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Sample records for magnetron plasma torch

  1. Inductively coupled helium plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Montaser, Akbar; Chan, Shi-Kit; Van Hoven, Raymond L.

    1989-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma torch including a base member, a plasma tube and a threaded insert member within the plasma tube for directing the plasma gas in a tangential flow pattern. The design of the torch eliminates the need for a separate coolant gas tube. The torch can be readily assembled and disassembled with a high degree of alignment accuracy.

  2. Ternary gas plasma welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Waldron, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is discussed. A first plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of a welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. A second plasma gas is disposed for flow through a longitudinal bore in the electrode. The second plasma gas enters one end of the electrode and exits the electrode at the tip thereof for co-acting with the electric welding arc to produce the desired weld. A shield gas is directed through the torch body and circulates around the head of the torch adjacent to the electrode tip.

  3. Adapter Helps To Aline Plasma Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosemer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Simple adapter allows plasma welding torch alined accurately on weld seam. Adapter fits over nozzle of torch. Light from pilot arc inside torch passes through central orifice in cone. Light emerges from cone as beam that creates spot of light at point where torch impinges on workpiece. When torch is alined with work, adapter is removed, plasma arc struck, and welding proceeds.

  4. Plasma torch igniter for scramjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Timothy C.; O'Brien, Walter F.; Northam, G. Burton; Eggers, James M.

    1989-01-01

    A small, uncooled plasma torch was developed and used in combination with an injector designed to study ignition and flameholding in hydrogen-fueled supersonic flows. The plasma torch was operated on mixtures of hydrogen and argon with total flows of 10 to 70 scfh. The fuel injector design consisted of five small upstream pilot fuel injectors, a rearward facing step for recirculation, and three main fuel injectors downstream of the step. The plasma torch was located in the recirculation region, and all injection was perpendicular to the Mach 2 stream. Both semi-freejet and ducted tests were conducted. The experimental results indicate that a low power plasma torch operating on a 1:1 volumetric mixture of hydrogen and argon and located in the recirculation zone fueled by the upstream pilot fuel injectors is a good igniter for flow conditions simulating a flight Mach number of 3.7. The total temperature required to autoignite the hydrogen fuel for this injector geometry was 2640 R. The injector configuration was shown to be a good flameholder over a wide range of total temperature. Spectroscopic measurements were used to verify the presence of air total temperatures below 1610 R.

  5. Plasma torch igniter for scramjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Timothy C.; Obrien, Walter F.; Northam, G. Burton; Eggers, James M.

    1986-01-01

    A small, uncooled plasma torch was developed and used in combination with an injector designed to study ignition and flameholding in hydrogen-fueled supersonic flows. The plasma torch was operated on mixtures of hydrogen and argon with total flows of 10 to 70 scfh. The fuel injector design consisted of five small upstream pilot fuel injectors, a rearward facing step for recirculation, and three main fuel injectors downstream of the step. The plasma torch was located in the recirculation region, and all injection was perpendicular to the Mach 2 stream. Both semi-freejet and ducted tests were conducted. The experimental results indicate that a low power plasma torch operating on a 1:1 volumetric mixture of hygrogen and argon and located in the recirculation zone fueled by the upstream pilot fuel injectors is a good igniter for flow conditions simulating a flight Mach number of 3.7. The total temperature required to autoignite the hydrogen fuel for this injector geometry was 2640 R. The injector configuration was shown to be a good flameholder over a wide range of total temperature. Spectroscopic measurements were used to verify the presence of air total temperatures below 1610 R.

  6. Atmospheric Electrodeless Microwave Plasma-torch for Gas Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Hong, Y. C.; Uhm, H. S.

    2001-10-01

    Increasing environmental awareness and regulation have motivated research into new method to remediate toxins from atmospheric pressure gas streams. Plasma remediation was identified as a promising technology treating contaminated gas streams and air. Plasma remediation of toxic gas streams from mobile emitting sources (i. e., Nox, Sox, soot emission from diesel truck engines) and cleaning processes (i.e., global warming gases) require inexpensive, compact, and reliable systems which efficiently and selectively convert the toxic gas to benign or more treatable products. Environmental clean-up and energy efficiency enhancement utilize plasma generated from air at the atmospheric pressure. Electrodes of the arc plasma torches oxidize very quickly due to the oxygen molecules in air. That is why the conventional thermal plasma torch can not be used in environmental applications. In order to solve this difficult problem, we developed a thermal plasma source operating without electrodes. One of electrodeless torches is the microwave plasma which can produce plasmas in large quantities. We can generate plasma at the atmospheric pressure by making use of magnetrons in microwave-ovens. Most of the magnetrons are operated at the frequency of 2.45GHz. Typical magnetron power of home-microwave oven is about 1kW. Electromagnetic waves from magnetron propagate through a waveguide. Plasma is generated under resonant condition, by initiation of an auxiliary ignition system. The plasma is stabilized by vortex stabilization. The eventual application of this research is in air pollution control. Perfluorocarbon Compounds(PFCs), , , and any other global warming gases from etching and cleaning processes have very long lifetime and high global warming potential. We will conduct an experiment to eliminate global warming gases. FT-IR and QMS will be used to analyze and identify by-products after plasma treatment.

  7. Arc plasma jets of a nontransferred plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, K.D.; Hong, S.H.

    1996-02-01

    The dc plasma torches have been widely used as clean plasma sources for plasma processings such as plasma spraying and synthesis. The plasma flow of a nontransferred plasma torch used for thermal plasma processings is produced by the arc-gas interactions between a cathode tip and an anode nozzle and expands as a jet through the nozzle. In this work, numerically calculated images of the arc plasma characteristics are found over the entire plasma region, including both an arc-gas interacting region inside the torch and a jet expanding region outside the torch. A numerical model used assumes a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) with near-electrode phenomena and compressible flow effects. The computational system is described by a two-dimensional (2-D) axisymmetric model which is solved for plasma temperature and velocity by a control volume approach with the modified SIMPLER algorithm in a real torch geometry.

  8. Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed

    DOEpatents

    Hooper, Frederick M

    2002-01-01

    A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

  9. Plasma arc welding torch having means for vortexing plasma gas exiting the welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is described wherein a plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of the welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. The plasma gas is provided with a vortexing motion prior to exiting the body by a vortex motion imparting member which is mounted in an orifice housing member and carried in the forward portion of the torch body. The orifice housing member is provided with an orifice of an predetermined diameter through which the electric arc and the plasma gas exits.

  10. Plasma Torch for Plasma Ignition and Combustion of Coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustimenko, Alexandr; Messerle, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    Plasma-fuel systems (PFS) have been developed to improve coal combustion efficiency. PFS is a pulverized coal burner equipped with arc plasma torch producing high temperature air stream of 4000 - 6000 K. Plasma activation of coal at the PFS increases the coal reactivity and provides more effective ignition and ecologically friendly incineration of low-rank coal. The main and crucial element of PFS is plasma torch. Simplicity and reliability of the industrial arc plasma torches using cylindrical copper cathode and air as plasma forming gas predestined their application at heat and power engineering for plasma aided coal combustion. Life time of these plasma torches electrodes is critical and usually limited to 200 hours. Considered in this report direct current arc plasma torch has the cathode life significantly exceeded 1000 hours. To ensure the electrodes long life the process of hydrocarbon gas dissociation in the electric arc discharge is used. In accordance to this method atoms and ions of carbon from near-electrode plasma deposit on the active surface of the electrodes and form electrode carbon condensate which operates as ``actual'' electrode. Complex physicochemical investigation showed that deposit consists of nanocarbon material.

  11. Control of arc plasma torches: compensation of operational enthalpy drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, D. H.; Alexieva, J.; Djakov, B. E.; Enikov, R.; Dimitrov, D.

    2008-05-01

    In arc plasma torches electrode wear is the main reason for slow changes in the electrical and thermal torch characteristics. Such effects hinder technological applications of this type of plasma torches whenever the enthalpy must be maintained at a fixed level, or varied as needed. To solve this problem, a new method and algorithm for torch control are proposed. The time evolution of the arc current, voltage and thermal power loss of the torch are recorded. The values measured are used to find the required value of the enthalpy.

  12. Properties of microwave plasma torch operating at a low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Soon C.; Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Yong C.; Kim, Jae H.

    2008-10-15

    A microwave plasma torch system is attached to a low-pressure chamber in this study. The electric field induced in a quartz discharge tube by microwave radiation breaks down the gas at a sufficiently low pressure, igniting the plasma, which is continuously sustained by the microwave radiation. The plasma profile at a very low pressure is shown to be asymmetric with higher density on the incoming side of the microwaves. The gas temperature at the bright spot of the torch plasma measured via the optical emission from hydroxide radicals is shown to increase drastically upon high-pressure operation as the microwave power increases. The electron density at the torch flame is measured by recording the Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer beta line. The plasma density increases as the microwave power increases. The typical argon plasma density of a plasma torch powered at 500 W under a pressure of 150 Torr is on the order of 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 3}. The electron temperature in the argon torch plasma was estimated to be 1.5 eV, thereby effectively exciting the molecules in the torch gas. Disintegration of nitrogen fluoride (NF{sub 3}) indicates that a microwave plasma torch operating at a low pressure can efficiently generate an abundant amount of chemical radicals.

  13. Plasma-Arc Torch For Welding Ducts In Place

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangl, Kenneth J.; Bayless, Ernest; Looney, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Plasma-arc-welding torch redesigned, more suitable for applications in which moved in circular or other orbits about stationary cylindrical workpieces. Preserves elements of original design critical to performance and endurance, but modifies other elements to decrease overall size of torch. Electrode collet and collet nut installed and removed through hole in top; makes installation and removal easier.

  14. Optical plasma torch electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, G.; Karger, O.; Knetsch, A.; Xi, Y.; Deng, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Smith, J.; Manahan, G. G.; Sheng, Z.-M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Hidding, B.

    2015-08-01

    A novel, flexible method of witness electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators is described. A quasistationary plasma region is ignited by a focused laser pulse prior to the arrival of the plasma wave. This localized, shapeable optical plasma torch causes a strong distortion of the plasma blowout during passage of the electron driver bunch, leading to collective alteration of plasma electron trajectories and to controlled injection. This optically steered injection is more flexible and faster when compared to hydrodynamically controlled gas density transition injection methods.

  15. Inductively coupled plasma torch with laminar flow cooling

    DOEpatents

    Rayson, Gary D.; Shen, Yang

    1991-04-30

    An improved inductively coupled gas plasma torch. The torch includes inner and outer quartz sleeves and tubular insert snugly fitted between the sleeves. The insert includes outwardly opening longitudinal channels. Gas flowing through the channels of the insert emerges in a laminar flow along the inside surface of the outer sleeve, in the zone of plasma heating. The laminar flow cools the outer sleeve and enables the torch to operate at lower electrical power and gas consumption levels additionally, the laminar flow reduces noise levels in spectroscopic measurements of the gaseous plasma.

  16. Decontamination of biological warfare agents by a microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Wilson; Lai, Henry; Kuo, Spencer P.; Tarasenko, Olga; Levon, Kalle

    2005-02-01

    A portable arc-seeded microwave plasma torch running stably with airflow is described and applied for the decontamination of biological warfare agents. Emission spectroscopy of the plasma torch indicated that this torch produced an abundance of reactive atomic oxygen that could effectively oxidize biological agents. Bacillus cereus was chosen as a simulant of Bacillus anthracis spores for biological agent in the decontamination experiments. Decontamination was performed with the airflow rate of 0.393 l/s, corresponding to a maximum concentration of atomic oxygen produced by the torch. The experimental results showed that all spores were killed in less than 8 s at 3 cm distance, 12 s at 4 cm distance, and 16 s at 5 cm distance away from the nozzle of the torch.

  17. Generation and characterization of atmospheric plasma torch array

    SciTech Connect

    Koretzky, E.; Kuo, S.P.

    1997-12-31

    Using a capacitively coupled electrical discharge, an array of plasma torches can be produced simultaneously by using a common 60 cycle power source (i.e. a simple wall plug) at atmospheric pressure. The size of each torch depends on the geometry of the electrode pair and the streaming speed of the air flow. Such a flat panel plasma torch array can be made into the desired volume and plasma density. A laser beam is used to measure the dimensions of the torch. It is found that each torch has a radius of about 1 cm and a height of about 6.5 cm. Surprisingly, it is shown that the torch can cause up to 80% modulation of the laser beam intensity. From the voltage and current measurements, the average power consumption of each torch is estimated to be 0.6 kW. The electron density can also be estimated and is found to exceed 10{sup 13}cm{sup {minus}3}. The discharge may be represented by a lump circuit. Thus, a computer simulation of the discharge is performed. The results are found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements. Simulations have also been performed to study the dependence of average electron density, with the electron-ion recombination coefficient as a parameter. The study is aimed at developing an efficient large volume dense plasma for industrial applications.

  18. A new small microwave plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stonies, Robert; Schermer, Susanne; Voges, Edgar; Broekaert, José A. C.

    2004-11-01

    The development of a new, very small coaxial plasma source based on the microwave plasma torch (MPT) is described. It generates a plasma jet up to 4 mm long and can be operated with a argon gas flow rate less than 70 ml per min at down to 2 W microwave power (2.45 GHz) at atmospheric pressure. It also works well with helium and does not show any wear during a test period of 30 h of operation with argon. It is, in particular, thought to be a source for the atomic spectroscopy of gaseous species. The excitation temperature is found to be ~4700 K for this device operating with helium and 17 W microwave power. A detection limit for an example application in which Cl is detected from HCCl3 is found to be below 66 ppb. For the first time, to our knowledge, microstrip circuits are used to match the small MPT to the generator's 50 OHgr impedance. The design considerations for the microstrip circuits are discussed and an approximated calculation for the layout is presented. With the introduced procedure it is possible to design even smaller MPTs for special applications.

  19. A Plasma Lens for Magnetron Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Brown, Jeff

    2010-11-30

    A plasma lens, consisting of a solenoid and potential-defining ring electrodes, has been placed between a magnetron and substrates to be coated. Photography reveals qualitative information on excitation, ionization, and the transport of plasma to the substrate.

  20. Development and Use of the Dual-Mode Plasma Torch

    SciTech Connect

    Womack, R.; Shuey, M.

    2002-02-26

    After several years of development, a commercially available high-temperature treatment system has been developed and installed that treats heterogeneous low-level radioactive waste. High temperature plasma processing, unique torch design and operating features make it feasible to achieve a volume reduced, permanent, high integrity waste form while eliminating the personnel exposure and costs associated with conventional sorting, characterizing and handling. Plasma technology can also be used to treat previous conditioned waste packages that no longer meet the current acceptance criteria for final disposal. Plasma treatment can result, in many cases, in a substantial volume reduction, which lowers the final disposal costs. This paper covers the recently patented dual mode plasma torch design(1), the lessons learned that fostered its development and the advantages it brings to radioactive waste processing. This paper also provides current full scale Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment (PACT) project status and how the dual mode torch is being used in the PACT system.

  1. Laminar-flow torch for helium inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, H.; Chan, S.K.; Montaser, A.

    1988-11-15

    Helium inductively coupled plasmas (He ICPs) operated at atmospheric pressure, possess two advantages compared to Ar ICPs for atomic emission spectrometry (AES) and mass spectrometry (MS). First, for the elements tested so far, the detection powers for the He ICPs are superior to those for an Ar discharge. Second, the emission background spectra of the He ICPs are quite simple in the red and the near-infrared regions, thus reducing the spectral interference problems encountered with the determination of halogens and other nonmetals. Relatedly, certain mass spectral interferences noted in the detection of monoisotopic elements are eliminated when helium is used as the plasma gas instead of argon. For the most recent studies of He ICPs, the authors used a tangential-flow torch to form an annular plasma at forward power of 1500 W with a total helium gas flow of 8 L/min. The present study is concerned with the formation and preliminary characterization of a He ICP using a laminar-flow torch. The total helium gas flow for this torch is less than 2 L/min. Studies of plasmas formed in laminar-flow torches are important because of the possibility to reduce one major source of noise resulting from the rotation of the plasma gas in tangential-flow torches.

  2. Acoustic stabilization of electric arc instabilities in nontransferred plasma torches

    SciTech Connect

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2010-03-08

    Electric arc instabilities in dc plasma torches lead to nonhomogeneous treatments of nanosized solid particles or liquids injected within thermal plasma jets. This paper shows that an additional acoustic resonator mounted on the cathode cavity allows reaching a significant damping of these instabilities, particularly the Helmholtz mode of arc oscillations. The acoustic resonator is coupled with the Helmholtz resonator of the plasma torch limiting the amplitude of arc voltage variations. It is also highlighted that this damping is dependent on friction effects in the acoustic resonator.

  3. Disintegration of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in a Microwave Plasma Torch.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyoung S; Uhm, Han S; Hong, Yong C; Choi, Eun H

    2015-12-17

    A pure carbon dioxide torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Carbon dioxide gas becomes the working gas and produces a stable carbon dioxide torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. Temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and thermocouple. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of relatively low-temperature zone. Study of carbon dioxide disintegration and gas temperature effects on the molecular fraction characteristics in the carbon dioxide plasma of a microwave plasma torch under atmospheric pressure is carried out. An analytical investigation of carbon dioxide disintegration indicates that substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules disintegrate and form other compounds in the torch. For example, the normalized particle densities at center of plasma are given by nCO2/nN = 6.12 × 10(-3), nCO/nN = 0.13, nC/nN = 0.24, nO/nN = 0.61, nC2/nN = 8.32 × 10(-7), nO2/nN = 5.39 × 10(-5), where nCO2, nCO, nC, nO, nC2, and nO2 are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon and oxygen atom, carbon and oxygen molecule densities, respectively. nN is the neutral particle density. Emission profiles of the oxygen and carbon atom radicals and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch.

  4. Disintegration of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in a Microwave Plasma Torch

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyoung S.; Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Yong C.; Choi, Eun H.

    2015-01-01

    A pure carbon dioxide torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Carbon dioxide gas becomes the working gas and produces a stable carbon dioxide torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. Temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and thermocouple. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of relatively low-temperature zone. Study of carbon dioxide disintegration and gas temperature effects on the molecular fraction characteristics in the carbon dioxide plasma of a microwave plasma torch under atmospheric pressure is carried out. An analytical investigation of carbon dioxide disintegration indicates that substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules disintegrate and form other compounds in the torch. For example, the normalized particle densities at center of plasma are given by nCO2/nN = 6.12 × 10−3, nCO/nN = 0.13, nC/nN = 0.24, nO/nN = 0.61, nC2/nN = 8.32 × 10−7, nO2/nN = 5.39 × 10−5, where nCO2, nCO, nC, nO, nC2, and nO2 are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon and oxygen atom, carbon and oxygen molecule densities, respectively. nN is the neutral particle density. Emission profiles of the oxygen and carbon atom radicals and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch. PMID:26674957

  5. Disintegration of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in a Microwave Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Hyoung S.; Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Yong C.; Choi, Eun H.

    2015-12-01

    A pure carbon dioxide torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Carbon dioxide gas becomes the working gas and produces a stable carbon dioxide torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. Temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and thermocouple. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of relatively low-temperature zone. Study of carbon dioxide disintegration and gas temperature effects on the molecular fraction characteristics in the carbon dioxide plasma of a microwave plasma torch under atmospheric pressure is carried out. An analytical investigation of carbon dioxide disintegration indicates that substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules disintegrate and form other compounds in the torch. For example, the normalized particle densities at center of plasma are given by nCO2/nN = 6.12 × 10-3, nCO/nN = 0.13, nC/nN = 0.24, nO/nN = 0.61, nC2/nN = 8.32 × 10-7, nO2/nN = 5.39 × 10-5, where nCO2, nCO, nC, nO, nC2, and nO2 are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon and oxygen atom, carbon and oxygen molecule densities, respectively. nN is the neutral particle density. Emission profiles of the oxygen and carbon atom radicals and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch.

  6. Disintegration of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in a Microwave Plasma Torch.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyoung S; Uhm, Han S; Hong, Yong C; Choi, Eun H

    2015-01-01

    A pure carbon dioxide torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Carbon dioxide gas becomes the working gas and produces a stable carbon dioxide torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. Temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and thermocouple. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of relatively low-temperature zone. Study of carbon dioxide disintegration and gas temperature effects on the molecular fraction characteristics in the carbon dioxide plasma of a microwave plasma torch under atmospheric pressure is carried out. An analytical investigation of carbon dioxide disintegration indicates that substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules disintegrate and form other compounds in the torch. For example, the normalized particle densities at center of plasma are given by nCO2/nN = 6.12 × 10(-3), nCO/nN = 0.13, nC/nN = 0.24, nO/nN = 0.61, nC2/nN = 8.32 × 10(-7), nO2/nN = 5.39 × 10(-5), where nCO2, nCO, nC, nO, nC2, and nO2 are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon and oxygen atom, carbon and oxygen molecule densities, respectively. nN is the neutral particle density. Emission profiles of the oxygen and carbon atom radicals and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch. PMID:26674957

  7. Advances in induction-heated plasma torch technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, J. W.; Vogel, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    Continuing research has resulted in significant advances in induction-heated plasma torch technology which extend and enhance its potential for broad range of uses in chemical processing, materials development and testing, and development of large illumination sources. Summaries of these advances are briefly described.

  8. Influence of Atmospheric Pressure Torch Plasma Irradiation on Plant Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyoshi, Yusuke; Hayashi, Nobuya; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2011-10-01

    Growth stimulation characteristics of plants seeds are investigated by an atmospheric discharge irradiation into plasma seeds. Atmospheric pressure plasma torch is consisted of alumina ceramics tube and the steel mesh electrodes wind inside and outside of the tube. When AC high voltage (8 kHz) is applied to the electrode gap, the barrier discharge plasma is produced inside the alumina ceramics tube. The barrier discharge plasma is blown outside with the gas flow in ceramics tube. Radish sprouts seeds locate at 1 cm from the torch edge. The growth stimulation was observed in the length of a stem and a root after the plasma irradiation. The stem length increases approximately 2.8 times at the cultivation time of 24 h. And the growth stimulation effect is found to be maintained for 40 h, after sowing seeds. The mechanism of the growth stimulation would be the redox reaction inside plant cells induced by oxygen radicals.

  9. The plasma arc torch -- its electrical and thermal characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    The plasma arc torch is a very effective heating device. Plasma arc heating technology is very appropriate and essential for product manufacture and for remediating and protecting the environment. The plasma torch initiates and maintains a length of arc column, similar to a lightning bolt, and the electrically-conducting column is used in the conversion of electricity into heat energy. The format of the heat energy delivery is a low-mass, high-enthalpy gas. Heat energy is delivered by the plasma torch with a minimum of mass -- only about 2--3% of the mass delivery from a combustion heater that is delivering the same heat enthalpy. This virtually mass-less heat is ideal for promoting very rapid physical changes and chemical changes in the material being heated. It is ideal for the pyrolysis (or gasification) of organic materials and for the vitrification (or melting) of inorganic materials -- processes that are desirable for new product manufacture and for environmental remediation and protection. Plasma arc heating technology has been perfected by industry during the last 20--30 years, and the industrial sector today is employing this unique heating source in product manufacture and, lately, in environmental remediation and protection processes. It is a cost-effective industrial heat source. The primary objective of this paper is to familiarize one with plasma heaters and their operating characteristics. The essential elements of the plasma arc torch: electrodes, insulators, gas injectors, water-cooling, electrical connectors, etc., are described and the electrical and thermal characteristics of this novel heating device are highlighted. An overview of today`s employment of plasma heating technology and a sample of some of today`s applications of the technology in the industrial sector in the United States and around the world are presented.

  10. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating. pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal.

  11. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode Pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, M.A.

    1995-04-25

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal. 5 figs.

  12. A theory of the plasma torch for waste-treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, H.S.; Hong, S.H.

    1997-12-31

    Arc-plasma technology has broad applications to waste treatment processing including the safe disposal of hazardous and low-level radioactive wastes. The plasma torch could be useful to the development of an efficient, compact, lightweight, clean burning incinerator for industrial and municipal waste disposal in an environmentally beneficial way. The authors therefore develop a simple theoretical model describing physics of the plasma torch plume in connection with its applications to the arc-plasma waste-treatment system. The theoretical analysis is carried out by making use of Bernoulli`s pressure-balance equation, which provides a stable equilibrium solution of the gas density in the plume ejected from the torch into a high-pressure reactor chamber with 4{var_epsilon} < 1. The pressure depression parameter {var_epsilon} is proportional to the gas temperature and inversely proportional to the square of the chamber pressure. In a low-pressure chamber, characterized by 4{var_epsilon} > 1, there is no stable equilibrium solution satisfying Bernoulli`s equation. Therefore, it is expected that the observable plasma data may change abruptly as the chamber pressure crosses the borderline defined by 4{var_epsilon} = 1. Indeed most of the plasma data measured in an experiment change abruptly at the pressure borderline of 4{var_epsilon} = 1.

  13. Plasma Spraying of Copper by Hybrid Water-Gas DC Arc Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavka, T.; Matějíček, J.; Ctibor, P.; Mašláni, A.; Hrabovský, M.

    2011-06-01

    Water-stabilized DC arc plasma torches offer a good alternative to common plasma sources used for plasma spraying applications. Unique properties of the generated plasma are determined by a specific plasma torch construction. This article is focused on a study of the plasma spraying process performed by a hybrid torch WSP500®-H, which combines two principles of arc stabilization—water vortex and gas flow. Spraying tests with copper powder have been carried out in a wide range of plasma torch parameters. First, analyses of particle in-flight behavior for various spraying conditions were done. After, particles were collected in liquid nitrogen, which enabled analyses of the particle in-flight oxidation. A series of spraying tests were carried out and coatings were analyzed for their microstructure, porosity, oxide content, mechanical, and thermal properties.

  14. The effects of axial magnetic fields on the operating characteristics and downstream plasma parameters of DC plasma torches

    SciTech Connect

    Takakura, Y.; Ono, S.; Teii, S.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma torch is used in many industrial processes for high temperature sources. In the past, an application of magnetic field is experientially known to stabilize plasma torch operations. However, there is a little discussion regarding to magnetic field effects on plasma torch operating characteristics and plasma parameters. In this work, the influences of magnetic field and plasma gas flow rate on plasma torch current-voltage characteristics and downstream plasma parameters have been experimentally studied, and results are qualitatively analyzed based on the charged particle transport equation.

  15. Plasma torch with liquid metal electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Predtechenskii, M.R.; Tukhto, O.M.

    2006-03-15

    In order to eliminate the negative effect of erosion processes on electrodes in arc plasma generators, a new scheme of arc discharge was proposed in which the surface of a molten metal acts as electrodes. A plasma reactor was designed on the basis of this concept. The electrophysical characteristics of such a discharge in steam and air as plasma gases were studied. Experiments on destruction of toxic polychlorinated biphenyls and steam coal gasification were performed.

  16. Polycrystal diamond growth in a microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeichev, K. F.; Lukina, N. A.; Bolshakov, A. P.; Ralchenko, V. G.; Arutyunyan, N. R.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2010-12-15

    Diamond films of different structures were deposited on quartz, WC-Co, and molybdenum substrates in a microwave plasma torch discharge in an argon-hydrogen-methane gas mixture in a sealed chamber at pressures close to atmospheric by using the chemical vapor deposition technique. Images of diamond polycrystal films and separate crystals, as well as results of Raman spectroscopy, are presented. The spectra of optical plasma radiation recorded during film deposition demonstrate the presence of intense H{sub {alpha}} hydrogen and C{sub 2} radical bands known as Swan bands.

  17. A comprehensive study of different gases in inductively coupled plasma torch operating at one atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Punjabi, Sangeeta B.; Joshi, N. K.; Mangalvedekar, H. A.; Lande, B. K.; Das, A. K.; Kothari, D. C.

    2012-01-15

    A numerical study is done to understand the possible operating regimes of RF-ICP torch (3 MHz, 50 kW) using different gases for plasma formation at atmospheric pressure. A two dimensional numerical simulation of RF-ICP torch using argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and air as plasma gas has been investigated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software fluent{sup (c)}. The operating parameters varied here are central gas flow, sheath gas flow, RF-power dissipated in plasma, and plasma gas. The temperature contours, flow field, axial, and radial velocity profiles were investigated under different operating conditions. The plasma resistance, inductance of the torch, and the heat distribution for various plasma gases have also been investigated. The plasma impedance of ICP torch varies with different operating parameters and plays an important role for RF oscillator design and power coupling. These studies will be useful to decide the design criteria for ICP torches required for different material processing applications.

  18. Microwave plasma torch abatement of NF3 and SF6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup; Chun, Byung Jun; Lee, Sun Ku; Hwang, Sang Kyu; Kim, Dong Su

    2006-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure microwave plasma torch as a tool for fluorinated compounds (FCs) abatement was presented. Detailed experiments were conducted on the abatement of NF3 and SF6 in terms of destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Swirl gas, compressed air for stable plasma, was tangentially injected into the microwave plasma torch and a mixture of N2, NF3, or SF6, and C2H4 was axially injected. The DRE of 99.1% for NF3 was achieved without an additive gas at the total flow rate of 50.1 liters per minute (lpm) by applying a microwave power of 1.4kW. Also, a DRE of SF6 up to 90.1% was obtained at the total flow rate of 40.6lpm using an applied microwave power of 1.4kW. Experimental results indicate that the microwave plasma abatement device can successfully eliminate FCs in the semiconductor industry.

  19. Influence of the Laminar Plasma Torch Construction on the Jet Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiuquan; Yu, Deping; Xiang, Yong; Yao, Jin; Miao, Jianguo

    2016-07-01

    Based on two typical laminar plasma torches (LPT), i.e. a multi-electrode plasma torch (MEPT) with segmented anode structure and a two-electrode plasma torch (TEPT) with conventional structure, this paper studied the influence of the LPTs construction on the jet characteristics. Experiments were designed to measure their arc voltage, jet length, thermal efficiency and specific enthalpy using a home-made data acquisition system. With them, the jet characteristics of the two different LPTs were compared in detail. Results show that different plasma torch construction leads to distinctively different characteristics of the generated plasma jet. Based on the different jet characteristics, a plasma torch with appropriate construction could be used to meet the different application requirements. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51405315) and the Laboratory of Precision Manufacturing Technology, CAEP (No. KF15002)

  20. Plasma torch toothbrush a new insight in fear free dentisry.

    PubMed

    Kumar Ch, Santosh; Sarada, P; Reddy Ch, Sampath; Reddy M, Surendra; Dsv, Nagasailaja

    2014-06-01

    Dental treatment is considered painful either because of fear or anxiety. Even though fear and anxiety could be managed; the needle pricks and the heat generated with drills are both painful and destructive to the tissues of the tooth. A new technology which can reduce the pain and destruction of the dental tissues will be of huge value. Plasma torch toothbrush fits into such criteria and when developed fully, will be able to apply for many of the dental procedures for increasing the efficiency. PMID:25121075

  1. Plasma torch toothbrush a new insight in fear free dentisry.

    PubMed

    Kumar Ch, Santosh; Sarada, P; Reddy Ch, Sampath; Reddy M, Surendra; Dsv, Nagasailaja

    2014-06-01

    Dental treatment is considered painful either because of fear or anxiety. Even though fear and anxiety could be managed; the needle pricks and the heat generated with drills are both painful and destructive to the tissues of the tooth. A new technology which can reduce the pain and destruction of the dental tissues will be of huge value. Plasma torch toothbrush fits into such criteria and when developed fully, will be able to apply for many of the dental procedures for increasing the efficiency.

  2. Plasma Torch Toothbrush a New Insight in Fear Free Dentisry

    PubMed Central

    Sarada, P; Reddy CH, Sampath; Reddy M, Surendra; DSV, Nagasailaja

    2014-01-01

    Dental treatment is considered painful either because of fear or anxiety. Even though fear and anxiety could be managed; the needle pricks and the heat generated with drills are both painful and destructive to the tissues of the tooth. A new technology which can reduce the pain and destruction of the dental tissues will be of huge value. Plasma torch toothbrush fits into such criteria and when developed fully, will be able to apply for many of the dental procedures for increasing the efficiency. PMID:25121075

  3. Effects of Nozzle Configuration on Flow Characteristics inside DC Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, X. Q.; Li, H.; Zhao, T. Z.; Guo, W. K.; Xu, P.

    2004-10-01

    The effects of nozzle configuration on the characteristics of flow inside DC arc plasma torches are investigated by numerical simulation. The plasma torches with three typical types of nozzle configuration are used in this paper, and these torches are the SG-100 series commercial products of PRAXAIR Thermal Spray Products Inc. The assumption of steady-state, axis-symmetric, local thermodynamic equilibrium, and optically thin plasma is adopted in a two-dimensional modeling of plasma flow inside a plasma torch. The PHOENICS software is used for solving the governing equations, i.e., the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy. The calculated arc voltages are consistent with the experimental results when arc current, gas inflow rate, and working gas are the same. Temperature, axial velocity contours inside the plasma torches, and profiles along the torch axis and at the outlet section are presented to show the plasma flow characteristics. Comparisons are made among these torches in detail and the results show that torches with different anode nozzle configurations produce different characteristic plasma flows.

  4. Plasma torch for ignition, flameholding and enhancement of combustion in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Billingsley, Matthew C. (Inventor); Sanders, Darius D. (Inventor); Schetz, Joseph A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Preheating of fuel and injection into a plasma torch plume fro adjacent the plasma torch plume provides for only ignition with reduced delay but improved fuel-air mixing and fuel atomization as well as combustion reaction enhancement. Heat exchange also reduced erosion of the anode of the plasma torch. Fuel mixing atomization, fuel mixture distribution enhancement and combustion reaction enhancement are improved by unsteady plasma torch energization, integral formation of the heat exchanger, fuel injection nozzle and plasma torch anode in a more compact, low-profile arrangement which is not intrusive on a highspeed air flow with which the invention is particularly effective and further enhanced by use of nitrogen as a feedstock material and inclusion of high pressure gases in the fuel to cause effervescence during injection.

  5. Design and test of a large plasma torch for environmental recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Tuszewski, M.

    1996-12-31

    A 2.5-inch inductive plasma torch has been tested with up to 600 kW rf power and with argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. A complete power balance is obtained from electrical, thermal, and radiation measurements. These data indicate that torch efficiencies of up to 30% are obtained with molecular gases, while efficiencies around 15% are obtained with argon. The efficiencies obtained with molecular gases almost triple earlier torch efficiencies and confirm substantially the predictions of a torch model developed during a previous CRADA. Torch efficiencies of up to 50% could be obtained in future tests with an improved rf power supply, with steam gas, and with larger torch dimensions. Future applications of the Plasma Energy Recycle and Conversion (PERC) process could include the high explosives of DOE`s nuclear weapons, chemical and biological remediation, and the treatment and volume reduction of radioactive mixed waste.

  6. Characteristics of plasma sterilizer using microwave torch plasma with AC high-voltage discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itarashiki, Tomomasa; Hayashi, Nobuya; Yonesu, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Microwave plasma sterilization has recently been attracting attention for medical applications. However, it is difficult to perform low-temperature sterilization in short time periods. Increasing the output power shortens the time required for sterilization but causes the temperature to increase. To overcome this issue, we have developed a hybrid plasma system that combines a microwave torch plasma and a high-voltage mesh plasma, which allows radicals to be produced at low temperatures. Using this system, successful sterilization was shown to be possible in a period of 45 min at a temperature of 41 °C.

  7. Application of DC plasma torch for synthesis of carbon nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavelkina, M. B.; Amirov, R. H.; Katarzhis, V. A.; Kiselev, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The results of the synthesis of carbon nanostructures at high temperatures using a DC plasma torch are presented. Plasma was generated by introduction of argon, nitrogen and helium into the plasma torch with an anode in the form of an expanding channel. Sustainable modes of the plasma torch operation have been achieved by simultaneous tangential input of a plasma gas with a carbon source. Obtained solid products were studied using electron microscopy, thermogravimetry, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction to characterize their properties and morphological structures.

  8. Non-Asbestos Insulation Testing Using a Plasma Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. E.; Prince, A. S.; Selvidge, S. A.; Phelps, J.; Martin, C. L.; Lawrence, T. W.

    2000-01-01

    Insulation obsolescence issues are a major concern for the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). As old sources of raw materials disappear, new sources must be found and qualified. No simple, inexpensive test presently exists for predicting the erosion performance of a candidate insulation in the full-scale motor, Large motor tests cost million of dollars and therefore can only be used on a few very select candidates. There is a need for a simple, low cost method of screening insulation performance that can simulate some of the different erosion environments found in the RSRM. This paper describes a series of erosion tests on two different non-asbestos insulation formulations, a KEVLAR(registered) fiber-filled and a carbon fiber-filled insulation containing Ethylene-Propylene-Diene Monomer (EPDM) rubber as the binder. The test instrument was a plasma torch device. The two main variables investigated were heat flux and alumina particle impingement concentration. Statistical analysis revealed that the two different formulations had very different responses to the main variable. The results of this work indicate that there may be fundamental differences in how these insulation formulations perform in the motor operating environment. The plasma torch appears to offer a low-cost means of obtaining a fundamental understanding of insulation response to critical factors in a series of statistically designed experiments.

  9. Carbon dioxide elimination and regeneration of resources in a microwave plasma torch.

    PubMed

    Uhm, Han S; Kwak, Hyoung S; Hong, Yong C

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide gas as a working gas produces a stable plasma-torch by making use of 2.45 GHz microwaves. The temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and a thermocouple device. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of a high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of a relatively low-temperature zone. The bright, whitish region is a typical torch based on plasma species where an analytical investigation indicates dissociation of a substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules, forming carbon monoxides and oxygen atoms. The emission profiles of the oxygen atoms and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch. Various hydrocarbon materials may be introduced into the carbon dioxide torch, regenerating new resources and reducing carbon dioxide concentration in the torch. As an example, coal powders in the carbon dioxide torch are converted into carbon monoxide according to the reaction of CO2 + C → 2CO, reducing a substantial amount of carbon dioxide concentration in the torch. In this regards, the microwave plasma torch may be one of the best ways of converting the carbon dioxides into useful new materials.

  10. Carbon dioxide elimination and regeneration of resources in a microwave plasma torch.

    PubMed

    Uhm, Han S; Kwak, Hyoung S; Hong, Yong C

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide gas as a working gas produces a stable plasma-torch by making use of 2.45 GHz microwaves. The temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and a thermocouple device. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of a high-temperature zone and a bluish, dimmer region of a relatively low-temperature zone. The bright, whitish region is a typical torch based on plasma species where an analytical investigation indicates dissociation of a substantial fraction of carbon dioxide molecules, forming carbon monoxides and oxygen atoms. The emission profiles of the oxygen atoms and the carbon monoxide molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of carbon dioxide disintegration in the torch. Various hydrocarbon materials may be introduced into the carbon dioxide torch, regenerating new resources and reducing carbon dioxide concentration in the torch. As an example, coal powders in the carbon dioxide torch are converted into carbon monoxide according to the reaction of CO2 + C → 2CO, reducing a substantial amount of carbon dioxide concentration in the torch. In this regards, the microwave plasma torch may be one of the best ways of converting the carbon dioxides into useful new materials. PMID:26774765

  11. Secondary-electrons-induced cathode plasma in a relativistic magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Queller, T.; Gleizer, J. Z.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2012-11-19

    Results of time- and space-resolved spectroscopic studies of cathode plasma during a S-band relativistic magnetron operation and a magnetically insulated diode having an identical interelectrode gap are presented. It was shown that in the case of the magnetron operation, one obtains an earlier, more uniform plasma formation due to energetic electrons' interaction with the cathode surface and ionization of desorbed surface monolayers. No differences were detected in the cathode's plasma temperature between the magnetron and the magnetically insulated diode operation, and no anomalous fast cathode plasma expansion was observed in the magnetron at rf power up to 350 MW.

  12. Improved plasma torch for ignition and flame holding in supersonic combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, W. F.; Roby, R. J.; Stouffer, S. D.

    1989-01-01

    A plasma torch system designed for ignition and flame-holding in supersonic combustion studies has been modified, in order to decrease electrode wear and increase stability, through the incorporation of a flow swirler in the gas inlet that adds vortex-stabilization to the arc. The torch body was redesigned in order to achieve superior alignment of the electrodes; the electrode gap was made continuously adjustable, thereby allowing fine tuning during torch operation. Table operation of the improved torch has been demonstrated in pure nitrogen, eliminating the requirement of argon gas for arc stabilization.

  13. The plasma torch for the vitrification of low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Peratt, A.L.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma torch technology provides a possible solution for radioactive material storage. During the past decade, plasma torches have been developed that produce temperatures as high as 25,000 F. Currently, the plasma torch finds application in solid waste vitrification and pyrolysis plants. Low-level radioactive waste is a topic of considerable interest for baseline technologies development, generally by means of low-temperature arc heating to characterize surrogate or low-level waste streams. High temperature plasma torches, the hottest members belonging to the family of plasma arc heaters, are efficient devices for reducing matter to its constituent elements but also the most complex in theory and operation. Characterization of the high energy density plasma instability that produces the intense heat, ranges from MHD computer modeling to stimulated Raman scattering by laser diagnostics. This paper describes the history of the plasma torch and the possible use of a 1-megawatt reverse polarity torch in a low-level radioactive waste testbed. Issues such as torch diagnostics, control, and the monitoring of radioactive gaseous, aqueous, solid, and plasma effluent streams are discussed.

  14. Synthesis of Ozone at Atmospheric Pressure by a Quenched Induction-Coupled Plasma Torch

    SciTech Connect

    A. Blutke; B.C. Stratton; D.R. Mikkelsen; J. Vavruska; R. Knight

    1998-01-01

    The technical feasibility of using an induction-coupled plasma (ICP) torch to synthesize ozone at atmospheric pressure is explored. Ozone concentrations up to ~250 ppm were produced using a thermal plasma reactor system based on an ICP torch operating at 2.5 MHz and ~11 kVA with an argon/oxygen mixture as the plasma-forming gas. A gaseous oxygen quench formed ozone by rapid mixing of molecular oxygen with atomic oxygen produced by the torch. The ozone concentration in the reaction chamber was measured by Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy over a wide range of experimental configurations. The geometry of the quench gas flow, the quench flow velocity, and the quench flow rate played important roles in determining the ozone concentration. The ozone concentration was sensitive to the torch RF power, but was insensitive to the torch gas flow rates. These observations are interpreted within the framework of a simple model of ozone synthesis.

  15. Disintegration of water molecules in a steam-plasma torch powered by microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Kim, Jong H.; Hong, Yong C.

    2007-07-15

    A pure steam torch is generated by making use of 2.45 GHz microwave. Steam from a steam generator enters the discharge tube as a swirl gas at a temperature higher than 150 deg. C. This steam becomes a working gas and produces a stable steam torch. The torch volume is almost linearly proportional to the microwave power. The temperature of the torch flame is measured by making use of optical spectroscopy and a thermocouple device. Two distinctive regions are exhibited, a bright, whitish region of a high-temperature zone and a reddish, dimmer region of a relatively low-temperature zone. The bright, whitish region is a typical torch based on plasma species and the reddish, dimmer region is hydrogen burning in oxygen. Study of water molecule disintegration and gas temperature effects on the molecular fraction characteristics in steam-plasma of a microwave plasma torch at the atmospheric pressure is carried out. An analytical investigation of water disintegration indicates that a substantial fraction of water molecules disintegrate and form other compounds at high temperatures in the steam-plasma torch. Emission profiles of the hydroxide radical and water molecules confirm the theoretical predictions of water disintegration in the torch.

  16. Modelling and diagnostics of multiple cathodes plasma torch system for plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Bagcivan, Nazlim; Zhao, Lidong; Petkovic, Ivica; Schein, Jochen; Hartz-Behrend, Karsten; Kirner, Stefan; Marqués, José-Luis; Forster, Günter

    2011-09-01

    Usage of a multiple-arcs system has significantly improved process stability and coating properties in air plasma spraying. However, there are still demands on understanding and controlling the physical process to determine process conditions for reproducible coating quality and homogeneity of coating microstructure. The main goal of this work is the application of numerical simulation for the prediction of the temperature profiles at the torch outlet for real process conditions. Behaviour of the gas flow and electric arcs were described in a three-dimensional numerical model. The calculated results showed the characteristic triangular temperature distribution at the torch nozzle outlet caused by three electric arcs. These results were compared with experimentally determined temperature distributions, which were obtained with specially developed computed tomography equipment for reconstructing the emissivity and temperature distribution of the plasma jet close to the torch exit. The calculated results related to temperature values and contours were verified for the most process parameters with experimental ones.

  17. [Development of a high resolution simultaneous microwave plasma torch spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jie; Huan, Yan-Fu; Jin, Wei; Feng, Guo-Dong; Fei, Qiang; Cao, Yan-Bo; Jin, Qin-Han

    2007-11-01

    A unique high resolution simultaneous microwave plasma torch (MPT) atomic emission spectrometer was developed and studied preliminarily. Some advanced technologies were applied to the spectrometer, such as echelle grating, UV-intensified CCD array detector, adjustable microwave generator, and water cooling system for the generator, etc. The detection limits of the spectrometer for some elements were determined, the spectral resolution and pixel resolution of the spectrometer were calculated, and an analysis of a practical sample was carried out. The preliminary results demonstrate that such simultaneous spectrometer has advantages of saving sample and time, possessing high sensitivity and resolution, and low-cost for the purchase and maintenance. Taking analytical figures of merit into consideration, the high resolution simultaneous MPT spectrometer will have extended application areas and greater competition potential as compared with sequential MPT spectrometers.

  18. Synthesis of Titanium Dioxide by Microwave Plasma Torch.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ta-Chin; Chen, Hua-Wei; Lin, Sheng-Kai

    2015-04-01

    In this study, TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized from titanium tetraisopropanol (TTIP) using a microwave plasma torch (MPT) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA). The visible light photocatalysis was studied by the decomposition of methylene blue. MB present in the aqueous solution could be almost completely (> 70%) decomposed within about 720 min of reaction time under visible light irradiation. This is due to the carbon-compounds on the surface of TiO2 (TiOC) corresponding to the results of FTIR. Furthermore, a decrease in recombination between the electron and hole was induced by the existence of TiOC. PMID:26353500

  19. Destruction of Hazardous Industrial Chemicals Using an Arcjet Plasma Torch*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleddermann, C. B.; Snyder, H. R.; Gahl, J. M.

    1996-10-01

    A small-scale thermal plasma torch has been used for the disposal of hazardous industrial chemicals including alcohols, ketones, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The plasma jet is operated at currents up to 200 Amperes and waste flow rates up to 600 ml/hr. Argon is used as the plasma gas with oxygen added to the reactor to alter the reaction chemistry. Destruction of the waste and by-product formation are monitored using a residual gas analyzer, and the temperature of the plasma plume is measured using an enthalpy probe. The by-products of the destruction of acetone are primarily carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and small amounts of hydrocarbons. Adding oxygen to the reactor increases the production of carbon dioxide and significantly decreases the amount of acetone in the exhaust gases. This reactor has achieved greater than 99 percent destruction efficiency for acetone when oxygen is added to the reaction mixture at an arcjet current of 75 Amperes, with similar destruction efficiencies observed for ethanol and trichloroethylene. *Supported by the U.S. DOE through the WERC program administered by New Mexico State University.

  20. Optimization of steam-vortex plasma-torch start-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, B. I.

    2011-12-01

    We propose a new optimal method of steam-vortex plasma-torches start-up; this method completely prevents the danger of water steam condensation in the arc chamber and all undesirable consequences of it.

  1. A study of gas flow pattern, undercutting and torch modification in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, John C.; Hou, Haihui Ron

    1994-01-01

    A study on the plasma and shield gas flow patterns in variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding was undertaken by shadowgraph techniques. Visualization of gas flow under different welding conditions was obtained. Undercutting is often present with aluminum welds. The effects of torch alignment, shield gas flow rate and gas contamination on undercutting were investigated and suggestions made to minimize the defect. A modified shield cup for the welding torch was fabricated which consumes much less shield gas while maintaining the weld quality. The current torch was modified with a trailer flow for Al-Li welding, in which hot cracking is a critical problem. The modification shows improved weldablility on these alloys.

  2. Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Seliskar, C.J.; Warner, D.K.

    1984-02-16

    An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an rf induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the rf heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

  3. Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Seliskar, Carl J.; Warner, David K.

    1988-12-27

    An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an r.f. induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the r.f. heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

  4. Microwave N{sub 2}-Ar plasma torch. I. Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, J.; Tatarova, E.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2011-01-15

    The spatial structure of a microwave plasma torch driven by an azimuthally symmetric surface wave operating in a N{sub 2}-Ar mixture at atmospheric pressure is investigated. A two-dimensional (2D) self-consistent theoretical model is developed to investigate the entire spatial structure of the source, including the discharge zone, sustained by the field of the surface TM{sub 00} mode, and the postdischarge plasma. Maxwell's equations, the rate balance equations for the most important excited species - vibrationally and electronically excited states, ions and nitrogen atoms N({sup 4}S) - and the Boltzmann equation for electrons are consistently solved. Model calculations of the 2D spatial distributions of species of interest such as charged particles (electrons and positive ions), N{sub 2}({Chi} {sup 1{Sigma}}{sub g}{sup +},v) vibrationally excited molecules, N{sub 2}(A {sup 3{Sigma}}{sub u}{sup +}) metastable molecules, and N({sup 4}S) ground state atoms are presented and discussed.

  5. Operating characteristics of a hydrogen-argon plasma torch for supersonic combustion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Barbi, E.; Mahan, J.R.; O'brien, W.F.; Wagner, T.C.

    1989-04-01

    The residence time of the combustible mixture in the combustion chamber of a scramjet engine is much less than the time normally required for complete combustion. Hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels require an ignition source under conditions typically found in a scramjet combustor. Analytical studies indicate that the presence of hydrogen atoms should greatly reduce the ignition delay in this environment. Because hydrogen plasmas are prolific sources of hydrogen atoms, a low-power, uncooled hydrogen plasma torch has been built and tested to evaluate its potential as a possible flame holder for supersonic combustion. The torch was found to be unstable when operated on pure hydrogen; however, stable operation could be obtained by using argon as a body gas and mixing in the desired amount of hydrogen. The stability limits of the torch are delineated and its electrical and thermal behavior documented. An average torch thermal efficiency of around 88 percent is demonstrated. 10 references.

  6. Operating characteristics of a hydrogen-argon plasma torch for supersonic combustion applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbi, E.; Mahan, J. R.; O'Brien, W. F.; Wagner, T. C.

    1989-01-01

    The residence time of the combustible mixture in the combustion chamber of a scramjet engine is much less than the time normally required for complete combustion. Hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels require an ignition source under conditions typically found in a scramjet combustor. Analytical studies indicate that the presence of hydrogen atoms should greatly reduce the ignition delay in this environment. Because hydrogen plasmas are prolific sources of hydrogen atoms, a low-power, uncooled hydrogen plasma torch has been built and tested to evaluate its potential as a possible flame holder for supersonic combustion. The torch was found to be unstable when operated on pure hydrogen; however, stable operation could be obtained by using argon as a body gas and mixing in the desired amount of hydrogen. The stability limits of the torch are delineated and its electrical and thermal behavior documented. An average torch thermal efficiency of around 88 percent is demonstrated.

  7. Ordering of Fine Particles in a Planar Magnetron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Totsuji, H.; Ishihara, O.; Sato, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Adachi, S.

    2008-09-07

    Fine particles injected in a planar magnetron were pushed upward by diffusible plasma, leading to being suspended by the force balance with the gravity and forming three-dimensional structures on the two-dimensional structure formed by particle strings.

  8. Parametric Study of Plasma Torch Operation Using a MHD Model Coupling the Arc and Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaya, M.; Chazelas, C.; Vardelle, A.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling of the electromagnetic and heat transfer phenomena in a non-transferred arc plasma torch is generally based on a current density profile and a temperature imposed on the cathode surface. However, it is not possible to observe the current density profile experimentally and so the computations are grounded on an estimation of current distribution at cathode tip. To eliminate this boundary condition and be able to predict the arc dynamics in the plasma torch, the cathode was included in the computational domain, the arc current was imposed on the rear surface of the cathode, and the electromagnetism and energy conservation equations for the fluid and the electrode were coupled and solved. The solution of this system of equations was implemented in a CFD computer code to model various plasma torch operating conditions. The model predictions for various arc currents were consistent and indicated that such a model could be applied with confidence to plasma torches of different geometries, such as cascaded-anode plasma torches.

  9. On the atomic state densities of plasmas produced by the ``torche à injection axiale''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonkers, J.; Vos, H. P. C.; van der Mullen, J. A. M.; Timmermans, E. A. H.

    1996-04-01

    The atomic state densities of helium and argon plasmas produced by the microwave driven plasma torch called the "torche à injection axiale" are presented. They are obtained by absolute line intensity measurements of the excited states and by applying the ideal gas law to the ground state. It will be shown that the atomic state distribution function (ASDF) does not obey the Saha-Boltzmann law: the ASDF cannot be described by one temperature. From the shape of the ASDF it can be concluded that the plasma is ionising. By extrapolating the measured state densities towards the ionisation limit, a minimum value of the electron density can be determined.

  10. How to Ignite an Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Plasma Torch without Any Additional Igniters.

    PubMed

    Leins, Martina; Gaiser, Sandra; Schulz, Andreas; Walker, Matthias; Schumacher, Uwe; Hirth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This movie shows how an atmospheric pressure plasma torch can be ignited by microwave power with no additional igniters. After ignition of the plasma, a stable and continuous operation of the plasma is possible and the plasma torch can be used for many different applications. On one hand, the hot (3,600 K gas temperature) plasma can be used for chemical processes and on the other hand the cold afterglow (temperatures down to almost RT) can be applied for surface processes. For example chemical syntheses are interesting volume processes. Here the microwave plasma torch can be used for the decomposition of waste gases which are harmful and contribute to the global warming but are needed as etching gases in growing industry sectors like the semiconductor branch. Another application is the dissociation of CO2. Surplus electrical energy from renewable energy sources can be used to dissociate CO2 to CO and O2. The CO can be further processed to gaseous or liquid higher hydrocarbons thereby providing chemical storage of the energy, synthetic fuels or platform chemicals for the chemical industry. Applications of the afterglow of the plasma torch are the treatment of surfaces to increase the adhesion of lacquer, glue or paint, and the sterilization or decontamination of different kind of surfaces. The movie will explain how to ignite the plasma solely by microwave power without any additional igniters, e.g., electric sparks. The microwave plasma torch is based on a combination of two resonators - a coaxial one which provides the ignition of the plasma and a cylindrical one which guarantees a continuous and stable operation of the plasma after ignition. The plasma can be operated in a long microwave transparent tube for volume processes or shaped by orifices for surface treatment purposes. PMID:25938699

  11. How to Ignite an Atmospheric Pressure Microwave Plasma Torch without Any Additional Igniters.

    PubMed

    Leins, Martina; Gaiser, Sandra; Schulz, Andreas; Walker, Matthias; Schumacher, Uwe; Hirth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This movie shows how an atmospheric pressure plasma torch can be ignited by microwave power with no additional igniters. After ignition of the plasma, a stable and continuous operation of the plasma is possible and the plasma torch can be used for many different applications. On one hand, the hot (3,600 K gas temperature) plasma can be used for chemical processes and on the other hand the cold afterglow (temperatures down to almost RT) can be applied for surface processes. For example chemical syntheses are interesting volume processes. Here the microwave plasma torch can be used for the decomposition of waste gases which are harmful and contribute to the global warming but are needed as etching gases in growing industry sectors like the semiconductor branch. Another application is the dissociation of CO2. Surplus electrical energy from renewable energy sources can be used to dissociate CO2 to CO and O2. The CO can be further processed to gaseous or liquid higher hydrocarbons thereby providing chemical storage of the energy, synthetic fuels or platform chemicals for the chemical industry. Applications of the afterglow of the plasma torch are the treatment of surfaces to increase the adhesion of lacquer, glue or paint, and the sterilization or decontamination of different kind of surfaces. The movie will explain how to ignite the plasma solely by microwave power without any additional igniters, e.g., electric sparks. The microwave plasma torch is based on a combination of two resonators - a coaxial one which provides the ignition of the plasma and a cylindrical one which guarantees a continuous and stable operation of the plasma after ignition. The plasma can be operated in a long microwave transparent tube for volume processes or shaped by orifices for surface treatment purposes.

  12. Arc-Cathode Coupling in the Modeling of a Conventional DC Plasma Spray Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaya, M.; Chazelas, C.; Mariaux, G.; Vardelle, A.

    2015-01-01

    The plasma torch is the basis of the plasma spray process and understanding of the electric arc dynamics within the plasma torch is necessary for better control of torch and process instabilities. Numerical simulation is a useful tool for investigating the effect of the torch geometry and operating parameters on the electric arc characteristics provided that the model of arc dynamics is reliable and the boundary conditions of the computational domain are well founded. However, such a model should also address the intricate transient and 3D interactions between the electrically conducting fluid and electromagnetic, thermal, and acoustics phenomena. Especially, the description of the electrode regions where the electric arc connects with solid material is an important part of a realistic model of the plasma torch operation as the properties of electric arcs at atmospheric pressure depend not only on the arc plasma medium, but also on the electrodes. This paper describes the 3D and time-dependent numerical simulation of a plasma arc and is focused on the cathode boundary conditions. This model was used to investigate the differences in arc characteristics when the cathode is included into the numerical domain and coupled with the arc. The magnetic and thermal coupling between the cathode and arc made it possible to get rid of the current density boundary condition at the cathode tip that is delicate to predetermine. It also allowed a better prediction of the cathode flow jet generated by the pumping action induced by the interaction of the self-magnetic field with the electric current and so it allowed a better description of the dynamics of arc. It should be a necessary step in the development of a fully predictive model of DC plasma torch operation.

  13. Design of a circular cascaded arc torch array for plasma spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, T.; Horenstein, M.

    2003-12-01

    A new concept has been verified for a plasma spray electrode system that improves plasma plume uniformity over that of a single arc torch. A six-electrode, circular, arc-cascade discharge was formed by mounting seven tungsten-rod electrodes radially around a stream of argon gas. To maintain the plasma plume, the cascade-arc discharge was repetitively triggered using a cascaded high-voltage spark initiated by a secondary spark gap. The typical cascade arc voltage and current were 130 V and 20 A. Results show that the cascaded arc array system can create a ring-shaped plasma plume having near-uniform electrical energy in the circular direction. This feature suggests that the configuration may have future use in plasma torch systems requiring uniform circular symmetry. In such a system, spray particles can be injected into the center of the plasma ring. At the same time, such an arrangement also could provide a lower-cost alternative to systems that use multiple two-electrode plasma torches arranged in a circular configuration. In the latter system, each two-electrode plasma torch is fed by a separate power supply.

  14. Laser Doppler velocity measurements in a transferred-arc plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, O.P.; Okhuysen, W.P.

    1995-12-31

    Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) is a nonintrusive method of measuring velocity. The measurement volume formed by the intersection of the two laser beams is compact, thus the method provides excellent spatial resolution. Furthermore, aside from the requirement that the flow contain scattering particles, the method is nonintrusive. Thus, no probe disturbs the flow and measurements can be made in extremely high temperature and hostile environments. Here, the LDV technique has been used to map the velocity field in the plasma jet issuing from a transferred-arc, reverse polarity plasma torch. This gas flow field is important in understanding the physics of the plasma torch. The torch was operated with nitrogen at a fixed distance of 5 inches from the graphite billet. Velocity measurements were made for combinations of current at 125 and 175 A and pressure at 22 and 55 psig. Results are presented for the high current/high pressure condition. Since the test procedure involves reestablishing the same flow conditions after swapping graphite billets, it is instructive to see how closely the torch operating variables were reproduced. The average current varied from 175.2 to 175.8 A over the eight separate time periods. The nitrogen supply pressure varied from 52.5 to 53.9 psi. The torch voltage drop ranged from 430.6 to 436.1 V, and the nitrogen flow rate from 4.8 to 5.4 scfm.

  15. Abatement of CF4 by atmospheric-pressure microwave plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yong C.; Uhm, Han S.

    2003-08-01

    An atmospheric microwave plasma torch is presented for post-pump destruction of perfluorocompound gases (PFCs), which are used widely in the semiconductor industry and are emitted with nitrogen gas for vacuum pump purges. Discharges of the microwave plasma torch are well suited for abatement of PFC contaminants discharged at a typical flow rate. The abatement was carried out using oxygen or air as additive gases. Analytical results are systematically compared to quadrupole mass spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) data in the laboratory. Destruction and removal efficiency of more than 99% in FTIR data was achieved for carbon tetrafluoride.

  16. Measurement of the electron density in a microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qing; Zhang Guixin; Wang Liming; Wang Xinxin; Wang Shumin; Chen Yan

    2009-11-16

    The electron density in a microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure was measured with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The electron density is on the order of 10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3}, one order higher than that deduced from the Stark broadening of spectral lines, and increases with the increase in the microwave power. The spatial distribution of the electron density was obtained. The highest electron density locates at the symmetrical axis of the plasma torch and decreases radially. It was found that the electron density fluctuates within a range of 0.3 with the time under the same experimental conditions.

  17. Establishing isokinetic flow for a plasma torch exhaust gas diagnostic for a plasma hearth furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, B.R.

    1996-05-01

    Real time monitoring of toxic metallic effluents in confined gas streams can be accomplished through use of Microwave Induced Plasmas to perform atomic emission spectroscopy, For this diagnostic to be viable it is necessary that it sample from the flowstream of interest in an isokinetic manner. A method of isokinetic sampling was established for this device for use in the exhaust system of a plasma hearth vitrification furnace. The flow and entrained particulate environment were simulated in the laboratory setting using a variable flow duct of the same dimensions (8-inch diameter, schedule 40) as that in the field and was loaded with similar particulate (less than 10 {mu}m in diameter) of lake bed soil typically used in the vitrification process. The flow from the furnace was assumed to be straight flow. To reproduce this effect a flow straightener was installed in the device. An isokinetic sampling train was designed to include the plasma torch, with microwave power input operating at 2.45 GHz, to match local freestream velocities between 800 and 2400 ft/sec. The isokinetic sampling system worked as planned and the plasma torch had no difficulty operating at the required flowrates. Simulation of the particulate suspension was also successful. Steady particle feeds were maintained over long periods of time and the plasma diagnostic responded as expected.

  18. Analysis of processes in DC arc plasma torches for spraying that use air as plasma forming gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V.; Ivanov, D.; Toropchin, A.

    2014-11-01

    Developed in Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University technological processes of air-plasma spraying of wear-resistant, regenerating, hardening and decorative coatings used in number of industrial areas are described. The article contains examples of applications of air plasma spraying of coatings as well as results of mathematical modelling of processes in air plasma torches for spraying.

  19. Ion Clouds in the Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch: A Closer Look through Computations.

    PubMed

    Aghaei, Maryam; Lindner, Helmut; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2016-08-16

    We have computationally investigated the introduction of copper elemental particles in an inductively coupled plasma torch connected to a sampling cone, including for the first time the ionization of the sample. The sample is inserted as liquid particles, which are followed inside the entire torch, i.e., from the injector inlet up to the ionization and reaching the sampler. The spatial position of the ion clouds inside the torch as well as detailed information on the copper species fluxes at the position of the sampler orifice and the exhausts of the torch are provided. The effect of on- and off-axis injection is studied. We clearly show that the ion clouds of on-axis injected material are located closer to the sampler with less radial diffusion. This guarantees a higher transport efficiency through the sampler cone. Moreover, our model reveals the optimum ranges of applied power and flow rates, which ensure the proper position of ion clouds inside the torch, i.e., close enough to the sampler to increase the fraction that can enter the mass spectrometer and with minimum loss of material toward the exhausts as well as a sufficiently high plasma temperature for efficient ionization.

  20. Ion Clouds in the Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch: A Closer Look through Computations.

    PubMed

    Aghaei, Maryam; Lindner, Helmut; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2016-08-16

    We have computationally investigated the introduction of copper elemental particles in an inductively coupled plasma torch connected to a sampling cone, including for the first time the ionization of the sample. The sample is inserted as liquid particles, which are followed inside the entire torch, i.e., from the injector inlet up to the ionization and reaching the sampler. The spatial position of the ion clouds inside the torch as well as detailed information on the copper species fluxes at the position of the sampler orifice and the exhausts of the torch are provided. The effect of on- and off-axis injection is studied. We clearly show that the ion clouds of on-axis injected material are located closer to the sampler with less radial diffusion. This guarantees a higher transport efficiency through the sampler cone. Moreover, our model reveals the optimum ranges of applied power and flow rates, which ensure the proper position of ion clouds inside the torch, i.e., close enough to the sampler to increase the fraction that can enter the mass spectrometer and with minimum loss of material toward the exhausts as well as a sufficiently high plasma temperature for efficient ionization. PMID:27457191

  1. Modeling of the coal gasification processes in a hybrid plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, I.B.; Serbin, S.I.

    2007-12-15

    The major advantages of plasma treatment systems are cost effectiveness and technical efficiency. A new efficient electrodeless 1-MW hybrid plasma torch for waste disposal and coal gasification is proposed. This product merges several solutions such as the known inductive-type plasma torch, innovative reverse-vortex (RV) reactor and the recently developed nonequilibrium plasma pilot and plasma chemical reactor. With the use of the computational-fluid-dynamics-computational method, preliminary 3-D calculations of heat exchange in a 1-MW plasma generator operating with direct vortex and RV have been conducted at the air flow rate of 100 g/s. For the investigated mode and designed parameters, reduction of the total wall heat transfer for the reverse scheme is about 65 kW, which corresponds to an increase of the plasma generator efficiency by approximately 6.5%. This new hybrid plasma torch operates as a multimode, high power plasma system with a wide range of plasma feedstock gases and turn down ratio, and offers convenient and simultaneous feeding of several additional reagents into the discharge zone.

  2. Production of nitric oxide using a microwave plasma torch and its application to fungal cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Young Ho; Kumar, Naresh; Kang, Min-Ho; Cho, Guang Sup; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Gyungsoon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2015-03-01

    The generation of nitric oxide by a microwave plasma torch is proposed for its application to cell differentiation. A microwave plasma torch was developed based on basic kinetic theory. The analytical theory indicates that nitric oxide density is nearly proportional to oxygen molecular density and that the high-temperature flame is an effective means of generating nitric oxide. Experimental data pertaining to nitric oxide production are presented in terms of the oxygen input in units of cubic centimeters per minute. The apparent length of the torch flame increases as the oxygen input increases. The various levels of nitric oxide are observed depending on the flow rate of nitrogen gas, the mole fraction of oxygen gas, and the microwave power. In order to evaluate the potential of nitric oxide as an activator of cell differentiation, we applied nitric oxide generated from the microwave plasma torch to a model microbial cell (Neurospora crassa: non-pathogenic fungus). Germination and hyphal differentiation of fungal cells were not dramatically changed but there was a significant increase in spore formation after treatment with nitric oxide. In addition, the expression level of a sporulation related gene acon-3 was significantly elevated after 24 h upon nitric oxide treatment. Increase in the level of nitric oxide, nitrite and nitrate in water after nitric oxide treatment seems to be responsible for activation of fungal sporulation. Our results suggest that nitric oxide generated by plasma can be used as a possible activator of cell differentiation and development.

  3. Development and evaluation of a 1 kW plasma torch ignitor for scramjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Timothy C.; Obrien, Walter F.; Northam, G. Burton; Eggers, James M.

    1986-01-01

    A low power, uncooled plasma torch was tested in combination with a new injector design to study ignition and flameholding in hydrogen-fueled supersonic flows. Both semifree jet and ducted tests were conducted in a Mach 2 flow under simulated scramjet combustor conditions at 1 atmosphere static pressure and total temperatures between 1400 and 2800 R. The injector design incorporates a small upstream pilot fuel flow, a step for recirculation, and primary fuel injectors downstream of the recirculation region. Using a 1:1 volumetric mixture of hydrogen and argon, good performance at a simulated flight Mach number of 3.7 is found for a 1-kW torch which is located in the recirculation zone and fueled by the upstream pilot fuel injectors. Spectroscopic measurements verified the presence of hydrogen atoms in the torch exhaust, and it is suggested that hydrogen atoms are responsible for the ignition.

  4. Analytical interpretation of arc instabilities in a DC plasma spray torch: the role of pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2016-06-01

    Arc instabilities in a plasma spray torch are investigated experimentally and theoretically thanks to a linear simplified analytical model. The different parameters that determine the useful properties of the plasma jet at the torch exit, such as specific enthalpy and speed, but also pressure inside the torch and time variations of the flow rate are studied. The work is particularly focused on the link between the recorded arc voltage and the pressure in the cathode cavity. A frequency analysis of the recorded voltage and pressure allows the separation of different contributions following their spectral characteristics and highlights a resonance effect due to Helmholtz oscillations; these oscillations are responsible for the large amplitude fluctuations of all the parameters investigated. The influence of heat transfer, friction forces and residence time of the plasma in the nozzle are taken into account, thanks to different characteristics’ times. The volume of the cathode cavity in which the cold gas is stored before entering the arc region appears to be of prime importance for the dynamics of instabilities, particularly for the non-intuitive effect that induces flow-rate fluctuations in spite of the fact that the torch is fed at a constant flow rate.

  5. Determination of plasma velocity from light fluctuations in a cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Kelly, H.

    2009-09-01

    Measurements of plasma velocities in a 30 A high energy density cutting torch are reported. The velocity diagnostic is based on the analysis of the light fluctuations emitted by the arc which are assumed to propagate with the flow velocity. These light fluctuations originate from plasma temperature and plasma density fluctuations mainly due to hydrodynamic instabilities. Fast photodiodes are employed as the light sensors. The arc core velocity was obtained from spectrally filtered light fluctuations measurements using a band-pass filter to detect light emission fluctuations emitted only from the arc axis. Maximum plasma jet velocities of 5000 m s{sup -1} close to the nozzle exit and about 2000 m s{sup -1} close to the anode were found. The obtained velocity values are in good agreement with those values predicted by a numerical code for a similar torch to that employed in this work.

  6. Effect of plasma suppression additives on electrodynamic characteristics of the torch discharge burning in the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidyaev, D.; Lutsenko, Yu; Boretsky, E.

    2016-06-01

    The paper shows the results of measurements of wave number of electromagnetic wave, which supports burning of high-frequency torch discharge in the mixture of air with water vapor and carbon dioxide. The nonmonotonic dependence of attenuation factor of electromagnetic waves is set on a concentration of water vapor. It is shown that the attenuation degree of electromagnetic field in the plasma with water vapor significantly exceeds the attenuation degree of electromagnetic field in the plasma with carbon dioxide.

  7. Development of a 100 kW plasma torch for plasma assisted combustion of low heating value fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takali, S.; Fabry, F.; Rohani, V.; Cauneau, F.; Fulcheri, L.

    2014-11-01

    Most thermal power plants need an auxiliary power source to (i) heat-up the boiler during start up phases before reaching autonomy power and (ii) sustain combustion at low load. This supplementary power is commonly provided with high LHV fossil fuel burners which increases operational expenses and disables the use of anti-pollutant filters. A Promising alternative is under development and consists in high temperature plasma assisted AC electro-burners. In this paper, the development of a new 100 kW three phase plasma torch with graphite electrodes is detailed. This plasma torch is working at atmospheric pressure with air as plasma gas and has three-phase power supply and working at 680 Hz. The nominal air flow rate is 60 Nm3.h-1 and the outlet gas temperature is above 2 500 K. At the beginning, graphite electrodes erosion by oxidizing medium was studied and controlling parameters were identified through parametric set of experiments and tuned for optimal electrodes life time. Then, a new 3-phase plasma torch design was modelled and simulated on ANSYS platform. The characteristics of the plasma flow and its interaction with the environing elements of the torch are detailed hereafter.

  8. Plasma regimes in high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Los Arcos, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    High Power Pulsed Magnetron Sputtering (HPPMS) is a relatively recent variation of magnetron sputtering where high power is applied to the magnetron in short pulses. The result is the formation of dense transient plasmas with a high fraction of ionized species, ideally leading to better control of film growth through substrate bias. However, the broad range of experimental conditions accessible in pulsed discharges results in bewildering variations in current and voltage pulse shapes, pulse power densities, etc, which represent different discharge behaviors, making it difficult to identify relevant deposition conditions. The complexity of the plasma dynamics is evident. Within each pulse, plasma characteristics such as plasma composition, density, gas rarefaction, spatial distribution, degree of self-sputtering, etc. vary with time. A recent development has been the discovery that the plasma emission can self-organize into well-defined regions of high and low plasma emissivity above the racetrack (spokes), which rotate in the direction given by the E ×B drift and that significantly influence the transport mechanisms in HPPMS. One seemingly universal characteristic of HPPMS plasmas is the existence of well defined plasma regimes for different power ranges. These regimes are clearly differentiated in terms of plasma conductivity, plasma composition and spatial plasma self-organization. We will discuss the global characteristics of these regimes in terms of current-voltage characteristics, energy-resolved QMS and OES analysis, and fast imaging. In particular we will discuss how the reorganization of the plasma emission into spokes is associated only to specific regimes of high plasma conductivity. We will also briefly discuss the role of the target in shaping the characteristics of the HPPMS plasma, since sputtering is a surface-driven process. This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) within the framework of the SFB-TR87.

  9. Evaluation of Rocket Research Company's Plasma Torch for NOx Reduction Studies CRADA PC93-001, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) formerly known as The Fuel Evaluation Facility was used from March 29 to April 17, 1993 for the sole purpose of evaluating the Rocket Research (RR) plasma torch and testing its effectiveness in reducing NO{sub x} emissions from coal flames. Two spare facility convective sections were modified to accept the torch and to allow for effective mixing in the convective section chambers. The torch was placed into the fourth convective section and a 1-inch fused silica bluff body was placed immediately upstream of the torch to further enhance the mixing at the torch injection location. The gases anticipated for use during testing included ammonia (NH{sub 3}) , hydrogen (H{sub 2}) , carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH{sub 4}). Ammonia and hydrogen were planned as the gases which would be introduced through the torch directly while CO and CH{sub 4} would be used only in the torch secondary injection ring. The intent was to minimize any potential fouling problems with the carbon containing gases. Actual test conditions did not allow evaluation of the CO or the CH{sub 4} due to continued intermittent operation of the Rocket Research plasma torch. The torch had not been previously tested under conditions similar to the high temperature condition of the CERF and consequently it was found that the torch would not operate effectively under the test conditions. The torch using NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2} as primary and secondary gases has evaluated for short periods of time.

  10. Measurements of solvent destruction efficiency using a low-frequency plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, H.; Fleddermann, C.B.; Gahl, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    A small-scale thermal plasma torch has been constructed to determine the feasibility of its use to dispose of hazardous solvent waste such as acetone, trichloroethane and trichloroethylene. The plasma jet is generated using argon and a commercial AC/DC welding supply. The system is operated using torch currents ranging from 50--150 Amperes and solvent flow rates ranging from 0-500 ml/hr. Reactive gases such as oxygen and water vapor are added to alter the thermal chemistry occurring in the reaction chamber. The daughter products consist primarily of CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub x}H{sub y} radicals. The relative amounts of the reaction byproducts are monitored using a residual gas analyzer. Results thus far have demonstrated over 99% destruction of acetone at a flow rate of 100 ml/hr using a torch current of 100 Amperes. This presentation will include data on the destruction efficiency of hazardous solvents as a function of solvent flow rate, torch current and reactive gas flow rate.

  11. Pressure and arc voltage coupling in dc plasma torches: Identification and extraction of oscillation modes

    SciTech Connect

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2010-08-15

    This work is devoted to the instabilities occurring in a plasma torch, such as those found in plasma spraying. These instabilities are responsible for a lack of reproducibility of coatings properties, especially in the case of suspension plasma spraying that is an innovative way to obtain thin coatings of submicron-sized particles. Strong Helmholtz oscillations are highlighted in the plasma flow and it is demonstrated that they overlap with different acoustic modes in addition with the more commonly admitted ''restrike'' mode, the later being due to rearcing events in the arc region. The instabilities occur in the arc voltage but it is experimentally shown in this paper that the pressure within the torch body presents the same kind of instabilities. Besides, a numerical filtering technique has been adapted to isolate the different instability components. The operating parameters of the plasma torch were varied in order to highlight their influence on the amplitude of the different modes, both for the arc voltage and the pressure.

  12. Multiple diagnostics in a high-pressure hydrogen microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J.; Mullen, J. J. A. M. van der; Gamero, A.; Sola, A.

    2010-02-01

    We present an experimental study of a hydrogen plasma produced by a microwave axial injection torch, launching the plasma in a helium-filled chamber. Three different diagnostic methods have been used to obtain the electron density and temperature as follows: The Stark intersection method of Balmer spectral lines (already tested in argon and helium plasmas); the modified Boltzmann-plot showing that the plasma is far from the local thermodynamic equilibrium but ruled by the excitation-saturation balance; and a study by the disturbed bilateral relations theory. All of these diagnostic techniques show a good agreement.

  13. Numerical analysis of a hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge for radioactive waste treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung-Chul; Kim, Dong-Uk; Kim, Min-Ho; Seo, Jun-Ho; Yang, O.-Bong

    2013-11-01

    In this study, a numerical analysis is carried out in order to investigate the effects of the electrode configuration and the operation conditions on the arc flow structure and the performance of a hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge. From the numerical results, a swirl injection of plasma gas and a hollowed cathode with a convergent entrance are found to help control the recirculation directions of backflows and the attachment position of the anode spot in the rear electrode. For example, the anode spot is observed to be moved to the central point of the blocked side in the rear electrode (the anode) when the plasma-forming gases are injected with a swirl. This attachment point is predicted to act as a stable anode spot for the transferred operation of the hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge. In addition, the torch performance is analyzed for operation variables, such as the arc current and the gas flow rates. Similar to that of a conventional hollow electrode plasma torch, the scale-up of input power is accompanied by increases in the arc current and the gas flow rate while increasing the arc current brings about a deterioration in the torch efficiency, which is defined as the ratio of the exit enthalpy to the input power. On the other hand, the temperature profiles at the torch's exit plane show relatively negligible differences for various arc currents and gas flow rates due to the cathode spot being close to the torch exit. Based on these features, we expect the hollow electrode plasma torch with a reversed polarity discharge to be a promising tool for treating radioactive wastes in a single step, both as a non-transferred-type plasma incinerator for combustibles and as a transferred-type arc-melter for non-combustibles.

  14. Plasma torch testing for thermostructural evaluation of rocket motor nozzle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, A.S.; Bunker, R.C.; Lawrence, T.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents data from the thermostructural testing of tape-wrapped carbon phenolic. This work has been performed with the use of a plasma torch and loading device in an effort to study the anomalous erosion characteristicfs of that seen in the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle STS-8A. Testing is conducted in an effort to determine conditions or parameters involved in this mode of failure.

  15. Baseline geoenvironmental experiments for in-situ soil transformation by plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, J.R.; Mayne, P.W.

    1995-12-31

    The advent of the nontransferred plasma arc torch has implicated a range of in-situ geoenvironmental applications that can revolutionize methods of ground modification and field remediation of contaminated sites. With reverse polarity nontransferred arc type plasma torches, temperatures of 4,000 C to 7,000 C can be directed at specific targets of contaminated soil or waste. At these extreme temperatures, all organic materials within the soil undergo pyrolysis, while the bulk composition is transformed into a magma that subsequently cools to form a vitrified mass resembling volcanic obsidian or a dense partially crystalline material resembling microcrystalline igneous rock. Simulations of in-situ transformation of soil have been conducted using both 100-kW and 240-kW torches to alter clay, silty sand, and sand in chamber tests. Although these materials are primarily composed of silica and alumina oxides having melting temperatures of 1,100 C to 1,600 C, the formation of a spheroidal magma core occurred within the first five minutes of exposure to the plasma flame. Experiments were conducted to quantify the improved engineering properties that occur after transformation and to demonstrate the relative effects of power level, water content, and soil type on the size and strength of the altered material. The ongoing research also serves as a baseline study for further experimentation that will focus on the in-situ remediation of soils with varied contaminants.

  16. Effects of coil location and injection flow rate in an inductively coupled RF plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, D.; Apelian, D.; Farouk, B.

    1985-07-01

    A numerical model has been developed to investigate the effects of central carrier gas flow rate and coil location in an inductively coupled RF plasma torch. Solution algorithm is based on the primitive variable formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations and includes a pseudo two-dimensional electromagnetic field model. Computational results have shown that with increasing carrier gas flow rate, the plasma plume is penetrated and the back flow due to the magnetic pumping effects is diminished. This facilitates the delivery of powder particles into the discharge region. However, the plasma plume is also disturbed significantly thus enhancing power loss.

  17. Effect of current connection to the anode nozzle on plasma torch efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Collares, M.P.; Pfender, E.

    1997-10-01

    Experiments have been performed to demonstrate the influence of the location of the electric power connection to the anode nozzle on the efficiency of dc plasma torches. The dc plasma torch used in these experiments offers the flexibility to work with different anode geometries and the possibility of connecting the electrical power to the anode at two different locations. For each set of experiments, the controllable parameters such as total gas flow rate, gas composition, and electric current were kept constant, changing only the location of the electrical connection to the anode nozzle. The efficiency of the torch, derived from a conventional energy balance, shows a significant change as the location of the electrical connection to the anode nozzle is changed. The measured mean voltage as well as the amplitude of the voltage fluctuations were also affected by the location of the electrical connection to the anode nozzle. An explanation for the arc behavior is given, based on an analysis of the forces acting on the anode arc column and their influence on the variation of the arc column length. Experimental data are in good agreement with analytical predictions.

  18. Destruction of acetone using a small-scale arcjet plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, H.R.; Fleddermann, C.B.; Gahl, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    A small-scale thermal plasma torch has been constructed to determine the feasibility of its use to dispose of hazardous solvent wastes. The system has been studied using acetone as a test compound. The plasma jet is generated using argon and a commercial AC/DC welding supply. The system is operated using torch currents ranging from 50 to 200 A and solvent flow rates in the range 0--200 ml/h. Oxygen is added to alter the chemistry occurring in the reaction chamber. The destruction of acetone and the relative amounts of the reaction by-products are monitored using a residual gas analyzer. The pyrolysis products consist primarily of CO, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and other C{sub x}H{sub y} radicals when no oxygen is added to the system. By adding oxygen to the system, thermal oxidation processes occur that increase the production of CO{sub 2} and significantly decrease the amount of acetone in the exhaust gases. This paper includes data on the destruction efficiency of acetone as a function of solvent flow rate, torch power, argon flow rate and oxygen injection rate. The results indicate that greater than 99% destruction efficiency of acetone can be achieved with addition of oxygen to the reaction mixture using an arcjet current of 75 A.

  19. Plasma properties of RF magnetron sputtering system using Zn target

    SciTech Connect

    Nafarizal, N.; Andreas Albert, A. R.; Sharifah Amirah, A. S.; Salwa, O.; Riyaz Ahmad, M. A.

    2012-06-29

    In the present work, we investigate the fundamental properties of magnetron sputtering plasma using Zn target and its deposited Zn thin film. The magnetron sputtering plasma was produced using radio frequency (RF) power supply and Argon (Ar) as ambient gas. A Langmuir probe was used to collect the current from the plasma and from the current intensity, we calculate the electron density and electron temperature. The properties of Zn sputtering plasma at various discharge conditions were studied. At the RF power ranging from 20 to 100 W and gas pressure 5 mTorr, we found that the electron temperature was almost unchanged between 2-2.5 eV. On the other hand, the electron temperature increased drastically from 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} to 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm{sup -3} when the discharge gas pressure increased from 5 to 10 mTorr. The electron microscope images show that the grain size of Zn thin film increase when the discharge power is increased. This may be due to the enhancement of plasma density and sputtered Zn density.

  20. Characterization of Plasma Jet in Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of YSZ Using a <80 kW Shrouded Torch Based on Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qing-Yu; Peng, Xiao-Zhuang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2015-08-01

    During plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings, evaporation of the YSZ powder is essential, but quite difficult when using a commercial <80 kW plasma torch. In this study, a shrouded plasma torch was examined to improve the YSZ evaporation. The plasma characteristics were diagnosed using optical emission spectroscopy. Results showed that the electron number density in the plasma jet was maintained at an order of magnitude of 1014 cm-3, indicating local thermal equilibrium of the plasma jet. Compared with a conventional torch, the shrouded torch resulted in much higher plasma temperature and much lower electron number density. With the shrouded torch, more energy of the plasma was transferred to the YSZ material, leading to more evaporation of the YSZ powder and thereby a much higher deposition rate of the YSZ coating. These results show that use of a shrouded torch is a simple and effective approach to improve the evaporation of feedstock material during PS-PVD.

  1. Preliminary Study of Thermal Treatment of Coke Wastewater Sludge Using Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingshu; Li, Shengli; Sun, Demao; Liu, Xin; Feng, Qiubao

    2016-10-01

    Thermal plasma was applied for the treatment of coke wastewater sludge derived from the steel industry in order to investigate the feasibility of the safe treatment and energy recovery of the sludge. A 30 kW plasma torch system was applied to study the vitrification and gas production of coke wastewater sludge. Toxicity leaching results indicated that the sludge treated via the thermal plasma process converted into a vitrified slag which resisted the leaching of heavy metals. CO2 was utilized as working gas to study the production and heat energy of the syngas. The heating value of the gas products by thermal plasma achieved 8.43 kJ/L, indicating the further utilization of the gas products. Considering the utilization of the syngas and recovery heat from the gas products, the estimated treatment cost of coke wastewater sludge via plasma torch was about 0.98 CNY/kg sludge in the experiment. By preliminary economic analysis, the dehydration cost takes an important part of the total sludge treatment cost. The treatment cost of the coke wastewater sludge with 50 wt.% moisture was calculated to be about 1.45 CNY/kg sludge dry basis. The treatment cost of the coke wastewater sludge could be effectively controlled by decreasing the water content of the sludge. These findings suggest that an economic dewatering pretreatment method could be combined to cut the total treatment cost in an actual treatment process.

  2. Ozone-stimulated emission due to atomic oxygen population inversions in an argon microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lukina, N. A.; Sergeichev, K. F.

    2008-06-15

    It is shown that, in a microwave torch discharge in an argon jet injected into an oxygen atmosphere at normal pressure, quasi-resonant energy transfer from metastable argon atoms to molecules of oxygen and ozone generated in the torch shell and, then, to oxygen atoms produced via the dissociation of molecular oxygen and ozone leads to the inverse population of metastable levels of atomic oxygen. As a result, the excited atomic oxygen with population inversions becomes a gain medium for lasing at wavelengths of 844.6 and 777.3 nm (the 3{sup 3}P-3{sup 3}S and 3{sup 5}P-3{sup 5}S transitions). It is shown that an increase in the ozone density is accompanied by an increase in both the lasing efficiency at these wavelength and the emission intensity of the plasma-forming argon at a wavelength of 811.15 nm (the {sup 2}P{sup 0}4s-{sup 2}P{sup 0}4p transition). When the torch operates unstably, the production of singlet oxygen suppresses ozone generation; as a result, the lasing effect at these wavelengths disappears.

  3. Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Tarasenko, O.; Chang, J.; Popovic, S.; Chen, C. Y.; Fan, H. W.; Scott, A.; Lahiani, M.; Alusta, P.; Drake, J. D.; Nikolic, M.

    2009-11-01

    The effectiveness and mechanism of a low temperature air plasma torch in clotting blood are explored. Both blood droplets and smeared blood samples were used in the tests. The treated droplet samples reveal how blood clotting depends on the distance at which the torch operated, and for how long the droplets have been exposed to the torch. Microscopy and cell count of smeared blood samples shed light on dependencies of erythrocyte and platelet counts on torch distance and exposure time. With an increase of torch distance, the platelet count of treated blood samples increases but is less than that of the control. The flux of reactive atomic oxygen (RAO) and the degree of blood clotting decreased. With an increase of exposure time, platelet count of treated samples decreased, while the degree of clot increased. The correlation among these dependencies and published data support a blood clotting mechanism that RAO as well as other likely reactive oxygen species generated by the plasma torch activate erythrocyte-platelets interactions and induces blood coagulation.

  4. Influence of internal cold gas flow and of nozzle contour on spray properties of an atmospheric plasma spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, R.H.; Borck, V.; Mayr, W.; Landes, K.; Reusch, A.

    1995-12-31

    With an automated Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) equipment trajectories, distributions and velocities of spray particles were measured operating a plasma spray torch under atmospheric pressure conditions. For this purpose a standard APS torch (PT F4) was used, applying different gas distribution rings and nozzle modifications to study the influence of internal plasma gas flow and of plasma jet formation. The main results are: (1) An inclined injection of the plasma cold gas results in a considerable spin of the plasma jet and a significant deviation of the particle trajectories around the plasma jet center. (2) With a plasma cold gas injection parallel to the torch axis no spin is observable, but torch voltage and the plasma jet enthalpy show considerably diminished values. (3) The flow of injected powder may be split up, if it is injected too fast. (4) In comparison with cylindrical nozzles, specially developed nozzles with a controlled expanding contour, lead to broader temperature profiles across the plasma jet and hence to better melting conditions for the particles.

  5. Microwave plasma torch abatement of NF{sub 3} and SF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup; Chun, Byung Jun; Lee, Sun Ku; Hwang, Sang Kyu; Kim, Dong Su

    2006-03-15

    An atmospheric pressure microwave plasma torch as a tool for fluorinated compounds (FCs) abatement was presented. Detailed experiments were conducted on the abatement of NF{sub 3} and SF{sub 6} in terms of destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Swirl gas, compressed air for stable plasma, was tangentially injected into the microwave plasma torch and a mixture of N{sub 2}, NF{sub 3}, or SF{sub 6}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} was axially injected. The DRE of 99.1% for NF{sub 3} was achieved without an additive gas at the total flow rate of 50.1 liters per minute (lpm) by applying a microwave power of 1.4 kW. Also, a DRE of SF{sub 6} up to 90.1% was obtained at the total flow rate of 40.6 lpm using an applied microwave power of 1.4 kW. Experimental results indicate that the microwave plasma abatement device can successfully eliminate FCs in the semiconductor industry.

  6. Aerosol measurements from plasma torch cuts on stainless steel, carbon steel, and aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, V.J.; Brodrick, C.J.; Crawford, S.; Nasiatka, J.; Pierucci, K.; Reyes, V.; Sambrook, J.; Wrobel, S.; Yeary, J.

    1996-01-01

    The main purpose of this project is to quantify aerosol particle size and generation rates produced by a plasma torch whencutting stainless steel, carbon steel and aluminum. the plasma torch is a common cutting tool used in the dismantling of nuclear facilities. Eventually, other cutting tools will be characterized and the information will be compiled in a user guide to aid in theplanning of both D&D and other cutting operations. The data will be taken from controlled laboratory experiments on uncontaminated metals and field samples taken during D&D operations at ANL nuclear facilities. The plasma torch data was collected from laboratory cutting tests conducted inside of a closed, filtered chamber. The particle size distributions were determined by isokinetically sampling the exhaust duct using a cascade impactor. Cuts on different thicknesses showed there was no observable dependence of the aerosol quantity produced as a function of material thickness for carbon steel. However, data for both stainless steel and aluminum revealed that the aerosol mass produced for these materials appear to have some dependance on thickness, with thinner materials producing tmore aerosols. The results of the laboratory cutting tests show that most measured particle size distributions are bimodal with one mode at about 0.2 {mu}m and the other at about 10 {mu}m. The average Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameters (MMAD`s) for these tests are 0.36 {+-}0.08 {mu}m for stainless steel, 0.48 {+-}0.17{mu}m for aluminum and 0.52{+-}0.12 {mu}m for carbon steel.

  7. Numerical analysis on plasma characteristics of high power plasma torch of hollow electrode type for waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, M.; Kang, K.D.; Hong, S.H.

    1997-12-31

    In this study, the plasma characteristics of a high power nontransferred plasma torch with hollow electrodes are investigated in the atmospheric condition by analyzing the distributions of plasma temperature, velocity and current density. Typical assumptions of steady state, axisymmetry, local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and optically thin plasma are adopted in a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling of thermal plasma with a special treatment of arc spot positions. A control volume method and the modified SIMPLER algorithm are used for solving the governing equations numerically, i.e., conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy along with the equations describing the {Kappa}-{var_epsilon} model for turbulence and the current continuity for arc discharge. The distributions of plasma temperature, velocity, and current density are calculated in various operation conditions such as gas species, gas flowrate, input current, and electrode geometry. The calculated results of plasma characteristics in various operations can be useful to determine the design parameters of the high power plasma torch of hollow electrode type for incinerating the hospital and municipal solid wastes.

  8. Plasma potential mapping of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Albert; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Sanders, Jason M.; Anders, Andre

    2011-12-20

    Pulsed emissive probe techniques have been used to determine the plasma potential distribution of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges. An unbalanced magnetron with a niobium target in argon was investigated for pulse length of 100 μs at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz, giving a peak current of 170 A. The probe data were taken with a time resolution of 20 ns and a spatial resolution of 1 mm. It is shown that the local plasma potential varies greatly in space and time. The lowest potential was found over the target’s racetrack, gradually reaching anode potential (ground) several centimeters away from the target. The magnetic pre-sheath exhibits a funnel-shaped plasma potential resulting in an electric field which accelerates ions toward the racetrack. In certain regions and times, the potential exhibits weak local maxima which allow for ion acceleration to the substrate. Knowledge of the local E and static B fields lets us derive the electrons’ E×B drift velocity, which is about 105 m/s and shows structures in space and time.

  9. Thermal inequilibrium of atmospheric helium microwave plasma produced by an axial injection torch

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, R.; Rodero, A.; Quintero, M.C.; Sola, A.; Gamero, A.; Ortega, D.

    2005-11-01

    The population density of several excited states has been obtained spectroscopically in a helium plasma sustained by a torch device at atmospheric pressure as a function of the radius in the plasma for different conditions of microwave power and plasma gas flow. The ground-state atom density is determined from the gas temperature, which is deduced from the rotational temperature of the molecular nitrogen ions. The population distribution is fitted to the theoretical results of a collisional-radiative model that includes particle transport. A large deviation of the measured populations is found from the theoretical populations for local thermodynamic equilibrium. The plasma at any radial position is far from local thermodynamic equilibrium; the equilibrium deviation parameter of the ground state is larger than 10 000. The equilibrium deviation parameters of the measured excited-state populations obey the theoretical p{sub k}{sup -6} exponential law.

  10. Spatiotemporal synchronization of drift waves in a magnetron sputtering plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Antoni, V.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Adámek, J.

    2014-10-15

    A feedforward scheme is applied for drift waves control in a magnetized magnetron sputtering plasma. A system of driven electrodes collecting electron current in a limited region of the explored plasma is used to interact with unstable drift waves. Drift waves actually appear as electrostatic modes characterized by discrete wavelengths of the order of few centimeters and frequencies of about 100 kHz. The effect of external quasi-periodic, both in time and space, travelling perturbations is studied. Particular emphasis is given to the role played by the phase relation between the natural and the imposed fluctuations. It is observed that it is possible by means of localized electrodes, collecting currents which are negligible with respect to those flowing in the plasma, to transfer energy to one single mode and to reduce that associated to the others. Due to the weakness of the external action, only partial control has been achieved.

  11. Experimental evidence of warm electron populations in magnetron sputtering plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, B. B. Han, Jeon G.; Kim, Hye R.; Ishikawa, K.; Hori, M.

    2015-01-21

    This work report on the results obtained using the Langmuir probe (LP) measurements in high-power dc magnetron sputtering discharges. Data show clear evidence of two electron components, such as warm and bulk electrons, in the sputtering plasma in a magnetic trap. We have also used optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic method along with LP to investigate the plasma production. Data show that there is a presence of low-frequency oscillations in the 2–3 MHz range, which are expected to be generated by high-frequency waves. Analysis also suggests that the warm electrons, in the plasmas, can be formed due to the collisionless Landau damping of the bulk electrons.

  12. The deposition of chromium by the use of an inductively-coupled radio-frequency plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, L.; Chumbley, L.S.

    1997-11-15

    This paper discusses attempts to deposit a layer of hard Cr metal, with properties similar to those of layers currently obtained by electrolytic methods, onto a metallic substrate using an inductively-coupled, radio-frequency plasma torch (ICP-RF) torch. Preliminary studies indicated that it might be possible to produce a suitable layer using a number of chromium-based compounds. For this study, Cr powders and a chromium precursor were injected into the high temperature region of the plasma plume, where thermal decomposition of the feed material produced Cr atoms that deposited onto the surface of metal substrates placed below the plasma torch. The films produced were examined to determine thickness, chemical compositions, and adherence. Since the goal of the project was to develop a coating method that was not only industrially suitable but also environmentally safe, care was taken to monitor the emissions produced by the system during deposition.

  13. Computation of non-equilibrium flow downstream of a plasma torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harle, Christophe; Varghese, Philip L.; Carey, Graham F.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for compressible reacting flow in an axisymmetric geometry are presented for a nitrogen plasma torch with both thermal and chemical nonequilibrium. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new axisymmetric finite element/finite volume formulation in which the convective flux is treated by an extension of the approximate Riemann solver due to Osher. The numerical scheme is validated by comparison with a previous solution of the same problem using a different computational scheme. Results obtained using two different models of nonthermal dissociation rates are compared to experimental data.

  14. Plasma torch production of Ti/Al nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Jonathan; Zea, Hugo; Cheng, Lily; Luhrs, Claudia; Courtney, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Using the Aerosol-through-Plasma (A-T-P) technique high surface area bi-cationic (Ti-Al) oxide particles of a range of stoichiometries were produced that showed remarkable resistance to sintering. Specifically, we found that homogeneous nanoparticles with surface areas greater than 150 m{sup 2}/gm were produced at all stoichiometries. In particular, for particles with a Ti:Al ratio of 1:3 a surface area of just over 200 m{sup 2}/gm was measured using the BET method. The most significant characteristic of these particles was that their sinter resistance was far superior to that of TiAl particles produced using any other method. For example, A-T-P generated particles retained >70% of their surface area even after sintering at 1000 C for five hours. In contrast, particles made using all other methods lost virtually all of their surface area after an 800 C treatment.

  15. Influence of a transverse magnetic field on arc root movements in a dc plasma torch: Diamagnetic effect of arc column

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Keun Su

    2009-03-23

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field on the anodic arc root movement inside a dc plasma torch has been investigated. The arc voltage fluctuation, which represents the degree of the arc instability, was reduced to 28.6% of the original value and the high frequency components in the voltage signal also decreased in their magnitudes. The inherent arc instability in a dc thermal plasma torch seems to be suppressed by a diamagnetic effect of the arc column. Furthermore, the measured voltage wave forms indicated that the arc root attachment mode would be controllable by a transverse magnetic field.

  16. Experimental characterization of ultraviolet radiation of air in a high enthalpy plasma torch facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casses, C. J.; Bertrand, P. J.; Jacobs, C. M.; Mac Donald, M. E.; Laux, Ch. O.

    2015-06-01

    During atmospheric reentry, a plasma is formed ahead of the surface of the vehicle and the excited particle present in the plasma produces radiative heating fluxes to the surface of the vehicle. A high-temperature air plasma torch operating at atmospheric pressure was used to experimentally reproduce atmospheric reentry conditions. A high-resolution and absolute intensity emission spectrum (full width at half maximum (FWHM) = 0.064 nm) was obtained from 200 to 450 nm and then compared with computational results provided by the SPECAIR code [1]. This paper discusses the comparison of the two spectra over this wavelength range in order to confirm the validity of the calculation and provide direction to improve the calculated spectrum.

  17. Coherent and incoherent Thomson scattering on an argon/hydrogen microwave plasma torch with transient behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrusník, A.; Synek, P.; Hübner, S.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Zajíčková, L.; Nijdam, S.

    2016-10-01

    A new method of processing time-integrated coherent Thomson scattering spectra is presented, which provides not only the electron density and temperature but also information about the transient behaviour of the plasma. Therefore, it is an alternative to single-shot Thomson scattering measurements as long as the scattering is coherent. The method is applied to a microwave plasma torch operating in argon or a mixture of argon with hydrogen at atmospheric pressure. Electron densities up to 8\\cdot {{10}21} m-3 (ionization degree above 10-3) were observed, which is more than two times higher than presented in earlier works on comparable discharges. Additionally, a parametric study with respect to the argon/hydrogen ratio and the input power was carried out and the results are discussed together with earlier Stark broadening measurements on the same plasma.

  18. Study of Earth and Jupiter-like plasmas for atmospheric entries using a non-transferred arc torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menecier, S.; Gouy, P. A.; Duffour, E.; Perisse, F.; Vacher, D.; Cerqueira, N.; Dudeck, M.; Reynier, Ph; Marraffa, L.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the results obtained by a 100 kW non-transferred arc plasma torch dedicated to the studies of plasmas characteristics of atmospheric entries of spatial probes, especially Earth and Jupiter entries. Spectra acquisition of the produced plasmas is achieved using optical emission spectroscopy. For Earth entry conditions, air plasma was obtained with a maximal temperature around 6800 K with a good agreement using atomic lines of oxygen and nitrogen (and also copper coming from electrode’s ablation) and molecular bands of N2, CN and \\text{N}2+ , testifying to a good thermal equilibrium. As the first step in the study of Jupiter atmospheric entry, pure helium plasma was produced with the same maximal temperature of about 7500 K. Helium plasma was achieved for the first time using the plasma torch. Recorded spectra show a continuum, He I lines as well as copper. He II lines are not detected.

  19. 3D MHD modelling of low current-high voltage dc plasma torch under restrike mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebouvier, A.; Delalondre, C.; Fresnet, F.; Cauneau, F.; Fulcheri, L.

    2012-01-01

    We present in this paper a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modelling of the gliding arc behaviour of a dc plasma torch operating with air under low current and high voltage conditions. The low current leads to instabilities and difficulties with simulating the process because the magnetic field is not sufficient to constrict the arc. The model is 3D, time dependent and the MHD equations are solved using CFD software Code_Saturne®. Although the arc is definitively non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), the LTE assumption is considered as a first approach. The injection of air is tangential. A hot gas channel reattachment model has been used to simulate the restriking process of the arc root. After the description of the model, the most appropriate electrical voltage breakdown parameter has been selected in comparing with experimental results. A typical operating point is then studied in detail and shows the helical shape of the arc discharge in the nozzle. Finally, the mass flow rate and the current have been varied in the range 0.16-0.5 g s-1 and 100-300 mA, respectively, corresponding to typical glidarc operating points of our experimental plasma torch. The model shows good consistency with experimental data in terms of global behaviour, arc length, mean voltage and glidarc frequency.

  20. Microwave N{sub 2}-Ar plasma torch. II. Experiment and comparison with theory

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, J.; Tatarova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Ferreira, C. M.

    2011-01-15

    Spatially resolved emission spectroscopy techniques have been used to determine the gas temperature, the electron, and N{sub 2}{sup +} ion densities and the relative emission intensities of radiative species in a microwave (2.45 GHz) plasma torch driven by a surface wave. The experimental results have been analyzed in terms of a two-dimensional theoretical model based on a self-consistent treatment of particles kinetics, gas dynamics, and wave electrodynamics. The measured spatial variations in the various quantities agree well with the model predictions. The radially averaged gas temperature is around 3000 K and varies only slowly along the discharge zone of the source but it drops sharply down to about 400 K in the postdischarge. The experimental wave dispersion characteristics nearly follow the theoretical ones, thus confirming that this plasma source is driven by a surface wave.

  1. The quenching effect of hydrogen on the nitrogen in metastable state in atmospheric-pressure N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shou-Zhe Zhang, Xin; Chen, Chuan-Jie; Zhang, Jialiang; Wang, Yong-Xing; Xia, Guang-Qing

    2014-07-15

    The atmospheric-pressure microwave N{sub 2}-H{sub 2} plasma torch is generated and diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy. It is found that a large amount of N atoms and NH radicals are generated in the plasma torch and the emission intensity of N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative band is the strongest over the spectra. The mixture of hydrogen in nitrogen plasma torch causes the morphology of the plasma discharge to change with appearance that the afterglow shrinks greatly and the emission intensity of N{sub 2}{sup +} first negative band decreases with more hydrogen mixed into nitrogen plasma. In atmospheric-pressure microwave-induced plasma torch, the hydrogen imposes a great influence on the characteristics of nitrogen plasma through the quenching effect of the hydrogen on the metastable state of N{sub 2}.

  2. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the coupling of time-dependent parameters in a blown arc plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2016-02-01

    A low-power dc arc torch using nitrogen as plasma-forming gas is studied to highlight the modulation of plasma jet specific enthalpy and speed at the nozzle exit. A special design is used for the torch and by tuning the arc current and the mass flow rate a resonant oscillating mode is obtained in the kHz range, for which the arc voltage presents a periodic triangular waveform, which is the result of the combination of the input parameters. At stabilized current and following the voltage, the electric power is modulated for the specific enthalpy, the mass density and the speed of the plasma at the nozzle exit. A change in the plasma speed is accompanied by a change in the momentum of the jet, which must influence the pressure inside the torch and particularly in the cathode cavity, the volume of which stores the cold gas before it enters the arc region. Even though the torch is fed with a constant flow rate, the arc is subjected to a more or less fluctuating flow rate depending on the cathode cavity volume. The link between the fluctuating components of the different parameters is searched by using a conservation equation and solutions are obtained by means of Fourier analysis. The results obtained are consistent with speed measurements and time-resolved temperature measurements.

  3. Experimental measurements of plasma properties for Miller SG-100 torch with Mach I setting

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.L.T.; Heberlein, J.; Pfender, E. )

    1991-10-01

    In this work measurements of plasma properties, including the fields of temperature, velocity and plasma composition have been completed for the Miller SG-100 plasma torch using argon-helium mixtures with the Mach 1 nozzle at 1 atm pressure. A computer-controlled system combining both spectroscopic and enthalpy probe diagnostics has been developed to allow temperature measurements covering a range from 2000--16000K which includes the plasma flame region which is of interest. The experimental results expose the dominant effects in different spatial areas of argon-helium plasma jets. In the center near the nozzle exit the temperatures exceed 10,000K, and strong diffusion exists due to the steep radial gradients of temperature and particle number densities. In the jet tail region where the temperatures are well below 10,000K and decay in axial and radial direction, the dominant effects in this area are strong cold gas entrainment associated with turbulence. Substantial discrepancies between temperatures evaluated from spectroscopic and enthalpy probe data are particularly severe in the jet fringes indicating that strong deviations from LTE may exist in the jet fringes. In addition, entrainment of the cold surrounding gas into the plasma jet causes severe discrepancies between spectrometric and enthalpy probe data. The validity of the two diagnostic methods will be discussed. The temperature profiles in argon-helium plasma jets are flatter and wider, and the velocities are higher than in a pure argon plasma jet. These features of argon-helium plasma jets may be beneficial for obtaining better performance in the plasma spraying process. 26 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Single-shot Thomson scattering on argon plasmas created by the Microwave Plasma Torch; evidence for a new plasma class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; van de Sande, M. J.; de Vries, N.; Broks, B.; Iordanova, E.; Gamero, A.; Torres, J.; Sola, A.

    2007-10-01

    To determine the fine-structure size of plasmas created by a Microwave Plasma Torch (MPT), single-shot Thomson scattering (TS) measurements were performed. The aim was to find a solution for the long-standing discrepancy between experiments and Global Plasma Models (GPMs). Since these GPMs are based on the assumption that (ambipolar) diffusion is the main loss process for charged particles, the diffusion length and thus the fine-structure size should be known with high precision before an appropriate theory-experiment comparison can be carried out. In order to avoid the effect of blurring, which is created during the accumulation of multi-shot TS signals and which obscures the fine-structures, single-shot measurements are indispensable to determine the diffusion length. The results of the present study reveal that the impression created by multi-shot TS that MPT plasmas resemble stable cones is not (always) correct; instead it is found that the plasmas we investigated are tiny filaments that rotate on the mantle of a virtual cone. However, the fine-structure, especially the thickness, of these filaments is not substantially smaller than that of the virtual cone. By applying the theory-experiment comparison to the filament we found that the disagreement is even worse than what we found for the cone. It is therefore inevitable to conclude that the main proposition of the GPM is incorrect. Apparently the plasma is not diffusive in nature; that is, the main loss process of charged particles is not provided by diffusion but by local chemistry. Swirling in a cool nitrogen-containing environment favors the production of molecular ions such as Ar 2+ and N 2+ inside the plasma filament. The destruction of these molecular ions leads to recombination frequencies that are more than a factor 100 larger than what ambipolar diffusion can provide. Thus we are dealing with another plasma class and it is useful to divide plasmas into diffusive and reactive plasmas. The well

  5. Production of carbon nanotubes by microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2005-05-15

    The key requirements of nanotube formation are an atomic carbon source and a source of nanometal particles. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been synthesized by an argon/nitrogen microwave plasma torch using a mixture of acetylene and vapor-phase iron pentacarbonyl at the atmospheric pressure. The synthesized CNTs have been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, field-emission transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, and are shown to be multiwalled and have a bamboo-shaped structure. The synthesized CNTs in some areas are well aligned. It is also found that the higher the content of nitrogen gas used, the higher the number of rough and wavy surfaces and the inner intersecting layers.

  6. [Study on vitrification of fly ashes from municipal wastes incinerator with a plasma torch].

    PubMed

    Pan, Xin-chao; Ma, Zeng-yi; Wang, Qin; Tu, Xin; Yan, Jian-hua

    2008-04-01

    TCLP analysis (USEPA method 1311) was employed on fly ash in order to analyze the metals leachability and the concentration of cadmium was 0.3225 mg/L which exceeded state TCLP standard(0.3 mg/L). According to USEPA method 1613, I-TEQ of PCDD/Fs in fly ash was 0.45 ng/g. Then a double arcs DC plasma torch was developed to vitrified fly ash. And the results showed that heavy metals were mostly immobilized in the vitrified slag and also I-TEQ of PCDD/Fs in fly ash was destroyed near 91.6%. The morphology of vitrified slag was amorphous state which showed the glassy slag of SiO2 and the microstructure of slag was very compact.

  7. Two-dimensional electromagnetic model of a microwave plasma reactor operated by an axial injection torch

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, R.; Alves, L. L.

    2007-05-15

    This paper presents a two-dimensional electromagnetic model for a microwave (2.45 GHz) plasma reactor operated by an axial injection torch. The model solves Maxwell's equations, adopting a harmonic time description and considering the collision dispersion features of the plasma. Perfect-conductor boundary conditions are satisfied at the reactor walls, and absorbing boundary conditions are used at the open end of the coaxial waveguide powering the system. Simulations yield the distribution of the electromagnetic fields and the average power absorbed by the system for a given spatial profile of the plasma density (tailored from previous experimental measurements), with maximum values in the range 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. Model results reveal that the system exhibits features similar to those of an air-filled, one-end-shorted circular metal waveguide, supporting evanescent or oscillatory solutions for radial dimensions below or above a critical radius, respectively. Results also show that the fractional average power absorbed by the plasma is strongly influenced by the system dimensions, which play a major role in defining the geometry pattern of the electromagnetic field distribution. Simulations are used to provide general guidelines for device optimization.

  8. Emission spectroscopy study of CF{sub 4} decomposition in an Ar-H{sub 2} inductive plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Ricard, A.; Al Ayoubi, S.; Cavvadias, S.; Amouroux, J.

    1995-12-31

    Radiative species in Ar RF plasma torch with addition of H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and CF{sub 4} polluting gases have been analyzed by emission spectroscopy. An efficient etching by F atoms of reactor quartz tube is detected from Si atom emission when a few 10{sup {minus}3} CF{sub 4} is introduced into the Ar plasma. The Si emission disappeared with H{sub 2} introduction into the Ar-CF{sub 4} gas mixture which has been correlated with HF formation. From C atomic emission, it is deduced that CF{sub 4} as CH{sub 4} polluting gases are largely dissociated into the Ar plasma torch.

  9. Study on the effect of target on plasma parameters of magnetron sputtering discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, P.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-10-15

    In this study, the effect of magnetron target on different plasma parameters of Argon/Hydrogen (Ar - H{sub 2}) direct current (DC) magnetron discharge is examined. Here, Copper (Cu) and Chromium (Cr) are used as magnetron targets. The value of plasma parameters such as electron temperature (kT{sub e}), electron density (N{sub e}), ion density (N{sub i}), degree of ionization of Ar, and degree of dissociation of H{sub 2} for both the target are studied as a function of input power and hydrogen content in the discharge. The plasma parameters are determined by using Langmuir probe and Optical emission spectroscopy. On the basis of the different reactions in the gas phase, the variation of plasma parameters and sputtering rate are explained. The obtained results show that electron and ion density decline with gradual addition of Hydrogen in the discharge and increase with rising input power. It brings significant changes on the degree of ionization of Ar and dissociation of H{sub 2}. The enhanced value of electron density (N{sub e}), ion density (N{sub i}), degree of Ionization of Ar, and degree of dissociation of H{sub 2} for Cr compared to Cu target is explained on the basis of it's higher Ion Induced Secondary Electron Emission Coefficient (ISEE) value.

  10. High power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges: Instabilities and plasma self-organization

    SciTech Connect

    Ehiasarian, A. P.; New, R.; Hecimovic, A.; Arcos, T. de los; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Boeke, M.; Winter, J.

    2012-03-12

    We report on instabilities in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas which are likely to be of the generalized drift wave type. They are characterized by well defined regions of high and low plasma emissivity along the racetrack of the magnetron and cause periodic shifts in floating potential. The azimuthal mode number m depends on plasma current, plasma density, and gas pressure. The structures rotate in E-vectorxB-vector direction at velocities of {approx}10 km s{sup -1} and frequencies up to 200 kHz. Collisions with residual gas atoms slow down the rotating wave, whereas increasing ionization degree of the gas and plasma conductivity speeds it up.

  11. Analytical performance of a low-gas-flow torch optimized for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montaser, A.; Huse, G.R.; Wax, R.A.; Chan, S.-K.; Golightly, D.W.; Kane, J.S.; Dorrzapf, A.F.

    1984-01-01

    An inductively coupled Ar plasma (ICP), generated in a lowflow torch, was investigated by the simplex optimization technique for simultaneous, multielement, atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The variables studied included forward power, observation height, gas flow (outer, intermediate, and nebulizer carrier) and sample uptake rate. When the ICP was operated at 720-W forward power with a total gas flow of 5 L/min, the signal-to-background ratios (S/B) of spectral lines from 20 elements were either comparable or inferior, by a factor ranging from 1.5 to 2, to the results obtained from a conventional Ar ICP. Matrix effect studies on the Ca-PO4 system revealed that the plasma generated in the low-flow torch was as free of vaporizatton-atomizatton interferences as the conventional ICP, but easily ionizable elements produced a greater level of suppression or enhancement effects which could be reduced at higher forward powers. Electron number densities, as determined via the series until line merging technique, were tower ht the plasma sustained in the low-flow torch as compared with the conventional ICP. ?? 1984 American Chemical Society.

  12. Detection of uranium in industrial and mines samples by microwave plasma torch mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Yang, Meiling; Sun, Rong; Zhong, Tao; Chen, Huanwen

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma torch (MPT), traditionally used as the light source for atomic emission spectrophotometry, has been employed as the ambient ionization source for sensitive detection of uranium in various ground water samples with widely available ion trap mass spectrometer. In the full-scan mass spectra obtained in the negative ion detection mode, uranium signal was featured by the uranyl nitrate complexes (e.g. [UO2 (NO3 )3 ](-) ), which yielded characteristic fragments in the tandem mass spectrometry experiments, allowing confident detection of trace uranium in water samples without sample pretreatment. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the calibration curves were linearly responded within the concentration levels ranged in 10-1000 µg·l(-1) , with the limit of detection (LOD) of 31.03 ng·l(-1) . The relative standard deviations (RSD) values were 2.1-5.8% for the given samples at 100 µg·l(-1) . The newly established method has been applied to direct detection of uranium in practical mine water samples, providing reasonable recoveries 90.94-112.36% for all the samples tested. The analysis of a single sample was completed within 30 s, showing a promising potential of the method for sensitive detection of trace uranium with improved throughput. PMID:26889932

  13. Detection of uranium in industrial and mines samples by microwave plasma torch mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Yang, Meiling; Sun, Rong; Zhong, Tao; Chen, Huanwen

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma torch (MPT), traditionally used as the light source for atomic emission spectrophotometry, has been employed as the ambient ionization source for sensitive detection of uranium in various ground water samples with widely available ion trap mass spectrometer. In the full-scan mass spectra obtained in the negative ion detection mode, uranium signal was featured by the uranyl nitrate complexes (e.g. [UO2 (NO3 )3 ](-) ), which yielded characteristic fragments in the tandem mass spectrometry experiments, allowing confident detection of trace uranium in water samples without sample pretreatment. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the calibration curves were linearly responded within the concentration levels ranged in 10-1000 µg·l(-1) , with the limit of detection (LOD) of 31.03 ng·l(-1) . The relative standard deviations (RSD) values were 2.1-5.8% for the given samples at 100 µg·l(-1) . The newly established method has been applied to direct detection of uranium in practical mine water samples, providing reasonable recoveries 90.94-112.36% for all the samples tested. The analysis of a single sample was completed within 30 s, showing a promising potential of the method for sensitive detection of trace uranium with improved throughput.

  14. Abatement of fluorinated compounds using a 2.45GHz microwave plasma torch with a reverse vortex plasma reactor.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Cho, C H; Shin, D H; Hong, Y C; Shin, Y W

    2015-08-30

    Abatement of fluorinated compounds (FCs) used in semiconductor and display industries has received an attention due to the increasingly stricter regulation on their emission. We have developed a 2.45GHz microwave plasma torch with reverse vortex reactor (RVR). In order to design a reverse vortex plasma reactor, we calculated a volume fraction and temperature distribution of discharge gas and waste gas in RVR by ANSYS CFX of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation code. Abatement experiments have been performed with respect to SF6, NF3 by varying plasma power and N2 flow rates, and FCs concentration. Detailed experiments were conducted on the abatement of NF3 and SF6 in terms of destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). The DRE of 99.9% for NF3 was achieved without an additive gas at the N2 flow rate of 150 liter per minute (L/min) by applying a microwave power of 6kW with RVR. Also, a DRE of SF6 was 99.99% at the N2 flow rate of 60 L/min using an applied microwave power of 6kW. The performance of reverse vortex reactor increased about 43% of NF3 and 29% of SF6 abatements results definition by decomposition energy per liter more than conventional vortex reactor. PMID:25841085

  15. Abatement of fluorinated compounds using a 2.45GHz microwave plasma torch with a reverse vortex plasma reactor.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Cho, C H; Shin, D H; Hong, Y C; Shin, Y W

    2015-08-30

    Abatement of fluorinated compounds (FCs) used in semiconductor and display industries has received an attention due to the increasingly stricter regulation on their emission. We have developed a 2.45GHz microwave plasma torch with reverse vortex reactor (RVR). In order to design a reverse vortex plasma reactor, we calculated a volume fraction and temperature distribution of discharge gas and waste gas in RVR by ANSYS CFX of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation code. Abatement experiments have been performed with respect to SF6, NF3 by varying plasma power and N2 flow rates, and FCs concentration. Detailed experiments were conducted on the abatement of NF3 and SF6 in terms of destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). The DRE of 99.9% for NF3 was achieved without an additive gas at the N2 flow rate of 150 liter per minute (L/min) by applying a microwave power of 6kW with RVR. Also, a DRE of SF6 was 99.99% at the N2 flow rate of 60 L/min using an applied microwave power of 6kW. The performance of reverse vortex reactor increased about 43% of NF3 and 29% of SF6 abatements results definition by decomposition energy per liter more than conventional vortex reactor.

  16. Advanced Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In order to more easily join the huge sections of the Space Shuttle external tank, Marshall Space Flight Center initiated development of the existing concept of Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding. VPPA welding employs a variable current waveform that allows the system to operate for preset time increments in either of two polarity modes for effective joining of light alloys. Marshall awarded the torch contract to B & B Precision Machine, which produced a torch for the Shuttle, then automated the system, and eventually delivered a small torch used by companies such as Whirlpool for sheet metal welding of appliance parts and other applications. The dependability of the torch offers cost and time advantages.

  17. A bulk plasma model for dc and HiPIMS magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenning, N.; Axnäs, I.; Raadu, M. A.; Lundin, D.; Helmerson, U.

    2008-11-01

    A plasma discharge model has been developed for the bulk plasma (also called the extended presheath) in sputtering magnetrons. It can be used both for high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and conventional dc sputtering magnetrons. Demonstration calculations are made for the parameters of the HiPIMS sputtering magnetron at Linköping University, and also benchmarked against results in the literature on dc magnetrons. New insight is obtained regarding the structure and time development of the currents, the electric fields and the potential profiles. The transverse resistivity ηbottom has been identified as having fundamental importance both for the potential profiles and for the motion of ionized target material through the bulk plasma. New findings are that in the HiPIMS mode, as a consequence of a high value of ηbottom, (1) there can be an electric field reversal that in our case extends 0.01-0.04 m from the target, (2) the electric field in the bulk plasma is typically an order of magnitude weaker than in dc magnetrons, (3) in the region of electric field reversal the azimuthal current is diamagnetic in nature, i.e. mainly driven by the electron pressure gradient, and actually somewhat reduced by the electron Hall current which here has a reversed direction and (4) the azimuthal current above the racetrack can, through resistive friction, significantly influence the motion of the ionized fraction of the sputtered material and deflect it sideways, away from the target and towards the walls of the magnetron.

  18. Modeling of a supersonic DC plasma torch system for carbon nanotube production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liping

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) structure forms a very promising source material. It has unique properties such as high thermal and electrical conductivities, and a very high mechanical strength. In recent years, researchers were able to improve both the quantity and quality of the CNT production. Among the efforts made to scale up the production, Harbec and Meunier designed a new plasma torch process for the industrial production of CNT in bulk powder form. Their process is based on the DC plasma-jet pyrolysis of a carbon-containing gas. Experiments were conducted using either 100 slpm of argon or 225 slpm of helium. Tetrachloroethylene (C2Cl4, or TCE) was selected as the carbon raw material. The present work focuses on the modeling of this CNT synthesis process and aims at an understanding of the physical and chemical phenomena observed in this system. First, a description is made of the temperature and flow fields, as well as the species concentration distribution in the torch nozzle using both possibilities of He or Ar as the plasma gas. This is followed in the second part of the thesis by a model aimed to study the nucleation and evolution of the metal particles acting as catalyst for CNT growth in the nozzle. In the third part, the modeling of the TCE pyrolysis process in the flow was carried out. The fluid dynamics equations are used in this system showing supersonic characteristics. A realizable k-ε model is used to address the turbulent effects in the flow fields. The moment method is employed to calculate the formation of the fine catalyst particles from the metal vapor injected. Within the supersonic domain of the flow field, the influence of existing shock waves on the particle nucleation is discussed, as well as the chemical reactions involved. Results show that the supersonic phenomena make it possible for metal particles to nucleate and be maintained in small sizes. This however also causes a backflow in the nozzle, which partially contributes to the

  19. WELDING TORCH

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  20. Modification of film structure by plasma potential control using triode high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Takeo; Umahashi, Takuya; Baba, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    We have designed a new triode configuration in a magnetron sputtering apparatus to control the plasma potential of the discharge. An additional chimney electrode was introduced above the conventional sputter gun to apply a positive voltage. The discharge power was provided by a pulse power source to achieve high power pulsed magnetron sputtering operation. We confirmed that the plasma potential increased with increasing positive electrode voltage. Copper films with substantially flatter surfaces could be obtained on a water-cooled and electrically grounded substrate at an Ar gas pressure of 5 Pa.

  1. Numerical analysis of nitrogen-mixed argon plasma characteristics and injected particle behavior in an ICP torch for ultrafine powder synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Hong, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    The ICP (inductively coupled plasma) torches have been extensively used for the synthesis of various ceramics and new materials as effective hot-temperature heat sources in the field of material processing. Here, a numerical model is presented for the analysis of plasma characteristics of an ICP torch and gas mixing effects on the plasma when a nitrogen gas is added into the argon plasma as a carrier or sheath gas at the torch inlet. The fluid equations describing the plasma flow and temperature fields and the diffusions between two different gases are solved along with a magnetic vector potential equation for electromagnetic fields. The trajectory and the temperature change with time for a particle injected into the plasma are also investigated by a plasma-particle interaction model to find out optimum injection conditions for the synthesis of ultra/fine nitride ceramic powders. It is found from the calculations that the nitrogen-mixed argon plasma with a nitrogen carrier gas for the reaction kinetics of nitride synthesis. It is also found that the radial injection through the holes of the tube wall is preferable to the axial injection at the torch inlet for the complete evaporation of injected particle and the effective chemical reaction of reactant vapor with nitrogen. For the radial injection in an ICP torch of 20 cm in axial length, the optimum injection locations and initial velocities of 50-{micro}m aluminum particles are found for synthesizing aluminum nitride are in the range of 6{approximately}12 cm apart from the torch inlet and over 15 m/s, respectively.

  2. Spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature of the atmospheric-pressure microwave induced nitrogen plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Jie; Li, Shou-Zhe

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric-pressure microwave induced N2 plasma is diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy with respect to the plasma gas temperature. The spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature is discussed with respect to the spectral line broadening of Ar I and the various emission rotational-vibrational band systems of N2(B-A), N2(C-B) and \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}). It is found that the Boltzmann plot of the selective spectral lines from \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}) at 391.4 nm is preferable to others with an accuracy better than 5% for an atmospheric-pressure plasma of high gas temperature. On the basis of the thermal balance equation, the dependences of the plasma gas temperature on the absorbed power, the gas flow rate, and the gas composition are investigated experimentally with photographs recording the plasma morphology.

  3. Downstream plasma transport and metal ionization in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Liang; Yu, He; Szott, Matthew M.; McLain, Jake T.; Ruzic, David N.

    2014-06-01

    Downstream plasma transport and ionization processes in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron were studied. The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) were characterized with a 3D scanning triple Langmuir probe. Plasma expanded from the racetrack region into the downstream region, where a high ne peak was formed some time into the pulse-off period. The expansion speed and directionality towards the substrate increased with a stronger magnetic field (B), largely as a consequence of a larger potential drop in the bulk plasma region during a relatively slower sheath formation. The fraction of Cu ions in the deposition flux was measured on the substrate using a gridded energy analyzer. It increased with higher pulse voltage. With increased B field from 200 to 800 Gauss above racetrack, ne increased but the Cu ion fraction decreased from 42% to 16%. A comprehensive model was built, including the diffusion of as-sputtered Cu flux, the Cu ionization in the entire plasma region using the mapped ne and Te data, and ion extraction efficiency based on the measured plasma potential (Vp) distribution. The calculations matched the measurements and indicated the main causes of lower Cu ion fractions in stronger B fields to be the lower Te and inefficient ion extraction in a larger pre-sheath potential.

  4. Downstream plasma transport and metal ionization in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Liang; Szott, Matthew M.; McLain, Jake T.; Ruzic, David N.; Yu, He

    2014-06-14

    Downstream plasma transport and ionization processes in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron were studied. The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of electron density (n{sub e}) and temperature (T{sub e}) were characterized with a 3D scanning triple Langmuir probe. Plasma expanded from the racetrack region into the downstream region, where a high n{sub e} peak was formed some time into the pulse-off period. The expansion speed and directionality towards the substrate increased with a stronger magnetic field (B), largely as a consequence of a larger potential drop in the bulk plasma region during a relatively slower sheath formation. The fraction of Cu ions in the deposition flux was measured on the substrate using a gridded energy analyzer. It increased with higher pulse voltage. With increased B field from 200 to 800 Gauss above racetrack, n{sub e} increased but the Cu ion fraction decreased from 42% to 16%. A comprehensive model was built, including the diffusion of as-sputtered Cu flux, the Cu ionization in the entire plasma region using the mapped n{sub e} and T{sub e} data, and ion extraction efficiency based on the measured plasma potential (V{sub p}) distribution. The calculations matched the measurements and indicated the main causes of lower Cu ion fractions in stronger B fields to be the lower T{sub e} and inefficient ion extraction in a larger pre-sheath potential.

  5. Kinetic Temperature and Electron Density Measurement in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch using Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, Julia; Lyons, Wendy; Tong, WIlliam G.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser wave mixing is presented as an effective technique for spatially resolved kinetic temperature measurements in an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma. Measurements are performed in a 1 kW, 27 MHz RF plasma using a continuous-wave, tunable 811.5-nm diode laser to excite the 4s(sup 3)P2 approaches 4p(sup 3)D3 argon transition. Kinetic temperature measurements are made at five radial steps from the center of the torch and at four different torch heights. The kinetic temperature is determined by measuring simultaneously the line shape of the sub-Doppler backward phase-conjugate degenerate four-wave mixing and the Doppler-broadened forward-scattering degenerate four-wave mixing. The temperature measurements result in a range of 3,500 to 14,000 K+/-150 K. Electron densities measured range from 6.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm to 10.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm. The experimental spectra are analyzed using a perturbative treatment of the backward phase-conjugate and forward-geometry wave-mixing theory. Stark width is determined from the collisional broadening measured in the phase-conjugate geometry. Electron density measurements are made based on the Stark width. The kinetic temperature of the plasma was found to be more than halved by adding deionized water through the nebulizer.

  6. Reduction in plasma potential by applying negative DC cathode bias in RF magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Masao; Yamada, Toshinori; Osuga, Kosuke; Shindo, Haruo

    2016-11-01

    We applied a negative DC bias voltage to the cathode of an RF magnetron sputtering system and successfully reduced the plasma potential in both argon plasma and hydrogen-diluted argon plasma. The crystallinity of the deposited Ge films is improved by increasing the negative DC bias voltage. It is indicated that the reduction in plasma potential is effective for reducing the plasma damage on deposited materials, caused by the electric potential between the plasma and substrates. In addition, the deposition rate is increased by the increased electric potential between the plasma and the cathode owing to the negative DC bias voltage. The present method successfully gives us higher speed and lower damage sputtering deposition. The increased electric potential between the plasma and the cathode suppresses the evacuation of electrons from the plasma and also enhances the generation of secondary electrons on the cathode. These probably suppress the electron loss from the plasma and result in the reduction in plasma potential.

  7. Laser-Aided Diagnostics of Atoms and Particulates in Magnetron Sputtering Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nafarizal, N.; Takada, N.; Sasaki, K.

    2009-07-07

    Laser-aided diagnostic technique is introduced as an advanced and valuable technique to evaluate the properties of plasma. This technique is an expensive and sophisticated technique which requires researchers to have a basic knowledge in optical spectroscopy. In the present paper, we will generally introduce the experimental work using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and laser light scattering (LLS) techniques. The LIF was used to evaluate the spatial distribution of Cu atoms in magnetron sputtering plasma. The change in the spatial distribution was studied as a function of discharge power. On the other hand, the LLS was used to evaluate the generation of Cu particulates in high-pressure magnetron sputtering plasma. The temporal evolution of Cu particulates in the gas phase of sputtering plasma was visualized successfully.

  8. TORCH Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the antigen or growing the microorganism in culture can be done earlier in the infectious disease process and are more specific. Some recent studies have found questionable benefit to routine TORCH screening ...

  9. TORCH screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a newborn. TORCH stands for toxoplasmosis , rubella , cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, and HIV, but it can also ... to screen infants for infections such as toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex, syphilis and others. These infections may ...

  10. S-band relativistic magnetron operation with an active plasma cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Hadas, Y.; Sayapin, A.; Kweller, T.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2009-04-15

    Results of experimental research on a relativistic S-band magnetron with a ferroelectric plasma source as a cathode are presented. The cathode plasma was generated using a driving pulse (approx3 kV, 200 ns) applied to the ferroelectric cathode electrodes via inductive decoupling prior to the beginning of an accelerating pulse (200 kV, 150 ns) delivered by a linear induction accelerator. The magnetron and generated microwave radiation parameters obtained for the ferroelectric plasma cathode and the explosive emission plasma were compared. It was shown that the application of the ferroelectric plasma cathode allows one to avoid a time delay in the appearance of the electron emission to achieve a better matching between the magnetron and linear induction accelerator impedances and to increase significantly (approx30%) the duration of the microwave pulse with an approx10% increase in the microwave power. The latter results in the microwave radiation generation being 30% more efficient than when the explosive emission cathode is used, where efficiency does not exceed 20%.

  11. Plasma"anti-assistance" and"self-assistance" to high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2009-01-30

    A plasma assistance system was investigated with the goal to operate high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) at lower pressure than usual, thereby to enhance the utilization of the ballistic atoms and ions with high kinetic energy in the film growth process. Gas plasma flow from a constricted plasma source was aimed at the magnetron target. Contrary to initial expectations, such plasma assistance turned out to be contra-productive because it led to the extinction of the magnetron discharge. The effect can be explained by gas rarefaction. A better method of reducing the necessary gas pressure is operation at relatively high pulse repetition rates where the afterglow plasma of one pulse assists in the development of the next pulse. Here we show that this method, known from medium-frequency (MF) pulsed sputtering, is also very important at the much lower pulse repetition rates of HiPIMS. A minimum in the possible operational pressure is found in the frequency region between HiPIMS and MF pulsed sputtering.

  12. Characteristics of the magnetron discharge plasma at large distances from the cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Pashentsev, V. N.

    2010-12-15

    The parameters of the magnetron plasma at distances several times larger than the cathode diameter were measured. The plasma temperature and density measured by the probe technique were found to be 1.4 eV and 6 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}, respectively. The dependences of the plasma density and temperature on the argon flow rate in the course of TiAlN coating deposition were determined. Before deposition of the coating, the substrate was cleaned by ion sputtering at substrate bias voltages higher than 200 V.

  13. Plasma effects on the growth rate of a helix magnetron-type conducting cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghaninejad, A.; Saviz, S.

    2016-10-01

    The linear theory of magnetron amplifier in the presence of the partially plasma loaded sheath helix is presented. The hollow electron beam and plasma column are exposed to the axial magnetic field. The dispersion relation is obtained by using the appropriate boundary conditions. The effects of electron beam, plasma column parameters and sheath helix are studied numerically on the gain. The numerical results show that the presence of the plasma column considerably increases the gain. It is shown that the bandwidth increases by increasing the plasma density. One of the interesting results are that the maximum gain occurs at the special value of the plasma and beam radius. The maximum of gain occurs when the helix approaches the vane. The results show that the gain and bandwidth at lower harmonics are greater than at higher harmonics. The gain and bandwidth in the presence of the plasma column are larger than when applying the dielectric rod.

  14. Swirl Ring Improves Performance Of Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma-arc welding torch modified to create vortex in plasma gas to focus arc into narrower and denser column. Swirl ring contains four channels with angled exit holes to force gas to swirl as it flows out of torch past tip of electrode. Degradation of electrode and orifice more uniform and need to rotate torch during operation to compensate for asymmetry in arc reduced or eliminated. Used in both keyhole and nonkeyhole welding modes.

  15. Analytic model of the energy distribution function for highly energetic electrons in magnetron plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gallian, Sara Trieschmann, Jan; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Hitchon, William N. G.

    2015-01-14

    This paper analyzes a situation which is common for magnetized technical plasmas such as dc magnetron discharges and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) systems, where secondary electrons enter the plasma after being accelerated in the cathode fall and encounter a nearly uniform bulk. An analytic calculation of the distribution function of hot electrons is presented; these are described as an initially monoenergetic beam that slows down by Coulomb collisions with a Maxwellian distribution of bulk (cold) electrons, and by inelastic collisions with neutrals. Although this analytical solution is based on a steady-state assumption, a comparison of the characteristic time-scales suggests that it may be applicable to a variety of practical time-dependent discharges, and it may be used to introduce kinetic effects into models based on the hypothesis of Maxwellian electrons. The results are verified for parameters appropriate to HiPIMS discharges, by means of time-dependent and fully kinetic numerical calculations.

  16. Pseudo-3D PIC modeling of drift-induced spatial inhomogeneities in planar magnetron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, A.; Minea, T.; Tsikata, S.

    2016-10-01

    A pseudo-3D modeling approach, based on a particle-in-cell (PIC)-Monte Carlo collisions algorithm, has been developed for the study of large- and short-scale organization of the plasma in a planar magnetron. This extension of conventional PIC modeling permits the observation of spontaneous organization of the magnetron plasma, under the influence of crossed electric and magnetic fields, into the well-known, large-scale regions of enhanced ionization and density known as spokes. The nature of complex three-dimensional electron trajectories around such structures, and non-uniform ionization within them, is revealed. This modeling provides direct numerical evidence for the existence of high-amplitude internal spoke electric fields, proposed in earlier works. A 3D phenomenological model, consistent with numerical results, is proposed. Electron density fluctuations in the megahertz range, with characteristics similar to the electron cyclotron drift instability experimentally identified in a recent Letter, are also found.

  17. Experimental investigation of quasiperiodic-chaotic-quasiperiodic-chaotic transition in a direct current magnetron sputtering plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabavath, Gopi Kishan; Banerjee, I.; Mahapatra, S. K.; Shaw, Pankaj Kumar; Sekar Iyengar, A. N.

    2015-08-15

    Floating potential fluctuations from a direct current magnetron sputtering plasma have been analysed using time series analysis techniques like phase space plots, power spectra, frequency bifurcation plot, etc. The system exhibits quasiperiodic-chaotic-quasiperiodic-chaotic transitions as the discharge voltage was increased. The transitions of the fluctuations, quantified using the largest Lyapunov exponent, have been corroborated by Hurst exponent and the Shannon entropy. The Shannon entropy is high for quasiperiodic and low for chaotic oscillations.

  18. AC plasma torch with a H2O/CO2/CH4 mix as the working gas for methane reforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutberg, Ph G.; Nakonechny, Gh V.; Pavlov, A. V.; Popov, S. D.; Serba, E. O.; Surov, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents results of investigations implemented during construction of the three-phase ac plasma torch working on a mixture of steam with carbon dioxide and methane (H2O/CO2/CH4) with power upto 120 kW. Such thermal plasma generators are needed in industrial technologies for methane reforming with the aim of producing the syngas comprising of the hydrogen and carbon mono-oxide (H2/CO). It was shown that during plasma torch work there are two character parts of the high-voltage arc. In these parts, the arc column has a different diameter and temperature about (8.5  -  8.3) · 103 K and (10.5  -  10.0) · 103 K, respectively. The plasma torch output characteristics have been obtained for working regimes with various flow rates of the methane (0.0-0.8 g s-1) in the plasma-forming mix and constant flow rates of the carbon dioxide and water steam (each of 3.0 g s-1). For the mentioned mix of gases, the unit generates plasma with the mass-average temperature ~(3.2-3.3) · 103K and the thermal efficiency ~94-96%. This provides effective reforming of methane.

  19. Effect of Nozzle Length on Arc Attachment and Heat Trasnfer on The Anode in A Transferred Plasma Torch for Waste Melting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chan Min; Choi, Shin Il; Choi, Soo Seok; Hong, Sang Hee

    2002-10-01

    The effects of nozzle length on arc attachment and heat transfer on a water-cooled copper anode plate in a transferred arc plasma torch for its application to melting and vitrification of solid wastes are discussed on the basis of experimental investigations. In the previous study(M. Hur, T. H. Hwang, W. T. Ju, C. M. Lee, and S. H. Hong, Thin Solid Films) 390 (2001) 186., the input power fractions to the anode is very rapidly decreased with increasing the arc length in a torch of short nozzle type compared to one of long nozzle type. In the present work, different modes of the arc attachment are experimentally identified by measuring arc voltage fluctuations and arc column images with a CCD camera. The different features of heat transfer rate obtained by the torch nozzle type are explained by its correlation with the arc anode attachment modes. In addition, the arc length ranges maintaining a diffuse mode according to arc current and gas flow rate are compared for the two types of plasma torches.

  20. Some Rare Earth Elements Analysis by Microwave Plasma Torch Coupled with the Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaohong; Jiang, Tao; Qi, Wenhao; Zuo, Jun; Yang, Meiling; Fei, Qiang; Xiao, Saijin; Yu, Aimin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive mass spectrometric analysis method based on the microwave plasma technique is developed for the fast detection of trace rare earth elements (REEs) in aqueous solution. The plasma was produced from a microwave plasma torch (MPT) under atmospheric pressure and was used as ambient ion source of a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ). Water samples were directly pneumatically nebulized to flow into the plasma through the central tube of MPT. For some REEs, the generated composite ions were detected in both positive and negative ion modes and further characterized in tandem mass spectrometry. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was at the level 0.1 ng/mL using MS2 procedure in negative mode. A single REE analysis can be completed within 2~3 minutes with the relative standard deviation ranging between 2.4% and 21.2% (six repeated measurements) for the 5 experimental runs. Moreover, the recovery rates of these REEs are between the range of 97.6%–122.1%. Two real samples have also been analyzed, including well and orange juice. These experimental data demonstrated that this method is a useful tool for the field analysis of REEs in water and can be used as an alternative supplement of ICP-MS. PMID:26421013

  1. Plasma Torch Development and Crater Growth Dynamics in the Course of Laser Processing of Materials and its Diangostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil‧ev, S. V.; Ivanov, A. Yu.; Kopytskii, A. V.; Nedolugov, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of the plasma torch arising under the action of laser radiation on a metal specimen has been investigated by several methods. The dependence of the time form and the spectrum of acoustic vibrations on the parameters of the irradiated material and the law of increase in the crater depth has been determined. It has been found that under the action of a lser pulse of length ~20 μs on the surface of a copper specimen the growth time of the destruction zone is about 40-50 μs, which is in good agreement with the lifetime of plasma formation near the surface of the target subjected to laser-plasma processing (~50 μs). It has been shown that the use of the model of a loaded zone with moving boundaries emitting acoustic waves into an elastic medium permits solving an important practical problem — determining the law of time growth of the zone of irreversible deformations on the surface of the specimen subjected to pulsed laser plasma processing.

  2. Some Rare Earth Elements Analysis by Microwave Plasma Torch Coupled with the Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaohong; Jiang, Tao; Qi, Wenhao; Zuo, Jun; Yang, Meiling; Fei, Qiang; Xiao, Saijin; Yu, Aimin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive mass spectrometric analysis method based on the microwave plasma technique is developed for the fast detection of trace rare earth elements (REEs) in aqueous solution. The plasma was produced from a microwave plasma torch (MPT) under atmospheric pressure and was used as ambient ion source of a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ). Water samples were directly pneumatically nebulized to flow into the plasma through the central tube of MPT. For some REEs, the generated composite ions were detected in both positive and negative ion modes and further characterized in tandem mass spectrometry. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was at the level 0.1 ng/mL using MS(2) procedure in negative mode. A single REE analysis can be completed within 2~3 minutes with the relative standard deviation ranging between 2.4% and 21.2% (six repeated measurements) for the 5 experimental runs. Moreover, the recovery rates of these REEs are between the range of 97.6%-122.1%. Two real samples have also been analyzed, including well and orange juice. These experimental data demonstrated that this method is a useful tool for the field analysis of REEs in water and can be used as an alternative supplement of ICP-MS. PMID:26421013

  3. A feedback model of magnetron sputtering plasmas in HIPIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A. E.; Ganesan, R.; Bilek, M. M. M.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2015-04-01

    We present a 1D feedback model that captures the essential elements of plasma pulse initiation and is useful for control and diagnostics of sputtering plasmas. Our model falls into the class of single-species population models with recruitment and time delay, which show no oscillatory behaviour. The model can reproduce essential features of published time-current traces from plasma discharges and is useful to determine the key parameters affecting the evolution of the discharge. We include the external circuit and we focus on the time evolution of the current as a function of the applied voltage and the plasma parameters. We find the necessity of a nonlinear loss term in the time-dependent plasma ion population to ensure a stable discharge, and we show that a higher secondary electron emission coefficient reduces the time delay for current initiation. We report that I-V characteristics in the plateau region, where it exists, fit a power curve of the form I = kVn, where n is influenced most strongly by the nonlinear loss term.

  4. RP and RQA Analysis for Floating Potential Fluctuations in a DC Magnetron Sputtering Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabavath, Gopikishan; Banerjee, I.; Mahapatra, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a direct current magnetron sputtering plasma is visualized using recurrence plot (RP) technique. RP comprises the recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) which is an efficient method to observe critical regime transitions in dynamics. Further, RQA provides insight information about the system’s behavior. We observed the floating potential fluctuations of the plasma as a function of discharge voltage by using Langmuir probe. The system exhibits quasi-periodic-chaotic-quasi-periodic-chaotic transitions. These transitions are quantified from determinism, Lmax, and entropy of RQA. Statistical investigations like kurtosis and skewness also studied for these transitions which are in well agreement with RQA results.

  5. E-H mode transition of a high-power inductively coupled plasma torch at atmospheric pressure with a metallic confinement tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenberend, Jochen; Chichignoud, Guy; Delannoy, Yves

    2012-08-01

    Inductively coupled plasma torches need high ignition voltages for the E-H mode transition and are therefore difficult to operate. In order to reduce the ignition voltage of an RF plasma torch with a metallic confinement tube the E-H mode transition was studied. A Tesla coil was used to create a spark discharge and the E-H mode transition of the plasma was then filmed using a high-speed camera. The electrical potential of the metallic confinement tube was measured using a high-voltage probe. It was found that an arc between the grounded injector and the metallic confinement tube is maintained by the electric field (E-mode). The transition to H-mode occurred at high magnetic fields when the arc formed a loop. The ignition voltage could be reduced by connecting the metallic confinement tube with a capacitor to the RF generator.

  6. Excess of L-alanine in amino acids synthesized in a plasma torch generated by a hypervelocity meteorite impact reproduced in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Managadze, George G.; Engel, Michael H.; Getty, Stephanie; Wurz, Peter; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Shokolov, Anatoly G.; Sholin, Gennady V.; Terent'ev, Sergey A.; Chumikov, Alexander E.; Skalkin, Alexander S.; Blank, Vladimir D.; Prokhorov, Vyacheslav M.; Managadze, Nina G.; Luchnikov, Konstantin A.

    2016-10-01

    We present a laboratory reproduction of hypervelocity impacts of a carbon containing meteorite on a mineral substance representative of planetary surfaces. The physical conditions of the resulting impact plasma torch provide favorable conditions for abiogenic synthesis of protein amino acids: We identified glycine and alanine, and in smaller quantities serine, in the produced material. Moreover, we observe breaking of alanine mirror symmetry with L excess, which coincides with the bioorganic world. Therefore the selection of L-amino acids for the formation of proteins for living matter could have been the result from plasma processes occurring during the impact meteorites on the surface. This indicates that the plasma torch from meteorite impacts could play an important role in the formation of biomolecular homochirality. Thus, meteorite impacts possibly were the initial stage of this process and promoted conditions for the emergence of a living matter.

  7. Influence of pulse duration on the plasma characteristics in high-power pulsed magnetron discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinidis, S.; Dauchot, J.P.; Ganciu, M.; Ricard, A.; Hecq, M.

    2006-01-01

    High-power pulsed magnetron discharges have drawn an increasing interest as an approach to produce highly ionized metallic vapor. In this paper we propose to study how the plasma composition and the deposition rate are influenced by the pulse duration. The plasma is studied by time-resolved optical emission and absorption spectroscopies and the deposition rate is controlled thanks to a quartz microbalance. The pulse length is varied between 2.5 and 20 {mu}s at 2 and 10 mTorr in pure argon. The sputtered material is titanium. For a constant discharge power, the deposition rate increases as the pulse length decreases. With 5 {mu}s pulse, for an average power of 300 W, the deposition rate is {approx}70% of the deposition rate obtained in direct current magnetron sputtering at the same power. The increase of deposition rate can be related to the sputtering regime. For long pulses, self-sputtering seems to occur as demonstrated by time-resolved optical emission diagnostic of the discharge. In contrary, the metallic vapor ionization rate, as determined by absorption measurements, diminishes as the pulses are shortened. Nevertheless, the ionization rate is in the range of 50% for 5 {mu}s pulses while it lies below 10% in the case of a classical continuous magnetron discharge.

  8. Comparative study of two- and three-dimensional modeling on arc discharge phenomena inside a thermal plasma torch with hollow electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Keun Su; Park, Jin Myung; Choi, Sooseok; Kim, Jongin; Hong, Sang Hee

    2008-02-15

    A comparative study between two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) modeling is carried out on arc discharge phenomena inside a thermal plasma torch with hollow electrodes, in order to evaluate the effects of arc root configuration characterized by either 2D annular or 3D highly localized attachment on the electrode surface. For this purpose, a more precise 3D transient model has been developed by taking account of 3D arc current distribution and arc root rotation. The 3D simulation results apparently reveal that the 3D arc root attachment brings about the inherent 3D and turbulence nature of plasma fields inside the torch. It is also found that the constricted arc column near the vortex chamber plays an important role in heating and acceleration of injected arc gases by concentrating arc currents on the axis of the hollow electrodes. The inherent 3D nature of arc discharge is well preserved inside the cathode region, while these 3D features slowly diminish behind the vortex chamber where the turbulent flow begins to be developed in the anode region. Based on the present simulation results, it is noted that the mixing effects of the strong turbulent flow on the heat and mass transfer are mainly responsible for the gradual relaxation of the 3D structures of plasma fields into the 2D axisymmetric ones that eventually appear in the anode region near the torch exit. From a detailed comparison of the 3D results with the 2D ones, the arc root configuration seems to have a significant effect on the heat transfer to the electrode surfaces interacting with the turbulent plasma flow. That is, in the 2D simulation based on an axisymmetric stationary model, the turbulence phenomena are fairly underestimated and the amount of heat transferred to the cold anode wall is calculated to be smaller than that obtained in the 3D simulation. For the validation of the numerical simulations, calculated plasma temperatures and axial velocities are compared with experimentally measured ones

  9. Gas-phase synthesis of nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} nanorods by microwave plasma torch at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Kim, Jong Hun; Bang, Chan Uk; Uhm, Han Sup

    2005-11-15

    Nitrogen (N)-doped titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanorods were directly synthesized via decomposition of gas-phase titanium tetrachloride (TiCl{sub 4}) by an atmospheric microwave plasma torch. X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscope, field-emission transmission electron microscope, and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) have been employed to investigate fraction of the anatase and rutile phases, diameter and length, and chemical composition of the nanorods, respectively. The diameters of the nanorods are approximately 30-80 nm and the length is several micrometers. EELS data show that incorporation of N into the O site of TiO{sub 2} nanorods was enhanced in N{sub 2} gas by the microwave plasma torch. Also, a growth model of the rods was proposed on the basis of vapor-liquid-solid mechanism.

  10. ZnO nanocrystals synthesized by evaporation of Zn in microwave plasma torch in terms of mixture ratio of N{sub 2} to O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Kim, Jong Hun; Cho, Soon Cheon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2006-06-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals synthesized by an atmospheric microwave plasma torch are characterized in terms of the mixture ratio of N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} in the torch gas. Zinc (Zn) granules as a source material placed on the plasma reactor were evaporated and oxidized to ZnO immediately as soon as Zn granules were in contact with the plasma torch flame. The samples obtained from the different gas mixtures were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and photoluminescence (PL). As the N{sub 2} content in the gas mixture increased to 93.6%, the aggregates or clusters of ZnO crystals were synthesized without nanorod-like and multipod-like structures. Especially, ZnO crystals synthesized in the N{sub 2} content of 55.6% mainly revealed the tripod and tetrapod. Also, the visible to ultraviolet (UV) intensity ratio in the PL analysis was increased with increasing of the N{sub 2} content, revealing that the aggregated ZnO crystals have the high concentration of oxygen vacancies.

  11. Spectroscopic imaging of self-organization in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, 117543 Singapore, Singapore; Andersson, Joakim; Ni, Pavel; Anders, Andre

    2013-07-17

    Excitation and ionization conditions in traveling ionization zones of high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas were investigated using fast camera imaging through interference filters. The images, taken in end-on and side on views using light of selected gas and target atom and ion spectral lines, suggest that ionization zones are regions of enhanced densities of electrons, and excited atoms and ions. Excited atoms and ions of the target material (Al) are strongly concentrated near the target surface. Images from the highest excitation energies exhibit the most localized regions, suggesting localized Ohmic heating consistent with double layer formation.

  12. Plasma reactivity in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering through oxygen kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Vitelaru, Catalin; Lundin, Daniel; Brenning, Nils; Minea, Tiberiu

    2013-09-02

    The atomic oxygen metastable dynamics in a Reactive High-Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (R-HiPIMS) discharge has been characterized using time-resolved diode laser absorption in an Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixture with a Ti target. Two plasma regions are identified: the ionization region (IR) close to the target and further out the diffusion region (DR), separated by a transition region. The μs temporal resolution allows identifying the main atomic oxygen production and destruction routes, which are found to be very different during the pulse as compared to the afterglow as deduced from their evolution in space and time.

  13. Rarefaction windows in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Palmucci, Maria; Britun, Nikolay; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Snyders, Rony

    2013-09-21

    The velocity distribution function of the sputtered particles in the direction parallel to the planar magnetron cathode is studied by spatially- and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in a short-duration (20 μs) high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge. The experimental evidence for the neutral and ionized sputtered particles to have a constant (saturated) velocity at the end of the plasma on-time is demonstrated. The velocity component parallel to the target surface reaches the values of about 5 km/s for Ti atoms and ions, which is higher that the values typically measured in the direct current sputtering discharges before. The results point out on the presence of a strong gas rarefaction significantly reducing the sputtered particles energy dissipation during a certain time interval at the end of the plasma pulse, referred to as “rarefaction window” in this work. The obtained results agree with and essentially clarify the dynamics of HiPIMS discharge studied during the plasma off-time previously in the work: N. Britun, Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 131504 (2011)

  14. Argon–oxygen dc magnetron discharge plasma probed with ion acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, Partha Saikia, Bipul Kumar; Goswami, Kalyan Sindhu; Phukan, Arindam

    2014-05-15

    The precise determination of the relative concentration of negative ions is very important for the optimization of magnetron sputtering processes, especially for those undertaken in a multicomponent background produced by adding electronegative gases, such as oxygen, to the discharge. The temporal behavior of an ion acoustic wave excited from a stainless steel grid inside the plasma chamber is used to determine the relative negative ion concentration in the magnetron discharge plasma. The phase velocity of the ion acoustic wave in the presence of negative ions is found to be faster than in a pure argon plasma, and the phase velocity increases with the oxygen partial pressure. Optical emission spectroscopy further confirms the increase in the oxygen negative ion density, along with a decrease in the argon positive ion density under the same discharge conditions. The relative negative ion concentration values measured by ion acoustic waves are compared with those measured by a single Langmuir probe, and a similarity in the results obtained by both techniques is observed.

  15. Calculation of thermal fluxes of plasma torch reradiation under the action of laser radiation on a condensed target

    SciTech Connect

    Rudenko, V. V.

    2010-12-15

    The problem of laser deposition with allowance for thermal radiation transport inside and outside the laser torch is considered in a multigroup approximation. The energy fluxes of laser torch thermal radiation onto a target in the far and near zones are calculated as functions of time and the character of the exposure. It is shown that absorption of thermal fluxes in the substrate and target in the course of laser deposition results in their substantial heating. The possibility of diagnosing thermal radiation fluxes from the laser torch by using photodetectors is demonstrated.

  16. Microwave plasma torch mass spectrometry for the direct detection of copper and molybdenum ions in aqueous liquids.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaohong; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Runzhi; Wang, Shangxian; Zou, Wei; Zhu, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Microwave plasma torch (MPT) is a simple and low power-consumption ambient ion source. And the MPT Mass spectra of many metal elements usually exhibit some novel features different from their inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectra, which may be helpful for metal element analysis. Here, we presented the results about the MPT mass spectra of copper and molybdenum elements by a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ). The generated copper or molybdenum contained ions in plasma were characterized further in collision-induced dissociated (CID) experiments. These researches built a novel, direct and sensitive method for the direct analysis of trace levels of copper and molybdenum in aqueous liquids. Quantitative results showed that the limit of detection (LOD) by using MS(2) procedure was estimated to be 0.265 µg/l (ppb) for copper and 0.497 µg/l for molybdenum. The linear dynamics ranges cover at least 2 orders of magnitude and the analysis of a single aqueous sample can be completed in 5-6 min with a reasonable semi-quantitative sense. Two practical aqueous samples, milk and urine, were also analyzed qualitatively with reasonable recovery rates and RSD. These experimental data demonstrated that the MPT MS is able to turn into a promising and hopeful tool in field analysis of copper and molybdenum ions in water and some aqueous media, and can be applied in many fields, such as environmental controlling, hydrogeology, and water quality inspection. Moreover, MPT MS could also be used as the supplement of ICP-MS for the rapid and in-situ analysis of metal ions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27194522

  17. Controlling chaos based on a novel intelligent integral terminal sliding mode control in a rod-type plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safa, Khari; Zahra, Rahmani; Behrooz, Rezaie

    2016-05-01

    An integral terminal sliding mode controller is proposed in order to control chaos in a rod-type plasma torch system. In this method, a new sliding surface is defined based on a combination of the conventional sliding surface in terminal sliding mode control and a nonlinear function of the integral of the system states. It is assumed that the dynamics of a chaotic system are unknown and also the system is exposed to disturbance and unstructured uncertainty. To achieve a chattering-free and high-speed response for such an unknown system, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system is utilized in the next step to approximate the unknown part of the nonlinear dynamics. Then, the proposed integral terminal sliding mode controller stabilizes the approximated system based on Lyapunov’s stability theory. In addition, a Bee algorithm is used to select the coefficients of integral terminal sliding mode controller to improve the performance of the proposed method. Simulation results demonstrate the improvement in the response speed, chattering rejection, transient response, and robustness against uncertainties.

  18. Short torch design for direct liquid sample introduction using conventional and micro-nebulizers for plasma spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Montaser, Akbar; Westphal, Craig S.; Kahen, Kaveh; Rutkowski, William F.

    2008-01-08

    An apparatus and method for providing direct liquid sample introduction using a nebulizer are provided. The apparatus and method include a short torch having an inner tube and an outer tube, and an elongated adapter having a cavity for receiving the nebulizer and positioning a nozzle tip of the nebulizer a predetermined distance from a tip of the outer tube of the short torch. The predetermined distance is preferably about 2-5 mm.

  19. Fast tomographic measurements of temperature in an air plasma cutting torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlína, J.; Šonský, J.; Gruber, J.; Cressault, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Temperatures in an air plasma jet were measured using a tomographic experimental arrangement providing time-resolved scans of plasma optical radiation in the spectral band 559-601 nm from two directions. The acquired data and subsequent processing yielded time-resolved temperature distributions in measurement planes perpendicular to the plasma jet axis with a temporal resolution of 1 μs. The measurement system and evaluation methods afforded detailed information about the influence of high-frequency ripple modulation of the arc current on plasma temperature.

  20. High-Speed, Integrated Ablation Cell and Dual Concentric Injector Plasma Torch for Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Douglas, David N; Managh, Amy J; Reid, Helen J; Sharp, Barry L

    2015-11-17

    In recent years, laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) has gained increasing importance for biological analysis, where ultratrace imaging at micrometer resolution is required. However, while undoubtedly a valuable research tool, the washout times and sensitivity of current technology have restricted its routine and clinical application. Long periods between sampling points are required to maintain adequate spatial resolution. Additionally, temporal signal dispersion reduces the signal-to-noise ratio, which is a particular concern when analyzing discrete samples, such as individual particles or cells. This paper describes a novel, two-volume laser ablation cell and integrated ICP torch designed to minimize aerosol dispersion for fast, efficient sample transport. The holistic design utilizes a short, continuous diameter fused silica conduit, which extends from the point of ablation, through the ICP torch, and into the base of the plasma. This arrangement removes the requirement for a dispersive component for argon addition, and helps to keep the sample on axis with the ICP cone orifice. Hence, deposition of sample on the cones is theoretically reduced with a resulting improvement in the absolute sensitivity (counts per unit mole). The system described here achieved washouts of 1.5, 3.2, and 4.9 ms for NIST 612 glass, at full width half, 10%, and 1% maximum, respectively, with an 8-14-fold improvement in absolute sensitivity, compared to a single volume ablation cell. To illustrate the benefits of this performance, the system was applied to a contemporary bioanalytical challenge, specifically the analysis of individual biological cells, demonstrating similar improvements in performance.

  1. High-Speed, Integrated Ablation Cell and Dual Concentric Injector Plasma Torch for Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Douglas, David N; Managh, Amy J; Reid, Helen J; Sharp, Barry L

    2015-11-17

    In recent years, laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) has gained increasing importance for biological analysis, where ultratrace imaging at micrometer resolution is required. However, while undoubtedly a valuable research tool, the washout times and sensitivity of current technology have restricted its routine and clinical application. Long periods between sampling points are required to maintain adequate spatial resolution. Additionally, temporal signal dispersion reduces the signal-to-noise ratio, which is a particular concern when analyzing discrete samples, such as individual particles or cells. This paper describes a novel, two-volume laser ablation cell and integrated ICP torch designed to minimize aerosol dispersion for fast, efficient sample transport. The holistic design utilizes a short, continuous diameter fused silica conduit, which extends from the point of ablation, through the ICP torch, and into the base of the plasma. This arrangement removes the requirement for a dispersive component for argon addition, and helps to keep the sample on axis with the ICP cone orifice. Hence, deposition of sample on the cones is theoretically reduced with a resulting improvement in the absolute sensitivity (counts per unit mole). The system described here achieved washouts of 1.5, 3.2, and 4.9 ms for NIST 612 glass, at full width half, 10%, and 1% maximum, respectively, with an 8-14-fold improvement in absolute sensitivity, compared to a single volume ablation cell. To illustrate the benefits of this performance, the system was applied to a contemporary bioanalytical challenge, specifically the analysis of individual biological cells, demonstrating similar improvements in performance. PMID:26460246

  2. Transport of ionized metal atoms in high-power pulsed magnetron discharges assisted by inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinidis, S.; Dauchot, J.P.; Ganciu, M.; Hecq, M.

    2006-01-09

    Transporting metallic ions from the magnetron cathode to the substrate is essential for an efficient thin-film deposition process. This letter examines how inductively coupled plasma superimposed onto a high-power pulsed magnetron discharge can influence the mobility of titanium ions. To this effect, time-resolved optical emission and absorption spectrometry are conducted and the current at the substrate is measured. With this new hybrid technique, ions are found to reach the substrate in two successive waves. Metal ions, only present in the second wave, are found to accelerate proportionally to the power supplied to the inductively coupled plasma. All the measurements in this study are made at 10 and 30 mTorr, with 10 {mu}s long pulses at the magnetron cathode.

  3. High power impulse magnetron sputtering and related discharges: scalable plasma sources for plasma-based ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2009-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) and related self-sputtering techniques are reviewed from a viewpoint of plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBII&D). HIPIMS combines the classical, scalable sputtering technology with pulsed power, which is an elegant way of ionizing the sputtered atoms. Related approaches, such as sustained self-sputtering, are also considered. The resulting intense flux of ions to the substrate consists of a mixture of metal and gas ions when using a process gas, or of metal ions only when using `gasless? or pure self-sputtering. In many respects, processing with HIPIMS plasmas is similar to processing with filtered cathodic arc plasmas, though the former is easier to scale to large areas. Both ion implantation and etching (high bias voltage, without deposition) and thin film deposition (low bias, or bias of low duty cycle) have been demonstrated.

  4. Very low pressure plasma sprayed alumina and yttria-stabilized zirconia thin dense coatings using a modified transferred arc plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Zhang, Baicheng; Sun, Fu; Bolot, Rodolphe; Planche, Marie-Pierre; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2011-12-01

    As a novel thermal spray process, very low pressure plasma spray (VLPPS) process has been significantly used to deposit thin, dense and homogenous ceramic coating materials for special application needs in recent years. In this study, in order to enhance low-energy plasma jet under very low pressure ambience, a home-made transferred arc nozzle was made and mounted on a low-power F100 plasma torch to fully melt or evaporate powder feedstock. As a result, thin and dense alumina (Al2O3) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) ceramic coatings with an average thickness of 30-40 μm were successfully elaborated by the VLPPS process below 1 mbar. An optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to analyze the plasma jet properties. The microstructures of the coatings were observed by means of a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the YSZ coatings displayed a bimodal microstructure which was composed of splats formed by melted particles and a little amount of vapor condensation from evaporated particles. However, vapor condensation could not be observed in the Al2O3 coatings, and only lamellar splats were found. The mechanical properties of both coatings were also evaluated.

  5. Optical Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Gas/tungsten-arc welding torch supports electrode at center while enabling viewing of weld area along torch axis. Gas torch accommodates lens and optical fibers, all part of vision system for welding robot. Welding torch includes spoked structure in central bore of optical body. Structure supports welding electrode, carries electric current to it, and takes heat away from it. Spokes formed by drilling six holes 60 degrees apart around center line of torch.

  6. Metal doped fluorocarbon polymer films prepared by plasma polymerization using an RF planar magnetron target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biederman, H.; Holland, L.

    1983-07-01

    Fluorocarbon films have been prepared by plasma polymerization of CF4 using an RF planar magnetron with an aluminium target. More than one order of magnitude higher deposition rate has been achieved in comparison with an r.f. diode system operated under similar conditions of monomer pressure and flow rate and power input. A glow discharge in a CF4[25%]-argon [75%] mixture was used to incorporate aluminium from a target electrode into the polymer films. The foregoing mixture and another based on CF4 [87%]-argon [13%] were used in the RF discharge with a copper target. Some experiments with a gold target and pure CF4 as the inlet gas were also made. The film structure was examined by SEM and TEM and characteristic micrographs are presented here. The composition of the films was estimated from an AES study. The sheet resistivity of the metal/polymer film complexes was determined.

  7. Diagnostics of RF magnetron sputtering plasma for synthesizing transparent conductive Indium-Zinc-Oxide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Inoue, Mari; Takota, Naoki; Ito, Masafumi; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Kano, Hiroyuki; den, Shoji; Yamakawa, Koji; Hori, Masaru

    2009-10-01

    Transparent conductive Oxide film has been used as transparent conducting electrodes of optoelectronic devices such as flat panel display, solar cells, and so on. Indium-Zinc-Oxide (IZO) has been investigated as one of promising alternatives Indium Tin Oxide film, due to amorphous, no nodule and so on. In order to control a sputtering process with highly precise, RF magnetron sputtering plasma using IZO composite target was diagnosed by absorption and emission spectroscopy. We have developed a multi-micro hollow cathode lamp which can emit simultaneous multi-atomic lines for monitoring Zn and In densities simultaneously. Zn and In densities were measured to be 10^9 from 10^10 cm-3 at RF power from 40 to 100 W, pressure of 5Pa, and Ar flow rate of 300 sccm. The emission intensities of Zn, In, InO, and Ar were also observed.

  8. Two-dimensional spatial survey of the plasma potential and electric field in a pulsed bipolar magnetron discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Vetushka, A.; Karkari, S.K.; Bradley, J.W.

    2004-11-01

    Emissive and Langmuir probe techniques have been used to obtain two-dimensional (2D) spatial maps of the plasma potential V{sub p}, electric field E, and ion trajectories in a pulsed bipolar magnetron discharge. The magnetron was pulsed at a frequency of 100 kHz, with a 50% duty cycle and operated at an argon pressure of 0.74 Pa. The pulse wave form was characterized by three distinct phases: the 'overshoot', 'reverse', and 'on' phases. In the 'on' phase of the pulse, when the cathode voltage is driven to -670 V, the 2D spatial distribution of V{sub p} has a similar form to that in dc magnetron, with significant axial and radial electric fields in the bulk plasma, accelerating ions to the sheath edge above the cathode racetrack region. During the 'overshoot' phase (duration 200 ns), V{sub p} is raised to values greater than +330 V, more than 100 V above the cathode potential, with E pointing away from the target. In the 'reverse' phase V{sub p} has a value of +45 V at all measured positions, 2 V more positive than the target potential. In this phase there is no electric field present in the plasma. In the bulk of the plasma, the results from Langmuir probe and the emissive probe are in good agreement, however, in one particular region of the plasma outside the radius of the cathode, the emissive probe measurements are consistently more positive (up to 45 V in the 'on' time). This discrepancy is discussed in terms of the different frequency response of the probes and their perturbation of the plasma. A simple circuit model of the plasma-probe system has been proposed to explain our results. A brief discussion of the effect of the changing plasma potential distribution on the operation of the magnetron is given.

  9. Production of Silicon Oxide like Thin Films by the Use of Atmospheric Plasma Torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozono, E. M.; Fachini, E. R.; Silva, M. L. P.; Ruchko, L. F.; Galvão, R. M. O.

    2015-03-01

    The advantages of HMDS (hexamethyldisilazane) APT-plasma films for sensor applications were explored producing films in a three-turn copper coil APT equipment. HMDS was introduced into the argon plasma at four different conditions. Additional flux of oxygen could modulate the presence of organic components in the film, the composition varying from pure inorganic oxides to organo-silane polymers. Oxygen promoted deposition rates as high as 900 nm/min on silicon, acrylic or piezoelectric quartz crystal substrates. Films with a clustered morphology and refractive index of 1.45 were obtained, mainly due to a silicon oxide structure. Raman spectroscopy and XPS data showed the presence of CHn and amorphous carbon in the inorganic matrix. The films were sensitive to the humidity of the air. The adsorptive capabilities of outstanding films were tested in a Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM). The results support that those films can be a useful and simple alternative for the development of sensors.

  10. Plasma Formed in Argon, Acid Nitric and Water Used in Industrial ICP Torches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendjebbar, F.; P., Andre; Benbakkar, M.; Rochette, D.; Flazi, S.; Vacher, D.

    2012-08-01

    Inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) are used in spectrochemical analyses. The introduction of the sample by means of an aerosol are widely used. The introduction and the total evaporation of the aerosol is required in order to obtain a good repeatability and reproducibility of analyses. To check whether the vaporization of the aerosol droplets inside the plasma is completed, a solution could be used to compare the experimental results of the emission spectral lines with theoretical results. An accurate calculation code to obtain monatomic spectral lines intensities is therefore required, which is the purpose of the present paper. The mixtures of argon, water and nitric acid are widely used in spectrochemical analyses with ICPs. With these mixtures, we calculate the composition, thermodynamic functions and monatomic spectral lines intensities of the plasma at thermodynamic equilibrium and at atmospheric pressure. To obtain a self sufficient paper and also to allow other researchers to compare their results, all required data and a robust accurate algorithm, which is simple and easy to compute, are given.

  11. Electrostatic quadrupole plasma mass spectrometer measurements during thin film depositions using simultaneous matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation and magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C. N.; Check, M. H.; Muratore, C.; Voevodin, A. A.

    2010-05-15

    A hybrid plasma deposition process, combining matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) of carbon nanopearls (CNPs) with magnetron sputtering of gold was investigated for growth of composite films, where 100 nm sized CNPs were encapsulated into a gold matrix. Composition and morphology of such composite films was characterized with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Carbon deposits on a gold magnetron sputter target and carbon impurities in the gold matrices of deposited films were observed while codepositing from gold and frozen toluene-CNP MAPLE targets in pure argon. Electrostatic quadrupole plasma analysis was used to determine that a likely mechanism for generation of carbon impurities was a reaction between toluene vapor generated from the MAPLE target and the argon plasma originating from the magnetron sputtering process. Carbon impurities of codeposited films were significantly reduced by introducing argon-oxygen mixtures into the deposition chamber; reactive oxygen species such as O and O+ effectively removed carbon contamination of gold matrix during the codeposition processes. Increasing the oxygen to argon ratio decreased the magnetron target sputter rate, and hence hybrid process optimization to prevent gold matrix contamination and maintain a high sputter yield is needed. High resolution TEM with energy dispersive spectrometry elemental mapping was used to study carbon distribution throughout the gold matrix as well as embedded CNP clusters. This research has demonstrated that a hybrid MAPLE and magnetron sputtering codeposition process is a viable means for synthesis of composite thin films from premanufactured nanoscale constituents, and that cross-process contaminations can be overcome with understanding of hybrid plasma process interaction mechanisms.

  12. Effect of hydrogen addition on the deposition of titanium nitride thin films in nitrogen added argon magnetron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, P.; Bhuyan, H.; Diaz-Droguett, D. E.; Guzman, F.; Mändl, S.; Saikia, B. K.; Favre, M.; Maze, J. R.; Wyndham, E.

    2016-06-01

    The properties and performance of thin films deposited by plasma assisted processes are closely related to their manufacturing techniques and processes. The objective of the current study is to investigate the modification of plasma parameters occurring during hydrogen addition in N2  +  Ar magnetron plasma used for titanium nitride thin film deposition, and to correlate the measured properties of the deposited thin film with the bulk plasma parameters of the magnetron discharge. From the Langmuir probe measurements, it was observed that the addition of hydrogen led to a decrease of electron density from 8.6 to 6.2  ×  (1014 m-3) and a corresponding increase of electron temperature from 6.30 to 6.74 eV. The optical emission spectroscopy study reveals that with addition of hydrogen, the density of argon ions decreases. The various positive ion species involving hydrogen are found to increase with increase of hydrogen partial pressure in the chamber. The thin films deposited were characterized using standard surface diagnostic tools such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Although it was possible to deposit thin films of titanium nitride with hydrogen addition in nitrogen added argon magnetron plasma, the quality of the thin films deteriorates with higher hydrogen partial pressures.

  13. Comparative study of laminar and turbulent flow model with different operating parameters for radio frequency-inductively coupled plasma torch working at 3  MHz frequency at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Punjabi, Sangeeta B.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Das, A. K.; Joshi, N. K.; Mangalvedekar, H. A.; Kothari, D. C.

    2014-01-15

    This paper provides 2D comparative study of results obtained using laminar and turbulent flow model for RF (radio frequency) Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) torch. The study was done for the RF-ICP torch operating at 50 kW DC power and 3 MHz frequency located at BARC. The numerical modeling for this RF-ICP torch is done using ANSYS software with the developed User Defined Function. A comparative study is done between laminar and turbulent flow model to investigate how temperature and flow fields change when using different operating conditions such as (a) swirl and no swirl velocity for sheath gas flow rate, (b) variation in sheath gas flow rate, and (c) variation in plasma gas flow rate. These studies will be useful for different material processing applications.

  14. Sensing Properties of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Grown in MW Plasma Torch: Electronic and Electrochemical Behavior, Gas Sensing, Field Emission, IR Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Majzlíková, Petra; Sedláček, Jiří; Prášek, Jan; Pekárek, Jan; Svatoš, Vojtěch; Bannov, Alexander G.; Jašek, Ondřej; Synek, Petr; Eliáš, Marek; Zajíčková, Lenka; Hubálek, Jaromír

    2015-01-01

    Vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) with an average diameter below 80 nm and a thickness of the uniform VA-MWCNT layer of about 16 μm were grown in microwave plasma torch and tested for selected functional properties. IR absorption important for a construction of bolometers was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Basic electrochemical characterization was performed by cyclic voltammetry. Comparing the obtained results with the standard or MWCNT‐modified screen-printed electrodes, the prepared VA-MWCNT electrodes indicated their high potential for the construction of electrochemical sensors. Resistive CNT gas sensor revealed a good sensitivity to ammonia taking into account room temperature operation. Field emission detected from CNTs was suitable for the pressure sensing application based on the measurement of emission current in the diode structure with bending diaphragm. The advantages of microwave plasma torch growth of CNTs, i.e., fast processing and versatility of the process, can be therefore fully exploited for the integration of surface-bound grown CNTs into various sensing structures. PMID:25629702

  15. Sensing properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown in MW plasma torch: electronic and electrochemical behavior, gas sensing, field emission, IR absorption.

    PubMed

    Majzlíková, Petra; Sedláček, Jiří; Prášek, Jan; Pekárek, Jan; Svatoš, Vojtěch; Bannov, Alexander G; Jašek, Ondřej; Synek, Petr; Eliáš, Marek; Zajíčková, Lenka; Hubálek, Jaromír

    2015-01-01

    Vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) with an average diameter below 80 nm and a thickness of the uniform VA-MWCNT layer of about 16 µm were grown in microwave plasma torch and tested for selected functional properties. IR absorption important for a construction of bolometers was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Basic electrochemical characterization was performed by cyclic voltammetry. Comparing the obtained results with the standard or MWCNT‑modified screen-printed electrodes, the prepared VA-MWCNT electrodes indicated their high potential for the construction of electrochemical sensors. Resistive CNT gas sensor revealed a good sensitivity to ammonia taking into account room temperature operation. Field emission detected from CNTs was suitable for the pressure sensing application based on the measurement of emission current in the diode structure with bending diaphragm. The advantages of microwave plasma torch growth of CNTs, i.e., fast processing and versatility of the process, can be therefore fully exploited for the integration of surface-bound grown CNTs into various sensing structures. PMID:25629702

  16. Development and Evaluation of an Externally Air-Cooled Low-Flow torch and the Attenuation of Space Charge and Matrix Effects in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Praphairaksit, N.

    2000-09-12

    An externally air-cooled low-flow torch has been constructed and successfully demonstrated for applications in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The torch is cooled by pressurized air flowing at {approximately}70 L/min through a quartz air jacket onto the exterior of the outer tube. The outer gas flow rate and operating RF forward power are reduced considerably. Although plasmas can be sustained at the operating power as low as 400 W with a 2 L/min of outer gas flow, somewhat higher power and outer gas flows are advisable. A stable and analytical useful plasma can be obtained at 850 W with an outer gas flow rate of {approximately}4 L/min. Under these conditions, the air-cooled plasma produces comparable sensitivities, doubly charged ion ratios, matrix effects and other analytical merits as those produced by a conventional torch while using significantly less argon and power requirements. Metal oxide ion ratios are slightly higher with the air-cooled plasma but can be mitigated by reducing the aerosol gas flow rate slightly with only minor sacrifice in analyte sensitivity. A methodology to alleviate the space charge and matrix effects in ICP-MS has been developed. A supplemental electron source adapted from a conventional electron impact ionizer is added to the base of the skimmer. Electrons supplied from this source downstream of the skimmer with suitable amount and energy can neutralize the positive ions in the beam extracted from the plasma and diminish the space charge repulsion between them. As a result, the overall ion transmission efficiency and consequent analyte ion sensitivities are significantly improved while other important analytical aspects, such as metal oxide ion ratio, doubly charged ion ratio and background ions remain relatively unchanged with the operation of this electron source. This technique not only improves the ion transmission efficiency but also minimizes the matrix effects drastically. The matrix-induced suppression

  17. Switchbox for welding torches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    Switchbox can be used to change from one welding torch setup to another without stopping production line. Simple flip of switch connects gas, water, and power to selected torch. In conventional systems, production must be stopped so that maintenance people can disconnect and reconnect another torch.

  18. Production Of Multi-magnetron Plasma By Using Polyphase Ac Glow Discharge In An Improved Multi-pole Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kazunori; Motoki, Kentaro; Miyamoto, Masahiro; Uetani, Yasuhiro

    1998-10-01

    Effects of an improved multi-pole magnetic field on a plasma production generated by a polyphase ac glow discharge with multiple electrodes have been investigated. Conventional configuration of the multi-pole magnetic filed has been modified to suppress plasma losses at both ends of the chamber due to ExB drift motion. The modified multi-pole magnetic field has enabled us to produce a multiple magnetron-plasma at a considerably low pressure less than mTorr. The low temperature plasma has been widely used as the fine processing technology of a dry etching and as the thin film formation technology of a sputtering coating. Large-scale plasmas which can be generated at a low gas-pressure have been desired for more wider dry etching and greater sputter coating. The purpose of this study is to develop a large-scale and low-cost plasma generator by using a polyphase ac power source with the low frequency. In this session, we will present the experimental result as to a multiple magnetron-plasma generated in the modified twenty-four poles magnetic field by using the twenty-four-phase ac power source with the commercial electric power frequency of 60Hz. The ac power is supplied to twenty-four electrodes which are fixed to the water-cooled chamber-wall through sheet insulators so that the electrodes can be cooled indirectly.

  19. [High current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp excited ionic fluorescence spectrometry of alkaline earth elements in inductively coupled plasma with a Fassel-torch].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Yu; Gong, Zhen-Bin; Huang, Ben-Li

    2006-02-01

    High current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP-HCL) excited ionic fluorescence spectrometry (IFS) of alkaline earth elements in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with a Fassel-torch has been investigated. In wide condition ranges only IFS was observed, whilst atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) was not detectable. More intense ionic fluorescence signal was observed at lower observation heights and at lower incident RF powers. Without introduction of any reduction organic gases into the ICP, the limit of detection (LOD, 3sigma) of Ba was improved by 50-fold over that of a conventional pulsed (CP) HCL with the Baird sleeve-extended torch. For Ca and Sr, the LODs by HCMP-HCL-ICP-IFS and CP-HCL-ICP-AFS show no significant difference. Relative standard deviations were 0.6%-1.4% (0.1-0.2 microg x mL(-1), n = 10) for 5 ionic fluorescence lines. Preliminary studies showed that the intensity of ionic fluorescence could be depressed in the presence of K, Al and P.

  20. Co-pyrolysis of sunflower-oil cake with potassium carbonate and zinc oxide using plasma torch to produce bio-fuels.

    PubMed

    Shie, Je-Lueng; Chang, Chia-Chi; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Tzeng, Chin-Ching; Wu, Chung-Yu; Lin, Kae-Long; Tseng, Jyi-Yeong; Yuan, Min-Hao; Li, Heng-Yi; Kuo, Ching-Hui; Yu, Yuh-Jeng; Chang, Lieh-Chih

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the effects of additives of potassium carbonate (K2CO3) and zinc oxide (ZnO) on the pyrolysis of waste sunflower-oil cake using a 60 kW pilot-scale plasma torch reactor. The major gaseous products were CO and H2. The productions of CO and CH4 increased while that of H2 decreased with the addition of K2CO3. The use of ZnO reduced while enhanced the formation of CO and H2, respectively. In order to match the appeal of resource reutilization, one can use the waste K2CO3 resulted from the sorption of CO2 with KOH in greenhouse gas control and the waste ZnO obtained from the melting process as additives for the co-pyrolysis of sunflower-oil cake, yielding fuels rich in CO and H2, respectively.

  1. [Determination of sodium, magnesium, calcium, lithium and strontium in natural mineral drinking water by microwave plasma torch spectrometer with nebulization sample introduction system].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Xiong, Hai-long; Feng, Guo-dong; Yu, Ai-min; Chen, Huan-wen

    2014-06-01

    The microwave plasma torch (MPT) was used as the emission light source. Aqueous samples were introduced with a nebulizer and a desolvation system. A method for the determination of Na, Mg, Ca, Li and Sr in natural mineral drinking water by argon microwave plasma torch spectrometer (ArMPT spectrometer) was established. The effects of microwave power, flow rate of carrier gas and support gas were investigated in detail and these parameters were optimized. Under the optimized condition, the experiments for the determination of Na, Mg, Ca, Li and Sr in 11 kinds of bottled mineral drinking water were carried out by ArMPT spectrometer. The limit-of-detection (LOD) of Na, Mg, Ca, Li and Sr was found to be 4.4, 21, 56, 11 and 84 μg x mL(-1), respectively. Relative standard deviation (n = 6) was in the range of 1.30%-5.45% and standard addition recoveries were in the range of 84.6%-98.5%. MPT spectrometer was simpler, more convenient and of lower cost as compared to ICP unit. MPT spectrometer demonstrated its rapid analysis speed, accuracy, sensitivity and simultaneous multi element analysis ability during the analysis process. The results showed that MPT spectrometer was suitable for metal elements detection for natural mineral drinking water. This approach provides not only one way for resisting the illegal dealings, but also a security for the quality of drinking water. Moreover, the usability of MPT spectrometer in the field of food security; drug safety; clinical diagnostic is promised.

  2. Deposition and characterization of molybdenum thin films using dc-plasma magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Majid; Islam, Mohammad

    2013-12-15

    Molebdenum (Mo) thin films were deposited on well-cleaned soda-lime glass substrates using DC-plasma magnetron sputtering. In the design of experiment deposition was optimized for maximum beneficial characteristics by monitoring effect of process variables such as deposition power (100–200 W). Their electrical, structural and morphological properties were analyzed to study the effect of these variables. The electrical resistivity of Mo thin films could be reduced by increasing deposition power. Within the range of analyzed deposition power, Mo thin films showed a mono crystalline nature and the crystallites were found to have an orientation along [110] direction. The surface morphology of thin films showed that a highly dense micro structure has been obtained. The surface roughness of films increased with deposition power. The adhesion of Mo thin films could be improved by increasing the deposition power. Atomic force microscopy was used for the topographical study of the films and to determine the roughness of the films. X-ray diffractrometer and scanning electron microscopy analysis were used to investigate the crystallinity and surface morphology of the films. Hall effect measurement system was used to find resistivity, carrier mobility and carrier density of deposited films. The adhesion test was performed using scotch hatch tape adhesion test. Mo thin films prepared at deposition power of 200 W, substrate temperature of 23°C and Ar pressure of 0.0123 mbar exhibited a mono crystalline structure with an orientation along (110) direction, thickness of ∼550 nm and electrical resistivity value of 0.57 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm.

  3. The application of an assisting gas plasma generator for low- temperature magnetron sputtering of Ti-C-Mo-S antifriction coatings on titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potekaev, A. I.; Savostikov, V. M.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Dudarev, E. F.; Melnikova, E. A.; Shulepov, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    The positive effect of assisting influence of high-density gas plasma formed by an independent plasma generator PINK on mechanical and tribological characteristics of Ti-C- Mo-S magnetron coating on titanium alloys at lowered to 350°C temperature of coating regardless of alloy structural condition was revealed by methods of calotest, nanorecognition, scratch testing and frictional material tests. The coating formed by means of a combined magnetron plasma method reduces titanium alloys friction coefficient in multiple times and increases wear resistance by two orders of magnitude. At the same time the mechanical properties of ultra-fine-grained titanium alloys obtained by nanostructuring do not deteriorate.

  4. Distribution of Fe atom density in a dc magnetron sputtering plasma source measured by laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibagaki, K.; Nafarizal, N.; Sasaki, K.; Toyoda, H.; Iwata, S.; Kato, T.; Tsunashima, S.; Sugai, H.

    2003-10-01

    Magnetron sputtering discharge is widely used as an efficient method for thin film fabrication. In order to achieve the optimized fabrication, understanding of the kinetics in plasmas is essential. In the present work, we measured the density distribution of sputtered Fe atoms using laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectroscopy. A dc magnetron plasma source with a Fe target was used. An area of 20 × 2 mm in front of the target was irradiated by a tunable laser beam having a planar shape. The picture of laser-induced fluorescence on the laser beam was taken using an ICCD camera. In this way, we obtained the two-dimensional image of the Fe atom density. As a result, it has been found that the Fe atom density observed at a distance of several centimeters from the target is higher than that adjacent to the target, when the Ar gas pressure was relatively high. It is suggested from this result that some gas-phase production processes of Fe atoms are available in the plasma. This work has been performed under the 21st Century COE Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan.

  5. Efficiency of inductively torch plasma operating at atmospheric pressure on destruction of chlorinated liquid wastes- A path to the treatment of radioactive organic halogen liquid wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamgang-Youbi, G.; Poizot, K.; Lemont, F.

    2012-12-01

    The performance of a plasma reactor for the degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbon waste is reported. Chloroform was used as a target for a recently patented destruction process based using an inductive plasma torch. Liquid waste was directly injected axially into the argon plasma with a supplied power of ~4 kW in the presence of oxygen as oxidant and carrier gas. Decomposition was performed at CHCl3 feed rates up to 400 g·h-1 with different oxygen/waste molar ratios, chloroform destruction was obtained with at least 99% efficiency and the energy efficiency reached 100 g·kWh-1. The conversion end products were identified and assayed by online FTIR spectroscopy (CO2, HCl and H2O) and redox titration (Cl2). Considering phosgene as representative of toxic compounds, only very small quantities of toxics were released (< 1 g·h-1) even with high waste feed rates. The experimental results were very close to the equilibrium composition predicted by thermodynamic calculations. At the bottom of the reactor, the chlorinated acids were successfully trapped in a scrubber and transformed into mineral salts, hence, only CO2 and H2O have been found in the final off-gases composition.

  6. Olympic torch transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    KSC Shuttle Operations Manager Loren J. Shriver (right) transfers the Olympic flame to KSC runner Joanne Maceo's torch at the top of Launch Pad 39A after he carried the Olympic torch to the top of the pad as his contribution to the July 7, 1996 KSC Olympic torch relay effort. Jon Granston of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (center) witnesses the exchange. Maceo then carried her lit torch down the concrete hard stand of the pad to pass the flame to another of the 20-member KSC runner team that participated in the KSC relay effort. The Olympic torch arrived at KSC at 1:40 p.m. and traveled a 20-mile course to the pad and then out to the KSC visitor Center. The Space Shuttle Atlantis is behind the trio, poised for the STS-79 mission, with will feature the fourth docking of the shuttle with the Russian Mir space station.

  7. ION MAGNETRON

    DOEpatents

    Gow, J.D.; Layman, R.W.

    1962-10-31

    A magnetohydrodynamic device or plasma generator of the ion magnetron class is described wherein a long central electrode is disposed along the axis of an evacuated cylinder. A radial electric field and an axial magnetic field are provided between the cylsnder and the electrode, forming a plasma trapping and heating region. For maximum effectiveness, neutral particles from the cylinder wall must be prevented from entering such region This is effected by forming a cylindrical sheath of electrons near the cylinder wall for ionizing undesired neutral particles, which are then trapped and removed by the magnetic field. An annular filament at one end of the device provides the electrons, which follow the axial magnetic field to a reflecting electrode at the opposite end of the device. (AEC)

  8. Physics of Plasma-Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID)and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS): A Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2007-08-28

    The emerging technology of High Power Impulse MagnetronSputtering (HIPIMS) has much in common with the more establishedtechnology of Plasma Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID):both use pulsed plasmas, the pulsed sheath periodically evolves andcollapses, the plasma-sheath system interacts with the pulse-drivingpower supply, the plasma parameters are affected by the power dissipated,surface atoms are sputtered and secondary electrons are emitted, etc.Therefore, both fields of science and technology could learn from eachother, which has not been fully explored. On the other hand, there aresignificant differences, too. Most importantly, the operation of HIPIMSheavilyrelies on the presence of a strong magnetic field, confiningelectrons and causing their ExB drift, which is closed for typicalmagnetron configurations. Second, at the high peak power levels used forHIPIMS, 1 kW/cm2 or greater averaged over the target area, the sputteredmaterial greatly affects plasma generation. For PBIID, in contrast,plasma generation and ion processing of the surface (ion implantation,etching, and deposition) are considered rela-tively independentprocesses. Third, secondary electron emission is generally considered anuisance for PBIID, especially at high voltages, whereas it is a criticalingredient to the operation of HIPIMS. Fourth, the voltages in PBIID areoften higher than in HIPIMS. For the first three reasons listed above,modelling of PBIID seems to be easier and could give some guidance forfuture HIPIMS models, which, clearly, will be more involved.

  9. Comparison of gate dielectric plasma damage from plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited and magnetron sputtered TiN metal gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Christopher J.; Neumann, Christopher M.; Vitale, Steven A.

    2015-07-01

    Fully depleted silicon-on-insulator transistors were fabricated using two different metal gate deposition mechanisms to compare plasma damage effects on gate oxide quality. Devices fabricated with both plasma-enhanced atomic-layer-deposited (PE-ALD) TiN gates and magnetron plasma sputtered TiN gates showed very good electrostatics and short-channel characteristics. However, the gate oxide quality was markedly better for PE-ALD TiN. A significant reduction in interface state density was inferred from capacitance-voltage measurements as well as a 1200× reduction in gate leakage current. A high-power magnetron plasma source produces a much higher energetic ion and vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) photon flux to the wafer compared to a low-power inductively coupled PE-ALD source. The ion and VUV photons produce defect states in the bulk of the gate oxide as well as at the oxide-silicon interface, causing higher leakage and potential reliability degradation.

  10. Comparison of gate dielectric plasma damage from plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited and magnetron sputtered TiN metal gates

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Christopher J.; Neumann, Christopher M.; Vitale, Steven A.

    2015-07-28

    Fully depleted silicon-on-insulator transistors were fabricated using two different metal gate deposition mechanisms to compare plasma damage effects on gate oxide quality. Devices fabricated with both plasma-enhanced atomic-layer-deposited (PE-ALD) TiN gates and magnetron plasma sputtered TiN gates showed very good electrostatics and short-channel characteristics. However, the gate oxide quality was markedly better for PE-ALD TiN. A significant reduction in interface state density was inferred from capacitance-voltage measurements as well as a 1200× reduction in gate leakage current. A high-power magnetron plasma source produces a much higher energetic ion and vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) photon flux to the wafer compared to a low-power inductively coupled PE-ALD source. The ion and VUV photons produce defect states in the bulk of the gate oxide as well as at the oxide-silicon interface, causing higher leakage and potential reliability degradation.

  11. High power impulse magnetron sputtering using a rotating cylindrical magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, W. P.; Mahieu, S.; Depla, D.; Ehiasarian, A. P.

    2010-01-15

    Both the industrially favorable deposition technique, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), and the industrially popular rotating cylindrical magnetron have been successfully combined. A stable operation without arcing, leaks, or other complications for the rotatable magnetron was attained, with current densities around 11 A cm{sup -2}. For Ti and Al, a much higher degree in ionization in the plasma region was observed for the HIPIMS mode compared to the direct current mode.

  12. Ordering of SiOxHyCz islands deposited by atmospheric pressure microwave plasma torch on Si(100) substrates patterned by nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landreau, X.; Lanfant, B.; Merle, T.; Laborde, E.; Dublanche-Tixier, C.; Tristant, P.

    2011-12-01

    SiO x H y C z nanometric layers are deposited from hexamethyldisiloxane by atmospheric pressure microwave plasma torch on Si(100) substrates submitted to temperatures varying on the range [0 °C; 120 °C]. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterizations of samples grown at intermediate substrate temperatures (~30 °C) demonstrate a layer-by-layer growth (Frank van der Merwe growth) leading to smooth flat and compact films while films deposited at lower and higher substrates temperatures show an island-like growth (Volmer-Weber growth) generating a high surface roughness. Concomitantly, a detailed infrared spectroscopy analysis of the growing films evidences structural modifications due to changes in the bond types, Si-O-Si conformation and stoichiometry correlated with scanning electron microscopy and AFM characterizations. Then, deposition conditions and specific microstructure are selected with the aim of generating 3-dimensional SiO x H y C z nanostructure arrays on nanoindented Si (100) templates. The first results are discussed.

  13. Refuse derived fuel (RDF) plasma torch gasification as a feasible route to produce low environmental impact syngas for the cement industry.

    PubMed

    López-Sabirón, Ana M; Fleiger, Kristina; Schäfer, Stefan; Antoñanzas, Javier; Irazustabarrena, Ane; Aranda-Usón, Alfonso; Ferreira, Germán A

    2015-08-01

    Plasma torch gasification (PTG) is currently researched as a technology for solid waste recovery. However, scientific studies based on evaluating its environmental implications considering the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology are lacking. Therefore, this work is focused on comparing the environmental effect of the emissions of syngas combustion produced by refuse derived fuel (RDF) and PTG as alternative fuels, with that related to fossil fuel combustion in the cement industry. To obtain real data, a semi-industrial scale pilot plant was used to perform experimental trials on RDF-PTG.The results highlight that PTG for waste to energy recovery in the cement industry is environmentally feasible considering its current state of development. A reduction in every impact category was found when a total or partial substitution of alternative fuel for conventional fuel in the calciner firing (60 % of total thermal energy input) was performed. Furthermore, the results revealed that electrical energy consumption in PTG is also an important parameter from the LCA approach.

  14. Refuse derived fuel (RDF) plasma torch gasification as a feasible route to produce low environmental impact syngas for the cement industry.

    PubMed

    López-Sabirón, Ana M; Fleiger, Kristina; Schäfer, Stefan; Antoñanzas, Javier; Irazustabarrena, Ane; Aranda-Usón, Alfonso; Ferreira, Germán A

    2015-08-01

    Plasma torch gasification (PTG) is currently researched as a technology for solid waste recovery. However, scientific studies based on evaluating its environmental implications considering the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology are lacking. Therefore, this work is focused on comparing the environmental effect of the emissions of syngas combustion produced by refuse derived fuel (RDF) and PTG as alternative fuels, with that related to fossil fuel combustion in the cement industry. To obtain real data, a semi-industrial scale pilot plant was used to perform experimental trials on RDF-PTG.The results highlight that PTG for waste to energy recovery in the cement industry is environmentally feasible considering its current state of development. A reduction in every impact category was found when a total or partial substitution of alternative fuel for conventional fuel in the calciner firing (60 % of total thermal energy input) was performed. Furthermore, the results revealed that electrical energy consumption in PTG is also an important parameter from the LCA approach. PMID:26081643

  15. Development of light source using micro hollow cathode plasma for monitoring absolute densities of metal atoms in magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Tachibana, Yoshihiro; Ito, Masafumi; Takashima, Seigo; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Kano, Hiroyuki; den, Shoji; Hori, Masaru

    2007-10-01

    The quantitative analysis of metal atoms is important for understanding the chemistry and controlling the conditions in sputtering process. The light source, which emits multi-atomic lines simultaneously, is required for diagnostics of behaviors of many kind of metallic atom at the same time. In this study, a multi-micro hollow cathode lamp for simultaneous monitoring of multi-metal atoms in sputtering process was developed. The emissions of Cu, Zn, Fe, and Mo for analysis were simultaneously obtained from 4 hollows. The Cu and Mo densities in the magnetron sputtering were measured using absorption spectroscopy employing the multi-micro hollow cathode lamp. Those densities were measured to be from 10^9 to 10^10 cm-3 in the RF power range from 0 to 100 W at a pressure of 5 Pa. The simultaneous measurement of the atomic densities in the sputtering plasma has been performed.

  16. Development of metal nanocluster ion source based on dc magnetron plasma sputtering at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Abhijit; Koepp, Daniel; Ganeva, Marina; Hippler, Rainer; Datta, Debasish; Bhattacharyya, Satyaranjan

    2009-09-15

    A simple and cost effective nanocluster ion source for the deposition of size selected metal nanocluster has been developed based on the dc magnetron discharge (including pulsed dc discharge). The most important and interesting feature of this cluster source is that it is working at room temperature, cooled by chilled water during the experiment. There is no extraction unit in this device and the cluster streams flow only due to the pressure gradient from source chamber to substrate via quadrupole mass filter. It has provision of multiple substrate holders in the deposition chamber, which can be controlled manually. The facility consists of quadrupole mass filter (QMF 200), which can select masses in the range of 2-125 000 atoms depending on the target materials, with a constant mass resolution (M/{Delta}M{approx}25). The dc magnetron discharge at a power of about 130 W with Ar as feed/buffer gas was used to produce the Cu nanocluster in an aggregation tube and deposited on Si (100) wafer temperature.

  17. Morphological changes of tungsten surfaces by low-flux helium plasma treatment and helium incorporation via magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Iyyakkunnel, Santhosh; Marot, Laurent; Eren, Baran; Steiner, Roland; Moser, Lucas; Mathys, Daniel; Düggelin, Marcel; Chapon, Patrick; Meyer, Ernst

    2014-07-23

    The effect of helium on the tungsten microstructure was investigated first by exposure to a radio frequency driven helium plasma with fluxes of the order of 1 × 10(19) m(-2) s(-1) and second by helium incorporation via magnetron sputtering. Roughening of the surface and the creation of pinholes were observed when exposing poly- and nanocrystalline tungsten samples to low-flux plasma. A coating process using an excess of helium besides argon in the process gas mixture leads to a porous thin film and a granular surface structure whereas gas mixture ratios of up to 50% He/Ar (in terms of their partial pressures) lead to a dense structure. The presence of helium in the deposited film was confirmed with glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy and thermal desorption measurements. Latter revealed that the highest fraction of the embedded helium atoms desorb at approximately 1500 K. Identical plasma treatments at various temperatures showed strongest modifications of the surface at 1500 K, which is attributed to the massive activation of helium singly bond to a single vacancy inside the film. Thus, an efficient way of preparing nanostructured tungsten surfaces and porous tungsten films at low fluxes was found. PMID:24960311

  18. Plasma characteristics and etch uniformity in CF4 magnetron etching using an annular permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Haruhisa; Ishida, Toshimasa; Ohno, Seigo

    1987-11-01

    Etch characteristics of SiO2 and Si obtained by magnetron etching using an annular permanent magnet were analyzed. From these analyses, etch characteristics were found to be classified into three regimes. Remarkable enhancements in SiO2 etch rate, 25-40 times, were observed at constant Vrf by applying magnetic field of 150 G. Ion densities over the cathode were found to be distributed linearly along the E×B drift direction. Such an ion density distribution will be formed by the repeated process (ionization→ion bombardment→electron emission and drift→ionization). Etch distribution can be averaged and flattened to a uniformity of below ±2% by the magnetic field being rotated in 90° steps.

  19. Non-Equilibrium Reaction Kinetics of an Atmospheric Pressure Microwave-Driven Plasma Torch: a Global Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsey, Guy; Güçlü, Yaman; Verboncoeur, John; Christlieb, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    In the context of microwave-coupled plasmas, within atmospheric pressure nozzle geometries, we have developed a kinetic global model (KGM) framework designed for quick exploration of parameter space. Our final goal is understanding key reaction pathways within non-equilibrium plasma assisted combustion (PAC). In combination with a Boltzmann equation solver, kinetic plasma and gas-phase chemistry are solved with iterative feedback to match observed bulk conditions from experiments; using a parameterized non-equilibrium electron energy distribution function (EEDF) to define electron-impact processes. The KGM is first applied to argon and ``air'' systems as a means of assessing the soundness of made assumptions. The test with ``air'' greatly increases the complexity by incorporating a plethora of excited states (e.g. translational and vibrational excitations) and providing new reaction pathways. The KGM is then applied to plasma driven combustion mechanisms (e.g. H2 or CH4 with an oxidizer source) which drastically increases the range of reaction time-scales. As the reaction mechanisms become more complex, availability of data will begin to hinder model physicality, requiring analytical and/or empirical treatment of gaps in data to maintain completeness of the reaction mechanisms. Supported by AFOSR and an MSU SPG.

  20. Microwave torch as a plasmachemical generator of nitric oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Knyazev, V. Yu.; Kossyi, I. A.; Popov, N. A.

    2006-06-15

    The possibility of using a microwave coaxial plasmatron (a microwave torch) as an efficient plasmachemical generator of nitric oxides in an air jet has been studied experimentally. A plasmachemical model of the generator is developed. Results of calculations by this model do not contradict experimental results. A conclusion about the mechanisms governing NO{sub x} production in a plasma torch is drawn by comparing the experimental and calculated results.

  1. Low-temperature growth of gallium nitride films by inductively coupled-plasma-enhanced reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Chih-Jui; Chau-Nan Hong, Franklin

    2014-05-15

    Gallium nitride (GaN) films were grown on sapphire substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering. Inductively coupled-plasma (ICP) source was installed between the substrate holder and the sputtering target to increase the plasma density and the degree of ionization of nitrogen gas. Liquid Ga and Ar/N{sub 2} were used as the sputtering target and sputtering gases, respectively. X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed that the authors could grow high quality GaN crystallites at 500 °C. However, the crystalline GaN (0002) peak remained even by lowering the growth temperature down to 300 °C. The N:Ga ratio of the film grown at 500 °C was almost 1:1, and the nitrogen composition became higher toward the 1:1 N:Ga ratio with increasing the growth temperature. The high degree of ionization induced by ICP source was essential to the growth of high crystalline quality GaN films.

  2. Microstructure, Hardness and Corrosion Resistance of ZrN Films Prepared by Inductively Coupled Plasma Enhanced RF Magnetron Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Meng, Yuedong; Ren, Zhaoxing; Shu, Xingsheng

    2008-04-01

    ZrN films were deposited on Si(111) and M2 steel by inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-enhanced RF magnetron sputtering. The effect of ICP power on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of ZrN films was investigated. When the ICP power is below 300 W, the ZrN films show a columnar structure. With the increase of ICP power, the texture coefficient (Tc) of the (111) plane, the nanohardness and elastic modulus of the films increase and reach the maximum at a power of 300 W. As the ICP Power exceeds 300 W, the films exhibit a ZrN and ZrNx mixed crystal structure without columnar grain while the nanohardness and elastic modulus of the films decrease. All the ZrN coated samples show a higher corrosion resistance than that of the bare M2 steel substrate in 3.5% NaCl electrolyte. The nanohardness and elastic modulus mostly depend on the crystalline structure and Tc of ZrN(111).

  3. Study on the effect of hydrogen addition on the variation of plasma parameters of argon-oxygen magnetron glow discharge for synthesis of TiO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Partha; Saikia, Bipul Kumar; Bhuyan, Heman

    2016-04-01

    We report the effect of hydrogen addition on plasma parameters of argon-oxygen magnetron glow discharge plasma in the synthesis of H-doped TiO2 films. The parameters of the hydrogen-added Ar/O2 plasma influence the properties and the structural phases of the deposited TiO2 film. Therefore, the variation of plasma parameters such as electron temperature (Te), electron density (ne), ion density (ni), degree of ionization of Ar and degree of dissociation of H2 as a function of hydrogen content in the discharge is studied. Langmuir probe and Optical emission spectroscopy are used to characterize the plasma. On the basis of the different reactions in the gas phase of the magnetron discharge, the variation of plasma parameters and sputtering rate are explained. It is observed that the electron and heavy ion density decline with gradual addition of hydrogen in the discharge. Hydrogen addition significantly changes the degree of ionization of Ar which influences the structural phases of the TiO2 film.

  4. Evolution of the plasma composition of a high power impulse magnetron sputtering system studied with a time-of-flight spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim; Anders, Andre

    2008-12-31

    The plasma of a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) system has been investigated using a time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer. The target materials included high sputter yield materials (Cu, Ag), transition metals (Nb, Cr, Ti), and carbon (graphite); the sputtering gases were argon, krypton and nitrogen, and two different target thicknesses were selected to consider the role of the magnetic field strength. Measurements for selected combinations of those parameters give quantitative information on the transition from gas-dominated to metal-dominated (self-sputtering) plasma, on the fractions of ion charge states, and in the case of molecular gases, on the fraction of atomic and molecular ions.

  5. Vehicle Exhaust Gas Clearance by Low Temperature Plasma-Driven Nano-Titanium Dioxide Film Prepared by Radiofrequency Magnetron Sputtering

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuang; Liang, Yongdong; Sun, Shujun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    A novel plasma-driven catalysis (PDC) reactor with special structure was proposed to remove vehicle exhaust gas. The PDC reactor which consisted of three quartz tubes and two copper electrodes was a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The inner and outer electrodes firmly surrounded the outer surface of the corresponding dielectric barrier layer in a spiral way, respectively. Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2) film prepared by radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering was coated on the outer wall of the middle quartz tube, separating the catalyst from the high voltage electrode. The spiral electrodes were designed to avoid overheating of microdischarges inside the PDC reactor. Continuous operation tests indicated that stable performance without deterioration of catalytic activity could last for more than 25 h. To verify the effectiveness of the PDC reactor, a non-thermal plasma(NTP) reactor was employed, which has the same structure as the PDC reactor but without the catalyst. The real vehicle exhaust gas was introduced into the PDC reactor and NTP reactor, respectively. After the treatment, compared with the result from NTP, the concentration of HC in the vehicle exhaust gas treated by PDC reactor reduced far more obviously while that of NO decreased only a little. Moreover, this result was explained through optical emission spectrum. The O emission lines can be observed between 870 nm and 960 nm for wavelength in PDC reactor. Together with previous studies, it could be hypothesized that O derived from catalytically O3 destruction by catalyst might make a significant contribution to the much higher HC removal efficiency by PDC reactor. A series of complex chemical reactions caused by the multi-components mixture in real vehicle exhaust reduced NO removal efficiency. A controllable system with a real-time feedback module for the PDC reactor was proposed to further improve the ability of removing real vehicle exhaust gas. PMID:23560062

  6. Influence of high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma ionization on the microstructure of TiN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehiasarian, A. P.; Vetushka, A.; Gonzalvo, Y. Aranda; Sáfrán, G.; Székely, L.; Barna, P. B.

    2011-05-01

    HIPIMS (High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering) discharge is a new PVD technology for the deposition of high-quality thin films. The deposition flux contains a high degree of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation. The microstructure of HIPIMS-deposited nitride films is denser compared to conventional sputter technologies. However, the mechanisms acting on the microstructure, texture and properties have not been discussed in detail so far. In this study, the growth of TiN by HIPIMS of Ti in mixed Ar and N2 atmosphere has been investigated. Varying degrees of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation were produced by increasing the peak discharge current (Id) from 5 to 30 A. The average power was maintained constant by adjusting the frequency. Mass spectrometry measurements of the deposition flux revealed a high content of ionized film-forming species, such as Ti1+, Ti2+ and atomic nitrogen N1+. Ti1+ ions with energies up to 50 eV were detected during the pulse with reducing energy in the pulse-off times. Langmuir probe measurements showed that the peak plasma density during the pulse was 3 × 1016 m-3. Plasma density, and ion flux ratios of N1+: N21+ and Ti1+: Ti0 increased linearly with peak current. The ratios exceeded 1 at 30 A. TiN films deposited by HIPIMS were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. At high Id, N1+: N21+> 1 and Ti1+: Ti0> 1 were produced; a strong 002 texture was present and column boundaries in the films were atomically tight. As Id reduced and N1+: N21+ and Ti1+: Ti0 dropped below 1, the film texture switched to strong 111 with a dense structure. At very low Id, porosity between columns developed. The effects of the significant activation of the deposition flux observed in the HIPIMS discharge on the film texture, microstructure, morphology and properties are discussed.

  7. The use of segmented cathodes to determine the spoke current density distribution in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Poolcharuansin, Phitsanu; Estrin, Francis Lockwood; Bradley, James W.

    2015-04-28

    The localized target current density associated with quasi-periodic ionization zones (spokes) has been measured in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge using an array of azimuthally separated and electrical isolated probes incorporated into a circular aluminum target. For a particular range of operating conditions (pulse energies up to 2.2 J and argon pressures from 0.2 to 1.9 Pa), strong oscillations in the probe current density are seen with amplitudes up to 52% above a base value. These perturbations, identified as spokes, travel around the discharge above the target in the E×B direction. Using phase information from the angularly separated probes, the spoke drift speeds, angular frequencies, and mode number have been determined. Generally, at low HiPIMS pulse energies E{sub p} < 0.8 J, spokes appear to be chaotic in nature (with random arrival times), however as E{sub p} increases, coherent spokes are observed with velocities between 6.5 and 10 km s{sup −1} and mode numbers m = 3 or above. At E{sub p} > 1.8 J, the plasma becomes spoke-free. The boundaries between chaotic, coherent, and no-spoke regions are weakly dependent on pressure. During each HiPIMS pulse, the spoke velocities increase by about 50%. Such an observation is explained by considering spoke velocities to be determined by the critical ionization velocity, which changes as the plasma composition changes during the pulse. From the shape of individual current density oscillations, it appears that the leading edge of the spoke is associated with a slow increase in local current density to the target and the rear with a more rapid decrease. The measurements show that the discharge current density associated with individual spokes is broadly spread over a wide region of the target.

  8. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy enhanced by a micro torch.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Huang, X; Li, S; Lu, Yao; Chen, K; Jiang, L; Silvain, J F; Lu, Y F

    2015-06-01

    A commercial butane micron troch was used to enhance plasma optical emissions in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Fast imaging and spectroscopic analyses were used to observe plasma evolution in the atmospheric pressure for LIBS without and with using a micro torch. Optical emission intensities and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) as functions of delay time were studied. Enhanced optical emission and SNRs were obtained by using a micro torch. The effects of laser pulse energy on the emission intensities and SNRs were studied. The same spectral intensity could be obtained using micro torch with much lower laser pulse energy. The investigation of SNR evolution with delay time at different laser pulse energies showed that the SNR enhancement factor is higher for plasmas generated by lower laser pulse energies than those generated by higher laser energies. The calibration curves of emission line intensities with elemental concentrations showed that detection sensitivities of Mn I 404.136 nm and V I 437.923 nm were improved by around 3 times. The limits of detection for both Mn I 404.136 nm and V I 437.923 nm are reduced from 425 and 42 ppm to 139 and 20 ppm, respectively, after using the micro torch. The LIBS system with micro torch was demonstrated to be cost-effective, compact, and capable of sensitivity improvement, especially for LIBS system operating with low laser pulse energy. PMID:26072861

  9. Hydrogen/Air-Ignition Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repas, George A.

    1988-01-01

    Torch is simple, reliable, and economical. Airflow cools inner tube prior to flowing through openings in inner tube and mixing with gaseous hydrogen. Spark plug connected to constant-duty simple ignition transformer threaded into side of torch and into inner tube. Transformer used to excite spark plug for period long enough to ignite gas. Transformer is turned off.

  10. Determination of ionization fraction and plasma potential in a dc magnetron sputtering system using a quartz crystal microbalance and a gridded energy analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Green, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    A diagnostic which combines a quartz crystal microbalance and a gridded energy analyzer has been developed to measure the ion-to- neutral ratio and the plasma potential in a commercial dc magnetron sputtering device. Additional features of this sensor include an externally controlled shutter which protects the diagnostic when it is in the chamber, but it is not in use. The diagnostic is mounted on a linear motion feedthrough and embedded in a slot in the wafer chuck to allow for measuring uniformity in deposition and ionization throughout the plane of the wafer. RF power is introduced to ionize the Al particles. Using the quartz crystal microbalance and the gridded energy analyzer, the ion-to-neutral ratio and other parameters are determined. Comparing the total deposition rate with and without a bias that screens out the ions, but leaves the plasma undisturbed, allows for the determination of the ion-to-neutral ratio. By varying the voltage applied to the grids, the plasma potential is measured. For example, a magnetron configuration having a pressure of 35 mtorr, a dc power of 2 kW, and a net rf power of 310{+-}5 W yielded 78{+-}5% ionization and a plasma potential of 35{+-}1 V.

  11. Spatially resolved electron density and electron energy distribution function in Ar magnetron plasmas used for sputter-deposition of ZnO-based thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloul, L.; Gangwar, R. K.; Morel, S.; Stafford, L.

    2015-11-15

    Langmuir probe and trace rare gases optical emission spectroscopy were used to analyze the spatial structure of the electron density and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a cylindrical Ar magnetron plasma reactor used for sputter-deposition of ZnO-based thin films. While a typical Bessel (zero order) diffusion profile was observed along the radial direction for the number density of charged particles at 21 cm from the ZnO target, a significant rise of these populations with respect to the Bessel function was seen in the center of the reactor at 4 cm from the magnetron surface. As for the EEDF, it was found to transform from a more or less Maxwellian far from the target to a two-temperature Maxwellian with a depletion of high-energy electrons where magnetic field confinement effects become important. No significant change in the behavior of the electron density and EEDF across a wide range of pressures (5–100 mTorr) and self-bias voltages (115–300 V) was observed during magnetron sputtering of Zn, ZnO, and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} targets. This indicates that sputtering of Zn, In, and O atoms do not play a very significant role on the electron particle balance and electron heating dynamics, at least over the range of experimental conditions investigated.

  12. Radial cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, M.C.

    1997-01-08

    The project`s aim is to complete development of the Radial Cutting Torch, a pyrotechnic cutter, for use in all downhole tubular cutting operations in the petroleum industry. Project objectives are to redesign and pressure test nozzle seals to increase product quality, reliability, and manufacturability; improve the mechanical anchor to increase its temperature tolerance and its ability to function in a wider variety of wellbore fluids; and redesign and pressure test the RCT nozzle for operation at pressures from 10 to 20 ksi. The proposal work statement is included in the statement of work for the grant via this reference.

  13. Influence of high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma ionization on the microstructure of TiN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ehiasarian, A. P.; Vetushka, A.; Gonzalvo, Y. Aranda; Safran, G.; Szekely, L.; Barna, P. B.

    2011-05-15

    HIPIMS (High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering) discharge is a new PVD technology for the deposition of high-quality thin films. The deposition flux contains a high degree of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation. The microstructure of HIPIMS-deposited nitride films is denser compared to conventional sputter technologies. However, the mechanisms acting on the microstructure, texture and properties have not been discussed in detail so far. In this study, the growth of TiN by HIPIMS of Ti in mixed Ar and N{sub 2} atmosphere has been investigated. Varying degrees of metal ionization and nitrogen dissociation were produced by increasing the peak discharge current (I{sub d}) from 5 to 30 A. The average power was maintained constant by adjusting the frequency. Mass spectrometry measurements of the deposition flux revealed a high content of ionized film-forming species, such as Ti{sup 1+}, Ti{sup 2+} and atomic nitrogen N{sup 1+}. Ti{sup 1+} ions with energies up to 50 eV were detected during the pulse with reducing energy in the pulse-off times. Langmuir probe measurements showed that the peak plasma density during the pulse was 3 x 10{sup 16} m{sup -3}. Plasma density, and ion flux ratios of N{sup 1+}: N{sub 2}{sup 1+} and Ti{sup 1+}: Ti{sup 0} increased linearly with peak current. The ratios exceeded 1 at 30 A. TiN films deposited by HIPIMS were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. At high I{sub d}, N{sup 1+}: N{sub 2}{sup 1+} > 1 and Ti{sup 1+}: Ti{sup 0} > 1 were produced; a strong 002 texture was present and column boundaries in the films were atomically tight. As I{sub d} reduced and N{sup 1+}: N{sub 2}{sup 1+} and Ti{sup 1+}: Ti{sup 0} dropped below 1, the film texture switched to strong 111 with a dense structure. At very low I{sub d}, porosity between columns developed. The effects of the significant activation of the deposition flux observed in the HIPIMS discharge on the film texture, microstructure, morphology and

  14. Microexplosions initiated by a microwave capillary torch on a metal surface at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A.

    2015-07-01

    The interaction of the plasma of a microwave capillary argon torch with a metal surface was studied experimentally. It is shown that the interaction of the plasma jet generated by the capillary plasma torch with the metal in atmospheric-pressure air leads to the initiation of microexplosions (sparks) on the metal surface. As a result, the initially smooth surface acquires a relief in the form of microtips and microcraters. The possibility of practical application of the observed phenomenon is discussed.

  15. Microexplosions initiated by a microwave capillary torch on a metal surface at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A.

    2015-07-15

    The interaction of the plasma of a microwave capillary argon torch with a metal surface was studied experimentally. It is shown that the interaction of the plasma jet generated by the capillary plasma torch with the metal in atmospheric-pressure air leads to the initiation of microexplosions (sparks) on the metal surface. As a result, the initially smooth surface acquires a relief in the form of microtips and microcraters. The possibility of practical application of the observed phenomenon is discussed.

  16. The Structure and Properties of Inductively Coupled Plasma Assisted Magnetron Sputtered Nanocrystalline CrN Coatings in Corrosion Protective Die Casting Molds.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sung-Yong

    2015-07-01

    Chromium nitride coatings for the surface modified die casting molds with various ICP powers have been prepared using ICP assisted magnetron sputtering. The applied ICP power was varied from 0 to 300 W. The deposited coatings were characterized post-deposition using X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Single CrN phased coatings with nano-grain sized (< 20 nm) were identified. The corrosion resistance and hardness of each coating were evaluated from potentiost at and nanoindentator. Superior corrosion protective coatings in excess of 20 GPa were deposited with assistance of ICP plasma during sputtering.

  17. The Structure and Properties of Inductively Coupled Plasma Assisted Magnetron Sputtered Nanocrystalline NbN Coatings in Corrosion Protective Die Casting Molds.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sung-Yong

    2016-02-01

    Niobium nitride coatings for the surface modified die casting molds with various ICP powers have been prepared using ICP assisted magnetron sputtering. The applied ICP power was varied from 0 to 200 W. The deposited coatings were characterized post-deposition using X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Single NbN phased coatings with nano-grain sized (<7.6 nm) were identified. The corrosion resistance and hardness of each coating were evaluated from potentiostat and nanoindentator. Superior corrosion protective coatings in excess of 13.9 GPa were deposited with assistance of ICP plasma during sputtering.

  18. The Structure and Properties of Inductively Coupled Plasma Assisted Magnetron Sputtered Nanocrystalline NbN Coatings in Corrosion Protective Die Casting Molds.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sung-Yong

    2016-02-01

    Niobium nitride coatings for the surface modified die casting molds with various ICP powers have been prepared using ICP assisted magnetron sputtering. The applied ICP power was varied from 0 to 200 W. The deposited coatings were characterized post-deposition using X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Single NbN phased coatings with nano-grain sized (<7.6 nm) were identified. The corrosion resistance and hardness of each coating were evaluated from potentiostat and nanoindentator. Superior corrosion protective coatings in excess of 13.9 GPa were deposited with assistance of ICP plasma during sputtering. PMID:27433719

  19. Loren Shriver carries Olympic torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    KSC Shuttle Operations Manager Loren J. Shriver proudly displays the Olympic torch that he carried to the top of Launch Pad 39A as his contribution to the July 7, 1996 KSC Olympic torch relay effort. Nineteen other KSC runners also participated in the relay effort at the Center. The Olympic torch arrived at KSC at 1:40 p.m. and traveled a 20-mile course to the pad and then out to the KSC visitor Center. The Space Shuttle Atlantis is behind Shriver, poised for the STS-79 mission, which will feature the fourth docking of the Shuttle with the Russian Mir space station.

  20. Ratio of Cu, Zn, Sn and S densities in magnetron sputtering plasmas employing a stoichiometric Cu2ZnSnS4 target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafarizal, Nayan; Sasaki, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) has drawn wide attention as a highly potential material for the next-generation thin film solar cells. In order to optimize CZTS thin films for solar cells, it is essential to understand their deposition mechanism. Especially since it consists of four elements, it is difficult to control the stoichiometric properties. In the present work, we measured the absolute ground-state densities of Cu, Zn, Sn, and S atoms released from a stoichiometric CZTS target in magnetron sputtering plasmas. The absolute atom densities were evaluated by ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. Magnetron sputtering plasmas were produced using a pulsed-modulated rf power supply and the temporal variations of atom densities were measured in the afterglow. The absolute Cu, Zn, Sn and S densities in the discharge phase were evaluated by the extrapolations of the temporal variations. It has been observed that the absolute Cu, Zn, Sn and S densities in the gas phase were not in agreement with the stoichiometry of the target as well as that of the deposited film. The results suggest possibilities of unconventional sputtering and deposition processes in the compound sputter deposition.

  1. Axial viewing of an ICP with a graphite torch injector

    SciTech Connect

    Houk, R.L.; Winge, R.K.; Praphairaksit, N.

    1996-09-01

    A hollow graphite torch injector constricts the analyte emission zone and prevents the production of off-axis emission from the upstream reaches of the axial channel. These properties should both improve signal, reduce background and alleviate matrix effects during axial viewing of the ICP through a metal sampling orifice thrust into the plasma. Recent results along these lines will be presented.

  2. Micro torch assisted nanostructures' formation of nickel during femtosecond laser surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kai; Duan, Ji'an; Wang, Cong; Dong, Xinran; Song, Yuxin; Luo, Zhi

    2016-06-01

    In this letter, we perform a comprehensive study of micro torch effect on the formation of femtosecond laser-induced nanostructures on nickel. Under identical experimental conditions, laser induced nanostructures and periodic surface patterns exhibit distinctly different level of morphology with and without the micro torch. In addition, assisted by the micro torch, the ablation threshold is considerably reduced and the content of oxygen in the textured nanostructures keeps a stable low level. It is suggested that the change on the surface directly relates to the status of plasma plume and substrate heating. With the assistance of the micro torch, laser induced plasma plume is confined and its density at center region is raised, which results in the increase of the central plasma's temperature, more energy deposited on the nickel surface, and ultimately leading to the changes in the nanostructures' morphology and ablation threshold.

  3. A novel 2.45 GHz/200 W Microwave Plasma Jet for High Temperature Applications above 3600 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schopp, C.; Nachtrodt, F.; Heuermann, H.; Scherer, U. W.; Mostacci, D.; Finger, T.; Tietsch, W.

    2012-12-01

    State of the art atmosphere plasma sources are operated with frequencies in kHz/MHz regions and all high power plasma jets make use of tungsten electrodes. A microwave plasma torch has been developed at FH Aachen for the application in various fields. The advantages over other plasma jet technologies are the high efficiency combined with a maintenance-free compact design and non-tungsten electrodes. In this paper the development of a 200 W torch is described. Argon is used as the primary plasma gas and a second gas can be applied for additional purposes. For the plasma generation a microwave at 2.45 GHz is sent through the torch. The special internal topology causes a high electric field that ignites the plasma at the tip and leads to the ionization of the passing Argon atoms which are emitted as a jet. By designing the copper electrode as a cannula it is possible to gain plasma temperatures higher than the electrode's melting point. The electric field simulations are made with Ansoft HFSS. Experiments were carried out to verify the simulations. The upcoming steps in the development will be the scale-up to higher power levels of several kW with a magnetron as power source.

  4. Automatic Guidance System for Welding Torches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H.; Wall, W.; Burns, M. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Digital system automatically guides welding torch to produce squarebutt, V-groove and lap-joint weldments within tracking accuracy of +0.2 millimeter. Television camera observes and traverses weld joint, carrying welding torch behind. Image of joint digitized, and resulting data used to derive control signals that enable torch to track joint.

  5. Welding torch and wire feed manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. T.

    1967-01-01

    Welding torch and wire feed manipulator increase capability for performing automatic welding operations. The manipulator rotates on its horizontal axis to avoid obstacles as they approach the torch. The initial individual attitudes of the torch and wire guide are set with respect to the general configuration of the part.

  6. Monitoring Weld Penetration Optically From Within Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew A.; Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Linsacum, Deron L.; Gutlow, David A.

    1993-01-01

    Photodetector or optical fiber leading to photodetector mounted inside gas/tungsten arc welding torch to monitor arc light reflected from oscillating surface of weld pool. Proposed optical monitoring components preserve compact profile of welding torch, maintained in fixed aim at weld-pool position at end of welding torch, and protected against bumping external objects.

  7. Absolute densities of Cu, Zn, Sn, and S atoms in magnetron sputtering plasmas employing a Cu2ZnSnS4 target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafarizal, Nayan; Sasaki, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    Absolute densities of Cu, Zn, Sn, and S atoms in magnetron sputtering plasmas were measured by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. A stoichiometric Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) target was used in this work. It was found that, at various Ar pressures, the S density ranged between (2-8) × 1010 cm-3, the Cu and Sn densities ranged between (0.6-3) × 1010 cm-3, and the Zn density ranged between (2-3) × 109 cm-3. The effective depositing flux, which was evaluated from the absolute densities and the sticking probabilities, was comparable with that evaluated from the deposition rate of the CZTS film. However, the composition ratio of Cu, Zn, Sn, and S in the gas phase deviated from the ideal stoichiometry of CZTS. We discussed the possible mechanisms for the difference among the element compositions of the target, the deposited film, and the gas-phase densities.

  8. Absolute densities of Cu, Zn, Sn, and S atoms in magnetron sputtering plasmas employing a Cu2ZnSnS4 target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafarizal, Nayan; Sasaki, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    Absolute densities of Cu, Zn, Sn, and S atoms in magnetron sputtering plasmas were measured by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. A stoichiometric Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) target was used in this work. It was found that, at various Ar pressures, the S density ranged between (2–8) × 1010 cm‑3, the Cu and Sn densities ranged between (0.6–3) × 1010 cm‑3, and the Zn density ranged between (2–3) × 109 cm‑3. The effective depositing flux, which was evaluated from the absolute densities and the sticking probabilities, was comparable with that evaluated from the deposition rate of the CZTS film. However, the composition ratio of Cu, Zn, Sn, and S in the gas phase deviated from the ideal stoichiometry of CZTS. We discussed the possible mechanisms for the difference among the element compositions of the target, the deposited film, and the gas-phase densities.

  9. Effects of Al and V Additions on Mechanical Response in Thick TiSiCN Nanocomposites Deposited Using Plasma-Enhanced Magnetron Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yu-Chen; Chen, Hsien-Wei; Wei, Rong-Hua; Lee, Jyh-Wei; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2013-11-01

    Thick TiSiCN and TiAlVSiCN nanocomposite coatings were fabricated by plasma-enhanced magnetron sputtering (PEMS). Characterizations by electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) and XRD revealed the dependence of films with various precursor flow rates on the constituent composition and structure evolution in coatings. HRTEM images clearly confirmed that a nanocomposite structure existed with grain size below 10 nm. It was believed that nanocrystalline TiCxN1-x-based phases with B1 structure were embedded in an amorphous SiCyNz matrix, and such phase segregation ameliorated the hardness and H/E ratios. In the scratch and ball-on-disc wear tests, the evidence from crack initiation resistance, friction coefficient, and worn surfaces verified that thick nanocomposites exhibited remarkable tribological resistance. Hybrid anti-wear mechanisms on the basis of mechanical property variation, composition distribution, and microstructure evolution were proposed to elucidate the favorable durability of these thick films.

  10. Hydrogen-air ignition torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repas, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    The design and operation of a hydrogen-air ignition torch presently being used to burn off excess hydrogen that accumulates in the scrubber exhaust ducts of two rocket engine test facilities at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, is described.

  11. Fundamental properties of an ICP with a graphite torch injector

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, P.S.; Houk, R.S.; Praphairakisit, N.

    1996-09-01

    A hollow graphite torch injector can be used to constrict the analyte zone in an ICP. From a practical standpoint, oxide levels can be reduced to 0.01% for the signal ratio LaO{sup +}/La{sup +} and analyte signals increased by factors of three to fifteen, depending on the element. This paper reports recent measurements of background mass spectra, temperature and electron density in the plasma flowing into the sampler using a graphite torch injector. The graphite injector improves BEC values for most analytes that suffer interference from prominent polyatomic ions like ArO{sup +}, ClO{sup +}, and ArCl{sup +}. One notable exception is ArC{sup +}, which is substantially worse because of the high level of carbon injected into the plasma. Carbon evaporation rates of 1x10{sup 17} to 5x10{sup 17} atoms/s have been measured, the actual values depending on the grade of graphite used. This is sufficient carbon for C{sup +} to become a major background ion and for formation of CO to help reduce the level of O atoms in the plasma. Charge transfer reactions from C{sup +} to neutral As and Se help enhance the sensitivity for these important elements. Doubly charged ions are somewhat more abundant with the graphite injector than with a conventional torch, because a hotter region of the plasma is sampled with the graphite injector.

  12. Adhesion improvement of TiN film on tool steel by a hybrid process of unbalanced magnetron sputtering and plasma-based ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, T.; Uemura, M.; Yatsuzuka, M.

    2007-04-01

    An interfacial mixing layer and a titanium (Ti) layer between the titanium-nitride (TiN) film and the substrate material was produced to improve the adhesion of TiN film on tool substrates by a hybrid process of unbalanced magnetron sputtering (UBM) and plasma-based ion implantation (PBII). Before TiN deposition by UBM, the negative high-voltage pulse and DC-bias were applied to the substrate immersed in the Ti plasma, resulting in implantation as well as deposition of Ti ions to the substrate. As a result, a Ti layer and a graded mixing layer of Ti and substrate materials was produced to work as a buffer interface between substrate and TiN film. The adhesion strength of TiN film with the interfacial treatment on tool steel substrates was evaluated by scratch and indentation tests, showing the considerable improvement of adhesion by the formation of the Ti and the interfacial mixing layers. The suitable ion implantation energy for the improvement of adhesion strength was found.

  13. Investigating the plasma parameters of an Ar/O{sub 2} discharge during the sputtering of Al targets in an inverted cylindrical magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Mensah, Samuel L. E-mail: scrr004@gmail.com; Gordon, Matt; Naseem, Hameed H.

    2014-09-15

    The plasma parameters and reaction kinetics in an inverted cylindrical magnetron chamber have been studied with an energy resolved mass spectrometer during the sputtering of aluminum targets in an Ar/O{sub 2} discharge. Mixtures of argon and oxygen were studied as a function of oxygen percentage (0%–90%) in the discharge. The plasma was powered at 4 kW and 40 kHz at a process pressure of 5 mTorr. Al{sup +}, Al, AlO, AlO{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sup +}, Al{sub 2}O{sup +}, and Ar{sup +} were among the species detected in the discharge. The deposition rate of the deposited thin film decreased with increasing oxygen percentage in the discharge and results indicated that the pure gamma-alumina was obtained when the percentage of oxygen was approximately 70%. The linear plot of energy distributions of the positively charged film forming species changed from a single peak to a bimodal distribution as the percentage of oxygen exceeds 65%. In a log plot, however, the distributions showed multiple peaks ranging from 2 eV to 78 eV. Fluctuations of about 1 eV in peak energies were observed.

  14. Measurements of sputtered neutrals and ions and investigation of their roles on the plasma properties during rf magnetron sputtering of Zn and ZnO targets

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloul, L.; Stafford, L.

    2013-11-15

    Langmuir probe and optical absorption spectroscopy measurements were used to determine the line-integrated electron density, electron temperature, and number density of Ar atoms in metastable {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} levels in a 5 mTorr, rf magnetron sputtering plasmas used for the deposition of ZnO-based thin films. While the average electron energy and density of Ar atoms in {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} excited states were fairly independent of self-bias voltage, the Ar {sup 3}P{sub 2}-to-electron number density ratio decreased by approximately a factor of 5 when going from −115 V to −300 V. This decrease was correlated to an increase by about one order of magnitude of the number density of sputtered Zn atoms determined by absolute actinometry measurements on Zn I using either Ar or Xe as the actinometer gas. These results were also found to be in excellent agreement with the predictions of a global model accounting for Penning ionization of sputtered Zn particles. The importance of the latter reactions was further confirmed by plasma sampling mass spectrometry showing a double peak structure for Zn ions: a low-energy component ascribed to thermalized ions created in the gas phase (by direct electron impact and by Penning ionization) and a high-energy tail due to ions ejected from the target and reaching quasi-collisionlessly the substrate surface.

  15. On the pressure effect in energetic deposition of Cu thin films by modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering: A global plasma model and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, B. C.; Meng, D.; Che, H. L.; Lei, M. K.

    2015-05-28

    The modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) discharge processes are numerically modeled and experimentally investigated, in order to explore the effect of the pressure on MPPMS discharges as well as on the microstructure of the deposited thin films. A global plasma model has been developed based on a volume-averaged global description of the ionization region, considering the loss of electrons by cross-B diffusion. The temporal variations of internal plasma parameters at different pressures from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa are obtained by fitting the model to duplicate the experimental discharge data, and Cu thin films are deposited by MPPMS at the corresponding pressures. The surface morphology, grain size and orientation, and microstructure of the deposited thin films are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. By increasing the pressure from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa, both the ion bombardment energy and substrate temperature which are estimated by the modeled plasma parameters decrease, corresponding to the observed transition of the deposited thin films from a void free structure with a wide distribution of grain size (zone T) into an underdense structure with a fine fiber texture (zone 1) in the extended structure zone diagram (SZD). The microstructure and texture transition of Cu thin films are well-explained by the extended SZD, suggesting that the primary plasma processes are properly incorporated in the model. The results contribute to the understanding of the characteristics of MPPMS discharges, as well as its correlation with the microstructure and texture of deposited Cu thin films.

  16. Advanced Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In order to more easily join the huge sections of the Space Shuttle external tank, Marshall Space Flight Center initiated development of the existing concept of Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding. VPPA welding employs a variable current waveform that allows the system to operate for preset time increments in either of two polarity modes for effective joining of light alloys.

  17. A Compact Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgen, Gene E.

    1991-01-01

    Compact gas/tungsten-arc welding torch delivers 100-A current, yet used in confined spaces inaccessible to even smallest commercially available torch. Despite its extremely small size, torch contains all usual components and delivers high current.

  18. Compact Through-The-Torch Vision System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Gutow, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Changes in gas/tungsten-arc welding torch equipped with through-the-torch vision system make it smaller and more resistant to welding environment. Vision subsystem produces image of higher quality, flow of gas enhanced, and parts replaced quicker and easier. Coaxial series of lenses and optical components provides overhead view of joint and weld puddle real-time control. Designed around miniature high-resolution video camera. Smaller size enables torch to weld joints formerly inaccessible.

  19. Hydrogen-oxygen Torch Ignitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repas, George A.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrogen-oxygen torch igniter described herein has been successfully used for many years at various NASA Lewis Research Center rocket test facilities to provide ignition for rocket engine research hardware. This igniter is inexpensive, simple to operate, and has demonstrated very good reliability. It has been used as an ignition source for rocket engines that utilized a variety of propellant combinations; some of these engines developed up to 40,000 lb of thrust.

  20. Hydrogen/Oxygen Torch Ignitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repas, George A.

    1995-01-01

    Reliable device used to ignite variety of fuels. Used as general-purpose ignitor in other applications, or as hydrogen/oxygen torch. Operation of device straight-forward. Hydrogen and oxygen flow through separate ports into combustion chamber in device, where they ignite by use of surface-gap spark plug. Hot gases flow from this combustion chamber, through injector tube, into larger combustion chamber containing fuel-oxidizer mixture to be ignited.

  1. Review of Magnetron Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Sandeep Kumar; Verma, Rajendra Kumar; Maurya, Shivendra; Singh, V. V. P.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetrons have been the most efficient high power microwave sources for decades. In the twenty-first century, many of the development works are headed towards the performance improvement of CW industrial magnetrons. In this review article, the development works and techniques, used on different types of magnetrons, for the performance enhancement in the past two decades have been discussed. The article focuses on the state of the art of CW magnetron and the direction it will take in foreseeable future. In addition it also glimpses some of the major variants of magnetron which have further opened up scope in mm-THz spectrum of electromagnetism.

  2. Welding torch gas cup extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to a gas shielded electric arc welding torch having a detachable gas cup extension which may be of any desired configuration or length. The gas cup extension assembly is mounted on a standard electric welding torch gas cup to enable welding in areas with limited access. The gas cup assembly has an upper tubular insert that fits within the gas cup such that its lower portion protrudes thereform and has a lower tubular extension that is screwed into the lower portion. The extension has a rim to define the outer perimeter of the seat edge about its entrance opening so a gasket may be placed to effect an airtight seal between the gas cup and extension. The tubular extension may be made of metal or cermaic material that can be machined. The novelty lies in the use of an extension assembly for a standard gas cup of an electric arc welding torch which extension assembly is detachable permitting the use of a number of extensions which may be of different configurations and materials and yet fit the standard gas cup.

  3. Effects of magnetic flux density and substrate bias voltage on Ni films prepared on a flexible substrate material using unbalanced magnetron sputtering assisted by inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Koda, Tatsunori; Toyota, Hiroshi

    2014-03-15

    The authors fabricated Ni films on a flexible substrate material using unbalanced magnetron sputtering assisted by inductively coupled plasma. The effects of magnetic flux density B{sub C} and substrate DC bias voltage V{sub S} on the Ni film structures were investigated. For V{sub S} = −40 V, the average surface grain size D{sub G} measured by atomic force microscopy for B{sub C} = 0, 3, and 5 mT was 88.2, 95.4, and 104.4 nm, respectively. In addition, D{sub G} increased with V{sub S}. From x-ray diffraction measurements, the (111) and (200) peaks were clearly visible for the fabricated Ni films. The ratio of the integrated intensities of I(111)/I(200) increased with V{sub S}. For V{sub S} = −40 V and B{sub C} = 3 mT, a film resistivity ρ of 8.96 × 10{sup −6} Ω cm was observed, which is close to the Ni bulk value of 6.84 × 10{sup −6} Ω cm. From these results, the authors determined that the structure of the fabricated Ni films on the flexible substrate material was affected by the values of B{sub C} and V{sub S}.

  4. Influence of Ar/Kr ratio and pulse parameters in a Cr-N high power pulse magnetron sputtering process on plasma and coating properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Bagcivan, Nazlim; Theiß, Sebastian; Trieschmann, Jan; Brugnara, Ricardo Henrique; Preissing, Sven; Hecimovic, Ante

    2014-03-15

    Krypton is sometimes used in physical vapor deposition processes due to its greater atomic mass and size compared to argon, which leads to a lower gas incorporation and may have beneficial effects on kinetics of the coating growth. In this paper, the authors investigate the plasma composition and properties of deposited high power pulse magnetron sputtering Cr-N coatings for discharges with various Ar/Kr ratios and for various pulse lengths of 40 μs, 80 μs, and 200 μs, keeping the average discharge power constant. The results show that an addition of Kr influences the discharge process by altering the ignition and peak values of the discharge current. This influences the metal ion generation and growth conditions on the substrate by reducing the nucleation site densities, leading to a predominantly columnar grow. However, the deposition rate is highest for an Ar/Kr ratio of 120/80. The integral of the metal ion and atom emission exhibits the same trend, having a maximum for Ar/Kr ratio of 120/80. By decreasing the pulse length, the deposition rate of coatings decreases, while the hardness increases.

  5. Aerospatiale industrial thermal plasma activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrot, Maxime

    Details of nontransferred arc torches, plasma systems in industrial use and operational plasma applications are listed. A plasma application on a foundry cupola is detailed. The setting up of a plasma system is described. Research and development activities are summarized.

  6. Spinarc gas tungsten arc torch holder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, D. F.; Crockett, J. L.

    1970-01-01

    Semiautomatic welding torch enables operator to control arc length, torch angle, and spring tension when welding small diameter aluminum tubing. Tungsten is preset for the weld to make arc initiation easier and to eliminate searching for the joint through a dark welding lens.

  7. Tests of Reading Comprehension (TORCH) Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgon, J. R.

    A New Zealand pilot study examined Tests of Reading Comprehension (TORCH) scores compared to PAT: Reading Comprehension scores and compared with teacher ratings. TORCH is a reading test package published in 1987 by the Australian Council for Educational Research. It consists of 14 untimed passages intended to assess the extent to which readers in…

  8. Plasma on a foundry cupola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineau, Didier

    An experiment of a plasma torch on a production foundry cupola is reported. The test runs were conducted on a hot blast cupola, the blast temperature in the absence of plasma being 400 C. With the torch, the temperature of the blast was increased to 1000 C. The experiment was conducted for the manufacture of car engines with a 2.5 MW transportable plasma system. The cupola was boosted with a 4 MW torch and results included an increase in production of 45 percent, a decrease in coke rate and no more new iron in the loads. The plasma torch and hot air cupola furnace are described.

  9. Characteristics of the electric arch and stream of plasma in the channel with porous cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dautov, G. Yu; Khairetdinova, R. R.; Dautov, I. G.

    2016-01-01

    We study the characteristics of the arc plasma torch with a porous wall. The increase in mass flow of gas through the porous wall leads to an increase in thermal efficiency of the plasma torch. Compared it with the characteristics of the plasma torch with interbay gas supply.

  10. 49 CFR 213.352 - Torch cut rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Torch cut rail. 213.352 Section 213.352... Torch cut rail. (a) Except as a temporary repair in emergency situations no rail having a torch cut end shall be used. When a rail end with a torch cut is used in emergency situations, train speed over...

  11. 49 CFR 213.352 - Torch cut rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Torch cut rail. 213.352 Section 213.352... Torch cut rail. (a) Except as a temporary repair in emergency situations no rail having a torch cut end shall be used. When a rail end with a torch cut is used in emergency situations, train speed over...

  12. 49 CFR 213.352 - Torch cut rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Torch cut rail. 213.352 Section 213.352... Torch cut rail. (a) Except as a temporary repair in emergency situations no rail having a torch cut end shall be used. When a rail end with a torch cut is used in emergency situations, train speed over...

  13. 49 CFR 213.352 - Torch cut rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Torch cut rail. 213.352 Section 213.352... Torch cut rail. (a) Except as a temporary repair in emergency situations no rail having a torch cut end shall be used. When a rail end with a torch cut is used in emergency situations, train speed over...

  14. 49 CFR 213.352 - Torch cut rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Torch cut rail. 213.352 Section 213.352... Torch cut rail. (a) Except as a temporary repair in emergency situations no rail having a torch cut end shall be used. When a rail end with a torch cut is used in emergency situations, train speed over...

  15. Gaseous fueled torch apparatus and fueling module therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Czerwinski, K.S.; Gabany, E.; Sharma, S.S.; Turko, J.W.

    1990-06-05

    This patent describes a fueling system. It is used for supplying natural gas to one of a natural gas fueled torch apparatus and at least one storage vessel, the torch apparatus including a torch adapted for use in cutting or welding operations. The torch apparatus includes a source of oxygen for supplying oxygen to the torch, and the torch being selectively operable for combustion of a mixture of natural gas and oxygen. The fueling system is connectable to an electric power source and supplies natural gas to one of the torch apparatus and the storage vessel at an elevated pressure from a relatively low pressure natural gas supply system.

  16. Populations of metastable and resonant argon atoms in radio frequency magnetron plasmas used for deposition of indium-zinc-oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloul, L.; Morel, S.; Stafford, L.

    2012-03-15

    This work reports optical absorption spectroscopy measurements of the number density of Ar atoms in resonant ({sup 3}P{sub 1}, {sup 1}P{sub 1}) and metastable ({sup 3}P{sub 2}, {sup 3}P{sub 0}) states in rf magnetron sputtering plasmas used for the deposition of ZnO-based thin films. While the density of Ar {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} was fairly independent of pressure in the range of experimental conditions investigated, the density of Ar {sup 3}P{sub 1} and {sup 1}P{sub 1} first sharply increased with pressure and then reached a plateau at values close to those of the {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} levels at pressures above about 50 mTorr. At such pressures, ultraviolet radiation from resonant states becomes trapped such that these levels behave as metastable states. For a self-bias voltage of -115 V and pressures in the 5-100 mTorr range, similar number densities of Ar resonant and metastable atoms were obtained for Zn, ZnO, and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} targets, suggesting that, over the range of experimental conditions investigated, collisions between these excited species and sputtered Zn, In, and O atoms played only a minor role on the discharge kinetics. The metastable-to-ground state number density ratios were also fitted to the predictions of a global model using the average electron temperature, T{sub e}, as the only adjustable parameter. For all targets examined, the values of T{sub e} deduced from this method were in excellent agreement with those obtained from Langmuir probe measurements.

  17. Morphology and structure evolution of Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2} films deposited by reactive magnetron co-sputtering with electron cyclotron resonance plasma assistance

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Man Ellmer, Klaus

    2014-02-28

    Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2} (CIGS) films were deposited on Mo coated soda lime glass substrates using an electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced one-step reactive magnetron co-sputtering process (ECR-RMS). The crystalline quality and the morphology of the Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2} films were investigated by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray fluorescence. We also compared these CIGS films with films previously prepared without ECR assistance and find that the crystallinity of the CIGS films is correlated with the roughness evolution during deposition. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure the surface topography and to derive one-dimensional power spectral densities (1DPSD). All 1DPSD spectra of CIGS films exhibit no characteristic peak which is typical for the scaling of a self-affine surface. The growth exponent β, characterizing the roughness R{sub q} evolution during the film growth as R{sub q} ∼ d{sup β}, changes with film thickness. The root-mean-square roughness at low temperatures increases only slightly with a growth exponent β = 0.013 in the initial growth stage, while R{sub q} increases with a much higher exponent β = 0.584 when the film thickness is larger than about 270 nm. Additionally, we found that the H{sub 2}S content of the sputtering atmosphere and the Cu- to-(In + Ga) ratio has a strong influence of the morphology of the CIGS films in this one-step ECR-RMS process.

  18. Friction and Wear Properties of Selected Solid Lubricating Films. Part 3; Magnetron-Sputtered and Plasma-Assisted, Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Iwaki, Masanori; Gotoh, Kenichi; Obara, Shingo; Imagawa, Kichiro

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate commercially developed dry solid film lubricants for aerospace bearing applications, an investigation was conducted to examine the friction and wear behavior of magnetron-sputtered diamondlike carbon (MS DLC) and plasma-assisted, chemical-vapor-deposited diamondlike carbon (PACVD DLC) films in sliding contact with 6-mm-diameter American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 440C stainless steel balls. Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with a load of 5.9 N (600 g), a mean Hertzian contact pressure of 0.79 GPa (maximum Hertzian contact pressure of L-2 GPa), and a sliding velocity of 0.2 m/s. The experiments were conducted at room temperature in three environments: ultrahigh vacuum (vacuum pressure, 7x10(exp -7) Pa), humid air (relative humidity, approx.20 percent), and dry nitrogen (relative humidity, <1 percent). The resultant films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and surface profilometry. Marked differences in the friction and wear of the DLC films investigated herein resulted from the environmental conditions. The main criteria for judging the performance of the DLC films were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.3 and on the order of 10(exp -6) cu mm/N-m or less, respectively. MS DLC films and PACVD DLC films met the criteria in humid air and dry nitrogen but failed in ultrahigh vacuum, where the coefficients of friction were greater than the criterion, 0.3. In sliding contact with 440C stainless steel balls in all three environments the PACVD DLC films exhibited better tribological performance (i.e., lower friction and wear) than the MS DLC films. All sliding involved adhesive transfer of wear materials: transfer of DLC wear debris to the counterpart 440C stainless steel and transfer of 440C stainless steel wear debris to the counterpart DLC film.

  19. Computerized system for translating a torch head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.; Ives, R. E.; Bruce, M. M., Jr.; Pryor, P. P., Jr.; Gard, L. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The system provides a constant travel speed along a contoured workpiece. It has a driven skate characterized by an elongated bed, with a pair of independently pivoted trucks connected to the bed for support. The trucks are mounted on a contoured track of arbitrary configuration in a mutually spaced relation. An axially extensible torch head manipulator arm is mounted on the bed of the carriage and projects perpendicular from the midportion. The torch head is mounted at its distal end. A real-time computerized control drive subsystem is used to advance the skate along the track of a variable rate for maintaining a constant speed for the torch head tip, and to position the torch axis relative to a preset angle to the workpiece.

  20. Torch kit for welding in difficult areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    Miniature tungsten inert gas welding torch, used with variously formed interchangeable soft copper tubing extensions, provides inexpensive, accurate welding capability for inaccessible joints. Kit effectively welds stainless steel tubing 0.089 cm thick. Other applications are cited.

  1. Diamond Research Overview and a Model for Lab Experiments Using Oxyacetylene Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Rustum

    1996-01-01

    High pressure synthetic diamonds have now been a commercial product for over 40 years. Russian scientists invented the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process 30 years ago, while the Japanese followed 10 years later and the U.S. was introduced to it 10 years after that. The new syntheses focus is on liquid and solid phase approaches. There are three CVD processes: microwave plasma, hot filament, and oxy-acetylene torch. The oxy-acetylene torch is an excellent materials synthesis lab experiment, emphasizing the simplicity of the science.

  2. Smaller Coaxial-View Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangl, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    Coaxial-view torch for gas/tungsten arc welding has only two-thirds length and width of its predecessor. Shape and size similar to that of commercial arc-welding torch (Linde HW-27 or equivalent), even though it contains lens system. Collet that holds electrode has unique design allowing greater passage of light. Used in small spaces previously inaccessible, also introduced into production welding operations with minimum of disturbance.

  3. Tracking Motions Of Manually Controlled Welding Torches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carolyn; Gangl, Ken

    1996-01-01

    Techniques for measuring motions of manually controlled welding torches undergoing development. Positions, orientations, and velocities determined in real time during manual arc welding. Makes possible to treat manual welding processes more systematically so manual welds made more predictable, especially in cases in which mechanical strengths and other properties of welded parts highly sensitive to heat inputs and thus to velocities and orientations of welding torches.

  4. Torch height control helps fabricator raise productivity

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    For high-speed, high-quality plate cutting with oxyfuel, several control factors are widely recognized to affect cut quality. Flame type and flame adjustment are critical factors. Matching the correct torch tip size and oxygen pressure setting to the precise material composition and exact thickness of the steel plate are essential. Control settings for preheating the fuel and for torch travel speed are equally important. A high-performance drive system is another essential part of the equation. Precisely matched to the exact size, weight and configuration of the gantry or cantilever machine, the right motor and drive combination can provide smoother x-y axis movement for cleaner cuts, less slag and less overall scrap. With the advent of the torch height control sensor for cantilever and gantry machines, there is a new element to consider in the quality equation. These torch-mounted sensor systems are helping some fabricators improve cut quality by making it easier for machine operators to maintain an optimum and consistent distance between the torch tip and the steel plate. Used by many fabricators in Europe for well over a decade, torch height control sensors are beginning to show their value in the United States.

  5. Epitaxial synthesis of diamond layers on a monocrystalline diamond substrate in a torch microwave plasmatron

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeichev, K. F. Lukina, N. A.

    2011-12-15

    The epitaxial growth of a diamond single-crystal film in a torch microwave discharge excited by a magnetron of a domestic microwave oven with the power of {<=}1 kW in an argon-hydrogen-methane mixture with a high concentration of methane (up to 25% with respect to hydrogen) at atmospheric pressure on a sub-strate of a synthetic diamond single crystal (HPHP) with the orientation (100) and 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 mm in size is obtained. A discharge with the torch diameter of {approx}2 mm and the concentration of the microwave power absorbed in the torch volume of >10{sup 3} W/cm{sup 3} is shown to be effective for epitaxial enlargement of a single crystal of synthetic diamond. The structure of the deposited film with the thickness up to 10 {mu}m with high-quality morphology is investigated with an optical microscope as well as using the methods of the Raman scattering and scanning electron microscopy.

  6. Particle contamination formation in magnetron sputtering processes

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, G.S.; Sequeda, F.; Huang, C.

    1997-07-01

    Defects caused by particulate contamination are an important concern in the fabrication of thin film products. Often, magnetron sputtering processes are used for this purpose. Particle contamination generated during thin film processing can be detected using laser light scattering, a powerful diagnostic technique which provides real-time, {ital in situ} imaging of particles {gt}0.3 {mu}m on the target, substrate, or in the plasma. Using this technique, we demonstrate that the mechanisms for particle generation, transport, and trapping during magnetron sputter deposition are different from the mechanisms reported in previously studied plasma etch processes, due to the inherent spatial nonuniformity of magnetically enhanced plasmas. During magnetron sputter deposition, one source of particle contamination is linked to portions of the sputtering target surface exposed to weaker plasma density. There, film redeposition induces filament or nodule growth. Sputter removal of these features is inhibited by the dependence of sputter yield on angle of incidence. These features enhance trapping of plasma particles, which then increases filament growth. Eventually the growths effectively {open_quotes}short-circuit{close_quotes} the sheath, causing high currents to flow through these features. This, in turn, causes mechanical failure of the growth resulting in fracture and ejection of the target contaminants into the plasma and onto the substrate. Evidence of this effect has been observed in semiconductor fabrication and storage disk manufacturing. Discovery of this mechanism in both technologies suggests it may be universal to many sputter processes. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

  7. Magnetron sputtering source

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.; Grabner, R.F.; Ramsey, P.B.

    1994-08-02

    A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal. 12 figs.

  8. Magnetron sputtering source

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.; Grabner, R. Fred; Ramsey, Philip B.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal.

  9. 39. View looking down on torch and flame from top ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. View looking down on torch and flame from top of scaffolding; ventilator cap has been removed from flame prior to removal of torch on July 4, 1984. July 1984. - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York County, NY

  10. Auxiliary Illumination For Viewing Along A Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Gutow, David A.

    1993-01-01

    Auxiliary optical subsystem provides additional illumination for through-torch vision system of type used in automated or semiautomated arc welding. Also useful during operation of torch to view parts in shadows cast by arc light.

  11. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  12. 49 CFR 213.122 - Torch cut rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Torch cut rail. 213.122 Section 213.122..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.122 Torch cut rail. (a) Except as a temporary repair in emergency situations no rail having a torch cut end shall be used in Classes 3 through...

  13. 49 CFR 213.122 - Torch cut rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Torch cut rail. 213.122 Section 213.122..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.122 Torch cut rail. (a) Except as a temporary repair in emergency situations no rail having a torch cut end shall be used in Classes 3 through...

  14. 49 CFR 213.122 - Torch cut rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Torch cut rail. 213.122 Section 213.122..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.122 Torch cut rail. (a) Except as a temporary repair in emergency situations no rail having a torch cut end shall be used in Classes 3 through...

  15. 49 CFR 213.122 - Torch cut rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Torch cut rail. 213.122 Section 213.122..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.122 Torch cut rail. (a) Except as a temporary repair in emergency situations no rail having a torch cut end shall be used in Classes 3 through...

  16. 49 CFR 213.122 - Torch cut rail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Torch cut rail. 213.122 Section 213.122..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.122 Torch cut rail. (a) Except as a temporary repair in emergency situations no rail having a torch cut end shall be used in Classes 3 through...

  17. Synthesis and characterization of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} films with fluoropolymer content using rf-plasma magnetron sputtering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Mohammad; Inal, Osman T.

    2008-03-15

    Pure and molecularly mixed inorganic films for protection against atomic oxygen in lower earth orbit were prepared using radio-frequency (rf) plasma magnetron sputtering technique. Alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and silica (SiO{sub 2}) films with average grain size in the range of 30-80 nm and fully dense or dense columnar structure were synthesized under different conditions of pressure and power. Simultaneous oxide sputtering and plasma polymerization (PP) of hexafluoropropylene (HFP) led to the formation of molecularly mixed films with fluoropolymer content. The degree of plasma polymerization was strongly influenced by total chamber pressure and the argon to HFP molar ratio (n{sub Ar}/n{sub M}). An order of magnitude increase in pressure due to argon during codeposition changed the plasma-polymerization mechanism from radical-chain- to radical-radical-type processes. Subsequently, a shift from linear CH{sub 2} group based chain polymerization to highly disordered fluoropolymer content with branching and cross-linking was observed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies revealed chemical interaction between depositing SiO{sub 2} and PP-HFP through appearance of absorption bands characteristic of Si-F stretching and expansion of SiO{sub 2} network. The relative amount and composition of plasma-polymerized fluoropolymer in such films can be controlled by changing argon to HFP flow ratio, total chamber pressure, and applied power. These films offer great potential for use as protective coatings in aerospace applications.

  18. Shriver and Granston display Olympic torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    KSC Shuttle Operations Manager Loren J. Shriver (right) proudly displays the Olympic torch that he carried to the top of Launch Pad 39A as his contribution to the July 7 KSC Olympic torch relay effort. To his right is Jon Granston of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games. Nineteen other KSC runners also participated in the relay effort at the center. The Olympic torch arrived at KSC at 1:40 p.m. and traveled a 20-mile course to the pad and then out to the KSC visitor Center. The Space Shuttle Atlantis is behind Shriver, poised for the STS-79 mission, which will feature the fourth docking of the Shuttle with the Russian Mir space station.

  19. Trailer shield assembly for a welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates generally to trailer shields for gas shielded arc welding torches, and more particularly to a trailer shield assembly provided with a shield gas manifold for providing an even dispersion of shield gas to the interior of the shield assembly, which generally encloses a joint being welded and a welding trailing portion of hot welded metal. The novelty of the invention lies in providing trailer shield with a manifold tube having a plurality of openings from which shield gas is distributed. A gas manifold region ahead of the torch is also provided with shield gas from a tube to protect metal preheated by the torch. Further novelty lies in constructing portions of sides and housing and portions of side walls of the guide of stainless steel screen having a tight mesh.

  20. Dual wire welding torch and method

    SciTech Connect

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  1. The Structure and Properties of Inductively Coupled Plasma Assisted Magnetron Sputtered Nanocrystalline CrN Films for Bearings of Wind Power Systems.

    PubMed

    Chun, Sung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Chromium nitride films used as important surface modified bearings for the wind power systems have been prepared using DC (direct current) and ICP assisted magnetron sputtering. The applied ICP power was varied from 0 to 500 W. The deposition rate and nano-grain size of ICP assisted films were decreased when the ICP power increased, while the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of chromium nitride films increased. We present in detail coatings (e.g., deposition rate, grain size, prefer-orientation, corrosion resistance and hardness). Our studies show that chromium nitride coatings with superior properties can be prepared using ICP assisted sputtering.

  2. The TORCH time-of-flight detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnew, N.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros Garcia, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-07-01

    The TORCH time-of-flight detector is being developed to provide particle identification between 2 and 10 GeV/c momentum over a flight distance of 10 m. TORCH is designed for large-area coverage, up to 30 m2, and has a DIRC-like construction. The goal is to achieve a 15 ps time-of-flight resolution per incident particle by combining arrival times from multiple Cherenkov photons produced within quartz radiator plates of 10 mm thickness. A four-year R&D programme is underway with an industrial partner (Photek, UK) to produce 53×53 mm2 Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detectors for the TORCH application. The MCP-PMT will provide a timing accuracy of 40 ps per photon and it will have a lifetime of up to at least 5 Ccm-2 of integrated anode charge by utilizing an Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) coating. The MCP will be read out using charge division with customised electronics incorporating the NINO chipset. Laboratory results on prototype MCPs are presented. The construction of a prototype TORCH module and its simulated performance are also described.

  3. Torche Comment on Downey and Condron

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torche, Florencia

    2016-01-01

    in this article, Florencia Torche, professor of sociology at New York University, reflects on the central question posed by the Coleman Report: What role do schools play in promoting equality of opportunity? The Coleman Report relied on analysis of variance and regression analysis, but over the past 50 years, social scientists have developed new…

  4. Manual tube-to-tubesheet welding torch

    DOEpatents

    Kiefer, Joseph H.; Smith, Danny J.

    1982-01-01

    A welding torch made of a high temperature plastic which fits over a tube intermediate the ends thereof for welding the juncture between the tube and the back side of a tube plate and has a ballooned end in which an electrode, filler wire guide, fiber optic bundle, and blanketing gas duct are disposed.

  5. Modulated electron cyclotron drift instability in a high-power pulsed magnetron discharge.

    PubMed

    Tsikata, Sedina; Minea, Tiberiu

    2015-05-01

    The electron cyclotron drift instability, implicated in electron heating and anomalous transport, is detected in the plasma of a planar magnetron. Electron density fluctuations associated with the mode are identified via an adapted coherent Thomson scattering diagnostic, under direct current and high-power pulsed magnetron operation. Time-resolved analysis of the mode amplitude reveals that the instability, found at MHz frequencies and millimeter scales, also exhibits a kHz-scale modulation consistent with the observation of larger-scale plasma density nonuniformities, such as the rotating spoke. Sharply collimated axial fluctuations observed at the magnetron axis are consistent with the presence of escaping electrons in a region where the magnetic and electric fields are antiparallel. These results distinguish aspects of magnetron physics from other plasma sources of similar geometry, such as the Hall thruster, and broaden the scope of instabilities which may be considered to dictate magnetron plasma features. PMID:26001007

  6. Modulated Electron Cyclotron Drift Instability in a High-Power Pulsed Magnetron Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsikata, Sedina; Minea, Tiberiu

    2015-05-01

    The electron cyclotron drift instability, implicated in electron heating and anomalous transport, is detected in the plasma of a planar magnetron. Electron density fluctuations associated with the mode are identified via an adapted coherent Thomson scattering diagnostic, under direct current and high-power pulsed magnetron operation. Time-resolved analysis of the mode amplitude reveals that the instability, found at MHz frequencies and millimeter scales, also exhibits a kHz-scale modulation consistent with the observation of larger-scale plasma density nonuniformities, such as the rotating spoke. Sharply collimated axial fluctuations observed at the magnetron axis are consistent with the presence of escaping electrons in a region where the magnetic and electric fields are antiparallel. These results distinguish aspects of magnetron physics from other plasma sources of similar geometry, such as the Hall thruster, and broaden the scope of instabilities which may be considered to dictate magnetron plasma features.

  7. Influence of plasma-generated negative oxygen ion impingement on magnetron sputtered amorphous SiO{sub 2} thin films during growth at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Macias-Montero, M.; Garcia-Garcia, F. J.; Alvarez, R.; Gil-Rostra, J.; Gonzalez, J. C.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A. R.; Palmero, A.; Cotrino, J.

    2012-03-01

    Growth of amorphous SiO{sub 2} thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering at low temperatures has been studied under different oxygen partial pressure conditions. Film microstructures varied from coalescent vertical column-like to homogeneous compact microstructures, possessing all similar refractive indexes. A discussion on the process responsible for the different microstructures is carried out focusing on the influence of (i) the surface shadowing mechanism, (ii) the positive ion impingement on the film, and (iii) the negative ion impingement. We conclude that only the trend followed by the latter and, in particular, the impingement of O{sup -} ions with kinetic energies between 20 and 200 eV, agrees with the resulting microstructural changes. Overall, it is also demonstrated that there are two main microstructuring regimes in the growth of amorphous SiO{sub 2} thin films by magnetron sputtering at low temperatures, controlled by the amount of O{sub 2} in the deposition reactor, which stem from the competition between surface shadowing and ion-induced adatom surface mobility.

  8. Performance and test results of a regulated magnetron pulser

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, C.R.; Warren, D.S.

    1998-12-31

    This paper describes the test results and performance of a 5.0-kV, 750-mA, regulated current pulser used to drive an Hitachi model 2M130 2,425-MHz magnetron. The magnetron is used to modulate the plasma in a particle accelerator injector. In this application, precise and stable rf power is crucial to extract a stable and accurate particle beam. A 10-kV high-voltage triode vacuum tube with active feedback is used to control the magnetron current and output rf power. The pulse width may be varied from as little as ten microseconds to continuous duty by varying the width of a supplied gate pulse. The output current level can be programmed between 10 and 750 mA. Current regulation and accuracy are better than 1%. The paper discusses the overall performance of the pulser and magnetron including anode current and rf power waveforms, linearity compliance, and vacuum tube performance.

  9. Rotating cylindrical magnetron sputtering: Simulation of the reactive process

    SciTech Connect

    Depla, D.; Mahieu, S.; Van Aeken, K.; Leroy, W. P.; Haemers, J.; De Gryse, R.; Li, X. Y.; Bogaerts, A.

    2010-06-15

    A rotating cylindrical magnetron consists of a cylindrical tube, functioning as the cathode, which rotates around a stationary magnet assembly. In stationary mode, the cylindrical magnetron behaves similar to a planar magnetron with respect to the influence of reactive gas addition to the plasma. However, the transition from metallic mode to poisoned mode and vice versa depends on the rotation speed. An existing model has been modified to simulate the influence of target rotation on the well known hysteresis behavior during reactive magnetron sputtering. The model shows that the existing poisoning mechanisms, i.e., chemisorption, direct reactive ion implantation and knock on implantation, are insufficient to describe the poisoning behavior of the rotating target. A better description of the process is only possible by including the deposition of sputtered material on the target.

  10. Magnetron sputtered boron films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1998-01-01

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for producing hardened surfaces, surfacing machine tools, etc. and for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z optical components, such as mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  11. Magnetron sputtered boron films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1998-06-16

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for producing hardened surfaces, surfacing machine tools, etc. and for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z optical components, such as mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence. 8 figs.

  12. Magnetron injection gun scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, W.

    1988-04-01

    A set of tradeoff equations was simplified to obtain scaling laws for magnetron injection guns (MIGs). The constraints are chosen to examine the maximum-peak-power capabilities of MIGs. The scaling laws are compared with exact solutions of the design equations and are supported by MIG simulations in which each MIG is designed to double the beam power of an existing design by adjusting one of the four fundamental parameters.

  13. Dielectric cavity relativistic magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. M. A.

    2010-02-01

    An alteration in the structure of the A6 relativistic magnetron is proposed, which introduces an extra degree of freedom to its design and enhances many of its quality factors. This modification involves the partial filling of the cavities of the device with a low-loss dielectric material. The operation of a dielectric-filled A6 is simulated; the results indicate single-mode operation at the desired π mode and a substantially cleaner rf spectrum.

  14. Performance Characteristics of Current-Generation Immulite 2000 TORCH Assays

    PubMed Central

    Centonze, A. R.; Tonolli, E.

    2013-01-01

    The performances of seven Immulite 2000 (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics) TORCH (Toxoplasma gondii, other microorganisms, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus) assays were evaluated in comparison with the performances of the ETI-MAX 3000 (DiaSorin) TORCH assays. The two systems demonstrated good agreement, and given their sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value, they can be used with confidence for TORCH prenatal screening. PMID:23175287

  15. Very low pressure high power impulse triggered magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Andersson, Joakim

    2013-10-29

    A method and apparatus are described for very low pressure high powered magnetron sputtering of a coating onto a substrate. By the method of this invention, both substrate and coating target material are placed into an evacuable chamber, and the chamber pumped to vacuum. Thereafter a series of high impulse voltage pulses are applied to the target. Nearly simultaneously with each pulse, in one embodiment, a small cathodic arc source of the same material as the target is pulsed, triggering a plasma plume proximate to the surface of the target to thereby initiate the magnetron sputtering process. In another embodiment the plasma plume is generated using a pulsed laser aimed to strike an ablation target material positioned near the magnetron target surface.

  16. Surface treatment of diamond-like carbon films by reactive Ar/CF4 high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Takashi; Nishimura, Ryotaro; Azuma, Kingo; Nakao, Setsuo; Sonoda, Tsutomu; Kusumori, Takeshi; Ozaki, Kimihiro

    2015-12-01

    Surface modification of diamond-like carbon films deposited by a high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) of Ar was carried out by a HPPMS of Ar/CF4 mixture, changing a CF4 fraction from 2.5% to 20%. The hardness of the modified films markedly decreased from about 13 to about 3.5 GPa with increasing CF4 fraction, whereas the water contact angle of the modified films increased from 68° to 109° owing to the increase in the CFx content on the film surface. C 1s spectra in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that a graphitic structure of modified films was formed at CF4 fractions less than 5%, above which the modified films possessed a polymer-like structure. Influence of treatment time on the properties of the modified films was also investigated in the range of treatment time from 5 to 30 min. The properties of the modified films did not depend on the treatment time in the range of treatment time longer than 10 min, whereas the water contact angle was not sensitive to the treatment time at any treatment time.

  17. Optical emission enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using micro-torches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Huang, X.; Li, S.; Lu, Yao; Chen, K.; Lu, Y. F.

    2016-03-01

    A cost effective method for optical emission enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been proposed in this research. The pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 532 nm was used for sample ablation and plasma generation. A cost effective commercial butane micro-torch was put parallel to the sample surface to generate a small flame above the surface. The laser-induced plasma expanded in the flame environment. The time-resolved optical emission intensity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) have been observed with and without micro torch. For laser with pulse energy of 20 mJ, the relationship between optical emission intensity and delay time indicates that signal intensities have been greatly enhanced in the initial several microseconds when using micro torch. The time-resolved study of signal-to-noise ratio shows that the maximum SNR occurs at the delay time of 2 μs. The laser energy effects on the enhancements of optical emission intensity and SNR have also been analyzed, which indicates that the enhancement factors are both delay time and laser energy dependent. The maximum enhancement factors for both optical emission intensity and SNR gradually decreases with the laser energy increase. The limits of detection (LODs) for aluminum (Al) and molybdenum (Mo) in steel have been estimated, which shows that the detection sensitivity has been improved by around 4 times. The LODs of Al and Mo have been reduced from 18 to 6 ppm and from 110 to 36 ppm in LIBS, respectively. The method of LIBS by a micro torch has been demonstrated to be a cost effective method for detection sensitivity improvement, especially in the situation of low laser pulse energy.

  18. Fuzzy tungsten in a magnetron sputtering device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, T. J.; Khan, A.; Heil, T.; Bradley, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    Helium ion induced tungsten nanostructure (tungsten fuzz) has been studied in a magnetron sputtering device. Three parameters were varied, the fluence from 3.4 × 1023-3.0 × 1024 m-2, the He ion energy from 25 to 70 eV, and the surface temperature from 900 to 1200 K. For each sample, SEM images were captured, and measurements of the fuzz layer thickness, surface roughness, reflectivity, and average structure widths are provided. A cross-over point from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is found at 2.4 ± 0.4 × 1024 m-2, and a temperature of 1080 ± 60 K. No significant change was observed in the energy sweep. The fuzz is compared to low fluence fuzz created in the PISCES-A linear plasma device. Magnetron fuzz is less uniform than fuzz created by PISCES-A and with generally larger structure widths. The thicknesses of the magnetron samples follow the original Φ1/2 relation as opposed to the incubation fluence fit.

  19. Magic-T-Coupled Magnetrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Outputs of two magnetrons added coherently in scheme based on resonant waveguide coupling and injection phase locking. In addition, filaments are turned off after starting. Overall effect is relatively-inexpensive, lowpower, noisy magnetrons generate clean carrier signals of higher power that ordinarily require more expensive klystrons.

  20. Improved torch increases weld quality in refractory metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessman, G. G.; Sprecace, R.

    1968-01-01

    Specially designed torch welds refractory metals in a vacuum purged, inert gas backfilled welding chamber /weld box/ with practically zero contamination resulting from its use. Included in the torch design is a radiation shield to protect the operators hands when welding at high amperages.

  1. The Shaking Torch: Another Variation on the Inductive Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Frank

    2010-01-01

    A recent article showed how the influx of neodymium magnets has provided striking demonstrations of the interactions between magnets and conductors. The "shaking torch" is yet another example. Many of these torches require no batteries and can be submerged in water--indeed, a light for life. In this article, the author disassembles a shaking torch…

  2. Self-clamping arc light reflector for welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    This invention is directed to a coaxial extending metal mirror reflector attached to the electrode housing or gas cup on a welding torch. An electric welding torch with an internal viewing system for robotic welding is provded with an annular arc light reflector to reflect light from the arc back onto the workpiece. The reflector has a vertical split or gap in its surrounding wall to permit the adjacent wall ends forming the split to be sprung open slightly to permit the reflector to be removed or slipped onto the torch housing or gas cup. The upper opening of the reflector is slightly smaller than the torch housing or gas cup and therefore, when placed on the torch housing or gas cup has that springiness to cause it to clamp tightly on the housing or gas cup. The split or gap also serves to permit the feed of weld wire through to the weld area,

  3. Submergible torch for treating waste solutions and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Mattus, Alfred J.

    1995-01-01

    A submergible torch for removing nitrate and/or nitrite ions from a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions comprises: a torch tip, a fuel delivery mechanism, a fuel flow control mechanism, a catalyst, and a combustion chamber. The submergible torch is ignited to form a flame within the combustion chamber of the submergible torch. The torch is submerged in a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions in such a manner that the flame is in contact with the waste solution and the catalyst and is maintained submerged for a period of time sufficient to decompose the nitrate and/or nitrite ions present in the waste solution.

  4. Submergible torch for treating waste solutions and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Mattus, A.J.

    1994-12-06

    A submergible torch is described for removing nitrate and/or nitrite ions from a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions comprises: a torch tip, a fuel delivery mechanism, a fuel flow control mechanism, a catalyst, and a combustion chamber. The submergible torch is ignited to form a flame within the combustion chamber of the submergible torch. The torch is submerged in a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions in such a manner that the flame is in contact with the waste solution and the catalyst and is maintained submerged for a period of time sufficient to decompose the nitrate and/or nitrite ions present in the waste solution. 2 figures.

  5. Submergible torch for treating waste solutions and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Mattus, Alfred J.

    1994-01-01

    A submergible torch for removing nitrate and/or nitrite ions from a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions comprises: a torch tip, a fuel delivery mechanism, a fuel flow control mechanism, a catalyst, and a combustion chamber. The submergible torch is ignited to form a flame within the combustion chamber of the submergible torch. The torch is submerged in a waste solution containing nitrate and/or nitrite ions in such a manner that the flame is in contact with the waste solution and the catalyst and is maintained submerged for a period of time sufficient to decompose the nitrate and/or nitrite ions present in the waste solution.

  6. DEPOSITION OF NIOBIUM AND OTHER SUPERCONDUCTING MATERIALS WITH HIGH POWER IMPULSE MAGNETRON SPUTTERING: CONCEPT AND FIRST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    High Current Electronics Institute, Tomsk, Russia; Anders, Andre; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Lim, Sunnie; Mentink, Matthijs; Slack, Jonathan L.; Wallig, Joseph G.; Nollau, Alexander V.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2011-07-24

    Niobium coatings on copper cavities have been considered as a cost-efficient replacement of bulk niobium RF cavities, however, coatings made by magnetron sputtering have not quite lived up to high expectations due to Q-slope and other issues. High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is a promising emerging coatings technology which combines magnetron sputtering with a pulsed power approach. The magnetron is turned into a metal plasma source by using very high peak power density of ~ 1 kW/cm{sup 2}. In this contribution, the cavity coatings concept with HIPIMS is explained. A system with two cylindrical, movable magnetrons was set up with custom magnetrons small enough to be inserted into 1.3 GHz cavities. Preliminary data on niobium HIPIMS plasma and the resulting coatings are presented. The HIPIMS approach has the potential to be extended to film systems beyond niobium, including other superconducting materials and/or multilayer systems.

  7. Automated weld torch guidance control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. E.; Wall, W. A.; Burns, M. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A device for automatically controlling the movement of a welding torch while welding an elongated joint is described. A charge injection television camera is carried on a movable support. The camera includes a matrix of individual light sensing video elements which generate voltages responsive to light reflected off of the joint and surrounding areas of the work piece. The voltages produced by the pixels are converted to digital words which are fed to a microprocessor for generating an error signal. This error signal is fed to a digital motor which is used to drive a movable support upon which the television camera is carried.

  8. Reflectance differences between Target and Torch rape cultivars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Spectroradiometric reflectance measurements were made on Target and Torch plants (four and five leaves, respectively) that were growing in 0.09 m2 soil-containing flats. Torch's spectrophotometric single leaf reflectance was consistently lower than Target's at the 650-nm chlorophyll absorption band because Torch's chlorophyll concentration was larger than Target's, which caused more red light absorption. Spectroradiometric measurements indicate that: wet soil strongly absorbs visible light (500 to 700 nm) so that Target's soil-containing flat with 60% plant cover has less reflectance than Torch's soil-containing flat with 75% plant cover; Torch (most foiliage) has higher near-infrared (750 to 1,350 nm) reflectance than Target (least foliage); and the 2,200-nm wavelength is a candidate band to distinguish Target from Torch. The difference in chlorophyll concentrations between Target and Torch, compared with leaf structural differences, is apparently the most important factor that would affect the infrared color film's tonal response to vegetation in the photographic sensitive region (500 to 900 nm).

  9. Liquid injection plasma deposition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Watkins, Arthur D.

    1999-01-01

    A liquid injection plasma torch deposition apparatus for depositing material onto a surface of a substrate may comprise a plasma torch for producing a jet of plasma from an outlet nozzle. A plasma confinement tube having an inlet end and an outlet end and a central bore therethrough is aligned with the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch so that the plasma jet is directed into the inlet end of the plasma confinement tube and emerges from the outlet end of the plasma confinement tube. The plasma confinement tube also includes an injection port transverse to the central bore. A liquid injection device connected to the injection port of the plasma confinement tube injects a liquid reactant mixture containing the material to be deposited onto the surface of the substrate through the injection port and into the central bore of the plasma confinement tube.

  10. Liquid injection plasma deposition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kong, P.C.; Watkins, A.D.

    1999-05-25

    A liquid injection plasma torch deposition apparatus for depositing material onto a surface of a substrate may comprise a plasma torch for producing a jet of plasma from an outlet nozzle. A plasma confinement tube having an inlet end and an outlet end and a central bore therethrough is aligned with the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch so that the plasma jet is directed into the inlet end of the plasma confinement tube and emerges from the outlet end of the plasma confinement tube. The plasma confinement tube also includes an injection port transverse to the central bore. A liquid injection device connected to the injection port of the plasma confinement tube injects a liquid reactant mixture containing the material to be deposited onto the surface of the substrate through the injection port and into the central bore of the plasma confinement tube. 8 figs.

  11. Beam Splitter For Welding-Torch Vision System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Compact welding torch equipped with along-the-torch vision system includes cubic beam splitter to direct preview light on weldment and to reflect light coming from welding scene for imaging. Beam splitter integral with torch; requires no external mounting brackets. Rugged and withstands vibrations and wide range of temperatures. Commercially available, reasonably priced, comes in variety of sizes and optical qualities with antireflection and interference-filter coatings on desired faces. Can provide 50 percent transmission and 50 percent reflection of incident light to exhibit minimal ghosting of image.

  12. Microwave plasma burner and temperature measurements in its flames

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Cho, Soon Cheon; Bang, Chan Uk; Shin, Dong Hun; Kim, Jong Hun; Uhm, Han Sup; Yi, Won Ju

    2006-05-15

    An apparatus for generating flames and more particularly the microwave plasma burner for generating high-temperature large-volume plasma flame was presented. The plasma burner is operated by injecting liquid hydrocarbon fuels into a microwave plasma torch in air discharge and by mixing the resultant gaseous hydrogen and carbon compounds with air or oxygen gas. The microwave plasma torch can instantaneously vaporize and decompose the hydrogen and carbon containing fuels. It was observed that the flame volume of the burner was more than 50 times that of the torch plasma. While the temperature of the torch plasma flame was only 550 K at a measurement point, that of the plasma-burner flame with the addition of 0.025 lpm (liters per minute) kerosene and 20 lpm oxygen drastically increased to about 1850 K. A preliminary experiment was carried out, measuring the temperature profiles of flames along the radial and axial directions.

  13. Schlieren technique applied to the arc temperature measurement in a high energy density cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Artana, G.; Kelly, H.

    2010-01-15

    Plasma temperature and radial density profiles of the plasma species in a high energy density cutting arc have been obtained by using a quantitative schlieren technique. A Z-type two-mirror schlieren system was used in this research. Due to its great sensibility such technique allows measuring plasma composition and temperature from the arc axis to the surrounding medium by processing the gray-level contrast values of digital schlieren images recorded at the observation plane for a given position of a transverse knife located at the exit focal plane of the system. The technique has provided a good visualization of the plasma flow emerging from the nozzle and its interactions with the surrounding medium and the anode. The obtained temperature values are in good agreement with those values previously obtained by the authors on the same torch using Langmuir probes.

  14. Comprehensive computer model for magnetron sputtering. II. Charged particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Francisco J. Dew, Steven K.; Field, David J.

    2014-11-01

    Discharges for magnetron sputter thin film deposition systems involve complex plasmas that are sensitively dependent on magnetic field configuration and strength, working gas species and pressure, chamber geometry, and discharge power. The authors present a numerical formulation for the general solution of these plasmas as a component of a comprehensive simulation capability for planar magnetron sputtering. This is an extensible, fully three-dimensional model supporting realistic magnetic fields and is self-consistently solvable on a desktop computer. The plasma model features a hybrid approach involving a Monte Carlo treatment of energetic electrons and ions, along with a coupled fluid model for thermalized particles. Validation against a well-known one-dimensional system is presented. Various strategies for improving numerical stability are investigated as is the sensitivity of the solution to various model and process parameters. In particular, the effect of magnetic field, argon gas pressure, and discharge power are studied.

  15. Thermal plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Boulos, M.I. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-12-01

    This paper is a review of the fundamental aspects involved in material processing using thermal plasma technology. The description of plasma-generating devices covers dc plasma torches, dc transferred arcs, radio-frequency (RF) inductively coupled plasma torches, and hybrid combinations of them. Emphasis is given to the identification of the basic energy-coupling mechanism in each case and the principal characteristics of the flow and temperature fields in the plasma. Materials-processing techniques using thermal plasmas are grouped in two broad categories, depending on the role played by the plasma in the process. Only typical examples are given in this review of each type of processes. The simplest and most widely used processes such as spheroidization, melting, deposition, and spray-coating make use of the plasma only as a high-temperature energy source. Thermal plasma technology is also used in applications involving chemical synthesis in which the plasma acts as a source of chemically active species.

  16. Henricks and Kregel display STS-78's Olympic torch - closeup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-78 Mission Commander Terence T. 'Tom' Henricks and Pilot Kevin R. Kregel display a replica of the Olympic torch that flew aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia during its record- setting 17-day mission during a July 7, 1996 ceremony held at the KSC Visitor Center to pay tribute to space center runners and others who participated in the Olympic Torch Relay. Henricks and Kregel presented the torch to members of the Olympic Committee at the ceremony after arriving at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility along with the rest of the STS-78 crew aboard Columbia at 8:37 a.m., EDT July 7, 1996. The Olympic torch arrived at KSC at 1:40 p.m. that day and was carried out to Launch Pad 39A by a team of 20 KSC runners.

  17. Henricks and Kregel display STS-78's Olympic torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-78 Mission Commander Terence T. 'Tom' Henricks and Pilot Kevin R. Kregel display a replica of the Olympic torch that flew aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia during its record- setting 17-day mission during a July 7, 1996 ceremony held at the KSC Visitor Center to pay tribute to space center runners and others who participated in the Olympic Torch Relay. Henricks and Kregel presented the torch to members of the Olympic Committee at the ceremony after arriving at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility along with the rest of the STS-78 crew aboard Columbia at 8:37 a.m., EDT July 7, 1996. The Olympic torch arrived at KSC at 1:40 p.m. that day and was carried out to Launch Pad 39A by a team of 20 KSC runners.

  18. Teaching "Torch Song": Gay Literature in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Marvin

    1993-01-01

    Presents methods and strategies for using gay literature in the English classroom, focusing on the experience of using Harvey Fierstein's play, "Torch Song Trilogy." Provides details about how the text was introduced and used in the classroom. (HB)

  19. 109. Detail view of structural frame supporting torch arm; cylindrical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    109. Detail view of structural frame supporting torch arm; cylindrical object in foreground is part of ventilating system. February 1984. - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York County, NY

  20. 250. VIEW OF FLAME AND TORCH PLATFORM SITTING AT THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    250. VIEW OF FLAME AND TORCH PLATFORM SITTING AT THE BASE OF FORT WOOD AFTER REMOVAL ON JULY 4, 1984, WITH SCAFFOLDED STATUE RISING IN BACKGROUND - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York County, NY

  1. 47. View of flame and torch platform sitting at the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. View of flame and torch platform sitting at the base of Fort Wood after removal on July 4, 1984, with scaffolded statue rising in background. October 1984. - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York County, NY

  2. Miniature oxygen-hydrogen cutting torch constructed from hypodermic needle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, P.

    1964-01-01

    A miniature cutting torch consisting of a main body member, upon which the hydrogen and oxygen containers are mounted, valves for controlling gas flow, and a hypodermic needle that acts as a mixing tube and flame tip is constructed.

  3. Simulation of gas particle flow in a HVOF torch

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Moore, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    A transient two-dimensional numerical simulation of Inconel spraying in an HVOF torch barrel has been performed. The gas flow is treated as a continuum multicomponent chemically reacting flow, while particles are modeled using a stochastic particle spray model, fully coupled to the gas flow. The calculated results agree well with experimental data, and show important statistical aspects of particle flow in the torch.

  4. Sublimation and combustion of coal particles in the erosion laser torch

    SciTech Connect

    Bulat, A.; Shumrikov, V.; Osenny, V.

    2005-07-01

    Rate of coal particles' combustion in low-temperature plasma is of interest both from application and scientific points of view. Necessity of knowing parameters of the process of coal particles' combustion in plasma torch with the temperature of 2500-3000 K is governed by arising a number of state-of-the-art technological tasks related to the problems of finding new methods of power production, generation of high-calorific synthetic gases and using carbon as a high temperature structural material in nuclear power engineering. The present work deals with a rate of combustion of the sorbed coal particles in the erosion laser torch formed by means of interaction of pulse laser radiation (wave length {lambda} = 1,06 {mu}m, power density j = 10{sup 5} - 10{sup 7} Wcm{sup 2} with coals of various grades (in the wide range of carbon concentrations (80-95 %)). Physical and mathematical modeling of the process of coal particles' sublimation and combustion in non-equilibrium plasma flows with weight-average temperature of 2500-3000 K showed a good convergence of results for the particles of 10-100 {mu}m diameter and satisfactory one for the particles of {gt} 250{mu}m diameter.

  5. An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron as metal vapor supply for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weichsel, T. Hartung, U.; Kopte, T.; Zschornack, G.; Kreller, M.; Silze, A.

    2014-05-15

    An inverted cylindrical sputter magnetron device has been developed. The magnetron is acting as a metal vapor supply for an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. FEM simulation of magnetic flux density was used to ensure that there is no critical interaction between both magnetic fields of magnetron and ECR ion source. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy measurements show an increase in electron density by one order of magnitude from 1 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3}, when the magnetron plasma is exposed to the magnetic mirror field of the ECR ion source. Electron density enhancement is also indicated by magnetron plasma emission photography with a CCD camera. Furthermore, photographs visualize the formation of a localized loss-cone - area, when the magnetron is operated at magnetic mirror field conditions. The inverted cylindrical magnetron supplies a metal atom load rate of R > 1 × 10{sup 18} atoms/s for aluminum, which meets the demand for the production of a milliampere Al{sup +} ion beam.

  6. Gaseous fueled torch apparatus and fueling module therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Czerwinski, K.S.; Gabany, E.; Sharma, S.S.; Turko, J.W.

    1988-10-11

    This patent describes a fueling module for supplying natural gas to a natural gas fueled torch apparatus including a torch adapted for use in cutting or welding operations, the torch apparatus further including a source of oxygen for supplying oxygen to the torch, and the torch being selectively operable for combustion of a mixture of natural gas and oxygen, the fueling module connectable to an electric power source and being supplying natural gas to the torch apparatus at an elevated pressure from a relatively low pressure natural gas supply system, the fueling module comprising: fueling module inlet means connectable in fluid communication with the natural gas supply system; compression means in fluid communication with the fueling module inlet means and selectively energizable for compressing the natural gas from the natural gas supply system in order to increase its pressure, the compression means having a compression intake in fluid communication with the fueling module inlet means and a compression discharge outlet for discharging compressed natural gas from the compression means; lubricant filter means in fluid communication with the compression discharge outlet for substantially trapping and collecting compression means lubricants from the compressed natural gas from the compression discharge outlet and for returning the collected compression means lubricants to the compression intake; cooling means in fluid communication with the compression discharge outlet means for reducing the temperature of the compressed natural gas.

  7. Deposition of copper coatings in a magnetron with liquid target

    SciTech Connect

    Tumarkin, A. V. Kaziev, A. V.; Kolodko, D. V.; Pisarev, A. A.; Kharkov, M. M.; Khodachenko, G. V.

    2015-12-15

    Copper coatings were deposited on monocrystalline Si substrates using a magnetron discharge with a liquid cathode in the metal vapour plasma. During the deposition, the bias voltage in the range from 0 V to–400 V was applied to the substrate. The prepared films were investigated by a scanning electron microscope, and their adhesive properties were studied using a scratch tester. It was demonstrated that the adhesion of the deposited films strongly depends on the bias voltage and varies in a wide range.

  8. Magnetron sputtering in rigid optical solar reflectors production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asainov, O. Kh; Bainov, D. D.; Krivobokov, V. P.; Sidelev, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetron sputtering was applied to meet the growing need for glass optical solar reflectors. This plasma method provided more uniform deposition of the silver based coating on glass substrates resulted in decrease of defective reflectors fraction down to 5%. For instance, such parameter of resistive evaporation was of 30%. Silver film adhesion to glass substrate was enhanced with indium tin oxide sublayer. Sunlight absorption coefficient of these rigid reflectors was 0.081-0.083.

  9. Geometrical Aspects of a Hollow-cathode Magnetron (HCM)

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Samuel, A.; Wang, Zhehui

    1998-11-01

    A hollow-cathode magnetron (HCM), built by surrounding a planar sputtering-magnetron cathode with a hollow-cathode structure (HCS), is operable at substantially lower pressures than its planar-magnetron counterpart. We have studied the dependence of magnetron operational parameters on the inner diameter D and length L of a cylindrical HCS. Only when L is greater than L sub zero, a critical length, is the HCM operable in the new low-pressure regime. The critical length varies with HCS inner diameter D. Explanations of the lower operational pressure regime, critical length, and plasma shape are proposed and compared with a one-dimension diffusion model for energetic or primary electron transport. At pressures above 1 mTorr, an electron-impact ionization model with Bohm diffusion at a temperature equivalent to one-half the primary electron energy and with an ambipolar constraint can explain the ion-electron pair creation required to sustain the discharge. The critical length L sub zero is determined by the magnetization length of the primary electrons.

  10. Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch

    SciTech Connect

    Rooney, Stephen J.

    2000-02-04

    A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

  11. Development of TORCH readout electronics for customised MCPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Cussans, D.; Fohl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros García, A.; Van Dijk, M.

    2016-04-01

    The TORCH detector is being developed for low-momentum particle identification, combining time-of-flight and Cherenkov techniques to achieve charged particle pi/K/p separation up to 10 GeV/c over a flight distance of 10m. This requires a timing resolution of 70 ps for single photons. Based on an existing scalable design, production and testing of a TORCH readout system has been undertaken over the past year, and a novel customized Micro Channel Plate (MCP) photomultiplier device with 128-channels has been instrumented. This paper will report on the development of the readout system which is being used to measure time-of-flight in a test-beam, and its performance. We will also discuss the communication and data alignment between the TORCH system and the TimePix3 telescope in order to provide track reconstruction.

  12. Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch

    DOEpatents

    Rooney, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

  13. Discharge current modes of high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhongzhen Xiao, Shu; Ma, Zhengyong; Cui, Suihan; Ji, Shunping; Pan, Feng; Tian, Xiubo; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-09-15

    Based on the production and disappearance of ions and electrons in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma near the target, the expression of the discharge current is derived. Depending on the slope, six possible modes are deduced for the discharge current and the feasibility of each mode is discussed. The discharge parameters and target properties are simplified into the discharge voltage, sputtering yield, and ionization energy which mainly affect the discharge plasma. The relationship between these factors and the discharge current modes is also investigated.

  14. Numerical simulation of oscillating magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palevsky, A.; Bekefi, G.; Drobot, A. T.

    1981-08-01

    The temporal evolution of the current, voltage, and RF fields in magnetron-type devices is simulated by a two-dimensional, electromagnetic, fully relativistic particle-in-cell code. The simulation allows for the complete geometry of the anode vane structure, space-charge-limited cathode emission and the external power source, and is applied to a 54-vane inverted relativistic magnetron at a voltage of 300 kV and a magnetic field of 0.17 T. Fields in the RF structure and the anode-cathode gap are solved from Maxwell's equations so that results contain all the two-dimensional resonances of the system, and the numerical solution yields a complete space-time history of the particle momenta. In the presence of strong RF fields, the conventional definition of voltages is found to be inappropriate, and a definition is developed to reduce to the conventional results.

  15. Plasma torch burns bright for fly-ash vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Tardy, P.; Labrot, M.; Pineau, D.

    1994-12-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration generates two main kinds of residues--bottom ash and fly ash. Bottom ash usually is nontoxic and can be disposed in nontoxic waste landfills or, as in France, used as road aggregates after passing toxicity characteristic leaching procedures tests. Fly ash consists of fine particles separated from exhaust gases in incinerator-gas cleaning systems. Fly ash generally contains heavy metals (such as lead, cadmium and mercury) and semivolatile organic compounds. These toxics are readily leachable and will pollute groundwater if carelessly disposed in landfills. Fly-ash storage regulations in Europe have become increasingly restrictive. For example, since December 1992, fly ash in France must be landfilled in special ''final waste storage centers.'' These new regulations and difficulties associated with opening new storage centers have resulted in a sharp rise in dumping costs. In this context, new treatment processes are being developed that eventually will enhance the value of the end-product. Vitrification yields the best results of all processing methods, because the end-product is chemically inert.

  16. Gas Metal Arc /GMA/ weld torch proximity control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkes, E. D.

    1969-01-01

    Adjustable transducer probe, which is attached to a welding torch and maintains a preset touch-to-work distance, accurately follows irregular surfaces, is less sensitive to heat and static interference, and has more positive response because of electro-mechanical control.

  17. Electrode support for gas arc welding torch having coaxial vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Richard W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An improved electrode mounting structure for a gas tungsten arc welding torch having a coaxial imaging system. The electrode mounting structure includes a support having a central hub and a plurality of spokes which extend from the hub generally radially with respect to the axis of the torch into supporting engagement with the interior walls of the torch. The spaces between the spokes are optical passages for transmission of light to form the image. A tubular collet holder is threadedly engaged at its upper end to the hub and extends downwardly toward the open end of the torch. The collet holder has an inwardly tapering constriction near its lower end. An electrode-retaining, tubular collet is mounted within the collet holder and has a longitudinally split and tapered end seating against the tapered constriction. A spring seats against the upper end of the collet and forces the split end against the tapered constriction to wedge the split end radially inwardly to grip the electrode within the collet.

  18. Torch ignition: Ideal for lean burn premixed-charge engines

    SciTech Connect

    Mavinahally, N.S. ); Assanis, D.N. ); Govinda Mallan, K.R.; Gopalakrishnan, K.V. )

    1994-10-01

    Sluggish flame initiation and propagation, and even potential misfiring, become major problems with lean-fueled, premixed-charge, spark-ignited engines. This work studies torch ignition as a means for improving combustion, fuel economy, and emissions of a retrofitted, large combustion chamber with nonideal spark plug location. A number of alternative configurations, employing different torch chamber designs, spark-plug locations, and materials, were tested under full-load and part-load conditions. Results indicate a considerable extension of the lean operating limit of the engine, especially under part-load conditions. In addition, torch ignition can lead to substantial thermal efficiency gains for either leaner or rich air-fuel ratios than the optimum for the conventional ignition system. On the richer side, in particular, the torch-ignited engine is capable of operating at maximum brake torque spark timings, rather than compromised, knock-limited spark timings used with conventional ignition. This translates into thermal efficiency improvements as high as 8% at an air-fuel ratio of 20:1 and full load.

  19. Properties of plasma flames sustained by microwaves and burning hydrocarbon fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2006-11-15

    Plasma flames made of atmospheric microwave plasma and a fuel-burning flame were presented and their properties were investigated experimentally. The plasma flame generator consists of a fuel injector and a plasma flame exit connected in series to a microwave plasma torch. The plasma flames are sustained by injecting hydrocarbon fuels into a microwave plasma torch in air discharge. The microwave plasma torch in the plasma flame system can burn a hydrocarbon fuel by high-temperature plasma and high atomic oxygen density, decomposing the hydrogen and carbon containing fuel. We present the visual observations of the sustained plasma flames and measure the gas temperature using a thermocouple device in terms of the gas-fuel mixture and flow rate. The plasma flame volume of the hydrocarbon fuel burners was more than approximately 30-50 times that of the torch plasma. While the temperature of the torch plasma flame was only 868 K at a measurement point, that of the diesel microwave plasma flame with the addition of 0.019 lpm diesel and 30 lpm oxygen increased drastically to about 2280 K. Preliminary experiments for methane plasma flame were also carried out, measuring the temperature profiles of flames along the radial and axial directions. Finally, we investigated the influence of the microwave plasma on combustion flame by observing and comparing OH molecular spectra for the methane plasma flame and methane flame only.

  20. Aligning Plasma-Arc Welding Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeff; Fairley, Mike

    1989-01-01

    Tool aids in alignment of oscillator probe on variable-polarity plasma-arc welding torch. Probe magnetically pulls arc from side to side as it moves along joint. Tensile strength of joint depends on alignment of weld bead and on alignment of probe. Operator installs new tool on front of torch body, levels it with built-in bubble glass, inserts probe in slot on tool, and locks probe in place. Procedure faster and easier and resulting alignment more accurate and repeatable.

  1. Oxy-gasoline torch. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Under the deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) Implementation Plan of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), non-recyclable process components and debris that are removed from buildings undergoing D and D are disposed of in an on-site disposal facility (OSDF). Critical to the design and operation of the FEMP`s OSDF are provisions to protect against subsidence of the OSDF`s cap. Subsidence of the cap could occur if void spaces within the OSDF were to collapse under the overburden of debris and the OSDF cap. Subsidence may create significant depressions in the OSDF`s cap in which rainwater could collect and eventually seep into the OSDF. To minimize voids in the FEMP`s OSDF, large metallic components are cut into smaller segments that can be arranged more compactly when placed in the OSDF. Component segmentation using an oxy-acetylene cutting torch was the baseline approach used by the FEMP`s D and D contractor on Plant 1, Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Services, Inc., for the dismantlement and size-reduction of large metal components. Although this technology has performed satisfactorily, improvements are sought in the areas of productivity, airborne contamination, safety, and cost. This demonstration investigated the feasibility of using an oxy-gasoline torch as an alternative to the baseline oxy-acetylene torch for segmenting D and D components. This report provides a comparative analysis of the cost and performance of the baseline oxy-acetylene torch currently used by B and W Services, Inc., and the innovative oxy-gasoline torch.

  2. An efficient magnetron transmitter for superconducting accelerators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kazakevich, G.; Lebedev, V.; Yakovlev, V.; Pavlov, V.

    2016-09-22

    A concept of a highly-efficient high-power magnetron transmitter allowing wide-band phase and the mid-frequency power control at the frequency of the locking signal is proposed. The proposal is aimed for powering Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities of intensity-frontier accelerators. The transmitter is intended to operate with phase and amplitude control feedback loops allowing suppression of microphonics and beam loading in the SRF cavities. The concept utilizes injectionlocked magnetrons controlled in phase by the locking signal supplied by a feedback system. The injection-locking signal pre-excites the magnetron and allows its operation below the critical voltage. This realizes control of the magnetron powermore » in a wide range by control of the magnetron current. Pre-excitation of the magnetron by the locking signal provides an output power range up to 10 dB. Experimental studies were carried out with 2.45 GHz, 1 kW, CW magnetrons. They demonstrated stable operation of the magnetrons and power control at a low noise level. In conclusion, an analysis of the kinetics of the drifting charge in the drift approximation substantiates the concept and the experimental results.« less

  3. Effect of torch jet direction on combustion and performance of a prechamber spark-ignition engine

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, H.; Chtsu, A.; Asanuma, T.

    1987-01-01

    To examine the effect of torch jet direction on the combustion characteristics and engine performances, a spark-ignition engine with each divided chamber having a torch nozzle of different flow direction is used by changing the torch nozzle area, prechamber volume and air-fuel ratio, while keeping the engine speed of 1000 rpm. Typical pressure diagrams for different torch jet directions are analyzed to obtain such combustion characteristics as the crank angles of combustion start and finish, heat release rate and mass burned fraction. The engine performances, e.g. mean effective pressure and specific fuel consumption, are also measured. As a result, it can be made clear not only the effect of torch jet direction on the combustion characteristics, but also the relationship between the combustion characteristics and the engine performances for different torch jet directions.

  4. Hard carbon coatings deposited by pulsed high current magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskomov, K. V.; Solov'ev, A. A.; Rabotkin, S. V.

    2014-12-01

    Hard (up to 17 GPa) carbon coatings are deposited onto face SiC bearings used in liquid pumps by pulsed high-current magnetron sputtering of graphite. As a result, the friction coefficient is decreased from 0.43 to 0.11 and the wear rate is decreased from 26 to 0.307 μm3 N-1 m-1, which increases the service life of the bearings by approximately three times. The deposited carbon coatings have a high hardness and wear resistance due to the generation of high-density (up to 1013 cm-3) plasma.

  5. STS-78 crew holds up Olympic torch at SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-78 Payload Commander Susan J. Helms (center) holds up an Olympic torch that was presented to the crew after they arrived at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. With Helms are (from left) Payload Specialist Robert Brenton Thirsk (Canadian Space Agency); Mission Specialist Charles E. Brady; Mission Commander Terence T. 'Tom' Henricks; Helms; Mission Specialist Richard M. Linnehan; Pilot Keven R. Kregel; and Payload Specialist Jean-Jacques Favier (French Space Agency). The crew will take the torch with them on their upcoming spaceflight and then present it upon their return to a representative of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic games (ACOG). The countdown clock began ticking earlier today toward the June 20 launch of the Space Shuttle Columbia on Mission STS- 78, the fifth Shuttle flight of 1996.

  6. Detection of TORCH pathogens in children with congenital cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bin; Yang, Yabo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between infection rates with TORCH pathogens including toxoplasma, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus (HSV) I and II and congenital cataracts. In total, the data from 69 children with congenital cataract treated at the Children's Hospital of the Zhejiang University School of Medicine between May 2006 and September 2013 were examined, including the complete serum test results for immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgM that target TORCH pathogenic antibodies. These results were compared with the antibody levels of 5,914 children in a control group. Using SPSS 19.0 software, variance equation Levene tests, mean equation t tests, and completely randomized design of four tables χ2 tests were applied. The HSV II IgG positivity rates significantly differed between the cataract and control groups. These results suggested that HSV may be one of the pathogenic viruses that leads to congenital cataracts. PMID:27446337

  7. Astronaut Andy Thomas holds facsimile Olympic torch like one to fly on STS-101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut Andy Thomas holds a facsimile of the Olympic torch that is being carried on Space Shuttle Atlantis during mission STS- 101. Thomas is from Australia, which is the site of the 2000 Olympics. He coordinated the effort to have the torch added to the manifest so that it would truly circle the Earth in the spirit of the worldwide sporting event. The Sydney Olympic Torch Relay will arrive in Australia on June 8. The games begin Sept. 1.

  8. A hybrid electron cyclotron resonance metal ion source with integrated sputter magnetron for the production of an intense Al⁺ ion beam.

    PubMed

    Weichsel, T; Hartung, U; Kopte, T; Zschornack, G; Kreller, M; Philipp, A

    2015-09-01

    A metal ion source prototype has been developed: a combination of magnetron sputter technology with 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source technology-a so called magnetron ECR ion source (MECRIS). An integrated ring-shaped sputter magnetron with an Al target is acting as a powerful metal atom supply in order to produce an intense current of singly charged metal ions. Preliminary experiments show that an Al(+) ion current with a density of 167 μA/cm(2) is extracted from the source at an acceleration voltage of 27 kV. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy were used to study the plasma states of the ion source: sputter magnetron, ECR, and MECRIS plasma. Electron density and temperature as well as Al atom density were determined as a function of microwave and sputter magnetron power. The effect of ECR heating is strongly pronounced in the center of the source. There the electron density is increased by one order of magnitude from 6 × 10(9) cm(-3) to 6 × 10(10) cm(-3) and the electron temperature is enhanced from about 5 eV to 12 eV, when the ECR plasma is ignited to the magnetron plasma. Operating the magnetron at constant power, it was observed that its discharge current is raised from 1.8 A to 4.8 A, when the ECR discharge was superimposed with a microwave power of 2 kW. At the same time, the discharge voltage decreased from about 560 V to 210 V, clearly indicating a higher plasma density of the MECRIS mode. The optical emission spectrum of the MECRIS plasma is dominated by lines of excited Al atoms and shows a significant contribution of lines arising from singly ionized Al. Plasma emission photography with a CCD camera was used to prove probe measurements and to identify separated plasma emission zones originating from the ECR and magnetron discharge.

  9. A hybrid electron cyclotron resonance metal ion source with integrated sputter magnetron for the production of an intense Al+ ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichsel, T.; Hartung, U.; Kopte, T.; Zschornack, G.; Kreller, M.; Philipp, A.

    2015-09-01

    A metal ion source prototype has been developed: a combination of magnetron sputter technology with 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source technology—a so called magnetron ECR ion source (MECRIS). An integrated ring-shaped sputter magnetron with an Al target is acting as a powerful metal atom supply in order to produce an intense current of singly charged metal ions. Preliminary experiments show that an Al+ ion current with a density of 167 μA/cm2 is extracted from the source at an acceleration voltage of 27 kV. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy were used to study the plasma states of the ion source: sputter magnetron, ECR, and MECRIS plasma. Electron density and temperature as well as Al atom density were determined as a function of microwave and sputter magnetron power. The effect of ECR heating is strongly pronounced in the center of the source. There the electron density is increased by one order of magnitude from 6 × 109 cm-3 to 6 × 1010 cm-3 and the electron temperature is enhanced from about 5 eV to 12 eV, when the ECR plasma is ignited to the magnetron plasma. Operating the magnetron at constant power, it was observed that its discharge current is raised from 1.8 A to 4.8 A, when the ECR discharge was superimposed with a microwave power of 2 kW. At the same time, the discharge voltage decreased from about 560 V to 210 V, clearly indicating a higher plasma density of the MECRIS mode. The optical emission spectrum of the MECRIS plasma is dominated by lines of excited Al atoms and shows a significant contribution of lines arising from singly ionized Al. Plasma emission photography with a CCD camera was used to prove probe measurements and to identify separated plasma emission zones originating from the ECR and magnetron discharge.

  10. Conversion of methane in a coaxial microwave torch

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Gushchin, P. A.; Davydov, A. M.; Ivanov, E. V.; Kossyi, I. A.; Misakyan, M. A.

    2009-11-15

    A microwave coaxial plasmatron (microwave torch) is used as a plasmachemical converter of methane into hydrogen and hydrocarbons. The measured energy cost of methane decomposition is close to its minimum theoretical value. Such a low energy cost is unsurpassed for reactors operating at atmospheric pressure. A model of the plasmachemical converter is constructed. The results of calculations in the frame-work of this model agree well with experimental data.

  11. Method for atmospheric pressure reactive atom plasma processing for surface modification

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Jeffrey W.

    2009-09-22

    Reactive atom plasma processing can be used to shape, polish, planarize and clean the surfaces of difficult materials with minimal subsurface damage. The apparatus and methods use a plasma torch, such as a conventional ICP torch. The workpiece and plasma torch are moved with respect to each other, whether by translating and/or rotating the workpiece, the plasma, or both. The plasma discharge from the torch can be used to shape, planarize, polish, and/or clean the surface of the workpiece, as well as to thin the workpiece. The processing may cause minimal or no damage to the workpiece underneath the surface, and may involve removing material from the surface of the workpiece.

  12. On the electron energy in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Sigurjonsson, P.; Larsson, P.; Lundin, D.; Helmersson, U.

    2009-06-15

    The temporal variation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) was measured with a Langmuir probe in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge at 3 and 20 mTorr pressures. In the HiPIMS discharge a high power pulse is applied to a planar magnetron giving a high electron density and highly ionized sputtered vapor. The measured EEDF is Maxwellian-like during the pulse; it is broader for lower discharge pressure and it becomes narrower as the pulse progresses. This indicates that the plasma cools as the pulse progresses, probably due to high metal content of the discharge.

  13. Experimental radiation cooled magnetrons for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. C.; Pollock, M.

    The heat disposal problem that occurs in the microwave generator of the Solar Power Satellite when it converts dc power from solar photovoltaic arrays into microwave power for transmission to earth is examined. A theoretical study is made of the radiation cooling of a magnetron directional amplifier, and some experimental data obtained from the QKH 2244 magnetron are presented. This instrument is an unpackaged microwave oven magnetron to which an anodized aluminum radiator has been attached and whose magnetic field is supplied by special samarium cobalt magnets.

  14. Development of magnetron sputtering simulator with GPU parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Ilyoup; Kim, Jihun; Bae, Junkyeong; Lee, Jinpil

    2014-12-01

    Sputtering devices are widely used in the semiconductor and display panel manufacturing process. Currently, a number of surface treatment applications using magnetron sputtering techniques are being used to improve the efficiency of the sputtering process, through the installation of magnets outside the vacuum chamber. Within the internal space of the low pressure chamber, plasma generated from the combination of a rarefied gas and an electric field is influenced interactively. Since the quality of the sputtering and deposition rate on the substrate is strongly dependent on the multi-physical phenomena of the plasma regime, numerical simulations using PIC-MCC (Particle In Cell, Monte Carlo Collision) should be employed to develop an efficient sputtering device. In this paper, the development of a magnetron sputtering simulator based on the PIC-MCC method and the associated numerical techniques are discussed. To solve the electric field equations in the 2-D Cartesian domain, a Poisson equation solver based on the FDM (Finite Differencing Method) is developed and coupled with the Monte Carlo Collision method to simulate the motion of gas particles influenced by an electric field. The magnetic field created from the permanent magnet installed outside the vacuum chamber is also numerically calculated using Biot-Savart's Law. All numerical methods employed in the present PIC code are validated by comparison with analytical and well-known commercial engineering software results, with all of the results showing good agreement. Finally, the developed PIC-MCC code is parallelized to be suitable for general purpose computing on graphics processing unit (GPGPU) acceleration, so as to reduce the large computation time which is generally required for particle simulations. The efficiency and accuracy of the GPGPU parallelized magnetron sputtering simulator are examined by comparison with the calculated results and computation times from the original serial code. It is found that

  15. Magnetron sputtering of copper on thermosensitive polymer materials of the gas centrifuge rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, V.; Senchenkov, S.; Titov, D.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetron sputtering is the well-known and widely-used deposition technique for coating versatile high-quality and well-adhered films. However, the technology has some limitations, caused by high temperatures on the coating surface. The paper is devoted to the experimental development of a process of magnetron sputtering of copper on a surface coated with a thermosensitive polymer made of carbon fiber with epoxide binder. This process is applied for balancing a rotor of a gas centrifuge for isotope separation. The optimum operating parameters of the process are found and discussed. They were in quantitative agreement with data obtained by means of non-stationary modeling based on a global description of plasma in the typical geometry of the magnetron discharges obtained in independent research. The structure of the resulting layer is investigated.

  16. Peer-to-Peer Magnetron Locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Edward Jeffrey

    The viability of coherent power combination of multiple high-efficiency, moderate power magnetrons requires a thorough understanding of frequency and phase control. Injection locking of conventional magnetrons, and other types of oscillators, employing a master-to-slave configuration has been studied theoretically and experimentally. This dissertation focuses on the peer-to-peer locking, where each oscillator acts as a master of and slave to all others, between two conventional magnetrons, where the general condition for locking was recently derived. The experiments performed on peer-to-peer locking of two 1-kW magnetrons verify the recently developed theory on the condition under which the two nonlinear oscillators may be locked to a common frequency and relative phase. This condition reduces to Adler's classical locking condition (master-slave) if the coupling is one way. Dependent on the degree of coupling, the frequency of oscillation when locking occurs was found to not necessarily lie between the two magnetrons' free running frequencies. Likewise, when the locking condition was violated, the beat of the spectrum was not necessarily found to be equal to the difference between the free running frequencies. The frequency of oscillation and relative phase between the two magnetrons when locking did occur were found to correspond to one of two solution modes given by the recent theory. The accessibility of the two possible modes is yet to be determined. This work was supported by ONR, AFRL, AFOSR, L-3 Communications Electron Devices Division and Northrop-Grumman Corporation.

  17. Congenital TORCH Infections in Infants and Young Children: Neurodevelopmental Sequelae and Implications for Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, M. Katherine; Sandall, Susan R.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes TORCH infections, a congenital cluster of infections including toxoplasmosis, syphilis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, and herpes which often results in developmental disabilities for infected children. Methods of transmission, incidence, and developmental outcomes for common TORCH infections are described, as are program…

  18. Enhancing a service life of torch components for MIG/MAG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filonov, A. V.; Kryukov, A. V.; Galimov, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    The paper analyzes the main vulnerable elements of torches used in mechanized gas-shielded welding. Particular attention is given to the gas nozzle designs, materials they are made of, and other welding torch elements exposed to increased electrical and thermal stresses during the welding process.

  19. Hydrogen and Cesium Monitor for H- Magnetron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; Bollinger, Dan; Schupbach, Brian; Seiya, Kiyomi

    2014-07-01

    The relative concentration of cesium to hydrogen in the plasma of a H- magnetron source is an important parameter for reliable operations. If there is too much cesium, the surfaces of the source become contaminated with it and sparking occurs. If there is too little cesium then the plasma cannot be sustained. In order to monitor these two elements, a spectrometer has been built and installed on a test and operating source that looks at the plasma. It is hypothesized that the concentration of each element in the plasma is proportional to the intensity of their spectral lines.

  20. Regularities pertinent to heat transfer between torch gas layers and steam boiler firebox waterwalls. Part I. Geometrical and physical torch model as a source of heat radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, A. N.

    2014-09-01

    The progress seen in the 19th-21st centuries in the development of methods for calculating heat transfer in torch furnaces, fireboxes, and combustion chambers is analyzed. Throughout the 20th century, calculations of heat transfer were carried out based on the law for radiation from solid bodies deduced by Y. Stefan and L. Boltzmann. It is shown that the use of this law for calculating heat transfer of a torch (a gaseous source of radiation) in heating furnaces and power-generating installations leads to incorrect results. It is substantiated that there is crisis of methods for calculating heat transfer in torch furnaces and power-generating installations. Geometrical and physical torch models in the form of radiating cylindrical gas volumes as sources of heat radiation are proposed for overcoming this crisis.

  1. Magnetron with flux switching cathode and method of operation

    DOEpatents

    Aaron, D.B.; Wiley, J.D.

    1989-09-12

    A magnetron sputtering apparatus is formed with a plurality of cells each for generating an independent magnetic field within a different region in the chamber of the apparatus. Each magnetic field aids in maintaining an ion plasma in the respective region of the chamber. One of a plurality of sputtering material targets is positioned on an electrode adjacent to each region so that said ions strike the target ejecting some of the target material. By selectively generating each magnetic field, the ion plasma may be moved from region to region to sputter material from different targets. The sputtered material becomes deposited on a substrate mounted on another electrode within the chamber. The duty cycle of each cell can be dynamically varied during the deposition to produce a layer having a graded composition throughout its thickness. 5 figs.

  2. Magnetron with flux switching cathode and method of operation

    DOEpatents

    Aaron, David B.; Wiley, John D.

    1989-01-01

    A magnetron sputtering apparatus is formed with a plurality of cells each for generating an independent magnetic field within a different region in the chamber of the apparatus. Each magnetic field aids in maintaining an ion plasma in the respective region of the chamber. One of a plurality of sputtering material targets is positioned on an electrode adjacent to each region so that said ions strike the target ejecting some of the target material. By selectively generating each magnetic field, the ion plasma may be moved from region to region to sputter material from different targets. The sputtered material becomes deposited on a substrate mounted on another electrode within the chamber. The duty cycle of each cell can be dynamically varied during the deposition to produce a layer having a graded composition throughout its thickness.

  3. A review comparing cathodic arcs and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, André

    2014-09-02

    In this study, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) has been in the center of attention over the last years as it is an emerging physical vapor deposition (PVD) technology that combines advantages of magnetron sputtering with various forms of energetic deposition of films such as ion plating and cathodic arc plasma deposition. It should not come at a surprise that many extension and variations of HiPIMS make use, intentionally or unintentionally, of previously discovered approaches to film processing such as substrate surface preparation by metal ion sputtering and phased biasing for film texture and stress control. Therefore, in this review, an overview is given on some historical developments and features of cathodic arc and HiPIMS plasmas, showing commonalities and differences. To limit the scope, emphasis is put on plasma properties, as opposed to surveying the vast literature on specific film materials and their properties.

  4. A review comparing cathodic arcs and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anders, André

    2014-09-02

    In this study, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) has been in the center of attention over the last years as it is an emerging physical vapor deposition (PVD) technology that combines advantages of magnetron sputtering with various forms of energetic deposition of films such as ion plating and cathodic arc plasma deposition. It should not come at a surprise that many extension and variations of HiPIMS make use, intentionally or unintentionally, of previously discovered approaches to film processing such as substrate surface preparation by metal ion sputtering and phased biasing for film texture and stress control. Therefore, in thismore » review, an overview is given on some historical developments and features of cathodic arc and HiPIMS plasmas, showing commonalities and differences. To limit the scope, emphasis is put on plasma properties, as opposed to surveying the vast literature on specific film materials and their properties.« less

  5. Improved Growth Of Diamond Films From Oxyacetylene Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Floyd E., III

    1995-01-01

    Two modifications proposed to improve nucleation and growth of diamond films on surfaces by use of oxyacetylene torch. In one modification, carbon monoxide added to fuel gas; in other, carbon monoxide, methane, and oxygen added in synchronized pulses. Second modification intended not only to improve nucleation and growth of diamond films but also makes films more nearly homogeneous over areas larger than spots of such film grown by oxygen/acetylene-growth technique. Modified technique enables deposition of diamond films on alternative materials-in particular, copper.

  6. Effect of magnetic field strength on deposition rate and energy flux in a dc magnetron sputtering system

    SciTech Connect

    Ekpe, Samuel D.; Jimenez, Francisco J.; Field, David J.; Davis, Martin J.; Dew, Steven K.

    2009-11-15

    Variations in the magnetic field strongly affect the plasma parameters in a magnetron sputtering system. This in turn affects the throughput as well as the energy flux to the substrate. The variation in the magnetic field in this study, for a dc magnetron process, is achieved by shifting the magnet assembly slightly away from the target. Measurements of the plasma parameters show that while the electron density at the substrate increases with decrease in magnetic field, the electron temperature decreases. The cooling of the electron temperature is consistent with results reported elsewhere. The deposition rate per input magnetron power is found to increase slightly with the decrease in magnetic field for the process conditions considered in this study. Results suggest that the energy flux to the substrate tends to show a general decrease with the shift in the magnet assembly.

  7. Systems Analysis for Thermal Infrared ` THz Torch' Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fangjing; Sun, Jingye; Brindley, Helen E.; Liang, Xiaoxin; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2015-05-01

    The ` THz Torch' concept was recently introduced by the authors for providing secure wireless communications over short distances within the thermal infrared (10-100 THz). Unlike conventional systems, thermal infrared can exploit front-end thermodynamics with engineered blackbody radiation. For the first time, a detailed power link budget analysis is given for this new form of wireless link. The mathematical modeling of a short end-to-end link is provided, which integrates thermodynamics into conventional signal and noise power analysis. As expected from the Friis formula for noise, it is found that the noise contribution from the pyroelectric detector dominates intrinsic noise. From output signal and noise voltage measurements, experimental values for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are obtained and compared with calculated predictions. As with conventional communications systems, it is shown for the first time that the measured SNR and measured bit error rate found with this thermodynamics-based system resembles classical empirical models. Our system analysis can serve as an invaluable tool for the development of thermal infrared systems, accurately characterizing each individual channel and, thus, enables the performance of multi-channel ` THz Torch' systems to be optimized.

  8. Evaluation of a torch ignition system for propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Robert Joseph

    In recent years NASA has had a renewed interest in oxygen and methane as propellants for propulsion. The drive for this combination comes from several factors including ease of land-based storage, handling safety, in situ resource utilization, and a relatively clean burning process when compared with the widely used hypergolic propellants. This project is part of a larger goal of the Center for Space Exploration Technology Research (cSETR) to better understand all aspects of using LOX/CH4 propellants to create future hardware that is specially optimized for these propellants. This paper discusses the literature background and reasons that led to the design of a swirl torch igniter that uses a spark ignition system meant to be used as a main engine ignition source. The main goal is to create a flammability map for all phases of propellant inlet conditions to determine what temperature, pressure, and flow rate combinations will lead to reliable and repeatable ignition. This comes from the contemplation that the torch igniter will be fed from the main engine's tank boil off to eliminate the need for extra tanks and to reduce the overall weight of the propulsion system. The current data encompasses flammability maps for three out of six combinations as well as the discussion of design changes that lead to successful ignition of liquid propellants. Possible design changes as well as the goal of future tests are also discussed.

  9. Stability of Brillouin flow in planar, conventional, and inverted magnetrons

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, D. H.; Lau, Y. Y.; Greening, G.; Wong, P.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Hoff, B. W.

    2015-08-15

    The Brillouin flow is the prevalent flow in crossed-field devices. We systematically study its stability in the conventional, planar, and inverted magnetron geometry. To investigate the intrinsic negative mass effect in Brillouin flow, we consider electrostatic modes in a nonrelativistic, smooth bore magnetron. We found that the Brillouin flow in the inverted magnetron is more unstable than that in a planar magnetron, which in turn is more unstable than that in the conventional magnetron. Thus, oscillations in the inverted magnetron may startup faster than the conventional magnetron. This result is consistent with simulations, and with the negative mass property in the inverted magnetron configuration. Inclusion of relativistic effects and electromagnetic effects does not qualitatively change these conclusions.

  10. Fundamental study of Ti feedstock evaporation and the precursor formation process in inductively coupled thermal plasmas during TiO2 nanopowder synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Naoto; Tanaka, Yasunori; Kita, K.; Ishisaka, Y.; Uesugi, Y.; Ishijima, T.; Sueyasu, S.; Nakamura, K.

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional spectroscopic observations were conducted for an inductively coupled thermal plasma (ICTP) torch during TiO2 nanopowder synthesis. The feedstock was injected intermittently into the ICTP torch to investigate the Ti feedstock evaporation process clearly and to elucidate the formation process of precursor species. Spatiotemporal distributions of Ti atomic lines and TiO spectra were observed simultaneously inside the plasma torch with the observation system developed. The observation results showed that the injected Ti feedstock was evaporated to form high-density Ti atomic vapour in the torch, and that the generated Ti atomic vapour is transported and diffused by gas flow and the density gradient. In addition, TiO molecular vapour was generated almost simultaneously around the on-axis region in the torch.

  11. Mathematical modeling of plasma deposition and hardening of coatings-switched electrical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrmetov, A. M.; Sharifullin, S. N.; Pustovalov, AS

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of simulation of plasma deposition and hardening of coatings in modulating the electrical parameters. Mathematical models are based on physical models of gas-dynamic mechanisms more dynamic and thermal processes of the plasma jet. As an example the modeling of dynamic processes of heterogeneous plasma jet, modulated current pulses indirect arc plasma torch.

  12. Asymmetric particle fluxes from drifting ionization zones in sputtering magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjan, Matjaž; Franz, Robert; Anders, André

    2014-04-01

    Electron and ion fluxes from direct current and high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (dcMS and HiPIMS) plasmas were measured in the plane of the target surface. Biased collector probes and a particle energy and mass analyzer showed asymmetric emission of electrons and of singly and doubly charged ions. For both HiPIMS and dcMS discharges, higher fluxes of all types of particles were observed in the direction of the electrons' E × B drift. These results are put in the context with ionization zones that drift over the magnetron's racetrack. The measured currents of time-resolving collector probes suggest that a large fraction of the ion flux originates from drifting ionization zones, while energy-resolving mass spectrometry indicates that a large fraction of the ion energy is due to acceleration by an electric field. This supports the recently proposed hypothesis that each ionization zone is associated with a negative-positive-negative space charge structure, thereby producing an electric field that accelerates ions from the location where they were formed.

  13. Elementary surface processes during reactive magnetron sputtering of chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Monje, Sascha; Corbella, Carles Keudell, Achim von

    2015-10-07

    The elementary surface processes occurring on chromium targets exposed to reactive plasmas have been mimicked in beam experiments by using quantified fluxes of Ar ions (400–800 eV) and oxygen atoms and molecules. For this, quartz crystal microbalances were previously coated with Cr thin films by means of high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering. The measured growth and etching rates were fitted by flux balance equations, which provided sputter yields of around 0.05 for the compound phase and a sticking coefficient of O{sub 2} of 0.38 on the bare Cr surface. Further fitted parameters were the oxygen implantation efficiency and the density of oxidation sites at the surface. The increase in site density with a factor 4 at early phases of reactive sputtering is identified as a relevant mechanism of Cr oxidation. This ion-enhanced oxygen uptake can be attributed to Cr surface roughening and knock-on implantation of oxygen atoms deeper into the target. This work, besides providing fundamental data to control oxidation state of Cr targets, shows that the extended Berg's model constitutes a robust set of rate equations suitable to describe reactive magnetron sputtering of metals.

  14. Analysis of peer-to-peer locking of magnetrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pengvanich, P.; Lau, Y. Y.; Cruz, E.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Hoff, B.; Luginsland, J. W.

    2008-10-15

    The condition for mutual, or peer-to-peer, locking of two magnetrons is derived. This condition reduces to Adler's classical phase-locking condition in the limit where one magnetron becomes the 'master' and the other becomes the 'slave.' The formulation is extended to the peer-to-peer locking of N magnetrons, under the assumption that the electromagnetic coupling among the N magnetrons is modeled by an N-port network.

  15. TORCH - Cherenkov and Time-of-Flight PID Detector for the LHCb Upgrade at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föhl, K.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Conneely, T.; Cussans, D.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Milnes, J.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros Garcì a, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-05-01

    TORCH is a large-area precision time-of-flight detector, based on Cherenkov light production and propagation in a quartz radiator plate, which is read out at its edges. TORCH is proposed for the LHCb experiment at CERN to provide positive particle identification for kaons, and is currently in the Research-and-Development phase. A brief overview of the micro-channel plate photon sensor development, the custom-made electronics, and an introduction to the current test beam activities is given. Optical readout solutions are presented for the potential use of BaBar DIRC bar boxes as part of the TORCH configuration in LHCb.

  16. Multi-frequency recirculating planar magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greening, Geoffrey B.; Jordan, Nicholas M.; Exelby, Steven C.; Simon, David H.; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, Ronald M.

    2016-08-01

    The multi-frequency recirculating planar magnetron (MFRPM) is the first magnetron capable of simultaneous generation of significantly different output frequencies (1 and 2 GHz) in a single operating pulse. Design and simulation of a prototype MFRPM were followed by hardware fabrication and experimental verification using the Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator with a Ceramic insulator at -300 kV, 1-5 kA, and 0.14-0.23 T axial magnetic field. Preliminary results demonstrated simultaneous generation of microwave pulses near 1 GHz and 2 GHz at powers up to 44 MW and 21 MW, respectively, with peak total efficiencies up to 9%.

  17. Probe measurements of magnetron discharge parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karzin, V.; Smirnov, V.

    2016-07-01

    Langmuir probe measurements have been carried out in a positive column discharge of a planar magnetron with a titanium target. In this work concentration and temperature of electrons is measured in positive column of magnetron discharge with Langmuir probe. Concentration of electrons is found to be on the level of 1016 m-3 at a notable distance (over 200 mm). Two groups of electrons exist: «cold» and «hot» with average temperature of 16 000 and 41 000 K respectively. Dependence of discharge parameters on working gas pressure is measured.

  18. Observations of a gradual transition between Ps 6 activity with auroral torches and surgelike pulsations during strong geomagnetic disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steen, A.; Collis, P. N.; Evans, D.; Kremser, G.; Capelle, S.; Rees, D.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a long-lasting large-amplitude pulsation event, which occurred on January 10, 1983 in the ionosphere and magnetosphere and was characterized by Steen and Rees (1983). Over the 4-h period (0200-0600 UT), the characteristics of the pulsations in the ionosphere changed from being Ps 6 auroral torches toward substorms and back to Ps 6. At GEO, the corresponding characteristics were a modulation of the high-energy particle intensity and plasma dropouts. Based on the ideas presented by Rostoker and Samson (1984), an interpretation of the event is offered, according to which the pulsations are caused by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability during an interval of strong magnetospheric convection. On the basis of this explanation, a new interpretation of the substorm time sequence is proposed.

  19. Elimination of dimethyl methylphosphonate by plasma flame made of microwave plasma and burning hydrocarbon fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, S. C.; Uhm, H. S.; Hong, Y. C.; Park, Y. G.; Park, J. S.

    2008-06-01

    Elimination of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) in liquid phase was studied by making use of a microwave plasma burner, exhibiting a safe removal capability of stockpiled chemical weapons. The microwave plasma burner consisted of a fuel injector and a plasma flame exit connected in series to a microwave plasma torch. The burner flames were sustained by injecting hydrocarbon fuels into the microwave plasma torch in air discharge. The Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated near perfect elimination of DMMP in the microwave plasma burner. This was confirmed by gas chromatography spectra as supporting data, revealing the disappearance of even intermediary compounds in the process of DMMP destruction. The experimental results and the physical configuration of the microwave plasma burner may provide an effective means of on-site removal of chemical warfare agents found on a battlefield.

  20. Elimination of dimethyl methylphosphonate by plasma flame made of microwave plasma and burning hydrocarbon fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S. C.; Uhm, H. S.; Hong, Y. C.; Park, Y. G.; Park, J. S.

    2008-06-15

    Elimination of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) in liquid phase was studied by making use of a microwave plasma burner, exhibiting a safe removal capability of stockpiled chemical weapons. The microwave plasma burner consisted of a fuel injector and a plasma flame exit connected in series to a microwave plasma torch. The burner flames were sustained by injecting hydrocarbon fuels into the microwave plasma torch in air discharge. The Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated near perfect elimination of DMMP in the microwave plasma burner. This was confirmed by gas chromatography spectra as supporting data, revealing the disappearance of even intermediary compounds in the process of DMMP destruction. The experimental results and the physical configuration of the microwave plasma burner may provide an effective means of on-site removal of chemical warfare agents found on a battlefield.

  1. Oxygen-hydrogen torch is a small-scale steam generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskell, C. E.

    1966-01-01

    Standard oxygen-hydrogen torch generates steam for corrosion-rate analysis of various metals. The steam is generated through local combustion inside a test chamber under constant temperature and pressure control.

  2. Development, characterization and beam tests of a small-scale TORCH prototype module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo García, L.; Brook, N.; Conneely, T.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Milnes, J.; Piedigrossi, D.; Ros García, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-05-01

    Within the TORCH (Time Of internally Reflected CHerenkov light) R&D project, a small-scale TORCH prototype module is currently under study. Circular-shaped micro-channel plate photon detectors with finely segmented square anodes (32 × 32 channels) have been produced for TORCH requirements in industrial partnership. A new generation of custom multi-channel electronics based on the 32-channel NINO and HPTDC ASICs has been developed. The performance of the photon detector coupled to these customized electronics has been assessed in the laboratory and is reported on. A time resolution of 80 ps and a spatial resolution of 0.03 mm have been measured. Finally, tests of the TORCH prototype module illuminated with laser light and in a charged particle beam will be highlighted.

  3. Investigation of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharge using fast ICCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecimovic, Ante

    2012-10-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) combines impulse glow discharges at power levels up to the MW range with conventional magnetron cathodes to achieve a highly ionised sputtered flux. The dynamics of the HIPIMS discharge was investigated using fast Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) camera. In the first experiment the HIPIMS plasma was recorded from the side with goal to analyse the plasma intensity using Abel inversion to obtain the emissivity maps of the plasma species. Resulting emissivity maps provide the information on the spatial distribution of Ar and sputtered material and evolution of the plasma chemistry above the cathode. In the second experiment the plasma emission was recorded with camera facing the target. The images show that the HIPIMS plasma develops drift wave type instabilities characterized by well defined regions of high and low plasma emissivity along the racetrack of the magnetron. The instabilities cause periodic shifts in the floating potential. The structures rotate in ExB direction at velocities of 10 kms-1 and frequencies up to 200 kHz. The high emissivity regions comprise Ar and metal ion emission with strong Ar and metal neutral emission depletion. A detailed analysis of the temporal evolution of the saturated instabilities using four consequently triggered fast ICCD cameras is presented. Furthermore working gas pressure and discharge current variation showed that the shape and the speed of the instability strongly depend on the working gas and target material combination. In order to better understand the mechanism of the instability, different optical interference band pass filters (of metal and gas atom, and ion lines) were used to observe the spatial distribution of each species within the instability.

  4. Factors Affecting the Capture Efficiency of a Fume Extraction Torch for Gas Metal Arc Welding.

    PubMed

    Bonthoux, Francis

    2016-07-01

    Welding fumes are classified as Group 2B 'possibly carcinogenic' and this prompts to the implementation of local exhaust ventilation (LEV). The fume extraction torch with LEV integrated into the tool is the most attractive solution but its capture efficiency is often disappointing in practice. This study assesses the main parameters affecting fume capture efficiency namely the extraction flow rate, the positioning of the suction openings on the torch, the angle of inclination of the torch to the workpiece during welding, the metal transfer modes, and the welding deposition rate. The theoretical velocity induced by suction, estimated from the extraction flow rate and the position of the suction openings, is the main parameter affecting effectiveness of the device. This is the design parameter and its value should never be <0.25 m s(-1) The angle of the torch relative to the workpiece also has a great deal of influence. To improve efficiency, work station layouts need to favour positions where the torch is held with angles closer to perpendicular (<15°). Welding with high deposition rates (>1.1g s(-1)) and spray transfer leads to low capture efficiency if induced velocities are <0.5 m s(-1) The results of the study can be used in the design of integrated on-torch extraction systems and provide information for fixing system objectives. PMID:27074798

  5. Factors Affecting the Capture Efficiency of a Fume Extraction Torch for Gas Metal Arc Welding.

    PubMed

    Bonthoux, Francis

    2016-07-01

    Welding fumes are classified as Group 2B 'possibly carcinogenic' and this prompts to the implementation of local exhaust ventilation (LEV). The fume extraction torch with LEV integrated into the tool is the most attractive solution but its capture efficiency is often disappointing in practice. This study assesses the main parameters affecting fume capture efficiency namely the extraction flow rate, the positioning of the suction openings on the torch, the angle of inclination of the torch to the workpiece during welding, the metal transfer modes, and the welding deposition rate. The theoretical velocity induced by suction, estimated from the extraction flow rate and the position of the suction openings, is the main parameter affecting effectiveness of the device. This is the design parameter and its value should never be <0.25 m s(-1) The angle of the torch relative to the workpiece also has a great deal of influence. To improve efficiency, work station layouts need to favour positions where the torch is held with angles closer to perpendicular (<15°). Welding with high deposition rates (>1.1g s(-1)) and spray transfer leads to low capture efficiency if induced velocities are <0.5 m s(-1) The results of the study can be used in the design of integrated on-torch extraction systems and provide information for fixing system objectives.

  6. Factors Affecting the Capture Efficiency of a Fume Extraction Torch for Gas Metal Arc Welding

    PubMed Central

    Bonthoux, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Welding fumes are classified as Group 2B ‘possibly carcinogenic’ and this prompts to the implementation of local exhaust ventilation (LEV). The fume extraction torch with LEV integrated into the tool is the most attractive solution but its capture efficiency is often disappointing in practice. This study assesses the main parameters affecting fume capture efficiency namely the extraction flow rate, the positioning of the suction openings on the torch, the angle of inclination of the torch to the workpiece during welding, the metal transfer modes, and the welding deposition rate. The theoretical velocity induced by suction, estimated from the extraction flow rate and the position of the suction openings, is the main parameter affecting effectiveness of the device. This is the design parameter and its value should never be <0.25 m s−1. The angle of the torch relative to the workpiece also has a great deal of influence. To improve efficiency, work station layouts need to favour positions where the torch is held with angles closer to perpendicular (<15°). Welding with high deposition rates (>1.1g s−1) and spray transfer leads to low capture efficiency if induced velocities are <0.5 m s−1. The results of the study can be used in the design of integrated on-torch extraction systems and provide information for fixing system objectives. PMID:27074798

  7. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: THE PLASMA CENTRIFUGAL FURNACE RETECH, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The plasma centrifugal furnace is a thermal technology which uses the heat generated from a plasma torch to decontaminate metal and organic contaminated waste. This is accomplished by melting metal-bearing solids and, in the process, thermally destroying organic contaminants. The...

  8. Discharge Physics of High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2010-10-13

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is pulsed sputtering where the peak power exceeds the time-averaged power by typically two orders of magnitude. The peak power density, averaged over the target area, can reach or exceed 107 W/m2, leading to plasma conditions that make ionization of the sputtered atoms very likely. A brief review of HIPIMS operation is given in a tutorial manner, illustrated by some original data related to the self-sputtering of niobium in argon and krypton. Emphasis is put on the current-voltage-time relationships near the threshold of self-sputtering runaway. The great variety of current pulse shapes delivers clues on the very strong gas rarefaction, self-sputtering runaway conditions, and the stopping of runaway due to the evolution of atom ionization and ion return probabilities as the gas plasma is replaced by metal plasma. The discussions are completed by considering instabilities and the special case of ?gasless? self-sputtering.

  9. Electron beam manipulation, injection and acceleration in plasma wakefield accelerators by optically generated plasma density spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, Georg; Karger, Oliver S.; Knetsch, Alexander; Xi, Yunfeng; Deng, Aihua; Rosenzweig, James B.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Smith, Jonathan; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, Dino A.; Manahan, Grace G.; Hidding, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    We discuss considerations regarding a novel and robust scheme for optically triggered electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators [1]. In this technique, a transversely propagating focused laser pulse ignites a quasi-stationary plasma column before the arrival of the plasma wake. This localized plasma density enhancement or optical "plasma torch" distorts the blowout during the arrival of the electron drive bunch and modifies the electron trajectories, resulting in controlled injection. By changing the gas density, and the laser pulse parameters such as beam waist and intensity, and by moving the focal point of the laser pulse, the shape of the plasma torch, and therefore the generated trailing beam, can be tuned easily. The proposed method is much more flexible and faster in generating gas density transitions when compared to hydrodynamics-based methods, and it accommodates experimentalists needs as it is a purely optical process and straightforward to implement.

  10. Alfven's critical ionization velocity observed in high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Brenning, N.; Lundin, D.

    2012-09-15

    Azimuthally rotating dense plasma structures, spokes, have recently been detected in several high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) devices used for thin film deposition and surface treatment, and are thought to be important for plasma buildup, energizing of electrons, as well as cross-B transport of charged particles. In this work, the drift velocities of these spokes are shown to be strongly correlated with the critical ionization velocity, CIV, proposed by Alfven. It is proposed as the most promising approach in combining the CIV and HiPIMS research fields is to focus on the role of spokes in the process of electron energization.

  11. RF Reactive Magnetron Sputter Deposition of Silicon Sub-Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hattum, E. D.

    2007-01-01

    RF reactive magnetron plasma sputter deposition of silicon sub oxide E.D. van Hattum Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Utrecht University The work described in the thesis has been inspired and stimulated by the use of SiOx layers in the direct inductive printing technology, where the SiOx layer is used as the charge retention layer on the drums for copying and printing devices. The thesis describes investigations of the plasma and of processes taking place on the sputter target and on the SiOx growth surface in the room temperature, RF reactive magnetron plasma sputter deposition technology. The sputtering target consists of silicon and the reactive atmosphere consists of an Ar/O2 mixture. The composition of the grown SiOx layers has been varied between x=0 and x=2 by variation of the O2 partial pressure. The characteristics of the growth process have been related to the nanostructural properties of the grown films. The deposition system enables the characterisation of the plasma (Langmuir probe, energy resolved mass spectrometer) and of the growing film (Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD), Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy) and is connected to a beamline of a 6MV tandem van de Graaff accelerator. Also Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy have been applied. It is shown how ERD can be used as a real-time in-situ technique. The thesis presents spatially resolved values of the ion density, electron temperature and the quasi-electrostatic potential, determined using a Langmuir probe. The plasma potential has a maximum about 2 cm from the cathode erosion area, and decreases (more than 200 V typically) towards the floating sputter cathode. The potential decreases slightly in the direction towards the grounded growth surface and the positive, mainly Ar+, ions created in the large volume of the plasma closest to the substrate are accelerated towards the growth surface. These ions obtain a few eV of

  12. Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yuxuan; Coyle, Thomas W.; Azimi, Gisele; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The effects of various spraying conditions including standoff distance, torch power, number of torch passes, types of solvent and plasma velocity were investigated. The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature. The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces.

  13. Are the argon metastables important in high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges?

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J. T.; Lundin, D.; Minea, T. M.; Stancu, G. D.; Brenning, N.

    2015-11-15

    We use an ionization region model to explore the ionization processes in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge in argon with a titanium target. In conventional dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS), stepwise ionization can be an important route for ionization of the argon gas. However, in the HiPIMS discharge stepwise ionization is found to be negligible during the breakdown phase of the HiPIMS pulse and becomes significant (but never dominating) only later in the pulse. For the sputtered species, Penning ionization can be a significant ionization mechanism in the dcMS discharges, while in the HiPIMS discharge Penning ionization is always negligible as compared to electron impact ionization. The main reasons for these differences are a higher plasma density in the HiPIMS discharge, and a higher electron temperature. Furthermore, we explore the ionization fraction and the ionized flux fraction of the sputtered vapor and compare with recent experimental work.

  14. Recirculating planar magnetrons: simulations and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Franzi, Matthew; Gilgenbach, Ronald; French, David; Lau, Y.Y.; Simon, David; Hoff, Brad; Luginsland, John W.

    2011-07-01

    The Recirculating Planar Magnetron (RPM) is a novel crossed-field device whose geometry is expected to reduce thermal load, enhance current yield as well as ease the geometric limitations in scaling to high RF frequencies as compared to the conventional cylindrical magnetrons. The RPM has two different adaptations: A. Axial B field and radial E field; B. Radial B field and axial E field. The preliminary configuration (A) to be used in experiments at the University of Michigan consists of two parallel planar sections which join on either end by cylindrical regions to form a concentric extruded ellipse. Similar to conventional magnetrons, a voltage across the AK gap in conjunction with an axial magnetic field provides the electrons with an ExB drift. The device is named RPM because the drifting electrons recirculate from one planar region to the other. The drifting electrons interact with the resonantly tuned slow wave structure on the anode causing spoke formation. These electron spokes drive a RF electric field in the cavities from which RF power may be extracted to Waveguides. The RPM may be designed in either a conventional configuration with the anode on the outside, for simplified extraction, or as an inverted magnetron with the anode at the inner conductor, for fast start-up. Currently, experiments at the Pulsed Power and Microwave Laboratory at the University of Michigan are in the setup and design phase. A conventional RPM with planar cavities is to be installed on the Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator (MELBA) and is anticipated to operate at -200kV, 0.2T with a beam current of 1-10 kA at 1GHz. The conventional RPM consists of 12 identical planar cavities, 6 on each planar side, with simulated quality factor of 20.

  15. A hybrid electron cyclotron resonance metal ion source with integrated sputter magnetron for the production of an intense Al{sup +} ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Weichsel, T. Hartung, U.; Kopte, T.; Zschornack, G.; Kreller, M.; Philipp, A.

    2015-09-15

    A metal ion source prototype has been developed: a combination of magnetron sputter technology with 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source technology—a so called magnetron ECR ion source (MECRIS). An integrated ring-shaped sputter magnetron with an Al target is acting as a powerful metal atom supply in order to produce an intense current of singly charged metal ions. Preliminary experiments show that an Al{sup +} ion current with a density of 167 μA/cm{sup 2} is extracted from the source at an acceleration voltage of 27 kV. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy were used to study the plasma states of the ion source: sputter magnetron, ECR, and MECRIS plasma. Electron density and temperature as well as Al atom density were determined as a function of microwave and sputter magnetron power. The effect of ECR heating is strongly pronounced in the center of the source. There the electron density is increased by one order of magnitude from 6 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −3} to 6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} and the electron temperature is enhanced from about 5 eV to 12 eV, when the ECR plasma is ignited to the magnetron plasma. Operating the magnetron at constant power, it was observed that its discharge current is raised from 1.8 A to 4.8 A, when the ECR discharge was superimposed with a microwave power of 2 kW. At the same time, the discharge voltage decreased from about 560 V to 210 V, clearly indicating a higher plasma density of the MECRIS mode. The optical emission spectrum of the MECRIS plasma is dominated by lines of excited Al atoms and shows a significant contribution of lines arising from singly ionized Al. Plasma emission photography with a CCD camera was used to prove probe measurements and to identify separated plasma emission zones originating from the ECR and magnetron discharge.

  16. A hybrid electron cyclotron resonance metal ion source with integrated sputter magnetron for the production of an intense Al⁺ ion beam.

    PubMed

    Weichsel, T; Hartung, U; Kopte, T; Zschornack, G; Kreller, M; Philipp, A

    2015-09-01

    A metal ion source prototype has been developed: a combination of magnetron sputter technology with 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source technology-a so called magnetron ECR ion source (MECRIS). An integrated ring-shaped sputter magnetron with an Al target is acting as a powerful metal atom supply in order to produce an intense current of singly charged metal ions. Preliminary experiments show that an Al(+) ion current with a density of 167 μA/cm(2) is extracted from the source at an acceleration voltage of 27 kV. Spatially resolved double Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy were used to study the plasma states of the ion source: sputter magnetron, ECR, and MECRIS plasma. Electron density and temperature as well as Al atom density were determined as a function of microwave and sputter magnetron power. The effect of ECR heating is strongly pronounced in the center of the source. There the electron density is increased by one order of magnitude from 6 × 10(9) cm(-3) to 6 × 10(10) cm(-3) and the electron temperature is enhanced from about 5 eV to 12 eV, when the ECR plasma is ignited to the magnetron plasma. Operating the magnetron at constant power, it was observed that its discharge current is raised from 1.8 A to 4.8 A, when the ECR discharge was superimposed with a microwave power of 2 kW. At the same time, the discharge voltage decreased from about 560 V to 210 V, clearly indicating a higher plasma density of the MECRIS mode. The optical emission spectrum of the MECRIS plasma is dominated by lines of excited Al atoms and shows a significant contribution of lines arising from singly ionized Al. Plasma emission photography with a CCD camera was used to prove probe measurements and to identify separated plasma emission zones originating from the ECR and magnetron discharge. PMID:26429434

  17. Spoke rotation reversal in magnetron discharges of aluminium, chromium and titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecimovic, A.; Maszl, C.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Böke, M.; von Keudell, A.

    2016-06-01

    The rotation of localised ionisation zones, i.e. spokes, in magnetron discharge are frequently observed. The spokes are investigated by measuring floating potential oscillations with 12 flat probes placed azimuthally around a planar circular magnetron. The 12-probe setup provides sufficient temporal and spatial resolution to observe the properties of various spokes, such as rotation direction, mode number and angular velocity. The spokes are investigated as a function of discharge current, ranging from 10 mA (current density 0.5 mA cm-2) to 140 A (7 A cm-2). In the range from 10 mA to 600 mA the plasma was sustained in DC mode, and in the range from 1 A to 140 A the plasma was pulsed in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering mode. The presence of spokes throughout the complete discharge current range indicates that the spokes are an intrinsic property of a magnetron sputtering plasma discharge. The spokes may disappear at discharge currents above 80 A for Cr, as the plasma becomes homogeneously distributed over the racetrack. Up to discharge currents of several amperes (the exact value depends on the target material), the spokes rotate in a retrograde \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} direction with angular velocity in the range of 0.2-4 km s-1. Beyond a discharge current of several amperes, the spokes rotate in a \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} direction with angular velocity in the range of 5-15 km s-1. The spoke rotation reversal is explained by a transition from Ar-dominated to metal-dominated sputtering that shifts the plasma emission zone closer to the target. The spoke itself corresponds to a region of high electron density and therefore to a hump in the electrical potential. The electric field around the spoke dominates the spoke rotation direction. At low power, the plasma is further away from the target and it is dominated by the electric field to the anode, thus retrograde \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} rotation. At high power, the plasma is closer to the target and it is

  18. Method and apparatus for improved high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre

    2013-11-05

    A high power impulse magnetron sputtering apparatus and method using a vacuum chamber with a magnetron target and a substrate positioned in the vacuum chamber. A field coil being positioned between the magnetron target and substrate, and a pulsed power supply and/or a coil bias power supply connected to the field coil. The pulsed power supply connected to the field coil, and the pulsed power supply outputting power pulse widths of greater that 100 .mu.s.

  19. TORCH Computational Reference Kernels - A Testbed for Computer Science Research

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Alex; Williams, Samuel Webb; Madduri, Kamesh; Ibrahim, Khaled; Bailey, David H.; Demmel, James W.; Strohmaier, Erich

    2010-12-02

    For decades, computer scientists have sought guidance on how to evolve architectures, languages, and programming models in order to improve application performance, efficiency, and productivity. Unfortunately, without overarching advice about future directions in these areas, individual guidance is inferred from the existing software/hardware ecosystem, and each discipline often conducts their research independently assuming all other technologies remain fixed. In today's rapidly evolving world of on-chip parallelism, isolated and iterative improvements to performance may miss superior solutions in the same way gradient descent optimization techniques may get stuck in local minima. To combat this, we present TORCH: A Testbed for Optimization ResearCH. These computational reference kernels define the core problems of interest in scientific computing without mandating a specific language, algorithm, programming model, or implementation. To compliment the kernel (problem) definitions, we provide a set of algorithmically-expressed verification tests that can be used to verify a hardware/software co-designed solution produces an acceptable answer. Finally, to provide some illumination as to how researchers have implemented solutions to these problems in the past, we provide a set of reference implementations in C and MATLAB.

  20. Landauer's blow-torch effect in systems with entropic potential.

    PubMed

    Das, Moupriya; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-11-01

    We consider local heating of a part of a two-dimensional bilobal enclosure of a varying cross section confining a system of overdamped Brownian particles. Since varying cross section in higher dimension results in an entropic potential in lower dimension, local heating alters the relative stability of the entropic states. We show that this blow-torch effect modifies the entropic potential in a significant way so that the resultant effective entropic potential carries both the features of variation of width of the confinement and variation of temperature along the direction of transport. The reduced probability distribution along the direction of transport calculated by full numerical simulations in two dimensions agrees well with our analytical findings. The extent of population transfer in the steady state quantified in terms of the integrated probability of residence of the particles in either of the two lobes exhibits interesting variation with the mean position of the heated region. Our study reveals that heating around two particular zones of a given lobe maximizes population transfer to the other. PMID:26651672

  1. Landauer's blow-torch effect in systems with entropic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Moupriya; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-11-01

    We consider local heating of a part of a two-dimensional bilobal enclosure of a varying cross section confining a system of overdamped Brownian particles. Since varying cross section in higher dimension results in an entropic potential in lower dimension, local heating alters the relative stability of the entropic states. We show that this blow-torch effect modifies the entropic potential in a significant way so that the resultant effective entropic potential carries both the features of variation of width of the confinement and variation of temperature along the direction of transport. The reduced probability distribution along the direction of transport calculated by full numerical simulations in two dimensions agrees well with our analytical findings. The extent of population transfer in the steady state quantified in terms of the integrated probability of residence of the particles in either of the two lobes exhibits interesting variation with the mean position of the heated region. Our study reveals that heating around two particular zones of a given lobe maximizes population transfer to the other.

  2. Satellite Power System (SPS) magnetron tube assessment study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    The data base was extended with respect to the magnetron directional amplifier and its operating parameters that are pertinent to its application in the solar power satellite. On the basis of the resulting extended data base the design of a magnetron was outlined that would meet the requirements of the SPS application and a technology program was designed that would result in its development. The proposed magnetron design for the SPS is a close scale of the microwave oven magnetron, and resembles it closely physically and electrically.

  3. Satellite Power System (SPS) magnetron tube assessment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. C.

    1981-02-01

    The data base was extended with respect to the magnetron directional amplifier and its operating parameters that are pertinent to its application in the solar power satellite. On the basis of the resulting extended data base the design of a magnetron was outlined that would meet the requirements of the SPS application and a technology program was designed that would result in its development. The proposed magnetron design for the SPS is a close scale of the microwave oven magnetron, and resembles it closely physically and electrically.

  4. Design and preliminary characterization of a miniature pulsed RF APGD torch with downstream injection of the source of reactive species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léveillé, V.; Coulombe, S.

    2005-08-01

    The design of a miniature low-power atmospheric pressure glow discharge torch (APGD-t) and the results of its preliminary electrical and spectroscopic characterization are presented. A capacitively-coupled pulsed RF (13.56 MHz) helium plasma jet is formed in a converging confinement tube and O2 is injected downstream in the plasma afterglow region through a capillary electrode. With 1 SLM He, the APGD-t produced a non-thermal plasma jet of 500 µm-diameter and ap2.5 mm-long at power levels ranging from 1 to 5 W. At ap1 W, the gas temperature and He excitation temperature near the nozzle exit were ap50°C and slightly below 2000 K, respectively. The breakdown voltage in 1 SLM He is approximately 220 Vpk-to-0. Careful electric probe measurements and circuit analysis revealed the strong effect of the voltage probe on the total load impedance. The injection of 10 SCCM O2 through the capillary electrode led to the transport of atomic O further downstream in the plasma jet and to a slight increase of the He excitation temperature without significant effects on the electrical properties and jet length. Alternatively, the addition of an equivalent amount of O2 (1 v/v%) to the plasma-forming gas affected the electrical properties slightly, but led to a drastic contraction of the plasma jet. The atomic oxygen production and transport conditions provided by the APGD-t are promising for precise bio-applications such as the treatment of skin tissues and cells.

  5. Electron transport in magnetrons by a posteriori Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, C.; Minea, T. M.; Popa, G.

    2014-02-01

    Electron transport across magnetic barriers is crucial in all magnetized plasmas. It governs not only the plasma parameters in the volume, but also the fluxes of charged particles towards the electrodes and walls. It is particularly important in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) reactors, influencing the quality of the deposited thin films, since this type of discharge is characterized by an increased ionization fraction of the sputtered material. Transport coefficients of electron clouds released both from the cathode and from several locations in the discharge volume are calculated for a HiPIMS discharge with pre-ionization operated in argon at 0.67 Pa and for very short pulses (few µs) using the a posteriori Monte Carlo simulation technique. For this type of discharge electron transport is characterized by strong temporal and spatial dependence. Both drift velocity and diffusion coefficient depend on the releasing position of the electron cloud. They exhibit minimum values at the centre of the race-track for the secondary electrons released from the cathode. The diffusion coefficient of the same electrons increases from 2 to 4 times when the cathode voltage is doubled, in the first 1.5 µs of the pulse. These parameters are discussed with respect to empirical Bohm diffusion.

  6. Development and use of hydrogen-air torches in an altitude facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lottig, Roy A.; Huber, Gary T.

    1993-01-01

    A hydrogen-air ignition torch concept that had been used successfully in two rocket engine test facilities to consume excess hydrogen in their exhausters at atmospheric conditions was experimentally evaluated and developed in an altitude test facility at NASA Lewis Research Center. The idea was to use several of these torches in conjunction with hydrogen detectors and dilution air to prevent excess accumulation of unburned hydrogen or mixtures of hydrogen and air exceeding the sea-level lower flammability limit in the altitude facility exhaust system during hydrogen-fueled propulsion system tests. The torches were evaluated for a range of fuel-to-air ratios from 0.09 to 0.39 and for a range of exit diameters from 19/64 to 49/64 in. From the results of these tests a torch geometry and a fuel-to-air ratio were selected that produced a reasonably sized torch exhaust flame for consumption of unburned hydrogen at altitude pressures from sea level to 4 psia.

  7. On the space-charge boundary layer inside the nozzle of a cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Kelly, H.

    2009-06-15

    A numerical study of the space-charge sheath adjacent to the nozzle wall of a cutting torch is presented. The hydrodynamic model corresponds to a collision-dominated sheath and does not assume cold ions, so drift-diffusion-type equations are used. Also an improved expression for the ion-neutral momentum transfer is employed rather than the usual constant ion-mean-free-path or constant ion collision frequency approximations. Assuming a constant electron temperature in the sheath and neglecting the electron inertial term, the continuity and momentum equations for ions and electrons, together with Poisson's equation, were solved for the electric potential, ion velocities (both normal and tangential components), and for the ion and electron densities. It was found that both the ion and electron densities present a sudden drop at the sheath-plasma edge. The ion density continues to decrease slowly inside the sheath, while the electron density presents a virtually zero value everywhere inside the sheath, the electron thermal conduction flux to the nozzle wall being negligible. These wall results thus become thermally isolated in spite of the high electron temperature in its adjacency. For a nozzle biasing voltage close to the gas breakdown, it was found that the electric field value is high, reaching a value of about 9x10{sup 6} V m{sup -1} at the exit of the nozzle wall. This value is higher than the average field value across the sheath and is on the order of the breakdown threshold value. This means that an undesired sheath breakdown could occur at the vicinities of the nozzle exit even if the average electric field across the sheath is not strong enough.

  8. Direct probing of anode arc root dynamics and voltage instability in a dc non-transferred arc plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorui, S.; Tiwari, N.; Meher, K. C.; Jan, A.; Bhat, A.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    The transient dynamics of the anode arc root in a dc non-transferred arc plasma torch is captured through fast photography and directly correlated with the associated voltage instability for the first time. The coexistence of multiple arc roots, the transition to a single arc root, root formation and extinction are investigated for the steady, takeover and re-strike modes of the arc. Contrary to the usual concept, the emerging plasma jet of a dc non-transferred arc plasma torch is found to carry current. An unusually long self-propelled arc plasma jet, a consequence of the phenomenon, is demonstrated.

  9. A replica of the Olympic torch is recovered from STS-101 Atlantis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A replica of the Olympic torch is recovered after its journey on Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-101. The addition of the torch to the payload was coordinated by astronaut Andy Thomas, who is from Australia. The torch will travel to Australia for the 2000 Olympic games being held there in September. STS-101 was the third flight to the International Space Station and included repairs to the Station plus transfer of equipment and supplies to the Station for future missions. The landing of Atlantis completed a 9-day, 20-hour, 9-minute-long mission. It was the 98th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 21st for Atlantis. The landing was the 51st at KSC, the 22nd consecutive landing at KSC, the 14th nighttime landing in Shuttle history and the 29th in the last 30 Shuttle flights.

  10. A replica of the Olympic torch is recovered from STS-101 Atlantis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Teri McKinney, with Shuttle Crew Escape, Johnson Space Center, holds a replica of the Olympic torch carried aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis on mission STS-101. The addition of the torch to the payload was coordinated by astronaut Andy Thomas, who is from Australia. The torch will travel to Australia for the 2000 Olympic games being held there in September. . STS-101 was the third flight to the International Space Station and included repairs to the Station plus transfer of equipment and supplies to the Station for future missions. The landing of Atlantis completed a 9-day, 20-hour, 9-minute-long mission. It was the 98th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 21st for Atlantis. The landing was the 51st at KSC, the 22nd consecutive landing at KSC, the 14th nighttime landing in Shuttle history and the 29th in the last 30 Shuttle flights.

  11. Micro-channel plate photon detector studies for the TORCH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo García, L.; Brook, N.; Cowie, E. N.; Cussans, D.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Piedigrossi, D.; Van Dijk, M.

    2015-07-01

    The Time Of internally Reflected Cherenkov light (TORCH) detector is under development. Charged particle tracks passing through a 1 cm plate of quartz will generate the Cherenkov photons, and their arrival will be timed by an array of micro-channel plate photon detectors. As part of the TORCH R&D studies, commercial and custom-made micro-channel plate detectors are being characterized. The final photon detectors for this application are being produced in a three-phase program in collaboration with industry. Custom-made single-channel devices with extended lifetime have been manufactured and their performance is being systematically investigated in the laboratory. Optical studies for the preparation of beam and laboratory tests of a TORCH prototype are also underway.

  12. Oleophobic optical coating deposited by magnetron PVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernt, D.; Ponomarenko, V.; Pisarev, A.

    2016-09-01

    Thin oxinitride films of Zn-Sn-O-N and Si-Al-O-N were deposited on glass by reactive magnetron sputtering at various nitrogen-to-oxygen ratios. Nitrogen added to oxygen led to decrease of the surface roughness and increase of oleophobic properties studied by the oil-drop test. The best oleophobity was obtained for Zn-Sn-O-N oxinitride at Zn:Sn=1:1 and N:O=1:2. Improved oleophobic properties were also demonstrated if the oxinitride film was deposited on top of the multilayer coating as the final step in the industrial cycle of production of energy efficient glass.

  13. Recirculating Planar Magnetron Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzi, Matthew; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Hoff, Brad; French, Dave; Lau, Y. Y.

    2011-10-01

    We present simulations and initial experimental results of a new class of crossed field device: Recirculating Planar Magnetrons (RPM). Two geometries of RPM are being explored: 1) Dual planar-magnetrons connected by a recirculating section with axial magnetic field and transverse electric field, and 2) Planar cathode and anode-cavity rings with radial magnetic field and axial electric field. These RPMs have numerous advantages for high power microwave generation by virtue of larger area cathodes and anodes. The axial B-field RPM can be configured in either the conventional or inverted (faster startup) configuration. Two and three-dimensional EM PIC simulations show rapid electron spoke formation and microwave oscillation in pi-mode. Smoothbore prototype axial-B RPM experiments are underway using the MELBA accelerator at parameters of -300 kV, 1-20 kA and pulselengths of 0.5-1 microsecond. Implementation and operation of the first RPM slow wave structure, operating at 1GHz, will be discussed. Research supported by AFOSR, AFRL, L-3 Communications, and Northrop Grumman. Done...processed 1830 records...17:52:57 Beginning APS data extraction...17:52:57

  14. Numerical simulation of the coal combustion process initiated by a plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askarova, A. S.; Messerle, V. E.; Ustimenko, A. B.; Bolegenova, S. A.; Maksimov, V. Yu.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical experiments on the torch combustion of the coal dust prepared by a plasma-thermochemical treatment for combustion have been done using the method of three-dimensional simulation. It is shown that the plasma preparation of coal for combustion enables one to optimize the process, improve the conditions for inflammation and combustion and minimize the emissions of harmful substances.

  15. Self-organization and self-limitation in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2012-05-28

    The plasma over the racetrack in high power impulse magnetron sputtering develops in traveling ionization zones. Power densities can locally reach 10{sup 9} W/m{sup 2}, which is much higher than usually reported. Ionization zones move because ions are 'evacuated' by the electric field, exposing neutrals to magnetically confined, drifting electrons. Drifting secondary electrons amplify ionization of the same ionization zone where the primary ions came from, while sputtered and outgassing atoms are supplied to the following zone(s). Strong density gradients parallel to the target disrupt electron confinement: a negative feedback mechanism that stabilizes ionization runaway.

  16. Operation of cold-cathode magnetron gauges in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.R. Jr.; Goerz, D.A.; Pickles, W.L.

    1986-05-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B), under construction at LLNL, requires measurement of the neutral gas density in high magnetic fields near the plasma at several axial regions. This background gas pressure (BGP) diagnostic will help us understand the role of background neutrals in particle and power balance, particularly in the maintenance of the cold halo plasma that shields the hot core plasma from the returning neutrals. The BGP consists of several cold-cathode, magnetron-type gauges stripped of their permanent magnets, and utilizes the MFTF-B ambient B-field in strengths of 5--25 kG. Similar gauges have operated in TMX-U in B-fields up to 3 kG. To determine how well the gauges will perform, we assembled a test stand which operated magnetron gauges in an external, uniform magnetic field of up to 30 kG, over a pressure range of 10/sup -8/--10/sup -5/ Torr, at several cathode voltages. This paper describes the test stand and presents the results of the tests.

  17. The spatial distribution of negative oxygen ion densities in a dc reactive magnetron discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scribbins, Steven; Bowes, Michael; Bradley, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Using Langmuir probe-assisted eclipse laser photodetachment, the spatial distribution of O- densities in the bulk plasma of magnetron sputter tool has been determined for a range of pressures, 0.79 to 2.40 Pa. The discharge was operated in dc (200 W) with a Ti target and a fixed oxygen-argon pressure ratio of 0.2, in poisoned mode. Measurements show significant O- densities occupying an annulus downstream from the magnetic trap in regions of most positive plasma potential. With increasing pressure the region of high O- density expands and the peak densities increase reaching ˜1.5 × 1016 m-3 at 2.40 Pa, corresponding to an O- to electron density ratio (electronegativity α) of ˜2. Outside the area of dense negative ions, and in regions of the magnetic trap accessible to our probe we measure α < 0.2. The results show that these reactive magnetron plasmas, utilized for oxide film production, to be highly electronegative in regions close to the substrate.

  18. Energy fluxes in a radio-frequency magnetron discharge for the deposition of superhard cubic boron nitride coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bornholdt, S.; Kersten, H.; Ye, J.; Ulrich, S.

    2012-12-15

    Energy flux measurements by a calorimetric probe in a rf-magnetron plasma used for the deposition of super-hard c-BN coatings are presented and discussed. Argon as working gas is used for sputtering a h-BN target. Adding a certain amount of N{sub 2} is essential for the formation of stoichiometric BN films, since a lack of nitrogen will lead to boron rich films. Subsequently, the contributions of different plasma species, surface reactions, and film growth to the resulting variation of the substrate temperature in dependence on nitrogen admixture are estimated and discussed. In addition, SRIM simulations are performed to estimate the energy influx by sputtered neutral atoms. The influence of magnetron target power and oxygen admixture (for comparison with nitrogen) to the process gas on the total energy flux is determined and discussed qualitatively, too. The results indicate that variation of the energy influx due to additional nitrogen flow, which causes a decrease of electron and ion densities, electron temperature and plasma potential, is negligible, while the admixture of oxygen leads to a drastic increase of the energy influx. The typical hysteresis effect which can be observed during magnetron sputtering in oxygen containing gas mixtures has also been confirmed in the energy influx measurements for the investigated system. However, the underlying mechanism is not understood yet, and will be addressed in further investigations.

  19. A study of dc discharge in cylindrical magnetron - comparison of experiment and PIC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, J. F.; Csambal, C.; Tichy, M.; Kudrna, P.; Rusz, J.

    2000-10-01

    We present experimental and numerical study of the DC discharge in cylindrical magnetron in argon. The grounded discharge chamber-anode has 110 mm in length and 60 mm inner diameter. The co-axially placed cathode has 10 mm in diameter. The magnetic field is created by couple of coils. Experimental results have been obtained by radially movable planar Langmuir probe with its plane perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. The radial profiles of the floating and plasma potential, plasma density, and the electron energy distribution function have been measured. Numerical results were obtained using the modified 1D PIC code (Berkeley). The comparison between experiment and model results computed at similar conditions shows reasonable agreement in plasma density and electron mean energy. The computed electric field is usually higher than the experimental one. This difference we explain by the end effects that are not taken into account in 1D model.

  20. 76 FR 44506 - Petition Requesting Non-See-Through Packaging for Torch Fuel and Lamp Oil

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ..., including torch fuel and lamp oil, as currently packaged, resemble juice. Petitioner notes that because young children enjoy the taste of juice and are accustomed to drinking it regularly, packaging petroleum distillates in clear plastic bottles causes needless danger, as children may mistake it for juice....

  1. 76 FR 64042 - Petition Requesting Non-See-Through Packaging for Torch Fuel and Lamp Oil

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... ill, and one killed due to torch oil being mistaken for apple juice.'' The petitioner also states that... FR 44506), we published a notice, stating that the Commission had received a submission from John L... packaged, resemble juice. The petitioner notes that because young children enjoy the taste of juice and...

  2. Optical Experiments Using Mini-Torches with Red, Green and Blue Light Emitting Diodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamata, Masahiro; Matsunaga, Ai

    2007-01-01

    We have developed two kinds of optical experiments: color mixture and fluorescence, using mini-torches with light emitting diodes (LEDs) that emit three primary colors. Since the tools used in the experiments are simple and inexpensive, students can easily retry and develop the experiments by themselves. As well as giving an introduction to basic…

  3. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  4. Phase and Frequency Locked Magnetrons for SRF Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, M.; Johnson, R.P.; Popovic, M.; Moretti, A.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Magnetrons are low-cost highly-efficient microwave sources, but they have several limitations, primarily centered about the phase and frequency stability of their output. When the stability requirements are low, such as for medical accelerators or kitchen ovens, magnetrons are the very efficient power source of choice. But for high energy accelerators, because of the need for frequency and phase stability - proton accelerators need 1-2 degrees source phase stability, and electron accelerators need .1-.2 degrees of phase stability - they have rarely been used. We describe a novel variable frequency cavity technique which will be utilized to phase and frequency lock magnetrons.

  5. Investigations of some aspects of the spray process in a single wire arc plasma spray system using high speed camera.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, N; Sahasrabudhe, S N; Tak, A K; Barve, D N; Das, A K

    2012-02-01

    A high speed camera has been used to record and analyze the evolution as well as particle behavior in a single wire arc plasma spray torch. Commercially available systems (spray watch, DPV 2000, etc.) focus onto a small area in the spray jet. They are not designed for tracking a single particle from the torch to the substrate. Using high speed camera, individual particles were tracked and their velocities were measured at various distances from the spray torch. Particle velocity information at different distances from the nozzle of the torch is very important to decide correct substrate position for the good quality of coating. The analysis of the images has revealed the details of the process of arc attachment to wire, melting of the wire, and detachment of the molten mass from the tip. Images of the wire and the arc have been recorded for different wire feed rates, gas flow rates, and torch powers, to determine compatible wire feed rates. High speed imaging of particle trajectories has been used for particle velocity determination using time of flight method. It was observed that the ripple in the power supply of the torch leads to large variation of instantaneous power fed to the torch. This affects the velocity of the spray particles generated at different times within one cycle of the ripple. It is shown that the velocity of a spray particle depends on the instantaneous torch power at the time of its generation. This correlation was established by experimental evidence in this paper. Once the particles leave the plasma jet, their forward speeds were found to be more or less invariant beyond 40 mm up to 500 mm from the nozzle exit.

  6. On-line elemental analysis of fossil fuel process streams by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, W.P.

    1995-06-01

    METC is continuing development of a real-time, multi-element plasma based spectrometer system for application to high temperature and high pressure fossil fuel process streams. Two versions are under consideration for development. One is an Inductively Coupled Plasma system that has been described previously, and the other is a high power microwave system. The ICP torch operates on a mixture of argon and helium with a conventional annular swirl flow plasma gas, no auxiliary gas, and a conventional sample stream injection through the base of the plasma plume. A new, demountable torch design comprising three ceramic sections allows bolts passing the length of the torch to compress a double O-ring seal. This improves the reliability of the torch. The microwave system will use the same data acquisition and reduction components as the ICP system; only the plasma source itself is different. It will operate with a 750-Watt, 2.45 gigahertz microwave generator. The plasma discharge will be contained within a narrow quartz tube one quarter wavelength from a shorted waveguide termination. The plasma source will be observed via fiber optics and a battery of computer controlled monochromators. To extract more information from the raw spectral data, a neural net computer program is being developed. This program will calculate analyte concentrations from data that includes analyte and interferant spectral emission intensity. Matrix effects and spectral overlaps can be treated more effectively by this method than by conventional spectral analysis.

  7. Tailoring of antibacterial Ag nanostructures on TiO2 nanotube layers by magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Uhm, Soo-Hyuk; Song, Doo-Hoon; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sang-Bae; Han, Jeon-Geon; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-04-01

    To reduce the incidence of postsurgical bacterial infection that may cause implantation failure at the implant-bone interface, surface treatment of titanium implants with antibiotic materials such as silver (Ag) has been proposed. The purpose of this work was to create TiO2 nanotubes using plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO), followed by formation of an antibacterial Ag nanostructure coating on the TiO2 nanotube layer using a magnetron sputtering system. PEO was performed on commercially pure Ti sheets. The Ag nanostructure was added onto the resulting TiO2 nanotube using magnetron sputtering at varying deposition rates. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the surface, and Ag content on the TiO2 nanotube layer was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Scanning probe microscopy for surface roughness and contact angle measurement were used to indirectly confirm enhanced TiO2 nanotube hydrophilicity. Antibacterial activity of Ag ions in solution was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and antibacterial testing against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). In vitro, TiO2 nanotubes coated with sputtered Ag resulted in significantly reduced S. aureus. Cell viability assays showed no toxicity for the lowest sputtering time group in the osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. These results suggest that a multinanostructured layer with a biocompatible TiO2 nanotube and antimicrobial Ag coating is a promising biomaterial that can be tailored with magnetron sputtering for optimal performance.

  8. Plasma magmavication of soils by nontransferred arc

    SciTech Connect

    Mayne, P.W.; Burns, S.E.; Circeo, L.J.

    2000-05-01

    Electrical plasma arcs create very high temperatures (T > 4,000 C) that can be specifically directed for the in-place melting of soils. This overview presents a summary of the basic features and capabilities of plasma torches having a nontransferred type of arc for the in situ vitrification of soils. Laboratory chamber experiments using 100 kW and 240 kW plasma systems and full-scale field trials using a 1 MW portable system have successfully melted a variety of soil types, including sands, silts, and clays. Within five minutes' exposure to the arc, a core region of magma forms within the soil matrix that expands radially outward and upward as the torch is pulled out vertically. Several days afterwards, the molten zone cools to form an artificial igneous rock similar to obsidian, basalt, or granite. The size of the vitrified mass is proportional to the electrical power demand. The plasma torch has a configuration similar to a flamethrower and will therefore be amenable to placement down boreholes for purposes of in situ ground modification and subsurface remediation.

  9. Microwave plasma conversion of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ko, Youngsam; Yang, Gosu; Chang, Daniel P Y; Kennedy, Ian M

    2003-05-01

    A microwave-induced, steam/Ar/O2, plasma "torch" was operated at atmospheric pressure to determine the feasibility of destroying volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of concern. The plasma process can be coupled with adsorbent technology by providing steam as the fluid carrier for desorbing the VOCs from an adsorbent. Hence, N2 can be excluded by using a relatively inexpensive carrier gas, and thermal formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) is avoided in the plasma. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the technical feasibility of destroying VOCs from gas streams by using a commercially available microwave plasma torch and to examine whether significant byproducts were produced. Trichloroethene (TCE) and toluene (TOL) were added as representative VOCs of interest to a flow that contained Ar as a carrier gas in addition to O2 and steam. The O2 was necessary to ensure that undesirable byproducts were not formed in the process. Microwave power applied at 500-600 W was found to be sufficient to achieve the destruction of the test compounds, down to the detection limits of the gas chromatograph that was used in the analysis. Samples of the postmicrowave gases were collected on sorbent tubes for the analysis of dioxins and other byproducts. No hazardous byproducts were detected when sufficient O2 was added to the flow. The destruction efficiency at a fixed microwave power improved with the addition of steam to the flow that passed through the torch.

  10. On the evolution of film roughness during magnetron sputtering deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Turkin, A. A.; Pei, Y. T.; Shaha, K. P.; Chen, C. Q.; Vainshtein, D. I.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2010-11-15

    The effect of long-range screening on the surface morphology of thin films grown with pulsed-dc (p-dc) magnetron sputtering is studied. The surface evolution is described by a stochastic diffusion equation that includes the nonlocal shadowing effects in three spatial dimensions. The diffusional relaxation and the angular distribution of the incident particle flux strongly influence the transition to the shadowing growth regime. In the magnetron sputtering deposition the shadowing effect is essential because of the configuration of the magnetron system (finite size of sputtered targets, rotating sample holder, etc.). A realistic angular distribution of depositing particles is constructed by taking into account the cylindrical magnetron geometry. Simulation results are compared with the experimental data of surface roughness evolution during 100 and 350 kHz p-dc deposition, respectively.

  11. Study of supersonic plasma technology jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selezneva, Svetlana; Gravelle, Denis; Boulos, Maher; van de Sanden, Richard; Schram, Dc

    2001-10-01

    Recently some new techniques using remote thermal plasma for thin film deposition and plasma chemistry processes were developed. These techniques include PECVD of diamonds, diamond-like and polymer films; a-C:H and a-Si:H films. The latter are of especial interest because of their applications for solar cell production industry. In remote plasma deposition, thermal plasma is formed by means of one of traditional plasma sources. The chamber pressure is reduced with the help of continuous pumping. In that way the flow is accelerated up to the supersonic speed. The plasma expansion is controlled using a specific torch nozzle design. To optimize the deposition process detailed knowledge about the gas dynamic structure of the jet and chemical kinetics mechanisms is required. In the paper, we show how the flow pattern and the character of the deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium differs in plasmas generated by different plasma sources, such as induction plasma torch, traditional direct current arc and cascaded arc. We study the effects of the chamber pressure, nozzle design and carrier gas on the resulting plasma properties. The analysis is performed by means of numerical modeling using commercially available FLUENT program with incorporated user-defined subroutines for two-temperature model. The results of continuum mechanics approach are compared with that of the kinetic Monte Carlo method and with the experimental data.

  12. ZrN coatings deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Purandare, Yashodhan Ehiasarian, Arutiun; Hovsepian, Papken; Santana, Antonio

    2014-05-15

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) coatings were deposited on 1 μm finish high speed steel and 316L stainless steel test coupons. Cathodic Arc (CA) and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) + Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering (UBM) techniques were utilized to deposit coatings. CA plasmas are known to be rich in metal and gas ions of the depositing species as well as macroparticles (droplets) emitted from the arc sports. Combining HIPIMS technique with UBM in the same deposition process facilitated increased ion bombardment on the depositing species during coating growth maintaining high deposition rate. Prior to coating deposition, substrates were pretreated with Zr{sup +} rich plasma, for both arc deposited and HIPIMS deposited coatings, which led to a very high scratch adhesion value (L{sub C2}) of 100 N. Characterization results revealed the overall thickness of the coatings in the range of 2.5 μm with hardness in the range of 30–40 GPa depending on the deposition technique. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and tribological experiments such as dry sliding wear tests and corrosion studies have been utilized to study the effects of ion bombardment on the structure and properties of these coatings. In all the cases, HIPIMS assisted UBM deposited coating fared equal or better than the arc deposited coatings, the reasons being discussed in this paper. Thus H+U coatings provide a good alternative to arc deposited where smooth, dense coatings are required and macrodroplets cannot be tolerated.

  13. Sputter deposition of MgxAlyOz thin films in a dual-magnetron device: a multi-species Monte Carlo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupov, M.; Saraiva, M.; Depla, D.; Bogaerts, A.

    2012-07-01

    A multi-species Monte Carlo (MC) model, combined with an analytical surface model, has been developed in order to investigate the general plasma processes occurring during the sputter deposition of complex oxide films in a dual-magnetron sputter deposition system. The important plasma species, such as electrons, Ar+ ions, fast Ar atoms and sputtered metal atoms (i.e. Mg and Al atoms) are described with the so-called multi-species MC model, whereas the deposition of MgxAlyOz films is treated by an analytical surface model. Target-substrate distances for both magnetrons in the dual-magnetron setup are varied for the purpose of growing stoichiometric complex oxide thin films. The metal atoms are sputtered from pure metallic targets, whereas the oxygen flux is only directed toward the substrate and is high enough to obtain fully oxidized thin films but low enough to avoid target poisoning. The calculations correspond to typical experimental conditions applied to grow these complex oxide films. In this paper, some calculation results are shown, such as the densities of various plasma species, their fluxes toward the targets and substrate, the deposition rates, as well as the film stoichiometry. Moreover, some results of the combined model are compared with experimental observations. Note that this is the first complete model, which can be applied for large and complicated magnetron reactor geometries, such as dual-magnetron configurations. With this model, we are able to describe all important plasma species as well as the deposition process. It can also be used to predict film stoichiometries of complex oxide films on the substrate.

  14. Fundamental properties of a planar type of inductively coupled thermal plasma with current modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tial, Mai Kai Suan; Tanaka, Yasunori; Akao, Mika; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Ishijima, Tatsuo

    2016-09-01

    A novel planar type of induction thermal plasma system with current modulation has been developed using a rectangular quartz vessel instead of a conventional cylindrical tube for thermal plasma processing for large-area material surface. To expand the generated thermal plasma laterally, the rectangular coil is used around the planar torch. Electrical properties including effective electrical impedance and instantaneous effective power of the thermal plasma at a pressure of 30 Torr at an input power about 10 kW were studied for the developed Ar planar type of induction thermal plasma. The spatial distribution of Ar excitation temperature in a planar torch was measured to elucidate fundamental aspects of a planar thermal plasma. Furthermore, the effect of coil current modulation was studied for changes in electrical properties and temperature, and their controllability in a planar thermal plasma.

  15. Silicon oxynitride films deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering using nitrous oxide as a single-source precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Hänninen, Tuomas Schmidt, Susann; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars; Högberg, Hans

    2015-09-15

    Silicon oxynitride thin films were synthesized by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering of silicon in argon/nitrous oxide plasmas. Nitrous oxide was employed as a single-source precursor supplying oxygen and nitrogen for the film growth. The films were characterized by elastic recoil detection analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, scanning electron microscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Results show that the films are silicon rich, amorphous, and exhibit a random chemical bonding structure. The optical properties with the refractive index and the extinction coefficient correlate with the film elemental composition, showing decreasing values with increasing film oxygen and nitrogen content. The total percentage of oxygen and nitrogen in the films is controlled by adjusting the gas flow ratio in the deposition processes. Furthermore, it is shown that the film oxygen-to-nitrogen ratio can be tailored by the high power impulse magnetron sputtering-specific parameters pulse frequency and energy per pulse.

  16. Role of oxygen atoms in the growth of magnetron sputter-deposited ZnO films

    SciTech Connect

    Jie, Jin; Morita, Aya; Shirai, Hajime

    2010-08-15

    The role of oxygen atoms in the growth of magnetron sputter-deposited ZnO films was studied by alternating the deposition of a several-nanometer-thick ZnO layer and the O{sub 2}/Ar mixture plasma exposure, i.e., layer-by-layer technique. The film crystallization promoted with suppressing the oxygen vacancy and interstitial defects by adjusting the exposure condition of O{sub 2}/Ar plasma. These findings suggest that the chemical potential of oxygen atom determine the film crystallization as well as the electronic state. The diffusion and effusion of oxygen atoms at the growing surface play a role of thermal annealing, promoted the film crystallization as well as the creation and the annihilation of oxygen and zinc related defects. The role of oxygen atoms reaching at the film-growing surface is discussed in term of chemical annealing. The possible oxygen diffusion mechanism is proposed.

  17. Deposition of ultrahard Ti-Si-N coatings by pulsed high-current reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskomov, K. V.; Zakharov, A. N.; Rabotkin, S. V.; Solov'ev, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the results of investigation of properties of ultrahard Ti-Si-N coatings deposited by pulsed high-current magnetron reactive sputtering (discharge pulse voltage is 300-900 V, discharge pulse current is up to 200 A, pulse duration is 10-100 μs, and pulse repetition rate is 20-2000 Hz). It is shown that for a short sputtering pulse (25 μs) and a high discharge current (160 A), the films exhibit high hardness (66 GPa), wear resistance, better adhesion, and a lower sliding friction coefficient. The reason is an enhancement of ion bombardment of the growing coating due to higher plasma density in the substrate region (1013 cm-3) and a manifold increase in the degree of ionization of the plasma with increasing peak discharge current (mainly due to the material being sputtered).

  18. Evaluation of Gate Oxide Damage Caused by Ionization Magnetron Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaka, Shigeki; Iyanagi, Katsumi; Fukuhara, Jota; Hayase, Shuzi

    2007-11-01

    An unbalanced magnet (UM) is commonly employed in ionization magnetron sputtering (IMS) in order to increase the ionization rates of sputtering species. In this paper, sputtering using an UM is compared with that using a balanced magnet (BM) during the deposition of Ti thin layers. Ti layers were fabricated on the top of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) gate electrodes of antenna metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) capacitors with various thicknesses of gate SiO2 layers ranging from 25 to 80 Å, and the durability of the gate SiO2 layers was monitored by current-voltage (I-V) measurements. It was found that the MOS capacitors with thin SiO2 layers fabricated with the UM were much more damaged than those fabricated with the BM. This characteristic became more marked for thinner SiO2 layers. Its origin was investigated by monitoring the current injected from the plasma to the substrate using a specially designed electrical configuration, and was explained as follows. Electrons are carried toward substrates by curvature drift originating from the diverging magnetic field perpendicular to the substrate. This causes the accumulation of electrons on the gate SiO2 thin layers where the diverging magnetic field is developed at the beginning of discharge, i.e., before the uniform Ti deposition starts to occur. Consequently, the accumulated electrons break the gate SiO2 layer. These results suggest that a new design of magnetic fields for the UM is needed so that the magnetic field does not reach the substrate. It is particularly important to keep the diverging magnetic fields away from the substrates at the beginning of discharge.

  19. Inert-Gas Diffuser For Plasma Or Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Spencer, Carl N.; Hosking, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    Inert-gas diffuser provides protective gas cover for weld bead as it cools. Follows welding torch, maintaining continuous flow of argon over newly formed joint and prevents it from oxidizing. Helps to ensure welds of consistently high quality. Devised for plasma arc keyhole welding of plates of 0.25-in. or greater thickness, also used in tungsten/inert-gas and other plasma or arc welding processes.

  20. ToRCH "co-infections" are associated with increased risk of abortion in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Rasti, Sima; Ghasemi, Fatemeh Sadat; Abdoli, Amir; Piroozmand, Ahmad; Mousavi, Seyed Gholam Abbas; Fakhrie-Kashan, Zohreh

    2016-03-01

    ToRCH infections (toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus and Herpes simplex virus) have long been known to be associated with bad obstetric outcomes. However, little information is available about the impact of ToRCH co-infections on the outcome of pregnancy. Hence, we tested the IgG and IgM antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii, Rubella, Cytomegalovirus and Herpes Simplex Virus among 81 pregnant women with abortion (case group) and 98 pregnant women with normal delivery (control group). In the single-infection model, only CMV-IgM seropositivity was significantly increased in case than control group (25.9% in case and 12.2 % in control, OR = 2.5, P = 0.019). In the co-infection model, 14 patterns were recognized, but two patterns were significantly increased in the case than the control group. Co-infection of T. gondii IgG + CMV IgM was 9.1-fold increased in the case than the control group (8.6% in the case and 1% in control, OR = 9.1; P = 0.024). Also, co-infection of T. gondii IgG + HSV IgG + CMV IgM was 7.7-fold increased in case than the control group (7.4% in case and 1 % in control, OR = 7.7; P = 0.04). Although the OR of other co-infections was higher in the case than the control group, the difference was not statistically significant. These findings indicate that ToRCH co-infections are associated with increased risk of abortion than single infection. Hence, the rates of co-infections should be considered in prenatal screening of ToRCH infections.

  1. ToRCH "co-infections" are associated with increased risk of abortion in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Rasti, Sima; Ghasemi, Fatemeh Sadat; Abdoli, Amir; Piroozmand, Ahmad; Mousavi, Seyed Gholam Abbas; Fakhrie-Kashan, Zohreh

    2016-03-01

    ToRCH infections (toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus and Herpes simplex virus) have long been known to be associated with bad obstetric outcomes. However, little information is available about the impact of ToRCH co-infections on the outcome of pregnancy. Hence, we tested the IgG and IgM antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii, Rubella, Cytomegalovirus and Herpes Simplex Virus among 81 pregnant women with abortion (case group) and 98 pregnant women with normal delivery (control group). In the single-infection model, only CMV-IgM seropositivity was significantly increased in case than control group (25.9% in case and 12.2 % in control, OR = 2.5, P = 0.019). In the co-infection model, 14 patterns were recognized, but two patterns were significantly increased in the case than the control group. Co-infection of T. gondii IgG + CMV IgM was 9.1-fold increased in the case than the control group (8.6% in the case and 1% in control, OR = 9.1; P = 0.024). Also, co-infection of T. gondii IgG + HSV IgG + CMV IgM was 7.7-fold increased in case than the control group (7.4% in case and 1 % in control, OR = 7.7; P = 0.04). Although the OR of other co-infections was higher in the case than the control group, the difference was not statistically significant. These findings indicate that ToRCH co-infections are associated with increased risk of abortion than single infection. Hence, the rates of co-infections should be considered in prenatal screening of ToRCH infections. PMID:26499091

  2. Industrial applications of thermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szente, Roberto Nunes

    1995-09-01

    The main characteristics and applications of thermal plasmas are reviewed here. The industrial applications of thermal plasmas can be divided in: low power-cutting, welding, spraying; metallurgical and steelmaking; materials; environment. Some of the processes described in this article include: powder spraying, metal refining, tundish and laddle heating, production of ferroalloys and ceramic materials, and treatment of residues (aluminum scrap, steel dusts, ashes, hospital wastes, electroplating mud). The use of thermal plasmas in the environment arena in particular has attracted increasingly attention as the regulations for disposal of residues become tougher. More research and development is needed particularly for decreasing the erosion of the electrodes of plasma torches and fundamental understanding of high temperature chemistry, heat transfer, and electric arcs for broadening the applications of thermal plasmas.

  3. On reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) is an ionized physical vapor deposition (IPVD) technique that is particularly promising for reactive sputtering applications. However, there are few issues that have to be resolved before the full potential of this technique can be realized. Here we give an overview of the key experimental findings for the reactive HiPIMS discharge. An increase in the discharge current is commonly observed with increased partial pressure of the reactive gas or decreased repetition pulse frequency. There are somewhat conflicting claims regarding the hysteresis effect in the reactive HiPIMS discharge as some report reduction or elimination of the hysteresis effect while others claim a feedback control is essential. The ion energy distribution of the metal ion and the atomic ion of the reactive gas are similar and extend to very high energies while the ion energy distribution of the working gas and the molecular ion of the reactive gas are similar and are much less energetic.

  4. 3-D Printed High Power Microwave Magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Nicholas; Greening, Geoffrey; Exelby, Steven; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Lau, Y. Y.; Hoff, Brad

    2015-11-01

    The size, weight, and power requirements of HPM systems are critical constraints on their viability, and can potentially be improved through the use of additive manufacturing techniques, which are rapidly increasing in capability and affordability. Recent experiments on the UM Recirculating Planar Magnetron (RPM), have explored the use of 3-D printed components in a HPM system. The system was driven by MELBA-C, a Marx-Abramyan system which delivers a -300 kV voltage pulse for 0.3-1.0 us, with a 0.15-0.3 T axial magnetic field applied by a pair of electromagnets. Anode blocks were printed from Water Shed XC 11122 photopolymer using a stereolithography process, and prepared with either a spray-coated or electroplated finish. Both manufacturing processes were compared against baseline data for a machined aluminum anode, noting any differences in power output, oscillation frequency, and mode stability. Evolution and durability of the 3-D printed structures were noted both visually and by tracking vacuum inventories via a residual gas analyzer. Research supported by AFOSR (grant #FA9550-15-1-0097) and AFRL.

  5. Thick beryllium coatings by magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H; Nikroo, A; Youngblood, K; Moreno, K; Wu, D; Fuller, T; Alford, C; Hayes, J; Detor, A; Wong, M; Hamza, A; van Buuren, T; Chason, E

    2011-04-14

    Thick (>150 {micro}m) beryllium coatings are studied as an ablator material of interest for fusion fuel capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). As an added complication, the coatings are deposited on mm-scale spherical substrates, as opposed to flats. DC magnetron sputtering is used because of the relative controllability of the processing temperature and energy of the deposits. We used ultra small angle x-ray spectroscopy (USAXS) to characterize the void fraction and distribution along the spherical surface. We investigated the void structure using a combination focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results show a few volume percent of voids and a typical void diameter of less than two hundred nanometers. Understanding how the stresses in the deposited material develop with thickness is important so that we can minimize film cracking and delamination. To that end, an in-situ multiple optical beam stress sensor (MOSS) was used to measure the stress behavior of thick Beryllium coatings on flat substrates as the material was being deposited. We will show how the film stress saturates with thickness and changes with pressure.

  6. Advances in Front-end Enabling Technologies for Thermal Infrared ` THz Torch' Wireless Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fangjing; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2016-09-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands (typically 20-40 and 60-100 THz) are best known for remote sensing applications that include temperature measurement (e.g. non-contacting thermometers and thermography), night vision and surveillance (e.g. ubiquitous motion sensing and target acquisition). This unregulated part of the electromagnetic spectrum also offers commercial opportunities for the development of short-range secure communications. The ` THz Torch' concept, which fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation by partitioning thermally generated spectral radiance into pre-defined frequency channels, was recently demonstrated by the authors. The thermal radiation within each channel can be independently pulse-modulated, transmitted and detected, to create a robust form of short-range secure communications within the thermal infrared. In this paper, recent progress in the front-end enabling technologies associated with the THz Torch concept is reported. Fundamental limitations of this technology are discussed; possible engineering solutions for further improving the performance of such thermal-based wireless links are proposed and verified either experimentally or through numerical simulations. By exploring a raft of enabling technologies, significant enhancements to both data rate and transmission range can be expected. With good engineering solutions, the THz Torch concept can exploit nineteenth century physics with twentieth century multiplexing schemes for low-cost twenty-first century ubiquitous applications in security and defence.

  7. Analysis of a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch. Part 2, Computational results

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Talpallikar, M.

    1993-12-31

    The fluid dynamics inside and outside a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) torch are analyzed using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques. The thermal spray device analyzed is similar to a Metco Diamond Jet torch with powder injection. The spray nozzle is axisymmetric with powder injected on the centerline, premixed fuel and oxygen fed from an annulus, and air cooling injected along the interior surface of the aircap choked flow conditions occur at the exit of the aircap and a supersonic, under-expanded jet develops externally. The details of the CFD simulation are given in a companion paper. This paper describes the general gas dynamic features of HVOF spraying and then gives a detailed discussion of the computational predictions of the present analysis. The gas velocity, temperature, pressure and Mach number distributions are presented for various locations inside and outside the torch. Characteristics of the metal spray particle velocity, temperature, Mach number, trajectory, and phase state (solid or liquid) are also presented and discussed. Extensive numerical flow visualization is provided to show flow features such as mixing layers, shock waves, and expansion waves.

  8. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1995-09-01

    The gas dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) torch are analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The thermal spray device analyzed is similar to a Metco Diamond Jet torch with powder feed. The injection nozzle is assumed to be axisymmetric with premixed fuel and oxygen fed from an annulus, and air cooling injected along the interior surface of the aircap. The aircap, a cronically converging nozzle, achieves choked flow conditions at the exit and a supersonic, under-expanded jet develops externally. Finite difference equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation are solved for the gas dynamics. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step and a 12-step quasi-global finite-rate chemistry model with dissociation of the gas and a total of nine species. Turbulent flow inside the aircap and in the free-jet decay is modeled using a two-equation k-{epsilon} model. An iterative, implicit, finite volume numerical method is used to solve the gas dynamic equations inside and outside the torch . The CFD results are compared with recent experimental measurements of pressure inside the HVOF aircap. Comparisons are made for two flow rates of premixed fuel and oxygen and air cooling. This paper presents the first published comparisons of CFD predictions and experimental measurements for HVOF tbermal spraying.

  9. Modelling Miniature Incandescent Light Bulbs for Thermal Infrared `THz Torch' Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fangjing; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2015-04-01

    The ` THz Torch' concept is an emerging technology that was recently introduced by the authors for implementing secure wireless communications over short distances within the thermal infrared (20-100 THz, 15 μm to 3 μm). In order to predict the band-limited output radiated power from ` THz Torch' transmitters, for the first time, this paper reports on a detailed investigation into the radiation mechanisms associated with the basic thermal transducer. We demonstrate how both primary and secondary sources of radiation emitted from miniature incandescent light bulbs contribute to the total band-limited output power. The former is generated by the heated tungsten filament within the bulb, while the latter is due to the increased temperature of its glass envelope. Using analytical thermodynamic modelling, the band-limited output radiated power is calculated, showing good agreement with experimental results. Finally, the output radiated power to input DC power conversion efficiency for this transducer is determined, as a function of bias current and operation within different spectral ranges. This modelling approach can serve as an invaluable tool for engineering solutions that can achieve optimal performances with both single and multi-channel ` THz Torch' systems.

  10. Plasma heating for containerless and microgravity materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Emily W. (Inventor); Man, Kin F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method for plasma heating of levitated samples to be used in containerless microgravity processing is disclosed. A sample is levitated by electrostatic, electromagnetic, aerodynamic, or acoustic systems, as is appropriate for the physical properties of the particular sample. The sample is heated by a plasma torch at atmospheric pressure. A ground plate is provided to help direct the plasma towards the sample. In addition, Helmholtz coils are provided to produce a magnetic field that can be used to spiral the plasma around the sample. The plasma heating system is oriented such that it does not interfere with the levitation system.

  11. Tribological performance of hybrid filtered arc-magnetron coatings - Part I: Coating deposition process and basic coating properties characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Gorokhovsky, Vladimir; Bowman, C.; Gannon, Paul E.; VanVorous, D.; Voevodin, A. A.; Rutkowski, A.; Muratore, C.; Smith, Richard J.; Kayani, Asghar N.; Gelles, David S.; Shutthanandan, V.; Trusov, B. G.

    2006-12-04

    Aircraft propulsion applications require low-friction and wear resistant surfaces that operate under high contact loads in severe environments. Recent research on supertough and low friction nanocomposite coatings produced with hybrid plasma deposition processes was demonstrated to have a high potential for such demanding applications. However, industrially scalable hybrid plasma technologies are needed for their commercial realization. The Large area Filtered Arc Deposition (LAFAD) process provides atomically smooth coatings at high deposition rates over large surface areas. The LAFAD technology allows functionally graded, multilayer, super-lattice and nanocomposite architectures of multi-elemental coatings via electro-magnetic mixing of two plasma flows composed of different metal ion vapors. Further advancement can be realized through a combinatorial process using a hybrid filtered arc-magnetron deposition system. In the present study, multilayer and nanostructured TiCrCN/TiCr +TiBC composite cermet coatings were deposited by the hybrid filtered arc-magnetron process. Filtered plasma streams from arc evaporated Ti and Cr targets, and two unbalanced magnetron sputtered B4C targets, were directed to the substrates in the presence of reactive gases. A multiphase nanocomposite coating architecture was designed to provide the optimal combination of corrosion and wear resistance of advanced steels (Pyrowear 675) used in aerospace bearing and gear applications. Coatings were characterized using SEM/EDS, XPS and RBS for morphology and chemistry, XRD and TEM for structural analyses, wafer curvature and nanoindentation for stress and mechanical properties, and Rockwell and scratch indentions for adhesion. Coating properties were evaluated for a variety of coating architectures. Thermodynamic modeling was used for estimation of phase composition of the top TiBC coating segment. Correlations between coating chemistry, structure and mechanical properties are discussed.

  12. Tracking the Magnetron Motion in FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jertz, Roland; Friedrich, Jochen; Kriete, Claudia; Nikolaev, Evgeny N; Baykut, Gökhan

    2015-08-01

    In Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) the ion magnetron motion is not usually directly measured, yet its contribution to the performance of the FT-ICR cell is important. Its presence is manifested primarily by the appearance of even-numbered harmonics in the spectra. In this work, the relationship between the ion magnetron motion in the ICR cell and the intensities of the second harmonic signal and its sideband peak in the FT-ICR spectrum is studied. Ion motion simulations show that during a cyclotron motion excitation of ions which are offset to the cell axis, a position-dependent radial drift of the cyclotron center takes place. This radial drift can be directed outwards if the ion is initially offset towards one of the detection electrodes, or it can be directed inwards if the ion is initially offset towards one of the excitation electrodes. Consequently, a magnetron orbit diameter can increase or decrease during a resonant cyclotron excitation. A method has been developed to study this behavior of the magnetron motion by acquiring a series of FT-ICR spectra using varied post-capture delay (PCD) time intervals. PCD is the delay time after the capture of the ions in the cell before the cyclotron excitation of the ion is started. Plotting the relative intensity of the second harmonic sideband peak versus the PCD in each mass spectrum leads to an oscillating "PCD curve". The position and height of minima and maxima of this curve can be used to interpret the size and the position of the magnetron orbit. Ion motion simulations show that an off-axis magnetron orbit generates even-numbered harmonic peaks with sidebands at a distance of one magnetron frequency and multiples of it. This magnetron offset is due to a radial offset of the electric field axis versus the geometric cell axis. In this work, we also show how this offset of the radial electric field center can be corrected by applying appropriate DC correction voltages to the

  13. Thermal plasma processing of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J.

    1992-02-01

    Emphasis has been on plasma synthesis of fine powders, plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), on related diagnostics, and on modeling work. Since plasma synthesis as well as plasma CVD make frequent use of plasma jets, the beginning has been devoted of plasma jets and behavior of particulates injected into such plasma jets. Although most of the construction of the Triple-Torch Plasma Reactor (TTPR) has already been done, modifications have been made in particular modifications required for plasma CVD of diamond. A new reactor designed for Counter-Flow Liquid Injection Plasma Synthesis (CFLIPS) proved to be an excellent tool for synthesis of fine powders as well as for plasma CVD. An attempt was made to model flow and temperature fields in this reactor. Substantial efforts were made to single out those parameters which govern particle size, size distribution, and powder quality in our plasma synthesis experiments. This knowledge is crucial for controlling the process and for meaningful diagnostics and modeling work. Plasma CVD of diamond films using both reactors has been very successful and we have been approached by a number of companies interested in using this technology for coating of tools.

  14. Full System Model of Magnetron Sputter Chamber - Proof-of-Principle Study

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, C; Gilmer, G; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Wemhoff, A; Barbee, T

    2007-05-04

    The lack of detailed knowledge of internal process conditions remains a key challenge in magnetron sputtering, both for chamber design and for process development. Fundamental information such as the pressure and temperature distribution of the sputter gas, and the energies and arrival angles of the sputtered atoms and other energetic species is often missing, or is only estimated from general formulas. However, open-source or low-cost tools are available for modeling most steps of the sputter process, which can give more accurate and complete data than textbook estimates, using only desktop computations. To get a better understanding of magnetron sputtering, we have collected existing models for the 5 major process steps: the input and distribution of the neutral background gas using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC), dynamics of the plasma using Particle In Cell-Monte Carlo Collision (PIC-MCC), impact of ions on the target using molecular dynamics (MD), transport of sputtered atoms to the substrate using DSMC, and growth of the film using hybrid Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) and MD methods. Models have been tested against experimental measurements. For example, gas rarefaction as observed by Rossnagel and others has been reproduced, and it is associated with a local pressure increase of {approx}50% which may strongly influence film properties such as stress. Results on energies and arrival angles of sputtered atoms and reflected gas neutrals are applied to the Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of film growth. Model results and applications to growth of dense Cu and Be films are presented.

  15. STEM-EELS analysis reveals stable high-density He in nanopores of amorphous silicon coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Schierholz, Roland; Lacroix, Bertrand; Godinho, Vanda; Caballero-Hernández, Jaime; Duchamp, Martial; Fernández, Asunción

    2015-02-20

    A broad interest has been showed recently on the study of nanostructuring of thin films and surfaces obtained by low-energy He plasma treatments and He incorporation via magnetron sputtering. In this paper spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope is used to locate and characterize the He state in nanoporous amorphous silicon coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering. A dedicated MATLAB program was developed to quantify the helium density inside individual pores based on the energy position shift or peak intensity of the He K-edge. A good agreement was observed between the high density (∼35-60 at nm(-3)) and pressure (0.3-1.0 GPa) values obtained in nanoscale analysis and the values derived from macroscopic measurements (the composition obtained by proton backscattering spectroscopy coupled to the macroscopic porosity estimated from ellipsometry). This work provides new insights into these novel porous coatings, providing evidence of high-density He located inside the pores and validating the methodology applied here to characterize the formation of pores filled with the helium process gas during deposition. A similar stabilization of condensed He bubbles has been previously demonstrated by high-energy He ion implantation in metals and is newly demonstrated here using a widely employed methodology, magnetron sputtering, for achieving coatings with a high density of homogeneously distributed pores and He storage capacities as high as 21 at%.

  16. STEM-EELS analysis reveals stable high-density He in nanopores of amorphous silicon coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schierholz, Roland; Lacroix, Bertrand; Godinho, Vanda; Caballero-Hernández, Jaime; Duchamp, Martial; Fernández, Asunción

    2015-02-01

    A broad interest has been showed recently on the study of nanostructuring of thin films and surfaces obtained by low-energy He plasma treatments and He incorporation via magnetron sputtering. In this paper spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope is used to locate and characterize the He state in nanoporous amorphous silicon coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering. A dedicated MATLAB program was developed to quantify the helium density inside individual pores based on the energy position shift or peak intensity of the He K-edge. A good agreement was observed between the high density (˜35-60 at nm-3) and pressure (0.3-1.0 GPa) values obtained in nanoscale analysis and the values derived from macroscopic measurements (the composition obtained by proton backscattering spectroscopy coupled to the macroscopic porosity estimated from ellipsometry). This work provides new insights into these novel porous coatings, providing evidence of high-density He located inside the pores and validating the methodology applied here to characterize the formation of pores filled with the helium process gas during deposition. A similar stabilization of condensed He bubbles has been previously demonstrated by high-energy He ion implantation in metals and is newly demonstrated here using a widely employed methodology, magnetron sputtering, for achieving coatings with a high density of homogeneously distributed pores and He storage capacities as high as 21 at%.

  17. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  18. Investigation on evaporation of Ti feedstock and formation of precursor TiO molecules during TiO2 nanopowder synthesis in induction thermal plasma with time-controlled feedstock injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Naoto; Kita, Kentaro; Ishisaka, Yosuke; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Sueyasu, Shiori; Nakamura, Keitaro; Kanazawa University Team; Nisshin Seifun Group Inc. Team

    2015-09-01

    The method using inductively coupled thermal plasma(ICTP) is very effective for nanopowder(NPs) synthesis. However, NPs formation process in the ICTP torch has not been clarified. In this study, the two-dimensional spectroscopic observation was carried out for ICTP torch during TiO2 NPs synthesis process with time-controlled feedstock injection. In order to investigate evaporation process of feedstock and formation process of precursor molecules, Ti feedstock was intermittently injected into the ICTP. Ti I(453.32 nm) and TiO(621 nm) were observed by using an imaging spectroscopic system. Observation results show that injected Ti feedstock was evaporated in the ICTP. Then, generated Ti atoms were transported to downstream of the torch by gas flow and were diffused to the radial direction by density gradient. High concentration of TiO molecular gas was formed only around central axis region in the torch.

  19. Laser Assisted Plasma Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.

    1999-10-05

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effecter to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (< 1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  20. Magnetron Sputtered Gold Contacts on N-gaas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buonaquisti, A. D.; Matson, R. J.; Russell, P. E.; Holloway, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    Direct current planar magnetron sputtering was used to deposit gold Schottky barrier electrical contacts on n-type GaAs of varying doping densities. The electrical character of the contact was determined from current voltage and electron beam induced voltage data. Without reducing the surface concentration of carbon and oxide, the contacts were found to be rectifying. There is evidence that energetic neutral particles reflected from the magnetron target strike the GaAs and cause interfacial damage similar to that observed for ion sputtering. Particle irradiation of the surface during contact deposition is discussed.

  1. Formation of dielectric silicon compounds by reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselov, D. S.; Voronov, Yu A.

    2016-09-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of reactive magnetron sputtering of the silicon target in the ambient of inert argon gas with reactive gas, nitrogen or oxygen. The magnetron was powered by two mid-frequency generators of a rectangular pulse of opposite polarity. The negative polarity pulse provides the sputtering of the target. The positive polarity pulse provides removal of accumulated charge from the surface of the target. This method does not require any special devices of resistances matching and provides continuous sputtering of the target.

  2. Magnetron sputtered boron films and TI/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1993-04-20

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  3. Magnetron sputtered boron films and Ti/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  4. Magnetron sputtered boron films and Ti/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1995-02-14

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence. 6 figs.

  5. Magnetron sputtered boron films and TI/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  6. Tribological and structural properties of titanium nitride and titanium aluminum nitride coatings deposited with modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Logan

    The demand for economical high-performance materials has brought attention to the development of advanced coatings. Recent advances in high power magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) have shown to improve tribological properties of coatings. These coatings offer increased wear and oxidation resistance, which may facilitate the use of more economical materials in harsh applications. This study demonstrates the use of novel forms of HPPMS, namely modulated pulsed-power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) and deep oscillation magnetron sputtering (DOMS), for depositing TiN and Ti1-xAlxN tribological coatings on commonly used alloys, such as Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718. Both technologies have been shown to offer unique plasma characteristics in the physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. High power pulses lead to a high degree of ionization compared to traditional direct-current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) and pulsed magnetron sputtering (PMS). Such a high degree of ionization was previously only achievable by cathodic arc deposition (CAD); however, CAD can lead to increased macroparticles that are unfavorable in high friction and corrosive environments. MPPMS, DOMS, and other HPPMS techniques offer unique plasma characteristics and have been shown to produce coatings with refined grain structure, improved density, hardness, adhesion, and wear resistance. Using DOMS and MPPMS, TiN and Ti1-xAlxN coatings were deposited using PMS to compare microstructures and tribological performance. For Ti1-xAlxN, two sputtering target compositions, Ti 0.5Al0.5 and Ti0.3Al0.7, were used to evaluate the effects of MPPMS on the coating's composition and tribological properties. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize microstructure and crystallographic texture. Several tribological properties were evaluated including: wear rate, coefficient of friction, adhesion, and nanohardness. Results show that substrate

  7. Plasma vitrification of waste materials

    DOEpatents

    McLaughlin, David F.; Dighe, Shyam V.; Gass, William R.

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a process wherein hazardous or radioactive wastes in the form of liquids, slurries, or finely divided solids are mixed with finely divided glassformers (silica, alumina, soda, etc.) and injected directly into the plume of a non-transferred arc plasma torch. The extremely high temperatures and heat transfer rates makes it possible to convert the waste-glassformer mixture into a fully vitrified molten glass product in a matter of milliseconds. The molten product may then be collected in a crucible for casting into final wasteform geometry, quenching in water, or further holding time to improve homogeneity and eliminate bubbles.

  8. Plasma vitrification of waste materials

    DOEpatents

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Dighe, S.V.; Gass, W.R.

    1997-06-10

    This invention provides a process wherein hazardous or radioactive wastes in the form of liquids, slurries, or finely divided solids are mixed with finely divided glassformers (silica, alumina, soda, etc.) and injected directly into the plume of a non-transferred arc plasma torch. The extremely high temperatures and heat transfer rates makes it possible to convert the waste-glassformer mixture into a fully vitrified molten glass product in a matter of milliseconds. The molten product may then be collected in a crucible for casting into final wasteform geometry, quenching in water, or further holding time to improve homogeneity and eliminate bubbles. 4 figs.

  9. Helical plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR{sup ®} rocket engine.

  10. Helical plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beklemishev, A. D.

    2015-10-01

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR® rocket engine.

  11. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  12. Simulated experiment for elimination of air contaminated with odorous chemical agents by microwave plasma burner

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Shin, Dong Hun; Uhm, Han Sup

    2007-10-15

    An experimental study on elimination of odorous chemical agent was carried out by making use of a microwave plasma burner, which consists of a microwave plasma torch and a reaction chamber with a fuel injector. Injection of hydrocarbon fuels into a high-temperature microwave torch plasma generates a plasma flame. The plasma flame can eliminate the odorous chemical agent diluted in air or purify the interior air of a large volume in isolated spaces. The specially designed reaction chamber eliminated H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} diluted in airflow rate of 5000 lpm (liters per minute), showing {beta} values of 46.52 and 39.69 J/l, respectively.

  13. Reactive sputtering of δ-ZrH{sub 2} thin films by high power impulse magnetron sputtering and direct current magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Högberg, Hans Tengdelius, Lina; Eriksson, Fredrik; Broitman, Esteban; Lu, Jun; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars; Samuelsson, Mattias

    2014-07-01

    Reactive sputtering by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) of a Zr target in Ar/H{sub 2} plasmas was employed to deposit Zr-H films on Si(100) substrates, and with H content up to 61 at. % and O contents typically below 0.2 at. % as determined by elastic recoil detection analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a chemical shift of ∼0.7 eV to higher binding energies for the Zr-H films compared to pure Zr films, consistent with a charge transfer from Zr to H in a zirconium hydride. X-ray diffraction shows that the films are single-phase δ-ZrH{sub 2} (CaF{sub 2} type structure) at H content >∼55 at. % and pole figure measurements give a 111 preferred orientation for these films. Scanning electron microscopy cross-section images show a glasslike microstructure for the HiPIMS films, while the DCMS films are columnar. Nanoindentation yield hardness values of 5.5–7 GPa for the δ-ZrH{sub 2} films that is slightly harder than the ∼5 GPa determined for Zr films and with coefficients of friction in the range of 0.12–0.18 to compare with the range of 0.4–0.6 obtained for Zr films. Wear resistance testing show that phase-pure δ-ZrH{sub 2} films deposited by HiPIMS exhibit up to 50 times lower wear rate compared to those containing a secondary Zr phase. Four-point probe measurements give resistivity values in the range of ∼100–120 μΩ cm for the δ-ZrH{sub 2} films, which is slightly higher compared to Zr films with values in the range 70–80 μΩ cm.

  14. Metal plasmas for the fabrication of nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2006-09-21

    A review is provided covering metal plasma production, theenergetic condensation of metal plasmas, and the formation ofnanostructures using such plasmas. Plasma production techniques includepulsed laser ablation, filtered cathodic arcs, and various forms ofionized physical vapor deposition, namely magnetron sputtering withionization of sputtered atoms in radio frequency discharges,self-sputtering, and high power impulse magnetron sputtering. Thediscussion of energetic condensation focuses on the control of kineticenergy by biasing and also includes considerations of the potentialenergy and the processes occurring at subplantation and implantation. Inthe final section on nanostructures, two different approaches arediscussed. In the top-down approach, the primary nanostructures arelithographically produced and metal plasma is used to coat or filltrenches and vias. Additionally, multilayers with nanosize periods(nanolaminates) can be produced. In the bottom-up approach, thermodynamicforces are used to fabricate nanocomposites and nanoporous materials bydecomposition and dealloying.

  15. Localized heating of electrons in ionization zones: Going beyond the Penning-Thornton paradigm in magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2014-12-07

    The fundamental question of how energy is supplied to a magnetron discharge is commonly answered by the Penning-Thornton paradigm invoking secondary electrons. Huo et al. (Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 22, 045005, (2013)) used a global discharge model to show that electron heating in the electric field of the magnetic presheath is dominant. In this contribution, this concept is applied locally taking into account the electric potential structure of ionization zones. Images of ionization zones can and should be interpreted as diagrams of the localization of electric potential and related electron energy, where certain collisions promote or dampen their formation.

  16. Surface properties and biocompatibility of nanostructured TiO2 film deposited by RF magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Asif; He, Jie; Jiao, Lingrui; Zhong, Xiaoxia; Sheng, Zhengming

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 films are deposited on a silicon substrate using 150-W power from the RF magnetron sputtering at working pressures of 3 to 5 Pa, with no substrate bias, and at 3 Pa with a substrate bias of -50 V. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that TiO2 films deposited on unbiased as well as biased substrates are all amorphous. Surface properties such as surface roughness and wettability of TiO2 films, grown in a plasma environment, under biased and unbiased substrate conditions are reported according to the said parameters of RF power and the working pressures. Primary rat osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) cells have been cultured on nanostructured TiO2 films fabricated at different conditions of substrate bias and working pressures. The effects of roughness and hydrophilicity of nanostructured TiO2 films on cell density and cell spreading have been discussed.

  17. Surface properties and biocompatibility of nanostructured TiO2 film deposited by RF magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Asif; He, Jie; Jiao, Lingrui; Zhong, Xiaoxia; Sheng, Zhengming

    2015-02-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 films are deposited on a silicon substrate using 150-W power from the RF magnetron sputtering at working pressures of 3 to 5 Pa, with no substrate bias, and at 3 Pa with a substrate bias of -50 V. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that TiO2 films deposited on unbiased as well as biased substrates are all amorphous. Surface properties such as surface roughness and wettability of TiO2 films, grown in a plasma environment, under biased and unbiased substrate conditions are reported according to the said parameters of RF power and the working pressures. Primary rat osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) cells have been cultured on nanostructured TiO2 films fabricated at different conditions of substrate bias and working pressures. The effects of roughness and hydrophilicity of nanostructured TiO2 films on cell density and cell spreading have been discussed.

  18. Characterization of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hala, Matej

    Paper I: In the first paper, we present a new approach in the characterization of the high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge evolution—time- and species-resolved plasma imaging—employing a set of band-pass optical interference filters suitable for the isolation of the emission originating from different species populating the plasma. We demonstrate that the introduction of such filters can be used to distinguish different phases of the discharge, and to visualize numerous plasma effects including background gas excitations during the discharge ignition, gas shock waves, and expansion of metal-rich plasmas. In particular, the application of this technique is shown on the diagnostics of the 200 µs long non-reactive HiPIMS discharges using a Cr target. Paper II: In order to gain further information about the dynamics of reactive HiPIMS discharges, both fast plasma imaging and time- and space-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES) are used for a systematic investigation of the 200 µs long HiPIMS pulses operated in Ar, N2 and N 2/Ar mixtures and at various pressures. It is observed that the dense metal plasma created next to the target propagates in the reactor at a speed ranging from 0.7 to 3.5 km s-1, depending on the working gas composition and the pressure. In fact, it increases with higher N 2 concentration and with lower pressure. The visible form of the propagating plasma wave changes from a hemispherical shape in Ar to a drop-like shape extending far from the target with increasing N2 concentration, owing to the significant emission from molecular N2. Interestingly, the evidence of the target self-sputtering is found for all investigated conditions, including pure N2 atmosphere. Paper III: Here, we report on the time- and species-resolved plasma imaging analysis of the dynamics of the 200 µs long HiPIMS discharges above a Cr target ignited in pure O2. It is shown that the discharge emission is dominated solely by neutral and

  19. On the physical origin of the nozzle characteristic and its connection with the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Kelly, H.

    2009-01-01

    The nozzle current-voltage characteristic for a cutting arc is presented in this work. The measurements are reported using a high energy density cutting arc torch with a nozzle bore radius of 0.5 mm. The arc current was fixed at 30 A while the plenum pressure and the oxygen gas mass flow rate were varied in the range of 0.55-0.65 MPa and 0.32-0.54 g s{sup -1}, respectively. The results show a very low electron density and the lack of electron attachment at the plasma boundary layer. No ion saturation current was found. For the smallest mass flow rate value gas breakdown was found for a biasing nozzle potential close to that of the cathode, but no evidence of such breakdown was found for the larger mass flow rate values. Using an expression for the ion speed at the entry of the collisional sheath formed between the nonequilibrium plasma and the negatively biased nozzle wall together with a generalized Saha equation coupled to the ion branch of the characteristic, the radial profile of the electron temperature, the spatial distribution of the plasma density at the plasma boundary, and the sheath thickness were obtained. In particular, the obtained thickness value at the breakdown condition was in good agreement with that obtained from the oxygen Paschen's curve. An electron temperature of about 4700-5700 K and a corresponding plasma density of the order of 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} m{sup -3} were found close to the nozzle wall. A physical interpretation on the origin of the double-arcing phenomenon is presented, that explains why the double-arcing (that it is established when the sheath breaks down) appears at low values of the gas mass flow.

  20. Welding torch trajectory generation for hull joining using autonomous welding mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hascoet, J. Y.; Hamilton, K.; Carabin, G.; Rauch, M.; Alonso, M.; Ares, E.

    2012-04-01

    Shipbuilding processes involve highly dangerous manual welding operations. Welding of ship hulls presents a hazardous environment for workers. This paper describes a new robotic system, developed by the SHIPWELD consortium, that moves autonomously on the hull and automatically executes the required welding processes. Specific focus is placed on the trajectory control of such a system and forms the basis for the discussion in this paper. It includes a description of the robotic hardware design as well as some methodology used to establish the torch trajectory control.