Science.gov

Sample records for main target organs

  1. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.10 Section 334.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.10 Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger...

  2. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.10 Section 334.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.10 Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger...

  3. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.10 Section 334.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.10 Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger...

  4. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.10 Section 334.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.10 Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger...

  5. 40 CFR 156.85 - Non-target organisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Non-target organisms. 156.85 Section 156.85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Non-target organisms. (a) Requirement. Where a hazard exists to non-target organisms, EPA may require...

  6. 40 CFR 156.85 - Non-target organisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Non-target organisms. 156.85 Section 156.85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Non-target organisms. (a) Requirement. Where a hazard exists to non-target organisms, EPA may require...

  7. 33 CFR 334.10 - Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gulf of Maine off Seal Island... REGULATIONS § 334.10 Gulf of Maine off Seal Island, Maine; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A circular area with a radius of 1.5 nautical miles, having its center just easterly of Seal...

  8. Artificial neural network study on organ-targeting peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunkyoung; Kim, Junhyoung; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Minkyoung; Rhee, Hokyoung; Shin, Jae-Min; Choi, Kihang; Kang, Sang-Kee; Lee, Nam Kyung; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Jung, Dong Hyun

    2010-01-01

    We report a new approach to studying organ targeting of peptides on the basis of peptide sequence information. The positive control data sets consist of organ-targeting peptide sequences identified by the peroral phage-display technique for four organs, and the negative control data are prepared from random sequences. The capacity of our models to make appropriate predictions is validated by statistical indicators including sensitivity, specificity, enrichment curve, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (the ROC score). VHSE descriptor produces statistically significant training models and the models with simple neural network architectures show slightly greater predictive power than those with complex ones. The training and test set statistics indicate that our models could discriminate between organ-targeting and random sequences. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the selection of organ-targeting peptides for generating peptide drugs or peptidomimetics.

  9. The brain is a target organ after acute exposure to depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    Lestaevel, P; Houpert, P; Bussy, C; Dhieux, B; Gourmelon, P; Paquet, F

    2005-09-01

    The health effects of depleted uranium (DU) are mainly caused by its chemical toxicity. Although the kidneys are the main target organs for uranium toxicity, uranium can also reach the brain. In this paper, the central effects of acute exposure to DU were studied in relation to health parameters and the sleep-wake cycle of adult rats. Animals were injected intraperitoneally with 144+/-10 microg DU kg-1 as nitrate. Three days after injection, the amounts of uranium in the kidneys represented 2.6 microg of DU g-1 of tissue, considered as a sub-nephrotoxic dosage. The central effect of uranium could be seen through a decrease in food intake as early as the first day after exposure and shorter paradoxical sleep 3 days after acute DU exposure (-18% of controls). With a lower dosage of DU (70+/-8 microg DU kg-1), no significant effect was observed on the sleep-wake cycle. The present study intends to illustrate the fact that the brain is a target organ, as are the kidneys, after acute exposure to a moderate dosage of DU. The mechanisms by which uranium causes these early neurophysiological perturbations shall be discussed.

  10. World Health Organization cardiovascular risk stratification and target organ damage.

    PubMed

    Piskorz, D; Bongarzoni, L; Citta, L; Citta, N; Citta, P; Keller, L; Mata, L; Tommasi, A

    2016-01-01

    Prediction charts allow treatment to be targeted according to simple markers of cardiovascular risk; many algorithms do not recommend screening asymptomatic target organ damage which could change dramatically the assessment. To demonstrate that target organ damage is present in low cardiovascular risk hypertensive patients and it is more frequent and severe as global cardiovascular risk increases. Consecutive hypertensive patients treated at a single Latin American center. Cardiovascular risk stratified according to 2013 WHO/ISH risk prediction chart America B. Left ventricular mass assessed by Devereux method, left ventricular hypertrophy considered >95g/m(2) in women and >115g/m(2) in men. Transmitral diastolic peak early flow velocity to average septal/lateral peak early diastolic relaxation velocity (E/e' ratio) measured cut off value >13. Systolic function assessed by tissue Doppler average interventricular septum/lateral wall mitral annulus rate systolic excursion (s wave). A total of 292 patients were included of whom 159 patients (54.5%) had cardiovascular risk of <10%, 90 (30.8%) had cardiovascular risk of 10-20% and 43 (14.7%) had cardiovascular risk of >20%. Left ventricular hypertrophy was detected in 17.6% low risk patients, 27.8% in medium risk and 23.3% in high risk (p<0.05), abnormal E/e' ratio was found in 13.8%, 31.1% and 27.9%, respectively (p<0.05). Mean s wave was 8.03+8, 8.1+9 and 8.7+1cm/s for low, intermediate and high risk patients, respectively (p<0.025). Target organ damage is more frequent and severe in high risk; one over four subjects was misclassified due to the presence of asymptomatic target organ damage. Copyright © 2015 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Do insect repellents induce drift behaviour in aquatic non-target organisms?

    PubMed

    Fink, Patrick; Moelzner, Jana; Berghahn, Ruediger; von Elert, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic insect repellents are compounds applied to surfaces to discourage insects, mainly mosquitoes, from landing on those surfaces. As some of these repellents have repeatedly been detected in surface waters at significant concentrations, they may also exert repellent effects on aquatic non-target organisms. In running water systems, aquatic invertebrates actively enter downstream drift in order to avoid unfavourable environmental conditions. We thus tested the hypothesis that the widely used insect repellents DEET (N,N-Diethyl-m-toluamide), EBAAP (3-[N-butyl-N-acetyl]-aminopropionic acid ethyl ester) and Icaridin (1-piperidinecarboxylic acid 2-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-methylpropyl ester) induce downstream drift behaviour in the aquatic invertebrates Gammarus pulex (Crustacea, Amphipoda) and Cloeon dipterum (Insecta, Ephemeroptera), using a laboratory-scale drift assay. We found no clear increase in the drift behaviour of both invertebrate species across a concentration gradient of eight orders of magnitude and even beyond maximum environmental concentrations for any of the three repellents. We found no evidence for a direct drift-inducing activity of insect repellents on aquatic non-target organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The apelin-APJ axis: A novel potential therapeutic target for organ fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shifang; Chen, Linxi; Lu, Liqun; Li, Lanfang

    2016-05-01

    Apelin, an endogenous ligand of the G-protein-coupled receptor APJ, is expressed in a diverse number of organs. The apelin-APJ axis helps to control the processes of pathological and physiological fibrosis, including renal fibrosis, cardiac fibrosis, liver fibrosis and pulmonary fibrosis. However, the role of apelin-APJ in organ fibrosis remains controversial due to conflicting study results. The apelin-APJ axis is a detrimental mechanism which promotes liver fibrosis mainly via up-regulation the expression of collagen-II and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ). On the contrary, the apelin-APJ axis is beneficial for renal fibrosis, cardiac fibrosis and pulmonary fibrosis. The apelin-APJ axis alleviates renal fibrosis by restraining the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In addition, the apelin-APJ axis attenuates cardiac fibrosis through multiple pathways. Furthermore, the apelin-APJ axis has beneficial effects on experimental bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) which suggest the apelin-APJ axis potentially alleviates pulmonary fibrosis. In this article, we review the controversies associated with apelin-APJ in organ fibrosis and introduce the drugs that target apelin-APJ. We conclude that future studies should place more emphasis on the relationship among apelin isoforms, APJ receptor subtypes and organ fibrosis. The apelin-APJ axis will be a potential therapeutic target and those drugs targeted for apelin-APJ may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy for renal fibrosis, cardiac fibrosis, liver fibrosis and pulmonary fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Macromolecular target prediction by self-organizing feature maps.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gisbert; Schneider, Petra

    2017-03-01

    Rational drug discovery would greatly benefit from a more nuanced appreciation of the activity of pharmacologically active compounds against a diverse panel of macromolecular targets. Already, computational target-prediction models assist medicinal chemists in library screening, de novo molecular design, optimization of active chemical agents, drug re-purposing, in the spotting of potential undesired off-target activities, and in the 'de-orphaning' of phenotypic screening hits. The self-organizing map (SOM) algorithm has been employed successfully for these and other purposes. Areas covered: The authors recapitulate contemporary artificial neural network methods for macromolecular target prediction, and present the basic SOM algorithm at a conceptual level. Specifically, they highlight consensus target-scoring by the employment of multiple SOMs, and discuss the opportunities and limitations of this technique. Expert opinion: Self-organizing feature maps represent a straightforward approach to ligand clustering and classification. Some of the appeal lies in their conceptual simplicity and broad applicability domain. Despite known algorithmic shortcomings, this computational target prediction concept has been proven to work in prospective settings with high success rates. It represents a prototypic technique for future advances in the in silico identification of the modes of action and macromolecular targets of bioactive molecules.

  14. Soil microbial community structure and target organisms under different fumigation treatments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several high-value crop producers in California rely heavily on soil fumigants to control key diseases, nematodes, weeds and volunteer crops. Fumigants with broad biocidal activity can affect both target and non-target soil organisms. The ability of non-target soil organisms to recover after fumigat...

  15. Self-organizing team formation for target observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, Richard S.; Bogner, Robert E.

    2001-08-01

    Target observation is a problem where the application of multiple sensors can improve the probability of detection and observation of the target. Team formation is one method by which seemingly unsophisticated heterogeneous sensors may be organized to achieve a coordinated observation system. The sensors, which we shall refer to as agents, are situated in an area of interest with the goal of observing a moving target. We apply a team approach to this problem, which combines the strengths of individual agents into a cohesive entity - the team. In autonomous systems, the mechanisms that underlie the formation of a team are of interest. Teams may be formed by various mechanisms, which include an externally imposed grouping of agents, or an internally, self-organized (SO) grouping of agents. Internally motivated mechanisms are particularly challenging, but offer the benefit of being unsupervised, an important quality for groups of autonomous cooperating machines. This is the focus of our research. By studying natural systems such as colonies of ants, we obtain insight into these mechanisms of self organization. We propose that the team is an expression of a distributed agent-self, and that a particular realization of the agent-self exists, whilst the environmental conditions are conducive to that existence. We describe an algorithms for agent team formation that is inspired by the self-organizing behavior of ants, and describe simulation results for team formation amongst a lattice of networked sensors.

  16. Association Mapping of Main Tomato Fruit Sugars and Organic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiantao; Xu, Yao; Ding, Qin; Huang, Xinli; Zhang, Yating; Zou, Zhirong; Li, Mingjun; Cui, Lu; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Association mapping has been widely used to map the significant associated loci responsible for natural variation in complex traits and are valuable for crop improvement. Sugars and organic acids are the most important metabolites in tomato fruits. We used a collection of 174 tomato accessions composed of Solanum lycopersicum (123 accessions) and S. lycopersicum var cerasiforme (51 accessions) to detect significantly associated loci controlling the variation of main sugars and organic acids. The accessions were genotyped with 182 SSRs spreading over the tomato genome. Association mapping was conducted on the main sugars and organic acids detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) over 2 years using the mixed linear model (MLM). We detected a total of 58 significantly associated loci (P < 0.001) for the 17 sugars and organic acids, including fructose, glucose, sucrose, citric acid, malic acid. These results not only co-localized with several reported QTLs, including fru9.1/PV, suc9.1/PV, ca2.1/HS, ca3.1/PV, ca4.1/PV, and ca8.1/PV, but also provided a list of candidate significantly associated loci to be functionally validated. These significantly associated loci could be used for deciphering the genetic architecture of tomato fruit sugars and organic acids and for tomato quality breeding. PMID:27617019

  17. Association Mapping of Main Tomato Fruit Sugars and Organic Acids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiantao; Xu, Yao; Ding, Qin; Huang, Xinli; Zhang, Yating; Zou, Zhirong; Li, Mingjun; Cui, Lu; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Association mapping has been widely used to map the significant associated loci responsible for natural variation in complex traits and are valuable for crop improvement. Sugars and organic acids are the most important metabolites in tomato fruits. We used a collection of 174 tomato accessions composed of Solanum lycopersicum (123 accessions) and S. lycopersicum var cerasiforme (51 accessions) to detect significantly associated loci controlling the variation of main sugars and organic acids. The accessions were genotyped with 182 SSRs spreading over the tomato genome. Association mapping was conducted on the main sugars and organic acids detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) over 2 years using the mixed linear model (MLM). We detected a total of 58 significantly associated loci (P < 0.001) for the 17 sugars and organic acids, including fructose, glucose, sucrose, citric acid, malic acid. These results not only co-localized with several reported QTLs, including fru9.1/PV, suc9.1/PV, ca2.1/HS, ca3.1/PV, ca4.1/PV, and ca8.1/PV, but also provided a list of candidate significantly associated loci to be functionally validated. These significantly associated loci could be used for deciphering the genetic architecture of tomato fruit sugars and organic acids and for tomato quality breeding.

  18. Inhaled Cadmium Oxide Nanoparticles: Their in Vivo Fate and Effect on Target Organs.

    PubMed

    Dumkova, Jana; Vrlikova, Lucie; Vecera, Zbynek; Putnova, Barbora; Docekal, Bohumil; Mikuska, Pavel; Fictum, Petr; Hampl, Ales; Buchtova, Marcela

    2016-06-03

    The increasing amount of heavy metals used in manufacturing equivalently increases hazards of environmental pollution by industrial products such as cadmium oxide (CdO) nanoparticles. Here, we aimed to unravel the CdO nanoparticle destiny upon their entry into lungs by inhalations, with the main focus on the ultrastructural changes that the nanoparticles may cause to tissues of the primary and secondary target organs. We indeed found the CdO nanoparticles to be transported from the lungs into secondary target organs by blood. In lungs, inhaled CdO nanoparticles caused significant alterations in parenchyma tissue including hyperemia, enlarged pulmonary septa, congested capillaries, alveolar emphysema and small areas of atelectasis. Nanoparticles were observed in the cytoplasm of cells lining bronchioles, in the alveolar spaces as well as inside the membranous pneumocytes and in phagosomes of lung macrophages. Nanoparticles even penetrated through the membrane into some organelles including mitochondria and they also accumulated in the cytoplasmic vesicles. In livers, inhalation caused periportal inflammation and local hepatic necrosis. Only minor changes such as diffusely thickened filtration membrane with intramembranous electron dense deposits were observed in kidney. Taken together, inhaled CdO nanoparticles not only accumulated in lungs but they were also transported to other organs causing serious damage at tissue as well as cellular level.

  19. Inhaled Cadmium Oxide Nanoparticles: Their in Vivo Fate and Effect on Target Organs

    PubMed Central

    Dumkova, Jana; Vrlikova, Lucie; Vecera, Zbynek; Putnova, Barbora; Docekal, Bohumil; Mikuska, Pavel; Fictum, Petr; Hampl, Ales; Buchtova, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    The increasing amount of heavy metals used in manufacturing equivalently increases hazards of environmental pollution by industrial products such as cadmium oxide (CdO) nanoparticles. Here, we aimed to unravel the CdO nanoparticle destiny upon their entry into lungs by inhalations, with the main focus on the ultrastructural changes that the nanoparticles may cause to tissues of the primary and secondary target organs. We indeed found the CdO nanoparticles to be transported from the lungs into secondary target organs by blood. In lungs, inhaled CdO nanoparticles caused significant alterations in parenchyma tissue including hyperemia, enlarged pulmonary septa, congested capillaries, alveolar emphysema and small areas of atelectasis. Nanoparticles were observed in the cytoplasm of cells lining bronchioles, in the alveolar spaces as well as inside the membranous pneumocytes and in phagosomes of lung macrophages. Nanoparticles even penetrated through the membrane into some organelles including mitochondria and they also accumulated in the cytoplasmic vesicles. In livers, inhalation caused periportal inflammation and local hepatic necrosis. Only minor changes such as diffusely thickened filtration membrane with intramembranous electron dense deposits were observed in kidney. Taken together, inhaled CdO nanoparticles not only accumulated in lungs but they were also transported to other organs causing serious damage at tissue as well as cellular level. PMID:27271611

  20. Can Maine metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) finance transportation projects through bond financing?

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2008-12-01

    In January 2008 the Maine metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) requested the Transportation : Research Division of the Maine Department of Transportation to conduct research to determine if it is : possible for MPOs to finance projects through ...

  1. Target organs in chronic bioassays of 533 chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, L.S.; Slone, T.H.; Manley, N.B.

    1991-06-01

    A compendium of carcinogenesis bioassay results organized by target organ is presented for 533 chemicals that are carcinogenic in at least one species. This compendium is based primarily on experiments in rats or mice; results in hamsters, nonhuman primates, and dogs are also reported. The compendium can be used to identify chemicals that induce tumors at particular sites, and to determine whether target sites are the same for chemicals positive in more than one species. The Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB), which includes results of 3969 experiments, is used in the analysis. The published CPDB includes details on each test, andmore » literature references. Chemical carcinogens are reported for 35 different target organs in rats or mice. More than 80% of the carcinogens in each of these species are positive in at least one of the 8 most frequent target sites; liver, lung, mammary gland, stomach, vascular system, kidney, hematopoietic system, and urinary bladder. An analysis is presented of how well one can predict the carcinogenic response in mice from results in rats, or vice versa. Among chemicals tested in both species, 76% of rat carcinogens are positive in mice, and 71% of mouse carcinogens are positive in rats. Prediction is less accurate to the same target site: 52% of rat carcinogens are positive in the same site in mice, and 48% of mouse carcinogens are positive in the same site in rats. The liver is the most frequent site in common between rats and mice.« less

  2. Transsynaptic Teneurin Signaling in Neuromuscular Synapse Organization and Target Choice

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Timothy J.; Hong, Weizhe; Dani, Vardhan S.; Favaloro, Vincenzo; Luo, Liqun

    2012-01-01

    Synapse assembly requires transsynaptic signals between the pre- and postsynapse1, but the understanding of essential organizational molecules remains incomplete2. Teneurins are conserved, EGF-repeat containing transmembrane proteins with large extracellular domains3. Here we show that two Drosophila Teneurins, Ten-m and Ten-a, are required for neuromuscular synapse organization and target selection. Ten-a is presynaptic while Ten-m is mostly postsynaptic; neuronal Ten-a and muscle Ten-m form a complex in vivo. Pre- or postsynaptic Teneurin perturbations cause severe synapse loss and impair many facets of organization transsynaptically and cell-autonomously. These include defects in active zone apposition, release sites, membrane and vesicle organization, and synaptic transmission. Moreover, the presynaptic microtubule and postsynaptic spectrin cytoskeletons are severely disrupted, suggesting a mechanism whereby Teneurins organize the cytoskeleton, which in turn affects other aspects of synapse development. Supporting this, Ten-m physically interacts with α-spectrin. Genetic analyses of teneurin and neuroligin reveal their differential roles that synergize to promote synapse assembly. Finally, at elevated endogenous levels, Ten-m regulates specific motoneuron-muscle target selection. Our study identifies the Teneurins as a key bi-directional transsynaptic signal in general synapse organization, and demonstrates that such a molecule can also regulate target selection. PMID:22426000

  3. Target Organ Metabolism, Toxicity, and Mechanisms of Trichloroethylene and Perchloroethylene: Key Similarities, Differences, and Data Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Cichocki, Joseph A.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Guha, Neela; Chiu, Weihsueh A.

    2016-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene or tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are high–production volume chemicals with numerous industrial applications. As a consequence of their widespread use, these chemicals are ubiquitous environmental contaminants to which the general population is commonly exposed. It is widely assumed that TCE and PCE are toxicologically similar; both are simple olefins with three (TCE) or four (PCE) chlorines. Nonetheless, despite decades of research on the adverse health effects of TCE or PCE, few studies have directly compared these two toxicants. Although the metabolic pathways are qualitatively similar, quantitative differences in the flux and yield of metabolites exist. Recent human health assessments have uncovered some overlap in target organs that are affected by exposure to TCE or PCE, and divergent species- and sex-specificity with regard to cancer and noncancer hazards. The objective of this minireview is to highlight key similarities, differences, and data gaps in target organ metabolism and mechanism of toxicity. The main anticipated outcome of this review is to encourage research to 1) directly compare the responses to TCE and PCE using more sensitive biochemical techniques and robust statistical comparisons; 2) more closely examine interindividual variability in the relationship between toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics for TCE and PCE; 3) elucidate the effect of coexposure to these two toxicants; and 4) explore new mechanisms for target organ toxicity associated with TCE and/or PCE exposure. PMID:27511820

  4. Target Organ Metabolism, Toxicity, and Mechanisms of Trichloroethylene and Perchloroethylene: Key Similarities, Differences, and Data Gaps.

    PubMed

    Cichocki, Joseph A; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Guha, Neela; Chiu, Weihsueh A; Rusyn, Ivan; Lash, Lawrence H

    2016-10-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene or tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are high-production volume chemicals with numerous industrial applications. As a consequence of their widespread use, these chemicals are ubiquitous environmental contaminants to which the general population is commonly exposed. It is widely assumed that TCE and PCE are toxicologically similar; both are simple olefins with three (TCE) or four (PCE) chlorines. Nonetheless, despite decades of research on the adverse health effects of TCE or PCE, few studies have directly compared these two toxicants. Although the metabolic pathways are qualitatively similar, quantitative differences in the flux and yield of metabolites exist. Recent human health assessments have uncovered some overlap in target organs that are affected by exposure to TCE or PCE, and divergent species- and sex-specificity with regard to cancer and noncancer hazards. The objective of this minireview is to highlight key similarities, differences, and data gaps in target organ metabolism and mechanism of toxicity. The main anticipated outcome of this review is to encourage research to 1) directly compare the responses to TCE and PCE using more sensitive biochemical techniques and robust statistical comparisons; 2) more closely examine interindividual variability in the relationship between toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics for TCE and PCE; 3) elucidate the effect of coexposure to these two toxicants; and 4) explore new mechanisms for target organ toxicity associated with TCE and/or PCE exposure. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. Self-organization and progenitor targeting generate stable patterns in planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Atabay, Kutay Deniz; LoCascio, Samuel A; de Hoog, Thom; Reddien, Peter W

    2018-04-27

    During animal regeneration, cells must organize into discrete and functional systems. We show that self-organization, along with patterning cues, govern progenitor behavior in planarian regeneration. Surgical paradigms allowed the manipulation of planarian eye regeneration in predictable locations and numbers, generating alternative stable neuroanatomical states for wild-type animals with multiple functional ectopic eyes. We used animals with multiple ectopic eyes and eye transplantation to demonstrate that broad progenitor specification, combined with self-organization, allows anatomy maintenance during regeneration. We propose a model for regenerative progenitors involving (i) migratory targeting cues, (ii) self-organization into existing or regenerating eyes, and (iii) a broad zone, associated with coarse progenitor specification, in which eyes can be targeted by progenitors. These three properties help explain how tissues can be organized during regeneration. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  6. Serum uric acid and target organ damage in essential hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ofori, Sandra N; Odia, Osaretin J

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular mortality, as it acts through its effects on target organs, such as the heart and kidneys. Hyperuricemia increases cardiovascular risk in patients with hypertension. Objective To assess the relationship between serum uric acid and target organ damage (left ventricular hypertrophy and microalbuminuria) in untreated patients with essential hypertension. Patients and methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 130 (85 females, 45 males) newly diagnosed, untreated patients with essential hypertension. Sixty-five healthy age- and sex-matched non-hypertensive individuals served as controls for comparison. Left ventricular hypertrophy was evaluated by cardiac ultrasound scan, and microalbuminuria was assessed in an early morning midstream urine sample by immunoturbidimetry. Blood samples were collected for assessing uric acid levels. Results Mean serum uric acid was significantly higher among the patients with hypertension (379.7±109.2 μmol/L) than in the controls (296.9±89.8 μmol/L; P<0.001), and the prevalence of hyperuricemia was 46.9% among the hypertensive patients and 16.9% among the controls (P<0.001). Among the hypertensive patients, microalbuminuria was present in 54.1% of those with hyperuricemia and in 24.6% of those with normal uric acid levels (P=0.001). Similarly, left ventricular hypertrophy was more common in the hypertensive patients with hyperuricemia (70.5% versus 42.0%, respectively; P=0.001). There was a significant linear relationship between mean uric acid levels and the number of target organ damage (none versus one versus two: P=0.012). Conclusion These results indicate that serum uric acid is associated with target organ damage in patients with hypertension, even at the time of diagnosis; thus, it is a reliable marker of cardiovascular damage in our patient population. PMID:24833906

  7. Serum uric acid and target organ damage in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ofori, Sandra N; Odia, Osaretin J

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular mortality, as it acts through its effects on target organs, such as the heart and kidneys. Hyperuricemia increases cardiovascular risk in patients with hypertension. To assess the relationship between serum uric acid and target organ damage (left ventricular hypertrophy and microalbuminuria) in untreated patients with essential hypertension. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 130 (85 females, 45 males) newly diagnosed, untreated patients with essential hypertension. Sixty-five healthy age- and sex-matched non-hypertensive individuals served as controls for comparison. Left ventricular hypertrophy was evaluated by cardiac ultrasound scan, and microalbuminuria was assessed in an early morning midstream urine sample by immunoturbidimetry. Blood samples were collected for assessing uric acid levels. Mean serum uric acid was significantly higher among the patients with hypertension (379.7±109.2 μmol/L) than in the controls (296.9±89.8 μmol/L; P<0.001), and the prevalence of hyperuricemia was 46.9% among the hypertensive patients and 16.9% among the controls (P<0.001). Among the hypertensive patients, microalbuminuria was present in 54.1% of those with hyperuricemia and in 24.6% of those with normal uric acid levels (P=0.001). Similarly, left ventricular hypertrophy was more common in the hypertensive patients with hyperuricemia (70.5% versus 42.0%, respectively; P=0.001). There was a significant linear relationship between mean uric acid levels and the number of target organ damage (none versus one versus two: P=0.012). These results indicate that serum uric acid is associated with target organ damage in patients with hypertension, even at the time of diagnosis; thus, it is a reliable marker of cardiovascular damage in our patient population.

  8. An integrated miRNA functional screening and target validation method for organ morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rebustini, Ivan T; Vlahos, Maryann; Packer, Trevor; Kukuruzinska, Maria A; Maas, Richard L

    2016-03-16

    The relative ease of identifying microRNAs and their increasing recognition as important regulators of organogenesis motivate the development of methods to efficiently assess microRNA function during organ morphogenesis. In this context, embryonic organ explants provide a reliable and reproducible system that recapitulates some of the important early morphogenetic processes during organ development. Here we present a method to target microRNA function in explanted mouse embryonic organs. Our method combines the use of peptide-based nanoparticles to transfect specific microRNA inhibitors or activators into embryonic organ explants, with a microRNA pulldown assay that allows direct identification of microRNA targets. This method provides effective assessment of microRNA function during organ morphogenesis, allows prioritization of multiple microRNAs in parallel for subsequent genetic approaches, and can be applied to a variety of embryonic organs.

  9. Non-Target Analyses of organic compounds in ice cores using HPLC-ESI-UHRMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuth, Christoph; Müller-Tautges, Christina; Eichler, Anja; Schwikowski, Margit; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    mass spectrometry were applied to the results of the non-target analysis. By various classifications in Van Krevelen plots[2], amino acids and degradation products of proteins as well as degradation products of lignins have been determined as the main components of the ice core. Furthermore, the majority of WSOC molecular formulas identified in this non-target analysis had molar H/C and O/C ratios similar to mono- and di-carboxylic acids and SOAs[3]. Studies of the carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol showed that a majority of the elemental formulas can be associated with the combustion of biomass as a major source of the WSOC[4]. References: [1] Grannas et al., J. Geophys Res.,2006, 111 [2] Sleighter, RL, Hatcher, PG, J. Mass Spectrom., 2007, 42, 559-574 [3] Wozniak et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2008, 8, 5099-5111 [4] Kroll et al., Nature Chemistry, 2011, 3, 133-139

  10. Ambulatory and home blood pressure monitoring in children and adolescents: diagnosis of hypertension and assessment of target-organ damage.

    PubMed

    Karpettas, Nikos; Nasothimiou, Efthimia; Kollias, Anastasios; Vazeou, Adriani; Stergiou, George S

    2013-04-01

    The prevalence of elevated blood pressure in children and adolescents is more common than previously believed and often represents the early onset of essential hypertension, particularly in adolescents. The definition of hypertension in children is based on distribution criteria and normalcy tables that provide blood pressure percentiles for each measurement method (office, ambulatory and home) according to the individual's age, gender and body size. Owing to the white coat and masked hypertension phenomena, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is indispensable for the diagnosis of hypertension in children. Home blood pressure monitoring in children has been less well studied, and at present, treatment decisions should not be based solely on such measurements. Hypertension-induced preclinical target-organ damage (mainly echocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy) is not uncommon in children and should be evaluated in all hypertensive children. Other indices of target-organ damage, such as carotid intima-media thickness, pulse wave velocity and microalbuminuria, remain under investigation in pediatric hypertension.

  11. Co-existence of GM, conventional and organic crops in developing countries: Main debates and concerns.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Hossein; Taube, Friedhelm; Taheri, Fatemeh

    2017-06-05

    The co-existence approach of GM crops with conventional agriculture and organic farming as a feasible agricultural farming system has recently been placed in the center of hot debates at the EU-level and become a source of anxiety in developing countries. The main promises of this approach is to ensure "food security" and "food safety" on the one hand, and to avoid the adventitious presence of GM crops in conventional and organic farming on the other, as well as to present concerns in many debates on implementing the approach in developing countries. Here, we discuss the main debates on ("what," "why," "who," "where," "which," and "how") applying this approach in developing countries and review the main considerations and tradeoffs in this regard. The paper concludes that a peaceful co-existence between GM, conventional, and organic farming is not easy but is still possible. The goal should be to implement rules that are well-established proportionately, efficiently and cost-effectively, using crop-case, farming system-based and should be biodiversity-focused ending up with "codes of good agricultural practice" for co-existence.

  12. Trace organic chemical pollutants from the lake waters of San Pablo City, Philippines by targeted and non-targeted analysis.

    PubMed

    Dimzon, Ian Ken D; Morata, Ann Selma; Müller, Janine; Yanela, Roy Kristian; Lebertz, Stephan; Weil, Heike; Perez, Teresita R; Müller, Jutta; Dayrit, Fabian M; Knepper, Thomas P

    2018-10-15

    More than half of the freshwater lakes in the Philippines are small with surface areas of <2 km 2 . The dynamics in these lakes are different from those in the bigger lakes. This study was conducted to determine the organic pollutants and their sources in three of the seven lakes of San Pablo City in Laguna, Philippines: lakes Palakpakin, Sampaloc, and Pandin. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and Liquid Chromatography - Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were used in the targeted and non-targeted analysis of the lake water samples. The three lakes are all volcanic crater lakes but are exposed to different anthropogenic activities, which includes domestic activities, livelihood (farming and aquaculture) and eco-tourism. Due to the presence of rice fields and fruit plantations, chlorpyrifos was detected in the three lakes while other pesticides like cypermethrin, picolinafen and quinoxyfen were additionally found in Lake Sampaloc, which is the biggest of the three lakes and located within the urbanized section of the city. Traces of different surfactants (linear alkylbenzene sulfonates, secondary alkyl sulfonates, alkyl sulfates, alkyl ether sulfates), biocide benzalkonium chloride, insect repellent diethyltoluamide, antibiotics (sulfadiazine and sulfamethoxazole), hypertension drug telmisartan, phosphate-based fire retardants, and artificial sweeteners (acesulfame, cyclamate, saccharin and sucralose) were detected in lakes Sampaloc and Palakpakin. The same surfactants, artificial sweeteners, insect repellant and phosphate-based fire retardants were also found in Lake Pandin, which is mainly used for eco-tourism activities like swimming and boating. The results of this study suggest that the organic pollutants present in the small lakes can be linked to the various human activities in the immediate lake environment. Because small lakes are more prone to environmental stresses, human activities in the said lakes must be regulated to ensure sustainable

  13. [Ethicolegal issues of organ donation as the main obstacle to the progress of clinical transplantation].

    PubMed

    Tarabarko, N V; Fomicheva, E V

    2006-01-01

    Ethicolegal issues present the main factor hindering obtaining organs from corpses and living donors, the distribution of cadaveric organs, and the financial providence of donorship in Russia. The actual Russian legislation is contradictory in terms of obtaining relatives' consent for the transplantation of cadaveric organs. There are no precise definitions of the degree of genetic relationship between the donor and recipient sufficient for transplantation. Selling and purchasing human organs is strictly prohibited, while financial compensation of the living donor seems to be a fair measure. Providing the possibility to verify brain death is a necessary condition for expanding the cadaveric organ pool. The organ shortage leads to improper distribution of donor organs. All these problems have to be solved for the progress of organ transplantation in Russia.

  14. Relationship between increased arterial stiffness and other markers of target organ damage.

    PubMed

    Rodilla, Enrique; Costa, José Antonio; Pérez-Lahiguera, Francisco; González, Carmen; Pascual, José María

    2010-04-24

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship of arterial stiffness with other markers of target organ damage, and the clinical factors related to it. Cross-sectional study that included 208 (115 men) never treated hypertensive, non-diabetic patients (mean age, 49+/-12 years). In addition to a full clinical study, 24h ambulatory blood pressure (BP), and determination of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and microalbuminuria were performed. Clinical arterial stiffness was assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) obtained with applanation tonometry (SphygmoCor-System). PWV was 8.3 (7.3-9.9)m/s (median, interquartile range). Stepwise regression analysis revealed that age (beta=0.086, p<0.001), 24-h pulse pressure (beta=0.058, p<0.001), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (beta=0.009, p<0.013) were independent determinants of PWV. PWV>12m/s (indicating target organ lesion) was present in only 16 (7.7%) patients, less frequent than LVH (28% of the patients) and microalbuminuria (16%). However, of the 16 patients with elevated PWV, 10 (62%) had neither LVH or microalbuminuria. In a logistic multivariate regression analysis the factors related to elevated PWV were age > or =45 in man and > or =55 in women (OR: 23.8, 95% CI: 2.7-195.5; p=0.004), LDL cholesterol > or =160mg/dl (OR: 10.6, 95% CI: 2.6-42.7; p=0.001) and increased 24-h pulse pressure > or =55mmHg (OR: 3.9, 95% CI: 1.2-12.9; p=0.03). In untreated middle age hypertensives arterial stiffness assessed by PWV is less frequent than LVH or microalbuminuria. PWV is mainly related to age, LDL cholesterol, and pulse pressure values. 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Hispanic organ donation: impact of a Spanish-language organ donation campaign.

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro, Eusebio M.; Jones, Sara Pace; Robles, Antonio Santa Maria; Siegel, Jason

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hispanic Americans have a substantial need for organ transplants and are underrepresented among organ donors, yet very little is known about how to increase available donors in this community. This study assesses the impact of a Spanish-language media campaign targeting organ donation among Hispanic Americans in two urban Arizona counties. METHODS: The study collected data via four surveys conducted before and after implementation of a Spanish-language media campaign targeting organ donation among Spanish-dominant Hispanic Americans in Pima and Maricopa counties in Arizona. The main intervention consisted of four Spanish-language television advertisements and two Spanish-language radio advertisements. RESULTS: The media campaign was successfully implemented and attained substantial exposure among the target audience. Postintervention beliefs were more prodonation, and there was more family discussion postintervention. In both counties, residents exposed to the campaign reported more prodonation beliefs and family discussion. Exposed Maricopa residents were also more likely to be potential donors. CONCLUSIONS: Study data indicate a positive impact of a media campaign targeting organ donation beliefs and behaviors among Spanish-dominant Hispanic Americans in Arizona. It is hoped that these findings will stimulate further research in this important area. PMID:16532975

  16. 33 CFR 334.40 - Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.40 Section 334.40... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.40 Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of... yards having its center on Shag Rock in the vicinity of Duck Island at latitude 43°00′12″, longitude 70...

  17. 33 CFR 334.40 - Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.40 Section 334.40... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.40 Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of... yards having its center on Shag Rock in the vicinity of Duck Island at latitude 43°00′12″, longitude 70...

  18. 33 CFR 334.40 - Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.40 Section 334.40... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.40 Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of... yards having its center on Shag Rock in the vicinity of Duck Island at latitude 43°00′12″, longitude 70...

  19. 33 CFR 334.40 - Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.40 Section 334.40... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.40 Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of... yards having its center on Shag Rock in the vicinity of Duck Island at latitude 43°00′12″, longitude 70...

  20. 33 CFR 334.40 - Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Duck Island, Maine, Isles of Shoals; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.40 Section 334.40... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.40 Atlantic Ocean in vicinity of Duck Island, Maine, Isles of... yards having its center on Shag Rock in the vicinity of Duck Island at latitude 43°00′12″, longitude 70...

  1. Gender-related differences in adolescent hypertension and in target organ effects.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Mária; Katona, Eva; Settakis, Georgios; Paragh, György; Molnár, Csilla; Fülesdi, Béla; Páll, Dénes

    2010-04-01

    To assess whether a gender difference exists in adolescent hypertension and its target organ damage and to compare potential confounding factors and target organ damage in hypertensive and normotensive adolescent girls. From the Debrecen Hypertension Study, the anthropometric, blood pressure, and laboratory data as well as intima-media thickness (IMT) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) of 58 hypertensive boys, 56 hypertensive girls, and 30 normotensive girls were analyzed. Both systolic and mean blood pressure values were higher in adolescent hypertensive boys than in girls. This difference was also present when comparing 24-hour average blood pressure values. Plasma concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin-1 were not different in the two gender groups. IMT of the carotid arteries were similar in hypertensive boys and girls, but a significantly higher LVMI was detected in boys. A significant difference was detected in anthropometric data (height, weight, and body mass index [BMI]), plasma concentration of NO (lower levels in hypertensives), and IMT in hypertensive and normotensive girls (higher IMT in hypertensive girls). There is a difference between the severity of hypertension between hypertensive adolescent girls and boys. Hypertensive girls differ from normotensive girls not only in blood pressure values but also in risk factors and subclinical target organ effects. Further studies are needed to explain the gender differences in adolescent hypertension. The potential role of sex hormones in hypertensive teenagers also needs to be clarified in future works.

  2. Ultralow-Power Near Infrared Lamp Light Operable Targeted Organic Nanoparticle Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling; Li, Zhanjun; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Yuanwei; Wu, Shuang; Zhao, Jianzhang; Han, Gang

    2016-11-09

    Tissue penetration depth is a major challenge in practical photodynamic therapy (PDT). A biocompatible and highly effective near infrared (NIR)-light-absorbing carbazole-substituted BODIPY (Car-BDP) molecule is reported as a class of imaging-guidable deep-tissue activatable photosensitizers for PDT. Car-BDP possesses an intense, broad NIR absorption band (600-800 nm) with a remarkably high singlet oxygen quantum yield (Φ Δ = 67%). After being encapsulated with biodegradable PLA-PEG-FA polymers, Car-BDP can form uniform and small organic nanoparticles that are water-soluble and tumor-targetable. Rather than using laser light, such nanoparticles offer an unprecedented deep-tissue, tumor targeting photodynamic therapeutic effect by using an exceptionally low-power-density and cost-effective lamp light (12 mW cm -2 ). In addition, these nanoparticles can be simultaneously traced in vivo due to their excellent NIR fluorescence. This study signals a major step forward in photodynamic therapy by developing a new class of NIR-absorbing biocompatible organic nanoparticles for effective targeting and treatment of deep-tissue tumors. This work also provides a potential new platform for precise tumor-targeting theranostics and novel opportunities for future affordable clinical cancer treatment.

  3. Expanded Target-Chemical Analysis Reveals Extensive Mixed-Organic-Contaminant Exposure in U.S. Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface-water from 38 streams nation-wide was assessed using 14 target-organic methods (719 compounds). Designedbioactive anthropogenic contaminants (biocides, pharmaceuticals) comprised 57% of 406 organics detected at least once. The 10 most-frequently detected anthropogenic-org...

  4. The myeloid-binding peptide adenoviral vector enables multi-organ vascular endothelial gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhi Hong; Kaliberov, Sergey; Zhang, Jingzhu; Muz, Barbara; Azab, Abdel K; Sohn, Rebecca E; Kaliberova, Lyudmila; Du, Yingqiu; Curiel, David T; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2014-08-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are ideal gene therapy targets as they provide widespread tissue access and are the first contact surfaces following intravenous vector administration. Human recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is the most frequently used gene transfer system because of its appreciable transgene payload capacity and lack of somatic mutation risk. However, standard Ad5 vectors predominantly transduce liver but not the vasculature following intravenous administration. We recently developed an Ad5 vector with a myeloid cell-binding peptide (MBP) incorporated into the knob-deleted, T4 fibritin chimeric fiber (Ad.MBP). This vector was shown to transduce pulmonary ECs presumably via a vector handoff mechanism. Here we tested the body-wide tropism of the Ad.MBP vector, its myeloid cell necessity, and vector-EC expression dose response. Using comprehensive multi-organ co-immunofluorescence analysis, we discovered that Ad.MBP produced widespread EC transduction in the lung, heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, pancreas, small bowel, and brain. Surprisingly, Ad.MBP retained hepatocyte tropism albeit at a reduced frequency compared with the standard Ad5. While binding specifically to myeloid cells ex vivo, multi-organ Ad.MBP expression was not dependent on circulating monocytes or macrophages. Ad.MBP dose de-escalation maintained full lung-targeting capacity but drastically reduced transgene expression in other organs. Swapping the EC-specific ROBO4 for the CMV promoter/enhancer abrogated hepatocyte expression but also reduced gene expression in other organs. Collectively, our multilevel targeting strategy could enable therapeutic biological production in previously inaccessible organs that pertain to the most debilitating or lethal human diseases.

  5. Morphological self-organizing feature map neural network with applications to automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shijun; Jing, Zhongliang; Li, Jianxun

    2005-01-01

    The rotation invariant feature of the target is obtained using the multi-direction feature extraction property of the steerable filter. Combining the morphological operation top-hat transform with the self-organizing feature map neural network, the adaptive topological region is selected. Using the erosion operation, the topological region shrinkage is achieved. The steerable filter based morphological self-organizing feature map neural network is applied to automatic target recognition of binary standard patterns and real-world infrared sequence images. Compared with Hamming network and morphological shared-weight networks respectively, the higher recognition correct rate, robust adaptability, quick training, and better generalization of the proposed method are achieved.

  6. Subcellular Targeting of Methylmercury Lyase Enhances Its Specific Activity for Organic Mercury Detoxification in Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Bizily, Scott P.; Kim, Tehryung; Kandasamy, Muthugapatti K.; Meagher, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    Methylmercury is an environmental pollutant that biomagnifies in the aquatic food chain with severe consequences for humans and other animals. In an effort to remove this toxin in situ, we have been engineering plants that express the bacterial mercury resistance enzymes organomercurial lyase MerB and mercuric ion reductase MerA. In vivo kinetics experiments suggest that the diffusion of hydrophobic organic mercury to MerB limits the rate of the coupled reaction with MerA (Bizily et al., 2000). To optimize reaction kinetics for organic mercury compounds, the merB gene was engineered to target MerB for accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum and for secretion to the cell wall. Plants expressing the targeted MerB proteins and cytoplasmic MerA are highly resistant to organic mercury and degrade organic mercury at 10 to 70 times higher specific activity than plants with the cytoplasmically distributed wild-type MerB enzyme. MerB protein in endoplasmic reticulum-targeted plants appears to accumulate in large vesicular structures that can be visualized in immunolabeled plant cells. These results suggest that the toxic effects of organic mercury are focused in microenvironments of the secretory pathway, that these hydrophobic compartments provide more favorable reaction conditions for MerB activity, and that moderate increases in targeted MerB expression will lead to significant gains in detoxification. In summary, to maximize phytoremediation efficiency of hydrophobic pollutants in plants, it may be beneficial to target enzymes to specific subcellular environments. PMID:12586871

  7. Toxicity of the bionematicide 1,4-naphthoquinone on non-target soil organisms.

    PubMed

    Chelinho, S; Maleita, C M N; Francisco, R; Braga, M E M; da Cunha, M J M; Abrantes, I; de Sousa, H C; Morais, P V; Sousa, J P

    2017-08-01

    The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the ecotoxicological effects of 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4-NTQ), a natural-origin compound presenting nematicidal activity, that can be obtained from walnut husk, in plants and soil invertebrates, including non-target soil nematode communities. This research was part of an ongoing project that aims to develop environmentally-friendly nematicides obtained from agricultural residues. The battery of ISO tests included emergence and growth of corn (Zea mays) and rape (Brassica napus); avoidance with the earthworm Eisenia andrei and the collembolan Folsomia candida; and reproduction with the previous species plus the enchytraeid Enchytraeus crypticus. A novel soil nematode community assay was also performed. ISO tests and nematode assays were conducted using a natural uncontaminated soil that was spiked with a range of 1,4-NTQ concentrations. Toxicity of 1,4-NTQ was found for all test-species and the most sensitive were F. candida and E. andrei. After 7 days of exposure to 1,4-NTQ, nematode abundance decreased along the concentration gradient, and a partial recovery was observed after 14 days (1,4-NTQ <48 mg kg -1 soil). The number of nematode families consistently decreased in both periods. Overall, results indicate that a 1,4-NTQ concentration of <20 mg kg -1 could be environmentally safe but preliminary data suggest that it might be ineffective for the target-nematodes, root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne spp., and root-lesion nematodes, Pratylenchus spp. In addition, if higher dosages of 1,4-NTQ bionematicide are necessary, the potential recovery of non-target organisms under real field scenarios also needs to be assessed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Targeted organ generation using Mixl1-inducible mouse pluripotent stem cells in blastocyst complementation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Kato-Itoh, Megumi; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-15

    Generation of functional organs from patients' own cells is one of the ultimate goals of regenerative medicine. As a novel approach to creation of organs from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), we employed blastocyst complementation in organogenesis-disabled animals and successfully generated PSC-derived pancreas and kidneys. Blastocyst complementation, which exploits the capacity of PSCs to participate in forming chimeras, does not, however, exclude contribution of PSCs to the development of tissues-including neural cells or germ cells-other than those specifically targeted by disabling of organogenesis. This fact provokes ethical controversy if human PSCs are to be used. In this study, we demonstrated that forced expression of Mix-like protein 1 (encoded by Mixl1) can be used to guide contribution of mouse embryonic stem cells to endodermal organs after blastocyst injection. We then succeeded in applying this method to generate functional pancreas in pancreatogenesis-disabled Pdx1 knockout mice using a newly developed tetraploid-based organ-complementation method. These findings hold promise for targeted organ generation from patients' own PSCs in livestock animals.

  9. Interarm blood pressure difference and target organ damage in the general population.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jouni K; Puukka, Pauli J; Jula, Antti M

    2014-02-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate interarm differences of blood pressure (BP) and its determinants, and to clarify whether both arms are equally good in assessing BP and target organ damage in the general population. We studied a representative sample of Finnish adult population with 484 study participants, ages 25-74 years. BP was measured twice by an oscillometric monitor simultaneously on both arms. Study participants underwent a clinical examination including measurements of serum lipids, glucose and indicators of target organ damage. BP was 2.3/0.2 mmHg higher on right than on left arm (P < 0.001/P = 0.15 for SBP/DBP differences). SBP and DBP measured on right and left arms correlated equally with left ventricular mass index (LVMI), interventricular septal thickness (IVST), posterior wall thickness (PWT), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and albuminuria. Higher SBP level was an independent determinant of both greater systolic and diastolic interarm BP difference. Exaggerated absolute diastolic interarm BP difference (>5 mmHg) was associated with higher BMI, arm circumference, LVMI, IVST and PWT, whereas exaggerated absolute systolic interarm BP difference (>10 mmHg) was not associated with any clinical variables. There was only a small difference in BP between arms in a healthy general population. Both arms are equally good determinants of target organ damage. BP should be measured at least once on both arms and prefer the arm with higher BP readings in the future BP measurements.

  10. The Influences of Riverine Dissolved Organic Matter in the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, G.; Cao, X.; Mao, J.; Spencer, R. G.; Balch, W. M.; Huntington, T. G.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported from the Gulf of St. Lawrence and by rivers in Maine, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick is being studied to quantify and characterize optical proxies in the receiving waters of the Gulf of Maine (GoM). Measurements of DOC concentrations, absorption coefficients (254nm, 350 nm and 412 nm), specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA254), spectral slope, and fluorescence, and DOC fractionation and isotopic analyses were used to determine the amount and nature of DOM from major inflowing rivers, marine waters, and the GoM. In addition, lignin phenols, 14C-age, 13C-NMR and FTICR-MS analyses were performed on the hydrophobic (HPOA) and transphilic organic acid fractions of the DOM isolated using XAD resins for a smaller subset of samples from the Penobscot River, Penobscot Bay, GoM waters in the Eastern Maine Coastal Current (EMCC), a sample from the eastern portion of the GoM (Scotian Shelf waters), and the Pacific Ocean. These samples provide detailed DOM compositional data in support of the more easily collected concentration and optical data obtained from discrete samples, optical data obtained by in situ glider, and remotely sensed satellite observations. Optical measurements, 13C-NMR, and lignin phenol analyses showed that DOM associated with inflowing rivers to the GoM is rich in aromatic compounds resulting in a large flux of terrestrially derived chromophoric DOM (CDOM). As a result, GoM DOM is more aromatic and younger than open ocean samples collected from the Sargasso Sea and from the Pacific Ocean near Hawaii. This observation is consistent with isotopic data that indicated δ 13C values for the HPOA fractions from the Gulf samples (δ 13C= -27‰ and -25‰) were considerably depleted in comparison to the whole DOM sample (δ 13C = -19‰; which also includes algal-produced DOM) and are more similar to those from the terrestrial sources. Samples from the EMCC were the most heavily influenced by terrestrial sources. While NMR

  11. Factors influencing organic-horizon carbon pools in mixed-species stands of central Maine, USA

    Treesearch

    Joshua J. Puhlick; Shawn Fraver; Ivan J. Fernandez; Aaron R. Weiskittel; Laura S. Kenefic; Randy Kolka; Marie-Cecile Gruselle

    2016-01-01

    The overall goal of this study was to evaluate the correlation of multiple abiotic and biotic factors with organic-horizon (O-horizon) carbon (C) content on the Penobscot Experimental Forest in central Maine, USA. O-horizon samples were collected and their associated depths were recorded from stands managed with a range of silvicultural and harvesting treatments (i.e...

  12. Spatial Cytoskeleton Organization Supports Targeted Intracellular Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Anne E.; Rieger, Heiko

    2018-03-01

    The efficiency of intracellular cargo transport from specific source to target locations is strongly dependent upon molecular motor-assisted motion along the cytoskeleton. Radial transport along microtubules and lateral transport along the filaments of the actin cortex underneath the cell membrane are characteristic for cells with a centrosome. The interplay between the specific cytoskeleton organization and the motor performance realizes a spatially inhomogeneous intermittent search strategy. In order to analyze the efficiency of such intracellular search strategies we formulate a random velocity model with intermittent arrest states. We evaluate efficiency in terms of mean first passage times for three different, frequently encountered intracellular transport tasks: i) the narrow escape problem, which emerges during cargo transport to a synapse or other specific region of the cell membrane, ii) the reaction problem, which considers the binding time of two particles within the cell, and iii) the reaction-escape problem, which arises when cargo must be released at a synapse only after pairing with another particle. Our results indicate that cells are able to realize efficient search strategies for various intracellular transport tasks economically through a spatial cytoskeleton organization that involves only a narrow actin cortex rather than a cell body filled with randomly oriented actin filaments.

  13. Acute Toxicity of the Antifouling Compound Butenolide in Non-Target Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli H.; Xu, Ying; Pan, Ke; Wang, Wen-Xiong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Butenolide [5-octylfuran-2(5H)-one] is a recently discovered and very promising anti-marine-fouling compound. In this study, the acute toxicity of butenolide was assessed in several non-target organisms, including micro algae, crustaceans, and fish. Results were compared with previously reported results on the effective concentrations used on fouling (target) organisms. According to OECD's guideline, the predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) was 0.168 µg l−1, which was among one of the highest in representative new biocides. Mechanistically, the phenotype of butenolide-treated Danio rerio (zebrafish) embryos was similar to the phenotype of the pro-caspase-3 over-expression mutant with pericardial edema, small eyes, small brains, and increased numbers of apoptotic cells in the bodies of zebrafish embryos. Butenolide also induced apoptosis in HeLa cells, with the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), Bcl-2 family proteins, and caspases and proteasomes/lysosomes involved in this process. This is the first detailed toxicity and toxicology study on this antifouling compound. PMID:21897857

  14. Visual target modulation of functional connectivity networks revealed by self-organizing group ICA.

    PubMed

    van de Ven, Vincent; Bledowski, Christoph; Prvulovic, David; Goebel, Rainer; Formisano, Elia; Di Salle, Francesco; Linden, David E J; Esposito, Fabrizio

    2008-12-01

    We applied a data-driven analysis based on self-organizing group independent component analysis (sogICA) to fMRI data from a three-stimulus visual oddball task. SogICA is particularly suited to the investigation of the underlying functional connectivity and does not rely on a predefined model of the experiment, which overcomes some of the limitations of hypothesis-driven analysis. Unlike most previous applications of ICA in functional imaging, our approach allows the analysis of the data at the group level, which is of particular interest in high order cognitive studies. SogICA is based on the hierarchical clustering of spatially similar independent components, derived from single subject decompositions. We identified four main clusters of components, centered on the posterior cingulate, bilateral insula, bilateral prefrontal cortex, and right posterior parietal and prefrontal cortex, consistently across all participants. Post hoc comparison of time courses revealed that insula, prefrontal cortex and right fronto-parietal components showed higher activity for targets than for distractors. Activation for distractors was higher in the posterior cingulate cortex, where deactivation was observed for targets. While our results conform to previous neuroimaging studies, they also complement conventional results by showing functional connectivity networks with unique contributions to the task that were consistent across subjects. SogICA can thus be used to probe functional networks of active cognitive tasks at the group-level and can provide additional insights to generate new hypotheses for further study. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Surface target-tracking guidance by self-organizing formation flight of fixed-wing UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regina, N.; Zanzi, M.

    This paper presents a new concept of ground target surveillance based on a formation flight of two Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) of fixed-wing type. Each UAV considered in this work has its own guidance law specifically designed for two different aims. A self organizing non-symmetric collaborative surveying scheme has been developed based on pursuers with different roles: the close-up-pursuer and the distance-pursuer. The close-up-pursuer behaves according to a guidance law which takes it to continually over-fly the target, also optimizing flight endurance. On the other hand, the distancepursuer behaves so as to circle around the target by flying at a certain distance and altitude from it; moreover, its motion ensures the maximum “ seeability” of the ground based target. In addition, the guidance law designed for the distance-pursuer also implements a collision avoidance feature in order to prevent possible risks of collision with the close-up-pursuer during the tracking maneuvers. The surveying scheme is non-symmetric in the sense that the collision avoidance feature is accomplished by a guidance law implemented only on one of the two pursuers; moreover, it is collaborative because the surveying is performed by different tasks of two UAVs and is self-organizing because, due to the collision avoidance feature, target tracking does not require pre-planned collision-risk-free trajectories but trajectories are generated in real time.

  16. Transcription Factors Expressed in Lateral Organ Boundaries: Identification of Downstream Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, Patricia S

    2010-07-12

    The processes of lateral organ initiation and patterning are central to the generation of mature plant form. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes is essential to our understanding of plant development. Communication between the shoot apical meristem and initiating organ primordia is important both for functioning of the meristem and for proper organ patterning, and very little is known about this process. In particular, the boundary between meristem and leaf is emerging as a critical region that is important for SAM maintenance and regulation of organogenesis. The goal of this project was to characterize three boundary-expressed genes thatmore » encode predicted transcription factors. Specifically, we have studied LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES (LOB), LATERAL ORGAN FUSION1 (LOF1), and LATERAL ORGAN FUSION2 (LOF2). LOB encodes the founding member of the LOB-DOMAIN (LBD) plant-specific DNA binding transcription factor family and LOF1 and LOF2 encode paralogous MYB-domain transcription factors. We characterized the genetic relationship between these three genes and other boundary and meristem genes. We also used an ectopic inducible expression system to identify direct targets of LOB.« less

  17. Differences in DNA Binding Specificity of Floral Homeotic Protein Complexes Predict Organ-Specific Target Genes.

    PubMed

    Smaczniak, Cezary; Muiño, Jose M; Chen, Dijun; Angenent, Gerco C; Kaufmann, Kerstin

    2017-08-01

    Floral organ identities in plants are specified by the combinatorial action of homeotic master regulatory transcription factors. However, how these factors achieve their regulatory specificities is still largely unclear. Genome-wide in vivo DNA binding data show that homeotic MADS domain proteins recognize partly distinct genomic regions, suggesting that DNA binding specificity contributes to functional differences of homeotic protein complexes. We used in vitro systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing (SELEX-seq) on several floral MADS domain protein homo- and heterodimers to measure their DNA binding specificities. We show that specification of reproductive organs is associated with distinct binding preferences of a complex formed by SEPALLATA3 and AGAMOUS. Binding specificity is further modulated by different binding site spacing preferences. Combination of SELEX-seq and genome-wide DNA binding data allows differentiation between targets in specification of reproductive versus perianth organs in the flower. We validate the importance of DNA binding specificity for organ-specific gene regulation by modulating promoter activity through targeted mutagenesis. Our study shows that intrafamily protein interactions affect DNA binding specificity of floral MADS domain proteins. Differential DNA binding of MADS domain protein complexes plays a role in the specificity of target gene regulation. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-target screening analyses of organic contaminants in river systems as a base for monitoring measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzbauer, J.

    2009-04-01

    Organic contaminants discharged to the aquatic environment exhibit a high diversity with respect to their molecular structures and the resulting physico-chemical properties. The chemical analysis of anthropogenic contamination in river systems is still an important feature, especially with respect to (i) the identification and structure elucidation of novel contaminants, (ii) to the characterisation of their environmental behaviour and (iii) to their risk for natural systems. A huge proportion of riverine contamination is caused by low-molecular weight organic compounds, like pesticides plasticizers, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, technical additives etc. Some of them, like PCB or PAH have already been investigated thoroughly and, consequently, their behaviour in aqueous systems is very well described. Although analyses on organic substances in river water traditionally focused on selected pollutants, in particular on common priority pollutants which are monitored routinely, the occurrence of further contaminants, e.g. pharmaceuticals, personal care products or chelating agents has received increasing attention within the last decade. Accompanied, screening analyses revealing an enormous diversity of low-molecular weight organic contaminants in waste water effluents and river water become more and more noticed. Since many of these substances have been rarely noticed so far, it will be an important task for the future to study their occurrence and fate in natural environments. Further on, it should be a main issue of environmental studies to provide a comprehensive view on the state of pollution of river water, in particular with respect to lipophilic low molecular weight organic contaminants. However, such non-target-screening analyses has been performed only rarely in the past. Hence, we applied extended non-target screening analyses on longitudinal sections of the rivers Rhine, Rur and Lippe (Germany) on the base of GC/MS analyses. The investigations

  19. Nutrients, organic compounds, and mercury in the Meduxnekeag River watershed, Maine, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, Charles W.; Tornes, Lan

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, sampled streambed sediments and surface water of the Meduxnekeag River watershed in northeastern Maine under various hydrologic conditions for nutrients, hydrophobic organic compounds, and mercury. Nutrients were sampled to address concerns related to summer algal blooms, and organic compounds and mercury were sampled to address concerns about regional depositional patterns and overall watershed quality. In most surface-water samples, phosphorus was not detected or was detected at concentrations below the minimum reporting limit. Nitrate and organic nitrogen were detected in every surface-water sample for which they were analyzed; the highest concentration of total nitrogen was 0.75 milligrams per liter during low flow. Instantaneous nitrogen loads and yields were calculated at four stations for two sampling events. These data indicate that the part of the watershed that includes Houlton, its wastewater-treatment plant, and four small urban brooks may have contributed high concentrations of nitrate to Meduxnekeag River during the high flows on April 23-24 and high concentrations of both organic and nitrate nitrogen on June 2-3. Mercury was detected in all three bed-sediment samples for which it was analyzed; concentrations were similar to those reported from regional studies. Notable organic compounds detected in bed sediments included p,p'-DDE and p,p'-DDT (pesticides of the DDT family) and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and phthalates were not detected in any sample, whereas p-cresol was the only phenolic compound detected. Phosphorus was detected at concentrations below 700 milligrams per kilogram in each bed-sediment sample for which it was analyzed. Data were insufficient to establish whether the lack of large algal blooms in 2003 was related to low concentrations of phosphorus.

  20. Targeting proteasomes in infectious organisms to combat disease.

    PubMed

    Bibo-Verdugo, Betsaida; Jiang, Zhenze; Caffrey, Conor R; O'Donoghue, Anthony J

    2017-05-01

    Proteasomes are multisubunit, energy-dependent, proteolytic complexes that play an essential role in intracellular protein turnover. They are present in eukaryotes, archaea, and in some actinobacteria species. Inhibition of proteasome activity has emerged as a powerful strategy for anticancer therapy and three drugs have been approved for treatment of multiple myeloma. These compounds react covalently with a threonine residue located in the active site of a proteasome subunit to block protein degradation. Proteasomes in pathogenic organisms such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Plasmodium falciparum also have a nucleophilic threonine residue in the proteasome active site and are therefore sensitive to these anticancer drugs. This review summarizes efforts to validate the proteasome in pathogenic organisms as a therapeutic target. We describe several strategies that have been used to develop inhibitors with increased potency and selectivity for the pathogen proteasome relative to the human proteasome. In addition, we highlight a cell-based chemical screening approach that identified a potent, allosteric inhibitor of proteasomes found in Leishmania and Trypanosoma species. Finally, we discuss the development of proteasome inhibitors as anti-infective agents. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  1. A New Method Without Organic Solvent to Targeted Nanodrug for Enhanced Anticancer Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shichao; Yang, Xiangrui; Zou, Mingyuan; Hou, Zhenqing; Yan, Jianghua

    2017-06-01

    Since the hydrophobic group is always essential to the synthesis of the drug-loaded nanoparticles, a majority of the methods rely heavily on organic solvent, which may not be completely removed and might be a potential threat to the patients. In this study, we completely "green" synthesized 10-hydroxycamptothecine (HCPT) loaded, folate (FA)-modified nanoneedles (HFNDs) for highly efficient cancer therapy with high drug loading, targeting property, and imaging capability. It should be noted that no organic solvent was used in the preparation process. In vitro cell uptake study and the in vivo distribution study showed that the HFNDs, with FA on the surface, revealed an obviously targeting property and entered the HeLa cells easier than the chitosan-HCPT nanoneedles without FA modified (NDs). The cytotoxicity tests illustrated that the HFNDs possessed better killing ability to HeLa cells than the individual drug or the NDs in the same dose, indicating its good anticancer effect. The in vivo anticancer experiment further revealed the pronounced anticancer effects and the lower side effects of the HFNDs. This new method without organic solvent will lead to a promising sustained drug delivery system for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Target organ damage in hypertensive patients of different ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Wolak, Talya; Anfanger, Sharon; Wolak, Arik; Furman, Tsilla; Abuara'ar, Touphic; Biton, Amnon; Pilpel, Dina; Paran, Esther

    2007-03-20

    Hypertension is associated with involvement of target organs which varies among the different ethnic groups. The multiplicity of the population in Israel offers an opportunity for evaluating target organ damage in hypertensive patients of different ethnic origins. Data were collected from the computerized medical files of hypertensive patients in primary care clinics. The analysis was done on 576 hypertensive patients: 138 Bedouins (Arab residents), 141 Sephardic Jews (immigrants from North Africa and the Middle East), 152 Asian-Indian Jews (immigrants from India) and 145 Ashkenazi Jews (immigrants from Europe and North and South America). In multivariable logistic regressions adjusted for known risk factors and ethnicity, the prevalence of cerebrovascular disease was the highest among the Asian-Indian Jews (OR=3.09, p value=0.009). Renal damage was highest among the Bedouins (OR=4.54, p value<0.0001) and Asian-Indian Jews (OR=2.88, p value=0.005). The differences in the prevalence of renal damage among the various ethnic groups were even more pronounced among patients without diabetes (OR=8.31, p value<0.0001 in Bedouins and OR=7.46, p value=0.001 in Asian-Indian Jews). The prevalence of ischemic heart disease did not differ significantly among the four ethnic groups. The prevalence of cerebrovascular and renal diseases are both significantly associated with ethnic origin of Asian-Indian Jews and Bedouins. However, the multivariate analysis shows that the prevalence of ischemic heart disease is not associated with ethnicity.

  3. Hypertensive crisis with 2 target organ impairment induced by glycyrrhizin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Fan, Xiaoli; Wang, Qin

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Glycyrrhizin is the main active component of licorice. Licorice and glycyrrhizin induced hypertension has been widely reported, yet licorice and glycyrrhizin induced hypertensive crisis has been rarely known. Patient concerns: The case of this report was a 47-year-old woman, who took 225 mg of glycyrrhizin daily for 3 years due to primary biliary cholangitis. She was found to have a dramatically elevated blood pressure of about 230/110 mmHg without a history of hypertension and was referred to the emergency department. Diagnoses: Hypokalemia, hypertensive retinopathy, and nephropathy were found during the following work-up. Since no other risk factors of hypertension were identified, she was suspected to have glycyrrhizin induced pseudo-hyperaldosteronism. Interventions: Glycyrrhizin was discontinued. Intravenous sodium nitroprusside was used during the first few days. Nifedipine and irbesartan were taken after discharge, and the dosage was reduced gradually under supervision. Outcomes: She stopped all the anti-hypertensive drugs 6 months since glycyrrhizin was stopped. Her blood pressure was about 110/60 mmHg after repetitive measurement. Her serum potassium and urine albumin/creatinine ratio were also normalized. Lessons: Licorice and glycyrrhizin induced hypertension due to pseudo-hyperaldosteronism has been widely reported, yet only 3 cases reported that excessive consumption of licorice could lead to hypertensive emergencies. This is the first case that glycyrrhizin induced hypertensive crisis with target organ impairment. By presenting this case, we remind clinicians of glycyrrhizin induced hypertension, a condition which could lead to medical emergencies. PMID:29538199

  4. Target and non-target toxicity of fern extracts against mosquito vectors and beneficial aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Chinnaperumal; Deepak, Paramasivam; Balasubramani, Govindasamy; Karthi, Sengodan; Arul, Dhayalan; Aiswarya, Dilipkumar; Amutha, Vadivel; Vimalkumar, Elangovan; Mathivanan, Damodaran; Suseem, Sundaram Renjitham; Muthu-Pandian, Chanthini Kanagaraj; Senthil-Nathan, Sengottayan; Perumal, Pachiappan

    2018-06-06

    Dengue and malaria are significant mosquito-borne diseases that are rapidly spread worldwide, mainly in temperate countries. Pteridophytes were identified to be a significant source of novel mosquitocidal agents. The present research was to explore the eco-friendly larvicides from methanol extracts of ferns, viz., Actiniopteris radiata, Adiantum caudatum, Cheilanthes swartzii, Hemionitis arifolia and Lycopodium clavatum. The larvicidal potential of the extracts screened using larvae of dengue vector Aedes aegypti (III and IV instar) and malarial vector Anopheles stephensi (III and IV instar), showed 10-100% mortality rates. Biosafety assessment was made on embryos of Danio rerio and Artemia nauplii. The phyto-constituents of the methanol extract of A. radiata leaves were identified through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Methanolic leaf extracts of A. radiata, A. caudatum and C. swartzii exhibited larvicidal activity against III and IV instar larvae of Ae. aegypti (LC 50 : 37.47, 74.51 and 152.38 and 67.58, 95.89 and 271.46 ppm) and An. stephensi (LC 50 : 70.35, 112.12 and 301.05 and 113.83, 175.30 and 315.19 ppm), respectively. The GC-MS of the methanol extract of A. radiata leaves revealed the presence of 7 phyto-components among which, Carbamic acid, phenyl-, (2-Nitrophenyl) methyl ester (1), Benzoic acid, 3- methylbenzoate (2) and 4-(benzylimino)- 1,4-dihydro-1-(p-toluoylmethyl) pyridine (3) were dominant. Biosafety assessment of methanol extract of A. radiata leaves on embryos of Danio rerio (Zebra fish) and Artemia nauplii (micro crustacean) revealed that there were no destructive or teratogenic effects. To conclude, the larvicidal activity and insignificant toxicity to non-target aquatic organisms of A. radiata leaves makes it a potential and environment safe biocontrol agent against dengue and malarial vectors. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Peripherally Administered Nanoparticles Target Monocytic Myeloid Cells, Secondary Lymphoid Organs and Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kourtis, Iraklis C.; Hirosue, Sachiko; de Titta, Alexandre; Kontos, Stephan; Stegmann, Toon; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Swartz, Melody A.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been extensively developed for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. While the focus of nanoparticle trafficking in vivo has traditionally been on drug delivery and organ-level biodistribution and clearance, recent work in cancer biology and infectious disease suggests that targeting different cells within a given organ can substantially affect the quality of the immunological response. Here, we examine the cell-level biodistribution kinetics after administering ultrasmall Pluronic-stabilized poly(propylene sulfide) nanoparticles in the mouse. These nanoparticles depend on lymphatic drainage to reach the lymph nodes and blood, and then enter the spleen rather than the liver, where they interact with monocytes, macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells. They were more readily taken up into lymphatics after intradermal (i.d.) compared to intramuscular administration, leading to ∼50% increased bioavailability in blood. When administered i.d., their distribution favored antigen-presenting cells, with especially strong targeting to myeloid cells. In tumor-bearing mice, the monocytic and the polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cell compartments were efficiently and preferentially targeted, rendering this nanoparticulate formulation potentially useful for reversing the highly suppressive activity of these cells in the tumor stroma. PMID:23626707

  6. Peripherally administered nanoparticles target monocytic myeloid cells, secondary lymphoid organs and tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Kourtis, Iraklis C; Hirosue, Sachiko; de Titta, Alexandre; Kontos, Stephan; Stegmann, Toon; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Swartz, Melody A

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles have been extensively developed for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. While the focus of nanoparticle trafficking in vivo has traditionally been on drug delivery and organ-level biodistribution and clearance, recent work in cancer biology and infectious disease suggests that targeting different cells within a given organ can substantially affect the quality of the immunological response. Here, we examine the cell-level biodistribution kinetics after administering ultrasmall Pluronic-stabilized poly(propylene sulfide) nanoparticles in the mouse. These nanoparticles depend on lymphatic drainage to reach the lymph nodes and blood, and then enter the spleen rather than the liver, where they interact with monocytes, macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells. They were more readily taken up into lymphatics after intradermal (i.d.) compared to intramuscular administration, leading to ∼50% increased bioavailability in blood. When administered i.d., their distribution favored antigen-presenting cells, with especially strong targeting to myeloid cells. In tumor-bearing mice, the monocytic and the polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cell compartments were efficiently and preferentially targeted, rendering this nanoparticulate formulation potentially useful for reversing the highly suppressive activity of these cells in the tumor stroma.

  7. SCFSAP controls organ size by targeting PPD proteins for degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhibiao; Li, Na; Jiang, Shan; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Inzé, Dirk; Li, Yunhai

    2016-01-01

    Control of organ size by cell proliferation and growth is a fundamental process, but the mechanisms that determine the final size of organs are largely elusive in plants. We have previously revealed that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 regulates organ size by repressing cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. Here we report that a mutant allele of STERILE APETALA (SAP) suppresses the da1-1 mutant phenotype. We show that SAP is an F-box protein that forms part of a SKP1/Cullin/F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and controls organ size by promoting the proliferation of meristemoid cells. Genetic analyses suggest that SAP may act in the same pathway with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, which are negative regulators of meristemoid proliferation, to control organ size, but does so independently of DA1. Further results reveal that SAP physically associates with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, and targets them for degradation. These findings define a molecular mechanism by which SAP and PEAPOD control organ size. PMID:27048938

  8. Toward a quantitative and empirical dissolved organic carbon budget for the Gulf of Maine, a semienclosed shelf sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balch, William; Huntington, Thomas; Aiken, George; Drapeau, David; Bowler, Bruce; Lubelczyk, Laura; Butler, Kenna

    2016-02-01

    A time series of organic carbon export from Gulf of Maine (GoM) watersheds was compared to a time series of biological, chemical, bio-optical, and hydrographic properties, measured across the GoM between Yarmouth, NS, Canada, and Portland, ME, U.S. Optical proxies were used to quantify the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon in the GoM. The Load Estimator regression model applied to river discharge data demonstrated that riverine DOC export (and its decadal variance) has increased over the last 80 years. Several extraordinarily wet years (2006-2010) resulted in a massive pulse of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM; proxy for DOC) into the western GoM along with unidentified optically scattering material (<0.2 µm diameter). A survey of DOC in the GoM and Scotian Shelf showed the strong influence of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence on the DOC that enters the GoM. A deep plume of CDOM-rich water was observed near the coast of Maine which decreased in concentration eastward. The Forel-Ule color scale was derived and compared to the same measurements made in 1912-1913 by Henry Bigelow. Results show that the GoM has yellowed in the last century, particularly in the region of the extension of the Eastern Maine Coastal Current. Time lags between DOC discharge and its appearance in the GoM increased with distance from the river mouths. Algae were also a significant source of DOC but not CDOM. Gulf-wide algal primary production has decreased. Increases in precipitation and DOC discharge to the GoM are predicted over the next century.

  9. Toward a quantitative and empirical dissolved organic carbon budget for the Gulf of Maine, a semienclosed shelf sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balch, William; Huntington, Thomas G.; Aiken, George R.; Drapeau, David; Bowler, Bruce; Lubelczyk, Laura; Butler, Kenna D.

    2016-01-01

    A time series of organic carbon export from Gulf of Maine (GoM) watersheds was compared to a time series of biological, chemical, bio-optical, and hydrographic properties, measured across the GoM between Yarmouth, NS, Canada, and Portland, ME, U.S. Optical proxies were used to quantify the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon in the GoM. The Load Estimator regression model applied to river discharge data demonstrated that riverine DOC export (and its decadal variance) has increased over the last 80 years. Several extraordinarily wet years (2006–2010) resulted in a massive pulse of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM; proxy for DOC) into the western GoM along with unidentified optically scattering material (<0.2 μm diameter). A survey of DOC in the GoM and Scotian Shelf showed the strong influence of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence on the DOC that enters the GoM. A deep plume of CDOM-rich water was observed near the coast of Maine which decreased in concentration eastward. The Forel-Ule color scale was derived and compared to the same measurements made in 1912–1913 by Henry Bigelow. Results show that the GoM has yellowed in the last century, particularly in the region of the extension of the Eastern Maine Coastal Current. Time lags between DOC discharge and its appearance in the GoM increased with distance from the river mouths. Algae were also a significant source of DOC but not CDOM. Gulf-wide algal primary production has decreased. Increases in precipitation and DOC discharge to the GoM are predicted over the next century.

  10. Factors associated with cardiovascular target organ damage in children after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Borchert-Mörlins, Bianca; Thurn, Daniela; Schmidt, Bernhard M W; Büscher, Anja K; Oh, Jun; Kier, Tanja; Bauer, Elena; Baig, Sabrina; Kanzelmeyer, Nele; Kemper, Markus J; Büscher, Rainer; Melk, Anette

    2017-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the second-most common cause of death in pediatric renal transplant recipients. The aim of this study was to evaluate subclinical cardiovascular target organ damage defined as the presence of arterio- and atherosclerotic lesions and cardiac remodeling and to analyze contributing risk factors in a large cohort of children after renal transplantation (RT). A total of 109 children aged 13.1 ± 3.3 years who had undergone RT at one of three German transplant centers were enrolled in this study. Patients had been transplanted a mean of 5.5 (±4.0) years prior to being enrolled in the study. Anthropometric data, laboratory values and office- and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) were evaluated. Cardiovascular target organ damage was determined through non-invasive measurements of aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and left ventricular mass (LVM). Elevated PWV or IMT values were detected in 22 and 58% of patients, respectively. Left ventricular hypertrophy was found in as many as 43% of patients. The prevalence of uncontrolled or untreated hypertension was 41%, of which 16% of cases were only detected by ABPM measurements. In the multivariable analysis, higher diastolic blood pressure, everolimus intake and lower estimated glomerular filtration rate were independently associated with high PWV. Higher systolic blood pressure and body mass index were associated with elevated LVM. Our results showed an alarming burden of cardiovascular subclinical organ damage in children after RT. Hypertension, obesity, immunosuppressive regimen and renal function emerged as independent risk factors of organ damage. Whereas the latter is not modifiable, the results of our study strongly indicate that the management of children after RT should focus on the control of blood pressure and weight.

  11. SCF(SAP) controls organ size by targeting PPD proteins for degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhibiao; Li, Na; Jiang, Shan; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun; Inzé, Dirk; Li, Yunhai

    2016-04-06

    Control of organ size by cell proliferation and growth is a fundamental process, but the mechanisms that determine the final size of organs are largely elusive in plants. We have previously revealed that the ubiquitin receptor DA1 regulates organ size by repressing cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. Here we report that a mutant allele of STERILE APETALA (SAP) suppresses the da1-1 mutant phenotype. We show that SAP is an F-box protein that forms part of a SKP1/Cullin/F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and controls organ size by promoting the proliferation of meristemoid cells. Genetic analyses suggest that SAP may act in the same pathway with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, which are negative regulators of meristemoid proliferation, to control organ size, but does so independently of DA1. Further results reveal that SAP physically associates with PEAPOD1 and PEAPOD2, and targets them for degradation. These findings define a molecular mechanism by which SAP and PEAPOD control organ size.

  12. A chemodynamic approach for estimating losses of target organic chemicals from water during sample holding time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capel, P.D.; Larson, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Minimizing the loss of target organic chemicals from environmental water samples between the time of sample collection and isolation is important to the integrity of an investigation. During this sample holding time, there is a potential for analyte loss through volatilization from the water to the headspace, sorption to the walls and cap of the sample bottle; and transformation through biotic and/or abiotic reactions. This paper presents a chemodynamic-based, generalized approach to estimate the most probable loss processes for individual target organic chemicals. The basic premise is that the investigator must know which loss process(es) are important for a particular analyte, based on its chemodynamic properties, when choosing the appropriate method(s) to prevent loss.

  13. [Target and non-target screening of volatile organic compounds in industrial exhaust gas using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ma, Huilian; Jin, Jing; Li, Yun; Chen, Jiping

    2017-10-08

    A method of comprehensive screening of the target and non-target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in industrial exhaust gas using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) has been developed. In this paper, two types of solid phase adsorption column were compared, and the Tenex SS TD Tube was selected. The analytes were enriched into the adsorption tube by constant flow sampling, and detected by TD-GC-MS in full scan mode. Target compounds were quantified by internal standard method, and the quantities of non-target compounds were calculated by response coefficient of toluene. The method detection limits (MDLs) for the 24 VOCs were 1.06 to 5.44 ng, and MDLs could also be expressed as 0.004 to 0.018 mg/m 3 assuming that the sampling volume was 300 mL. The average recoveries were in the range of 78.4% to 89.4% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 3.9% to 14.4% ( n =7). The established analytical method was applied for the comprehensive screening of VOCs in a waste incineration power plant in Dalian city. Twenty-nine VOCs were identified. In these compounds, only five VOCs were the target compounds set in advance, which accounted for 26.7% of the total VOCs identified. Therefore, this study further proved the importance of screening non-target compounds in the analysis of VOCs in industrial exhaust gas, and has certain reference significance for the complete determination of VOCs distribution.

  14. [Subnational analysis of probability of premature mortality caused by four main non-communicable diseases in China during 1990-2015 and " Health China 2030" reduction target].

    PubMed

    Zeng, X Y; Li, Y C; Liu, S W; Wang, L J; Liu, Y N; Liu, J M; Zhou, M G

    2017-03-06

    Objective: To investigate the current status, temporal trend and achieving Health China 2030 reduction target of probability of premature mortality caused by four main non-communicable diseases (NCDs) including cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, tumour, diabetes, and chronic respiratory disease in China both at national and provincial level during 1990 to 2015. Methods: Using the results of Global Burden of Disease study 2015 (GBD 2015), according to the method of calculating premature mortality probability recommended by WHO, the current status and temporal trend by different gender from 1990 to 2015 were calculated, analyzed, and compared. Referring to " Health China 2030" target of reduction 30% of probability of premature mortality caused by major NCDs, we evaluated the difficulty of achieving the reduction target among provinces (not including Taiwan). Results: From 1990 to 2015, the probabilities of premature mortality in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, tumour, and chronic respiratory disease were all declined consistently for both men and women in China, the total of four main NCDs decreased from 30.69% to 18.54% with higher decreasing in women (from 25.97% to 12.40%) than that in men (from 34.94% to 24.19%). In 2015, the top five provinces in terms of probability of premature mortality caused by four main NCDs were Qinghai (28.81%), Tibet (25.88%), Guizhou (24.67%), Guangxi (23.56%), and Xinjiang (23.21%) in turn, while the top five provinces with the lowest probability were Shanghai (8.40%), Beijing (9.39%), Hong Kong (10.10%), Macao (10.31%), and Zhejiang (11.70%). If achieving the " Health China 2030" target, the probabilities of premature mortality in Qinghai and Tibet with the highest probability should decline to about 20.17%, and 18.12%, respectively in 2030, while 5.88%, and 6.57% in Shanghai and Beijing, respectively. From 1990 to 2015, the probability of premature mortality of four main NCDs declined by 2.00% a year on

  15. ASSESSING POSSIBLE ECOLOGICAL RISKS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS: GENE EXPRESSION ASSAYS AND GENETIC MONITORING OF NON-TARGET ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widespread planting of genetically modified crops with the Bt transgene pesticide has led to concern over non-target effects of Bt compounds in agroecosystems. While some research suggests that non-target organisms exposed to Bt toxin exhibit reduced fecundity and increased morta...

  16. Functional conjugated pyridines via main-group element tuning.

    PubMed

    Stolar, Monika; Baumgartner, Thomas

    2018-03-29

    Pyridine-based materials have seen widespread attention for the development of n-type organic materials. In recent years, the incorporation of main-group elements has also explored significant advantages for the development and tunability of organic conjugated materials. The unique chemical and electronic structure of main-group elements has led to several enhancements in conventional organic materials. This Feature article highlights recent main-group based pyridine materials by discussing property enhancements and application in organic electronics.

  17. Does the achievement of an intermediate glycemic target reduce organ failure and mortality? A post hoc analysis of the Glucontrol trial.

    PubMed

    Penning, Sophie; Chase, J Geoffrey; Preiser, Jean-Charles; Pretty, Christopher G; Signal, Matthew; Mélot, Christian; Desaive, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    This research evaluates the impact of the achievement of an intermediate target glycemic band on the severity of organ failure and mortality. Daily Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score and the cumulative time in a 4.0 to 7.0 mmol/L band (cTIB) were evaluated daily up to 14 days in 704 participants of the multicentre Glucontrol trial (16 centers) that randomized patients to intensive group A (blood glucose [BG] target: 4.4-6.1 mmol/L) or conventional group B (BG target: 7.8-10.0 mmol/L). Sequential Organ Failure Assessment evolution was measured by percentage of patients with SOFA less than or equal to 5 on each day, percentage of individual organ failures, and percentage of organ failure-free days. Conditional and joint probability analysis of SOFA and cTIB 0.5 or more assessed the impact of achieving 4.0 to 7.0 mmol/L target glycemic range on organ failure. Odds ratios (OR) compare the odds risk of death for cTIB 0.5 or more vs cTIB less than 0.5, where a ratio greater than 1.0 indicates an improvement for achieving cTIB 0.5 or more independent of SOFA or glycemic target. Groups A and B were matched for demographic and severity of illness data. Blood glucose differed between groups A and B (P<.05), as expected. There was no difference in the percentage of patients with SOFA less than or equal to 5, individual organ failures, and organ failure-free days between groups A and B over days 1 to 14. However, 20% to 30% of group A patients failed to achieve cTIB 0.5 or more for all days, and significant crossover confounds interpretation. Mortality OR was greater than 1.0 for patients with cTIB 0.5 or more in both groups but much higher for group A on all days. There was no difference in organ failure in the Glucontrol study based on intention to treat to different glycemic targets. Actual outcomes and significant crossover indicate that this result may not be due to the difference in target or treatment. Odds ratios-associated achieving an intermediate 4

  18. Frequency of MELAS main mutation in a phenotype-targeted young ischemic stroke patient population.

    PubMed

    Tatlisumak, Turgut; Putaala, Jukka; Innilä, Markus; Enzinger, Christian; Metso, Tiina M; Curtze, Sami; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Amaral-Silva, Alexandre; Jungehulsing, Gerhard Jan; Tanislav, Christian; Thijs, Vincent; Rolfs, Arndt; Norrving, Bo; Fazekas, Franz; Suomalainen, Anu; Kolodny, Edwin H

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial diseases, predominantly mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), may occasionally underlie or coincide with ischemic stroke (IS) in young and middle-aged individuals. We searched for undiagnosed patients with MELAS in a target subpopulation of unselected young IS patients enrolled in the Stroke in Young Fabry Patients study (sifap1). Among the 3291 IS patients aged 18-55 years recruited to the sifap1 study at 47 centers across 14 European countries, we identified potential MELAS patients with the following phenotypic features: (a) diagnosed cardiomyopathy or (b) presence of two of the three following findings: migraine, short stature (≤165 cm for males; ≤155 cm for females), and diabetes. Identified patients' blood samples underwent analysis of the common MELAS mutation, m.3243A>G in the MTTL1 gene of mitochondrial DNA. Clinical and cerebral MRI features of the mutation carriers were reviewed. We analyzed blood samples of 238 patients (177 with cardiomyopathy) leading to identification of four previously unrecognized MELAS main mutation carrier-patients. Their clinical and MRI characteristics were within the expectation for common IS patients except for severe hearing loss in one patient and hyperintensity of the pulvinar thalami on T1-weighted MRI in another one. Genetic testing for the m.3243A>G MELAS mutation in young patients with IS based on phenotypes suggestive of mitochondrial disease identifies previously unrecognized carriers of MELAS main mutation, but does not prove MELAS as the putative cause.

  19. Can eHealth tools enable health organizations to reach their target audience?

    PubMed

    Zbib, Ahmad; Hodgson, Corinne; Calderwood, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Data from the health risk assessment operated by the Heart and Stroke Foundation found users were more likely to be female; married; have completed post secondary education; and report hypertension, stroke, or being overweight or obese. In developing and operating eHealth tools for health promotion, organizations should compare users to their target population(s). eHealth tools may not be optimal for reaching some higher-risk sub-groups, and a range of social marketing approaches may be required.

  20. Enantioselective Effects of Chiral Pesticides on their Primary Targets and Secondary Targets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Zhang, Jianyun; Yao, Yijun

    2017-01-01

    Enantioselectivity has been well recognized in the environmental fate and effects of chiral pesticides. Enantiospecific action of the optical enantiomers on the biological molecules establishes the mechanistic basis for the enantioselective toxicity of chiral pesticides to both target and non-target organisms. We undertook a structured search of bibliographic databases for research literature concerning the enantioselective effects of chiral pesticides, including insecticides, herbicides and fungicides, on biomolecules in various species by using some key words. The results of the relevant literatures were reviewed in the text and summarized in tables. Pesticides generally exert their activity on the target organisms via disrupting the primary target biomolecules. In non-target species, effects of pesticides on the secondary targets distinguished from the primary ones make great contribution to their toxicity. Recent investigations have provided convincing evidence of enantioselective toxicity of chiral pesticides to both target and non-target species which is recognized to result from their enantiospecific action on the primary or secondary targets in organisms. This review confirms that chiral pesticides have enantiospecific effects on both primary and secondary target biomolecules in organisms. Future studies regarding toxicological effects of chiral pesticides should focus on the relationship between the enantiomeric difference in the compound-biomolecules interaction and the enantioselectivity in their toxicity.

  1. The genetics of blood pressure regulation and its target organs from association studies in 342,415 individuals.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Georg B; Ferreira, Teresa; Chasman, Daniel I; Jackson, Anne U; Schmidt, Ellen M; Johnson, Toby; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Luan, Jian'an; Donnelly, Lousie A; Kanoni, Stavroula; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Pihur, Vasyl; Strawbridge, Rona J; Shungin, Dmitry; Hughes, Maria F; Meirelles, Osorio; Kaakinen, Marika; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Kristiansson, Kati; Shah, Sonia; Kleber, Marcus E; Guo, Xiuqing; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Fava, Cristiano; Eriksson, Niclas; Nolte, Ilja M; Magnusson, Patrik K; Salfati, Elias L; Rallidis, Loukianos S; Theusch, Elizabeth; Smith, Andrew J P; Folkersen, Lasse; Witkowska, Kate; Pers, Tune H; Joehanes, Roby; Kim, Stuart K; Lataniotis, Lazaros; Jansen, Rick; Johnson, Andrew D; Warren, Helen; Kim, Young Jin; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Ying; Tayo, Bamidele O; Bochud, Murielle; Absher, Devin; Adair, Linda S; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan E; Axelsson, Tomas; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barnes, Michael R; Barroso, Inês; Bevan, Stephen; Bis, Joshua C; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bornstein, Stefan R; Brown, Morris J; Burnier, Michel; Cabrera, Claudia P; Chambers, John C; Chang, I-Shou; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Ren-Hua; Collins, Francis S; Connell, John M; Döring, Angela; Dallongeville, Jean; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; Delgado, Graciela; Dominiczak, Anna F; Doney, Alex S F; Drenos, Fotios; Edkins, Sarah; Eicher, John D; Elosua, Roberto; Enroth, Stefan; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Per; Esko, Tonu; Evangelou, Evangelos; Evans, Alun; Fall, Tove; Farrall, Martin; Felix, Janine F; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fornage, Myriam; Forrester, Terrence; Franceschini, Nora; Duran, Oscar H Franco; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Fraser, Ross M; Ganesh, Santhi K; Gao, He; Gertow, Karl; Gianfagna, Francesco; Gigante, Bruna; Giulianini, Franco; Goel, Anuj; Goodall, Alison H; Goodarzi, Mark O; Gorski, Mathias; Gräßler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassinen, Maija; Havulinna, Aki S; Hayward, Caroline; Hercberg, Serge; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Holmen, Jostein; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Howard, Phil; Hsiung, Chao A; Hunt, Steven C; Ikram, M Arfan; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jensen, Richard A; Kähönen, Mika; Kang, Hyun; Kathiresan, Sekar; Keating, Brendan J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Kim, Eric; Kivimaki, Mika; Klopp, Norman; Kolovou, Genovefa; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kosova, Gulum; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kutalik, Zoltan; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Lakka, Timo A; Lee, Nanette R; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Levy, Daniel; Li, Xiaohui; Liang, Kae-Woei; Lin, Honghuang; Lin, Li; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Männistö, Satu; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Mach, François; Markus, Hugh S; Marouli, Eirini; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Menni, Cristina; Metspalu, Andres; Mijatovic, Vladan; Moilanen, Leena; Montasser, May E; Morris, Andrew D; Morrison, Alanna C; Mulas, Antonella; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nikus, Kjell; O'Donnell, Christopher J; O'Reilly, Paul F; Ong, Ken K; Paccaud, Fred; Palmer, Cameron D; Parsa, Afshin; Pedersen, Nancy L; Penninx, Brenda W; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Poulter, Neil; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rao, Dabeeru C; Rasheed, Asif; Rayner, N William N W R; Renström, Frida; Rettig, Rainer; Rice, Kenneth M; Roberts, Robert; Rose, Lynda M; Rossouw, Jacques; Samani, Nilesh J; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schunkert, Heribert; Sebert, Sylvain; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shin, Young-Ah; Sim, Xueling; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Albert V; Sosa, Maria X; Spector, Tim D; Stančáková, Alena; Stanton, Alice; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Stringham, Heather M; Sundstrom, Johan; Swift, Amy J; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tai, E-Shyong; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tarasov, Kirill V; Teumer, Alexander; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tobin, Martin D; Tremoli, Elena; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Uusitupa, Matti; Vaez, Ahmad; Vaidya, Dhananjay; van Duijn, Cornelia M; van Iperen, Erik P A; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Verwoert, Germaine C; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Voight, Benjamin F; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagner, Aline; Wain, Louise V; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Weder, Alan B; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wilks, Rainford; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Wong, Tien Y; Yang, Tsun-Po; Yao, Jie; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Bovet, Pascal; Cooper, Richard S; Mohlke, Karen L; Saleheen, Danish; Lee, Jong-Young; Elliott, Paul; Gierman, Hinco J; Willer, Cristen J; Franke, Lude; Hovingh, G Kees; Taylor, Kent D; Dedoussis, George; Sever, Peter; Wong, Andrew; Lind, Lars; Assimes, Themistocles L; Njølstad, Inger; Schwarz, Peter Eh; Langenberg, Claudia; Snieder, Harold; Caulfield, Mark J; Melander, Olle; Laakso, Markku; Saltevo, Juha; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Ingelsson, Erik; Lehtimäki, Terho; Hveem, Kristian; Palmas, Walter; März, Winfried; Kumari, Meena; Salomaa, Veikko; Chen, Yii-Der I; Rotter, Jerome I; Froguel, Philippe; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Lakatta, Edward G; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Franks, Paul W; Hamsten, Anders; Wichmann, H-Erich; Palmer, Colin N A; Stefansson, Kari; Ridker, Paul M; Loos, Ruth J F; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Deloukas, Panos; Morris, Andrew P; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Munroe, Patricia B

    2016-10-01

    To dissect the genetic architecture of blood pressure and assess effects on target organ damage, we analyzed 128,272 SNPs from targeted and genome-wide arrays in 201,529 individuals of European ancestry, and genotypes from an additional 140,886 individuals were used for validation. We identified 66 blood pressure-associated loci, of which 17 were new; 15 harbored multiple distinct association signals. The 66 index SNPs were enriched for cis-regulatory elements, particularly in vascular endothelial cells, consistent with a primary role in blood pressure control through modulation of vascular tone across multiple tissues. The 66 index SNPs combined in a risk score showed comparable effects in 64,421 individuals of non-European descent. The 66-SNP blood pressure risk score was significantly associated with target organ damage in multiple tissues but with minor effects in the kidney. Our findings expand current knowledge of blood pressure-related pathways and highlight tissues beyond the classical renal system in blood pressure regulation.

  2. The genetics of blood pressure regulation and its target organs from association studies in 342,415 individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chasman, Daniel I.; Jackson, Anne U.; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Johnson, Toby; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Luan, Jian'an; Donnelly, Lousie A.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Pihur, Vasyl; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Shungin, Dmitry; Hughes, Maria F.; Meirelles, Osorio; Kaakinen, Marika; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Kristiansson, Kati; Shah, Sonia; Kleber, Marcus E.; Guo, Xiuqing; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Fava, Cristiano; Eriksson, Niclas; Nolte, Ilja M.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Salfati, Elias L.; Rallidis, Loukianos S.; Theusch, Elizabeth; Smith, Andrew J.P.; Folkersen, Lasse; Witkowska, Kate; Pers, Tune H.; Joehanes, Roby; Kim, Stuart K.; Lataniotis, Lazaros; Jansen, Rick; Johnson, Andrew D.; Warren, Helen; Kim, Young Jin; Zhao, Wei; Wu, Ying; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Bochud, Murielle; Absher, Devin; Adair, Linda S.; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan E.; Axelsson, Tomas; Baldassarre, Damiano; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barnes, Michael R.; Barroso, Inês; Bevan, Stephen; Bis, Joshua C.; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Brown, Morris J.; Burnier, Michel; Cabrera, Claudia P.; Chambers, John C.; Chang, I-Shou; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chines, Peter S.; Chung, Ren-Hua; Collins, Francis S.; Connell, John M.; Döring, Angela; Dallongeville, Jean; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; Delgado, Graciela; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Doney, Alex S.F.; Drenos, Fotios; Edkins, Sarah; Eicher, John D.; Elosua, Roberto; Enroth, Stefan; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Per; Esko, Tonu; Evangelou, Evangelos; Evans, Alun; Fall, Tove; Farrall, Martin; Felix, Janine F.; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fornage, Myriam; Forrester, Terrence; Franceschini, Nora; Duran, Oscar H. Franco; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Fraser, Ross M.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Gao, He; Gertow, Karl; Gianfagna, Francesco; Gigante, Bruna; Giulianini, Franco; Goel, Anuj; Goodall, Alison H.; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Gorski, Mathias; Gräßler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassinen, Maija; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Hercberg, Serge; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Holmen, Jostein; Holmen, Oddgeir Lingaas; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Howard, Phil; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hunt, Steven C.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jensen, Richard A.; Kähönen, Mika; Kang, Hyun; Kathiresan, Sekar; Keating, Brendan J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Kim, Eric; Kivimaki, Mika; Klopp, Norman; Kolovou, Genovefa; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kosova, Gulum; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kuh, Diana; Kutalik, Zoltan; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Lakka, Timo A; Lee, Nanette R.; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Levy, Daniel; Li, Xiaohui; Liang, Kae-Woei; Lin, Honghuang; Lin, Li; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Männistö, Satu; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Mach, François; Markus, Hugh S.; Marouli, Eirini; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meneton, Pierre; Menni, Cristina; Metspalu, Andres; Mijatovic, Vladan; Moilanen, Leena; Montasser, May E.; Morris, Andrew D.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Mulas, Antonella; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nikus, Kjell; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Ong, Ken K.; Paccaud, Fred; Palmer, Cameron D.; Parsa, Afshin; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Poulter, Neil; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Rasheed, Asif; Rayner, N William N.W.R.; Renström, Frida; Rettig, Rainer; Rice, Kenneth M.; Roberts, Robert; Rose, Lynda M.; Rossouw, Jacques; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schunkert, Heribert; Sebert, Sylvain; Sheu, Wayne H.-H.; Shin, Young-Ah; Sim, Xueling; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Albert V.; Sosa, Maria X.; Spector, Tim D.; Stančáková, Alena; Stanton, Alice; Stirrups, Kathleen E.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sundstrom, Johan; Swift, Amy J.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tai, E-Shyong; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Teumer, Alexander; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tobin, Martin D.; Tremoli, Elena; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Vaez, Ahmad; Vaidya, Dhananjay; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagner, Aline; Wain, Louise V.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Weder, Alan B.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wilks, Rainford; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Wong, Tien Y.; Yang, Tsun-Po; Yao, Jie; Yengo, Loic; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Bovet, Pascal; Cooper, Richard S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Saleheen, Danish; Lee, Jong-Young; Elliott, Paul; Gierman, Hinco J.; Willer, Cristen J.; Franke, Lude; Hovingh, G Kees; Taylor, Kent D.; Dedoussis, George; Sever, Peter; Wong, Andrew; Lind, Lars; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Njølstad, Inger; Schwarz, Peter EH.; Langenberg, Claudia; Snieder, Harold; Caulfield, Mark J.; Melander, Olle; Laakso, Markku; Saltevo, Juha; Rauramaa, Rainer; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Ingelsson, Erik; Lehtimäki, Terho; Hveem, Kristian; Palmas, Walter; März, Winfried; Kumari, Meena; Salomaa, Veikko; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Froguel, Philippe; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Lakatta, Edward G.; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Franks, Paul W.; Hamsten, Anders; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Stefansson, Kari; Ridker, Paul M; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Deloukas, Panos; Morris, Andrew P.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2016-01-01

    To dissect the genetic architecture of blood pressure and assess effects on target-organ damage, we analyzed 128,272 SNPs from targeted and genome-wide arrays in 201,529 individuals of European ancestry and genotypes from an additional 140,886 individuals were used for validation. We identified 66 blood pressure loci, of which 17 were novel and 15 harbored multiple distinct association signals. The 66 index SNPs were enriched for cis-regulatory elements, particularly in vascular endothelial cells, consistent with a primary role in blood pressure control through modulation of vascular tone across multiple tissues. The 66 index SNPs combined in a risk score showed comparable effects in 64,421 individuals of non-European descent. The 66-SNP blood pressure risk score was significantly associated with target-organ damage in multiple tissues, with minor effects in the kidney. Our findings expand current knowledge of blood pressure pathways and highlight tissues beyond the classic renal system in blood pressure regulation. PMID:27618452

  3. Targeting nursing homes under the Quality Improvement Organization program's 9th statement of work.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, David G; Mor, Vincent

    2009-09-01

    In the Quality Improvement Organization (QIO) program's latest Statement of Work, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is targeting its nursing home activities toward facilities that perform poorly on two quality measures-pressure ulcers and restraint use. The designation of target facilities is a shift in strategy for CMS and a direct response to criticism that QIO program resources were not being targeted effectively to facilities or clinical areas that most needed improvement. Using administrative data, this article analyzes implications of using narrowly defined criteria to identify facilities that need improvement, particularly in light of considerable evidence showing that nursing home quality is multidimensional and may change over time. The analyses show that one in four facilities is targeted for improvement nationally but that approximately half of some states' facilities are targeted while other states have almost none targeted. The analyses also convey deeper limitations to using threshold values on individual measures to identify poorly performing homes. Target facilities can be among the top performers on a range of other quality measures, and their performance on targeted measures themselves may change over time. The implication of these features is that a very different group of facilities would have been chosen had the QIO program targeted other measures or examined performance at a different point in time. Ultimately, CMS has chosen a blunt instrument to identify poorly performing nursing homes, and supplemental strategies-such as soliciting input from state survey agencies and more closely aligning quality improvement and quality assurance efforts-should be considered to address potential limitations.

  4. EFFECT OF NON-TARGET ORGANICS ON ORGANIC CHEMICAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To improve our standard of living, man has synthesized organic compounds for use in products considered essential for life. These compounds are having and will continue to have a significant impact on the terrestrial environment. Understanding organic chemical transport through s...

  5. Recent advances in hopanoids analysis: Quantification protocols overview, main research targets and selected problems of complex data exploration.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Paweł K; Portka, Joanna K

    2015-09-01

    Pentacyclic triterpenoids, particularly hopanoids, are organism-specific compounds and are generally considered as useful biomarkers that allow fingerprinting and classification of biological, environmental and geological samples. Simultaneous quantification of various hopanoids together with battery of related non-polar and low-molecular mass compounds may provide principal information for geochemical and environmental research focusing on both modern and ancient investigations. Target compounds can be derived from microbial biomass, water columns, sediments, coals, crude fossils or rocks. This create number of analytical problems due to different composition of the analytical matrix and interfering compounds and therefore, proper optimization of quantification protocols for such biomarkers is still the challenge. In this work we summarizing typical analytical protocols that were recently applied for quantification of hopanoids like compounds from different samples. Main steps including components of interest extraction, pre-purification, fractionation, derivatization and quantification involving gas (1D and 2D) as well as liquid separation techniques (liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, planar and low resolution column chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography) are described and discussed from practical point of view, mainly based on the experimental papers that were published within last two years, where significant increase in hopanoids research was noticed. The second aim of this review is to describe the latest research trends concerning determination of hopanoids and related low-molecular mass lipids analyzed in various samples including sediments, rocks, coals, crude oils and plant fossils as well as stromatolites and microbial biomass cultivated under different conditions. It has been found that majority of the most recent papers are based on uni- or bivariate approach for complex data analysis. Data interpretation involves

  6. Tracking targeted bimodal nanovaccines: immune responses and routing in cells, tissue, and whole organism.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Luis J; Tacken, Paul J; Zeelenberg, Ingrid S; Srinivas, Mangala; Bonetto, Fernando; Weigelin, Bettina; Eich, Christina; de Vries, I Jolanda; Figdor, Carl G

    2014-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs), involved in the induction of immunity and currently exploited for antitumor immunotherapies. An optimized noninvasive imaging modality capable of determining and quantifying DC-targeted nanoparticle (NP) trajectories could provide valuable information regarding therapeutic vaccine outcome. Here, targeted poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (PLGA NPs) recognizing DC receptors were equipped with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) or gold nanoparticles with fluorescently labeled antigen. The fluorescent label allowed for rapid analysis and quantification of DC-specific uptake of targeted PLGA NPs in comparison to uptake by other cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that a fraction of the encapsulated antigen reached the lysosomal compartment of DCs, where SPIO and gold were already partially released. However, part of the PLGA NPs localized within the cytoplasm, as confirmed by confocal microscopy. DCs targeted with NPs carrying SPIO or fluorescent antigen were detected within lymph nodes as early as 1 h after injection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Despite the fact that targeting did not markedly affect PLGA NP biodistribution on organism and tissue level, it increased delivery of NPs to DCs residing in peripheral lymph nodes and resulted in enhanced T cell proliferation. In conclusion, two imaging agents within a single carrier allows tracking of targeted PLGA NPs at the subcellular, cellular, and organismal levels, thereby facilitating the rational design of in vivo targeted vaccination strategies.

  7. MAGNETIC ACTIVITY ANALYSIS FOR A SAMPLE OF G-TYPE MAIN SEQUENCE KEPLER TARGETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrabi, Ahmad; He, Han; Khosroshahi, Habib, E-mail: mehrabi@basu.ac.ir

    2017-01-10

    The variation of a stellar light curve owing to rotational modulation by magnetic features (starspots and faculae) on the star’s surface can be used to investigate the magnetic properties of the host star. In this paper, we use the periodicity and magnitude of the light-curve variation as two proxies to study the stellar magnetic properties for a large sample of G-type main sequence Kepler targets, for which the rotation periods were recently determined. By analyzing the correlation between the two magnetic proxies, it is found that: (1) the two proxies are positively correlated for most of the stars in ourmore » sample, and the percentages of negative, zero, and positive correlations are 4.27%, 6.81%, and 88.91%, respectively; (2) negative correlation stars cannot have a large magnitude of light-curve variation; and (3) with the increase of rotation period, the relative number of positive correlation stars decreases and the negative correlation one increases. These results indicate that stars with shorter rotation period tend to have positive correlation between the two proxies, and a good portion of the positive correlation stars have a larger magnitude of light-curve variation (and hence more intense magnetic activities) than negative correlation stars.« less

  8. Temporal trends in organic carbon content in the main Swiss rivers, 1974-2010.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Murillo, J C; Zobrist, J; Filella, M

    2015-01-01

    Increases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations have often been reported in rivers and lakes of the Northern Hemisphere over the last few decades. High-quality organic carbon (OC) concentration data have been used to study the change in DOC and total (TOC) organic carbon concentrations in the main rivers of Switzerland (Rhône, Rhine, Thur and Aar) between 1974 and 2010. These rivers are characterized by high discharge regimes (due to their Alpine origin) and by running in populated areas. Small long term trends (a general statistically significant decrease in TOC and a less clear increase in DOC concentrations), on the order of 1% of mean OC concentration per year, have been observed. An upward trend before 1999 reversed direction to a more marked downward trend from 1999 to 2010. Of the potential causes of OC temporal variation analysed (water temperature, dissolved reactive phosphorus and river discharge), only discharge explains a significant, albeit still small, part of TOC variability (8-31%), while accounting for barely 2.5% of DOC variability. Estimated anthropogenic TOC and DOC loads (treated sewage) to the rivers could account for a maximum of 4-20% of the temporal trends. Such low predictability is a good example of the limitations faced when studying causality and drivers behind small variations in complex systems. River export of OC from Switzerland has decreased significantly over the period. Since about 5.5% of estimated NEP of Switzerland is exported by the rivers, riverine OC fluxes should be taken into account in a detailed carbon budget of the country. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthetic lipid nanoparticles targeting steroid organs.

    PubMed

    Mérian, Juliette; Boisgard, Raphaël; Decleves, Xavier; Thezé, Benoît; Texier, Isabelle; Tavitian, Bertrand

    2013-11-01

    Lipidots are original nanoparticulate lipid delivery vectors for drugs and contrast agents made from materials generally regarded as safe. Here, we characterized the in vivo stability, biodistribution, and pharmacokinetics of lipidots. Lipidots 55 nm in diameter and coated with a phospholipid/poly(ethyleneglycol) surfactant shell were triply labeled with (3)H-cholesteryl-hexadecyl-ether, cholesteryl-(14)C-oleate, and the 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindotricarbocyanine infrared fluorescent dye and injected intravenously into immunocompetent Friend virus B-type mice. The pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of lipidots were analyzed quantitatively in serial samples of blood and tissue and with in vivo optical imaging and were refined by microscopic examination of selected target tissues. The plasmatic half-life of lipidots was approximately 30 min. Radioactive and fluorescent tracers displayed a similar nanoparticle-driven biodistribution, indicative of the lipidots' integrity during the first hours after injection. Lipidots distributed in the liver and, surprisingly, in the steroid-rich organs adrenals and ovaries, but not in the spleen. This tropism was confirmed at the microscopic level by histologic detection of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindotricarbocyanine. Nanoparticle loading with cholesterol derivatives increased accumulation in ovaries in a dose-dependent manner. This previously unreported distribution pattern is specific to lipidots and attributed to their nanometric size and composition, conferring on them a lipoproteinlike behavior. The affinity of lipidots for steroid hormone-rich areas is of interest to address drugs and contrast agents to lipoprotein-receptor-overexpressing cancer cells found in hormone-dependent tumors.

  10. [Prevalence of target organ damage in patients treated for primary arterial hypertension: Comparison between men and women. ESSENTIELLE study].

    PubMed

    Boivin, J-M; Koch, C; Vigié, L; Meppiel, L

    2015-06-01

    To compare the percentages of men and women treated for primary arterial hypertension presenting with at least one target organ damage; to identify factors associated with target organ damage and/or blood pressure control. Observational, transverse study carried out between March 2012 and July 2013 on a representative sample of 2666 outpatients (including 1343 men) consulting general practitioners (n=469) or cardiologists (n=250) in routine follow-up. Characteristics "men vs. women" were: mean age (62.6 ± 11.6 vs. 57.4 ± 14.7 years; P<0.0001); ≥ 60 years (61.1% vs. 43.9%; P<0.0001); waist circumference (98.9 ± 12.2 vs. 89.4 ± 14.3 cm; P<0.0001); SBP (146.5 ± 16.1 vs. 145.8 ± 17.0 mmHg; NS); DBP (85.1 ± 10.3 vs. 84.2 ± 10.4; P=0,03). Target organ damage was more frequent in men (37.6% vs. 22.9%; P<0.0001), whether it was subclinical (20.4% vs. 13.6%; P<0.0001) or documented (26.3% vs. 13.5%; P<0.0001); some patients presented with both types of damages. Men developed more often microalbuminuria (6.5% vs. 4.3%; P=0.01) and LVH (16.3% vs. 10.5%; P<0.0001); some patients presented with both types of subclinical injuries. Target organ damage was more common in men without regular physical activity than in those exercising regularly (42.1% vs. 32.5%; P=0.0004). Regular exercises had no effect in women (24.1% vs. 21.3%). For both sexes, other factors associated with target organ damage were: age ≥ 60 years, myocardial infarction/sudden death in family history, LDL-cholesterol ≥ 1.60 g/L, HDL-cholesterol ≤ 0.40 g/L. Stroke before 45 years in family history was a predictive factor in women. Hypertension was controlled in one third of patients without difference between sexes. In women, hypertension was less often controlled in case of excessive alcohol consumption compared to normal alcohol intake (17.9% vs. 36.1%; P=0.0007); this factor had no effect in men (28.1% vs. 32.6%). Other factors associated with poor blood pressure control were: BMI (P=0.002), LDL

  11. Enhanced guide-RNA design and targeting analysis for precise CRISPR genome editing of single and consortia of industrially relevant and non-model organisms.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Brian J; Trinh, Cong T

    2018-01-01

    Genetic diversity of non-model organisms offers a repertoire of unique phenotypic features for exploration and cultivation for synthetic biology and metabolic engineering applications. To realize this enormous potential, it is critical to have an efficient genome editing tool for rapid strain engineering of these organisms to perform novel programmed functions. To accommodate the use of CRISPR/Cas systems for genome editing across organisms, we have developed a novel method, named CRISPR Associated Software for Pathway Engineering and Research (CASPER), for identifying on- and off-targets with enhanced predictability coupled with an analysis of non-unique (repeated) targets to assist in editing any organism with various endonucleases. Utilizing CASPER, we demonstrated a modest 2.4% and significant 30.2% improvement (F-test, P < 0.05) over the conventional methods for predicting on- and off-target activities, respectively. Further we used CASPER to develop novel applications in genome editing: multitargeting analysis (i.e. simultaneous multiple-site modification on a target genome with a sole guide-RNA requirement) and multispecies population analysis (i.e. guide-RNA design for genome editing across a consortium of organisms). Our analysis on a selection of industrially relevant organisms revealed a number of non-unique target sites associated with genes and transposable elements that can be used as potential sites for multitargeting. The analysis also identified shared and unshared targets that enable genome editing of single or multiple genomes in a consortium of interest. We envision CASPER as a useful platform to enhance the precise CRISPR genome editing for metabolic engineering and synthetic biology applications. https://github.com/TrinhLab/CASPER. ctrinh@utk.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Construction of ultrasonic nanobubbles carrying CAIX polypeptides to target carcinoma cells derived from various organs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lianhua; Guo, Yanli; Wang, Luofu; Fan, Xiaozhou; Xiong, Xingyu; Fang, Kejing; Xu, Dan

    2017-09-29

    . Targeted nanobubbles carrying CAIX polypeptides can specifically enhance ultrasound imaging in CAIX-positive transplanted tumor tissues and could potentially be used in early diagnosis of a variety of solid tumors derived from various organs.

  13. Hypertensive crisis with 2 target organ impairment induced by glycyrrhizin: A case report.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Fan, Xiaoli; Wang, Qin

    2018-03-01

    Glycyrrhizin is the main active component of licorice. Licorice and glycyrrhizin induced hypertension has been widely reported, yet licorice and glycyrrhizin induced hypertensive crisis has been rarely known. The case of this report was a 47-year-old woman, who took 225 mg of glycyrrhizin daily for 3 years due to primary biliary cholangitis. She was found to have a dramatically elevated blood pressure of about 230/110 mmHg without a history of hypertension and was referred to the emergency department. Hypokalemia, hypertensive retinopathy, and nephropathy were found during the following work-up. Since no other risk factors of hypertension were identified, she was suspected to have glycyrrhizin induced pseudo-hyperaldosteronism. Glycyrrhizin was discontinued. Intravenous sodium nitroprusside was used during the first few days. Nifedipine and irbesartan were taken after discharge, and the dosage was reduced gradually under supervision. She stopped all the anti-hypertensive drugs 6 months since glycyrrhizin was stopped. Her blood pressure was about 110/60 mmHg after repetitive measurement. Her serum potassium and urine albumin/creatinine ratio were also normalized. Licorice and glycyrrhizin induced hypertension due to pseudo-hyperaldosteronism has been widely reported, yet only 3 cases reported that excessive consumption of licorice could lead to hypertensive emergencies. This is the first case that glycyrrhizin induced hypertensive crisis with target organ impairment. By presenting this case, we remind clinicians of glycyrrhizin induced hypertension, a condition which could lead to medical emergencies.

  14. When organ donation from living donors serves as the main source of organ procurement: a critical examination of the ethical and legal challenges to Turkey's recent efforts to overcome organ shortage.

    PubMed

    Sert, G; Guven, T; Gorkey, S

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that Turkey has implemented a number of legislative and regulatory efforts to increase cadaveric donations, live donors still serve as the main source of organ procurement in this country. To address this problem, Turkey's regulatory authorities have sought to increase the number of brain death declarations. A new regulation issued in 2012 repeats the criteria for brain death that were first issued in 1993. This paper argues that these efforts are far from adequate owing to a number of complicated, ethical, and legal challenges that must be addressed to increase cadaveric organ donations. After examining these factors, which are completely neglected in current policies, we conclude that Turkey needs a realistic ethically justifiable organ procurement policy that must be supported by a framework of patient rights to implement the concept of patient autonomy and respect for human dignity in health care services as the primary goal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biosafety research for non-target organism risk assessment of RNAi-based GE plants

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Andrew F.; Devos, Yann; Lemgo, Godwin N. Y.; Zhou, Xuguo

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference, or RNAi, refers to a set of biological processes that make use of conserved cellular machinery to silence genes. Although there are several variations in the source and mechanism, they are all triggered by double stranded RNA (dsRNA) which is processed by a protein complex into small, single stranded RNA, referred to as small interfering RNAs (siRNA) with complementarity to sequences in genes targeted for silencing. The use of the RNAi mechanism to develop new traits in plants has fueled a discussion about the environmental safety of the technology for these applications, and this was the subject of a symposium session at the 13th ISBGMO in Cape Town, South Africa. This paper continues that discussion by proposing research areas that may be beneficial for future environmental risk assessments of RNAi-based genetically modified plants, with a particular focus on non-target organism assessment. PMID:26594220

  16. Attractive Toxic Sugar Bait (ATSB) For Control of Mosquitoes and Its Impact on Non-Target Organisms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Fiorenzano, Jodi M.; Koehler, Philip G.; Xue, Rui-De

    2017-01-01

    Mosquito abatement programs contend with mosquito-borne diseases, insecticidal resistance, and environmental impacts to non-target organisms. However, chemical resources are limited to a few chemical classes with similar modes of action, which has led to insecticide resistance in mosquito populations. To develop a new tool for mosquito abatement programs that control mosquitoes while combating the issues of insecticidal resistance, and has low impacts of non-target organisms, novel methods of mosquito control, such as attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSBs), are being developed. Whereas insect baiting to dissuade a behavior, or induce mortality, is not a novel concept, as it was first introduced in writings from 77 AD, mosquito baiting through toxic sugar baits (TSBs) had been quickly developing over the last 60 years. This review addresses the current body of research of ATSB by providing an overview of active ingredients (toxins) include in TSBs, attractants combined in ATSB, lethal effects on mosquito adults and larvae, impact on non-target insects, and prospects for the use of ATSB. PMID:28394284

  17. Attractive Toxic Sugar Bait (ATSB) For Control of Mosquitoes and Its Impact on Non-Target Organisms: A Review.

    PubMed

    Fiorenzano, Jodi M; Koehler, Philip G; Xue, Rui-De

    2017-04-10

    Mosquito abatement programs contend with mosquito-borne diseases, insecticidal resistance, and environmental impacts to non-target organisms. However, chemical resources are limited to a few chemical classes with similar modes of action, which has led to insecticide resistance in mosquito populations. To develop a new tool for mosquito abatement programs that control mosquitoes while combating the issues of insecticidal resistance, and has low impacts of non-target organisms, novel methods of mosquito control, such as attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSBs), are being developed. Whereas insect baiting to dissuade a behavior, or induce mortality, is not a novel concept, as it was first introduced in writings from 77 AD, mosquito baiting through toxic sugar baits (TSBs) had been quickly developing over the last 60 years. This review addresses the current body of research of ATSB by providing an overview of active ingredients (toxins) include in TSBs, attractants combined in ATSB, lethal effects on mosquito adults and larvae, impact on non-target insects, and prospects for the use of ATSB.

  18. Pathogenicity Tests on Nine Mosquito Species and Several Non-target Organisms with Strelkovimermis spiculatus (Nemata Mermithidae).

    PubMed

    Becnel, J J; Johnson, M A

    1998-12-01

    Nine species of mosquitoes and several species of non-target aquatic organisms were tested for susceptibility to the mernaithid nematode, Strelkovimermis spiculatus. All species of Anopheles, Aedes, Culex, and Toxorhynchites exposed to S. spiculatus were susceptible. Of the nine mosquito species tested, C. pipiens quinquefasciatus had the greatest tolerance to initial invasion and the highest percent infection of those that survived. High levels of infection were also achieved with Aedes taeniorhynchus and A. albopictus, but these mosquitoes were significantly less tolerant to parasitism than C. pipiens quinquefasciatus. Strelkovimermis spiculatus did not infect or develop in any of the non-target hosts tested.

  19. The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ protects against organ damage in a lipopolysaccharide-peptidoglycan model of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lowes, Damon A; Thottakam, Bensita M V; Webster, Nigel R; Murphy, Michael P; Galley, Helen F

    2008-12-01

    Sepsis is characterised by a systemic dysregulated inflammatory response and oxidative stress, often leading to organ failure and death. Development of organ dysfunction associated with sepsis is now accepted to be due at least in part to oxidative damage to mitochondria. MitoQ is an antioxidant selectively targeted to mitochondria that protects mitochondria from oxidative damage and which has been shown to decrease mitochondrial damage in animal models of oxidative stress. We hypothesised that if oxidative damage to mitochondria does play a significant role in sepsis-induced organ failure, then MitoQ should modulate inflammatory responses, reduce mitochondrial oxidative damage, and thereby ameliorate organ damage. To assess this, we investigated the effects of MitoQ in vitro in an endothelial cell model of sepsis and in vivo in a rat model of sepsis. In vitro MitoQ decreased oxidative stress and protected mitochondria from damage as indicated by a lower rate of reactive oxygen species formation (P=0.01) and by maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential (P<0.005). MitoQ also suppressed proinflammatory cytokine release from the cells (P<0.05) while the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 was increased by MitoQ (P<0.001). In a lipopolysaccharide-peptidoglycan rat model of the organ dysfunction that occurs during sepsis, MitoQ treatment resulted in lower levels of biochemical markers of acute liver and renal dysfunction (P<0.05), and mitochondrial membrane potential was augmented (P<0.01) in most organs. These findings suggest that the use of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants such as MitoQ may be beneficial in sepsis.

  20. Membrane organization of virus and target cell plays a role in HIV entry.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Fabrice; Preira, Pascal; Salomé, Laurence

    2014-12-01

    The initial steps of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) replication cycle play a crucial role that arbitrates viral tropism and infection efficiency. Before the release of its genome into the host cell cytoplasm, viruses operate a complex sequence of events that take place at the plasma membrane of the target cell. The first step is the binding of the HIV protein envelope (Env) to the cellular receptor CD4. This triggers conformational changes of the gp120 viral protein that allow its interaction with a co-receptor that can be either CCR5 or CXCR4, defining the tropism of the virus entering the cell. This sequential interaction finally drives the fusion of the viral and host cell membrane or to the endocytosis of the viruses. Here, we discuss how the membrane composition and organization of both the virus and the target cell can affect these steps and thus influence the capability of the viruses to infect cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. An efficient and robust MRI-guided radiotherapy planning approach for targeting abdominal organs and tumours in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Luke; Tullis, Iain D. C.; Newman, Robert G.; Corroyer-Dulmont, Aurelien; Falzone, Nadia; Azad, Abul; Vallis, Katherine A.; Sansom, Owen J.; Muschel, Ruth J.; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Hill, Mark A.; Fokas, Emmanouil; Smart, Sean C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Preclinical CT-guided radiotherapy platforms are increasingly used but the CT images are characterized by poor soft tissue contrast. The aim of this study was to develop a robust and accurate method of MRI-guided radiotherapy (MR-IGRT) delivery to abdominal targets in the mouse. Methods A multimodality cradle was developed for providing subject immobilisation and its performance was evaluated. Whilst CT was still used for dose calculations, target identification was based on MRI. Each step of the radiotherapy planning procedure was validated initially in vitro using BANG gel dosimeters. Subsequently, MR-IGRT of normal adrenal glands with a size-matched collimated beam was performed. Additionally, the SK-N-SH neuroblastoma xenograft model and the transgenic KPC model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma were used to demonstrate the applicability of our methods for the accurate delivery of radiation to CT-invisible abdominal tumours. Results The BANG gel phantoms demonstrated a targeting efficiency error of 0.56 ± 0.18 mm. The in vivo stability tests of body motion during MR-IGRT and the associated cradle transfer showed that the residual body movements are within this MR-IGRT targeting error. Accurate MR-IGRT of the normal adrenal glands with a size-matched collimated beam was confirmed by γH2AX staining. Regression in tumour volume was observed almost immediately post MR-IGRT in the neuroblastoma model, further demonstrating accuracy of x-ray delivery. Finally, MR-IGRT in the KPC model facilitated precise contouring and comparison of different treatment plans and radiotherapy dose distributions not only to the intra-abdominal tumour but also to the organs at risk. Conclusion This is, to our knowledge, the first study to demonstrate preclinical MR-IGRT in intra-abdominal organs. The proposed MR-IGRT method presents a state-of-the-art solution to enabling robust, accurate and efficient targeting of extracranial organs in the mouse and can operate with a

  2. Expanded target-chemical analysis reveals extensive mixed-organic-contaminant exposure in USA streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste A.; Romanok, Kristin; Barber, Larry B.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Foreman, William T.; Furlong, Edward T.; Glassmeyer, Susan T.; Hladik, Michelle L.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Jones, Daniel K.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Loftin, Keith A.; Mills, Marc A.; Meyer, Michael T.; Orlando, James L.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.

    2017-01-01

    Surface water from 38 streams nationwide was assessed using 14 target-organic methods (719 compounds). Designed-bioactive anthropogenic contaminants (biocides, pharmaceuticals) comprised 57% of 406 organics detected at least once. The 10 most-frequently detected anthropogenic-organics included eight pesticides (desulfinylfipronil, AMPA, chlorpyrifos, dieldrin, metolachlor, atrazine, CIAT, glyphosate) and two pharmaceuticals (caffeine, metformin) with detection frequencies ranging 66–84% of all sites. Detected contaminant concentrations varied from less than 1 ng L–1 to greater than 10 μg L–1, with 77 and 278 having median detected concentrations greater than 100 ng L–1 and 10 ng L–1, respectively. Cumulative detections and concentrations ranged 4–161 compounds (median 70) and 8.5–102 847 ng L–1, respectively, and correlated significantly with wastewater discharge, watershed development, and toxic release inventory metrics. Log10 concentrations of widely monitored HHCB, triclosan, and carbamazepine explained 71–82% of the variability in the total number of compounds detected (linear regression; p-values: < 0.001–0.012), providing a statistical inference tool for unmonitored contaminants. Due to multiple modes of action, high bioactivity, biorecalcitrance, and direct environment application (pesticides), designed-bioactive organics (median 41 per site at μg L–1 cumulative concentrations) in developed watersheds present aquatic health concerns, given their acknowledged potential for sublethal effects to sensitive species and lifecycle stages at low ng L–1.

  3. A multifunctional metal-organic framework based tumor targeting drug delivery system for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Dong, Zhi-Yue; Cheng, Hong; Wan, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Wei-Hai; Zou, Mei-Zhen; Huo, Jia-Wei; Deng, He-Xiang; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects.Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  4. Colorimetric detection of genetically modified organisms based on exonuclease III-assisted target recycling and hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Decai; Wang, Weijia; Dong, Qian; Huang, Yunxiu; Wen, Dongmei; Mu, Yuejing; Yuan, Yong

    2017-12-21

    An isothermal colorimetric method is described for amplified detection of the CaMV 35S promoter sequence in genetically modified organism (GMO). It is based on (a) target DNA-triggered unlabeled molecular beacon (UMB) termini binding, and (b) exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted target recycling, and (c) hemin/G-quadruplex (DNAzyme) based signal amplification. The specific binding of target to the G-quadruplex sequence-locked UMB triggers the digestion of Exo III. This, in turn, releases an active G-quadruplex segment and target DNA for successive hybridization and cleavage. The Exo III impellent recycling of targets produces numerous G-quadruplex sequences. These further associate with hemin to form DNAzymes and hence will catalyze H 2 O 2 -mediated oxidation of the chromogenic enzyme substrate ABTS 2- causing the formation of a green colored product. This finding enables a sensitive colorimetric determination of GMO DNA (at an analytical wavelength of 420 nm) at concentrations as low as 0.23 nM. By taking advantage of isothermal incubation, this method does not require sophisticated equipment or complicated syntheses. Analyses can be performed within 90 min. The method also discriminates single base mismatches. In our perception, it has a wide scope in that it may be applied to the detection of many other GMOs. Graphical abstract An isothermal and sensitive colorimetric method is described for amplified detection of CaMV 35S promoter sequence in genetically modified organism (GMO). It is based on target DNA-triggered molecular beacon (UMB) termini-binding and exonuclease III assisted target recycling, and on hemin/G-quadruplex (DNAzyme) signal amplification.

  5. Chemical structure determines target organ carcinogenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquer, C. A.; Malik, N.; States, G.; Qamar, S.; Cunningham, S.L.; Cunningham, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    SAR models were developed for 12 rat tumour sites using data derived from the Carcinogenic Potency Database. Essentially, the models fall into two categories: Target Site Carcinogen – Non-Carcinogen (TSC-NC) and Target Site Carcinogen – Non-Target Site Carcinogen (TSC-NTSC). The TSC-NC models were composed of active chemicals that were carcinogenic to a specific target site and inactive ones that were whole animal non-carcinogens. On the other hand, the TSC-NTSC models used an inactive category also composed of carcinogens but to any/all other sites but the target site. Leave one out validations produced an overall average concordance value for all 12 models of 0.77 for the TSC-NC models and 0.73 for the TSC-NTSC models. Overall, these findings suggest that while the TSC-NC models are able to distinguish between carcinogens and non-carcinogens, the TSC-NTSC models are identifying structural attributes that associate carcinogens to specific tumour sites. Since the TSC-NTSC models are composed of active and inactive compounds that are genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens, the TSC-NTSC models may be capable of deciphering non-genotoxic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Together, models of this type may also prove useful in anticancer drug development since they essentially contain chemicals moieties that target specific tumour site. PMID:23066888

  6. Multi-target determination of organic ultraviolet absorbents in organism tissues by ultrasonic assisted extraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xianzhi; Jin, Jiabin; Wang, Chunwei; Ou, Weihui; Tang, Caiming

    2015-03-06

    A sensitive and reliable method was developed for multi-target determination of 13 most widely used organic ultraviolet (UV) absorbents (including UV filters and UV stabilizers) in aquatic organism tissues. The organic UV absorbents were extracted using ultrasonic-assisted extraction, purified via gel permeation chromatography coupled with silica gel column chromatography, and determined by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Recoveries of the UV absorbents from organism tissues mostly ranged from 70% to 120% from fish filet with satisfactory reproducibility. Method quantification limits were 0.003-1.0ngg(-1) dry weight (dw) except for 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate. This method has been applied to analysis of the UV absorbents in wild and farmed aquatic organisms collected from the Pearl River Estuary, South China. 2-Hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone and UV-P were frequently detected in both wild and farmed marine organisms at low ngg(-1)dw. 3-(4-Methylbenzylidene)camphor and most of the benzotriazole UV stabilizers were also frequently detected in maricultured fish. Octocrylene and 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate were not detected in any sample. This work lays basis for in-depth study about bioaccumulation and biomagnification of the UV absorbents in marine environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Carotid and aortic stiffness in essential hypertension and their relation with target organ damage: the CATOD study

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Rosa Maria; Cartoni, Giulia; Stea, Francesco; Armenia, Sabina; Bianchini, Elisabetta; Buralli, Simona; Giannarelli, Chiara; Taddei, Stefano; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study is to investigate in the hypertensive population the possible differential association between increased aortic and/or carotid stiffness and organ damage in multiple districts, such as the kidney, the vessels, and the heart. Methods In 314 essential hypertensive patients, carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV, by applanation tonometry) and carotid stiffness (from ultrasound images analysis), together with left ventricular hypertrophy, carotid intima–media thickness, urinary albumin–creatinin ratio, and glomerular filtration rate were measured. Increased cfPWV and carotid stiffness were defined according to either international reference values or the 90th percentile of a local control group (110 age and sex-matched healthy individuals). Results When considering the 90th percentile of a local control group, increased cfPWV was associated with reduced glomerular filtration rate, either when carotid stiffness was increased [odds ratio (OR) 13.27 (confidence limits (CL) 95% 3.86–45.58)] or not [OR 7.39 (CL95% 2.25–24.28)], whereas increased carotid stiffness was associated with left ventricular hypertrophy, either when cfPWV was increased [OR 2.86 (CL95% 1.15–7.09)] or not [OR 2.81 (CL95% 1.13–6.97)]. No association between increased cfPWV or carotid stiffness and target organ damage was found when cutoffs obtained by international reference values were used. The concomitance of both increased cfPWV and carotid stiffness did not have an additive effect on organ damage. Conclusion Aortic and carotid stiffness are differentially associated with target organ damage in hypertensive patients. Regional arterial stiffness as assessed by cfPWV is associated with renal organ damage and local carotid stiffness with cardiac organ damage. PMID:27841779

  8. [Musculoskeletal system as a target organ of a frailty processes].

    PubMed

    Zlobina, I A; Krivtsunov, A N; Bogat, S V; Prashchayeu, K I

    Pathology of the musculoskeletal system is widespread in the population and is one of the most common diseases of patients in older age groups. The most significant of them are osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and sarcopenia. All three components separately, of course, lead to lower quality of life. In our work we show the mechanisms of interference of these states at each other, and their combined impact on the musculoskeletal system as a target organ processes senile asthenia. Osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and sarcopenia, and especially their combination lead to hypomobility. Hypomobility under the influence of external factors is one of the leading syndromes potentiating aggravation processes senile asthenia. Thus, the mechanism of re-entry is triggered, and a vicious circle leading to fatal medical-social and social consequences. It is shown that changes in the musculoskeletal system should be considered as a single aging within senile asthenia, and all used and newly created medical and social rehabilitation and prevention programs should be integrated in nature.

  9. Development and validation of a 48-target analytical method for high-throughput monitoring of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Wu, Yuhua; Li, Jun; Li, Yunjing; Long, Likun; Li, Feiwu; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-05

    The rapid increase in the number of genetically modified (GM) varieties has led to a demand for high-throughput methods to detect genetically modified organisms (GMOs). We describe a new dynamic array-based high throughput method to simultaneously detect 48 targets in 48 samples on a Fludigm system. The test targets included species-specific genes, common screening elements, most of the Chinese-approved GM events, and several unapproved events. The 48 TaqMan assays successfully amplified products from both single-event samples and complex samples with a GMO DNA amount of 0.05 ng, and displayed high specificity. To improve the sensitivity of detection, a preamplification step for 48 pooled targets was added to enrich the amount of template before performing dynamic chip assays. This dynamic chip-based method allowed the synchronous high-throughput detection of multiple targets in multiple samples. Thus, it represents an efficient, qualitative method for GMO multi-detection.

  10. Development and Validation of A 48-Target Analytical Method for High-throughput Monitoring of Genetically Modified Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofei; Wu, Yuhua; Li, Jun; Li, Yunjing; Long, Likun; Li, Feiwu; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The rapid increase in the number of genetically modified (GM) varieties has led to a demand for high-throughput methods to detect genetically modified organisms (GMOs). We describe a new dynamic array-based high throughput method to simultaneously detect 48 targets in 48 samples on a Fludigm system. The test targets included species-specific genes, common screening elements, most of the Chinese-approved GM events, and several unapproved events. The 48 TaqMan assays successfully amplified products from both single-event samples and complex samples with a GMO DNA amount of 0.05 ng, and displayed high specificity. To improve the sensitivity of detection, a preamplification step for 48 pooled targets was added to enrich the amount of template before performing dynamic chip assays. This dynamic chip-based method allowed the synchronous high-throughput detection of multiple targets in multiple samples. Thus, it represents an efficient, qualitative method for GMO multi-detection. PMID:25556930

  11. Improved prediction of peptide detectability for targeted proteomics using a rank-based algorithm and organism-specific data.

    PubMed

    Qeli, Ermir; Omasits, Ulrich; Goetze, Sandra; Stekhoven, Daniel J; Frey, Juerg E; Basler, Konrad; Wollscheid, Bernd; Brunner, Erich; Ahrens, Christian H

    2014-08-28

    The in silico prediction of the best-observable "proteotypic" peptides in mass spectrometry-based workflows is a challenging problem. Being able to accurately predict such peptides would enable the informed selection of proteotypic peptides for targeted quantification of previously observed and non-observed proteins for any organism, with a significant impact for clinical proteomics and systems biology studies. Current prediction algorithms rely on physicochemical parameters in combination with positive and negative training sets to identify those peptide properties that most profoundly affect their general detectability. Here we present PeptideRank, an approach that uses learning to rank algorithm for peptide detectability prediction from shotgun proteomics data, and that eliminates the need to select a negative dataset for the training step. A large number of different peptide properties are used to train ranking models in order to predict a ranking of the best-observable peptides within a protein. Empirical evaluation with rank accuracy metrics showed that PeptideRank complements existing prediction algorithms. Our results indicate that the best performance is achieved when it is trained on organism-specific shotgun proteomics data, and that PeptideRank is most accurate for short to medium-sized and abundant proteins, without any loss in prediction accuracy for the important class of membrane proteins. Targeted proteomics approaches have been gaining a lot of momentum and hold immense potential for systems biology studies and clinical proteomics. However, since only very few complete proteomes have been reported to date, for a considerable fraction of a proteome there is no experimental proteomics evidence that would allow to guide the selection of the best-suited proteotypic peptides (PTPs), i.e. peptides that are specific to a given proteoform and that are repeatedly observed in a mass spectrometer. We describe a novel, rank-based approach for the prediction

  12. Managing soil nutrients with compost in organic farms of East Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi

    2013-04-01

    Soil Fertility management in organic farming relies on a long-term integrated approach rather than the more short-term very targeted solutions common in conventional agriculture. Increasing soil organic matter content through the addition of organic amendments has proven to be a valuable practice for maintaining or restoring soil quality. Organic agriculture relies greatly on building soil organic matter with compost typically replacing inorganic fertilizers and animal manure as the fertility source of choice. In Georgia, more and more attention is paid to the development of organic farming, occupying less than 1% of total agricultural land of the country. Due to increased interest towards organic production the question about soil amendments is arising with special focus on organic fertilizers as basic nutrient supply sources under organic management practice. In the frame of current research two different types of compost was prepared and their nutritional value was studied. The one was prepared from organic fraction municipal solid waste and another one using fruit processing residues. In addition to main nutritional properties both composts were tested on heavy metals content, as one of the main quality parameter. The results have shown that concentration of main nutrient is higher in municipal solid waste compost, but it contains also more heavy metals, which is not allowed in organic farming system. Fruit processing residue compost also has lower pH value and is lower in total salt content being is more acceptable for soil in lowlands of East Georgia, mainly characterised by alkaline reaction. .

  13. Civil Rights in Maine. Proceedings of a consultation sponsored by the Maine Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights (Augusta, Maine, November 16-17, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Augusta.

    This publication records statements made by representatives of some 20 organizations at a Consultation on the Status of Civil Rights in Maine. Following the chairperson's introductory remarks, presentations on the following five sets of issues are offered: (1) general and multiple civil rights issues (the Maine Human Rights Commission, the Pine…

  14. Risk assessment of Bt crops on the non-target plant-associated insects and soil organisms.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Amina; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Samiullah, Tahir Rehman; Rao, Abdul Qayyum; Khan, Muhammad Azmat Ullah; Tahir, Sana; Mirza, Safdar Ali; Husnain, Tayyab

    2016-06-01

    Transgenic plants containing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genes are being cultivated worldwide to express toxic insecticidal proteins. However, the commercial utilisation of Bt crops greatly highlights biosafety issues worldwide. Therefore, assessing the risks caused by genetically modified crops prior to their commercial cultivation is a critical issue to be addressed. In agricultural biotechnology, the goal of safety assessment is not just to identify the safety of a genetically modified (GM) plant, rather to demonstrate its impact on the ecosystem. Various experimental studies have been made worldwide during the last 20 years to investigate the risks and fears associated with non-target organisms (NTOs). The NTOs include beneficial insects, natural pest controllers, rhizobacteria, growth promoting microbes, pollinators, soil dwellers, aquatic and terrestrial vertebrates, mammals and humans. To highlight all the possible risks associated with different GM events, information has been gathered from a total of 76 articles, regarding non-target plant and soil inhabiting organisms, and summarised in the form of the current review article. No significant harmful impact has been reported in any case study related to approved GM events, although critical risk assessments are still needed before commercialisation of these crops. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Non-target organism effects tests on Vip3A and their application to the ecological risk assessment for cultivation of MIR162 maize.

    PubMed

    Raybould, Alan; Vlachos, Demetra

    2011-06-01

    Transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) provide economic, environmental and health benefits by maintaining or increasing crop yields with fewer applications of insecticide. To sustain these benefits, it is important to delay the evolution of insect resistance to the proteins, and to ensure that the proteins do not harm non-target organisms, particularly those that may control secondary pests that would otherwise flourish because of reduced insecticide applications. Vip3A is a Bt vegetative insecticidal protein that is active against lepidopterous pests. It has a different mode of action from other proteins for control of Lepidoptera in current Bt crops, and when combined with these proteins, it should help to delay the evolution of pest resistance to Bt crops. This paper presents data on the effects of Vip3A on non-target organisms, and an ecological risk assessment of MIR162 maize, which expresses Vip3Aa20. Laboratory studies indicate few adverse effects of Vip3A to non-target organisms: 11 of 12 species tested showed no adverse effects when exposed to high concentrations of Vip3A relative to estimated exposures resulting from cultivation of MIR162 maize. Daphnia magna exposed to Vip3Aa20 were unaffected in terms of survival or fecundity, but grew slightly more slowly than unexposed controls. The data indicate that cultivation of MIR162 maize poses negligible risk to non-target organisms, and that crops producing Vip3A are unlikely to adversely affect biological control organisms such that benefits from reduced insecticide applications are lost.

  16. Chemical characteristics and acidity of soluble organic substances from a northern hardwood forest floor, central Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, George F.; David, Mark B.

    1991-12-01

    Our understanding of the chemistry, structure, and reactions of organic substances in forest floor leachates is limited and incomplete. Therefore, we examined the organic and inorganic chemistry of forest floor leachates collected from a hardwood forest in central Maine over a two-year period (1987-1989), including detailed study of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Seasonal variations in NH 4+, NO 3-, K +, and total Al were believed due to organic matter decomposition and release. Leaching of other base cations closely followed that of NO 3-. Snowmelt resulted in NO 3- levels that decreased in time due to flushing of mineralization/nitrification by-products that had accumulated during the winter months. Total DOC ranged from 2228 to 7193 μmol L -1 with an average of 4835 μmol L -1. Monosaccharides and polyphenols constituted 3.9% (range of 3.4 to 4.4%) and 3.0% (2.2 to 3.7%) of the DOC, respectively, which suggests DOC may contain partially oxidized products that are possibly of a lignocellulose nature. Fractionation of the forest floor DOC indicated high organic acid contents (hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids) that averaged 92% of the total DOC. Organic acids were isolated and analyzed for elemental content (C, H, N, and S), and determination of UV absorptivity ( E 4/E 6) ratios, CuO oxidation products, FT-IR and 13C-NMR spectra, and acidity by potentiometric titration. Results from these analyses indicate the organic acids in the forest floor leachates are similar to fulvic acids. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic acids had average exchange acidities of 0.126 and 0.148 μeq μmol -1 C, respectively, and pKa, of 4.23 and 4.33. Their FT-IR and 13C-NMR spectra suggest they are primarily carboxylic acids, with aliphatic and aromatic structure. An organic charge contribution model was developed using titration data, DOC fractionation percentages, and the total DOC in the forest floor leachates. Application of the model to all solutions accounted for 97% of the charge

  17. Sequential improvements in organ procurement increase the organ donation rate.

    PubMed

    Billeter, Adrian T; Sklare, Seth; Franklin, Glen A; Wright, Jerry; Morgan, Gary; O'Flynn, Paul E; Polk, Hiram C

    2012-11-01

    Organ demand exceeds availability of transplantable organs. Organ procurement continues to suffer from failures to identify potential donors, inability to obtain consent for donation, as well as failures to retrieve certain organs as donor demographics change. The purpose of this article is to propose how sequentially introduced measures can increase organ donation rates as well as improve organ procurement. We analysed the effect of stepwise improvements in the organ procurement process patients in a university-based surgical intensive care unit over a 20-year period. We related newly introduced measures in the organ retrieval process with changes in donation rates. We specifically targeted these three main steps in the donation process: donor identification, conversion of potential donors to actual donors, and organ protection during the procurement process. Finally, we assessed the effect of the same measures on organ procurement after introduction in other hospitals of the same organ procurement region. Introduction of quality improvement steps increased all of the observed parameters. The number of organ donors was stabilised due to a better identification of potential donors, a major increase in conversion from potential to actual donors, and an increase in extended criteria donor. Improvements in organ protection led to higher rates of organs transplanted per donor and increased recovery of lungs and hearts despite increasing donor age. The same measures were introduced successfully in other hospitals in our organ procurement region. Sequential improvements in organ procurement can increase the yield of retrieved organs. The same measures can be applied to other hospitals and lead to comparable improvements in organ donation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Effects of persistent insecticides on beneficial soil arthropod in conventional fields compared to organic fields, puducherry.

    PubMed

    Anbarashan, Padmavathy; Gopalswamy, Poyyamoli

    2013-07-15

    The usage of synthetic fertilizers/insecticides in conventional farming has dramatically increased over the past decades. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of bio-pesticides and insecticides/pesticides on selected beneficial non targeted arthropods. Orders Collembola, Arachinida/Opiliones, Oribatida and Coleoptera were the main groups of arthropods found in the organic fields and Coleoptera, Oribatida, Gamasida and Collembola in conventional fields. Pesticides/insecticides had a significant effect on non-targeted arthropods order- Collembola, Arachinida/Opiliones, Hymenoptera and Thysonoptera were suppressed after pesticides/insecticides spraying. Bio-insecticides in organic fields had a non-significant effect on non targeted species and they started to increase in abundance after 7 days of spraying, whereas insecticide treatment in conventional fields had a significant long-term effect on non targeted arthropods and short term effect on pests/insects, it started to increase after 21 days of the spraying. These results indicate that insecticide treatment kept non targeted arthropods at low abundance. In conclusion, organic farming does not significantly affected the beneficial-non targeted arthropods biodiversity, whereas preventive insecticide application in conventional fields had significant negative effects on beneficial non targeted arthropods. Therefore, conventional farmers should restrict insecticide applications, unless pest densities reach the thresholds and more desirably can switch to organic farming practices.

  19. Non-Destructive High-Resolution Organic Matter Record on Lake Sediment using Steady-State Solid Phase Fluorescence: Organic Matter Quality and Quantity Assessment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiers, M.; Perrette, Y.; Etienne, D.; Develle, A. L.; Jacq, K.

    2017-12-01

    The use of organic proxies increases in paleoenvironmental reconstructions from natural archives. Major advances have been achieved by the development of new highly informative molecular proxies usually linked to specific compounds. While studies focused on targeted compounds, offering a high information degree, advances on bulk organic matter are limited. However, this bulk is the main contributor to carbon cycle and has been shown to be a driver of many mineral or organic compounds transfer and record. Development of target proxies need complementary information on bulk organic matter to understand biases link to controlling factors or analytical methods, and provide a robust interpretation. Fluorescence methods have often been employed to characterize and quantify organic matter. However, these technics are mainly developed for liquid samples, inducing material and resolution loss when working on natural archives (either stalagmite or sediments). High-resolution solid phase fluorescence (SPF) was developed on speleothems. This method allows now to analyse organic matter quality and quantity if procedure to constrain the optical density are adopted. In fact, a calibration method using liquid phase fluorescence (LPF) was developed for speleothem, allowing to quantify organic carbon at high-resolution. We report here an application of such a procedure SPF/LPF measurements on lake sediments. In order to avoid sediment matrix effects on the fluorescence signal, a calibration using LPF measurements was realised. First results using this method provided organic matter quality record of different organic matter compounds (humic-like, protein-like and chlorophylle-like compounds) at high resolution for the sediment core. High resolution organic matter fluxes are obtained in a second time, applying pragmatic chemometrics model (non linear models, partial least square models) on high resolution fluorescence data. SPF method can be considered as a promising tool for high

  20. Effect of malachite green toxicity on non target soil organisms.

    PubMed

    Gopinathan, R; Kanhere, J; Banerjee, J

    2015-02-01

    Although malachite green (MG), is banned in Europe and US for its carcinogenic and teratogenic effect, the dye being cheap, is persistently used in various countries for fish farming, silk, dye, leather and textile industries. Current research, however, fails to elucidate adequate knowledge concerning the effects of MG in our ecosystem. In the present investigation, for the first time, an attempt has been made to study the effects of MG on soil biota by testing Bacillus subtilis, Azotobacter chroococcum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Penicillium roqueforti, Eisenia fetida and seeds of three crop plants of different families. Various tests were conducted for determining cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, acute toxicity, morphological and germination effect. Our data confirmed MG toxicity on fungi and bacteria (gram positive and gram negative organisms) showing elevated level of ROS. Genotoxicity caused in the microorganisms was detected by DNA polymorphism and fragmentation. Also, scanning electron microscopy data suggests that the inhibitory effect of MG to these beneficial microbes in the ecosystem might be due to pore formation in the cell and its eventual disruption. Filter paper and artificial soil test conducted on earthworms demonstrated a LC 50 of 2.6 mg cm(-2) and 1.45 mg kg(-1) respectively with severe morphological damage. However, seed germination of Mung bean, Wheat and Mustard was found to be unaffected in presence of MG up to 100 mL(-1) concentration. Thus, understanding MG toxicity in non target soil organisms and emphasis on its toxicological effects would potentially explicate its role as an environmental contaminant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Expanded Target-Chemical Analysis Reveals Extensive Mixed-Organic-Contaminant Exposure in U.S. Streams.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul M; Journey, Celeste A; Romanok, Kristin M; Barber, Larry B; Buxton, Herbert T; Foreman, William T; Furlong, Edward T; Glassmeyer, Susan T; Hladik, Michelle L; Iwanowicz, Luke R; Jones, Daniel K; Kolpin, Dana W; Kuivila, Kathryn M; Loftin, Keith A; Mills, Marc A; Meyer, Michael T; Orlando, James L; Reilly, Timothy J; Smalling, Kelly L; Villeneuve, Daniel L

    2017-05-02

    Surface water from 38 streams nationwide was assessed using 14 target-organic methods (719 compounds). Designed-bioactive anthropogenic contaminants (biocides, pharmaceuticals) comprised 57% of 406 organics detected at least once. The 10 most-frequently detected anthropogenic-organics included eight pesticides (desulfinylfipronil, AMPA, chlorpyrifos, dieldrin, metolachlor, atrazine, CIAT, glyphosate) and two pharmaceuticals (caffeine, metformin) with detection frequencies ranging 66-84% of all sites. Detected contaminant concentrations varied from less than 1 ng L -1 to greater than 10 μg L -1 , with 77 and 278 having median detected concentrations greater than 100 ng L -1 and 10 ng L -1 , respectively. Cumulative detections and concentrations ranged 4-161 compounds (median 70) and 8.5-102 847 ng L -1 , respectively, and correlated significantly with wastewater discharge, watershed development, and toxic release inventory metrics. Log 10 concentrations of widely monitored HHCB, triclosan, and carbamazepine explained 71-82% of the variability in the total number of compounds detected (linear regression; p-values: < 0.001-0.012), providing a statistical inference tool for unmonitored contaminants. Due to multiple modes of action, high bioactivity, biorecalcitrance, and direct environment application (pesticides), designed-bioactive organics (median 41 per site at μg L -1 cumulative concentrations) in developed watersheds present aquatic health concerns, given their acknowledged potential for sublethal effects to sensitive species and lifecycle stages at low ng L -1 .

  2. The nature of organic records in impact excavated rocks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, W.; Bromiley, G. D.; Sephton, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Impact ejected rocks are targets for life detection missions to Mars. The Martian subsurface is more favourable to organic preservation than the surface owing to an attenuation of radiation and physical separation from oxidising materials with increasing depth. Impact events bring materials to the surface where they may be accessed without complicated drilling procedures. On Earth, different assemblages of organic matter types are derived from varying depositional environments. Here we assess whether these different types of organic materials can survive impact events without corruption. We subjected four terrestrial organic matter types to elevated pressures and temperatures in piston-cylinder experiments followed by chemical characterisation using whole-rock pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Our data reveal that long chain hydrocarbon-dominated organic matter (types I and II; mainly microbial or algal) are unresistant to pressure whereas aromatic hydrocarbon-dominated organic matter types (types III and IV; mainly land plant, metamorphosed or degraded, displaying some superficial chemical similarities to abiotic meteoritic organic matter) are relatively resistant. This suggests that the impact excavated record of potential biology on Mars will be unavoidably biased, with microbial organic matter underrepresented while metamorphosed, degraded or abiotic meteoritic organic matter types will be selectively preserved.

  3. The nature of organic records in impact excavated rocks on Mars.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, W; Bromiley, G D; Sephton, M A

    2016-08-05

    Impact ejected rocks are targets for life detection missions to Mars. The Martian subsurface is more favourable to organic preservation than the surface owing to an attenuation of radiation and physical separation from oxidising materials with increasing depth. Impact events bring materials to the surface where they may be accessed without complicated drilling procedures. On Earth, different assemblages of organic matter types are derived from varying depositional environments. Here we assess whether these different types of organic materials can survive impact events without corruption. We subjected four terrestrial organic matter types to elevated pressures and temperatures in piston-cylinder experiments followed by chemical characterisation using whole-rock pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Our data reveal that long chain hydrocarbon-dominated organic matter (types I and II; mainly microbial or algal) are unresistant to pressure whereas aromatic hydrocarbon-dominated organic matter types (types III and IV; mainly land plant, metamorphosed or degraded, displaying some superficial chemical similarities to abiotic meteoritic organic matter) are relatively resistant. This suggests that the impact excavated record of potential biology on Mars will be unavoidably biased, with microbial organic matter underrepresented while metamorphosed, degraded or abiotic meteoritic organic matter types will be selectively preserved.

  4. Simultaneous cytofluorometric measurement of phagocytosis, burst production and killing of human phagocytes using Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus as target organisms.

    PubMed

    Salih, H R; Husfeld, L; Adam, D

    2000-05-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) play a central role in the elimination of most extracellular pathogens, and an impairment of their functions predisposes an individual towards local and systemic bacterial and fungal infections. Here we describe a rapid and easy-to-perform cytofluorometric assay for investigation of PMN activity using Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus as target organisms. Phagocytes were stained with anti-CD13-RPE antibody, and microorganisms were stained with calcein-AM. Oxidative burst production was measured by oxidation of dihydroethidium. The percentage of killed target organisms after ingestion was determined by staining with ethidium-homodimer-1 after lysis of human cells. The dyes and procedures used in this method were chosen after comparison of different stains and cell preparation techniques described in previous assays. Concerning phagocytosis, the percentages of active phagocytes and of ingested microorganisms were determined. Furthermore, the method allowed measurement of the resulting percentage of PMNs producing respiratory burst, and of the percentage of killed microorganisms. We minimized artifactual changes, which might have been the reason for the difficulties and conflicting results of other cytofluorometric methods. The described method provides a new whole blood cytofluorometric assay, which combines rapid and simple handling with high reproducibility of results obtained by investigation of PMN activity using Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus as target organisms.

  5. Targeted Nanotechnology in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Talita; Han, Inbo; Wu, Liquan; Zeng, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Gliomas, and in particular glioblastoma multiforme, are aggressive brain tumors characterized by a poor prognosis and high rates of recurrence. Current treatment strategies are based on open surgery, chemotherapy (temozolomide) and radiotherapy. However, none of these treatments, alone or in combination, are considered effective in managing this devastating disease, resulting in a median survival time of less than 15 months. The efficiency of chemotherapy is mainly compromised by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that selectively inhibits drugs from infiltrating into the tumor mass. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), with their unique biology and their resistance to both radio- and chemotherapy, compound tumor aggressiveness and increase the chances of treatment failure. Therefore, more effective targeted therapeutic regimens are urgently required. In this article, some well-recognized biological features and biomarkers of this specific subgroup of tumor cells are profiled and new strategies and technologies in nanomedicine that explicitly target CSCs, after circumventing the BBB, are detailed. Major achievements in the development of nanotherapies, such as organic poly(propylene glycol) and poly(ethylene glycol) or inorganic (iron and gold) nanoparticles that can be conjugated to metal ions, liposomes, dendrimers and polymeric micelles, form the main scope of this summary. Moreover, novel biological strategies focused on manipulating gene expression (small interfering RNA and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats [CRISPR]/CRISPR associated protein 9 [Cas 9] technologies) for cancer therapy are also analyzed. The aim of this review is to analyze the gap between CSC biology and the development of targeted therapies. A better understanding of CSC properties could result in the development of precise nanotherapies to fulfill unmet clinical needs. PMID:28408882

  6. Export of dissolved organic carbon from the Penobscot River basin in north-central Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huntington, Thomas G.; Aiken, George R.

    2013-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) flux from the Penobscot River and its major tributaries in Maine was determined using continuous discharge measurements, discrete water sampling, and the LOADEST regression software. The average daily flux during 2004–2007 was 71 kg C ha−1 yr−1 (392 Mt C d−1), an amount larger than measured in most northern temperate and boreal rivers. Distinct seasonal variation was observed in the relation between concentration and discharge (C–Q). During June through December (summer/fall), there was a relatively steep positive C–Q relation where concentration increased by a factor of 2–3 over the approximately 20-fold range of observed stream discharge for the Penobscot River near Eddington, Maine. In contrast, during January through May (winter/spring), DOC concentration did not increase with increasing discharge. In addition, we observed a major shift in the C–Q between 2004–2005 and 2006–2007, apparently resulting from unprecedented rainfall, runoff, and soil flushing beginning in late fall 2005. The relative contribution to the total Penobscot River basin DOC flux from each tributary varied dramatically by season, reflecting the role of large regulated reservoirs in certain basins. DOC concentration and flux per unit watershed area were highest in tributaries containing the largest areas in palustrine wetlands. Tributary DOC concentration and flux was positively correlated to percentage wetland area. Climatic or environmental changes that influence the magnitude or timing of river discharge or the abundance of wetlands will likely affect the export of DOC to the near-coastal ocean.

  7. Surrogate species selection for assessing potential adverse environmental impacts of genetically engineered insect-resistant plants on non-target organisms.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Keri; Cayabyab, Bonifacio; De Schrijver, Adinda; Gadaleta, Patricia G; Hellmich, Richard L; Romeis, Jörg; Storer, Nicholas; Valicente, Fernando H; Wach, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Most regulatory authorities require that developers of genetically engineered insect-resistant (GEIR) crops evaluate the potential for these crops to have adverse impacts on valued non-target organisms (NTOs), i.e., organisms not intended to be controlled by the trait. In many cases, impacts to NTOs are assessed using surrogate species, and it is critical that the data derived from surrogates accurately predict any adverse impacts likely to be observed from the use of the crop in the agricultural context. The key is to select surrogate species that best represent the valued NTOs in the location where the crop is going to be introduced, but this selection process poses numerous challenges for the developers of GE crops who will perform the tests, as well as for the ecologists and regulators who will interpret the test results. These issues were the subject of a conference "Surrogate Species Selection for Assessing Potential Adverse Environmental Impacts of Genetically Engineered Plants on Non-Target Organisms" convened by the Center for Environmental Risk Assessment, ILSI Research Foundation. This report summarizes the proceedings of the conference, including the presentations, discussions and the points of consensus agreed to by the participants.

  8. A network analysis of the Chinese medicine Lianhua-Qingwen formula to identify its main effective components.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Hua; Zhong, Yi; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jin-Ping; Wang, Yue-Fei; Jia, Wei-Na; Wang, Guo-Cai; Li, Zheng; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Xiu-Mei

    2016-02-01

    Chinese medicine is known to treat complex diseases with multiple components and multiple targets. However, the main effective components and their related key targets and functions remain to be identified. Herein, a network analysis method was developed to identify the main effective components and key targets of a Chinese medicine, Lianhua-Qingwen Formula (LQF). The LQF is commonly used for the prevention and treatment of viral influenza in China. It is composed of 11 herbs, gypsum and menthol with 61 compounds being identified in our previous work. In this paper, these 61 candidate compounds were used to find their related targets and construct the predicted-target (PT) network. An influenza-related protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed and integrated with the PT network. Then the compound-effective target (CET) network and compound-ineffective target network (CIT) were extracted, respectively. A novel approach was developed to identify effective components by comparing CET and CIT networks. As a result, 15 main effective components were identified along with 61 corresponding targets. 7 of these main effective components were further experimentally validated to have antivirus efficacy in vitro. The main effective component-target (MECT) network was further constructed with main effective components and their key targets. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of the MECT network predicted key functions such as NO production being modulated by the LQF. Interestingly, five effective components were experimentally tested and exhibited inhibitory effects on NO production in the LPS induced RAW 264.7 cell. In summary, we have developed a novel approach to identify the main effective components in a Chinese medicine LQF and experimentally validated some of the predictions.

  9. Office and 24-hour heart rate and target organ damage in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We investigated the association between heart rate and its variability with the parameters that assess vascular, renal and cardiac target organ damage. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed including a consecutive sample of 360 hypertensive patients without heart rate lowering drugs (aged 56 ± 11 years, 64.2% male). Heart rate (HR) and its standard deviation (HRV) in clinical and 24-hour ambulatory monitoring were evaluated. Renal damage was assessed by glomerular filtration rate and albumin/creatinine ratio; vascular damage by carotid intima-media thickness and ankle/brachial index; and cardiac damage by the Cornell voltage-duration product and left ventricular mass index. Results There was a positive correlation between ambulatory, but not clinical, heart rate and its standard deviation with glomerular filtration rate, and a negative correlation with carotid intima-media thickness, and night/day ratio of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. There was no correlation with albumin/creatinine ratio, ankle/brachial index, Cornell voltage-duration product or left ventricular mass index. In the multiple linear regression analysis, after adjusting for age, the association of glomerular filtration rate and intima-media thickness with ambulatory heart rate and its standard deviation was lost. According to the logistic regression analysis, the predictors of any target organ damage were age (OR = 1.034 and 1.033) and night/day systolic blood pressure ratio (OR = 1.425 and 1.512). Neither 24 HR nor 24 HRV reached statistical significance. Conclusions High ambulatory heart rate and its variability, but not clinical HR, are associated with decreased carotid intima-media thickness and a higher glomerular filtration rate, although this is lost after adjusting for age. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01325064 PMID:22439900

  10. Application of the target lipid model and passive samplers to characterize the toxicity of bioavailable organics in oil sands process-affected water.

    PubMed

    Redman, Aaron D; Parkerton, Thomas F; Butler, Josh David; Letinski, Daniel J; Frank, Richard A; Hewitt, L Mark; Bartlett, Adrienne J; Gillis, Patricia Leigh; Marentette, Julie R; Parrott, Joanne L; Hughes, Sarah A; Guest, Rodney; Bekele, Asfaw; Zhang, Kun; Morandi, Garrett; Wiseman, Steve B; Giesy, John P

    2018-06-14

    Oil sand operations in Alberta, Canada will eventually include returning treated process-affected waters to the environment. Organic constituents in oil sand process-affected water (OSPW) represent complex mixtures of nonionic and ionic (e.g. naphthenic acids) compounds, and compositions can vary spatially and temporally, which has impeded development of water quality benchmarks. To address this challenge, it was hypothesized that solid phase microextraction fibers coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) could be used as a biomimetic extraction (BE) to measure bioavailable organics in OSPW. Organic constituents of OSPW were assumed to contribute additively to toxicity, and partitioning to PDMS was assumed to be predictive of accumulation in target lipids, which were the presumed site of action. This method was tested using toxicity data for individual model compounds, defined mixtures, and organic mixtures extracted from OSPW. Toxicity was correlated with BE data, which supports the use of this method in hazard assessments of acute lethality to aquatic organisms. A species sensitivity distribution (SSD), based on target lipid model and BE values, was similar to SSDs based on residues in tissues for both nonionic and ionic organics. BE was shown to be an analytical tool that accounts for bioaccumulation of organic compound mixtures from which toxicity can be predicted, with the potential to aid in the development of water quality guidelines.

  11. Forward Neutron Production at the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmanov, T.S.; /Michigan U.; Rajaram, D.

    2010-10-01

    We have measured cross sections for forward neutron production from a variety of targets using proton beams from the Fermilab Main Injector. Measurements were performed for proton beam momenta of 58 GeV/c, 84 GeV/c, and 120 GeV/c. The cross section dependence on the atomic weight (A) of the targets was found to vary as A{sup a} where a is 0.46 {+-} 0.06 for a beam momentum of 58 GeV/c and 0.54 {+-} 0.05 for 120 GeV/c. The cross sections show reasonable agreement with FLUKA and DPMJET Monte Carlos. Comparisons have also been made with the LAQGSM Monte Carlo. The MIPPmore » (Main Injector Particle Production) experiment (FNAL E907) [1] acquired data in the Meson Center beam line at Fermilab. The primary purposes of the experiment were to investigate scaling laws in hadron fragmentation [2], to obtain hadron production data for the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector [3]) target to be used for calculating neutrino fluxes, and to obtain inclusive pion, neutron, and photon production data to facilitate proton radiography [4]. While there is considerable data available on inclusive charged particle production [5], there is little data on neutron production. In this article we present results for forward neutron production using proton beams of 58 GeV/c, 84 GeV/c, and 120 GeV/c on hydrogen, beryllium, carbon, bismuth, and uranium targets, and compare these data with predictions from Monte Carlo simulations.« less

  12. A review of NIR dyes in cancer targeting and imaging.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shenglin; Zhang, Erlong; Su, Yongping; Cheng, Tianmin; Shi, Chunmeng

    2011-10-01

    The development of multifunctional agents for simultaneous tumor targeting and near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging is expected to have significant impact on future personalized oncology owing to the very low tissue autofluorescence and high tissue penetration depth in the NIR spectrum window. Cancer NIR molecular imaging relies greatly on the development of stable, highly specific and sensitive molecular probes. Organic dyes have shown promising clinical implications as non-targeting agents for optical imaging in which indocyanine green has long been implemented in clinical use. Recently, significant progress has been made on the development of unique NIR dyes with tumor targeting properties. Current ongoing design strategies have overcome some of the limitations of conventional NIR organic dyes, such as poor hydrophilicity and photostability, low quantum yield, insufficient stability in biological system, low detection sensitivity, etc. This potential is further realized with the use of these NIR dyes or NIR dye-encapsulated nanoparticles by conjugation with tumor specific ligands (such as small molecules, peptides, proteins and antibodies) for tumor targeted imaging. Very recently, natively multifunctional NIR dyes that can preferentially accumulate in tumor cells without the need of chemical conjugation to tumor targeting ligands have been developed and these dyes have shown unique optical and pharmaceutical properties for biomedical imaging with superior signal-to-background contrast index. The main focus of this article is to provide a concise overview of newly developed NIR dyes and their potential applications in cancer targeting and imaging. The development of future multifunctional agents by combining targeting, imaging and even therapeutic routes will also be discussed. We believe these newly developed multifunctional NIR dyes will broaden current concept of tumor targeted imaging and hold promise to make an important contribution to the diagnosis

  13. Ion acceleration enhanced by target ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, S.; State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, and Key Lab of HEDPS, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871; Institute of Radiation, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden

    2015-07-15

    Laser proton acceleration can be enhanced by using target ablation, due to the energetic electrons generated in the ablation preplasma. When the ablation pulse matches main pulse, the enhancement gets optimized because the electrons' energy density is highest. A scaling law between the ablation pulse and main pulse is confirmed by the simulation, showing that for given CPA pulse and target, proton energy improvement can be achieved several times by adjusting the target ablation.

  14. Target organs for lymphocystis disease virus replication in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Valverde, Estefania J; Borrego, Juan J; Sarasquete, M Carmen; Ortiz-Delgado, Juan B; Castro, Dolores

    2017-04-11

    The lymphocystis disease (LCD), the main viral pathology described in cultured gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata), is a self-limiting condition characterized by the appearance of hypertrophied fibroblasts (named lymphocysts) in the connective tissue of fish, primarily in the skin and fins. The causative agent of the disease is the Lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV), a member of the Iridoviridae family. In the present study, LCDV genome and transcripts were detected by real-time PCR in caudal fin, as well as in several internal organs, such as intestine, liver, spleen, kidney and brain, from asymptomatic, diseased and recovered gilthead seabream juveniles. These results indicate that the LCDV has a broad range tissue tropism, and can establish a systemic infection, even in subclinically infected fish. As showed by in situ hybridization, the permissive cells for LCDV infection seem to be fibroblasts, hepatocytes and cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. Histopathological alterations associated with LCD were observed in all the organs analysed, including necrotic changes in liver and kidney, inflammatory response in the intestine submucosa or brain haemorrhage, although lymphocysts were only detected in the dermis of the caudal fin. Nevertheless, these histological changes were reverted in recovered animals.

  15. [Prevalence of target organ damage and metabolic abnormalities in resistant hypertension].

    PubMed

    Armario, Pedro; Oliveras, Anna; Hernández Del Rey, Raquel; Ruilope, Luis Miguel; De La Sierra, Alejandro

    2011-10-15

    Patients with resistant hypertension (RH) are relatively frequently visited in specialized units of hypertension. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of target organ damage, central obesity and metabolic syndrome in a cohort of patients with RH consecutively included in the Register of Resistant Hypertension of the Spanish Society of Hypertension (SHE-LELHA). Cross-sectional, multicenter epidemiologic study in usual clinical practice conditions. Patients with clinical diagnosis of resistant hypertension, that is, office systolic and diastolic blood pressure ≥ 140 mm Hg and/or ≥ 90 mm Hg, respectively, despite a prescribed therapeutic schedule with an appropriate combination of three or more full-dose antihypertensive drugs, including a diuretic, were consecutively recruited from specialized hypertension units spread through Spain. Demographic and anthropometric characteristics as well as cardiovascular risk factors and associated conditions were recorded, and all the subjects underwent 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Left ventricular hypertrophy was considered as a left ventricular mass index ≥ 125 g/m(2) in males and ≥ 110 g/m(2) in females. Left atrial enlargement was defined as an indexed left atrium diameter ≥ 26 mm/m(2). Microalbuminuria was defined as a urinary albumin/creatinine ratio ≥ 22 mg/g in males and ≥ 31 mg/g in females. 513 patients were included, aged 64±11 years old, 47% women. Central obesity was present in 65.7% (CI 95% 61.6-69.9), 38.6% (CI 95% 34.4-42.8) had diabetes and 63.7% (CI 95% 59.4-67.9) had metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy and left atrial enlargement, determined by echocardiography was 57.1% (CI 95% 50.8-63.5) and 10.0% (CI 95% 6.3-13.7) respectively. Microalbuminuria was found in 46.6% (CI 95% 41.4-51.8) of the subjects. Patients with metabolic syndrome were significantly older (65.4±11 and 62.5±12 years; P=.0052), presented a higher prevalence of diabetes

  16. The nature of organic records in impact excavated rocks on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, W.; Bromiley, G. D.; Sephton, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Impact ejected rocks are targets for life detection missions to Mars. The Martian subsurface is more favourable to organic preservation than the surface owing to an attenuation of radiation and physical separation from oxidising materials with increasing depth. Impact events bring materials to the surface where they may be accessed without complicated drilling procedures. On Earth, different assemblages of organic matter types are derived from varying depositional environments. Here we assess whether these different types of organic materials can survive impact events without corruption. We subjected four terrestrial organic matter types to elevated pressures and temperatures in piston-cylinder experiments followed by chemical characterisation using whole-rock pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Our data reveal that long chain hydrocarbon-dominated organic matter (types I and II; mainly microbial or algal) are unresistant to pressure whereas aromatic hydrocarbon-dominated organic matter types (types III and IV; mainly land plant, metamorphosed or degraded, displaying some superficial chemical similarities to abiotic meteoritic organic matter) are relatively resistant. This suggests that the impact excavated record of potential biology on Mars will be unavoidably biased, with microbial organic matter underrepresented while metamorphosed, degraded or abiotic meteoritic organic matter types will be selectively preserved. PMID:27492071

  17. Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) as Critical In Situ Investigation for Targeting Mars Returned Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Szopa, C.; Buch, A.; Goesmann, F.; Goetz, W.; Raulin, F.; SAM Science Team; MOMA Science Team

    2018-04-01

    SAM (Curiosity) and MOMA (ExoMars) Mars instruments, seeking for organics and biosignatures, are essential to establish taphonomic windows of preservation of molecules, in order to target the most interesting samples to return from Mars.

  18. The genome editing revolution: A CRISPR-Cas TALE off-target story.

    PubMed

    Stella, Stefano; Montoya, Guillermo

    2016-07-01

    In the last 10 years, we have witnessed a blooming of targeted genome editing systems and applications. The area was revolutionized by the discovery and characterization of the transcription activator-like effector proteins, which are easier to engineer to target new DNA sequences than the previously available DNA binding templates, zinc fingers and meganucleases. Recently, the area experimented a quantum leap because of the introduction of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein (Cas) system (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic sequence). This ribonucleoprotein complex protects bacteria from invading DNAs, and it was adapted to be used in genome editing. The CRISPR ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecule guides to the specific DNA site the Cas9 nuclease to cleave the DNA target. Two years and more than 1000 publications later, the CRISPR-Cas system has become the main tool for genome editing in many laboratories. Currently the targeted genome editing technology has been used in many fields and may be a possible approach for human gene therapy. Furthermore, it can also be used to modifying the genomes of model organisms for studying human pathways or to improve key organisms for biotechnological applications, such as plants, livestock genome as well as yeasts and bacterial strains. © 2016 The Authors. BioEssays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A Review on the Toxicity and Non-Target Effects of Macrocyclic Lactones in Terrestrial and Aquatic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Lumaret, Jean-Pierre; Errouissi, Faiek; Floate, Kevin; Römbke, Jörg; Wardhaugh, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The avermectins, milbemycins and spinosyns are collectively referred to as macrocyclic lactones (MLs) which comprise several classes of chemicals derived from cultures of soil micro-organisms. These compounds are extensively and increasingly used in veterinary medicine and agriculture. Due to their potential effects on non-target organisms, large amounts of information on their impact in the environment has been compiled in recent years, mainly caused by legal requirements related to their marketing authorization or registration. The main objective of this paper is to critically review the present knowledge about the acute and chronic ecotoxicological effects of MLs on organisms, mainly invertebrates, in the terrestrial and aquatic environment. Detailed information is presented on the mode-of-action as well as the ecotoxicity of the most important compounds representing the three groups of MLs. This information, based on more than 360 references, is mainly provided in nine tables, presenting the effects of abamectin, ivermectin, eprinomectin, doramectin, emamectin, moxidectin, and spinosad on individual species of terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates as well as plants and algae. Since dung dwelling organisms are particularly important non-targets, as they are exposed via dung from treated animals over their whole life-cycle, the information on the effects of MLs on dung communities is compiled in an additional table. The results of this review clearly demonstrate that regarding environmental impacts many macrocyclic lactones are substances of high concern particularly with larval instars of invertebrates. Recent studies have also shown that susceptibility varies with life cycle stage and impacts can be mitigated by using MLs when these stages are not present. However information on the environmental impact of the MLs is scattered across a wide range of specialised scientific journals with research focusing mainly on ivermectin and to a lesser extent on abamectin

  20. Quality of laboratory studies assessing effects of Bt-proteins on non-target organisms: minimal criteria for acceptability.

    PubMed

    De Schrijver, Adinda; Devos, Yann; De Clercq, Patrick; Gathmann, Achim; Romeis, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    The potential risks that genetically modified plants may pose to non-target organisms and the ecosystem services they contribute to are assessed as part of pre-market risk assessments. This paper reviews the early tier studies testing the hypothesis whether exposure to plant-produced Cry34/35Ab1 proteins as a result of cultivation of maize 59122 is harmful to valued non-target organisms, in particular Arthropoda and Annelida. The available studies were assessed for their scientific quality by considering a set of criteria determining their relevance and reliability. As a case-study, this exercise revealed that when not all quality criteria are met, weighing the robustness of the study and its relevance for risk assessment is not obvious. Applying a worst-case expected environmental concentration of bioactive toxins equivalent to that present in the transgenic crop, confirming exposure of the test species to the test substance, and the use of a negative control were identified as minimum criteria to be met to guarantee sufficiently reliable data. This exercise stresses the importance of conducting studies meeting certain quality standards as this minimises the probability of erroneous or inconclusive results and increases confidence in the results and adds certainty to the conclusions drawn.

  1. Effects of manufactured nanomaterials on fishes: a target organ and body systems physiology approach.

    PubMed

    Handy, R D; Al-Bairuty, G; Al-Jubory, A; Ramsden, C S; Boyle, D; Shaw, B J; Henry, T B

    2011-10-01

    Manufactured nanomaterials (NM) are already used in consumer products and exposure modelling predicts releases of ng to low µg l(-1) levels of NMs into surface waters. The exposure of aquatic ecosystems, and therefore fishes, to manufactured NMs is inevitable. This review uses a physiological approach to describe the known effects of NMs on the body systems of fishes and to identify the internal target organs, as well as outline aspects of colloid chemistry relevant to fish biology. The acute toxicity data, suggest that the lethal concentration for many NMs is in the mg l(-1) range, and a number of sublethal effects have been reported at concentrations from c. 100 µg to 1 mg l(-1). Exposure to NMs in the water column can cause respiratory toxicity involving altered ventilation, mucus secretion and gill pathology. This may not lead, however, to overt haematological disturbances in the short term. The internal target organs include the liver, spleen and haematopoietic system, kidney, gut and brain; with toxic effects involving oxidative stress, ionoregulatory disturbances and organ pathologies. Some pathology appears to be novel for NMs, such as vascular injury in the brain of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss with carbon nanotubes. A lack of analytical methods, however, has prevented the reporting of NM concentrations in fish tissues, and the precise uptake mechanisms across the gill or gut are yet to be elucidated. The few dietary exposure studies conducted show no effects on growth or food intake at 10-100 mg kg(-1) inclusions of NMs in the diet of O. mykiss, but there are biochemical disturbances. Early life stages are sensitive to NMs with reports of lethal toxicity and developmental defects. There are many data gaps, however, including how water quality alters physiological responses, effects on immunity and chronic exposure data at environmentally relevant concentrations. Overall, the data so far suggest that the manufactured NMs are not as toxic as some

  2. Pharmacological AMP Kinase Activators Target the Nucleolar Organization and Control Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kodiha, Mohamed; Salimi, Ali; Wang, Yi Meng; Stochaj, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Aims Phenformin, resveratrol and AICAR stimulate the energy sensor 5′-AMP activated kinase (AMPK) and inhibit the first step of ribosome biogenesis, de novo RNA synthesis in nucleoli. Nucleolar activities are relevant to human health, because ribosome production is crucial to the development of diabetic complications. Although the function of nucleoli relies on their organization, the impact of AMPK activators on nucleolar structures is not known. Here, we addressed this question by examining four nucleolar proteins that are essential for ribosome biogenesis. Methods Kidney cells were selected as model system, because diabetic nephropathy is one of the complications associated with diabetes mellitus. To determine the impact of pharmacological agents on nucleoli, we focused on the subcellular and subnuclear distribution of B23/nucleophosmin, fibrillarin, nucleolin and RPA194. This was achieved by quantitative confocal microscopy at the single-cell level in combination with cell fractionation and quantitative Western blotting. Results AMPK activators induced the re-organization of nucleoli, which was accompanied by changes in cell proliferation. Among the compounds tested, phenformin and resveratrol had the most pronounced impact on nucleolar organization. For B23, fibrillarin, nucleolin and RPA194, both agents (i) altered the nucleocytoplasmic distribution and nucleolar association and (ii) reduced significantly the retention in the nucleus. (iii) Phenformin and resveratrol also increased significantly the total concentration of B23 and nucleolin. Conclusions AMPK activators have unique effects on the subcellular localization, nuclear retention and abundance of nucleolar proteins. We propose that the combination of these events inhibits de novo ribosomal RNA synthesis and modulates cell proliferation. Our studies identified nucleolin as a target that is especially sensitive to pharmacological AMPK activators. Because of its response to pharmacological agents

  3. Pharmacological AMP kinase activators target the nucleolar organization and control cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kodiha, Mohamed; Salimi, Ali; Wang, Yi Meng; Stochaj, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Phenformin, resveratrol and AICAR stimulate the energy sensor 5'-AMP activated kinase (AMPK) and inhibit the first step of ribosome biogenesis, de novo RNA synthesis in nucleoli. Nucleolar activities are relevant to human health, because ribosome production is crucial to the development of diabetic complications. Although the function of nucleoli relies on their organization, the impact of AMPK activators on nucleolar structures is not known. Here, we addressed this question by examining four nucleolar proteins that are essential for ribosome biogenesis. Kidney cells were selected as model system, because diabetic nephropathy is one of the complications associated with diabetes mellitus. To determine the impact of pharmacological agents on nucleoli, we focused on the subcellular and subnuclear distribution of B23/nucleophosmin, fibrillarin, nucleolin and RPA194. This was achieved by quantitative confocal microscopy at the single-cell level in combination with cell fractionation and quantitative Western blotting. AMPK activators induced the re-organization of nucleoli, which was accompanied by changes in cell proliferation. Among the compounds tested, phenformin and resveratrol had the most pronounced impact on nucleolar organization. For B23, fibrillarin, nucleolin and RPA194, both agents (i) altered the nucleocytoplasmic distribution and nucleolar association and (ii) reduced significantly the retention in the nucleus. (iii) Phenformin and resveratrol also increased significantly the total concentration of B23 and nucleolin. AMPK activators have unique effects on the subcellular localization, nuclear retention and abundance of nucleolar proteins. We propose that the combination of these events inhibits de novo ribosomal RNA synthesis and modulates cell proliferation. Our studies identified nucleolin as a target that is especially sensitive to pharmacological AMPK activators. Because of its response to pharmacological agents, nucleolin represents a potential

  4. Real-time method for motion-compensated MR thermometry and MRgHIFU treatment in abdominal organs.

    PubMed

    Celicanin, Zarko; Auboiroux, Vincent; Bieri, Oliver; Petrusca, Lorena; Santini, Francesco; Viallon, Magalie; Scheffler, Klaus; Salomir, Rares

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound is considered to be a promising treatment for localized cancer in abdominal organs such as liver, pancreas, or kidney. Abdominal motion, anatomical arrangement, and required sustained sonication are the main challenges. MR acquisition consisted of thermometry performed with segmented gradient-recalled echo echo-planar imaging, and a segment-based one-dimensional MR navigator parallel to the main axis of motion to track the organ motion. This tracking information was used in real-time for: (i) prospective motion correction of MR thermometry and (ii) HIFU focal point position lock-on target. Ex vivo experiments were performed on a sheep liver and a turkey pectoral muscle using a motion demonstrator, while in vivo experiments were conducted on two sheep liver. Prospective motion correction of MR thermometry yielded good signal-to-noise ratio (range, 25 to 35) and low geometric distortion due to the use of segmented EPI. HIFU focal point lock-on target yielded isotropic in-plane thermal build-up. The feasibility of in vivo intercostal liver treatment was demonstrated in sheep. The presented method demonstrated in moving phantoms and breathing sheep accurate motion-compensated MR thermometry and precise HIFU focal point lock-on target using only real-time pencil-beam navigator tracking information, making it applicable without any pretreatment data acquisition or organ motion modeling. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Skin: Major target organ of allergic reactions to small molecular weight compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Merk, Hans F.; Baron, Jens M.; Neis, Mark M.

    2007-11-01

    Skin is a major target organ for allergic reactions to small molecular weight compounds. Drug allergic reactions may be life-threatening such as in the case of anaphylactic reactions or bullous drug reactions and occur in about 5% of all hospitalized patients. Allergic contact dermatitis has an enormous influence on the social life of the patient because it is the most frequent reason for occupational skin diseases and the treatment and prevention of this disease cost approximately Euro 3 billion per year in Germany. The different proposed pathophysiological pathways leading to a drug eruption are discussed in this paper. All majormore » enzymes which are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotica were shown to be present in skin. Evidence supporting the role of metabolism in the development of drug allergy and allergic contact dermatitis is demonstrated in the example of sulphonamides and fragrances.« less

  6. DNA and proteins of the nuclear matrix are the main targets of benzo[a]pyrene's action in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Widłak, P; Rzeszowska-Wolny, J

    1993-01-01

    The binding of [14C]benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) to DNA and proteins in total nuclei and subnuclear fractions of cultured rat hepatocytes was compared. The main targets of B[a]P were non-histone high molecular weight proteins of the nuclear matrix and DNA sequences attached to this structure. Following 24 h exposure to B[a]P the amounts of adducts in the nuclear matrix DNA and proteins were twice as high as in total nuclei. After withdrawal of the carcinogen containing medium the level of B[a]P-induced adducts gradually decreased but always remained the highest in the nuclear matrix proteins. Removal of adducts from the nuclear matrix DNA was more efficient than from the other DNA fractions, and 72 h after exposure to the carcinogen the level of DNA adducts in this fraction was similar to that in total nuclei.

  7. Lenses matching of compound eye for target positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fang; Zheng, Yan Pei; Wang, Keyi

    2012-10-01

    Compound eye, as a new imaging method with multi-lens for a large field of view, could complete target positioning and detection fastly, especially at close range. Therefore it could be applicated in the fields of military and medical treatment and aviation with vast market potential and development prospect. Yet the compound eye imaging method designed use three layer construction of multiple lens array arranged in a curved surface and refractive lens and imaging sensor of CMOS. In order to simplify process structure and increase the imaging area of every sub-eye, the imaging area of every eye is coved with the whole CMOS. Therefore, for several imaging point of one target, the corresponding lens of every imaging point is unkonown, and thus to identify. So an algorithm was put forward. Firstly, according to the Regular Geometry relationship of several adjacent lenses, data organization of seven lenses with a main lens was built. Subsequently, by the data organization, when one target was caught by several unknown lenses, we search every combined type of the received lenses. And for every combined type, two lenses were selected to combine and were used to calculate one three-dimensional (3D) coordinate of the target. If the 3D coordinates are same to the some combine type of the lenses numbers, in theory, the lenses and the imaging points are matched. So according to error of the 3D coordinates is calculated by the different seven lenses numbers combines, the unknown lenses could be distinguished. The experimental results show that the presented algorithm is feasible and can complete matching task for imaging points and corresponding lenses.

  8. Climate change and dissolved organic carbon export to the Gulf of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huntington, Thomas G.; Balch, William M.; Aiken, George R.; Sheffield, Justin; Luo, Lifeng; Roesler, Collin S.; Camill, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing climate change is affecting the concentration, export (flux), and timing of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exported to the Gulf of Maine (GoM) through changes in hydrologic regime. DOC export was calculated for water years 1950 through 2013 for 20 rivers and for water years 1930 through 2013 for 14 rivers draining to the GoM. DOC export was also estimated for the 21st century based on climate and hydrologic modeling in a previously published study. DOC export was calculated by using the regression model LOADEST to fit seasonally adjusted concentration discharge (C-Q) relations. Our results are an analysis of the sensitivity of DOC export to changes in hydrologic conditions over time since land cover and vegetation were held constant over time. Despite large interannual variability, all rivers had increasing DOC export during winter and these trends were significant (p < 0.05) in 10 out of 20 rivers for 1950 to 2013 and in 13 out of 14 rivers for 1930 to 2013. All rivers also had increasing annual export of DOC although fewer trends were statistically significant than for winter export. Projections for DOC export during the 21st century were variable depending on the climate model and greenhouse gas emission scenario that affected future river discharge through effects on precipitation and evapotranspiration. The most consistent result was a significant increase in DOC export in winter in all model-by-emission scenarios. DOC export was projected to decrease during the summer in all model-by-emission scenarios, with statistically significant decreases in half of the scenarios.

  9. Strategies for targeting tetraspanin proteins: potential therapeutic applications in microbial infections.

    PubMed

    Hassuna, Noha; Monk, Peter N; Moseley, Gregory W; Partridge, Lynda J

    2009-01-01

    The identification of novel targets and strategies for therapy of microbial infections is an area of intensive research due to the failure of conventional vaccines or antibiotics to combat both newly emerging diseases (e.g. viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and new influenza strains, and antibiotic-resistant bacteria) and entrenched, pandemic diseases exemplified by HIV. One clear approach to this problem is to target processes of the host organism rather than the microbe. Recent data have indicated that members of the tetraspanin superfamily, proteins with a widespread distribution in eukaryotic organisms and 33 members in humans, may provide such an approach. Tetraspanins traverse the membrane four times, but are distinguished from other four-pass membrane proteins by the presence of conserved charged residues in the transmembrane domains and a defining 'signature' motif in the larger of the two extracellular domains (the EC2). They characteristically form promiscuous associations with one another and with other membrane proteins and lipids to generate a specialized type of microdomain: the tetraspanin-enriched microdomain (TEM). TEMs are integral to the main role of tetraspanins as 'molecular organizers' involved in functions such as membrane trafficking, cell-cell fusion, motility, and signaling. Increasing evidence demonstrates that tetraspanins are used by intracellular pathogens as a means of entering and replicating within human cells. Although previous investigations focused mainly on viruses such as hepatitis C and HIV, it is now becoming clear that other microbes associate with tetraspanins, using TEMs as a 'gateway' to infection. In this article we review the properties and functions of tetraspanins/TEMs that are relevant to infective processes and discuss the accumulating evidence that shows how different pathogens exploit these properties in infection and in the pathogenesis of disease. We then investigate the novel and exciting

  10. Fluorescence quenching effects of antibiotics on the main components of dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Yan, Peng-Fei; Hu, Zhen-Hu; Yu, Han-Qing; Li, Wei-Hua; Liu, Li

    2016-03-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in wastewater can be characterized using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and parallel factor (EEM-PARAFAC) analysis. Wastewater from animal farms or pharmaceutical plants usually contains high concentration of antibiotics. In this study, the quenching effect of antibiotics on the typical components of DOM was explored using fluorescence EEM-PARAFAC analysis. Four antibiotics (roxarsone, sulfaquinoxaline sodium, oxytetracycline, and erythromycin) at the concentration of 0.5∼4.0 mg/L and three typical components of DOM (tyrosine, tryptophan, and humic acid) were selected. Fluorescence quenching effects were observed with the addition of antibiotics. Among these four antibiotics, roxarsone (2.9∼20.2 %), sulfaquinoxaline sodium (0∼32.0 %), and oxytetracycline (0∼41.8 %) led to a stronger quenching effect than erythromycin (0∼8.0 %). From the side of DOM, tyrosine and tryptophan (0.5∼41.8 %) exhibited a similar quenching effect, but they were higher than humic acids (0∼20.2 %) at the same concentration of antibiotics. For humic acid, a significant quenching effect was observed only with the addition of roxarsone. This might be the first report about the fluorescence quenching effect caused by antibiotics. The results from this study confirmed the interference of antibiotics on the fluorescence intensity of the main components of DOM and highlighted the importance of correcting fluorescence data in the wastewater containing antibiotics.

  11. Plasma Cardiotrophin-1 as a Marker of Hypertension and Diabetes-Induced Target Organ Damage and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Recio-Rodriguez, José I.; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Fernández-Martín, José L.; Cannata-Andía, Jorge B.; López-Novoa, José M.; García-Ortiz, Luis; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The search for biomarkers of hypertension and diabetes-induced damage to multiple target organs is a priority. We analyzed the correlation between plasma cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1), a chemokine that participates in cardiovascular remodeling and organ fibrosis, and a wide range of parameters currently used to diagnose morphological and functional progressive injury in left ventricle, arteries, and kidneys of diabetic and hypertensive patients, in order to validate plasma levels of CT-1 as clinical biomarker. This is an observational study with 93 type 2-diabetic patients, 209 hypertensive patients, and 82 healthy controls in which we assessed the following parameters: plasma CT-1, basal glycaemia, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), pulse pressure (PP), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH by electrocardiographic indexes), peripheral vascular disease (by pulse wave velocity—PWV, carotid intima-media thickness—C-IMT, and ankle-brachial index—ABI), and renal impairment (by microalbuminuria, albumin/creatinine urinary ratio, plasma creatinine concentrations, and glomerular filtration rate). Hypertensive or diabetic patients have higher plasma CT-1 than control patients. CT-1 positively correlates with basal glycaemia, SBP, DBP, PP, LVH, arterial damage (increased IMT, decreased ABI), and early renal damage (microalbuminuria, elevated albumin/creatinine ratio). CT-1 also correlates with increased 10-year cardiovascular risk. Multiple linear regression analysis confirmed that CT-1 was associated with arterial injury assessed by PWV, IMT, ABI, and cardiac damage evaluated by Cornell voltage duration product. Increases in plasma CT-1 are strongly related to the intensity of several parameters associated to target organ damage supporting further investigation of its diagnostic capacity as single biomarker of cardiovascular injury and risk and, possibly, of subclinical renal damage. PMID:26222851

  12. 3D Miniaturization of Human Organs for Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Park, Joseph; Wetzel, Isaac; Dréau, Didier; Cho, Hansang

    2018-01-01

    "Engineered human organs" hold promises for predicting the effectiveness and accuracy of drug responses while reducing cost, time, and failure rates in clinical trials. Multiorgan human models utilize many aspects of currently available technologies including self-organized spherical 3D human organoids, microfabricated 3D human organ chips, and 3D bioprinted human organ constructs to mimic key structural and functional properties of human organs. They enable precise control of multicellular activities, extracellular matrix (ECM) compositions, spatial distributions of cells, architectural organizations of ECM, and environmental cues. Thus, engineered human organs can provide the microstructures and biological functions of target organs and advantageously substitute multiscaled drug-testing platforms including the current in vitro molecular assays, cell platforms, and in vivo models. This review provides an overview of advanced innovative designs based on the three main technologies used for organ construction leading to single and multiorgan systems useable for drug development. Current technological challenges and future perspectives are also discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Reaching to multiple targets when standing: the spatial organization of feedforward postural adjustments.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Julia A; Brown, Ryan H; Stapley, Paul J

    2009-04-01

    We examined the spatial organization of feedforward postural adjustments produced prior to and during voluntary arm reaching movements executed while standing. We sought to investigate whether the activity of postural muscles before and during reaching was directionally tuned and whether a strategy of horizontal force constraint could be observed. To this end, eight human subjects executed self-paced reach-to-point movements on the random illumination of one of 13 light targets placed within a 180 degrees array centered along the midline of the body. Analysis was divided into two periods: a first corresponding to the 250 ms preceding the onset of the reaching movements (termed pPA period) and a second 250-ms period immediately preceding target attainment (the aPA period). For both periods, electromyographic activity of the lower limb muscles revealed a clear directional tuning, with groups of muscles being activated for similar directions of reach. Analysis of horizontal ground reaction forces supported the existence of a force constraint strategy only for the pPA period, however, with those in the aPA period being more widely dispersed. We suggest that the strategy adopted for feedforward pPAs is one where the tuned muscle synergies constrain the forces diagonally away from the center of mass (CoM) to move it within the support base. However, the need to control for final finger and body position for each target during the aPA phase resulted in a distribution of vectors across reaching directions. Overall, our results would support the idea that endpoint limb force during postural tasks depends on the use of functional muscle synergies, which are used to displace the CoM or decelerate the body at the end of the reach.

  14. Erectile dysfunction and target organ damage in the early stages of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kakkavas, Apostolos; Tsioufis, Costas; Tsiachris, Dimitris; Thomopoulos, Costas; Dimitriadis, Kyriakos; Milkas, Anastasios; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Kallikazaros, Ioannis; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2013-09-01

    The authors investigated whether erectile dysfunction (ED) in the early stages of hypertension is associated with heightened end-organ damage. A total of 174 consecutive men with untreated, newly diagnosed essential hypertension (aged 50.3 years, office blood pressure [BP] 150/98 mm Hg) were studied. All participants underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, blood examination, albumin-creatinine ratio, carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity assessment, and echocardiography for estimation of left ventricular mass index and diastolic function. Hypertensive men with ED (n=43, 24.7%) compared with those without ED were older (by 6.4 years, P<.05), had greater 24-hour pulse pressure (by 4.3 mm Hg, P=.011) and a greater prevalence of nondipping status (72.2% vs 46.7%, P=.008), while the two groups did not differ in plasma glucose, lipid, creatinine, and albumin/creatinine ratio levels. Regarding cardiac adaptations, hypertensive men with ED exhibited only significantly lower tissue Doppler imaging-derived Em (by 1.6 cm/s, adjusted P=.035), while no difference in left ventricular mass index or pulse wave velocity were detected. ED in the setting of untreated newly diagnosed essential hypertension does not have an unfavorable impact on traditional markers of target organ damage. This finding suggests that ED assessment might not refine the traditional risk stratification procedure at least in the early stages of hypertensive disease. ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Ecosystem Indicators and Tools in the Gulf of Maine

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment is a U.S.-Canadian partnership of government and non-government organizations focused on the health, environmental quality and productivity of the Gulf of Maine. In 2006, the Ecosystem Indicator Partnership (ESIP) commenced acti...

  16. Parasitism as the main factor shaping peptide vocabularies in current organisms.

    PubMed

    Zemková, Michaela; Zahradník, Daniel; Mokrejš, Martin; Flegr, Jaroslav

    2017-06-01

    Self/non-self-discrimination by vertebrate immune systems is based on the recognition of the presence of peptides in proteins of a parasite that are not contained in the proteins of a host. Therefore, a reduction of the number of 'words' in its own peptide vocabulary could be an efficient evolutionary strategy of parasites for escaping recognition. Here, we compared peptide vocabularies of 30 endoparasitic and 17 free-living unicellular organisms and also eight multicellular parasitic and 16 multicellular free-living organisms. We found that both unicellular and multicellular parasites used a significantly lower number of different pentapeptides than free-living controls. Impoverished pentapeptide vocabularies in parasites were observed across all five clades that contain both the parasitic and free-living species. The effect of parasitism on a number of peptides used in an organism's proteins is larger than effects of all other studied factors, including the size of a proteome, the number of encoded proteins, etc. This decrease of pentapeptide diversity was partly compensated for by an increased number of hexapeptides. Our results support the hypothesis of parasitism-associated reduction of peptide vocabulary and suggest that T-cell receptors mostly recognize the five amino acids-long part of peptides that are presented in the groove of major histocompatibility complex molecules.

  17. Effect of mannose targeting of hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimers on cellular and organ biodistribution in a neonatal brain injury model.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anjali; Porterfield, Joshua E; Smith, Elizabeth; Sharma, Rishi; Kannan, Sujatha; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M

    2018-06-05

    Neurotherapeutics for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders must overcome challenges relating to the blood-brain barrier (BBB), brain tissue penetration, and the targeting of specific cells. Neuroinflammation mediated by activated microglia is a major hallmark of several neurological disorders, making these cells a desirable therapeutic target. Building on the promise of hydroxyl-terminated generation four polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (D4-OH) for penetrating the injured BBB and targeting activated glia, we explored if conjugation of targeting ligands would enhance and modify brain and organ uptake. Since mannose receptors [cluster of differentiation (CD) 206] are typically over-expressed on injured microglia, we conjugated mannose to the surface of multifunctional D4-OH using highly efficient, atom-economical, and orthogonal Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry and evaluated the effect of mannose conjugation on the specific cell uptake of targeted and non-targeted dendrimers both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro results indicate that the conjugation of mannose as a targeting ligand significantly changes the mechanism of dendrimer internalization, giving mannosylated dendrimer a preference for mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis as opposed to non-specific fluid phase endocytosis. We further investigated the brain uptake and biodistribution of targeted and non-targeted fluorescently labeled dendrimers in a maternal intrauterine inflammation-induced cerebral palsy (CP) rabbit model using quantification methods based on fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal microscopy. We found that the conjugation of mannose modified the distribution of D4-OH throughout the body in this neonatal rabbit CP model without lowering the amount of dendrimer delivered to injured glia in the brain, even though significantly higher glial uptake was not observed in this model. Mannose conjugation to the dendrimer modifies the dendrimer

  18. Drug target identification in protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Müller, Joachim; Hemphill, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Despite the fact that diseases caused by protozoan parasites represent serious challenges for public health, animal production and welfare, only a limited panel of drugs has been marketed for clinical applications. Herein, the authors investigate two strategies, namely whole organism screening and target-based drug design. The present pharmacopoeia has resulted from whole organism screening, and the mode of action and targets of selected drugs are discussed. However, the more recent extensive genome sequencing efforts and the development of dry and wet lab genomics and proteomics that allow high-throughput screening of interactions between micromolecules and recombinant proteins has resulted in target-based drug design as the predominant focus in anti-parasitic drug development. Selected examples of target-based drug design studies are presented, and calcium-dependent protein kinases, important drug targets in apicomplexan parasites, are discussed in more detail. Despite the enormous efforts in target-based drug development, this approach has not yet generated market-ready antiprotozoal drugs. However, whole-organism screening approaches, comprising of both in vitro and in vivo investigations, should not be disregarded. The repurposing of already approved and marketed drugs could be a suitable strategy to avoid fastidious approval procedures, especially in the case of neglected or veterinary parasitoses.

  19. Drug target identification in protozoan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Joachim; Hemphill, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite the fact that diseases caused by protozoan parasites represent serious challenges for public health, animal production and welfare, only a limited panel of drugs has been marketed for clinical applications. Areas covered Herein, the authors investigate two strategies, namely whole organism screening and target-based drug design. The present pharmacopoeia has resulted from whole organism screening, and the mode of action and targets of selected drugs are discussed. However, the more recent extensive genome sequencing efforts and the development of dry and wet lab genomics and proteomics that allow high-throughput screening of interactions between micromolecules and recombinant proteins has resulted in target-based drug design as the predominant focus in anti-parasitic drug development. Selected examples of target-based drug design studies are presented, and calcium-dependent protein kinases, important drug targets in apicomplexan parasites, are discussed in more detail. Expert opinion Despite the enormous efforts in target-based drug development, this approach has not yet generated market-ready antiprotozoal drugs. However, whole-organism screening approaches, comprising of both in vitro and in vivo investigations, should not be disregarded. The repurposing of already approved and marketed drugs could be a suitable strategy to avoid fastidious approval procedures, especially in the case of neglected or veterinary parasitoses. PMID:27238605

  20. Target-Specific Delivery of an Antibody That Blocks the Formation of Collagen Deposits in Skin and Lung.

    PubMed

    Fertala, Jolanta; Romero, Freddy; Summer, Ross; Fertala, Andrzej

    2017-10-01

    Regardless of the cause of organ fibrosis, its main unwanted consequence is the formation of collagen fibril-rich deposits that hamper the structure and function of affected tissues. Although many strategies have been proposed for the treatment of fibrotic diseases, no therapy has been developed, which can effectively block the formation of collagen fibril deposits. With this in mind, we recently developed an antibody-based therapy to block key interactions that drive collagen molecules into fibrils. In this study, we analyzed target specificity, which is a main parameter that defines the safe use of all antibody-based therapies in humans. We hypothesized that, regardless of the route of administration, our antibody would preferentially bind to free collagen molecules synthesized at the sites of fibrosis and have minimal off-target interactions when applied in various tissues. To test this hypothesis, we used two experimental models of organ fibrosis: (1) a keloid model, in which antibody constructs were directly implanted under the skin of nude mice and (2) an experimental model of pulmonary fibrosis, in which our antibody was administered systemically by intravenous injection. Following administration, we studied the distribution of our antibody within target and off-target sites as well as analyzed its effects on fibrotic tissue formation. We found that local and systemic application of our antibody had high specificity for targeting collagen fibrillogenesis and also appeared safe and therapeutically effective. In summary, this study provides the basis for further testing our antifibrotic antibody in a broad range of disease conditions and suggests that this treatment approach will be effective if delivered by local or systemic administration.

  1. A new approach to data evaluation in the non-target screening of organic trace substances in water analysis.

    PubMed

    Müller, Alexander; Schulz, Wolfgang; Ruck, Wolfgang K L; Weber, Walter H

    2011-11-01

    Non-target screening via high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) has gained increasingly in importance for monitoring organic trace substances in water resources targeted for the production of drinking water. In this article a new approach for evaluating the data from non-target HPLC-MS screening in water is introduced and its advantages are demonstrated using the supply of drinking water as an example. The crucial difference between this and other approaches is the comparison of samples based on compounds (features) determined by their full scan data. In so doing, we take advantage of the temporal, spatial, or process-based relationships among the samples by applying the set operators, UNION, INTERSECT, and COMPLEMENT to the features of each sample. This approach regards all compounds, detectable by the used analytical method. That is the fundamental meaning of non-target screening, which includes all analytical information from the applied technique for further data evaluation. In the given example, in just one step, all detected features (1729) of a landfill leachate sample could be examined for their relevant influences on water purification respectively drinking water. This study shows that 1721 out of 1729 features were not relevant for the water purification. Only eight features could be determined in the untreated water and three of them were found in the final drinking water after ozonation. In so doing, it was possible to identify 1-adamantylamine as contamination of the landfill in the drinking water at a concentration in the range of 20 ng L(-1). To support the identification of relevant compounds and their transformation products, the DAIOS database (Database-Assisted Identification of Organic Substances) was used. This database concept includes some functions such as product ion search to increase the efficiency of the database query after the screening. To identify related transformation products the database function

  2. Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Different Organs of Potentilla fruticosa L. from Two Main Production Areas of China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Danmeng; Pu, Wenjun; Li, Dengwu; Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Qiaoxiao; Wang, Yongtao

    2016-09-01

    This report compared the phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of the leaves, flowers, and stems of Potentilla fruticosa L. collected from two main production areas of P. R. China (Taibai Mountains and the Qinghai Huzhu Northern Mountains). The results indicated that there were significant differences in the phenol contents and antioxidant activities among the different organs and between the two productions. High-performance liquid-chromatography analysis indicated that hyperoside, (+)-catechin, ellagic acid, and rutin were the primary compounds in leaves and flowers; for stems, the content of six phenolic compounds, from two productions, were the lowest. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) di-ammonium salt (ABTS), ferric reducing power (FRAP), lipid peroxidation assays, and microbial test system (MTS) were used to evaluate the antioxidant activity. The results demonstrated that the leaves from two productions exhibited powerful antioxidant activity than other organs, which did not significantly differ from that of the positive control (rutin), followed by the flowers and stems. The correlation between the content of phytochemicals and the antioxidant activities of different organs showed that the total phenol, tannin, hyperoside, and (+)-catechin contents may influence the antioxidant activity, and these compounds can be used as markers for the quality control of P. fruticosa. © 2016 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zürich.

  3. Surrogate species selection for assessing potential adverse environmental impacts of genetically engineered insect-resistant plants on non-target organisms

    PubMed Central

    Carstens, Keri; Cayabyab, Bonifacio; De Schrijver, Adinda; Gadaleta, Patricia G; Hellmich, Richard L; Romeis, Jörg; Storer, Nicholas; Valicente, Fernando H; Wach, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Most regulatory authorities require that developers of genetically engineered insect-resistant (GEIR) crops evaluate the potential for these crops to have adverse impacts on valued non-target organisms (NTOs), i.e., organisms not intended to be controlled by the trait. In many cases, impacts to NTOs are assessed using surrogate species, and it is critical that the data derived from surrogates accurately predict any adverse impacts likely to be observed from the use of the crop in the agricultural context. The key is to select surrogate species that best represent the valued NTOs in the location where the crop is going to be introduced, but this selection process poses numerous challenges for the developers of GE crops who will perform the tests, as well as for the ecologists and regulators who will interpret the test results. These issues were the subject of a conference “Surrogate Species Selection for Assessing Potential Adverse Environmental Impacts of Genetically Engineered Plants on Non-Target Organisms” convened by the Center for Environmental Risk Assessment, ILSI Research Foundation. This report summarizes the proceedings of the conference, including the presentations, discussions and the points of consensus agreed to by the participants. PMID:24637519

  4. Modeling soil organic carbon dynamics and their driving factors in the main global cereal cropping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guocheng; Zhang, Wen; Sun, Wenjuan; Li, Tingting; Han, Pengfei

    2017-10-01

    Changes in the soil organic carbon (SOC) stock are determined by the balance between the carbon input from organic materials and the output from the decomposition of soil C. The fate of SOC in cropland soils plays a significant role in both sustainable agricultural production and climate change mitigation. The spatiotemporal changes of soil organic carbon in croplands in response to different carbon (C) input management and environmental conditions across the main global cereal systems were studied using a modeling approach. We also identified the key variables that drive SOC changes at a high spatial resolution (0.1° × 0.1°) and over a long timescale (54 years from 1961 to 2014). A widely used soil C turnover model (RothC) and state-of-the-art databases of soil and climate variables were used in the present study. The model simulations suggested that, on a global average, the cropland SOC density increased at annual rates of 0.22, 0.45 and 0.69 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 under crop residue retention rates of 30, 60 and 90 %, respectively. Increasing the quantity of C input could enhance soil C sequestration or reduce the rate of soil C loss, depending largely on the local soil and climate conditions. Spatially, under a specific crop residue retention rate, relatively higher soil C sinks were found across the central parts of the USA, western Europe, and the northern regions of China. Relatively smaller soil C sinks occurred in the high-latitude regions of both the Northern and Southern hemispheres, and SOC decreased across the equatorial zones of Asia, Africa and America. We found that SOC change was significantly influenced by the crop residue retention rate (linearly positive) and the edaphic variable of initial SOC content (linearly negative). Temperature had weak negative effects, and precipitation had significantly negative impacts on SOC changes. The results can help guide carbon input management practices to effectively mitigate climate change through soil C

  5. Effect of the entomopathogenic fungus Lecanicillium muscariumon the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis as a non-target organism.

    PubMed

    Donka, András; Sermann, Helga; Büttner, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    In biological control, different benefit organisms have to combine for an effective management. If entomopathogenic fungi will be integrated, than it has to be considered also the effect on non-target organisms Like beneficial arthropods. Because of the high importance of predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis in biological control it was to determine side effects of Leconicillium muscarium on this species. In two standardised biotests in petri dish and on plants (P. vulgaris) individuals were dipped in suspension or set down on leafs after spraying with L. muscarium at different spore density. Results indicate pathogenicity for the predatory mite in principle. But the dimension of infection risk decrease, all the more conditions approach to practical sequence. Under practical conditions on plants and in practical relevant concentration of 10(6) and 10(7) sp./ml no risk is to expect on the plant.

  6. Rotationally resolved colors of the targets of NASA's Lucy mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, Joshua; Mottola, Stefano; Brown, Mike; Noll, Keith; Binzel, Richard

    2018-05-01

    We propose rotationally resolved photometry at 3.6 and 4.5 um of 5 Trojan asteroids and one Main Belt asteroid - the targets of NASA's Lucy mission. The proposed Spitzer observations are designed to meet a combination of science goals and mission support objectives. Science goals 1) Search for signatures of volatiles and/or organics on the surfaces. a. This goal includes resolving a discrepancy between previous WISE and Spitzer measurements of Trojans 2) Provide new constraints on the cause of rotational spectral heterogeneity detected on 3548 Eurybates at shorter wavelengths a. Determine whether the heterogeneity (Fig 1) extends to the 3-5 um region 3) Assess the possibility for spectral heterogeneity on the other targets a. This goal will help test the hypothesis of Wong and Brown (2015) that the near-surface interiors of Trojans differ from their surfaces 4) Thermal data at 4.5 um for the Main Belt target Donaldjohanson will refine estimates of size, albedo, and provide the first estimate of thermal inertia Mission support objectives 1) Assess scientifically optimal encounter times (viewing geometries) for the fly-bys a. Characterizing rotational spectral units now will enable the team to choose the most scientifically valuable part of the asteroid to view 2) Gather data to optimize observing parameters for Lucy instruments a. Measuring brightness in the 3 - 5 um region and resolving the discrepancy between WISE and Spitzer will enable better planning of the Lucy spectral observations in this wavelength range 3) The size, albedo, and thermal inertia of Donaldjohanson are fundamental data for planning the encounter with that Main Belt asteroid

  7. Pharyngeal cavity and the gills are the target organ for the repellent action of pardaxin in shark.

    PubMed

    Primor, N

    1985-05-15

    Pardaxin, an active principle of the repellent secretion of the Red Sea flatfish, Pardachirus marmoratus, elicited severe struggling, mouth paralysis, and transient increase in urea leakage from the gills only when administered to the medium bathing the shark's pharyngeal cavity and gills. An apparatus was constructed which prevents a mixing of the outflow from shark's gills with water bathing its surface skin. It is concluded that in sharks the gills and/or the pharyngeal cavity are the target organ for the repellent action of pardaxin.

  8. ORGANIC ACIDITY IN MAINE (U.S.A.) LAKES AND IN HUMEX LAKE SKJERVATJERN (NORWAY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic acids, a component of dissolved organic carbon can be a major factor in the acidity of many lakes and streams. n order to evaluate the importance of organic acidity, we fractionated (hydrophobic acids and neutrals, hydrophilic acids, bases, and neutrals) and isolated hydr...

  9. Synthetic PAMAM-RGD conjugates target and bind to odontoblast-like MDPC 23 cells and the predentin in tooth organ cultures.

    PubMed

    Hill, Elliott; Shukla, Rameshwer; Park, Steve S; Baker, James R

    2007-01-01

    Screening techniques now allow for the identification of small peptides that bind specifically to molecules like cells. However, despite the enthusiasm for this approach, single peptides often lack the binding affinity to target in vivo and regulate cell function. We took peptides containing the Arg-Gly Asp(RGD) motif that bind to the alpha Vbeta 3 integrin and have shown potential as therapeutics. To improve their binding affinity, we synthesized polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer-RGD conjugates that that contain 12-13 copies of the peptide. When cultured with human dermal microvessel endothelial cells (HDMEC), human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), or odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells, the PAMAM dendrimer conjugate targets this receptor in a manner that is both time- and dose-dependent. Finally, this conjugate selectively targets RGD binding sites in the predentin of human tooth organ cultures. Taken together, these studies provide proof of principle that synthetic PAMAM-RGD conjugates could prove useful as carriers for the tissue-specific delivery of integrin-targeted therapeutics or imaging agents and could be used to engineer tissue regeneration.

  10. Membrane Transporters: Structure, Function and Targets for Drug Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravna, Aina W.; Sager, Georg; Dahl, Svein G.; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    Current therapeutic drugs act on four main types of molecular targets: enzymes, receptors, ion channels and transporters, among which a major part (60-70%) are membrane proteins. This review discusses the molecular structures and potential impact of membrane transporter proteins on new drug discovery. The three-dimensional (3D) molecular structure of a protein contains information about the active site and possible ligand binding, and about evolutionary relationships within the protein family. Transporters have a recognition site for a particular substrate, which may be used as a target for drugs inhibiting the transporter or acting as a false substrate. Three groups of transporters have particular interest as drug targets: the major facilitator superfamily, which includes almost 4000 different proteins transporting sugars, polyols, drugs, neurotransmitters, metabolites, amino acids, peptides, organic and inorganic anions and many other substrates; the ATP-binding cassette superfamily, which plays an important role in multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy; and the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family, which includes the molecular targets for some of the most widely used psychotropic drugs. Recent technical advances have increased the number of known 3D structures of membrane transporters, and demonstrated that they form a divergent group of proteins with large conformational flexibility which facilitates transport of the substrate.

  11. Potential of targeting TGF-β for organ transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Iwashima, Makio; Love, Robert

    2015-01-01

    TGF-β was originally considered as an immunoregulatory cytokine, but accumulating data demonstrate that it also plays a critical role in development of effector immunity. Since TGF-β has a potent ability to alter immune responses, modulation of the TGF-β pathway for treatment of transplantation patients could be effective if carried out in a target selective manner. This review will focus on the role of TGF-β in T cell differentiation and discuss the prospect of TGF-β as the therapeutic target of lung transplantation acceptance. PMID:23464518

  12. Pioneering topological methods for network-based drug-target prediction by exploiting a brain-network self-organization theory.

    PubMed

    Durán, Claudio; Daminelli, Simone; Thomas, Josephine M; Haupt, V Joachim; Schroeder, Michael; Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio

    2017-04-26

    The bipartite network representation of the drug-target interactions (DTIs) in a biosystem enhances understanding of the drugs' multifaceted action modes, suggests therapeutic switching for approved drugs and unveils possible side effects. As experimental testing of DTIs is costly and time-consuming, computational predictors are of great aid. Here, for the first time, state-of-the-art DTI supervised predictors custom-made in network biology were compared-using standard and innovative validation frameworks-with unsupervised pure topological-based models designed for general-purpose link prediction in bipartite networks. Surprisingly, our results show that the bipartite topology alone, if adequately exploited by means of the recently proposed local-community-paradigm (LCP) theory-initially detected in brain-network topological self-organization and afterwards generalized to any complex network-is able to suggest highly reliable predictions, with comparable performance with the state-of-the-art-supervised methods that exploit additional (non-topological, for instance biochemical) DTI knowledge. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the novel predictions revealed that each class of methods prioritizes distinct true interactions; hence, combining methodologies based on diverse principles represents a promising strategy to improve drug-target discovery. To conclude, this study promotes the power of bio-inspired computing, demonstrating that simple unsupervised rules inspired by principles of topological self-organization and adaptiveness arising during learning in living intelligent systems (like the brain) can efficiently equal perform complicated algorithms based on advanced, supervised and knowledge-based engineering. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Target for production of X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenev, S. A.

    2004-09-01

    The patented new type of X-ray target is considered in this report. The main concept of the target consists in developing a sandwich structure depositing a coating of materials with high Z on the substrate with low Z, high thermal conductivity and high thermal stability. The target presents multiple layers system. The thermal conditions for X-ray target are discussed. The experimental results for Ta target on the Al and Cu substrates are presented.

  14. Developing, implementing, and evaluating a condom promotion program targeting sexually active adolescents.

    PubMed

    Alstead, M; Campsmith, M; Halley, C S; Hartfield, K; Goldbaum, G; Wood, R W

    1999-12-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of the Condom Campaign, a 1995 HIV prevention program promoting condom use among sexually active adolescents in three King County, Washington, urban communities. This program employed three main strategies: (a) mobilizing all levels of the target communities to support and guide program development and implementation; (b) creating and implementing a mass media campaign targeting sexually active teenagers that promoted correct condom use and favorable attitudes toward condoms; and (c) recruiting public agencies, community organizations, and businesses to distribute condoms from bins and vending machines. We evaluated the program through a series of cross-sectional interviews conducted in the three communities chosen for their elevated levels of adolescent sexual risk behavior. Overall, 73% of target youth reported exposure to the Condom Campaign; exposure did not differ by age, gender, race, or level of sexual experience. Levels of sexual activity remained stable throughout the media campaign.

  15. Fabrication of 14 different RNA nanoparticles for specific tumor targeting without accumulation in normal organs

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yi; Haque, Farzin; Shu, Dan; Li, Wei; Zhu, Zhenqi; Kotb, Malak; Lyubchenko, Yuri; Guo, Peixuan

    2013-01-01

    Due to structural flexibility, RNase sensitivity, and serum instability, RNA nanoparticles with concrete shapes for in vivo application remain challenging to construct. Here we report the construction of 14 RNA nanoparticles with solid shapes for targeting cancers specifically. These RNA nanoparticles were resistant to RNase degradation, stable in serum for >36 h, and stable in vivo after systemic injection. By applying RNA nanotechnology and exemplifying with these 14 RNA nanoparticles, we have established the technology and developed “toolkits” utilizing a variety of principles to construct RNA architectures with diverse shapes and angles. The structure elements of phi29 motor pRNA were utilized for fabrication of dimers, twins, trimers, triplets, tetramers, quadruplets, pentamers, hexamers, heptamers, and other higher-order oligomers, as well as branched diverse architectures via hand-in-hand, foot-to-foot, and arm-on-arm interactions. These novel RNA nanostructures harbor resourceful functionalities for numerous applications in nanotechnology and medicine. It was found that all incorporated functional modules, such as siRNA, ribozymes, aptamers, and other functionalities, folded correctly and functioned independently within the nanoparticles. The incorporation of all functionalities was achieved prior, but not subsequent, to the assembly of the RNA nanoparticles, thus ensuring the production of homogeneous therapeutic nanoparticles. More importantly, upon systemic injection, these RNA nanoparticles targeted cancer exclusively in vivo without accumulation in normal organs and tissues. These findings open a new territory for cancer targeting and treatment. The versatility and diversity in structure and function derived from one biological RNA molecule implies immense potential concealed within the RNA nanotechnology field. PMID:23604636

  16. Target Organ Damage and Target Systolic Blood Pressure in Clinical Practice: The Campania Salute Network.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Andrea; Mancusi, Costantino; Losi, Maria Angela; Izzo, Raffaele; Arnone, Maria Immacolata; Canciello, Grazia; Senese, Salvatore; De Luca, Nicola; de Simone, Giovanni; Trimarco, Bruno

    2018-05-07

    Lowering systolic blood pressure (SBP) below the conventional threshold (140 mm Hg) reduces left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and incident cardiovascular (CV) events. We assessed whether different thresholds of SBP as the average value during follow-up (FU) have different impact on changes in target organ damage (TOD). From the Campania Salute Network registry, we selected 4,148 hypertensive patients with average SBP-FU <140 mm Hg, and without history of prevalent CV or chronic kidney disease (i.e.,

  17. Identification and modeling of the electrohydraulic systems of the main gun of a main battle tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Luiz C. A.; Menegaldo, Luciano L.

    2012-11-01

    The black-box mathematical models of the electrohydraulic systems responsible for driving the two degrees of freedom (elevation and azimuth) of the main gun of a main battle tank (MBT) were identified. Such systems respond to gunner's inputs while acquiring and tracking targets. Identification experiments were designed to collect simultaneous data from two inertial measurement units (IMU) installed at the gunner's handle (input) and at the center of rotation of the turret (output), for the identification of the azimuth system. For the elevation system, IMUs were installed at the gunner's handle (input) and at the breech of the gun (output). Linear accelerations and angular rates were collected for both input and output. Several black-box model architectures were investigated. As a result, nonlinear autoregressive with exogenous variables (NARX) second order model and nonlinear finite impulse response (NFIR) fourth order model, demonstrate to best fit the experimental data, with low computational costs. The derived models are being employed in a broader research, aiming to reproduce such systems in a laboratory virtual main gun simulator.

  18. Natural products from marine organisms with neuroprotective activity in the experimental models of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and ischemic brain stroke: their molecular targets and action mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Young; Choi, Hyukjae

    2015-02-01

    Continuous increases in the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and brain stroke demand the urgent development of therapeutics. Marine organisms are well-known producers of natural products with diverse structures and pharmacological activities. Therefore, researchers have endeavored to identify marine natural products with neuroprotective effects. In this regard, this review summarizes therapeutic targets for AD, PD, and ischemic brain stroke and marine natural products with pharmacological activities on the targets according to taxonomies of marine organisms. Furthermore, several marine natural products on the clinical trials for the treatment of neurological disorders are discussed.

  19. Lake transparency: a window into decadal variations in dissolved organic carbon concentrations in Lakes of Acadia National Park, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roesler, Collin S.; Culbertson, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    A forty year time series of Secchi depth observations from approximately 25 lakes in Acadia National Park, Maine, USA, evidences large variations in transparency between lakes but relatively little seasonal cycle within lakes. However, there are coherent patterns over the time series, suggesting large scale processes are responsible. It has been suggested that variations in colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are primarily responsible for the variations in transparency, both between lakes and over time and further that CDOM is a robust optical proxy for dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Here we present a forward model of Secchi depth as a function of DOC based upon first principles and bio-optical relationships. Inverting the model to estimate DOC concentration from Secchi depth observations compared well with the measured DOC concentrations collected since 1995 (RMS error < 1.3 mg C l-1). This inverse model allows the time series of DOC to be extended back to the mid 1970s when only Secchi depth observations were collected, and thus provides a means for investigating lake response to climate forcing, changing atmospheric chemistry and watershed characteristics, including land cover and land use.

  20. Bacteriophages and phage-inspired nanocarriers for targeted delivery of therapeutic cargos.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mahdi; Mirshekari, Hamed; Moosavi Basri, Seyed Masoud; Bahrami, Sajad; Moghoofei, Mohsen; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-11-15

    The main goal of drug delivery systems is to target therapeutic cargoes to desired cells and to ensure their efficient uptake. Recently a number of studies have focused on designing bio-inspired nanocarriers, such as bacteriophages, and synthetic carriers based on the bacteriophage structure. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically recognize their bacterial hosts. They can replicate only inside their host cell and can act as natural gene carriers. Each type of phage has a particular shape, a different capacity for loading cargo, a specific production time, and their own mechanisms of supramolecular assembly, that have enabled them to act as tunable carriers. New phage-based technologies have led to the construction of different peptide libraries, and recognition abilities provided by novel targeting ligands. Phage hybridization with non-organic compounds introduces new properties to phages and could be a suitable strategy for construction of bio-inorganic carriers. In this review we try to cover the major phage species that have been used in drug and gene delivery systems, and the biological application of phages as novel targeting ligands and targeted therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the biological activity of the molluscicidal fraction of Solanum sisymbriifolium against non target organisms.

    PubMed

    Bagalwa, Jean-Jacques M; Voutquenne-Nazabadioko, Laurence; Sayagh, Charlotte; Bashwira, Augustin S

    2010-10-01

    The evaluation of the biocidal activity of the fruit of Solanum sisymbriifolium involving non target organisms such as aquatic insects, fish and snails lead to the isolation of the steroidal alkaloids, solamargine and β-solamarine, from the active fractions. The fractions A3 and C, with biological activity against fish, snail and aquatic insect and larvae, are able to affect the good functioning of ecosystem found on alimentary chain. The fraction B seems to be less toxic to fish and aquatic insect and larvae. The fraction B could thus be used as molluscicide in the future. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Space moving target detection using time domain feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Chen, Jin-yong; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Jin-yu

    2018-01-01

    The traditional space target detection methods mainly use the spatial characteristics of the star map to detect the targets, which can not make full use of the time domain information. This paper presents a new space moving target detection method based on time domain features. We firstly construct the time spectral data of star map, then analyze the time domain features of the main objects (target, stars and the background) in star maps, finally detect the moving targets using single pulse feature of the time domain signal. The real star map target detection experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively detect the trajectory of moving targets in the star map sequence, and the detection probability achieves 99% when the false alarm rate is about 8×10-5, which outperforms those of compared algorithms.

  3. Targeted systemic gene therapy and molecular imaging of cancer contribution of the vascular-targeted AAVP vector.

    PubMed

    Hajitou, Amin

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy and molecular-genetic imaging have faced a major problem: the lack of an efficient systemic gene delivery vector. Unquestionably, eukaryotic viruses have been the vectors of choice for gene delivery to mammalian cells; however, they have had limited success in systemic gene therapy. This is mainly due to undesired uptake by the liver and reticuloendothelial system, broad tropism for mammalian cells causing toxicity, and their immunogenicity. On the other hand, prokaryotic viruses such as bacteriophage (phage) have no tropism for mammalian cells, but can be engineered to deliver genes to these cells. However, phage-based vectors have inherently been considered poor vectors for mammalian cells. We have reported a new generation of vascular-targeted systemic hybrid prokaryotic-eukaryotic vectors as chimeras between an adeno-associated virus (AAV) and targeted bacteriophage (termed AAV/phage; AAVP). In this hybrid vector, the targeted bacteriophage serves as a shuttle to deliver the AAV transgene cassette inserted in an intergenomic region of the phage DNA genome. As a proof of concept, we assessed the in vivo efficacy of vector in animal models of cancer by displaying on the phage capsid the cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD-4C) ligand that binds to alphav integrin receptors specifically expressed on the angiogenic blood vessels of tumors. The ligand-directed vector was able to specifically deliver imaging and therapeutic transgenes to tumors in mice, rats, and dogs while sparing the normal organs. This chapter reviews some gene transfer strategies and the potential of the vascular-targeted AAVP vector for enhancing the effectiveness of existing systemic gene delivery and genetic-imaging technologies. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Control of Sand Flies with Attractive Toxic Sugar Baits (ATSB) and Potential Impact on Non-Target Organisms in Morocco

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-08

    dinotefuran has successful con- trolled Culex and Aedes spp. in similar field sites in Morocco [22]. However, this if the first report of the use of...et al. Control of Aedes abopttus with attractive toxic sugar baits (A TSB) and potential Impact on non target organisms In St. Augustine, Florida...of Anopheles sergenti and Aedes CO!Pk.JS populations following presentation of attractive toxic (splnosad) sugar bait stations In an oasis. J Am

  5. DETAIL OF MAIN ENTRANCE ON EAST (FRONT) ELEVATION OF BUILDING. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF MAIN ENTRANCE ON EAST (FRONT) ELEVATION OF BUILDING. view TO SOUTHWEST. - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, Target Intelligence Training Building-Combat Center, Off Connecticut Road, east of Idaho Avenue, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  6. Development of a qualitative real-time PCR method to detect 19 targets for identification of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Wang, Pengfei; Xu, Xiaoli; Wang, Xiaofu; Wei, Wei; Chen, Xiaoyun; Xu, Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    As the amount of commercially available genetically modified organisms (GMOs) grows recent years, the diversity of target sequences for molecular detection techniques are eagerly needed. Considered as the gold standard for GMO analysis, the real-time PCR technology was optimized to produce a high-throughput GMO screening method. With this method we can detect 19 transgenic targets. The specificity of the assays was demonstrated to be 100 % by the specific amplification of DNA derived from reference material from 20 genetically modified crops and 4 non modified crops. Furthermore, most assays showed a very sensitive detection, reaching the limit of ten copies. The 19 assays are the most frequently used genetic elements present in GM crops and theoretically enable the screening of the known GMO described in Chinese markets. Easy to use, fast and cost efficient, this method approach fits the purpose of GMO testing laboratories.

  7. Results from the Maine 1992 foliage penetration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toups, Michael F.; Ayasli, Serpil

    1993-11-01

    In order to investigate the detection of targets which are hidden by foliage, an experiment was designed which utilized a forest region located near Portage, Maine. The experiment was designed to address four issues. First, the properties of the backscatter or clutter which competes with the desired target were investigated. Second, the foliage induced attenuation that is experienced by the radar energy traversing the foliage were measured. Third, the ability of a synthetic aperture radar system to focus on a target obscured by foliage was investigated. Fourth, target signatures of foliage obscured and unobscured targets were measured. The forest region was investigated using two different airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. A UHF wide-band SAR operated by SRI International was used as well as a L-, C-, and X-band SAR installed on a P-3 aircraft operated by the U.S. Navy. The SRI system was used to collect data over 16 square kilometers with repeat passes for verification of system performance. The P-3 system was used to collect over 50 square kilometers of data at three different depression angles with several repeat passes.

  8. Association of target organ damage with 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels and hypertension subtypes in untreated Chinese.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang-Fei; Li, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Xu, Ting-Yan; Ding, Feng-Hua; Staessen, Jan A; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2014-02-01

    The association of target organ damage with 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels and ambulatory hypertension subtypes has not yet been examined in untreated Chinese patients. We measured left ventricular mass index by echocardiography (n=619), the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (n=1047), and aortic pulse wave velocity by tonometry (n=1013) in 1047 untreated subjects (mean age, 50.6 years; 48.9% women). Normotension was a 24-hour systolic/diastolic blood pressure <130/<80 mm Hg. Hypertension subtypes were isolated diastolic hypertension and mixed systolic plus diastolic hypertension. We assessed associations of interest by multivariable-adjusted linear models. Using normotension as reference, mixed hypertension was associated with higher (P≤0.003) left ventricular mass index (+4.31 g/m(2)), urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (+1.63 mg/mmol), and pulse wave velocity (+0.76 m/s); and isolated diastolic hypertension was associated with similar left ventricular mass index and pulse wave velocity (P≥0.39), but higher urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (+1.24 mg/mmol; P=0.002). In younger participants (<55 years), the mutually independent effect sizes associated with 1 SD increases in 24-hour systolic/diastolic blood pressure were +3.31/-0.36 g/m(2) (P=0.009/0.79) for left ventricular mass index, +1.15/+1.14 mg/mmol (P=0.02/0.04) for the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio, and +0.54/-0.05 m/s (P<0.001/0.54) for pulse wave velocity. In older participants, these estimates were +3.58/+0.30 g/m(2) (P=0.045/0.88), +1.23/+1.05 mg/mmol (P=0.002/0.54), and +0.76/-0.49 m/s (P<0.001/<0.001), respectively. In conclusion, 24-hour systolic blood pressure and mixed hypertension are major determinants of target organ damage irrespective of age and target organ, whereas 24-hour diastolic blood pressure and isolated diastolic hypertension only relate to the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio below middle age.

  9. Heterogeneous targeting of centrifugal inputs to the glomerular layer of the main olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Gómez, C; Briñón, J G; Barbado, M V; Weruaga, E; Valero, J; Alonso, J R

    2005-06-01

    The centrifugal systems innervating the olfactory bulb are important elements in the functional regulation of the olfactory pathway. In this study, the selective innervation of specific glomeruli by serotonergic, noradrenergic and cholinergic centrifugal axons was analyzed. Thus, the morphology, distribution and density of positive axons were studied in the glomerular layer of the main olfactory bulb of the rat, using serotonin-, serotonin transporter- and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase-immunohistochemistry and acetylcholinesterase histochemistry in serial sections. Serotonin-, serotonin transporter-immunostaining and acetylcholinesterase-staining revealed a higher heterogeneity in the glomerular layer of the main olfactory bulb than previously reported. In this sense, four types of glomeruli could be identified according to their serotonergic innervation. The main distinctive feature of these four types of glomeruli was their serotonergic fibre density, although they also differed in their size, morphology and relative position throughout the rostro-caudal main olfactory bulb. In this sense, some specific regions of the glomerular layer were occupied by glomeruli with a particular morphology and a characteristic serotonergic innervation pattern that was consistent from animal to animal. Regarding the cholinergic system, we offer a new subclassification of glomeruli based on the distribution of cholinergic fibres in the glomerular structure. Finally, the serotonergic and cholinergic innervation patterns were compared in the glomerular layer. Sexual differences concerning the density of serotonergic fibres were observed in the atypical glomeruli (characterized by their strong cholinergic innervation). The present report provides new data on the heterogeneity of the centrifugal innervation of the glomerular layer that constitutes the morphological substrate supporting the existence of differential modulatory levels among the entire glomerular population.

  10. Particle therapy of moving targets—the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving targets irradiation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Particle therapy of moving targets is still a great challenge. The motion of organs situated in the thorax and abdomen strongly affects the precision of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy. The motion is responsible for not only the dislocation of the tumour but also the alterations in the internal density along the beam path, which influence the range of particle beams. Furthermore, in case of pencil beam scanning, there is an interference between the target movement and dynamic beam delivery. This review presents the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving target irradiation in the context of hadron therapy. Methods enabling the direct determination of tumour position (fluoroscopic imaging of implanted radio-opaque fiducial markers, electromagnetic detection of inserted transponders and ultrasonic tumour localization systems) are presented. Attention is also drawn to the techniques which use external surrogate motion for an indirect estimation of target displacement during irradiation. The role of respiratory-correlated CT [four-dimensional CT (4DCT)] in the determination of motion pattern prior to the particle treatment is also considered. An essential part of the article is the review of the main approaches to moving target irradiation in hadron therapy: gating, rescanning (repainting), gated rescanning and tumour tracking. The advantages, drawbacks and development trends of these methods are discussed. The new accelerators, called “cyclinacs”, are presented, because their application to particle therapy will allow making a breakthrough in the 4D spot scanning treatment of moving organs. PMID:27376637

  11. Forward neutron production at the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmanov, T. S.; Rajaram, D.; Longo, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    We have measured cross sections for forward neutron production from a variety of targets using proton beams from the Fermilab Main Injector. Measurements were performed for proton beam momenta of 58, 84, and 120 GeV/c. The cross section dependence on the atomic weight (A) of the targets was found to vary as A{sup {alpha}}, where {alpha} is 0.46{+-}0.06 for a beam momentum of 58 GeV/c and 0.54{+-}0.05 for 120 GeV/c. The cross sections show reasonable agreement with FLUKA and DPMJET Monte Carlos. Comparisons have also been made with the LAQGSM Monte Carlo.

  12. Antigenic role of single residues within the main immunogenic region of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Papadouli, I; Potamianos, S; Hadjidakis, I; Bairaktari, E; Tsikaris, V; Sakarellos, C; Cung, M T; Marraud, M; Tzartos, S J

    1990-01-01

    The target of most of the autoantibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) in myasthenic sera is the main immunogenic region (MIR) on the extracellular side of the AChR alpha-subunit. Binding of anti-MIR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has been recently localized between residues alpha 67 and alpha 76 of Torpedo californica electric organ (WNPADYGGIK) and human muscle (WNPDDYGGVK) AChR. In order to evaluate the contribution of each residue to the antigenicity of the MIR, we synthesized peptides corresponding to residues alpha 67-76 from Torpedo and human AChRs, together with 13 peptide analogues. Nine of these analogues had one residue of the Torpedo decapeptide replaced by L-alanine, three had a structure which was intermediate between those of the Torpedo and human alpha 67-76 decapeptides, and one had D-alanine in position 73. Binding studies employing six anti-MIR mAbs and all 15 peptides revealed that some residues (Asn68 and Asp71) are indispensable for binding by all mAbs tested, whereas others are important only for binding by some mAbs. Antibody binding was mainly restricted to residues alpha 68-74, the most critical sequence being alpha 68-71. Fish electric organ and human MIR form two distinct groups of strongly overlapping epitopes. Some peptide analogues enhanced mAb binding compared with Torpedo and human peptides, suggesting that the construction of a very antigenic MIR is feasible. PMID:1695844

  13. DNA damage in internal organs after cutaneous exposure to sulphur mustard.

    PubMed

    Batal, Mohamed; Boudry, Isabelle; Mouret, Stéphane; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Wartelle, Julien; Bérard, Izabel; Douki, Thierry

    2014-07-01

    Sulphur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that attacks mainly skin, eye and lungs. Due to its lipophilic properties, SM is also able to diffuse through the skin and reach internal organs. DNA represents one of the most critical molecular targets of this powerful alkylating agent which modifies DNA structure by forming monoadducts and biadducts. These DNA lesions are involved in the acute toxicity of SM as well as its long-term carcinogenicity. In the present work we studied the formation and persistence of guanine and adenine monoadducts and guanine biadducts in the DNA of brain, lungs, kidneys, spleen, and liver of SKH-1 mice cutaneously exposed to 2, 6 and 60mg/kg of SM. SM-DNA adducts were detected in all studied organs, except in liver at the two lowest doses. Brain and lungs were the organs with the highest level of SM-DNA adducts, followed by kidney, spleen and liver. Monitoring the level of adducts for three weeks after cutaneous exposure showed that the lifetime of adducts were not the same in all organs, lungs being the organ with the longest persistence. Diffusion from skin to internal organs was much more efficient at the highest compared to the lowest dose investigated as the result of the loss of the skin barrier function. These data provide novel information on the distribution of SM in tissues following cutaneous exposures and indicate that brain is an important target. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Temporal organization as a therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Wirz-Justice, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Biological functions occur at many different frequencies, and each has its healthy and pathological ranges, patterns, and properties. Physiology, biochemistry, and behavior are not only organized at the morphological level in cells and organs, but separated or coordinated in time for minimal interference and optimal function. One of the most important temporal frameworks is that of the 24-hour day-night cycle, and its change in day length with season. Robust circadian rhythms are important for mental and physical well-being. Though rhythms have been long neglected as irrelevant (in spite of the high prevalence of sleep disorders in nearly every psychiatric illness), we now have tools to document rhythm disruption and, through better understanding of underlying molecular and physiological mechanisms, to develop therapeutic applications. Light as the major synchronizing agent of the biological clock is becoming a treatment option not only for winter depression but other, nonseasonal forms, as well as an adjunct in optimizing sleep-wake cycles, daytime alertness, cognition, and mood in many neuropsychiatric illnesses. Melatonin is the signal of darkness and promotes sleep onset. Manipulation of sleep (wake therapy, phase advance) has yielded the most rapid, nonpharmacological antidepressant effect known, and combinations (with light, medication) provide long-lasting response. Thus, by analogy, new molecules to augment synchronization or mimic changes occuring during night-time wakefulness may yield novel treatments. This issue on biological rhythms contains articles on a variety of different frequencies not included in the usual definition of chronobiology, but which open up interesting approaches to time and illness. PMID:23393412

  15. Organ donor screening practices for Strongyloides stercoralis infection among US organ procurement organizations.

    PubMed

    Abanyie, Francisca A; Valice, Emily; Delli Carpini, Kristin W; Gray, Elizabeth B; McAuliffe, Isabel; Chin-Hong, Peter V; Handali, Sukwan; Montgomery, Susan P; Huprikar, Shirish

    2018-03-07

    Targeted donor screening for strongyloidiasis performed at the time of organ procurement can prevent this life-threatening donor-derived infection. The Association of Organ Procurement Organizations surveyed members to determine the number of US organ procurement organizations (OPOs) performing donor screening for Strongyloides infection and their screening practices. All 58 OPOs responded to the survey. Only 6 (10%) currently screen donors for strongyloidiasis; most OPOs started 6-36 months before the survey and one started 6 years prior. All used risk-based criteria to determine which donors to screen, though the criteria varied among OPOs. A median of 56 donors have been screened at each OPO since initiating their screening programs, with a median of 2 infected donors (range 0-13) identified. Overall, 53 organs have been transplanted from 22 infected donors, including hearts, lungs, kidneys, and livers. Of 52 OPOs not currently screening, 20 had considered screening and one plans to start screening in the near future. Of those considering risk-based screening, most had not decided on the criteria. Uncertainty about the benefits of and guidelines for screening and misconceptions about the interpretation of test results were concerns shared by non-screening OPOs. Continued education and advocacy on the importance of targeted donor screening are needed. Published 2018. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Monitoring the World Health Organization Global Target 2025 for Exclusive Breastfeeding: Experience From the United States.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Priya M; Perrine, Cria G; Chen, Jian; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Flores-Ayala, Rafael

    2017-08-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months, calculated from a single 24-hour recall among mothers of children 0 to 5 months of age, is a World Health Organization (WHO) indicator used to monitor progress on the 2025 global breastfeeding target. Many upper-middle-income and high-income countries, including the United States, do not have estimates for this indicator. Research aim: To describe the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months in the United States. We used a single 24-hour dietary recall from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2012 to calculate the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months. We discuss our results in the context of routine breastfeeding surveillance, which is reported from a national survey with different methodology. Among children younger than 6 months, 24.4%, 95% confidence interval [17.6, 31.1], were exclusively breastfed the previous day. To our knowledge, this is the first estimate of the WHO indicator of exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months for the United States. This study supports the global surveillance and data strategy for reporting to the WHO on the 2025 target for exclusive breastfeeding.

  17. Mitochondria are targets for the antituberculosis drug rifampicin in cultured epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Erokhina, M V; Kurynina, A V; Onishchenko, G E

    2013-10-01

    Rifampicin is a widely used drug for antituberculosis therapy. Its target is the bacterial RNA polymerase. After entry into the human or mammalian organism, rifampicin is accumulated in cells of epithelial origin (kidneys, liver, lungs) where it induces apoptosis, necrosis, and fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to determine the intracellular mechanisms leading to rifampicin-induced pathological changes and cell death. We analyzed the survival and state of the chondriome of cultured epithelial cells of the SPEV line under the influence of rifampicin. Our data show that the drug induces pronounced pathological changes in the network and ultrastructure of mitochondria, and their dysfunction results in excessive production of reactive oxygen species and release of cytochrome c. These data suggest the initiation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Simultaneously, we observed inhibition of cell proliferation and changes in morphology of the epithelial cells toward fibroblast-like appearance, which could indicate induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Thus, mitochondria are the main potential target for rifampicin in cells of epithelial origin. We suggest that similar mechanisms of pathological changes can be induced in vivo in organs and tissues accumulating rifampicin during chemotherapy of bacterial infectious diseases.

  18. Emerging therapeutic targets currently under investigation for the treatment of systemic amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Nuvolone, Mario; Merlini, Giampaolo

    2017-12-01

    Systemic amyloidosis occurs when one of a growing list of circulating proteins acquires an abnormal fold, aggregates and gives rise to extracellular amyloid deposits in different body sites, leading to organ dysfunction and eventually death. Current approaches are mainly aimed at lowering the supply of the amyloidogenic precursor or at stabilizing it in a non-amyloidogenic state, thus interfering with the initial phases of amyloid formation and toxicity. Areas covered: Improved understanding of the pathophysiology is indicating novel steps and molecules that could be therapeutically targeted. Here, we will review emerging molecular targets and therapeutic approaches against the main forms of systemic amyloidosis at the early preclinical level. Expert opinion: Conspicuous efforts in drug design and drug discovery have provided an unprecedented list of potential new drugs or therapeutic strategies, from gene-based therapies to small molecules and peptides, from novel monoclonal antibodies to engineered cell-based therapies. The challenge will now be to validate and optimize the most promising candidates, cross the bridge from the preclinical phase to the clinics and identify, through innovative trials design, the safest and most effective combination therapies, striving for a better care, possibly a definitive cure for these diseases.

  19. High mobility high efficiency organic films based on pure organic materials

    DOEpatents

    Salzman, Rhonda F [Ann Arbor, MI; Forrest, Stephen R [Ann Arbor, MI

    2009-01-27

    A method of purifying small molecule organic material, performed as a series of operations beginning with a first sample of the organic small molecule material. The first step is to purify the organic small molecule material by thermal gradient sublimation. The second step is to test the purity of at least one sample from the purified organic small molecule material by spectroscopy. The third step is to repeat the first through third steps on the purified small molecule material if the spectroscopic testing reveals any peaks exceeding a threshold percentage of a magnitude of a characteristic peak of a target organic small molecule. The steps are performed at least twice. The threshold percentage is at most 10%. Preferably the threshold percentage is 5% and more preferably 2%. The threshold percentage may be selected based on the spectra of past samples that achieved target performance characteristics in finished devices.

  20. Open-target sparse sensing of biological agents using DNA microarray

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Current biosensors are designed to target and react to specific nucleic acid sequences or structural epitopes. These 'target-specific' platforms require creation of new physical capture reagents when new organisms are targeted. An 'open-target' approach to DNA microarray biosensing is proposed and substantiated using laboratory generated data. The microarray consisted of 12,900 25 bp oligonucleotide capture probes derived from a statistical model trained on randomly selected genomic segments of pathogenic prokaryotic organisms. Open-target detection of organisms was accomplished using a reference library of hybridization patterns for three test organisms whose DNA sequences were not included in the design of the microarray probes. Results A multivariate mathematical model based on the partial least squares regression (PLSR) was developed to detect the presence of three test organisms in mixed samples. When all 12,900 probes were used, the model correctly detected the signature of three test organisms in all mixed samples (mean(R2)) = 0.76, CI = 0.95), with a 6% false positive rate. A sampling algorithm was then developed to sparsely sample the probe space for a minimal number of probes required to capture the hybridization imprints of the test organisms. The PLSR detection model was capable of correctly identifying the presence of the three test organisms in all mixed samples using only 47 probes (mean(R2)) = 0.77, CI = 0.95) with nearly 100% specificity. Conclusions We conceived an 'open-target' approach to biosensing, and hypothesized that a relatively small, non-specifically designed, DNA microarray is capable of identifying the presence of multiple organisms in mixed samples. Coupled with a mathematical model applied to laboratory generated data, and sparse sampling of capture probes, the prototype microarray platform was able to capture the signature of each organism in all mixed samples with high sensitivity and specificity. It was demonstrated

  1. Targeting Metastasis with Snake Toxins: Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Urra, Félix A.

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis involves the migration of cancer cells from a primary tumor to invade and establish secondary tumors in distant organs, and it is the main cause for cancer-related deaths. Currently, the conventional cytostatic drugs target the proliferation of malignant cells, being ineffective in metastatic disease. This highlights the need to find new anti-metastatic drugs. Toxins isolated from snake venoms are a natural source of potentially useful molecular scaffolds to obtain agents with anti-migratory and anti-invasive effects in cancer cells. While there is greater evidence concerning the mechanisms of cell death induction of several snake toxin classes on cancer cells; only a reduced number of toxin classes have been reported (i.e., disintegrins/disintegrin-like proteins, C-type lectin-like proteins, C-type lectins, serinproteases, cardiotoxins, snake venom cystatins) as inhibitors of adhesion, migration, and invasion of cancer cells. Here, we discuss the anti-metastatic mechanisms of snake toxins, distinguishing three targets, which involve (1) inhibition of extracellular matrix components-dependent adhesion and migration, (2) inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and (3) inhibition of migration by alterations in the actin/cytoskeleton network. PMID:29189742

  2. Effects of carvedilol or amlodipine on target organ damage in L-NAME hypertensive rats: their relationship with blood pressure variability.

    PubMed

    Del Mauro, Julieta S; Prince, Paula D; Donato, Martín; Fernandez Machulsky, Nahuel; Morettón, Marcela A; González, Germán E; Bertera, Facundo M; Carranza, Andrea; Gorzalczany, Susana B; Chiappetta, Diego A; Berg, Gabriela; Morales, Celina; Gelpi, Ricardo J; Taira, Carlos A; Höcht, Christian

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of chronic oral treatment with carvedilol or amlodipine on blood pressure, blood pressure variability and target organ damage in N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) hypertensive rats. Wistar rats were treated with L-NAME administered in the drinking water for 8 weeks together with oral administration of carvedilol 30 mg/kg (n = 6), amlodipine 10 mg/kg (n = 6), or vehicle (n = 6). At the end of the treatment, echocardiographic evaluation, blood pressure, and short-term variability measurements were performed. Left ventricular and thoracic aortas were removed to assess activity of metalloproteinase 2 and 9 and expression levels of transforming growth factor β, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6. Histological samples were prepared from both tissues. Carvedilol and amlodipine induced a comparable reduction of systolic and mean arterial pressure and its short-term variability in L-NAME rats. The expression of transforming growth factor β, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6 decreased in both organs after carvedilol or amlodipine treatment and the activity of metalloproteinase was reduced in aortic tissue. Treatment with carvedilol or amlodipine completely prevented left ventricular collagen deposition and morphometric alterations in aorta. Oral chronic treatment with carvedilol or amlodipine significantly attenuates blood pressure variability and reduces target organ damage and biomarkers of tissue fibrosis and inflammation in L-NAME hypertensive rats. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Long-term Monitoring Program Optimization for Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compound Plume, Naval Air Station Brunswick, Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderone, G. M.

    2006-12-01

    A long-term monitoring program was initiated in 1995 at 6 sites at NAS Brunswick, including 3 National Priorities List (Superfund) sites. Primary contaminants of concern include chlorinated volatile organic compounds, including tetrachloroethane, trichloroethene, and vinyl chloride, in addition to metals. More than 80 submersible pumping systems were installed to facilitate sample collection utilizing the low-flow sampling technique. Long-term monitoring of the groundwater is conducted to assess the effectiveness of remedial measures, and monitor changes in contaminant concentrations in the Eastern Plume Operable Unit. Long-term monitoring program activities include quarterly groundwater sampling and analysis at more than 90 wells across 6 sites; surface water, sediment, seep, and leachate sampling and analysis at 3 sites; landfill gas monitoring; well maintenance; engineering inspections of landfill covers and other sites or evidence of stressed vegetation; water level gauging; and treatment plant sampling and analysis. Significant cost savings were achieved by optimizing the sampling network and reducing sampling frequency from quarterly to semi- annual or annual sampling. As part of an ongoing optimization effort, a geostatistical assessment of the Eastern Plume was conducted at the Naval Air Station, Brunswick, Maine. The geostatistical assessment used 40 monitoring points and analytical data collected over 3 years. For this geostatistical assessment, EA developed and utilized a database of analytical results generated during 3 years of long-term monitoring which was linked to a Geographic Information System to enhance data visualization capacity. The Geographic Information System included themes for groundwater volatile organic compound concentration, groundwater flow directions, shallow and deep wells, and immediate access to point-specific analytical results. This statistical analysis has been used by the site decision-maker and its conclusions supported a

  4. Drugs and Targets in Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyi; Zhu, Lixin; Wang, Beibei; Yuan, Meifei; Zhu, Ruixin

    2017-01-01

    Fibrosis contributes to the development of many diseases and many target molecules are involved in fibrosis. Currently, the majority of fibrosis treatment strategies are limited to specific diseases or organs. However, accumulating evidence demonstrates great similarities among fibroproliferative diseases, and more and more drugs are proved to be effective anti-fibrotic therapies across different diseases and organs. Here we comprehensively review the current knowledge on the pathological mechanisms of fibrosis, and divide factors mediating fibrosis progression into extracellular and intracellular groups. Furthermore, we systematically summarize both single and multiple component drugs that target fibrosis. Future directions of fibrosis drug discovery are also proposed. PMID:29218009

  5. Success in Two Languages: Focused Programming Provides On-Target Development for Maine Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Karen

    2017-01-01

    On Mackworth Island, not far from Portland, the Mackworth Island Preschool Program at the Maine Educational Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing/Governor Baxter School for the Deaf (MECDHH/GBSD) helps deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing children flourish. At MECDHH/GBSD, instructors immerse students, 3-5 years old, in American Sign Language…

  6. The greenhouse gas balance of a drained fen peatland is mainly controlled by land-use rather than soil organic carbon content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickenscheidt, T.; Heinichen, J.; Drösler, M.

    2015-04-01

    Drained organic soils are considered as hotspots for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Particularly arable lands and intensively used grasslands have been regarded as the main producers of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O). However, GHG balances of former peatlands and associated organic soils not considered as peatland according to the definition of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have not been investigated so far. Therefore, our study addressed the question to what extent the soil organic carbon (SOC) content affects the GHG release of drained organic soils under two different land-use types (arable land and intensively used grassland). Both land-use types were established on a mollic Gleysol (named Cmedium) as well as on a sapric Histosol (named Chigh). The two soil types significantly differed in their SOC contents in the topsoil (Cmedium: 9.4-10.9% SOC; Chigh: 16.1-17.2% SOC). We determined GHG fluxes (CO2, N2O and methane (CH4)) over a period of 2 years. The daily and annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 was determined with the closed dynamic chamber technique and by modeling the ecosystem respiration (RECO) and the gross primary production (GPP). N2O and CH4 were determined by the close chamber technique. Estimated NEE of CO2 significantly differed between the two land-use types with lower NEE values (-6 to 1707 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1) at the arable sites and higher values (1354 to 1823 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1) at the grassland sites. No effect on NEE was found regarding the SOC content. Significantly higher annual N2O exchange rates were observed at the arable sites (0.23-0.86 g N m-2 yr-1) compared to the grassland sites (0.12-0.31 g N m-2 yr-1). Furthermore, N2O fluxes from the Chigh sites significantly exceeded those of the Cmedium sites. CH4 fluxes were found to be close to zero at all plots. Estimated global warming potential, calculated for a time horizon of 100 years (GWP100) revealed a very high release of GHGs from all plots

  7. Fingerprints for main varieties of argentinean wines: terroir differentiation by inorganic, organic, and stable isotopic analyses coupled to chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Di Paola-Naranjo, Romina D; Baroni, Maria V; Podio, Natalia S; Rubinstein, Hector R; Fabani, Maria P; Badini, Raul G; Inga, Marcela; Ostera, Hector A; Cagnoni, Mariana; Gallegos, Ernesto; Gautier, Eduardo; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Wunderlin, Daniel A

    2011-07-27

    Our main goal was to investigate if robust chemical fingerprints could be developed for three Argentinean red wines based on organic, inorganic, and isotopic patterns, in relation to the regional soil composition. Soils and wines from three regions (Mendoza, San Juan, and Córdoba) and three varieties (Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, and Syrah) were collected. The phenolic profile was determined by HPLC-MS/MS and multielemental composition by ICP-MS; (87)Sr/(86)Sr and δ(13)C were determined by TIMS and IRMS, respectively. Chemometrics allowed robust differentiation between regions, wine varieties, and the same variety from different regions. Among phenolic compounds, resveratrol concentration was the most useful marker for wine differentiation, whereas Mg, K/Rb, Ca/Sr, and (87)Sr/(86)Sr were the main inorganic and isotopic parameters selected. Generalized Procrustes analysis (GPA) using two studied matrices (wine and soil) shows consensus between them and clear differences between studied areas. Finally, we applied a canonical correlation analysis, demonstrating significant correlation (r = 0.99; p < 0.001) between soil and wine composition. To our knowledge this is the first report combining independent variables, constructing a fingerprint including elemental composition, isotopic, and polyphenol patterns to differentiate wines, matching part of this fingerprint with the soil provenance.

  8. Downeast Drainage - Examining and Communicating the Dynamics of Bacteria Pollution Events in the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. M.; Brady, D. C.; Cole, K. L.; Jones, S.; McGreavy, B.; Petersen, C.; Rothenheber, D.; Gerard, B.; Roy, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    The New England Sustainability Consortium is an interdisciplinary NSF EPSCoR funded project organized to strengthen the connections between science and decision-making and to advance the practice of sustainability science. The project uses complementary research capacity at several institutions to examine watershed and estuarine processes linked to bacteria pollution affecting shellfish harvesting and beach water quality in the Gulf of Maine. A fundamental research target is the development of a better approach for the prediction of coastal bacteria pollution events that can cause losses in tourism and shellfishery revenue. Enhanced prediction and communication of the events require a simultaneous examination of watershed pollution sources, drainage systems, estuarine residence times and bacterial survival. Our presentation will summarize initial observations from our investigations and stakeholder engagement activities at two project reference sites located in Wells and Bar Harbor, Maine. These will include field measurements, watershed and estuarine modeling outcomes, and stakeholder engagement results that are framed to quantify and explain land-sea interactions linked to bacterial pollution events in locations with varied relief, hydrodynamics, and stakeholder communities.

  9. A Delta-V map of the known Main Belt Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Anthony; McDowell, Jonathan C.; Elvis, Martin

    2018-05-01

    With the lowered costs of rocket technology and the commercialization of the space industry, asteroid mining is becoming both feasible and potentially profitable. Although the first targets for mining will be the most accessible near Earth objects (NEOs), the Main Belt contains 106 times more material by mass. The large scale expansion of this new asteroid mining industry is contingent on being able to rendezvous with Main Belt asteroids (MBAs), and so on the velocity change required of mining spacecraft (delta-v). This paper develops two different flight burn schemes, both starting from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and ending with a successful MBA rendezvous. These methods are then applied to the ∼700,000 asteroids in the Minor Planet Center (MPC) database with well-determined orbits to find low delta-v mining targets among the MBAs. There are 3986 potential MBA targets with a delta-v < 8 km s-1 , but the distribution is steep and reduces to just 4 with delta-v < 7 km s-1. The two burn methods are compared and the orbital parameters of low delta-v MBAs are explored.

  10. Brain-inspired cheminformatics of drug-target brain interactome, synthesis, and assay of TVP1022 derivatives.

    PubMed

    Romero-Durán, Francisco J; Alonso, Nerea; Yañez, Matilde; Caamaño, Olga; García-Mera, Xerardo; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2016-04-01

    The use of Cheminformatics tools is gaining importance in the field of translational research from Medicinal Chemistry to Neuropharmacology. In particular, we need it for the analysis of chemical information on large datasets of bioactive compounds. These compounds form large multi-target complex networks (drug-target interactome network) resulting in a very challenging data analysis problem. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithms may help us predict the interactions of drugs and targets in CNS interactome. In this work, we trained different ANN models able to predict a large number of drug-target interactions. These models predict a dataset of thousands of interactions of central nervous system (CNS) drugs characterized by > 30 different experimental measures in >400 different experimental protocols for >150 molecular and cellular targets present in 11 different organisms (including human). The model was able to classify cases of non-interacting vs. interacting drug-target pairs with satisfactory performance. A second aim focus on two main directions: the synthesis and assay of new derivatives of TVP1022 (S-analogues of rasagiline) and the comparison with other rasagiline derivatives recently reported. Finally, we used the best of our models to predict drug-target interactions for the best new synthesized compound against a large number of CNS protein targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Selective Detection of Target Volatile Organic Compounds in Contaminated Humid Air Using a Sensor Array with Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Toshio; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Tsuruta, Akihiro; Shin, Woosuck

    2017-01-01

    We investigated selective detection of the target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) nonanal, n-decane, and acetoin for lung cancer-related VOCs, and acetone and methyl i-butyl ketone for diabetes-related VOCs, in humid air with simulated VOC contamination (total concentration: 300 μg/m3). We used six “grain boundary-response type” sensors, including four commercially available sensors (TGS 2600, 2610, 2610, and 2620) and two Pt, Pd, and Au-loaded SnO2 sensors (Pt, Pd, Au/SnO2), and two “bulk-response type” sensors, including Zr-doped CeO2 (CeZr10), i.e., eight sensors in total. We then analyzed their sensor signals using principal component analysis (PCA). Although the six “grain boundary-response type” sensors were found to be insufficient for selective detection of the target gases in humid air, the addition of two “bulk-response type” sensors improved the selectivity, even with simulated VOC contamination. To further improve the discrimination, we selected appropriate sensors from the eight sensors based on the PCA results. The selectivity to each target gas was maintained and was not affected by contamination. PMID:28753948

  12. Gulf of Maine Research Institute | Site Credits

    Science.gov Websites

    development staff, are now employees of GMRI, and are known as the Ocean Data Products Group. This group have a question specific to one of the organizations mentioned earlier, the contact information follows Maine Research Institute As one of the region's leading research institutions, GMRI advances sustainable

  13. Impact of age on the association between 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurements and target organ damage.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Thomas B; Pareek, Manan; Stidsen, Jacob V; Blicher, Marie K; Rasmussen, Susanne; Vishram-Nielsen, Julie K K; Kjaer-Hansen, Kathrine; Olsen, Michael H

    2018-05-17

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of age on the associations between hemodynamic components derived from 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (24-h ABPM) and target organ damage, in apparently healthy, nonmedicated individuals. Twenty-four-hour ABPM and target organ damage (left ventricular mass index, pulse wave velocity, urine albumin : creatinine ratio and carotid atherosclerotic plaques) were evaluated in 1408 individuals. Associations were examined in regression models, stratified for age [middle-aged (41 or 51 years) or elderly (61 or 71 years)], and adjusted for sex, smoking status, and total-cholesterol. In middle-aged individuals, an increase of 10 mmHg in 24-h SBP was independently associated with an increase of 3.8 (2.7-4.8) g/m in LVMI. The effect was nearly doubled in the elderly subgroup, where the same increase resulted in an increase in LVMI of 6.3 (5.0-7.6) g/m (P for interaction <0.01). An increase of 10 mmHg of 24-h SBP was associated with a 6.7% increase in pulse wave velocity in middle-aged individuals and with an 9.1% increase in elderly individuals (P for interaction <0.01). An independent association between 24-h ABPM and urine albumin : creatinine ratio was only observed in the elderly subgroup. Associations between the presence of atherosclerotic plaques and components from 24-h ABPM except 24-h DBP were not modified by age (all P for interaction >0.26). Age enhances the associations between hemodynamic components obtained from 24-h ABPM and measures of arterial stiffness, microvascular damage, and cardiac structure, but not atherosclerosis.

  14. Targeted polypeptide degradation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M [Brookline, MA; Janse, Daniel M [Brookline, MA

    2008-05-13

    This invention pertains to compositions, methods, cells and organisms useful for selectively localizing polypeptides to the proteasome for degradation. Therapeutic methods and pharmaceutical compositions for treating disorders associated with the expression and/or activity of a polypeptide by targeting these polypeptides for degradation, as well as methods for targeting therapeutic polypeptides for degradation and/or activating therapeutic polypeptides by degradation are provided. The invention provides methods for identifying compounds that mediate proteasome localization and/or polypeptide degradation. The invention also provides research tools for the study of protein function.

  15. Drug Target Protein-Protein Interaction Networks: A Systematic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The identification and validation of drug targets are crucial in biomedical research and many studies have been conducted on analyzing drug target features for getting a better understanding on principles of their mechanisms. But most of them are based on either strong biological hypotheses or the chemical and physical properties of those targets separately. In this paper, we investigated three main ways to understand the functional biomolecules based on the topological features of drug targets. There are no significant differences between targets and common proteins in the protein-protein interactions network, indicating the drug targets are neither hub proteins which are dominant nor the bridge proteins. According to some special topological structures of the drug targets, there are significant differences between known targets and other proteins. Furthermore, the drug targets mainly belong to three typical communities based on their modularity. These topological features are helpful to understand how the drug targets work in the PPI network. Particularly, it is an alternative way to predict potential targets or extract nontargets to test a new drug target efficiently and economically. By this way, a drug target's homologue set containing 102 potential target proteins is predicted in the paper. PMID:28691014

  16. Development, optimization and characterization of glycyrrhetinic acid-chitosan nanoparticles of atorvastatin for liver targeting.

    PubMed

    Rohilla, Raman; Garg, Tarun; Bariwal, Jitender; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-09-01

    Glycyrrhetinic acid-modified chitosan (mGA-suc-CTS) is used as liver-targeted carrier for drug delivery. In this study, nanoparticles were prepared by ionic gelation process, and glycyrrhetinic acid act as the targeting ligand. The structure of the product was confirmed by IR and NMR techniques. The main aim of this study was to deliver atorvastatin directly to the liver by using same conjugate and reduce the associated side-effects, i.e. hepatotoxicity at high dose. Characterization of the developed formulation was performed by differential scanning calorimetry, particle size measurements and cellular uptake studies. Release profile, pharmacokinetics studies and organ distribution studies showed that developed formulation shows a relative higher liver uptake. The optimized formulation showed increased plasma concentration than the CTS nanoparticles as well as plain drug and the accumulation in the liver was nearly 2.59 times more than that of obtained with the CTS nanoparticles. Pharmaceutical and pharmacological indicators suggested that the proposed strategy can be successfully utilized for liver targeting of therapeutics.

  17. The ecological risks of genetically engineered organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfenbarger, Lareesa

    2001-03-01

    Highly publicized studies have suggested environmental risks of releasing genetically engineered organisms (GEOs) and have renewed concerns over the evaluation and regulation of these products in domestic and international arenas. I present an overview of the risks of GEOs and the available evidence addressing these and discuss the challenges for risk assessment. Main categories of risk include non-target effects from GEOs, emergence of new viral diseases, and the spread of invasive (weedy) characteristics. Studies have detected non-target effects in some cases but not all; however, much less information exists on other risks, in part due to a lack of conceptual knowledge. For example, general models for predicting invasiveness are not well developed for any introduced organism. The risks of GEOs appear comparable to those for any introduced species or organism, but the magnitude of the risk or the pathway of exposure to the risk can differ among introduced organisms. Therefore, assessing the risks requires a case-by-case analysis so that any differences can be identified. Challenges to assessing risks to valued ecosystems include variability in effects and ecosystem complexity. Ecosystems are a dynamic and complex network of biological and physical interactions. Introducing a new biological entity, such as a GEO, may potentially alter any of these interactions, but evaluating all of these is unrealistic. Effects on a valued ecosystem could vary greatly depending on the geographical location of the experimental site, the GEO used, the plot size of the experiment (scaling effects), and the biological and physical parameters used in the experiment. Experiments that address these sources of variability will provide the most useful information for risk assessments.

  18. [Event-related synchronization/desynhronization during processing of target, no target and unknown visually presented words].

    PubMed

    Rebreikina, A B; Larionova, E B; Varlamov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study neurophysiologic mechanisms of processing of relevant words and unknown words. Event-related synchronization/desynchronization during categorization of three types of stimuli (known targets, known no targets and unknown words) was examined. The main difference between known targets and unknown stimuli was revealed in the thetal and theta2 bands at the early stage after stimuli onset (150-300 ms) and in the delta band (400-700 ms). In the late time window at about 800-1500 ms thetal ERS in response to the target stimuli was smaller than to other stimuli, but theta2 and alpha ERD in response to the target stimuli was larger than to known nontarget words.

  19. Targets of perioperative fluid therapy and their effects on postoperative outcome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Berger, M M; Gradwohl-Matis, I; Brunauer, A; Ulmer, H; Dünser, M W

    2015-07-01

    Perioperative fluid management plays a fundamental role in maintaining organ perfusion, and is considered to affect morbidity and mortality. Targets according to which fluid therapy should be administered are poorly defined. This systematic review aimed to identify specific targets for perioperative fluid therapy. The PubMed database (January 1993-December 2013) and reference lists were searched to identify clinical trials which evaluated specific targets of perioperative fluid therapy and reported clinically relevant perioperative endpoints in adult patients. Only studies in which targeted fluid therapy was the sole intervention were included into the main data analysis. A pooled data analysis was used to compare mortality between goal-directed fluid therapy and control interventions. Thirty-six clinical studies were selected. Sixteen studies including 1224 patients specifically evaluated targeted fluid therapy and were included into the main data analysis. Three specific targets for perioperative fluid therapy were identified: a systolic or pulse pressure variation <10-12%, an increase in stroke volume <10%, and a corrected flow time of 0.35-0.4 s in combination with an increase in stroke volume <10%. Targeting any one of these goals resulted in less postoperative complications (pooled data analysis: OR 0.53; CI95, 0.34-0.83; P=0.005) and a shorter length of intensive care unit/hospital stay, but no difference in postoperative mortality (pooled data analysis: OR 0.61; CI95, 0.33-1.11; P=0.12). This systematic review identified three goals for perioperative fluid administration, targeting of which appeared to be associated with less postoperative complications and shorter intensive care unit/hospital lengths of stay. Perioperative mortality remained unaffected.

  20. Probing nano-organization of astroglia with multi-color super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Heller, Janosch P; Michaluk, Piotr; Sugao, Kohtaroh; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2017-11-01

    Astroglia are essential for brain development, homeostasis, and metabolic support. They also contribute actively to the formation and regulation of synaptic circuits, by successfully handling, integrating, and propagating physiological signals of neural networks. The latter occurs mainly by engaging a versatile mechanism of internal Ca 2+ fluctuations and regenerative waves prompting targeted release of signaling molecules into the extracellular space. Astroglia also show substantial structural plasticity associated with age- and use-dependent changes in neural circuitry. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood, mainly because of the extraordinary complex morphology of astroglial compartments on the nanoscopic scale. This complexity largely prevents direct experimental access to astroglial processes, most of which are beyond the diffraction limit of optical microscopy. Here we employed super-resolution microscopy (direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy; dSTORM), to visualize astroglial organization on the nanoscale, in culture and in thin brain slices, as an initial step to understand the structural basis of astrocytic nano-physiology. We were able to follow nanoscopic morphology of GFAP-enriched astrocytes, which adapt a flattened shape in culture and a sponge-like structure in situ, with GFAP fibers of varied diameters. We also visualized nanoscopic astrocytic processes using the ubiquitous cytosolic astrocyte marker proteins S100β and glutamine synthetase. Finally, we overexpressed and imaged membrane-targeted pHluorin and lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (N-terminal domain) -green fluorescent protein (lck-GFP), to better understand the molecular cascades underlying some common astroglia-targeted fluorescence imaging techniques. The results provide novel, albeit initial, insights into the cellular organization of astroglia on the nanoscale, paving the way for function-specific studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals

  1. Foucault on targets.

    PubMed

    Lynch, John

    2004-01-01

    This paper seeks to gain an insight into the behavior of a large NHS trust, in its attempt to meet a 90 percent patient access target, in a week long national audit in March 2003. Why did individuals act in dramatically different ways to their norm over this period. The work of Michel Foucault is used to explore these issues. The discourses of power, knowledge, discipline and governmentality are identified as key foucaudian themes that offer an alternative interpretation of how individuals behave in their place of work. The importance of the historical context of discourse within the NHS cannot be underestimated in shaping the behavior of individuals and groups today. Power and knowledge permeate NHS organizations through disciplinary practices and dressage. Governmentality seeks to maintain the status quo through disciplinary processes such as national healthcare targets. The natural response of NHS organizations is therefore, to seek order and conformity rather than disorder and conflict.

  2. Synthesis of a biofuel target through conventional organic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Jordan P.; Robinson, Joshua W.; Albrecht, Karl O.

    In this work, the biofuel target compound 2-ethyl-5,5-dimethylcyclopenta-1,3-diene (1) and its exo isomers (9a and 9b), were successfully synthesized via two different pathways from the common intermediate 4,4-dimethylcyclopent-2-ene-1-one (2). The first pathway produced the endocyclic product as a pure isomer via a triflate intermediate obtained from the ketone 2 in 60% yield, followed by copper catalyzed coupling with ethyl magnesium bromide in 63% yield. The second pathway employed a Grignard reaction with ketone 2, which generated an alcohol that was immediately subjected to mild acid catalyzed elimination upon workup of the previous step to yield a primarily a mixture ofmore » exo diastereomers 9a and 9b in 77% yield. These targets had their fuel properties characterized in a separate study.« less

  3. Exploring What’s Missing: What Do Target Absent Trials Reveal About Autism Search Superiority?

    PubMed Central

    Keehn, Brandon; Joseph, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    We used eye-tracking to investigate the roles of enhanced discrimination and peripheral selection in superior visual search in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Children with ASD were faster at visual search than their typically developing peers. However, group differences in performance and eye-movements did not vary with the level of difficulty of discrimination or selection. Rather, consistent with prior ASD research, group differences were mainly the effect of faster performance on target-absent trials. Eye-tracking revealed a lack of left-visual-field search asymmetry in ASD, which may confer an additional advantage when the target is absent. Lastly, ASD symptomatology was positively associated with search superiority, the mechanisms of which may shed light on the atypical brain organization that underlies social-communicative impairment in ASD. PMID:26762114

  4. Metabolic syndrome indicators and target organ damage in urban active coping African and Caucasian men: the SABPA study.

    PubMed

    de Kock, A; Malan, L; Potgieter, J C; Steenekamp, W; van der Merwe, M T

    2012-05-01

    Psychosocial stress relating to an urban environment or acculturation increases the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS). The objectives of this study were firstly to indicate and compare differences regarding appraisal of stress or active coping responses in urban African (n=88) and Caucasian (n=101) male teachers of South Africa, in accord with the prevalence of MetS indicators. And secondly to investigate the extent to which utilisation of active coping responses, together with MetS indicators, predict target organ damage, in these men. The Coping Strategy Indicator determined high and low active coping responses in male teachers from the Sympathetic Activity and Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Africans (SABPA) study. SABPA inclusion and exclusion criteria were used. Additionally, diabetic medication users (n=8), and participants with renal impairment (n=2) or HIV positive (n=13), were excluded. MetS indicators included glucose, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood pressure, and waist circumference, independent of confounders (age, physical activity, gamma glutamyl transferase). Microalbuminuria and carotid intima-media thickness indicated target organ damage. More MetS indicators exceeded the IDF cut-off points in high active coping African men (14.71%) than in their Caucasian counterparts (3.33%), as determined from χ² analyses. Furthermore, stepwise regressions indicated that more MetS indicators predicted endothelial dysfunction, especially in the high active coping African men. High active coping African men showed more manifestation of MetS, compared to their Caucasian counterparts, and revealed progress towards endothelial dysfunction. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Design, Development, and Psychometric Analysis of a General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry Topic Inventory Based on the Identified Main Chemistry Topics Relevant to Nursing Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Corina E.

    2013-01-01

    This two-stage study focused on the undergraduate nursing course that covers topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry. In the first stage, the central objective was to identify the main concepts of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was based on open-ended interviews of both nursing…

  6. Ion beam sputter target and method of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Higdon, Clifton; Elmoursi, Alaa A.; Goldsmith, Jason

    A target for use in an ion beam sputtering apparatus made of at least two target tiles where at least two of the target tiles are made of different chemical compositions and are mounted on a main tile and geometrically arranged on the main tile to yield a desired chemical composition on a sputtered substrate. In an alternate embodiment, the tiles are of varied thickness according to the desired chemical properties of the sputtered film. In yet another alternate embodiment, the target is comprised of plugs pressed in a green state which are disposed in cavities formed in a mainmore » tile also formed in a green state and the assembly can then be compacted and then sintered.« less

  7. Glioma targeting and blood-brain barrier penetration by dual-targeting doxorubincin liposomes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian-Qing; Lv, Qing; Li, Li-Ming; Tang, Xin-Jiang; Li, Fan-Zhu; Hu, Yu-Lan; Han, Min

    2013-07-01

    Effective chemotherapy for glioblastoma requires a carrier that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and subsequently target the glioma cells. Dual-targeting doxorubincin (Dox) liposomes were produced by conjugating liposomes with both folate (F) and transferrin (Tf), which were proven effective in penetrating the BBB and targeting tumors, respectively. The liposome was characterized by particle size, Dox entrapment efficiency, and in vitro release profile. Drug accumulation in cells, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression, and drug transport across the BBB in the dual-targeting liposome group were examined by using bEnd3 BBB models. In vivo studies demonstrated that the dual-targeting Dox liposomes could transport across the BBB and mainly distribute in the brain glioma. The anti-tumor effect of the dual-targeting liposome was also demonstrated by the increased survival time, decreased tumor volume, and results of both hematoxylin-eosin staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling analysis. The dual-targeting Dox liposome could improve the therapeutic efficacy of brain glioma and were less toxic than the Dox solution, showing a dual-targeting effect. These results indicate that this dual-targeting liposome can be used as a potential carrier for glioma chemotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. USGS aerial resolution targets.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salamonowicz, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    It is necessary to measure the achievable resolution of any airborne sensor that is to be used for metric purposes. Laboratory calibration facilities may be inadequate or inappropriate for determining the resolution of non-photographic sensors such as optical-mechanical scanners, television imaging tubes, and linear arrays. However, large target arrays imaged in the field can be used in testing such systems. The USGS has constructed an array of resolution targets in order to permit field testing of a variety of airborne sensing systems. The target array permits any interested organization with an airborne sensing system to accurately determine the operational resolution of its system. -from Author

  9. Development of a novel cyclic RGD peptide for multiple targeting approaches of liposomes to tumor region.

    PubMed

    Amin, Mohamadreza; Mansourian, Mercedeh; Koning, Gerben A; Badiee, Ali; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2015-12-28

    Liposomes containing cytotoxic agents and targeted with Arg-Gly-Asp based peptides have frequently been used against αvβ3 integrin on tumor neovasculature. However, like many other ligand modified liposomes these preparations suffered from enhanced uptake by the reticulo endothelial system (RES) and off-targeted interaction with integrin receptors vastly expressed in normal organs causing poor biodistribution and toxic effects. Here we mainly focus on development of a RGD-modified liposomal delivery system to enhance both targeting selectivity and tumor uptake. First, sterically stabilized liposomal doxorubicin (SSLD) prepared and decorated with cRGDfK and RGDyC peptides differ in their physical properties. Stability assessments as well as in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that increasing the peptide hydrophobicity promotes the therapeutic efficacy of RGD-SSLD in a C-26 tumor model due to decreased recognition by RES and opsonization and limited off-targeted interactions. Then a novel N-methylated RGD peptide was designed and its capability in targeting integrin presenting cells was comprehensively assessed both in vitro and in vivo. RGDf[N-methyl]C promotes the liposome internalization by HUVEC via integrin mediated endocytosis. Intravital microscopy in window chamber bearing mice illustrated the capability of RGDf[N-methyl]C-liposomes in targeting both tumor vasculature and tumor cells in murine B16F0 and human BLM tumor models. Quantitative biodistribution in mice bearing B16F0 tumor revealed its high affinity to tumor with no considerable affinity to normal organs. Treatment by high dose of RGDf[N-methyl]C-SSLD was found more effective than non-targeted SSLD and no toxic side effect was observed. In conclusion, the RGDf[N-methyl]C-liposome was found promising in targeting tumor vasculature as well as other cells inside the tumor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The greenhouse gas balance of a drained fen peatland is mainly controlled by land-use rather than soil organic carbon content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickenscheidt, T.; Heinichen, J.; Drösler, M.

    2015-09-01

    Drained organic soils are considered to be hotspots for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Arable lands and intensively used grasslands, in particular, have been regarded as the main producers of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O). However, GHG balances of former peatlands and associated organic soils not considered to be peatland according to the definition of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have not been investigated so far. Therefore, our study addressed the question to what extent the soil organic carbon (SOC) content affects the GHG release of drained organic soils under two different land-use types (arable land and intensively used grassland). Both land-use types were established on a Mollic Gleysol (labeled Cmedium) as well as on a Sapric Histosol (labeled Chigh). The two soil types differed significantly in their SOC contents in the topsoil (Cmedium: 9.4-10.9 % SOC; Chigh: 16.1-17.2 % SOC). We determined GHG fluxes over a period of 1 or 2 years in case of N2O or methane (CH4) and CO2, respectively. The daily and annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 was determined by measuring NEE and the ecosystem respiration (RECO) with the closed dynamic chamber technique and by modeling the RECO and the gross primary production (GPP). N2O and CH4 were measured with the static closed chamber technique. Estimated NEE of CO2 differed significantly between the two land-use types, with lower NEE values (-6 to 1707 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1) at the arable sites and higher values (1354 to 1823 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1) at the grassland sites. No effect on NEE was found regarding the SOC content. Significantly higher annual N2O exchange rates were observed at the arable sites (0.23-0.86 g N m-2 yr-1) than at the grassland sites (0.12-0.31 g N m-2 yr-1). Furthermore, N2O fluxes from the Chigh sites significantly exceeded those of the Cmedium sites. CH4 fluxes were found to be close to zero at all plots. Estimated global warming potential, calculated for a time

  11. Investigating an organ-targeting platform based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using a novel in situ method of radioactive ¹²⁵Iodine labeling.

    PubMed

    Ignjatović, Nenad; Vranješ Djurić, Sanja; Mitić, Zarko; Janković, Drina; Uskoković, Dragan

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we have investigated the synthesis of nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and hydroxyapatite coated with chitosan (HAp/Ch) and the chitosan-poly-d,l-lactide-co-glycolide polymer blend (HAp/Ch-PLGA) as an organ-targeting system. We have examined and defined the final destination, as well as the dynamics and the pathways of the synthesized particles following intravenous administration in vivo. The XRD, ZP, FT-IR and SEM analyses have confirmed that the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with d50=72 nm are coated with polymers. Radioactive 125-Iodine ((125)I), a low energy gamma emitter, was used to develop a novel in situ method for the radiolabeling of particles and investigation of their biodistribution. (125)I-labeled particles exhibited high stability in saline and serum over the second day, which justified their use in the following in vivo studies. The biodistribution of (125)I-labeled particles after intravenous injection in rats differed significantly: HAp particles mostly targeted the liver, HAp/Ch the spleen and the liver, while HAp/Ch-PLGA targeted the lungs. Twenty-four hours post injection, HAp particles were excreted completely, while both (125)I-HAp/Ch and (125)I-HAp/Ch-PLGA were retained in the body for a prolonged period of time with more than 20% of radioactivity still found in different organs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The cytoskeleton as a novel therapeutic target for old neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Eira, Jessica; Silva, Catarina Santos; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Liz, Márcia Almeida

    2016-06-01

    Cytoskeleton defects, including alterations in microtubule stability, in axonal transport as well as in actin dynamics, have been characterized in several unrelated neurodegenerative conditions. These observations suggest that defects of cytoskeleton organization may be a common feature contributing to neurodegeneration. In line with this hypothesis, drugs targeting the cytoskeleton are currently being tested in animal models and in human clinical trials, showing promising effects. Drugs that modulate microtubule stability, inhibitors of posttranslational modifications of cytoskeletal components, specifically compounds affecting the levels of tubulin acetylation, and compounds targeting signaling molecules which regulate cytoskeleton dynamics, constitute the mostly addressed therapeutic interventions aiming at preventing cytoskeleton damage in neurodegenerative disorders. In this review, we will discuss in a critical perspective the current knowledge on cytoskeleton damage pathways as well as therapeutic strategies designed to revert cytoskeleton-related defects mainly focusing on the following neurodegenerative disorders: Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, Huntington's Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Formulation of multifunctional oil-in-water nanosized emulsions for active and passive targeting of drugs to otherwise inaccessible internal organs of the human body.

    PubMed

    Tamilvanan, Shunmugaperumal

    2009-10-20

    Oil-in-water (o/w) type nanosized emulsions (NE) have been widely investigated as vehicles/carrier for the formulation and delivery of drugs with a broad range of applications. A comprehensive summary is presented on how to formulate the multifunctional o/w NE for active and passive targeting of drugs to otherwise inaccessible internal organs of the human body. The NE is classified into three generations based on its development over the last couple of decades to make ultimately a better colloidal carrier for a target site within the internal and external organs/parts of the body, thus allowing site-specific drug delivery and/or enhanced drug absorption. The third generation NE has tremendous application for drug absorption enhancement and for 'ferrying' compounds across cell membranes in comparison to its first and second generation counterparts. Furthermore, the third generation NE provides an interesting opportunity for use as drug delivery vehicles for numerous therapeutics that can range in size from small molecules to macromolecules.

  14. Radar Imaging for Moving Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    MOVING TARGETS by Teo Beng Koon William June 2009 Thesis Advisor: Brett H. Borden Second Reader: Donald L. Walters THIS PAGE...Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radar Imaging for Moving Targets 6. AUTHOR(S) Teo Beng Koon William 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S

  15. Clustering self-organizing maps (SOM) method for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA as the main cause of cervical cancer disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustamam, A.; Aldila, D.; Fatimah, Arimbi, M. D.

    2017-07-01

    One of the most widely used clustering method, since it has advantage on its robustness, is Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) method. This paper discusses the application of SOM method on Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA which is the main cause of cervical cancer disease, the most dangerous cancer in developing countries. We use 18 types of HPV DNA-based on the newest complete genome. By using open-source-based program R, clustering process can separate 18 types of HPV into two different clusters. There are two types of HPV in the first cluster while 16 others in the second cluster. The analyzing result of 18 types HPV based on the malignancy of the virus (the difficultness to cure). Two of HPV types the first cluster can be classified as tame HPV, while 16 others in the second cluster are classified as vicious HPV.

  16. Treatment of rats with a self-selected hyperlipidic diet, increases the lipid content of the main adipose tissue sites in a proportion similar to that of the lipids in the rest of organs and tissues.

    PubMed

    Romero, María Del Mar; Roy, Stéphanie; Pouillot, Karl; Feito, Marisol; Esteve, Montserrat; Grasa, María Del Mar; Fernández-López, José-Antonio; Alemany, Marià; Remesar, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) is distributed as large differentiated masses, and smaller depots covering vessels, and organs, as well as interspersed within them. The differences between types and size of cells makes AT one of the most disperse and complex organs. Lipid storage is partly shared by other tissues such as muscle and liver. We intended to obtain an approximate estimation of the size of lipid reserves stored outside the main fat depots. Both male and female rats were made overweight by 4-weeks feeding of a cafeteria diet. Total lipid content was analyzed in brain, liver, gastrocnemius muscle, four white AT sites: subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric, two brown AT sites (interscapular and perirenal) and in a pool of the rest of organs and tissues (after discarding gut contents). Organ lipid content was estimated and tabulated for each individual rat. Food intake was measured daily. There was a surprisingly high proportion of lipid not accounted for by the main macroscopic AT sites, even when brain, liver and BAT main sites were discounted. Muscle contained about 8% of body lipids, liver 1-1.4%, four white AT sites lipid 28-63% of body lipid, and the rest of the body (including muscle) 38-44%. There was a good correlation between AT lipid and body lipid, but lipid in "other organs" was highly correlated too with body lipid. Brain lipid was not. Irrespective of dietary intake, accumulation of body fat was uniform both for the main lipid storage and handling organs: large masses of AT (but also liver, muscle), as well as in the "rest" of tissues. These storage sites, in specialized (adipose) or not-specialized (liver, muscle) tissues reacted in parallel against a hyperlipidic diet challenge. We postulate that body lipid stores are handled and regulated coordinately, with a more centralized and overall mechanisms than usually assumed.

  17. Organization of the main olfactory bulbs of some mammals: musk shrews, moles, hedgehogs, tree shrews, bats, mice, and rats.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Katsuko; Kosaka, Toshio

    2004-04-19

    We immunohistochemically examined the organization of the main olfactory bulbs (MOBs) in seven mammalian species, including moles, hedgehogs, tree shrews, bats, and mice as well as laboratory musk shrews and rats. We focused our investigation on two points: 1) whether nidi, particular spheroidal synaptic regions subjacent to glomeruli, which we previously reported for the laboratory musk shrew MOBs, are also present in other animals and 2) whether the compartmental organization of glomeruli and two types of periglomerular cells we proposed for the rat MOBs are general in other animals. The general laminar pattern was similar among these seven species, but discrete nidi and the nidal layer were recognized only in two insectivores, namely, the mole and laboratory musk shrew. Olfactory marker protein-immunoreactive (OMP-IR) axons extended beyond the limits of the glomerular layer (GL) into the superficial region of the external plexiform layer (EPL) or the nidal layer in the laboratory musk shrew, mole, hedgehog, and tree shrew but not in bat, mouse, and rat. We observed, in nidi and the nidal layer in the mole and laboratory musk shrew MOBs, only a few OMP-IR axons. In the hedgehog, another insectivore, OMP-IR processes extending from the glomeruli were scattered and intermingled with calbindin D28k-IR cells at the border between the GL and the EPL. In the superficial region of the EPL of the tree shrew MOBs, there were a small number of tiny glomerulus-like spheroidal structures where OMP-IR axons protruding from glomeruli were intermingled with dendritic branches of surrounding calbindin D28k-IR cells. Furthermore, we recognized the compartmental organization of glomeruli and two types of periglomerular cells in the MOBs of all of the mammals we examined. These structural features are therefore considered to be common and important organizational principles of the MOBs. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Planning for the 80's: Post Secondary Education and the Maine Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1982

    The Maine postsecondary education situation, the state's economy, and their interrelationships are considered. The analysis is based on interviews with leaders of Maine private enterprises, postsecondary institutions, professional and trade union organizations, and state government. An operational model for higher education and economic…

  19. Synthesis of a biofuel target through conventional organic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Jordan P.; Robinson, Joshua W.; Albrecht, Karl O.

    Here in this work, the biofuel target compound 2-ethyl-5,5-dimethylcyclopenta-1,3-diene (1) and its exo isomers (9a and 9b), were successfully synthesized via two different pathways from the common intermediate 4,4-dimethylcyclopent-2-ene-1-one (2). The first pathway produced the endocyclic product as a pure isomer via a triflate intermediate obtained from ketone 2 in 60% yield, followed by copper-catalyzed coupling with ethyl magnesium bromide in 63% yield. The second pathway employed a Grignard reaction with ketone 2, which generated an alcohol that was immediately subjected to mild acid-catalyzed elimination to yield primarily a mixture of exo isomers 9a and 9b in 46% yield. Themore » preparation method developed by this work allowed for the production of a sufficient quantity of these targets to evaluate their fuel properties, which will be reported in a separate study.« less

  20. Synthesis of a biofuel target through conventional organic chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Page, Jordan P.; Robinson, Joshua W.; Albrecht, Karl O.; ...

    2018-02-28

    Here in this work, the biofuel target compound 2-ethyl-5,5-dimethylcyclopenta-1,3-diene (1) and its exo isomers (9a and 9b), were successfully synthesized via two different pathways from the common intermediate 4,4-dimethylcyclopent-2-ene-1-one (2). The first pathway produced the endocyclic product as a pure isomer via a triflate intermediate obtained from ketone 2 in 60% yield, followed by copper-catalyzed coupling with ethyl magnesium bromide in 63% yield. The second pathway employed a Grignard reaction with ketone 2, which generated an alcohol that was immediately subjected to mild acid-catalyzed elimination to yield primarily a mixture of exo isomers 9a and 9b in 46% yield. Themore » preparation method developed by this work allowed for the production of a sufficient quantity of these targets to evaluate their fuel properties, which will be reported in a separate study.« less

  1. Optical design of the National Ignition Facility main laser and switchyard/target area beam transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John L.; English, R. Edward, Jr.; Korniski, Ronald J.; Rodgers, J. Michael

    1999-07-01

    The optical design of the main laser and transport mirror sections of the National Ignition Facility are described. For the main laser the configuration, layout constraints, multiple beam arrangement, pinhole layout and beam paths, clear aperture budget, ray trace models, alignment constraints, lens designs, wavefront performance, and pupil aberrations are discussed. For the transport mirror system the layout, alignment controls and clear aperture budget are described.

  2. Studying dissolved organic carbon export from the Penobscot Watershed in to Gulf of Maine using Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhani, S. F. B. B.; Schaaf, C.; Douglas, E. M.; Choate, J. S.; Yang, Y.; Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    The movement of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from terrestrial system into aquatic system plays an important role for carbon sequestration in ecosystems and affects the formation of soil organic matters.Carbon cycling, storage, and transport to marine systems have become critical issues in global-change science, especially with regard to northern latitudes (Freeman et al., 2001; Benner et al., 2004). DOC, as an important composition of the carbon cycling, leaches from the terrestrial watersheds is a large source of marine DOC. The Penobscot River basin in north-central Maine is the second largest watershed in New England, which drains in to Gulf of Maine. Approximately 89% of the watershed is forested (Griffith and Alerich, 1996).Studying temporal and spatial changes in DOC export can help us to understand terrestrial carbon cycling and to detect any shifts from carbon sink to carbon source or visa versa in northern latitude forested ecosystems.Despite for the importance of understanding carbon cycling in terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemistry, the Doc export, especially the combination of DOC production from bio-system and DOC transportation from the terrestrial in to stream has been lightly discussed in most conceptual or numerical models. The Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys), which has been successfully applied in many study sites, is a physical process based terrestrial model that has the ability to simulate both the source and transportation of DOC by combining both hydrological and ecological processes. The focus of this study is on simulating the DOC concentration and flux from the land to the water using RHESSys in the Penobscot watershed. The simulated results will be compared with field measurement of DOC from the watershed to explore the spatial and temporal DOC export pattern. This study will also enhance our knowledge to select sampling locations properly and also improve our understanding on DOC production and transportation in

  3. Are leaves that fall from imidacloprid-treated maple trees to control Asian longhorned beetles toxic to non-target decomposer organisms?

    PubMed

    Kreutzweiser, David P; Good, Kevin P; Chartrand, Derek T; Scarr, Taylor A; Thompson, Dean G

    2008-01-01

    The systemic insecticide imidacloprid may be applied to deciduous trees for control of the Asian longhorned beetle, an invasive wood-boring insect. Senescent leaves falling from systemically treated trees contain imidacloprid concentrations that could pose a risk to natural decomposer organisms. We examined the effects of foliar imidacloprid concentrations on decomposer organisms by adding leaves from imidacloprid-treated sugar maple trees to aquatic and terrestrial microcosms under controlled laboratory conditions. Imidacloprid in maple leaves at realistic field concentrations (3-11 mg kg(-1)) did not affect survival of aquatic leaf-shredding insects or litter-dwelling earthworms. However, adverse sublethal effects at these concentrations were detected. Feeding rates by aquatic insects and earthworms were reduced, leaf decomposition (mass loss) was decreased, measurable weight losses occurred among earthworms, and aquatic and terrestrial microbial decomposition activity was significantly inhibited. Results of this study suggest that sugar maple trees systemically treated with imidacloprid to control Asian longhorned beetles may yield senescent leaves with residue levels sufficient to reduce natural decomposition processes in aquatic and terrestrial environments through adverse effects on non-target decomposer organisms.

  4. Liver as a target for oligonucleotide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Alfica; Vaishnaw, Akshay; Fitzgerald, Kevin

    2013-12-01

    Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics are an emerging class of drugs that hold the promise for silencing "un-druggable" targets,thus creating unique opportunities for innovative medicines. As opposed to gene therapy, oligonucleotides are considered to be more akin to small molecule therapeutics because they are small,completely synthetic in origin, do not integrate into the host genome,and have a defined duration of therapeutic activity after which effects recover to baseline. They offer a high degree of specificity at the genetic level, thereby reducing off-target effects.At the same time, they provide a strategy for targeting any gene in the genome, including transcripts that produce mutated proteins.Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics include short interfering RNA (siRNA), that degrade target mRNA through RISC mediated RNAi; anti-miRs, that target miRNAs; miRNA mimics, that regulate target mRNA; antisense oligonucleotides, that may be working through RNAseH mediated mRNA decay; mRNA upregulation,by targeting long non-coding RNAs; and oligonucleotides induced alternative splicing [1]. All these approaches require some minimal degree of homology at the nucleic acid sequence level for them to be functional. The different mechanisms of action and their relevant activity are outlined in Fig. 1. Besides homology,RNA secondary structure has also been exploited in the case of ribozymes and aptamers, which act by binding to nucleic acids or proteins, respectively. While there have been many reports of gene knockdown and gene modulation in cell lines and mice with all these methods, very few have advanced to clinical stages.The main obstacle to date has been the safe and effective intracellular delivery of these compounds in higher species, including humans. Indeed, their action requires direct interaction with DNA/RNA within the target cell so even when one solves the issues of tissue and cellular access, intracellular/intranuclear location represents yet another barrier to

  5. Cancer-linked targets modulated by curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Hasima, Noor; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2012-01-01

    In spite of major advances in oncology, the World Health Organization predicts that cancer incidence will double within the next two decades. Although it is well understood that cancer is a hyperproliferative disorder mediated through dysregulation of multiple cell signaling pathways, most cancer drug development remains focused on modulation of specific targets, mostly one at a time, with agents referred to as “targeted therapies,” “smart drugs,” or “magic bullets.” How many cancer targets there are is not known, and how many targets must be attacked to control cancer growth is not well understood. Although more than 90% of cancer-linked deaths are due to metastasis of the tumor to vital organs, most drug targeting is focused on killing the primary tumor. Besides lacking specificity, the targeted drugs induce toxicity and side effects that sometimes are greater problems than the disease itself. Furthermore, the cost of some of these drugs is so high that most people cannot afford them. The present report describes the potential anticancer properties of curcumin, a component of the Indian spice turmeric (Curcuma longa), known for its safety and low cost. Curcumin can selectively modulate multiple cell signaling pathways linked to inflammation and to survival, growth, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis of cancer cells. More clinical trials of curcumin are needed to prove its usefulness in the cancer setting. PMID:23301199

  6. Chemical characterization of the main secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products formed through aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanovski, Z.; Čusak, A.; Grgić, I.; Claeys, M.

    2014-04-01

    Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives can be emitted into the atmosphere by thermal degradation (i.e. burning) of wood lignins. Due to its volatility, guaiacol is predominantly distributed in the atmospheric gaseous phase. Recent studies have shown the importance of aqueous-phase reactions in addition to the dominant gas-phase and heterogeneous reactions of guaiacol, in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. The main objectives of the present study were to chemically characterize the low-volatility SOA products of the aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol and examine their possible presence in urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous-phase reactions were carried out under simulated sunlight and in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. The formed guaiacol reaction products were concentrated by using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then purified by means of semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The fractionated individual compounds were isolated as pure solids and further analyzed with liquid-state 1H, 13C and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and direct infusion negative ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry ((-)ESI-MS/MS). The NMR and product ion (MS2) spectra were used for unambiguous product structure elucidation. The main products of guaiacol photonitration are 4-nitroguaiacol (4NG), 6-nitroguaiacol (6NG), and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol (4,6DNG). Using the isolated compounds as standards, 4NG and 4,6DNG were unambiguously identified in winter PM10 aerosols from the city of Ljubljana (Slovenia) by means of HPLC/(-)ESI-MS/MS. Owing to the strong absorption of UV and visible light, 4,6DNG could be an important constituent of atmospheric "brown" carbon, especially in regions affected by biomass burning.

  7. [Prevalence of target organ damage and factors associated with cardiovascular events in subjects with refractory hypertension].

    PubMed

    Armario, Pedro; Oliveras, Anna; Hernández Del Rey, Raquel; Poch, Esteban; Larrouse, María; Roca-Cusachs, Alex; de la Sierra, Alejandro

    2009-06-27

    To asses the prevalence of target organ damage (TOD) and factors associated with cardiovascular events in subjects with refractory hypertension. Cross-sectional study of 146 patients with clinical diagnosis of refractory hypertension. TOD was defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (MA), renal failure (RF), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or left atrial enlargement (LAE). Cardiovascular events were defined as the antecedent of stroke, coronary heart disease, heart failure or peripheral arterial disease. 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was (ABPM) performed with a validated Spacelabs 90207. The prevalence of LVH was 62.3%, and LAE was observed in 27.7% of the subjects. The prevalence of RF was 28.1% and MA was found in 41,4%. An association between MA and LVH was observed. After adjusting by age, the urinary albumin excretion (UAE) correlated with clinical blood pressure (BP) and BP during 24-h ABPM, whereas LVMI correlated with ambulatory BP but not with clinical BP. The prevalence of previous cardiovascular events was 22% and in the multivariate regression analysis, UAE was the only independent factor associated with the antecedent of cardiovascular events. In subjects with refractory hypertension, the prevalence of TOD was high, and an association between heart and renal organ damage was observed. UAE was independently associated with the antecedent of cardiovascular disease.

  8. Central blood pressure variability is increased in hypertensive patients with target organ damage.

    PubMed

    de la Sierra, Alejandro; Pareja, Julia; Yun, Sergi; Acosta, Eva; Aiello, Francesco; Oliveras, Anna; Vázquez, Susana; Armario, Pedro; Blanch, Pedro; Sierra, Cristina; Calero, Francesca; Fernández-Llama, Patricia

    2018-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the association of aortic and brachial short-term blood pressure variability (BPV) with the presence of target organ damage (TOD) in hypertensive patients. One-hundred seventy-eight patients, aged 57 ± 12 years, 33% women were studied. TOD was defined by the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy on echocardiogram, microalbuminuria, reduced glomerular filtration rate, or increased aortic pulse wave velocity. Aortic and brachial BPV was assessed by 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (Mobil-O-Graph). TOD was present in 92 patients (51.7%). Compared to those without evidence of TOD, they had increased night-to-day ratios of systolic and diastolic BP (both aortic and brachial) and heart rate. They also had significant increased systolic BPV, as measured by both aortic and brachial daytime and 24-hours standard deviations and coefficients of variation, as well as for average real variability. Circadian patterns and short-term variability measures were very similar for aortic and brachial BP. We conclude that BPV is increased in hypertensive-related TOD. Aortic BPV does not add relevant information in comparison to brachial BPV. ©2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Human microRNA target analysis and gene ontology clustering by GOmir, a novel stand-alone application

    PubMed Central

    Roubelakis, Maria G; Zotos, Pantelis; Papachristoudis, Georgios; Michalopoulos, Ioannis; Pappa, Kalliopi I; Anagnou, Nicholas P; Kossida, Sophia

    2009-01-01

    Background microRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded RNA molecules of about 20–23 nucleotides length found in a wide variety of organisms. miRNAs regulate gene expression, by interacting with target mRNAs at specific sites in order to induce cleavage of the message or inhibit translation. Predicting or verifying mRNA targets of specific miRNAs is a difficult process of great importance. Results GOmir is a novel stand-alone application consisting of two separate tools: JTarget and TAGGO. JTarget integrates miRNA target prediction and functional analysis by combining the predicted target genes from TargetScan, miRanda, RNAhybrid and PicTar computational tools as well as the experimentally supported targets from TarBase and also providing a full gene description and functional analysis for each target gene. On the other hand, TAGGO application is designed to automatically group gene ontology annotations, taking advantage of the Gene Ontology (GO), in order to extract the main attributes of sets of proteins. GOmir represents a new tool incorporating two separate Java applications integrated into one stand-alone Java application. Conclusion GOmir (by using up to five different databases) introduces miRNA predicted targets accompanied by (a) full gene description, (b) functional analysis and (c) detailed gene ontology clustering. Additionally, a reverse search initiated by a potential target can also be conducted. GOmir can freely be downloaded BRFAA. PMID:19534746

  10. Human microRNA target analysis and gene ontology clustering by GOmir, a novel stand-alone application.

    PubMed

    Roubelakis, Maria G; Zotos, Pantelis; Papachristoudis, Georgios; Michalopoulos, Ioannis; Pappa, Kalliopi I; Anagnou, Nicholas P; Kossida, Sophia

    2009-06-16

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded RNA molecules of about 20-23 nucleotides length found in a wide variety of organisms. miRNAs regulate gene expression, by interacting with target mRNAs at specific sites in order to induce cleavage of the message or inhibit translation. Predicting or verifying mRNA targets of specific miRNAs is a difficult process of great importance. GOmir is a novel stand-alone application consisting of two separate tools: JTarget and TAGGO. JTarget integrates miRNA target prediction and functional analysis by combining the predicted target genes from TargetScan, miRanda, RNAhybrid and PicTar computational tools as well as the experimentally supported targets from TarBase and also providing a full gene description and functional analysis for each target gene. On the other hand, TAGGO application is designed to automatically group gene ontology annotations, taking advantage of the Gene Ontology (GO), in order to extract the main attributes of sets of proteins. GOmir represents a new tool incorporating two separate Java applications integrated into one stand-alone Java application. GOmir (by using up to five different databases) introduces miRNA predicted targets accompanied by (a) full gene description, (b) functional analysis and (c) detailed gene ontology clustering. Additionally, a reverse search initiated by a potential target can also be conducted. GOmir can freely be downloaded BRFAA.

  11. Geometric shapes inversion method of space targets by ISAR image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Chao-ying; Xing, Xiao-yu; Yin, Hong-cheng; Li, Chen-guang; Zeng, Xiang-yun; Xu, Gao-gui

    2017-11-01

    The geometric shape of target is an effective characteristic in the process of space targets recognition. This paper proposed a method of shape inversion of space target based on components segmentation from ISAR image. The Radon transformation, Hough transformation, K-means clustering, triangulation will be introduced into ISAR image processing. Firstly, we use Radon transformation and edge detection to extract space target's main body spindle and solar panel spindle from ISAR image. Then the targets' main body, solar panel, rectangular and circular antenna are segmented from ISAR image based on image detection theory. Finally, the sizes of every structural component are computed. The effectiveness of this method is verified using typical targets' simulation data.

  12. Control of Aedes albopictus with attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSB) and potential impact on non-target organisms in St. Augustine, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Revay, Edita E.; Müller, Gunter C.; Qualls, Whitney A.; Kline, Daniel; Naranjo, Diana P.; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Kravchenko, Vasiliy D.; Yfremova, Zoya; Hausmann, Axel; Beier, John C.; Schlein, Yosef; Xue, Rui-De

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of bait stations and foliar applications containing attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSB) and eugenol to control Aedes albopictus. At the same time the potential impact of these control methods was evaluated on non-target organisms. The study was conducted at five tire sites in St. Augustine, Florida. Aedes albopictus populations were significantly reduced with ATSB-eugenol applications applied directly to non-flowering vegetation and as bait stations compared with non-attractive sugar baits and control. The application of ATSB made to non-flowering vegetation resulted in more significant reductions of mosquito populations compared to the application of ATSB presented in a bait station. Over 5.5% of the non-targets were stained in the flowering vegetation application site. However, when the attractive sugar bait application was made to non-flowering vegetation or presented in bait stations the impact on non-target insects was very low for all non-target orders as only 0.6% of the individual insects were stained with the dye from the sugar solutions, respectively. There were no significant differences between the staining of mosquitoes collected in flowering vegetation (206/1000) or non-flowering vegetation (242/1000) sites during the non-target evaluation. Our field studies support the use of eugenol as an active ingredient for controlling the dengue vector Ae. albopictus when used as an ATSB toxin and demonstrates potential use in sub-tropical and tropical environments for dengue control. PMID:24122115

  13. Sequential Extraction Results and Mineralogy of Mine Waste and Stream Sediments Associated With Metal Mines in Vermont, Maine, and New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatak, N.M.; Seal, R.R.; Sanzolone, R.F.; Lamothe, P.J.; Brown, Z.A.; Adams, M.

    2007-01-01

    We report results from sequential extraction experiments and the quantitative mineralogy for samples of stream sediments and mine wastes collected from metal mines. Samples were from the Elizabeth, Ely Copper, and Pike Hill Copper mines in Vermont, the Callahan Mine in Maine, and the Martha Mine in New Zealand. The extraction technique targeted the following operationally defined fractions and solid-phase forms: (1) soluble, adsorbed, and exchangeable fractions; (2) carbonates; (3) organic material; (4) amorphous iron- and aluminum-hydroxides and crystalline manganese-oxides; (5) crystalline iron-oxides; (6) sulfides and selenides; and (7) residual material. For most elements, the sum of an element from all extractions steps correlated well with the original unleached concentration. Also, the quantitative mineralogy of the original material compared to that of the residues from two extraction steps gave insight into the effectiveness of reagents at dissolving targeted phases. The data are presented here with minimal interpretation or discussion and further analyses and interpretation will be presented elsewhere.

  14. Surface Modified Multifunctional and Stimuli Responsive Nanoparticles for Drug Targeting: Current Status and Uses

    PubMed Central

    Siafaka, Panoraia I.; Üstündağ Okur, Neslihan; Karavas, Evangelos; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N.

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarriers, due to their unique features, are of increased interest among researchers working with pharmaceutical formulations. Polymeric nanoparticles and nanocapsules, involving non-toxic biodegradable polymers, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and inorganic–organic nanomaterials, are among the most used carriers for drugs for a broad spectrum of targeted diseases. In fact, oral, injectable, transdermal-dermal and ocular formulations mainly consist of the aforementioned nanomaterials demonstrating promising characteristics such as long circulation, specific targeting, high drug loading capacity, enhanced intracellular penetration, and so on. Over the last decade, huge advances in the development of novel, safer and less toxic nanocarriers with amended properties have been made. In addition, multifunctional nanocarriers combining chemical substances, vitamins and peptides via coupling chemistry, inorganic particles coated by biocompatible materials seem to play a key role considering that functionalization can enhance characteristics such as biocompatibility, targetability, environmental friendliness, and intracellular penetration while also have limited side effects. This review aims to summarize the “state of the art” of drug delivery carriers in nanosize, paying attention to their surface functionalization with ligands and other small or polymeric compounds so as to upgrade active and passive targeting, different release patterns as well as cell targeting and stimuli responsibility. Lastly, future aspects and potential uses of nanoparticulated drug systems are outlined. PMID:27589733

  15. Targeting Terrorist Leaders: A Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    PRESSURE .................................38 IV. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS ON ISRAELI LEADERSHIP TARGETING ...43 V. CONCLUSION: HAVE ISRAELI ATTEMPTS TO...organization. D. POTENTIAL WEAKNESSES The use of one case to evaluate the efficacy of the terrorist-leadership targeting model is problematic...times who was in charge. In addition, the literature on Hamas is widely split on the role that inspirational leaders had on operational matters

  16. The development of organized visual search

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Adam J.; Goksun, Tilbe; Chatterjee, Anjan; Zelonis, Sarah; Mehta, Anika; Smith, Sabrina E.

    2013-01-01

    Visual search plays an important role in guiding behavior. Children have more difficulty performing conjunction search tasks than adults. The present research evaluates whether developmental differences in children's ability to organize serial visual search (i.e., search organization skills) contribute to performance limitations in a typical conjunction search task. We evaluated 134 children between the ages of 2 and 17 on separate tasks measuring search for targets defined by a conjunction of features or by distinct features. Our results demonstrated that children organize their visual search better as they get older. As children's skills at organizing visual search improve they become more accurate at locating targets with conjunction of features amongst distractors, but not for targets with distinct features. Developmental limitations in children's abilities to organize their visual search of the environment are an important component of poor conjunction search in young children. In addition, our findings provide preliminary evidence that, like other visuospatial tasks, exposure to reading may influence children's spatial orientation to the visual environment when performing a visual search. PMID:23584560

  17. Novel targeted therapies for cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Argilés, Josep M; López-Soriano, Francisco Javier; Stemmler, Britta; Busquets, Sílvia

    2017-07-27

    Anorexia and metabolic alterations are the main components of the cachectic syndrome. Glucose intolerance, fat depletion, muscle protein catabolism and other alterations are involved in the development of cancer cachexia, a multi-organ syndrome. Nutritional approach strategies are not satisfactory in reversing the cachectic syndrome. The aim of the present review is to deal with the recent therapeutic targeted approaches that have been designed to fight and counteract wasting in cancer patients. Indeed, some promising targeted therapeutic approaches include ghrelin agonists, selective androgen receptor agonists, β-blockers and antimyostatin peptides. However, a multi-targeted approach seems absolutely essential to treat patients affected by cancer cachexia. This approach should not only involve combinations of drugs but also nutrition and an adequate program of physical exercise, factors that may lead to a synergy, essential to overcome the syndrome. This may efficiently reverse the metabolic changes described above and, at the same time, ameliorate the anorexia. Defining this therapeutic combination of drugs/nutrients/exercise is an exciting project that will stimulate many scientific efforts. Other aspects that will, no doubt, be very important for successful treatment of cancer wasting will be an optimized design of future clinical trials, together with a protocol for staging cancer patients in relation to their degree of cachexia. This will permit that nutritional/metabolic/pharmacological support can be started early in the course of the disease, before severe weight loss occurs. Indeed, timing is crucial and has to be taken very seriously when applying the therapeutic approach. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  18. Intermediaries for youth: a vital target audience.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    Worldwide, youth are recognized as a key target audience for HIV/STD awareness and prevention campaigns. Rural young people, who often have less access to information and prevention tools than urban youth, may be particularly vulnerable to HIV/STD infection. Many initiatives have been organized by nongovernmental organizations, governments, churches, and other organizations to help youth. However, parents, relatives, guardians, teachers, church and youth leaders, social workers, and other adults in a position to influence youth must also be helped to undertake the role of an intermediary between youth and HIV/STD interventions and other youth-oriented programs. In training adults to openly address sexual and reproductive health issues with adolescents, adults must first be encouraged to feel comfortable about discussing such issues among themselves. Intermediaries and how to target them are discussed.

  19. Cortical Recruitment and Nuclear–Cytoplasmic Shuttling of Scd5p, a Protein Phosphatase-1-targeting Protein Involved in Actin Organization and EndocytosisD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ji Suk; Henry, Kenneth; Geli, María Isabel; Lemmon, Sandra K.

    2006-01-01

    Scd5p regulates endocytosis and cortical actin organization as a targeting subunit for the Ser/Thr protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) in yeast. To identify localization signals in Scd5p required for cell surface recruitment, visualization of GFP-tagged Scd5 truncations and deletions was performed. Scd5p contains a PP1 binding site, a 3-repeat region of 20 amino acids (3R), and a 9-repeat region of 12 amino acids (9R). We found that the 9R is critical for cortical localization of Scd5p, but cortical recruitment is not essential for Scd5p's function in actin organization and endocytosis. We propose that Scd5p can target PP1 to endocytic factors in the cytoplasm that have been disassembled and/or inactivated by phosphorylation. We also found that Scd5p undergoes nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling in a Crm1p-dependent manner. Scd5p-ΔCT lacking the 9R region and its nuclear export signal (NES) accumulates in the nucleus, causing cortical actin and endocytic defects. Cytoplasmic localization and function of Scd5p-ΔCT is restored by NES addition. However, removal of Scd5p's nuclear localization signal prevents nuclear entry, but endocytosis and actin organization remain relatively normal. These results indicate that nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling is not required for regulation of Scd5p's cortical function and suggest that Scd5p has an independent nuclear function. PMID:16251346

  20. Tracking Organs Composed of One or Multiple Regions Using Geodesic Active Region Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, A.; Jiménez, J. J.

    In radiotherapy treatment it is very important to find out the target organs on the medical image sequence in order to determine and apply the proper dose. The techniques to achieve this goal can be classified into extrinsic and intrinsic. Intrinsic techniques only use image processing with medical images associated to the radiotherapy treatment, as we deal in this chapter. To accurately perform this organ tracking it is necessary to find out segmentation and tracking models that were able to be applied to several image modalities involved on a radiotherapy session (CT See Modality , MRI , etc.). The movements of the organs are mainly affected by two factors: breathing and involuntary movements associated with the internal organs or patient positioning. Among the several alternatives to track the organs of interest, a model based on geodesic active regions is proposed. This model has been tested over CT images from the pelvic, cardiac, and thoracic area. A new model for the segmentation of organs composed by more than one region is proposed.

  1. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In themore » present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.« less

  2. Porous organic polymers with different pore structures for sensitive solid-phase microextraction of environmental organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhoubing; Liu, Shuqin; Xu, Jianqiao; Yin, Li; Zheng, Juan; Zhou, Ningbo; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2017-10-09

    Adsorption capacity is the major sensitivity-limited factor in solid-phase microextraction. Due to its light-weight properties, large specific surface area and high porosity, especially tunable pore structures, the utilization of porous organic polymers as solid-phase microextraction adsorbents has attracting researchers' attentions. However, these works mostly concentrated on the utilization of specific porous organic polymers for preparing high-performance solid-phase microextraction coatings. The relationship between pore structures and adsorption performance of the porous organic polymers still remain unclear. Herein, three porous organic polymers with similar properties but different pore distributions were prepared by condensation polymerization reaction of phloroglucinol and terephthalaldehyde, which were fabricated as solid-phase microextraction coatings subsequently. The adsorption capacity of the porous organic polymers-coated fibers were evaluated by using benzene and its derivatives (i.e.,benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as the target analytes. The results showed that the different adsorption performance of these porous organic polymers was mainly caused by their different pore volumes instead of their surface areas or pore sizes. Finally, the proposed method by using the mesoporous organic polymer coating was successfully applied to the determination of benzene and its derivatives in environmental water samples. As for analytical performance, high pre-concentration factors (74-2984), satisfactory relative recoveries (94.5 ± 18.5-116.9 ± 12.5%), intraday precision (2.44-5.34%), inter-day precision (4.62-7.02%), low limit of detections (LODs, 0.10-0.29 ng L -1 ) and limit of quantifications (LOQs, 0.33-0.96 ng L -1 ) were achieved under the optimal conditions. This study provides an important idea in the rational design of porous organic polymers for solid-phase microextraction or other

  3. Targeting the proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Sachiko; Yokosawa, Hideyoshi

    2009-05-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway functions as a main pathway in intracellular protein degradation and plays a vital role in almost all cellular events. Various inhibitors of this pathway have been developed for research purposes. The recent approval of bortezomib (PS-341, Velcade, a proteasome inhibitor, for the treatment of multiple myeloma has opened the way to the discovery of drugs targeting the proteasome and other components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. We review the current understanding of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and inhibitors targeting this pathway, including proteasome inhibitors, as candidate drugs for chemical therapy. Preclinical and clinical data for inhibitors of the proteasome and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway are discussed. The proteasome and other members in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway have emerged as novel therapeutic targets.

  4. S-phase duration is the main target of cell cycle regulation in neural progenitors of developing ferret neocortex.

    PubMed

    Turrero García, Miguel; Chang, YoonJeung; Arai, Yoko; Huttner, Wieland B

    2016-02-15

    The evolutionary expansion of the neocortex primarily reflects increases in abundance and proliferative capacity of cortical progenitors and in the length of the neurogenic period during development. Cell cycle parameters of neocortical progenitors are an important determinant of cortical development. The ferret (Mustela putorius furo), a gyrencephalic mammal, has gained increasing importance as a model for studying corticogenesis. Here, we have studied the abundance, proliferation, and cell cycle parameters of different neural progenitor types, defined by their differential expression of the transcription factors Pax6 and Tbr2, in the various germinal zones of developing ferret neocortex. We focused our analyses on postnatal day 1, a late stage of cortical neurogenesis when upper-layer neurons are produced. Based on cumulative 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) labeling as well as Ki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunofluorescence, we determined the duration of the various cell cycle phases of the different neocortical progenitor subpopulations. Ferret neocortical progenitors were found to exhibit longer cell cycles than those of rodents and little variation in the duration of G1 among distinct progenitor types, also in contrast to rodents. Remarkably, the main difference in cell cycle parameters among the various progenitor types was the duration of S-phase, which became shorter as progenitors progressively changed transcription factor expression from patterns characteristic of self-renewal to those of neuron production. Hence, S-phase duration emerges as major target of cell cycle regulation in cortical progenitors of this gyrencephalic mammal. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Integrin Targeted MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Mingqian; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful medical diagnostic imaging modality for integrin targeted imaging, which uses the magnetic resonance of tissue water protons to display tissue anatomic structures with high spatial resolution. Contrast agents are often used in MRI to highlight specific regions of the body and make them easier to visualize. There are four main classes of MRI contrast agents based on their different contrast mechanisms, including T1, T2, chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents, and heteronuclear contrast agents. Integrins are an important family of heterodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins that function as mediators of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. The overexpressed integrins can be used as the molecular targets for designing suitable integrin targeted contrast agents for MR molecular imaging. Integrin targeted contrast agent includes a targeting agent specific to a target integrin, a paramagnetic agent and a linker connecting the targeting agent with the paramagnetic agent. Proper selection of targeting agents is critical for targeted MRI contrast agents to effectively bind to integrins for in vivo imaging. An ideal integrin targeted MR contrast agent should be non-toxic, provide strong contrast enhancement at the target sites and can be completely excreted from the body after MR imaging. An overview of integrin targeted MR contrast agents based on small molecular and macromolecular Gd(III) complexes, lipid nanoparticles and superparamagnetic nanoparticles is provided for MR molecular imaging. By using proper delivery systems for loading sufficient Gd(III) chelates or superparamagnetic nanoparticles, effective molecular imaging of integrins with MRI has been demonstrated in animal models. PMID:21547154

  6. Spatial organization of the cytoskeleton enhances cargo delivery to specific target areas on the plasma membrane of spherical cells.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Anne E; Rieger, Heiko

    2016-11-15

    Intracellular transport is vital for the proper functioning and survival of a cell. Cargo (proteins, vesicles, organelles, etc) is transferred from its place of creation to its target locations via molecular motor assisted transport along cytoskeletal filaments. The transport efficiency is strongly affected by the spatial organization of the cytoskeleton, which constitutes an inhomogeneous, complex network. In cells with a centrosome microtubules grow radially from the central microtubule organizing center towards the cell periphery whereas actin filaments form a dense meshwork, the actin cortex, underneath the cell membrane with a broad range of orientations. The emerging ballistic motion along filaments is frequently interrupted due to constricting intersection nodes or cycles of detachment and reattachment processes in the crowded cytoplasm. In order to investigate the efficiency of search strategies established by the cell's specific spatial organization of the cytoskeleton we formulate a random velocity model with intermittent arrest states. With extensive computer simulations we analyze the dependence of the mean first passage times for narrow escape problems on the structural characteristics of the cytoskeleton, the motor properties and the fraction of time spent in each state. We find that an inhomogeneous architecture with a small width of the actin cortex constitutes an efficient intracellular search strategy.

  7. Spatial organization of the cytoskeleton enhances cargo delivery to specific target areas on the plasma membrane of spherical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Anne E.; Rieger, Heiko

    2016-12-01

    Intracellular transport is vital for the proper functioning and survival of a cell. Cargo (proteins, vesicles, organelles, etc) is transferred from its place of creation to its target locations via molecular motor assisted transport along cytoskeletal filaments. The transport efficiency is strongly affected by the spatial organization of the cytoskeleton, which constitutes an inhomogeneous, complex network. In cells with a centrosome microtubules grow radially from the central microtubule organizing center towards the cell periphery whereas actin filaments form a dense meshwork, the actin cortex, underneath the cell membrane with a broad range of orientations. The emerging ballistic motion along filaments is frequently interrupted due to constricting intersection nodes or cycles of detachment and reattachment processes in the crowded cytoplasm. In order to investigate the efficiency of search strategies established by the cell’s specific spatial organization of the cytoskeleton we formulate a random velocity model with intermittent arrest states. With extensive computer simulations we analyze the dependence of the mean first passage times for narrow escape problems on the structural characteristics of the cytoskeleton, the motor properties and the fraction of time spent in each state. We find that an inhomogeneous architecture with a small width of the actin cortex constitutes an efficient intracellular search strategy.

  8. Assessment of cardiovascular risk and target organ damage among adult patients with primary hypertension in Thika Level 5 Hospital, Kenya: a criteria-based clinical audit.

    PubMed

    Mwita, Clifford Chacha; Akello, Walter; Sisenda, Gloria; Ogoti, Evans; Tivey, David; Munn, Zachary; Mbogo, David

    2013-06-01

    Appropriate management of hypertension reduces the risk of death from stroke and cardiac disease and includes routine assessment for target organ damage and estimation of cardiovascular risk. However, implementation of evidence-based hypertension management guidelines is unsatisfactory. We explore the use of audit and feedback as a quality improvement (QI) strategy for reducing the knowledge practice gap in hypertension care in a resource poor setting. The aim of this study is to determine the level of compliance to evidence-based guidelines on assessment of cardiovascular risk and target organ damage among patients with hypertension in Thika Level 5 Hospital in central Kenya and to implement best practice with regard to evidence utilisation among clinicians in the hospital. A retrospective clinical audit done in three phases spread over 5 months. Phase one involved identifying five audit criteria on assessment of cardiovascular risk and target organ damage in patients with hypertension and conducting a baseline audit in which compliance to audit criteria, blood pressure control and drug prescription practices were assessed. Phase two involved identifying barriers to compliance to audit criteria and strategies to overcoming these barriers. The third phase was a follow-up audit. There was no use of a cardiovascular risk assessment tool in both audits (0% vs. 0%; P = 1.00). Testing urine for haematuria and proteinuria reduced from 13% to 8% (P = 0.230) while taking a blood sample for measuring blood glucose, electrolytes and creatinine levels improved from 11% to 17% (P = 0.401). Performance of fundoscopy and electrocardiography remained unchanged at 2% and 8%, respectively (P = 0.886 and P = 0.898). High patient load was identified as the biggest barrier to implementation of best practice. Blood pressure control improved from 33% to 70% (P ≤ 0.001), whereas the proportion of patients on two or more recommended antihypertensive drugs rose

  9. About miRNAs, miRNA seeds, target genes and target pathways.

    PubMed

    Kehl, Tim; Backes, Christina; Kern, Fabian; Fehlmann, Tobias; Ludwig, Nicole; Meese, Eckart; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Keller, Andreas

    2017-12-05

    miRNAs are typically repressing gene expression by binding to the 3' UTR, leading to degradation of the mRNA. This process is dominated by the eight-base seed region of the miRNA. Further, miRNAs are known not only to target genes but also to target significant parts of pathways. A logical line of thoughts is: miRNAs with similar (seed) sequence target similar sets of genes and thus similar sets of pathways. By calculating similarity scores for all 3.25 million pairs of 2,550 human miRNAs, we found that this pattern frequently holds, while we also observed exceptions. Respective results were obtained for both, predicted target genes as well as experimentally validated targets. We note that miRNAs target gene set similarity follows a bimodal distribution, pointing at a set of 282 miRNAs that seems to target genes with very high specificity. Further, we discuss miRNAs with different (seed) sequences that nonetheless regulate similar gene sets or pathways. Most intriguingly, we found miRNA pairs that regulate different gene sets but similar pathways such as miR-6886-5p and miR-3529-5p. These are jointly targeting different parts of the MAPK signaling cascade. The main goal of this study is to provide a general overview on the results, to highlight a selection of relevant results on miRNAs, miRNA seeds, target genes and target pathways and to raise awareness for artifacts in respective comparisons. The full set of information that allows to infer detailed results on each miRNA has been included in miRPathDB, the miRNA target pathway database (https://mpd.bioinf.uni-sb.de).

  10. SETI target selection.

    PubMed

    Latham, D W; Soderblom, D R

    1995-01-01

    The NASA High Resolution Microwave Survey consists of two complementary elements: a Sky Survey of the entire sky to a moderate level of sensitivity; and a Targeted Search of nearby stars, one at a time, to a much deeper level of sensitivity. In this paper we propose strategies for target selection. We have two goals: to improve the chances of successful detection of signals from technical civilizations that inhabit planets around solar-type stars, and to minimize the chances of missing signals from unexpected sites. For the main Targeted Search survey of approximately 1000 nearby solar-type stars, we argue that the selection criteria should be heavily biased by what we know about the origin and evolution of life here on Earth. We propose that observations of stars with stellar companions orbiting near the habitable zone should be de-emphasized, because such companions would prevent the formation of habitable planets. We also propose that observations of stars younger than about three billion years should be de-emphasized in favor of older stars, because our own technical civilization took longer than three billion years to evolve here on Earth. To provide the information needed for the preparation of specific target lists, we have undertaken an inventory of a large sample of solar-type stars out to a distance of 60 pc, with the goal of characterizing the relevant astrophysical properties of these stars, especially their ages and companionship. To complement the main survey, we propose that a modest sample of the nearest stars should be observed without any selection biases whatsoever. Finally, we argue that efforts to identify stars with planetary systems should be expanded. If found, such systems should receive intensive scrutiny.

  11. Risk-targeted maps for Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacareanu, Radu; Pavel, Florin; Craciun, Ionut; Coliba, Veronica; Arion, Cristian; Aldea, Alexandru; Neagu, Cristian

    2018-03-01

    Romania has one of the highest seismic hazard levels in Europe. The seismic hazard is due to a combination of local crustal seismic sources, situated mainly in the western part of the country and the Vrancea intermediate-depth seismic source, which can be found at the bend of the Carpathian Mountains. Recent seismic hazard studies have shown that there are consistent differences between the slopes of the seismic hazard curves for sites situated in the fore-arc and back-arc of the Carpathian Mountains. Consequently, in this study we extend this finding to the evaluation of the probability of collapse of buildings and finally to the development of uniform risk-targeted maps. The main advantage of uniform risk approach is that the target probability of collapse will be uniform throughout the country. Finally, the results obtained are discussed in the light of a recent study with the same focus performed at European level using the hazard data from SHARE project. The analyses performed in this study have pointed out to a dominant influence of the quantile of peak ground acceleration used for anchoring the fragility function. This parameter basically alters the shape of the risk-targeted maps shifting the areas which have higher collapse probabilities from eastern Romania to western Romania, as its exceedance probability increases. Consequently, a uniform procedure for deriving risk-targeted maps appears as more than necessary.

  12. Impacts of transgenic poplar-cotton agro-ecosystems upon target pests and non-target insects under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D J; Liu, J X; Lu, Z Y; Li, C L; Comada, E; Yang, M S

    2015-07-27

    Poplar-cotton agro-ecosystems are the main agricultural planting modes of cotton fields in China. With increasing acres devoted to transgenic insect-resistant poplar and transgenic insect-resistant cotton, studies examining the effects of transgenic plants on target and non-target insects become increasingly important. We systematically surveyed populations of both target pests and non-target insects for 4 different combinations of poplar-cotton eco-systems over 3 years. Transgenic Bt cotton strongly resisted the target insects Fall webworm moth [Hyphantria cunea (Drury)], Sylepta derogata Fabrieius, and American bollworm (Heliothis armigera), but no clear impact on non-target insect cotton aphids (Aphis gossypii). Importantly, intercrops containing transgenic Pb29 poplar significantly increased the inhibitory effects of Bt cotton on Fall webworm moth in ecosystem IV. Highly resistant Pb29 poplar reduced populations of the target pests Grnsonoma minutara Hubner and non-target insect poplar leaf aphid (Chaitophorus po-pulialbae), while Fall webworm moth populations were unaffected. We determined the effects of Bt toxin from transgenic poplar and cotton on target and non-target pests in different ecosystems of cotton-poplar intercrops and identified the synergistic effects of such combinations toward both target and non-target insects.

  13. Target size matters: target errors contribute to the generalization of implicit visuomotor learning.

    PubMed

    Reichenthal, Maayan; Avraham, Guy; Karniel, Amir; Shmuelof, Lior

    2016-08-01

    The process of sensorimotor adaptation is considered to be driven by errors. While sensory prediction errors, defined as the difference between the planned and the actual movement of the cursor, drive implicit learning processes, target errors (e.g., the distance of the cursor from the target) are thought to drive explicit learning mechanisms. This distinction was mainly studied in the context of arm reaching tasks where the position and the size of the target were constant. We hypothesize that in a dynamic reaching environment, where subjects have to hit moving targets and the targets' dynamic characteristics affect task success, implicit processes will benefit from target errors as well. We examine the effect of target errors on learning of an unnoticed perturbation during unconstrained reaching movements. Subjects played a Pong game, in which they had to hit a moving ball by moving a paddle controlled by their hand. During the game, the movement of the paddle was gradually rotated with respect to the hand, reaching a final rotation of 25°. Subjects were assigned to one of two groups: The high-target error group played the Pong with a small ball, and the low-target error group played with a big ball. Before and after the Pong game, subjects performed open-loop reaching movements toward static targets with no visual feedback. While both groups adapted to the rotation, the postrotation reaching movements were directionally biased only in the small-ball group. This result provides evidence that implicit adaptation is sensitive to target errors. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Belowground communication: impacts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from soil fungi on other soil-inhabiting organisms.

    PubMed

    Werner, Stephanie; Polle, Andrea; Brinkmann, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    We reviewed the impact of fungal volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on soil-inhabiting organisms and their physiological and molecular consequences for their targets. Because fungi can only move by growth to distinct directions, a main mechanism to protect themselves from enemies or to manipulate their surroundings is the secretion of exudates or VOCs. The importance of VOCs in this regard has been significantly underestimated. VOCs not only can be means of communication, but also signals that are able to specifically manipulate the recipient. VOCs can reprogram root architecture of symbiotic partner plants or increase plant growth leading to enlarged colonization surfaces. VOCs are also able to enhance plant resistance against pathogens by activating phytohormone-dependent signaling pathways. In some cases, they were phytotoxic. Because the response was specific to distinct species, fungal VOCs may contribute to regulate the competition of plant communities. Additionally, VOCs are used by the producing fungus to attack rivaling fungi or bacteria, thereby protecting the emitter or its nutrient sources. In addition, animals, like springtails, nematodes, and earthworms, which are important components of the soil food web, respond to fungal VOCs. Some VOCs are effective repellents for nematodes and, therefore, have applications as biocontrol agents. In conclusion, this review shows that fungal VOCs have a huge impact on soil fauna and flora, but the underlying mechanisms, how VOCs are perceived by the recipients, how they manipulate their targets and the resulting ecological consequences of VOCs in inter-kingdom signaling is only partly understood. These knowledge gaps are left to be filled by future studies.

  15. Simulation and analysis of main steam control system based on heat transfer calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhenqun; Li, Ruyan; Feng, Zhongbao; Wang, Songhan; Li, Wenbo; Cheng, Jiwei; Jin, Yingai

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, after thermal power plant 300MW boiler was studied, mat lab was used to write calculation program about heat transfer process between the main steam and boiler flue gas and amount of water was calculated to ensure the main steam temperature keeping in target temperature. Then heat transfer calculation program was introduced into Simulink simulation platform based on control system multiple models switching and heat transfer calculation. The results show that multiple models switching control system based on heat transfer calculation not only overcome the large inertia of main stream temperature, a large hysteresis characteristic of main stream temperature, but also adapted to the boiler load changing.

  16. Abdominal multi-organ CT segmentation using organ correlation graph and prediction-based shape and location priors.

    PubMed

    Okada, Toshiyuki; Linguraru, Marius George; Hori, Masatoshi; Summers, Ronald M; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    The paper addresses the automated segmentation of multiple organs in upper abdominal CT data. We propose a framework of multi-organ segmentation which is adaptable to any imaging conditions without using intensity information in manually traced training data. The features of the framework are as follows: (1) the organ correlation graph (OCG) is introduced, which encodes the spatial correlations among organs inherent in human anatomy; (2) the patient-specific organ shape and location priors obtained using OCG enable the estimation of intensity priors from only target data and optionally a number of untraced CT data of the same imaging condition as the target data. The proposed methods were evaluated through segmentation of eight abdominal organs (liver, spleen, left and right kidney, pancreas, gallbladder, aorta, and inferior vena cava) from 86 CT data obtained by four imaging conditions at two hospitals. The performance was comparable to the state-of-the-art method using intensity priors constructed from manually traced data.

  17. Chemical quality of precipitation at Greenville, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smath, J.A.; Potter, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    Weekly composite precipitation samples were collected at a rural site located in Greenville, Maine for analysis of trace metals and organic compounds. Samples collected during February 1982, through May 1984, were analyzed for cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, and zinc and during February 1982, through March 1983, for chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides, pthalate ester plasticizers, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Deposition rates were computed. Data reported by the NADP (National Atmospheric Deposition Program) was used to evaluate the general chemical quality of the precipitation. The precipitation had relatively high concentrations of hydrogen ions, sulfate, and nitrate, compared to other constituents. Of the trace metals included for analysis, only copper, lead, and zinc were consistently detected. Lead concentrations exceeded the U.S. EPA recommended limit for domestic water supply in three samples. High deposition rates for some of the metals were episodic. Alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane was the only organic compound that was consistently detected (maximum 120 nanograms/L). None of the other organic compounds were detected in any of the samples. (Author 's abstract)

  18. Photoelectrochemical DNA Biosensor Based on Dual-Signal Amplification Strategy Integrating Inorganic-Organic Nanocomposites Sensitization with λ-Exonuclease-Assisted Target Recycling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Mei; Fan, Gao-Chao; Shen, Qingming; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2016-12-28

    Sensitive and accurate analysis of DNA is crucial to better understanding of DNA functions and early diagnosis of fatal disease. Herein, an enhanced photoelectrochemical (PEC) DNA biosensor was proposed based on dual-signal amplification via coupling inorganic-organic nanocomposites sensitization with λ-exonuclease (λ-Exo)-assisted target recycling. The short DNA sequence about chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML, type b3a2) was selected as target DNA (tDNA). ZnO nanoplates were deposited with CdS nanocrystals to form ZnO/CdS hetero-nanostructure, and it was used as PEC substrate for immobilizing hairpin DNA (hDNA). CdTe quantum dots (QDs) covalently linked with meso-tetra(4-carboxyphenyl)porphine (TCPP) to form CdTe/TCPP inorganic-organic nanocomposites, which were utilized as sensitization agents labeling at the terminal of probe DNA (pDNA). When the hDNA-modified sensing electrode was incubated with tDNA and λ-Exo, hDNA hybridized with tDNA, and meanwhile it could be recognized and cleaved by λ-Exo, resulting in the release of tDNA. The rest of nonhybridized hDNA would continuously hybridize with the released tDNA, cleave by λ-Exo, and set free the tDNA again. After λ-Exo-assisted tDNA recycling, more amounts of short DNA (sDNA) fragments coming from digestion of hDNA produced on the electrode and hybridized with CdTe/TCPP-labeled pDNA (pDNA-CdTe/TCPP conjugates). In this case, the sensitization of CdTe/TCPP inorganic-organic nanocomposites occurred, which evidently extend the absorption range and strengthened the absorption intensity of light energy, and accordingly the photocurrent signal significantly promoted. Through introducing the dual-signal amplification tactics, the developed PEC assay allowed a low calculated detection limit of 25.6 aM with a wide detection scope from 0.1 fM to 5 pM for sensitive and selective determination of tDNA.

  19. EU Water Framework Directive and Stockholm Convention: can we reach the targets for priority substances and persistent organic pollutants?

    PubMed

    Fuerhacker, Maria

    2009-08-01

    Water is a renewable resource and acceptable quality is important for human health, ecological and economic reasons, but human activity can cause great damage to the natural aquatic environment. Managing the water cycle in a sustainable way is the key to protect natural resources and human health. On a global level, the microbiological contamination of water sources is a major problem in connection with poverty and the United Nations Millennium Development Declaration is an important initiative to handle this problem. In terms of environmental health, persistent organic pollutants (POPs) circulate globally; as they travel long distances, they are found in remote areas far from their original source of application and can cause damage wherever they move to. On a global scale, United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) issued the Stockholm Convention to reduce POPs; in the European Union (EU), one intention of the Water Framework Directive (WFD) is to reach the good chemical status of waters; beside these regulations, there are other directives in support of these goals. The aim of this paper is to discuss whether the Stockholm Convention and the WFD allows meeting the targets of protection of human and environmental health, which are established in the different directives and how could we approach the targets. The aims and scopes of different directives are compiled and compared with the actual quality of water, different approaches of standard settings are compared and potential treatment options are discussed. Under the Stockholm Convention on POPs, which came into force in May 2004, governments are required to develop a National Implementation Plan (NIP) setting out how they will address their obligations under the convention and how they will take measures to eliminate or reduce the release of POPs into the environment by the use of best available techniques (BAT) and application of best environmental practices (BEP). On a European level, the WFD has been in

  20. Late Multiple Organ Surge in Interferon-Regulated Target Genes Characterizes Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Ferreyra, Gabriela A.; Elinoff, Jason M.; Demirkale, Cumhur Y.; Starost, Matthew F.; Buckley, Marilyn; Munson, Peter J.; Krakauer, Teresa; Danner, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial superantigens are virulence factors that cause toxic shock syndrome. Here, the genome-wide, temporal response of mice to lethal intranasal staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) challenge was investigated in six tissues. Results The earliest responses and largest number of affected genes occurred in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), spleen, and lung tissues with the highest content of both T-cells and monocyte/macrophages, the direct cellular targets of SEB. In contrast, the response of liver, kidney, and heart was delayed and involved fewer genes, but revealed a dominant genetic program that was seen in all 6 tissues. Many of the 85 uniquely annotated transcripts participating in this shared genomic response have not been previously linked to SEB. Nine of the 85 genes were subsequently confirmed by RT-PCR in every tissue/organ at 24 h. These 85 transcripts, up-regulated in all tissues, annotated to the interferon (IFN)/antiviral-response and included genes belonging to the DNA/RNA sensing system, DNA damage repair, the immunoproteasome, and the ER/metabolic stress-response and apoptosis pathways. Overall, this shared program was identified as a type I and II interferon (IFN)-response and the promoters of these genes were highly enriched for IFN regulatory matrices. Several genes whose secreted products induce the IFN pathway were up-regulated at early time points in PBMCs, spleen, and/or lung. Furthermore, IFN regulatory factors including Irf1, Irf7 and Irf8, and Zbp1, a DNA sensor/transcription factor that can directly elicit an IFN innate immune response, participated in this host-wide SEB signature. Conclusion Global gene-expression changes across multiple organs implicated a host-wide IFN-response in SEB-induced death. Therapies aimed at IFN-associated innate immunity may improve outcome in toxic shock syndromes. PMID:24551153

  1. S‐phase duration is the main target of cell cycle regulation in neural progenitors of developing ferret neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Turrero García, Miguel; Chang, YoonJeung; Arai, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The evolutionary expansion of the neocortex primarily reflects increases in abundance and proliferative capacity of cortical progenitors and in the length of the neurogenic period during development. Cell cycle parameters of neocortical progenitors are an important determinant of cortical development. The ferret (Mustela putorius furo), a gyrencephalic mammal, has gained increasing importance as a model for studying corticogenesis. Here, we have studied the abundance, proliferation, and cell cycle parameters of different neural progenitor types, defined by their differential expression of the transcription factors Pax6 and Tbr2, in the various germinal zones of developing ferret neocortex. We focused our analyses on postnatal day 1, a late stage of cortical neurogenesis when upper‐layer neurons are produced. Based on cumulative 5‐ethynyl‐2′‐deoxyuridine (EdU) labeling as well as Ki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunofluorescence, we determined the duration of the various cell cycle phases of the different neocortical progenitor subpopulations. Ferret neocortical progenitors were found to exhibit longer cell cycles than those of rodents and little variation in the duration of G1 among distinct progenitor types, also in contrast to rodents. Remarkably, the main difference in cell cycle parameters among the various progenitor types was the duration of S‐phase, which became shorter as progenitors progressively changed transcription factor expression from patterns characteristic of self‐renewal to those of neuron production. Hence, S‐phase duration emerges as major target of cell cycle regulation in cortical progenitors of this gyrencephalic mammal. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:456–470, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25963823

  2. An estimation of the main wetting branch of the soil water retention curve based on its main drying branch using the machine learning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamorski, Krzysztof; Šimūnek, Jiří; Sławiński, Cezary; Lamorska, Joanna

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we estimated using the machine learning methodology the main wetting branch of the soil water retention curve based on the knowledge of the main drying branch and other, optional, basic soil characteristics (particle size distribution, bulk density, organic matter content, or soil specific surface). The support vector machine algorithm was used for the models' development. The data needed by this algorithm for model training and validation consisted of 104 different undisturbed soil core samples collected from the topsoil layer (A horizon) of different soil profiles in Poland. The main wetting and drying branches of SWRC, as well as other basic soil physical characteristics, were determined for all soil samples. Models relying on different sets of input parameters were developed and validated. The analysis showed that taking into account other input parameters (i.e., particle size distribution, bulk density, organic matter content, or soil specific surface) than information about the drying branch of the SWRC has essentially no impact on the models' estimations. Developed models are validated and compared with well-known models that can be used for the same purpose, such as the Mualem (1977) (M77) and Kool and Parker (1987) (KP87) models. The developed models estimate the main wetting SWRC branch with estimation errors (RMSE = 0.018 m3/m3) that are significantly lower than those for the M77 (RMSE = 0.025 m3/m3) or KP87 (RMSE = 0. 047 m3/m3) models.

  3. Seeking organic compounds on Mars : in situ analysis of organic compounds by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry on MOMA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, C.; Sternberg, R.; Pinnick, V.; Szopa, C.; Coll, P. J.; Rodier, C.; Garnier, C.; Steininger, H.; Moma Team

    2010-12-01

    The search for signs of past or present life is one of the primary goals of future Mars exploratory missions. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment of the ExoMars mission (set to launch 2016-2018) is a joint venture by the European Space Agency and NASA to develop a sensitive detector for organics on Mars. MOMA will be one of the main analytical instruments aboard the ExoMars Rover aimed at characterizing possible “signs-of-life molecules” in the Martian environment such as amino acids, carboxylic acids, nucleobases or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). With the aim to separate and detect organic compounds from Martian soil, the French MOMA team has built a gas chromatograph able to work in standalone mode by using a TCD detector. The gas chromatograph can also be coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer developed by the US MOMA team. Moreover, a GC-MS compatible sample processing system (SPS) allowing the extraction and the chemical transformation of the organic compounds from the soil, that fits within space flight conditions, has also been developed. The sample processing is performed in an oven, dedicated to the MOMA experiment containing the solid sample (50-100mg). The internal temperature of oven can be ranged from 20 to 1000 °C which allows for pyrolysis, thermochemolysis or derivatization. The organic extraction step is achieved by using thermodesorption in the range of 100 to 300°C for 0.5 to 5 min. Then, the chemical derivatization and/or thermochemolysis of the extracted compounds is performed directly on the soil with a mixture of MTBSTFA-DMF, TMAH or DMF-DMA solution when enantiomeric separation is required. By decreasing the polarity of the target molecules, this step allows for their volatilization at a temperature below 250°C without any chemical degradation. Once derivatized, the volatile target molecules are trapped in a cold chemical trap and promptly desorbed into the gas chromatograph coupled to the mass

  4. Panorama: A Targeted Proteomics Knowledge Base

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Panorama is a web application for storing, sharing, analyzing, and reusing targeted assays created and refined with Skyline,1 an increasingly popular Windows client software tool for targeted proteomics experiments. Panorama allows laboratories to store and organize curated results contained in Skyline documents with fine-grained permissions, which facilitates distributed collaboration and secure sharing of published and unpublished data via a web-browser interface. It is fully integrated with the Skyline workflow and supports publishing a document directly to a Panorama server from the Skyline user interface. Panorama captures the complete Skyline document information content in a relational database schema. Curated results published to Panorama can be aggregated and exported as chromatogram libraries. These libraries can be used in Skyline to pick optimal targets in new experiments and to validate peak identification of target peptides. Panorama is open-source and freely available. It is distributed as part of LabKey Server,2 an open source biomedical research data management system. Laboratories and organizations can set up Panorama locally by downloading and installing the software on their own servers. They can also request freely hosted projects on https://panoramaweb.org, a Panorama server maintained by the Department of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington. PMID:25102069

  5. "Why can't I give you my organs after my heart has stopped beating?" An overview of the main clinical, organisational, ethical and legal issues concerning organ donation after circulatory death in Italy.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Alberto; Abelli, Massimo; Azzoni, Giampaolo; Biancofiore, Gianni; Citterio, Franco; Geraci, Paolo; Latronico, Nicola; Picozzi, Mario; Procaccio, Francesco; Riccioni, Luigi; Rigotti, Paolo; Valenza, Franco; Vesconi, Sergio; Zamperetti, Nereo

    2016-03-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) is a valuable option for the procurement of functioning organs for transplantation. Clinical results are promising and public acceptance is quite good in most western countries. Yet, although DCD is widespread in Europe, several problems still persist in Italy as well as in some other countries. This paper aims to describe the main clinical, organisational, ethical and legal issues at stake, bearing in mind the particular situation created by Italian legislation. Currently, as regards DCD, Italy is somewhat different from other countries. Therefore, every effort should be made for the safe and effective implementation of DCD programs: uncontrolled DCD programs should be promoted and encouraged, within the framework of shared and authoritative rules. At the same time, we need to tackle the question of controlled DCD, promoting debate among all involved subjects regarding the fundamental issues of end-of-life care within protocols that best integrate the highest standard of care for the dying and the legitimate interests of those awaiting a life-saving organ.

  6. Screening phage display libraries for organ-specific vascular immunotargeting in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Valadon, Philippe; Garnett, Jeff D.; Testa, Jacqueline E.; Bauerle, Marc; Oh, Phil; Schnitzer, Jan E.

    2006-01-01

    The molecular diversity of the luminal endothelial cell surface arising in vivo from local variations in genetic expression and tissue microenvironment may create opportunities for achieving targeted molecular imaging and therapies. Here, we describe a strategy to identify probes and their cognate antigens for targeting vascular endothelia of specific organs in vivo. We differentially screen phage libraries to select organ-targeting antibodies by using luminal endothelial cell plasma membranes isolated directly from tissue and highly enriched in natively expressed proteins exposed to the bloodstream. To obviate liver uptake of intravenously injected phage, we convert the phage-displayed antibodies into scFv-Fc fusion proteins, which then are able to rapidly target select organ(s) in vivo as visualized directly by γ-scintigraphic whole-body imaging. Mass spectrometry helps identify the antigen targets. This comprehensive strategy provides new promise for harnessing the power of phage display for mapping vascular endothelia natively in tissue and for achieving vascular targeting of specific tissues in vivo. PMID:16384919

  7. Targeting Ovarian Cancer with Porphysome Nanotechnology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    ORGANIZATION: University Health Network Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 2C4 REPORT DATE : October 2016 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army...THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) October 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting...non-targeted Porphysomes for the detection of orthotopic ovarian lesions. Methods : Two ovarian tumour xenograft models are established with human SK

  8. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene targeting in Arabidopsis using sequential transformation.

    PubMed

    Miki, Daisuke; Zhang, Wenxin; Zeng, Wenjie; Feng, Zhengyan; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2018-05-17

    Homologous recombination-based gene targeting is a powerful tool for precise genome modification and has been widely used in organisms ranging from yeast to higher organisms such as Drosophila and mouse. However, gene targeting in higher plants, including the most widely used model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, remains challenging. Here we report a sequential transformation method for gene targeting in Arabidopsis. We find that parental lines expressing the bacterial endonuclease Cas9 from the egg cell- and early embryo-specific DD45 gene promoter can improve the frequency of single-guide RNA-targeted gene knock-ins and sequence replacements via homologous recombination at several endogenous sites in the Arabidopsis genome. These heritable gene targeting can be identified by regular PCR. Our approach enables routine and fine manipulation of the Arabidopsis genome.

  9. Riverine export of dissolved organic carbon to the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, T. G.; Aiken, G.

    2013-12-01

    Land-to-sea carbon transport of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important part of the carbon cycle that can affect long-term carbon sequestration, satellite-derived ocean color metrics, and ocean primary productivity and biogeochemistry. Using continuous discharge data and discrete sampling we estimated DOC fluxes from rivers covering about 68% of the watershed that drains to the Gulf of Maine (GoM) for water years (October through September) 2011 and 2012. Estimates for rivers entering the GoM in the USA were made using LOADEST regression software that fits a seasonally-adjusted concentration discharge relation to the data. The basin area-weighted 95% confidence limits about the LOADEST mean fluxes averaged 8.1% for the lower limit and 8.9% for the upper limit. Estimates for rivers entering the GoM in Canada were obtained from previously published estimates. Carbon yield tends to increase from southwest (35 to 36 kg C/ha/yr) to a maximum of 76 kg C/ha/yr for the Penobscot River and then decline further to the northeast (61 kg C/ha/yr in the St. John River and 41 kg C/ha/yr in the rest of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia). The area-weighted average carbon yield for all measured basins was 54.5 kg C/ha/yr. The variation in carbon yield is most closely associated with the amount of runoff and wetland area within a river basin. Simple area-weighted extrapolation to the entire GoM basin resulted in an estimate of 9.8 x 105 metric tons C per year for the WY2011 and WY2012 period. Runoff is the dominant control on intra and inter-annual variation in DOC flux because runoff varies much more than DOC concentration at these temporal scales. Runoff is usually low during the winter, peaks in the spring during snowmelt, decreases to a minimum in late summer and increases again in the fall when transpiration decreases. DOC concentration is low during the winter and snowmelt-dominated spring period, generally increases through the summer, and peaks during the fall. DOC flux to

  10. Nonequilibrium self-organization of colloidal particles on substrates: adsorption, relaxation, and annealing.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Nuno A M; Dias, Cristóvão S; Telo da Gama, Margarida M

    2017-01-11

    Colloidal particles are considered ideal building blocks to produce materials with enhanced physical properties. The state-of-the-art techniques for synthesizing these particles provide control over shape, size, and directionality of the interactions. In spite of these advances, there is still a huge gap between the synthesis of individual components and the management of their spontaneous organization towards the desired structures. The main challenge is the control over the dynamics of self-organization. In their kinetic route towards thermodynamically stable structures, colloidal particles self-organize into intermediate (mesoscopic) structures that are much larger than the individual particles and become the relevant units for the dynamics. To follow the dynamics and identify kinetically trapped structures, one needs to develop new theoretical and numerical tools. Here we discuss the self-organization of functionalized colloids (also known as patchy colloids) on attractive substrates. We review our recent results on the adsorption and relaxation and explore the use of annealing cycles to overcome kinetic barriers and drive the relaxation towards the targeted structures.

  11. The Probability of Hitting a Polygonal Target

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    required for the use of this method for coalputing the probability of hitting d polygonal target. These functions are 1. PHIT (called by user’s main progran...2. FIJ (called by PHIT ) 3. FUN (called by FIJ) The user must include all three of these in his main program, but needs only to call PHIT . The

  12. Development of Bone Targeting Drugs.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Molly; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Mackenzie, William G; Mason, Robert W; Orii, Tadao; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2017-06-23

    The skeletal system, comprising bones, ligaments, cartilage and their connective tissues, is critical for the structure and support of the body. Diseases that affect the skeletal system can be difficult to treat, mainly because of the avascular cartilage region. Targeting drugs to the site of action can not only increase efficacy but also reduce toxicity. Bone-targeting drugs are designed with either of two general targeting moieties, aimed at the entire skeletal system or a specific cell type. Most bone-targeting drugs utilize an affinity to hydroxyapatite, a major component of the bone matrix that includes a high concentration of positively-charged Ca 2+ . The strategies for designing such targeting moieties can involve synthetic and/or biological components including negatively-charged amino acid peptides or bisphosphonates. Efficient delivery of bone-specific drugs provides significant impact in the treatment of skeletal related disorders including infectious diseases (osteoarthritis, osteomyelitis, etc.), osteoporosis, and metabolic skeletal dysplasia. Despite recent advances, however, both delivering the drug to its target without losing activity and avoiding adverse local effects remain a challenge. In this review, we investigate the current development of bone-targeting moieties, their efficacy and limitations, and discuss future directions for the development of these specific targeted treatments.

  13. Development of Bone Targeting Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Molly; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Mackenzie, William G.; Mason, Robert W.; Orii, Tadao; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2017-01-01

    The skeletal system, comprising bones, ligaments, cartilage and their connective tissues, is critical for the structure and support of the body. Diseases that affect the skeletal system can be difficult to treat, mainly because of the avascular cartilage region. Targeting drugs to the site of action can not only increase efficacy but also reduce toxicity. Bone-targeting drugs are designed with either of two general targeting moieties, aimed at the entire skeletal system or a specific cell type. Most bone-targeting drugs utilize an affinity to hydroxyapatite, a major component of the bone matrix that includes a high concentration of positively-charged Ca2+. The strategies for designing such targeting moieties can involve synthetic and/or biological components including negatively-charged amino acid peptides or bisphosphonates. Efficient delivery of bone-specific drugs provides significant impact in the treatment of skeletal related disorders including infectious diseases (osteoarthritis, osteomyelitis, etc.), osteoporosis, and metabolic skeletal dysplasia. Despite recent advances, however, both delivering the drug to its target without losing activity and avoiding adverse local effects remain a challenge. In this review, we investigate the current development of bone-targeting moieties, their efficacy and limitations, and discuss future directions for the development of these specific targeted treatments. PMID:28644392

  14. Information integration in health care organizations: The case of a European health system.

    PubMed

    Calciolari, Stefano; Buccoliero, Luca

    2010-01-01

    Information system integration is an important dimension of a company's information system maturity and plays a relevant role in meeting information needs and accountability targets. However, no generalizable evidence exists about whether and how the main integrating technologies influence information system integration in health care organizations. This study examined how integrating technologies are adopted in public health care organizations and chief information officers' (CIOs) perceptions about their influence on information system integration. We used primary data on integrating technologies' adoption and CIOs' perception regarding information system integration in public health care organizations. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multinomial logistic regression were used to examine the relationship between CIOs' perception about information system integration and the adopted technologies. Data from 90 health care organizations were available for analyses. Integrating technologies are relatively diffused in public health care organizations, and CIOs seem to shape information system toward integrated architectures. There is a significant positive (although modest, .3) correlation between the number of integrating technologies adopted and the CIO's satisfaction with them. However, regression analysis suggests that organizations covering a broader spectrum of these technologies are less likely to have their CIO reporting main problems concerning integration in the administrative area of the information system compared with the clinical area and where the two areas overlap. Integrating technologies are associated with less perceived problems in the information system administrative area rather than in other areas. Because CIOs play the role of information resource allocators, by influencing information system toward integrated architecture, health care organization leaders should foster cooperation between CIOs and medical staff to enhance information system

  15. Ground target recognition using rectangle estimation.

    PubMed

    Grönwall, Christina; Gustafsson, Fredrik; Millnert, Mille

    2006-11-01

    We propose a ground target recognition method based on 3-D laser radar data. The method handles general 3-D scattered data. It is based on the fact that man-made objects of complex shape can be decomposed to a set of rectangles. The ground target recognition method consists of four steps; 3-D size and orientation estimation, target segmentation into parts of approximately rectangular shape, identification of segments that represent the target's functional/main parts, and target matching with CAD models. The core in this approach is rectangle estimation. The performance of the rectangle estimation method is evaluated statistically using Monte Carlo simulations. A case study on tank recognition is shown, where 3-D data from four fundamentally different types of laser radar systems are used. Although the approach is tested on rather few examples, we believe that the approach is promising.

  16. PREDICTING THE RISKS OF NEUROTOXIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BASED ON TARGET TISSUE DOSE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative exposure-dose-response models relate the external exposure of a substance to the dose in the target tissue, and then relate the target tissue dose to production of adverse outcomes. We developed exposure-dose-response models to describe the affects of acute exposure...

  17. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), the main extracellular matrix (ECM) enzymes in collagen degradation, as a target for anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Jabłońska-Trypuć, Agata; Matejczyk, Marzena; Rosochacki, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    The main group of enzymes responsible for the collagen and other protein degradation in extracellular matrix (ECM) are matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Collagen is the main structural component of connective tissue and its degradation is a very important process in the development, morphogenesis, tissue remodeling, and repair. Typical structure of MMPs consists of several distinct domains. MMP family can be divided into six groups: collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, matrilysins, membrane-type MMPs, and other non-classified MMPs. MMPs and their inhibitors have multiple biological functions in all stages of cancer development: from initiation to outgrowth of clinically relevant metastases and likewise in apoptosis and angiogenesis. MMPs and their inhibitors are extensively examined as potential anticancer drugs. MMP inhibitors can be divided into two main groups: synthetic and natural inhibitors. Selected synthetic inhibitors are in clinical trials on humans, e.g. synthetic peptides, non-peptidic molecules, chemically modified tetracyclines, and bisphosphonates. Natural MMP inhibitors are mainly isoflavonoids and shark cartilage.

  18. Radiation effects in IFMIF Li target diagnostic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molla, J.; Vila, R.; Shikama, T.; Horiike, H.; Simakov, S.; Ciotti, M.; Ibarra, A.

    2009-04-01

    Diagnostics for the lithium target will be crucial for the operation of IFMIF. Several parameters as the lithium temperature, target thickness or wave pattern must be monitored during operation. Radiation effects may produce malfunctioning in any of these diagnostics due to the exposure to high radiation fields. The main diagnostic systems proposed for the operation of IFMIF are reviewed in this paper from the point of view of radiation damage. The main tools for the assessment of the performance of these diagnostics are the neutronics calculations by using specialised codes and the information accumulated during the last decades on the radiation effects in functional materials, components and diagnostics for ITER. This analysis allows to conclude that the design of some of the diagnostic systems must be revised to assure the high availability required for the target system.

  19. Research pressure instrumentation for NASA Space Shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. J.; Nussbaum, P.; Gustafson, G.

    1984-01-01

    The development of prototype pressure transducers which are targeted to meet the Space Shuttle Main Engine SSME performance design goals is discussed. The fabrication, testing and delivery of 10 prototype units is examined. Silicon piezoresistive strain sensing technology is used to achieve the objectives of advanced state-of-the-art pressure sensors in terms of reliability, accuracy and ease of manufacture. Integration of multiple functions on a single chip is the key attribute of this technology.

  20. Use of grape seed and its natural polyphenol extracts as a natural organic coagulant for removal of cationic dyes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Kim, Eun-Ju; Kim, Young-Mo; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2009-11-01

    Natural organic coagulants (NOCs) such as chitosan and Moringa oleifera seeds have been extensively characterized for potential application in water treatment as an alternative to metal-based coagulants. However, the action of both chitosan and M. oleifera seeds is mainly restricted to anionic organic pollutants because of their cationic functional groups affording poor cationic pollutant coagulation by electrostatic repulsion. In this study, we employed ethanolic grape seed extract (GSE) and grape seed-derived polyphenols such as tannic acid and catechin in an effort to find novel NOCs showing stable anionic forms for removal of cationic organic pollutants. The target substances tested were malachite green (MG) and crystal violet (CV), both mutagenic cationic dyes. Polyphenol treatment induced fast decolorization followed by gradual floc formation concomitant with red or blue shifts in maximum absorbance wavelengths of the cationic dyes. Liquid chromatography analysis of flocs formed by polyphenols directly showed that initial supramolecular complexes attributed mainly to electrostatic attraction between polyphenol hydroxyphenyl groups and cationic dyes further progressed into stronger aggregates, leading to precipitation of dye-polyphenol complexes. Consistent with the results obtained using catechin and tannic acid, use of GSE also resulted in effective decolorization and coagulation of soluble MG and CV in aqueous solutions. Screening of several organic GSE components for NOC activity strongly suggested that natural polyphenols are the main organic ingredients causing MG and CV removal via gradual floc formation. The treatment by natural polyphenols and GSE decreased toxicity of MG- or CV-contaminated water.

  1. Motion compensation with skin contact control for high intensity focused ultrasound surgery in moving organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diodato, A.; Cafarelli, A.; Schiappacasse, A.; Tognarelli, S.; Ciuti, G.; Menciassi, A.

    2018-02-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an emerging therapeutic solution that enables non-invasive treatment of several pathologies, mainly in oncology. On the other hand, accurate targeting of moving abdominal organs (e.g. liver, kidney, pancreas) is still an open challenge. This paper proposes a novel method to compensate the physiological respiratory motion of organs during HIFU procedures, by exploiting a robotic platform for ultrasound-guided HIFU surgery provided with a therapeutic annular phased array transducer. The proposed method enables us to keep the same contact point between the transducer and the patient’s skin during the whole procedure, thus minimizing the modification of the acoustic window during the breathing phases. The motion of the target point is compensated through the rotation of the transducer around a virtual pivot point, while the focal depth is continuously adjusted thanks to the axial electronically steering capabilities of the HIFU transducer. The feasibility of the angular motion compensation strategy has been demonstrated in a simulated respiratory-induced organ motion environment. Based on the experimental results, the proposed method appears to be significantly accurate (i.e. the maximum compensation error is always under 1 mm), thus paving the way for the potential use of this technique for in vivo treatment of moving organs, and therefore enabling a wide use of HIFU in clinics.

  2. Contaminated sediments database for the Gulf of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchholtz ten Brink, Marilyn R.; Manheim, F.T.; Mecray, E.L.; Hastings, M.E.; Currence, J.M.; Farrington, J.W.; Jones, S.H.; Larsen, P.F.; Tripp, B.W.; Wallace, G.T.; Ward, L.G.; Fredette, T.J.; Liebman, M.L.; Smith Leo, W.

    2002-01-01

    Bottom sediments in the Gulf of Maine and its estuaries have accumulated pollutants of many types, including metals and organic compounds of agricultural, industrial, and household derivation. Much analytical and descriptive data has been obtained on these sediments over the past decades, but only a small effort had been made, prior to this project, to compile and edit the published and unpublished data in forms suitable for a variety of users. The Contaminated Sediments Database for the Gulf of Maine provides a compilation and synthesis of existing data to help establish the environmental status of our coastal sediments and the transport paths and fate of contaminants in this region. This information, in turn, forms one of the essential bases for developing successful remediation and resource management policies.

  3. Laser ``M'egajoule'' cryogenic target program: from target fabrication to conformation of the deuterium-tritium ice layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Rémy; Durut, Frédéric; Reneaume, Benoît; Chicane, Cédric; Théobald, Marc; Breton, Olivier; Martin, Michel; Fleury, Emmanuel; Vincent-Viry, Olivier; Bachelet, Franck; Jeannot, Laurent; Geoffray, Isabelle; Botrel, Ronan; Dauteuil, Christophe; Hermerel, Cyril; Choux, Alexandre; Bednarczyk, Sophie; Legaie, Olivier

    2008-11-01

    For the French inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, cryogenic target assemblies (CTAs) for the LMJ program are manufactured and filled at CEA Valduc (Dijon) in the cryogenic targets filling station (IRCC). They will be moved at about 20 K into a transport cryostat for cryogenic targets and will be driven from CEA/Valduc to CEA/CESTA (Bordeaux). Cryogenic targets will then be transferred by several cryogenic grippers on the cryogenic target positioner before shots. The CTA has to meet severe specifications and involves a lot of challenging tasks for its manufacture. To fill CTAs by permeation with deuterium-tritium (DT), the IRCC need to meet strict thermal, mechanical and dimensional specifications. To obtain a good combustion yield, a very homogenous DT ice layer and very smooth roughness at 1.5 K below the DT triple point are also required. This paper deals with the up to date main issues in the different fields of the LMJ cryogenic target program.

  4. Outcome of referrals for deceased organ donation to the government organ procurement organization.

    PubMed

    Suguitan, G A; Cabanayan-Casasola, C B; Danguilan, R A; Jaro, J M A

    2014-05-01

    The Human Organ Preservation Effort is a government organ procurement organization that pioneered the Deceased Organ Donation Program in the Philippines. Deceased organ donation comprises only 20% of kidney transplantation in the Philippines in the last 3 years. Various measures were implemented to improve deceased organ donor referrals and organ retrieval. To compare outcome of deceased organ donor referrals from 2002 to 2008 and 2009 to 2012 in the Philippines. This retrospective study reviewed the deceased organ donor referrals from 2002 to 2008 and 2009 to 2012. There were 437 referrals for potential deceased organ donors from 2009 to 2012, compared to 434 referrals from 2002 to 2008. Referrals were mainly trauma victims (76%) followed by those with cerebrovascular accidents (12%). In the recent cohort, 81% were approached and 60% consented for donation, but only 23% were retrieved and transplanted. Among those not retrieved, the majority (19%) were medically unsuitable and 6% retracted their consent. Although there was an increasing trend of organ donation referrals in the last 4 years, only 25% were procured. The reasons for nonprocurement should be addressed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. No association between the use of Bti for mosquito control and the dynamics of non-target aquatic invertebrates in French coastal and continental wetlands.

    PubMed

    Lagadic, Laurent; Schäfer, Ralf B; Roucaute, Marc; Szöcs, Eduard; Chouin, Sébastien; de Maupeou, Jérôme; Duchet, Claire; Franquet, Evelyne; Le Hunsec, Benoit; Bertrand, Céline; Fayolle, Stéphanie; Francés, Benoît; Rozier, Yves; Foussadier, Rémi; Santoni, Jean-Baptiste; Lagneau, Christophe

    2016-05-15

    The environmental safety of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is still controversial, mainly because most of the previous field studies on its undesired effects were spatially limited and did not address the relationship between community similarity and application time and frequency. No general statement can therefore be drawn on the usage conditions of Bti that insure protection of non-target organisms. The present study was conducted in eight sites distributed over the main geographical sectors where mosquito control is implemented in mainland France and Corsica. Changes in non-target aquatic invertebrates were followed at elapsed time after repeated applications of two Bti formulations (VectoBac® WDG or 12AS) up to four consecutive years. We examined the influence of both larvicide treatments and environmental variables on community dynamics and dissimilarity between treated and control areas. As it can be argued that chironomids are the most vulnerable group of non-target invertebrates, we scrutinised potential Bti-related effects on the dynamics of their community. The use of VectoBac® WDG and 12AS in coastal and continental wetlands had no immediate or long-term detectable effect on the taxonomic structure and taxa abundance of non-target aquatic invertebrate communities, including chironomids. This applied to the main habitats where mosquito larvae occur, regardless of their geographic location. Flooding, whose frequency and duration depend on local meteorological and hydrological conditions, was identified as the main environmental driver of invertebrate community dynamics. Our findings add support to the environmental safety of currently available Bti formulations when following recommended application rates and best mosquito control practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Target organ specific activity of drosophila MRP (ABCC1) moderates developmental toxicity of methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Prince, Lisa; Korbas, Malgorzata; Davidson, Philip; Broberg, Karin; Rand, Matthew Dearborn

    2014-08-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous and persistent neurotoxin that poses a risk to human health. Although the mechanisms of MeHg toxicity are not fully understood, factors that contribute to susceptibility are even less well known. Studies of human gene polymorphisms have identified a potential role for the multidrug resistance-like protein (MRP/ABCC) family, ATP-dependent transporters, in MeHg susceptibility. MRP transporters have been shown to be important for MeHg excretion in adult mouse models, but their role in moderating MeHg toxicity during development has not been explored. We therefore investigated effects of manipulating expression levels of MRP using a Drosophila development assay. Drosophila MRP (dMRP) is homologous to human MRP1-4 (ABCC1-4), sharing 50% identity and 67% similarity with MRP1. A greater susceptibility to MeHg is seen in dMRP mutant flies, demonstrated by reduced rates of eclosion on MeHg-containing food. Furthermore, targeted knockdown of dMRP expression using GAL4>UAS RNAi methods demonstrates a tissue-specific function for dMRP in gut, Malpighian tubules, and the nervous system in moderating developmental susceptibility to MeHg. Using X-ray synchrotron fluorescence imaging, these same tissues were also identified as the highest Hg-accumulating tissues in fly larvae. Moreover, higher levels of Hg are seen in dMRP mutant larvae compared with a control strain fed an equivalent dose of MeHg. In sum, these data demonstrate that dMRP expression, both globally and within Hg-targeted organs, has a profound effect on susceptibility to MeHg in developing flies. Our findings point to a potentially novel and specific role for dMRP in neurons in the protection against MeHg. Finally, this experimental system provides a tractable model to evaluate human polymorphic variants of MRP and other gene variants relevant to genetic studies of mercury-exposed populations. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of

  7. A review of the ligands and related targeting strategies for active targeting of paclitaxel to tumours.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Wang, Fengshan; Sun, Deqing; Wang, Rongmei

    2016-08-01

    It has been 30 years since the discovery of the anti-tumour property of paclitaxel (PTX), which has been successfully applied in clinic for the treatment of carcinomas of the lungs, breast and ovarian. However, PTX is poorly soluble in water and has no targeting and selectivity to tumour tissue. Recent advances in active tumour targeting of PTX delivery vehicles have addressed some of the issues related to lack of solubility in water and non-specific toxicities associated with PTX. These PTX delivery vehicles are designed for active targeting to specific cancer cells by the addition of ligands for recognition by specific receptors/antigens on cancer cells. This article will focus on various ligands and related targeting strategies serving as potential tools for active targeting of PTX to tumour tissues, illustrating their use in different tumour models. This review also highlights the need of further studies on the discovery of receptors in different cells of specific organ and ligands with binding efficiency to these specific receptors.

  8. What "best practice" could be in Palliative Care: an analysis of statements on practice and ethics expressed by the main Health Organizations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In palliative care it would be necessary to refer to a model. Nevertheless it seems that there are no official statements which state and describe that model. We carried out an analysis of the statements on practice and ethics of palliative care expressed by the main health organizations to show which dimensions of end-of-life care are taken into consideration. Methods The official documents by the most representative health organisations committed to the definition of policies and guidelines for palliative and end-of-life care had been considered. The documents were analysed through a framework of the components of end-of-life care derived from literature, which was composed of 4 main "areas" and of 12 "sub-areas". Results Overall, 34 organizations were identified, 7 international organisations, and 27 organisations operating on the national level in four different countries (Australia, Canada, UK and United States). Up to 56 documents were selected and analysed. Most of them (38) are position statements. Relevant quotations from the documents were presented by "areas" and "sub-areas". In general, the "sub-areas" of symptoms control as well as those referring to relational and social issues are more widely covered by the documents than the "sub-areas" related to "preparation" and to "existential condition". Indeed, the consistency of end-of-life choices with the patient's wishes, as well as completion and meaningfulness at the end of life is given only a minor relevance. Conclusions An integrated model of the best palliative care practice is generally lacking in the documents. It might be argued that the lack of a fixed and coherent model is due to the relevance of unavoidable context issues in palliative care, such as specific cultural settings, patient-centred variables, and family specificity. The implication is that palliative care staff have continuously to adapt their model of caring to the specific needs and values of each patient, more than

  9. In Vivo Bio-distribution and Efficient Tumor Targeting of Gelatin/Silica Nanoparticles for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xueqin; Wang, Jun; Tao, SiJie; Ye, Ting; Kong, Xiangdong; Ren, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The non-viral gene delivery system is an attractive alternative to cancer therapy. The clinical success of non-viral gene delivery is hampered by transfection efficiency and tumor targeting, which can be individually overcome by addition of functional modules such as cell penetration or targeting. Here, we first engineered the multifunctional gelatin/silica (GS) nanovectors with separately controllable modules, including tumor-targeting aptamer AGRO100, membrane-destabilizing peptide HA2, and polyethylene glycol (PEG), and then studied their bio-distribution and in vivo transfection efficiencies by contrast resonance imaging (CRI). The results suggest that the sizes and zeta potentials of multifunctional gelatin/silica nanovectors were 203-217 nm and 2-8 mV, respectively. Functional GS-PEG nanoparticles mainly accumulated in the liver and tumor, with the lowest uptake by the heart and brain. Moreover, the synergistic effects of tumor-targeting aptamer AGRO100 and fusogenic peptide HA2 promoted the efficient cellular internalization in the tumor site. More importantly, the combined use of AGRO100 and PEG enhanced tumor gene expression specificity and effectively reduced toxicity in reticuloendothelial system (RES) organs after intravenous injection. Additionally, low accumulation of GS-PEG was observed in the heart tissues with high gene expression levels, which could provide opportunities for non-invasive gene therapy.

  10. Biological and targeted therapies of systemic lupus erythematosus: evidence and the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Mok, Chi Chiu

    2017-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-systemic disease characterized by an unpredictable disease course and periods of remission and flare, leading to organ damage and mortality. Novel biological agents are being developed (targeting the lymphocytes, accessory molecules and cytokines) that aim to enhance the therapeutic efficacy when combined with standard therapies. Areas covered: This article updates recent data on the use of biological and targeted therapies in SLE. Expert commentary: B cells remain the main target of development of novel therapeutics in SLE. Similar to the intravenous preparation, subcutaneous belimumab has been shown to be superior to placebo when added to the standard of care in SLE. However, two phase III trials of epratuzumab and blisibimod did not meet their primary endpoints. Recent data on the inhibition of type I interferons (anifrolumab) appear promising. Newer calcineurin inhibitors and combination strategies using conventional immunosuppressive agents are being tested in lupus nephritis. Finally, international groups are developing consensus definitions on disease remission and low disease activity state to explore the benefits of the treat-to-target strategy in SLE. Hopefully, the armamentarium for the treatment of SLE can be expanded in the near future, so that the longevity and quality of life of patients can be further improved.

  11. Advances in Bone-targeted Drug Delivery Systems for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Jun; Liu, Xiao-Zhou; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Long-Bang; Shi, Xin; Wu, Su-Jia; Zhao, Jian-Ning

    2016-05-01

    Targeted therapy for osteosarcoma includes organ, cell and molecular biological targeting; of these, organ targeting is the most mature. Bone-targeted drug delivery systems are used to concentrate chemotherapeutic drugs in bone tissues, thus potentially resolving the problem of reaching the desired foci and minimizing the toxicity and adverse effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Some progress has been made in bone-targeted drug delivery systems for treatment of osteosarcoma; however, most are still at an experimental stage and there is a long transitional period to clinical application. Therefore, determining how to combine new, polymolecular and multi-pathway targets is an important research aspect of designing new bone-targeted drug delivery systems in future studies. The purpose of this article was to review the status of research on targeted therapy for osteosarcoma and to summarize the progress made thus far in developing bone-targeted drug delivery systems for neoadjuvant chemotherapy for osteosarcoma with the aim of providing new ideas for highly effective therapeutic protocols with low toxicity for patients with osteosarcoma. © 2016 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Preventing Prostate Cancer Metastasis by Targeting Exosome Secretion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Exosome Secretion PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Christine Vogel CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: New York University, New York, NY 10012...30 Sep 2013 - 29 Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Preventing Prostate Cancer Metastasis by Targeting Exosome Secretion 5a. CONTRACT...NUMBER Preventing Prostate Cancer Metastasis by Targeting Exosome Secretion 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0467 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  13. NON-TARGET AND ECOSYSTEM IMPACTS FROM GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS CONTAINING PLANT INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS (PIPS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The risk of unintended and unexpected adverse impacts on non-target organisms and ecosystems is a key issue in environmental risk assessment of PIP crop plants. While there has been considerable examination of the effects of insect resistant crops on certain non-target organisms...

  14. Autoimmune therapies targeting costimulation and emerging trends in multivalent therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chittasupho, Chuda; Siahaan, Teruna J; Vines, Charlotte M; Berkland, Cory

    2011-07-01

    Proteins participating in immunological signaling have emerged as important targets for controlling the immune response. A multitude of receptor-ligand pairs that regulate signaling pathways of the immune response have been identified. In the complex milieu of immune signaling, therapeutic agents targeting mediators of cellular signaling often either activate an inflammatory immune response or induce tolerance. This review is primarily focused on therapeutics that inhibit the inflammatory immune response by targeting membrane-bound proteins regulating costimulation or mediating immune-cell adhesion. Many of these signals participate in larger, organized structures such as the immunological synapse. Receptor clustering and arrangement into organized structures is also reviewed and emerging trends implicating a potential role for multivalent therapeutics is posited.

  15. Expanding the Targeting Process into the Space Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    planning and operations. The process is a continuous method by which information is converted into intelligence and made available to users...Targeting personnel and organizations consume intelligence produced by various agencies and organizations. Actionable and predictive intelligence applies to... intelligence and operations communities (Figure 1). 1 United States Department of Defense Joint

  16. 27 CFR 478.35 - Skeet, trap, target, and similar shooting activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Skeet, trap, target, and... FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions § 478.35 Skeet, trap, target, and... records, for skeet, trap, target, and similar organized activities shall be determined by the Director of...

  17. 27 CFR 478.35 - Skeet, trap, target, and similar shooting activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Skeet, trap, target, and... FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION Administrative and Miscellaneous Provisions § 478.35 Skeet, trap, target, and... records, for skeet, trap, target, and similar organized activities shall be determined by the Director of...

  18. Mechanisms involved in the transport of mercuric ions in target tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Christy C.; Zalups, Rudolfs K.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury exists in the environment in various forms, all of which pose a risk to human health. Despite guidelines regulating the industrial release of mercury into the environment, humans continue to be exposed regularly to various forms of this metal via inhalation or ingestion. Following exposure, mercuric ions are taken up by and accumulate in numerous organs, including brain, intestine, kidney, liver, and placenta. In order to understand the toxicological effects of exposure to mercury, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms that facilitate entry of mercuric ions into target cells must first be obtained. A number of mechanisms for the transport of mercuric ions into target cells and organs have been proposed in recent years. However, the ability of these mechanisms to transport mercuric ions and the regulatory features of these carriers have not been characterized completely. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current findings related to the mechanisms that may be involved in the transport of inorganic and organic forms of mercury in target tissues and organs. This review will describe mechanisms known to be involved in the transport of mercury and will also propose additional mechanisms that may potentially be involved in the transport of mercuric ions into target cells. PMID:27422290

  19. Models of plasma membrane organization can be applied to mitochondrial membranes to target human health and disease with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Raza Shaikh, Saame; Brown, David A

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), abundant in fish oil, have potential for treating symptoms associated with inflammatory and metabolic disorders; therefore, it is essential to determine their fundamental molecular mechanisms. Recently, several labs have demonstrated the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exerts anti-inflammatory effects by targeting the molecular organization of plasma membrane microdomains. Here we briefly review the evidence that DHA reorganizes the spatial distribution of microdomains in several model systems. We then emphasize how models on DHA and plasma membrane microdomains can be applied to mitochondrial membranes. We discuss the role of DHA acyl chains in regulating mitochondrial lipid-protein clustering, and how these changes alter several aspects of mitochondrial function. In particular, we summarize effects of DHA on mitochondrial respiration, electron leak, permeability transition, and mitochondrial calcium handling. Finally, we conclude by postulating future experiments that will augment our understanding of DHA-dependent membrane organization in health and disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Community-Engaged Strategies to Promote Relevance of Research Capacity-Building Efforts Targeting Community Organizations.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Jennifer; Miller, Stephania T; Joosten, Yvonne; Elzey, Jared D; Israel, Tiffany; King, Christine; Luther, Patrick; Vaughn, Yolanda; Wilkins, Consuelo H

    2015-10-01

    The study goal is to highlight strategies for promoting relevance of research capacity-building efforts targeting community organizations (CO)s. Two community partners, representing two COs, were invited to participate in CO research development trainings, Community Research Forums (Forum)s. Their contributions were documented via Forum document review. Forum participants, representatives from other COs, completed post-Forum surveys to identify additional training needs and rate Forum impact relative to their training expectations. A content-based analysis and descriptive statistics were used to summarize needs assessment- and impact-related survey responses, respectively. Community partners were involved in eight Forum-related activities including marketing (planning), facilitation (implementation), and manuscript coauthorship (dissemination). Eighty-one individuals, representing 55 COs, attended the Forums. Needs assessment responses revealed a desire for additional assistance with existing Forum topics (e.g., defining research priorities) and a need for new ones (e.g., promoting organizational buy in for research). Ninety-one percent of participants agreed that the Forum demonstrated the value of research to COs and how to create a research agenda. Including community partners in all Forum phases ensured that CO perspectives were integrated throughout. Post-Forum needs and impact assessment results will help in tailoring, where needed, future training topics and strategies, respectively. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Using portable Raman spectrometers for the identification of organic compounds at low temperatures and high altitudes: exobiological applications.

    PubMed

    Jehlicka, J; Edwards, H G M; Culka, A

    2010-07-13

    Organic minerals, organic acids and NH-containing organic molecules represent important target molecules for astrobiology. Here, we present the results of the evaluation of a portable hand-held Raman spectrometer to detect these organic compounds outdoors under field conditions. These measurements were carried out during the February-March 2009 winter period in Austrian Alpine sites at temperatures ranging between -5 and -25 degrees C. The compounds investigated were detected under field conditions and their main Raman spectral features were observed unambiguously at their correct reference wavenumber positions. The results obtained demonstrate that a miniaturized Raman spectrometer equipped with 785 nm excitation could be applied with advantage as a key instrument for investigating the presence of organic minerals, organic acids and nitrogen-containing organic compounds outdoors under terrestrial low-temperature conditions. Within the payload designed by ESA and NASA for several missions focusing on Mars, Titan, Europa and other extraterrestrial bodies, Raman spectroscopy can be proposed as an important non-destructive analytical tool for the in situ identification of organic compounds relevant to life detection on planetary and moon surfaces or near subsurfaces.

  2. Eye Tracking of Occluded Self-Moved Targets: Role of Haptic Feedback and Hand-Target Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Danion, Frederic; Mathew, James; Flanagan, J Randall

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies on smooth pursuit eye movements have shown that humans can continue to track the position of their hand, or a target controlled by the hand, after it is occluded, thereby demonstrating that arm motor commands contribute to the prediction of target motion driving pursuit eye movements. Here, we investigated this predictive mechanism by manipulating both the complexity of the hand-target mapping and the provision of haptic feedback. Two hand-target mappings were used, either a rigid (simple) one in which hand and target motion matched perfectly or a nonrigid (complex) one in which the target behaved as a mass attached to the hand by means of a spring. Target animation was obtained by asking participants to oscillate a lightweight robotic device that provided (or not) haptic feedback consistent with the target dynamics. Results showed that as long as 7 s after target occlusion, smooth pursuit continued to be the main contributor to total eye displacement (∼60%). However, the accuracy of eye-tracking varied substantially across experimental conditions. In general, eye-tracking was less accurate under the nonrigid mapping, as reflected by higher positional and velocity errors. Interestingly, haptic feedback helped to reduce the detrimental effects of target occlusion when participants used the nonrigid mapping, but not when they used the rigid one. Overall, we conclude that the ability to maintain smooth pursuit in the absence of visual information can extend to complex hand-target mappings, but the provision of haptic feedback is critical for the maintenance of accurate eye-tracking performance.

  3. Eye Tracking of Occluded Self-Moved Targets: Role of Haptic Feedback and Hand-Target Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, James

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies on smooth pursuit eye movements have shown that humans can continue to track the position of their hand, or a target controlled by the hand, after it is occluded, thereby demonstrating that arm motor commands contribute to the prediction of target motion driving pursuit eye movements. Here, we investigated this predictive mechanism by manipulating both the complexity of the hand-target mapping and the provision of haptic feedback. Two hand-target mappings were used, either a rigid (simple) one in which hand and target motion matched perfectly or a nonrigid (complex) one in which the target behaved as a mass attached to the hand by means of a spring. Target animation was obtained by asking participants to oscillate a lightweight robotic device that provided (or not) haptic feedback consistent with the target dynamics. Results showed that as long as 7 s after target occlusion, smooth pursuit continued to be the main contributor to total eye displacement (∼60%). However, the accuracy of eye-tracking varied substantially across experimental conditions. In general, eye-tracking was less accurate under the nonrigid mapping, as reflected by higher positional and velocity errors. Interestingly, haptic feedback helped to reduce the detrimental effects of target occlusion when participants used the nonrigid mapping, but not when they used the rigid one. Overall, we conclude that the ability to maintain smooth pursuit in the absence of visual information can extend to complex hand-target mappings, but the provision of haptic feedback is critical for the maintenance of accurate eye-tracking performance. PMID:28680964

  4. Marine sources influence fog bioaerosol composition in Namibia and Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, S. E.; Dueker, E.; Logan, J. R. V.; Weathers, K. C.

    2017-12-01

    Organic aerosol particles act as condensation nuclei for fogs and clouds (CCN) and are main determinants of fog evolution, chemical processing, and overall aerosol-fog-cloud interactions. Recent work has confirmed the presence of marine bioaerosols, but little is known about their sources, transport, taxonomic diversity or viability. The few studies that have characterized bioaerosols in fog have been limited to culture-based approaches that capture only a fraction of microbial diversity. We characterized fungal and bacterial communities in the fog in two iconic fog systems, the Coast of Maine (USA) and the Namib Desert (Namibia). The biology of fog in both systems was diverse and distinct, by geography, from dry aerosols, and from local sources. The local environment had a dominant influence on fog in both the Namib and Maine; in particular, the biology of fog in Maine, which was collected near the coast, was more similar to microbial communities from the ocean surface. In both systems, differences between pre- and post-fog aerosol communities suggest that fog events can significantly alter microbial aerosol diversity and composition. This insight into the microbial composition of fog indicates that its origin and frequency has the potential to influence the number and diversity of microorganisms that settle in a given environment, and the composition of microbial aerosol communities in ambient or clear conditions. Here we suggest that fog microbes can possess specific traits that enhance nucleation, altering the transport and deposition of marine- and soil-derived organic matter in terrestrial systems.

  5. Perceptual organization, visual attention, and objecthood.

    PubMed

    Kimchi, Ruth; Yeshurun, Yaffa; Spehar, Branka; Pirkner, Yossef

    2016-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the mere organization of some elements in the visual field into an object attracts attention automatically. Here, we explored three different aspects of this automatic attentional capture: (a) Does the attentional capture by an object involve a spatial component? (b) Which Gestalt organization factors suffice for an object to capture attention? (c) Does the strength of organization affect the object's ability to capture attention? Participants viewed multi-elements displays and either identified the color of one element or responded to a Vernier target. On some trials, a subset of the elements grouped by Gestalt factors into an object that was irrelevant to the task and not predictive of the target. An object effect - faster performance for targets within the object than for targets outside the object - was found even when the target appeared after the object offset, and was sensitive to target-object distance, suggesting that the capture of attention by an object is accompanied by a deployment of attention to the object location. Object effects of similar magnitude were found for objects grouped by a combination of factors (collinearity, closure, and symmetry, or closure and symmetry) or by a single factor when it was collinearity, but not symmetry, suggesting that collinearity, or closure combined with symmetry, suffices for automatic capture of attention by an object, but symmetry does not. Finally, the strength of grouping in modal completion, manipulated by varying contrast polarity between and within elements, affected the effectiveness of the attentional capture by the induced object. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Activation of IFN pathways and plasmacytoid dendritic cell recruitment in target organs of primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Cagnard, Nicolas; Lucchesi, Carlo; Letourneur, Franck; Mistou, Sylvie; Lazure, Thierry; Jacques, Sebastien; Ba, Nathalie; Ittah, Marc; Lepajolec, Christine; Labetoulle, Marc; Ardizzone, Marc; Sibilia, Jean; Fournier, Catherine; Chiocchia, Gilles; Mariette, Xavier

    2006-02-21

    Gene expression analysis of target organs might help provide new insights into the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We used global gene expression profiling of minor salivary glands to identify patterns of gene expression in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), a common and prototypic systemic autoimmune disease. Gene expression analysis allowed for differentiating most patients with pSS from controls. The expression of 23 genes in the IFN pathways, including two Toll-like receptors (TLR8 and TLR9), was significantly different between patients and controls. Furthermore, the increased expression of IFN-inducible genes, BAFF and IFN-induced transmembrane protein 1, was also demonstrated in ocular epithelial cells by quantitative RT-PCR. In vitro activation showed that these genes were effectively modulated by IFNs in salivary gland epithelial cells, the target cells of autoimmunity in pSS. The activation of IFN pathways led us to investigate whether plasmacytoid dendritic cells were recruited in salivary glands. These IFN-producing cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in all patients with pSS, whereas none was observed in controls. In conclusion, our results support the pathogenic interaction between the innate and adaptive immune system in pSS. The persistence of the IFN signature might be related to a vicious circle, in which the environment interacts with genetic factors to drive the stimulation of salivary TLRs.

  7. Motor cortex and hippocampus are the two main cortical targets in LGI1-antibody encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Vincent; Kas, Aurélie; Apartis, Emmanuelle; Chami, Linda; Rogemond, Véronique; Levy, Pierre; Psimaras, Dimitri; Habert, Marie-Odile; Baulac, Michel; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Honnorat, Jérome

    2016-04-01

    . Cognitive impairment, either anterograde amnesia or confusion was evident in 30 of 34 patients (88%). Brain imaging was normal in patients with isolated tonic-dystonic seizures; in patients with limbic symptoms it revealed initially a hippocampal hyperintensity in 8 of 19 patients (42%) and 17 of 24 patients (70%) at later stages. Our data suggest that the major signs of LGI1-antibody encephalitis can be linked to involvement of motor cortex and hippocampus. They occur in parallel with striatum involvement. One of these cortical targets is involved, often unilaterally at disease onset. As the encephalitis progresses, in the absence of immunomodulatory treatment, the second cortical target is affected and effects become bilateral. Progression to the second cortical target occurs with a variable delay of days to several months. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Glyphosate sub-lethal toxicity to non-target organisms occurring in Jatropha curcas plantations in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Saraiva, Althiéris Souza; Sarmento, Renato Almeida; Pedro-Neto, Marçal; Teodoro, Adenir Vieira; Erasmo, Eduardo Andrea Lemus; Belchior, Diana Cléssia Vieira; de Azevedo, Emiliano Brandão

    2016-10-01

    Weed management in physic nut plantations has generally been performed by spraying the herbicide glyphosate. However, the effects of glyphosate on non-target organisms present in the crop system are unknown. Here, we evaluated the toxicity of glyphosate (Roundup Transorb(®)) against the pest species Polyphagotarsonemus latus (Acari: Tarsonemidae) and Tetranychus bastosi (Acari: Tetranychidae) which can be exposed by drift. These mites are considered pests of the physic nut; however, they can also feed and reside on weeds associated with the crop, serving as food sources for predatory mites. When subjected to residue (by ingestion of sap of treated plants), and direct contact to glyphosate, P. latus reproduction was affected but T. bastosi was affected only by the residual effect. Although the herbicide caused a reduction in the number of eggs laid by the females of both pest mites, it is suggested that sublethal effects of glyphosate stimulates oviposition of P. latus and T. bastosi: both species displayed higher reproductive rates when exposed to 0.36 kg ha(-1) of the herbicide. We conclude that glyphosate negatively affects the arthropod herbivores studied and we discuss possible implications on their biological control in Jatropha curcas plantations.

  9. Postsynthetic Tuning of Metal-Organic Frameworks for Targeted Applications.

    PubMed

    Islamoglu, Timur; Goswami, Subhadip; Li, Zhanyong; Howarth, Ashlee J; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2017-04-18

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are periodic, hybrid, atomically well-defined porous materials that typically form by self-assembly and consist of inorganic nodes (metal ions or clusters) and multitopic organic linkers. MOFs as a whole offer many intriguing properties, including ultrahigh porosity, tunable chemical functionality, and low density. These properties point to numerous potential applications, including gas storage, chemical separations, catalysis, light harvesting, and chemical sensing, to name a few. Reticular chemistry, or the linking of molecular building blocks into predetermined network structures, has been employed to synthesize thousands of MOFs. Given the vast library of candidate nodes and linkers, the number of potentially synthetically accessible MOFs is enormous. Nevertheless, a powerful complementary approach to obtain specific structures with desired chemical functionality is to modify known MOFs after synthesis. This approach is particularly useful when incorporation of particular chemical functionalities via direct synthesis is challenging or impossible. The challenges may stem from limited stability or solubility of precursors, unwanted secondary reactivity of precursors, or incompatibility of functional groups with the conditions needed for direct synthesis. MOFs can be postsynthetically modified by replacing the metal nodes and/or organic linkers or via functionalization of the metal nodes and/or organic linkers. Here we describe some of our efforts toward the development and application of postsynthetic strategies for imparting desired chemical functionalities in MOFs of known topology. The techniques include methods for functionalizing MOF nodes, i.e., solvent-assisted ligand incorporation (SALI) and atomic layer deposition in MOFs (AIM) as well as a method to replace structural linkers, termed solvent-assisted linker exchange (SALE), also known as postsynthethic exchange (PSE). For each functionalization strategy, we first describe

  10. Removal of organic matter from a variety of water matrices by UV photolysis and UV/H2O2 method.

    PubMed

    Vilhunen, Sari; Vilve, Miia; Vepsäläinen, Mikko; Sillanpää, Mika

    2010-07-15

    A re-circulated flow-through photoreactor was used to evaluate the ultraviolet (UV) photolysis and UV/H(2)O(2) oxidation process in the purification of three different water matrices. Chemically coagulated and electrocoagulated surface water, groundwater contaminated with creosote wood preservative and 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) containing washing water from the plant manufacturing tailor-made ion-exchange resins were used as sample waters. The organic constituents of creosote consist mainly of harmful polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) whereas 1,2-DCE is a toxic volatile organic compound (VOC). Besides analyzing the specific target compounds, total organic carbon (TOC) analysis and measurement of change in UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV(254)) were performed. Initial TOC, UV(254) and pH varied significantly among treated waters. Initial H(2)O(2) concentrations 0-200 mg/l were used. The UV/H(2)O(2) treatment was efficient in removing the hazardous target pollutants (PAHs and 1,2-DCE) and natural organic matter (NOM). In addition, high removal efficiency for TOC was achieved for coagulated waters and groundwater. Also, the efficiency of direct photolysis in UV(254) removal was significant except in the treatment of 1,2-DCE containing washing water. Overall, UV(254) and TOC removal rates were high, except in case of washing water, and the target pollutants were efficiently decomposed with the UV/H(2)O(2) method. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional evaluation of peripheral nerve regeneration and target reinnervation in animal models: a critical overview.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Xavier

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries usually lead to severe loss of motor, sensory and autonomic functions in the patients. Due to the complex requirements for adequate axonal regeneration, functional recovery is often poorly achieved. Experimental models are useful to investigate the mechanisms related to axonal regeneration and tissue reinnervation, and to test new therapeutic strategies to improve functional recovery. Therefore, objective and reliable evaluation methods should be applied for the assessment of regeneration and function restitution after nerve injury in animal models. This review gives an overview of the most useful methods to assess nerve regeneration, target reinnervation and recovery of complex sensory and motor functions, their values and limitations. The selection of methods has to be adequate to the main objective of the research study, either enhancement of axonal regeneration, improving regeneration and reinnervation of target organs by different types of nerve fibres, or increasing recovery of complex sensory and motor functions. It is generally recommended to use more than one functional method for each purpose, and also to perform morphological studies of the injured nerve and the reinnervated targets. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Comparative assessment of Graves' disease and main extrathyroidal manifestation, Graves' ophthalmopathy, by non-targeted metabolite profiling of blood and orbital tissue.

    PubMed

    Ji, Dong Yoon; Park, Se Hee; Park, Soo Jin; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Shin, Dong Yeob; Yoon, Jin Sook; Lee, Do Yup; Lee, Eun Jig

    2018-06-18

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune disorder that causes the overproduction of thyroid hormones and consequent cascade of systemic metabolism dysfunction. Moreover, Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is the main extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease (GD). The goal of the study was to identify metabolic signatures in association with diagnostic biomarkers of GD without GO and GO, respectively. Ninety metabolites were profiled and analyzed based on a non-targeted primary metabolite profiling from plasma samples of 21 GD patients without GO, 26 subjects with GO, and 32 healthy subjects. Multivariate statistics showed a clear discrimination between healthy controls and disease group (R2Y = 0.518, Q2 = 0.478) and suggested a biomarker panel consisting of 10 metabolites. Among them, most of metabolites showed the positive association with the levels of thyrotropin receptor antibodies. With combination of proline and 1,5-anhydroglucitol, which were identified as GO-specific modulators, the re-constructed biomarker model greatly improved the statistical power and also facilitated simultaneous discrimination among healthy control, GO, and GD without GO groups (AUC = 0.845-0.935). Finally, the comparative analysis of tissue metabolite profiles from GO patients proposed putative metabolic linkage between orbital adipose/connective tissues and the biofluidic consequences, in which fumarate, proline, phenylalanine, and glycerol were coordinately altered with the blood metabolites.

  13. Extra cellular pH influences uptake and photodynamic action of pyropheophorbide-a entrapped in folate receptor targeted organically modified silica nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surya Prakash; Sharma, Mrinalini; Patel, Harishankar; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Photodynamic efficacy of pyropheophorbide-a (PPa) is limited due to poor aqueous solubility. In the present study, organically modified silica nanoparticles (ORMOSIL) entrapping PPa and its folate receptor targeted conjugate (FR-Np-PPa) were prepared and the effect of pH on uptake and photodynamic action of plain and FR-Np-PPa in squamous cell carcinoma (Nt-8e) cells and adenocarcinoma of breast (MCF-7) cells were studied. Nanoformulations of PPa were characterized by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Dynamic light scattering was used for size measurements. The uptake of the two nanoformulations by cells incubated in media of pH 6.5 and 7.4 was studied by confocal fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluoremetrically. Phototoxicity of PPa was studied by MTT assay. In MCF-7 and Nt-8e cells, while the uptake of PPa was observed to increase with a decrease in pH of the incubation media for folate receptor targeted Np, uptake of Np-PPa was not influenced by a change in the pH of the media. Inhibition in the uptake of PPa in presence of free folic acid for cells incubated in a medium of pH 6.5 with targeted nanoparticles was higher compared to physiological pH. Consistent with uptake studies in both the cell lines phototoxicity of PPa delivered through FR-Np-PPa was higher in medium of pH 6.5 as compared to physiological pH and phototoxicity induced by NP-PPa was independent of the pH of medium. Acidic pH enhances the photodynamic efficacy of FR-targeted nanoformulated PPa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Clearance Pathways and Tumor Targeting of Imaging Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mengxiao; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    A basic understanding of how imaging nanoparticles are removed from the normal organs/tissues but retained in the tumors is important for their future clinical applications in early cancer diagnosis and therapy. In this review, we discuss current understandings of clearance pathways and tumor targeting of small-molecule- and inorganic-nanoparticle-based imaging probes with an emphasis on molecular nanoprobes, a class of inorganic nanoprobes that can escape reticuloendothelial system (RES) uptake and be rapidly eliminated from the normal tissues/organs via kidneys but can still passively target the tumor with high efficiency through the enhanced permeability permeability and retention (EPR) effect. The impact of nanoparticle design (size, shape, and surface chemistry) on their excretion, pharmacokinetics, and passive tumor targeting were quantitatively discussed. Synergetic integration of effective renal clearance and EPR effect offers a promising pathway to design low-toxicity and high-contrast-enhancement imaging nanoparticles that could meet with the clinical translational requirements of regulatory agencies. PMID:26149184

  15. Liver cell-targeted delivery of therapeutic molecules.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong-Hun; Toita, Riki; Murata, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    The liver is the largest internal organ in mammals and is involved in metabolism, detoxification, synthesis of proteins and lipids, secretion of cytokines and growth factors and immune/inflammatory responses. Hepatitis, alcoholic or non-alcoholic liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatic veno-occlusive disease, and liver fibrosis and cirrhosis are the most common liver diseases. Safe and efficient delivery of therapeutic molecules (drugs, genes or proteins) into the liver is very important to increase the clinical efficacy of these molecules and to reduce their side effects in other organs. Several liver cell-targeted delivery systems have been developed and tested in vivo or ex vivo/in vitro. In this review, we discuss the literature concerning liver cell-targeted delivery systems, with a particular emphasis on the results of in vivo studies.

  16. Characterizing Health Information for Different Target Audiences.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yueping; Hou, Zhen; Hou, Li; Li, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Different groups of audiences in health care: health professionals and health consumers, each have different information needs. Health monographs targeting different audiences are created by leveraging readers' background knowledge. The NCI's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries provide parallel cancer information and education resources with different target audiences. In this paper, we used targeted audience-specific cancer information PDQs to measure characteristic differences on the element level between audiences. In addition, we compared vocabulary coverage. Results show a significant difference between the professional and patient version of cancer monographs in both content organization and vocabulary. This study provides a new view to assess targeted audience-specific health information, and helps editors to improve the quality and readability of health information.

  17. Simultaneous attenuation of pharmaceuticals, organic matter, and nutrients in wastewater effluent through managed aquifer recharge: Batch and column studies.

    PubMed

    Im, Huncheol; Yeo, Inseol; Maeng, Sung Kyu; Park, Chul Hwi; Choi, Heechul

    2016-01-01

    Batch and column experiments were conducted to evaluate the removal of organic matter, nutrients, and pharmaceuticals and to identify the removal mechanisms of the target contaminants. The sands used in the experiments were obtained from the Youngsan River located in South Korea. Neutral and cationic pharmaceuticals (iopromide, estrone, and trimethoprim) were removed with efficiencies greater than 80% from different sand media during experiments, due to the effect of sorption between sand and pharmaceuticals. However, the anionic pharmaceuticals (sulfamethoxazole, ketoprofen, ibuprofen, and diclofenac) were more effectively removed by natural sand, compared to baked sand. These observations were mainly attributed to biodegradation under natural conditions of surface organic matter and ATP concentrations. The removal of organic matter and nitrogen was also found to increase under biotic conditions. Therefore, it is indicated that biodegradation plays an important role and act as major mechanisms for the removal of organic matter, nutrients, and selected pharmaceuticals during sand passage and the managed aquifer recharge, which is an effective treatment method for removing target contaminants. However, the low removal efficiencies of pharmaceuticals (e.g., carbamazepine and sulfamethoxazole) require additional processes (e.g., AOPs, NF and RO membrane), a long residence time, and long travel distance for increasing the removal efficiencies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis and optimization of three main organic Rankine cycle configurations using a set of working fluids with different thermodynamic behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, Basma; Mabrouk, Mohamed Tahar; Kairouani, Lakdar; Kheiri, Abdelhamid

    2017-06-01

    Different configurations of organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems are potential thermodynamic concepts for power generation from low grade heat. The aim of this work is to investigate and optimize the performances of the three main ORC systems configurations: basic ORC, ORC with internal heat exchange (IHE) and regenerative ORC. The evaluation for those configurations was performed using seven working fluids with typical different thermodynamic behaviours (R245fa, R601a, R600a, R227ea, R134a, R1234ze and R1234yf). The optimization has been performed using a genetic algorithm under a comprehensive set of operative parameters such as the fluid evaporating temperature, the fraction of flow rate or the pressure at the steam extracting point in the turbine. Results show that there is no general best ORC configuration for all those fluids. However, there is a suitable configuration for each fluid. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy harvesting, conversion and storage II (ICOME 2016)", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  19. [Antifungals cellular targets and mechanisms of resistance].

    PubMed

    Accoceberry, Isabelle; Noël, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Antifungals of systemic use for the treatment of invasive fungal infections belong to four main chemical families which have globally three cellular targets in fungal cells: fluorinated pyrimidines act on deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication and protein synthesis; polyenes and azoles are toxic for ergosterol and its biosynthetic pathway; lipopeptides inhibit the synthesis of cell wall beta glucans. The resistance mechanisms that are developed by some fungi begin to be well understood particularly in Candida yeasts. The underlying bases of these mechanisms are either mutations that modify the antifungal target, or that block access to the target, and, on the other hand, the overexpression of genes encoding the target, or some membrane proteins involved in the active efflux of antifungal drugs.

  20. Use of portable devices and confocal Raman spectrometers at different wavelength to obtain the spectral information of the main organic components in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebolazabala, Josu; Maguregui, Maite; Morillas, Héctor; de Diego, Alberto; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2013-03-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit samples, in two ripening stages, ripe (red) and unripe (green), collected from a cultivar in the North of Spain (Barrika, Basque Country), were analyzed directly, without any sample pretreatment, with two different Raman instruments (portable spectrometer coupled to a micro-videocamera and a confocal Raman microscope), using two different laser excitation wavelengths (514 and 785 nm, only for the confocal microscope). The combined use of these laser excitation wavelengths allows obtaining, in a short period of time, the maximum spectral information about the main organic compounds present in this fruit. The major identified components of unripe tomatoes were cutin and cuticular waxes. On the other hand, the main components on ripe tomatoes were carotenes, polyphenoles and polysaccharides. Among the carotenes, it was possible to distinguish the presence of lycopene from β-carotene with the help of both excitation wavelengths, but specially using the 514 nm one, which revealed specific overtones and combination tones of this type of carotene.

  1. Applying Convergent Immunity to Innovative Vaccines Targeting Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Yeaman, Michael R.; Filler, Scott G.; Schmidt, Clint S.; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Edwards, John E.; Hennessey, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent perspectives forecast a new paradigm for future “third generation” vaccines based on commonalities found in diverse pathogens or convergent immune defenses to such pathogens. For Staphylococcus aureus, recurring infections and a limited success of vaccines containing S. aureus antigens imply that native antigens induce immune responses insufficient for optimal efficacy. These perspectives exemplify the need to apply novel vaccine strategies to high-priority pathogens. One such approach can be termed convergent immunity, where antigens from non-target organisms that contain epitope homologs found in the target organism are applied in vaccines. This approach aims to evoke atypical immune defenses via synergistic processes that (1) afford protective efficacy; (2) target an epitope from one organism that contributes to protective immunity against another; (3) cross-protect against multiple pathogens occupying a common anatomic or immunological niche; and/or (4) overcome immune subversion or avoidance strategies of target pathogens. Thus, convergent immunity has a potential to promote protective efficacy not usually elicited by native antigens from a target pathogen. Variations of this concept have been mainstays in the history of viral and bacterial vaccine development. A more far-reaching example is the pre-clinical evidence that specific fungal antigens can induce cross-kingdom protection against bacterial pathogens. This trans-kingdom protection has been demonstrated in pre-clinical studies of the recombinant Candida albicans agglutinin-like sequence 3 protein (rAls3) where it was shown that a vaccine containing rAls3 provides homologous protection against C. albicans, heterologous protection against several other Candida species, and convergent protection against several strains of S. aureus. Convergent immunity reflects an intriguing new approach to designing and developing vaccine antigens and is considered here in the context of vaccines to target S

  2. Laser Irradiated Foam Targets: Absorption and Radiative Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, Martina; Luigi Andreoli, Pier; Cipriani, Mattia; Consoli, Fabrizio; Cristofari, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Riccardo; di Giorgio, Giorgio; Giulietti, Danilo; Ingenito, Francesco; Gus'kov, Sergey Yu.; Rupasov, Alexander A.

    2018-01-01

    An experimental campaign to characterize the laser radiation absorption of foam targets and the subsequent emission of radiation from the produced plasma was carried out in the ABC facility of the ENEA Research Center in Frascati (Rome). Different targets have been used: plastic in solid or foam state and aluminum targets. The activated different diagnostics allowed to evaluate the plasma temperature, the density distribution, the fast particle spectrum and the yield of the X-Ray radiation emitted by the plasma for the different targets. These results confirm the foam homogenization action on laser-plasma interaction, mainly attributable to the volume absorption of the laser radiation propagating in such structured materials. These results were compared with simulation absorption models of the laser propagating into a foam target.

  3. Targeted drug delivery to circulating tumor cells via platelet membrane-functionalized particles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiahe; Ai, Yiwei; Wang, Lihua; Bu, Pengcheng; Sharkey, Charles C.; Wu, Qianhui; Wun, Brittany; Roy, Sweta; Shen, Xiling; King, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are responsible for metastases in distant organs via hematogenous dissemination. Fundamental studies in the past decade have suggested that neutralization of CTCs in circulation could represent an effective strategy to prevent metastasis. Current paradigms of targeted drug delivery into a solid tumor largely fall into two main categories: unique cancer markers (e.g. overexpression of surface receptors) and tumor-specific microenvironment (e.g. low pH, hypoxia, etc.). While relying on a surface receptor to target CTCs can be greatly challenged by cancer heterogeneity, targeting of tumor microenvironments has the advantage of recognizing a broader spectrum of cancer cells regardless of genetic differences or tumor types. The blood circulation, however, where CTCs transit through, lacks the same tumor microenvironment as that found in a solid tumor. In this study, a unique “microenvironment” was confirmed upon introduction of cancer cells of different types into circulation where activated platelets and fibrin were physically associated with blood-borne cancer cells. Inspired by this observation, synthetic silica particles were functionalized with activated platelet membrane along with surface conjugation of tumor-specific apoptosis-inducing ligand cytokine, TRAIL. Biomimetic synthetic particles incorporated into CTC-associated micro-thrombi in lung vasculature and dramatically decreased lung metastases in a mouse breast cancer metastasis model. Our results demonstrate a “Trojan Horse” strategy of neutralizing CTCs to attenuate metastasis. PMID:26519648

  4. Robust infrared targets tracking with covariance matrix representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jian

    2009-07-01

    Robust infrared target tracking is an important and challenging research topic in many military and security applications, such as infrared imaging guidance, infrared reconnaissance, scene surveillance, etc. To effectively tackle the nonlinear and non-Gaussian state estimation problems, particle filtering is introduced to construct the theory framework of infrared target tracking. Under this framework, the observation probabilistic model is one of main factors for infrared targets tracking performance. In order to improve the tracking performance, covariance matrices are introduced to represent infrared targets with the multi-features. The observation probabilistic model can be constructed by computing the distance between the reference target's and the target samples' covariance matrix. Because the covariance matrix provides a natural tool for integrating multiple features, and is scale and illumination independent, target representation with covariance matrices can hold strong discriminating ability and robustness. Two experimental results demonstrate the proposed method is effective and robust for different infrared target tracking, such as the sensor ego-motion scene, and the sea-clutter scene.

  5. Synthesis Road Map Problems in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Jones, T. Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Road map problems ask students to integrate their knowledge of organic reactions with pattern recognition skills to "fill in the blanks" in the synthesis of an organic compound. Students are asked to identify familiar organic reactions in unfamiliar contexts. A practical context, such as a medicinally useful target compound, helps…

  6. The Hippo Pathway Targets Rae1 to Regulate Mitosis and Organ Size and to Feed Back to Regulate Upstream Components Merlin, Hippo, and Warts.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, Maryam; Hsiao, Kuangfu; Jenny, Andreas; Pfleger, Cathie M

    2016-08-01

    Hippo signaling acts as a master regulatory pathway controlling growth, proliferation, and apoptosis and also ensures that variations in proliferation do not alter organ size. How the pathway coordinates restricting proliferation with organ size control remains a major unanswered question. Here we identify Rae1 as a highly-conserved target of the Hippo Pathway integrating proliferation and organ size. Genetic and biochemical studies in Drosophila cells and tissues and in mammalian cells indicate that Hippo signaling promotes Rae1 degradation downstream of Warts/Lats. In proliferating cells, Rae1 loss restricts cyclin B levels and organ size while Rae1 over-expression increases cyclin B levels and organ size, similar to Hippo Pathway over-activation or loss-of-function, respectively. Importantly, Rae1 regulation by the Hippo Pathway is crucial for its regulation of cyclin B and organ size; reducing Rae1 blocks cyclin B accumulation and suppresses overgrowth caused by Hippo Pathway loss. Surprisingly, in addition to suppressing overgrowth, reducing Rae1 also compromises survival of epithelial tissue overgrowing due to loss of Hippo signaling leading to a tissue "synthetic lethality" phenotype. Excitingly, Rae1 plays a highly conserved role to reduce the levels and activity of the Yki/YAP oncogene. Rae1 increases activation of the core kinases Hippo and Warts and plays a post-transcriptional role to increase the protein levels of the Merlin, Hippo, and Warts components of the pathway; therefore, in addition to Rae1 coordinating organ size regulation with proliferative control, we propose that Rae1 also acts in a feedback circuit to regulate pathway homeostasis.

  7. Tracking Organs Composed of One or Multiple Regions Using Geodesic Active Region Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, A.; Jiménez, J. J.

    In radiotherapy treatment it is very important to find out the target organs on the medical image sequence in order to determine and apply the proper dose. The techniques to achieve this goal can be classified into extrinsic and intrinsic. Intrinsic techniques only use image processing with medical images associated to the radiotherapy Radiotherapy treatment, as we deal in this chapter. To accurately perform this organ tracking it is necessary to find out segmentation and tracking models that were able to be applied to several image modalities involved on a radiotherapy session (CT CT See Modality , MRI Magnetic resoance imaging , etc.). The movements of the organs are mainly affected by two factors: breathing and involuntary movements associated with the internal organs or patient positioning. Among the several alternatives to track the organs of interest, a model based on geodesic active regions is proposed. This model has been tested over CT Computed tomography images from the pelvic, cardiac, and thoracic area. A new model for the segmentation of organs composed by more than one region is proposed.

  8. Synthetic aperture radar operator tactical target acquisition research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershberger, M. L.; Craig, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    A radar target acquisition research study was conducted to access the effects of two levels of 13 radar sensor, display, and mission parameters on operator tactical target acquisition. A saturated fractional-factorial screening design was employed to examine these parameters. Data analysis computed ETA squared values for main and second-order effects for the variables tested. Ranking of the research parameters in terms of importance to system design revealed four variables (radar coverage, radar resolution/multiple looks, display resolution, and display size) accounted for 50 percent of the target acquisition probability variance.

  9. Highly targeted cholera vaccination campaigns in urban setting are feasible: The experience in Kalemie, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Massing, Louis Albert; Aboubakar, Soumah; Page, Anne-Laure; Cohuet, Sandra; Ngandwe, Adalbert; Mukomena Sompwe, Eric; Ramazani, Romain; Allheimen, Marcela; Levaillant, Philippe; Lechevalier, Pauline; Kashimi, Marie; de la Motte, Axelle; Calmejane, Arielle; Bouhenia, Malika; Dabire, Ernest; Bompangue, Didier; Kebela, Benoit; Porten, Klaudia

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Oral cholera vaccines are primarily recommended by the World Health Organization for cholera control in endemic countries. However, the number of cholera vaccines currently produced is very limited and examples of OCV use in endemic countries, and especially in urban settings, are scarce. A vaccination campaign was organized by Médecins Sans Frontières and the Ministry of Health in a highly endemic area in the Democratic Republic of Congo. This study aims to describe the vaccine coverage achieved with this highly targeted vaccination campaign and the acceptability among the vaccinated communities. Methods and findings We performed a cross-sectional survey using random spatial sampling. The study population included individuals one year old and above, eligible for vaccination, and residing in the areas targeted for vaccination in the city of Kalemie. Data sources were household interviews with verification by vaccination card. In total 2,488 people were included in the survey. Overall, 81.9% (95%CI: 77.9–85.3) of the target population received at least one dose of vaccine. The vaccine coverage with two doses was 67.2% (95%CI: 61.9–72.0) among the target population. The vaccine coverage was higher during the first round (74.0, 95%CI: 69.3–78.3) than during the second round of vaccination (69.1%, 95%CI: 63.9–74.0). Vaccination coverage was lower in male adults. The main reason for non-vaccination was to be absent during the campaign. No severe adverse events were notified during the interviews. Conclusions Cholera vaccination campaigns using highly targeted strategies are feasible in urban settings. High vaccination coverage can be obtained using door to door vaccination. However, alternative strategies should be considered to reach non-vaccinated populations like male adults and also in order to improve the efficiency of the interventions. PMID:29734337

  10. [Body donation versus organ donation].

    PubMed

    Reis, Ria

    2010-01-01

    There appears to be a discrepancy between the oversupply of donated bodies 'for science' in anatomical institutions in the Netherlands and the shortage of donated organs. However, organ donation is not as straightforward as it seems, mainly because of its strict conditions, e.g. with respect to age and the required hospital setting of the dying. Since Dutch body donors are mainly elderly men, their attitudes to their body, death and science should be explored from a generational perspective.

  11. Morphology targets: What do seedling morphological attributes tell us?

    Treesearch

    Jeremiah R. Pinto

    2011-01-01

    Morphology is classically defined as the form and structure of individual organisms, as distinct from their anatomy or physiology. We use morphological targets in the nursery because they are easy to measure, and because we can often quantitatively link seedling morphological traits with survival and growth performance in the field. In the 20 years since the Target...

  12. Viral kinetics are associated with changes in cytokines and chemokines in serum and target organs of SSM-CVB3-infected macaques.

    PubMed

    Han, Tiesuo; Zhao, Kui; Wu, Chenchen; Lu, Huijun; Song, Deguang; He, Wenqi; Gao, Feng

    2013-02-01

    To determine the relationship between viral kinetics and the expression patterns for different cytokines and chemokines in the serum and organs of coxsackievirus B3 (SSM-CVB3)-infected macaques over the course of infection. SSM-CVB3 levels in serum and organs were measured using the Spearman-Karber 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID(50)) method. Cytokine and chemokine levels in the serum and organs were measured by indirect-ELISA. Low viral titers were detected in the serum samples on the first day post-inoculation (p.i.) and peaked at 6 to 10 days p.i. in the serum samples from five macaques. Serum levels of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12p40, IL-17α, IFN-γ, TNF-α, MCP-1 and MIP-1β were detected each day and, similar to the viral titers, peaked at 6 to 10 days. IL-10 was only detected on days 10 to 14 p.i. Additionally, higher viral titers and relative viral mRNA levels were associated with higher cytokine and chemokine levels in selected tissues from infected macaques including heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney and brain. The results indicate that patterns of cytokine and chemokine response are associated with viral kinetics in the serum and target organs of SSM-CVB3-infected macaques, suggesting that the changes in cytokines and chemokines could help further our understanding of the progress of CVB3 infections in clinical settings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Main-belt Asteroids in the K2 Uranus Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, L.; Pál, A.; Sárneczky, K.; Szabó, R.; Vinkó, J.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Kiss, Cs.; Hanyecz, O.; Marton, G.; Kiss, L. L.

    2018-02-01

    We present the K2 light curves of a large sample of untargeted main-belt asteroids (MBAs) detected with the Kepler Space Telescope. The asteroids were observed within the Uranus superstamp, a relatively large, continuous field with a low stellar background designed to cover the planet Uranus and its moons during Campaign 8 of the K2 mission. The superstamp offered the possibility of obtaining precise, uninterrupted light curves of a large number of MBAs and thus determining unambiguous rotation rates for them. We obtained photometry for 608 MBAs, and were able to determine or estimate rotation rates for 90 targets, of which 86 had no known values before. In an additional 16 targets we detected incomplete cycles and/or eclipse-like events. We found the median rotation rate to be significantly longer than that of the ground-based observations, indicating that the latter are biased toward shorter rotation rates. Our study highlights the need and benefits of further continuous photometry of asteroids.

  14. Intercepting moving targets: does memory from practice in a specific condition of target displacement affect movement timing?

    PubMed

    de Azevedo Neto, Raymundo Machado; Teixeira, Luis Augusto

    2011-05-01

    This investigation aimed at assessing the extent to which memory from practice in a specific condition of target displacement modulates temporal errors and movement timing of interceptive movements. We compared two groups practicing with certainty of future target velocity either in unchanged target velocity or in target velocity decrease. Following practice, both experimental groups were probed in the situations of unchanged target velocity and target velocity decrease either under the context of certainty or uncertainty about target velocity. Results from practice showed similar improvement of temporal accuracy between groups, revealing that target velocity decrease did not disturb temporal movement organization when fully predictable. Analysis of temporal errors in the probing trials indicated that both groups had higher timing accuracy in velocity decrease in comparison with unchanged velocity. Effect of practice was detected by increased temporal accuracy of the velocity decrease group in situations of decreased velocity; a trend consistent with the expected effect of practice was observed for temporal errors in the unchanged velocity group and in movement initiation at a descriptive level. An additional point of theoretical interest was the fast adaptation in both groups to a target velocity pattern different from that practiced. These points are discussed under the perspective of integration of vision and motor control by means of an internal forward model of external motion.

  15. Target Glint Suppression Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    report is organized into two principal sections. Section 2 addresses the impact of target effects on the noncoherent detection problem associated with...zero pulse-to-pulse correlation. Results are presented for a scanning search radar which is assumed to noncoherently integrate N pulses. Generally...speaking, detection performance is shown to be a maximum when the pulse-to-pulse correlation is a minimum. As a result noncoherent search radars should

  16. Autonomic innervation of immune organs and neuroimmune modulation.

    PubMed

    Mignini, F; Streccioni, V; Amenta, F

    2003-02-01

    1. Increasing evidence indicates the occurrence of functional interconnections between immune and nervous systems, although data available on the mechanisms of this bi-directional cross-talking are frequently incomplete and not always focussed on their relevance for neuroimmune modulation. 2. Primary (bone marrow and thymus) and secondary (spleen and lymph nodes) lymphoid organs are supplied with an autonomic (mainly sympathetic) efferent innervation and with an afferent sensory innervation. Anatomical studies have revealed origin, pattern of distribution and targets of nerve fibre populations supplying lymphoid organs. 3. Classic (catecholamines and acetylcholine) and peptide transmitters of neural and non-neural origin are released in the lymphoid microenvironment and contribute to neuroimmune modulation. Neuropeptide Y, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and vasoactive intestinal peptide represent the neuropeptides most involved in neuroimmune modulation. 4. Immune cells and immune organs express specific receptors for (neuro)transmitters. These receptors have been shown to respond in vivo and/or in vitro to the neural substances and their manipulation can alter immune responses. Changes in immune function can also influence the distribution of nerves and the expression of neural receptors in lymphoid organs. 5. Data on different populations of nerve fibres supplying immune organs and their role in providing a link between nervous and immune systems are reviewed. Anatomical connections between nervous and immune systems represent the structural support of the complex network of immune responses. A detailed knowledge of interactions between nervous and immune systems may represent an important basis for the development of strategies for treating pathologies in which altered neuroimmune cross-talking may be involved.

  17. Retroperitoneal Sarcoma Target Volume and Organ at Risk Contour Delineation Agreement Among NRG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    SciTech Connect

    Baldini, Elizabeth H., E-mail: ebaldini@partners.org; Abrams, Ross A.; Bosch, Walter

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability in target volume and organ at risk (OAR) contour delineation for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Radiation planning computed tomography (CT) scans for 2 cases of RPS were distributed among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions for contouring gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), high-risk CTV (HR CTV: area judged to be at high risk of resulting in positive margins after resection), and OARs: bowel bag, small bowel, colon, stomach, and duodenum. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneousmore » truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. Results: Ten radiation oncologists contoured both RPS cases, 1 contoured only RPS1, and 1 contoured only RPS2 such that each case was contoured by 11 radiation oncologists. The first case (RPS 1) was a patient with a de-differentiated (DD) liposarcoma (LPS) with a predominant well-differentiated (WD) component, and the second case (RPS 2) was a patient with DD LPS made up almost entirely of a DD component. Contouring agreement for GTV and CTV contours was high. However, the agreement for HR CTVs was only moderate. For OARs, agreement for stomach, bowel bag, small bowel, and colon was high, but agreement for duodenum (distorted by tumor in one of these cases) was fair to moderate. Conclusions: For preoperative treatment of RPS, sarcoma radiation oncologists contoured GTV, CTV, and most OARs with a high level of agreement. HR CTV contours were more variable. Further clarification of this volume with the help of sarcoma surgical oncologists is necessary to reach consensus. More attention to delineation of the duodenum is also needed.« less

  18. Retroperitoneal Sarcoma Target Volume and Organ at Risk Contour Delineation Agreement Among NRG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Abrams, Ross A.; Bosch, Walter; Roberge, David; Haas, Rick L.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Olsen, Jeffrey R.; Deville, Curtiland; Chen, Yen-Lin; Finkelstein, Steven E.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Wang, Dian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability in target volume and organ at risk (OAR) contour delineation for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials Radiation planning computed tomography (CT) scans for 2 cases of RPS were distributed among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions for contouring gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), high-risk CTV (HR CTV: area judged to be at high risk of resulting in positive margins after resection), and OARs: bowel bag, small bowel, colon, stomach, and duodenum. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. Results Ten radiation oncologists contoured both RPS cases, 1 contoured only RPS1, and 1 contoured only RPS2 such that each case was contoured by 11 radiation oncologists. The first case (RPS 1) was a patient with a de-differentiated (DD) liposarcoma (LPS) with a predominant well-differentiated (WD) component, and the second case (RPS 2) was a patient with DD LPS made up almost entirely of a DD component. Contouring agreement for GTV and CTV contours was high. However, the agreement for HR CTVs was only moderate. For OARs, agreement for stomach, bowel bag, small bowel, and colon was high, but agreement for duodenum (distorted by tumor in one of these cases) was fair to moderate. Conclusions For preoperative treatment of RPS, sarcoma radiation oncologists contoured GTV, CTV, and most OARs with a high level of agreement. HR CTV contours were more variable. Further clarification of this volume with the help of sarcoma surgical oncologists is necessary to reach consensus. More attention to delineation of the duodenum is also needed. PMID:26194680

  19. Titan's organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager discovered nine simple organic molecules in the atmosphere of Titan. Complex organic solids, called tholins, produced by irradiation of the simulated Titanian atmosphere, are consistent with measured properties of Titan from ultraviolet to microwave frequencies and are the likely main constituents of the observed red aerosols. The tholins contain many of the organic building blocks central to life on earth. At least 100-m, and possibly kms thicknesses of complex organics have been produced on Titan during the age of the solar system, and may exist today as submarine deposits beneath an extensive ocean of simple hydrocarbons.

  20. Cumulative Effects of Several Target Organ Damages in Risk Assessment in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Harbaoui, Brahim; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Defforges, Alice; Khettab, Fouad; Milon, Hugues; Girerd, Nicolas; Lantelme, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The prognostic value of screening multiple target organ damages (TODs) in hypertensive subjects has not been extensively studied. We estimated the prognostic value of considering 3 TODs in estimating the 10-year survival in hypertensive subjects. At baseline 1,848 out of a cohort of 1,963 hypertensive patients had a previous cardiovascular disease (CVD) or assessments of 3 TODs: Modification in Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) <60ml/min or albuminuria >300mg/day, Sokolow index >3.5 mV, and advanced hypertensive retinopathy (grades 3 and 4 of Keith-Wagener-Barker classification). The cohort was divided into 5 groups: 0 TOD (N = 978), 1 TOD (N = 308), 2 TODs (N = 94), 3 TODs (N = 30), and previous CVD (N = 438). After 10 years of follow-up, we observed 418 deaths of which 254 from cardiovascular cause. The adjusted hazard ratios for the major cardiovascular risk factors showed a progressive risk associated with the number of TODs. For all-cause death, the hazard ratios [95% confidence intervals] vs. 0 TOD of the other 4 groups were 1.91 [1.39-2.63], 1.99 [1.28-3.10], 4.33 [2.42-7.72], and 3.09 [2.35-4.05], respectively. For cardiovascular death, the hazard ratios [95% confidence intervals] were of the same order of magnitude: 2.14 [1.38-3.32], 2.12 [1.15-3.89], 4.22 [1.83-9.72], and 4.24 [2.95-6.11], respectively. Our results indicate that hypertensive patients with several TODs had a worst outcome. Thus, it seems important to screen for multiple TODs in hypertension; especially check for severe hypertensive retinopathy in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and renal damage. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. MicroRNAs As Potential Targets for Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shriram, Varsha; Kumar, Vinay; Devarumath, Rachayya M.; Khare, Tushar S.; Wani, Shabir H.

    2016-01-01

    The microRNAs (miRNAs) are small (20–24 nt) sized, non-coding, single stranded riboregulator RNAs abundant in higher organisms. Recent findings have established that plants assign miRNAs as critical post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in sequence-specific manner to respond to numerous abiotic stresses they face during their growth cycle. These small RNAs regulate gene expression via translational inhibition. Usually, stress induced miRNAs downregulate their target mRNAs, whereas, their downregulation leads to accumulation and function of positive regulators. In the past decade, investigations were mainly aimed to identify plant miRNAs, responsive to individual or multiple environmental factors, profiling their expression patterns and recognizing their roles in stress responses and tolerance. Altered expressions of miRNAs implicated in plant growth and development have been reported in several plant species subjected to abiotic stress conditions such as drought, salinity, extreme temperatures, nutrient deprivation, and heavy metals. These findings indicate that miRNAs may hold the key as potential targets for genetic manipulations to engineer abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants. This review is aimed to provide recent updates on plant miRNAs, their biogenesis and functions, target prediction and identification, computational tools and databases available for plant miRNAs, and their roles in abiotic stress-responses and adaptive mechanisms in major crop plants. Besides, the recent case studies for overexpressing the selected miRNAs for miRNA-mediated enhanced abiotic stress tolerance of transgenic plants have been discussed. PMID:27379117

  2. Hypertensive crisis. Clinical presentation, comorbidities, and target organ involvement.

    PubMed

    Al-Bannay, Rashed; Husain, Aysha A

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical presentation and comorbidities of hypertensive crisis in our own population. In this cohort based study, we investigate the clinical presentation and comorbidities of hypertensive crisis by evaluating the data collected between January and April 2009. We included 154 patients admitted with systolic and diastolic blood pressure of >179 mm Hg and >119 mm Hg (based on the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure criteria) in the Department of Internal Medicine, Salmaniya Medical Complex, Kingdom of Bahrain. In the study population, 64.3% had hypertensive urgency (blood pressure elevation without end organ damage) and 35.7% had hypertensive emergency (blood pressure elevation with end organ damage). The mean age group was 45-65 years (56% of the study population) and more men were affected than women (100:54). Shortness of breath and neurological deficits had a strong statistical association with hypertensive emergency, and headache and blurring of vision had the same tendency toward hypertensive urgency. Diabetes mellitus was an independent risk factor for hypertensive crisis. Most of the studied patients were known hypertensive. Diabetes mellitus is powerful predictor for hypertensive crisis. Dyspnea and neurological deficits have significant statistical correlation with hypertensive emergencies.

  3. RNAi at work: Targeting invertebrate pests and beneficial organisms' diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Invertebrates present two types of large scale RNAi application opportunities: pest control and beneficial insect health. The former involves the introduction of sustainable applications to keep pest populations low, and the latter represents the challenge of keeping beneficial organisms healthy. RN...

  4. UniDrug-target: a computational tool to identify unique drug targets in pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chanumolu, Sree Krishna; Rout, Chittaranjan; Chauhan, Rajinder S

    2012-01-01

    pathogen-specific drug targets identification which will increase their success and durability as drugs developed against them have less chance to develop resistances and adverse impact on environment. The server is freely available at http://117.211.115.67/UDT/main.html. The standalone application (source codes) is available at http://www.bioinformatics.org/ftp/pub/bioinfojuit/UDT.rar.

  5. Discovery and characterization of 3000+ main-sequence binaries from APOGEE spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Badry, Kareem; Ting, Yuan-Sen; Rix, Hans-Walter; Quataert, Eliot; Weisz, Daniel R.; Cargile, Phillip; Conroy, Charlie; Hogg, David W.; Bergemann, Maria; Liu, Chao

    2018-05-01

    We develop a data-driven spectral model for identifying and characterizing spatially unresolved multiple-star systems and apply it to APOGEE DR13 spectra of main-sequence stars. Binaries and triples are identified as targets whose spectra can be significantly better fit by a superposition of two or three model spectra, drawn from the same isochrone, than any single-star model. From an initial sample of ˜20 000 main-sequence targets, we identify ˜2500 binaries in which both the primary and secondary stars contribute detectably to the spectrum, simultaneously fitting for the velocities and stellar parameters of both components. We additionally identify and fit ˜200 triple systems, as well as ˜700 velocity-variable systems in which the secondary does not contribute detectably to the spectrum. Our model simplifies the process of simultaneously fitting single- or multi-epoch spectra with composite models and does not depend on a velocity offset between the two components of a binary, making it sensitive to traditionally undetectable systems with periods of hundreds or thousands of years. In agreement with conventional expectations, almost all the spectrally identified binaries with measured parallaxes fall above the main sequence in the colour-magnitude diagram. We find excellent agreement between spectrally and dynamically inferred mass ratios for the ˜600 binaries in which a dynamical mass ratio can be measured from multi-epoch radial velocities. We obtain full orbital solutions for 64 systems, including 14 close binaries within hierarchical triples. We make available catalogues of stellar parameters, abundances, mass ratios, and orbital parameters.

  6. Active targeted delivery of immune therapeutics to lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Bahmani, Baharak; Vohra, Ishaan; Kamaly, Nazila; Abdi, Reza

    2018-02-01

    Organ transplantation is a life-saving procedure and the only option for patients with end-organ failure. Immune therapeutics have been key to the success of organ transplantation. However, immune therapeutics are still unable to eliminate graft rejection and their toxicity has been implicated in poorer long-term transplant outcomes. Targeted nanodelivery has the potential to enhance not only the therapeutic index but also the bioavailability of the immune therapeutics. One of the key sites of immune therapeutics delivery is lymph node where the priming of immune cells occur. The focus of this review is on nanomedicine research to develop the targeted delivery of immune therapeutics to lymph nodes for controlling immune activation. As nanomedicine creates its niche in clinical care, it provides novel immunotherapy platforms for transplant recipients. Draining lymph nodes are the primary loci of immune activation and represent a formidable site for delivery of wide variety of immune therapeutics. There have been relentless efforts to improve the properties of nanomedicines, to have in-depth knowledge of antigen and drug loading, and, finally, to explore various routes of passive and active targeted delivery to lymph nodes. The application of nanotechnology principles in the delivery of immune therapeutics to the lymph node has created enormous excitement as a paradigm shifting approach that enables targeted delivery of a gamut of molecules to achieve a desired immune response. Therefore, innovative strategies that improve their efficacy while reducing their toxicity are among the highest unmet needs in transplantation.

  7. Activation of IFN pathways and plasmacytoid dendritic cell recruitment in target organs of primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Cagnard, Nicolas; Lucchesi, Carlo; Letourneur, Franck; Mistou, Sylvie; Lazure, Thierry; Jacques, Sebastien; Ba, Nathalie; Ittah, Marc; Lepajolec, Christine; Labetoulle, Marc; Ardizzone, Marc; Sibilia, Jean; Fournier, Catherine; Chiocchia, Gilles; Mariette, Xavier

    2006-01-01

    Gene expression analysis of target organs might help provide new insights into the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We used global gene expression profiling of minor salivary glands to identify patterns of gene expression in patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS), a common and prototypic systemic autoimmune disease. Gene expression analysis allowed for differentiating most patients with pSS from controls. The expression of 23 genes in the IFN pathways, including two Toll-like receptors (TLR8 and TLR9), was significantly different between patients and controls. Furthermore, the increased expression of IFN-inducible genes, BAFF and IFN-induced transmembrane protein 1, was also demonstrated in ocular epithelial cells by quantitative RT-PCR. In vitro activation showed that these genes were effectively modulated by IFNs in salivary gland epithelial cells, the target cells of autoimmunity in pSS. The activation of IFN pathways led us to investigate whether plasmacytoid dendritic cells were recruited in salivary glands. These IFN-producing cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in all patients with pSS, whereas none was observed in controls. In conclusion, our results support the pathogenic interaction between the innate and adaptive immune system in pSS. The persistence of the IFN signature might be related to a vicious circle, in which the environment interacts with genetic factors to drive the stimulation of salivary TLRs. PMID:16477017

  8. Controllable Synthesis of a Smart Multifunctional Nanoscale Metal-Organic Framework for Magnetic Resonance/Optical Imaging and Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuechuan; Zhai, Manjue; Guan, Weihua; Liu, Jingjuan; Liu, Zhiliang; Damirin, Alatangaole

    2017-02-01

    As a result of their extraordinarily large surfaces and well-defined pores, the design of a multifunctional metal-organic framework (MOF) is crucial for drug delivery but has rarely been reported. In this paper, a novel drug delivery system (DDS) based on nanoscale MOF was developed for use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. This MOF-based tumor targeting DDS was fabricated by a simple postsynthetic surface modification process. First, magnetic mesoporous nanomaterial Fe-MIL-53-NH 2 was used for encapsulating the drug and served as a magnetic resonance contrast agent. Moreover, the Fe-MIL-53-NH 2 nanomaterial exhibited a high loading capacity for the model anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Subsequently, the fluorescence imaging agent 5-carboxyfluorescein (5-FAM) and the targeting reagent folic acid (FA) were conjugated to the 5-FU-loaded Fe-MIL-53-NH 2 , resulting in the advanced DDS Fe-MIL-53-NH 2 -FA-5-FAM/5-FU. Owing to the multifunctional surface modification, the obtained DDS Fe-MIL-53-NH 2 -FA-5-FAM/5-FU shows good biocompatibility, tumor enhanced cellular uptake, strong cancer cell growth inhibitory effect, excellent fluorescence imaging, and outstanding magnetic resonance imaging capability. Taken together, this study integrates diagnostic and treatment aspects into a single platform by a simple and efficient strategy, aiming for facilitating new possibilities for MOF use for multifunctional drug delivery.

  9. Liquid Organic Fertilizers for Sustainable Agriculture: Nutrient Uptake of Organic versus Mineral Fertilizers in Citrus Trees

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Bermejo, Almudena; Legaz, Francisco; Quiñones, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the performance of two liquid organic fertilizers, an animal and a plant-based fertilizer, with mineral fertilization on citrus trees. The source of the fertilizer (mineral or organic) had significant effect in the nutritional status of the organic and conventionally managed mandarins. Nutrient uptake, vegetative growth, carbohydrate synthesis and soil characteristics were analyzed. Results showed that plants fertilized with animal based liquid fertilizers exhibited higher total biomass with a more profuse development of new developing organs (leaves and fibrous roots). Liquid organic fertilization resulted in an increased uptake of macro and micronutrients compared to mineral fertilized trees. Moreover, organic fertilization positively affected the carbohydrate content (fructose, glucose and sucrose) mainly in summer flush leaves. Liquid organic fertilization also resulted in an increase of soil organic matter content. Animal-based fertilizer, due to intrinsic composition, increased total tree biomass and carbohydrate leaves content, and led to lower soil nitrate concentration and higher P and Mg exchangeable in soil extract compared to vegetal-based fertilizer. Therefore, liquid organic fertilizers could be used as an alternative to traditional mineral fertilization in drip irrigated citrus trees. PMID:27764099

  10. Liquid Organic Fertilizers for Sustainable Agriculture: Nutrient Uptake of Organic versus Mineral Fertilizers in Citrus Trees.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Martínez-Cuenca, Mary-Rus; Bermejo, Almudena; Legaz, Francisco; Quiñones, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the performance of two liquid organic fertilizers, an animal and a plant-based fertilizer, with mineral fertilization on citrus trees. The source of the fertilizer (mineral or organic) had significant effect in the nutritional status of the organic and conventionally managed mandarins. Nutrient uptake, vegetative growth, carbohydrate synthesis and soil characteristics were analyzed. Results showed that plants fertilized with animal based liquid fertilizers exhibited higher total biomass with a more profuse development of new developing organs (leaves and fibrous roots). Liquid organic fertilization resulted in an increased uptake of macro and micronutrients compared to mineral fertilized trees. Moreover, organic fertilization positively affected the carbohydrate content (fructose, glucose and sucrose) mainly in summer flush leaves. Liquid organic fertilization also resulted in an increase of soil organic matter content. Animal-based fertilizer, due to intrinsic composition, increased total tree biomass and carbohydrate leaves content, and led to lower soil nitrate concentration and higher P and Mg exchangeable in soil extract compared to vegetal-based fertilizer. Therefore, liquid organic fertilizers could be used as an alternative to traditional mineral fertilization in drip irrigated citrus trees.

  11. Targeted therapy in advanced gastric carcinoma: the future is beginning.

    PubMed

    Schinzari, G; Cassano, A; Orlandi, A; Basso, M; Barone, C

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer represents one of the most common cancer worldwide. Unfortunately, the majority of patients present in advanced stage and outcome still remains poor with high mortality rate despite decreasing incidence and new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Although utility of classical chemotherapy agents has been widely explored, advances have been slow and the efficacy of these agents has reached a plateau of median overall survival not higher than 12 months. Therefore, researchers focused their attention on better understanding molecular biology of carcinogenesis and deeper knowledge of the cancer cell phenotype, as well on development of rationally designed drugs that would target specific molecular aberrancies in signal transduction pathways. These targets include cell surface receptors, circulating growth and angiogenic factors and other molecules involved in downstream intracellular signaling pathways, including receptor tyrosine kinases. However, therapeutic advances in gastric cancer are not so encouraging when compared to other solid organ malignancies such as breast and colorectal cancer. This article reviews the role of targeted agents in gastric cancer as single-agent therapy or in combination regimens, including their rational and emerging mechanism of action, current and emerging data. We focused our attention mainly on published phase III studies, therefore cornerstone clinical trials with trastuzumab and bevacizumab have been largely discussed. Phase III studies presented in important international meetings are also reviewed as well phase II published studies and promising new therapies investigated in preclinical or phase I studies. Today, in first-line treatment only trastuzumab has shown significantly increased survival in combination with chemotherapy, whereas ramucirumab as single agent resulted effective in progressing patients, but - despite several disappointing results - these are the proof of principle that targeting the proper

  12. Effects of stored feed cropping systems and farm size on the profitability of Maine organic dairy farm simulations.

    PubMed

    Hoshide, A K; Halloran, J M; Kersbergen, R J; Griffin, T S; DeFauw, S L; LaGasse, B J; Jain, S

    2011-11-01

    United States organic dairy production has increased to meet the growing demand for organic milk. Despite higher prices received for milk, organic dairy farmers have come under increasing financial stress due to increases in concentrated feed prices over the past few years, which can make up one-third of variable costs. Market demand for milk has also leveled in the last year, resulting in some downward pressure on prices paid to dairy farmers. Organic dairy farmers in the Northeast United States have experimented with growing different forage and grain crops to maximize on-farm production of protein and energy to improve profitability. Three representative organic feed systems were simulated using the integrated farm system model for farms with 30, 120, and 220 milk cows. Increasing intensity of equipment use was represented by organic dairy farms growing only perennial sod (low) to those with corn-based forage systems, which purchase supplemental grain (medium) or which produce and feed soybeans (high). The relative profitability of these 3 organic feed systems was strongly dependent on dairy farm size. From results, we suggest smaller organic dairy farms can be more profitable with perennial sod-based rather than corn-based forage systems due to lower fixed costs from using only equipment associated with perennial forage harvest and storage. The largest farm size was more profitable using a corn-based system due to greater economies of scale for growing soybeans, corn grain, winter cereals, and corn silages. At an intermediate farm size of 120 cows, corn-based forage systems were more profitable if perennial sod was not harvested at optimum quality, corn was grown on better soils, or if milk yield was 10% higher. Delayed harvest decreased the protein and energy content of perennial sod crops, requiring more purchased grain to balance the ration and resulting in lower profits. Corn-based systems were less affected by lower perennial forage quality, as corn silage

  13. The Hippo Pathway Targets Rae1 to Regulate Mitosis and Organ Size and to Feed Back to Regulate Upstream Components Merlin, Hippo, and Warts

    PubMed Central

    Jenny, Andreas; Pfleger, Cathie M.

    2016-01-01

    Hippo signaling acts as a master regulatory pathway controlling growth, proliferation, and apoptosis and also ensures that variations in proliferation do not alter organ size. How the pathway coordinates restricting proliferation with organ size control remains a major unanswered question. Here we identify Rae1 as a highly-conserved target of the Hippo Pathway integrating proliferation and organ size. Genetic and biochemical studies in Drosophila cells and tissues and in mammalian cells indicate that Hippo signaling promotes Rae1 degradation downstream of Warts/Lats. In proliferating cells, Rae1 loss restricts cyclin B levels and organ size while Rae1 over-expression increases cyclin B levels and organ size, similar to Hippo Pathway over-activation or loss-of-function, respectively. Importantly, Rae1 regulation by the Hippo Pathway is crucial for its regulation of cyclin B and organ size; reducing Rae1 blocks cyclin B accumulation and suppresses overgrowth caused by Hippo Pathway loss. Surprisingly, in addition to suppressing overgrowth, reducing Rae1 also compromises survival of epithelial tissue overgrowing due to loss of Hippo signaling leading to a tissue “synthetic lethality” phenotype. Excitingly, Rae1 plays a highly conserved role to reduce the levels and activity of the Yki/YAP oncogene. Rae1 increases activation of the core kinases Hippo and Warts and plays a post-transcriptional role to increase the protein levels of the Merlin, Hippo, and Warts components of the pathway; therefore, in addition to Rae1 coordinating organ size regulation with proliferative control, we propose that Rae1 also acts in a feedback circuit to regulate pathway homeostasis. PMID:27494403

  14. Shock Modifications of Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Chondrite Parent Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George W.

    1998-01-01

    Impacts among asteroidal objects would have altered or destroyed pre-existing organic matter in both targets and projectiles to a greater or lesser degree depending upon impact velocities. To begin filling a knowledge gap on the shock metamorphism of organic compounds, we are studying the effects of shock impacts on selected classes of organic compounds utilizing laboratory shock facilities. Our approach is to subject mixtures of organic compounds, embedded in the matrix of the Murchison meteorite, to simulated hypervelocity impacts by firing them into targets at various pressures. The mixtures are then analyzed to determine the amount of each compound that survives as well as to determine if new compounds are being synthesized. The initial compounds added to the matrix (with the exception of thiosulfate). The sulfonic acids were chosen in part because they are relatively abundant in Murchison, relatively stable, and because they and the phosphonic acids are the first well-characterized homologous series of organic sulfur and phosphorus compounds identified in an extraterrestrial material. Experimental procedures were more fully described in the original proposal. A 20 mm gun, with its barrel extending into a vacuum chamber (10(exp -2) torr), was used to launch the projectile containing the sample at approx. 1.6 km/sec (3,600 mi/hr) into the target material. Maximum pressure of impact depend on target/projectile materials. The target was sufficiently thin to assure minimum pressure decay over the total sample thickness.

  15. Identification of significant precursor gases of secondary organic aerosols from residential wood combustion

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Emily A.; El Haddad, Imad; Slowik, Jay G.; Kilic, Dogushan; Klein, Felix; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Organic gases undergoing conversion to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) during atmospheric aging are largely unidentified, particularly in regions influenced by anthropogenic emissions. SOA dominates the atmospheric organic aerosol burden and this knowledge gap contributes to uncertainties in aerosol effects on climate and human health. Here we characterize primary and aged emissions from residential wood combustion using high resolution mass spectrometry to identify SOA precursors. We determine that SOA precursors traditionally included in models account for only ~3–27% of the observed SOA, whereas for the first time we explain ~84–116% of the SOA by inclusion of non-traditional precursors. Although hundreds of organic gases are emitted during wood combustion, SOA is dominated by the aging products of only 22 compounds. In some cases, oxidation products of phenol, naphthalene and benzene alone comprise up to ~80% of the observed SOA. Identifying the main precursors responsible for SOA formation enables improved model parameterizations and SOA mitigation strategies in regions impacted by residential wood combustion, more productive targets for ambient monitoring programs and future laboratories studies, and links between direct emissions and SOA impacts on climate and health in these regions. PMID:27312480

  16. The efficiency of ceramic-faced metal targets at high-velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolkachev, V. F.; Konyaev, A. A.; Pakhnutova, N. V.

    2017-11-01

    The paper represents experimental results and engineering evaluation concerning the efficiency of composite materials to be used as an additional protection during the high- velocity interaction of a tungsten rod with a target in the velocity range of 1...5 km/s. The main parameter that characterizes the high-velocity interaction of a projectile with a layered target is the penetration depth. Experimental data, numerical simulation and engineering evaluation by modified models are used to determine the penetration depth. Boron carbide, aluminum oxide, and aluminum nickelide are applied as a front surface of targets. Based on experimental data and numerical simulation, the main characteristics of ceramics are determined, which allows composite materials to be effectively used as additional elements of protection.

  17. Introduction to the ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction technique.

    PubMed

    Walton, Chad B; Anderson, Cynthia D; Boulay, Rachel; Shohet, Ralph V

    2011-06-12

    In UTMD, bioactive molecules, such as negatively charged plasmid DNA vectors encoding a gene of interest, are added to the cationic shells of lipid microbubble contrast agents. In mice these vector-carrying microbubbles can be administered intravenously or directly to the left ventricle of the heart. In larger animals they can also be infused through an intracoronary catheter. The subsequent delivery from the circulation to a target organ occurs by acoustic cavitation at a resonant frequency of the microbubbles. It seems likely that the mechanical energy generated by the microbubble destruction results in transient pore formation in or between the endothelial cells of the microvasculature of the targeted region. As a result of this sonoporation effect, the transfection efficiency into and across the endothelial cells is enhanced, and transgene-encoding vectors are deposited into the surrounding tissue. Plasmid DNA remaining in the circulation is rapidly degraded by nucleases in the blood, which further reduces the likelihood of delivery to non-sonicated tissues and leads to highly specific target-organ transfection.

  18. Targeting therapeutics to the glomerulus with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Jonathan E; Davis, Mark E

    2013-11-01

    Nanoparticles are an enabling technology for the creation of tissue-/cell-specific therapeutics that have been investigated extensively as targeted therapeutics for cancer. The kidney, specifically the glomerulus, is another accessible site for nanoparticle delivery that has been relatively overlooked as a target organ. Given the medical need for the development of more potent, kidney-targeted therapies, the use of nanoparticle-based therapeutics may be one such solution to this problem. Here, we review the literature on nanoparticle targeting of the glomerulus. Specifically, we provide a broad overview of nanoparticle-based therapeutics and how the unique structural characteristics of the glomerulus allow for selective, nanoparticle targeting of this area of the kidney. We then summarize literature examples of nanoparticle delivery to the glomerulus and elaborate on the appropriate nanoparticle design criteria for glomerular targeting. Finally, we discuss the behavior of nanoparticles in animal models of diseased glomeruli and review examples of nanoparticle therapeutic approaches that have shown promise in animal models of glomerulonephritic disease. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Targeting bacterial central metabolism for drug development.

    PubMed

    Murima, Paul; McKinney, John D; Pethe, Kevin

    2014-11-20

    Current antibiotics, derived mainly from natural sources, inhibit a narrow spectrum of cellular processes, namely DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cell wall biosynthesis. With the worldwide explosion of drug resistance, there is renewed interest in the investigation of alternate essential cellular processes, including bacterial central metabolic pathways, as a drug target space for the next generation of antibiotics. However, the validation of targets in central metabolism is more complex, as essentiality of such targets can be conditional and/or contextual. Bearing in mind our enhanced understanding of prokaryotic central metabolism, a key question arises: can central metabolism be bacteria's Achilles' heel and a therapeutic target for the development of new classes of antibiotics? In this review, we draw lessons from oncology and attempt to address some of the open questions related to feasibility of targeting bacterial central metabolism as a strategy for developing new antibacterial drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pathogenicity of Fusarium semitectum against crop pests and its biosafety to non-target organisms.

    PubMed

    Mikunthan, G; Manjunatha, M

    2006-01-01

    Microbial control is receiving more attention, since these alternative tactics, compared to chemical control methods, are energy saving, non polluting, ecologically sound and sustainable. A mycopathogen, Fusarium semitectum Berk. and Rav. (ARSEF 7233) was isolated from diseased cadavers of aphid (Aphis gossypii) and cultured in Saboraud Maltose Agar supplemented with Yeast extract medium (SMAY). Being isolated first time from the chilli ecosystem its potential was evaluated. Experiments were conducted to understand its pathogenicity against crop pests as well as to ensure its safety to non target organisms such as silk worm (Bombyx mor), honey bee (Apis indica) and earthworm (Eisenia foetida). A paper-thrips-paper sandwich method for thrips and detached-leaf bioassay method for mites were used. Test insects and mites either reared in laboratory or obtained from the field were topically applied with spore suspension of F. semitectum (1x10(9) spores/ml). Mortality was recorded and dead animals were surface sterilized with 0.5% NaOCl and placed in SMAY medium to confirm pathogenicity. Mulberry leaves sprayed with the fungal suspension were fed to larvae of B. mori and reared. Newly emerged A. indica were topically applied with fungus. The fungus grown in cow dung for two weeks was used to assess the composting ability of E. foetida. F. semitectum produced mycosis and caused mortality to sucking pests such as chilli thrips (Scirtothrips dorsalis), broad mite (Polyphagotarsonemus latus), sugarcane wooly aphid (Ceratavacuna lanigera), spiraling whitefly (Aleyrodicus disperses), whitefly (Bemisia tabaci, A. gossypii and coconut mite (Aceria guerroronis). The fungus did not cause mortality on larvae of lepidopteran insect pests and ladybird beetle (Menochilus sexmaculatus), predatory mite (Amblysius ovalis) and larval parasitoid (Goniozus nephantidis). F. semitectum failed to infect the larvae of B. mori and newly emerged A. indica and its brood. The mycopathogen had no

  1. [Main indoor air pollutants and their health impacts].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Jin, Yinlong

    2003-05-01

    The quality of indoor air is a very important factor that may directly affect human health. There are many sources as well as a variety of indoor air pollutants. Therefore, the health impact is complicated, affecting different organs and systems of human being such as respiratory and immune system. The main indoor air pollutants are the combustion products from smoking, cooking and heating, the chemical pollutants from renovation materials and the biological contaminants. The kinds, sources and health impacts of these pollutants that affect the indoor air quality are reviewed in this paper.

  2. Transferrin-Conjugated Nanocarriers as Active-Targeted Drug Delivery Platforms for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Librelotto, Daniele R; Codevilla, Cristiane F; Farooqi, Ammad; Rolim, Clarice M B

    2017-01-01

    A lot of effort has been devoted to achieving active targeting for cancer therapy in order to reach the right cells. Hence, increasingly it is being realized that active-targeted nanocarriers notably reduce off-target effects, mainly because of targeted localization in tumors and active cellular uptake. In this context, by taking advantage of the overexpression of transferrin receptors on the surface of tumor cells, transferrin-conjugated nanodevices have been designed, in hope that the biomarker grafting would help to maximize the therapeutic benefit and to minimize the side effects. Notably, active targeting nanoparticles have shown improved therapeutic performances in different tumor models as compared to their passive targeting counterparts. In this review, current development of nano-based devices conjugated with transferrin for active tumor-targeting drug delivery are highlighted and discussed. The main objective of this review is to provide a summary of the vast types of nanomaterials that have been used to deliver different chemotherapeutics into tumor cells, and to ultimately evaluate the progression on the strategies for cancer therapy in view of the future research. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Toward optimal organ at risk sparing in complex volumetric modulated arc therapy: An exponential trade-off with target volume dose homogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Tol, Jim P., E-mail: j.tol@vumc.nl; Dahele, Max; Doornaert, Patricia

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Conventional radiotherapy typically aims for homogenous dose in the planning target volume (PTV) while sparing organs at risk (OAR). The authors quantified and characterized the trade-off between PTV dose inhomogeneity (IH) and OAR sparing in complex head and neck volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. Methods: Thirteen simultaneous integrated boost plans were created per patient, for ten patients. PTV boost{sub (B)}/elective{sub (E)} optimization priorities were systematically increased. IH{sub B} and IH{sub E}, defined as (100% − V95%) + V107%, were evaluated against the average of the mean dose to the combined composite swallowing and combined salivary organs (D-OAR{sub comp}). Tomore » investigate the influence of OAR size and position with respect to PTV{sub B/E}, OAR dose was evaluated against a modified Euclidean distance (DM{sub B}/DM{sub E}) between OAR and PTV. Results: Although the achievable D-OAR{sub comp} for a given level of PTV IH differed between patients, excellent logarithmic fits described the D-OAR{sub comp}/IH{sub B} and IH{sub E} relationship in all patients (mean R{sup 2} of 0.98 and 0.97, respectively). Allowing an increase in average IH{sub B} and IH{sub E} over a clinically acceptable range, e.g., from 0.4% ± 0.5% to 2.0% ± 2.0% and 6.9% ± 2.8% to 14.8% ± 2.7%, respectively, corresponded to a decrease in average dose to the composite salivary and swallowing structures from 30.3 ± 6.5 to 23.6 ± 4.7 Gy and 32.5 ± 8.3 to 26.8 ± 9.3 Gy. The increase in PTV{sub E} IH was mainly accounted for by an increase in V107, by on average 5.9%, rather than a reduction in V95, which was on average only 2%. A linear correlation was found between the OAR dose to composite swallowing structures and contralateral parotid and submandibular gland, with DM{sub E} (R{sup 2} = 0.83, 0.88, 0.95). Only mean ipsilateral parotid dose correlated with DM{sub B} (R{sup 2} = 0.87). Conclusions: OAR sparing is highly dependent on the permitted PTV

  4. shRNA target prediction informed by comprehensive enquiry (SPICE): a supporting system for high-throughput screening of shRNA library.

    PubMed

    Kamatuka, Kenta; Hattori, Masahiro; Sugiyama, Tomoyasu

    2016-12-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) screening is extensively used in the field of reverse genetics. RNAi libraries constructed using random oligonucleotides have made this technology affordable. However, the new methodology requires exploration of the RNAi target gene information after screening because the RNAi library includes non-natural sequences that are not found in genes. Here, we developed a web-based tool to support RNAi screening. The system performs short hairpin RNA (shRNA) target prediction that is informed by comprehensive enquiry (SPICE). SPICE automates several tasks that are laborious but indispensable to evaluate the shRNAs obtained by RNAi screening. SPICE has four main functions: (i) sequence identification of shRNA in the input sequence (the sequence might be obtained by sequencing clones in the RNAi library), (ii) searching the target genes in the database, (iii) demonstrating biological information obtained from the database, and (iv) preparation of search result files that can be utilized in a local personal computer (PC). Using this system, we demonstrated that genes targeted by random oligonucleotide-derived shRNAs were not different from those targeted by organism-specific shRNA. The system facilitates RNAi screening, which requires sequence analysis after screening. The SPICE web application is available at http://www.spice.sugysun.org/.

  5. Double-shell target fabrication workshop-2016 report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. Morris; Oertel, John; Farrell, Michael

    On June 30, 2016, over 40 representatives from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), General Atomics (GA), Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), Schafer Corporation, and NNSA headquarter attended a double-shell (DS) target fabrication workshop at Livermore, California. Pushered-single-shell (PSS) and DS metalgas platforms potentially have a large impact on programmatic applications. The goal of this focused workshop is to bring together target fabrication scientists, physicists, and designers to brainstorm future PSS and DS target fabrication needs and strategies. This one-day workshop intends to give an overall view of historical information, recent approaches, and future research activitiesmore » at each participating organization. Five topical areas have been discussed that are vital to the success of future DS target fabrications, including inner metal shells, foam spheres, outer ablators, fill tube assembly, and metrology.« less

  6. Efficacy and Ecotoxicity of Novel Anti-Fouling Nanomaterials in Target and Non-Target Marine Species.

    PubMed

    Avelelas, Francisco; Martins, Roberto; Oliveira, Tânia; Maia, Frederico; Malheiro, Eliana; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana; Tedim, João

    2017-04-01

    Biofouling is a global problem that affects virtually all the immersed structures. Currently, several novel environmentally friendly approaches are being tested worldwide to decrease the toxicity of biocides in non-fouling species, such as the encapsulation/immobilization of commercially available biocides, in order to achieve control over the leaching rate. The present study addresses the toxicity of two widely used booster biocides, zinc pyrithione (ZnPT) and copper pyrithione (CuPT), in its free and incorporated forms in order to assess their toxicity and anti-fouling efficacy in target and non-target species. To achieve this goal, the following marine organisms were tested; the green microalgae Tetraselmis chuii (non-target species) and both target species, the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and the mussel Mytilus edulis. Organisms were exposed to both biocides, two unloaded nanostructured materials and nanomaterials loaded with biocides, from 10 μg/L to 100 mg/L total weight, following standard protocols. The most eco-friendly and simultaneously efficient anti-fouling solution against the two photosynthetic species (nanoclays loaded with ZnPT) was then tested on mussels to assess its lethal efficacy (LC 50  = 123 μg/L) and compared with free biocide (LC 50  = 211 μg/L) and unloaded material (LC 50  > 1000 μg/L). A second exposure test with sub-lethal concentrations (lower than 100 μg/L), using mussels, was carried out to assess biochemical changes caused by the tested compounds. Oxidative stress, detoxification and neurotransmission markers were not responsive; however, different antioxidant patterns were found with free ZnPT and loaded nanoclay exposures. Thus, the immobilization of the biocide ZnPT into nanoclays proved to be a promising efficient and eco-friendly anti-fouling strategy.

  7. Fluorescence imaging and targeted distribution of bacterial magnetic particles in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tao; Zhang, Lianfeng; Gao, Ran; Dai, Yunping; Meng, Fanchao; Li, Ying

    2012-04-01

    Bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs) are of interest as potential carriers of bioactive macromolecules, drugs, or liposomes. In this study, a high-pressure homogenizer was used to disrupt Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 cells, and BMPs were purified. BMPs were labeled with fluorescence reagent 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocianin perchlorate (DiI) and injected into the tail vein of BALB/c nude mice. Distribution of fluorescence signals of DiI-BMPs in vivo was examined using a whole-body fluorescence imaging system. The result showed that fluorescence signals were detected in liver, stomach, intestine, lungs, and spleen. However, transmission electron microscopy of ultrathin sections indicated that BMPs were mainly present in liver and lungs, but not in the other organs. BMPs could be useful as carriers for targeted drug therapy of diseases of the liver or lung.

  8. Detection of organic compounds with whole-cell bioluminescent bioassays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Smartt, Abby; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Natural and manmade organic chemicals are widely deposited across a diverse range of ecosystems including air, surface water, groundwater, wastewater, soil, sediment, and marine environments. Some organic compounds, despite their industrial values, are toxic to living organisms and pose significant health risks to humans and wildlife. Detection and monitoring of these organic pollutants in environmental matrices therefore is of great interest and need for remediation and health risk assessment. Although these detections have traditionally been performed using analytical chemical approaches that offer highly sensitive and specific identification of target compounds, these methods require specialized equipment and trained operators, and fail to describe potential bioavailable effects on living organisms. Alternatively, the integration of bioluminescent systems into whole-cell bioreporters presents a new capacity for organic compound detection. These bioreporters are constructed by incorporating reporter genes into catabolic or signaling pathways that are present within living cells and emit a bioluminescent signal that can be detected upon exposure to target chemicals. Although relatively less specific compared to analytical methods, bioluminescent bioassays are more cost-effective, more rapid, can be scaled to higher throughput, and can be designed to report not only the presence but also the bioavailability of target substances. This chapter reviews available bacterial and eukaryotic whole-cell bioreporters for sensing organic pollutants and their applications in a variety of sample matrices.

  9. Detection of Organic Compounds with Whole-Cell Bioluminescent Bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan; Smartt, Abby; Ripp, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Natural and manmade organic chemicals are widely deposited across a diverse range of ecosystems including air, surface water, groundwater, wastewater, soil, sediment, and marine environments. Some organic compounds, despite their industrial values, are toxic to living organisms and pose significant health risks to humans and wildlife. Detection and monitoring of these organic pollutants in environmental matrices therefore is of great interest and need for remediation and health risk assessment. Although these detections have traditionally been performed using analytical chemical approaches that offer highly sensitive and specific identification of target compounds, these methods require specialized equipment and trained operators, and fail to describe potential bioavailable effects on living organisms. Alternatively, the integration of bioluminescent systems into whole-cell bioreporters presents a new capacity for organic compound detection. These bioreporters are constructed by incorporating reporter genes into catabolic or signaling pathways that are present within living cells and emit a bioluminescent signal that can be detected upon exposure to target chemicals. Although relatively less specific compared to analytical methods, bioluminescent bioassays are more cost-effective, more rapid, can be scaled to higher throughput, and can be designed to report not only the presence but also the bioavailability of target substances. This chapter reviews available bacterial and eukaryotic whole-cell bioreporters for sensing organic pollutants and their applications in a variety of sample matrices. PMID:25084996

  10. Use of portable devices and confocal Raman spectrometers at different wavelength to obtain the spectral information of the main organic components in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruits.

    PubMed

    Trebolazabala, Josu; Maguregui, Maite; Morillas, Héctor; de Diego, Alberto; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2013-03-15

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit samples, in two ripening stages, ripe (red) and unripe (green), collected from a cultivar in the North of Spain (Barrika, Basque Country), were analyzed directly, without any sample pretreatment, with two different Raman instruments (portable spectrometer coupled to a micro-videocamera and a confocal Raman microscope), using two different laser excitation wavelengths (514 and 785 nm, only for the confocal microscope). The combined use of these laser excitation wavelengths allows obtaining, in a short period of time, the maximum spectral information about the main organic compounds present in this fruit. The major identified components of unripe tomatoes were cutin and cuticular waxes. On the other hand, the main components on ripe tomatoes were carotenes, polyphenoles and polysaccharides. Among the carotenes, it was possible to distinguish the presence of lycopene from β-carotene with the help of both excitation wavelengths, but specially using the 514 nm one, which revealed specific overtones and combination tones of this type of carotene. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessing the fate of organic micropollutants during riverbank filtration utilizing field studies and laboratory test systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C. K.; Lange, F. T.; Sacher, F.; Baus, C.; Brauch, H.-J.

    2003-04-01

    In Germany and other highly populated countries, several waterworks use riverbank filtration as a first step in the treatment of river water for water supplies. Unfortunately, industrial and municipal discharges and the influence of agriculture lead to the pollution of rivers and lakes by a number of organic chemicals. In order to assess the impact of those organic micropollutants on the quality of drinking water, it is necessary to clarify their fate during infiltration and underground passage. The fate of organic micropollutants in a river water-groundwater infiltration system is mainly determined by adsorption mechanisms and biological transformations. One possibility to simulate the microbial degradation of single compounds during riverbank filtration is the use of laboratory test filter systems, that are operated as biological fixed-bed reactors under aerobic conditions. The benefit and meaningfulness of those test filters was evaluated on the basis of selected target compounds by comparing the results derived from test filter experiments with field studies under environmental conditions at the River Rhine. Samples from the river and from groundwater of a well characterized aerobic infiltration pathway were analyzed over a time period of several years for a spectrum of organic micropollutants. Target compounds comprised several contaminants relevant for the aquatic environment, such as complexing agents, aromatic sulfonates, pharmaceuticals (including iodinated X ray contrast media), and MTBE. Furthermore, the behaviour of some target compounds during aerobic riverbank filtration was compared to their fate along a section of an anaerobic (oxygen-depleted) aquifer at the River Ruhr that is characterized by a transition state between sulfate reduction and methane production. While some organic micropollutants showed no major differences, the elimination of others turned out to be clearly dependent on the underlying redox processes in the groundwater. The

  12. A Single Peroxisomal Targeting Signal Mediates Matrix Protein Import in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Nicola H.; Felsner, Gregor; Schramm, Frederic D.; Klingl, Andreas; Maier, Uwe-G.; Bolte, Kathrin

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisomes are single membrane bound compartments. They are thought to be present in almost all eukaryotic cells, although the bulk of our knowledge about peroxisomes has been generated from only a handful of model organisms. Peroxisomal matrix proteins are synthesized cytosolically and posttranslationally imported into the peroxisomal matrix. The import is generally thought to be mediated by two different targeting signals. These are respectively recognized by the two import receptor proteins Pex5 and Pex7, which facilitate transport across the peroxisomal membrane. Here, we show the first in vivo localization studies of peroxisomes in a representative organism of the ecologically relevant group of diatoms using fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. By expression of various homologous and heterologous fusion proteins we demonstrate that targeting of Phaeodactylum tricornutum peroxisomal matrix proteins is mediated only by PTS1 targeting signals, also for proteins that are in other systems imported via a PTS2 mode of action. Additional in silico analyses suggest this surprising finding may also apply to further diatoms. Our data suggest that loss of the PTS2 peroxisomal import signal is not reserved to Caenorhabditis elegans as a single exception, but has also occurred in evolutionary divergent organisms. Obviously, targeting switching from PTS2 to PTS1 across different major eukaryotic groups might have occurred for different reasons. Thus, our findings question the widespread assumption that import of peroxisomal matrix proteins is generally mediated by two different targeting signals. Our results implicate that there apparently must have been an event causing the loss of one targeting signal even in the group of diatoms. Different possibilities are discussed that indicate multiple reasons for the detected targeting switching from PTS2 to PTS1. PMID:21966495

  13. [Organization, functioning and expectations of organizations representing patients. Survey of key informants].

    PubMed

    García-Sempere, Aníbal; Artells, Juan José

    2005-01-01

    To explore patient organizations and their scope in terms of patient and user participation in decisions affecting their health. Semi-structured questionnaire survey of key informants from 21 patient organizations. Most of the patient organizations were regional or national private organizations. Their main objectives include improving quality of life and representing the interests of patients and their families, developing information triage and dissemination activities, and providing additional services not offered by the public health service. The main methods of communicating with members were electronic mail, open meetings and forums. Most patient organizations considered health professionals to be the most important group of stakeholders. The sources of funding most frequently quoted were membership fees, public grants and contributions from the pharmaceutical industry. The most important factor for enhancing patient co-responsibility was considered to be involving patients in health care as a way to improve the quality of the heath services. The proposed future scenario that received the most support was the creation of a legal forum in which the patient's voice could be heard and demonstrably taken into account. Patient organizations can play an important role in providing patients and health professionals with information, promoting self care and improving the effectiveness of health care. These features require visible commitment by the health authorities to facilitate opportunities for patient decisions and choice within the system.

  14. 75 FR 27863 - Savings Bank of Maine, MHC and Savings Bank of Maine, Gardiner, Maine; Approval of Conversion...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision [AC-38: OTS Nos. 06947 and H 4709] Savings Bank of Maine, MHC and Savings Bank of Maine, Gardiner, Maine; Approval of Conversion Application Notice is hereby given that on May 7, 2010, the Office of Thrift Supervision approved the application of...

  15. New schools design: Acoustics as main target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, Luigi; Lembo, Paola

    2005-04-01

    The effects of poor intelligibility and high background noise levels on the cognitive development of school children and on the dissatisfaction of teachers has been largely investigated. National standards have been implemented and attempts to harmonize these standards in international guidelines are ongoing. All these activities have led to the awareness that design of new schools must be centered on the achievement of a good acoustic environment. At this point a strong research effort to study and implement best solutions must be conducted, in collaboration, by architects, acousticians, pedagogues, psychologists, builders and acoustic materials producers. Recently an international competition for the planning of new primary schools in Rome, Italy has been announced. The aim of the competition is to study new architectural and running features of primary schools to obtain, among other parameters such as lighting, low cost energy solutions and air quality, the control of reverberation time, sound insulation and mechanical equipments noise. In these school buildings, as innovative requirement, children must be also able to elaborate interpretative hypothesis of physical phenomena such as sound emission and perception and be aware of their influence on these phenomena. Different possible solutions are presented.

  16. Composites for removing metals and volatile organic compounds and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R [Livermore, CA; Coleman, Sabre J [Oakland, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA

    2006-12-12

    Functionalized hydrophobic aerogel/solid support structure composites have been developed to remove metals and organic compounds from aqueous and vapor media. The targeted metals and organics are removed by passing the aqueous or vapor phase through the composite which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The composites adsorb the metals and the organics leaving a purified aqueous or vapor stream. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific functionalization of the aerogels tailored towards specific metals and/or organics. After adsorption, the composites can be disposed of or the targeted metals and/or organics can be reclaimed or removed and the composites recycled.

  17. Wave-Based Algorithms and Bounds for Target Support Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-15

    vector electromagnetic formalism in [5]. This theory leads to three main variants of the optical theorem detector, in particular, three alternative...further expands the applicability for transient pulse change detection of ar- bitrary nonlinear-media and time-varying targets [9]. This report... electromagnetic methods a new methodology to estimate the minimum convex source region and the (possibly nonconvex) support of a scattering target from knowledge of

  18. National Launch System Space Transportation Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoodless, Ralph M., Jr.; Monk, Jan C.; Cikanek, Harry A., III

    1991-01-01

    The present liquid-oxygen/liquid-hydrogen engine is described as meeting the specific requirements of the National Launch System (NLS) Program including cost-effectiveness and robustness. An overview of the NLS and its objectives is given which indicates that the program aims to develop a flexible launch system to meet security, civil, and commercial needs. The Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) provides core and boost propulsion for the 1.5-stage vehicle and core propulsion for the solid booster vehicle. The design incorporates step-throttling, order-of-magnitude reductions in welds, and configuration targets designed to optimize robustness. The STME is designed to provide adaptable and dependable propulsion while minimizing recurring costs and is designed to meet the needs of NLS and other typical space-transportation programs currently being planned.

  19. Organization Theory as Ideology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Thomas B.

    The theory that organizations are ideological inventions of the human mind is discussed. Organizational science is described as an ideology which is based upon social concepts and experiences. The main justification for organizational theory is that it attempts to answer why we behave as we do in social organizations. Ways in which ideas and…

  20. Control of hypertension in treated children and its association with target organ damage.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Tomáš; Dostálek, Lukáš; Gilík, Jiří

    2012-03-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the control of hypertension (HT) in treated children using ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM). We retrospectively reviewed all ABPM studies in our center. Controlled HT was defined as systolic and diastolic BP index (patients' BP divided by the 95th percentile) at daytime and nighttime <1.0 or alternatively as BP load (percentage of BP readings above the 95th percentile) <25% in children on antihypertensive therapy. A total of 195 ABPM studies were included. The mean age was 13.6 ± 4.0 years. One hundred and thirty two children had renoparenchymal HT, 10 renovascular (RVH), 10 endocrine, 4 cardiovascular, 29 primary (PH) and 5 children other forms of HT. 53% of all children had controlled HT. There was no difference in the prevalence of controlled HT between primary and secondary HT (52% and 53%) using the BP index criterion. Children with renoparenchymal HT had significantly better control of HT than children with RVH (58% vs. 20% P = 0.02). The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) monotherapy was significantly more effective in controlling HT than the use of calcium-channel blockers (CCB, P = 0.02). The prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy in children with uncontrolled HT (assessed in 58 patients) was significantly higher than in children with controlled HT (46% vs. 13%, P < 0.01). This is the first pediatric study, to our knowledge, on BP control in hypertensive children using ABPM. It indicates that control of HT is inadequate in ~50% of treated children. Inadequate control of HT is associated with target organ damage in this population. © 2012 American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd.

  1. Self-enhancement learning: target-creating learning and its application to self-organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Ryotaro

    2011-05-01

    In this article, we propose a new learning method called "self-enhancement learning." In this method, targets for learning are not given from the outside, but they can be spontaneously created within a neural network. To realize the method, we consider a neural network with two different states, namely, an enhanced and a relaxed state. The enhanced state is one in which the network responds very selectively to input patterns, while in the relaxed state, the network responds almost equally to input patterns. The gap between the two states can be reduced by minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the two states with free energy. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, we applied self-enhancement learning to the self-organizing maps, or SOM, in which lateral interactions were added to an enhanced state. We applied the method to the well-known Iris, wine, housing and cancer machine learning database problems. In addition, we applied the method to real-life data, a student survey. Experimental results showed that the U-matrices obtained were similar to those produced by the conventional SOM. Class boundaries were made clearer in the housing and cancer data. For all the data, except for the cancer data, better performance could be obtained in terms of quantitative and topological errors. In addition, we could see that the trustworthiness and continuity, referring to the quality of neighborhood preservation, could be improved by the self-enhancement learning. Finally, we used modern dimensionality reduction methods and compared their results with those obtained by the self-enhancement learning. The results obtained by the self-enhancement were not superior to but comparable with those obtained by the modern dimensionality reduction methods.

  2. Educational Targeting in the Fight against Poverty: Limits, Omissions and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarabini, Aina

    2008-01-01

    Educational targeting has become one of the hegemonic mechanisms in the fight against poverty. Both international organisms and developing countries support targeting as one of the best strategies in order to simultaneously guarantee poverty reduction and economic growth, and consequently to tackle the challenges generated by globalisation. The…

  3. Investigating the Interaction of Graphic Organizers and Seductive Details: Can a Graphic Organizer Mitigate the Seductive-Details Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland-Bryant, Emily; Skinner, Christopher H.; Skinner, Amy L.; Saudargas, Richard; Robinson, Daniel H.; Kirk, Emily R.

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between seductive details (SD) and a graphic organizer (GO) was investigated. Undergraduate students (n = 207) read a target-material passage about Freud's psychosexual stages. Depending on condition, the participants also read a biographical paragraph (SD-only), viewed a graphic organizer that linked the seductive details to the…

  4. Achieving target refraction after cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Simon, Shira S; Chee, Yewlin E; Haddadin, Ramez I; Veldman, Peter B; Borboli-Gerogiannis, Sheila; Brauner, Stacey C; Chang, Kenneth K; Chen, Sherleen H; Gardiner, Matthew F; Greenstein, Scott H; Kloek, Carolyn E; Chen, Teresa C

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the difference between target and actual refraction after phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation at an academic teaching institution's Comprehensive Ophthalmology Service. Retrospective study. We examined 1275 eye surgeries for this study. All consecutive cataract surgeries were included if they were performed by an attending or resident surgeon from January through December 2010. Postoperative refractions were compared with preoperative target refractions. Patients were excluded if they did not have a preoperative target refraction documented or if they did not have a recorded postoperative manifest refraction within 90 days. The main outcome measure was percentage of cases achieving a postoperative spherical equivalent ± 1.0 diopter (D) of target spherical equivalent. We performed 1368 cataract surgeries from January through December of 2010. Of these, 1275 (93%) had sufficient information for analysis. Of the included cases, 94% (1196 of 1275) achieved ± 1.0 D of target refraction by 90 days after cataract surgery. This paper establishes a new benchmark for a teaching hospital, where 94% of patients achieved within 1.0 D of target refraction after cataract surgery. The refractive outcomes after cataract surgery at this academic teaching institution were higher than average international benchmarks. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Near-infrared Spectroscopy Of Outer Main Belt Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takir, Driss; Emery, J.

    2009-09-01

    We have recently begun a spectral survey of the outer Main Belt population (3.2 AU < a < 4.6 AU), using near-infrared spectroscopy (0.8-2.5 μm). The objective of this survey is to search for signatures of H2O, organics, hydrated silicates, and/or anhydrous silicates on this group of asteroids. Studying the outer Main Belt asteroids will allow us to better understand the dynamical evolution of the Solar System and provide crucial constrains on nebular composition. Our first observing run, using the SpeX spectrograph/imager at the NASA IRTF, took place remotely form the University of Tennessee Knoxville on the nights of April 15, 16, and 17, 2009 (UT). More observing runs will be conducted this year and the beginning of next year. The initial data reduction process reveals that some of these asteroids exhibit weak and strong absorption features. We will present some of these initial spectra and results.

  6. Analysis of Degree of Similarity among Crude Oils, the Upper and the Lower Crust, Organic Matter, Clays, and Different Caustobioliths by the Content of Their Main and Trace Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodkin, Mikhail; Punanova, Svetlana

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this research was to estimate, based on the content of Trace Elements, the level of contribution of the lower and the upper crust as well as the organic matter into ontogenesis of hydrocarbons. The analysis of degree of similarity of the main and trace element (TE) content among the upper and lower continental crust, clays, organic matter, and different caustobioliths (oil, coal, oil-and-black shales) is performed by calculating coefficients of correlation of logarithms of concentrations of a large number of different chemical elements. Different oils from a number of oil bearing provinces in Russia and from the volcanic caldera Uzon (Kamchatka, Russia) were examined. It has been shown that the content of main elements and TEs of coals and oil-and-black shales is better correlated with the chemical composition of the upper crust, while the TE content of oils correlates better with the composition of the lower continental crust. The TE content of oils correlates with the chemical content of living organisms but the correlation in the most cases is weaker than the one with the lower crust. The results of the examination of different samples from the same oil-bearing province were found to be similar. The mean results for different oil-bearing provinces can vary considerably. The results of the examination of young oil from the Uzon volcanic caldera were found to be rather specific and different from the other oils. We also suggest a set of a small number of "characteristic" elements (Cs, Rb, K, U, V, Cr and Ni), which allows to compare the degree of similarity between an oil sample and upper or lower continental crust using only a few chemical elements. Some interpretation of the results is presented.

  7. PIE preparation of the MEGAPIE target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlmuther, Michael; Wagner, Werner

    2012-12-01

    The MEGAPIE target, after successfully operating for 4 months at a beam power of 0.77 MW, is now being prepared for post irradiation examination PIE. The lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) target was irradiated from August until December 2006, and in this period received a beam charge of 2.8 A h of 575 MeV protons. After that, the target was stored in the target storage facility of PSI, waiting for its post irradiation examination. In the meantime several campaigns of tests have been conducted by PSI and ZWILAG, the interim storage facility of Swiss nuclear power plants. In these tests the feasibility of the conditioning of the target and the extraction of sample material for the PIE has been proven. After transport to the hot cell facility at ZWILAG in June 2009, the dismantling of the MEGAPIE target started. It finally was cut into 21 pieces. Ten of these pieces will be shipped to the Hot Laboratory of PSI ('PSI hotlab') to extract samples from the structural materials as well as from the LBE. Currently it is foreseen that the sample extraction will start in the first half of 2011. The remaining parts of the MEGAPIE target were conditioned as radioactive waste. The present paper will mainly focus on the dismantling and first visual inspection of the MEGAPIE target. In addition an outlook on the PIE phase of MEGAPIE is given.

  8. [Genome-editing: focus on the off-target effects].

    PubMed

    He, Xiubin; Gu, Feng

    2017-10-25

    Breakthroughs of genome-editing in recent years have paved the way to develop new therapeutic strategies. These genome-editing tools mainly include Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas-based RNA-guided DNA endonucleases. However, off-target effects are still the major issue in genome editing, and limit the application in gene therapy. Here, we summarized the cause and compared different detection methods of off-targets.

  9. 18. MAIN FLOOR HOLDING TANKS Main floor, looking at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. MAIN FLOOR - HOLDING TANKS Main floor, looking at holding tanks against the west wall, from which sluice gates are seen protruding. Right foreground-wooden holding tanks. Note narrow wooden flumes through which fish were sluiced into holding and brining tanks. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  10. Fast cat-eye effect target recognition based on saliency extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Ren, Jianlin; Wang, Xingbin

    2015-09-01

    Background complexity is a main reason that results in false detection in cat-eye target recognition. Human vision has selective attention property which can help search the salient target from complex unknown scenes quickly and precisely. In the paper, we propose a novel cat-eye effect target recognition method named Multi-channel Saliency Processing before Fusion (MSPF). This method combines traditional cat-eye target recognition with the selective characters of visual attention. Furthermore, parallel processing enables it to achieve fast recognition. Experimental results show that the proposed method performs better in accuracy, robustness and speed compared to other methods.

  11. Teacher Professional Development through a Collaborative Curriculum Project--An Example of TPACK in Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Walter C.; Erickson, Jeryl L.; Brookhouse, Phil; Johnson, Judith L.

    2010-01-01

    Maine's one-to-one laptop program provides an ideal opportunity to explore conditions that optimize teacher integration of technology-focused curriculum into the classroom. EcoScienceWorks (ESW) is an ecology curriculum that includes targeted simulations and a code block programming challenge developed through an NSF-ITEST grant. The project was…

  12. Large scale RNAi screen in Tribolium reveals novel target genes for pest control and the proteasome as prime target.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Julia; Dao, Van Anh; Majumdar, Upalparna; Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schwirz, Jonas; Schultheis, Dorothea; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Leboulle, Gérard; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stanke, Mario; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-09-03

    Insect pest control is challenged by insecticide resistance and negative impact on ecology and health. One promising pest specific alternative is the generation of transgenic plants, which express double stranded RNAs targeting essential genes of a pest species. Upon feeding, the dsRNA induces gene silencing in the pest resulting in its death. However, the identification of efficient RNAi target genes remains a major challenge as genomic tools and breeding capacity is limited in most pest insects impeding whole-animal-high-throughput-screening. We use the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum as a screening platform in order to identify the most efficient RNAi target genes. From about 5,000 randomly screened genes of the iBeetle RNAi screen we identify 11 novel and highly efficient RNAi targets. Our data allowed us to determine GO term combinations that are predictive for efficient RNAi target genes with proteasomal genes being most predictive. Finally, we show that RNAi target genes do not appear to act synergistically and that protein sequence conservation does not correlate with the number of potential off target sites. Our results will aid the identification of RNAi target genes in many pest species by providing a manageable number of excellent candidate genes to be tested and the proteasome as prime target. Further, the identified GO term combinations will help to identify efficient target genes from organ specific transcriptomes. Our off target analysis is relevant for the sequence selection used in transgenic plants.

  13. Organs-on-chips at the frontiers of drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Esch, Eric W.; Bahinski, Anthony; Huh, Dongeun

    2016-01-01

    Improving the effectiveness of preclinical predictions of human drug responses is critical to reducing costly failures in clinical trials. Recent advances in cell biology, microfabrication and microfluidics have enabled the development of microengineered models of the functional units of human organs — known as organs-on-chips — that could provide the basis for preclinical assays with greater predictive power. Here, we examine the new opportunities for the application of organ-on-chip technologies in a range of areas in preclinical drug discovery, such as target identification and validation, target-based screening, and phenotypic screening. We also discuss emerging drug discovery opportunities enabled by organs-on-chips, as well as important challenges in realizing the full potential of this technology. PMID:25792263

  14. Effects of marine toxins on the reproduction and early stages development of aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Vítor; Azevedo, Joana; Silva, Marisa; Ramos, Vítor

    2010-01-19

    Marine organisms, and specially phytoplankton species, are able to produce a diverse array of toxic compounds that are not yet fully understood in terms of their main targets and biological function. Toxins such as saxitoxins, tetrodotoxin, palytoxin, nodularin, okadaic acid, domoic acid, may be produced in large amounts by dinoflagellates, cyanobacteria, bacteria and diatoms and accumulate in vectors that transfer the toxin along food chains. These may affect top predator organisms, including human populations, leading in some cases to death. Nevertheless, these toxins may also affect the reproduction of aquatic organisms that may be in contact with the toxins, either by decreasing the amount or quality of gametes or by affecting embryonic development. Adults of some species may be insensitive to toxins but early stages are more prone to intoxication because they lack effective enzymatic systems to detoxify the toxins and are more exposed to the toxins due to a higher metabolic growth rate. In this paper we review the current knowledge on the effects of some of the most common marine toxins on the reproduction and development of early stages of some organisms.

  15. New Advances in Nanotechnology-Based Diagnosis and Therapeutics for Breast Cancer: An Assessment of Active-Targeting Inorganic Nanoplatforms.

    PubMed

    Falagan-Lotsch, Priscila; Grzincic, Elissa M; Murphy, Catherine J

    2017-01-18

    Breast cancer is a major cause of suffering and mortality among women. Limitations in the current diagnostic methods and treatment approaches have led to new strategies to positively impact the survival rates and quality of life of breast cancer patients. Nanotechnology offers a real possibility of mitigating breast cancer mortality by early-stage cancer detection and more precise diagnosis as well as more effective treatments with minimal side effects. The current nanoplatforms approved for breast cancer therapeutics are based on passive tumor targeting using organic nanoparticles and have not provided the expected significant improvements in the clinic. In this review, we present the emerging approaches in breast cancer nanomedicine based on active targeting using versatile inorganic nanoplatforms with biomedical relevance, such as gold, silica, and iron oxide nanoparticles, as well as their efficacy in breast cancer imaging, drug and gene delivery, thermal therapy, combinational therapy, and theranostics in preclinical studies. The main challenges for clinical translation and perspectives are discussed.

  16. A new method for tracking organ motion on diagnostic ultrasound images

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Yoshiki, E-mail: y-kubota@gunma-u.ac.jp; Matsumura, Akihiko, E-mail: matchan.akihiko@gunma-u.ac.jp; Fukahori, Mai, E-mail: fukahori@nirs.go.jp

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Respiratory-gated irradiation is effective in reducing the margins of a target in the case of abdominal organs, such as the liver, that change their position as a result of respiratory motion. However, existing technologies are incapable of directly measuring organ motion in real-time during radiation beam delivery. Hence, the authors proposed a novel quantitative organ motion tracking method involving the use of diagnostic ultrasound images; it is noninvasive and does not entail radiation exposure. In the present study, the authors have prospectively evaluated this proposed method. Methods: The method involved real-time processing of clinical ultrasound imaging data rather thanmore » organ monitoring; it comprised a three-dimensional ultrasound device, a respiratory sensing system, and two PCs for data storage and analysis. The study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method by tracking the gallbladder in one subject and a liver vein in another subject. To track a moving target organ, the method involved the control of a region of interest (ROI) that delineated the target. A tracking algorithm was used to control the ROI, and a large number of feature points and an error correction algorithm were used to achieve long-term tracking of the target. Tracking accuracy was assessed in terms of how well the ROI matched the center of the target. Results: The effectiveness of using a large number of feature points and the error correction algorithm in the proposed method was verified by comparing it with two simple tracking methods. The ROI could capture the center of the target for about 5 min in a cross-sectional image with changing position. Indeed, using the proposed method, it was possible to accurately track a target with a center deviation of 1.54 ± 0.9 mm. The computing time for one frame image using our proposed method was 8 ms. It is expected that it would be possible to track any soft-tissue organ or tumor with large

  17. 29. MAIN CONTROL ROOM, PANELS WEST OF MAIN CONTROL AREA, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. MAIN CONTROL ROOM, PANELS WEST OF MAIN CONTROL AREA, LOOKING SOUTH (LOCATION Q) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  18. 28. MAIN CONTROL ROOM, PANELS WEST OF MAIN CONTROL AREA, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. MAIN CONTROL ROOM, PANELS WEST OF MAIN CONTROL AREA, LOOKING NORTH (LOCATION Q) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  19. Identification of NPM and DDX5 as Therapeutic Targets in TSC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-12-01

    Individuals with TSC develop benign tumors in multiple organs, including the retina, skin, lung, kidney and brain. The identification of valid targets in TSC...individuals. Individuals with TSC develop benign tumors in multiple organs, including the retina, skin, lung, kidney and brain. However, these lesions can

  20. Main sources of errors in diagnosis of chronic radiation sickness (in Russian)

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatova, V.A.

    1973-11-01

    With the aim of finding out the main sources of errors in the diagnosis of chronic radiation sickness, the author analyzed a total of 500 cases of this sickness in roenigenologists and radiologists sent to the clinic to be examined according to occupational indications. lt was shown that the main source of errors when interpreting the observed deviations as occupational was underestimation of etiological significance of functional and organic diseases of the nervous system, endocrinevascular dystonia and also such diseases as hypochromic anemia and chronic infection. The majority of diagnostic errors is explained by insufficient knowledge of the main regularitymore » of forming the picture of chronic radiation sickness and by the absence of the necessary differential diagnosis with general somatic diseases. (auth)« less

  1. 125. Pre1911. Crew on main deck, starboard side at main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    125. Pre-1911. Crew on main deck, starboard side at main hatch, looking aft. Note dark object in center of photo that may be original main deck capstan. Fred Heick collection. (K9.9571) - Ship BALCLUTHA, 2905 Hyde Street Pier, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  2. Mars 2020 Rover SHERLOC Calibration Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, Trevor; Fries, Marc; Burton, Aaron; Ross, Amy; Larson, Kristine; Garrison, Dan; Calaway, Mike; Tran, Vinh; Bhartia, Roh; Beegle, Luther

    2016-01-01

    The Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics & Chemicals (SHERLOC) instrument is a deep ultraviolet (UV) Raman Fluorescence instrument selected as part of the Mars 2020 rover instrument suite. SHERLOC will be mounted on the rover arm and its primary role is to identify carbonaceous species in martian samples. The SHERLOC instrument requires a calibration target which is being designed and fabricated at JSC as part of our continued science participation in Mars robotic missions. The SHERLOC calibration target will address a wide range of NASA goals to include basic science of interest to both the Science Mission Directorate and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate.

  3. Hitting the sweet spot-glycans as targets of fungal defense effector proteins.

    PubMed

    Künzler, Markus

    2015-05-06

    Organisms which rely solely on innate defense systems must combat a large number of antagonists with a comparably low number of defense effector molecules. As one solution of this problem, these organisms have evolved effector molecules targeting epitopes that are conserved between different antagonists of a specific taxon or, if possible, even of different taxa. In order to restrict the activity of the defense effector molecules to physiologically relevant taxa, these target epitopes should, on the other hand, be taxon-specific and easily accessible. Glycans fulfill all these requirements and are therefore a preferred target of defense effector molecules, in particular defense proteins. Here, we review this defense strategy using the example of the defense system of multicellular (filamentous) fungi against microbial competitors and animal predators.

  4. Problem-Solving Test: Targeted Gene Disruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of a specific gene is the most powerful technique to analyze the biological function of the gene. This approach has been used for a long time in viruses, bacteria, yeast, and fruit fly, but looked quite hopeless in more complex organisms. Targeted inactivation of specific genes (also known as knock-out mutation) in mice is…

  5. 22. View showing main anchor arm, as viewed from main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. View showing main anchor arm, as viewed from main cantilever arm looking south. Note upper chord eyebar arrangement. - Williamstown-Marietta Bridge, Spanning Ohio River between Williamstown & Marietta, Williamstown, Wood County, WV

  6. Overview on the target fabrication facilities at ELI-NP and ongoing strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, C. C.; Leca, V.; Popa, D.; Cernaianu, M. O.; Stutman, D.

    2016-10-01

    Along with the development of petawatt class laser systems, the interaction between high power lasers and matter flourished an extensive research, with high-interest applications like: laser nuclear physics, proton radiography or cancer therapy. The new ELI-NP (Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics) petawatt laser facility, with 10PW and ~ 1023W/cm2 beam intensity, is one of the innovative projects that will provide novel research of fundamental processes during light-matter interaction. As part of the ELI-NP facility, Targets Laboratory will provide the means for in-house manufacturing and characterization of the required targets (mainly solid ones) for the experiments, in addition to the research activity carried out in order to develop novel target designs with improved performances. A description of the Targets Laboratory with the main pieces of equipment and their specifications are presented. Moreover, in view of the latest progress in the target design, one of the proposed strategies for the forthcoming experiments at ELI-NP is also described, namely: ultra-thin patterned foil of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated with a carbon-based ultra-low density layer. The carbon foam which behaves as a near-critical density plasma, will allow the controlled-shaping of the laser pulse before the main interaction with the solid foil. Particular emphasis will be directed towards the target's design optimization, by simulation tests and tuning the key-properties (thickness/length, spacing, density foam, depth, periodicity etc.) which are expected to have a crucial effect on the laser-matter interaction process.

  7. Community Organizing as an Education Reform Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renee, Michelle; McAlister, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Community organizing for school reform offers an urgently needed alternative to traditional approaches to school change. Many current reforms fail to thrive due to lack of trust, understanding, or cultural relevance to the community being targeted. The high turnover of reformers (superintendents, principals, or outside organizations) in high-need…

  8. Main predators of insect pests: screening and evaluation through comprehensive indices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tingbang; Liu, Jie; Yuan, Longyu; Zhang, Yang; Peng, Yu; Li, Daiqin; Chen, Jian

    2017-11-01

    Predatory natural enemies play key functional roles in integrated pest management. However, the screening and evaluation of the main predators of insect pests has seldom been reported in the field. Here, we employed comprehensive indices for evaluating the predation of a common pest (Ectropis obliqua) by nine common spider species in Chinese tea plantations. We established the relative dominance of the spider species and their phenological overlap with the pest species, and analyzed DNA from the nine spider species using targeted real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to identify the residual DNA of E. obliqua. The predation rates and predation numbers per predator were estimated by the positive rates of target fragments and the residual minimum number of E. obliqua in predators' guts, respectively. The results showed that only four spider species preyed on E. obliqua, and the order of potential of the spiders to control E. obliqua from greatest to smallest was Neoscona mellotteei, Xysticus ephippiatus, Evarcha albaria and Coleosoma octomaculatum by the Z-score method. The orb-weaving spider N. mellotteei has the maximum potential as a biological control agent of E. obliqua in an integrated pest management strategy. An approach of screening and evaluating main predators of insect pests through comprehensive indices was preliminarily established. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. A Review of Chief Information Officer' Main Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portela, Luis; Carvalho, Roberto; Varajão, João; Magalhães, Luis

    Information Systems are transforming our lives. Their social and economic impact means opportunities and challenges for people, organizations and governments. Being decisive for competitiveness, they are more and more taken in account by companies, which look at them in order to find a way of improving the business. In this context, the CIO (Chief Information Officer) has a central role, and needs to perform several tasks to ensure that information systems under his supervision are efficient. To be competent in his job, the CIO needs several skills. In this paper, the CIO's main skills are identified and discussed.

  10. On Target: Organizing and Executing the Strategic Air Campaign Against Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    possession, use, sale, creation or display of any porno graphic photograph, videotape, movie, drawing, book, or magazine or similar represen- tations. This...forward-looking infrared (FLIR) sensor to create daylight-quality video images of terrain and utilized terrain-following radar to enable the aircraft to...The Black Hole Planners had pleaded with CENTAF Intel to provide them with photos of targets, provide additional personnel to analyze PGM video

  11. Cachexia and sarcopenia: mechanisms and potential targets for intervention.

    PubMed

    Argilés, Josep M; Busquets, Silvia; Stemmler, Britta; López-Soriano, Francisco J

    2015-06-01

    Cachexia is a multi-organ syndrome associated with cancer and other chronic diseases, characterized by body weight loss, muscle and adipose tissue wasting and inflammation, being often associated with anorexia. Skeletal muscle tissue represents more than 40% of body weight and seems to be one of the main tissues involved in the wasting that occurs during cachexia. Sarcopenia is a degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass, quality, and strength associated with healthy ageing. The molecular mechanisms behind cachexia and sarcopenia share some common trends. Muscle wasting is the result of a combination of an imbalance between synthetic and degradative protein pathways together with increased myocyte apoptosis and decreased regenerative capacity. Oxidative pathways are also altered in skeletal muscle during muscle wasting and this seems to be a consequence of mitochondrial abnormalities that include altered morphology and function, decreased ATP synthesis and uncoupling. The aim of the present review is to analyse common molecular pathways between cachexia and sarcopenia in order to put forward potential targets for intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Development and validation of a multiplex real-time PCR method to simultaneously detect 47 targets for the identification of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Cottenet, Geoffrey; Blancpain, Carine; Sonnard, Véronique; Chuah, Poh Fong

    2013-08-01

    Considering the increase of the total cultivated land area dedicated to genetically modified organisms (GMO), the consumers' perception toward GMO and the need to comply with various local GMO legislations, efficient and accurate analytical methods are needed for their detection and identification. Considered as the gold standard for GMO analysis, the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RTi-PCR) technology was optimised to produce a high-throughput GMO screening method. Based on simultaneous 24 multiplex RTi-PCR running on a ready-to-use 384-well plate, this new procedure allows the detection and identification of 47 targets on seven samples in duplicate. To comply with GMO analytical quality requirements, a negative and a positive control were analysed in parallel. In addition, an internal positive control was also included in each reaction well for the detection of potential PCR inhibition. Tested on non-GM materials, on different GM events and on proficiency test samples, the method offered high specificity and sensitivity with an absolute limit of detection between 1 and 16 copies depending on the target. Easy to use, fast and cost efficient, this multiplex approach fits the purpose of GMO testing laboratories.

  13. Reward modulation of contextual cueing: Repeated context overshadows repeated target location.

    PubMed

    Sharifian, Fariba; Contier, Oliver; Preuschhof, Claudia; Pollmann, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Contextual cueing can be enhanced by reward. However, there is a debate if reward is associated with the repeated target-distractor configurations or with the repeated target locations that occur in both repeated and new displays. Based on neuroimaging evidence, we hypothesized that reward becomes associated with the target location only in new displays, but not in repeated displays, where the repeated target location is overshadowed by the more salient repeated target-distractor configuration. To test this hypothesis, we varied the reward value associated with the same target location in repeated and new displays. The results confirmed the overshadowing hypothesis in that search facilitation in repeated target-distractor configurations was modulated by the variable value associated with the target location. This effect was observed mainly in early learning.

  14. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations.

    PubMed

    Perez-Lopez, Áron R; Szalay, Kristóf Z; Türei, Dénes; Módos, Dezső; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-05-11

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understanding of the network position and dynamics of drug targets and disease-related proteins, and may contribute to develop additional, network-based tests to increase the potential safety of drug candidates.

  15. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Lopez, Áron R.; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Türei, Dénes; Módos, Dezső; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understanding of the network position and dynamics of drug targets and disease-related proteins, and may contribute to develop additional, network-based tests to increase the potential safety of drug candidates.

  16. Targets of drugs are generally, and targets of drugs having side effects are specifically good spreaders of human interactome perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Lopez, Áron R.; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Türei, Dénes; Módos, Dezső; Lenti, Katalin; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Network-based methods are playing an increasingly important role in drug design. Our main question in this paper was whether the efficiency of drug target proteins to spread perturbations in the human interactome is larger if the binding drugs have side effects, as compared to those which have no reported side effects. Our results showed that in general, drug targets were better spreaders of perturbations than non-target proteins, and in particular, targets of drugs with side effects were also better spreaders of perturbations than targets of drugs having no reported side effects in human protein-protein interaction networks. Colorectal cancer-related proteins were good spreaders and had a high centrality, while type 2 diabetes-related proteins showed an average spreading efficiency and had an average centrality in the human interactome. Moreover, the interactome-distance between drug targets and disease-related proteins was higher in diabetes than in colorectal cancer. Our results may help a better understanding of the network position and dynamics of drug targets and disease-related proteins, and may contribute to develop additional, network-based tests to increase the potential safety of drug candidates. PMID:25960144

  17. How many mechanosensory organs in the bushcricket leg? Neuroanatomy of the scolopidial accessory organ in Tettigoniidae (Insecta: Orthoptera).

    PubMed

    Strauß, Johannes; Riesterer, Anja S; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    The subgenual organ and associated scolopidial organs are well studied in Orthoptera and related taxa. In some insects, a small accessory organ or Nebenorgan is described posterior to the subgenual organ. In Tettigoniidae (Ensifera), the accessory organ has only been noted in one species though tibial sensory organs are well studied for neuroanatomy and physiology. Here, we use axonal tracing to analyse the posterior subgenual organ innervated by the main motor nerve. Investigating seven species from different groups of Tettigoniidae, we describe a small group of scolopidial sensilla (5-9 sensory neurons) which has features characteristic of the accessory organ: posterior tibial position, innervation by the main leg nerve rather than by the tympanal nerve, orientation of dendrites in proximal or ventro-proximal direction in the leg, and commonly association with a single campaniform sensillum. The neuroanatomy is highly similar between leg pairs. We show differences in the innervation in two species of the genus Poecilimon as compared to the other species. In Poecilimon, the sensilla of the accessory organ are innervated by one nerve branch together with the subgenual organ. The results suggest that the accessory organ is part of the sensory bauplan in the leg of Tettigoniidae and probably Ensifera. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Organic Solvents on Microalgae Growth, Metabolism and Industrial Bioproduct Extraction: A Review.

    PubMed

    Miazek, Krystian; Kratky, Lukas; Sulc, Radek; Jirout, Tomas; Aguedo, Mario; Richel, Aurore; Goffin, Dorothee

    2017-07-04

    In this review, the effect of organic solvents on microalgae cultures from molecular to industrial scale is presented. Traditional organic solvents and solvents of new generation-ionic liquids (ILs), are considered. Alterations in microalgal cell metabolism and synthesis of target products (pigments, proteins, lipids), as a result of exposure to organic solvents, are summarized. Applications of organic solvents as a carbon source for microalgal growth and production of target molecules are discussed. Possible implementation of various industrial effluents containing organic solvents into microalgal cultivation media, is evaluated. The effect of organic solvents on extraction of target compounds from microalgae is also considered. Techniques for lipid and carotenoid extraction from viable microalgal biomass (milking methods) and dead microalgal biomass (classical methods) are depicted. Moreover, the economic survey of lipid and carotenoid extraction from microalgae biomass, by means of different techniques and solvents, is conducted.

  19. Fluid mechanics aspects of magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations using a flow phantom for magnetic drug targeting have been undertaken. The flow phantom is a half y-branched tube configuration where the main tube represents an artery from which a tumour-supplying artery, which is simulated by the side branch of the flow phantom, branches off. In the experiments a quantification of the amount of magnetic particles targeted towards the branch by a magnetic field applied via a permanent magnet is achieved by impedance measurement using sensor coils. Measuring the targeting efficiency, i.e. the relative amount of particles targeted to the side branch, for different field configurations one obtains targeting maps which combine the targeting efficiency with the magnetic force densities in characteristic points in the flow phantom. It could be shown that targeting efficiency depends strongly on the magnetic field configuration. A corresponding numerical model has been set up, which allows the simulation of targeting efficiency for variable field configuration. With this simulation good agreement of targeting efficiency with experimental data has been found. Thus, the basis has been laid for future calculations of optimal field configurations in clinical applications of magnetic drug targeting. Moreover, the numerical model allows the variation of additional parameters of the drug targeting process and thus an estimation of the influence, e.g. of the fluid properties on the targeting efficiency. Corresponding calculations have shown that the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid will significantly influence the targeting process, an aspect which has to be taken into account, especially recalling the fact that the viscosity of magnetic suspensions depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and the mechanical load.

  20. Impaired Monoamine and Organic Cation Uptake in Choroid Plexus in Mice with Targeted Disruption of the Plasma Membrane Monoamine Transporter (Slc29a4) Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Haichuan; Wang, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    The choroid plexus (CP) forms the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and protects the brain from circulating metabolites, drugs, and toxins. The plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT, SLC29A4) is a new polyspecific organic cation transporter that transports a wide variety of organic cations including biogenic amines, cationic drugs, and neurotoxins. PMAT is known to be expressed in the CP, but its specific role in CP transport of organic cations has not been clearly defined. Here we showed that PMAT transcript is highly expressed in human and mouse CPs, whereas transcripts of other functionally related transporters are minimally expressed in the CPs. Immunofluorescence staining further revealed that PMAT protein is localized to the apical (CSF-facing) membrane of the CP epithelium, consistent with a role of transporting organic cations from the CSF into CP epithelial cells. To further evaluate the role of PMAT in the CP, mice with targeted deletion of the Slc29a4 gene were generated and validated. Although Pmat−/− mice showed no overt abnormalities, the uptake of monoamines and the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium was significantly reduced in CP tissues isolated from the knock-out mice. Together, our data demonstrated that PMAT is a major transporter for CP uptake of bioactive amines and xenobiotic cations. By removing its substrates from the CSF, PMAT may play an important role in protecting the brain from cationic neurotoxins and other potentially toxic organic cations. PMID:23255610

  1. Research pressure instrumentation for NASA space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. J.; Nussbaum, P.; Gustafson, G.

    1985-01-01

    The breadboard feasibility model of a silicon piezoresistive pressure transducer suitable for space shuttle main engine (SSME) applications was demonstrated. The development of pressure instrumentation for the SSME was examined. The objective is to develop prototype pressure transducers which are targeted to meet the SSME performance design goals and to fabricate, test and deliver a total of 10 prototype units. Effective utilization of the many advantages of silicon piezoresistive strain sensing technology to achieve the objectives of advanced state-of-the-art pressure sensors for reliability, accuracy and ease of manufacture is analyzed. Integration of multiple functions on a single chip is the key attribute of the technology.

  2. Target organ damage and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Strong Heart Study.

    PubMed

    de Simone, Giovanni; Wang, Wenyu; Best, Lyle G; Yeh, Fawn; Izzo, Raffaele; Mancusi, Costantino; Roman, Mary J; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Devereux, Richard B

    2017-05-12

    Recent analyses in a registry of hypertensive patients suggested that preceding left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (LVH) and/or carotid atherosclerosis are associated with incident type 2 diabetes, independent of confounders. We assess the relation between prevalent cardio-renal target organ damage (TOD) and subsequent incident type 2 diabetes in a population-based study with high prevalence of obesity. We selected 2887 non-diabetic participants from two cohorts of the Strong Heart Study (SHS). Clinical exam, laboratory tests and echocardiograms were performed. Adjudicated TODs were LVH, left atrium (LA) dilatation, and high urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify variables responsible for the association between initial TODs and incident diabetes at 4-year follow-up (FU). After 4 years, 297 new cases of diabetes (10%) were identified, 216 of whom exhibited baseline impaired fasting glucose (IFG, 73%, p < 0.0001). Participants developing type 2 diabetes exhibited higher inflammatory markers, fat-free mass and adipose mass and higher prevalence of initial LVH and LA dilatation than those without (both p < 0.04). In multivariable logistic regression, controlling for age, sex, family relatedness, presence of arterial hypertension and IFG, all three indicators of TOD predicted incident diabetes (all p < 0.01). However, the effects of TOD was offset when body fat and inflammatory markers were introduced into the model. In this population-based study with high prevalence of obesity, TOD precedes clinical appearance of type 2 diabetes and is related to the preceding metabolic status, body composition and inflammatory status. Trial registration Trial registration number: NCT00005134, Name of registry: Strong Heart Study, URL of registry: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00005134, Date of registration: May 25, 2000, Date of enrolment of the first participant to the trial: September 1988.

  3. Antibacterial Targets in Fatty Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, H. Tonie; Reynolds, Kevin A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The fatty acid biosynthesis pathway is an attractive but still largely unexploited target for development of new anti-bacterial agents. The extended use of the anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid and the antiseptic triclosan, which are inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis, validates this pathway as a target for anti-bacterial development. Differences in subcellular organization of the bacterial and eukaryotic multi-enzyme fatty acid synthase systems offer the prospect of inhibitors with host vs. target specificity. Platensimycin, platencin, and phomallenic acids, newly discovered natural product inhibitors of the condensation steps in fatty acid biosynthesis, represent new classes of compounds with antibiotic potential. An almost complete catalogue of crystal structures for the enzymes of the type II fatty acid biosynthesis pathway can now be exploited in the rational design of new inhibitors, as well as the recently published crystal structures of type I FAS complexes. PMID:17707686

  4. Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System (RAAS): its biology and drug targets for treating diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Zain, Maryam; Awan, Fazli Rabbi

    2014-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multifactorial disorder of hyperglycemia caused by a combination of biochemical, molecular and genetic factors, which leads to the dysfunction of various organs including kidneys. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the microvascular complications of diabetes that results due to poor glycemic control. Several molecular and biochemical pathways have been implicated in the pathogenesis of DN. Of these, the Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System (RAAS) is considered as a key pathway. RAAS involves various subsystems which contribute to the development of DN. Mutations in several genes of the RAAS pathway have been associated with the development of DN. These genes or their products present them as therapeutic targets for potent drugs to control or prevent DN, and development of new drugs for targeting the RAAS. Drugs in use for DN are mainly the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, Angiotensin Receptors Blockers (ARB) and renin inhibitors which play important roles in reducing DN. Hence, the present review is focused on the pathophysiology and genetic factors for DN by exploring the RAAS pathway and emphasizing the benefits of blocking this pathway to control and prevent DN.

  5. Bypassing Protein Corona Issue on Active Targeting: Zwitterionic Coatings Dictate Specific Interactions of Targeting Moieties and Cell Receptors.

    PubMed

    Safavi-Sohi, Reihaneh; Maghari, Shokoofeh; Raoufi, Mohammad; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Hajipour, Mohammad J; Ghassempour, Alireza; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2016-09-07

    Surface functionalization strategies for targeting nanoparticles (NP) to specific organs, cells, or organelles, is the foundation for new applications of nanomedicine to drug delivery and biomedical imaging. Interaction of NPs with biological media leads to the formation of a biomolecular layer at the surface of NPs so-called as "protein corona". This corona layer can shield active molecules at the surface of NPs and cause mistargeting or unintended scavenging by the liver, kidney, or spleen. To overcome this corona issue, we have designed biotin-cysteine conjugated silica NPs (biotin was employed as a targeting molecule and cysteine was used as a zwitterionic ligand) to inhibit corona-induced mistargeting and thus significantly enhance the active targeting capability of NPs in complex biological media. To probe the targeting yield of our engineered NPs, we employed both modified silicon wafer substrates with streptavidin (i.e., biotin receptor) to simulate a target and a cell-based model platform using tumor cell lines that overexpress biotin receptors. In both cases, after incubation with human plasma (thus forming a protein corona), cellular uptake/substrate attachment of the targeted NPs with zwitterionic coatings were significantly higher than the same NPs without zwitterionic coating. Our results demonstrated that NPs with a zwitterionic surface can considerably facilitate targeting yield of NPs and provide a promising new type of nanocarriers in biological applications.

  6. Gene silencing in Tribolium castaneum as a tool for the targeted identification of candidate RNAi targets in crop pests.

    PubMed

    Knorr, Eileen; Fishilevich, Elane; Tenbusch, Linda; Frey, Meghan L F; Rangasamy, Murugesan; Billion, Andre; Worden, Sarah E; Gandra, Premchand; Arora, Kanika; Lo, Wendy; Schulenberg, Greg; Valverde-Garcia, Pablo; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Narva, Kenneth E

    2018-02-01

    RNAi shows potential as an agricultural technology for insect control, yet, a relatively low number of robust lethal RNAi targets have been demonstrated to control insects of agricultural interest. In the current study, a selection of lethal RNAi target genes from the iBeetle (Tribolium castaneum) screen were used to demonstrate efficacy of orthologous targets in the economically important coleopteran pests Diabrotica virgifera virgifera and Meligethes aeneus. Transcript orthologs of 50 selected genes were analyzed in D. v. virgifera diet-based RNAi bioassays; 21 of these RNAi targets showed mortality and 36 showed growth inhibition. Low dose injection- and diet-based dsRNA assays in T. castaneum and D. v. virgifera, respectively, enabled the identification of the four highly potent RNAi target genes: Rop, dre4, ncm, and RpII140. Maize was genetically engineered to express dsRNA directed against these prioritized candidate target genes. T 0 plants expressing Rop, dre4, or RpII140 RNA hairpins showed protection from D. v. virgifera larval feeding damage. dsRNA targeting Rop, dre4, ncm, and RpII140 in M. aeneus also caused high levels of mortality both by injection and feeding. In summary, high throughput systems for model organisms can be successfully used to identify potent RNA targets for difficult-to-work with agricultural insect pests.

  7. Promiscuous, Multi-Target Lupane-Type Triterpenoids Inhibits Wild Type and Drug Resistant HIV-1 Replication Through the Interference With Several Targets.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Luis M; Beltrán, Manuela; García-Pérez, Javier; Obregón-Calderón, Patricia; Callies, Oliver; Jímenez, Ignacio A; Bazzocchi, Isabel L; Alcamí, José

    2018-01-01

    Current research on antiretroviral therapy is mainly focused in the development of new formulations or combinations of drugs belonging to already known targets. However, HIV-1 infection is not cured by current therapy and thus, new approaches are needed. Bevirimat was developed by chemical modification of betulinic acid, a lupane-type pentacyclic triterpenoid (LPT), as a first-in-class HIV-1 maturation inhibitor. However, in clinical trials, bevirimat showed less activity than expected because of the presence of a natural mutation in Gag protein that conferred resistance to a high proportion of HIV-1 strains. In this work, three HIV-1 inhibitors selected from a set of previously screened LPTs were investigated for their targets in the HIV-1 replication cycle, including their maturation inhibitor effect. LPTs were found to inhibit HIV-1 infection acting as promiscuous compounds with several targets in the HIV-1 replication cycle. LPT12 inhibited HIV-1 infection mainly through reverse transcription, integration, viral transcription, viral proteins (Gag) production and maturation inhibition. LPT38 did it through integration, viral transcription or Gag production inhibition and finally, LPT42 inhibited reverse transcription, viral transcription or Gag production. The three LPTs inhibited HIV-1 infection of human primary lymphocytes and infections with protease inhibitors and bevirimat resistant HIV-1 variants with similar values of IC 50 . Therefore, we show that the LPTs tested inhibited HIV-1 infection through acting on different targets depending on their chemical structure and the activities of the different LPTs vary with slight structural alterations. For example, of the three LPTs under study, we found that only LPT12 inhibited infectivity of newly-formed viral particles, suggesting a direct action on the maturation process. Thus, the multi-target behavior gives a potential advantage to these compounds since HIV-1 resistance can be overcome by modulating more

  8. Plant-microbe interactions as drivers of ecosystem functions relevant for the biodegradation of organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Fester, Thomas; Giebler, Julia; Wick, Lukas Y; Schlosser, Dietmar; Kästner, Matthias

    2014-06-01

    The plant organism and associated microbial communities can be seen as a sunlight driven hotspot for the turnover of organic chemicals. In such environments the fate of a chemical will not only depend on its intrinsic structural stability toward (bio-)chemical reactions and its bioavailability but also on the functional effectiveness and stability of natural microbial communities as main drivers of natural attenuation of chemicals. Recent research demonstrates that interactions between plants and microorganisms are crucial for the biotransformation of organic chemicals, for various processes affecting the bioavailability of such compounds, and for the stability of the affected ecosystem. Practical bioremediation approaches, therefore, should encompass integrated measures targeting functional vegetation as well as functional microbial communities. Good examples for a successful practical approach are constructed wetlands, where an artificial, simplified ecosystem is used for the detoxification of organic contaminants. While such systems have considerable practical success, they are often treated as a black box and a sound mechanistic understanding of functional resilience and of the 'reactive power' of such plant-microbe ecosystems is poor. This situation has to change, if progress in the application of bioremediation is to be made. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Active Multimodal Sensor System for Target Recognition and Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guirong; Zou, Zhaofan; Liu, Ziyue; Mao, Jiansen

    2017-01-01

    High accuracy target recognition and tracking systems using a single sensor or a passive multisensor set are susceptible to external interferences and exhibit environmental dependencies. These difficulties stem mainly from limitations to the available imaging frequency bands, and a general lack of coherent diversity of the available target-related data. This paper proposes an active multimodal sensor system for target recognition and tracking, consisting of a visible, an infrared, and a hyperspectral sensor. The system makes full use of its multisensor information collection abilities; furthermore, it can actively control different sensors to collect additional data, according to the needs of the real-time target recognition and tracking processes. This level of integration between hardware collection control and data processing is experimentally shown to effectively improve the accuracy and robustness of the target recognition and tracking system. PMID:28657609

  10. Genome organization and characteristics of soybean microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background microRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression and play important roles in many aspects of plant biology. The role(s) of miRNAs in nitrogen-fixing root nodules of leguminous plants such as soybean is not well understood. We examined a library of small RNAs from Bradyrhizobium japonicum-inoculated soybean roots and identified novel miRNAs. In order to enhance our understanding of miRNA evolution, diversification and function, we classified all known soybean miRNAs based on their phylogenetic conservation (conserved, legume- and soybean-specific miRNAs) and examined their genome organization, family characteristics and target diversity. We predicted targets of these miRNAs and experimentally validated several of them. We also examined organ-specific expression of selected miRNAs and their targets. Results We identified 120 previously unknown miRNA genes from soybean including 5 novel miRNA families. In the soybean genome, genes encoding miRNAs are primarily intergenic and a small percentage were intragenic or less than 1000 bp from a protein-coding gene, suggesting potential co-regulation between the miRNA and its parent gene. Difference in number and orientation of tandemly duplicated miRNA genes between orthologous genomic loci indicated continuous evolution and diversification. Conserved miRNA families are often larger in size and produce less diverse mature miRNAs than legume- and soybean-specific families. In addition, the majority of conserved and legume-specific miRNA families produce 21 nt long mature miRNAs with distinct nucleotide distribution and regulate a more conserved set of target mRNAs compared to soybean-specific families. A set of nodule-specific target mRNAs and their cognate regulatory miRNAs had inverse expression between root and nodule tissues suggesting that spatial restriction of target gene transcripts by miRNAs might govern nodule-specific gene expression in soybean. Conclusions Genome organization of soybean mi

  11. Target-directed Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: A Study on Potentials and Pitfalls as Exemplified on a Bacterial Target.

    PubMed

    Frei, Priska; Pang, Lijuan; Silbermann, Marleen; Eriş, Deniz; Mühlethaler, Tobias; Schwardt, Oliver; Ernst, Beat

    2017-08-25

    Target-directed dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) is an emerging technique for the efficient identification of inhibitors of pharmacologically relevant targets. In this contribution, we present an application for a bacterial target, the lectin FimH, a crucial virulence factor of uropathogenic E. coli being the main cause of urinary tract infections. A small dynamic library of acylhydrazones was formed from aldehydes and hydrazides and equilibrated at neutral pH in presence of aniline as nucleophilic catalyst. The major success factors turned out to be an accordingly adjusted ratio of scaffolds and fragments, an adequate sample preparation prior to HPLC analysis, and the data processing. Only then did the ranking of the dynamic library constituents correlate well with affinity data. Furthermore, as a support of DCC applications especially to larger libraries, a new protocol for improved hit identification was established. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Anticancer patent landscape and technology assessment of Indian public-funded research institutes and organizations.

    PubMed

    Dara, Ajay; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2014-08-01

    This review discusses the various drug therapeutic targets and latest technologies of anticancer patents from 10 Indian public-funded research organizations covering more than 150 esteemed institutes. We have identified and reported the leading assignee and inventors along with their collaboration network and, thereby, have analyzed the various patent trends, geographical distributions, citation maps, Derwent World Patents Index, international patent classification analysis and the like. This article provides the insights of 1905 patent documents from 191 families and discusses in-depth anticancer technology through categorization studies at the level of drug discovery, drug development and treatment and diagnosis. In addition, various cancer targets were correlated with recent technologies so as to identify the white spaces for upcoming technologies. Over a period of 13 years (1990 - 2013) the main focus of Indian cancer research was in the field of synthetic chemistry and natural extracts followed by the pharmaceutical compositions and combinations, whereas, the white spaces for future cancer remedy were identified from research in the areas of cancer stem cell lines, vaccines, gene therapy, nano formulations with targeted drug delivery systems as core and latest technologies.

  13. Effect of Organic Solvents on Microalgae Growth, Metabolism and Industrial Bioproduct Extraction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Miazek, Krystian; Sulc, Radek; Jirout, Tomas; Aguedo, Mario; Goffin, Dorothee

    2017-01-01

    In this review, the effect of organic solvents on microalgae cultures from molecular to industrial scale is presented. Traditional organic solvents and solvents of new generation-ionic liquids (ILs), are considered. Alterations in microalgal cell metabolism and synthesis of target products (pigments, proteins, lipids), as a result of exposure to organic solvents, are summarized. Applications of organic solvents as a carbon source for microalgal growth and production of target molecules are discussed. Possible implementation of various industrial effluents containing organic solvents into microalgal cultivation media, is evaluated. The effect of organic solvents on extraction of target compounds from microalgae is also considered. Techniques for lipid and carotenoid extraction from viable microalgal biomass (milking methods) and dead microalgal biomass (classical methods) are depicted. Moreover, the economic survey of lipid and carotenoid extraction from microalgae biomass, by means of different techniques and solvents, is conducted. PMID:28677659

  14. Drug-targeting methodologies with applications: A review

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstreuer, Clement; Feng, Yu; Childress, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery to solid tumors is a very active research area, focusing mainly on improved drug formulation and associated best delivery methods/devices. Drug-targeting has the potential to greatly improve drug-delivery efficacy, reduce side effects, and lower the treatment costs. However, the vast majority of drug-targeting studies assume that the drug-particles are already at the target site or at least in its direct vicinity. In this review, drug-delivery methodologies, drug types and drug-delivery devices are discussed with examples in two major application areas: (1) inhaled drug-aerosol delivery into human lung-airways; and (2) intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting. The major problem addressed is how to deliver efficiently the drug-particles from the entry/infusion point to the target site. So far, most experimental results are based on animal studies. Concerning pulmonary drug delivery, the focus is on the pros and cons of three inhaler types, i.e., pressurized metered dose inhaler, dry powder inhaler and nebulizer, in addition to drug-aerosol formulations. Computational fluid-particle dynamics techniques and the underlying methodology for a smart inhaler system are discussed as well. Concerning intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting, passive and active targeting are reviewed as well as direct drug-targeting, using optimal delivery of radioactive microspheres to liver tumors as an example. The review concludes with suggestions for future work, considereing both pulmonary drug targeting and direct drug delivery to solid tumors in the vascular system. PMID:25516850

  15. New targeted therapies in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Seicean, Andrada; Petrusel, Livia; Seicean, Radu

    2015-05-28

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have a poor prognosis with a median survival of 4-6 mo and a 5-year survival of less than 5%. Despite therapy with gemcitabine, patient survival does not exceed 6 mo, likely due to natural resistance to gemcitabine. Therefore, it is hoped that more favorable results can be obtained by using guided immunotherapy against molecular targets. This review summarizes the new leading targeted therapies in pancreatic cancers, focusing on passive and specific immunotherapies. Passive immunotherapy may have a role for treatment in combination with radiochemotherapy, which otherwise destroys the immune system along with tumor cells. It includes mainly therapies targeting against kinases, including epidermal growth factor receptor, Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, insulin growth factor-1 receptor, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR and hepatocyte growth factor receptor. Therapies against DNA repair genes, histone deacetylases, microRNA, and pancreatic tumor tissue stromal elements (stromal extracellular matric and stromal pathways) are also discussed. Specific immunotherapies, such as vaccines (whole cell recombinant, peptide, and dendritic cell vaccines), adoptive cell therapy and immunotherapy targeting tumor stem cells, have the role of activating antitumor immune responses. In the future, treatments will likely include personalized medicine, tailored for numerous molecular therapeutic targets of multiple pathogenetic pathways.

  16. A ground moving target emergency tracking method for catastrophe rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Li, D.; Li, G.

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, great disasters happen now and then. Disaster management test the emergency operation ability of the government and society all over the world. Immediately after the occurrence of a great disaster (e.g., earthquake), a massive nationwide rescue and relief operation need to be kicked off instantly. In order to improve the organizations efficiency of the emergency rescue, the organizers need to take charge of the information of the rescuer teams, including the real time location, the equipment with the team, the technical skills of the rescuers, and so on. One of the key factors for the success of emergency operations is the real time location of the rescuers dynamically. Real time tracking methods are used to track the professional rescuer teams now. But volunteers' participation play more and more important roles in great disasters. However, real time tracking of the volunteers will cause many problems, e.g., privacy leakage, expensive data consumption, etc. These problems may reduce the enthusiasm of volunteers' participation for catastrophe rescue. In fact, the great disaster is just small probability event, it is not necessary to track the volunteers (even rescuer teams) every time every day. In order to solve this problem, a ground moving target emergency tracking method for catastrophe rescue is presented in this paper. In this method, the handheld devices using GPS technology to provide the location of the users, e.g., smart phone, is used as the positioning equipment; an emergency tracking information database including the ID of the ground moving target (including the rescuer teams and volunteers), the communication number of the handheld devices with the moving target, and the usually living region, etc., is built in advance by registration; when catastrophe happens, the ground moving targets that living close to the disaster area will be filtered by the usually living region; then the activation short message will be sent to the selected

  17. A distributed computational search strategy for the identification of diagnostics targets: application to finding aptamer targets for methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Keith; Cockell, Simon; Harwood, Colin; Hallinan, Jennifer; Nakjang, Sirintra; Lawry, Beth; Wipat, Anil

    2014-06-30

    The rapid and cost-effective identification of bacterial species is crucial, especially for clinical diagnosis and treatment. Peptide aptamers have been shown to be valuable for use as a component of novel, direct detection methods. These small peptides have a number of advantages over antibodies, including greater specificity and longer shelf life. These properties facilitate their use as the detector components of biosensor devices. However, the identification of suitable aptamer targets for particular groups of organisms is challenging. We present a semi-automated processing pipeline for the identification of candidate aptamer targets from whole bacterial genome sequences. The pipeline can be configured to search for protein sequence fragments that uniquely identify a set of strains of interest. The system is also capable of identifying additional organisms that may be of interest due to their possession of protein fragments in common with the initial set. Through the use of Cloud computing technology and distributed databases, our system is capable of scaling with the rapidly growing genome repositories, and consequently of keeping the resulting data sets up-to-date. The system described is also more generically applicable to the discovery of specific targets for other diagnostic approaches such as DNA probes, PCR primers and antibodies.

  18. A distributed computational search strategy for the identification of diagnostics targets: Application to finding aptamer targets for methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Keith; Cockell, Simon; Harwood, Colin; Hallinan, Jennifer; Nakjang, Sirintra; Lawry, Beth; Wipat, Anil

    2014-06-01

    The rapid and cost-effective identification of bacterial species is crucial, especially for clinical diagnosis and treatment. Peptide aptamers have been shown to be valuable for use as a component of novel, direct detection methods. These small peptides have a number of advantages over antibodies, including greater specificity and longer shelf life. These properties facilitate their use as the detector components of biosensor devices. However, the identification of suitable aptamer targets for particular groups of organisms is challenging. We present a semi-automated processing pipeline for the identification of candidate aptamer targets from whole bacterial genome sequences. The pipeline can be configured to search for protein sequence fragments that uniquely identify a set of strains of interest. The system is also capable of identifying additional organisms that may be of interest due to their possession of protein fragments in common with the initial set. Through the use of Cloud computing technology and distributed databases, our system is capable of scaling with the rapidly growing genome repositories, and consequently of keeping the resulting data sets up-to-date. The system described is also more generically applicable to the discovery of specific targets for other diagnostic approaches such as DNA probes, PCR primers and antibodies.

  19. Advances in targeted genome editing.

    PubMed

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Ousterout, David G; Gersbach, Charles A

    2012-08-01

    New technologies have recently emerged that enable targeted editing of genomes in diverse systems. This includes precise manipulation of gene sequences in their natural chromosomal context and addition of transgenes to specific genomic loci. This progress has been facilitated by advances in engineering targeted nucleases with programmable, site-specific DNA-binding domains, including zinc finger proteins and transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs). Recent improvements have enhanced nuclease performance, accelerated nuclease assembly, and lowered the cost of genome editing. These advances are driving new approaches to many areas of biotechnology, including biopharmaceutical production, agriculture, creation of transgenic organisms and cell lines, and studies of genome structure, regulation, and function. Genome editing is also being investigated in preclinical and clinical gene therapies for many diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-target screening of extractable and non-extractable organic xenobiotics in riverine sediments of Ems and Mulde Rivers, Germany.

    PubMed

    Kronimus, Alexander; Schwarzbauer, Jan

    2007-05-01

    Subaquatic sediment samples derived form Elbe and Mulde Rivers, Germany, were analyzed for extractable and non-extractable anthropogenic organic compounds by a non-target screening approach. Applied methodologies were gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, dispersion extraction and degradation procedures, particularly alkaline and acidic hydrolysis, boron tribromide treatment, ruthenium tetroxide oxidation as well as pyrolysis and TMAH (tetramethylammonium hydroxide)-thermochemolysis. Numerous compounds were identified, including halogenated benzenes, anisoles, styrenes, alkanes, diphenylmethane derivates, anilines, phenols and diphenyl ethers. The results were interpreted with respect to compound specific modes of incorporation as well as to potential sources (e.g. municipal, agricultural, industrial). Extractable and non-extractable fractions differed significantly with respect to their qualitative and quantitative composition. For example, quantities in the extractable and non-extractable fractions of chlorinated benzenes differed up to factor 50. Among other significant results, the investigation revealed hints for a dependence of the mode of incorporation of chlorinated benzenes on their substitution pattern.

  1. miRNA-23 regulates high glucose induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition in human mesotheial peritoneal cells by targeting VDR.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lina; Fan, Yi; Zhang, Xiuli; Ma, Jianfei

    2017-11-15

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition(EMT) is the main reason for peritoneal fibrosis and the mechanism underlying peritoneal EMT were extensively studied in recent years. Recent researches showed that miRNAs were so important in the development of organ EMT and fibrosis, the role of microRNAs on peritoneal dialysis have also been studied. In the current study, we investigated microRNA-23(miR-23) expression in high glucose(HG) induced EMT in human mesotheial peritoneal cells(HPMCs). We found that HG promoted EMT, which was characterized by the upregulation of mesenchymal markers α-SMA and FN and downregulation of epithelial marker E-cadherin. The expression miR-23 showed a significant upregulation when treated with HG. Enhanced expression of miR-23 could aggravate HG induced EMT by targeting VDR, inhibition of miR-23 in HPMCs could reverse HG induced EMT by targeting VDR. Furthermore, VDRshRNA exacerbated the EMT process and reversed miR-23 inhibitor-attenuated EMT process in HPMCs. These data manifested that miR-23 played a key role in HG-induced EMT of HPMCs by targeting VDR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Targeting the zona pellucida for immunocontraception: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Tesarik, J

    1995-12-01

    This minireview summarizes the main data relevant to the development of contraceptive vaccines based on zona pellucida (ZP) antigens, as well as the pros and the cons of this immunocontraceptive strategy. Even though the antifertility efficacy of anti-ZP antibodies in humans is not corroborated by a clear relationship between spontaneous autoimmunization against the ZP and infertility, passive and active immunization studies in laboratory animals have provided convincing results. The contraceptive action of anti-ZP antibodies, targeting events situated upstream of gamete fusion, is devoid of potential ethical concerns related to the destruction of early embryos. The high protein content of the mammalian ZP, knowledge of the complete amino acid sequence of the major ZP proteins, and the high degree of sequence homology between individual species all favour the rapid advancement of anti-ZP vaccine projects. However, certain sequences of ZP proteins, when incorporated into the vaccine construct, activate CD4+ T cells of the recipient organism to direct a cellular immune attack (autoimmune oophoritis) to other functionally relevant ovarian components (primordial follicles, steroidogenic cells). The search for the optimal combination of B cell and T cell epitopes in the vaccine construct will hopefully overcome this problem.

  3. Off-target Effects in CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Genome Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Tee, Louis Y; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Huang, Qun-Shan; Yang, Shi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 is a versatile genome-editing technology that is widely used for studying the functionality of genetic elements, creating genetically modified organisms as well as preclinical research of genetic disorders. However, the hig