of the ATF to determine the lithospheric-scale structure of the fault system. Dimensionality analyses demonstrated that the MT data can be interpreted using two-dimensional approaches, but some localized 3-D effects are seen. Consequently, both 2-D and 3-D inversions were carried out, and a joint interpretation was made on the basis of these two types of models. Inversion models revealed two major conductors beneath the Qaidam Basin (QB) and Altyn Tagh Range (ATR), respectively. The conductive region beneath the QB was interpreted as a ductile layer in the lower crust to upper mantle that might represent flow beneath the western margin of the QB, whereas the large scale south-dipping conductor beneath the ATR is interpreted as a region with high fluid content formed by metamorphism associated with the oblique underthrusting of the Tarim Block beneath the northern Tibetan Plateau. These fluids migrate upward through the fault system and have formed serpentinized zones in the crust. Combining these interpretations, a structural model compatible with diverse geophysical observations is proposed, in which we suggest the competing end-member rigid block model and continuum model are reconcilable with the continuum model locally dominant for the study region, as evidenced by a thickened crust. * This work was funded by National Natural Science Foundation of China (41404060, 40974058, 40904025) and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (2652014016). Reference:Zhang, L., Unsworth, M., Jin, S., Wei, W., Ye, G., Jones, A.G., Jing, J., Dong, H., Xie, C., Le Pape, F., Vozar, J., 2015. Structure of the Central

  1. Comparison of United States and British Methods for Testing Plastic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-01

    an ASTM Cantilever Method for Stiffness. 29 ignn MMtMuiaMi^JI m^ ’"■ ^ipp" "WRur 12. Melt Flow Index of Thermoplastics (NOTE: It would be...better to call this heading "Flow Properties of Thermoplastics" because some of the methods described are not strictly melt flow indexes.) L ASTM D...is particularly useful for quality control tests in thermoplastics having relatively low melt viscosities. Procedure A - a manual cut-off operation

  2. A target-oriented magnetotelluric inversion approach for characterizing the low enthalpy Groß Schönebeck geothermal reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, G.; Ritter, O.; Moeck, I.

    2010-12-01

    Electrical conductivity is a key parameter for the exploration and characterization of geothermal reservoirs as hot mineralized formation water of active geothermal areas usually exhibits significantly higher conductivity than the surrounding host rock. Here we present results of a magnetotelluric (MT) exploration experiment carried out in the vicinity of the Groß Schönebeck geothermal test site in Northern Germany, where a doublet system of two 4.3-km deep boreholes was drilled to establish an in situ laboratory to investigate the potential for geothermal energy production. Classical 2-D smooth inversion of the MT data, recorded along two profiles, reveals a shallow conductive structure in good agreement with information from regional geology and seismic images. However, at the northernmost part of the profiles, the conductivity models reveal deep-reaching conductive structures, which appear uncorrelated with existing (geophysical or geological) data. Incorporating information from seismics as independent constraints for MT inversions allows us to examine the model space rigorously but target oriented. Employing so-called tear-zone inversions we can effectively derive an alternative class of models, which are consistent with the MT observations but also with the other data sets. We speculate that the zones of high conductivity imaged at reservoir depth are related areas of reduced thickness of the overlaying evapourite layer. The enhanced conductivity can be explained by a higher fracture density in anhydritic layers and/or generally lower resistivity of the pore fluid.

  3. 2D magnetotelluric imaging of the Anqing-Guichi ore district, Yangtze metallogenic belt, eastern China: An insight into the crustal structure and tectonic units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangbin; Yan, Jiayong

    2016-08-01

    Two parallel NW-trending magnetotelluric (MT) profiles were placed perpendicularly to the main structures of the Anqing-Guichi ore district, one of the seven ore districts in the middle-lower Yangtze River metallogenic belt of eastern China. In October-December 2013, the MT data acquisition was carried out at 117 sites with 0.5-1 km site spacing. The MT data has a good quality in the frequency range between 320 and 0.01 Hz. The dimensionality analysis and 2D resistivity inversion results indicate that: (1) the deep of the ore district with three-dimensional structural characteristics, but two-dimensional structural characteristics for shallow; (2) there is a clear correlation between resistivity and the main geological units of the ore district, as well as correlation with mapped surface faults; (3) the Gandan deep fault (GDF) and Jiangnan deep fault (JNF) extend from the surface to 10 km deep, with dip of NW45°, and dip angles larger than 60°. A series of NE-trending acidic intrusive rocks were controlled by the GDF.

  4. A preliminary electrical image of the passive continental margin at the Kaoko Belt in Northern Namibia and the Walvis Ridge derived from an amphibian magnetotelluric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapinos, Gerhard; Weckmann, Ute; Ritter, Oliver; Jegen-Kulcsar, Marion

    2013-04-01

    Imaging the subsurface electrical conductivity structure and studying the magmatic and tectonic processes occurred during the breakup of the supercontinent Gondwana, are objectives of the amphibian magnetotelluric (MT) investigations of the Southern African passive continental margin in Northern Namibia. The onshore experiment consists of 167 sites in a ~140 km wide and ~260 km long EW trending corridor from the Atlantic Ocean onto the Congo Craton across the major tectono-stratigraphic units of the Kaoko Belt. It was extended offshore by measurements along two transects parallel and perpendicular to the Walvis Ridge. The MT data are generally of a high quality but large diagonal components of impedance tensor, phases over 90° at some sites and a strong variability of transfer functions within short distances indicate three-dimensional structures in the crust and upper mantle. Such 3D effects are observed particularly in the Western Kaoko Zone in the vicinity of the prominent Neoproterozoic shear zones (Purros Mylonite Zone, Three Palm Mylonite Zone). Thus, we apply a two-part inversion strategy: In areas and frequency ranges where the 3D effects are not dominant, we apply 2D inversion of data sub-sets in order to identify the prominent conductivity features and assess their resolution and robustness; however, the entire data set can only be explained by 3D inversion. The 2D models of the crust beneath the profile from the Walvis Ridge onto the Congo Craton reveal a spatial correlation of resistive zones with the Archean Craton and the Northern Platform. Zones of high electrical conductivity seem to correlate with surface expressions of prominent faults of the Kaoko Belt. First 3D inversion models will complement the 2D results.

  5. 3-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor computers - Part II: direct data-space inverse solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    Following the creation described in Part I of a deformable edge finite-element simulator for 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) responses using direct solvers, in Part II we develop an algorithm named HexMT for 3-D regularized inversion of MT data including topography. Direct solvers parallelized on large-RAM, symmetric multiprocessor (SMP) workstations are used also for the Gauss-Newton model update. By exploiting the data-space approach, the computational cost of the model update becomes much less in both time and computer memory than the cost of the forward simulation. In order to regularize using the second norm of the gradient, we factor the matrix related to the regularization term and apply its inverse to the Jacobian, which is done using the MKL PARDISO library. For dense matrix multiplication and factorization related to the model update, we use the PLASMA library which shows very good scalability across processor cores. A synthetic test inversion using a simple hill model shows that including topography can be important; in this case depression of the electric field by the hill can cause false conductors at depth or mask the presence of resistive structure. With a simple model of two buried bricks, a uniform spatial weighting for the norm of model smoothing recovered more accurate locations for the tomographic images compared to weightings which were a function of parameter Jacobians. We implement joint inversion for static distortion matrices tested using the Dublin secret model 2, for which we are able to reduce nRMS to ˜1.1 while avoiding oscillatory convergence. Finally we test the code on field data by inverting full impedance and tipper MT responses collected around Mount St Helens in the Cascade volcanic chain. Among several prominent structures, the north-south trending, eruption-controlling shear zone is clearly imaged in the inversion.

  6. 3-D magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on SMP computers - Part I: forward problem and parameter Jacobians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm, which we call HexMT, for 3-D simulation and inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) responses using deformable hexahedral finite elements that permit incorporation of topography. Direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP), single-chassis workstations with large RAM are used throughout, including the forward solution, parameter Jacobians and model parameter update. In Part I, the forward simulator and Jacobian calculations are presented. We use first-order edge elements to represent the secondary electric field (E), yielding accuracy O(h) for E and its curl (magnetic field). For very low frequencies or small material admittivities, the E-field requires divergence correction. With the help of Hodge decomposition, the correction may be applied in one step after the forward solution is calculated. This allows accurate E-field solutions in dielectric air. The system matrix factorization and source vector solutions are computed using the MKL PARDISO library, which shows good scalability through 24 processor cores. The factorized matrix is used to calculate the forward response as well as the Jacobians of electromagnetic (EM) field and MT responses using the reciprocity theorem. Comparison with other codes demonstrates accuracy of our forward calculations. We consider a popular conductive/resistive double brick structure, several synthetic topographic models and the natural topography of Mount Erebus in Antarctica. In particular, the ability of finite elements to represent smooth topographic slopes permits accurate simulation of refraction of EM waves normal to the slopes at high frequencies. Run-time tests of the parallelized algorithm indicate that for meshes as large as 176 × 176 × 70 elements, MT forward responses and Jacobians can be calculated in ˜1.5 hr per frequency. Together with an efficient inversion parameter step described in Part II, MT inversion problems of 200-300 stations are computable with total run times

  7. Three-dimensional Magnetotelluric Inversion and Model Validation with Potential Field Data and Seismics for the Central Portion of Parana Sedimentary Basin in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Terra, E. F.; Fontes, S. L.; Taveira, D. T.; Miquelutti, L. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Paraná basin, on the central-south region of the South American Plate, is one of the biggest South American intracratonic basins. It is composed by Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments, which were covered by the enormous Cretaceous flood basalts, associated with the rifting of Gondwana and the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean. Its depocenter region, with a maximum estimated depth of just over 7000 m, was crossed by three magnetotelluric - MT profiles proposed by the Brazilian Petroleum Agency (ANP) aimed at better characterizing its geological structure, as the seismic images are very poor. The data include about 350 MT broadband soundings spanning from 1000 Hz down to 2,000 s. The MT data were processed using robust techniques and remote reference. Static shift observed in some stations were corrected based on Transient Electromagnetic - TEM measurements at each site. These models were integrated to existent gravity, magnetic and seismic data for a more comprehensive interpretation of the region. A pilot 3D model has also been constructed on a crustal scale covering the study area using four frequencies per decade in the 3D inversion scheme proposed by Siripunvaraporn et al. (2005). The inversion scheme produced a reliable model and the observations were adequately reproduced, with observed fitting particularly better for the deeper structures related to basement compared to the 2D results. The main features in the conductivity model correspond to known geological features. These included the conductivity structures obtained for the upper crust, i.e. the sedimentary sequences, underlain by more resistive material, assumed to be basement. Local resistive features in the near-surface are associated to volcanic basalts covering the sediments. Some highly resistivity horizontal and vertical bodies were associated to volcanic intrusion like dikes and sills. We observed depressions on basement consistent with half-graben structures possibly filled with sandstones.

  8. Conductivity model of the passive continental margin derived from an amphibian magnetotelluric study on the Walvis Ridge and at the Kaoko Belt in Northern Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckmann, U.; Kapinos, G.; Ritter, O.; Jegen, M.

    2013-12-01

    The magnetotelluric (MT) study is a part of the interdisciplinary SAMPLE project investigating processes related to the breakup of supercontinent Gondwana and the post breakup evolution of the passive continental margins of Africa and South America. We present an electrical conductivity image from the Southern African passive continental margin, derived from an amphibian MT experiment crossing the entire Kaoko Belt in Northern Namibia and the Walvis Ridge in the Atlantic Ocean. The MT data at 167 onshore sites are generally of a high quality but large diagonal components of impedance tensor, phases over 90° at some sites and a strong variability of transfer functions within short distances indicate three-dimensional structures in the crust and upper mantle. Such 3D effects are observed particularly in the Western Kaoko Zone in the vicinity of the prominent Neoproterozoic shear zones. Thus, we apply a two-part inversion strategy: In areas and frequency ranges where the 3D effects are not dominant, we apply 2D inversion of data sub-sets in order to identify the prominent conductivity features and assess their resolution and robustness; however, the entire data set can only be explained by 3D inversion. The 2D models of the crust beneath the profile from the Walvis Ridge onto the Congo Craton reveal a spatial correlation of resistive zones with the cratonic Northern Platform. Zones of high electrical conductivity seem to correlate with surface expressions of prominent faults such as the Purros Mylonite Zone and the Three Palm Mylonite Zone of the Kaoko Belt. Outcropping Etendeka flood basalts in the Western Kaoko Zones correlate with zones of high resistivity. The offshore part of the models shows a thin conductive layer corresponding to sea floor sediments. Interestingly, the Walvis Ridge exhibits a more resistive and deeper reaching seafloor compared to what typically is expected from oceanic crust. These results are complemented by 3D inversion, which generally

  9. Subsurface structure and stratigraphy of the northwest end of the Turkana Basin, Northern Kenya Rift, as revealed by magnetotellurics and gravity joint inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelfettah, Yassine; Tiercelin, Jean-Jacques; Tarits, Pascal; Hautot, Sophie; Maia, Marcia; Thuo, Peter

    2016-07-01

    In order to understand the subsurface stratigraphy and structure of the northwest end of the Turkana Basin, Northern Kenya Rift, we used 2-D joint inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) and gravity data acquired along 3 profiles perpendicular to the main Murua Rith-Lapur Rift Border Fault. The regional geology is characterized by a basement of Precambrian age overlain by a ≤500-m thick sandstone formation named the Lapur Sandstone of upper Cretaceous-lower Eocene in age, covered by thick rhyolitic and basaltic lavas of late Eocene-middle Miocene age, known as the "Turkana Volcanics". Final interpretation of the resistivity and density models, until 5 km depth, obtained by the joint inversion approach confirms the previous general knowledge about the half-graben geometry of the northern part of the Turkana Basin. The main Murua Rith-Lapur Rift Border Fault is well identified by both gravity and MT. At least, two other important secondary faults without surface expression are also identified. A new small half-graben basin, named the Kachoda Basin, parallel to the main Turkana Basin and filled by 1.5 km of sediments, has been also characterized. This study also highlights strong thickness variations of the three main geological units that could be expected in the subsurface of the Turkana Basin. For example, the sedimentary Nachukui and Kibish Formations reach up to >3 km in thickness at the eastern end of the north and central profiles. Lateral variations of the topography of the Precambrian basement are also evidenced. Conceptual geological models, which result from the combination of the obtained density and resistivity models as well as from geological and reflection seismic data, are proposed. In such an area of intensive and promising oil exploration, these models are essential in terms of identification of reservoirs, source rocks and trapping mechanisms.

  10. Semiautomatic approaches to account for 3-D distortion of the electric field from local, near-surface structures in 3-D resistivity inversions of 3-D regional magnetotelluric data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2017-03-31

    This report summarizes the results of three-dimensional (3-D) resistivity inversion simulations that were performed to account for local 3-D distortion of the electric field in the presence of 3-D regional structure, without any a priori information on the actual 3-D distribution of the known subsurface geology. The methodology used a 3-D geologic model to create a 3-D resistivity forward (“known”) model that depicted the subsurface resistivity structure expected for the input geologic configuration. The calculated magnetotelluric response of the modeled resistivity structure was assumed to represent observed magnetotelluric data and was subsequently used as input into a 3-D resistivity inverse model that used an iterative 3-D algorithm to estimate 3-D distortions without any a priori geologic information. A publicly available inversion code, WSINV3DMT, was used for all of the simulated inversions, initially using the default parameters, and subsequently using adjusted inversion parameters. A semiautomatic approach of accounting for the static shift using various selections of the highest frequencies and initial models was also tested. The resulting 3-D resistivity inversion simulation was compared to the “known” model and the results evaluated. The inversion approach that produced the lowest misfit to the various local 3-D distortions was an inversion that employed an initial model volume resistivity that was nearest to the maximum resistivities in the near-surface layer.

  11. MM&T Program to Establish Production Techniques for the Automatic Detection and Qualification of Trace Elements Present in the Production of Microwave Semiconductors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    upgraded by an of several methods Including reverse osmosis and dialysis , and finally polished to the theoretical limit of purity. for the measured...normally drawn through a capillary tube by a negative pressure created by the Venturi effect of the aspirator. The aspiration rate was controlled by...exit slit may be more than 50 to 75 percent of the total intensity falling upon the photo- multiplier tube . In making accurate measurements in the parts

  12. Structural influence on the evolution of the pre-Eonile drainage system of southern Egypt: Insights from magnetotelluric and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Jeff; Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Atekwana, Estella; El-Qady, Gad; Tarabees, Elhamy Aly

    2011-12-01

    The Wadi Kubbaniya in the Western Desert of Egypt north of the City of Aswan has been interpreted as the downstream continuation of the Wadi Abu Subeira, comprising an ancient W- and NW-flowing river system originating from the Precambrian crystalline rocks of the Red Sea Hills which were uplifted during the Miocene in association with the opening of the Red Sea. This drainage system is thought to have been active before the onset of the N-flowing Egyptian Nile which started ˜6 Ma with the Eonile phase; an event that resulted in carving of ˜1000 km long canyon (the Eonile canyon) extending from the Mediterranean Sea in the north to Aswan in the south due to the Messinian Salinity Crisis. This study utilizes geophysical data to examine the role of regional tectonics and local structures in controlling the evolution of the pre-Eonile drainage system. Magnetotelluric (MT) and gravity surveys were conducted along two ˜5 km-long profiles across the NW-trending Wadi Kubbaniya. Two-dimensional (2D) inversion of MT data and gravity models indicate the Wadi Kubbaniya is filled with loosely-consolidated sandstone and conglomerate that extend to a depth of ˜150-200 m into Cretaceous sandstone formations which overlie Precambrian crystalline rocks. These results were evaluated in terms of two end-member models; an incision model in which the 150-200 m thick sedimentary rocks were considered as being deposited within an incised valley that was carved into bedrock, or a structural model in which the sedimentary rocks are considered as filling a NW-trending graben controlled by normal faults that deform the Cretaceous sandstone formations and the underlying Precambrian crystalline rocks. Geological observations as well as supporting seismic data favor the interpretation that the Wadi Kubbaniya is a NW-trending graben similar to other extensional structures found 400 km northwest along-strike of Wadi Kubbaniya. These structures are impressively parallel to the western

  13. Implications for the lithospheric geometry of the Iapetus suture beneath Ireland based on electrical resistivity models from deep-probing magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, C. K.; Jones, Alan G.; Moorkamp, Max; Weckmann, Ute

    2014-08-01

    Broad-band and long period magnetotelluric (MT) data were acquired at 39 stations along five NNW-SSE profiles crossing the Iapetus Suture Zone (ISZ) in Ireland. Regional strike analyses indicate that the vast majority of the MT data is consistent with an assumption of a 2-D geo-electric strike direction. Strike is N52°E for the three easternmost profiles and N75°E for the two westernmost profiles; these directions correlate well with the observed predominant geological strike of the study region. 2-D inversions of the galvanic distortion-corrected TE and TM mode data from each profile are shown and discussed. As mapped geological variations between the neighbouring profiles suggest a heterogeneous subsurface, it is important to verify the robustness of the presence and geometries of prominent conductivity anomalies by employing 3-D forward and inverse modelling. A high conductivity layer (resistivity of 1-10 Ωm), found at middle to lower crustal depths and presumed to be indicative of metamorphosed graphitic sediments rich in sulphides deposited during the convergence of the Laurentian and Avalonian continents, essentially constitutes the electrical signature of the ISZ. Shallow conductors observed are probably due to black shales that were widely deposited within the sedimentary accretionary wedge during Ordovician time. We interpret the moderately low resistivity at shallow depths from west to east across Ireland as indicative of an increase in maturity of the black shales in the easterly direction. From our conductivity models the southern extent of the ISZ is inferred to lie between the Navan Silvermines Fault and the Navan Tipperary Line, and shows clear resistivity contrast along all the profiles at the southern MT stations. The change in resistivity deduced from the 2-D models is spatially related to the composition of Lower Palaeozoic Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian and Carboniferous rocks. At upper mantle depths of about 60 km, a high conductivity block

  14. Understanding hydrothermal circulation patterns at a low-enthalpy thermal spring using audio-magnetotelluric data: A case study from Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Sarah; Henry, Tiernan; Muller, Mark R.; Jones, Alan G.; Moore, John Paul; Murray, John; Campanyà, Joan; Vozar, Jan; Walsh, John; Rath, Volker

    2016-09-01

    Kilbrook spring is a thermal spring in east-central Ireland. The temperatures in the spring are the highest recorded for any thermal spring in Ireland (maximum of 25 °C). The temperature is elevated with respect to average Irish groundwater temperatures (9.5-10.5 °C), and represents a geothermal energy potential, which is currently under evaluation. A multi-disciplinary investigation based upon an audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) survey, and hydrochemical analysis including time-lapse temperature and chemistry measurements, has been undertaken with the aims of investigating the provenance of the thermal groundwater and characterising the geological structures facilitating groundwater circulation in the bedrock. The three-dimensional (3-D) electrical resistivity model of the subsurface at Kilbrook spring was obtained by the inversion of AMT impedances and vertical magnetic transfer functions. The model is interpreted alongside high resolution temperature and electrical conductivity measurements, and a previous hydrochemical analysis. The hydrochemical analysis and time-lapse measurements suggest that the thermal waters have a relatively stable temperature and major ion hydrochemistry, and flow within the limestones of the Carboniferous Dublin Basin at all times. The 3-D resistivity model of the subsurface reveals a prominent NNW aligned structure within a highly resistive limestone lithology that is interpreted as a dissolutionally enhanced strike-slip fault, of Cenozoic age. The karstification of this structure, which extends to depths of at least 500 m directly beneath the spring, has provided conduits that facilitate the operation of a relatively deep hydrothermal circulation pattern (likely estimated depths between 560 and 1000 m) within the limestone succession of the Dublin Basin. The results of this study support the hypothesis that the winter thermal maximum and simultaneous increased discharge at Kilbrook spring is the result of rapid infiltration, heating and

  15. Topographic effect in marine magnetotelluric data and implications to the electrical conductivity structure of the mantle beneath the Tristan da Cunha hotspot area in southern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, K.; Chen, J.; Jegen, M. D.; Utada, H.; Kammann, J.; Geissler, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Kiyoshi Baba1,2, Jin Chen2, Marion Jegen2, Hisashi Utada1, Janina Kammann3, and Wolfram H. Geissler4 1. Earthquake Research Institute, The University of Tokyo2. GEOMAR, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel3. University of Hamburg4. Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine ResearchTristan da Cunha Island is one of the hot spots in the Atlantic Ocean. The discussion about its source have not reached consensus yet whether it is in shallow asthenosphere or deeper mantle, because of lack of the geophysical observations in the area. A marine magnetotelluric (MT) experiment was conducted together with seismological observations in the area in 2012-2013 by collaboration between Germany and Japan, in order to give further constraints on the physical state of the mantle beneath the area. A total of 26 seafloor stations were deployed around the Tristan da Cunha islands and available data were retrieved from 23 stations. The MT responses were estimated for those available sites. The detailed data processing will be presented by Chen et al. in this meeting. In this study, we report on the topographic effect on the observed MT responses. During the cruises for seafloor instruments deployment and recovery, detailed bathymetry data were collected around the stations by onboard multi-narrow beam echo sounding (MBES) system. We compiled the MBES data and ETOPO1 data to incorporate the local and regional topography. Then, we applied iterative topographic effect correction and one-dimensional (1-D) conductivity structure inversion. The MT responses of each station were simulated by three-dimensional (3-D) forward modeling. Preliminary results show the overall feature of the observed MT responses at some stations were qualitatively well explained by the seafloor topography included in the conductivity structure model over the 1-D mantle structure. An extreme example is the station near the Tristan da Cunha Island. The impedance phases varies ~300 degrees in

  16. Magnetotelluric and audiomagnetotelluric groundwater survey along the Humu'ula portion of Saddle Road near and around the Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, Herbert A.; Thomas, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    The Pohakuloa Training Area (PTA), operated by the U.S. Army on the Big Island of Hawaii, is in need of a reliable potable water supply to sustain ongoing operations by staff and trainees. In an effort to acquire baseline hydrologic data with which to develop a plan for providing that water, a series of magnetotelluric (MT) geophysical surveys was performed that spanned the Mauna Loa/Mauna Kea Saddle region of Hawaii Island. These surveys provided electrical resistivity profiles and resistivity maps at several elevations along the axis of the field measurements that can be interpreted to yield information on the depth to the water table. In 2004 a preliminary sequence of 23 audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) soundings was collected along Saddle Road extending from the Waikii Ranch area, west of the PTA, to Department of Hawaiian Home Lands Humu'ula properties east of the Mauna Kea access road. The results of those soundings showed that highly resistive rocks, consistent with dry basalts, were present to depths of at least one kilometer, the maximum depth to which the AMT technique can reliably reach in Hawaii's rocks. A second survey was conducted in 2008 using MT instruments capable of recovering resistivity data to depths of several kilometers below sea level where saturated formations are known to exist. A total of 30 MT soundings was performed along a roughly east to west transect that extended from the (recently acquired) Keamuku PTA lands on the west to as far as the County of Hawaii's upper Kaumana water supply well to the east. Inversion and processing of the field data yielded an electrical cross-section following the Saddle that roughly parallels the geologic contact between the Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa lavas. Several additional electrical sections were constructed normal to the main transect to investigate the three-dimensional nature of the contact. These resistivity data and models suggest that the elevation of saturated rock in places are 400 to 600 meters

  17. A novel solution blending method for using olive oil and corn oil as plasticizers in chitosan based organoclay nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Giannakas, A; Patsaoura, A; Barkoula, N-M; Ladavos, A

    2017-02-10

    In the current study a novel reflux-solution blending method is being followed with the introduction of small ethanol volumes into chitosan acetic acid aquatic solution in order to incorporate olive oil and corn oil in chitosan and its organoclay nanocomposites. Ethanol enables the direct interaction of chitosan with oils and results in effective plasticization of chitosan/oil films with remarkable increase of the strain at break from 8% of chitosan and chitosan/oil aquatic samples to app. 22% for chitosan/oil ethanol samples. Compared with olive oil, corn oil is less effective as plasticizer (max strain at break app. 14%). Addition of oils is beneficial for water sorption, water vapor permeability and oxygen permeability response of the obtained films. Barrier properties are further improved after the use of OrgMMT, however OrgMMT results in significant reduction of strain at break of all oil containing samples (app. 8%) acting as stress concentrator upon deformation.

  18. STS-114: Discovery Post MMT Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Bruce Buckingham from NASA Public Affairs introduces the panel who consists of: Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Program Deputy Manager; John Muratore, Manager, Space Shuttle Systems and Integration; and Mike Wetmore, Director of Shuttle Processing. Hale begins with a video presentation of the point sensor box (black box) and discusses the troubleshooting plans that are in place to fix the low level fuel sensor inside the External Tank of the Space Shuttle Discovery. Muratore talks about exploring conditions that may be causing the problem and Wetmore discusses completing scrub securing. Questions from the news media pertaining to solutions to the sensor problem, risks involved, and anomalies are addressed.

  19. MM&T for VHSIC Multichip Packages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-20

    360 10 360 12 464 450 452 447 481 447 447 442 486 486 AYI 17 27 17 25 480 462 461 450 486 448 461 444 492 494 AY2 334 2 334 6 372 352 353 345 350 347 ...edges of (CLK/ WEJ required to exit Reset state. X H L L L Halt Cycle: In pipelined mode, AO-A12, CS. CTO- CT2 values ae repeated from the previous

  20. STS-114: Discovery Post MMT Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Bruce Buckingham of NASA Public Affairs hosted this press conference. Wayne Hill, Space Shuttle Deputy Program Manager; John Muratore, Shuttle Systems and Integration Manager; Mike Wetmore, Director for Shuttle Processing were present. Wayne started with a video from Shuttle Logistics Depot showing details of a point sensor box commonly named the black box. Work with the trouble shooting continues on a day to day basis, no definite launching date is set. John reports that they are in a mission support mode all over the country until the sensor problem is solved. Mike reports his team will complete scrub and securing tasks through the next day, restore the facility to its normal mode, and will start to a four day process of getting back to launch once trouble shooting is completed. Tanking test, thermal environment, problem identification, engine cut-off sensor problems, sensors, risk, design reviews, test and analysis, correlation of the problem with Columbia, are some of the topics covered with the News media.

  1. STS-114: Discovery Post MMT Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Bruce Buckingham, NASA Public Affairs hosted this conference. Bill Parsons, Space Shuttle Program Manager; John Muratore, Shuttle System and Integration Manager; Mike Wetmore, Shuttle Processing Director were present. The Panel summarizes that thorough effort of analysis and test techniques and great amount of work is being done to fix the sensor problem and will be ready to call the stations for a launch countdown process after the trouble shooting is fully completed. Launch time, grounding problem, sensor failure, trouble shooting, tanking test, pin swap, and heaters were topics covered with the News media. For clarification, Bruce Buckingham provided information that preferred launch time is at 10:39am on July 26, Eastern Time.

  2. STS-114: Discovery Post MMT Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    On flight day 13, Leroy Cain, STS-114 Ascent/Entry Flight Director, discusses the condition of the Space Shuttle Discovery, and the weather outlook for landing. He answers questions from the news media about his feelings about re-entry since the Columbia tragedy, possible new information during re-entry, critical moments in the Mission Control Room during landing, and differences between night landing and day landing. Footage of the Mission Control Room and a talk with Soichi Noguchi in orbit is shown. Also, footage of the truss structure of the International Space Station, Destiny Laboratory, crew cabin of Discovery, and the Orbiter Docking System linked up to forward docking port on Discovery is shown. Eileen Collins and Wendy Lawrence are shown in the flight deck of Discovery. Charles Camarda is also shown in the mid-deck. Downlink television from Discovery shows spacewalk choreographer Andy Thomas with Stephen Robinson and Soichi Noguchi preparing for depressurization and pre-breathing activities that will lead to the opening of the hatch. The installation of a replacement GPS antenna, images of the port wing of Discovery and Canadarm moving with the Orbital Boom Sensor System (OBSS) extension is shown.

  3. MM&T Advanced Balancing/Machining

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    cou~puter control. Preliminary low cycle fatigue testing showed no major differences be ~ween laser irradiated test bars anid hand ground and burnished... test bars. 2C OISTRIBUTIONIAVAILAOILITY OF ABSTRACT 21 ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION ~UNCLASSI FIE DIUNLIMITED 0 SAME AS RPT. C3 OTIC USERS...SAEP provided AGT1500 impellers and Lycoming fatigue specifmens for testing during the various stages of the system development. 6 ARL integrated laser

  4. STS-114: Discovery Post MMT Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    George Diller, NASA Public Affairs, introduces the panel who consist of: Bill Parsons, Space Shuttle Program Manager; Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Deputy Program Manager; Ed Mango, Deputy Manager JSC Orbiter Project Office; and Mike Wetmore, Director of Shuttle Processing. Bill Parsons begins by expressing that he is still searching for the problem with the low level fuel sensor inside the external tank. Hale talks about more ambient tests that will be performed to fix this problem. Mango expresses his findings from tests in the aft engine compartment, point sensor box, orbiter wiring, and wire resistance. He also talks about looking in detail into the circuit analysis of the point sensor box. Questions from the news media about tanking tests and extending the launch window are addressed.

  5. A Mixed-methods Evaluation of the Feasibility, Acceptability and Preliminary Efficacy of a Mobile Intervention for Methadone Maintenance Clients

    PubMed Central

    Guarino, Honoria; Acosta, Michelle; Marsch, Lisa A.; Xie, Haiyi; Aponte-Melendez, Yesenia

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recent explosion of behavioral health interventions delivered on mobile devices, little is known about factors that make such applications practical, engaging and useful to their target audience. This study reports on the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary efficacy of a prototype of a novel, interactive mobile psychosocial intervention to reduce problematic drug use among clients in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). A mixed-methods pilot study with new MMT clients (n=25) indicated that the mobile intervention approach was feasible, and that participants found the intervention highly acceptable and useful. On 100-point visual analog scale (VAS) items, participants reported high levels of liking the program (M=75.6), and endorsed it as useful (M=77.5), easy to use (M=80.7), and containing a significant amount of new information (M=74.8). When compared with 25 study participants who received standard MMT alone, pilot participants rated their treatment significantly higher in interestingness and usefulness, and were significantly more satisfied with their treatment. In qualitative interviews, participants reported using the mobile intervention in a range of settings, including during times of heightened risk for substance use, and finding it helpful in managing drug cravings. Additionally, pilot participants showed evidence of increased treatment retention and abstinence from illicit opioids (in terms of effect size) over a 3-month period relative to those in standard MMT, suggesting the application’s potential to enhance treatment outcomes. These promising findings suggest that an evidence-based mobile therapeutic tool addressing substance use may appeal to drug treatment clients and have clinical utility as an adjunct to formal treatment. PMID:26618796

  6. A magnetotelluric investigation of the Scandinavian Caledonides in western Jämtland, Sweden, using the COSC borehole logs as prior information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ping; Garcia Juanatey, Maria A.; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Juhlin, Christopher; Hedin, Peter; Savvaidis, Alexandros; Lorenz, Henning; Kück, Jochem

    2017-03-01

    In connection with the Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides (COSC) project, broad-band magnetotelluric (MT) data were acquired at 78 stations along a recent ca. 55-km-long NW-SE directed reflection seismic profile (referred to as the COSC Seismic Profile; CSP), with the eastern end located ˜30 km to the west of the orogenic Caledonian front. The MT component of the project aims at (i) delineating the highly conductive (˜0.1 Ω ṡ m) alum shales that are associated with an underlying main décollement and (ii) calibrating the MT model to borehole logs. Strike and distortion analyses of the MT data show a 3-D structure in the western 10 km of the profile around the 2.5 km deep COSC-1 borehole (IGSN: ICDP5054EHW1001) and a preferred strike angle of N34°E in the central and eastern parts of the profile. 2-D modelling of MT impedances was tested using different inversion schemes and parameters. To adjust the resistivity structure locally around the borehole, resistivity logging data from COSC-1 were successfully employed as prior constraints in the 2-D MT inversions. Compared with the CSP, the model inverted from the determinant impedances shows the highest level of structural similarity. A shallow resistor (>1000 Ω ṡ m) in the top 2-3 km depth underneath the western most 10 km of the profile around COSC-1 corresponds to a zone of high seismic reflectivity, and a boundary at less than 1 km depth where the resistivity decreases rapidly from >100 to <1 Ω ṡ m in the central and eastern parts of the profile coincides with the first seismic reflections. The depth to this boundary is well constrained as shown by 1-D inversions of the MT data from five selected sites and it decreases towards the Caledonian front in the east. Underneath the easternmost part of the profile, the MT data show evidence of a second deeper conductor (resistivity <1 Ω ṡ m) at >3 km depth. Based upon the COSC-1 borehole logs, the CSP reflection seismic image, and the surface

  7. Regional conductivity structures of the northwestern segment of the North American Plate derived from 3-D inversion of USArray magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meqbel, N. M.; Egbert, G. D.; Kelbert, A.

    2010-12-01

    Long period (10-20,000 s) magnetotelluric (MT) data are being acquired in a series of temporary arrays deployed across the continental United States through EMScope, a component of EarthScope, a multidisciplinary decade-long project to study the structure and evolution of the North American Continent. MT deployments in 2006-2010 have so far acquired data at 237 sites on an approximately regular grid, with the same nominal spacing as the USArray broadband seismic transportable array (~70 km), covering the Northwestern US, from the Oregon-Washington coast across the Rocky Mountains, into Montana and Wyoming. Preliminary 3-D inversion results (Patro and Egbert; 2008), based on data from the 110 westernmost “Cascadia” sites collected in the first two years, revealed extensive areas of high conductivity in the lower crust beneath the Northwest Basin and Range (NBR), inferred to result from fluids (including possibly partial melt at depth) associated with magmatic underplating, and beneath the Cascade Mountains, probably due to fluids released by the subducting Juan de Fuca slab. Here we extend this study, refining and further testing the preliminary results from Cascadia, and extending the inversion domain to the East, to include all of the EarthScope data. Although site spacing is very broad, distinct regional structures are clearly evident even in simple maps of apparent resistivity, phase and induction vectors. For the 3-D inversion we are using the parallelized version of our recently developed Modular Code (ModEM), which supports Non-Linear Conjugate Gradient and several Gauss-Newton type schemes. Our initial 3-D inversion results using 212 MT sites, fitting impedances and vertical field transfer functions (together and separately) suggest several conductive and resistive structures which appear to be stable and required by the measured data. These include: - A conductive structure elongated in the N-S direction underneath the volcanic arc of the Cascadia

  8. Methods for enhancing mapping of thermal fronts in oil recovery

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1984-03-30

    A method for enhancing the resistivity contrasts of a thermal front in an oil recovery production field as measured by the controlled source audio frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) technique is disclosed. This method includes the steps of: (1) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field; (2) introducing a solution of a dopant material into the production field at a concentration effective to alter the resistivity associated with the thermal front; said dopant material having a high cation exchange capacity which might be selected from the group consisting of montmorillonite, illite, and chlorite clays; said material being soluble in the conate water of the production field; (3) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field while said dopant material is moving therethrough; and (4) mathematically comparing the maps from step (1) and step (3) to determine the location of the thermal front. This method is effective with the steam flood, fire flood and water flood techniques.

  9. Realizing 2D magnetotelluric inversion in the case of divergent geoelectric strike directions in the crust and mantle - Case study using synthetic models and real data from the Tajo Basin (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoldt, J.; Jones, A. G.; Muller, M. R.; Kiyan, D.; Hogg, C.; Rosell, O.

    2010-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) inversions of magnetotelluric (MT) data are presently far more commonly used than three-dimensional (3D) inversions as they still significantly outperform 3D inversions in terms of speed, thus allowing for much better resolution of the subsurface through a larger feasible number of grid cells. The suitability of 2D inversion needs thereby to be tested for cases where the electric resistivity structure of the subsurface is potentially 3D to some extent. One particular case of a 3D subsurface structure consists of lateral interfaces with varying orientations at crustal and mantle depths. Such a case might emerge, for instance, where crustal faulting, originating from present day tectonics, is situated above a mantle where structures are dominated by earlier or current plate tectonic processes. Those plate tectonic processes could comprise continental collision from an oblique direction, or lattice preferred orientation in the lithosphere-asthenosphere transition zone due to an oblique relative motion between lithosphere and asthenosphere. Whereas recovery of crustal structures can usually be achieved in a straightforward manner by confining the modelled frequency range to the crustal depths, deriving mantle structures is more challenging. Different approaches for this case have been investigated here using synthetic model studies as well as inversion of a real MT dataset collected in southern Spain as part of the PICASSO fieldwork campaign. The PICASSO project intends to enhance knowledge about the geological setting of the Alboran Domain beneath the western Mediterranean Sea and its surrounding regions, and through that knowledge to understand processes related to continent-continent collision. The Iberian Peninsula is the focus of the first phase of DIAS’s PICASSO efforts, and comprised a magnetotelluric profile crossing the Tajo Basin and Betics Cordillera. Analyses of MT responses and seismic tomography data indicate varying geologic strike

  10. Metasomatism and current state of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field constrained by trace element modelling and magnetotelluric survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klébesz, Rita; Patkó, Levente; Novák, Attila; Wesztergom, Viktor; Szabó, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    The Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field (NGVF) is one of the five mantle xenolith bearing alkali basalt locations in the Carpathian-Pannonian Region, where Plio-Pleistocene alkali basalt brought to the surface lherzolite and wehrlite xenoliths. Petrographic and geochemical signature (i.e. newly formed clinopyroxene and olivine grains, Ti, Al, Fe, Mn and LRRE enrichment in rock-forming minerals) of the wehrlite xenoliths suggest that a portion of the upper mantle was transformed to wehrlite beneath the NGVF by upward migrating mafic melt agents. Based on trace element modelling, we argue that the metasomatic agent had an OIB-like trace element composition, similar to the host alkali basalts. In order to study the current state of the lithospheric mantle and to test whether the spatial distribution of the metasomatism can be imaged, magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out. Long period MT data were collected at 14 locations along a ~50 km long NNW-SSE profile in the NGVF. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary was detected at 70-90 km of depth. A low resistivity anomaly (~5-10 Ωm) was observed at 30-45 km in depth below the central part of the NNW-SSE profile, indicating the presence of a conductive body barely below the Moho. We suggest that the low resistivity body is related to the presence of residual, connected melt and/or the conductivity differences between the lherzolitic and wehrlitic mantle domain due to different chemical composition and ratio of the rock-forming minerals.

  11. Manual muscle testing: a method of measuring extremity muscle strength applied to critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Nancy; Dinglas, Victor; Fan, Eddy; Kho, Michelle; Kuramoto, Jill; Needham, Dale

    2011-04-12

    Survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and other causes of critical illness often have generalized weakness, reduced exercise tolerance, and persistent nerve and muscle impairments after hospital discharge. Using an explicit protocol with a structured approach to training and quality assurance of research staff, manual muscle testing (MMT) is a highly reliable method for assessing strength, using a standardized clinical examination, for patients following ARDS, and can be completed with mechanically ventilated patients who can tolerate sitting upright in bed and are able to follow two-step commands. (7, 8) This video demonstrates a protocol for MMT, which has been taught to ≥ 43 research staff who have performed >800 assessments on >280 ARDS survivors. Modifications for the bedridden patient are included. Each muscle is tested with specific techniques for positioning, stabilization, resistance, and palpation for each score of the 6-point ordinal Medical Research Council scale. Three upper and three lower extremity muscles are graded in this protocol: shoulder abduction, elbow flexion, wrist extension, hip flexion, knee extension, and ankle dorsiflexion. These muscles were chosen based on the standard approach for evaluating patients for ICU-acquired weakness used in prior publications. (1,2).

  12. A comparative study of results obtained in magnetotelluric deep soundings in Villarrica active volcano zone (Chile) with gravity investigations, distribution of earthquake foci, heat flow empirical relationships, isotopic geochemistry 87Sr/ 86Sr and SB systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, M.; Fournier, H.; Mamani, M.; Febrer, J.; Borzotta, E.; Maidana, A.

    The first magnetotelluric deep soundings in Chile were carried out during 1986 in the Villarrica active volcano zone (39°25'S, 71°57'W). In the TM mode of polarization, the curves show a distorted segment with dispersion. A static distortion at long periods is observed in curves in the TE mode of polarization; the segment was shifted vertically to fit the geomagnetic global model values at daily periods. This modified curve was used for 1D modelling to determine the electrical structure in the study area. The upper level of the intermediate conducting layer of resistivity 20-60 ω m is found to be at 35-50 km depth. A higher resistivity layer (600 ω m), starting at 100 km depth, may be resolved in the intermediate conducting layer. A sharp decrease in the resistivity is shown by the model at 500 km. Large heterogeneities at the level of the conducting layer encountered in the 1D modelling, and increased resistivity of the ultimate layer, may account for distortion observed at long periods. Two-dimensional test models show that the conducting layer in the area of Villarrica volcano may be an anomalous heated layer surrounded by rocks of higher resistivity of about 2 × 10 3 ω m. These features correspond to the interaction with a subsiding oceanic lithosphere resulting in a complex thermal structure and perturbed resistivity distribution in transition zones of the Pacific type such as Chile, and to the existence of a megafault and a system of fractures in the sounding area. These facts make it difficult to determine the conductance of the electrical asthenosphere. The parameters of the model structure correlate well with geophysical and geochemical results obtained in the area by other workers. Gravity studies indicate a maximum crustal thickness of about 37 km, which implies a non-full compensation according to the Airy hypothesis. The morphology of the Wadati-Benioff zone clearly shows a sharp decrease of earthquake foci at 50 km depth, and a reinitiation of

  13. Magnetotelluric characterization through the Ambargasta-Sumampa Range: The connection between the northern and southern trace of the Río de La Plata Craton - Pampean Terrane tectonic boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peri, V. Gisel; Barcelona, Hernan; Pomposiello, M. Cristina; Favetto, Alicia

    2015-04-01

    The South American Platform was part of the Western Gondwana, a collage of plates of different ages assembled in late Neoproterozoic to Cambrian times. The Transbrasiliano Lineament, a continental shear belt that transversely intersects this platform from NE to SW, has its southern expression in the tectonic boundary between the Río de La Plata Craton and the Pampean Terrane. Magnetotelluric long-period data in a W-E profile (29°30‧ S) that crosses the Ambargasta-Sumampa Range and the Chaco-Pampean Plain were obtained to connect information of this mostly inferred tectonic boundary. A 2-D inversion model shows the Chacoparanense basin, Río Dulce lineament, Ambargasta-Sumampa Range and Salina de Ambargasta in the upper crust. At mid-to-lower crust and 40 km to the east of the Ambargasta-Sumampa Range, a discontinuity (500-2000 Ω m) of 20-km-wide separates two highly resistive blocks, the Río de La Plata Craton (6000-20,000 Ω m) in the east, and the Pampean Terrane (5000-20,000 Ω m) in the west. This discontinuity represents the tectonic boundary between both cratons and could be explained by the presence of graphite. The geometry of the Pampean Terrane suggests an east-dipping paleo-subduction. Our results are consistent with gravimetric and seismicity data of the study area. A more conductive feature beneath the range and the tectonic boundary was associated with the NE-SW dextral transpressive system evidenced by the mylonitic belts exposed in the Eastern Pampean Ranges. This belt represents a conjugate of the mega-shear Transbrasiliano Lineament and could be explained by fluid-rock interaction by shearing during hundreds of years. The eastern border of the Ambargasta-Sumampa Range extends the trace of the Transbrasiliano Lineament. The electrical Moho depth (40 km to the west and 35 km to the east) was identified by a high electrical contrast between the crust and upper mantle. The upper mantle shows a resistive structure beneath the Río de La Plata

  14. Geothermal investigations in Idaho, Part 2, An evaluation of thermal water in the Bruneau-Grand View area, southwest Idaho - with a section on a reconnaissance audio-magnetotelluric survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, H.W.; Whitehead, R.L.; Hoover, Donald B.; Tippens, C.L.

    1974-01-01

    The Bruneau-Grand View area occupies about 1,100 square miles in southwest Idaho and is on the southern flank of the large depression (possibly a graben) in which lies the western Snake River Plain. The igneous and sedimentary rocks in the area range in age from Late Cretaceous to Holocene. They are transected by a prominent system of northwest-trending faults. For discussion purposes, the aquifers in the area have been separated into two broad units: (1) the volcanic-rock aquifers, and (2) the overlying sedimentary-rock aquifers. The Idavada Volcanics or underlying rock units probably constitute the reservoir that contains thermal water. An audio-magnetotelluric survey indicates that a large conductive zone having apparent resistivities approaching 2 ohm-metres underlies a part of the area at a relatively shallow depth. Chemical analysis of 94 water samples collected in 1973 show that the thermal waters in the area are of a sodium bicarbonate type. Although dissolved-solids concentrations of water ranged from 181 to 1,100 milligrams per litre (mg/l) in the volcanic-rock aquifers, they were generally less than 500 mg/l. Measured chloride concentrations of water in the volcanic-rock aquifers were less than 20 mg/l. Temperatures of water from wells and springs ranged from 9.5 to 83.0 degrees C. Temperatures of water from the volcanic-rock aquifers ranged from 40.0 to 83.0 degrees C, whereas temperatures of water from the sedimentary-rock aquifers seldom exceeded 35 degrees C. Aquifer temperatures at depth, as estimated by silica and sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometers, probably do not exceed 150 degrees C. However, a mixed-water geochemical thermometer indicates that temperatures at depth may exceed 180 degrees C. The gas in water from the volcanic-rock aquifers is composed chiefly of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen. Methane gas (probably derived from organic material) was also found in some water from the sedimentary-rock aquifers. The thermal waters

  15. Efficiency of Pareto joint inversion of 2D geophysical data using global optimization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, Katarzyna; Bogacz, Adrian; Kozubal, Adam; Danek, Tomasz; Wojdyła, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Pareto joint inversion of two or more sets of data is a promising new tool of modern geophysical exploration. In the first stage of our investigation we created software enabling execution of forward solvers of two geophysical methods (2D magnetotelluric and gravity) as well as inversion with possibility of constraining solution with seismic data. In the algorithm solving MT forward solver Helmholtz's equations, finite element method and Dirichlet's boundary conditions were applied. Gravity forward solver was based on Talwani's algorithm. To limit dimensionality of solution space we decided to describe model as sets of polygons, using Sharp Boundary Interface (SBI) approach. The main inversion engine was created using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm adapted to handle two or more target functions and to prevent acceptance of solutions which are non - realistic or incompatible with Pareto scheme. Each inversion run generates single Pareto solution, which can be added to Pareto Front. The PSO inversion engine was parallelized using OpenMP standard, what enabled execution code for practically unlimited amount of threads at once. Thereby computing time of inversion process was significantly decreased. Furthermore, computing efficiency increases with number of PSO iterations. In this contribution we analyze the efficiency of created software solution taking under consideration details of chosen global optimization engine used as a main joint minimization engine. Additionally we study the scale of possible decrease of computational time caused by different methods of parallelization applied for both forward solvers and inversion algorithm. All tests were done for 2D magnetotelluric and gravity data based on real geological media. Obtained results show that even for relatively simple mid end computational infrastructure proposed solution of inversion problem can be applied in practice and used for real life problems of geophysical inversion and interpretation.

  16. Joint inversion of 3-D seismic, gravimetric and magnetotelluric data for sub-basalt imaging in the Faroe-Shetland Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heincke, B.; Moorkamp, M.; Jegen, M.; Hobbs, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    Imaging of sub-basalt sediments with reflection seismic techniques is limited due to absorption, scattering and transmission effects and the presence of peg-leg multiples. Although many of the difficulties facing conventional seismic profiles can be overcome by recording long offset data resolution of sub-basalt sediments in seismic sections is typically still largely restricted. Therefore multi-parametric approaches in general and joint inversion strategies in particular (e.g. Colombo et al., 2008, Jordan et al., 2012) are considered as alternative to gain additional information from sub-basalt structures. Here, we combine in a 3-D joint inversion first-arrival time tomography, FTG gravity and MT data to identify the base basalt and resolve potential sediments underneath. For sub-basalt exploration the three methods complement each other such that the null space is reduced and significantly better resolved models can be obtained than would be possible by the individual methods: The seismic data gives a robust model for the supra-basalt sediments whilst the gravity field is dominated by the high density basalt and basement features. The MT on the other hand is sensitive to the conductivity in both the supra- and sub-basalt sediments. We will present preliminary individual and joint inversion result for a FTG, seismic and MT data set located in the Faroe-Shetland basin. Because the investigated area is rather large (~75 x 40 km) and the individual data sets are relatively huge, we use a joint inversion framework (see Moorkamp et al., 2011) which is designed to handle large amount of data/model parameters. This program has moreover the options to link the individual parameter models either petrophysically using fixed parameter relationships or structurally using the cross-gradient approach. The seismic data set consists of a pattern of 8 intersecting wide-angle seismic profiles with maximum offsets of up to ~24 km. The 3-D gravity data set (size :~ 30 x 30 km) is

  17. Combination of Geophysical Methods to Support Urban Geological Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabàs, A.; Macau, A.; Benjumea, B.; Bellmunt, F.; Figueras, S.; Vilà, M.

    2014-07-01

    Urban geological mapping is a key to assist management of new developed areas, conversion of current urban areas or assessment of urban geological hazards. Geophysics can have a pivotal role to yield subsurface information in urban areas provided that geophysical methods are capable of dealing with challenges related to these scenarios (e.g., low signal-to-noise ratio or special logistical arrangements). With this principal aim, a specific methodology is developed to characterize lithological changes, to image fault zones and to delineate basin geometry in the urban areas. The process uses the combination of passive and active techniques as complementary data: controlled source audio-magnetotelluric method (CSAMT), magnetotelluric method (MT), microtremor H/V analysis and ambient noise array measurements to overcome the limitations of traditional geophysical methodology. This study is focused in Girona and Salt surrounding areas (NE of Spain) where some uncertainties in subsurface knowledge (maps of bedrock depth and the isopach maps of thickness of quaternary sediments) need to be resolved to carry out the 1:5000 urban geological mapping. These parameters can be estimated using this proposed methodology. (1) Acoustic impedance contrast between Neogene sediments and Paleogene or Paleozoic bedrock is detected with microtremor H/V analysis that provides the soil resonance frequency. The minimum value obtained is 0.4 Hz in Salt city, and the maximum value is the 9.5 Hz in Girona city. The result of this first method is a fast scanner of the geometry of basement. (2) Ambient noise array constrains the bedrock depth using the measurements of shear-wave velocity of soft soil. (3) Finally, the electrical resistivity models contribute with a good description of lithological changes and fault imaging. The conductive materials (1-100 Ωm) are associated with Neogene Basin composed by unconsolidated detrital sediments; medium resistive materials (100-400 Ωm) correspond to

  18. Results of investigation at the Ahuachapan Geothermal Field, El Salvador. Part 2, Electrical-methods geophysics: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.B.

    1990-04-01

    The Ahuachapan Geothermal Field (AGF) is a 95 megawatt geothemal-sourced power-plant operated by the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) of El Salvador. During the past decade, as part of an effort to increase in situ thermal reserves in order to realize the full generation capacity of the AGF, extensive surface geophysical coverage has been obtained over the AGF and the prospective Chipilapa area to the east. The geophysical surveys were performed to determine physical property characteristics of the known reservoir and then to search for similar characteristics in the Chipilapa area. A secondary objective was to evaluate the surface recharge area in the highlands to the south of the AGF. The principal surface electrical geophysical methods used during this period were DC resistivity and magnetotellurics. Three available data sets have been reinterpreted using drillhole control to help form geophysical models of the area. The geophysical models are compared with the geologic interpretations.

  19. Magnetotelluric Measurements in the Alboran Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R. L.; Jegen, M. D.; Garcia, X. A.; Matsuno, T.; Elsenbeck, J.; Worzewski, T. W.

    2010-12-01

    The PICASSO program aims to understand the tectonic history of the western Mediterranean, between Spain and Morocco, where conflicting models have suggested that the region is either a relict subduction system or a zone of mantle delamination. As part of this program we successfully deployed 12 seafloor MT instruments in water depths greater than 800m in the Alboran sea. We plan to deploy additional instruments in the fall of 2010. An initial analysis of the data shows complex MT response functions with strong distortion due to seafloor topography and coast effect. This coast effect suggests a fairly resistive lithosphere beneath the seafloor, which is confirmed after inspection of the preliminary responses. We will present the data collected thus far, along with preliminary models of the profiles collected.

  20. MTpy: A Python toolbox for magnetotellurics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krieger, Lars; Peacock, Jared R.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the structure and concept of MTpy  . Additionally, we show some examples from an everyday work-flow of MT data processing: the generation of standard EDI data files from raw electric (E-) and magnetic flux density (B-) field time series as input, the conversion into MiniSEED data format, as well as the generation of a graphical data representation in the form of a Phase Tensor pseudosection.

  1. Magnetotelluric Sounding of Europa's Ice Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, R. E.; Delory, G. T.; Espley, J. R.; Stillman, D. E.

    2016-10-01

    A magnetometer alone in insufficient to determine thicknesses of water layers in the ice shell because electromagnetic souce geometry is indeterminate at the "high" frequencies ( 1 Hz) needed for adequate resolution.

  2. MM&T: Testing of Electro-Optic Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    Interferometers (a) Newtoa Interferometer (b) Fizeau Interferometer (c) Haidinger Fringes 2. Twyman -Green and Williams Interferometers 3. Common Path...operator can use the instrument as input for his intuitive interpretation. 12. You should consider listing Twyman Green and Fizeau interferometers together...the scatterometer is simple and inexpensively made. The second choice would be to set up a Twyman -Green interferometer as described above where the zero

  3. MM&T: Precision Machining of Optical Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    type interferometer configuration has been constructed on a granite metrology bench, located in the environmentally I. [16 7 : ° L N~l Jn -N...produced by rotating both spindles in the turning mode. 4 2 Z SPHERICAL PARTS The Fizeau type interferometer constructed to meet this task was...reconfigured to the Twyman -Greene mode so that interferometric measurement of the spherical surfaces pro- duced could be measured and photographed. Figure VIII

  4. STS-114: Discovery Day 6 Post MMT Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Wayne Hale, Space Shuttle Deputy Program Manager and Steve Poulos, Orbiter Program Manager, discuss the damage assessment from the tiles that came off the Space Shuttle Discovery during launch. Poulos presents charts and discusses in detail the following topics: 1) Composite Tile Damage/Gap Filler Sites Evaluation; 2) Protruding Ceramic Shim Aft of the Nose Landing Gear Door (NLGD); 3) Protruding Chine Gap Filler; 4) RH NLGD Tile Damage; 5) RH NLGD Damage Analysis; 6) Left Wing Tile Damage; 7) Comparison of Ground Test Results vs. FD5 Focused Inspection; 8) Current Status: Focused Inspection 721L07-01 ITVC FD5 Image of Panel 7L Apex 9) Current Status: Focused Inspection Lower Panel 7L721L07-02; 10) Current Status Focused Inspection 721L10-02 Lower Panel 10L Close-up view; and 11) Window 1 Blanket. The presentation ends with a question and answer period from the news media.

  5. Spur Gear Laser Surface Hardening MM/T Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    case profile for D6AC before ....... 34 and after temper 8. Charpy V-Notch impact test specimen configuration. 35 9. Charpy V-Notch impact strength of...analysis of D6AC ......................... 32 4. Longitudinal Charpy V-Notch impact strength ....... 36 of D6AC at two different hardness levels from...TOLERANCE:,.001 UNLESS SPECIFIED OTHERWISE ALL DIMENSIONS IN INCHES. Figure 8. Charpy V-notch impact test specimen configuration. 35 A TABLE 4

  6. MM&T: Precision Machining of Optical Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    illuniination or dark ac ss to pe rforni thme us ual imcloe il()L, procedures. These as has been ie ntioned, inc jude visual inspection, n-icasuretnent, re...P ni A a\\; ere tetkcy exit Poo _)I t to’ jjili irttv hidt tr lip’ t’it: I’ :)-v,hoA ’:~’ eno w lnos othe t&A be t hsur ouned 6 tl hei ,Iur s I i nir

  7. STS-114: Mission Status/Post MMT Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Paul Hill, STS-114 Lead Shuttle Flight Director, and Wayne Hill, Deputy Manager for the Space Shuttle Program and Chair of the Mission Management Team, discusses with the News media the complete operational success of the STS-114 Flight. Paul Hill mentioned the undocking and flight around did occur right on time that day, and checking out Discovery's entry system in preparation for de-orbit on Monday morning. He summarized the long list of flight operations and activities demonstrated like various forms of inspections on RCC and tile, gap fillers and blanket, imagery and photography, three space walks and re-supply. Wayne Hill talked about flight control check out, pre-entry plans, opportunity landing in Cape Carneval, Florida and back-up landing operations in Edwards Air Force Base, California. He emphasized the concern for crew and public safety during landing. News media focused their questions on public expectations and feelings about the return of the Shuttle to Earth, analysis of mechanical and technical failures, safety of dark or daylight landings.

  8. Boundary element solutions for broad-band 3-D geo-electromagnetic problems accelerated by an adaptive multilevel fast multipole method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a generalized and stable surface integral formula for 3-D uniform inducing field and plane wave electromagnetic induction problems, which works reliably over a wide frequency range. Vector surface electric currents and magnetic currents, scalar surface electric charges and magnetic charges are treated as the variables. This surface integral formula is successfully applied to compute the electromagnetic responses of 3-D topography to low frequency magnetotelluric and high frequency radio-magnetotelluric fields. The standard boundary element method which is used to solve this surface integral formula quickly exceeds the memory capacity of modern computers for problems involving hundreds of thousands of unknowns. To make the surface integral formulation applicable and capable of dealing with large-scale 3-D geo-electromagnetic problems, we have developed a matrix-free adaptive multilevel fast multipole boundary element solver. By means of the fast multipole approach, the time-complexity of solving the final system of linear equations is reduced to O(m log m) and the memory cost is reduced to O(m), where m is the number of unknowns. The analytical solutions for a half-space model were used to verify our numerical solutions over the frequency range 0.001-300 kHz. In addition, our numerical solution shows excellent agreement with a published numerical solution for an edge-based finite-element method on a trapezoidal hill model at a frequency of 2 Hz. Then, a high frequency simulation for a similar trapezoidal hill model was used to study the effects of displacement currents in the radio-magnetotelluric frequency range. Finally, the newly developed algorithm was applied to study the effect of moderate topography and to evaluate the applicability of a 2-D RMT inversion code that assumes a flat air-Earth interface, on RMT field data collected at Smørgrav, southern Norway. This paper constitutes the first part of a hybrid boundary element-finite element

  9. Ted Madden's Network Methods: Applications to the Earth's Schumann Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, E. R.; Yu, H.

    2014-12-01

    Ted Madden made clever use of electrical circuit concepts throughout his long career in geophysical research: induced polarization, DC resistivity, magnetotellurics, Schumann resonances, the transport properties of rocks and even elasticity and the brittle failure of stressed rocks. The general methods on network analogies were presented in a terse monograph (Madden, 1972) which came to be called "The Grey Peril" by his students, named more for the challenge of deciphering the material as for the color of its cover. This talk will focus on Ted's first major use of the transmission line analogy in treating the Earth's Schumann resonances. This approach in Madden and Thompson (1965) provided a greatly simplified two-dimensional treatment of an electromagnetic problem with a notable three-dimensional structure. This skillful treatment that included the role of the Earth's magnetic field also led to predictions that the Schumann resonance energy would leak into space, predictions that have been verified nearly 50 years later in satellite observations. An extension of the network analogy by Nelson (1967) using Green's function methods provides a means to treat the inverse problem for the background Schumann resonances for the global lightning activity. The development of Madden's methods will be discussed along with concrete results based on them for the monitoring of global lightning.

  10. Advanced methods for depth-to-basement estimation using gravity, magnetic, and electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongzhu

    There is a strong interest in developing effective methods to estimate the depth-to-basement. Potential field methods have already been widely used in this application by parameterizing the earth's subsurface into 3D cells. I introduce a new method of solving this problem based on the 3D Cauchy-type integral (CTI) method which makes it possible to represent the potential fields as surface integrals and the density or magnetization contrast surface needs to be discretized only for the calculation of the potential fields. Another significant objective is the development of a novel method for inversion of potential field data to recover the depth-to-basement using 3D Cauchy-type integral representation. Numerical studies show that the new method is much faster than the conventional method to compute the potential field. My synthetic model studies also show that the developed inversion algorithm is capable of recovering the geometry and depth of a sedimentary basin effectively with a complex density profile in the vertical direction. By nature, the recovered model from potential field inversion is usually very diffusive. Under these circumstances, one has to consider some other geophysical methods, such as electromagnetic (especially the magnetotelluric) methods, which have higher resolution and acceptable exploration cost. Conventional inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) data is aimed at determining the volumetric conductivity distribution. This dissertation develops a novel approach to 3D MT inversion for the depth-to-basement estimation. The key to this approach is selection of the depth-to-basement being the major unknown parameter. The inversion algorithm recovers both the thickness and the conductivities of a sedimentary basin. The sediment-basement interface is usually characterized by density, magnetization, and electrical conductivity contrasts. This makes realistic the joint inversion of potential field and MT data to recover the depth-to-basement. I have

  11. A telluric method for natural field induced polarization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorin, Nikita; Epishkin, Dmitrii; Yakovlev, Andrey

    2016-12-01

    Natural field induced polarization (NFIP) is a branch of low-frequency electromagnetics designed for detection of buried polarizable objects from magnetotelluric (MT) data. The conventional approach to the method deals with normalized MT apparent resistivity. We show that it is more favorable to extract the IP effect from solely electric (telluric) transfer functions instead. For lateral localization of polarizable bodies it is convenient to work with the telluric tensor determinant, which does not depend on the rotation of the receiving electric dipoles. Applicability of the new method was verified in the course of a large-scale field research. The field work was conducted in a well-explored area in East Kazakhstan known for the presence of various IP sources such as graphite, magnetite, and sulfide mineralization. A new multichannel processing approach allowed the determination of the telluric tensor components with very good accuracy. This holds out a hope that in some cases NFIP data may be used not only for detection of polarizable objects, but also for a rough estimation of their spectral IP characteristics.

  12. Marine Controlled Source EM Methods: Equipment, Methodology, and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, S.; Behrens, J.; Key, K.

    2005-12-01

    The marine CSEM method has become an important tool for academia and the petroleum industry. Commercially viable seafloor receivers were developed for marine MT exploration over the last decade, but progress in CSEM transmitter design is still at an early stage. We have developed 200~A and 500~A transmitters (Scripps Undersea Electromagnetic Source Instrument, or SUESI-200/500) which operate within the 30~kVA power limitations of academic tow cables. This is done by careful control of antenna impedance (resistance and inductance) and power efficiency. Electrode impedance is largely a function of length, rather than surface area or diameter. The antenna can be made neutrally buoyant by balancing the weight of an aluminum conductor with a thick plastic jacket. Telemetry for control, navigation, and monitoring is overlaid on high voltage power transmission down coaxial tow cables, as an alternative to fiber optic telemetry, allowing use with winches and cables of opportunity. The CSEM noise floor determines the source--receiver ranges, and thus the investigation depths, that can be achieved, and depends on frequency, dipole moment, receiver noise, magnetotelluric interference, and stack time. For typical values, this is 10-15~VA-1m-2. We present examples of data from a sub-salt hydrocarbon prospect in the Gulf of Mexico, and an academic project over the magma chambers of the East Pacific Rise.

  13. Geophysical Monitoring Methods Evaluation for the FutureGen 2.0 Project

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, Chris E.; USA, Richland Washington; Vermeul, Vince R.; USA, Richland Washington; Bonneville, Alain; USA, Richland Washington; Sullivan, E. Charlotte; USA, Richland Washington; Johnson, Tim C.; USA, Richland Washington; Spane, Frank A.; USA, Richland Washington; Gilmore, Tyler J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-31

    A comprehensive monitoring program will be needed in order to assess the effectiveness of carbon sequestration at the FutureGen 2.0 carbon capture and storage (CCS) field-site. Geophysical monitoring methods are sensitive to subsurface changes that result from injection of CO2 and will be used for: (1) tracking the spatial extent of the free phase CO2 plume, (2) monitoring advancement of the pressure front, (3) identifying or mapping areas where induced seismicity occurs, and (4) identifying and mapping regions of increased risk for brine or CO2 leakage from the reservoir. Site-specific suitability and cost effectiveness were evaluated for a number of geophysical monitoring methods including: passive seismic monitoring, reflection seismic imaging, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, pulsed neutron capture logging, cross-borehole seismic, electrical resistivity tomography, magnetotellurics and controlled source electromagnetics. The results of this evaluation indicate that CO2 injection monitoring using reflection seismic methods would likely be difficult at the FutureGen 2.0 site. Electrical methods also exhibited low sensitivity to the expected CO2 saturation changes and would be affected by metallic infrastructure at the field site. Passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture monitoring were selected for implementation as part of the FutureGen 2.0 storage site monitoring program.

  14. Geophysical Monitoring Methods Evaluation for the FutureGen 2.0 Project

    DOE PAGES

    Strickland, Chris E.; USA, Richland Washington; Vermeul, Vince R.; ...

    2014-12-31

    A comprehensive monitoring program will be needed in order to assess the effectiveness of carbon sequestration at the FutureGen 2.0 carbon capture and storage (CCS) field-site. Geophysical monitoring methods are sensitive to subsurface changes that result from injection of CO2 and will be used for: (1) tracking the spatial extent of the free phase CO2 plume, (2) monitoring advancement of the pressure front, (3) identifying or mapping areas where induced seismicity occurs, and (4) identifying and mapping regions of increased risk for brine or CO2 leakage from the reservoir. Site-specific suitability and cost effectiveness were evaluated for a number ofmore » geophysical monitoring methods including: passive seismic monitoring, reflection seismic imaging, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, pulsed neutron capture logging, cross-borehole seismic, electrical resistivity tomography, magnetotellurics and controlled source electromagnetics. The results of this evaluation indicate that CO2 injection monitoring using reflection seismic methods would likely be difficult at the FutureGen 2.0 site. Electrical methods also exhibited low sensitivity to the expected CO2 saturation changes and would be affected by metallic infrastructure at the field site. Passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture monitoring were selected for implementation as part of the FutureGen 2.0 storage site monitoring program.« less

  15. Case studies of geophysical search methods relevant to the continuation phase of an on-Site inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, J J

    1999-04-20

    Part II of the Protocol of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty prescribes the use of geophysical methods such as active seismic surveys and electrical conductivity measurements to search for and locate underground anomalies, including cavities and rubble zones, during the continuation phase of an on-site inspection. In this paper the application of spontaneous potential, magnetotelluric, active seismic, and gas sampling studies at the US Nevada Test Site associated with underground nuclear explosions will be described and discussed in the context of on-site inspections. Spontaneous potential and E-field ratio telluric methods were found to be effective in some geologic settings but not in others. An example of gas sampling is shown for which radiogenic gas was detected several years after detonation. The case study of the application of active seismic methods illustrates limitations imposed by the use of relatively simple systems in the field. Detection of a deeply-buried cavity or rubble zone will be difficult; results from the application of only a single method will likely be ambiguous. Best results will come from the synthesis of results from a number of widely-varying methods.

  16. EM Methods Applied for the Characterization and Monitoring of the Hontomin (Spain) CO2 Storage Pilot Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Marcuello, Alex; Ogaya, Xenia; Vilamajo, Eloi; Bosch, David; Escalas, Lena; Piña, Perla

    2013-04-01

    The work presented here correspond to an on-going project in the frame of the development of a pilot plant for CO2 storage in a deep saline aquifer funded by Fundación Ciudad de la Energía-CIUDEN (http://www.ciuden.es/) on behalf of the Spanish Government. The main objective of the research Project is to monitor the CO2 migration within the reservoir during and after the injection as well as testing and evaluating different EM monitoring methods. In this way, a good characterization of the zone is imperative to perceive and quantify, as soon as possible, any change owing to the CO2 injection. Among all geophysical techniques, electrical and electromagnetic methods are especially useful and meaningful to monitor the CO2 plume since these methods are sensitive to the electrical conductivity of the pore fluid. The presence of CO2 inside the pore will replace a fraction of saline fluid within the storage aquifer, reducing the effective volume available for ionic transport. As a consequence, the bulk electrical resistivity of the rock is expected to increase significantly. The proposed EM techniques are the following: 1- Magnetotelluric method, 2-Cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography, 3- Control source electromagnetics. Moreover laboratory experiments are being carried out to monitor the CO2 flux inside sample cores using ERT.

  17. Marine electromagnetic methods for gas hydrate characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitemeyer, Karen Andrea

    Gas hydrate is a type of clathrate consisting of a gas molecule (usually methane) encased in a water lattice, and is found worldwide in marine and permafrost regions. Hydrate is important because it is a geo-hazard, has potential as an energy resource, and is a possible contributor to climate change. There are large uncertainties about the global amount of hydrate present, partly because the characterization of hydrate with seismic methods is unreliable. Marine electromagnetic (EM) methods can be used to image the bulk resistivity structure of the subsurface and are able to augment seismic data to provide valuable information about gas hydrate distribution in the marine environment. Marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) sounding data from a pilot survey at Hydrate Ridge, located on the Cascadia subduction zone, show that regions with higher concentrations of hydrate are resistive. The apparent resistivities computed from the CSEM data are consistent for both apparent resistivity pseudosections and two-dimensional regularized inversion results. The 2D inversion results provide evidence of a strong resistor near the seismic bottom simulating reflector (BSR), and geologic structures are imaged to about a kilometer depth. Comparisons with electrical resistivity logging while drilling (LWD) data from Ocean Drilling Program Leg 204 show a general agreement except for one of three sites where the CSEM inversion shows a large resistor at depth as compared to the LWD. An overlay of the CSEM inversion with a collocated seismic line 230 from Trehu et al. (2001) exhibits remarkable similarities with the sedimentary layering, geologic structures, and the seismic BSR. Magnetotelluric (MT) sounding data collected simultaneously during the CSEM survey provide an electrical image of the oceanic crust and mantle (50 km depth) and the folding associated with the accretionary complex (top 2 km depth). In addition, the MT model provides a complementary low-resolution image of

  18. Effect of clay concentration on morphology and properties of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose films.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Dibyendu; Bhowmick, Biplab; Mollick, Md Masud R; Maity, Dipanwita; Mukhopadhyay, Asis; Rana, Dipak; Chattopadhyay, Dipankar

    2013-07-01

    Hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC)/montmorillonite (MMT) nanocomposite films are prepared by solution intercalation method. Mechanical, thermal, moisture absorption, optical clarity and water vapor permeability of HPMC/MMT nanocomposite films are measured. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) results establish formation of partially intercalated and partially exfoliated HPMC/MMT nanocomposite films. In presence of MMT, the tensile strength, tensile modulus and elongation at break of HPMC films are improved. The thermal stability of HPMC/MMT nanocomposites is better than pure HPMC. The moisture absorption of HPMC film measured in 75% of constant relative humidity is reduced with loading of MMT. Optical clarity of HPMC film is almost unaffected in presence of MMT. Water vapor permeability of HPMC decreases in presence of nanoclay due to increasing tortuous path for diffusion.

  19. Comparative Analysis of Kernel Methods for Statistical Shape Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    successfully used by the machine learning community for pattern recognition and image denoising [14]. A Gaussian kernel was used by Cremers et al. [8] for...matrix M, where φi ∈ RNd . Using Singular Value Decomposition ( SVD ), the covariance matrix 1nMM T is decomposed as: UΣUT = 1 n MMT (1) where U is a

  20. An Experiment to Test Geophysical Methods For Monitoring Fluid Re-Injection at the Wairakei Geothermal Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiracek, G. R.; Bowles-Martinez, E.; Feucht, D. W.; Ryan, J.; Caldwell, T. G.; Bannister, S. C.; Bertrand, T.; Bennie, S.; Bourguignon, S.

    2010-12-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is supporting US students to participate in GNS Science’s geothermal research program supported by the New Zealand Government. The NSF international program aims to quick-start a new generation of geothermal-oriented US geophysics students who will be poised to be active participants and leaders in US geothermal energy development. This year’s project evaluated joint passive seismic and magnetotelluric (MT) field measurements to determine three-dimensional (3-D) reservoir characteristics during fluid withdrawal and re-injection. A preliminary test of the ability to achieve repeatable MT data in high noise locations was carried out in the Wairakei geothermal field using a 14-site base-line MT survey and repeat occupations at four sites. Different data processing schemes identified MT frequency bands where impedance phase tensor data were most sensitive to known variables such as daily solar source variations, wind, and drilling operations. Other frequency bands were identified where good MT repeatability will allow further tests. A streamlined method was developed for visualizing 3-D earthquake focal mechanisms resulting from production changes in geothermal reservoirs. The computer program allows spatial sorting of seismic events and thus subsurface fracture identification.

  1. Department of the Army Justification of Estimates for Fiscal Year 1982, Submitted to Congress January 1981. Part 1. Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    support of the Army Aviation Program. It includes $14.2 million for Manufacturing Methods and Technology Program (MM&T). MM&T request will allow...completion of effort on composite structures for the tail rotor, tail section and main rotors of Army helicopters. Heavy effort of improved methods for...million for Manufacturing Methods and Technology (MM&T). 1-28 - 1/15/81 J ( ( 1 Department of the Army Annual Budget Estimate

  2. Reducing Uncertainty in the Distribution of Hydrogeologic Units within Volcanic Composite Units of Pahute Mesa Using High-Resolution 3-D Resistivity Methods, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.; Sweetkind, Don; Burton, Bethany L.

    2010-01-01

    Pahute Mesa within the Calico Hills zeolitic volcanic composite unit (VCU), an important hydrostratigraphic unit in Area 20. The resistivity response was evaluated and compared with existing well data and hydrogeologic unit tops from the current Pahute Mesa framework model. In 2008, the USGS processed and inverted the magnetotelluric data into a 3-D resistivity model. We interpreted nine depth slices and four west-east profile cross sections of the 3-D resistivity inversion model. This report documents the geologic interpretation of the 3-D resistivity model. Expectations are that spatial variations in the electrical properties of the Calico Hills zeolitic VCU can be detected and mapped with 3-D resistivity, and that these changes correlate to differences in rock permeability. With regard to LFA and TCU, electrical resistivity and permeability are typically related. Tuff confining units will typically have low electrical resistivity and low permeability, whereas LFA will have higher electrical resistivity and zones of higher fracture-related permeability. If expectations are shown to be correct, the method can be utilized by the UGTA scientists to refine the hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) framework in an effort to more accurately predict radionuclide transport away from test areas on Pahute and Rainier Mesas.

  3. Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

    1984-06-27

    The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

  4. Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. O.; Montoya, P. C.; Wayland, J. R., Jr.

    1984-06-01

    The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak.

  5. True Chemical Abundances of Galaxies in the Nearby Universe: A Comparison of Abundance Methods, Interstellar Processes, and Galaxy Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Danielle Amanda

    2013-12-01

    Peeples et al. (2008) identified low-mass, high oxygen abundance outliers from the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relationship. We present new MMT spectroscopy of four of these dwarf galaxy outliers. We re-examined these anomalous spectra and compared to the parameter space for which standard strong-line methods are calibrated. We discuss the physical nature of these galaxies that leads to their unusual spectra (and previous classification as outliers), finding their low excitation, elevated N/O, and strong Balmer absorption are consistent with the properties expected from galaxies evolving past the "Wolf-Rayet galaxy" phase. To address the issue of securing the low-luminosity end of the M-Z relationship, we present MMT spectroscopic observations of HII regions in 42 low-luminosity galaxies in the Spitzer LVL survey. Direct oxygen abundances were determined based on the temperature sensitive [O III] lambda4363 line, measured at a strength of 4sigma or greater, for 31 of the 42 galaxies in our sample. Combining our results with previous direct abundance studies, we present a further refined sample, requiring reliable distance determinations. We characterize the direct L-Z and M-Z relationships at low-luminosity using the resulting 38 object sample. We show that the luminosity of a low-luminosity galaxy is often a better indicator of metallicity than strong-line methods. Additionally, our results provide the first direct estimates of oxygen abundance for 19 local volume dwarf galaxies. Properties of the ISM of spiral galaxies are known to show radial variations. Motivated by the need to place gradients on the same scale for comparisons amongst galaxies, we present direct oxygen abundance gradients of the nearby spiral galaxies NGC 628 and NGC 2403. A bi-modal N/O gradient pattern is measured for NGC 628. Notably, the N/O ratio plateaus beyond R25, demonstrating that primary nitrogen production is the dominant mechanism in the outer disk. The outer disk beyond R 25 was not

  6. Axial structures within the Reelfoot Rift delineated with magnetotelluric surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, B.D.; Stanley, W.D.; Williams, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    In the winter of 1811-12, three of the largest historic earthquakes in the United States occurred near New Madrid, Mo. Seismicity continues to the present day throughout a tightly clustered pattern of epicenters centered on the bootheel of Missouri, including parts of northeastern Arkansas, northwestern Tennessee, western Kentucky, and southern Illinois. In 1990, the New Madrid seismic zone/Central United States became the first seismically active region east of the Rocky Mountains to be designated a priority research area within the Natural Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP). This Professional Paper is a collection of papers, some published separately, presenting results of the newly intensified research program in this area. Major components of this research program include tectonic framework studies, seismicity and deformation monitoring and modeling, improved seismic hazard and risk assessments, and cooperative hazard mitigation studies.

  7. The distortion tensor of magnetotellurics: a tutorial on some properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilley, Frederick E. M.

    2016-05-01

    A 2 × 2 matrix is introduced which relates the electric field at an observing site where geological distortion applies to the regional electric field, which is unaffected by the distortion. For the student of linear algebra this matrix provides a practical example with which to demonstrate the basic and important procedures of eigenvalue analysis and singular value decomposition. The significance of the results can be visualised because the eigenvectors of such a telluric distortion matrix have a clear practical meaning, as do their eigenvalues. A Mohr diagram for the distortion matrix displays when real eigenvectors exist, and tells their magnitudes and directions. The results of singular value decomposition (SVD) also have a clear practical meaning. These results too can be displayed on a Mohr diagram. Whereas real eigenvectors may or may not exist, SVD is always possible. The ratio of the two singular values of the matrix gives a condition number, useful to quantify distortion. Strong distortion causes the matrix to approach the condition known as `singularity'. A closely-related anisotropy number may also be useful, as it tells when a 2 × 2 matrix has a negative determinant by then having a value greater than unity.

  8. Superconducting gradiometer-magnetometer array for magnetotelluric logging

    SciTech Connect

    Vozoff, K.

    1982-09-14

    A subsurface electromagnetic sensing device for use in boreholes and mine shafts which includes a sonde for lowering underground which is supercooled and contains squid gradiometers for measuring vector current density, and magnetometers for measuring vector magnetic fields. When these measured values are combined, information is obtained to construct a conductivity model of the underlying and surrounding subsurface region.

  9. Lithospheric deformation inferred from electrical anisotropy of magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Y.; Wei, W.; Jin, S.; Ye, G.; Unsworth, M. J.; Zhang, L.

    2013-12-01

    In our research, a comprehensive procedure of analyzing and modeling electrical anisotropy for MT data is suggested, based on the field examples of the Great Slave Lake shear zone (GSLsz) in western Canada, the North China Craton (NCC) and the Altyn Tagh fault in northern Tibet. Diverse dimensionality tools are used to distinguish heterogeneity and anisotropy from MT data. In addition to the phase splits and phase tensor polarizations, a combination of the phase tensor and induction arrows is applied to judge anisotropy. The skin depths of specific period band are considered to determine whether these features result from anisotropy or heterogeneity. Specific resistivity structures in the 2-D isotropic inversion models can indicate electrical anisotropy as well, like the dike-like media or a series of conductive ';blobs' can be observed in the 2-D isotropic inversion models of the GSLsz and NCC data. Anisotropic inversions can be undertaken using an improved inversion code based on isotropic code but incorporating a trade-off parameter for electrical anisotropy named anisotropic tau. A series of anisotropic tau have been applied to test its effect and to get a best trade-off between anisotropy and heterogeneity. Then, 2-D and 3-D forward modeling works are undertaken to test the robustness of the major anisotropic features. The anisotropic structures inferred from the inversion models are replaced by various alternating isotropic or anisotropic structures to see if they are required. The fitting of the response curves compared with the field data and corresponding r.m.s misfits can help us choose the best model that can generally illustrate the underground structure. Finally, the analysis and modeling result of the MT data from North China Craton is taken as an example to demonstrate how the electrical anisotropy can be linked with the lithospheric deformation. According to the reliable models we got, there may be an anisotropic layer at the mid-lower crustal to upper mantle depths (~25-50 km) beneath the North China rift basin. In isotropic 2-D and 3-D resistivity models, this anisotropic layer/block is shown as a low-resistivity (<10Ωm) belt with more than 100 km width extending from Xingtai to Tangshan in the northeast. Given the high heat flow values (>64 mW/m2) in this area, one of the reasonable interpretations of the anisotropic layer would be fluidized/melt-bearing accident shear zone. Graphite film is supposed to be another possibility. However, the low-resistivity/anisotropic layer is consistent with the world-famous earthquake zone that can be confirmed by results of seismic tomography. So an unstable fluidized/melt-bearing crustal and upper mantle structure seems to be more reasonable. A kinetic model can be established according to the inferred accident shear zone that causes the anisotropy, which may provide a new piece of evidence to the lithospheric destruction of the eastern block of the NCC.

  10. Comparison of EMG activity between maximal manual muscle testing and cybex maximal isometric testing of the quadriceps femoris.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ting; Hsu, Ar-Tyan; Chang, Jia-Hao; Chien, Chi-Sheng; Chang, Guan-Liang

    2008-02-01

    Two methods have been used to produce a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the superficial quadriceps femoris muscles for normalization of electromyographic (EMG) data. The purposes of this study were to compare the myoelectic activity of MVIC of manual muscle testing (MMT) versus Cybex maximal isometric testing. Eighteen normal subjects were recruited. MMT and Cybex testing for MVIC of the dominant leg were performed. EMG activities of the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis and rectus femoris were recorded during MMT and Cybex trials. EMG amplitude and median frequency obtained from the two methods (MMT and Cybex testing) were used for statistical analysis of these three muscles. Statistically, the difference in the mean of the EMG signal amplitude and median frequency between MMT and Cybex testing were not significant. Considering cost and time, MMT for MVIC technique appears to be reliable and highly valuable.

  11. Multicomponent mass transport model: a model for simulating migration of radionuclides in ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, J.F.; Kaszeta, F.E.; Simmons, C.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the results of the development of a one-dimensional radionuclide transport code, MMT2D (Multicomponent Mass Transport), for the AEGIS Program. Multicomponent Mass Transport is a numerical solution technique that uses the discrete-parcel-random-wald (DPRW) method to directly simulate the migration of radionuclides. MMT1D accounts for: convection;dispersion; sorption-desorption; first-order radioactive decay; and n-membered radioactive decay chains. Comparisons between MMT1D and an analytical solution for a similar problem show that: MMT1D agrees very closely with the analytical solution; MMT1D has no cumulative numerical dispersion like that associated with solution techniques such as finite differences and finite elements; for current AEGIS applications, relatively few parcels are required to produce adequate results; and the power of MMT1D is the flexibility of the code in being able to handle complex problems for which analytical solution cannot be obtained. Multicomponent Mass Transport (MMT1D) codes were developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to predict the movement of radiocontaminants in the saturated and unsaturated sediments of the Hanford Site. All MMT models require ground-water flow patterns that have been previously generated by a hydrologic model. This report documents the computer code and operating procedures of a third generation of the MMT series: the MMT differs from previous versions by simulating the mass transport processes in systems with radionuclide decay chains. Although MMT is a one-dimensional code, the user is referred to the documentation of the theoretical and numerical procedures of the three-dimensional MMT-DPRW code for discussion of expediency, verification, and error-sensitivity analysis.

  12. POLICE BRIBERY AND ACCESS TO METHADONE MAINTENANCE THERAPY WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF DRUG POLICY REFORM IN TIJUANA, MEXICO

    PubMed Central

    Werb, D; Wagner, KD; Beletsky, L; Gonzalez-Zuniga, Patricia; Rangel, Gudelia; Strathdee, SA

    2015-01-01

    Aims In 2009, Mexico passed legislation to decriminalize drug possession and improve access to addiction treatment. We undertook research to assess the implementation of the reform among a cohort of people who inject drugs (PWID) in Tijuana. This study specifically sought to determine whether discretionary policing practices like extortion impact access to methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) in Tijuana, a city characterized by high levels of drug-related harms. Methods Generalized estimating equation analyses were used to construct longitudinal confounding models to determine the association between paying a police bribe and MMT enrolment among PWID in Tijuana enrolled in a prospective cohort study. Outcome of interest was MMT enrolment in the past six months. Data on police interactions and MMT enrolment were also obtained. Results Between October, 2011 and September, 2013, 637 participants provided 1,825 observations, with 143 (7.8%) reports of MMT enrolment during the study period. In a final confounding model, recently reporting being forced to pay a bribe to police was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of accessing MMT (Adjusted Odds Ratio = 1.69, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.02 – 2.81, p = 0.043). However, in 56 (39.2%) cases, MMT enrolment ceased within six months. The majority of participant responses cited the fact that MMT was too expensive (69.1%). Discussion Levels of MMT access were low. PWID who experienced police extortion were more likely to access MMT at baseline, though this association decreased during the study period. Coupled with the costs of MMT, this may compromise MMT retention among PWID. PMID:25655577

  13. MM&T Program for the Establishment of Production Techniques for High Power Bulk Semiconductor Limiters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    F. Jellison, ’"-Band, High Power Solid State Receiv6:. IProtector Employing a Bulk Semiconductor Limiter", 1979 IEEE, MTT-S- INTERNATIONAL , Orlando...Techniques for High-Power Bulk Semiconductor Limiters", First Quaterly Report for Contract DAAB07-76-C-0039, ECOM, U.S. Army Electronics Research and...Electronics Supply Ctr Palo Alto, CA 94304 Directorate of Engineering & Standardization Rockwell International ATTN: (DESC-ECS) Mr. N.A. Hauck Science

  14. MM/T Program for Three Color Light Emitting Diode Display Modules.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    back side or it had to have judiciously placed plated thru- holes to do the same. The plated thru- hole concept proved to be extremely expensive...design changes the guide holes in the collimator will be changed to a hole and a slot. All dimensions will be referenced from the hole which goes into...excessive epoxy makes them float on top of the epoxy. 13. The optical die sensor did not work very well because the vacuum hole in the die collet

  15. Rheological investigation of specific interactions in Na Alginate and Na MMT suspension.

    PubMed

    Zlopasa, Jure; Norder, Ben; Koenders, Eduard A B; Picken, Stephen J

    2016-10-20

    Here we report on a study of a rheological behavior of sodium alginate and montmorillonite suspension. We find that viscoelastic behavior of this suspension is dramatically affected with increasing volume fraction of montmorillonite platelets. Addition of montmorillonite generally leads to gel formation, which is attributed to interactions of montmorillonite and alginate via H-bonding and attraction between the positive edges of the platelets and the anionic backbone of the biopolymer. A critical concentration for the measured system was observed at 20wt.% montmorillonite, where a crossover to a gel-like structure was detected. The observed gel has a rubber plateau, which develops further with higher montmorillonite concentration. In this physical gel the relaxation maximum was detected, which is associated with the breaking and reformation of the bonds between the platelets and the biopolymer. For this transient behavior, we find that a Maxwell type viscoelasticity quite well describes the relaxation time and the observed G'-G" crossover. We believe that this gel-like behavior plays an important role in formation of highly ordered nanostructures that develop during the drying of these bio-nanocomposite suspensions.

  16. On the Efect of the Oxidative Reagents on the Conductivity of Polyaniline/MMT Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Bernabé, A.; Gil-Agustí, M.; Ortega, G.; Llovera, P.; Almarza, A.; Vázquez, S.; Amantia, D.; Aubouy, L.

    2010-06-01

    The synthesis of polyaniline has been reported using three different oxidative reagents: ammonium persulfate, potassium iodate and potassium iodate+sodium hypochlorite. This polyaniline has been used to prepare several nanocomposites with different percentage of Montmorillonite. The DC conductivity of the nanocomposites was determined by impedance spectroscopy. The oxidative reagent that gives higher conductivity is ammonium persulfate. The temperature dependence of the conductivity was studied.

  17. Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI

    SciTech Connect

    Wannamaker, Philip E.; Wright, Phillip M.

    1992-03-24

    The principal objective of electrical geophysical research at UURI has been to provide reliable exploration and reservoir assessment tools for the shallowest to the deepest levels of interest in geothermal fields. Three diverse methods are being considered currently: magnetotellurics (MT, and CSAMT), self-potential, and borehole resistivity. Primary shortcomings in the methods addressed have included a lack of proper interpretation tools to treat the effects of the inhomogeneous structures often encountered in geothermal systems, a lack of field data of sufficient accuracy and quantity to provide well-focused models of subsurface resistivity structure, and a poor understanding of the relation of resistivity to geothermal systems and physicochemical conditions in the earth generally. In MT, for example, interpretation research has focused successfully on the applicability of 2-D models in 3-D areas which show a preferred structural grain. Leading computer algorithms for 2-D and 3-D simulation have resulted and are combined with modern methods of regularized inversion. However, 3-D data coverage and interpretation is seen as a high priority. High data quality in our own research surveys has been assured by implementing a fully remote reference with digital FM telemetry and real-time processing with data coherence sorting. A detailed MT profile across Long Valley has mapped a caldera-wide altered tuff unit serving as the primary hydrothermal aquifer, and identified a low-resistivity body in the middle crust under the west moat which corresponds closely with teleseismic delay and low density models. In the CSAMT method, our extensive tensor survey over the Sulphur Springs geothermal system provides valuable structural information on this important thermal regime and allows a fundamental analysis of the CSAMT method in heterogeneous areas. The self-potential (SP) method is promoted as an early-stage, cost-effective, exploration technique for covered hydrothermal

  18. Fabrication of composite poly(d,l-lactide)/montmorillonite nanoparticles for controlled delivery of acetaminophen by solvent-displacement method using glass capillary microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Othman, Rahimah; Vladisavljević, Goran T; Thomas, Noreen L; Nagy, Zoltan K

    2016-05-01

    Paracetamol (PCM)-loaded composite nanoparticles (NPs) composed of a biodegradable poly(d,l-lactide) (PLA) polymer matrix filled with organically modified montmorillonite (MMT) nanoparticles were fabricated by antisolvent nanoprecipitation in a microfluidic co-flow glass capillary device. The incorporation of MMT in the polymer improved both the drug encapsulation efficiency and the drug loading, and extended the rate of drug release in simulated intestinal fluid (pH 7.4). The particle size increased on increasing both the drug loading and the concentration of MMT in the polymer matrix, and decreased on increasing the aqueous to organic flow rate ratio. The drug encapsulation efficiency in the NPs was higher at higher aqueous to organic flow rate ratio due to faster formation of the NPs. The PCM-loaded PLA NPs containing 2 wt% MMT in PLA prepared at an aqueous to organic flow rate ratio of 10 with an orifice size of 200 μm exhibited a spherical shape with a mean size of 296 nm, a drug encapsulation efficiency of 38.5% and a drug loading of 5.4%. The encapsulation of MMT and PCM in the NPs was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  19. Evolution of Minimum Mortality Temperature in Stockholm, Sweden, 1901–2009

    PubMed Central

    Åström, Daniel Oudin; Tornevi, Andreas; Ebi, Kristie L.; Rocklöv, Joacim; Forsberg, Bertil

    2015-01-01

    Background: The mortality impacts of hot and cold temperatures have been thoroughly documented, with most locations reporting a U-shaped relationship with a minimum mortality temperature (MMT) at which mortality is lowest. How MMT may have evolved over previous decades as the global mean surface temperature has increased has not been thoroughly explored. Objective: We used observations of daily mean temperatures to investigate whether MMT changed in Stockholm, Sweden, from the beginning of the 20th century until 2009. Methods: Daily mortality and temperature data for the period 1901–2009 in Stockholm, Sweden, were used to model the temperature–mortality relationship. We estimated MMT using distributed lag nonlinear Poisson regression models considering lags up to 21 days of daily mean temperature as the exposure variable. To avoid large influences on the MMT from intra- and interannual climatic variability, we estimated MMT based on 30-year periods. Furthermore, we investigated whether there were trends in the absolute value of the MMT and in the relative value of the MMT (the corresponding percentile of the same-day temperature distribution) over the study period. Results: Our findings suggest that both the absolute MMT and the relative MMT increased in Stockholm, Sweden, over the course of the 20th century. Conclusions: The increase in the MMT over the course of the 20th century suggests autonomous adaptation within the context of the large epidemiological, demographical, and societal changes that occurred. Whether the rate of increase will be sustained with climate change is an open question. Citation: Oudin Åström D, Tornevi A, Ebi KL, Rocklöv J, Forsberg B. 2016. Evolution of minimum mortality temperature in Stockholm, Sweden, 1901–2009. Environ Health Perspect 124:740–744; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1509692 PMID:26566270

  20. The impact of financial discharge from methadone maintenance therapy on incarceration

    PubMed Central

    Zaller, Nickolas D.; Fu, Jeannia J.; Bazazi, Alexander R.; Rich, Josiah D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The authors sought to analyze the relationship between financial discharge from methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) and subsequent involvement in the criminal justice system among individuals receiving state-subsidized MMT slots and individuals who were financially discharged from MMT. Methods The authors examined state-level client treatment records from all individuals who were on a subsidized MMT slot and all individuals who were discharged due to their inability to pay (financial discharge) from one of the three MMT programs during an 18-month period. The authors cross-referenced these records, through a state-managed database, with records of the Department of Corrections. Results Individuals in the control group had longer durations of stay in MMT and fewer other kinds of treatment admissions during the study period. An 81 percent of individuals in the financially discharged group received other treatment episodes versus 0.3 percent in the control group (p < 0.001). More than twice the number of individuals financially discharged from MMT were incarcerated during the study period when compared with the control group (67 percent vs 33 percent, p < 0.001). In logistic regression analysis, individuals in the control group had 0.26 times the odds of incarceration when compared with individuals financially discharged from MMT (95% CI: 0.09-0.73). Conclusions MMT has been shown to reduce involvement in the criminal justice system, yet cost of MMT continues to inhibit its accessibility. Our data suggest that removal of cost as a barrier to access MMT may facilitate longer treatment duration and minimize involvement with the criminal justice system. PMID:21046934

  1. Evaluation of Perfusion Quantification Methods with Ultrasound Contrast Agents in a Machine-Perfused Pig Liver.

    PubMed

    Averkiou, M; Keravnou, C P; Izamis, M L; Leen, E

    2016-05-03

    Purpose: To evaluate dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS) as a tool for measuring blood flow in the macro- and microcirculation of an ex-vivo machine-perfused pig liver and to confirm the ability of DCEUS to accurately detect induced flow rate changes so that it could then be used clinically for monitoring flow changes in liver tumors. Materials and Methods: Bolus injections of contrast agents in the hepatic artery (HA) and portal vein (PV) were administered to 3 machine-perfused pig livers. Flow changes were induced by the pump of the machine perfusion system. The induced flow rates were of clinical relevance (150 - 400 ml/min for HA and 400 - 1400 ml/min for PV). Quantification parameters from time-intensity curves [rise time (RT), mean transit time (MTT), area under the curve (AUC) and peak intensity (PI)] were extracted in order to evaluate whether the induced flow changes were reflected in these parameters. Results: A linear relationship between the image intensity and the microbubble concentration was confirmed first, while time parameters (RT and MMT) were found to be independent of concentration. The induced flow changes which propagated from the larger vessels to the parenchyma were reflected in the quantification parameters. Specifically, RT, MTT and AUC correlated with flow rate changes. Conclusion Machine-perfused pig liver is an excellent test bed for DCEUS quantification approaches for the study of the hepatic vascular networks. DCEUS quantification parameters (RT, MTT, and AUC) can measure relative flow changes of about 20 % and above in the liver vasculature. DCEUS quantification is a promising tool for real-time monitoring of the vascular network of tumors.

  2. Development of 3D Geological Structure Analysis Method Using Multi-geophysical Data: Application to Hwasan Caldera in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, G.; Yang, J.; Yi, M.; Kim, J.; Kwon, B.

    2011-12-01

    Multi-geophysical surveys were carried out around the Hwasan caldera at the Euisung Sub-basin in Korea. To overcome the limitations of survey resolutions of previous studies, 510 points of gravity and 32 points of magnetotelluric (MT) data were obtained. To analyze three-dimensional density and resistivity models, gravity and MT inversions were carried out using Marquardt-Levenberg method and WSINV3DMT code, respectively. To carry out the objective structure analysis of multi-parametric geophysical data, a new classification technique, Structure Index (SI) method, was proposed. SI method consists of Type Angle (TA) and Type Intensity (TI) values. It is one of the projection techniques similar to the universal transverse Mercator (UTM) projection, and a mathematical method of showing the patterns of correlation and abnormalness of physical property values by TA and TI values. TA values indicate the correlation patterns of normalized data sets and TI values show the levels of the abnormalness of physical property values. For the processing, the density and resistivity values were estimated at the same nodes using kriging methods through S-GeMS based on GSLIB. Base on the results of the SI processing, all classified nodes were plotted and visualized in 3-dimensional space as shown in Fig. 1. The analyzed results of SI method using gravity and MT data match well with those of the previous researches, including the geologic map. First, the intrusive igneous rocks, which have high density and resistivity values, were analyzed according to the ring fault and intrusive igneous area at the north-east side of the Hwasan caldera. Second, the pyroclastic rocks at the center of the caldera, which is extended to a depth of around 1 km with low density and resistivity values, were imaged. The basement structure, which has a relatively low resistivity and high density at a depth of 5 km was also inferred by integration analysis. This method makes it possible to classify and three

  3. Spectroscopic study of silver halides in montmorillonite and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Sohrabnezhad, Sh; Rassa, M; Mohammadi Dahanesari, E

    2016-10-01

    In this study silver halides (AgX, X=Cl, Br, I) in montmorillonite (MMT) were prepared by dispersion method in dark. AgNO3 was used as a silver precursor. The nanocomposites (NCs) (AgX-MMT) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). The powder X-ray diffraction showed intercalation of AgCl and AgBr nanoparticles (NPs) into the clay interlayer space. The diffuse reflectance spectra indicated a broad surface plasmon resonance (SPR) absorption band in the visible region for AgCl-MMT and AgBr-MMT NCs, resulting of metallic Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs). But the results were opposite in case of AgI-MMT NC. The antibacterial activity of NCs was investigated against Gram-positive bacteria, i.e., Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus luteus and Gram-negative bacteria, i.e., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, by the well diffusion method. The antibacterial effects on Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus and Escherichia coli decrease in the order: AgCl-MMT>AgBr-MMT>AgI-MMT. No antibacterial activity was detected for Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  4. Improvement of interfacial interactions using natural polyphenol-inspired tannic acid-coated nanoclay enhancement of soy protein isolate biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong; Kang, Haijiao; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Shifeng; Li, Jianzhang

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a novel and economic surface modification technique for montmorillonite (MMT) nanosheets, a biocompatible coupling cross-linking agent, was developed on an attempt at improving the interfacial adhesion with soy protein isolate (SPI) matrix. Inspired by natural polyphenol, the "green dip-coating" method using tannic acid (TA) to surface-modify MMT (TA@MMT). SPI nanocomposite films modified with MMT or TA@MMT, as well as the control ones, were prepared via the casting method. The TA layer was successfully coated on the MMT surface through the (FeIII) ions coordination chemistry and the synthetic samples were characterized by the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The compatibility and interfacial interactions between modified MMT and SPI matrix were greatly enhanced by the TA-FeIII coating on the MMT surface. The mechanical properties, water resistance, and thermal stability of the resultant biofilm were increased accordingly. Compared with that of the unmodified SPI film, the tensile strength of the nanocomposite films modified by the green dip-coating was increased by 113.3%. These SPI-based nanocomposite films showed the favorable potential in terms of food packing applications due to their efficient barriers to water vapor and UV and/or visible light.

  5. Vortex methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chorin, A.J. |

    1993-06-01

    Vortex methods originated from the observation that in incompressible inviscid flow vorticity (or, more accurately, circulation) is a conserved quantity, as can be readily deduced from the absence of tangential stresses. Thus, if the vorticity is known at time t=0, one can find the flow at a later time by simply following the vorticity. In this narrow context, a vortex method is a numerical method that follows vorticity. The author restricts himself in these lectures to a special class of numerical vortex methods, those that are based on a Lagrangian transport of vorticity in hydrodynamics by smoothed particles (blobs) and those whose analysis contributes to the understanding of blob methods. Blob methods started in the 1930`s.

  6. Geophysical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    Geophysical measurements involve no magic or mystery but straightforward applications of physical principles. This book is both a geophysical survey and a reference guide. It explains the physical principles involved in geophysical methods. Over one-third of the text is devoted to seismic methods. Comprehensive topics in the volume include: the measurement of different physical properties and their geological significance; how different kinds of measurements are combined to draw geological conclusions; surface, borehole, airborne, and satellite measurements; computer processing and interactive methods; geodetic, gravity, magnetic, radioactive, heat flow, and electrical methods; interpretation of natural processes such as earthquakes and heat flow; and a summation of present knowledge of the earth.

  7. RESISTIVITY METHODS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistivity methods were among the first geophysical techniques developed. The basic concept originated with Conrad Schlumberger, who conducted the initial resistivity field tests in Normandy, France during 1912. The resistivity method, employed in its earliest and most conventional form, uses an ex...

  8. Panel methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Ashok

    1993-10-01

    A comprehensive description of panel methods has been given to enable an understanding of the underlying theory and the basic structure of the panel codes for aerodynamic applications. Panel methods have seen peak activity in the industry and remain as yet the sole technique for efficient and practical computations on complex-aircraft configurations. The method of the linearized approach of solving flow problems is well proven and till the turn of the century panel methods will continue to remain as the workhorse for computing aerodynamic characteristics of aircraft shapes in the industry. The alternative Euler and Navier-Stokes solvers have yet to mature for applications to complex shapes, hence panel methods will be in the light for at least another decade.

  9. Enhanced proton conductivity by the influence of modified montmorillonite on poly (vinyl alcohol) based blend composite membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palani, P. Bahavan; Abidin, K. Sainul; Kannan, R.; Rajashabala, S.; Sivakumar, M.

    2016-05-01

    The highest proton conductivity value of 0.0802 Scm-1 is obtained at 6wt% of protonated MMT added to the PVA/PEG blends. The polymer blend composite membranes are prepared with varied concentration of Poly vinyl alcohol (PVA), Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) and Montmorillonite (MMT) by solution casting method. The Na+ MMT was modified (protonated) to H+ MMT with ion exchange process. The prepared membranes were characterized by using TGA, FTIR, XRD, Ion Exchange Capacity, Water/Methanol uptake, swelling ratio and proton conductivity. The significant improvements in the hydrolytic stability were observed. In addition, thermal stability of the composite membranes were improved and controlled by the addition of MMT. All the prepared membranes are shown appreciable values of proton conductivity at room temperature with 100% relative humidity.

  10. Electrodeionization method

    DOEpatents

    Lin, YuPo J.; Hestekin, Jamie; Arora, Michelle; St. Martin, Edward J.

    2004-09-28

    An electrodeionization method for continuously producing and or separating and/or concentrating ionizable organics present in dilute concentrations in an ionic solution while controlling the pH to within one to one-half pH unit method for continuously producing and or separating and/or concentrating ionizable organics present in dilute concentrations in an ionic solution while controlling the pH to within one to one-half pH unit.

  11. Ensemble Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, Matteo; Valentini, Giorgio

    2012-03-01

    Ensemble methods are statistical and computational learning procedures reminiscent of the human social learning behavior of seeking several opinions before making any crucial decision. The idea of combining the opinions of different "experts" to obtain an overall “ensemble” decision is rooted in our culture at least from the classical age of ancient Greece, and it has been formalized during the Enlightenment with the Condorcet Jury Theorem[45]), which proved that the judgment of a committee is superior to those of individuals, provided the individuals have reasonable competence. Ensembles are sets of learning machines that combine in some way their decisions, or their learning algorithms, or different views of data, or other specific characteristics to obtain more reliable and more accurate predictions in supervised and unsupervised learning problems [48,116]. A simple example is represented by the majority vote ensemble, by which the decisions of different learning machines are combined, and the class that receives the majority of “votes” (i.e., the class predicted by the majority of the learning machines) is the class predicted by the overall ensemble [158]. In the literature, a plethora of terms other than ensembles has been used, such as fusion, combination, aggregation, and committee, to indicate sets of learning machines that work together to solve a machine learning problem [19,40,56,66,99,108,123], but in this chapter we maintain the term ensemble in its widest meaning, in order to include the whole range of combination methods. Nowadays, ensemble methods represent one of the main current research lines in machine learning [48,116], and the interest of the research community on ensemble methods is witnessed by conferences and workshops specifically devoted to ensembles, first of all the multiple classifier systems (MCS) conference organized by Roli, Kittler, Windeatt, and other researchers of this area [14,62,85,149,173]. Several theories have been

  12. Evaluation of the potential of the Clare Basin, SW Ireland, for onshore carbon sequestration using electromagnetic geophysical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovet, Joan Campanya i.; Ogaya, Xenia; Jones, Alan G.; Rath, Volker; Ledo, Juanjo; McConnell, Brian

    2015-04-01

    Carbon capture, sequestration and long-term storage (CCS) is a critically important and intellectually and technologically challenging bridging technology for assisting humanity to migrate from its dependence on fossil fuels to green energy over the next half century. The IRECCSEM project (www.ireccsem.ie) is a Science Foundation Ireland Investigator Project to evaluate Ireland's potential for onshore carbon sequestration in saline aquifers by integrating new electromagnetic geophysical data with existing geophysical and geological data. The main goals of the project are to determine porosity and permeability values of the potential reservoir formation as well as to evaluate the integrity of the seal formation. During the summer of 2014, a magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out in the Carboniferous Clare Basin (SW Ireland). Data from a total of 140 sites were acquired, including audio-magnetotelluric (AMT), broadband magnetotelluric (BBMT) and long period magnetotelluric (LMT) data. These new data added to existing MT data acquired at 32 sites during a feasibility pilot survey conducted in 2010. The nominal space between the 2014 sites was 0.6 km between AMT sites, 1.2 km between BBMT sites and 8 km between LMT sites. The electrical resistivity distribution beneath the survey area was constrained using three different types of electromagnetic data: MT impedance tensor responses (Z), geomagnetic transfer functions (GTF) and inter-station horizontal magnetic transfer-functions (HMT). A newly-computed code based on the Generalized Archie's Law and available data from boreholes were used to relate the obtained geoelectrical model to rock properties (i.e. porosity and permeability). The results are compared to independent geological and geophysical data for superior interpretation.

  13. Characterization methods

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Methods discussed in this compilation of notes and diagrams are Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and other surface analysis techniques (auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and scanning tunnelling microscopy). A comparative evaluation of different techniques is performed. In-vacuo and in-situ analyses are described.

  14. Methadone Maintenance Treatment Participant Retention and Behavioural Effectiveness in China: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Chow, Eric P. F.; Zhuang, Xun; Liang, Yanxian; Wang, Yafei; Tang, Caiyun; Ling, Li; Tucker, Joseph D.; Wilson, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has been scaled up by the Chinese government alongside persistent compulsory drug user detention, but the extent to which detention interferes with MMT is unknown. The study systematically reviews Chinese MMT retention rates, reasons for drop out, and behavioural changes. Method Chinese and English databases of literature are searched for studies reporting retention rates, drug use and sexual behaviours among MMT participants in China between 2004 and 2013. The estimates are summarized through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Results A total of 74 studies representing 43,263 individuals are included in this analysis. About a third of MMT participants drop out during the first three months of treatment (retention rate 69.0% (95% CI 57.7-78.4%)). Police arrest and detention in compulsory rehabilitation was the most common cause of drop out, accounting for 22.2% of all those not retained. Among retained participants, changing unsafe drug use behaviours was more effective than changing unsafe sexual behaviours. At 12 months following MMT initiation, 24.6% (15.7-33.5%) of MMT participants had a positive urine test, 9.3% (4.7-17.8%) injected drugs and only 1.1% (0.4-3.0%) sold sex for drugs. These correspond to 0.002 (<0.001-0.011), 0.045 (0.004-0.114) and 0.209 (0.076-0.580) times lower odds than baseline. However, MMT participants did not have substantial changes in condom use rates. Conclusion MMT is effective in drug users in China but participant retention is poor, substantially related to compulsory detention. Reforming the compulsory drug user detention system may improve MMT retention and effectiveness. PMID:23922668

  15. COATING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, R.G.

    1959-08-25

    A method is described for protectively coating beryllium metal by etching the metal in an acid bath, immersing the etched beryllium in a solution of sodium zincate for a brief period of time, immersing the beryllium in concentrated nitric acid, immersing the beryhlium in a second solution of sodium zincate, electroplating a thin layer of copper over the beryllium, and finally electroplating a layer of chromium over the copper layer.

  16. SINTERING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Googin, J.M.

    1963-11-01

    Methods of making articles by powder metallurgy techniques are presented. An article is made by packing a metal powder into a desired shape, raising the temperature of the powder compact to a sintering temperature in the presence of a reducing gas, and alternately increasing and decreasing the pressure of the gas while the temperatume is being raised. The product has a greater density than can be achieved by sintering for the same length of time at a constant gas pressure. (AEC)

  17. Gelcasting methods

    DOEpatents

    Walls, Claudia A.; Kirby, Glen H.; Janney, Mark A.; Omatete, Ogbemi O.; Nunn, Stephen D.; McMillan, April D.

    2000-01-01

    A method of gelcasting includes the steps of providing a solution of at least hydroxymethylacrylamide (HMAM) and water. At least one inorganic powder is added to the mixture. At least one initiator system is provided to polymerize the HMAM. The initiator polymerizes the HMAM and water, to form a firm hydrogel that contains the inorganic powder. One or more comonomers can be polymerized with the HMAM monomer, to alter the final properties of the gelcast material. Additionally, one or more additives can be included in the polymerization mixture, to alter the properties of the gelcast material.

  18. Casting methods

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  19. Tensiometer methods

    DOEpatents

    Grover, Blair K.; Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.; Casper, William L.

    2005-12-20

    A method for collecting data regarding a matric potential of a media includes providing a tensiometer having a stainless steel tensiometer casing, the stainless steel tensiometer casing comprising a tip portion which includes a wetted porous stainless steel membrane through which a matric potential of a media is sensed; driving the tensiometer into the media using an insertion tube comprising a plurality of probe casing which are selectively coupled to form the insertion tube as the tensiometer is progressively driven deeper into the media, wherein the wetted porous stainless steel membrane is in contact with the media; and sensing the matric potential the media exerts on the wetted porous stainless steel membrane by a pressure sensor in fluid hydraulic connection with the porous stainless steel membrane. A tensiometer includes a stainless steel casing.

  20. WELDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  1. [Contraceptive methods].

    PubMed

    Toivonen, J

    1987-01-01

    Interest in contraceptive devices has increased in recent years due to their safety and protection offered against venereal disease. Use of the devices prevents sperm from entering the uterine canal. Failure of a device is usually caused either because the contraceptive outside the uterus is wrongly positioned or because not enough active spermicidal ingredients were released before ejaculation. Mass production of condoms was made possible through utilization of latex rubber. Different color and shape alternatives have made condom usage more popular in developing countries. The diaphragm and its variation, the cervical cap, are treated with spermicide and then placed inside the vagina. Correct size of the contraceptive is an important consideration. Spermicides consist of active substances that kill sperm, as well as a carrier substance such as foam, ointment and jelly. The newest preventive device is the contraceptive sponge, which can stay in place for up to 36 hours. IN vitro studies show that effectiveness of condoms is 0.5-2.0 (Pearl's index). Combination use of diaphragm and spermicide yields a protection rate of 2-20 (life-table index), and spermicides 0.3-30.0. Risks associated with these methods include local irritation. It was believed that some spermicides increased rats of miscarriage, Down's Syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities, as well as limb anomalies. Diaphragm use increases potential for urinary tract infections. Toxic shock may occur with some users of sponge and diaphragm. All the mentioned contraceptives protect from infection, and are most suitable for people who cannot tolerate hormonal preparations or IUD's, who are in a casual sexual relationship or nursing mothers or youth.

  2. Effect of amylose content and nanoclay incorporation order in physicochemical properties of starch/montmorillonite composites.

    PubMed

    Romero-Bastida, C A; Tapia-Blácido, D R; Méndez-Montealvo, G; Bello-Pérez, L A; Velázquez, G; Alvarez-Ramirez, J

    2016-11-05

    The effects of the amylose content and the preparation sequence in physicochemical properties of starch/montmorillonite (MMT) composites were studied in this work. Native (30%) and high amylose Hylon VII (70%) starches were considered for assessing the effects of amylose content. Glycerol and MMT were used as additives to evaluate the effects of the former as plasticizer and the latter as reinforcer. The glycerol was incorporated before (Method M1) and after (Method M2) the addition of MMT. FTIR studies indicated that water bonding was affected by amylose content. Sorption isotherms indicated that method M2 favoured water adsorption and method M1 reduced water adsorption due to competition for active sites for interaction. TGA showed that method M1 induced a higher degradation rate than method M2. Wettability analysis by contact angle measurements showed that plasticizer promoted the hydrophilicity of the film, whereas MMT promoted a hydrophobic surface for both cases of amylose content.

  3. Structure and spectroscopic properties of organoclays doped by multiwall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrodnaya, T. V.; Nesprava, V. V.; Puchkovskaya, G. A.; Chashechnikova, I. T.; Boyko, Yu. P.; Baran, J.

    2011-03-01

    A method to modify a montmorillonite (MMT) clay mineral (CM) surface by surfactant (SA) cations with simultaneous doping by multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) has been proposed. The structure and spectroscopic properties of composites based on MMT from two deposits (Cherkassy and Pyzhevsk, Ukraine) that differ in the inorganic impurity contents and cation-exchange capacities (CEC) have been investigated. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was used as the SA. According to x-ray diffraction analysis, CTA+ cations intercalated into MMT interplanar spaces expand them significantly whereas MWNTs do not affect the MMT galleries due to the much larger sizes of the former. Studies of the composite materials by IR spectroscopy revealed the mutual influence of the components appearing as the ordering of near-surface layers in the aluminosilicate framework and a change in the modifier methylene chain conformation at the interphase boundary. The majority of CTAB (~90%) is shown to be located inside the MMT galleries, the packing arrangement of which depends on the CEC value and affects the interplanar distances in MMT. The alkyl chains of the CTA+ cations on the outer surface of the MMT plates are sorbed by nanotubes, thus providing contact between the organoclay and MWNT surfaces.

  4. Ultrasonic treatment and synthesis of sugar alcohol modified Na+-montmorillonite clay.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Deeptangshu; Liu, Huihua

    2013-01-01

    Na(+)-montmorillonite clay (generally referred to as MMT) is very useful for reinforcing polymeric matrix at very low concentrations (typically, 2-5% wt). These clay particles are typically exfoliated before they can demonstrate the significant gains in heat deflection temperature, modulus, and elongation properties. In the case of hydrophilic biopolymer based matrices, such as carbohydrates and chitosan, exfoliating these nanoclay particles needs greater attention because the exfoliation is typically carried out using hydrophobic oligomers through ion-exchange. This study reports a new method of synthesizing completely hydrophilic MMT-assemblages using hydrophilic plasticizers for biopolymers. We used sugar alcohols (glycerol, xylitol with 3 and 5 hydroxyl groups) and polysaccharide maltodextrin to exfoliate the MMT. Sonication was conducted for MMT nanoclay and plasticizers at different weight ratios. It was confirmed that all plasticizer/modifier led to expansion of MMT gallery spacing (d-spacing) and the change in d-spacing could be related to the molecular structure of the plasticizer. Meanwhile, the extent of exfoliation was maximum with maltodextrin (fully exfoliation with 1:10 and 1:20 ratio of MMT:plasticizer) across all test samples and interestingly, glycerol and xylitol samples quickly established within the MMT galleries and exhibited minimal influence with further increase in relative concentrations.

  5. Synergistic reinforcing effect of TiO2 and montmorillonite on potato starch nanocomposite films: Thermal, mechanical and barrier properties.

    PubMed

    Oleyaei, Seyed Amir; Almasi, Hadi; Ghanbarzadeh, Babak; Moayedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-11-05

    In this study, ternary potato starch (PS) bionanocomposite films containing two types of nanoparticles, sodium montmorillonite (MMT), one-dimensional (1D) clay platelets, (3 and 5wt%) and TiO2, three-dimensional (3D) nanospheres, (0.5, 1 and 2wt%), are prepared using solvent casting method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) test confirms the completely exfoliated structure formed in the PS-MMT nanocomposites containing 3 and 5% MMT. The success of the formation of new hydrogen bonds between the hydroxyl groups of starch and nanofillers is confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Tensile strength (TS), elongation at break (EB), glass transition temperature (Tg), and melting point (Tm) of the films are also enhanced after MMT and TiO2 incorporation. The water vapor permeability (WVP) and the visible, UVA, UVB and UVC lights transmittance decreases upon TiO2 and MMT content increasing. Generally, a synergistic effect is observed between MMT and TiO2 at lower concentrations of MMT.

  6. Directional Solidification and Characterization of Hg(0.89) Mn(0.11)Te

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, M. W.; Scripa, R. N.; Lehoczky. S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Su, C.-H.

    1998-01-01

    Two boules of Hg(0.89)Mn(0.11)Te(MMT) were solidified using the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger method. Translation rates of 0.09 and 0. 18 microns/s were used. The influence of growth rate on axial compositional homogeneity in the MMT boules was evaluated experimentally by conducting precision density measurements on radial slices taken from each boule. In addition, Plane Front Solidification theory and segregation coefficient (k) data for the Hg(1-x)Mn(x)Te system were used to fit theoretical composition profiles to the measured MMT axial composition profiles. The strong correlation between the measured and calculated MMT axial composition profiles indicates diffusion dominated axial solute redistribution in the boules under the applied growth conditions. The analysis of the MMT axial composition profiles by Plane Front Solidification theory allowed the calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient (D(eff) = 3.5 x l0(exp -5) sq cm/s). The k-values for the Hg(1-x)Mn(x)Te system and the D(sub eff) - value were then used to verify that both boules were solidified under conditions which did not exceed the Constitutional Supercooling Criteria under ideal conditions. Finally, a preliminary examination of the radial compositional variation in each MMT was made using Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR). The radial homogeneity in the MMT boules was found to be comparable for both translation rates.

  7. Methadone maintenance treatment program in prisons from the perspective of medical and non-medical prison staff: a qualitative study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Ghobad; Farnia, Marzieh; Shokoohi, Mostafa; Shahbazi, Mohammad; Moazen, Babak; Rahmani, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Background: As one of the most important components of harm reduction strategy for high-risk groups, following the HIV epidemics, Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) has been initiated in prisoners since 2003. In this paper, we aimed to assess the advantages and shortcomings of the MMT program from the perspective of people who were involved with the delivery of prison healthcare in Iran. Methods: On the basis of grounded theory and through conducting 14 Focus Group Discussions (FGDs), 7 FGDs among physicians, consultants, experts, and 7 FGDs among directors and managers of prisons (n= 140) have been performed. The respondents were asked about positive and negative elements of the MMT program in Iranian prisons. Results: This study included a total of 48 themes, of which 22 themes were related to advantages and the other 26 were about shortcomings of MMT programs in the prisons. According to participants’ views "reduction of illegal drug use and high-risk injection", "reduction of potentially high-risk behaviors" and "making positive attitudes" were the main advantages of MMT in prisons, while issues such as "inaccurate implementation", "lack of skilled manpower" and "poor care after release from prison" were among the main shortcomings of MMT program. Conclusions: MMT program in Iran’s prisons has achieved remarkable success in the field of harm reduction, but to obtain much more significant results, its shortcomings and weaknesses must be also taken into account by policy-makers. PMID:26340487

  8. Chandra and MMT observations of low-mass black hole active galactic nuclei accreting at low rates in dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, W.; Zhou, H.; Dou, L.; Dong, X.-B.; Wang, T.-G.; Fan, X.

    2014-02-10

    We report on Chandra X-ray observations of four candidate low-mass black hole (M {sub bh} ≲ 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that have the estimated Eddington ratios among the lowest (∼10{sup –2}) found for this class. The aims are to validate the nature of their AGNs and to confirm the low Eddington ratios that are derived from the broad Hα line, and to explore this poorly studied regime in the AGN parameter space. Among them, two objects with the lowest significance of the broad lines are also observed with the Multi-Mirror Telescope, and the high-quality optical spectra taken confirm them as Seyfert 1 AGNs and as having small black hole masses. X-ray emission is detected from the nuclei of two of the galaxies, which is variable on timescales of ∼10{sup 3} s, whereas no significant (or only marginal at best) detection is found for the remaining two. The X-ray luminosities are on the order of 10{sup 41} erg s{sup –1} or even lower, on the order of 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1} for non-detections, which are among the lowest regimes ever probed for Seyfert galaxies. The low X-ray luminosities, compared to their black hole masses derived from Hα, confirm their low accretion rates assuming typical bolometric corrections. Our results hint at the existence of a possibly large population of under-luminous low-mass black holes in the local universe. An off-nucleus ultra-luminous X-ray source in one of the dwarf galaxies is detected serendipitously, with a luminosity (6-9)× 10{sup 39} erg s{sup –1} in 2-10 keV.

  9. Slow-released NPK fertilizer encapsulated by NaAlg-g-poly(AA-co-AAm)/MMT superabsorbent nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Rashidzadeh, Azam; Olad, Ali

    2014-12-19

    A novel slow released NPK fertilizer encapsulated by superabsorbent nanocomposite was prepared via in-situ free radical polymerization of sodium alginate, acrylic acid, acrylamide, and montmorillonite in the presence of fertilizer compounds. Evidence of grafting and component interactions, superabsorbent nanocomposite structure and morphology was obtained by a FT-IR, XRD and SEM techniques. The water absorbency behavior of superabsorbent nanocomposite was investigated. After those characterizations, the potential application was verified through the study of fertilizer release from prepared formulations. Results indicated that the presence of the montmorillonite caused the system to liberate the nutrient in a more controlled manner than that with the neat superabsorbent. The good slow release fertilizer property as well as good water retention capacity showed that this formulation is potentially viable for application in agriculture as a fertilizer carrier vehicle.

  10. Birth Control Methods

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z Health Topics Birth control methods Birth control methods > A-Z Health Topics Birth control methods fact ... Publications email updates Enter email Submit Birth control methods Birth control (contraception) is any method, medicine, or ...

  11. Preparation and Mechanical Properties of Chitosan-graft Maleic Anhydride Reinforced with Montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajrin, A.; Sari, L. A.; Rahmawati, N.; Saputra, O. A.; Suryanti, V.

    2017-02-01

    The research aims to develop biodegradable composites as bio-based plastics from chitosan. The composites were prepared via solution casting method by introducing the maleic anhydride (MAH) as grafting agent and montmorillonite (MMt) as reinforcement. The grafting process of chitosan was conducted by varying concentrations of MAH which were 10, 20, and 30% w/w. It was observed that the chitosan-graft-maleic anhydride (Cs-g-MAH) containing 10% w/w of MAH increased its tensile strength by 70%. Reinforcement material was added to the Cs-g-MAH by varying MMt concentrations, e.g. 3, 6, 9 and 12% w/w. It was noted that the presence of 9% w/w of MMt in the Cs-g-MAH gave the best mechanical properties of the Cs-g-MAH/MMt composite.

  12. Preparation and Characterization of Nanocomposites from Whey Protein Concentrate Activated with Lycopene.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rafaela Corrêa; de Deus Souza Carneiro, João; Borges, Soraia Vilela; Assis, Odílio Benedito Garrido; Alvarenga, Gabriela Lara

    2016-03-01

    The production and characterization of nanocomposites based on whey protein concentrate (WPC) and montmorilonite (MMT) incorporated with lycopene as a functional substance is presented and discussed as an alternative biomaterial for potential uses in foodstuff applications. A full factorial design with varying levels of MMT (0% and 2% in w/w) and lycopene (0%, 6%, and 12% in w/w) was used. Color, light transmission, film transparency, moisture, density, solubility, water vapor permeability, and antioxidant activity of the resulting materials were evaluated. Results indicated that lycopene and MMT nanoparticles were successfully included in WPC films using the casting/evaporation method. Inclusion of 2% w/w of MMT in the polymeric matrix significantly improved barrier property against water vapor. Lycopene, besides its good red coloring ability, provided to the films antioxidant activity and UV-vis light protection. These findings open a new perspective for the use of materials for bioactive packaging applications.

  13. Maghemite Intercalated Montmorillonite as New Nanofillers for Photopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Tarablsi, Bassam; Delaite, Christelle; Brendle, Jocelyne; Croutxe-Barghorn, Celine

    2012-01-01

    In this work, maghemite intercalated montmorillonite (γFe2O3-MMT)/polymer nanocomposites loaded with 1 or 2 wt.% of nanofillers were obtained by photopolymerization of difunctional acrylate monomers. The γFe2O3-MMT nanofillers were prepared by a new method based on the in situ formation of maghemite in the interlayer space of Fe-MMT using a three step process. X-ray diffraction (XRD), chemical analysis, TG/DTA and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization of these nanofillers indicated the efficiency of the synthesis. When following the kinetics of the photopolymerization of diacrylate-γFe2O3-MMT nanocomposites using FTIR spectroscopy no significant inhibition effect of the nanofillers was observed at a loading up to 2 wt.%. These innovative nanocomposites exhibit improved mechanical properties compared to the crude polymer. PMID:28348316

  14. Magnetotelluric data in the middle Rio Grande basin, Albuquerque volcanoes, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Jackie M.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    The population in the Albuquerque-Santa Fe region of New Mexico is rapidly growing. The Santa Fe Group aquifer in the Middle Rio Grande Basin is the main source of municipal water for the greater Albuquerque metropolitan area. The capacity of this aquifer is more limited than previously thought (Thorn et al., 1993). The Middle Rio Grande Basin, as defined hydrologically and used here, is the area within the Rio Grande Valley extending from Cochiti Dam downstream to the community of San Acacia (Figure 1). Because approximately 600,000 people (40 percent of the population of New Mexico) live in the study area (Bartolino, 1999), water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depends on accurate assessment and protection of the region’s groundwater resources. An important issue in defining the ground water resources is a better understanding of the hydrogeology of the Santa Fe Group and the other sedimentary deposits that fill the Rio Grande rift.

  15. Crustal and upper mantle structure of central Qiangtang terrane (Tibet Plateau) imaged with magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, S.; Hu, X.; Li, J.

    2013-12-01

    Since the Tethys Ocean closed, the ongoing collision between India and Aisa continents has created the Tibet Plateau, which is the most spectacular topographic feature on the surface of the earth. In the last decades, a large number of geological and geophysical studies have been undertaken in the Tibet Plateau, but most of these studies were focused on southern Tibet, where the collision of the Indian tectonic plate with Eurasia was occurred, and southeast Tibet, where lateral extrusion of crustal material may be occurred, absent in the central Tibet. As research continues, it has become clear that a complete understanding of the formation and deformation of the Tibet Plateau requires a study of the entire plateau. The Qiangtang terrane is located in the central Tibet Plateau. In 1993-1994, three profiles of broadband MT data (320 Hz to 2000 s) along N-S trending ranges from 86°E to 91°E were collected by China University of Geoscience in central Qiangtang terrane for the purpose of oil and gas exploration, the previous interpretation was focused on the shallow structures. In this study, we reanalyze the three MT profiles to produce more detailed images of the deep electrical structure of the Qiangtang terrane. Dimensionality analysis and geoelectric strike analysis of these data show that they appear to be two dimensional. 2-D inversion model show that there is a pervasive conductivity layer in the mid- to lower crustal and upper mantle, especially in the north Qiangtang terrane, which was considered to be the result of partial melt. The partial melt fraction is sufficient for crustal flow to occur. The similarity of the inversion models of the three profiles show that there is west-east crustal flow along the Jinsha River suture in central Qiangtang terrane, which seems to be western extension of the crustal flow observed in southeast Tibet by Bai et al. (2010). The inversion results also show difference of the electrical structure between the west and east profiles. In the west profile, the crust is a relatively integrated high resistivity body. In the other two profiles, the high conductivity anomalies nearly spread all over the mid- to lower crust. The result is supported by the areomagnetic data that there is a buried aulacogen in the deep, which acts as a path for the upwelling of mantle-derived magma. The upwelling of the mantle-derived magma through the weak zone may contribute to the balance between the changeless of crustal thickness and the northward underthrusting of the Indian lithosphere from at least the Oligocene to the present, which provide a complementary mechanism for the deformation of the Tibet Plateau.

  16. Structure of the mantle beneath the Alboran Basin from magnetotelluric soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, X.; Seillé, H.; Elsenbeck, J.; Evans, R. L.; Jegen, M.; Hölz, Sebastian; Ledo, J.; Lovatini, A.; Marti, A.; Marcuello, A.; Queralt, P.; Ungarelli, C.; Ranero, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present results of marine MT acquisition in the Alboran sea that also incorporates previously acquired land MT from southern Spain into our analysis. The marine data show complex MT response functions with strong distortion due to seafloor topography and the coastline, but inclusion of high resolution topography and bathymetry and a seismically defined sediment unit into a 3-D inversion model has allowed us to image the structure in the underlying mantle. The resulting resistivity model is broadly consistent with a geodynamic scenario that includes subduction of an eastward trending plate beneath Gibraltar, which plunges nearly vertically beneath the Alboran. Our model contains three primary features of interest: a resistive body beneath the central Alboran, which extends to a depth of ˜150 km. At this depth, the mantle resistivity decreases to values of ˜100 Ohm-m, slightly higher than those seen in typical asthenosphere at the same depth. This transition suggests a change in slab properties with depth, perhaps reflecting a change in the nature of the seafloor subducted in the past. Two conductive features in our model suggest the presence of fluids released by the subducting slab or a small amount of partial melt in the upper mantle (or both). Of these, the one in the center of the Alboran basin, in the uppermost-mantle (20-30 km depth) beneath Neogene volcanics and west of the termination of the Nekkor Fault, is consistent with geochemical models, which infer highly thinned lithosphere and shallow melting in order to explain the petrology of seafloor volcanics.

  17. Multi-dimensional Magnetotelluric Modeling of General Anisotropy and Its Implication for Structural Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z.; Wei, W.; Egbert, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    Although electrical anisotropy is likely at various scales in the Earth, present 3D inversion codes only allow for isotropic models. In fact, any effects of anisotropy present in any real data can always be accommodated by (possibly fine scale) isotropic structures. This suggests that some complex structures found in 3D inverse solutions (e.g., alternating elongate conductive and resistive "streaks" of Meqbel et al. (2014)), may actually represent anisotropic layers. As a step towards better understanding how anisotropy is manifest in 3D inverse models, and to better incorporate anisotropy in 3D MT interpretations, we have implemented new 1D, 2D AND 3D forward modeling codes which allow for general anisotropy and are implemented in matlab using an object oriented (OO) approach. The 1D code is used primarily to provide boundary conditions (BCs). For the 2D case we have used the OO approach to quickly develop and compare several variants including different formulations (three coupled electric field components, one electric and one magnetic component coupled) and different discretizations (staggered and fixed grids). The 3D case is implemented in integral form on a staggered grid, using either 1D or 2D BC. Iterative solvers, including divergence correction, allow solution for large model grids. As an initial application of these codes we are conducting synthetic inversion tests. We construct test models by replacing streaky conductivity layers, as found at the top of the mantle in the EarthScope models of Meqbel et al. (2014), with simpler smoothly varying anisotropic layers. The modeling process is iterated to obtain a reasonable match to actual data. Synthetic data generated from these 3D anisotropic models can then be inverted with a 3D code (ModEM) and compared to the inversions obtained with actual data. Results will be assessed, taking into account the diffusive nature of EM imaging, to better understand how actual anisotropy is mapped to structure by 3D isotropic inversion.

  18. Obtaining valid geologic models from 3-D resistivity inversion of magnetotelluric data at Pahute Mesa, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.; Sweetkind, Donald S.

    2015-01-01

    The 3-D inversion was generally able to reproduce the gross resistivity structure of the “known” model, but the simulated conductive volcanic composite unit horizons were often too shallow when compared to the “known” model. Additionally, the chosen computation parameters such as station spacing appear to have resulted in computational artifacts that are difficult to interpret but could potentially be removed with further refinements of the 3-D resistivity inversion modeling technique.

  19. Low Angle Contact Between the Oaxaca and Juárez Terranes Deduced From Magnetotelluric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzate-Flores, Jorge A.; Molina-Garza, Roberto; Corbo-Camargo, Fernando; Márquez-Ramírez, Víctor

    2016-10-01

    We present the electrical resistivity model along a profile perpendicular to the Middle America trench in southern Mexico that reveals previously unrecognized tectonic features at upper to mid-crustal depths. Our results support the hypotheses that the upper crust of the Oaxaca terrane is a residual ~20 km thick crust composed by an ~10 km thick faulted crustal upper layer and an ~10 km thick hydrated and/or mineralized layer. Oaxaca basement overthrust the younger Juárez (or Cuicateco) terrane. The electrical resistivity model supports the interpretation of a slab subducting at a low angle below Oaxaca. Uplift in the Oaxaca region appears to be related to fault reactivation induced by low angle subduction. In the Juárez terrane, isostatic forces may contribute to uplift because it is largely uncompensated. In the Sierra Madre del Sur, closer to the coast, uplift is facilitated by slab-dehydration driven buoyancy. Both gravity and resistivity models are consistent with a thinned upper crust in the northeast end of the profile.

  20. Imaging hydrothermal systems at Furnas caldera (Azores, Portugal): Insights from Audio-Magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, Colin; Kiyan, Duygu; Rath, Volker; Byrdina, Svetlana; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Silva, Catarina; Viveiros, Maria FB; Ferreira, Teresa

    2016-04-01

    The Furnas volcano is the eastern-most of the three active central volcanoes of Sao Miguel Island. The main caldera formed about 30 ka BP, followed by a younger eruption at 10-12 ka BP, which forms the steep topography of more than 200 m in the measuring area. It contains several very young eruptive centers, and a shallow caldera lake. Tectonic features of varying directions have been identified in the Caldera and its vicinity. In the northern part of the caldera, containing the fumarole field of Caldeiras das Furnas, a detailed map of surface CO2 emissions was recently made available. In 2015, a pilot survey of 13 AudioMagnetoTelluric soundings (AMT) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) data were collected along two profiles in the eastern part of Furnas caldera in order to image the electrical conductivity of the subsurface. The data quality achieved by both techniques is extraordinary and first results indicate a general correlation between regions of elevated conductivity and the mapped surface CO2 emissions, suggesting that they may both be caused by the presence hydrothermal fluids. Tensor decomposition analysis using the Groom-Bailey approach produce a generalised geo-electric strike direction, 72deg East of North, for the AMT data compared to the surface geological strike derived from the major mapped fault crossing the profiles of 105deg. An analysis of the real induction arrows at certain frequencies (at depths greater than 350 m) infer that an extended conductor at depth does not exactly correspond to the degassing structures at the surface and extends outside the area of investigation. The geometry of the most conductive regions with electrical conductivities less then1 Ώm found at various depths differ from what was expected from earlier geologic and tectonic studies and possibly may not be directly related to the mapped fault systems at the surface. On the eastern profile, which seemed to be more appropriate for 2-D modelling with 72deg strike angle, a deep structure starting north of the major mapped fault crossing this profile can be found. It extends far to the south, with a top of approximately 150 m below the surface at the northern limit. A deeper conductive structure (top at about 300 m) is emerging at the southern end of the profile, though not fully resolved by the existing data. This work will focus on the processing, analysis and preliminary modelling results of the AMT data. A joint interpretation of the AMT results together with the ERT data covering the shallow regime with much higher resolution will be presented.

  1. Deep crustal structure of the Cascade Range and surrounding regions from seismic refraction and magnetotelluric data

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, W.D. ); Mooney, W.D.; Fuis, G.S. )

    1990-11-10

    Analysis of three MT and two seismic refraction profiles in Oregon and a coincident MT and refraction profile in northern California show a high degree of correlation between resistivity and velocity models. The main feature that is evident in both data sets is a highly conductive (2-20 ohm m) zone that occurs at depths of 6-20 km and largely within a midcrustal velocity layer of 6.4-6.6 km/s, overlying a lower crust with velocities of 7.0-7.4 km/s. Although this conductor and the midcrustal zone of 6.4-6.6 km/s velocities are generally rather horizontal, important structures do occur. For instance, near the boundary of Western Cascades and High Cascades the MT midcrustal conductor rises to within 6 km of the surface. In addition, on the coincident MT-refraction profile in northern California a significant westward downdip occurs on both the MT deep conductor and the 6.4-km/s velocity layer, with both occurring at very similar depths. However, in the Columbia Plateau of Washington, no deep crustal conductors occur shallower than 25 km; also, the velocity structure is quite different, with a 6.8-km/s midcrust and a 7.5-km/s lower crust. Complex accretionary structures occur on MT models for the southern Washington Cascades. The accretionary structures in the southern Washington Cascades have been shown to be related to stress release in the area of Mount St. Helens. In order to explain the similar structures in the MT and refraction models for Oregon and California, the authors propose a model involving the effects of metamorphic zonation to produce the velocity structure, combined with metamorphically produced fluids and partial melt to produce the deep conductor.

  2. Mount St. Helens: Controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) data and inversions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeff; Pierce, Herbert A.

    2015-01-01

    The apparent conductivity (or its inverse, apparent resistivity) measured by a geoelectrical system is caused by several factors. The most important of these are water-filled rock porosity and the presence of water-filled fractures; however, rock type and minerals (for instance, sulfides and clay content) also contribute to apparent conductivity. In situations with little recharge (for instance, in arid regions), variations in ionic content of water occupying pore space and fractures sampled by the measurement system must also be factored in (Wynn, 2006). Variations in ionic content may also be present in hydrothermal fluids surrounding volcanoes in wet regions. In unusual cases, temperature may also affect apparent conductivity (Keller, 1989; Palacky, 1989). There is relatively little hydrothermal alteration (and thus fewer clay minerals that might add to the apparent conductivity) in the eruptive products of Mount St. Helens (Reid and others, 2010), so conductors observed in the Fischer, Occam, and Marquardt inversion results later in this report are thus believed to map zones with significant water content. Geoelectrical surveys thus have the potential to reveal subsurface regions with significant groundwater content, including perched and regional aquifers. Reid and others (2001) and Reid (2004) have suggested that groundwater involvement may figure in both the scale and the character of some if not all volcanic edifice collapse events. Ongoing research by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and others aims to better understand the contribution of groundwater to both edifice pore pressure and rock alteration as well as its direct influence on eruption processes by violent interaction with magma (Schmincke, 1998).

  3. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles in montmorillonite and their antibacterial behavior

    PubMed Central

    Shameli, Kamyar; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Zargar, Mohsen; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Rustaiyan, Abdolhossein; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa

    2011-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were synthesized by the chemical reducing method in the external and interlamellar space of montmorillonite (MMT) as a solid support at room temperature. AgNO3 and NaBH4 were used as a silver precursor and reducing agent, respectively. The most favorable experimental conditions for synthesizing Ag NPs in the MMT are described in terms of the initial concentration of AgNO3. The interlamellar space limits changed little (d-spacing = 1.24–1.47 nm); therefore, Ag NPs formed on the MMT suspension with d-average = 4.19–8.53 nm diameter. The Ag/MMT nanocomposites (NCs), formed from AgNO3/MMT suspension, were characterizations with different instruments, for example UV-visible, PXRD, TEM, SEM, EDXRF, FT-IR, and ICP-OES analyzer. The antibacterial activity of different sizes of Ag NPs in MMT were investigated against Gram-positive, ie, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and Gram-negative bacteria, ie, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Klebsiella pneumoniae, by the disk diffusion method using Mueller-Hinton agar (MHA). The smaller Ag NPs were found to have significantly higher antibacterial activity. These results showed that Ag NPs can be used as effective growth inhibitors in different biological systems, making them applicable to medical applications. PMID:21674015

  4. Cancellations of (helicopter-transported) mobile medical team dispatches in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Lubbers, Wouter D.; Christiaans, Herman M. T.; van Exter, Pieternel; Bet, Piet; Hugen, Paul J. C.; Innemee, Gerard; Schubert, Edo; de Lange-Klerk, Elly S. M.; Goslings, J. Carel; Jukema, Gerrolt N.

    2010-01-01

    Background The trauma centre of the Trauma Center Region North-West Netherlands (TRNWN) has consensus criteria for Mobile Medical Team (MMT) scene dispatch. The MMT can be dispatched by the EMS-dispatch centre or by the on-scene ambulance crew and is transported by helicopter or ground transport. Although much attention has been paid to improve the dispatch criteria, the MMT is often cancelled after being dispatched. The aim of this study was to assess the cancellation rate and the noncompliant dispatches of our MMT and to identify factors associated with this form of primary overtriage. Methods By retrospective analysis of all MMT dispatches in the period from 1 July 2006 till 31 December 2006 using chart review, we conducted a consecutive case review of 605 dispatches. Four hundred and sixty seven of these were included for our study, collecting data related to prehospital triage, patient’s condition on-scene and hospital course. Results Average age was 35.9 years; the majority of the patients were male (65.3%). Four hundred and thirty patients were victims of trauma, sustaining injuries in most cases from blunt trauma (89.3%). After being dispatched, the MMT was cancelled 203 times (43.5%). Statistically significant differences between assists and cancellations were found for overall mortality, mean RTS, GCS and ISS, mean hospitalization, length and amount of ICU admissions (p < 0.001). All dispatches were evaluated by using the MMT-dispatch criteria and mission appropriateness criteria. Almost 26% of all dispatches were neither appropriate, nor met the dispatch criteria. Fourteen missions were appropriate, but did not meet the dispatch criteria. The remaining 318 dispatches had met the dispatch criteria, of which 135 (30.3%) were also appropriate. The calculated additional costs of the cancelled dispatches summed up to a total of € 34,448, amounting to 2.2% of the total MMT costs during the study period. Conclusion In our trauma system, the MMT

  5. Volcano Monitoring and Early Warning on MT Etna, Italy, Using Volcanic Tremor - Methods and Technical Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, Marcello; Di Grazia, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Ferruccio; Langer, Horst; Messina, Alfio; Reitano, Danilo; Spampinato, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    Recent activity on Mt Etna was characterized by 25 lava fountains occurred on Mt Etna in 2011 and the first semester of 2012. In summer 2012 volcanic activity in a milder form was noticed within the Bocca Nuova crater, before it came to an essential halt in August 2012. Together with previous unrests (e. g., in 2007-08) these events offer rich material for testing automatic data processing and alert issue in the context of volcano monitoring. Our presentation focuses on the seismic background radiation - volcanic tremor - which has a key role in the surveillance of Mt Etna. From 2006 on a multi-station alert system exploiting STA/LTA ratios, has been established in the INGV operative centre of Catania. Besides, also the frequency content has been found to change correspondingly to the type of volcanic activity, and can thus be exploited for warning purposes. We apply Self Organizing Maps and Fuzzy Clustering which offer an efficient way to visualize signal characteristics and its development with time. These techniques allow to identify early stages of eruptive events and automatically flag a critical status before this becomes evident in conventional monitoring techniques. Changes of tremor characteristics are related to the position of the source of the signal. Given the dense seismic network we can base the location of the sources on distribution of the amplitudes across the network. The locations proved to be extremely useful for warning throughout both a flank eruption in 2008 as well as the 2011 lava fountains. During all these episodes a clear migration of tremor sources towards the eruptive centres was revealed in advance. The location of the sources completes the picture of an imminent volcanic unrest and corroborates early warnings flagged by the changes of signal characteristics. Automatic real time data processing poses high demands on computational efficiency, robustness of the methods and stability of data acquisition. The amplitude based multi

  6. Efficient approach to improving the flame retardancy of poly(vinyl alcohol)/clay aerogels: incorporating piperazine-modified ammonium polyphosphate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Tao; Liao, Shi-Fu; Shang, Ke; Chen, Ming-Jun; Huang, Jian-Qian; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Schiraldi, David A

    2015-01-28

    Ammonium polyphosphates (APP) modified with piperazine (PA-APP) was used to improve the flame retardancy of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/montmorillonite (MMT) aerogels, which were prepared via an environmentally friendly freeze-drying method. The thermal stabilities of the samples were evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TG); the flammability behaviors of samples were investigated by limiting oxygen index (LOI), vertical burning test (UL-94) and cone calorimeter (CC) tests. TG test results showed that the 5% weight loss temperature (T5%) of PVA/MMT/PA-APP was 10 °C higher than that of PVA/MMT/APP. In combustion testing, all of PVA/MMT/PA-APP aerogels achieved V-0 ratings and have a higher LOI values than the unmodified PVA/MMT aerogel. Moreover, the aerogel with 1% PA-APP5, which means that the content of piperazine is 5% in PA-APP, decreased the cone calorimetry THR value to 5.71 MJ/m(2), and increased the char residue to 52%. The compressive modulus of PVA/MMT/PA-APP was increased by 93.4% compared with PVA/MMT/APP because of the increase in interfacial adhesion between matrix and PA-APP fillers. The densities of the PVA/MMT/PA-APP samples were slightly lower than those of the unmodified aerogels because of reduced shrinkage in the presence of PA-APP. All the tests results indicated that the incorporation of PA-APP not only improved the thermal stability and flame retardancy of aerogels but also maintained their mechanical properties.

  7. Multilevel Predictors of Concurrent Opioid Use during Methadone Maintenance Treatment among Drug Users with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Bach Xuan; Ohinmaa, Arto; Mills, Steve; Duong, Anh Thuy; Nguyen, Long Thanh; Jacobs, Philip; Houston, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Background Ongoing drug use during methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) negatively affects outcomes of HIV/AIDS care and treatment for drug users. This study assessed changes in opioid use, and longitudinal predictors of continued opioid use during MMT among HIV-positive drug users in Vietnam, with the aim of identifying changes that might enhance program efficacy. Methods We analyze data of 370 HIV-positive drug users (mean age 29.5; 95.7% male) taking MMT at multi-sites. Opioid use was assessed at baseline, 3, 6, and 9 months using interviews and heroin confirmatory urine tests. A social ecological model was applied to explore multilevel predictors of continued opioid use, including individual, interpersonal, community and service influences. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) statistical models were constructed to adjust for intra-individual correlations. Results Over 9 month follow-up, self-reported opioid use and positive heroin urine test substantially decreased to 14.6% and 14.4%. MMT helped improve referrals and access to health care and social services. However, utilization of social integration services was small. GEE models determined that participants who were older (Adjusted Odd Ratio - AOR = 0.97 for 1 year increase), had economic dependents (AOR = 0.33), or were referred to TB treatment (AOR = 0.53) were less likely to continue opioid use. Significant positive predictors of ongoing opioid use included frequency of opioid use prior to MMT, peer pressure, living with sexual partners, taking antiretroviral treatment, other health concerns and TB treatment. Conclusion These findings show that MMT in the Vietnamese context can dramatically reduce opioid use, which is known to be associated with reduced antiretroviral (ART) adherence. Disease stage and drug interactions between antiretrovirals or TB drugs and MMT could explain some of the observed predictors of ongoing drug use; these findings could inform changes in MMT program design and

  8. Headspace thin-film microextraction onto graphene membranes for specific detection of methyl(cyclopentadienyl)-tricarbonyl manganese in water samples by total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, V.; Costas-Mora, I.; Lavilla, I.; Bendicho, C.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a novel analytical approach for determining methyl(cyclopentadienyl)-tricarbonyl (MMT) by total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) based on its trapping onto unmodified graphene membranes is described. Graphene membranes were synthesized by mild-thermal reduction of graphene oxide following drop-casting onto a glass substrate. High flexible and easy-to-handle graphene membranes with 10 mm diameter were obtained. In order to use the as-prepared membranes as extraction phases for headspace thin-solid film microextraction of MMT, they were fitted to quartz reflectors and placed onto the top of the glass vial containing the sample. Reflectors containing graphene membranes were directly used as sample carriers for TXRF analysis. Different parameters involved in the microextraction step were optimized in order to obtain the best performance. Detection and quantification limits were 18 and 60 ng L- 1 MMT, respectively. An enrichment factor of 265 was obtained. The method was successfully applied for the specific detection of MMT in different water samples and a certified reference material e.g., NWTM-27.2 fortified lake water. A recovery study was carried out on spiked water samples showing recoveries in the range 98-104% with a relative standard deviation of 4% (N = 5). In addition, speciation of manganese, i.e. MMT and Mn(II),in water samples can be accomplished since only volatile MMT is transferred to the headspace and retained onto graphene membranes.

  9. A narrative review of manual muscle testing and implications for muscle testing research

    PubMed Central

    Conable, Katharine M.; Rosner, Anthony L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Manual muscle testing (MMT) is used for a variety of purposes in health care by medical, osteopathic, chiropractic, physical therapy, rehabilitation, and athletic training professionals. The purpose of this study is to provide a narrative review of variations in techniques, durations, and forces used in MMT putting applied kinesiology (AK) muscle testing in context and highlighting aspects of muscle testing important to report in MMT research. Method PubMed, the Collected Papers of the International College of Applied Kinesiology–USA, and related texts were searched on the subjects of MMT, maximum voluntary isometric contraction testing, and make/break testing. Force parameters (magnitude, duration, timing of application), testing variations of MMT, and normative data were collected and evaluated. Results “Break” tests aim to evaluate the muscle's ability to resist a gradually increasing pressure and may test different aspects of neuromuscular control than tests against fixed resistances. Applied kinesiologists use submaximal manual break tests and a binary grading scale to test short-term changes in muscle function in response to challenges. Many of the studies reviewed were not consistent in reporting parameters for testing. Conclusions To increase the chances for replication, studies using MMT should specify parameters of the tests used, such as exact procedures and instrumentation, duration of test, peak force, and timing of application of force. PMID:22014904

  10. Is the modified Mallampati test performed in supine position a reliable predictor of difficult tracheal intubation?

    PubMed

    Bindra, Ashish; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Singh, Gyaninder Pal; Ali, Zulfiqar; Singhal, Vasudha

    2010-06-01

    Management of the airway is central to the practice of anesthesia. Several bedside airway assessment methods have been proposed for preoperative identification of patients who are difficult to intubate. The modified Mallampati test (MMT) remains a time-tested technique to date for recognizing an anticipated difficult tracheal intubation as assessed by Cormack-Lehane grade. Both Mallampati and its further modification by Samsoon and Young evaluate patients in the seated position. Recently a study mentioned a change in MMT score from sitting to supine position toward the higher side. However, there is a lack of data regarding the relationship of positional change in MMT with Cormack-Lehane grade. The aim of this prospective study was to assess if MMT score observed in sitting or supine position is a better predictor of difficult tracheal intubation. One hundred and twenty-three patients of ASA physical status I and II, aged 18-60 years, who were scheduled to undergo various neurosurgical procedures were enrolled for the study. We found that the MMT in supine position has a higher positive predictive value and is associated with more true positives as compared to MMT in the sitting position.

  11. Patient Satisfaction with Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Vietnam: A Comparison of Different Integrative-Service Delivery Models

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Bach Xuan; Nguyen, Long Hoang; Phan, Huong Thu Thi; Latkin, Carl A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is an important component of quality in healthcare delivery. To inform the expansion of Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) services in Vietnam, we examined the satisfaction of patients with regards to different services delivery models and identified its associated factors. Methods We interviewed 1,016 MMT patients at 5 clinics in Hanoi and Nam Dinh province. The modified SATIS instrument, a 10-item scale, was used to measure three dimensions: “Services quality and convenience”, “Health workers’ capacity and responsiveness” and “Inter-professional care”. Results The average score was high across three SATIS dimensions. However, only one third of patients completely satisfied with general health services and treatment outcomes. Older age, higher education, having any problem in self-care and anxiety/depression were negatively associated with patient’s satisfaction. Meanwhile, patients receiving MMT at clinics, where more comprehensive HIV and general health care services were available, were more likely to report a complete satisfaction. Conclusion Patients were highly satisfied with MMT services in Vietnam. However, treatment for drug users should go beyond methadone maintenance to address complicated health demands of drug users. Integrating MMT with comprehensive HIV and general health services together with improving the capacity of health workers and efficiency of services organisation to provide interconnected health care for drug users are critical for improving the outcomes of the MMT program. PMID:26556036

  12. Integrating antiretroviral therapy in methadone maintenance therapy clinics: Service provider perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chunqing; Cao, Xiaobin; Li, Li

    2014-01-01

    Background Using methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) clinics to deliver antiretroviral therapy (ART) is an effective strategy to promote treatment initiation and adherence for HIV-positive drug users. This paper describes the implementation barriers perceived by service providers for an intervention pilot designed to integrate ART services in MMT clinics. Methods The study was conducted in six MMT clinics in Sichuan province, China. Two service providers selected from each of the six clinics underwent training in administering ART. The trained providers delivered ART-related services in their clinics. A focus group was conducted among the service providers to assess their experiences and perceived challenges in delivering integrated services. Results Barriers at policy, institutional, provider, and client levels were identified. Policy level barriers included household registration restrictions and a lack of insurance coverage for testing expenses. Inefficient coordination between treatment sites and MMT clinics was an obstacle at the institutional level. Insufficient training and added workload were barriers at the provider level. Finally, conflict with daily dosing habits was identified as the primary reason that clients did not accept ART. Conclusion Although integrating ART into MMT clinics is beneficial, multilevel barriers to implementation need to be addressed. This study documents the need for treatment transferability and insurance coverage, protection of client confidentiality, proper provider training, coordination with treatment sites, and individualized ART service for MMT clients. PMID:24939555

  13. From Method to Post Method: A Panacea!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masouleh, Nima Shakouri

    2012-01-01

    The foundation of language teaching has undergone many changes. The rise and fall of language teaching methods depends upon a variety of factors extrinsic to a method itself and often reflects the influence of profit-seekers and promoters, as well as the forces of the intellectual marketplace. There was always a source of contention among people…

  14. Turbine blade testing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Testing procedures which could be used to model test turbine blades are developed. The methods studied were methods which used and extended current modal testing procedures. An acoustical impacting testing method was perfected for testing small turbine blades.

  15. Uranium price forecasting methods

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, D.M.

    1994-03-01

    This article reviews a number of forecasting methods that have been applied to uranium prices and compares their relative strengths and weaknesses. The methods reviewed are: (1) judgemental methods, (2) technical analysis, (3) time-series methods, (4) fundamental analysis, and (5) econometric methods. Historically, none of these methods has performed very well, but a well-thought-out model is still useful as a basis from which to adjust to new circumstances and try again.

  16. On waveform multigrid method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taasan, Shlomo; Zhang, Hong

    1993-01-01

    Waveform multigrid method is an efficient method for solving certain classes of time dependent PDEs. This paper studies the relationship between this method and the analogous multigrid method for steady-state problems. Using a Fourier-Laplace analysis, practical convergence rate estimates of the waveform multigrid iterations are obtained. Experimental results show that the analysis yields accurate performance prediction.

  17. Radiochemical method development

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, M.D.; Aldstadt, J.H.; Alvarado, J.S.; Crain, J.S.; Orlandini, K.A.; Smith, L.L.

    1994-09-01

    The authors have developed methods for chemical characterization of the environment under a multitask project that focuses on improvement of radioanalytical methods with an emphasis on faster and cheaper routine methods. The authors have developed improved methods for separation of environmental levels of technetium-99, radium, and actinides from soil and water; separation of actinides from soil and water matrix interferences; and isolation of strontium. They are also developing methods for simultaneous detection of multiple isotopes (including nonradionuclides) by using a new instrumental technique, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The new ICP-MS methods have greater sensitivity and efficiency and could replace many radiometric techniques. They are using flow injection analysis to integrate and automate the separation methods with the ICP-MS methodology. The final product of all activities will be methods that are available (published in the U.S. Department of Energy`s analytical methods compendium) and acceptable for use in regulatory situations.

  18. Inflow Turbulence Generation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Research