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Sample records for maintain cardiac output

  1. Cardiac output after burn injury.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, J. M.; Shakespeare, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    Cardiac output after burn injury has been measured by the non-invasive method of impedance plethysmography. An initial study of 143 normal subjects was undertaken in order to investigate variations in cardiac output with age. Fifteen patients were monitored during resuscitation after extensive burns. Fourteen patients showed a depression of stroke volume below the lower limits of the normal range, derived from the initial study on normal people. PMID:6691694

  2. Mathematics and the Heart: Understanding Cardiac Output

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champanerkar, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    This paper illustrates a biological application of the concepts of relative change and area under a curve, from mathematics. We study two biological measures "relative change in cardiac output" and "cardiac output", which are predictors of heart blockages and other related ailments. Cardiac output refers to the quantity of…

  3. Seasonal variations of cardiac output in rats.

    PubMed

    Back, G; Strubelt, O

    1975-11-15

    Cardiac output of rats shows seasonal variations with low values in spring and summer and high ones in autumn and winter. The stroke volume was much more implicated in these changes than the heart rate. The seasonal changes of cardiac output are probably due to changes of thyroid function.

  4. Cardiac output measurement in pediatric anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Skowno, Justin J; Broadhead, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Maintenance of cardiovascular stability is crucial to safe anesthetic practice, but measurement of cardiac output has been technically challenging, particularly in pediatric patients. Cardiovascular monitoring has therefore generally relied upon pressure-based measurements, as opposed to flow-based measurements. The measurement of cardiac output under anesthesia and in critical care has recently become easier as a result of new techniques of measurement. This article reviews the basic concepts of and rationale for cardiac output monitoring, and then describes the techniques available for monitoring in clinical practice.

  5. Methods in pharmacology: measurement of cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Geerts, Bart F; Aarts, Leon P; Jansen, Jos R

    2011-01-01

    Many methods of cardiac output measurement have been developed, but the number of methods useful for human pharmacological studies is limited. The ‘holy grail’ for the measurement of cardiac output would be a method that is accurate, precise, operator independent, fast responding, non-invasive, continuous, easy to use, cheap and safe. This method does not exist today. In this review on cardiac output methods used in pharmacology, the Fick principle, indicator dilution techniques, arterial pulse contour analysis, ultrasound and bio-impedance are reviewed. PMID:21284692

  6. Cardiac output determinations with ear piece densitometry.

    PubMed

    Hedenstierna, G; Schildt, B

    1975-01-01

    The results of cardiac output determinations by a dye dilution technique were compared using (a) a dichromatic earpiece which was calibrated as a flow-through cuvette, but also permitted automatic computing by virtue of a pressure capsule, and (b) an ordinary flow-through densitometer. Eleven subjects, some with cardio-pulmonary disease, were investigated. Cardiac outputs were systematically overestimated when automatically computed. The results obtained by manual calculation with the ear-piece corresponded more nearly with those derived from the flow-through cuvette, but still with a deviation from the identity line and with a residual standard deviation of 0.8 l/min. Double determinations had a residual standard deviation of 0.7 l/min. Despite its ease of handling, an earpiece densitometer seems to be too unreliable to be suitable for routine use.

  7. Pathophysiology of Post-Operative Low Cardiac Output Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Epting, Conrad L; McBride, Mary E; Wald, Eric L; Costello, John M

    2016-01-01

    Low cardiac output syndrome frequently complicates the post-operative care of infants and children following cardiac surgery. The onset of low cardiac output follows a predictable course in the hours following cardiopulmonary bypass, as myocardial performance declines in the face of an elevated demand for cardiac output. When demand outstrips supply, shock ensues, and early recognition and intervention can decrease mortality. Multifactorial in etiology, this article will discuss the pathophysiology of low cardiac output syndrome, including myocardial depression following bypass, altered cardiac loading conditions, and inflammation driving a hypermetabolic state. Contributions from altered neurohormonal, thyroid, and adrenal axes will also be discussed. Sources included the clinical experiences of four cardiac intensivists, supported throughout by primary sources and relevant reviews obtained through PubMed searches and from seminal textbooks in the field. This article addresses the second of eight topics comprising the special issue entitled "Pharmacologic strategies with afterload reduction in low cardiac output syndrome after pediatric cardiac surgery".

  8. Methods and apparatus for determining cardiac output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J. (Inventor); Mukkamala, Ramakrishna (Inventor); Sherman, Derin A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for determining a dynamical property of the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree using long time scale information, i.e., information obtained from measurements over time scales greater than a single cardiac cycle. In one aspect, the invention provides a method and apparatus for monitoring cardiac output (CO) from a single blood pressure signal measurement obtained at any site in the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree or from any related measurement including, for example, fingertip photoplethysmography.According to the method the time constant of the arterial tree, defined to be the product of the total peripheral resistance (TPR) and the nearly constant arterial compliance, is determined by analyzing the long time scale variations (greater than a single cardiac cycle) in any of these blood pressure signals. Then, according to Ohm's law, a value proportional to CO may be determined from the ratio of the blood pressure signal to the estimated time constant. The proportional CO values derived from this method may be calibrated to absolute CO, if desired, with a single, absolute measure of CO (e.g., thermodilution). The present invention may be applied to invasive radial arterial blood pressure or pulmonary arterial blood pressure signals which are routinely measured in intensive care units and surgical suites or to noninvasively measured peripheral arterial blood pressure signals or related noninvasively measured signals in order to facilitate the clinical monitoring of CO as well as TPR.

  9. Cardiac output response to exercise in chronic cardiac failure patients.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Taira; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Kurano, Miwa; Takano, Haruhito; Iida, Haruko; Morita, Toshihiro; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Hirata, Yasunobu; Nagai, Ryozo; Nakajima, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the precise pattern of stroke volume (SV) response during exercise in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) compared with age-matched controls. Fourteen patients with CHF and 7 controls performed symptom-limited bicycle exercise testing with respiratory gas exchange measurement. Patients were classified into group A (n = 7) with peak VO2 ≥ 18.0 mL/kg/minute and group B (n = 7) with peak VO2 < 18.0 mL/kg/ minute. SV and cardiac output (CO) were continuously measured during exercise using a novel thoracic impedance method (Physioflow). CO and SV were lower in the group B patients than those in controls at peak exercise [CO: 11.3 ± 1.0 (SE) versus 15.6 ± 0.9 L/minute, P < 0.05, SV: 89 ± 6 versus 110 ± 6 mL, P < 0.05]. SV reached its peak levels during submaximal exercise and remained close to the peak value until peak exercise in 6 of 7 group B patients (86%). On the other hand, it progressively increased until peak exercise in 6 of 7 controls (86%) and 5 of 7 group A patients (71%). In all subjects, CO at peak exercise was more closely correlated with SV at peak exercise (r = 0.86, P < 0.001) than with peak heart rate (r = 0.69, P < 0.001). CHF patients with impaired exercise capacity had attenuated increment of CO during exercise, and SV reached its peak levels during submaximal exercise.

  10. Evaluation of transpulmonary thermodilution as a method to measure cardiac output in anesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Kim E; Kerr, Carolyn L; McDonell, Wayne N

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of a transpulmonary thermodilution (Trans) technique for the measurement of cardiac output, and to determine the agreement between Trans and conventional thermodilution (TD) in anesthetized cats. Using each technique, cardiac output was measured in 5 mature cats (weights 2.4 to 5.6 kg) anesthetized with isoflurane. To induce different levels of cardiac output in each cat, anesthesia was maintained at > 1.5x end-tidal minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane, and at 1.3x end-tidal isoflurane MAC with and without administration of dobutamine. At least 2 comparisons between TD and Trans values were made at each cardiac output rate. Thirty-two of the 42 recorded comparisons were analyzed. Linear regression analysis (TD vs Trans) yielded an r(2) value of 0.83. The mean bias (TD-Trans) was -3.7 mL/kg/min with limits of agreement of -35.9 to 28.5 mL/kg/min. The concordance coefficient was 0.91. The Trans method showed good relationship and good agreement with TD in anesthetized cats. The Trans method is a relatively noninvasive, practical, and safe method to measure cardiac output in anesthetized cats.

  11. Evaluation of noninvasive cardiac output methods during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alan D.; Barrows, Linda H.; Rashid, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.

    1992-01-01

    Noninvasive techniques to estimate cardiac output (Qc) will be used during future space flight. This retrospective literature survey compared the Qc techniques of carbon dioxide rebreathing (CO2-R), CO2 single breath (CO2-S), Doppler (DOP), impedance (IM), and inert gas (IG: acetylene or nitrous oxide) to direct (DIR) assessments measured at rest and during exercise.

  12. Less-invasive cardiac output monitoring by earpiece densitometry.

    PubMed

    Grasberger, R C; Yeston, N S

    1986-06-01

    Cardiac output was measured by thermodilution and ear densitometry in surgical ICU patients who had pulmonary arterial catheters. Overall comparison based on 56 sets of triplicate measurements revealed a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.76 between the two techniques. Although ear densitometry was more accurate with injection via the antecubital vein (r = 0.88) vs. more distal injection (r = 0.67), these data suggest that this technique lacks the accuracy for clinical application.

  13. Measurement of cardiac output from dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Seonghwan; Scalzetti, Ernest M.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce a method of estimating cardiac output from the dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT that is primarily used to determine the optimal time window of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Methods: Dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT series, acquired for eight patients, were retrospectively analyzed. The dynamic CT series was acquired, prior to the main CTPA, in cine mode (1 frame/s) for a single slice at the level of the main pulmonary artery covering the cross sections of ascending aorta (AA) and descending aorta (DA) during the infusion of iodinated contrast. The time series of contrast changes obtained for DA, which is the downstream of AA, was assumed to be related to the time series for AA by the convolution with a delay function. The delay time constant in the delay function, representing the average time interval between the cross sections of AA and DA, was determined by least square error fitting between the convoluted AA time series and the DA time series. The cardiac output was then calculated by dividing the volume of the aortic arch between the cross sections of AA and DA (estimated from the single slice CT image) by the average time interval, and multiplying the result by a correction factor. Results: The mean cardiac output value for the six patients was 5.11 (l/min) (with a standard deviation of 1.57 l/min), which is in good agreement with the literature value; the data for the other two patients were too noisy for processing. Conclusions: The dynamic single-slice pulmonary circulation time CT series also can be used to estimate cardiac output.

  14. Non-invasive assessment of cardiac output in children.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, J R; Ferguson, J; Hiscox, J; Rawles, J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke distance, the systolic velocity integral of aortic blood flow, is a linear analogue of stroke volume; its product with heart rate is minute distance, analogous to cardiac output. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility of assessing cardiac output in children with a simple non-invasive Doppler ultrasound technique, and to determine the normal range of values. METHODS: Peak aortic blood velocity, stroke distance, and minute distance were measured through the suprasternal window in 166 children (mean age 9.6 years, range 2-14) using a portable non-imaging Doppler ultrasound instrument. RESULTS: The technique was well tolerated by all the children participating. Mean peak aortic blood velocity was 138 cm/s and was independent of age. Mean stroke distance was 31.8 cm and showed a small but significant increase with age; mean minute distance was 2490 cm and fell with age, as did heart rate. CONCLUSIONS: Suprasternal Doppler ultrasound measurement of stroke distance is a convenient, well tolerated, non-invasive technique for the assessment of cardiac output in children. The normal range of values during childhood has been established. The technique has great potential for assessing hypovolaemia in children. Images p307-a PMID:9785155

  15. A computerised dichromatic earpiece densitometer for the measurement of cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P S; Crowther, A; Jenkins, B S; Webb-Peploe, M M; Coltart, D J

    1979-07-01

    This study assesses a precalibrated dichromatic earpiece densitometer and microprocessor for the measurement of cardiac output by indocyanine green dye dilution. The measured cardiac output is compared with values of cardiac output simultaneously determined using a cuvette densitometer. The microprocessor computation of cardiac output agreed very closely with the cardiac output determined by manual calculation from the same dye dilution curves (standard deviation +/- 1.47%). The reproducibility of the earpiece densitometer (standard deviation +/- 5.2%) was virtually identical to that of the cuvette densitometer (+/- 5.3%). In a comparison of earpiece and cuvette densitometers for 60 measurements of cardiac output following pulmonary arterial injection of dye and for 50 measurements following femoral venous injection of dye, correlation coefficients were 0.83 and 0.78 and the standard deviations of the differences of simultaneous measurements were 7.2% and 8.3% respectively. The instrument offers an accurate reproducible and relatively noninvasive technique for measuring cardiac output.

  16. A fiberoptic reflection densitometer with cardiac output calculator.

    PubMed

    Landsman, M L; Knop, N; Mook, G A; Zijlstra, W G

    1979-02-14

    A catheter-tip densitometer for indocyanine green is described consisting of a cardiac catheter containing optical fibers, an incandescent light source, a light detection unit and a processing unit. Half of the optical fibers guide the light to the blood at the tip of the catheter, the other half the back-scattered (reflected) light to the detection unit. In the detection unit the light is measured by two silicium barrier layer photocells after it has been split into two beams by a beam splitter. In the measuring channel the light passes an 800 nm filter before reaching the photocell. When fiberoptic catheters with glass fibers are employed, the other channel, used for compensation of non-specific effects such as blood flow variations, contains no filter, thus measuring light in a broad spectral band. It is shown that in this way compensation of flow effects may be about two times better than when a 920 nm filter is used. When using plastic optical fibers a 950 nm filter must be used, because above lambda = 850 nm plastic fibers transmit only a band around that wavelength (950 nm). At zero dye concentration the densitometer output or ratio of compensating and measuring photocell output R/R800 is almost insensitive to changes in haemoglobin concentration. When the blood contains dye, however, the influence of haemoglobin concentration is considerable. The densitometer output R/R800 is linearly related to dye concentration up to 50 mg . 1-1, the output R920/R800 up to 30 mg . 1(-1). The output R/R800 decreases with decreasing oxygen saturation; the slope of the calibration line, however, appears to be unaffected. The processing unit also contains an analog cardiac output calculator consisting of an integrator and a divider. Central dye dilution curves recorded from the pulmonary artery after injection of dye into the right atrium or a caval vein come down to the baseline. At this moment the reading of a digital voltmeter displaying the divider output calibrated in 1

  17. Cardiac output and venous return as interdependent and independent variables.

    PubMed

    Badeer, H S

    1981-01-01

    Under steady states the heart pumps whatever it receives and receives whatever it pumps. In other words, cardiac output (CO) and venous return (VR) are equal and the distinction between the two seems unnecessary. However, under nonsteady states the two are temporarily unequal and the distinction becomes significant. VR varies directly with the difference in pressure between the end of systemic capillaries and the right ventricle during filling and inversely with the total resistance of the venous system. Thus, the energy for VR is derived from CO. In some transient states VR becomes an independent variable and CO dependent until a new steady state is reached (e.g., exercise, hemorrhage, fevers, hyperthyroidism, severe anemia, etc.). In other conditions the opposite is true (e.g., myocardial infarction, altered ventricular contractility, etc.). Explanation of changes in cardiac output in various perturbations of circulation are based on the identification of the independent variable (VR or CO) in a given physiologic or pathologic condition during the period that a nonsteady state exists.

  18. Cardiac output estimation using pulmonary mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) decreases cardiac output (CO). Accurate measurement of CO is highly invasive and is not ideal for all MV critically ill patients. However, the link between the PEEP used in MV, and CO provides an opportunity to assess CO via MV therapy and other existing measurements, creating a CO measure without further invasiveness. This paper examines combining models of diffusion resistance and lung mechanics, to help predict CO changes due to PEEP. The CO estimator uses an initial measurement of pulmonary shunt, and estimations of shunt changes due to PEEP to predict CO at different levels of PEEP. Inputs to the cardiac model are the PV loops from the ventilator, as well as the oxygen saturation values using known respiratory inspired oxygen content. The outputs are estimates of pulmonary shunt and CO changes due to changes in applied PEEP. Data from two published studies are used to assess and initially validate this model. The model shows the effect on oxygenation due to decreased CO and decreased shunt, resulting from increased PEEP. It concludes that there is a trade off on oxygenation parameters. More clinically importantly, the model also examines how the rate of CO drop with increased PEEP can be used as a method to determine optimal PEEP, which may be used to optimise MV therapy with respect to the gas exchange achieved, as well as accounting for the impact on the cardiovascular system and its management. PMID:21108836

  19. Fiberoptic ear densitometer for measurement of cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Sekelj, P; Retfalvi, S; Lavoie, A

    1978-02-01

    This study presents theory, operation, and evaluation of a new earpiece method for measurement of cardiac output using the multichannel fiberoptic system recently described. The system includes an earpiece of simple design and small size suitable for applications in all subjects regardless of their age or size. The method requires no withdrawal and analysis of blood samples for calibration. Compared with earlier techniques the present method, based on measurements in three distinct absorption bands in the infrared, provides an increase in accuracy of the estimations. This accuracy was tested in children undergoing routine cardiac catheterization. Comparisons were made in 39 instances (25 subjects) between simultaneously carried out determinations by the earpiece and cuvette densitometer methods. The agreement was good (r = 0.97, p less than 0.001), with a standard deviation of the differences of 0.479 litre/min, or 10.2% of the mean values derived from the cuvette curves. The regression equation describing the values derived from ear curves in terms of values from the cuvette curves differed only slightly from unity (Y = 0.167 + 0.985X). The usefulness of the fiberoptic earpiece technique both in clinical investigations and cardiovascular diagnosis was demonstrated.

  20. Comparison of three methods for cardiac output determination in cats.

    PubMed

    Dyson, D H; Allen, D G; McDonell, W N

    1985-12-01

    Cardiac output (CO) was measured in sodium pentobarbital-anesthetized cats over a wide range of blood flow rates. In 10 cats, CO was measured simultaneously, using Fick determination and thermodilution techniques. Echocardiography was used to estimate contractility of the heart by measuring percentage change in minor diameter and velocity of circumferential fiber shortening. These indices were compared with CO by the other techniques. Echocardiographic equations used for CO determination in man were evaluated for reliability in the cat. Thermodilution and Fick determination correlated best with low CO (r = 0.89) and less with intermediate (r = 0.69) and high (r = 0.75) CO. Percentage change in minor diameter and velocity of circumferential fiber shortening correlated with thermodilution measurements of the cardiac index (r = 0.71 and r = 0.84, respectively). The value of echocardiography for CO estimation was questionable, using existing equations. Fick determination of CO was more inconsistent and was more prone to technical error than was thermodilution.

  1. Thermodynamics of the heart: Relation between cardiac output and oxygen consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Mituo; Sakane, Kumiko K.; Bertolotti, Simone A.

    2008-06-01

    A thermodynamic approach is used to derive a relation between cardiac output and rate of oxygen consumption. As an example, the relation is used to calculate the cardiac output of a young woman exercising on a treadmill. The results can be understood by undergraduates without any previous knowledge of human physiology.

  2. Cardiac output during high afterload artificial lung attachment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongho; Sato, Hitoshi; Griffith, Grant W; Cook, Keith E

    2009-01-01

    Attachment of thoracic artificial lungs (TALs) can increase right ventricular (RV) afterload and decrease cardiac output (CO) under certain conditions. However, there is no established means of predicting the extent of RV dysfunction. The zeroth harmonic impedance modulus, Z0, was thus examined to determine its effectiveness at predicting CO during high afterload TAL attachment. The MC3 Biolung was attached in four adult sheep groups based on baseline (BL) pulmonary vascular resistance and TAL attachment mode: normal, parallel (n=7); normal, series (n=7); chronic pulmonary hypertension, parallel (n=5), and chronic pulmonary hypertension, series (n=5). The resistance of each attachment mode was increased incrementally and instantaneous pulmonary system hemodynamic data were acquired at each increment. The change in Z0 from BL, DeltaZ0, and percent change in CO (DeltaCO%) were then calculated to determine their relationship. The DeltaCO% varied significantly with DeltaZ0 (p<10(-40)) and DeltaZ02 (p<10(-4)) but not with the attachment and pulmonary hemodynamics group. The relationship between the variables for all sheep groups was DeltaCO%=0.215DeltaZ0(2)-7.14DeltaZ0+2.94 (R2=0.82) for DeltaZ0 in mm Hg/(L/min). Therefore, Z0 is an effective index for determining the CO during TAL attachment in both attachment modes with and without elevated pulmonary vascular resistance.

  3. Immediate effect on cardiac output of reversion to sinus rhythm from rapid arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Wright, J S; Fabian, J; Epstein, E J

    1970-08-08

    Cardiac output was estimated immediately before and after conversion to sinus rhythm in nine patients with rapid arrhythmias. Conversion was by synchronized direct-current shock in eight patients, and by direct atrial wall stimulation in the other. In seven patients there was an immediate increase in cardiac output after restoration of sinus rhythm. The percentage increase in output was directly proportional to the rate of the arrhythmia immediately before conversion (r=0.91, P<0.01). The critical heart rate, above which an immediate increase in cardiac output might be expected on conversion to sinus rhythm, appeared in these patients to be about 160 beats per minute.

  4. High flow variant postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome amplifies the cardiac output response to exercise in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pianosi, Paolo T; Goodloe, Adele H; Soma, David; Parker, Ken O; Brands, Chad K; Fischer, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by chronic fatigue and dizziness and affected individuals by definition have orthostatic intolerance and tachycardia. There is considerable overlap of symptoms in patients with POTS and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), prompting speculation that POTS is akin to a deconditioned state. We previously showed that adolescents with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) have excessive heart rate (HR) during, and slower HR recovery after, exercise - hallmarks of deconditioning. We also noted exaggerated cardiac output during exercise which led us to hypothesize that tachycardia could be a manifestation of a high output state rather than a consequence of deconditioning. We audited records of adolescents presenting with long-standing history of any mix of fatigue, dizziness, nausea, who underwent both head-up tilt table test and maximal exercise testing with measurement of cardiac output at rest plus 2-3 levels of exercise, and determined the cardiac output () versus oxygen uptake () relationship. Subjects with chronic fatigue were diagnosed with POTS if their HR rose ≥40 beat·min(-1) with head-up tilt. Among 107 POTS patients the distribution of slopes for the , relationship was skewed toward higher slopes but showed two peaks with a split at ~7.0 L·min(-1) per L·min(-1), designated as normal (5.08 ± 1.17, N = 66) and hyperkinetic (8.99 ± 1.31, N = 41) subgroups. In contrast, cardiac output rose appropriately with in 141 patients with chronic fatigue but without POTS, exhibiting a normal distribution and an average slope of 6.10 ± 2.09 L·min(-1) per L·min(-1). Mean arterial blood pressure and pulse pressure from rest to exercise rose similarly in both groups. We conclude that 40% of POTS adolescents demonstrate a hyperkinetic circulation during exercise. We attribute this to failure of normal regional vasoconstriction during exercise, such that patients must increase flow through an

  5. Cardiac output during exercise: a comparison of four methods.

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, C; Rasmussen, P; Sørensen, H; Zaar, M; Hvidtfeldt, M; Pichon, A; Secher, N H; Lundby, C

    2015-02-01

    Several techniques assessing cardiac output (Q) during exercise are available. The extent to which the measurements obtained from each respective technique compares to one another, however, is unclear. We quantified Q simultaneously using four methods: the Fick method with blood obtained from the right atrium (Q(Fick-M)), Innocor (inert gas rebreathing; Q(Inn)), Physioflow (impedance cardiography; Q(Phys)), and Nexfin (pulse contour analysis; Q(Pulse)) in 12 male subjects during incremental cycling exercise to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FiO2  = 12%). While all four methods reported a progressive increase in Q with exercise intensity, the slopes of the Q/oxygen uptake (VO2) relationship differed by up to 50% between methods in both normoxia [4.9 ± 0.3, 3.9 ± 0.2, 6.0 ± 0.4, 4.8 ± 0.2 L/min per L/min (mean ± SE) for Q(Fick-M), Q(Inn), QP hys and Q(Pulse), respectively; P = 0.001] and hypoxia (7.2 ± 0.7, 4.9 ± 0.5, 6.4 ± 0.8 and 5.1 ± 0.4 L/min per L/min; P = 0.04). In hypoxia, the increase in the Q/VO2 slope was not detected by Nexfin. In normoxia, Q increases by 5-6 L/min per L/min increase in VO2, which is within the 95% confidence interval of the Q/VO2 slopes determined by the modified Fick method, Physioflow, and Nexfin apparatus while Innocor provided a lower value, potentially reflecting recirculation of the test gas into the pulmonary circulation. Thus, determination of Q during exercise depends significantly on the applied method.

  6. Measurement of cardiac output in adult and newborn animals by ascorbic acid dilution.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, J K; Haselby, K A; Paradise, R R

    1984-05-01

    We have developed an ascorbic acid-dilution method for measuring cardiac output which requires minimal blood withdrawal. Ascorbate is injected into a central venous catheter. The indicator-dilution curve is obtained by drawing blood from an arterial catheter through an amperometric cell at 0.96 ml/min for 35 s. The current is measured by a picoammeter . A calibration curve is obtained in 15 s prior to each indicator-dilution curve. An on-line digital computer measures the curve areas and calculates the cardiac output. Cardiac outputs of heparinized dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital and halothane measured by this method (AA) compared closely to cardiac outputs measured by the dye-dilution method (CG) (AA = 0.96 CG + 20 ml/min, r = 0.98). Both the cardiac output and the arterial blood pressure remained stable during replicate measurements of the cardiac output of 1-day-old piglets. This system allows cardiac output determinations of neonatal subjects without excessive blood removal and, with further development, should be practical in human neonates.

  7. Reproducibility of cardiac power output and other cardiopulmonary exercise indices in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Seferovic, Petar M; Nunan, David; Donovan, Gay; Trenell, Michael I; Grocott-Mason, Richard; Brodie, David A

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac power output is a direct measure of overall cardiac function that integrates both flow- and pressure-generating capacities of the heart. The present study assessed the reproducibility of cardiac power output and other more commonly reported cardiopulmonary exercise variables in patients with chronic heart failure. Metabolic, ventilatory and non-invasive (inert gas re-breathing) central haemodynamic measurements were undertaken at rest and near-maximal exercise of the modified Bruce protocol in 19 patients with stable chronic heart failure. The same procedure was repeated 7 days later to assess reproducibility. Cardiac power output was calculated as the product of cardiac output and mean arterial pressure. Resting central haemodynamic variables demonstrate low CV (coefficient of variation) (ranging from 3.4% for cardiac output and 5.6% for heart rate). The CV for resting metabolic and ventilatory measurements ranged from 8.2% for respiratory exchange ratio and 14.2% for absolute values of oxygen consumption. The CV of anaerobic threshold, peak oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and respiratory exchange ratio ranged from 3.8% (for anaerobic threshold) to 6.4% (for relative peak oxygen consumption), with minute ventilation having a CV of 11.1%. Near-maximal exercise cardiac power output and cardiac output had CVs of 4.1 and 2.2%, respectively. Cardiac power output demonstrates good reproducibility suggesting that there is no need for performing more than one cardiopulmonary exercise test. As a direct measure of cardiac function (dysfunction) and an excellent prognostic marker, it is strongly advised in the assessment of patients with chronic heart failure undergoing cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

  8. Use of the single-breath method of estimating cardiac output during exercise-stress testing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buderer, M. C.; Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Mauldin, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    The single-breath cardiac output measurement technique of Kim et al. (1966) has been modified for use in obtaining cardiac output measurements during exercise-stress tests on Apollo astronauts. The modifications involve the use of a respiratory mass spectrometer for data acquisition and a digital computer program for data analysis. The variation of the modified method for triplicate steady-state cardiac output measurements was plus or minus 1 liter/min. The combined physiological and methodological variation seen during a set of three exercise tests on a series of subjects was 1 to 2.5 liter/min. Comparison of the modified method with the direct Fick technique showed that although the single-breath values were consistently low, the scatter of data was small and the correlation between the two methods was high. Possible reasons for the low single-breath cardiac output values are discussed.

  9. Comparison of cardiac output determined by bioimpedance and bioreactance methods at rest and during exercise.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Moore, Sarah; Hallsworth, Kate; Fattakhova, Gulnar; Thoma, Christian; Trenell, Michael I

    2012-04-01

    Bioreactance is a novel non-invasive method for cardiac output measurement that involves the analysis of blood flow-dependent changes in the phase shifts of electrical currents applied across the chest. The present study (1) compared resting and exercise cardiac outputs determined by bioreactance and bioimpedance methods and those estimated from measured oxygen consumption, (2) determined the relationship between cardiac output and oxygen consumption, and (3) assessed the agreement between the bioreactance and bioimpedance methods. Twelve healthy subjects (aged 30 ± 4 years) performed graded cardiopulmonary exercise test on a recumbent cycle ergometer on two occasions, 1 week apart. Cardiac output was monitored at rest, at 30, 50, 70, 90, 150 W and at peak exercise intensity by bioreactance and bioimpedance and expired gases collected. Resting cardiac output was not significantly different between the bioreactance and bioimpedance methods (6.2 ± 1.4 vs. 6.5 ± 1.4 l min(-1), P = 0.42). During exercise cardiac outputs were correlated with oxygen uptake for both bioreactance (r = 0.84, P < 0.01) and bioimpedance techniques (r = 0.82, P < 0.01). At peak exercise bioimpedance estimated significantly lower cardiac outputs than both bioreactance and theoretically calculated cardiac output (14.3 ± 2.6 vs. 17.5 ± 5.2 vs. 16.9 ± 4.9 l min(-1), P < 0.05). Bland-Altman analyses including data from rest and exercise demonstrated that the bioimpedance method reported ~1.5 l min(-1) lower cardiac output than bioreactance with lower and upper limits of agreement of -2.98 to 5.98 l min(-1). Bioimpedance and bioreactance methods provide different cardiac output estimates, particularly at high exercise intensity, and therefore the two methods cannot be used interchangeably. In contrast with bioimpedance, bioreactance cardiac outputs are similar to those estimated from measured oxygen consumption.

  10. Evaluation of cardiac output by 5 arterial pulse contour techniques using trend interchangeability method

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Diouf, Momar; de Wilde, Robert B.P.; Dupont, Hervé; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Lorne, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac output measurement with pulse contour analysis is a continuous, mini-invasive, operator-independent, widely used, and cost-effective technique, which could be helpful to assess changes in cardiac output. The 4-quadrant plot and the polar plot have been described to compare the changes between 2 measurements performed under different conditions, and the direction of change by using different methods of measurements. However, the 4-quadrant plot and the polar plot present a number of limitations, with a risk of misinterpretation in routine clinical practice. We describe a new trend interchangeability method designed to objectively define the interchangeability of each change of a variable. Using the repeatability of the reference method, we classified each change as either uninterpretable or interpretable and then as either noninterchangeable, in the gray zone or interchangeable. An interchangeability rate can then be calculated by the number of interchangeable changes divided by the total number of interpretable changes. In this observational study, we used this objective method to assess cardiac output changes with 5 arterial pulse contour techniques (Wesseling's method, LiDCO, PiCCO, Hemac method, and Modelflow) in comparison with bolus thermodilution technique as reference method in 24 cardiac surgery patients. A total of 172 cardiac output variations were available from the 199 data points: 88 (51%) were uninterpretable, according to the first step of the method. The second step of the method, based on the 84 (49%) interpretable variations, showed that only 18 (21%) to 30 (36%) variations were interchangeable regardless of the technique used. None of pulse contour cardiac output technique could be interchangeable with bolus thermodilution to assess changes in cardiac output using the trend interchangeability method in cardiac surgery patients. Future studies may consider using this method to assess interchangeability of changes between different

  11. Comparison of impedance cardiography and dye dilution method for measuring cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Spiering, W; van Es, P N; de Leeuw, P W

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To assess the degree of agreement between impedance cardiography, using the NCCOM3-R7 device, and the gold standard—the dye dilution method—both under basal conditions and after stimulation of cardiac output.
Patients—35 paired measurements in five healthy male volunteers.
Interventions—To obtain higher levels of cardiac output, cardiac performance was stimulated with a dopamine infusion.
Results—In 35 paired measurements, the mean of all the impedance values was higher than that of the dye dilution values, at 10.2 v 7.4 l/min (p < 0.0001). The mean discrepancy between the two methods was 3.3 l/min, and the mean bias −2.9 l/min, with limits of agreement of −9.0 and 3.2 l/min. A change in cardiac output could not adequately be predicted by the NCCOM3-R7. In 20 of 25 measurements obtained during continuous intravenous dopamine infusions there was a rise in dye dilution cardiac output (range 0.2 to 5.9 l/min). Neither the magnitude nor the direction of the change in dye dilution values corresponded with the change measured by impedance cardiography. The mean discrepancy here between the two methods was 1.8 l/min, and the mean bias −0.8 l/min, with limits of agreement of −4.9 and 3.3 l/min.
Conclusions—In healthy volunteers, impedance cardiography with NCCOM3-R7 is inadequate for assessing cardiac output when compared with the dye dilution method.

 Keywords: cardiac output;  impedance cardiography;  dye dilution PMID:9659188

  12. Cardiac power output and its response to exercise in athletes and non-athletes.

    PubMed

    Klasnja, Aleksandar V; Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Barak, Otto F; Popadic Gacesa, Jelena Z; Lukac, Damir D; Grujic, Nikola G

    2013-05-01

    Cardiac power output (CPO) is an integrative measure of overall cardiac function as it accounts for both, flow- and pressure-generating capacities of the heart. The purpose of the present study was twofold: (i) to assess cardiac power output and its response to exercise in athletes and non-athletes and (ii) to determine the relationship between cardiac power output and reserve and selected measures of cardiac function and structure. Twenty male athletes and 32 age- and gender-matched healthy sedentary controls participated in this study. CPO was calculated as the product of cardiac output and mean arterial pressure, expressed in watts. Measures of hemodynamic status, cardiac structure and pumping capability were assessed by echocardiography. CPO was assessed at rest and after peak bicycle exercise. At rest, the two groups had similar values of cardiac power output (1·08 ± 0·2 W versus 1·1 ± 0·24 W, P>0·05), but the athletes demonstrated lower systolic blood pressure (109·5 ± 6·2 mmHg versus 117·2 ± 8·2 mmHg, P<0·05) and thicker posterior wall of the left ventricle (9·8 ± 1 mm versus 9 ± 1·1 mm, P<0·05). Peak CPO was higher in athletes (5·87 ± 0·75 W versus 5·4 ± 0·69 W, P<0·05) as was cardiac reserve (4·92 ± 0·66 W versus 4·26 ± 0·61 W, P<0·05), respectively. Peak exercise CPO and reserve were only moderately correlated with end-diastolic volume (r = 0·54; r = 0·46, P<0·05) and end-diastolic left ventricular internal diameter (r = 0·48; r = 0·42, P<0·05), respectively. Athletes demonstrated greater maximal cardiac pumping capability and reserve than non-athletes. The study provides new evidence that resting measures of cardiac structure and function need to be considered with caution in interpretation of maximal cardiac performance.

  13. Noninvasive measurement of cardiac output during exercise by inert gas rebreathing technique.

    PubMed

    Cattadori, Gaia; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2009-04-01

    Reduced exercise tolerance and dyspnea during exercise are hallmarks of heart failure syndrome. Exercise capacity and various parameters of cardiopulmonary response to exercise are of important prognostic value. All the available parameters only indirectly reflect left ventricular dysfunction and hemodynamic adaptation to an increased demand. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac output, especially during an incremental exercise stress test, would allow the direct measure of cardiac reserve and may become the gold standard for prognostic evaluation in the future.

  14. Validation of a new spectrometer for noninvasive measurement of cardiac output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Marc M.; Kumar, Sasi; Moss, John A.; Wagner, Peter D.

    2004-07-01

    Acetylene is a blood-soluble gas and for many years its uptake rate during rebreathing tests has been used to calculate the flow rate of blood through the lungs (normally equal to cardiac output) as well as the volume of lung tissue. A new, portable, noninvasive instrument for cardiac output determination using the acetylene uptake method is described. The analyzer relies on nondispersive IR absorption spectroscopy as its principle of operation and is configured for extractive (side-stream) sampling. The instrument affords exceptionally fast (30 ms, 10%-90%, 90%-10%, at 500 mL min-1 flow rates), interference-free, simultaneous measurement of acetylene, sulfur hexafluoride (an insoluble reference gas used in the cardiac output calculation), and carbon dioxide (to determine alveolar ventilation), with good (typically ±2% full-scale) signal-to-noise ratios. Comparison tests with a mass spectrometer using serially diluted calibration gas samples gave excellent (R2>0.99) correlation for all three gases, validating the IR system's linearity and accuracy. A similar level of agreement between the devices also was observed during human subject C2H2 uptake tests (at rest and under incremental levels of exercise), with the instruments sampling a common extracted gas stream. Cardiac output measurements by both instruments were statistically equivalent from rest to 90% of maximal oxygen consumption; the physiological validity of the measurements was confirmed by the expected linear relationship between cardiac output and oxygen consumption, with both the slope and intercept in the published range. These results indicate that the portable, low-cost, rugged prototype analyzer discussed here is suitable for measuring cardiac output noninvasively in a point-of-care setting.

  15. Peripheral vasodilatation determines cardiac output in exercising humans: insight from atrial pacing.

    PubMed

    Bada, A A; Svendsen, J H; Secher, N H; Saltin, B; Mortensen, S P

    2012-04-15

    In dogs, manipulation of heart rate has no effect on the exercise-induced increase in cardiac output. Whether these findings apply to humans remain uncertain, because of the large differences in cardiovascular anatomy and regulation. To investigate the role of heart rate and peripheral vasodilatation in the regulation of cardiac output during steady-state exercise, we measured central and peripheral haemodynamics in 10 healthy male subjects, with and without atrial pacing (100–150 beats min(−1)) during: (i) resting conditions, (ii) one-legged knee extensor exercise (24 W) and (iii) femoral arterial ATP infusion at rest. Exercise and ATP infusion increased cardiac output, leg blood flow and vascular conductance (P < 0.05), whereas cerebral perfusion remained unchanged. During atrial pacing increasing heart rate by up to 54 beats min(−1), cardiac output did not change in any of the three conditions, because of a parallel decrease in stroke volume (P < 0.01). Atrial pacing increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) at rest and during ATP infusion (P < 0.05), whereas MAP remained unchanged during exercise. Atrial pacing lowered central venous pressure (P < 0.05) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (P < 0.05) in all conditions, whereas it did not affect pulmonary mean arterial pressure. Atrial pacing lowered the left ventricular contractility index (dP/dt) (P < 0.05) in all conditions and plasma noradrenaline levels at rest (P < 0.05), but not during exercise and ATP infusion. These results demonstrate that the elevated cardiac output during steady-state exercise is regulated by the increase in skeletal muscle blood flow and venous return to the heart, whereas the increase in heart rate appears to be secondary to the regulation of cardiac output.

  16. Is pulmonary gas exchange during exercise in hypoxia impaired with the increase of cardiac output?

    PubMed

    Calbet, José A L; Robach, Paul; Lundby, Carsten; Boushel, Robert

    2008-06-01

    During exercise in humans, the alveolar-arterial O(2) tension difference ((A-a)DO(2)) increases with exercise intensity and is an important factor determining the absolute level of oxygen binding to hemoglobin and therefore the level of systemic oxygen transport. During exercise in hypoxia, the (A-a)DO(2) is accentuated. Using the multiple inert gas elimination technique it has been shown that during exercise in acute hypoxia the contribution of ventilation-perfusion inequality to (A-a)DO(2) is rather small and in the absence of pulmonary edema intrapulmonary shunts can be ruled out. This implies that the main mechanism limiting pulmonary gas exchange is diffusion limitation. It is presumed that an elevation of cardiac output during exercise in acute hypoxia should increase the (A-a)DO(2). However, no studies have examined how variations in cardiac output independently affect pulmonary diffusion with increases in exercise intensity. We have consistently observed that during steady-state, submaximal (100-120 W) exercise on the cycle ergometer in hypoxia the lung can accommodate an increase in cardiac output of approximately 2 L x min(-1) without any significant effect on pulmonary gas exchange. This result contrasts with the predicted effect of cardiac output on (A-a)DO(2) using the model of Piiper and Scheid, and thus indicates that an elevation of cardiac output is not necessarily accompanied by a reduction of mean transit time and (or) diffusion limitation during submaximal exercise in acute hypoxia. It remains to be determined what is the influence of changes in cardiac output per se on pulmonary gas exchange during high-intensity exercise.

  17. Continuous cardiac output measurement - Aspects of Doppler frequency analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. S.; Hechtman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    From the suprasternal notch blood flow velocity in the aorta can be measured non-invasively by a Doppler probe. Integration over systole after frequency analysis gives a measure of stroke volume if a separate diameter observation is incorporated. Frequency analysis by a zero crossing counter or by a set of parallel phaselock loops was less effective than a set of bandpass filters. Observations on dogs, baboons and humans before and after exercise or surgery suggest the indications to be useful. Application to judging heart failure by the effect of introducing a volume load is indicated. Changes in output also are measured in freely moving subjects.

  18. The role of adrenergic stimulation in maintaining maximum cardiac performance in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during hypoxia, hyperkalemia and acidosis at 10 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Linda M; Obradovich, Shannon; Mouniargi, Janet; Farrell, Anthony P

    2006-07-01

    As rainbow trout approach exhaustion during prolonged exercise, they maintain maximum cardiac output despite the fact their venous blood, which bathes the heart, becomes hypoxic, acidotic and hyperkalemic. Because these factors are individually recognized to have detrimental inotropic and chronotropic effects on cardiac performance, we hypothesized that adrenergic stimulation is critical in maintaining maximum cardiac performance under these collectively adverse conditions in vivo. To test this hypothesis, maximum cardiac performance in the presence and absence of maximal adrenergic stimulation was assessed with in situ rainbow trout hearts using relevant hyperkalemic (5.0 mmol l(-1) K+), acidotic (pH 7.5) and hypoxic challenges. With tonic adrenergic stimulation (5.0 nmol l(-1) adrenaline), hearts produced only 44.8+/-14.6% of their normal maximum cardiac output when exposed under normoxic conditions (20 kPa) to the hyperkalemic, acidotic perfusate, indicating that in vivo there was no refuge from cardiac impairment even if venous blood was fully oxygenated. By contrast, maximum adrenergic stimulation (500 nmol l(-1) adrenaline), fully protected maximum cardiac performance under hyperkalemic and acidotic conditions over a wide range of oxygen availability, from normoxia to 2.0 kPa, a venous oxygen tension close to routine values in vivo. Extending the level of hypoxia to 1.3 kPa resulted in a 43.6+/-2.8% decrease in maximum cardiac output, with hearts failing when tested at 1.0 kPa. Our results suggest that adrenergic stimulation of the trout heart is critical in maintaining maximum performance during prolonged swimming tests, and probably during all forms of exhaustive activity and recovery, when venous blood is hyperkalemic, acidotic and hypoxic.

  19. Measurement of cardiac output by earpiece dye-dilution method with automatic calibration of dye concentration.

    PubMed

    Katori, R; Hayashi, T; Kanamasa, K; Ishikawa, K

    1977-05-01

    A non-invasive method for measuring cardiac output by an earpiece dye densitometer was proposed. The densitometer is dichromatic and has an air capsule to make subject's ear bloodless by inflation, so that it can calibrate indocyanine green dye concentration without blood sampling. Duplicate measurements of cardiac output showed a good agreement in 40 cases (r = 0.97, standard deviation (S.D.) = 8.9%), which was comparable to the result of the cuvette method (r = 0.98, S.D. = 8.1%). Simultaneous measurements of cardiac output by the earpiece method (x) and the standard cuvette method (y) revealed a good agreement (r = 0.91, y = 0.96x+0.34, S.D. = 16.4%) in 52 measurements of 25 cases. A similarly good correlation was obtained between the two methods during ergometer exercise in supine position in 5 cases. These suggest that this earpiece dye-dilution method is reliable for cardiac output measurement and advantageous for clinical use because of non-invasive technique.

  20. The pioneering use of systems analysis to study cardiac output regulation.

    PubMed

    Hall, John E

    2004-11-01

    This essay examines the historical significance of an APS classic paper that is freely available online: Guyton AC, Lindsey AW, and Kaufmann BN. Effect of mean circulatory filling pressure and other peripheral circulatory factors on cardiac output. Am J Physiol 180: 463-468, 1955 (http://ajplegacy.physiology.org/cgi/reprint/180/3/463).

  1. Effect of Hemorrhage on Cardiac Output, PVP, Alodosterone and Diuresis during Immersion in Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simanonok, K.; Greenleaf, John E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Wade, C. E.; Keil, L. C.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a reduction in blood volume would attenuate or eliminate immersion-induced increases in cardiac output (Q (sup dot) sub co)) and urine excretion, and to investigate accompanying vasoactive and fluid-electrolyte hormonal responses.

  2. Exercise cardiac output following Skylab missions - The second manned Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buderer, M. C.; Mauldin, D. G.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.; Sawin, C. F.

    1976-01-01

    Cardiac output was measured during preflight and postflight exercise-stress tests on the Skylab astronauts. In the postflight tests immediately following the 28-, 59-, and 84-d earth orbital missions, the astronauts exhibited an approximate 30% decrease in cardiac output coupled with an approximate 50% decrease in cardiac stroke volume during exercise. These changes were accompanied by elevated heart rates and significant increases in total systemic peripheral vascular resistance. Mean arterial pressure was unchanged. All parameters returned to normal preflight values within 30 d of the end of the orbital period. Duration of the zero-G exposure did not appear to influence either the magnitude of the hemodynamic changes or the time-course of their return to normal. These results are discussed in relation to other cardiovascular findings and possible mechanisms responsible for the observations are outlined.

  3. Evaluation of two methods for continuous cardiac output assessment during exercise in chronic heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Kemps, Hareld M C; Thijssen, Eric J M; Schep, Goof; Sleutjes, Boudewijn T H M; De Vries, Wouter R; Hoogeveen, Adwin R; Wijn, Pieter F F; Doevendans, Pieter A F M

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of two techniques for the continuous assessment of cardiac output in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF): a radial artery pulse contour analysis method that uses an indicator dilution method for calibration (LiDCO) and an impedance cardiography technique (Physioflow), using the Fick method as a reference. Ten male CHF patients (New York Heart Association class II-III) were included. At rest, cardiac output values obtained by LiDCO and Physioflow were compared with those of the direct Fick method. During exercise, the continuous Fick method was used as a reference. Exercise, performed on a cycle ergometer in upright position, consisted of two constant-load tests at 30% and 80% of the ventilatory threshold and a symptom-limited maximal test. Both at rest and during exercise LiDCO showed good agreement with reference values [bias +/- limits of agreement (LOA), -1% +/- 28% and 2% +/- 28%, respectively]. In contrast, Physioflow overestimated reference values both at rest and during exercise (bias +/- LOA, 48% +/- 60% and 48% +/- 52%, respectively). Exercise-related within-patient changes of cardiac output, expressed as a percent change, showed for both techniques clinically acceptable agreement with reference values (bias +/- LOA: 2% +/- 26% for LiDCO, and -2% +/- 36% for Physioflow, respectively). In conclusion, although the limits of agreement with the Fick method are pretty broad, LiDCO provides accurate measurements of cardiac output during rest and exercise in CHF patients. Although Physioflow overestimates cardiac output, this method may still be useful to estimate relative changes during exercise.

  4. Asymmetric sympathetic output: The dorsomedial hypothalamus as a potential link between emotional stress and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky; Filho, Marcelo Limborço; Santos Machado, Natália L; de Paula, Cristiane Amorim; Souza Cordeiro, Letícia M; Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Marins, Fernanda Ribeiro; Henderson, Luke; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2017-01-17

    The autonomic response to emotional stress, while involving several target organs, includes an important increase in sympathetic drive to the heart. There is ample evidence that cardiac sympathetic innervation is lateralized, and asymmetric autonomic output to the heart during stress is postulated to be a causal factor that precipitates cardiac arrhythmias. Recent animal studies provided a new picture of the central pathways involved in the cardiac sympathetic response evoked by emotional stress, pointing out a key role for the region of dorsomedial hypothalamus. However, how much of this information can be extrapolated to humans? Analysis of human functional imaging data at rest or during emotional stress shows some consistency with the components that integrate these pathways, and attention must be given to the asymmetric activation of subcortical sites. In this short review, we will discuss related findings in humans and animals, aiming to understand the neurogenic background for the origin of emotional stress-induced cardiac arrhythmias.

  5. Control of cardiac output in thyrotoxic calves. Evaluation of changes in the systemic circulation.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, S; Olajos, M; Morkin, E

    1984-01-01

    The contribution of peripheral vascular factors to the high output state in thyrotoxicosis was examined in 11 calves treated with daily intramuscular injections of L-thyroxine (200 micrograms/kg) for 12-14 d. Thyroxine treatment increased cardiac output from 14.1 +/- 1.4 to 24.7 +/- 1.4 liters/min (P less than 0.001) and decreased systemic vascular resistance from 562 +/- 65 to 386 +/- 30 dyn-s/cm5 (P less than 0.01). Blood volume was increased from 65 +/- 4 ml/kg in the euthyroid state to 81 +/- 6 ml/kg when the animals were thyrotoxic (P less than 0.05). The role of low peripheral vascular resistance in maintenance of the high output state was evaluated by infusion of phenylephrine at two dosages (2.5 and 4.0 micrograms/kg per min). In the euthyroid state, no significant decrease in cardiac output was observed at either level of pressor infusion. In the thyrotoxic state, the higher dosage of phenylephrine increased peripheral resistance to the euthyroid control level and caused a small (6%) decrease in cardiac output (P less than 0.05). This small decrease in cardiac output probably could be attributed to the marked increase in left ventricular afterload caused by the pressor infusion as assessed from measurements of intraventricular pressure and dimensions. Changes in the venous circulation were evaluated by measurement of mean circulatory filling pressure and the pressure gradient for venous return in six animals during cardiac arrest induced by injection of acetylcholine into the pulmonary artery. Mean circulatory filling pressure increased from 10 +/- 1 mmHg in the euthyroid state to 16 +/- 2 mmHg (P less than 0.01) during thyrotoxicosis, while pressure gradient for venous return increased from 10 +/- 1 to 14 +/- 2 mmHg (P less than 0.02). These changes in venous return curves were not affected significantly by ganglionic blockade with trimethapan (2.0 mg/kg per min) before cardiac arrest. Thus, the high output state associated with thyrotoxicosis is not

  6. Initial Observations of the Effects of Calcium Chloride Infusions in Pediatric Patients with Low Cardiac Output.

    PubMed

    Averin, Konstantin; Villa, Chet; Krawczeski, Catherine D; Pratt, Jesse; King, Eileen; Jefferies, John L; Nelson, David P; Cooper, David S; Ryan, Thomas D; Sawyer, Jaclyn; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Lorts, Angela

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial contractility and relaxation are highly dependent on calcium homeostasis. Immature myocardium, as in pediatric patients, is thought to be more dependent on extracellular calcium for optimal function. For this reason, intravenous calcium chloride infusions may improve myocardial function in the pediatric patient. The objectives of this study were to report the hemodynamic changes seen after administration of continuous calcium chloride to critically ill children. We retrospectively identified pediatric patients (newborn to 17 years old) with hemodynamic instability admitted to the cardiac ICU between May 2011 and May 2012 who received a continuous infusion of calcium chloride. The primary outcome was improvement in cardiac output, assessed by arterial-mixed venous oxygen saturation (A-V) difference. Sixty-eight patients, mean age 0.87 ± 2.67 years, received a total of 116 calcium infusions. Calcium chloride infusions resulted in significant improvements in primary and secondary measures of cardiac output at 2 and 6 h. Six hours after calcium initiation, A-V oxygen saturation difference decreased by 7.4 % (32.6 ± 2.1 to 25.2 ± 2.0 %, p < 0.001), rSO2 increased by 5.5 % (63.1 vs 68.6 %, p < 0.001), and serum lactate decreased by 0.9 mmol/l (3.3 vs 2.4 mmol/l, p < 0.001) with no change in HR (149.1 vs 145.6 bpm p = 0.07). Urine output increased 0.66 ml/kg/h in the 8-h period after calcium initiation when compared to pre-initiation (p = 0.003). Neonates had the strongest evidence of effectiveness with other age groups trending toward significance. Calcium chloride infusions improve markers of cardiac output in a heterogenous group of pediatric patients in a cardiac ICU. Neonates appear to derive the most benefit from utilization of these infusions.

  7. Dynamic asymmetries of cardiac output transients in response to muscular exercise in man.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T; Whipp, B J

    1994-01-01

    1. We determined the kinetics of cardiac output (Q) with respect to oxygen uptake (VO2) at the on- and off-transients of constant-load exercise. Six subjects performed constant-load exercise which consisted of 5 min rest, 5 min one-legged pedalling at 50 W and a 5 min recovery period. 2. The transient responses were characterized by first-order kinetics. There was no significant difference between the time constants for VO2 (tau VO2) at the on- (33.9 +/- 3.5 s, mean +/- S.E.M.) and off-transient (37.2 +/- 2.9 s). The time constant for Q (tau Q, 29.4 +/- 3.2 s) was consistently shorter than tau VO2 at the on-transient. However, tau Q was appreciably longer at the off-transient (44.3 +/- 3.6 s) than the on-transient. 3. The results support the contention that the time constant for the on-transient of Q is appreciably faster than that for VO2 and hence there seems little justification for the notion that the time constants for the kinetics of VO2 are determined by the limitations of blood flow in the transient. The asymmetry of Q kinetics, with the off-transient tau Q being appreciably slower than the on-transient tau Q, serves to maintain a sufficiently high oxygen flow to the muscle during recovery from exercise at a time when the muscle oxygen uptake remains high. PMID:7869250

  8. [Non-invasive cardiac output measurement with USCOM in air rescue operation].

    PubMed

    Schedler, O; Handschak, H; Hensel, M

    2008-12-01

    In cardiac emergency events (NACA score = 3.4), a non-invasive cardiac output test involving transaortalic blood flow velocity measurement was used in the air rescue of 30 patients. An average velocity integral (Vti) of 21.9 +/- 9.9 cm was determined in the short examination time (t = 120 +/- 30 sec). Related to the middle body surface (BSA = 2.0 +/- 0.3 m (2)), the calculated cardiac index (CI) was 2.6 +/- 1.1 l/min/m (2). The CI was under 2.2 l/min/m (2) in 12 examinations (40 %). 5 patients in this group subsequently received catecholamine therapy. Thrombolysis therapy increased by 17 % in the myocardial infarction group with CI

  9. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: postpartum decompensation and use of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lorello, G; Cubillos, J; McDonald, M; Balki, M

    2014-02-01

    The utility of a non-invasive cardiac output monitor (NICOM™) in guiding the peripartum management and identification of postpartum complications in a patient with severe peripartum cardiomyopathy is reported. A 31-year-old nulliparous woman at 35 weeks of gestation presented with a three-week history of worsening dyspnea and progressive functional deterioration. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction with an ejection fraction <20%. Cardiac status was monitored using NICOM™ during labor and delivery. The baseline values were: cardiac output 5.3 L/min, total peripheral resistance 1549 dynes.sec/cm(5), stroke volume 42.1 mL and stroke volume variation 18%. She received early epidural analgesia during labor, titrated slowly with a loading dose of 0.0625% bupivacaine 10 mL and fentanyl 25 μg, followed by patient-controlled epidural analgesia (0.0625% bupivacaine with fentanyl 2 μg/mL, infusion at 10 mL/h, bolus dose 5 mL and lockout interval 10 min). After epidural drug administration, total peripheral resistance decreased, cardiac output increased, and satisfactory analgesia was obtained. She had an uneventful vaginal delivery with a forceps-assisted second stage after prophylactic administration of furosemide 20 mg. NICOM™ was discontinued after delivery. Fifteen hours post-delivery, the patient developed cardiogenic shock, which resolved after aggressive therapy with inotropes and furosemide. NICOM™ can be used to guide treatment during labor and delivery in patients with critical peripartum cardiomyopathy. We suggest that use of NICOM™ be extended into the postpartum period to detect signs of cardiac decompensation in such patients.

  10. Validation and application of single breath cardiac output determinations in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Fletcher, E. R.; Myhre, L. G.; Luft, U. C.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a procedure for estimating cardiac output by a single-breath technique (Qsb), obtained in healthy males during supine rest and during exercise on a bicycle ergometer, were compared with the results on cardiac output obtained by the direct Fick method (QF). The single breath maneuver consisted of a slow exhalation to near residual volume following an inspiration somewhat deeper than normal. The Qsb calculations incorporated an equation of the CO2 dissociation curve and a 'moving spline' sequential curve-fitting technique to calculate the instantaneous R from points on the original expirogram. The resulting linear regression equation indicated a 24-percent underestimation of QF by the Qsb technique. After applying a correction, the Qsb-QF relationship was improved. A subsequent study during upright rest and exercise to 80 percent of VO2(max) in 6 subjects indicated a close linear relationship between Qsb and VO2 for all 95 values obtained, with slope and intercept close to those in published studies in which invasive cardiac output measurements were used.

  11. Does targeted pre-load optimisation by stroke volume variation attenuate a reduction in cardiac output in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-Y; Lee, T-S; Chan, K-C; Jeng, C-S; Cheng, Y-J

    2012-07-01

    The prone position can reduce cardiac output by up to 25% due to reduced preload. We hypothesised that preload optimisation targeted to stroke volume variation before turning prone might alleviate this. A supine threshold stroke volume variation of 14% in a preliminary study identified patients whose cardiac outputs would decline when turned prone. In 45 patients, cardiac output declined only in the group whose supine stroke volume variation was high (mean (SD) 5.1 (2.0) to 3.9 (1.9) l.min(-1) ; p < 0.001), but not in patients in whom it was low, or in those in whom stroke volume variation was high, but who received volume preload (p = 0.525 and 0.941, respectively). We conclude that targeted preload optimisation using a supine stroke volume variation value < 14% is effective in preventing falls in cardiac output induced by the prone position.

  12. Caveolae protect endothelial cells from membrane rupture during increased cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jade P.X.; Mendoza-Topaz, Carolina; Howard, Gillian; Chadwick, Jessica; Shvets, Elena; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Dunmore, Benjamin J.; Crosby, Alexi; Morrell, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Caveolae are strikingly abundant in endothelial cells, yet the physiological functions of caveolae in endothelium and other tissues remain incompletely understood. Previous studies suggest a mechanoprotective role, but whether this is relevant under the mechanical forces experienced by endothelial cells in vivo is unclear. In this study we have sought to determine whether endothelial caveolae disassemble under increased hemodynamic forces, and whether caveolae help prevent acute rupture of the plasma membrane under these conditions. Experiments in cultured cells established biochemical assays for disassembly of caveolar protein complexes, and assays for acute loss of plasma membrane integrity. In vivo, we demonstrate that caveolae in endothelial cells of the lung and cardiac muscle disassemble in response to acute increases in cardiac output. Electron microscopy and two-photon imaging reveal that the plasma membrane of microvascular endothelial cells in caveolin 1−/− mice is much more susceptible to acute rupture when cardiac output is increased. These data imply that mechanoprotection through disassembly of caveolae is important for endothelial function in vivo. PMID:26459598

  13. Measurement of cardiac output in ventricular rupture following acute myocardial infarction--pulmonary artery catheter vs transpulmonary thermodilution--a case report.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Konrad; Simon, Stefan; Preussler, Niels-Peter; Hüter, Lars

    2009-02-01

    We compared the cardiac output measured by the transpulmonary aortic single indicator thermodilution method with that by the pulmonary artery catheterization in a patient with ventricular septal rupture after acute myocardial infarction. Though the former cardiac output was lower than the latter, in the presence of the ventricular septal rupture, the cardiac outputs were equal after the rupture was closed. This indicates that, while the cardiac output measured by the pulmonary artery catheter is influenced by the ventricular left-to-right shunt, transpulmonary aortic thermodilution method measures the true cardiac output of the left heart, which is responsible for organ perfusion.

  14. The clinical application of pulse contour cardiac output and intrathoracic volume measurements in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Nicky A; Braaf, Sandra C

    2006-08-01

    Cardiac output (CO) determination by pulmonary artery (PA) catheter has increasingly been criticised within the literature due to its invasive nature and poor correlation between the pressure measurements and intravascular volume status in mechanically ventilated patients. Consequently, alternative less invasive technologies to PA catheterisation are emerging within intensive care. One such novel technology are pulse contour CO (PCCO) systems. They establish comprehensive and continuous haemodynamic monitoring utilising a central venous catheter (CVC) and an arterial line. Furthermore, a key feature of this technology is its ability to produce intrathoracic volume measurements which may provide a better estimation of cardiac preload as well as indicate the presence and severity of pulmonary oedema. This article aims to discuss the theoretical basis and clinical application of PCCO systems, how PCCO systems differ from PA catheters and how the intrathoracic volume measurements are derived. Understanding these advanced concepts will ensure that clinicians are able to employ this innovative monitoring technology more effectively.

  15. Cardiac output assessment using oxygen consumption estimated from the left ventricular pressure-volume area.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Jorge A; Lascano, Elena C; Bertolotti, Alejandro M; Gómez, Carmen B; Rodríguez Correa, Carlos A; Favaloro, Roberto R

    2010-01-01

    Use of a majority of structural variables (age, sex, height) to estimate oxygen consumption in the calculation of cardiac output (CO) by the Fick principle does not account for changes in physiological conditions. To improve this limitation, oxygen consumption was estimated based on the left ventricular pressure-volume area. A pilot study with 10 patients undergoing right cardiac catheterization showed that this approach was successful to estimate CO (r=0,73, vs. thermodilution measured CO). Further essays changing end-diastolic-volume in the pressure-volume area formula by body weight or body surface area showed that this last yielded the best correlation with the thermodilution measured CO (slope=1, ordinate =0.01 and r=0.93). These preliminary results indicate that use of a formula originated from the pressure-volume-area concept is a good alternative to estimate oxygen consumption for CO calculation.

  16. Oxygen uptake kinetics at work onset: role of cardiac output and of phosphocreatine breakdown.

    PubMed

    Francescato, M P; Cettolo, V; di Prampero, P E

    2013-01-15

    The hypothesis that variability in individual's cardiac output response affects the kinetics of pulmonary O₂ uptake (VO₂) was tested by investigating the time constants of cardiac output (Q) adjustment (τ(Q)), of PCr splitting (τ(PCr)), and of phase II pulmonary O₂ uptake (τ(VO₂)) in eight volunteers. VO₂, Q, and gastrocnemius [PCr] (by (31)P-MRS) were measured at rest and during low intensity two-legged exercise. Steady state VO₂ and Q increased (ΔVO₂(s) = 182 ± 58 mL min⁻¹; ΔQ = 1.3 ± 0.4 L min⁻¹), whereas [PCr] decreased significantly (21 ± 8%). τ(VO₂), τ(PCr) and τ(Q) were significantly different from each other (38.3 ± 4.0, 23.9 ± 2.5, 11.6 ± 4.6 s, respectively; p<0.001). τ(PCr) assumed to be equal to the time constant of VO₂ at the muscle level (τ(mVO₂)), was not related to τ(Q), whereas τ(VO₂) and τ(Q) were significantly related (p<0.05) as were τ(VO₂) and τ(PCr) (p<0.05). Venous blood O₂ stores changes, as determined from arterio-to-mixed-venous O₂ content, were essentially equal to those estimated as (τ(VO₂)-τ(PCr))·ΔVO₂(s). This suggests that cardiac output responses affect O₂ stores utilization and hence τ(VO₂) : thus τ(VO₂) is not necessarily a good estimate of τ(mVO₂).

  17. Effect of hemorrhage on cardiac output, vasopressin, aldosterone, and diuresis during immersion in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Simanonok, K.; Bernauer, E. M.; Wade, C. E.; Keil, L. C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to test the hypotesis that a reduction in blood volume would attenuate or eliminate immersion-induced increases in cardiac output (Q(sub co)) and urine excretion, and to investigate accompanying vasoactive and fluid-electrolyte hormonal responses. Eight men (19-23 yr) were supine during a 2-hr control period in air, and then sat for 5-hr test periods in air at 20 C (dry control, DC); water at 34.5 C (wet control, WC); and water (34.5 C) after hemorrhage (WH) of 14.8 plus or minus 0.3 percent of their blood volume. Blood volume was -11.6 plus or minus 0.6 percent at immersion (time 0). Mean (bar-X hrs 1-5) Q(sub co) was unchanged in WC (5.3 plus or minus 0.01 l/min) and in WH (4.5 plus or minus 0.1 l/min), but decreased (P less than 0.05) in DC to 3.6 plus or minus 0.1 l/min. Mean urine excretion rates were 1.0 plus or minus 0.2 ml/min for DC and 1.1 plus or minus 0.2 ml/min for WH; both were lower (P less than 0.05) than that for WC of 2.0 plus or minus 0.4 ml/min. Plasma (Na+) and (Osm) were unchanged in all experiments. Mean plasma vasopressin (PVP) (bar-X hrs 1-5) was 1.1 plus or minus 0.1 pg/ml in WC, and higher (P less than 0.05) in DC (2.1 plus or minus 0.2 pg/ml)and WH (2.1 plus or minus 0.1 pg/ml); it was unchanged during air and water test periods. Thus, hemorrhage attenuated the immersion-induced increase in Q(sub co), eliminated the WC diuresis, maintained plasma renin activity and PVP at DC levels and did not change immersion-induced aldosterone suppression; the osmotic diuresis during control immersion is apparently not due to either aldosterone suppression or vasopressin suppression.

  18. Measurements of cardiac output of an isolated heart using a specially designed turbine.

    PubMed

    Bunc, M; Suput, D; Zupanc, O; Rozman, J

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac output is one of the important parameters used in evaluation of heart function. A turbine which works on mechanical principles was designed. It is also suitable for cardiac output measurements on isolated pig hearts in cases where some other equipment is not, like on doppler effect based transducers. The basic principle of measuring liquid flow through a turbine is based on measurement of the time that elapses when the rotor rotates by one degree. For this purpose, the rotor is fitted with transparent foil with a ring of 360 short black lines printed close to its circumference. Two infrared light-emitting diodes are mounted on one side of the foil and two photo-transistors, used as sensors of the transmitted infrared light, are mounted on the other. Voltage-regulated output ranging from 0 to +/- 2048 V at one revolution per second gives 500 mV at the output (changeable by programming), calculating time 2 ms, 1 mV resolution (11 bits), with an external power supply of 5 V. The turbine showed a linear response at a continuous saline flow up to 3000 ml min-1 at pressure loads of between 20 and 220 cm H2O. Pressure drop across the turbine depends on the volume flow and was 1 mm Hg at 100 ml min-1 and 3 mm Hg at 7000 ml min-1. A rotating movement 1.25 x 10(-4) kg m2 s-1 was calculated. The lowest volume change of a bolus of saline solution, detected by the turbine, was 1.6 ml.

  19. A rebreathing method for measuring lung volume, diffusing capacity and cardiac output in conscious small animals.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Johnson, Robert L; Hsia, Connie C W

    2005-04-15

    We developed a multiple gas rebreathing technique for measuring lung diffusing capacity (DL(CO)), lung volume (V(L)) and cardiac output simultaneously in conscious spontaneously breathing small animals. Lung volume was measured from the dilution of methane (CH4) or sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and verified independently by a helium washout technique. Cardiac output and DL(CO) were estimated from the uptake of acetylene and carbon monoxide, respectively. We tested guinea pigs at two levels of alveolar oxygen tension in order to estimate membrane diffusing capacity and pulmonary capillary blood volume by the Roughton-Forster technique. Results show that measured DL(CO) are consistent with reported values in anesthetized guinea pigs as well as with allometric comparison across species. Lung volume estimated from SF6 dilution agreed closely with that estimated independently from helium washout; however, lung volume estimated from CH4 dilution was systematically lower due to the addition of endogenously produced CH4 to the rebreathing system. We conclude that this technique can be used to measure resting lung function in conscious unsedated small animals.

  20. NOTE: Increasing cardiac output and decreasing oxygenation sequence in pump twins of acardiac twin pregnancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Umur, Asli; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Van Bavel, Ed; Vandenbussche, Frank P. H. A.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.

    2005-02-01

    An acardiac twin pregnancy is a rare but serious complication of monochorionic twinning and consists of an acardiac twin and a pump twin. The acardiac twin is a severely malformed fetus that lacks most organs, particularly a heart, but grows during pregnancy because it is perfused by the developmentally normal pump twin via a set of arterioarterial and venovenous placental anastomoses. Pump twins die intrauterine or neonatally in about 50% of the cases. Because the effects of an acardiac mass on the pump twin's development are incompletely known, methods for outcome prognosis are currently not available. We sought to derive simple relations for the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decreased oxygenation and to use available clinical cases for a preliminary test of the model. As a method, we used a theoretical flow model to represent the fetoplacental circulation of an acardiac twin pregnancy and estimated blood deoxygenation and reoxygenation following perfusion of the two bodies and placentas, respectively. The results show the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decrease of venous oxygen saturation to depend on the ratio of pump twin to acardiac twin umbilical blood flow, whose ratio can be measured by ultrasonography. The clinical cases show a decreasing umbilical flow ratio with gestation. In conclusion, prospective serial study is necessary to test whether measurement of umbilical flow ratios allows monitoring the pump twin's pathophysiologic development, possibly resulting in a guideline for prognosis of pump twin survival.

  1. Cardiac output and vasodilation in the vasovagal response: An analysis of the classic papers.

    PubMed

    Wieling, Wouter; Jardine, David L; de Lange, Frederik J; Brignole, Michele; Nielsen, Henning B; Stewart, Julian; Sutton, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The simple faint is secondary to hypotension and bradycardia resulting in transient loss of consciousness. According to Ohm's law applied to the circulation, BP = SVR × CO, hypotension can result from a decrease in systemic vascular resistance (SVR), cardiac output (CO), or both. It is important to understand that when blood pressure (BP) is falling, SVR and CO do not change reciprocally as they do in the steady state. In 1932, Lewis, assuming that decreased SVR alone accounted for hypotension, defined "the vasovagal response" along pathophysiologic lines to denote the association of vasodilation with vagal-induced bradycardia in simple faint. Studies performed by Barcroft and Sharpey-Schafer between 1940 and 1950 used volume-based plethysmography to demonstrate major forearm vasodilation during extreme hypotension and concluded that the main mechanism for hypotension was vasodilation. Plethysmographic measurements were intermittent and not frequent enough to capture rapid changes in blood flow during progressive hypotension. However, later investigations by Weissler, Murray, and Stevens performed between 1950 and 1970 used invasive beat-to-beat BP measurements and more frequent measurements of CO using the Fick principle. They demonstrated that CO significantly fell before syncope, and little vasodilation occurred until very late in the vasovagal reaction Thus, since the 1970s, decreasing cardiac output rather than vasodilation has been regarded as the principal mechanism for the hypotension of vasovagal syncope.

  2. The precision of a special purpose analog computer in clinical cardiac output determination.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, F J; Mroz, E A; Miller, R E

    1975-01-01

    Three hundred dye-dilution curves taken during our first year of clinical experience with the Waters CO-4 cardiac output computer were analyzed to estimate the errors involved in its use. Provided that calibration is accurate and 5.0 mg of dye are injected for each curve, then the percentage standard deviation of measurement using this computer is about 8.7%. Included in this are the errors inherent in the computer, errors due to baseline drift, errors in the injection of dye and acutal variation of cardiac output over a series of successive determinations. The size of this error is comparable to that involved in manual calculation. The mean value of five successive curves will be within 10% of the real value in 99 cases out of 100. Advances in methodology and equipment are discussed which make calibration simpler and more accurate, and which should also improve the quality of computer determination. A list of suggestions is given to minimize the errors involved in the clinical use of this equipment. Images Fig. 4. PMID:1089394

  3. Effect of norepinephrine dosage and calibration frequency on accuracy of pulse contour-derived cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Continuous cardiac output monitoring is used for early detection of hemodynamic instability and guidance of therapy in critically ill patients. Recently, the accuracy of pulse contour-derived cardiac output (PCCO) has been questioned in different clinical situations. In this study, we examined agreement between PCCO and transcardiopulmonary thermodilution cardiac output (COTCP) in critically ill patients, with special emphasis on norepinephrine (NE) administration and the time interval between calibrations. Methods This prospective, observational study was performed with a sample of 73 patients (mean age, 63 ± 13 years) requiring invasive hemodynamic monitoring on a non-cardiac surgery intensive care unit. PCCO was recorded immediately before calibration by COTCP. Bland-Altman analysis was performed on data subsets comparing agreement between PCCO and COTCP according to NE dosage and the time interval between calibrations up to 24 hours. Further, central artery stiffness was calculated on the basis of the pulse pressure to stroke volume relationship. Results A total of 330 data pairs were analyzed. For all data pairs, the mean COTCP (±SD) was 8.2 ± 2.0 L/min. PCCO had a mean bias of 0.16 L/min with limits of agreement of -2.81 to 3.15 L/min (percentage error, 38%) when compared to COTCP. Whereas the bias between PCCO and COTCP was not significantly different between NE dosage categories or categories of time elapsed between calibrations, interchangeability (percentage error <30%) between methods was present only in the high NE dosage subgroup (≥0.1 μg/kg/min), as the percentage errors were 40%, 47% and 28% in the no NE, NE < 0.1 and NE ≥ 0.1 μg/kg/min subgroups, respectively. PCCO was not interchangeable with COTCP in subgroups of different calibration intervals. The high NE dosage group showed significantly increased central artery stiffness. Conclusions This study shows that NE dosage, but not the time interval between calibrations, has an

  4. Effects of acute hypoxia at moderate altitude on stroke volume and cardiac output during exercise.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Taira; Maegawa, Taketeru; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Komatsu, Yutaka; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Nagai, Ryozo; Kawahara, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    It has been unclear how acute hypoxia at moderate altitude affects stroke volume (SV), an index of cardiac function, during exercise. The present study was conducted to reveal whether acute normobaric hypoxia might alter SV during exercise.Nine healthy male subjects performed maximal exercise testing under normobaric normoxic, and normobaric hypoxic conditions (O(2): 14.4%) in a randomized order. A novel thoracic impedance method was used to continuously measure SV and cardiac output (CO) during exercise. Acute hypoxia decreased maximal work rate (hypoxia; 247 + or - 6 [SE] versus normoxia; 267 + or - 8 W, P < 0.005) and VO(2) max (hypoxia; 2761 + or - 99 versus normoxia; 3039 + or - 133 mL/min, P < 0.005). Under hypoxic conditions, SV and CO at maximal exercise decreased (SV: hypoxia; 145 + or - 11 versus normoxia; 163 + or - 11 mL, P < 0.05, CO: hypoxia; 26.7 + or - 2.1 versus normoxia; 30.2 + or - 1.8 L/min, P < 0.05). In acute hypoxia, SV during submaximal exercise at identical work rate decreased. Furthermore, in hypoxia, 4 of 9 subjects attained their highest SV at maximal exercise, while in normoxia, 8 of 9 subjects did.Acute normobaric hypoxia attenuated the increment of SV and CO during exercise, and SV reached a plateau earlier under hypoxia than in normoxia. Cardiac function during exercise at this level of acute normobaric hypoxia might be attenuated.

  5. Application of bioreactance for cardiac output assessment during exercise in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Adrian; Hull, James H; Nunan, David; Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Brodie, David; Ansley, Lesley

    2010-07-01

    In patients with cardiac failure, bioreactance-based cardiac output (CO) monitoring provides a valid non-invasive method for assessing cardiac performance during exercise. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of this technique during strenuous exercise in healthy, trained individuals. Fourteen recreational cyclists, mean (SD) age of 34 (8) years and relative peak oxygen uptake of (VO(2)) 56 (6) ml kg(-1) min(-1), underwent incremental maximal exercise testing, whilst CO was recorded continuously using a novel bioreactance-based device (CO(bio)). The CO(bio) was evaluated against relationship with VO(2), theoretical calculation of arterial-venous oxygen difference (C(a - v) O(2)) and level of agreement with an inert gas rebreathing method (CO(rb)) using a Bland-Altman plot. Bioreactance-based CO measurement was practical and straightforward in application, although there was intermittent loss of electrocardiograph signal at high-intensity exercise. At rest and during exercise, CO(bio) was strongly correlated with VO(2) (r = 0.84; P < 0.001), however, there was evidence of systematic bias with CO(bio) providing lower values than CO(rb); mean bias (limits of agreement) -19% (14.6 to -53%). Likewise, calculated (C(a - v) O(2)) was greater when determined using CO(bio) than CO(rb) (P < 0.001), although both devices provided values in excess of those reported in invasive studies. Bioreactance-based determination of CO provides a pragmatic approach to the continuous assessment of cardiac performance during strenuous exercise in trained individuals. Our findings, however, suggest that further work is needed to refine the key measurement determinants of CO using this device to improve measurement accuracy in this setting.

  6. Differences between directly measured and calculated values for cardiac output in the dogfish: a criticism of the Fick method.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, J D; Butler, P J

    1982-08-01

    Cardiac output has been measured directly, and calculated by the Fick method, during normoxia and hypoxia in six artificially perfused dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula) in an attempt to estimate the accuracy of this method in fish. The construction and operation of a simple extra-corporeal cardiac bypass pump is described. This pump closely mimics the flow pulse profiles of the fish's own heart and allows complete control of both cardiac stroke volume and systolic and diastolic periods. During normoxia (PO2 = 21 kPa) there was no significant difference between directly measured and calculated values for cardiac output. However, some shunting of blood past the respiratory surface of the gills may have been obscured by cutaneous oxygen uptake. In response to hypoxia (PO2 = 8.6 kPa) there is either a decrease in the amount of blood being shunted past the respiratory surface of the gills and/or an increase in cutaneous oxygen uptake such that the Fick calculated value for cardiac output is on average 38% greater than the measured value. It is proposed that the increase in the levels of circulating catecholamines that is reported to occur in response to hypoxia in this species may play an important role in the observed response to hypoxia. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for the calculation of cardiac output by the Fick principle in fish.

  7. Comparison of Levosimendan, Milrinone and Dobutamine in treating Low Cardiac Output Syndrome Following Valve Replacement Surgeries with Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Sunny; Karim, Habib Md Reazaul; Saikia, Manuj Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis; Dey, Samarjit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Low Cardiac Output Syndrome (LCOS) following Cardiopulmonary Bypass (CPB) is common and associated with increased mortality. Maintenance of adequate cardiac output is one of the primary objectives in management of such patients. Aim To compare Levosimendan, Milrinone and Dobutamine for the treatment of LCOS after CPB in patients who underwent valve replacement surgeries. Materials and Methods Sixty eligible patients meeting LCOS were allocated into three treatment groups: Group A-Levosimendan (loading dose 10μg/kg over 10 minutes, followed by 0.1μg/kg/min); Group B-Milrinone (loading dose 50 mcg/kg over 10 minutes followed by 0.5mcg/kg/min) and Group C-Dobutamine @ 5μg/kg/min to achieve target cardiac index (CI) of > 2.5 L/min/m2. In case of failure, other drugs were added as required. Hemodynamic parameters were monitored using EV1000TM clinical platform till 30 minutes post CPB. INSTAT software was used for statistics and p<0.05 was considered significant. Results The mean±standard deviation of time taken by Dobutamine, Levosimendan and Milrinone to bring the CI to target were 11.1±8.79, 11.3±6.34 and 16.62±9.33 minutes respectively (p=0.064). Levosimendan was equally effective in increasing and maintaining adequate CI as compared to Dobutamine (p>0.05). Levosimendan and Milrinone increased MAP (Mean Arterial Pressure) equally while Dobutamine was more effective as compared to both Levosimendan and Milrinone 20th minute onwards (p<0.01). Milrinone was less effective in increasing the stroke volume as compared to Dobutamine and Levosimendan while Dobutamine and Levosimendan were equally effective. There was no difference in the HR (Heart Rate) achieved with all these three drugs. Conclusion Levosimendan is equally effective to Dobutamine and better than Milrinone for the treatment of LCOS following CPB in patients undergoing valve replacement surgeries. PMID:28208977

  8. Low Cardiac Output Secondary to a Malpositioned Umbilical Venous Catheter: Value of Targeted Neonatal Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, Dany E.; Poon, Wei Bing; James, Andrew; McNamara, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic hypotension is common in very low birthweight preterm infants but the nature of the precipitating cause may be unclear. Targeted neonatal echocardiography (TnEcho) is being increasingly used to support hemodynamic decisions in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), including identifying impairments in the transitional circulation of preterm infants, providing timely re-evaluation after institution of therapies and evaluating the placement of indwelling catheters. We present a case of a preterm infant with systemic hypotension and low cardiac output secondary to a large transatrial shunt induced by a malpositioned umbilical venous catheter. Repositioning of the line led to resolution of the hemodynamic disturbance and clinical instability, highlighting the utility of TnEcho in the NICU. PMID:25032055

  9. Reference values for total blood volume and cardiac output in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    Much research has been devoted to measurement of total blood volume (TBV) and cardiac output (CO) in humans but not enough effort has been devoted to collection and reduction of results for the purpose of deriving typical or {open_quotes}reference{close_quotes} values. Identification of normal values for TBV and CO is needed not only for clinical evaluations but also for the development of biokinetic models for ultra-short-lived radionuclides used in nuclear medicine (Leggett and Williams 1989). The purpose of this report is to offer reference values for TBV and CO, along with estimates of the associated uncertainties that arise from intra- and inter-subject variation, errors in measurement techniques, and other sources. Reference values are derived for basal supine CO and TBV in reference adult humans, and differences associated with age, sex, body size, body position, exercise, and other circumstances are discussed.

  10. Monitoring Cardiac Output and Transesophageal Echocardiography during Removal of a Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Demir, Aslı; Karadeniz, Ümit; Aydınlı, Bahar; Taş, Murat; Erdemli, Özcan

    2013-12-01

    A ventricular assist device (VAD) is a mechanical pump used to support heart function and blood flow in patients with poor heart functions. For selected patients who are too ill to wait for a heart transplant or are not eligible for a heart transplant because of age or other medical problems, ventricular assist devices offer life-saving therapy. This device has also become a life-saving approach for patients with acute viral myocarditis. Following the acute illness phase, when heart function has improved, the VAD is carefully removed. It is very important to continuously monitor myocardial functions during this period. In this paper, we present a patient who underwent cardiac output and transesophageal echocardiography monitoring during VAD removal.

  11. Monitoring Cardiac Output and Transesophageal Echocardiography during Removal of a Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Aslı; Karadeniz, Ümit; Aydınlı, Bahar; Taş, Murat; Erdemli, Özcan

    2013-01-01

    A ventricular assist device (VAD) is a mechanical pump used to support heart function and blood flow in patients with poor heart functions. For selected patients who are too ill to wait for a heart transplant or are not eligible for a heart transplant because of age or other medical problems, ventricular assist devices offer life-saving therapy. This device has also become a life-saving approach for patients with acute viral myocarditis. Following the acute illness phase, when heart function has improved, the VAD is carefully removed. It is very important to continuously monitor myocardial functions during this period. In this paper, we present a patient who underwent cardiac output and transesophageal echocardiography monitoring during VAD removal. PMID:27366376

  12. Accuracy of Cardiac Output by Nine Different Pulse Contour Algorithms in Cardiac Surgery Patients: A Comparison with Transpulmonary Thermodilution.

    PubMed

    Broch, Ole; Bein, Berthold; Gruenewald, Matthias; Masing, Sarah; Huenges, Katharina; Haneya, Assad; Steinfath, Markus; Renner, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Today, there exist several different pulse contour algorithms for calculation of cardiac output (CO). The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of nine different pulse contour algorithms with transpulmonary thermodilution before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods. Thirty patients scheduled for elective coronary surgery were studied before and after CPB. A passive leg raising maneuver was also performed. Measurements included CO obtained by transpulmonary thermodilution (COTPTD) and by nine pulse contour algorithms (COX1-9). Calibration of pulse contour algorithms was performed by esophageal Doppler ultrasound after induction of anesthesia and 15 min after CPB. Correlations, Bland-Altman analysis, four-quadrant, and polar analysis were also calculated. Results. There was only a poor correlation between COTPTD and COX1-9 during passive leg raising and in the period before and after CPB. Percentage error exceeded the required 30% limit. Four-quadrant and polar analysis revealed poor trending ability for most algorithms before and after CPB. The Liljestrand-Zander algorithm revealed the best reliability. Conclusions. Estimation of CO by nine different pulse contour algorithms revealed poor accuracy compared with transpulmonary thermodilution. Furthermore, the less-invasive algorithms showed an insufficient capability for trending hemodynamic changes before and after CPB. The Liljestrand-Zander algorithm demonstrated the highest reliability. This trial is registered with NCT02438228 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

  13. Accuracy of Cardiac Output by Nine Different Pulse Contour Algorithms in Cardiac Surgery Patients: A Comparison with Transpulmonary Thermodilution

    PubMed Central

    Bein, Berthold; Gruenewald, Matthias; Masing, Sarah; Huenges, Katharina; Haneya, Assad; Steinfath, Markus; Renner, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Today, there exist several different pulse contour algorithms for calculation of cardiac output (CO). The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of nine different pulse contour algorithms with transpulmonary thermodilution before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods. Thirty patients scheduled for elective coronary surgery were studied before and after CPB. A passive leg raising maneuver was also performed. Measurements included CO obtained by transpulmonary thermodilution (COTPTD) and by nine pulse contour algorithms (COX1–9). Calibration of pulse contour algorithms was performed by esophageal Doppler ultrasound after induction of anesthesia and 15 min after CPB. Correlations, Bland-Altman analysis, four-quadrant, and polar analysis were also calculated. Results. There was only a poor correlation between COTPTD and COX1–9 during passive leg raising and in the period before and after CPB. Percentage error exceeded the required 30% limit. Four-quadrant and polar analysis revealed poor trending ability for most algorithms before and after CPB. The Liljestrand-Zander algorithm revealed the best reliability. Conclusions. Estimation of CO by nine different pulse contour algorithms revealed poor accuracy compared with transpulmonary thermodilution. Furthermore, the less-invasive algorithms showed an insufficient capability for trending hemodynamic changes before and after CPB. The Liljestrand-Zander algorithm demonstrated the highest reliability. This trial is registered with NCT02438228 (ClinicalTrials.gov). PMID:28116294

  14. The normal ranges of cardiovascular parameters measured using the ultrasonic cardiac output monitor.

    PubMed

    Cattermole, Giles N; Leung, P Y Mia; Ho, Grace Y L; Lau, Peach W S; Chan, Cangel P Y; Chan, Stewart S W; Smith, Brendan E; Graham, Colin A; Rainer, Timothy H

    2017-03-01

    The ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM) is a noninvasive transcutaneous continuous wave Doppler method for assessing hemodynamics. There are no published reference ranges for normal values in adults (aged 18-60 years) for this device. This study aimed to (1) measure cardiovascular indices using USCOM in healthy adults aged 18-60 years; (2) combine these data with those for healthy children (aged 0-12), adolescents (aged 12-18), and the elderly (aged over 60) from our previously published studies in order to present normal ranges for all ages, and (3) establish normal ranges of USCOM-derived variables according to both weight and age. This was a population-based cross-sectional observational study of healthy Chinese subjects aged 0.5-89 years in Hong Kong. USCOM scans were performed on all subjects, to produce measurements including stroke volume, cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance. Data from previously published studies (children, adolescents, and the elderly) were included. Normal ranges were defined as lying between the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles. A total of 2218 subjects were studied (mean age = 16.4, range = 0.5-89; 52% male). From previous studies, 1197 children (aged 0-12, 55% male), 590 adolescents (aged 12-18, 49% male), and 77 elderly (aged 60-89, 55% male) were included. New data were collected from 354 adults aged 18-60 (47% male). Normal ranges are presented according to age and weight. We present comprehensive normal ranges for hemodynamic parameters obtained with USCOM in healthy subjects of all ages from infancy to the elderly.

  15. Why do tuna maintain elevated slow muscle temperatures? Power output of muscle isolated from endothermic and ectothermic fish.

    PubMed

    Altringham, J D; Block, B A

    1997-10-01

    It has been hypothesised that regional endothermy has evolved in the muscle of some tunas to enhance the locomotory performance of the fish by increasing muscle power output. Using the work loop technique, we have determined the relationship between cycle frequency and power output, over a range of temperatures, in isolated bundles of slow muscle fibres from the endothermic yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) and its ectothermic relative the bonito (Sarda chiliensis). Power output in all preparations was highly temperature-dependent. A counter-current heat exchanger which could maintain a 10 degrees C temperature differential would typically double maximum muscle power output and the frequency at which maximum power is generated (fopt). The deep slow muscle of the tuna was able to operate at higher temperatures than slow muscle from the bonito, but was more sensitive to temperature change than more superficially located slow fibres from both tuna and bonito. This suggests that it has undergone some evolutionary specialisation for operation at higher, but relatively stable, temperatures. fopt of slow muscle was higher than the tailbeat frequency of undisturbed cruising tuna and, together with the high intrinsic power output of the slow muscle mass, suggests that cruising fish have a substantial slow muscle power reserve. This reserve should be sufficient to power significantly higher sustainable swimming speeds, presumably at lower energetic cost than if intrinsically less efficient fast fibres were recruited.

  16. Rowing increases stroke volume and cardiac output to a greater extent than cycling.

    PubMed

    Horn, P; Ostadal, P; Ostadal, B

    2015-01-01

    Exercise stimulates increases in heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). These adaptive mechanisms are strongly dependent on the type of exercise. Both rowing and cycling are widely used for physical training worldwide; however, evidence regarding the differences in major hemodynamic parameters during rowing and cycling remains insufficient. Ten healthy male volunteers were randomly assigned to perform either a rowing or cycling exercise. After 20 min rest, the group who had rowed first performed the cycling exercise and vice versa. Exercise was performed at a power-to-weight ratio of 2 W/kg for 2 min. HR, SV, CO and blood pressure (BP) were measured noninvasively using pulse-wave analysis at baseline and immediately after each exercise. HR, SV and CO were significantly higher after exercise than at rest. Whereas HR was comparable between rowing and cycling, SV and CO were significantly higher after rowing than after cycling. BP was comparable among all three measurements. Rowing increased SV and CO to a greater extent than cycling, whereas HR and BP were not influenced by the type of exercise. Our data suggest that rowing leads to more extensive stimulation of cardiac contractility and/or decreases in peripheral vascular resistance compared with cycling.

  17. Noninvasive aortic bloodflow by Pulsed Doppler Echocardiography (PDE) compared to cardiac output by the direct Fick procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Left ventricular stroke volume was estimated from the systolic velocity integral in the ascending aorta by pulsed Doppler Echocardiography (PDE) and the cross sectional area of the aorta estimated by M mode echocardiography on 15 patients with coronary disease undergoing right catheterization for diagnostic purposes. Cardiac output was calculated from stroke volume and heart volume using the PDE method as well as the Fick procedure for comparison. The mean value for the cardiac output via the PDE method (4.42 L/min) was only 6% lower than for the cardiac output obtained from the Fick procedure (4.69 L/min) and the correlation between the two methods was excellent (r=0.967, p less than .01). The good agreement between the two methods demonstrates that the PDE technique offers a reliable noninvasive alternative for estimating cardiac output, requiring no active cooperation by the subject. It was concluded that the Doppler method is superior to the Fick method in that it provides beat by beat information on cardiac performance.

  18. Equipment review: New techniques for cardiac output measurement – oesophageal Doppler, Fick principle using carbon dioxide, and pulse contour analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berton, Christine; Cholley, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    Measuring cardiac output is of paramount importance in the management of critically ill patients in the intensive care unit and of 'high risk' surgical patients in the operating room. Alternatives to thermodilution are now available and are gaining acceptance among practitioners who have been trained almost exclusively in the use of the pulmonary artery catheter. The present review focuses on the principles, advantages and limitations of oesophageal Doppler, Fick principle applied to carbon dioxide, and pulse contour analysis. No single method stands out or renders the others obsolete. By making cardiac output easily measurable, however, these techniques should all contribute to improvement in haemodynamic management. PMID:12133181

  19. In vivo validation of cardiac output assessment in non-standard 3D echocardiographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nillesen, M. M.; Lopata, R. G. P.; de Boode, W. P.; Gerrits, I. H.; Huisman, H. J.; Thijssen, J. M.; Kapusta, L.; de Korte, C. L.

    2009-04-01

    Automatic segmentation of the endocardial surface in three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic images is an important tool to assess left ventricular (LV) geometry and cardiac output (CO). The presence of speckle noise as well as the nonisotropic characteristics of the myocardium impose strong demands on the segmentation algorithm. In the analysis of normal heart geometries of standardized (apical) views, it is advantageous to incorporate a priori knowledge about the shape and appearance of the heart. In contrast, when analyzing abnormal heart geometries, for example in children with congenital malformations, this a priori knowledge about the shape and anatomy of the LV might induce erroneous segmentation results. This study describes a fully automated segmentation method for the analysis of non-standard echocardiographic images, without making strong assumptions on the shape and appearance of the heart. The method was validated in vivo in a piglet model. Real-time 3D echocardiographic image sequences of five piglets were acquired in radiofrequency (rf) format. These ECG-gated full volume images were acquired intra-operatively in a non-standard view. Cardiac blood flow was measured simultaneously by an ultrasound transit time flow probe positioned around the common pulmonary artery. Three-dimensional adaptive filtering using the characteristics of speckle was performed on the demodulated rf data to reduce the influence of speckle noise and to optimize the distinction between blood and myocardium. A gradient-based 3D deformable simplex mesh was then used to segment the endocardial surface. A gradient and a speed force were included as external forces of the model. To balance data fitting and mesh regularity, one fixed set of weighting parameters of internal, gradient and speed forces was used for all data sets. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were computed from the segmented endocardial surface. The cardiac output derived from this automatic segmentation was

  20. Noninvasive cardiac output measurement by inert gas rebreathing in suspected pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Farina, Stefania; Teruzzi, Giovanni; Cattadori, Gaia; Ferrari, Cristina; De Martini, Stefano; Bussotti, Maurizio; Calligaris, Giuseppe; Bartorelli, Antonio; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate inert gas rebreathing (IGR) reliability in cardiac output (CO) measurement compared with Fick method and thermodilution. IGR is a noninvasive method for CO measurement; CO by IGR is calculated as pulmonary blood flow plus intrapulmonary shunt. IGR may be ideal for follow-up of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH), sparing the need of repeated invasive right-sided cardiac catheterization. Right-sided cardiac catheterization with CO measurement by thermodilution, Fick method, and IGR was performed in 125 patients with possible PH by echocardiography. Patients were grouped according to right-sided cardiac catheterization-measured mean pulmonary and wedge pressures: normal pulmonary arterial pressure (n = 20, mean pulmonary arterial pressure = 18 ± 3 mm Hg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure = 11 ± 5 mm Hg), PH and normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PH-NW, n = 37 mean pulmonary arterial pressure = 42 ± 13 mm Hg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure = 11 ± 6 mm Hg), and PH and high pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PH-HW, n = 68, mean pulmonary arterial pressure = 37 ± 9 mm Hg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure = 24 ± 6 mm Hg). Thermodilution and Fick measurements were comparable. Fick and IGR agreement was observed in normal pulmonary arterial pressure (CO = 4.10 ± 1.14 and 4.08 ± 0.97 L/min, respectively), whereas IGR overestimated Fick in patients with PH-NW and those with PH-HW because of intrapulmonary shunting overestimation in hypoxemic patients. When patients with arterial oxygen saturation (SO2) ≤90% were excluded, IGR and Fick agreement improved in PH-NW (CO = 4.90 ± 1.70 and 4.76 ± 1.35 L/min, respectively) and PH-HW (CO = 4.05 ± 1.04 and 4.10 ± 1.17 L/min, respectively). In hypoxemic patients, we estimated pulmonary shunt as Fick - pulmonary blood flow and calculated shunt as: -0.2423 × arterial SO2 + 21.373 L/min. In conclusion, IGR is reliable for CO measurement in patients with PH

  1. The Treatment of Shock Based Upon Physiological Principles and Impedence Method for Measuring Cardiac Output in Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1967-01-01

    cardiogenic shock following intracoronary artery microsphere embolization. The syndrome has been previously characterized by a fall in cardiac output and a...previously been oub- jected to and survived usually lethal cardiogenic shock, 5 dogs were selected. One month after intracoronary embolization, an LD, 0 0

  2. Pulmonary diffusing capacity, capillary blood volume, and cardiac output during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. K.; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Deutschman, Robert A., III; West, John B.

    1993-01-01

    We measured pulmonary diffusing capacity (DL), diffusing capacity per unit lung volume, pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc), membrane diffusing capacity (Dm), pulmonary capillary blood flow or cardiac output (Qc), and cardiac stroke volume (SV) in four subjects exposed to nine days of microgravity. DL in microgravity was elevated compared with preflight standing values and was higher than preflight supine because of the elevation of both Vc and Dm. The elevation in Vc was comparable to that measured supine in 1 G, but the increase in Dm was in sharp contrast to the supine value. We postulate that, in 0 G, pulmonary capillary blood is evenly distributed throughout the lung, providing for uniform capillary filling, leading to an increase in the surface area available for diffusion. By contrast, in the supine 1-G state, the capillaries are less evenly filled, and although a similar increase in blood volume is observed, the corresponding increase in surface area does not occur. DL and its subdivisions showed no adaptive changes from the first measurement 24 h after the start of 0 G to eight days later. Similarly, there were no trends in the postflight data, suggesting that the principal mechanism of these changes was gravitational. The increase in Dm suggests that subclinical pulmonary edema did not result from exposure to 0 G. Qc was modestly increased inflight and decreased postflight compared with preflight standing. Compared with preflight standing, SV was increased 46 percent inflight and decreased 14 percent in the 1st week postflight. There were temporal changes in Qc and SV during 0 G, with the highest values recorded at the first measurement, 24 h into the flight. The lowest values of Qc and SV occurred on the day of return.

  3. Pilot Study: Estimation of Stroke Volume and Cardiac Output from Pulse Wave Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Steppan, Jochen; Barodka, Viachaslau

    2017-01-01

    Background Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is increasingly replacing thermodilution pulmonary artery catheters to assess hemodynamics in patients at high risk for cardiovascular morbidity. However, one of the drawbacks of TEE compared to pulmonary artery catheters is the inability to measure real time stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) continuously. The aim of the present proof of concept study was to validate a novel method of SV estimation, based on pulse wave velocity (PWV) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods This is a retrospective observational study. We measured pulse transit time by superimposing the radial arterial waveform onto the continuous wave Doppler waveform of the left ventricular outflow tract, and calculated SV (SVPWV) using the transformed Bramwell-Hill equation. The SV measured by TEE (SVTEE) was used as a reference. Results A total of 190 paired SV were measured from 28 patients. A strong correlation was observed between SVPWV and SVTEE with the coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.71. A mean difference between the two (bias) was 3.70 ml with the limits of agreement ranging from -20.33 to 27.73 ml and a percentage error of 27.4% based on a Bland-Altman analysis. The concordance rate of two methods was 85.0% based on a four-quadrant plot. The angular concordance rate was 85.9% with radial limits of agreement (the radial sector that contained 95% of the data points) of ± 41.5 degrees based on a polar plot. Conclusions PWV based SV estimation yields reasonable agreement with SV measured by TEE. Further studies are required to assess its utility in different clinical situations. PMID:28060961

  4. Noninvasive measurement of cardiac output during exercise in children with tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Marcuccio, Elisa; Arora, Gaurav; Quivers, Eric; Yurchak, Mary Kay; McCaffrey, Francis

    2012-10-01

    In patients with surgically repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), reported peak oxygen consumption (VO(2)) is decreased compared with control subjects. The measurement of exercise cardiac output (CO) could be a useful adjunct for assessing cardiovascular fitness. There are few data assessing noninvasive CO, cardiac index (CI), and stroke volume (SV) during exercise for these patients. This study sought to measure noninvasive CI and SV during rest and exercise in children with repaired TOF. The authors compared 21 asymptomatic children with repaired TOF ages 11-17 years during rest and exercise and 42 gender- and age-matched healthy control children without structural heart disease. Using a Bruce exercise protocol, exercise data were measured noninvasively by a novel inert gas rebreathing technique including peak duration and heart rate, as well as VO(2), CO, CI, and SV measured at 90 % of peak predicted theoretical heart rate (90 % ppHR). Statistical correlation between peak VO(2) and CI was performed. At baseline, there was no statistically significant difference in any of the measures between the groups. At 90 % ppHR, there was an increase in CI during exercise of 140 % in the TOF children and 180 % in the control children. During exercise, SV changed minimally in the patient group, whereas it increased more than 30 % in the control children. At 90 % ppHR, the patient group showed an increase in VO(2) during exercise similar to that of their healthy peers. The patients had a significantly shorter peak exercise duration than normal control subjects. The patients had a lower CI during exercise because they were less able to increase SV. Therefore, at similar heart rates, patients who have had TOF repair must rely on increased peripheral muscle extraction, with a higher arteriovenous oxygen difference (SaO(2)-MvO(2)) during exercise, which may limit peak exercise capacity. In this cohort of TOF patients, noninvasive CI measurement was feasible, and correlation with VO

  5. Acoustic output of multi-line transmit beamforming for fast cardiac imaging: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Santos, Pedro; Tong, Ling; Ortega, Alejandra; Løvstakken, Lasse; Samset, Eigil; D'hooge, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Achieving higher frame rates in cardiac ultrasound could unveil short-lived myocardial events and lead to new insights on cardiac function. Multi-line transmit (MLT) beamforming (i.e., simultaneously transmitting multiple focused beams) is a potential approach to achieve this. However, two challenges come with it: first, it leads to cross-talk between the MLT beams, appearing as imaging artifacts, and second, it presents acoustic summation in the near field, where multiple MLT beams overlap. Although several studies have focused on the former, no studies have looked into the implications of the latter on acoustic safety. In this paper, the acoustic field of 4-MLT was simulated and compared with single-line transmit (SLT). The findings suggest that standard MLT does present potential concerns. Compared with SLT, it shows a 2-fold increase in mechanical index (MI) (from 1.0 to 2.3), a 6-fold increase in spatial-peak pulse-average intensity (I(sppa)) (from 99 to 576 W∙cm(-2)) and a 12-fold increase in spatial-peak temporalaverage intensity (I(spta)) (from 119 to 1407 mW∙cm(-2)). Subsequently, modifications of the transmit pulse and delay line of MLT were studied. These modifications allowed for a change in the spatio-temporal distribution of the acoustic output, thereby significantly decreasing the safety indices (MI = 1.2, I(sppa) = 92 W∙cm(-2) and I(spta) = 366 mW∙cm(-2)). Accordingly, they help mitigate the concerns around MLT, reducing potential tradeoffs between acoustic safety and image quality.

  6. Quantification of the impaired cardiac output response to exercise in heart failure: application of a non-invasive device.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jonathan; Gujja, Pradeep; Neelagaru, Suresh; Hsu, Leon; Burkhoff, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    An impaired cardiac output (CO) response to exercise is a hallmark of chronic heart failure (CHF), and the degree to which CO is impaired is related to the severity of CHF and prognosis. However, practical methods for obtaining cardiac output during exercise are lacking, and what constitutes and impaired response is unclear. Forty six CHF patients and 13 normal subjects underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) while CO and other hemodynamic measurements at rest and during exercise were obtained using a novel, non-invasive, bioreactance device based on assessment of relative phase shifts of electric currents injected across the thorax, heart rate and ventricular ejection time. An abnormal cardiac output response to exercise was defined as achieving ≤ 95% of the confidence limits of the slope of the relationship between CO and oxygen uptake (VO2). An impaired CO slope identified patients with more severe CHF as evidenced by a lower peak VO2, lower peak CO, heightened VE/VCO2 slope, and lower oxygen uptake efficiency slope. CO can be estimated during exercise using a novel bioreactance technique; patients with an impaired response to exercise exhibit reduced exercise capacity and inefficient ventilation typical of more severe CHF. Non- invasive measurement of cardiac performance in response to exercise provides a simple method of identifying patients with more severe CHF and may complement the CPX in identifying CHF patients at high risk. Key pointsNon-invasive measurement of cardiac output during exercise is feasible in patients with heart failure.Impairment in the CO response to exercise identifies heart failure patients with more severe disease, lower exercise capacity and inefficient ventilation.Non-invasive measurement of cardiac performance during exercise has potentially important applications for the functional and prognostic assessment of patients with heart failure.

  7. Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement is preserved with lifelong endurance training and is the main determinant of maximal cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Boushel, Robert C; Calbet, José A; Åkeson, Per; Mortensen, Stefan P

    2015-12-01

    Age-related decline in cardiac function can be prevented or postponed by lifelong endurance training. However, effects of normal ageing as well as of lifelong endurance exercise on longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine resting longitudinal and radial pumping in elderly athletes, sedentary elderly and young sedentary subjects. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate determinants of maximal cardiac output in elderly. Eight elderly athletes (63 ± 4 years), seven elderly sedentary (66 ± 4 years) and ten young sedentary subjects (29 ± 4 years) underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. All subjects underwent maximal exercise testing and for elderly subjects maximal cardiac output during cycling was determined using a dye dilution technique. Longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume did not differ between groups (longitudinal left ventricle (LV) 52-65%, P = 0.12, right ventricle (RV) 77-87%, P = 0.16, radial 7.9-8.6%, P = 1.0). Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement (LVAVPD) was higher in elderly athletes and young sedentary compared with elderly sedentary subjects (14 ± 3, 15 ± 2 and 11 ± 1 mm, respectively, P < 0.05). There was no difference between groups for RVAVPD (P = 0.2). LVAVPD was an independent predictor of maximal cardiac output (R(2) = 0.61, P < 0.01, β = 0.78). Longitudinal and radial contributions to stroke volume did not differ between groups. However, how longitudinal pumping was achieved differed; elderly athletes and young sedentary subjects showed similar AVPD whereas this was significantly lower in elderly sedentary subjects. Elderly sedentary subjects achieved longitudinal pumping through increased short-axis area of the ventricle. Large AVPD was a determinant of maximal cardiac output and exercise capacity.

  8. Quantification of mitral regurgitation by automated cardiac output measurement: experimental and clinical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, J. P.; Yang, X. S.; Qin, J. X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Zhou, J.; Vazquez, C. J.; Griffin, B. P.; Stewart, W. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate an automated noninvasive method to quantify mitral regurgitation. BACKGROUND: Automated cardiac output measurement (ACM), which integrates digital color Doppler velocities in space and in time, has been validated for the left ventricular (LV) outflow tract but has not been tested for the LV inflow tract or to assess mitral regurgitation (MR). METHODS: First, to validate ACM against a gold standard (ultrasonic flow meter), 8 dogs were studied at 40 different stages of cardiac output (CO). Second, to compare ACM to the LV outflow (ACMa) and inflow (ACMm) tracts, 50 normal volunteers without MR or aortic regurgitation (44+/-5 years, 31 male) were studied. Third, to compare ACM with the standard pulsed Doppler-two-dimensional echocardiographic (PD-2D) method for quantification of MR, 51 patients (61+/-14 years, 30 male) with MR were studied. RESULTS: In the canine studies, CO by ACM (1.32+/-0.3 liter/min, y) and flow meter (1.35+/-0.3 liter/min, x) showed good correlation (r=0.95, y=0.89x+0.11) and agreement (deltaCO(y-x)=0.03+/-0.08 [mean+/-SD] liter/min). In the normal subjects, CO measured by ACMm agreed with CO by ACMa (r=0.90, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.09+/-0.42 liter/min), PD (r=0.87, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=0.12+/-0.49 liter/min) and 2D (r=0.84, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.16+/-0.48 liter/min). In the patients, mitral regurgitant volume (MRV) by ACMm-ACMa agreed with PD-2D (r= 0.88, y=0.88x+6.6, p < 0.0001, deltaMRV=2.68+/-9.7 ml). CONCLUSIONS: We determined that ACM is a feasible new method for quantifying LV outflow and inflow volume to measure MRV and that ACM automatically performs calculations that are equivalent to more time-consuming Doppler and 2D measurements. Additionally, ACM should improve MR quantification in routine clinical practice.

  9. Cardiac output but not stroke volume is similar in a Wingate and VO2peak test in young men.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Piero; Betschon, Katharina; Boutellier, Urs; Toigo, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Wingate test (WT) training programmes lasting 2-3 weeks lead to improved peak oxygen consumption. If a single 30 s WT was capable of significantly increasing stroke volume and cardiac output, the increase in peak oxygen consumption could possibly be explained by improved oxygen delivery. Thus, we investigated whether a single WT increases stroke volume and cardiac output to similar levels than those obtained at peak exercise during a graded cycling exercise test (GXT) to exhaustion. Fifteen healthy young men (peak oxygen consumption 45.0 ± 5.3 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) performed one WT and one GXT on separate days in randomised order. During the tests, we estimated cardiac output using inert gas rebreathing (nitrous oxide and sulphur hexafluoride) and subsequently calculated stroke volume. We found that cardiac output was similar (18.2 ± 3.3 vs. 17.9 ± 2.6 l min(-1); P = 0.744), stroke volume was higher (127 ± 37 vs. 94 ± 15 ml; P < 0.001), and heart rate was lower (149 ± 26 vs. 190 ± 12 beats min(-1); P < 0.001) at the end (27 ± 2 s) of a WT as compared to peak exercise during a GXT. Our results suggest that a single WT produces a haemodynamic response which is characterised by similar cardiac output, higher stroke volume and lower heart rate as compared to peak exercise during a GXT.

  10. Increased cardiac output elicits higher V̇O2max in response to self-paced exercise.

    PubMed

    Astorino, Todd Anthony; McMillan, David William; Edmunds, Ross Montgomery; Sanchez, Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a self-paced protocol demonstrated higher maximal oxygen uptake versus the traditional ramp protocol. The primary aim of the current study was to further explore potential differences in maximal oxygen uptake between the ramp and self-paced protocols using simultaneous measurement of cardiac output. Active men and women of various fitness levels (N = 30, mean age = 26.0 ± 5.0 years) completed 3 graded exercise tests separated by a minimum of 48 h. Participants initially completed progressive ramp exercise to exhaustion to determine maximal oxygen uptake followed by a verification test to confirm maximal oxygen uptake attainment. Over the next 2 sessions, they performed a self-paced and an additional ramp protocol. During exercise, gas exchange data were obtained using indirect calorimetry, and thoracic impedance was utilized to estimate hemodynamic function (stroke volume and cardiac output). One-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used to determine differences in maximal oxygen uptake and cardiac output between ramp and self-paced testing. Results demonstrated lower (p < 0.001) maximal oxygen uptake via the ramp (47.2 ± 10.2 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) versus the self-paced (50.2 ± 9.6 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) protocol, with no interaction (p = 0.06) seen for fitness level. Maximal heart rate and cardiac output (p = 0.02) were higher in the self-paced protocol versus ramp exercise. In conclusion, data show that the traditional ramp protocol may underestimate maximal oxygen uptake compared with a newly developed self-paced protocol, with a greater cardiac output potentially responsible for this outcome.

  11. Kinetics of Cardiac Output at the Onset of Exercise in Precapillary Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bengueddache, Samir; Ferretti, Guido; Soccal, Paola M.; Noble, Stéphane; Beghetti, Maurice; Chemla, Denis; Hervé, Philippe; Sitbon, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Cardiac output (CO) is a cornerstone parameter in precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH). The Modelflow (MF) method offers a reliable noninvasive determination of its beat-by-beat changes. So MF allows exploration of CO adjustment with the best temporal resolution. Methods. Fifteen subjects (5 PH patients, 10 healthy controls) performed a submaximal supine exercise on a cycle ergometer after 5 min of rest. CO was continuously determined by MF (COMF). Kinetics of heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), and CO were determined with 3 monoexponential models. Results. In PH patients, we observed a sudden and transitory drop of SV upon exercise onset. This implied a transitory drop of CO whose adjustment to a new steady state depended on HR increase. The kinetics of HR and CO for PH patients was slower than that of controls for all models and for SV in model 1. SV kinetics was faster for PH patients in models 2 and 3. Conclusion. This is the first description of beat-by-beat cardiovascular adjustments upon exercise onset in PH. The kinetics of HR and CO appeared slower than those of healthy controls and there was a transitory drop of CO upon exercise onset in PH due to a sudden drop of SV. PMID:27990432

  12. Cardiac output and associated left ventricular hypertrophy in pediatric chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Donald J; Kimball, Thomas R; Koury, Phillip R; Mitsnefes, Mark M

    2009-03-01

    A significant number of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), suggesting the role of preload overload. Therefore, we hypothesized that increased cardiac output (CO) might be a contributing factor for increased left ventricular mass index (LVMI) in these children. Patients aged 6-20 years with CKD stages 2-4 were enrolled. Echocardiograms were performed to assess LV function and geometry at rest and during exercise. Heart rate, stroke volume, and CO were also assessed at rest and during exercise. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure (AMBP) monitoring was performed. Of the patients enrolled in this study, 17% had LVH. Increased stroke volume and CO were observed in patients with LVH compared to patients without LVH. Univariate analysis revealed significant positive associations between LVMI and CO, stroke volume, body mass index, pulse pressure from mean 24-h AMBP, and mean 24-h systolic BP load. No association with heart rate, age, parathyroid hormone, glomerular filtration rate, or anemia was observed. Only CO (beta = 1.98, p = 0.0005) was independently associated with increased LVMI in multivariate modeling (model R (2) = 0.25). The results of this study suggest that increased CO might predispose to increased LVMI in pediatric patients with CKD. Adaptations may be required to meet increased metabolic demand in these patients.

  13. Noninvasive cardiac output determination for children by the inert gas-rebreathing method.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Gesa; Kerst, Gunter; Baden, Winfried; Hofbeck, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Standard methods for determination of cardiac output (CO) are either invasive or technically demanding. Measurement of CO by the inert gas-rebreathing (IGR) method, applied successfully in adults, uses a low-concentration mixture of an inert and a blood-soluble gas, respectively. This study tested the feasibility of this method for determining CO during exercise for pediatric patients with complete congenital atrioventricular block (CCAVB) stimulated with a VVI pacemaker. In this study, 5 CCAVB patients (age 9.2-17.4 years) were compared with 10 healthy age-matched boys and girls. Testing was performed with the Innocor system. The patients were instructed to breathe the test gas from a closed system. Pulmonary blood flow was calculated according to the washout of the soluble gas component. During standardized treadmill testing, CO was determined at three defined levels. The CO measurements were successful for all the study participants. The patients reached a lower peak CO than the control subjects (5.9 l/min/m(2) vs 7.3 [boys] and 7.2 [girls]). The stroke volume increase under exercise also was reduced in the patients compared with the control subjects. The feasibility of the IGR method for exercise CO testing in children was documented. Application of the IGR method for children requires careful instruction of the patients and appears restricted to subjects older than 8 years. The method offers new insights into mechanisms of cardiovascular adaptation in children with congenital heart disease.

  14. Kinetics of Cardiac Output at the Onset of Exercise in Precapillary Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lador, Frédéric; Bringard, Aurélien; Bengueddache, Samir; Ferretti, Guido; Bendjelid, Karim; Soccal, Paola M; Noble, Stéphane; Beghetti, Maurice; Chemla, Denis; Hervé, Philippe; Sitbon, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Cardiac output (CO) is a cornerstone parameter in precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH). The Modelflow (MF) method offers a reliable noninvasive determination of its beat-by-beat changes. So MF allows exploration of CO adjustment with the best temporal resolution. Methods. Fifteen subjects (5 PH patients, 10 healthy controls) performed a submaximal supine exercise on a cycle ergometer after 5 min of rest. CO was continuously determined by MF (COMF). Kinetics of heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), and CO were determined with 3 monoexponential models. Results. In PH patients, we observed a sudden and transitory drop of SV upon exercise onset. This implied a transitory drop of CO whose adjustment to a new steady state depended on HR increase. The kinetics of HR and CO for PH patients was slower than that of controls for all models and for SV in model 1. SV kinetics was faster for PH patients in models 2 and 3. Conclusion. This is the first description of beat-by-beat cardiovascular adjustments upon exercise onset in PH. The kinetics of HR and CO appeared slower than those of healthy controls and there was a transitory drop of CO upon exercise onset in PH due to a sudden drop of SV.

  15. A computational model-based validation of Guyton's analysis of cardiac output and venous return curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Guyton developed a popular approach for understanding the factors responsible for cardiac output (CO) regulation in which 1) the heart-lung unit and systemic circulation are independently characterized via CO and venous return (VR) curves, and 2) average CO and right atrial pressure (RAP) of the intact circulation are predicted by graphically intersecting the curves. However, this approach is virtually impossible to verify experimentally. We theoretically evaluated the approach with respect to a nonlinear, computational model of the pulsatile heart and circulation. We developed two sets of open circulation models to generate CO and VR curves, differing by the manner in which average RAP was varied. One set applied constant RAPs, while the other set applied pulsatile RAPs. Accurate prediction of intact, average CO and RAP was achieved only by intersecting the CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs because of the pulsatility and nonlinearity (e.g., systemic venous collapse) of the intact model. The CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs were also practically independent. This theoretical study therefore supports the validity of Guyton's graphical analysis.

  16. A novel continuous cardiac output monitor based on pulse wave transit time.

    PubMed

    Sugo, Yoshihiro; Ukawa, Teiji; Takeda, Sunao; Ishihara, Hironori; Kazama, Tomiei; Takeda, Junzo

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring cardiac output (CO) is important for the management of patient circulation in an operation room (OR) or intensive care unit (ICU). We assumed that the change in pulse wave transit time (PWTT) obtained from an electrocardiogram (ECG) and a pulse oximeter wave is correlated with the change in stroke volume (SV), from which CO is derived. The present study reports the verification of this hypothesis using a hemodynamic analysis theory and animal study. PWTT consists of a pre-ejection period (PEP), the pulse transit time through an elasticity artery (T(1)), and the pulse transit time through peripheral resistance arteries (T(2)). We assumed a consistent negative correlation between PWTT and SV under all conditions of varying circulatory dynamics. The equation for calculating SV from PWTT was derived based on the following procedures. 1. Approximating SV using a linear equation of PWTT. 2. The slope and y-intercept of the above equation were determined under consideration of vessel compliance (SV was divided by Pulse Pressure (PP)), animal type, and the inherent relationship between PP and PWTT. Animal study was performed to verify the above-mentioned assumption. The correlation coefficient of PWTT and SV became r = -0.710 (p 〈 0.001), and a good correlation was admitted. It has been confirmed that accurate continuous CO and SV measurement is only possible by monitoring regular clinical parameters (ECG, SpO2, and NIBP).

  17. High Output Cardiac Failure Resolving after Repair of AV Fistula in a Six-Month-Old

    PubMed Central

    Teomete, Uygar; Gugol, Rubee Anne; Neville, Holly; Dandin, Ozgur; Young, Ming-Lon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acquired AVF in pediatrics are commonly caused by iatrogenic means, including arterial or venous punctures. These fistulae can cause great hemodynamic stress on the heart as soon as they are created. Case. A six-month-old 25-week gestation infant was referred for respiratory distress. Initial exam revealed tachypnea, tachycardia, and hypertension. There was a bruit noted on her left arm. An ultrasound showed an arteriovenous fistula. Its location, however, precluded intervention because of the high risk for limb-loss. An echocardiogram showed evidence of pulmonary hypertension that was treated with sildenafil and furosemide. However, no improvement was seen. On temporary manual occlusion of the fistula, the patient was noted to have increased her blood pressure and decreased her heart rate, suggesting significant hemodynamic effect of the fistula. The fistula was subsequently ligated and the patient clinically and echocardiographically improved. Conclusion. A patient in high output cardiac failure or pulmonary artery hypertension, especially prematüre patients with preexisting lung disease, should be probed for history of multiple punctures, trauma, or surgery and should have prompt evaluation for AVF. If it can be diagnosed and repaired, most of the cases have been shown to decrease the stress on the heart and reverse the pathologic hemodynamics. PMID:26885434

  18. High Output Cardiac Failure Resolving after Repair of AV Fistula in a Six-Month-Old.

    PubMed

    Teomete, Uygar; Gugol, Rubee Anne; Neville, Holly; Dandin, Ozgur; Young, Ming-Lon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acquired AVF in pediatrics are commonly caused by iatrogenic means, including arterial or venous punctures. These fistulae can cause great hemodynamic stress on the heart as soon as they are created. Case. A six-month-old 25-week gestation infant was referred for respiratory distress. Initial exam revealed tachypnea, tachycardia, and hypertension. There was a bruit noted on her left arm. An ultrasound showed an arteriovenous fistula. Its location, however, precluded intervention because of the high risk for limb-loss. An echocardiogram showed evidence of pulmonary hypertension that was treated with sildenafil and furosemide. However, no improvement was seen. On temporary manual occlusion of the fistula, the patient was noted to have increased her blood pressure and decreased her heart rate, suggesting significant hemodynamic effect of the fistula. The fistula was subsequently ligated and the patient clinically and echocardiographically improved. Conclusion. A patient in high output cardiac failure or pulmonary artery hypertension, especially prematüre patients with preexisting lung disease, should be probed for history of multiple punctures, trauma, or surgery and should have prompt evaluation for AVF. If it can be diagnosed and repaired, most of the cases have been shown to decrease the stress on the heart and reverse the pathologic hemodynamics.

  19. Cardiac output: a central issue in patients with respiratory extracorporeal support.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Stefano; Zagli, Giovanni; Ricci, Zaccaria; Villa, Gianluca; Barbani, Francesco; Pinelli, Fulvio; De Gaudio, Raffaele; Chelazzi, Cosimo

    2017-01-01

    The iLA-activve(®) Novalung is a new extracorporeal device specifically designed for lung support in patients with hypercapnic and/or hypoxemic respiratory failure. To date, only low-flow applications for decompensated hypercapnic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have been reported in the literature. Here, we briefly report three cases of iLA-activve use in patients with hypercapnic-hypoxemic acute lung failure assisted with mid-flow (up to 2.4 L/min) and different single/double venous cannulation. The main findings of our small case series were: firstly, extracorporeal blood flows over 2.0 L/min across the membrane provided clinically satisfying decarboxylation and improved oxygenation; secondly, the ratio between blood flow through the membrane and the patient's cardiac output (CO) was a major determinant for the oxygen increase. The latter could, therefore, be a useful indicator for understanding performance in the complex and multifactorial evaluation of patients with extracorporeal veno-venous lung support.

  20. Increase in cardiac output and PEEP as mechanism of pulmonary optimization.

    PubMed

    Curiel, C; Martínez, R; Pinto, V; Rosales, A; D'Empaire, G; Sánchez De Leon, R

    1995-03-01

    The influence of cardiac output (CO) and PEEP on pulmonary shunt (Qs/Qt) has been the subjects of considerable investigation but findings are controversial. The role of CO and PEEP on 19 isolated rabbit lung preparations perfused with hypoxic mixture (6% CO2, 10% O2, and 84% N2), which resulted in a constant oxygen venous pressure (64 +/- 5.6 mmHg) has been studied. The first group of 11 preparations were used to study the influence of CO modifications with room air ventilation on the Qs/Qt when the CO rises in 48%; in the second group simultaneous modifications in CO and PEEP (0.5 and 10 cm H2O) were performed. A positive correlation (p < 0.01) in Qs/Qt (0.048 +/- 0.04 to 0.12933 +/- 0.09) was found when the CO increased in the first experimental group, the fluid filtration rate (FFR) also increased and the pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) remained stable. In the second group an increase of 5 and 10 cm H2O of PEEP at constant CO reduced the Qs/Qt (0.0361 +/- 0.02 to 0.0184 +/- 0.006) while it increased the arterio-venous oxygen difference, PVR and FFR. During high CO conditions increase of 5 and 10 cm H2O of PEEP reduced the Qs/Qt (0.099 +/- 0.03 to 0.027 +/- 0.02) and FFR. These data suggest that when the Qs/Qt is increased, the use of PEEP can compensate the ventilation/perfusion alterations and restore pulmonary gas exchange.

  1. Dynamic device properties of pulse contour cardiac output during transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Petzoldt, Martin; Riedel, Carsten; Braeunig, Jan; Haas, Sebastian; Goepfert, Matthias S; Treede, Hendrik; Baldus, Stephan; Goetz, Alwin E; Reuter, Daniel A

    2015-06-01

    This prospective single-center study aimed to determine the responsiveness and diagnostic performance of continuous cardiac output (CCO) monitors based on pulse contour analysis compared with invasive mean arterial pressure (MAP) during predefined periods of acute circulatory deterioration in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The ability of calibrated (CCO(CAL)) and self-calibrated (CCO(AUTOCAL)) pulse contour analysis to detect the hemodynamic response to 37 episodes of balloon aortic valvuloplasty enabled by rapid ventricular pacing was quantified in 13 patients undergoing TAVI. A "low" and a "high" cut-off limit were predefined as a 15 or 25 % decrease from baseline respectively. We found no significant differences between CCO(CAL) and MAP regarding mean response time [low cut-off: 8.6 (7.1-10.5) vs. 8.9 (7.3-10.8) s, p = 0.76; high cut-off: 11.4 (9.7-13.5) vs. 12.6 (10.7-14.9) s, p = 0.32] or diagnostic performance [area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC): 0.99 (0.98-1.0) vs. 1.0 (0.99-1.0), p = 0.46]. But CCOCAL had a significantly higher amplitude response [95.0 (88.7-98.8) % decrease from baseline] than MAP [41.2 (30.0-52.9) %, p < 0.001]. CCOAUTOCAL had a significantly lower AUC [0.83 (0.73-0.93), p < 0.001] than MAP. Moreover, CCO(CAL) detected hemodynamic recovery significantly earlier than MAP. In conclusion, CCO(CAL) and MAP provided equivalent responsiveness and diagnostic performance to detect acute circulatory depression, whereas CCO(AUTOCAL) appeared to be less appropriate. In contrast to CCO(CAL) the amplitude response of MAP was poor. Consequently even small response amplitudes of MAP could indicate severe decreases in CO.

  2. Role of the autonomic nervous system in the reduced maximal cardiac output at altitude.

    PubMed

    Bogaard, Harm J; Hopkins, Susan R; Yamaya, Yoshiki; Niizeki, Kyuichi; Ziegler, Michael G; Wagner, Peter D

    2002-07-01

    After acclimatization to high altitude, maximal exercise cardiac output (QT) is reduced. Possible contributing factors include 1) blood volume depletion, 2) increased blood viscosity, 3) myocardial hypoxia, 4) altered autonomic nervous system (ANS) function affecting maximal heart rate (HR), and 5) reduced flow demand from reduced muscle work capability. We tested the role of the ANS reduction of HR in this phenomenon in five normal subjects by separately blocking the sympathetic and parasympathetic arms of the ANS during maximal exercise after 2-wk acclimatization at 3,800 m to alter maximal HR. We used intravenous doses of 8.0 mg of propranolol and 0.8 mg of glycopyrrolate, respectively. At altitude, peak HR was 170 +/- 6 beats/min, reduced from 186 +/- 3 beats/min (P = 0.012) at sea level. Propranolol further reduced peak HR to 139 +/- 2 beats/min (P = 0.001), whereas glycopyrrolate increased peak HR to sea level values, 184 +/- 3 beats/min, confirming adequate dosing with each drug. In contrast, peak O(2) consumption, work rate, and QT were similar at altitude under all drug treatments [peak QT = 16.2 +/- 1.2 (control), 15.5 +/- 1.3 (propranolol), and 16.2 +/- 1.1 l/min (glycopyrrolate)]. All QT results at altitude were lower than those at sea level (20.0 +/- 1.8 l/min in air). Therefore, this study suggests that, whereas the ANS may affect HR at altitude, peak QT is unaffected by ANS blockade. We conclude that the effect of altered ANS function on HR is not the cause of the reduced maximal QT at altitude.

  3. Spontaneous baroreflex control of cardiac output during dynamic exercise, muscle metaboreflex activation, and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Masashi; Sala-Mercado, Javier A; O'Leary, Donal S; Hammond, Robert L; Coutsos, Matthew; Ichinose, Tomoko; Pallante, Marco; Iellamo, Ferdinando

    2008-03-01

    We have previously shown that spontaneous baroreflex-induced changes in heart rate (HR) do not always translate into changes in cardiac output (CO) at rest. We have also shown that heart failure (HF) decreases this linkage between changes in HR and CO. Whether dynamic exercise and muscle metaboreflex activation (via imposed reductions in hindlimb blood flow) further alter this translation in normal and HF conditions is unknown. We examined these questions using conscious, chronically instrumented dogs before and after pacing-induced HF during mild and moderate dynamic exercise with and without muscle metaboreflex activation. We measured left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP), CO, and HR and analyzed the spontaneous HR-LVSP and CO-LVSP relationships. In normal animals, mild exercise significantly decreased HR-LVSP (-3.08 +/- 0.5 vs. -5.14 +/- 0.6 beats.min(-1).mmHg(-1); P < 0.05) and CO-LVSP (-134.74 +/- 24.5 vs. -208.6 +/- 22.2 ml.min(-1).mmHg(-1); P < 0.05). Moderate exercise further decreased both and, in addition, significantly reduced HR-CO translation (25.9 +/- 2.8% vs. 52.3 +/- 4.2%; P < 0.05). Muscle metaboreflex activation at both workloads decreased HR-LVSP, whereas it had no significant effect on CO-LVSP and the HR-CO translation. HF significantly decreased HR-LVSP, CO-LVSP, and the HR-CO translation in all situations. We conclude that spontaneous baroreflex HR responses do not always cause changes in CO during exercise. Moreover, muscle metaboreflex activation during mild and moderate dynamic exercise reduces this coupling. In addition, in HF the HR-CO translation also significantly decreases during both workloads and decreases even further with muscle metaboreflex activation.

  4. Phlebotomy eliminates the maximal cardiac output response to six weeks of exercise training.

    PubMed

    Bonne, Thomas C; Doucende, Gregory; Flück, Daniela; Jacobs, Robert A; Nordsborg, Nikolai B; Robach, Paul; Walther, Guillaume; Lundby, Carsten

    2014-05-15

    With this study we tested the hypothesis that 6 wk of endurance training increases maximal cardiac output (Qmax) relatively more by elevating blood volume (BV) than by inducing structural and functional changes within the heart. Nine healthy but untrained volunteers (Vo2max 47 ± 5 ml·min(-1)·kg(-1)) underwent supervised training (60 min; 4 times weekly at 65% Vo2max for 6 wk), and Qmax was determined by inert gas rebreathing during cycle ergometer exercise before and after the training period. After the training period, blood volume (determined in duplicates by CO rebreathing) was reestablished to pretraining values by phlebotomy and Qmax was quantified again. Resting echography revealed no structural heart adaptations as a consequence of the training intervention. After the training period, plasma volume (PV), red blood cell volume (RBCV), and BV increased (P < 0.05) by 147 ± 168 (5 ± 5%), 235 ± 64 (10 ± 3%), and 382 ± 204 ml (7 ± 4%), respectively. Vo2max was augmented (P < 0.05) by 10 ± 7% after the training period and decreased (P < 0.05) by 8 ± 7% with phlebotomy. Concomitantly, Qmax was increased (P < 0.05) from 18.9 ± 2.1 to 20.4 ± 2.3 l/min (9 ± 6%) as a consequence of the training intervention, and after normalization of BV by phlebotomy Qmax returned to pretraining values (18.1 ± 2.5 l/min; 12 ± 5% reversal). Thus the exercise training-induced increase in BV is the main mechanism increasing Qmax after 6 wk of endurance training in previously untrained subjects.

  5. Assessment of cardiac output with transpulmonary thermodilution during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Calbet, José A L; Boushel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy and reproducibility of transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTd) to assess cardiac output (Q̇) in exercising men was determined using indocyanine green (ICG) dilution as a reference method. TPTd has been utilized for the assessment of Q̇ and preload indexes of global end-diastolic volume and intrathoracic blood volume, as well as extravascular lung water (EVLW) in resting humans. It remains unknown if this technique is also accurate and reproducible during exercise. Sixteen healthy men underwent catheterization of the right femoral vein (for iced saline injection), an antecubital vein (ICG injection), and femoral artery (thermistor) to determine their Q̇ by TPTd and ICG concentration during incremental one- and two-legged pedaling on a cycle ergometer and combined arm cranking with leg pedaling to exhaustion. There was a close relationship between TPTd-Q̇ and ICG-Q̇ (r = 0.95, n = 151, standard error of the estimate: 1.452 l/min, P < 0.001; mean difference of 0.06 l/min; limits of agreement -2.98 to 2.86 l/min), and TPTd-Q̇ and ICG-Q̇ increased linearly with oxygen uptake with similar intercepts and slopes. Both methods had mean coefficients of variation close to 5% for Q̇, global end-diastolic volume, and intrathoracic blood volume. The mean coefficient of variation of EVLW, assessed with both indicators (ICG and thermal) was 17% and was sensitive enough to detect a reduction in EVLW of 107 ml when changing from resting supine to upright exercise. In summary, TPTd with bolus injection into the femoral vein is an accurate and reproducible method to assess Q̇ during exercise in humans.

  6. Cardiac output distribution in miniature swine during locomotory exercise to VO/sub 3max/

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, R.B.; Delp, M.D.; Laughlin, M.H.

    1986-03-01

    Distribution of cardiac output (CO) was studied in miniature swine (22 +/- 1 kg) during level treadmill exercise up to the speed (17.7 km/hr) that elicited maximal oxygen consumption (VO/sub 2max/) (60 +/- 4 m1/min/kg). COs and tissue blood flows (BFs) were measured with the radiolabelled microsphere technique. CO increased from a preexercise value of 2.1 +/- 0.5 1/min up to 9.9 +/- 0.5 1/min at VO/sub 2max/. In preexercise standing 43% of CO went to skeletal muscle, which comprised 36 +/- 1% of body mass, 42% to viscera (12 +/- 1% mass), 5% to brain, heart, and lungs (2% +/- 0.1% mass), and 10% to skin and skeleton (35 +/- 2% mass). Preexercise could not be considered resting because of the animals' excitability. Skeletal muscle BF increased progressively with speed up to VO/sub 2max/, both in absolute terms and in percent CO. At VO/sub 2max/, 88% of CO went to muscle, 3% to viscera, 8% to brain, heart and lungs, and 1% to skin and skeleton. Thus, at VO/sub 2max/ only 4% of CO went to the inactive tissues, which constituted 47% of body mass. In 2 pigs that ran at speeds above 17 km/hr, total muscle BF leveled off at VO/sub 2max/. These findings demonstrate that muscle BF progressively increases up to VO/sub 2max/, and that VO/sub 2/ levels off at the same intensity as muscle flow.

  7. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation enhances stroke volume and cardiac output during dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Walser, Buddy; Stebbins, Charles L

    2008-10-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have beneficial effects on cardiovascular function. We tested the hypotheses that dietary supplementation with DHA (2 g/day) + EPA (3 g/day) enhances increases in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) and decreases in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) during dynamic exercise. Healthy subjects received DHA + EPA (eight men, four women) or safflower oil (six men, three women) for 6 weeks. Both groups performed 20 min of bicycle exercise (10 min each at a low and moderate work intensity) before and after DHA + EPA or safflower oil treatment. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), SV, CO, and SVR were assessed before exercise and during both workloads. HR was unaffected by DHA + EPA and MAP was reduced, but only at rest (88 +/- 5 vs. 83 +/- 4 mm Hg). DHA + EPA augmented increases in SV (14.1 +/- 6.3 vs. 32.3 +/- 8.7 ml) and CO (8.5 +/- 1.0 vs. 10.3 +/- 1.2 L/min) and tended to attenuate decreases in SVR (-7.0 +/- 0.6 vs. -10.1 +/- 1.6 mm Hg L(-1) min(-1)) during the moderate workload. Safflower oil treatment had no effects on MAP, HR, SV, CO or SVR at rest or during exercise. DHA + EPA-induced increases in SV and CO imply that dietary supplementation with these fatty acids can increase oxygen delivery during exercise, which may have beneficial clinical implications for individuals with cardiovascular disease and reduced exercise tolerance.

  8. Plasma volume expansion does not increase maximal cardiac output or VO2 max in lowlanders acclimatized to altitude.

    PubMed

    Calbet, José A L; Rådegran, Göran; Boushel, Robert; Søndergaard, Hans; Saltin, Bengt; Wagner, Peter D

    2004-09-01

    With altitude acclimatization, blood hemoglobin concentration increases while plasma volume (PV) and maximal cardiac output (Qmax) decrease. This investigation aimed to determine whether reduction of Qmax at altitude is due to low circulating blood volume (BV). Eight Danish lowlanders (3 females, 5 males: age 24.0 +/- 0.6 yr; mean +/- SE) performed submaximal and maximal exercise on a cycle ergometer after 9 wk at 5,260 m altitude (Mt. Chacaltaya, Bolivia). This was done first with BV resulting from acclimatization (BV = 5.40 +/- 0.39 liters) and again 2-4 days later, 1 h after PV expansion with 1 liter of 6% dextran 70 (BV = 6.32 +/- 0.34 liters). PV expansion had no effect on Qmax, maximal O2 consumption (VO2), and exercise capacity. Despite maximal systemic O2 transport being reduced 19% due to hemodilution after PV expansion, whole body VO2 was maintained by greater systemic O2 extraction (P < 0.05). Leg blood flow was elevated (P < 0.05) in hypervolemic conditions, which compensated for hemodilution resulting in similar leg O2 delivery and leg VO2 during exercise regardless of PV. Pulmonary ventilation, gas exchange, and acid-base balance were essentially unaffected by PV expansion. Sea level Qmax and exercise capacity were restored with hyperoxia at altitude independently of BV. Low BV is not a primary cause for reduction of Qmax at altitude when acclimatized. Furthermore, hemodilution caused by PV expansion at altitude is compensated for by increased systemic O2 extraction with similar peak muscular O2 delivery, such that maximal exercise capacity is unaffected.

  9. Invasive Hemodynamic Assessment of Cardiac Output State after MitraClip Therapy in Nonanaesthetized Patients with Functional Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Budesinsky, Tomas; Linkova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Background. Surgical correction of mitral regurgitation (MR) can lead to postoperative low cardiac output state. We aimed to assess the acute hemodynamic changes after percutaneous MitraClip therapy (a unique model without influence of factors linked to surgical procedure) in patients with functional MR without the influence of general anaesthesia. Methods. We studied invasive hemodynamic parameters in 23 patients before procedure (conscious, nonsedated patients), during procedure (intubated patients), and the first day after MitraClip implantation (conscious, extubated patients). Results. Mitral valve clipping significantly increased cardiac index (CI) (from 2.0 ± 0.5 to 3.3 ± 0.6 L/min/m2; p < 0.01). Conversely, there was significant reduction in the mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) (from 18.6 ± 5.7 to 10.5 ± 3.8 mmHg; p < 0.01), mean pulmonary artery pressure (from 29.8 ± 10.9 to 25.2 ± 10.3 mmHg; p = 0.03), and pulmonary vascular resistance index (from 531 ± 359 to 365 ± 193 dyn·s·cm−5/m2; p = 0.03). Conclusions. The functional MR therapy with percutaneous MitraClip device results in significant increase in CI (+66%) and concomitant decrease in PCWP (−42%). None of our patients developed low cardiac output state. Our results support the idea that significant part of low cardiac output state after cardiac surgery is due to surgery related factors rather than due to increase in afterload after MR elimination. PMID:28058260

  10. Cardiac-Specific Disruption of GH Receptor Alters Glucose Homeostasis While Maintaining Normal Cardiac Performance in Adult Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Jara, Adam; Liu, Xingbo; Sim, Don; Benner, Chance M; Duran-Ortiz, Silvana; Qian, Yanrong; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Kim, Jason K; Kopchick, John J

    2016-05-01

    GH is considered necessary for the proper development and maintenance of several tissues, including the heart. Studies conducted in both GH receptor null and bovine GH transgenic mice have demonstrated specific cardiac structural and functional changes. In each of these mouse lines, however, GH-induced signaling is altered systemically, being decreased in GH receptor null mice and increased in bovine GH transgenic mice. Therefore, to clarify the direct effects GH has on cardiac tissue, we developed a tamoxifen-inducible, cardiac-specific GHR disrupted (iC-GHRKO) mouse line. Cardiac GH receptor was disrupted in 4-month-old iC-GHRKO mice to avoid developmental effects due to perinatal GHR gene disruption. Surprisingly, iC-GHRKO mice showed no difference vs controls in baseline or postdobutamine stress test echocardiography measurements, nor did iC-GHRKO mice show differences in longitudinal systolic blood pressure measurements. Interestingly, iC-GHRKO mice had decreased fat mass and improved insulin sensitivity at 6.5 months of age. By 12.5 months of age, however, iC-GHRKO mice no longer had significant decreases in fat mass and had developed glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Furthermore, investigation via immunoblot analysis demonstrated that iC-GHRKO mice had appreciably decreased insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation, specifically in heart and liver, but not in epididymal white adipose tissue. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in circulating IGF-1 levels in 12.5-month-old iC-GHRKO mice. These data indicate that whereas the disruption of cardiomyocyte GH-induced signaling in adult mice does not affect cardiac function, it does play a role in systemic glucose homeostasis, in part through modulation of circulating IGF-1.

  11. A comparison of the Nexfin® and transcardiopulmonary thermodilution to estimate cardiac output during coronary artery surgery.

    PubMed

    Broch, O; Renner, J; Gruenewald, M; Meybohm, P; Schöttler, J; Caliebe, A; Steinfath, M; Malbrain, M; Bein, B

    2012-04-01

    The newly introduced Nexfin(®) device allows analysis of the blood pressure trace produced by a non-invasive finger cuff. We compared the cardiac output derived from the Nexfin and PiCCO, using transcardiopulmonary thermodilution, during cardiac surgery. Forty patients with preserved left ventricular function undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery were studied after induction of general anaesthesia and until discharge to the intensive care unit. There was a significant correlation between Nexfin and PiCCO before (r(2) = 0.81, p < 0.001) and after (r(2) = 0.56, p < 0.001) cardiopulmonary bypass. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated the mean bias of Nexfin to be -0.1 (95% limits of agreement -0.6 to +0.5, percentage error 23%) and -0.1 (-0.8 to +0.6, 26%) l.min(-1).m(-2), before and after cardiopulmonary bypass, respectively. After a passive leg-raise was performed, there was also good correlation between the two methods, both before (r(2) = 0.72, p < 0.001) and after (r(2) = 0.76, p < 0.001) cardiopulmonary bypass. We conclude that the Nexfin is a reliable method of measuring cardiac output during and after cardiac surgery.

  12. Non-invasive assessment of cardiac output during mechanical ventilation - a novel approach using an inert gas rebreathing method.

    PubMed

    Nickl, Werner; Bugaj, Till; Mondritzki, Thomas; Kuhlebrock, Kathrin; Dinh, Winfried; Krahn, Thomas; Sohler, Florian; Truebel, Hubert

    2011-06-01

    Measurement of cardiac output (CO) is of importance in the diagnostic of critically ill patients. The invasive approach of thermodilution (TD) via pulmonary artery catheter is clinically widely used. A new non-invasive technique of inert gas rebreathing (IGR) shows a good correlation with TD measurements in spontaneously breathing individuals. For the first time, we investigated whether IGR can also be applied to sedated and mechanically ventilated subjects with a clinical point of care device. CO data from IGR were compared with TD in six healthy mongrel dogs. Data sampling was repeated under baseline conditions (rest) and under stress challenge by applying 10 μg/kg/min of dobutamine intravenously. Switching from mechanical ventilation to IGR, as well as the rebreathing procedures, were carried out manually. Cardiac output data from IGR and TD correlated with a coefficient of r=0.90 (95% confidence interval [0.81; 0.95]). The Bland-Altman analysis showed a bias of 0.46 l/min for the IGR CO measurements. Ninety-five percent of all differences fall in the interval [-1.03; 1.95], being the limit of the ± 1.96 standard deviation lines. IGR is a new approach for non-invasive cardiac output measurement in mechanically ventilated individuals, but requires further investigation for clinical use.

  13. Assessment of the effect of vasodilators on the distribution of cardiac output by whole-body Thallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Juni, J.E.; Wallis, J.; Diltz, E.; Nicholas, J.; Lahti, D.; Pitt, B.

    1985-05-01

    Vasodilator therapy (tx) of congestive heart failure (CHF) has been shown to be effective in increasing cardiac output (CO) and lowering vascular resistance. Unfortunately, these hemodynamic effects are not usually accompanied by improved peripheral circulation of exercise capacity. To assess the effect of a new vasodilator, Cl-914, on the redistribution of CO to the peripheral circulation, the authors performed testing whole-body thallium scanning (WB-Th) on 6 patients (pts) with severe CHF. Immediately following i.v. injection of 1.5 mCi Th-201, WB scanning was performed from anterior and posterior views. Regions of interest were defined for the peripheral (P) muscles (legs and arms), central torso (C), and splanchnic bed (S). The geometric mean of activity in these regions was calculated from both views. Each pt was studied before tx and again, after 1 week on tx. Invasive measurements revealed that all pts had significant improvements in resting cardiac output (mean increase 49%) and vascular resistance (mean decrease 30%). Unlike other vasodilators, all CI-914 pts had a significant improvement in treadmill exercise capacity (mean increase 54%). WB-Th revealed a significant shift in CO to the peripheral circulation with P:C increased 33.2% (rho= .001) and P:S increased 29% (rho=.01). Vasoactive drugs may significantly alter the relative distribution of cardiac output. WB-Th scanning provides a simple quantitative means of following such changes.

  14. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure–Prone Rats

    PubMed Central

    Farraj, Aimen K.

    2013-01-01

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel engine exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance of normal cardiac function. To explore this putative mechanism, we examined cardiophysiologic responses to DE inhalation in a model of aged heart failure–prone rats without signs or symptoms of overt heart failure. We hypothesized that acute DE exposure would alter heart rhythm, cardiac electrophysiology, and ventricular performance and dimensions consistent with autonomic imbalance while increasing biochemical markers of toxicity. Spontaneously hypertensive heart failure rats (16 months) were exposed once to whole DE (4h, target PM2.5 concentration: 500 µg/m3) or filtered air. DE increased multiple heart rate variability (HRV) parameters during exposure. In the 4h after exposure, DE increased cardiac output, left ventricular volume (end diastolic and systolic), stroke volume, HRV, and atrioventricular block arrhythmias while increasing electrocardiographic measures of ventricular repolarization (i.e., ST and T amplitudes, ST area, T-peak to T-end duration). DE did not affect heart rate relative to air. Changes in HRV positively correlated with postexposure changes in bradyarrhythmia frequency, repolarization, and echocardiographic parameters. At 24h postexposure, DE-exposed rats had increased serum C-reactive protein and pulmonary eosinophils. This study demonstrates that cardiac effects of DE inhalation are likely to occur through changes in autonomic balance associated with modulation of cardiac electrophysiology and mechanical function and may offer insights into the adverse health effects of traffic-related air pollutants. PMID:23047911

  15. Pulmonary Artery Catheter (PAC) Accuracy and Efficacy Compared with Flow Probe and Transcutaneous Doppler (USCOM): An Ovine Cardiac Output Validation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert A; Hood, Sally G; Jacobson, Beverley M; West, Malcolm J; Wan, Li; May, Clive N

    2012-01-01

    Background. The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) is an accepted clinical method of measuring cardiac output (CO) despite no prior validation. The ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM) is a noninvasive alternative to PAC using Doppler ultrasound (CW). We compared PAC and USCOM CO measurements against a gold standard, the aortic flow probe (FP), in sheep at varying outputs. Methods. Ten conscious sheep, with implanted FPs, had measurements of CO by FP, USCOM, and PAC, at rest and during intervention with inotropes and vasopressors. Results. CO measurements by FP, PAC, and USCOM were 4.0 ± 1.2 L/min, 4.8 ± 1.5 L/min, and 4.0 ± 1.4 L/min, respectively, (n = 280, range 1.9 L/min to 11.7 L/min). Percentage bias and precision between FP and PAC, and FP and USCOM was -17 and 47%, and 1 and 36%, respectively. PAC under-measured Dobutamine-induced CO changes by 20% (relative 66%) compared with FP, while USCOM measures varied from FP by 3% (relative 10%). PAC reliably detected -30% but not +40% CO changes, as measured by receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC), while USCOM reliably detected ±5% changes in CO (AUC > 0.70). Conclusions. PAC demonstrated poor accuracy and sensitivity as a measure of CO. USCOM provided equivalent measurements to FP across a sixfold range of outputs, reliably detecting ±5% changes.

  16. Cardiac Output Monitoring Managing Intravenous Therapy (COMMIT) to Treat Emergency Department Patients with Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Peter C.; Filbin, Michael R.; Napoli, Anthony; Feldman, Joseph; Pang, Peter S.; Sankoff, Jeffrey; Lo, Bruce M.; Dickey-White, Howard; Birkhahn, Robert H.; Shapiro, Nathan I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Fluid responsiveness is proposed as a physiology-based method to titrate fluid therapy based on preload dependence. The objectives of this study were to determine if a fluid responsiveness protocol would decrease progression of organ dysfunction, and a fluid responsiveness protocol would facilitate a more aggressive resuscitation. Methods: Prospective, 10-center, randomized interventional trial. Inclusion criteria: suspected sepsis and lactate 2.0 to 4.0 mmol/L. Exclusion criteria (abbreviated): systolic blood pressure more than 90 mmHg, and contraindication to aggressive fluid resuscitation. Intervention: fluid responsiveness protocol using Non-Invasive Cardiac Output Monitor (NICOM) to assess for fluid responsiveness (>10% increase in stroke volume in response to 5 mL/kg fluid bolus) with balance of a liter given in responsive patients. Control: standard clinical care. Outcomes: primary—change in Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score at least 1 over 72 h; secondary—fluids administered. Trial was initially powered at 600 patients, but stopped early due to a change in sponsor's funding priorities. Results: Sixty-four patients were enrolled with 32 in the treatment arm. There were no significant differences between arms in age, comorbidities, baseline vital signs, or SOFA scores (P > 0.05 for all). Comparing treatment versus Standard of Care—there was no difference in proportion of increase in SOFA score of at least 1 point (30% vs. 33%) (note bene underpowered, P = 1.0) or mean preprotocol fluids 1,050 mL (95% confidence interval [CI]: 786–1,314) vs. 1,031 mL (95% CI: 741–1,325) (P = 0.93); however, treatment patients received more fluids during the protocol (2,633 mL [95% CI: 2,264–3,001] vs. 1,002 mL [95% CI: 707–1,298]) (P < 0.001). Conclusions: In this study of a “preshock” population, there was no change in progression of organ dysfunction with a fluid responsiveness protocol

  17. Blood pressure reduction after gastric bypass surgery is explained by a decrease in cardiac output.

    PubMed

    van Brussel, Peter M; van den Bogaard, Bas; de Weijer, Barbara A; Truijen, Jasper; Krediet, C T Paul; Janssen, Ignace M; van de Laar, Arnold; Kaasjager, Karin; Fliers, Eric; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Serlie, Mireille J; van den Born, Bert-Jan H

    2017-02-01

    Blood pressure (BP) decreases in the first weeks after Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery. Yet the pathophysiology of the BP-lowering effects observed after gastric bypass surgery is incompletely understood. We evaluated BP, systemic hemodynamics, and baroreflex sensitivity in 15 obese women[mean age 42 ± 7 standard deviation (SD) yr, body mass index 45 ± 6 kg/m(2)] 2 wk before and 6 wk following Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery. Six weeks after gastric bypass surgery, mean body weight decreased by 13 ± 5 kg (10%, P < 0.001). Office BP decreased from 137 ± 10/86 ± 6 to 128 ± 12/81 ± 9 mmHg (P < 0.001, P < 0.01), while daytime ambulatory BP decreased from 128 ± 14/80 ± 9 to 114 ± 10/73 ± 6 mmHg (P = 0.01, P = 0.05), whereas nighttime BP decreased from 111 ± 13/66 ± 7 to 102 ± 9/62 ± 7 mmHg (P = 0.04, P < 0.01). The decrease in BP was associated with a 1.6 ± 1.2 l/min (20%, P < 0.01) decrease in cardiac output (CO), while systemic vascular resistance increased (153 ± 189 dyn·s·cm(-5), 15%, P < 0.01). The maximal ascending slope in systolic blood pressure decreased (192 mmHg/s, 19%, P = 0.01), suggesting a reduction in left ventricular contractility. Baroreflex sensitivity increased from 9.0 [6.4-14.3] to 13.8 [8.5-19.0] ms/mmHg (median [interquartile range]; P < 0.01) and was inversely correlated with the reductions in heart rate (R = -0.64, P = 0.02) and CO (R = -0.61, P = 0.03). In contrast, changes in body weight were not correlated with changes in either BP or CO. The BP reduction following Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery is correlated with a decrease in CO independent of changes in body weight. The contribution of heart rate to the reduction in CO together with enhanced baroreflex sensitivity suggests a shift toward increased parasympathetic cardiovascular control.

  18. Scalp congenital hemangioma with associated high-output cardiac failure in a premature infant: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sumedh S; Snelling, Brian M; Sur, Samir; Ramnath, Alexandra R; Bandstra, Emmalee S; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Scalp congenital hemangiomas (CHs) are rare vascular malformations among infants; they can be associated with an array of complications, including cardiac and cosmetic issues. Here, we report the endovascular treatment of a premature infant with a suspected large right parietal scalp hemangioma and associated high-output cardiac failure. Case description A two-day-old female premature infant (29 weeks gestational age; 1330 g birth weight) was referred by the neonatologists to our department for consultation and potential treatment of a large right parietal CH causing abrupt hypotension and high-output cardiac failure. Doppler ultrasound imaging at bedside revealed areas of arterial-venous shunting from the scalp and the presence of a superior sagittal sinus waveform, consistent with intracranial venous drainage. To alleviate cardiac dysfunction secondary to this lesion, trans-arterial embolization via n-butyl cyanoacrylate (nBCA) glue and deployment of detachable coils was performed via umbilical artery to occlude the right superficial temporal and occipital artery branches supplying the CH. Following treatment, the infant continued to require ventilator management, vasopressor support, and correction of coagulopathy, but by post-operative day two, her condition improved remarkably and the mass size began decreasing. The patient was discharged after a relatively uncomplicated subsequent 2½-month course in the neonatal intensive care unit. Conclusion Endovascular therapy proved effective and safe in treating cardiac failure associated with scalp CH, despite potential complications associated with neuro-interventional surgery in premature infants. Appropriate consideration in this patient population should be given to factors including blood loss, contrast use, radiation exposure, operative time, and possible intra-/post-operative complications.

  19. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  20. Effect of increased cardiac output on liver blood flow, oxygen exchange and metabolic rate during longterm endotoxin-induced shock in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Šantak, Borislav; Radermacher, Peter; Adler, Jens; Iber, Thomas; Rieger, Karen M; Wachter, Ulrich; Vogt, Josef; Georgieff, Michael; Träger, Karl

    1998-01-01

    We investigated hepatic blood flow, O2 exchange and metabolism in porcine endotoxic shock (Control, n=8; Endotoxin, n=10) with administration of hydroxyethylstarch to maintain arterial pressure (MAP)>60 mmHg. Before and 12, 18 and 24 h after starting continuous i.v. endotoxin we measured portal venous and hepatic arterial blood flow, intracapillary haemoglobin O2 saturation (Hb-O2%) of the liver surface and arterial, portal and hepatic venous lactate, pyruvate, glyercol and alanine concentrations. Glucose production rate was derived from the plasma isotope enrichment during infusion of [6,6-2H2]-glucose. Despite a sustained 50% increase in cardiac output endotoxin caused a progressive, significant fall in MAP. Liver blood flow significantly increased, but endotoxin affected neither hepatic O2 delivery and uptake nor mean intracapillary Hb-O2% and Hb-O2% frequency distributions. Endotoxin nearly doubled endogenous glucose production rate while hepatic lactate, alanine and glycerol uptake rates progressively decreased significantly. The lactate uptake rate even became negative (P<0.05 vs Control). Endotoxin caused portal and hepatic venous pH to fall significantly concomitant with significantly increased arterial, portal and hepatic venous lactate/pyruvate ratios. During endotoxic shock increased cardiac output achieved by colloid infusion maintained elevated liver blood flow and thereby macro- and microcirculatory O2 supply. Glucose production rate nearly doubled with complete dissociation of hepatic uptake of glucogenic precursors and glucose release. Despite well-preserved capillary oxygenation increased lactate/pyruvate ratios reflecting impaired cytosolic redox state suggested deranged liver energy balance, possibly due to the O2 requirements of gluconeogenesis. PMID:9756385

  1. Effects of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy mutations on power output by human β-cardiac myosin.

    PubMed

    Spudich, James A; Aksel, Tural; Bartholomew, Sadie R; Nag, Suman; Kawana, Masataka; Yu, Elizabeth Choe; Sarkar, Saswata S; Sung, Jongmin; Sommese, Ruth F; Sutton, Shirley; Cho, Carol; Adhikari, Arjun S; Taylor, Rebecca; Liu, Chao; Trivedi, Darshan; Ruppel, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most frequently occurring inherited cardiovascular disease, with a prevalence of more than one in 500 individuals worldwide. Genetically acquired dilated cardiomyopathy is a related disease that is less prevalent. Both are caused by mutations in the genes encoding the fundamental force-generating protein machinery of the cardiac muscle sarcomere, including human β-cardiac myosin, the motor protein that powers ventricular contraction. Despite numerous studies, most performed with non-human or non-cardiac myosin, there is no clear consensus about the mechanism of action of these mutations on the function of human β-cardiac myosin. We are using a recombinantly expressed human β-cardiac myosin motor domain along with conventional and new methodologies to characterize the forces and velocities of the mutant myosins compared with wild type. Our studies are extending beyond myosin interactions with pure actin filaments to include the interaction of myosin with regulated actin filaments containing tropomyosin and troponin, the roles of regulatory light chain phosphorylation on the functions of the system, and the possible roles of myosin binding protein-C and titin, important regulatory components of both cardiac and skeletal muscles.

  2. Improved hepatic arterial fraction estimation using cardiac output correction of arterial input functions for liver DCE MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Manil D.; Bainbridge, Alan; Atkinson, David; Punwani, Shonit; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Taylor, Stuart A.

    2017-02-01

    Liver dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI pharmacokinetic modelling could be useful in the assessment of diffuse liver disease and focal liver lesions, but is compromised by errors in arterial input function (AIF) sampling. In this study, we apply cardiac output correction to arterial input functions (AIFs) for liver DCE MRI and investigate the effect on dual-input single compartment hepatic perfusion parameter estimation and reproducibility. Thirteen healthy volunteers (28.7  ±  1.94 years, seven males) underwent liver DCE MRI and cardiac output measurement using aortic root phase contrast MRI (PCMRI), with reproducibility (n  =  9) measured at 7 d. Cardiac output AIF correction was undertaken by constraining the first pass AIF enhancement curve using the indicator-dilution principle. Hepatic perfusion parameters with and without cardiac output AIF correction were compared and 7 d reproducibility assessed. Differences between cardiac output corrected and uncorrected liver DCE MRI portal venous (PV) perfusion (p  =  0.066), total liver blood flow (TLBF) (p  =  0.101), hepatic arterial (HA) fraction (p  =  0.895), mean transit time (MTT) (p  =  0.646), distribution volume (DV) (p  =  0.890) were not significantly different. Seven day corrected HA fraction reproducibility was improved (mean difference 0.3%, Bland–Altman 95% limits-of-agreement (BA95%LoA)  ±27.9%, coefficient of variation (CoV) 61.4% versus 9.3%, ±35.5%, 81.7% respectively without correction). Seven day uncorrected PV perfusion was also improved (mean difference 9.3 ml min‑1/100 g, BA95%LoA  ±506.1 ml min‑1/100 g, CoV 64.1% versus 0.9 ml min‑1/100 g, ±562.8 ml min‑1/100 g, 65.1% respectively with correction) as was uncorrected TLBF (mean difference 43.8 ml min‑1/100 g, BA95%LoA  ±586.7 ml min‑1/ 100 g, CoV 58.3% versus 13.3 ml min‑1/100 g, ±661.5 ml min‑1/100 g, 60

  3. Femoral Blood Flow and Cardiac Output During Blood Flow Restricted Leg Press Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, M. E.; Hackney, K.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    Low load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (LBFR) causes muscle hypertrophy that may be stimulated by the local ischemic environment created by the cuff pressure. However, local blood flow (BF) during such exercise is not well understood. PURPOSE: To characterize femoral artery BF and cardiac output (CO) during leg press exercise (LP) performed at a high load (HL) and low load (LL) with different levels of cuff pressure. METHODS: Eleven subjects (men/women 4/7, age 31.4+/-12.8 y, weight 68.9+/-13.2 kg, mean+/-SD) performed 3 sets of supine left LP to fatigue with 90 s of rest in 4 conditions: HL (%1-RM/cuff pressure: 80%/0); LL (20%/0); LBFR(sub DBP) (20%/1.3 x diastolic blood pressure, BP); LBFR(sub SBP) (20%/1.3 x supine systolic BP). The cuff remained inflated throughout the LBFR exercise sessions. Artery diameter, velocity time integral (VTI), and stroke volume (SV) were measured using Doppler ultrasound at rest and immediately after each set of exercise. Heart rate (HR) was monitored using a 3-lead ECG. BF was calculated as VTI x vessel cross-sectional area. CO was calculated as HR x SV. The data obtained after each set of exercise were averaged and used for analyses. Multi-level modeling was used to determine the effect of exercise condition on dependent variables. Statistical significance was set a priori at p< 0.05. RESULTS: Artery diameter did not change from baseline. BF increased (p<0.05) after exercise in each condition except LBFR(sub SBP) in the order of HL (12.73+/-1.42 cm3,mean+/-SE) > LL (9.92+/-0.82 cm3) > LBFR(sub dBP)(6.47+/-0.79 cm3) > LBFR(sub SBP) (3.51+/-0.59 cm3). Blunted exercise induced increases occurred in HR, SV, and CO after LBFR compared to HL and LL. HR increased 45% after HL and LL and 28% after LBFR (p<0.05), but SV increased (p<0.05) only after HL. Consequently, the increase (p<0.05) in CO was greater in HL and LL (approximately 3 L/min) than in LBFR (approximately 1 L/min). CONCLUSION: BF during LBFR(sub SBP) was 1/3 of

  4. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac output from arterial pressure profiles during exercise.

    PubMed

    Antonutto, G; Girardis, M; Tuniz, D; di Prampero, P E

    1995-01-01

    , MAPin, HR, PP, MAP are the above parameters at rest and during exercise, respectively. Also in this case, the coefficients f to 1 were determined by a computerized statistical method using Z* as the experimental reference. The values of Zcor so obtained allowed us to calculate SV from arterial pulse contour analysis as SVF = As.Z-1cor. The mean percentage error between the SVF obtained and the values simultaneously determined by PDE, was 10.0 (SD 8.7)%. It is concluded that the SV of the left ventricle, and hence cardiac output, can be determined during exercise from photoplethysmograph tracings with reasonable accuracy, provided that an initial estimate of SV at rest is made by means an independent high quality reference method.

  5. Reliability of continuous cardiac output measurement during intra-abdominal hypertension relies on repeated calibrations: an experimental animal study

    PubMed Central

    Gruenewald, Matthias; Renner, Jochen; Meybohm, Patrick; Höcker, Jan; Scholz, Jens; Bein, Berthold

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Monitoring cardiac output (CO) may allow early detection of haemodynamic instability, aiming to reduce morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Continuous cardiac output (CCO) monitoring is recommended in septic or postoperative patients with high incidences of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH). The aim of the present study was to compare the agreement between three CCO methods and a bolus thermodilution CO technique during acute IAH and volume loading. Methods Ten pigs were anaesthetised and instrumented for haemodynamic measurements. Cardiac output was obtained using CCO by pulse power analysis (PulseCO; LiDCO monitor), using CCO by pulse contour analysis (PCCO; PiCCO monitor) and using CCO by pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution (CCOPAC), and was compared with bolus transcardiopulmonary thermodilution CO (COTCP) at baseline, after fluid loading, at IAH and after an additional fluid loading at IAH. Whereas PulseCO was only calibrated at baseline, PCCO was calibrated at each experimental step. Results PulseCO and PCCO underestimated CO, as the overall bias ± standard deviation was 1.0 ± 1.5 l/min and 1.0 ± 1.1 l/min compared with COTCP. A clinically accepted agreement between all of the CCO methods and COTCP was observed only at baseline. Whereas IAH did not influence the CO, increased CO following fluid loading at IAH was only reflected by CCOPAC and COTCP, not by uncalibrated PulseCO and PCCO. After recalibration, PCCO was comparable with COTCP. Conclusions The CO obtained by uncalibrated PulseCO and PCCO failed to agree with COTCP during IAH and fluid loading. In the critically ill patient, recalibration of continuous arterial waveform CO methods should be performed after fluid loading or before a major change in therapy is initiated. PMID:18957114

  6. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Smerup, Morten; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil; Baandrup, Ulrik T; Kristiansen, Steen Buus; Nygaard, Hans; Funder, Jonas; Aalkjær, Christian; Sauer, Cathrine; Buchanan, Rasmus; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Østergaard, Kristine; Grøndahl, Carsten; Candy, Geoffrey; Hasenkam, J Michael; Secher, Niels H; Bie, Peter; Wang, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Giraffes--the tallest extant animals on Earth--are renowned for their high central arterial blood pressure, which is necessary to secure brain perfusion. Arterial pressure may exceed 300 mmHg and has historically been attributed to an exceptionally large heart. Recently, this has been refuted by several studies demonstrating that the mass of giraffe heart is similar to that of other mammals when expressed relative to body mass. It thus remains unexplained how the normal-sized giraffe heart generates such massive arterial pressures. We hypothesized that giraffe hearts have a small intraventricular cavity and a relatively thick ventricular wall, allowing for generation of high arterial pressures at normal left ventricular wall tension. In nine anaesthetized giraffes (495±38 kg), we determined in vivo ventricular dimensions using echocardiography along with intraventricular and aortic pressures to calculate left ventricular wall stress. Cardiac output was also determined by inert gas rebreathing to provide an additional and independent estimate of stroke volume. Echocardiography and inert gas-rebreathing yielded similar cardiac outputs of 16.1±2.5 and 16.4±1.4 l min(-1), respectively. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 521±61 ml and 228±42 ml, respectively, yielding an ejection fraction of 56±4% and a stroke volume of 0.59 ml kg(-1). Left ventricular circumferential wall stress was 7.83±1.76 kPa. We conclude that, relative to body mass, a small left ventricular cavity and a low stroke volume characterizes the giraffe heart. The adaptations result in typical mammalian left ventricular wall tensions, but produce a lowered cardiac output.

  7. Reduced central blood volume and cardiac output and increased vascular resistance during static handgrip exercise in postural tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Julian M; Taneja, Indu; Medow, Marvin S

    2007-09-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by exercise intolerance and sympathoactivation. To examine whether abnormal cardiac output and central blood volume changes occur during exercise in POTS, we studied 29 patients with POTS (17-29 yr) and 12 healthy subjects (18-27 yr) using impedance and venous occlusion plethysmography to assess regional blood volumes and flows during supine static handgrip to evoke the exercise pressor reflex. POTS was subgrouped into normal and low-flow groups based on calf blood flow. We examined autonomic effects with variability techniques. During handgrip, systolic blood pressure increased from 112 +/- 4 to 139 +/- 9 mmHg in control, from 119 +/- 6 to 143 +/- 9 in normal-flow POTS, but only from 117 +/- 4 to 128 +/- 6 in low-flow POTS. Heart rate increased from 63 +/- 6 to 82 +/- 4 beats/min in control, 76 +/- 3 to 92 +/- 6 beats/min in normal-flow POTS, and 88 +/- 4 to 100 +/- 6 beats/min in low-flow POTS. Heart rate variability and coherence markedly decreased in low-flow POTS, indicating uncoupling of baroreflex heart rate regulation. The increase in central blood volume with handgrip was absent in low-flow POTS and blunted in normal-flow POTS associated with abnormal splanchnic emptying. Cardiac output increased in control, was unchanged in low-flow POTS, and was attenuated in normal-flow POTS. Total peripheral resistance was increased compared with control in all POTS. The exercise pressor reflex was attenuated in low-flow POTS. While increased cardiac output and central blood volume characterizes controls, increased peripheral resistance with blunted or eliminated in central blood volume increments characterizes POTS and may contribute to exercise intolerance.

  8. Clinical review: Guyton--the role of mean circulatory filling pressure and right atrial pressure in controlling cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Henderson, William R; Griesdale, Donald E G; Walley, Keith R; Sheel, A William

    2010-01-01

    Arthur Guyton's concepts of the determinative role of right heart filling in cardiac output continue to be controversial. This paper reviews his seminal experiments in detail and clarifies the often confusing concepts underpinning his model. One primary criticism of Guyton's model is that the parameters describing venous return had not been measured in a functioning cardiovascular system in humans. Thus, concerns have been expressed in regard to the ability of Guyton's simplistic model, with few parameters, to model the complex human circulation. Further concerns have been raised in regard to the artificial experimental preparations that Guyton used. Recently reported measurements in humans support Guyton's theoretical and animal work.

  9. Combined use of phenoxybenzamine and dopamine for low cardiac output syndrome in children at withdrawal from cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, M; Minamikawa, O; Yokochi, H; Maki, S; Yasuda, T; Mizukawa, Y

    1980-04-01

    The combined use of phenoxybenzamine and dopamine was applied in infants and children when it was difficult to come off cardiopulmonary bypass for low cardiac output. The rationale of this method is to prevent the alpha-adrenergic action of dopamine by phenoxybenzamine and to encourage the beta-adrenergic and direct specific action of dopamine. Dopamine was used in dosage of 10 to 30 micrograms/kg per min after the additional administration of a half of the initial dosage of phenoxybenzamine; this was infused by drip always in a dosage of 0.5 to 1.0 mg/kg during the first half of cardiopulmonary bypass. It was possible to come off cardiopulmonary bypass with a stable haemodynamic state (mean arterial pressure more than 60 mmHg and total peripheral vascular resistance less than 2000 bynes s cm-5) and a good urinary output.

  10. Combined use of phenoxybenzamine and dopamine for low cardiac output syndrome in children at withdrawal from cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, M; Minamikawa, O; Yokochi, H; Maki, S; Yasuda, T; Mizukawa, Y

    1980-01-01

    The combined use of phenoxybenzamine and dopamine was applied in infants and children when it was difficult to come off cardiopulmonary bypass for low cardiac output. The rationale of this method is to prevent the alpha-adrenergic action of dopamine by phenoxybenzamine and to encourage the beta-adrenergic and direct specific action of dopamine. Dopamine was used in dosage of 10 to 30 micrograms/kg per min after the additional administration of a half of the initial dosage of phenoxybenzamine; this was infused by drip always in a dosage of 0.5 to 1.0 mg/kg during the first half of cardiopulmonary bypass. It was possible to come off cardiopulmonary bypass with a stable haemodynamic state (mean arterial pressure more than 60 mmHg and total peripheral vascular resistance less than 2000 bynes s cm-5) and a good urinary output. PMID:7397040

  11. Pulmonary Artery Catheter (PAC) Accuracy and Efficacy Compared with Flow Probe and Transcutaneous Doppler (USCOM): An Ovine Cardiac Output Validation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert A.; Hood, Sally G.; Jacobson, Beverley M.; West, Malcolm J.; Wan, Li; May, Clive N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) is an accepted clinical method of measuring cardiac output (CO) despite no prior validation. The ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM) is a noninvasive alternative to PAC using Doppler ultrasound (CW). We compared PAC and USCOM CO measurements against a gold standard, the aortic flow probe (FP), in sheep at varying outputs. Methods. Ten conscious sheep, with implanted FPs, had measurements of CO by FP, USCOM, and PAC, at rest and during intervention with inotropes and vasopressors. Results. CO measurements by FP, PAC, and USCOM were 4.0 ± 1.2 L/min, 4.8 ± 1.5 L/min, and 4.0 ± 1.4 L/min, respectively, (n = 280, range 1.9 L/min to 11.7 L/min). Percentage bias and precision between FP and PAC, and FP and USCOM was −17 and 47%, and 1 and 36%, respectively. PAC under-measured Dobutamine-induced CO changes by 20% (relative 66%) compared with FP, while USCOM measures varied from FP by 3% (relative 10%). PAC reliably detected −30% but not +40% CO changes, as measured by receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC), while USCOM reliably detected ±5% changes in CO (AUC > 0.70). Conclusions. PAC demonstrated poor accuracy and sensitivity as a measure of CO. USCOM provided equivalent measurements to FP across a sixfold range of outputs, reliably detecting ±5% changes. PMID:22649718

  12. The comparison of a novel continuous cardiac output monitor based on pulse wave transit time and echo Doppler during exercise.

    PubMed

    Sugo, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Tomoyuki; Terao, Mami; Ukawa, Teiji; Ochiai, Ryoichi

    2012-01-01

    A new technology called estimated continuous cardiac output (esCCO) uses pulse wave transit time (PWTT) obtained from an electrocardiogram and pulse oximeter to measure cardiac output (CO) non-invasively and continuously. This study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of esCCO during exercise testing. We compared esCCO with CO measured by the echo Doppler aortic velocity-time integral (VTIao_CO). The correlation coefficient between esCCO and VTIao_CO was r= 0.87 (n= 72). Bias and precision were 0.33 ± 0.95 L/min and percentage error was 31%. The esCCO could detect change in VTIao_CO larger than 1 L/min with a concordance rate of 88%. In polar plot, 83% of data are within 0.5 L/min, and 100% of data are within 1 L/min. Those results show the acceptable accuracy and trend ability of esCCO. Change in pre-ejection period (PEP) measured by using M-mode of Diagnostic Ultrasound System accounted for approximately half of change in PWTT. This indicates that PEP included in PWTT has an impact on the accuracy of esCCO measurement. In this study, the validity of esCCO during exercise testing was assessed and shown to be acceptable. The result of this study suggests that we can expand its application.

  13. The effect of lidocaine on regional blood flows and cardiac output in the non-stressed and the stressed foetal lamb.

    PubMed

    Friesen, C; Yarnell, R; Bachman, C; Meatheral, R; Biehl, D

    1986-03-01

    Lidocaine has been used in obstetrical anaesthesia for many years but there are still concerns about possible adverse affects of this drug on the foetus in utero. To examine in greater detail the effects of lidocaine in the foetus, the following two-part study was done. In Part A, seven pregnant ewes were surgically prepared with maternal and foetal arterial and venous catheters. After recovery from surgery lidocaine was infused intravenously, initially into the ewe and then into both ewe and foetus. Blood lidocaine concentrations were monitored and foetal regional blood flows were determined by the radioactive microsphere method. In Part B, 14 ewes were prepared as in Part A with the addition of an inflatable loop around the umbilical cord. During each study the loop was inflated to partially compress the cord and produce foetal acidosis. In all animals this cord compression was maintained for 30 minutes. In seven animals a lidocaine infusion was given, to examine the effect of lidocaine in the acidotic foetus. Organ blood flows were measured and cardiac outputs calculated. The normal foetuses in Part A showed no change in organ blood flow or cardiac output with arterial lidocaine concentrations of 1.5-3.4 mg X ml-1. In the acidotic foetuses, lidocaine concentrations of 1.4-1.5 mg X ml-1 produced a tachycardia and an increase in cerebral blood flow compared to the control acidotic foetuses. There were no other significant changes. We conclude that arterial lidocaine concentrations of less than 3.5 mg X ml-1 do not produce significant alterations in organ blood flow in normal foetal lambs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Beta-adrenergic or parasympathetic inhibition, heart rate and cardiac output during normoxic and acute hypoxic exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Susan R; Bogaard, Harm J; Niizeki, Kyuichi; Yamaya, Yoshiki; Ziegler, Michael G; Wagner, Peter D

    2003-07-15

    Acute hypoxia increases heart rate (HR) and cardiac output (Qt) at a given oxygen consumption (VO2) during submaximal exercise. It is widely believed that the underlying mechanism involves increased sympathetic activation and circulating catecholamines acting on cardiac beta receptors. Recent evidence indicating a continued role for parasympathetic modulation of HR during moderate exercise suggests that increased parasympathetic withdrawal plays a part in the increase in HR and Qt during hypoxic exercise. To test this, we separately blocked the beta-sympathetic and parasympathetic arms of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in six healthy subjects (five male, one female; mean +/- S.E.M. age = 31.7+/-1.6 years, normoxic maximal VO2 (VO2,max)=3.1+/-0.3 l min(-1)) during exercise in conditions of normoxia and acute hypoxia (inspired oxygen fraction=0.125) to VO2,max. Data were collected on different days under the following conditions: (1)control, (2) after 8.0 mg propranolol i.v. and (3) after 0.8 mg glycopyrrolate i.v. Qt was measured using open-circuit acetylene uptake. Hypoxia increased venous [adrenaline] and [noradrenaline] but not [dopamine] at a given VO2 (P<0.05, P<0.01 and P=0.2, respectively). HR/VO2 and Qt/VO2 increased during hypoxia in all three conditions (P<0.05). Unexpectedly, the effects of hypoxia on HR and Qt were not significantly different from control with either beta-sympathetic or parasympathetic inhibition. These data suggest that although acute exposure to hypoxia increases circulating [catecholamines], the effects of hypoxia on HR and Qt do not necessarily require intact cardiac muscarinic and beta receptors. It may be that cardiac alpha receptors play a primary role in elevating HR and Qt during hypoxic exercise, or perhaps offer an alternative mechanism when other ANS pathways are blocked.

  15. Evaluating cardiac physiology through echocardiography in bottlenose dolphins: using stroke volume and cardiac output to estimate systolic left ventricular function during rest and following exercise.

    PubMed

    Miedler, Stefan; Fahlman, Andreas; Valls Torres, Mónica; Álvaro Álvarez, Teresa; Garcia-Parraga, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Heart-rate (fH) changes during diving and exercise are well documented for marine mammals, but changes in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) are much less known. We hypothesized that both SV and CO are also modified following intense exercise. Using transthoracic ultrasound Doppler at the level of the aortic valve, we compared blood flow velocities in the left ventricle and cardiac frequencies during rest and at 1, 3 and 4 min after a bout of exercise in 13 adult bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus, six male and seven female, body mass range 143-212 kg). Aortic cross-sectional area and ventricle blood velocity at the aortic valve were used to calculate SV, which together with fH provided estimates of left CO at rest and following exercise. fH and SV stabilized approximately 4-7 s following the post-respiratory tachycardia, so only data after the fH had stabilized were used for analysis and comparison. There were significant increases in fH, SV and CO associated with each breath. At rest, fH, SV and CO were uncorrelated with body mass, and averaged 41±9 beats min(-1), 136±19 ml and 5514±1182 l min(-1), respectively. One minute following high intensity exercise, the cardiac variables had increased by 104±43%, 63±11% and 234±84%, respectively. All variables remained significantly elevated in all animals for at least 4 min after the exercise. These baseline values provide the first data on SV and CO in awake and unrestrained cetaceans in water.

  16. Evaluation of the estimated continuous cardiac output monitoring system in adults and children undergoing kidney transplant surgery: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takashi; Maemura, Yumi; Yoshida, Akiko; Muto, Rika; Ochiai, Ryoichi

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation of the estimated continuous cardiac output (esCCO) allows non-invasive and continuous assessment of cardiac output. However, the applicability of this approach in children has not been assessed thus far. We compared the correlation coefficient, bias, standard deviation (SD), and the lower and upper 95 % limits of agreement for esCCO and dye densitography-cardiac output (DDG-CO) measurements by pulse dye densitometry (PDD) in adults and children. On the basis of these assessments, we aimed to examine whether esCCO can be used in pediatric patients. DDG-CO was measured by pulse dye densitometry (PDD) using indocyanine green. Modified-pulse wave transit time, obtained using pulse oximetry and electrocardiography, was used to measure esCCO. Correlations between DDG-CO and esCCO in adults and children were analyzed using regression analysis with the least squares method. Differences between the two correlation coefficients were statistically analyzed using a correlation coefficient test. Bland-Altman plots were used to evaluate bias and SD for DDG-CO and esCCO in both adults and children, and 95 % limits of agreement (bias ± 1.96 SD) and percentage error (1.96 SD/mean DDG-CO) were calculated and compared. The average age of the adult patients (n = 10) was 39.3 ± 12.1 years, while the average age of the pediatric patients (n = 7) was 9.4 ± 3.1 years (p < 0.001). For adults, the correlation coefficient was 0.756; bias, -0.258 L/min; SD, 1.583 L/min; lower and upper 95 % limits of agreement for DDG-CO and esCCO, -3.360 and 2.844 L/min, respectively; and percentage error, 42.7 %. For children, the corresponding values were 0.904; -0.270; 0.908; -2.051 and 1.510 L/min, respectively; and 35.7 %. Due to the high percentage error values, we could not establish a correlation between esCCO and DDG-CO. However, the 95 % limits of agreement and percentage error were better in children than in adults. Due to the high percentage error, we could not confirm a correlation

  17. Hemodynamic monitoring in the critically ill: an overview of current cardiac output monitoring methods

    PubMed Central

    Huygh, Johan; Peeters, Yannick; Bernards, Jelle; Malbrain, Manu L. N. G.

    2016-01-01

    Critically ill patients are often hemodynamically unstable (or at risk of becoming unstable) owing to hypovolemia, cardiac dysfunction, or alterations of vasomotor function, leading to organ dysfunction, deterioration into multi-organ failure, and eventually death. With hemodynamic monitoring, we aim to guide our medical management so as to prevent or treat organ failure and improve the outcomes of our patients. Therapeutic measures may include fluid resuscitation, vasopressors, or inotropic agents. Both resuscitation and de-resuscitation phases can be guided using hemodynamic monitoring. This monitoring itself includes several different techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages, and may range from invasive to less- and even non-invasive techniques, calibrated or non-calibrated. This article will discuss the indications and basics of monitoring, further elaborating on the different techniques of monitoring. PMID:28003877

  18. Evaluation of noninvasive exercise cardiac output determination in chronic heart failure patients: a proposal of a new diagnostic and prognostic method.

    PubMed

    Cattadori, Gaia; Salvioni, Elisabetta; Gondoni, Erica; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Peak oxygen consumption (VO2) and various parameters of cardiopulmonary response to exercise are of important prognostic value in chronic heart failure patients. However, all the available parameters only indirectly reflect left-ventricular dysfunction and hemodynamic adaptation to an increased demand. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac output, especially during an incremental exercise test, would allow the direct measurement of cardiac reserve and may become the gold standard for prognostic evaluation of chronic heart failure patients.

  19. A review of intraoperative goal-directed therapy using arterial waveform analysis for assessment of cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Neil; Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Seres, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that goal-directed hemodynamic management can improve outcomes in surgical and intensive care settings. Arterial waveform analysis is one of the different techniques used for guiding goal-directed therapy. Multiple proprietary systems have developed algorithms for obtaining cardiac output from an arterial waveform, including the FloTrac, LiDCO, and PiCCO systems. These systems vary in terms of how they analyze the arterial pressure waveform as well as their requirements for invasive line placement and calibration. Although small-scale clinical trials using these monitors show promising data, large-scale multicenter trials are still needed to better determine how intraoperative goal-directed therapy with arterial waveform analysis can improve patient outcomes. This review provides a comparative analysis of the different arterial waveform monitors for intraoperative goal-directed therapy.

  20. Minimally invasive measurement of cardiac output during surgery and critical care: a meta-analysis of accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Peyton, Philip J; Chong, Simon W

    2010-11-01

    When assessing the accuracy and precision of a new technique for cardiac output measurement, the commonly quoted criterion for acceptability of agreement with a reference standard is that the percentage error (95% limits of agreement/mean cardiac output) should be 30% or less. We reviewed published data on four different minimally invasive methods adapted for use during surgery and critical care: pulse contour techniques, esophageal Doppler, partial carbon dioxide rebreathing, and transthoracic bioimpedance, to assess their bias, precision, and percentage error in agreement with thermodilution. An English language literature search identified published papers since 2000 which examined the agreement in adult patients between bolus thermodilution and each method. For each method a meta-analysis was done using studies in which the first measurement point for each patient could be identified, to obtain a pooled mean bias, precision, and percentage error weighted according to the number of measurements in each study. Forty-seven studies were identified as suitable for inclusion: N studies, n measurements: mean weighted bias [precision, percentage error] were: pulse contour N = 24, n = 714: -0.00 l/min [1.22 l/min, 41.3%]; esophageal Doppler N = 2, n = 57: -0.77 l/min [1.07 l/min, 42.1%]; partial carbon dioxide rebreathing N = 8, n = 167: -0.05 l/min [1.12 l/min, 44.5%]; transthoracic bioimpedance N = 13, n = 435: -0.10 l/min [1.14 l/min, 42.9%]. None of the four methods has achieved agreement with bolus thermodilution which meets the expected 30% limits. The relevance in clinical practice of these arbitrary limits should be reassessed.

  1. Measurement of cardiac output during exercise in healthy, trained humans using lithium dilution and pulse contour analysis.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Adrian D; Skowno, Justin; Prabhu, Mahesh; Ansley, Les

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of pulse contour analysis calibrated with lithium dilution in a single device (LiDCO) for measurement of cardiac output (Q) during exercise in healthy volunteers. We sought to; (a) compare pulse contour analysis (PulseCO) and lithium indicator dilution (LiDCO) for the measurement of Q during exercise, and (b) assess the requirement for recalibration of PulseCO with LiDCO during exercise. Ten trained males performed multi-stage cycling exercise at intensities below and above ventilatory threshold before constant load maximal exercise to exhaustion. Uncalibrated PulseCO Q (Qraw) was compared to that calibrated with lithium dilution at baseline Qbaseline, during submaximal exercise below (Qlow) and above (Qhigh) ventilatory threshold, and at each exercise stage individually (Qexercise). There was a significant difference between Qbaseline and all other calibration methods during exercise, but not at rest. No significant differences were observed between other methods. Closest agreement with Qexercise was observed for Qhigh (bias ± limits of agreement: 4.8 ± 30.0%). The difference between Qexercise and both Qlow and Qraw was characterized by low bias (4-7%) and wide limits of agreement (> ± 40%). Calibration of pulse contour analysis with lithium dilution prior to exercise leads to a systematic overestimation of exercising cardiac output. A single calibration performed during exercise above the ventilatory threshold provided acceptable limits of agreement with an approach incorporating multiple calibrations throughout exercise. Pulse contour analysis may be used for Q measurement during exercise providing the system is calibrated during exercise.

  2. The Neuromuscular Transform of the Lobster Cardiac System Explains the Opposing Effects of a Neuromodulator on Muscle Output

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Alex H.; Calkins, Andrew; O'Leary, Timothy; Symonds, Renee; Marder, Eve

    2013-01-01

    Motor neuron activity is transformed into muscle movement through a cascade of complex molecular and biomechanical events. This nonlinear mapping of neural inputs to motor behaviors is called the neuromuscular transform (NMT). We examined the NMT in the cardiac system of the lobster Homarus americanus by stimulating a cardiac motor nerve with rhythmic bursts of action potentials and measuring muscle movements in response to different stimulation patterns. The NMT was similar across preparations, which suggested that it could be used to predict muscle movement from spontaneous neural activity in the intact heart. We assessed this possibility across semi-intact heart preparations in two separate analyses. First, we performed a linear regression analysis across 122 preparations in physiological saline to predict muscle movements from neural activity. Under these conditions, the NMT was predictive of contraction duty cycle but was unable to predict contraction amplitude, likely as a result of uncontrolled interanimal variability. Second, we assessed the ability of the NMT to predict changes in motor output induced by the neuropeptide C-type allatostatin. Wiwatpanit et al. (2012) showed that bath application of C-type allatostatin produced either increases or decreases in the amplitude of the lobster heart contractions. We show that an important component of these preparation-dependent effects can arise from quantifiable differences in the basal state of each preparation and the nonlinear form of the NMT. These results illustrate how properly characterizing the relationships between neural activity and measurable physiological outputs can provide insight into seemingly idiosyncratic effects of neuromodulators across individuals. PMID:24133260

  3. Clinical significance of a spiral phenomenon in the plot of CO₂ output versus O₂ uptake during exercise in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Osamu; Koike, Akira; Himi, Tomoko; Sakurada, Koji; Kato, Yuko; Suzuki, Shinya; Sato, Akira; Yamashita, Takeshi; Wasserman, Karlman; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2015-03-01

    A spiral phenomenon is sometimes noted in the plots of CO₂ output (VCO₂) against O₂ uptake (VO₂) measured during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) in patients with heart failure with oscillatory breathing. However, few data are available that elucidate the clinical significance of this phenomenon. Our group studied the prevalence of this phenomenon and its relation to cardiac and cardiopulmonary function. Of 2,263 cardiac patients who underwent CPX, 126 patients with a clear pattern of oscillatory breathing were identified. Cardiopulmonary indexes were compared between patients who showed the spiral phenomenon (n = 49) and those who did not (n = 77). The amplitudes of VO₂ and VCO₂ oscillations were greater and the phase difference between VO₂ and VCO₂ oscillations was longer in the patients with the spiral phenomenon than in those without it. Patients with the spiral phenomenon also had a lower left ventricular ejection fraction (43.4 ± 21.4% vs 57.1 ± 16.8%, p <0.001) and a higher level of brain natriuretic peptide (637.2 ± 698.3 vs 228.3 ± 351.4 pg/ml, p = 0.002). The peak VO₂ was lower (14.5 ± 5.6 vs 18.1 ± 6.3, p = 0.002), the slope of the increase in ventilation versus VCO₂ was higher (39.8 ± 9.5 vs 33.6 ± 6.8, p <0.001), and end-tidal PCO₂ both at rest and at peak exercise was lower in the patients with the spiral phenomenon than in those without it. In conclusion, the spiral phenomenon in the VCO₂-versus-VO₂ plot arising from the phase difference between VCO₂ and VO₂ oscillations reflects more advanced cardiopulmonary dysfunction in cardiac patients with oscillatory breathing.

  4. Influence of heart motion on cardiac output estimation by means of electrical impedance tomography: a case study.

    PubMed

    Proença, Martin; Braun, Fabian; Rapin, Michael; Solà, Josep; Adler, Andy; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Bohm, Stephan H; Lemay, Mathieu; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that can measure cardiac-related intra-thoracic impedance changes. EIT-based cardiac output estimation relies on the assumption that the amplitude of the impedance change in the ventricular region is representative of stroke volume (SV). However, other factors such as heart motion can significantly affect this ventricular impedance change. In the present case study, a magnetic resonance imaging-based dynamic bio-impedance model fitting the morphology of a single male subject was built. Simulations were performed to evaluate the contribution of heart motion and its influence on EIT-based SV estimation. Myocardial deformation was found to be the main contributor to the ventricular impedance change (56%). However, motion-induced impedance changes showed a strong correlation (r = 0.978) with left ventricular volume. We explained this by the quasi-incompressibility of blood and myocardium. As a result, EIT achieved excellent accuracy in estimating a wide range of simulated SV values (error distribution of 0.57 ± 2.19 ml (1.02 ± 2.62%) and correlation of r = 0.996 after a two-point calibration was applied to convert impedance values to millilitres). As the model was based on one single subject, the strong correlation found between motion-induced changes and ventricular volume remains to be verified in larger datasets.

  5. Measurement of cardiac output in children by pressure-recording analytical method.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Javier; López, Jorge; González, Rafael; Solana, María José; Fernández, Sarah N; Bellón, José M; López-Herce, Jesús

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated two pressure-recording analytical method (PRAM) software versions (v.1 and v.2) to measure cardiac index (CI) in hemodynamically stable critically ill children and investigate factors that influence PRAM values. The working hypothesis was that PRAM CI measurements would stay within normal limits in hemodynamically stable patients. Ninety-five CI PRAM measurements were analyzed in 47 patients aged 1-168 months. Mean CI was 4.1 ± 1.4 L/min/m(2) (range 2.0-7.0). CI was outside limits defined as normal (3-5 L/min/m(2)) in 53.7% of measurements (47.8% with software v.1 and 69.2% with software v.2, p = 0.062). Moreover, 14.7% of measurements were below 2.5 L/min/m(2), and 13.6% were above 6 L/min/m(2). CI was significantly lower in patients with a clearly visible dicrotic notch than in those without (3.7 vs. 4.6 L/min/m(2), p = 0.004) and in children with a radial arterial catheter (3.5 L/min/m(2)) than in those with a brachial (4.4 L/min/m(2), p = 0.021) or femoral catheter (4.7 L/min/m(2), p = 0.005). By contrast, CI was significantly higher in children under 12 months (4.2 vs. 3.6 L/min/m(2), p = 0.034) and weighing under 10 kg (4.2 vs. 3.6 L/min/m(2), p = 0.026). No significant differences were observed between cardiac surgery patients and the rest of children. A high percentage of CI measurements registered by PRAM were outside normal limits in hemodynamically stable, critically ill children. CI measured by PRAM may be influenced by the age, weight, location of catheter, and presence of a dicrotic notch.

  6. Cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography in the premature baboon: Comparison with radiolabeled microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, J.P.; Morrow, W.R.; Gerstmann, D.R.; Taylor, A.F.; deLemos, R.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Pulsed-Doppler echocardiography (PDE) is a useful noninvasive method for determining left ventricular output (LVO). However, despite increasingly widespread use in neonatal intensive care units, validation studies in prematures with cardiopulmonary disease are lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare radiolabeled microsphere (RLM) and PDE measurements of LVO, using the critically ill premature baboon as a model of the human neonate. Twenty-two paired RLM and PDE measurements of LVO were obtained in 14 animals between 3 and 24 h of age. Average PDE LVO was 152 ml/min/kg (range, 40-258 ml/min/kg) compared to 158 ml/min/kg (range, 67-278 ml/min/kg) measured by RLM. Linear regression analysis of the paired measurements showed good correlation with a slope near unity (gamma = 0.94x + 4.20, r = 0.91, SEE = 25.7 ml). The authors conclude that PDE determinations of LVO compare well with those measured by RLM in the premature baboon. PDE appears to provide a valid estimate of LVO and should be useful in human prematures with cardiopulmonary distress.

  7. Cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography in the premature baboon: comparison with radiolabeled microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, J P; Morrow, W R; Gerstmann, D R; Taylor, A F; deLemos, R A

    1991-04-01

    Pulsed-Doppler echocardiography (PDE) is a useful noninvasive method for determining left ventricular output (LVO). However, despite increasingly widespread use in neonatal intensive care units, validation studies in prematures with cardiopulmonary disease are lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare radiolabeled microsphere (RLM) and PDE measurements of LVO, using the critically ill premature baboon as a model of the human neonate. Twenty-two paired RLM and PDE measurements of LVO were obtained in 14 animals between 3 and 24 h of age. Average PDE LVO was 152 ml/min/kg (range, 40-258 ml/min/kg) compared to 158 ml/min/kg (range, 67-278 ml/min/kg) measured by RLM. Linear regression analysis of the paired measurements showed good correlation with a slope near unity (gamma = 0.94x + 4.20, r = 0.91, SEE = 25.7 ml). We conclude that PDE determinations of LVO compare well with those measured by RLM in the premature baboon. PDE appears to provide a valid estimate of LVO and should be useful in human prematures with cardiopulmonary distress.

  8. Role of cardiac output and the autonomic nervous system in the antinatriuretic response to acute constriction of the thoracic superior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.; Ufferman, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the differential characteristics of hepatic congestion and decreased cardiac output in terms of potential afferent stimuli in the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction. An attempt is made to see if the autonomic nervous system is involved in the antinatriuretic effect of acute TIVC or thoracic superior vena cava constriction.

  9. On- and off-exercise kinetics of cardiac output in response to cycling and walking in COPD patients with GOLD Stages I-IV.

    PubMed

    Vasilopoulou, M K; Vogiatzis, I; Nasis, I; Spetsioti, S; Cherouveim, E; Koskolou, M; Kortianou, E A; Louvaris, Z; Kaltsakas, G; Koutsoukou, A; Koulouris, N G; Alchanatis, M

    2012-05-31

    Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation and large intrathoracic pressure swings may compromise the normal increase in cardiac output (Q) in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Therefore, it is anticipated that the greater the disease severity, the greater would be the impairment in cardiac output during exercise. Eighty COPD patients (20 at each GOLD Stage) and 10 healthy age-matched individuals undertook a constant-load test on a cycle-ergometer (75% WR(peak)) and a 6min walking test (6MWT). Cardiac output was measured by bioimpedance (PhysioFlow, Enduro) to determine the mean response time at the onset of exercise (MRTon) and during recovery (MRToff). Whilst cardiac output mean response time was not different between the two exercise protocols, MRT responses during cycling were slower in GOLD Stages III and IV compared to Stages I and II (MRTon: Stage I: 45±2, Stage II: 65±3, Stage III: 90±3, Stage IV: 106±3s; MRToff: Stage I: 42±2, Stage II: 68±3, Stage III: 87±3, Stage IV: 104±3s, respectively). In conclusion, the more advanced the disease severity the more impaired is the hemodynamic response to constant-load exercise and the 6MWT, possibly reflecting greater cardiovascular impairment and/or greater physical deconditioning.

  10. Reliability of a new 4th generation FloTrac algorithm to track cardiac output changes in patients receiving phenylephrine.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fuhai; Li, Jian; Fleming, Neal; Rose, David; Liu, Hong

    2015-08-01

    Phenylephrine is often used to treat intra-operative hypotension. Previous studies have shown that the FloTrac cardiac monitor may overestimate cardiac output (CO) changes following phenylephrine administration. A new algorithm (4th generation) has been developed to improve performance in this setting. We performed a prospective observational study to assess the effects of phenylephrine administration on CO values measured by the 3rd and 4th generation FloTrac algorithms. 54 patients were enrolled in this study. We used the Nexfin, a pulse contour method shown to be insensitive to vasopressor administration, as the reference method. Radial arterial pressures were recorded continuously in patients undergoing surgery. Phenylephrine administration times were documented. Arterial pressure recordings were subsequently analyzed offline using three different pulse contour analysis algorithms: FloTrac 3rd generation (G3), FloTrac 4th generation (G4), and Nexfin (nf). One minute of hemodynamic measurements was analyzed immediately before phenylephrine administration and then repeated when the mean arterial pressure peaked. A total of 157 (4.6 ± 3.2 per patient, range 1-15) paired sets of hemodynamic recordings were analyzed. Phenylephrine induced a significant increase in stroke volume (SV) and CO with the FloTrac G3, but not with FloTrac G4 or Nexfin algorithms. Agreement between FloTrac G3 and Nexfin was: 0.23 ± 1.19 l/min and concordance was 51.1%. In contrast, agreement between FloTrac G4 and Nexfin was: 0.19 ± 0.86 l/min and concordance was 87.2%. In conclusion, the pulse contour method of measuring CO, as implemented in FloTrac 4th generation algorithm, has significantly improved its ability to track the changes in CO induced by phenylephrine.

  11. Uncalibrated pulse power analysis fails to reliably measure cardiac output in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Uncalibrated arterial pulse power analysis has been recently introduced for continuous monitoring of cardiac index (CI). The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of arterial pulse power analysis with intermittent transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods Forty-two patients scheduled for elective coronary surgery were studied after induction of anaesthesia, before and after CPB respectively. Each patient was monitored with the pulse contour cardiac output (PiCCO) system, a central venous line and the recently introduced LiDCO monitoring system. Haemodynamic variables included measurement of CI derived by transpulmonary thermodilution (CITPTD) or CI derived by pulse power analysis (CIPP), before and after calibration (CIPPnon-cal., CIPPcal.). Percentage changes of CI (ΔCITPTD, ΔCIPPnon-cal./PPcal.) were calculated to analyse directional changes. Results Before CPB there was no significant correlation between CIPPnon-cal. and CITPTD (r2 = 0.04, P = 0.08) with a percentage error (PE) of 86%. Higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) values were significantly correlated with higher CIPPnon-cal. (r2 = 0.26, P < 0.0001). After CPB, CIPPcal. revealed a significant correlation compared with CITPTD (r2 = 0.77, P < 0.0001) with PE of 28%. Changes in CIPPcal. (ΔCIPPcal.) showed a correlation with changes in CITPTD (ΔCITPTD) only after CPB (r2 = 0.52, P = 0.005). Conclusions Uncalibrated pulse power analysis was significantly influenced by MAP and was not able to reliably measure CI compared with TPTD. Calibration improved accuracy, but pulse power analysis was still not consistently interchangeable with TPTD. Only calibrated pulse power analysis was able to reliably track haemodynamic changes and trends. PMID:21356060

  12. A comparison of the changes in cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance during exercise following high-fat meals containing DHA or EPA.

    PubMed

    Rontoyanni, Victoria G; Hall, Wendy L; Pombo-Rodrigues, Sonia; Appleton, Amber; Chung, Roxanna; Sanders, Thomas A B

    2012-08-01

    Long-chain n-3 PUFA can lower blood pressure (BP) but their acute effects on cardiac output, BP and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) in response to dynamic exercise are uncertain. We compared the effects of high-fat meals rich in EPA (20 : 5n-3), DHA (22 : 6n-3) or oleic acid (control) on cardiac output, BP and SVR in response to exercise stress testing. High-fat meals (50 g fat) containing high-oleic sunflower oil enriched with 4·7 g of either EPA or DHA v. control (high-oleic sunflower oil only) were fed to twenty-two healthy males using a randomised cross-over design. Resting measurements of cardiac output, heart rate and BP were made before and hourly over 5 h following the meal. A standardised 12 min exercise test was then conducted with further measurements made during and post-exercise. Blood samples were collected at fasting, 5 h postprandially and immediately post-exercise for the analysis of lipid, glucose and 8-isoprostane-F2α (8-iso-PGF2α). Plasma concentrations of EPA and DHA increased by 0·22 mmol/l 5 h following the EPA and DHA meals, respectively, compared with the control (P < 0·001). Resting cardiac output and 8-iso-PGF2α increased similarly following all meals and there were no significant differences in cardiac output during exercise between the meals. SVR was lower at 5 h and during exercise following the DHA but not EPA meal, compared with the control meal, by 4·9 % (95 % CI 1·3, 8·4; P < 0·01). Meals containing DHA appear to differ from EPA with regard to their effects on cardiovascular haemodynamics during exercise.

  13. Differential acute effects of carbohydrate- and protein-rich drinks compared with water on cardiac output during rest and exercise in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Rontoyanni, Victoria G; Werner, Kristin; Sanders, Thomas A B; Hall, Wendy L

    2015-08-01

    The acute effects of drinks rich in protein (PRO) versus carbohydrate (CHO) on cardiovascular hemodynamics and reactivity are uncertain. A randomized crossover design was used to compare 400-mL isoenergetic (1.1 MJ) drinks containing whey protein (PRO; 44 g) or carbohydrate (CHO; 57 g) versus 400 mL of water in 14 healthy men. The primary and secondary outcomes were changes in cardiac output, blood pressure, systemic vascular resistance (SVR) and digital volume pulse measured prior to and 30 min following consumption at rest, during 12 min of multi-stage bicycle ergometry, and 15 min postexercise. The mean change (95% confidence interval (CI)) in resting cardiac output at 30 min was greater for CHO than for PRO or water: 0.7 (0.4 to 1.0), 0.1 (-0.2 to 0.40), and 0.0 (-0.3 to 0.3) L/min (P < 0.001), respectively; the higher cardiac output following CHO was accompanied by an increase in stroke volume and a lower SVR. The mean increments (95% CI) in cardiac output during exercise were CHO 4.7 (4.4 to 5.0), PRO 4.9 (4.6 to 5.2), and water 4.6 (4.3 to 4.9) L/min with the difference between PRO versus water being significant (P < 0.025). There were no other statistically significant differences. In summary, a CHO-rich drink increased cardiac output and lowered SVR in the resting state compared with a PRO-rich drink or water but the effect size of changes in these variables did not differ during or after exercise between CHO and PRO. Neither protein nor carbohydrate affected blood pressure reactivity to exercise.

  14. Three-dimensional perfusion cultivation of human cardiac-derived progenitors facilitates their expansion while maintaining progenitor state.

    PubMed

    Kryukov, Olga; Ruvinov, Emil; Cohen, Smadar

    2014-11-01

    The therapeutic application of autologous cardiac-derived progenitor cells (CPCs) requires a large cell quantity generated under defined conditions. Herein, we investigated the applicability of a three-dimensional (3D) perfusion cultivation system to facilitate the expansion of CPCs harvested from human heart biopsies and characterized by a relatively high percentage of c-kit(+) cells. The cells were seeded in macroporous alginate scaffolds and after cultivation for 7 days under static conditions, some of the constructs were transferred into a perfusion bioreactor, which was operated for an additional 14 days. A robust and highly reproducible human CPC (hCPC) expansion of more than seven-fold was achieved under the 3D perfusion culture conditions, while under static conditions, the expansion of CPCs was limited only to the first 7 days, after which it leveled-off. On day 21 of perfusion cultivation, the expanded cells exhibited a higher expression level of the progenitor marker c-kit, suggesting that the c-kit-positive CPCs are the main cell population undergoing proliferation. The profile of the spontaneous differentiation in the perfused construct was different from that in the static cultivated constructs; genes typical for cardiac and endothelial cell lineages were more widely expressed in the perfused constructs. By contrast, the differentiation to osteogenic (Von Kossa staining and alkaline phosphatase activity) and adipogenic (Oil Red staining) lineages was reduced in the perfused constructs compared with static cultivated constructs. Collectively, our results indicate that 3D perfusion cultivation mode is an appropriate system for robust expansion of human CPCs while maintaining their progenitor state and differentiation potential into the cardiovascular cell lineages.

  15. Fetal cardiac ventricular volume, cardiac output, and ejection fraction determined with four-dimensional ultrasound using Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) and Virtual Organ Computed-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL™)

    PubMed Central

    Hamill, Neil; Yeo, Lami; Romero, Roberto; Hassan, Sonia S.; Myers, Stephen A.; Mittal, Pooja; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Vaisbuch, Edi; Espinoza, Jimmy; Gotsch, Francesca; Goncalves, Luis F.; Lee, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    Objective To quantify fetal cardiovascular parameters with Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) and Virtual Organ Computed-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL™) utilizing the sub-feature: “Contour Finder: Trace”. Study Design A cross-sectional study was designed consisting of patients with normal pregnancies between 19 and 40 weeks of gestation. After STIC datasets were acquired, analysis was performed offline (4DView) and the following cardiovascular parameters were evaluated: ventricular volume in end systole and end diastole, stroke volume, cardiac output, and ejection fraction. To account for fetal size, cardiac output was also expressed as a function of head circumference, abdominal circumference, or femoral diaphysis length. Regression models were fitted for each cardiovascular parameter to assess the effect of gestational age and paired comparisons were made between the left and right ventricles. Results 1) Two hundred and seventeen patients were retrospectively identified, of whom 184 had adequate STIC datasets (85% acceptance); 2) ventricular volume, stroke volume, cardiac output, and adjusted cardiac output increased with gestational age; whereas, the ejection fraction decreased as gestation advanced; 3) the right ventricle was larger than the left in both systole (Right: 0.50 ml, IQR: 0.2 – 0.9; vs. Left: 0.27 ml, IQR: 0.1 – 0.5; p<0.001) and diastole (Right: 1.20 ml, IQR: 0.7 – 2.2; vs. Left: 1.03 ml, IQR: 0.5 – 1.7; p<0.001); 4) there were no differences between the left and right ventricle with respect to stroke volume, cardiac output, or adjusted cardiac output; and 5) the left ventricular ejection fraction was greater than the right (Left: 72.2%, IQR: 64 – 78; vs. Right: 62.4%, IQR: 56 – 69; p<0.001). Conclusion Fetal echocardiography, utilizing STIC and VOCAL™ with the sub-feature: “Contour Finder: Trace”, allows assessment of fetal cardiovascular parameters. Normal fetal cardiovascular physiology is characterized by ventricular

  16. Can stroke volume and cardiac output be determined reliably in a tilt-table test using the pulse contour method?

    PubMed

    Nieminen, T; Kööbi, T; Turjanmaa, V

    2000-11-01

    The applicability of the finger pressure-derived pulse contour (PC) technique was evaluated in the measurement of stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and their changes in different phases of the tilt-table test. The reference method was whole-body impedance cardiography (ICG). A total number of 40 physically active patients, aged 41 +/- 19 years, were randomly chosen from a pool of 230. Specifically speaking, 20 of the patients experienced (pre)syncope (tilt+ patients) during the head-up tilt (HUT), and 20 did not (tilt-). A total number of three measurement periods, 30-60 s each, were analysed: supine position, 5 min after the commencement of HUT, and 1 min before set down. SV and CO values measured by PC underestimated significantly those measured by ICG (biases +/- SD 19 +/- 14 ml and 1.55 +/- 1.14 l min-1, respectively) in agreement with earlier reports. The bias between the methods was almost the same in the different phases of the test. However, the SD of the bias was bigger for tilt+ (P < 0.05). When the bias between the methods was eliminated by scaling the first measurement to 100%, the agreement between the methods in the second and third measurements was clearly better than without scaling. Both methods showed a physiological drop in SV after the commencement of HUT. These results indicate that PC suffices in tracking the changes in CO and SV, but for absolute values it is not reliable.

  17. Cardiac output method comparison studies: the relation of the precision of agreement and the precision of method.

    PubMed

    Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Cecconi, Maurizio; Saugel, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac output (CO) plays a crucial role in the hemodynamic management of critically ill patients treated in the intensive care unit and in surgical patients undergoing major surgery. In the field of cardiovascular dynamics, innovative techniques for CO determination are increasingly available. Therefore, the number of studies comparing these techniques with a reference, such as pulmonary artery thermodilution, is rapidly growing. There are mainly two outcomes of such method comparison studies: (1) the accuracy of agreement and (2) the precision of agreement. The precision of agreement depends on the precision of each method, i.e., the precision that the studied and the reference technique are able to achieve. We call this "precision of method". A decomposition of variance shows that method agreement does not only depend on the precision of method but also on another important source of variability, i.e., the method's general variability about the true values. Ignorance of that fact leads to falsified conclusions about the precision of method of the studied technique. In CO studies, serial measurements are frequently confused with repeated measurements. But as the actual CO of a subject changes from assessment to assessment, there is no real repetition of a measurement. This situation equals a scenario in which single measurements are given for multiple true values per subject. In such a case it is not possible to assess the precision of method.

  18. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance...

  19. The 24 h pattern of arterial pressure in mice is determined mainly by heart rate‐driven variation in cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Theodore W.; Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have systematically investigated whether daily patterns of arterial blood pressure over 24 h are mediated by changes in cardiac output, peripheral resistance, or both. Understanding the hemodynamic mechanisms that determine the 24 h patterns of blood pressure may lead to a better understanding of how such patterns become disturbed in hypertension and influence risk for cardiovascular events. In conscious, unrestrained C57BL/6J mice, we investigated whether the 24 h pattern of arterial blood pressure is determined by variation in cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, or both and also whether variations in cardiac output are mediated by variations in heart rate and or stroke volume. As expected, arterial pressure and locomotor activity were significantly (P < 0.05) higher during the nighttime period compared with the daytime period when mice are typically sleeping (+12.5 ± 1.0 mmHg, [13%] and +7.7 ± 1.3 activity counts, [254%], respectively). The higher arterial pressure during the nighttime period was mediated by higher cardiac output (+2.6 ± 0.3 mL/min, [26%], P < 0.05) in association with lower peripheral resistance (−1.5 ± 0.3 mmHg/mL/min, [−13%] P < 0.05). The increased cardiac output during the nighttime was mainly mediated by increased heart rate (+80.0 ± 16.5 beats/min, [18%] P < 0.05), as stroke volume increased minimally at night (+1.6 ± 0.5 μL per beat, [6%] P < 0.05). These results indicate that in C57BL/6J mice, the 24 h pattern of blood pressure is hemodynamically mediated primarily by the 24 h pattern of cardiac output which is almost entirely determined by the 24 h pattern of heart rate. These findings suggest that the differences in blood pressure between nighttime and daytime are mainly driven by differences in heart rate which are strongly correlated with differences in locomotor activity. PMID:25428952

  20. Arterial pressure-based cardiac output monitoring: a multicenter validation of the third-generation software in septic patients

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Gernot; Tan, Andrew; Junker, Christopher; Van Nuffelen, Marc; Hüter, Lars; Ching, Willy; Michard, Frédéric; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Second-generation FloTrac software has been shown to reliably measure cardiac output (CO) in cardiac surgical patients. However, concerns have been raised regarding its accuracy in vasoplegic states. The aim of the present multicenter study was to investigate the accuracy of the third-generation software in patients with sepsis, particularly when total systemic vascular resistance (TSVR) is low. Methods Fifty-eight septic patients were included in this prospective observational study in four university-affiliated ICUs. Reference CO was measured by bolus pulmonary thermodilution (iCO) using 3–5 cold saline boluses. Simultaneously, CO was computed from the arterial pressure curve recorded on a computer using the second-generation (COG2) and third-generation (COG3) FloTrac software. CO was also measured by semi-continuous pulmonary thermodilution (CCO). Results A total of 401 simultaneous measurements of iCO, COG2, COG3, and CCO were recorded. The mean (95%CI) biases between COG2 and iCO, COG3 and iCO, and CCO and iCO were −10 (−15 to −5)% [−0.8 (−1.1 to −0.4) L/min], 0 (−4 to 4)% [0 (−0.3 to 0.3) L/min], and 9 (6–13)% [0.7 (0.5–1.0) L/min], respectively. The percentage errors were 29 (20–37)% for COG2, 30 (24–37)% for COG3, and 28 (22–34)% for CCO. The difference between iCO and COG2 was significantly correlated with TSVR (r2 = 0.37, p < 0.0001). A very weak (r2 = 0.05) relationship was also observed for the difference between iCO and COG3. Conclusions In patients with sepsis, the third-generation FloTrac software is more accurate, as precise, and less influenced by TSVR than the second-generation software. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-010-2098-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21153399

  1. Rest and exercise cardiac output and diffusing capacity assessed by a single slow exhalation of methane, acetylene, and carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Ramage, J E; Coleman, R E; MacIntyre, N R

    1987-07-01

    To study rest and exercise pulmonary capillary blood flow (Qc) and diffusing capacity (DLexh) assessed by the rapid analysis of methane, acetylene, and carbon monoxide during a single, slow exhalation, we evaluated 36 subjects during first-pass radionuclide angiography (RNA). At rest (N = 36) and at exercise (N = 21) there was no difference in the respective measurements of cardiac output (Qc = 6.0 +/- 1.7 and CORNA = 6.9 +/- 2.5 at rest; Qc = 13.7 +/- 3.2 and CORNA = 14.5 +/- 4.1 at exercise, L/min, mean +/- SD, r = .80). Mild maldistribution of ventilation, as manifested by an increased phase 3 alveolar slope for methane (CH4 slope), did not significantly influence the results. CH4 slope and DLexh did increase significantly with exercise, while total lung capacity remained unchanged (CH4 slope: 6.2 +/- 5.0 vs 12.5 +/- 6.8% delta CH4/L, mean +/- SD, p less than 0.001; Dsb: 27.7 +/- 9.2 vs 42.0 +/- 17.9 ml/min/mm Hg, mean +/- SD, p less than 0.001; TLC: 5.47 +/- .20 vs 5.96 +/- 1.20 L, mean +/- SD). DLexh was related to CORNA (r = .68) and RNA stroke volume (r = .50). Qc was significantly less than CORNA in the subset of studies with valvular regurgitation (VHD) (N = 7). On the other hand, Qc was significantly greater than CORNA in the setting of coronary artery disease (CAD) and severe wall motion abnormalities (N = 7). These differences may be attributed to regurgitant fractions in VHD, and the influence of wall motion abnormalities on the estimation of left ventricular volume by the area-length method in CAD. These two noninvasive methods compare well at rest and exercise in clinical subjects and may provide complementary information in certain cardiopulmonary diseases.

  2. A novel method of measuring cardiac output in infants following extracorporeal procedures: preliminary validation in a swine model.

    PubMed

    Melchior, Richard; Darling, Edward; Terry, Bryan; Gunst, Gordy; Searles, Bruce

    2005-10-01

    In infants, technologies for obtaining rapid, quantified measurements of cardiac output (CO) following weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are not readily available. A new technique to measure CO based on ultrasound velocity dilution is described. It utilizes reusable probes placed on the extracorporeal circuit that permits convenient measurement of CO prior to decannulation. This report provides preliminary validation data in an animal model. Three Yorkshire pigs (11-14 kg) were fully heparinized and cannulated via the right common carotid artery (cannula advanced to the aortic arch) and right atrium. Both the venous and arterial lines were instrumented with ultrasonic probes connected to a computer-monitoring system. A 'stopcock bridge' between the arterial and venous cannulas provided the access for saline injection and a controlled AV-shunt. For comparison, a vascular flow probe was fitted directly to the pulmonary artery (PA) in both animals and, for the larger animal, a PA catheter was inserted to obtain standard thermodilution measurements. Linear regression analysis revealed a correlation between the CO by ultrasound dilution (CO UD) technique and the vascular probe and PA thermodilution techniques to be R2 =0.94 and 0.81. This pilot study demonstrated that the CO UD technique correlates to other benchmarks of CO measurements. This novel technology has specific application in the field of pediatric open heart surgery in that it would allow the surgeon to accurately and inexpensively measure the CO of neonatal and pediatric patients before and after surgical manipulation of the heart without the need for placement of additional catheters or probes.

  3. Cardiac output response to exercise in relation to metabolic demand in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Abudiab, Muaz M.; Redfield, Margaret M.; Melenovsky, Vojtech; Olson, Thomas P.; Kass, David A.; Johnson, Bruce D.; Borlaug, Barry A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Exercise intolerance is a hallmark of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), yet its mechanisms remain unclear. The current study sought to determine whether increases in cardiac output (CO) during exercise are appropriately matched to metabolic demands in HFpEF. Methods and results Patients with HFpEF (n = 109) and controls (n = 73) exercised to volitional fatigue with simultaneous invasive (n = 96) or non-invasive (n = 86) haemodynamic assessment and expired gas analysis to determine oxygen consumption (VO2) during upright or supine exercise. At rest, HFpEF patients had higher LV filling pressures but similar heart rate, stroke volume, EF, and CO. During supine and upright exercise, HFpEF patients displayed lower peak VO2 coupled with blunted increases in heart rate, stroke volume, EF, and CO compared with controls. LV filling pressures increased dramatically in HFpEF patients, with secondary elevation in pulmonary artery pressures. Reduced peak VO2 in HFpEF patients was predominantly attributable to CO limitation, as the slope of the increase in CO relative to VO2 was 20% lower in HFpEF patients (5.9 ± 2.5 vs. 7.4 ± 2.6 L blood/L O2, P = 0.0005). While absolute increases in arterial–venous O2 difference with exercise were similar in HFpEF patients and controls, augmentation in arterial–venous O2 difference relative to VO2 was greater in HFpEF patients (8.9 ± 3.4 vs. 5.5 ± 2.0 min/dL, P < 0.0001). These differences were observed in the total cohort and when upright and supine exercise modalities were examined individually. Conclusion While diastolic dysfunction promotes congestion and pulmonary hypertension with stress in HFpEF, reduction in exercise capacity is predominantly related to inadequate CO relative to metabolic needs. PMID:23426022

  4. Accuracy and precision of minimally-invasive cardiac output monitoring in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Koichi; Joosten, Alexandre; Murphy, Linda Suk-Ling; Desebbe, Olivier; Alexander, Brenton; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Cannesson, Maxime

    2016-10-01

    Several minimally-invasive technologies are available for cardiac output (CO) measurement in children, but the accuracy and precision of these devices have not yet been evaluated in a systematic review and meta-analysis. We conducted a comprehensive search of the medical literature in PubMed, Cochrane Library of Clinical Trials, Scopus, and Web of Science from its inception to June 2014 assessing the accuracy and precision of all minimally-invasive CO monitoring systems used in children when compared with CO monitoring reference methods. Pooled mean bias, standard deviation, and mean percentage error of included studies were calculated using a random-effects model. The inter-study heterogeneity was also assessed using an I(2) statistic. A total of 20 studies (624 patients) were included. The overall random-effects pooled bias, and mean percentage error were 0.13 ± 0.44 l min(-1) and 29.1 %, respectively. Significant inter-study heterogeneity was detected (P < 0.0001, I(2) = 98.3 %). In the sub-analysis regarding the device, electrical cardiometry showed the smallest bias (-0.03 l min(-1)) and lowest percentage error (23.6 %). Significant residual heterogeneity remained after conducting sensitivity and subgroup analyses based on the various study characteristics. By meta-regression analysis, we found no independent effects of study characteristics on weighted mean difference between reference and tested methods. Although the pooled bias was small, the mean pooled percentage error was in the gray zone of clinical applicability. In the sub-group analysis, electrical cardiometry was the device that provided the most accurate measurement. However, a high heterogeneity between studies was found, likely due to a wide range of study characteristics.

  5. Addressing Assumptions for the Use of Non-invasive Cardiac Output Measurement Techniques During Exercise in COPD.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Hélène; Richard, Ruddy; Kapchinsky, Sophia; Baril, Jacinthe; Bourbeau, Jean; Taivassalo, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial functional limitation of COPD increasingly demonstrates the need for an integrated circulatory assessment. In this study cardiac output (Qc) derived from non-inert (CO2-RB), inert (N2O-RB) gas rebreathing approaches and bioimpedance were compared to examine the limitations of currently available non-invasive techniques for exercise Qc determination in patients with chronic lung disease. Thirteen COPD patients (GOLD II-III) completed three constant cycling bouts at 20, 35, and 50% of peak work on two occasions to assess Qc with bioimpedance as well as using CO2-RB and N2O-RB for all exercise tests. Results showed significantly lower Qc using the N2O-RB or end-tidal CO2-derived Qc compared to the PaCO2-derived CO2-RB or the bioimpedance at rest and for all exercise intensities. End-tidal CO2-derived values are however not statistically different from those obtained using inert-gas rebreathing. This study show that in COPD patients, CO2-rebreathing Qc values obtained using PaCO2 contents which account for any gas exchange impairment or inadequate gas mixing are similar to those obtained using thoracic bioimpedance. Alternately, the lower values for N2O rebreathing derived Qc indicates the inability of this technique to account for gas exchange impairment in the computation of Qc. These findings indicate that the choice of a gas rebreathing technique to measure Qc in patients must be dictated by the ability to include in the derived computations a correction for either gas exchange inadequacies and/or a vascular shunt.

  6. Dynamic cardiac output regulation at rest, during exercise, and muscle metaboreflex activation: impact of congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Masashi; Sala-Mercado, Javier A; Coutsos, Matthew; Li, Zhenhua; Ichinose, Tomoko K; Dawe, Elizabeth; Fano, Dominic; O'Leary, Donal S

    2012-10-01

    We tested whether mild and moderate dynamic exercise and muscle metaboreflex activation (MMA) affect dynamic baroreflex control of heart rate (HR) and cardiac output (CO), and the influence of stroke volume (SV) fluctuations on CO regulation in normal (N) and pacing-induced heart failure (HF) dogs by employing transfer function analyses of the relationships between spontaneous changes in left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and HR, LVSP and CO, HR and CO, and SV and CO at low and high frequencies (Lo-F, 0.04-0.15 Hz; Hi-F, 0.15-0.6 Hz). In N dogs, both workloads significantly decreased the gains for LVSP-HR and LVSP-CO in Hi-F, whereas only moderate exercise also reduced the LVSP-CO gain in Lo-F. MMA during mild exercise further decreased the gains for LVSP-HR in both frequencies and for LVSP-CO in Lo-F. MMA during moderate exercise further reduced LVSP-HR gain in Lo-F. Coherence for HR-CO in Hi-F was decreased by exercise and MMA, whereas that in Lo-F was sustained at a high level (>0.8) in all settings. HF significantly decreased dynamic HR and CO regulation in all situations. In HF, the coherence for HR-CO in Lo-F decreased significantly in all settings; the coherence for SV-CO in Lo-F was significantly higher. We conclude that dynamic exercise and MMA reduces dynamic baroreflex control of HR and CO, and these are substantially impaired in HF. In N conditions, HR modulation plays a major role in CO regulation. In HF, influence of HR modulation wanes, and fluctuations of SV dominate in CO variations.

  7. Importance of re-calibration time on pulse contour analysis agreement with thermodilution measurements of cardiac output: a retrospective analysis of intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Scully, Christopher G; Gomatam, Shanti; Forrest, Shawn; Strauss, David G

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the effect of re-calibration time on cardiac output estimation and trending performance in a retrospective analysis of an intensive care unit patient population using error grid analyses. Paired thermodilution and arterial blood pressure waveform measurements (N = 2141) from 222 patient records were extracted from the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II database. Pulse contour analysis was performed by implementing a previously reported algorithm at calibration times of 1, 2, 8 and 24 h. Cardiac output estimation agreement was assessed using Bland-Altman and error grid analyses. Trending was assessed by concordance and a 4-Quadrant error grid analysis. Error between pulse contour and thermodilution increased with longer calibration times. Limits of agreement were -1.85 to 1.66 L/min for 1 h maximum calibration time compared to -2.70 to 2.41 L/min for 24 h. Error grid analysis resulted in 74.2 % of points bounded by 20 % error limits of thermodilution measurements for 1 h calibration time compared to 65 % for 24 h. 4-Quadrant error grid analysis showed <75 % of changes in pulse contour estimates to be within ±80 % of the change in the thermodilution measurement at any calibration time. Shorter calibration times improved the agreement of cardiac output pulse contour estimates with thermodilution. Use of minimally invasive pulse contour methods in intensive care monitoring could benefit from prospective studies evaluating calibration protocols. The applied pulse contour analysis method and thermodilution showed poor agreement to monitor changes in cardiac output.

  8. Early predictors of acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and bacterial infection: urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cardiac output as reliable tools

    PubMed Central

    Ximenes, Rafael O.; Farias, Alberto Q.; Helou, Claudia M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic abnormalities and acute kidney injury (AKI) are often present in infected cirrhotic patients. Hence, an early diagnosis of AKI is necessary, which might require the validation of new predictors as the determinations of urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) and cardiac output. Methods We evaluated 18 infected cirrhotic patients subdivided into two groups at admission (0 hours). In Group I, we collected urine samples at 0 hours, 6 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours for uNGAL and fractional excretion of sodium determinations. In Group II, we measured cardiac output using echocardiography. Results The age of patients was 55.0±1.9 years, and 11 patients were males. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score was 21±1, whereas the Child–Pugh score was C in 11 patients and B in 7 patients. Both patients in Group I and Group II showed similar baseline characteristics. In Group I, we diagnosed AKI in 5 of 9 patients, and the mean time to this diagnosis by measuring serum creatinine was 5.4 days. Patients with AKI showed higher uNGAL levels than those without AKI from 6 hours to 48 hours. The best accuracy using the cutoff values of 68 ng uNGAL/mg creatinine was achieved at 48 hours when we distinguished patients with and without AKI in all cases. In Group II, we diagnosed AKI in 4 of 9 patients, and cardiac output was significantly higher in patients who developed AKI at 0 hours. Conclusion Both uNGAL and cardiac output determinations allow the prediction of AKI in infected cirrhotic patients earlier than increments in serum creatinine. PMID:26484038

  9. Evaluation of cardiac output in intensive care using a non-invasive arterial pulse contour technique (Nexfin(®)) compared with echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Taton, O; Fagnoul, D; De Backer, D; Vincent, J-L

    2013-09-01

    In this prospective study, cardiac output was measured in 38 intensive care unit patients before and after a fluid challenge, using both pulse contour analysis (Nexfin(®); BMEYE, Amsterdam, the Netherlands) and transthoracic echocardiography. The ability of the Nexfin device to detect significant changes in the velocity-time integral was evaluated. The pulse wave could not be detected by the Nexfin device in five patients (13%), leaving 33 patients for analysis. The Nexfin device adequately tracked changes in the velocity-time integral in 20 (61%) patients. Using a cut-off of a 10% increase in cardiac output estimated by the Nexfin or by echocardiography, the sensitivity of the Nexfin device to detect a response to fluid challenge was 47%, with specificity 81% and accuracy 64%. The percentage error between the Nexfin and echocardiography was 448%; lower limit of agreement -48% (95% CI -62 to -36%) and upper limit of agreement, 32% (95% CI 20-45%). We conclude that the Nexfin device does not adequately track changes in cardiac output in critically ill patients.

  10. Reduced heart rate and cardiac output differentially affect angiogenesis, growth, and development in early chicken embryos (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Branum, Sylvia R; Yamada-Fisher, Miho; Burggren, Warren

    2013-01-01

    An increase in both vascular circumferential tension and shear stress in the developing vasculature of the chicken embryo has been hypothesized to stimulate angiogenesis in the developing peripheral circulation chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). To test this hypothesis, angiogenesis in the CAM, development, and growth were measured in the early chicken embryo, following acute and chronic topical application of the purely bradycardic drug ZD7288. At hour 56, ZD7288 reduced heart rate (f(H)) by ~30% but had no significant effect on stroke volume (~0.19 ± 0.2 μL), collectively resulting in a significant fall in cardiac output (CO) from ~27 ± 3 to 18 ± 2 μL min(-1). Mean f(H) at 72 h of development was similarly significantly lowered by acute ZD7288 treatment (250 μM) to 128 ± 0.3 beats min(-1), compared with 174.5 ± 0.3 and 174.7 ± 0.8 beats min(-1) in control and Pannett-Compton (P-C) saline-treated embryos, respectively. Chronic dosing with ZD7288-and the attendant decreases in f(H) and CO-did not change eye diameter or cervical flexion (key indicators of development rate) at 120 h but significantly reduced overall growth (wet and dry body mass decreased by 20%). CAM vessel density index (reflecting angiogenesis) measured 200-400 μm from the umbilical stalk was not altered, but ZD7288 reduced vessel numbers-and therefore vessel density-by 13%-16% more distally (500-600 μm from umbilical stalk) in the CAM. In the ZD7288-treated embryos, a decrease in vessel length was found within the second branch order (~300-400 μm from the umbilical stock), while a decrease in vessel diameter was found closer to the umbilical stock, beginning in the first branch order (~200-300 μm). Paradoxically, chronic application of P-C saline also reduced peripheral CAM vessel density index at 500 and 600 μm by 13% and 7%, respectively, likely from washout of local angiogenic factors. In summary, decreased f(H) with reduced CO did not slow development rate but reduced embryonic

  11. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (ogg1) maintains the function of cardiac progenitor cells during heart formation in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lifeng; Zhou, Yong; Yu, Shanhe; Ji, Guixiang; Liu, Wei; Gu, Aihua

    2013-11-15

    Genomic damage may devastate the potential of progenitor cells and consequently impair early organogenesis. We found that ogg1, a key enzyme initiating the base-excision repair, was enriched in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. So far, little is known about DNA repair in cardiogenesis. Here, we addressed the critical role of ogg1 in cardiogenesis for the first time. ogg1 mainly expressed in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), the primary heart tube, and subsequently the embryonic myocardium by in situ hybridisation. Loss of ogg1 resulted in severe cardiac morphogenesis and functional abnormalities, including the short heart length, arrhythmia, decreased cardiomyocytes and nkx2.5{sup +} cardiac progenitor cells. Moreover, the increased apoptosis and repressed proliferation of progenitor cells caused by ogg1 deficiency might contribute to the heart phenotype. The microarray analysis showed that the expression of genes involved in embryonic heart tube morphogenesis and heart structure were significantly changed due to the lack of ogg1. Among those, foxh1 is an important partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage. Our work demonstrates the requirement of ogg1 in cardiac progenitors and heart development in zebrafish. These findings may be helpful for understanding the aetiology of congenital cardiac deficits. - Highlights: • A key DNA repair enzyme ogg1 is expressed in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. • We found that ogg1 is essential for normal cardiac morphogenesis in zebrafish. • The production of embryonic cardiomyocytes requires appropriate ogg1 expression. • Ogg1 critically regulated proliferation of cardiac progenitor cells in zebrafish. • foxh1 is a partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage.

  12. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) but not (9-36) augments cardiac output during myocardial ischemia via a Frank-Starling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Adam G; Tune, Johnathan D; Noblet, Jillian N; Conteh, Abass M; Sassoon, Daniel; Casalini, Eli D; Mather, Kieren J

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 (7-36) or (9-36) on myocardial oxygen consumption, function and systemic hemodynamics in vivo during normal perfusion and during acute, regional myocardial ischemia. Lean Ossabaw swine received systemic infusions of saline vehicle or GLP-1 (7-36 or 9-36) at 1.5, 3.0, and 10.0 pmol/kg/min in sequence for 30 min at each dose, followed by ligation of the left circumflex artery during continued infusion at 10.0 pmol/kg/min. Systemic GLP-1 (9-36) had no effect on coronary flow, blood pressure, heart rate or indices of cardiac function before or during regional myocardial ischemia. Systemic GLP-1 (7-36) exerted no cardiometabolic or hemodynamic effects prior to ischemia. During ischemia, GLP-1 (7-36) increased cardiac output by approximately 2 L/min relative to vehicle-controls (p = 0.003). This response was not diminished by treatment with the non-depolarizing ganglionic blocker hexamethonium. Left ventricular pressure-volume loops measured during steady-state conditions with graded occlusion of the inferior vena cava to assess load-independent contractility revealed that GLP-1 (7-36) produced marked increases in end-diastolic volume (74 ± 1 to 92 ± 5 ml; p = 0.03) and volume axis intercept (8 ± 2 to 26 ± 8; p = 0.05), without any change in the slope of the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship vs. vehicle during regional ischemia. GLP-1 (9-36) produced no changes in any of these parameters compared to vehicle. These findings indicate that short-term systemic treatment with GLP-1 (7-36) but not GLP-1 (9-36) significantly augments cardiac output during regional myocardial ischemia, via increases in ventricular preload without changes in cardiac inotropy.

  13. A comparison between intravascular and traditional cooling for inducing and maintaining temperature control in patients following cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Rosman, Jérémy; Hentzien, Maxime; Dramé, Moustapha; Roussel, Vincent; Just, Bernard; Jolly, Damien; Mateu, Philippe

    2016-11-29

    Therapeutic temperature control has been widely used during the last decade to improve clinical outcomes. We conducted this retrospective observational study to compare traditional cooling with endovascular cooling in post-cardiac arrest comatose survivors and to compare results with current guidelines.

  14. Measurement of signal intensity depth profiles in rat brains with cardiac arrest maintaining primary temperature by wide-field optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Sato, Manabu; Nomura, Daisuke; Tsunenari, Takashi; Nishidate, Izumi

    2010-09-10

    We have already reported that after an injection for euthanasia, the signal intensity of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images are 2.7 times increased before cardiac arrest (CA) using OCT and rat brains without temperature control to show the potential of OCT to monitor tissue viability in brains [Appl. Opt.48, 4354 (2009)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.48.004354]. In this paper, we similarly measured maintaining the primary temperature of rat brains. It was confirmed that when maintaining the primary temperature, the time courses of the ratios of signal intensity (RSIs) were almost the same as those without temperature control. RSIs after CA varied from 1.6 to 4.5 and depended on positions measured in tissues. These results mean that the OCT technique has clinical potential for applications to monitor or diagnose a focal degraded area, such as cerebral infarctions due to focal ischemia in brains.

  15. Comparison of cardiac power output and exercise performance in patients with left ventricular assist devices, explanted (recovered) patients, and those with moderate to severe heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; George, Robert S; Donovan, Gay; Nunan, David; Henderson, Keiran; Bougard, Robert S; Yacoub, Magdi H; Birks, Emma J; Brodie, David A

    2010-06-15

    Peak cardiac power output (CPO), as a direct measurement of overall cardiac function, has been shown to be a most powerful predictor of prognosis for patients with chronic heart failure. The present study assessed CPO and exercise performance in patients implanted with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD), those explanted due to myocardial recovery, and those with moderate to severe heart failure. Hemodynamic and respiratory gas exchange measurements were undertaken at rest and at peak graded exercise. These were performed in 54 patients-20 with moderate to severe heart failure, 18 with implanted LVADs, and 16 with explanted LVADs. At rest there was a nonsignificant difference in CPO among groups (p >0.05). Peak CPO was significantly higher in the explanted LVAD than in the heart failure and implanted LVAD groups (heart failure 1.90 +/- 0.45 W, implanted LVAD 2.37 +/- 0.55 W, explanted LVAD 3.39 +/- 0.61 W, p <0.01) as was peak cardiac output (heart failure 9.1 +/- 2.1 L/min, implanted LVAD 12.4 +/- 2.2 L/min, explanted LVD 14.6 +/- 2.9 L/min, p <0.01). Peak oxygen consumption was higher in the explanted LVAD than in the heart failure and implanted LVAD groups (heart failure 15.8 +/- 4.1 ml/kg/min, implanted LVAD 19.8 +/- 5.8 ml/kg/min, explanted LVAD 28.2 +/- 5.0 ml/kg/min, p <0.05) as was anaerobic threshold (heart failure 11.2 +/- 1.9 ml/kg/min, implanted LVAD 14.7 +/- 4.9 ml/kg/min, explanted LVAD 21.4 +/- 5.0 ml/kg/min, p <0.05). In conclusion, peak CPO differentiates well during cardiac restoration using LVADs and emphasizes the benefits of this therapy. CPO has the potential to be a key physiologic marker of heart failure severity and can guide management of patients with LVAD.

  16. The feasibility and applications of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring, thromboelastography and transit-time flow measurement in living-related renal transplantation surgery: results of a prospective pilot observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Delayed graft function (DGF) remains a significant and detrimental postoperative phenomenon following living-related renal allograft transplantation, with a published incidence of up to 15%. Early therapeutic vasodilatory interventions have been shown to improve DGF, and modifications to immunosuppressive regimens may subsequently lessen its impact. This pilot study assesses the potential applicability of perioperative non-invasive cardiac output monitoring (NICOM), transit-time flow monitoring (TTFM) of the transplant renal artery and pre-/perioperative thromboelastography (TEG) in the early prediction of DGF and perioperative complications. Methods Ten consecutive living-related renal allograft recipients were studied. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring commenced immediately following induction of anaesthesia and was maintained throughout the perioperative period. Doppler-based TTFM was performed during natural haemostatic pauses in the transplant surgery: immediately following graft reperfusion and following ureteric implantation. Central venous blood sampling for TEG was performed following induction of anaesthesia and during abdominal closure. Results A single incidence of DGF was seen within the studied cohort and one intra-operative (thrombotic) complication noted. NICOM confirmed a predictable trend of increased cardiac index (CI) following allograft reperfusion (mean CI - clamped: 3.17 ± 0.29 L/min/m2, post-reperfusion: 3.50 ± 0.35 L/min/m2; P < 0.05) mediated by a significant reduction in total peripheral resistance. Reduced TTFM at the point of allograft reperfusion (227 ml/min c.f. mean; 411 ml/min (95% CI: 358 to 465)) was identified in a subject who experienced intra-operative transplant renal artery thrombosis. TEG data exhibited significant reductions in clot lysis (LY30 (%): pre-op: 1.0 (0.29 to 1.71), post reperfusion 0.33 (0.15 to 0.80); P = 0.02) and a trend towards increased clot initiation following

  17. Role of heart rate and stroke volume during muscle metaboreflex-induced cardiac output increase: differences between activation during and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Crisafulli, Antonio; Piras, Francesco; Filippi, Michele; Piredda, Carlo; Chiappori, Paolo; Melis, Franco; Milia, Raffaele; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto

    2011-09-01

    We hypothesized that the role of stroke volume (SV) in the metaboreflex-induced cardiac output (CO) increase was blunted when the metaboreflex was stimulated by exercise muscle ischemia (EMI) compared with post-exercise muscle ischemia (PEMI), because during EMI heart rate (HR) increases and limits diastolic filling. Twelve healthy volunteers were recruited and their hemodynamic responses to the metaboreflex evoked by EMI, PEMI, and by a control dynamic exercise were assessed. The main finding was that the blood pressure increment was very similar in the EMI and PEMI settings. In both conditions the main mechanism used to raise blood pressure was a CO elevation. However, during the EMI test CO was increased as a result of HR elevation whereas during the PEMI test CO was increased as a result of an increase in SV. These results were explainable on the basis of the different HR behavior between the two settings, which in turn led to different diastolic time and myocardial performance.

  18. Coconut Haustorium Maintains Cardiac Integrity and Alleviates Oxidative Stress in Rats Subjected to Isoproterenol-induced Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chikku, A. M.; Rajamohan, T.

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of aqueous extract of coconut haustorium on isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction in Sprague Dawley rats. Rats were pretreated with aqueous extract of coconut haustorium (40 mg/100 g) orally for 45 days. After pretreatment, myocardial infarction was induced by injecting isoproterenol subcutaneously (20 mg/100 g body weight) twice at an interval of 24 h. Activity of marker enzymes like lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine kinase-MB, aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase were increased in the serum and decreased in the heart of isoproterenol treated rats indicating cardiac damage. These changes were significantly reduced in haustorium pretreated rats. Moreover, an increase in the activities of antioxidant enzymes and decrease in the levels of peroxidation products were observed in the myocardium of coconut haustorium pretreated rats. Histopathology of the heart of these rats showed almost normal tissue morphology. From these results, it is clear that aqueous extract of coconut haustorium possess significant cardioprotective and antioxidant properties during isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction in rats. PMID:23716867

  19. Ease of noninvasive measurement of cardiac output coupled with peak VO2 determination at rest and during exercise in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lang, Chim C; Karlin, Paula; Haythe, Jennifer; Tsao, Lana; Mancini, Donna M

    2007-02-01

    Peak oxygen consumption (VO2) is a powerful prognostic predictor of survival in patients with heart failure (HF) because it provides an indirect assessment of a patient's ability to increase cardiac output (CO). However, many peripheral factors affect VO2. Inert gas rebreathing using low-concentration soluble and insoluble inert gases can derive CO by the Fick principle. The Innocor rebreathing system uses an oxygen-enriched mixture of an inert soluble gas (0.5% nitrous oxide) and an inert insoluble gas (0.1% sulfur hexafluoride) measured by photoacoustic analyzers over a 5-breath interval. The practicality of this device in measuring CO and VO2 during exercise was assessed in patients with HF. Ninety-two consecutive exercise tests were prospectively performed in 88 patients with HF using the Innocor system. Incremental bicycle exercise was performed with CO measurements at rest, at 50 W, and at peak exercise. The mean age of the 68 men and 20 women was 54 +/- 13 years; 33% had coronary artery disease, and 67% had dilated cardiomyopathy. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 24 +/- 9%. Patients were able to rapidly learn the rebreathing technique and easily integrate it into the exercise protocol. Eighty-six percent of the tests had successful measurement of metabolic and cardiac output data. Mean CO at rest was 3.5 +/- 1.1 L/min and increased to 7.2 +/- 2.7 L/min. Mean peak VO2 was 12.6 +/- 4.7 ml/kg/min. A significant linear correlation was observed between peak VO2 and peak CO (r = 0.64, p <0.0001). In conclusion, combined metabolic stress testing with inert gas rebreathing can be easily performed in patients with HF.

  20. Continuous cardiac output and left atrial pressure monitoring by long time interval analysis of the pulmonary artery pressure waveform: proof of concept in dogs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Da; Olivier, N Bari; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2009-02-01

    We developed a technique to continuously (i.e., automatically) monitor cardiac output (CO) and left atrial pressure (LAP) by mathematical analysis of the pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) waveform. The technique is unique to the few previous related techniques in that it jointly estimates the two hemodynamic variables and analyzes the PAP waveform over time scales greater than a cardiac cycle wherein wave reflections and inertial effects cease to be major factors. First, a 6-min PAP waveform segment is analyzed so as to determine the pure exponential decay and equilibrium pressure that would eventually result if cardiac activity suddenly ceased (i.e., after the confounding wave reflections and inertial effects vanish). Then, the time constant of this exponential decay is computed and assumed to be proportional to the average pulmonary arterial resistance according to a Windkessel model, while the equilibrium pressure is regarded as average LAP. Finally, average proportional CO is determined similar to invoking Ohm's law and readily calibrated with one thermodilution measurement. To evaluate the technique, we performed experiments in five dogs in which the PAP waveform and accurate, but highly invasive, aortic flow probe CO and LAP catheter measurements were simultaneously recorded during common hemodynamic interventions. Our results showed overall calibrated CO and absolute LAP root-mean-squared errors of 15.2% and 1.7 mmHg, respectively. For comparison, the root-mean-squared error of classic end-diastolic PAP estimates of LAP was 4.7 mmHg. On future successful human testing, the technique may potentially be employed for continuous hemodynamic monitoring in critically ill patients with pulmonary artery catheters.

  1. Flow balance between the left and right cardiac output of an eccentric roller type total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Wada, H; Fukunaga, S; Watari, M; Sakai, H; Sugawara, Y; Ochikubo, H; Imai, K; Shibamura, H; Orihashi, K; Sueda, T; Matsuura, Y

    1999-08-01

    We have made an eccentric roller type total artificial heart (ERTAH). The ERTAH is a positive-displacement device comparable to a DeBakey roller pump. Its left and right outputs are determined by the size of its blood chambers, and the ratio of its left and right output is almost constant. We focused on an interatrial shunt to achieve left-right balance. We have conducted numerical simulation, a mock test, and an acute animal experiment to analyze left-right heart balance during ERTAH operation. Numerical simulation was performed under conditions in which the flow of the left artificial heart was fixed at 6 L/min, the flow of the right artificial heart was varied from 4.8 to 6 L/min, and the interatrial resistance was also varied. The relationship between the interatrial shunt flow rate and the output of the left and right artificial hearts was balanced when the flow of the right artificial heart was at 5.45 L/min. In a mock test, 2 DeBakey roller pumps were connected to the left and right sides of a Donovan mock circulatory system, and an interatrial shunt was created between the inlet ports of the left and right roller pumps. The interatrial resistance of the mock system was varied from 7.7, to 4.3, and to 2.9 mm Hg x min/L when the inner diameter of the interatrial shunt was 6, 8, and 10 mm, respectively. As in the mock test, 2 roller pumps were used to bypass the right and left hearts of a goat weighing 60 kg. The flow rate of the left heart was almost constant (4.7 L/min). The flow of the right heart was approximately 4.1 L/min when the interatrial shunt flow rate was zero. A leading consideration was that the left to left shunt through the bronchial arteries in this goat was approximately 0.6 L/min. In developing the ERTAH, we considered that creating an interatrial shunt between the inlet ports of the ERTAH as well as making a difference between the chamber volumes might be effective in balancing the left-right sides of the artificial heart.

  2. The Impact of Direct Cardiac Output Determination On Using A Widely Available Direct Continuous Oxygen Consumption Measuring Device On The Hemodynamic Assessment of Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Fanari, Zaher; Grove, Matthew; Rajamanickam, Anitha; Hammami, Sumaya; Walls, Cassie; Kolm, Paul; Saltzberg, Mitchell; Weintraub, William S.; Doorey, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate assessment of cardiac output (CO) is essential for the hemodynamic assessment of aortic valve area (AVA). Estimation of oxygen consumption (VO2) and Thermodilution (TD) is employed in many cardiac catheterization laboratories (CCL) given the historically cumbersome nature of direct continuous VO2 measurement, the “gold standard” for this technique. A portable facemask device simplifies the direct continuous measurement of VO2, allowing for relatively rapid and continuous assessment of CO and AVA. Methods and Materials Seventeen consecutive patients undergoing right heart catheterization had simultaneous determination of CO by both direct continuous and assumed VO2 and TD. Assessments were only made when a plateau of VO2 had occurred. All measurements of direct continuous and assumed VO2, as well as, TD CO were obtained in triplicate. Results Direct continuous VO2 CO and assumed VO2 CO correlated poorly (R= 0.57; ICC =0.59). Direct continuous VO2 CO and TD CO also correlated poorly (R= 0.51; ICC=0.60). Similarly AVA derived from direct continuous VO2 correlated poorly with those of assumed VO2 (R= 0.68; ICC=0.55) and TD (R=0.66, ICC=0.60). Repeated direct continuous VO2 CO and AVA measurements were extremely correlated and reproducible [(R=0.93; ICC=0.96) and (R=0.99; ICC>0.99) respectively], suggesting that this was the most reliable measurement of CO. Conclusions CO calculated from direct continuous VO2 measurement varies substantially from both assumed VO2 and TD based CO, which are widely used in most CCL. These differences may significantly impact the CO and AVA measurements. Furthermore, continuous, rather than average, measurement of VO2 appears to give highly reproducible results. PMID:27904163

  3. Sex differences in carotid baroreflex control of arterial blood pressure in humans: relative contribution of cardiac output and total vascular conductance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Areum; Deo, Shekhar H.; Vianna, Lauro C.; Balanos, George M.; Hartwich, Doreen; Fisher, James P.

    2011-01-01

    It is presently unknown whether there are sex differences in the magnitude of blood pressure (BP) responses to baroreceptor perturbation or if the relative contribution of cardiac output (CO) and total vascular conductance (TVC) to baroreflex-mediated changes in BP differs in young women and men. Since sympathetic vasoconstrictor tone is attenuated in women, we hypothesized that carotid baroreflex-mediated BP responses would be attenuated in women by virtue of a blunted vascular response (i.e., an attenuated TVC response). BP, heart rate (HR), and stroke volume were continuously recorded during the application of 5-s pulses of neck pressure (NP; carotid hypotension) and neck suction (NS; carotid hypertension) ranging from +40 to −80 Torr in women (n = 20, 21 ± 0.5 yr) and men (n = 20, 21 ± 0.4 yr). CO and TVC were calculated on a beat-to-beat basis. Women demonstrated greater depressor responses to NS (e.g., −60 Torr, −17 ± 1%baseline in women vs. −11 ± 1%baseline in men, P < 0.05), which were driven by augmented decreases in HR that, in turn, contributed to larger reductions in CO (−60 Torr, −15 ± 2%baseline in women vs. −6 ± 2%baseline in men, P < 0.05). In contrast, pressor responses to NP were similar in women and men (e.g., +40 Torr, +14 ± 2%baseline in women vs. +10 ± 1%baseline in men, P > 0.05), with TVC being the primary mediating factor in both groups. Our findings indicate that sex differences in the baroreflex control of BP are evident during carotid hypertension but not carotid hypotension. Furthermore, in contrast to our hypothesis, young women exhibited greater BP responses to carotid hypertension by virtue of a greater cardiac responsiveness. PMID:21963834

  4. Hypertensive crises in quadriplegic patients. Changes in cardiac output, blood volume, serum dopamine-beta-hydroxylase activity, and arterial prostaglandin PGE2.

    PubMed

    Naftchi, N E; Demeny, M; Lowman, E W; Tuckman, J

    1978-02-01

    The syndrome of autonomic dysreflexia often occurs in quadriplegic subjects and is characterized by paroxysmal hypertension, headache, vasoconstriction below and flushing of the skin above the level of transection, and bradycardia. These attacks may cause hypertnesive encephalopathy, cerebral vascular accidents, and death. In five patients during crises, the mean arterial pressure changed from 95 to 154 mm Hg, heart rate 72 to 45 beats/min, cardiac output 4.76 to 4.70 L/min, and peripheral resistance 1650 to 2660 dynes.sec.cm-5. In eight subjects the control plasma, red cell, and total blood volumes were 19.1, 10.5, and 29.6 ml/cm body height, respectively, and when hypertensive, the plasma protein concentration increased by 9.9% and the hematocrit by 9.5%. Plasma volume was only reduced by an estimated 10-15%. At that time, arterial dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DbetaH) activity increased 65% and prostaglandin E2 concentration by 68%. Thus, the augmented DbetaH activity presented primarily an elevated sympathetic tone and not hemoconcentration of that protein. The rise in prostaglandin may contribute to the severe headaches during hypertensive episodes.

  5. Comparison of stroke volume and cardiac output as measured by a single observer using four different ultrasound techniques in six clinically healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Biermann, K; Hungerbühler, S; Kästner, S B R

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess agreement and repeatability of four ultrasound methods for measuring stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) in cats. Measurement of SV and CO was performed by the Teichholz method, the Simpson's method (SM), the area length method (ALM) and a volumetric flow method across the aorta (Trace method). For each method, the coefficient of variation (CV) was calculated and agreement was determined by Bland-Altman analysis. The CV was acceptable (<20%) for all parameters, except for SV and CO obtained by SM (28.8% and 22.4%, respectively) and ALM (21.6% and 22.6%, respectively). Narrow limits of agreement were observed between both planimetric methods (SM and ALM). The Trace method was the most repeatable, followed by the Teichholz method. Despite excellent inter-method agreement, neither of the planimetric methods produced results with adequate repeatability. As the Teichholz and Trace methods were acceptably repeatable, and probably gave the most representative values, they appear to be the most useful methods for the measurement of SV and CO in cats. Further investigations are needed to compare the echocardiographic methods described here with a standard technique such as thermodilution.

  6. Continuous registration of blood velocity and cardiac output with a hot-film anemometer probe, mounted on a Swan-Ganz thermodilution catheter.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, P K; Andersen, M

    1981-01-01

    In order to construct a catheter, capable of monitoring cardiac output, a specially designed double-conical hot-film anemometer probe was fastened at the tip of a Swan-Ganz thermodilution catheter. Common sources of error for most catheter velocity probes include difficult calibration, unknown velocity profile at the point of measurement and unknown position of the probe in this profile. By using mongrel dogs and in order to exclude these sources of error, the intermittent thermodilution method was used to in vitro calibrate the hot-film anemometer, which registered velocity continuously. A mean correlation coefficient between these two methods was found to be 0.886. A mean line of regression between thermodilution (abscissa) and anemometer (ordinate) had a slope of 0.796 +/- 0.223 (+/- SD) and a y-intercept of 24 +/- 14 ml/min/kg. The slope was significantly lower than one (t test, p less than 0.05) and the y-intercept significantly larger than zero (t test, p less than 0.02). As a control of the thermodilution method, electromagnetic flow in the ascending aorta was registered and a mean correlation coefficient of 0.967 found. The hot-film sensor itself can be used as thermodilution method with the hot-film anemometer's continuous registration of velocity.

  7. The relation between cardiac output kinetics and skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate exercise in moderately impaired patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Spee, Ruud F; Niemeijer, Victor M; Schoots, Thijs; Wijn, Pieter F; Doevendans, Pieter A; Kemps, Hareld M

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen uptake (V̇o2) kinetics are prolonged in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). This may be caused by impaired oxygen delivery or skeletal muscle derangements. We investigated whether impaired cardiac output (Q̇) kinetics limit skeletal muscle oxygen delivery relative to the metabolic demands at submaximal exercise in CHF patients by evaluating the relation between Q̇ kinetics and skeletal muscle deoxygenation. Forty-three CHF patients, NYHA II-III, performed a constant-load exercise test at 80% of the ventilatory aerobic threshold (VAT) to assess V̇o2 kinetics (τV̇o2). Q̇ kinetics (τQ̇) were assessed by a radial artery pulse contour analysis method. Skeletal muscle deoxygenation was assessed by near infrared spectroscopy at the m. vastus lateralis, using the minimal value of the tissue saturation index during onset of exercise (TSImin). Patients were categorized in slow and normal Q̇ responders relative to metabolic demands (τQ̇/V̇o2 ≥1 and τQ̇/V̇o2 <1, respectively), τQ̇ (62 ± 29 s), and τV̇o2 (60 ± 21 s) were significantly related (r = 0.66, P = 0.001). There was a significant correlation between τQ̇ and TSImin in the slow Q̇ responders [rs= -0.57, P = 0.005, n = 22 (51%)]. In conclusion, in moderately impaired CHF patients with relatively slow Q̇ kinetics, central hemodynamics may limit skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate-intensity exercise.

  8. Heart mass and the maximum cardiac output of birds and mammals: implications for estimating the maximum aerobic power input of flying animals

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    Empirical studies of cardiovascular variables suggest that relative heart muscle mass (relative Mh) is a good indicator of the degree of adaptive specialization for prolonged locomotor activities, for both birds and mammals. Reasonable predictions for the maximum oxygen consumption of birds during flight can be obtained by assuming that avian heart muscle has the same maximum physiological and biomechanical performance as that of terrestrial mammals. Thus, data on Mh can be used to provide quantitative estimates for the maximum aerobic power input (aerobic Pi,max) available to animals during intense levels of locomotor activity. The maximum cardiac output of birds and mammals is calculated to scale with respect to Mh (g) as 213 Mh0.88+-0.04 (ml min-1), while aerobic Pi,max is estimated to scale approximately as 11 Mh0.88+-0.09 (W). In general, estimated inter-species aerobic Pi,max, based on Mh for all bird species (excluding hummingbirds), is calculated to scale with respect to body mass (Mb in kg) as 81 Mb0.82+-0.11 (W). Comparison of family means for Mh indicate that there is considerable diversity in aerobic capacity among birds and mammals, for example, among the medium to large species of birds the Tinamidae have the smallest relative Mh (0.25 per cent) while the Otidae have unusually large relative Mh (1.6 per cent). Hummingbirds have extremely large relative Mh (2.28 per cent), but exhibit significant sexual dimorphism in their scaling of Mh and flight muscle mass, so that when considering hummingbird flight performance it may be useful to control for sexual differences in morphology. The estimated scaling of aerobic Pi,max (based on Mh and Mb in g) for male and female hummingbirds is 0.51 Mb0.83 +/-0.07 and 0.44 Mb0.85+- 0.11 (W), respectively. Locomotory muscles are dynamic structures and it might be anticipated that where additional energetic 'costs' occur seasonally (e.g. due to migratory fattening or the development of large secondary sexual

  9. The effect of head up tilting on bioreactance cardiac output and stroke volume readings using suprasternal transcutaneous Doppler as a control in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Critchley, Lester A H; Lee, Daniel C W; Khaw, Kim S; Lee, Shara W Y

    2016-10-01

    To compare the performance of a bioreactance cardiac output (CO) monitor (NICOM) and transcutaneous Doppler (USCOM) during head up tilting (HUT). Healthy young adult subjects, age 22 ± 1 years, 7 male and 7 female, were tilted over 3-5 s from supine to 70° HUT, 30° HUT and back to supine. Positions were held for 3 min. Simultaneous readings of NICOM and USCOM were performed 30 s into each new position. Mean blood pressure (MBP), heart rate (HR), CO and stroke volume (SV), and thoracic fluid content (TFC) were recorded. Bland-Altman, percentage changes and analysis of variance for repeated measures were used for statistical analysis. Pre-tilt NICOM CO and SV readings (6.1 ± 1.0 L/min and 113 ± 25 ml) were higher than those from USCOM (4.1 ± 0.6 L/min and 77 ± 9 ml) (P < 0.001). Bland-Altman limits of agreement for CO were wide with a percentage error of 38 %. HUT increased MBP and HR (P < 0.001). CO and SV readings decreased with HUT. However, the percentage changes in USCOM and NICOM readings did not concur (P < 0.001). Whereas USCOM provided gravitational effect proportional changes in SV readings of 23 ± 15 % (30° half tilt) and 44 ± 11 % (70° near full tilt), NICOM changes did not being 28 ± 10 and 33 ± 11 %. TFC decreased linearly with HUT. The NICOM does not provide linear changes in SV as predicted by physiology when patients are tilted. Furthermore there is a lack of agreement with USCOM measurements at baseline and during tilting.

  10. Usefulness of non-invasive measurement of cardiac output during sub-maximal exercise to predict outcome in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Goda, Ayumi; Lang, Chim C; Williams, Paula; Jones, Margaret; Farr, Mary Jane; Mancini, Donna M

    2009-12-01

    Peak oxygen consumption (Vo(2)) is a powerful prognostic predictor of survival in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) because it provides an indirect assessment of a patient's ability to increase cardiac output (CO). However, many patients with CHF who undergo cardiopulmonary exercise testing are unable to perform maximal exercise. New metabolic carts coupled with the inert gas rebreathing technique provide a noninvasive measurement of CO. Whether the noninvasive measurement of CO at a fixed submaximal workload can predict outcome is unknown. This study's population comprised 259 patients (mean age 54 +/- 14 years, mean left ventricular ejection fraction 27 +/- 14%) with CHF who underwent symptom-limited incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Vo(2) and CO were measured at rest, at 25 W, and at peak exercise. Submaximal exercise was defined as <80% peak Vo(2). Among 259 patients, 145 had Vo(2) at 25 W <80% of peak. Vo(2) at 25 W averaged 9.3 +/- 1.8 ml/kg/min. This Vo(2) represented 62 +/- 11% of peak Vo(2), which averaged 15.4 +/- 4.4 ml/kg/min. Prospective follow-up averaged 521 +/- 337 days. In this cohort, there were 15 outcome events (death, urgent heart transplantation, or implantation of a left ventricular assist device as a bridge to transplantation). On univariate Cox hazard analysis, CO at 25 W (hazard ratio 0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.48 to 0.84, p = 0.002) was found to be significant predictor of events of outcome. In conclusion, CO at 25 W measured noninvasively during submaximal exercise may have potential value as a predictor of outcomes in patients with CHF.

  11. Phase I dynamics of cardiac output, systemic O2 delivery, and lung O2 uptake at exercise onset in men in acute normobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lador, Frédéric; Tam, Enrico; Azabji Kenfack, Marcel; Cautero, Michela; Moia, Christian; Morel, Denis R; Capelli, Carlo; Ferretti, Guido

    2008-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that vagal withdrawal plays a role in the rapid (phase I) cardiopulmonary response to exercise. To this aim, in five men (24.6+/-3.4 yr, 82.1+/-13.7 kg, maximal aerobic power 330+/-67 W), we determined beat-by-beat cardiac output (Q), oxygen delivery (QaO2), and breath-by-breath lung oxygen uptake (VO2) at light exercise (50 and 100 W) in normoxia and acute hypoxia (fraction of inspired O2=0.11), because the latter reduces resting vagal activity. We computed Q from stroke volume (Qst, by model flow) and heart rate (fH, electrocardiography), and QaO2 from Q and arterial O2 concentration. Double exponentials were fitted to the data. In hypoxia compared with normoxia, steady-state fH and Q were higher, and Qst and VO2 were unchanged. QaO2 was unchanged at rest and lower at exercise. During transients, amplitude of phase I (A1) for VO2 was unchanged. For fH, Q and QaO2, A1 was lower. Phase I time constant (tau1) for QaO2 and VO2 was unchanged. The same was the case for Q at 100 W and for fH at 50 W. Qst kinetics were unaffected. In conclusion, the results do not fully support the hypothesis that vagal withdrawal determines phase I, because it was not completely suppressed. Although we can attribute the decrease in A1 of fH to a diminished degree of vagal withdrawal in hypoxia, this is not so for Qst. Thus the dual origin of the phase I of Q and QaO2, neural (vagal) and mechanical (venous return increase by muscle pump action), would rather be confirmed.

  12. The influence of priming exercise on oxygen uptake, cardiac output, and muscle oxygenation kinetics during very heavy-intensity exercise in 9- to 13-yr-old boys.

    PubMed

    Barker, Alan R; Jones, Andrew M; Armstrong, Neil

    2010-08-01

    The present study examined the effect of priming exercise on O(2) uptake (Vo(2)) kinetics during subsequent very heavy exercise in eight 9- to 13-yr-old boys. We hypothesised that priming exercise would 1) elevate muscle O(2) delivery prior to the subsequent bout of very heavy exercise, 2) have no effect on the phase II Vo(2) tau, 3) elevate the phase II Vo(2) total amplitude, and 4) reduce the magnitude of the Vo(2) slow component. Each participant completed repeat 6-min bouts of very heavy-intensity cycling exercise separated by 6 min of light pedaling. During the tests Vo(2), muscle oxygenation (near infrared spectroscopy), and cardiac output (Q) (thoracic impedance) were determined. Priming exercise increased baseline muscle oxygenation and elevated Q at baseline and throughout the second exercise bout. The phase II Vo(2) tau was not altered by priming exercise (bout 1: 22 + or - 7 s vs. bout 2: 20 + or - 4 s; P = 0.30). However, the time constant describing the entire Vo(2) response from start to end of exercise was accelerated (bout 1: 43 + or - 8 s vs. bout 2: 36 + or - 5 s; P = 0.002) due to an increased total phase II Vo(2) amplitude (bout 1: 1.73 + or - 0.33 l/min vs. bout 2: 1.80 + or - 0.59 l/min; P = 0.002) and a reduced Vo(2) slow component amplitude (bout 1: 0.18 + or - 0.08 l/min vs. bout 2: 0.12 + or - 0.09 l/min; P = 0.048). These results suggest that phase II Vo(2) kinetics in young boys is principally limited by intrinsic muscle metabolic factors, whereas the Vo(2) total phase II and slow component amplitudes may be O(2) delivery sensitive.

  13. Nexfin Noninvasive Continuous Hemodynamic Monitoring: Validation against Continuous Pulse Contour and Intermittent Transpulmonary Thermodilution Derived Cardiac Output in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Van De Vijver, Katrijn; De laet, Inneke; Schoonheydt, Karen; Dits, Hilde; Bein, Berthold; Malbrain, Manu L. N. G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Nexfin (Bmeye, Amsterdam, Netherlands) is a noninvasive cardiac output (CO) monitor based on finger arterial pulse contour analysis. The aim of this study was to validate Nexfin CO (NexCO) against thermodilution (TDCO) and pulse contour CO (CCO) by PiCCO (Pulsion Medical Systems, Munich, Germany). Patients and Methods. In a mix of critically ill patients (n = 45), NexCO and CCO were measured continuously and recorded at 2-hour intervals during the 8-hour study period. TDCO was measured at 0–4–8 hrs. Results. NexCO showed a moderate to good (significant) correlation with TDCO (R2 0.68, P < 0.001) and CCO (R2 0.71, P < 0.001). Bland and Altman analysis comparing NexCO with TDCO revealed a bias (± limits of agreement, LA) of 0.4 ± 2.32 L/min (with 36% error) while analysis comparing NexCO with CCO showed a bias (±LA) of 0.2 ± 2.32 L/min (37% error). NexCO is able to follow changes in TDCO and CCO during the same time interval (level of concordance 89.3% and 81%). Finally, polar plot analysis showed that trending capabilities were acceptable when changes in NexCO (ΔNexCO) were compared to ΔTDCO and ΔCCO (resp., 89% and 88.9% of changes were within the level of 10% limits of agreement). Conclusion. we found a moderate to good correlation between CO measurements obtained with Nexfin and PiCCO. PMID:24319373

  14. Single session of sprint interval training elicits similar cardiac output but lower oxygen uptake versus ramp exercise to exhaustion in men and women

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Trevor; Roverud, Garret; Sutzko, Kandice; Browne, Melissa; Parra, Cristina; Astorino, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    Sprint interval training (SIT) elicits comparable long-term adaptations versus continuous exercise training (CEX) including increased maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and fat utilization. However, there is limited research examining acute hemodynamic responses to SIT. The aim of this study was to examine hemodynamic responses to low-volume SIT. Active men (n=6, VO2max = 39.8 ± 1.7 mL/kg/min) and women (n=7, VO2max = 37.3 ± 5.7 mL/kg/min) performed a ramp-based VO2max test (RAMP) to determine workload for the SIT session. Subjects returned within 1 wk and completed a session of SIT consisting of six 30-s bouts of “all-out” cycling at 130% maximal workload (Wmax) interspersed with 120 s of active recovery. Continuously during RAMP and exercise and recovery in SIT, VO2 was obtained and thoracic impedance was used to estimate heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), and cardiac output (CO). Results revealed no significant differences in COmax (p = 0.12, 19.7 ± 2.4 L/min vs. 20.3 ± 1.8 L/min) but lower SVmax (p = 0.004, 110.4 ± 15.7 mL vs. 119.4 ± 15.5 mL) in RAMP versus SIT. HRmax from SIT (179.0 ± 11.8 b/min) was lower (p = 0.008) versus RAMP (184.4 ± 7.9 b/min). Peak VO2 (L/min) was lower (p < 0.001) in response to SIT (2.43 ± 0.82 L/min) compared to RAMP (2.84 ± 0.82 L/min). Hemodynamic variables increased linearly across SIT bouts and remained significantly elevated in recovery. Sprint interval training consisting of 3 min of supramaximal exercise elicits similar CO yet lower VO2 compared to RAMP. PMID:27785335

  15. Single session of sprint interval training elicits similar cardiac output but lower oxygen uptake versus ramp exercise to exhaustion in men and women.

    PubMed

    Horn, Trevor; Roverud, Garret; Sutzko, Kandice; Browne, Melissa; Parra, Cristina; Astorino, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    Sprint interval training (SIT) elicits comparable long-term adaptations versus continuous exercise training (CEX) including increased maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and fat utilization. However, there is limited research examining acute hemodynamic responses to SIT. The aim of this study was to examine hemodynamic responses to low-volume SIT. Active men (n=6, VO2max = 39.8 ± 1.7 mL/kg/min) and women (n=7, VO2max = 37.3 ± 5.7 mL/kg/min) performed a ramp-based VO2max test (RAMP) to determine workload for the SIT session. Subjects returned within 1 wk and completed a session of SIT consisting of six 30-s bouts of "all-out" cycling at 130% maximal workload (Wmax) interspersed with 120 s of active recovery. Continuously during RAMP and exercise and recovery in SIT, VO2 was obtained and thoracic impedance was used to estimate heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), and cardiac output (CO). Results revealed no significant differences in COmax (p = 0.12, 19.7 ± 2.4 L/min vs. 20.3 ± 1.8 L/min) but lower SVmax (p = 0.004, 110.4 ± 15.7 mL vs. 119.4 ± 15.5 mL) in RAMP versus SIT. HRmax from SIT (179.0 ± 11.8 b/min) was lower (p = 0.008) versus RAMP (184.4 ± 7.9 b/min). Peak VO2 (L/min) was lower (p < 0.001) in response to SIT (2.43 ± 0.82 L/min) compared to RAMP (2.84 ± 0.82 L/min). Hemodynamic variables increased linearly across SIT bouts and remained significantly elevated in recovery. Sprint interval training consisting of 3 min of supramaximal exercise elicits similar CO yet lower VO2 compared to RAMP.

  16. Kindlin-2 interacts with α-actinin-2 and β1 integrin to maintain the integrity of the Z-disc in cardiac muscles.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lihua; Yu, Yu; Chi, Xiaochun; Xu, Weizhi; Lu, Danyu; Song, Yao; Zhang, Youyi; Zhang, Hongquan

    2015-07-22

    Kindlin-2, as an integrin-interacting protein, was known to be required for the maintenance of cardiac structure and function in zebrafish. However, the mechanism remains unclear. We found that Kindlin-2 interacts and colocalizes with α-actinin-2 at the Z-disc of mouse cardiac muscles and there Kindlin-2 also interacts with β1 integrin. Knockdown of Kindlin-2 influences the association of β1 integrin with α-actinin-2 and disrupts the structure of the Z-disc and leads to cardiac dysfunction. Our data indicated that Kindlin-2 is a novel α-actinin-2-interacting protein and plays an important role in the regulation of cardiac structure and function.

  17. Comparison of cardiac output measures by transpulmonary thermodilution, pulse contour analysis, and pulmonary artery thermodilution during off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery: a subgroup analysis of the cardiovascular anaesthesia registry at a single tertiary centre.

    PubMed

    Cho, Youn Joung; Koo, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyong; Hong, Deok Man; Jeon, Yunseok

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac output measurement has a long history in haemodynamic management and many devices are now available with varying levels of accuracy. The purpose of the study was to compare the agreement and trending abilities of cardiac output, as measured by transpulmonary thermodilution and calibrated pulse contour analysis, using the VolumeView™ system, continuous thermodilution via a pulmonary artery catheter, and uncalibrated pulse contour analysis, using FloTrac™ with pulmonary artery bolus thermodilution. Twenty patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery using a pulmonary artery catheter and the VolumeView™ and FloTrac™ systems were included in this subgroup analysis of the cardiovascular anaesthesia registry at a single tertiary centre. During surgery, cardiac output was assessed after the induction of anaesthesia, after sternotomy, during the harvesting of grafts, during revascularization of the anterior and posterior/lateral wall, after protamine infusion, and after sternal fixation. In total, 145 sets of measurements were evaluated using Bland-Altman with % error calculation, correlation, concordance, and polar plot analyses. The percentage error (bias, limits of agreement) was 12.6 % (-0.12, -0.64 to 0.41 L/min), 26.7 % (-0.38, -1.50 to 0.74 L/min), 29.3 % (-0.08, -1.32 to 1.15 L/min), and 33.8 % (-0.05, -1.47 to 1.37 L/min) for transpulmonary thermodilution, pulmonary artery continuous thermodilution, calibrated, and uncalibrated pulse contour analysis, respectively, compared with pulmonary artery bolus thermodilution. All pairs of measurements showed significant correlations (p < 0.001), whereas only transpulmonary thermodilution revealed trending ability (concordance rate of 95.1 %, angular bias of 1.33°, and radial limits of agreement of 28.71°) compared with pulmonary artery bolus thermodilution. Transpulmonary thermodilution using the VolumeView™ system provides reliable data on cardiac output measurement and

  18. Exercise capacity in patients supported with rotary blood pumps is improved by a spontaneous increase of pump flow at constant pump speed and by a rise in native cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Luc; Vancaenegem, Olivier; Pasquet, Agnès; Matte, Pascal; Poncelet, Alain; Price, Joel; Gurné, Olivier; Noirhomme, Philippe

    2011-07-01

    Exercise capacity is improved in patients supported with continuous flow rotary blood pumps (RP). The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying this improvement. Ten patients implanted with a RP underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) at 6 months after surgery with hemodynamic and metabolic measurements (RP group). A group of 10 matched heart failure patients were extracted from our heart transplant database, and the results of their last CPET before transplantation were used for comparison (heart failure [HF] group). Peak VO(2) was significantly higher in RP than in HF patients (15.8 ± 6.2 vs. 10.9 ± 3 mL O(2)/kg.min) reaching 52 ± 16% of their predicted peak VO(2). The total output measured by a Swan-Ganz catheter increased from 5.6 ± 1.6 to 9.2 ± 1.8 L/min in the RP group and was significantly higher at rest and at peak exercise than in the HF group, whose output increased from 3.5 ± 0.4 to 5.6 ± 1.6 L/min. In the RP group, the estimated pump flow increased from 5.3 ± 0.4 to 6.2 ± 0.8, whereas the native cardiac output increased from 0.0 ± 0.5 to 3 ± 1.7 L/min. Cardiac output at peak exercise was inversely correlated with age (r = -0.86, P = 0.001) and mean pulmonary artery pressure (r = -0.75, P = 0.012). Maximal exercise capacity is improved in patients supported by RP as compared to matched HF patients and reaches about 50% of the expected values. Both a spontaneous increase of pump flow at constant pump speed and an increase of the native cardiac output contribute to total flow elevation. These findings may suggest that an automatic pump speed adaptation during exercise would further improve the exercise capacity. This hypothesis should be examined.

  19. The effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function.

    PubMed

    Houghton, David; Jones, Thomas W; Cassidy, Sophie; Siervo, Mario; MacGowan, Guy A; Trenell, Michael I; Jakovljevic, Djordje G

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in cardiac and vascular function are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study was to define the effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function. Haemodynamic and gas exchange measurements were performed at rest and peak exercise in healthy individuals. Augmentation index was measured at rest. Cardiac power output, a measure of overall cardiac function, was calculated as the product of cardiac output and mean arterial blood pressure. Augmentation index was significantly higher in older than younger participants (27.7 ± 10.1 vs. 2.5 ± 10.1%, P<0.01). Older people demonstrated significantly higher stroke volume and mean arterial blood pressure (P<0.05), but lower heart rate (145 ± 13 vs. 172 ± 10 beats/min, P<0.01) and peak oxygen consumption (22.5 ± 5.2 vs. 41.2 ± 8.4 ml/kg/min, P<0.01). There was a significant negative relationship between augmentation index and peak exercise cardiac power output (r=-0.73, P=0.02) and cardiac output (r=-0.69, P=0.03) in older participants. Older people maintain maximal cardiac function due to increased stroke volume. Vascular function is a strong predictor of overall cardiac function in older but in not younger people.

  20. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  1. Pulse transit time measured by photoplethysmography improves the accuracy of heart rate as a surrogate measure of cardiac output, stroke volume and oxygen uptake in response to graded exercise.

    PubMed

    Pollonini, L; Padhye, N S; Re, R; Torricelli, A; Simpson, R J; Dacso, C C

    2015-05-01

    Heart rate (HR) is a valuable and widespread measure for physical training programs, although its description of conditioning is limited to the cardiac response to exercise. More comprehensive measures of exercise adaptation include cardiac output (Q̇), stroke volume (SV) and oxygen uptake (V̇O2), but these physiological parameters can be measured only with cumbersome equipment installed in clinical settings. In this work, we explore the ability of pulse transit time (PTT) to represent a valuable pairing with HR for indirectly estimating Q̇, SV and V̇O2 non-invasively. PTT was measured as the time interval between the peak of the electrocardiographic (ECG) R-wave and the onset of the photoplethysmography (PPG) waveform at the periphery (i.e. fingertip) with a portable sensor. Fifteen healthy young subjects underwent a graded incremental cycling protocol after which HR and PTT were correlated with Q̇, SV and V̇O2 using linear mixed models. The addition of PTT significantly improved the modeling of Q̇, SV and V̇O2 at the individual level ([Formula: see text] for SV, 0.548 for Q̇, and 0.771 for V̇O2) compared to predictive models based solely on HR ([Formula: see text] for SV, 0.503 for Q̇, and 0.745 for V̇O2). While challenges in sensitivity and artifact rejection exist, combining PTT with HR holds potential for development of novel wearable sensors that provide exercise assessment largely superior to HR monitors.

  2. [The Contribution of Vascular Capacity and Blood Volume to Maintain Stable Blood Circulation during General Anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Shigemi, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    To maintain proper cardiac preload is one of the most effective procedures for the systemic circulation remaining stable. In particular, the balance between vascular capacity and total blood volume must be maintained within appropriate range by the administration of fluids, blood and/or vasoactive drugs with mean circulatory filling pressure (Pmcf), central venous pressure (CVP) or stroke volume variation (SVV). End-diastolic left ventricular volume (Ved) is theoretically the best index of cardiac preload; however, without transesophageal echocardbalanceiogram we cannot directly monitor Ved during anesthesia. The infused fluid volume remaining in intravascular space, the vascular capacity controlled by autonomic nervous system and/or vasoactive agents, and the unstressed blood volume properly mobilized to excess blood volume are the crucial factors to maintain cardiac output The knowledge of vascular physiology contribute the decision making to manipulate such factors to control blood circulation during general anesthesia. For example, CVP is usually maintained in the narrow range and seems to be stable; however, it must be changed just after the circulatory disturbances, such as acute bleeding, blood transfusion, and fluid infusion, and followed by gradual returning to initial value, because of the solid mechanism to preserve cardiac output

  3. The FMRFamide-related peptides F1 and F2 alter hemolymph distribution and cardiac output in the crab Cancer magister.

    PubMed

    McGaw, I J; McMahon, B R

    1995-04-01

    The FMRFamide-related peptides F1 and F2, originally isolated from lobster pericardial organs, have been shown to exert cardioexcitatory effects on isolated or semi-isolated crustacean hearts. The present study sought to determine the in vivo effects of F1 and F2 on cardiac and circulatory performance of Cancer magister using a pulsed-Doppler technique. In general the effects of F1 and F2 were similar; however, F1 was more potent and its effects were of longer duration than those exerted by F2. Infusion of either F1 or F2 caused a decrease in heart rate and subsequent periods of acardia. These decreases in rate occurred concurrently with a short-term increase in stroke volume of the heart, followed by a longer-term decrease in stroke volume. Hemolymph flow rates through the anterior aorta, anterolateral arteries, sternal artery, and posterior aorta also showed the same trend, with an initial short-term increase in flow rate followed by a longer-term decrease with periods of ischemia. Hemolymph flow through the paired hepatic arteries simply decreased, but recovery to pretreatment levels was faster than in the other arterial systems. Threshold for these responses occurred at circulating concentrations between 10(-9) mol.l-1 and 10(-8) mol.l-1 for F1 and somewhat higher, between 10(-8) mol.l-1 and 10(-7) mol.l-1, for F2.

  4. Cardiac arrest due to a missed diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jennifer; Spitzer, David; Phylactou, Maria; Glasser, Martin

    2016-05-06

    A 91-year-old presented with a rare cause of cardiac arrest. He was initially admitted with severe back pain following vomiting and diagnosed with probable aspiration pneumonia. On day 3 of admission, he was discovered in cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was started. On intubation, a left-sided pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema were noted. Needle decompression showed gastric fluid leaking from the cannula. The patient regained a cardiac output, and a subsequent CT scan confirmed a large pneumomediastinum with air tracking to the neck and chest, and bilateral pneumothoraces. A diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome was made. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit but did not survive. This case demonstrates the importance of looking for and treating the rarer reversible causes of cardiac arrest, and of maintaining a high index of suspicion for Boerhaave's syndrome. Despite its rarity, Boerhaave's syndrome is often misdiagnosed on initial presentation, leading to delayed treatment and poor outcomes.

  5. Reverse Cardiac Remodeling: A Marker of Better Prognosis in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Reis, José Rosino de Araújo Rocha; Cardoso, Juliano Novaes; Cardoso, Cristina Martins dos Reis; Pereira-Barretto, Antonio Carlos

    2015-01-01

    In heart failure syndrome, myocardial dysfunction causes an increase in neurohormonal activity, which is an adaptive and compensatory mechanism in response to the reduction in cardiac output. Neurohormonal activity is initially stimulated in an attempt to maintain compensation; however, when it remains increased, it contributes to the intensification of clinical manifestations and myocardial damage. Cardiac remodeling comprises changes in ventricular volume as well as the thickness and shape of the myocardial wall. With optimized treatment, such remodeling can be reversed, causing gradual improvement in cardiac function and consequently improved prognosis. PMID:26131706

  6. Preoperative levosimendan decreases mortality and the development of low cardiac output in high-risk patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Ricardo; Degrange, Marcela; Del Mazo, Carlos; Tanus, Eduardo; Porcile, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The calcium sensitizer levosimendan has been used in cardiac surgery for the treatment of postoperative low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) and difficult weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of preoperative treatment with levosimendan on 30-day mortality, the risk of developing LCOS and the requirement for inotropes, vasopressors and intra-aortic balloon pumps in patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction. METHODS: Patient with severe left ventricular dysfunction and an ejection fraction <25% undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with CPB were admitted 24 h before surgery and were randomly assigned to receive levosimendan (loading dose 10 μg/kg followed by a 23 h continuous infusion of 0.1μg/kg/min) or a placebo. RESULTS: From December 1, 2002 to June 1, 2008, a total of 252 patients were enrolled (127 in the levosimendan group and 125 in the control group). Individuals treated with levosimendan exhibited a lower incidence of complicated weaning from CPB (2.4% versus 9.6%; P<0.05), decreased mortality (3.9% versus 12.8%; P<0.05) and a lower incidence of LCOS (7.1% versus 20.8%; P<0.05) compared with the control group. The levosimendan group also had a lower requirement for inotropes (7.9% versus 58.4%; P<0.05), vasopressors (14.2% versus 45.6%; P<0.05) and intra-aortic balloon pumps (6.3% versus 30.4%; P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Patients with severe left ventricle dysfunction (ejection fraction <25%) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with CPB who were pretreated with levosimendan exhibited lower mortality, a decreased risk for developing LCOS and a reduced requirement for inotropes, vasopressors and intra-aortic balloon pumps. Studies with a larger number of patients are required to confirm whether these findings represent a new strategy to reduce the operative risk in this high-risk patient population. PMID:23620700

  7. Applications of minimally invasive cardiac output monitors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Because of the increasing age of the population, critical care and emergency medicine physicians have seen an increased number of critically ill patients over the last decade. Moreover, the trend of hospital closures in the United States t imposes a burden of increased efficiency. Hence, the identification of devices that facilitate accurate but rapid assessments of hemodynamic parameters without the added burden of invasiveness becomes tantamount. The purpose of this review is to understand the applications and limitations of these new technologies. PMID:22531454

  8. The effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, David; Jones, Thomas W.; Cassidy, Sophie; Siervo, Mario; MacGowan, Guy A.; Trenell, Michael I.; Jakovljevic, Djordje G.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in cardiac and vascular function are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study was to define the effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function. Haemodynamic and gas exchange measurements were performed at rest and peak exercise in healthy individuals. Augmentation index was measured at rest. Cardiac power output, a measure of overall cardiac function, was calculated as the product of cardiac output and mean arterial blood pressure. Augmentation index was significantly higher in older than younger participants (27.7 ± 10.1 vs. 2.5 ± 10.1%, P < 0.01). Older people demonstrated significantly higher stroke volume and mean arterial blood pressure (P < 0.05), but lower heart rate (145 ± 13 vs. 172 ± 10 beats/min, P < 0.01) and peak oxygen consumption (22.5 ± 5.2 vs. 41.2 ± 8.4 ml/kg/min, P < 0.01). There was a significant negative relationship between augmentation index and peak exercise cardiac power output (r = −0.73, P = 0.02) and cardiac output (r = −0.69, P = 0.03) in older participants. Older people maintain maximal cardiac function due to increased stroke volume. Vascular function is a strong predictor of overall cardiac function in older but in not younger people. PMID:26590322

  9. Airway Management of the Cardiac Surgical Patients: Current Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Arindam; Gupta, Nishkarsh; Magoon, Rohan; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2017-01-01

    The difficult airway (DA) is a common problem encountered in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, the challenge is not only just establishment of airway but also maintaining a definitive airway for the safe conduct of cardiopulmonary bypass from initiation to weaning after surgical correction or palliation, de-airing of cardiac chambers. This review describes the management of the DA in a cardiac theater environment. The primary aims are recognition of DA both anatomical and physiological, necessary preparations for (and management of) difficult intubation and extubation. All patients undergoing cardiac surgery should initially be considered as having potentially DA as many of them have poor physiologic reserve. Making the cardiac surgical theater environment conducive to DA management is as essential as it is to deal with low cardiac output syndrome or acute heart failure. Tube obstruction and/or displacement should be suspected in case of a new onset ventilation problem, especially in the recovery unit. Cardiac anesthesiologists are often challenged with DA while inducing general endotracheal anesthesia. They ought to be familiar with the DA algorithms and possess skill for using the latest airway adjuncts. PMID:28074820

  10. The role of cardiac sympathetic innervation and skin thermoreceptors on cardiac responses during heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Umemoto, Yasunori; Kinoshita, Tokio; Kouda, Ken; Ito, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Crandall, Craig G.; Tajima, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) for the changes in cardiac function during heat stress remain unknown. This study tested two unique hypotheses. First, sympathetic innervation to the heart is required for increases in cardiac systolic function during heat stress. This was accomplished by comparing responses during heat stress between paraplegics versus tetraplegics, with tetraplegics having reduced/absent cardiac sympathetic innervation. Second, stimulation of skin thermoreceptors contributes to cardiovascular adjustments that occur during heat stress in humans. This was accomplished by comparing responses during leg only heating between paraplegic versus able-bodied individuals. Nine healthy able-bodied, nine paraplegics, and eight tetraplegics participated in this study. Lower body (i.e., nonsensed area for para/tetraplegics) was heated until esophageal temperature had increased by ∼1.0°C. Echocardiographic indexes of diastolic and systolic function were performed before and at the end of heat stress. The heat stress increased cardiac output in all groups, but the magnitude of this increase was attenuated in the tetraplegics relative to the able-bodied (1.3 ± 0.4 vs. 2.3 ± 1.0 l/min; P < 0.05). Diastolic function was maintained in all groups. Indexes of left atrial and ventricular systolic function were enhanced in the able-bodied, but did not change in tetraplegics, while these changes in paraplegics were attenuated relative to the able-bodied. These data suggest that the cardiac sympathetic innervation is required to achieve normal increases in cardiac systolic function during heat stress but not required to maintain diastolic function during this exposure. Second, elevated systolic function during heat stress primarily occurs as a result of increases in internal temperature, although stimulation of skin thermoreceptors may contribute. PMID:25795714

  11. Overload protection circuit for output driver

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, Roger G.

    1982-05-11

    A protection circuit for preventing excessive power dissipation in an output transistor whose conduction path is connected between a power terminal and an output terminal. The protection circuit includes means for sensing the application of a turn on signal to the output transistor and the voltage at the output terminal. When the turn on signal is maintained for a period of time greater than a given period without the voltage at the output terminal reaching a predetermined value, the protection circuit decreases the turn on signal to, and the current conduction through, the output transistor.

  12. Cardiac catheterization - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac - discharge; Heart catheterization - discharge: Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization discharge; CAD - cardiac catheterization discharge; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization ...

  13. External cardiac compression may be harmful in some scenarios of pulseless electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Hogan, T S

    2012-10-01

    Pulseless electrical activity occurs when organised or semi-organised electrical activity of the heart persists but the product of systemic vascular resistance and the increase in systemic arterial flow generated by the ejection of the left venticular stroke volume is not sufficient to produce a clinically detectable pulse. Pulseless electrical activity encompasses a very heterogeneous variety of severe circulatory shock states ranging in severity from pseudo-cardiac arrest to effective cardiac arrest. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for pulseless electrical activity are generally poor. Impairment of cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output in many scenarios of pulseless electrical activity, including extreme vasodilatory shock states. There is no evidence that external cardiac compression can increase cardiac output when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. If impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output and the heart is effectively ejecting all the blood returning to it, then external cardiac compression can only increase cardiac output if it increases venous return and cardiac filling. Repeated cardiac compression asynchronous with the patient's cardiac cycle and raised mean intrathoracic pressure due to chest compression can be expected to reduce rather than to increase cardiac filling and therefore to reduce rather than to increase cardiac output in such circumstances. The hypothesis is proposed that the performance of external cardiac compression will have zero or negative effect on cardiac output in pulseless electrical activity when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. External cardiac compression may be both directly and indirectly harmful to significant sub-groups of patients with pulseless electrical activity. We have neither evidence nor theory to provide comfort that external cardiac compression is not harmful in many scenarios of pulseless

  14. Mechano-chemo-transduction in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen-Izu, Ye; Izu, Leighton T

    2017-01-18

    The heart has the ability to adjust to changing mechanical loads. The Frank-Starling law and the Anrep effect describe exquisite intrinsic mechanisms the heart has for autoregulating the force of contraction to maintain cardiac output under preload and afterload. Although these mechanisms have been known for more than a century, their cellular and molecular underpinnings are still debated. How does the cardiac myocyte sense a change in preload or afterload? How does the myocyte adjust its response to compensate for such changes? In cardiac myocytes Ca(2+) is a crucial regulator of contractile force and in this review we compare and contrast recent results from different labs that address two important questions. The "dimensionality" of the mechanical milieu under which experiments are carried out provide important clues to the location of the mechanosensors and the kinds of mechanical forces they can sense and respond to. As a first approximation, sensors inside the myocyte appear to modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) while sensors on the cell surface appear to also modulate nitric oxide (NO) signalling; both signalling pathways affect Ca(2+) handling. Undoubtedly, further studies will add layers to this simplified picture. Clarifying the intimate links from cellular mechanics to ROS and NO signalling and to Ca(2+) handling will deepen our understanding of the Frank-Starling law and the Anrep effect, and also provide a unified view on how arrhythmias may arise in seemingly disparate diseases that have in common altered myocyte mechanics. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Design and testing of an MRI-compatible cycle ergometer for non-invasive cardiac assessments during exercise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool for cardiac research, and it is frequently used for resting cardiac assessments. However, research into non-pharmacological stress cardiac evaluation is limited. Methods We aimed to design a portable and relatively inexpensive MRI cycle ergometer capable of continuously measuring pedalling workload while patients exercise to maintain target heart rates. Results We constructed and tested an MRI-compatible cycle ergometer for a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Resting and sub-maximal exercise images (at 110 beats per minute) were successfully obtained in 8 healthy adults. Conclusions The MRI-compatible cycle ergometer constructed by our research group enabled cardiac assessments at fixed heart rates, while continuously recording power output by directly measuring pedal force and crank rotation. PMID:22423637

  16. Comparison Between Phenylephrine and Dopamine in Maintaining Cerebral Oxygen Saturation in Thoracic Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Won; Joo Ahn, Hyun; JooAhn, Hyun; Yang, Mikyung; Kim, Jie Ae; Lee, Sangmin M; Ahn, Jin Hee

    2015-12-01

    Fluid is usually restricted during thoracic surgery, and vasoactive agents are often administered to maintain blood pressure. One-lung ventilation (OLV) decreases arterial oxygenation; thus oxygen delivery to the brain can be decreased. In this study, we compared phenylephrine and dopamine with respect to maintaining cerebral oxygenation during OLV in major thoracic surgery.Sixty-three patients undergoing lobectomies were randomly assigned to the dopamine (D) or phenylephrine (P) group. The patients' mean arterial pressure was maintained within 20% of baseline by a continuous infusion of dopamine or phenylephrine. Maintenance fluid was kept at 5 mL/kg/h. The depth of anesthesia was maintained with desflurane 1MAC and remifentanil infusion under bispectral index guidance. Regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) and hemodynamic variables were recorded using near-infrared spectroscopy and esophageal cardiac Doppler.The rScO2 was higher in the D group than the P group during OLV (OLV 60 min: 71 ± 6% vs 63 ± 12%; P = 0.03). The number of patients whose rScO2 dropped more than 20% from baseline was 0 and 6 in the D and P groups, respectively (P = 0.02). The D group showed higher cardiac output, but lower mean arterial pressure than the P group (4.7 ± 1.0 vs 3.9 ± 1.2 L/min; 76.7 ± 8.1 vs 84.5 ± 7.5 mm Hg; P = 0.02, P = 0.02). Among the variables, age, hemoglobin concentration, and cardiac output were associated with rScO2 by correlation analysis.Dopamine was superior to phenylephrine in maintaining cerebral oxygenation during OLV in thoracic surgery.

  17. Validation of Maintainability Prediction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Fault Detection and Isolation S outputs (FD&I outputs) to replaceable items (RI’s). In performing the detailed prediction, the...the reliability prediction. Next, the Fault Detection and Isolation outputs are identified. The FD&I outputs can be derived from the schematics or if...acheive systems where fault detection and isolation are virtually instantaneous, accurate, and not dependent on operator skill levels. 9.1

  18. Epo deficiency alters cardiac adaptation to chronic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    El Hasnaoui-Saadani, Raja; Marchant, Dominique; Pichon, Aurélien; Escoubet, Brigitte; Pezet, Mylène; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Hoch, Melanie; Pham, Isabelle; Quidu, Patricia; Voituron, Nicolas; Journé, Clément; Richalet, Jean-Paul; Favret, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    The involvement of erythropoietin in cardiac adaptation to acute and chronic (CHx) hypoxia was investigated in erythropoietin deficient transgenic (Epo-TAg(h)) and wild-type (WT) mice. Left (LV) and right ventricular functions were assessed by echocardiography and hemodynamics. HIF-1α, VEGF and Epo pathways were explored through RT-PCR, ELISA, Western blot and immunocytochemistry. Epo gene and protein were expressed in cardiomyocytes of WT mice in normoxia and hypoxia. Increase in blood hemoglobin, angiogenesis and functional cardiac adaptation occurred in CHx in WT mice, allowing a normal oxygen delivery (O2T). Epo deficiency induced LV hypertrophy, increased cardiac output (CO) and angiogenesis, but O2T remained lower than in WT mice. In CHx Epo-TAg(h) mice, LV hypertrophy, CO and O2T decreased. HIF-1α and Epo receptor pathways were depressed, suggesting that Epo-TAg(h) mice could not adapt to CHx despite activation of cardioprotective pathways (increased P-STAT-5/STAT-5). HIF/Epo pathway is activated in the heart of WT mice in hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia induced cardiac adaptive responses that were altered with Epo deficiency, failing to maintain oxygen delivery to tissues.

  19. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  20. [Effects of temporary dual-chamber cardiac pacing in refractory cardiac failure].

    PubMed

    Scanu, P; Lecluse, E; Michel, L; Bureau, G; Saloux, E; Cleron, S; Valette, B; Grollier, G; Potier, J C; Foucault, J P

    1996-12-01

    The authors studied 18 patients (15 men, 3 women) with an average age of 67 +/- 8 years with refractory cardiac failure. In order to determine the potential of pacing to raise cardiac output in severe cardiac failure. The average ejection fraction was 26 +/- 6.5%. All patients were in sinus rhythm:resting cardiac output was 3.35 l/min. Two temporary pacing catheters were positioned in the right atrium and at the apex of the right ventricle for dual-chamber mode pacing triggered by the spontaneous P waves. Changes in cardiac output were measured by Doppler echocardiography at different values of atrioventricular delay. Patients were considered to be responders if their cardiac outputs rose by 15%. In 7 patients meeting this criterion, the average increase in cardiac output was 27% (2.99 +/- 0.7 to 3.81 +/- 0.86 l/mn; p < 0.01); all had dilated cardiomyopathies with left bundle branch block and the optimal AV delay was 103 +/- 21 ms (80-140 ms); the duration of diastolic filling increased from 212 +/- 98 to 292 +/- 116 ms (p = 0.02). In the non-responding group (11 patients with an increase of cardiac output of only 3.6 +/- 0.09 to 3.9 +/- 0.92 l/mn; p < 0.01), the underlying disease process was mainly ischaemic. Two predictive factors of efficacy of dual-chamber pacing were identified: a short ventricular filling period (29 +/- 8% of the RR interval in the responders vs 44 +/- 9% in the non-responders; p < 0.01) and the presence of 1st degree atrioventricular block. Dual-chamber pacing could be a valuable method of increasing resting cardiac outputs in a selected group of patients with severe, refractory, cardiac failure.

  1. ECMO Maintains Cerebral Blood Flow During Endotoxic Shock in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Batts, Sherreen G.; Uyehara-Lock, Jane H.; Murata, Lee-Ann; Uyehara, Catherine F. T.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular injury while on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) may be caused by excessive brain perfusion during hypoxemic reperfusion. Previous studies have postulated that the most vulnerable period of time for cerebrovascular injury is during the transfer period to ECMO. Therefore, our objective was to compare brain perfusion and hemodynamics in a piglet endotoxic shock ECMO model. The effect of ECMO flow on microcirculation of different brain regions was compared between 10 control pigs and six pigs (7–10 kg) administered IV endotoxin to achieve a drop in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of at least 30%. Cardiac output (CO), brain oxygen utilization, and microcirculatory blood flow (BF) were compared at baseline and 2 hours after ECMO stabilization. Matching ECMO delivery with baseline CO in control animals increased perfusion (p < 0.05) in all areas of the brain. In contrast, with endotoxin, ECMO returned perfusion closer to baseline levels in all regions of the brain and maintained brain tissue oxygen consumption. Both control and endotoxic pigs showed no evidence of acute neuronal necrosis in histologic cerebral cortical sections examined after 2 hours of ECMO. Results show that during endotoxic shock, transition to ECMO can maintain brain BF equally to all brain regions without causing overperfusion, and does not appear to cause brain tissue histopathologic changes (hemorrhage or necrosis) during the acute stabilization period after ECMO induction. PMID:27442858

  2. [Changes in the morphology of the normal left ventricle during the phases of isovolumic contraction and relaxation. Consequences on the calculation of the volume and cardiac output by cineangiocardiographic methods].

    PubMed

    Nitenberg, A; Geschwind, H; Herreman, F

    1976-04-01

    It is well known that the left ventricular volume, as measured by the cineangiographic method, decreases during the phase of isometric contraction. What is more, the cardiac index and the ejection fraction measured by this method are definitely larger than those derived from dilution methods. These discrepancies can be explained by movements of the mitral valve during the phases of isometric contraction and relaxation. The systolic ejection volume (SEV) was measured by three different methods: 1. End-diastolic volume (EDV) -end-systolic volume (ESV) ; 2. EDV - pre-filling volume (PFV) ; 3. Pre-ejection volume (PEV) - ESV. It has emerged that the results given by the methods (2) and (3) correspond closely, and differ significantly from those given by method (1); they are also close to those obtained by the dilution method. This difference seems to arise from the fact that the movements of the mitral valve during the phase of isometric relaxation are diametrically opposite to those which occur during isometric contraction; thus, when the values EDV-ESV are used in the calculation of SEV, an overestimate is made because the mitral valve is not to be found in the same position within the ventricular cavity for both values.

  3. Assessing cardiac pumping capability by exercise testing and inotropic stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, L B; Bain, R J; Littler, W A

    1989-01-01

    In heart failure both functional capacity and prognosis are primarily determined by the degree of pump dysfunction. Although data on haemodynamic function at rest may indicate impaired cardiac function, they do not assess the capacity of the heart to respond to stress. Maximal bicycle ergometry and incremental intravenous inotropic stimulation in 31 patients with moderately severe heart failure were evaluated as methods of stressing the heart to determine cardiac pumping capability, which is defined as the cardiac power obtained during maximal stimulation. There was good agreement between the cardiac pumping capabilities assessed by these two methods. Maximal cardiac power output was better than maximal cardiac output and left ventricular stroke work index in representing cardiac pumping capability, because it was less dependent on the type of stimulation used during evaluation. Inotropic challenge is at least as effective as exercise testing in assessing cardiac pumping capability in heart failure, and may be a better method in patients who find physical exercise difficult. PMID:2757870

  4. Cardiac tamponade, constrictive pericarditis, and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, James A

    2004-09-01

    The pericardium envelopes the cardiac chambers and under physiological conditions exerts subtle functions, including mechanical effects that enhance normal ventricular interactions that contribute to balancing left and right cardiac outputs. Because the pericardium is non-compliant, conditions that cause intrapericardial crowding elevate intrapericardial pressure, which may be the mediator of adverse cardiac compressive effects. Elevated intrapericardial pressure may result from primary disease of the pericardium itself (tamponade or constriction) or from abrupt chamber dilatation (eg, right ventricular infarction). Regardless of the mechanism leading to increased intrapericardial pressure, the resultant pericardial constraint exerts adverse effects on cardiac filling and output. Constriction and restrictive cardiomyopathy share common pathophysiological and clinical features; their differentiation can be quite challenging. This review will consider the physiology of the normal pericardium and its dynamic interactions with the heart and review in detail the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of cardiac tamponade, constrictive pericarditis, and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

  5. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  6. Cardiac Cephalgia

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, Nancy; Ali, Ali Turab; Katsanevaki, Alexia-Zacharoula; Nishtar, Salman

    2014-01-01

    Although most of the patients presenting with ischemic heart disease have chest pains, there are other rare presenting symptoms like cardiac cephalgia. In this report, we present a case of acute coronary syndrome with an only presentation of exertional headache. It was postulated as acute presentation of coronary artery disease, due to previous history of similar presentation associated with some chest pains with previous left coronary artery stenting. We present an unusual case with cardiac cephalgia in a young patient under the age of 50 which was not reported at that age before. There are four suggested mechanisms for this cardiac presentation. PMID:28352454

  7. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  8. Cardiac cameras.

    PubMed

    Travin, Mark I

    2011-05-01

    Cardiac imaging with radiotracers plays an important role in patient evaluation, and the development of suitable imaging instruments has been crucial. While initially performed with the rectilinear scanner that slowly transmitted, in a row-by-row fashion, cardiac count distributions onto various printing media, the Anger scintillation camera allowed electronic determination of tracer energies and of the distribution of radioactive counts in 2D space. Increased sophistication of cardiac cameras and development of powerful computers to analyze, display, and quantify data has been essential to making radionuclide cardiac imaging a key component of the cardiac work-up. Newer processing algorithms and solid state cameras, fundamentally different from the Anger camera, show promise to provide higher counting efficiency and resolution, leading to better image quality, more patient comfort and potentially lower radiation exposure. While the focus has been on myocardial perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography, increased use of positron emission tomography is broadening the field to include molecular imaging of the myocardium and of the coronary vasculature. Further advances may require integrating cardiac nuclear cameras with other imaging devices, ie, hybrid imaging cameras. The goal is to image the heart and its physiological processes as accurately as possible, to prevent and cure disease processes.

  9. High-output heart failure in a newborn.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Maria Inês; Moniz, Marta; Ferreira, Sofia; Goulão, Augusto; Barroso, Rosalina

    2012-07-10

    High-output cardiac failure is rare in newborns. Emergent diagnosis and management of this pathology is crucial. We report the case of a child, currently 12-months old; obstetric background is non-contributory. Clinic observation on D1 was normal except for the presence of a systolic cardiac murmur; cardiological evaluation revealed mild ventricular dysfunction of the right ventricle. On the third day of life, she developed cardiac failure with gallop rhythm, hepatomegaly and a murmur in the anterior fontanel; an echocardiogram confirmed clinic aggravation with biventricular dysfunction and right cavities and superior vena cava dilatation. The cranial MRI confirmed the presence of a pial arteriovenous malformation (AVM) involving the anterior and middle cerebral arteries with an associated fronto-parietal ischaemic lesion. The infant underwent embolisations of AVM with successful flow reduction and cardiac failure improvement. The multidisciplinary follow-up showed no cardiac dysfunction or permanent lesions but confirmed a severe psycho-motor delay and left hemiparesia.

  10. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cardiac Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Tocchi, Autumn; Quarles, Ellen K.; Basisty, Nathan; Gitari, Lemuel; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in most developed nations. While it has received the least public attention, aging is the dominant risk factor for developing cardiovascular diseases, as the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases increases dramatically with increasing age. Cardiac aging is an intrinsic process that results in impaired cardiac function, along with cellular and molecular changes. Mitochondria play a great role in these processes, as cardiac function is an energetically demanding process. In this review, we examine mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac aging. Recent research has demonstrated that mitochondrial dysfunction can disrupt morphology, signaling pathways, and protein interactions; conversely, mitochondrial homeostasis is maintained by mechanisms that include fission/fusion, autophagy, and unfolded protein responses. Finally, we describe some of the recent findings in mitochondrial targeted treatments to help meet the challenges of mitochondrial dysfunction in aging. PMID:26191650

  11. Governmentally amplified output volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funashima, Yoshito

    2016-11-01

    Predominant government behavior is decomposed by frequency into several periodic components: updating cycles of infrastructure, Kuznets cycles, fiscal policy over business cycles, and election cycles. Little is known, however, about the theoretical impact of such cyclical behavior in public finance on output fluctuations. Based on a standard neoclassical growth model, this study intends to examine the frequency at which public investment cycles are relevant to output fluctuations. We find an inverted U-shaped relationship between output volatility and length of cycle in public investment. This implies that periodic behavior in public investment at a certain frequency range can cause aggravated output resonance. Moreover, we present an empirical analysis to test the theoretical implication, using the U.S. data in the period from 1968 to 2015. The empirical results suggest that such resonance phenomena change from low to high frequency.

  12. Mechanical cardiac assistance.

    PubMed

    Sezai, Y

    1998-08-01

    In our institute, we have intensively introduced both pulsatile and non-pulsatile mechanical cardiac assist devices, such as the pneumatic ventricular assist device (VAD) and percutaneous cardiopulmonary support (PCPS), using a centrifugal pump. From various kinds of clinical views, these cases were estimated and evaluated retrospectively according to the weaning results, long-term survival rate and cause of death. Based upon our experiences and clinical results, an alternate strategy of mechanical cardiac assistance for severe heart failure is suggested as follows. In the case of post-cardiotomy cardiogenic shock or low output syndrome, PCPS system should be applied firstly under intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP) assist for a maximum of 2-3 days. If the native cardiac function does not recover and more long-term support is needed, several types of VAD, which are more powerful and durable devices should be introduced, according to end organ function and expected support duration. In order to obtain better clinical results, we have to select an appropriate device depending on the limited availability of supporting duration. Generally speaking, centrifugal pumps can support in short-term duration, while pulsatile devices cover the broad spectrum of the supporting period. Pneumatic VADs can cover short-term to long-term support up to a year, and electric VADs can cover over 1 year, and can be used as a bridge to heart transplantation.

  13. Dipyridamole cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.; Askenase, A.; Segal, B.L.; Auerbach, N.

    1988-02-01

    Dipyridamole cardiac imaging is a useful alternative technique to exercise stress testing in the evaluation of patients with ischemic heart disease. Intravenous dipyridamole is still in the investigational phase, while oral dipyridamole is widely available. The hemodynamic effects of dipyridamole include an increase in coronary blood flow (due to coronary vasodilation) which is in excess of the increase in myocardial oxygen consumption and cardiac output. The disparity in the increase in coronary blood flow relative to the cardiac output results in an increase in myocardial thallium activity and an increase in the myocardial/background activity ratio. The quality of the thallium images is better or similar to that of exercise thallium images. The optimal dose of intravenous dipyridamole is 0.56 mg/kg, and of the oral dose it is 300 to 400 mg, although higher doses may be necessary in some patients. Analysis of the thallium images has been to a large extent based on visual inspection of the planar images. Delayed images are helpful to establish the nature of the perfusion abnormalities (transient or fixed). The process of redistribution is based on disparate rates of washout from the normal and abnormal zones. The sensitivity and specificity of dipyridamole thallium imaging, whether intravenous or oral, have been shown in a number of studies to be quite adequate and comparable to that achieved during exercise thallium imaging. Dipyridamole two-dimensional echocardiography has also been used in the detection of coronary artery disease; transient (new or worsening of preexisting) wall motion abnormalities have been found to be a specific marker of coronary artery disease. Transmural as well as regional coronary steal phenomena have been postulated as the mechanism for dipyridamole-induced regional wall motion abnormalities. 65 references.

  14. Quality Control Systems in Cardiac Aging

    PubMed Central

    Quarles, Ellen K; Dai, Dao-Fu; Tocchi, Autumn; Basisty, Nathan; Gitari, Lemuel; Rabinovitch, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac aging is an intrinsic process that results in impaired cardiac function, along with cellular and molecular changes. These degenerative changes are intimately associated with quality control mechanisms. This review provides a general overview of the clinical and cellular changes which manifest in cardiac aging, and the quality control mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis and retarding aging. These mechanisms include autophagy, ubiquitin-mediated turnover, apoptosis, mitochondrial quality control and cardiac matrix homeostasis. Finally, we discuss aging interventions that have been observed to impact cardiac health outcomes. These include caloric restriction, rapamycin, resveratrol, GDF11, mitochondrial antioxidants and cardiolipin-targeted therapeutics. A greater understanding of the quality control mechanisms that promote cardiac homeostasis will help to understand the benefits of these interventions, and hopefully lead to further improved therapeutic modalities. PMID:25702865

  15. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... your risk of future heart problems, and to improve your health and quality of life. Cardiac rehabilitation programs increase ... exercise routine at home or at a local gym. You may also continue to ... health concerns. Education about nutrition, lifestyle and weight loss ...

  16. Biomechanics of Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Voorhees, Andrew P.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-01-01

    The heart pumps blood to maintain circulation and ensure the delivery of oxygenated blood to all the organs of the body. Mechanics play a critical role in governing and regulating heart function under both normal and pathological conditions. Biological processes and mechanical stress are coupled together in regulating myocyte function and extracellular matrix structure thus controlling heart function. Here we offer a brief introduction to the biomechanics of left ventricular function and then summarize recent progress in the study of the effects of mechanical stress on ventricular wall remodeling and cardiac function as well as the effects of wall mechanical properties on cardiac function in normal and dysfunctional hearts. Various mechanical models to determine wall stress and cardiac function in normal and diseased hearts with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction are discussed. The results of these studies have enhanced our understanding of the biomechanical mechanism in the development and remodeling of normal and dysfunctional hearts. Biomechanics provide a tool to understand the mechanism of left ventricular remodeling in diastolic and systolic dysfunction and guidance in designing and developing new treatments. PMID:26426462

  17. Diodes stabilize LED output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deters, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Small-signal diodes are placed in series with light-emitting diodes (LED's) to stabilize LED output against temperature fluctuations. Simple inexpensive method compensates for thermal fluctuations over a broad temperature range. Requiring few components, technique is particularly useful where circuit-board space is limited.

  18. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU, a novel analysis of cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bin; Tong, Suiyang; Ren, Xiaofeng; Xia, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that mammalian hearts maintain the capacity for cardiac regeneration. Rapid and sensitive identification of cardiac cellular proliferation is prerequisite for understanding the underlying mechanisms and strategies of cardiac regeneration. The following immunologically related markers of cardiac cells were analyzed: cardiac transcription factors Nkx2.5 and Gata 4; specific marker of cardiomyocytes TnT; endothelial cell marker CD31; vascular smooth muscle marker smooth muscle myosin IgG; cardiac resident stem cells markers IsL1, Tbx18, and Wt1. Markers were co-localized in cardiac tissues of embryonic, neonatal, adult, and pathological samples by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining. EdU was also used to label isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes in vitro. EdU robustly labeled proliferating cells in vitro and in vivo, co-immunostaining with different cardiac cells markers. EdU can rapidly and sensitively label proliferating cardiac cells in developmental and pathological states. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU is a novel analytical tool for investigating the mechanism and strategies of cardiac regeneration in response to injury.

  19. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  20. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  1. Maintaining DACUM Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Robert E.

    This document discusses the importance of maintaining the quality of DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) occupational analyses and presents a 2-page checklist detailing DACUM quality performance criteria. The introduction to the checklist discusses various "infractions" discovered during an analyses of some curriculum/program developers'…

  2. Maintaining Medicinal Plant Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For all plant genetic resources collections, including medicinal plant germplasm, maintaining the genetic integrity of material held ex situ is of major importance. This holds true for all intended end uses of the material whether it is as a source for crop improvement, medical research, as voucher...

  3. Sulfide intoxication induced circulatory failure is mediated by a depression in cardiac contractility

    PubMed Central

    Sonobe, Takashi; Haouzi, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) intoxication produces a rapid cardio-circulatory failure leading to cardiac arrest. In non-lethal forms of sulfide exposure, the presence of a circulatory shock is associated with long-term neurological sequelae. Our aim was to clarify the mechanisms of H2S-induced circulatory failure. In anesthetized paralyzed and mechanically ventilated rats, cardiac output, arterial pressure and ventricular pressures were determined while NaHS was infused to increase arterial concentration of soluble H2S (CgH2S) from undetectable to levels leading to circulatory failure. Compared to control/saline infusion, blood pressure started to decrease significantly along with a modest drop in peripheral vascular resistance (-19 ± 5%, P<0.01), when CgH2S reached about 1 microM. As CgH2S exceeded 2-3 microM, parameters of ventricular contractility diminished with no further reduction in peripheral resistance. Whenever H2S exposure was maintained at a higher level (CgH2S over 7 microM), a clear inhibition of cardiac contractility was observed, leading to asystole within minutes, but with no evidence of peripheral vasoplegia. The immediate and long-term neurological effects of specifically counteracting sulfide induced cardiac contractility depression following H2S exposure remain to be investigated. PMID:25616319

  4. Climate Model Output Rewriter

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K. E.; Doutriaux, C.

    2004-06-21

    CMOR comprises a set of FORTRAN 90 dunctions that can be used to produce CF-compliant netCDF files. The structure of the files created by CMOR and the metadata they contain fulfill the requirements of many of the climate community’s standard model experiments (which are referred to here as "MIPS", which stands for "model intercomparison project", including, for example, AMIP, CMIP, CFMIP, PMIP, APE, and IPCC scenario runs), CMOR was not designed to serve as an all-purpose wfiter of CF-compliant netCDF files, but simply to reduce the effort required to prepare and manage MIP data. Although MIPs encourage systematic analysis of results across models, this is only easy to do if the model output is written in a common format with files structured similarly and with sufficient metadata uniformly stored according to a common standard. Individual modeling groups store their data in different ways. but if a group can read its own data with FORTRAN, then it should easily be able to transform the data, using CMOR, into the common format required by the MIPs, The adoption of CMOR as a standard code for exchanging climate data will facilitate participation in MIPs because after learning how to satisfy the output requirements of one MIP, it will be easy to prepare output for the other MIPs.

  5. Aging Impairs Myocardial Fatty Acid and Ketone Oxidation and Modifies Cardiac Functional and Metabolic Responses to Insulin in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Ledee, Dolena; Ning, Xue-Han; Ge, Ming; Portman, Michael A.

    2010-07-02

    Aging presumably initiates shifts in substrate oxidation mediated in part by changes in insulin sensitivity. Similar shifts occur with cardiac hypertrophy and may contribute to contractile dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that aging modifies substrate utilization and alters insulin sensitivity in mouse heart when provided multiple substrates. In vivo cardiac function was measured with microtipped pressure transducers in the left ventricle from control (4–6 mo) and aged (22–24 mo) mice. Cardiac function was also measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate and anaplerotic fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle (CAC) by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate, lactate, and unlabeled glucose. Stroke volume and cardiac output were diminished in aged mice in vivo, but pressure development was preserved. Systolic and diastolic functions were maintained in aged isolated hearts. Insulin prompted an increase in systolic function in aged hearts, resulting in an increase in cardiac efficiency. FFA and ketone flux were present but were markedly impaired in aged hearts. These changes in myocardial substrate utilization corresponded to alterations in circulating lipids, thyroid hormone, and reductions in protein expression for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)4. Insulin further suppressed FFA oxidation in the aged. Insulin stimulation of anaplerosis in control hearts was absent in the aged. The aged heart shows metabolic plasticity by accessing multiple substrates to maintain function. However, fatty acid oxidation capacity is limited. Impaired insulin-stimulated anaplerosis may contribute to elevated cardiac efficiency, but may also limit response to acute stress through depletion of CAC intermediates.

  6. Nuclear power plant maintainability.

    PubMed

    Seminara, J L; Parsons, S O

    1982-09-01

    In the mid-1970s a general awareness of human factors engineering deficiencies associated with power plant control rooms took shape and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) awarded the Lockheed Corporation a contract to review the human factors aspects of five representative operational control rooms and their associated simulators. This investigation revealed a host of major and minor deficiencies that assumed unforeseen dimensions in the post- Three Mile Island accident period. In the course of examining operational problems (Seminara et al, 1976) and subsequently the methods for overcoming such problems (Seminara et al, 1979, 1980) indications surfaced that power plants were far from ideal in meeting the needs of maintenance personnel. Accordingly, EPRI sponsored an investigation of the human factors aspects of power plant maintainability (Seminara, 1981). This paper provides an overview of the maintainability problems and issues encountered in the course of reviewing five nuclear power plants.

  7. Obtaining and maintaining funding

    SciTech Connect

    Beverly Hartline

    1996-04-01

    Obtaining and maintaining funding is important for individuals, groups, institutions, and fields. This challenge is easier during times of abundant and growing resources than it is now, when funding is tight and shrinking. Thus, to obtain and maintain funding will require: maintaining healthy funding levels for all of science; maintaining healthy funding levels for the field(s) you work in; and competing successfully for the available funds. Everyone should pay attention to the overall prospects for science funding and dedicate some effort to working with others to grow the constituency for science. Public support is likely an important prerequisite for keeping future science budgets high. In this context, researchers should share with society at large the benefits of their research, so that taxpayers can see and appreciate some return from the federal investment in science. Assuming this effort is successful, and there continue to be government and private organizations with substantial resources to invest in research, what can the individual investigator do to improve her chances? She can be clear about her goal(s) and carefully plan her effort to make maximum progress for minimum resources, especially early in her career while she is establishing a solid professional reputation. Specific useful strategies include: brainstorm funding options and select the most promising one(s); be persistent but flexible, responsive to new information and changing circumstances; provide value and assistance to prospective funding sources both before and after receiving funding; know the funding agents and what their goals are, they are the customers; promise a lot and always deliver more; build partnerships and collaboration to leverage interest and resources; and develop capabilities and ideas with a promising, irresistible future. There is no guarantee of success. For the best chances, consistently contribute positively and productively in all your efforts, and continue to

  8. About Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Cardiac Arrest Updated:Mar 10,2017 What is cardiac arrest? Cardiac arrest is the abrupt loss of heart function in a person who may or may not have diagnosed heart ...

  9. Is levosimendan effective in paediatric heart failure and post-cardiac surgeries?

    PubMed

    Angadi, Ullas; Westrope, Claire; Chowdhry, Mohammed F

    2013-10-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'do children with heart failure post-cardiac surgery undergoing treatment with levosimendan have an acceptable haemodynamic improvement?' The use of levosimendan as a vasoactive drug is an accepted intervention for patients with altered haemodynamics post-cardiac surgeries. However, the role of levosimendan and its efficacy have been debated. Eleven relevant papers were identified, which represented the best evidence to answer the question. The author, journal, date, country of publication and relevant outcomes are tabulated. The 11 studies comprised 3 randomized trials, 2 of which compared levosimendan and milrinone. A single-centre randomized study that included 40 infants showed that cardiac output (CO) and cardiac index (CI) increased overtime in the levosimendan group compared with the milrinone group. The significant interaction for CO (P = 0.005) and CI (P = 0.007) indicated different time courses in the two groups. A similar, European randomized study undertaken on neonates (n = 63) showed better lactate levels [P = 0.015 (intensive care admission); P = 0.048 (after 6 h) with low inotropic scores in the levosimendan group. Although the length of mechanical ventilation and mortality were less, this was statistically insignificant. A retrospective cohort analysis (n = 13) in children reported a reduced use of dobutamine and improvement in the ejection fraction from 29.8 to 40.5% (P = 0.015) with the use of levosimendan. In a questionnaire-based study from Finland, 61.1% of respondents felt that it had saved the lives of some children when the other treatments had failed. No study reported any adverse effect attributable to use of levosimendan. In conclusion, the above studies were in favour of levosimendan as a safe and feasible drug providing potential clinical benefit in low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) and post-cardiac surgeries when

  10. Hypertension-induced remodeling of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling in ventricular myocytes occurs prior to hypertrophy development.

    PubMed

    Chen-Izu, Ye; Chen, Ling; Bányász, Tamás; McCulle, Stacey L; Norton, Byron; Scharf, Steven M; Agarwal, Anuj; Patwardhan, Abhijit; Izu, Leighton T; Balke, C William

    2007-12-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for developing cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Previous studies show that hypertrophied and failing hearts display alterations in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling. However, it is unclear whether remodeling of the E-C coupling system occurs before or after heart disease development. We hypothesized that hypertension might cause changes in the E-C coupling system that, in turn, induce hypertrophy. Here we tested this hypothesis by utilizing the progressive development of hypertensive heart disease in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) to identify a window period when SHR had just developed hypertension but had not yet developed hypertrophy. We found the following major changes in cardiac E-C coupling during this window period. 1) Using echocardiography and hemodynamics measurements, we found a decrease of left ventricular ejection fraction and cardiac output after the onset of hypertension. 2) Studies in isolated ventricular myocytes showed that myocardial contraction was also enhanced at the same time. 3) The action potential became prolonged. 4) The E-C coupling gain was increased. 5) The systolic Ca(2+) transient was augmented. These data show that profound changes in E-C coupling already occur at the onset of hypertension and precede hypertrophy development. Prolonged action potential and increased E-C coupling gain synergistically increase the Ca(2+) transient. Functionally, augmented Ca(2+) transient causes enhancement of myocardial contraction that can partially compensate for the greater workload to maintain cardiac output. The increased Ca(2+) signaling cascade as a molecular mechanism linking hypertension to cardiac hypertrophy development is also discussed.

  11. Modes of induced cardiac arrest: hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia - Literature review

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseini; Cortez, José Luis Lasso; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    The entry of sodium and calcium play a key effect on myocyte subjected to cardiac arrest by hyperkalemia. They cause cell swelling, acidosis, consumption of adenosine triphosphate and trigger programmed cell death. Cardiac arrest caused by hypocalcemia maintains intracellular adenosine triphosphate levels, improves diastolic performance and reduces oxygen consumption, which can be translated into better protection to myocyte injury induced by cardiac arrest. PMID:25372919

  12. Maintaining plant safety margins

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Final Safety Analysis Report Forms the basis of demonstrating that the plant can operate safely and meet all applicable acceptance criteria. In order to assure that this continues through each operating cycle, the safety analysis is reexamined for each reload core. Operating limits are set for each reload core to assure that safety limits and applicable acceptance criteria are not exceeded for postulated events within the design basis. These operating limits form the basis for plant operation, providing barriers on various measurable parameters. The barriers are refereed to as limiting conditions for operation (LCO). The operating limits, being influenced by many factors, can change significantly from cycle to cycle. In order to be successful in demonstrating safe operation for each reload core (with adequate operating margin), it is necessary to continue to focus on ways to maintain/improve existing safety margins. Existing safety margins are a function of the plant type (boiling water reactor/pressurized water reactor (BWR/PWR)), nuclear system supply (NSSS) vendor, operating license date, core design features, plant design features, licensing history, and analytical methods used in the safety analysis. This paper summarizes the experience at Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in its efforts to provide adequate operating margin for the plants that it supports.

  13. Cardiac output and cardiac contractility by impedance cardiography during exercise of runners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubicek, W. G.; Tracy, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Most of the solid state electronic engineering of the system now generally known as the Minnesota Impedance Cardiograph was performed with the support of a five-year contract, NAS9-4500, with the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas. This contract ran from 1965 to 1970. In addition to the engineering design and development of the hardware, the contract called for testing on both animals and human subjects. This project also provided funds to construct twenty impedance cardiographs and place them in selected research and clinical facilities for further evaluation. This, then, led to the First Symposium on Impedance Cardiography, held at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, 2-4 June 1969. Twenty-four excellent papers were presented.

  14. Mammalian clock output mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kalsbeek, Andries; Yi, Chun-Xia; Cailotto, Cathy; la Fleur, Susanne E; Fliers, Eric; Buijs, Ruud M

    2011-06-30

    In mammals many behaviours (e.g. sleep-wake, feeding) as well as physiological (e.g. body temperature, blood pressure) and endocrine (e.g. plasma corticosterone concentration) events display a 24 h rhythmicity. These 24 h rhythms are induced by a timing system that is composed of central and peripheral clocks. The highly co-ordinated output of the hypothalamic biological clock not only controls the daily rhythm in sleep-wake (or feeding-fasting) behaviour, but also exerts a direct control over many aspects of hormone release and energy metabolism. First, we present the anatomical connections used by the mammalian biological clock to enforce its endogenous rhythmicity on the rest of the body, especially the neuro-endocrine and energy homoeostatic systems. Subsequently, we review a number of physiological experiments investigating the functional significance of this neuro-anatomical substrate. Together, this overview of experimental data reveals a highly specialized organization of connections between the hypothalamic pacemaker and neuro-endocrine system as well as the pre-sympathetic and pre-parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system.

  15. ADAS Update and Maintainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000, both the National Weather Service Melbourne (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have used a local data integration system (LOIS) as part of their forecast and warning operations. The original LOIS was developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in 1998 (Manobianco and Case 1998) and has undergone subsequent improvements. Each has benefited from three-dimensional (3-D) analyses that are delivered to forecasters every 15 minutes across the peninsula of Florida. The intent is to generate products that enhance short-range weather forecasts issued in support of NWS MLB and SMG operational requirements within East Central Florida. The current LDIS uses the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (AD AS) package as its core, which integrates a wide variety of national, regional, and local observational data sets. It assimilates all available real-time data within its domain and is run at a finer spatial and temporal resolution than current national or regional-scale analysis packages. As such, it provides local forecasters with a more comprehensive understanding of evolving fine-scale weather features. Over the years, the LDIS has become problematic to maintain since it depends on AMU-developed shell scripts that were written for an earlier version of the ADAS software. The goals of this task were to update the NWS MLB/SMG LDIS with the latest version of ADAS, incorporate new sources of observational data, and upgrade and modify the AMU-developed shell scripts written to govern the system. In addition, the previously developed ADAS graphical user interface (GUI) was updated. Operationally, these upgrades will result in more accurate depictions of the current local environment to help with short-range weather forecasting applications, while also offering an improved initialization for local versions of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model used by both groups.

  16. Cardiac xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    DiSesa, V J

    1997-12-01

    Heart failure is an important medical and public health problem. Although medical therapy is effective for many people, the only definitive therapy is heart transplantation, which is limited severely by the number of donors. Mechanical devices presently are used as "bridges" to transplantation. Their widespread use may solve the donor shortage problem, but at present, mechanical devices are limited by problems related to blood clotting, power supply, and foreign body infection. Cardiac xenotransplantation using animal donors is a potential biologic solution to the donor organ shortage. The immune response, consisting of hyperacute rejection, acute vascular rejection, and cellular rejection, currently prevents clinical xenotransplantation. Advances in the solution of these problems have been made using conventional immunosuppressive drugs and newer agents whose use is based on an understanding of important steps in xenoimmunity. The most exciting approaches use tools of molecular biology to create genetically engineered donors and to induce states of donor and recipient bone marrow chimerism and tolerance in xenogeneic organ recipients. The successful future strategy may use a combination of a genetically engineered donor and a chimeric recipient with or without nonspecific immunosuppressive drugs.

  17. Maintaining the unmethylated state

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A remarkable correspondence exists between the cytogenetic locations of the known fragile sites and frequently reported sites of hypermethylation. The best-known features of fragile sites are sequence motifs that are prone to the spontaneous formation of a non-B DNA structure. These facts, coupled with the known enzymological specificities of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), the ATP-dependent and actin-dependent helicases, and the ten-eleven translocation (TET) dioxygenases, suggest that these enzymes are involved in an epigenetic cycle that maintains the unmethylated state at these sites by resolving non-B structure, preventing both the sequestration of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and hypermethylation in normal cells. Presentation of the hypothesis The innate tendency of DNA sequences present at fragile sites to form non-B DNA structures results in de novo methylation of DNA at these sites that is held in check in normal cells by the action of ATP-dependent and actin-dependent helicases coupled with the action of TET dioxygenases. This constitutes a previously unrecognized epigenetic repair cycle in which spontaneously forming non-B DNA structures formed at fragile sites are methylated by DNMTs as they are removed by the action of ATP-dependent and actin-dependent helicases, with the resulting nascent methylation rendered non-transmissible by TET dioxygenases. Testing the hypothesis A strong prediction of the hypothesis is that knockdown of ATP-dependent and actin-dependent helicases will result in enhanced bisulfite sensitivity and hypermethylation at non-B structures in multiple fragile sites coupled with global hypomethylation. Implications of the hypothesis A key implication of the hypothesis is that helicases, like the lymphoid-specific helicase and alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked helicase, passively promote accurate maintenance of DNA methylation by preventing the sequestration of DNMTs at sites of unrepaired non-B DNA

  18. Modes of induced cardiac arrest: hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia--literature review.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza de; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; Santos, Carlos Alberto dos; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseini; Cortez, José Luis Lasso; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    The entry of sodium and calcium play a key effect on myocyte subjected to cardiac arrest by hyperkalemia. They cause cell swelling, acidosis, consumption of adenosine triphosphate and trigger programmed cell death. Cardiac arrest caused by hypocalcemia maintains intracellular adenosine triphosphate levels, improves diastolic performance and reduces oxygen consumption, which can be translated into better protection to myocyte injury induced by cardiac arrest.

  19. High-output heart failure in a newborn

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Maria Inês; Moniz, Marta; Ferreira, Sofia; Goulão, Augusto; Barroso, Rosalina

    2012-01-01

    High-output cardiac failure is rare in newborns. Emergent diagnosis and management of this pathology is crucial. We report the case of a child, currently 12-months old; obstetric background is non-contributory. Clinic observation on D1 was normal except for the presence of a systolic cardiac murmur; cardiological evaluation revealed mild ventricular dysfunction of the right ventricle. On the third day of life, she developed cardiac failure with gallop rhythm, hepatomegaly and a murmur in the anterior fontanel; an echocardiogram confirmed clinic aggravation with biventricular dysfunction and right cavities and superior vena cava dilatation. The cranial MRI confirmed the presence of a pial arteriovenous malformation (AVM) involving the anterior and middle cerebral arteries with an associated fronto-parietal ischaemic lesion. The infant underwent embolisations of AVM with successful flow reduction and cardiac failure improvement. The multidisciplinary follow-up showed no cardiac dysfunction or permanent lesions but confirmed a severe psycho-motor delay and left hemiparesia. PMID:22783011

  20. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each

  1. CMOS output buffer wave shaper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, L.; Whitaker, S.; Merrell, R.

    1990-01-01

    As the switching speeds and densities of Digital CMOS integrated circuits continue to increase, output switching noise becomes more of a problem. A design technique which aids in the reduction of switching noise is reported. The output driver stage is analyzed through the use of an equivalent RLC circuit. The results of the analysis are used in the design of an output driver stage. A test circuit based on these techniques is being submitted to MOSIS for fabrication.

  2. Inverter communications using output signal

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Patrick L.

    2017-02-07

    Technologies for communicating information from an inverter configured for the conversion of direct current (DC) power generated from an alternative source to alternating current (AC) power are disclosed. The technologies include determining information to be transmitted from the inverter over a power line cable connected to the inverter and controlling the operation of an output converter of the inverter as a function of the information to be transmitted to cause the output converter to generate an output waveform having the information modulated thereon.

  3. Origin of Cardiac Fibroblasts and the Role of Periostin

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Paige; Standley, Kara N.; Wang, Jian; Azhar, Mohamad; Doetschman, Thomas; Conway, Simon J.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts are the most populous non-myocyte cell type within the mature heart and are required for extracellular matrix synthesis and deposition, generation of the cardiac skeleton, and to electrically insulate the atria from the ventricles. Significantly, cardiac fibroblasts have also been shown to play an important role in cardiomyocyte growth and expansion of the ventricular chambers during heart development. Although there are currently no cardiac fibroblast-restricted molecular markers, it is generally envisaged that the majority of the cardiac fibroblasts are derived from the proepicardium via epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation. However, still relatively little is known about when and where the cardiac fibroblasts cells are generated, the lineage of each cell, and how cardiac fibroblasts move to reside in their final position throughout all four cardiac chambers. In this review we summarize the current understanding regarding the function of Periostin, a useful marker of the non-cardiomyocyte lineages, and its role during cardiac morphogenesis. Characterization of the cardiac fibroblast lineage and identification of the signals that maintain, expand and regulate their differentiation will be required to improve our understanding of cardiac function in both normal and pathophysiological states. PMID:19893021

  4. Advances in cardiac processing software.

    PubMed

    Gordon DePuey, Ernest

    2014-07-01

    New software methods that incorporate iterative reconstruction, resolution recovery, and noise compensation now provide the ability to maintain or improve myocardial perfusion SPECT image quality with conventional sodium iodide cameras. Despite lower image counting statistics associated with significantly decreased injected radiopharmaceutical doses or shortened acquisition times or both, image quality is preserved or even improved compared with conventional processing methods. The ability to prescribe a desired myocardial count density by preselecting a SPECT acquisition time now avoids additional patient radiation exposure associated with "weight-based" dosing. More recent advancements, including temporal correlation among the gated perfusion frames and higher resolution SPECT acquisitions, hold promise to further improve image quality and diagnostic accuracy. Phase analysis of gated perfusion SPECT provides the ability to assess cardiac dyssynchrony and to select those patients who will most benefit from resynchronization therapy. In combination with the higher counting statistics afforded by the new solid-state dedicated cardiac cameras, these software advancements allow for even further decreased patient radiation doses or acquisition times or both. List-mode software allows for refinement of myocardial perfusion SPECT by interrogating particular data from selected cardiac cycles. Rejection of frames degraded by arrhythmic cardiac cycles or excessive extracardiac uptake can be excluded for reconstruction. Respiratory gating, which diminishes cardiac motion and potentially decreases diaphragmatic attenuation, has been demonstrated to improve diagnostic specificity. With high-count first-pass list-mode acquisitions at rest and during pharmacologic vasodilatation, it may be possible to measure global and regional myocardial perfusion reserve to more accurately diagnose coronary artery disease and avoid false-negative studies owing to balanced ischemia.

  5. Cardiac tamponade (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiac tamponade is a condition involving compression of the heart caused by blood or fluid accumulation in the space ... they cannot adequately fill or pump blood. Cardiac tamponade is an emergency condition that requires hospitalization.

  6. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components ... the cardiac conduction system's electrical activity in the heart.

  7. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... from American Heart Association Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy Carotid Artery Disease Chronic ... terms: SCA, sudden cardiac death (SCD), sudden death, arrhythmias, ... ventricular fibrillation, defibrillator, automatic cardiac defibrillator ( ...

  8. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  9. Neurons within the same network independently achieve conserved output by differentially balancing variable conductance magnitudes.

    PubMed

    Ransdell, Joseph L; Nair, Satish S; Schulz, David J

    2013-06-12

    Biological and theoretical evidence suggest that individual neurons may achieve similar outputs by differentially balancing variable underlying ionic conductances. Despite the substantial amount of data consistent with this idea, a direct biological demonstration that cells with conserved output, particularly within the same network, achieve these outputs via different solutions has been difficult to achieve. Here we demonstrate definitively that neurons from native neural networks with highly similar output achieve this conserved output by differentially tuning underlying conductance magnitudes. Multiple motor neurons of the crab (Cancer borealis) cardiac ganglion have highly conserved output within a preparation, despite showing a 2-4-fold range of conductance magnitudes. By blocking subsets of these currents, we demonstrate that the remaining conductances become unbalanced, causing disparate output as a result. Therefore, as strategies to understand neuronal excitability become increasingly sophisticated, it is important that such variability in excitability of neurons, even among those within the same individual, is taken into account.

  10. [Hemodynamic control by optimization of the cardiac pump].

    PubMed

    Metry, S; Fromageot, C; Brocas, J; Cherruault, Y; Guillez, A; Lelong, F

    1981-11-01

    Transport of energy appears as the ultimate finality of the force convection cardiovascular system. Blood pressure cardiac output and vascular resistances are the three major components of the circulatory system. Among them, blood pressure is regarded as the regulated parameter whose control value is the best adapted parameter, to each kind of activity, neurogenic mechanisms. The authors, considering the physiological variations of blood pressure during increasing energetic loads imposed on the organism, propose a new control function: optimization of cardiac mechanical power necessary to assure convection of the energy needed by the organism. Blood pressure is no more regarded as a constant. Simultaneous changes in cardiac output and blood pressure are both significant, adjusted to realize energetic minimisation of the cardiac pump. This cardiovascular regulation is described by a system of equations whose resolution leads to results in good accordance with physiological data.

  11. Collector-Output Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glandorf, D. R.; Phillips, Robert F., II

    1986-01-01

    Collector-Output Analysis Program (COAP) programmer's aid for analyzing output produced by UNIVAC collector (MAP processor). COAP developed to aid in design of segmentation structures for programs with large memory requirements and numerous elements but of value in understanding relationships among components of any program. Crossreference indexes and supplemental information produced. COAP written in FORTRAN 77.

  12. Enhanced performance CCD output amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dunham, Mark E.; Morley, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A low-noise FET amplifier is connected to amplify output charge from a che coupled device (CCD). The FET has its gate connected to the CCD in common source configuration for receiving the output charge signal from the CCD and output an intermediate signal at a drain of the FET. An intermediate amplifier is connected to the drain of the FET for receiving the intermediate signal and outputting a low-noise signal functionally related to the output charge signal from the CCD. The amplifier is preferably connected as a virtual ground to the FET drain. The inherent shunt capacitance of the FET is selected to be at least equal to the sum of the remaining capacitances.

  13. Influence of the coronary circulation on thermal tolerance and cardiac performance during warming in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Ekström, Andreas; Axelsson, Michael; Gräns, Albin; Brijs, Jeroen; Sandblom, Erik

    2017-04-01

    Thermal tolerance in fish may be related to an oxygen limitation of cardiac function. While the hearts of some fish species receive oxygenated blood via a coronary circulation, the influence of this oxygen supply on thermal tolerance and cardiac performance during warming remain unexplored. Here, we analyzed the effect in vivo of acute warming on coronary blood flow in adult sexually mature rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss) and the consequences of chronic coronary ligation on cardiac function and thermal tolerance in juvenile trout. Coronary blood flow at 10°C was higher in females than males (0.56 ± 0.08 vs. 0.30 ± 0.08 ml·min(-1)·g ventricle(-1)), and averaged 0.47 ± 0.07 ml·min(-1)·g ventricle(-1) across sexes. Warming increased coronary flow in both sexes until 14°C, at which it peaked and plateaued at 0.78 ± 0.1 and 0.61 ± 0.1 ml·min(-1)·g ventricle(-1) in females and males, respectively. Thus, the scope for increasing coronary flow was 101% in males, but only 39% in females. Coronary-ligated juvenile trout exhibited elevated heart rate across temperatures, reduced Arrhenius breakpoint temperature for heart rate (23.0 vs. 24.6°C), and reduced upper critical thermal maximum (25.3 vs. 26.3°C). To further analyze the effects of coronary flow restriction on cardiac rhythmicity, electrocardiogram characteristics were determined before and after coronary occlusion in anesthetized trout. Occlusion resulted in reduced R-wave amplitude and an elevated S-T segment, indicating myocardial ischemia, while heart rate was unaffected. This suggests that the tachycardia in ligated trout across temperatures in vivo was mainly to compensate for reduced cardiac contractility to maintain cardiac output. Moreover, our findings show that coronary flow increases with warming in a sex-specific manner. This may improve whole animal thermal tolerance, presumably by sustaining cardiac oxygenation and contractility at high temperatures.

  14. Cardiac ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Birgit T; McDermott, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are critical for all aspects of cardiac function, including rhythmicity and contractility. Consequently, ion channels are key targets for therapeutics aimed at cardiac pathophysiologies such as atrial fibrillation or angina. At the same time, off-target interactions of drugs with cardiac ion channels can be the cause of unwanted side effects. This manuscript aims to review the physiology and pharmacology of key cardiac ion channels. The intent is to highlight recent developments for therapeutic development, as well as elucidate potential mechanisms for drug-induced cardiac side effects, rather than present an in-depth review of each channel subtype. PMID:26556552

  15. Multi-output differential technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidare, Srinivas R.

    1997-01-01

    A differential is a very old and proven mechanical device that allows a single input to be split into two outputs having equal torque irrespective of the output speeds. A standard differential is capable of providing only two outputs from a single input. A recently patented multi-output differential technology known as `Plural-Output Differential' allows a single input to be split into many outputs. This new technology is the outcome of a systematic study of complex gear trains (Bidare 1992). The unique feature of a differential (equal torque at different speeds) can be applied to simplify the construction and operation of many complex mechanical devices that require equal torque's or forces at multiple outputs. It is now possible to design a mechanical hand with three or more fingers with equal torque. Since these finger are powered via a differential they are `mechanically intelligent'. A prototype device is operational and has been used to demonstrate the utility and flexibility of the design. In this paper we shall review two devices that utilize the new technology resulting in increased performance, robustness with reduced complexity and cost.

  16. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  17. Controlled Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenglin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ge

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has been a hot topic for years because of the clinical importance of cardiac diseases and the rapid evolution of CT systems. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy for controlled cardiac CT that may effectively reduce image artifacts due to cardiac and respiratory motions. Our approach is radically different from existing ones and is based on controlling the X-ray source rotation velocity and powering status in reference to the cardiac motion. We theoretically show that by such a control-based intervention the data acquisition process can be optimized for cardiac CT in the cases of periodic and quasiperiodic cardiac motions. Specifically, we formulate the corresponding coordination/control schemes for either exact or approximate matches between the ideal and actual source positions, and report representative simulation results that support our analytic findings. PMID:23165017

  18. A pharmacologic review of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Bradley J; Yunker, Nancy S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is manifested by arrhythmias (ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia, pulseless electrical activity, or asystole) resulting in minimal to no forward blood flow to the body's oxygen-dependent tissues. Defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) should be initiated immediately as they have been shown to increase return of spontaneous circulation and survival to discharge rates. Cardiac arrest in the surgical patient population has devastating consequences. Data specific to the surgical patient found that 1 in 203 surgical patients experienced cardiac arrest requiring CPR within 30 days after surgery. A subgroup analysis found that 1 in 1,020 plastic surgery patients required CPR in this same time frame. Thirty-day mortality in the general surgery patient population was 72%. The American Heart Association updates the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) guidelines every 5 years. Their latest publication in 2010 recommended that the resuscitative protocol be transitioned from its basic life support sequence of airway-breathing-chest compressions to chest compressions-airway-breathing. All health care professionals should have an understanding of the clinical presentation and medical management of cardiac arrest. Maintaining biannual basic life support and ACLS certification ensures that health care professionals remain current with American Heart Association guideline recommendations. Guideline-directed management of cardiac arrest should include timely implementation of the ACLS algorithm to maximize patient outcomes.

  19. Cardiac Trauma: Clinical and Experimental Correlations of Myocardial Contusion

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Donald B.; Anderson, Alan E.; Rose, Earl F.; Go, Raymundo T.; Chiu, Chiang L.; Ehrenhaft, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Clinical and experimental observations in myocardial contusion have been correlated. Cardiac arrhythmia is always an important consequence and may be fatal. Reduction in cardiac output often accompanies significant cardiac injury. The coronary arterial circulation is not interrupted and is generally enhanced to the area of injury. Healing of the injury under these circulatory conditions may result in patchy scarring and peculiar adynamic areas of myocardium. Early diagnosis of myocardial contusion may be aided using radionuclide imaging with 99mTc-Sn-polyphosphate. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 8. PMID:4412327

  20. Output optics for laser velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Dana H. (Inventor); Gunter, William D. (Inventor); Mcalister, Kenneth W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Space savings are effected in the optical output system of a laser velocimeter. The output system is comprised of pairs of optical fibers having output ends from which a beam of laser light emerges, a transfer lens for each light beam, and at least one final (LV) lens for receiving the light passing through the transfer lenses and for focussing that light at a common crossing point or area. In order to closely couple the transfer lenses to the final lens, each transfer lens is positioned relative to the final lens receiving light therefrom such that the output waist of the corresponding beam received by the final lens from the transfer lens is a virtual waist located before the transfer lens.

  1. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, Anthony J.

    1988-01-01

    A summary is presented of the main results obtained during the course of research on output feedback control. The term output feedback is used to denote a controller design approach which does not rely on an observer to estimate the states of the system. Thus, the order of the controller is fixed, and can even be zero order, which amounts to constant gain ouput feedback. The emphasis has been on optimal output feedback. That is, a fixed order controller is designed based on minimizing a suitably chosen quadratic performance index. A number of problem areas that arise in this context have been addressed. These include developing suitable methods for selecting an index of performance, both time domain and frequency domain methods for achieving robustness of the closed loop system, developing canonical forms to achieve a minimal parameterization for the controller, two time scale design formulations for ill-conditioned systems, and the development of convergent numerical algorithms for solving the output feedback problem.

  2. Exploring cardiac biophysical properties.

    PubMed

    Ait Mou, Younss; Bollensdorff, Christian; Cazorla, Olivier; Magdi, Yacoub; de Tombe, Pieter P

    2015-01-01

    The heart is subject to multiple sources of stress. To maintain its normal function, and successfully overcome these stresses, heart muscle is equipped with fine-tuned regulatory mechanisms. Some of these mechanisms are inherent within the myocardium itself and are known as intrinsic mechanisms. Over a century ago, Otto Frank and Ernest Starling described an intrinsic mechanism by which the heart, even ex vivo, regulates its function on a beat-to-beat basis. According to this phenomenon, the higher the ventricular filling is, the bigger the stroke volume. Thus, the Frank-Starling law establishes a direct relationship between the diastolic and systolic function of the heart. To observe this biophysical phenomenon and to investigate it, technologic development has been a pre-requisite to scientific knowledge. It allowed for example to observe, at the cellular level, a Frank-Starling like mechanism and has been termed: Length Dependent Activation (LDA). In this review, we summarize some experimental systems that have been developed and are currently still in use to investigate cardiac biophysical properties from the whole heart down to the single myofibril. As a scientific support, investigation of the Frank-Starling mechanism will be used as a case study.

  3. Exploring cardiac biophysical properties

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Younss Ait; Bollensdorff, Christian; Cazorla, Olivier; Magdi, Yacoub; de Tombe, Pieter P.

    2015-01-01

    The heart is subject to multiple sources of stress. To maintain its normal function, and successfully overcome these stresses, heart muscle is equipped with fine-tuned regulatory mechanisms. Some of these mechanisms are inherent within the myocardium itself and are known as intrinsic mechanisms. Over a century ago, Otto Frank and Ernest Starling described an intrinsic mechanism by which the heart, even ex vivo, regulates its function on a beat-to-beat basis. According to this phenomenon, the higher the ventricular filling is, the bigger the stroke volume. Thus, the Frank-Starling law establishes a direct relationship between the diastolic and systolic function of the heart. To observe this biophysical phenomenon and to investigate it, technologic development has been a pre-requisite to scientific knowledge. It allowed for example to observe, at the cellular level, a Frank-Starling like mechanism and has been termed: Length Dependent Activation (LDA). In this review, we summarize some experimental systems that have been developed and are currently still in use to investigate cardiac biophysical properties from the whole heart down to the single myofibril. As a scientific support, investigation of the Frank-Starling mechanism will be used as a case study. PMID:26779498

  4. Regulation of cardiac function during a cold pressor test in athletes and untrained subjects.

    PubMed

    Ifuku, Hirotoshi; Moriyama, Kayo; Arai, Kuniko; Shiraishi-Hichiwa, Yumiko

    2007-09-01

    By using (dP/dt)/P of carotid artery pulse, a non-invasive index of cardiac contractility, we examined the regulatory mechanism of cardiac function during a cold pressor test in athletes and untrained subjects. Twenty-four healthy subjects (9 athletes, 8 untrained subjects, and 7 hyperreactors of 4 athletes and 3 untrained subjects with a rise of 15 mmHg or greater in systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure) underwent the cold pressor test according to Hines and Brown (Am Heart J 11:1-9, 1936): immersion of the right hand in 4 degrees C water for 1 min. Although mean blood pressure increased during the cold stress in all the groups, cardiac function differed. In athletes, heart rate and cardiac contractility caused cardiac output to increase while total peripheral resistance (TPR) did not change. In untrained subjects, however, heart rate and cardiac contractility tended to decrease cardiac output and thus TPR increased. In hyperreactors, heart rate and cardiac contractility increased during cold stress, and also TPR increased. After the end of the test, heart rate and cardiac contractility decreased only in untrained group. The findings that during a cold pressor test heart rate and cardiac contractility are enhanced in athletes but depressed in untrained subjects indicate that the state of physical training influences cardiac sympathetic neural reactivity to cold stress, except for hyperreactors.

  5. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  6. Peru struggles to maintain crude production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-14

    Revival of Peru's moribund oil and gas industry in the 1990s hinges on whether the new administration of President Alberto Fujimori is successful in attracting foreign investment in Peru. Fujimori's success would mean Peru pushing ahead into stepped up exploration and major development projects, such as the huge Camisea gas/condensate field discovered 2 years ago. His failure could mean Peru continuing to fall further behind in its already lagging low oil production. Huge sums of money will be needed. Peru also needs to succeed in its efforts to become creditworthy again for international agencies, foreign governments, and commercial banks. Meanwhile, Petroleos del Peru SA (Petroperu), the state oil company, will have to transfer an increasing share of its operations to private investors. But the company is likely to try to hold onto producing fields, even though it is unable to maintain full output.

  7. Vagus nerve stimulation mitigates intrinsic cardiac neuronal remodeling and cardiac hypertrophy induced by chronic pressure overload in guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Eric; Wright, Gary L; Southerland, Elizabeth M; Li, Ying; Chui, Ray; KenKnight, Bruce H; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2016-05-15

    Our objective was to determine whether chronic vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) mitigates pressure overload (PO)-induced remodeling of the cardioneural interface. Guinea pigs (n = 48) were randomized to right or left cervical vagus (RCV or LCV) implant. After 2 wk, chronic left ventricular PO was induced by partial (15-20%) aortic constriction. Of the 31 animals surviving PO induction, 10 were randomized to RCV VNS, 9 to LCV VNS, and 12 to sham VNS. VNS was delivered at 20 Hz and 1.14 ± 0.03 mA at a 22% duty cycle. VNS commenced 10 days after PO induction and was maintained for 40 days. Time-matched controls (n = 9) were evaluated concurrently. Echocardiograms were obtained before and 50 days after PO. At termination, intracellular current-clamp recordings of intrinsic cardiac (IC) neurons were studied in vitro to determine effects of therapy on soma characteristics. Ventricular cardiomyocyte sizes were assessed with histology along with immunoblot analysis of selected proteins in myocardial tissue extracts. In sham-treated animals, PO increased cardiac output (34%, P < 0.004), as well as systolic (114%, P < 0.04) and diastolic (49%, P < 0.002) left ventricular volumes, a hemodynamic response prevented by VNS. PO-induced enhancements of IC synaptic efficacy and muscarinic sensitivity of IC neurons were mitigated by chronic VNS. Increased myocyte size, which doubled in PO (P < 0.05), was mitigated by RCV. PO hypertrophic myocardium displayed decreased glycogen synthase (GS) protein levels and accumulation of the phosphorylated (inactive) form of GS. These PO-induced changes in GS were moderated by left VNS. Chronic VNS targets IC neurons accompanying PO to obtund associated adverse cardiomyocyte remodeling.

  8. Experimental characterization of variable output refractive beamshapers using freeform elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, Jason A.; Smilie, Paul J.; Dutterer, Brian S.; Davies, Matthew A.; Suleski, Thomas J.

    2014-09-01

    We present experimental results from variable output refractive beam shapers based on freeform optical surfaces. Two freeform elements in close proximity comprise a beam shaper that maps a circular Gaussian input to a circular `flat-top' output. Different lateral relative shifts between the elements result in a varying output diameter while maintaining the uniform irradiance distribution. We fabricated the beam shaping elements in PMMA using multi-axis milling on a Moore Nanotech 350FG diamond machining center and tested with a 632.8 nm Gaussian input. Initial optical testing confirmed both the predicted beam shaping and variable functionality, but with poor output uniformity. The effects of surface finish on optical performance were investigated using LightTrans VirtualLabTM to perform physical optics simulations of the milled freeform surfaces. These simulations provided an optimization path for determining machining parameters to improve the output uniformity of the beam shaping elements. A second variable beam shaper based on a super-Gaussian output was designed and fabricated using the newly determined machining parameters. Experimental test results from the second beam shaper showed outputs with significantly higher quality, but also suggest additional areas of study for further improvements in uniformity.

  9. New approach for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion correction in cardiac PET (NAMC-CPET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohamed A. A.; Xiao, Peng; Xie, Qingguo

    2015-10-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions are inevitable during the relatively long acquisition time of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The correction of the resultant motion blur has become a significant challenge due to recent spatial resolution improvement of the PET scanners. The majority of current motion compensation algorithms are based on gating as a primary step. A new approach based on temporal basis functions is developed to correct respiratory and cardiac motion simultaneously in cardiac PET within the normal scanning time (NAMC-CPET). Simulation and experimental studies are conducted to evaluate and validate the final outputs in comparison to the existing gating methods. A dynamic digital phantom is used to simulate realistic human thorax and abdomen with respiratory and cardiac motions. GATE simulation was run at China National Grid Center to obtain realistic PET data in a reasonable time. Moreover, Tibet minipig experiments were conducted using a preclinical small animal PET scanner developed at HUST to validate the performance of the NAMC-CPET in real data. The results reveal that NAMC-CPET outperformed the existing gating methods (respiratory, cardiac, and dual) in cardiac imaging in term of noise reduction and contrast, especially in short acquisition duration. NAMC-CPET obtained better results in the conducted experiments in terms of contrast and the visibility of the heart. In contrast, the dual gating failed to obtain valuable images in the normal scan time due to the low 18F-FDG uptake. NAMC-CPET is advantageous in the low-statistic situation. The results are promising with great potential implications in cardiac PET imaging in terms of the radioactive dose and scan time reduction.

  10. New approach for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion correction in cardiac PET (NAMC-CPET).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed A A; Xiao, Peng; Xie, Qingguo

    2015-10-07

    Respiratory and cardiac motions are inevitable during the relatively long acquisition time of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The correction of the resultant motion blur has become a significant challenge due to recent spatial resolution improvement of the PET scanners. The majority of current motion compensation algorithms are based on gating as a primary step. A new approach based on temporal basis functions is developed to correct respiratory and cardiac motion simultaneously in cardiac PET within the normal scanning time (NAMC-CPET). Simulation and experimental studies are conducted to evaluate and validate the final outputs in comparison to the existing gating methods. A dynamic digital phantom is used to simulate realistic human thorax and abdomen with respiratory and cardiac motions. GATE simulation was run at China National Grid Center to obtain realistic PET data in a reasonable time. Moreover, Tibet minipig experiments were conducted using a preclinical small animal PET scanner developed at HUST to validate the performance of the NAMC-CPET in real data. The results reveal that NAMC-CPET outperformed the existing gating methods (respiratory, cardiac, and dual) in cardiac imaging in term of noise reduction and contrast, especially in short acquisition duration. NAMC-CPET obtained better results in the conducted experiments in terms of contrast and the visibility of the heart. In contrast, the dual gating failed to obtain valuable images in the normal scan time due to the low 18F-FDG uptake. NAMC-CPET is advantageous in the low-statistic situation. The results are promising with great potential implications in cardiac PET imaging in terms of the radioactive dose and scan time reduction.

  11. Cardiac Extracellular Vesicles in Normal and Infarcted Heart

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2016-01-01

    Heart is a complex assembly of many cell types constituting myocardium, endocardium and epicardium that intensively communicate to each other in order to maintain the proper cardiac function. There are many types of intercellular intracardiac signals, with a prominent role of extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes and microvesicles, for long-distant delivering of complex messages. Cardiomyocytes release EVs, whose content could significantly vary depending on the stimulus. In stress, such as hypoxia, inflammation or injury, cardiomyocytes increase secretion of EVs. In hypoxic conditions, cardiac EVs are enriched with angiogenic and prosurvival factors. In acute myocardial infarction (AMI), damaged cardiac muscle cells produce EVs with increased content of angiogenic, anti-apoptotic, mitogenic and growth factors in order to induce repair and healing of the infarcted myocardium. Exosomal microRNAs play a central role in cardiac regeneration. In AMI, circulating cardiac EVs abundantly contain cardiac-specific miRNAs that serve as indicators of cardiac damage and have a big diagnostic potential as AMI biomarkers. Cardioprotective and regenerative properties of exosomes derived from cardiac and non-cardiac stem/progenitor cells are very helpful to be used in cell-free cardiotherapy and regeneration of post-infarct myocardium. PMID:26742038

  12. Quantifying PV power Output Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, Thomas E.; Perez, Richard

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents a novel approach to rigorously quantify power Output Variability from a fleet of photovoltaic (PV) systems, ranging from a single central station to a set of distributed PV systems. The approach demonstrates that the relative power Output Variability for a fleet of identical PV systems (same size, orientation, and spacing) can be quantified by identifying the number of PV systems and their Dispersion Factor. The Dispersion Factor is a new variable that captures the relationship between PV Fleet configuration, Cloud Transit Speed, and the Time Interval over which variability is evaluated. Results indicate that Relative Output Variability: (1) equals the inverse of the square root of the number of systems for fully dispersed PV systems; and (2) could be further minimized for optimally-spaced PV systems. (author)

  13. Return of Viable Cardiac Function After Sonographic Cardiac Standstill in Pediatric Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Katherine; Thompson, W Reid; Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Su, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Sonographic cardiac standstill during adult cardiac arrest is associated with failure to get return to spontaneous circulation. This report documents 3 children whose cardiac function returned after standstill with extracorporeal membranous oxygenation. Sonographic cardiac standstill may not predict cardiac death in children.

  14. Control of cardiac function and venous return in thyrotoxic calves.

    PubMed

    Gay, R; Lee, R W; Appleton, C; Olajos, M; Martin, G V; Morkin, E; Goldman, S

    1987-03-01

    The mechanisms responsible for maintenance of the high-output state associated with thyrotoxicosis have been investigated by measurement of cardiac-function curves and venous compliance during ganglionic blockade with trimethaphan. Thirteen calves were injected daily with L-thyroxine (200 micrograms/kg) for 12-14 days. Thyroxine treatment increased heart rate (70%), left ventricular systolic pressure (22%), cardiac output (120%), left ventricular maximum rate of pressure development (dP/dt) (56%), and total blood volume (18%) and decreased systemic vascular resistance (39%). These hemodynamic changes persisted during ganglionic blockade or autonomic blockade with atropine and propranolol. Cardiac-function curves in conscious thyrotoxic calves were displaced upward and to the left. Mean circulatory filling pressure (MCFP), measured during anesthesia, was increased from 8 +/- 1 to 12 +/- 1 mmHg. During autonomic and ganglionic blockade MCFP remained elevated after treatment with thyroxine. Venous compliance decreased from 2.1 +/- 0.2 to 1.3 +/- 0.1 ml X mmHg-1 X kg-1 after thyroxine. Unstressed vascular volume was increased from 52.3 +/- 1.1 to 67.1 +/- 0.9 ml/kg. Thus the elevated cardiac output and new cardiac-function curve in thyrotoxicosis are associated with a combination of increased inotropic state, increased blood volume, and decreased venous compliance. These effects are not the result of autonomic influences and may represent direct actions of thyroid hormone on the heart and peripheral venous circulation.

  15. The role of cardiac energy metabolism in cardiac hypertrophy and failure.

    PubMed

    Tuomainen, Tomi; Tavi, Pasi

    2017-03-24

    In mammalian heart, incessant production of cellular energy is vital for maintaining continuous mechanical pumping function providing the body for oxygen and nutrients. To ensure this essential function, cardiac muscle adapt to increased energy demand or compromised energy supply by reprogramming the network of genes whose products are necessary to match the production of energy to consumption. Failure in this regulation leads to severe cardiac dysfunction and has been associated with cardiac pathogenesis including cardiac hypertrophy, failure and diabetes. Metabolic adaptations are induced by network of transcriptional pathways that are activated by a variety of factors such as hormones, nutrients, second messengers and oxygen. The metabolic phenotype of the heart is maintained by pathways controlling transcriptional regulators, which include peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, estrogen-related receptors and nuclear respiratory factors, as well as their common coactivator protein peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1. These central regulators of gene expression are complemented with factors such as hypoxia inducible factor 1, which is activated in insufficient oxygenation of the tissue. Here, we discuss how these pathways relate to the cardiac metabolism and how they interact with pathways controlling the contractile phenotype of the heart.

  16. NITROGEN OUTPUTS OF SMALL MAMMALS FROM FECAL AND URINE DEPOSITION: IMPLICATIONS FOR NITROGEN CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contribution of small mammals in nitrogen cycling is poorly understood and could have reverberations back to the producer community by maintaining or even magnifying increased nitrogen availability. Our objective was to model nitrogen outputs (deposition of feces and urine) ...

  17. World Input-Output Network

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  18. Classroom Interaction and Language Output

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Qiaoying; Castro, Carolyn D.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of classroom interactions between a) students and students and b) students and teachers on the learning of English passivization by L1 Chinese adult learners of English as a foreign language during the language input and output treatments. In phase 1, both groups were asked to read and underline the input…

  19. Studies on Feedback Control of Cardiac Alternans

    PubMed Central

    Dubljevic, Stevan; Lin, Shien-Fong; Christofides, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    A beat-to-beat variation in the electric wave propagation morphology in myocardium is referred to as cardiac alternans and it has been linked to the onset of life threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Experimental studies have demonstrated that alternans can be annihilated by the feedback modulation of the basic pacing interval in a small piece of cardiac tissue. In this work, we study the capability of feedback control to suppress alternans both spatially and temporally in an extracted rabbit heart and in a cable of cardiac cells. This work demonstrates real-time control of cardiac alternans in an extracted rabbit heart and provides an analysis of the control methodology applied in the case of a one-dimensional (1D) cable of cardiac cells. The real-time system control is realized through feedback by proportional perturbation of the basic pacing cycle length (PCL). The measurements of the electric wave propagation are obtained by optical mapping of fluorescent dye from the surface of the heart and are fed into a custom-designed software that provides the control action signal that perturbs the basic pacing cycle length. In addition, a novel pacing protocol that avoids conduction block is applied. A numerical analysis, complementary to the experimental study is also carried out, by the ionic model of a 1D cable of cardiac cells under a self-referencing feedback protocol, which is identical to the one applied in the experimental study. Further, the amplitude of alternans linear parabolic PDE that is associated with the 1D ionic cardiac cell cable model under full state feedback control is analyzed. We provide an analysis of the amplitude of alternans parabolic PDE which admits a standard evolutionary form in a well defined functional space. Standard modal decomposition techniques are used in the analysis and the controller synthesis is carried out through pole-placement. State and output feedback controller realizations are developed and the important

  20. Liver Abnormalities in Cardiac Diseases and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Alicia M.; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is characterized by the inability of systemic perfusion to meet the body's metabolic demands and is usually caused by cardiac pump dysfunction and may occasionally present with symptoms of a noncardiac disorder such as hepatic dysfunction. The primary pathophysiology involved in hepatic dysfunction from HF is either passive congestion from increased filling pressures or low cardiac output and the consequences of impaired perfusion. Passive hepatic congestion due to increased central venous pressure may cause elevations of liver enzymes and both direct and indirect serum bilirubin. Impaired perfusion from decreased cardiac output may be associated with acute hepatocellular necrosis with marked elevations in serum aminotransferases. Cardiogenic ischemic hepatitis (“shock liver”) may ensue following an episode of profound hypotension in patients with acute HF. We discuss pathophysiology and identification of liver abnormalities that are commonly seen in patients with HF. PMID:22942628

  1. Action of SNAIL1 in Cardiac Myofibroblasts Is Important for Cardiac Fibrosis following Hypoxic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Hirak; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic injury to the heart results in cardiac fibrosis that leads to cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. SNAIL1 is a zinc finger transcription factor implicated in fibrosis following organ injury and cancer. To determine if the action of SNAIL1 contributed to cardiac fibrosis following hypoxic injury, we used an endogenous SNAIL1 bioluminescence reporter mice, and SNAIL1 knockout mouse models. Here we report that SNAIL1 expression is upregulated in the infarcted heart, especially in the myofibroblasts. Utilizing primary cardiac fibroblasts in ex vivo cultures we find that pro-fibrotic factors and collagen I increase SNAIL1 protein level. SNAIL1 is required in cardiac fibroblasts for the adoption of myofibroblast fate, collagen I expression and expression of fibrosis-related genes. Taken together this data suggests that SNAIL1 expression is induced in the cardiac fibroblasts after hypoxic injury and contributes to myofibroblast phenotype and a fibrotic scar formation. Resultant collagen deposition in the scar can maintain elevated SNAIL1 expression in the myofibroblasts and help propagate fibrosis. PMID:27706205

  2. PGC-1 coactivators in cardiac development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Glenn C.; Jiang, Aihua; Arany, Zolt

    2010-01-01

    The beating heart requires a constant flux of ATP to maintain contractile function, and there is increasing evidence that energetic defects contribute to the development of heart failure. The last ten years have seen a resurgent interest in cardiac intermediary metabolism, and a dramatic increase in our understanding of transcriptional networks that regulate cardiac energetics. The PPAR-gamma coactivator (PGC)-1 family of proteins plays a central role in these pathways. The mechanisms by which PGC-1 proteins regulate transcriptional networks and are regulated by physiological cues, and the roles they play in cardiac development and disease, are reviewed here. PMID:20884884

  3. Cardiac Hegemony of Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Sailay; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac senescence and age-related disease development have gained general attention and recognition in the past decades due to increased accessibility and quality of health care. The advancement in global civilization is complementary to concerns regarding population aging and development of chronic degenerative diseases. Cardiac degeneration has been rigorously studied. The molecular mechanisms of cardiac senescence are on multiple cellular levels and hold a multilayer complexity level, thereby hampering development of unambiguous treatment protocols. In particular, the synergistic exchange of the senescence phenotype through a senescence secretome between myocytes and stem cells appears complicated and is of great future therapeutic value. The current review article will highlight hallmarks of senescence, cardiac myocyte and stem cell senescence, and the mutual exchange of senescent secretome. Future cardiac cell therapy approaches require a comprehensive understanding of myocardial senescence to improve therapeutic efficiency as well as efficacy. PMID:24349878

  4. Maintaining oral health after stroke.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Hazel

    Oral care is essential to maintain oral health and prevent complications such as tooth loss, gingivitis and periodontitis. Poor oral hygiene in dependent, hospitalised patients could lead to serious complications such as chest infection, pneumonia, poor nutritional intake and increased length of hospital stay. Patients who have had a stroke may have physical and cognitive problems that make them dependent on others for their personal care, including oral care. It is essential that nurses and carers understand why maintaining oral hygiene is important following stroke and the consequences of poor oral care.

  5. Ultrasound imaging in teaching cardiac physiology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher D; Montgomery, Laura E A; Quinn, Joe G; Roe, Sean M; Stewart, Michael T; Tansey, Etain A

    2016-09-01

    This laboratory session provides hands-on experience for students to visualize the beating human heart with ultrasound imaging. Simple views are obtained from which students can directly measure important cardiac dimensions in systole and diastole. This allows students to derive, from first principles, important measures of cardiac function, such as stroke volume, ejection fraction, and cardiac output. By repeating the measurements from a subject after a brief exercise period, an increase in stroke volume and ejection fraction are easily demonstrable, potentially with or without an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic volume (which indicates preload). Thus, factors that affect cardiac performance can readily be discussed. This activity may be performed as a practical demonstration and visualized using an overhead projector or networked computers, concentrating on using the ultrasound images to teach basic physiological principles. This has proved to be highly popular with students, who reported a significant improvement in their understanding of Frank-Starling's law of the heart with ultrasound imaging.

  6. Imaging of cardiac electrical excitation conduction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, D F; Jiang, S Q; Zhu, J C; Zhao, C; Yan, Y R; Gronemeyer, D; Van Leeuwen, P

    2015-08-01

    We present a multiple time windows beamformer (MTWB) method of solving the inverse problem of magnetic field and non-invasively imaging the cardiac electrical excitation conduction using the magnetocardiac signals acquired by a 61-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The MTWB constructs spatial filters for each location in source space, one for each component of the source moment based on the distributed source model, and estimates the cardiac equivalent current sources. The output of spatial filters is the source strength estimated in three-dimensional space and the weight matrix calculated with magnetocardiac signals in multiple time windows. A signal subspace projection technique is used to suppress noise. Then, the characteristics of cardiac electrical excitation conduction among two healthy subjects and two coronary vessel stenosis (CVS) patients are extracted from reconstructed current sources with maximum strength at each instant during QRS complex and ST-T segment, and a series of two-dimensional cardiac electrical excitation conduction maps (EECM) are obtained. It is demonstrated that two healthy subjects are of similar and the stronger electrical activities than those of two CVS patients. This technique can be used as an effective tool for the diagnosis of heart diseases.

  7. Strategies for Maintaining Community Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruber, Fred

    1986-01-01

    This article outlines strategies of maintaining integration emphasizing: (1) housing offices and counseling; (2) community action to alter real estate policies; (3) school action including public relations and human relations thinking; (4) community organization of commercial and religious institutions; (5) financial incentives for pro-integrative…

  8. Maintaining COTS-Based Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    12-1 Maintaining COTS-Based Systems Dr. Mark R. Vigder John Dean National Research Council of Canada Institute for Information Technology Ottawa...evluton destifyng cand s yste dff uresamng sets ongoingoperato n.ts devhoisg Configuration magement Tracking versions of different COTS products

  9. Maintaining Sustainability for Green Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The promise of sustainably designed school facilities is that they will operate more efficiently and last longer than buildings constructed in more traditional ways. But that promise comes with a big if. The payoff is delivered only if the facility managers operate and maintain the buildings in ways that adhere to sustainable strategies called for…

  10. The optimal hemodynamics management of post-cardiac arrest shock.

    PubMed

    Pellis, Tommaso; Sanfilippo, Filippo; Ristagno, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    Patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest develop a pathophysiological state named "post-cardiac arrest syndrome." Post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction is a common feature of this syndrome, and many patients eventually die from cardiovascular failure. Cardiogenic shock accounts for most deaths in the first 3 days, when post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction peaks. Thus, identification and treatment of cardiovascular failure is one of the key therapeutic goals during hospitalization of post-cardiac arrest patients. Patients with hemodynamic instability may require advanced cardiac output monitoring. Inotropes and vasopressors should be considered if hemodynamic goals are not achieved despite optimized preload. If these measures fail to restore adequate organ perfusion, a mechanical circulatory assistance device may be considered. Adequate organ perfusion should be ensured in the absence of definitive data on the optimal target pressure goals. Hemodynamic goals should also take into account targeted temperature management and its effect on the cardiovascular function.

  11. Microgyroscope with closed loop output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Cargille, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A micro-gyroscope (10) having closed loop operation by a control voltage (V.sub.TY), that is demodulated by an output signal of the sense electrodes (S1, S2), providing Coriolis torque rebalance to prevent displacement of the micro-gyroscope (10) on the output axis (y-axis). The present invention provides wide-band, closed-loop operation for a micro-gyroscope (10) and allows the drive frequency to be closely tuned to a high Q sense axis resonance. A differential sense signal (S1-S2) is compensated and fed back by differentially changing the voltage on the drive electrodes to rebalance Coriolis torque. The feedback signal is demodulated in phase with the drive axis signal (K.sub..omega..crclbar..sub.x) to produce a measure of the Coriolis force.

  12. UFO - The Universal FEYNRULES Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrande, Céline; Duhr, Claude; Fuks, Benjamin; Grellscheid, David; Mattelaer, Olivier; Reiter, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    We present a new model format for automatized matrix-element generators, the so-called Universal FEYNRULES Output (UFO). The format is universal in the sense that it features compatibility with more than one single generator and is designed to be flexible, modular and agnostic of any assumption such as the number of particles or the color and Lorentz structures appearing in the interaction vertices. Unlike other model formats where text files need to be parsed, the information on the model is encoded into a PYTHON module that can easily be linked to other computer codes. We then describe an interface for the MATHEMATICA package FEYNRULES that allows for an automatic output of models in the UFO format.

  13. Research on output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calise, A. J.; Kramer, F. S.

    1985-01-01

    In designing fixed order compensators, an output feedback formulation has been adopted by suitably augmenting the system description to include the compensator states. However, the minimization of the performance index over the range of possible compensator descriptions was impeded due to the nonuniqueness of the compensator transfer function. A controller canonical form of the compensator was chosen to reduce the number of free parameters to its minimal number in the optimization. In the MIMO case, the controller form requires a prespecified set of ascending controllability indices. This constraint on the compensator structure is rather innocuous in relation to the increase in convergence rate of the optimization. Moreover, the controller form is easily relatable to a unique controller transfer function description. This structure of the compensator does not require penalizing the compensator states for a nonzero or coupled solution, a problem that occurs when following a standard output feedback synthesis formulation.

  14. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment.

    PubMed

    Mankad, Rekha; Herrmann, Joerg

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001-0.03% in most autopsy series). They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1) thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2) cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3) primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses.

  15. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mankad, Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001–0.03% in most autopsy series). They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1) thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2) cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3) primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses. PMID:27600455

  16. CARFMAP: A Curated Pathway Map of Cardiac Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Nim, Hieu T.; Furtado, Milena B.; Costa, Mauro W.; Kitano, Hiroaki; Rosenthal, Nadia A.; Boyd, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The adult mammalian heart contains multiple cell types that work in unison under tightly regulated conditions to maintain homeostasis. Cardiac fibroblasts are a significant and unique population of non-muscle cells in the heart that have recently gained substantial interest in the cardiac biology community. To better understand this renaissance cell, it is essential to systematically survey what has been known in the literature about the cellular and molecular processes involved. We have built CARFMAP (http://visionet.erc.monash.edu.au/CARFMAP), an interactive cardiac fibroblast pathway map derived from the biomedical literature using a software-assisted manual data collection approach. CARFMAP is an information-rich interactive tool that enables cardiac biologists to explore the large body of literature in various creative ways. There is surprisingly little overlap between the cardiac fibroblast pathway map, a foreskin fibroblast pathway map, and a whole mouse organism signalling pathway map from the REACTOME database. Among the use cases of CARFMAP is a common task in our cardiac biology laboratory of identifying new genes that are (1) relevant to cardiac literature, and (2) differentially regulated in high-throughput assays. From the expression profiles of mouse cardiac and tail fibroblasts, we employed CARFMAP to characterise cardiac fibroblast pathways. Using CARFMAP in conjunction with transcriptomic data, we generated a stringent list of six genes that would not have been singled out using bioinformatics analyses alone. Experimental validation showed that five genes (Mmp3, Il6, Edn1, Pdgfc and Fgf10) are differentially regulated in the cardiac fibroblast. CARFMAP is a powerful tool for systems analyses of cardiac fibroblasts, facilitating systems-level cardiovascular research. PMID:26673252

  17. Vocal output in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, L; Sigman, M; Cohen, S E; Parmelee, A H

    1977-11-01

    Data on vocal output of 51 preterm infants and 16 term infants were obtained during naturalistic home observations at 1, 3, and 8 months; during the administration of a preference-for-novelty paradigm in the laboratory at 8 months; and by the administration of the Gesell Developmental Schedules at 9 months. Preterm and term infant groups were found to show both similarities and differences: both groups vocalized a similar amount in the preference-for-novelty situation; both groups earned similar scores on the language subtest of the Gesell; both groups increased the percentage of awake time they spent in nondistress vocalization from 1 to 8 months. Term infants showed an earlier increase than did preterm infants: term infants significantly increased during the 1-3 month period, whereas preterm infants only increased significantly during the 3-8 month period. The developmental differences suggest a link between vocal output and perinatal conditions in that caregiver behavior was not found to be different among groups. Within the preterm groups, some relationships were found between vocal output and later test performance: infants who vocalized more during mutual gazing with the mother earned significantly higher scores on the language subtest of the Gesell.

  18. Numerical simulation of the influence of gravity and posture on cardiac performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Kristy; Ozawa, Edwin T.; Pantalos, George M.; Sharp, M. Keith

    2002-01-01

    A numerical model of the cardiovascular system was used to quantify the influences on cardiac function of intrathoracic pressure and intravascular and intraventricular hydrostatic pressure, which are fundamental biomechanical stimuli for orthostatic response. The model included a detailed arterial circulation with lumped parameter models of the atria, ventricles, pulmonary circulation, and venous circulation. The venous circulation was divided into cranial, central, and caudal regions with nonlinear compliance. Changes in intrathoracic pressure and the effects of hydrostatic pressure were simulated in supine, launch, sitting, and standing postures for 0, 1, and 1.8 G. Increasing intrathoracic pressure experienced with increasing gravity caused 12% and 14% decreases in cardiac output for 1 and 1.8 G supine, respectively, compared to 0 G. Similar results were obtained for launch posture, in which the effects of changing intrathoracic pressure dominated those of hydrostatic pressure. Compared to 0 G, cardiac output decreased 0.9% for 1 G launch and 15% for 1.8 G launch. In sitting and standing, the position of the heart above the hydrostatic indifference level caused the effects of changing hydrostatic pressure to dominate those of intrathoracic pressure. Compared to 0 G, cardiac output decreased 13% for 1 G sitting and 23% for 1.8 G sitting, and decreased 17% for 1 G standing and 31% for 1.8 G standing. For a posture change from supine to standing in 1 G, cardiac output decreased, consistent with the trend necessary to explain orthostatic intolerance in some astronauts during postflight stand tests. Simulated lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in 0 G reduced cardiac output and mean aortic pressure similar to I G standing, suggesting that LBNP provides at least some cardiovascular stimuli that may be useful in preventing postflight orthostatic intolerance. A unifying concept, consistent with the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart, was that cardiac output was

  19. Numerical simulation of the influence of gravity and posture on cardiac performance.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kristy; Ozawa, Edwin T; Pantalos, George M; Sharp, M Keith

    2002-02-01

    A numerical model of the cardiovascular system was used to quantify the influences on cardiac function of intrathoracic pressure and intravascular and intraventricular hydrostatic pressure, which are fundamental biomechanical stimuli for orthostatic response. The model included a detailed arterial circulation with lumped parameter models of the atria, ventricles, pulmonary circulation, and venous circulation. The venous circulation was divided into cranial, central, and caudal regions with nonlinear compliance. Changes in intrathoracic pressure and the effects of hydrostatic pressure were simulated in supine, launch, sitting, and standing postures for 0, 1, and 1.8 G. Increasing intrathoracic pressure experienced with increasing gravity caused 12% and 14% decreases in cardiac output for 1 and 1.8 G supine, respectively, compared to 0 G. Similar results were obtained for launch posture, in which the effects of changing intrathoracic pressure dominated those of hydrostatic pressure. Compared to 0 G, cardiac output decreased 0.9% for 1 G launch and 15% for 1.8 G launch. In sitting and standing, the position of the heart above the hydrostatic indifference level caused the effects of changing hydrostatic pressure to dominate those of intrathoracic pressure. Compared to 0 G, cardiac output decreased 13% for 1 G sitting and 23% for 1.8 G sitting, and decreased 17% for 1 G standing and 31% for 1.8 G standing. For a posture change from supine to standing in 1 G, cardiac output decreased, consistent with the trend necessary to explain orthostatic intolerance in some astronauts during postflight stand tests. Simulated lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in 0 G reduced cardiac output and mean aortic pressure similar to I G standing, suggesting that LBNP provides at least some cardiovascular stimuli that may be useful in preventing postflight orthostatic intolerance. A unifying concept, consistent with the Frank-Starling mechanism of the heart, was that cardiac output was

  20. [Cardiac manifestations of mitochondrial diseases].

    PubMed

    Ritzenthaler, Thomas; Luis, David; Hullin, Thomas; Fayssoil, Abdallah

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are multi-system disorders in relation with mitochondrial DNA and/or nuclear DNA abnormalities. Clinical pictures are heterogeneous, involving endocrine, cardiac, neurologic or sensory systems. Cardiac involvements are morphological and electrical disturbances. Prognosis is worsened in case of cardiac impairment. Treatments are related to the type of cardiac dysfunction including medication or pacemaker implantation.

  1. Disturbance maintains alternative biome states.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Vinícius de L; Hirota, Marina; Oliveira, Rafael S; Pausas, Juli G

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling the distribution of biomes remains a challenge. Although tropical biome distribution has traditionally been explained by climate and soil, contrasting vegetation types often occur as mosaics with sharp boundaries under very similar environmental conditions. While evidence suggests that these biomes are alternative states, empirical broad-scale support to this hypothesis is still lacking. Using community-level field data and a novel resource-niche overlap approach, we show that, for a wide range of environmental conditions, fire feedbacks maintain savannas and forests as alternative biome states in both the Neotropics and the Afrotropics. In addition, wooded grasslands and savannas occurred as alternative grassy states in the Afrotropics, depending on the relative importance of fire and herbivory feedbacks. These results are consistent with landscape scale evidence and suggest that disturbance is a general factor driving and maintaining alternative biome states and vegetation mosaics in the tropics.

  2. Maintaining the Defense Industrial Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-02

    34 43 Utilizing concurrent engineering , development times are reduced by up to 40%.44 Japan’s auto industry use of concurrent engineering is a factor in... Developing this prescription for maintaining the defense industrial base involves a two step process. First, it is important to establish the current...increased. The skills required to work with advanced aerospace composite materials are unique to the industry . Developing 8 -1777 profiiency in this

  3. Gymnasium-based unsupervised exercise maintains benefits in oxygen uptake kinetics obtained following supervised training in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Macananey, Oscar; O'Shea, Donal; Warmington, Stuart A; Green, Simon; Egaña, Mikel

    2012-08-01

    Supervised exercise (SE) in patients with type 2 diabetes improves oxygen uptake kinetics at the onset of exercise. Maintenance of these improvements, however, has not been examined when supervision is removed. We explored if potential improvements in oxygen uptake kinetics following a 12-week SE that combined aerobic and resistance training were maintained after a subsequent 12-week unsupervised exercise (UE). The involvement of cardiac output (CO) in these improvements was also tested. Nineteen volunteers with type 2 diabetes were recruited. Oxygen uptake kinetics and CO (inert gas rebreathing) responses to constant-load cycling at 50% ventilatory threshold (V(T)), 80% V(T), and mid-point between V(T) and peak workload (50% Δ) were examined at baseline (on 2 occasions) and following each 12-week training period. Participants decided to exercise at a local gymnasium during the UE. Thirteen subjects completed all the interventions. The time constant of phase 2 of oxygen uptake was significantly faster (p < 0.05) post-SE and post-UE compared with baseline at 50% V(T) (17.3 ± 10.7 s and 17.5 ± 5.9 s vs. 29.9 ± 10.7 s), 80% V(T) (18.9 ± 4.7 and 20.9 ± 8.4 vs. 34.3 ± 12.7s), and 50% Δ (20.4 ± 8.2 s and 20.2 ± 6.0 s vs. 27.6 ± 3.7 s). SE also induced faster heart rate kinetics at all 3 intensities and a larger increase in CO at 30 s in relation to 240 s at 80% V(T); and these responses were maintained post-UE. Unsupervised exercise maintained benefits in oxygen uptake kinetics obtained during a supervised exercise in subjects with diabetes, and these benefits were associated with a faster dynamic response of heart rate after training.

  4. NMG documentation, part 3: maintainer`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsch, F.N.; Dickinson, R.P. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    This is the third of a three-part report documenting NMG, the Numerical Mathematics Guide. Part I is aimed at the user of the systenL It contains an introduction, with an out- line of the complete report, and Chapter 1, User`s Point of View. Part II is aimed at the programmer and contains Chapter 2, How It Works. Part III is aimed at the maintainer of NMG and contains Chapter 3, Maintenance, and Chapter 4, Validation. Because its contents are so specialized, Part III will receive only limited distribution. Note that each chapter has its own page numbering and table of contents.

  5. Comparison and relation of indirect and direct dynamic indexes of cardiac pumping capacity in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Williams, Simon G; Tzeng, Bing-H; Barker, Diane; Tan, Lip-Bun

    2005-10-15

    Cardiac power output (CPO), the product of cardiac output (CO) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), is a direct measure of cardiac pumping capability and is strongly indicative of prognosis and exercise ability in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). However, it is not as easily measured as indirect indicators of cardiac function, such as peak oxygen consumption (VO(2)) or peak "circulatory power" (CircP), the product of VO(2) and MAP. The relation between direct and indirect indexes of cardiac pumping capacity was evaluated in 219 ambulatory patients with CHF. CircP was found to have a direct and consistent relation with CPO, overall (R = 0.93, p <0.0001) and at peak exercise (R = 0.84, p < 0.0001). The results suggest CircP to be an adequate measure of cardiac pumping capacity when the more directly measured CPO is not available.

  6. Uncertainty and variability in computational and mathematical models of cardiac physiology

    PubMed Central

    Mirams, Gary R.; Pathmanathan, Pras; Gray, Richard A.; Challenor, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Key points Mathematical and computational models of cardiac physiology have been an integral component of cardiac electrophysiology since its inception, and are collectively known as the Cardiac Physiome.We identify and classify the numerous sources of variability and uncertainty in model formulation, parameters and other inputs that arise from both natural variation in experimental data and lack of knowledge.The impact of uncertainty on the outputs of Cardiac Physiome models is not well understood, and this limits their utility as clinical tools.We argue that incorporating variability and uncertainty should be a high priority for the future of the Cardiac Physiome.We suggest investigating the adoption of approaches developed in other areas of science and engineering while recognising unique challenges for the Cardiac Physiome; it is likely that novel methods will be necessary that require engagement with the mathematics and statistics community. Abstract The Cardiac Physiome effort is one of the most mature and successful applications of mathematical and computational modelling for describing and advancing the understanding of physiology. After five decades of development, physiological cardiac models are poised to realise the promise of translational research via clinical applications such as drug development and patient‐specific approaches as well as ablation, cardiac resynchronisation and contractility modulation therapies. For models to be included as a vital component of the decision process in safety‐critical applications, rigorous assessment of model credibility will be required. This White Paper describes one aspect of this process by identifying and classifying sources of variability and uncertainty in models as well as their implications for the application and development of cardiac models. We stress the need to understand and quantify the sources of variability and uncertainty in model inputs, and the impact of model structure and complexity and

  7. Cardiac Catheterization (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... done during a cardiac catheterization include: closing small holes inside the heart repairing leaky or narrow heart ... bandage. It's normal for the site to be black and blue, red, or slightly swollen for a ...

  8. Cardiac Catheterization (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person will have only a small puncture hole where the catheter was put in. Doctors usually ... done using a cardiac catheterization, including: closing small holes inside the heart repairing leaky or narrow heart ...

  9. Cardiac glycoside overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in the leaves of the digitalis (foxglove) plant. This plant is the original source of this medicine. People ... Digitoxin (Crystodigin) Digoxin (Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin) Besides the foxglove plant, cardiac glycosides also occur naturally in plants such ...

  10. The estrogen receptor-α is required and sufficient to maintain physiological glucose uptake in the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Arias-Loza, Paula-Anahi; Kreissl, Michael C; Kneitz, Susanne; Kaiser, Franz R; Israel, Ina; Hu, Kai; Frantz, Stefan; Bayer, Barbara; Fritzemeier, Karl-Heinz; Korach, Kenneth S; Pelzer, Theo

    2012-10-01

    Estrogens attenuate cardiac hypertrophy and increase cardiac contractility via their cognate estrogen receptors (ERs) ERα and ERβ. Because female sex hormones enhance global glucose use and because myocardial function and mass are tightly linked to cardiac glucose metabolism, we tested the hypothesis that expression and activation of the ERα might be required and sufficient to maintain physiological cardiac glucose uptake in the murine heart. Cardiac glucose uptake quantified in vivo by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography was strongly impaired in ovariectomized compared with gonadal intact female C57BL/6JO mice. The selective ERα agonist 16α-LE2 and the nonselective ERα and ERβ agonist 17β-estradiol completely restored cardiac glucose uptake in ovariectomized mice. Cardiac 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake was strongly decreased in female ERα knockout mice compared with wild-type littermates. Analysis of cardiac mRNA accumulation by quantitative RT-PCR revealed an upregulation of genes involved in glycolisis and tricarboxylic acid cycle by ERα treatment. In conclusion, systemic activation of ERα is sufficient, and its expression is required to maintain physiological glucose uptake in the murine heart, which is likely to contribute to known cardioprotective estrogen effects.

  11. The Estrogen Receptor-α Is Required and Sufficient to Maintain Physiological Glucose Uptake in the Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Loza, Paula-Anahi; Kreissl, Michael C.; Kneitz, Susanne; Kaiser, Franz R.; Israel, Ina; Hu, Kai; Frantz, Stefan; Bayer, Barbara; Fritzemeier, Karl-Heinz; Korach, Kenneth S.; Pelzer, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens attenuate cardiac hypertrophy and increase cardiac contractility via their cognate estrogen receptors (ERs) ERα and ERβ. Because female sex hormones enhance global glucose use and because myocardial function and mass are tightly linked to cardiac glucose metabolism, we tested the hypothesis that expression and activation of the ERα might be required and sufficient to maintain physiological cardiac glucose uptake in the murine heart. Cardiac glucose uptake quantified in vivo by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography was strongly impaired in ovariectomized compared with gonadal intact female C57BL/6JO mice. The selective ERα agonist 16α-LE2 and the nonselective ERα and ERβ agonist 17β-estradiol completely restored cardiac glucose uptake in ovariectomized mice. Cardiac 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake was strongly decreased in female ERα knockout mice compared with wild-type littermates. Analysis of cardiac mRNA accumulation by quantitative RT-PCR revealed an upregulation of genes involved in glycolisis and tricarboxylic acid cycle by ERα treatment. In conclusion, systemic activation of ERα is sufficient, and its expression is required to maintain physiological glucose uptake in the murine heart, which is likely to contribute to known cardioprotective estrogen effects. PMID:22892812

  12. Cardiac imaging in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  13. [Intrinsic cardiac ganglia].

    PubMed

    Birand, Ahmet

    2008-12-01

    Heart has been considered as the source and the seat of emotions, passion and love. But from the dawn of XIXth century, scientists have emphasized that the heart, though life depends on its ceaseless activity, is merely a electromechanical pump, pumping oxygenated blood. Nowadays, we all know that heart pumps blood commensurate with the needs of the body and this unending toil, and its regulation depends on the intrinsic properties of the myocardium, Frank-Starling Law and neurohumoral contribution. It has been understood, though not clearly enough, that these time-tensions may cause structural or functional cardiac impairments and arrhythmias are related to the autonomic nervous system. Less well known and less taken in account in daily cardiology practice is the fact that heart has an intrinsic cardiac nervous system, or "heart brain" consisting of complex ganglia, intrinsic cardiac ganglia containing afferent (receiving), local circuit (interneurons) and efferent (transmitting) sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons. This review enlightens structural and functional aspects of intrinsic cardiac ganglia as the very first step in the regulation of cardiac function. This issue is important for targets of pharmacological treatment and techniques of cardiac surgery interventions as repair of septal defects, valvular interventions and congenital corrections.

  14. Cardiac septic pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xin yu; Li, Shan; Cao, Jian; Xu, Kai; Huang, Hui; Xu, Zuo jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Based on the source of the embolus, septic pulmonary embolism (SPE) can be classified as cardiac, peripheral endogenous, or exogenous. Cardiac SPEs are the most common. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 20 patients with cardiac SPE hospitalized between 1991 and 2013 at a Chinese tertiary referral hospital. The study included 14 males and 6 females with a median age of 38.1 years. Fever (100%), cough (95%), hemoptysis (80%), pleuritic chest pain (80%), heart murmur (80%), and moist rales (75%) were common clinical manifestations. Most patients had a predisposing condition: congenital heart disease (8 patients) and an immunocompromised state (5 patients) were the most common. Staphylococcal (8 patients) and Streptococcal species (4 patients) were the most common causative pathogens. Parenchymal opacities, nodules, cavitations, and pleural effusions were the most common manifestations observed via computed tomography (CT). All patients exhibited significant abnormalities by echocardiography, including 15 patients with right-sided vegetations and 4 with double-sided vegetations. All patients received parenteral antimicrobial therapy as an initial treatment. Fourteen patients received cardiac surgery, and all survived. Among the 6 patients who did not undergo surgery, only 1 survived. Most patients in our cardiac SPE cohort had predisposing conditions. Although most exhibited typical clinical manifestations and radiography, they were nonspecific. For suspected cases of SPE, blood culture, echocardiography, and CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) are important measures to confirm an early diagnosis. Vigorous early therapy, including appropriate antibiotic treatment and timely cardiac surgery to eradicate the infective source, is critical. PMID:27336870

  15. Impairment of cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Raine, A E; Seymour, A M; Roberts, A F; Radda, G K; Ledingham, J G

    1993-01-01

    Cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure in the rat (5/6 nephrectomy) have been investigated by means of an isolated perfused working heart preparation and an isometric Langendorff preparation using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR). 4 wk after nephrectomy cardiac output of isolated hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) at all levels of preload and afterload in the renal failure groups than in the pair-fed sham operated control group. In control hearts, cardiac output increased with increases in perfusate calcium from 0.73 to 5.61 mmol/liter whereas uremic hearts failed in high calcium perfusate. Collection of 31P NMR spectra from hearts of renal failure and control animals during 30 min normoxic Langendorff perfusion showed that basal phosphocreatine was reduced by 32% to 4.7 mumol/g wet wt (P < 0.01) and the phosphocreatine to ATP ratio was reduced by 32% (P < 0.01) in uremic hearts. During low flow ischemia, there was a substantial decrease in phosphocreatine in the uremic hearts and an accompanying marked increase in release of inosine into the coronary effluent (14.9 vs 6.1 microM, P < 0.01). We conclude that cardiac function is impaired in experimental renal failure, in association with abnormal cardiac energetics and increased susceptibility to ischemic damage. Disordered myocardial calcium utilization may contribute to these derangements. PMID:8254048

  16. How to maintain chain drives

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.L. )

    1992-06-18

    Properly selected and maintained chain drives can be expected to give thousands of hours of reliable service. Selection is usually done just once. This paper reports on good maintenance which must be done regularly to keep the drive operating. An effective maintenance program for roller chain should include correct type and adequate amounts of lubrication, replacement of worn chains and sprockets, and elimination of drive interferences. It is important to set u a lubrication and inspection/correction schedule to ensure that all required maintenance is carried out.

  17. Anisotropic Silk Biomaterials Containing Cardiac Extracellular Matrix for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Stoppel, Whitney L.; Hu, Dongjian; Domian, Ibrahim J.; Kaplan, David L.; Black, Lauren D.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac malformations and disease are the leading causes of death in the United States in live-born infants and adults, respectively. In both of these cases, a decrease in the number of functional cardiomyocytes often results in improper growth of heart tissue, wound healing complications, and poor tissue repair. The field of cardiac tissue engineering seeks to address these concerns by developing cardiac patches created from a variety of biomaterial scaffolds to be used in surgical repair of the heart. These scaffolds should be fully degradable biomaterial systems with tunable properties such that the materials can be altered to meet the needs of both in vitro culture (e.g., disease modeling) and in vivo application (e.g., cardiac patch). Current platforms do not utilize both structural anisotropy and proper cell-matrix contacts to promote functional cardiac phenotypes and thus there is still a need for critically sized scaffolds that mimic both the structural and adhesive properties of native tissue. To address this need, we have developed a silk-based scaffold platform containing cardiac tissue-derived extracellular matrix (cECM). These silk-cECM composite scaffolds have tunable architectures, degradation rates, and mechanical properties. Subcutaneous implantation in rats demonstrated that addition of the cECM to aligned silk scaffold led to 99% endogenous cell infiltration and promoted vascularization of a critically sized scaffold (10 mm × 5 mm × 2.5 mm) after 4 weeks in vivo. In vitro, silk-cECM scaffolds maintained the HL-1 atrial cardiomyocytes and human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and promoted a more functional phenotype in both cell types. This class of hybrid silk-cECM anisotropic scaffolds offers new opportunities for developing more physiologically relevant tissues for cardiac repair and disease modeling. PMID:25826196

  18. Caste ratios affect the reproductive output of social trematode colonies.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, T; Poulin, R

    2013-03-01

    Intraspecific phenotypic diversification in social organisms often leads to formation of physical castes which are morphologically specialized for particular tasks within the colony. The optimal caste allocation theory argues that specialized morphological castes are efficient at specific tasks, and hence different caste ratios should affect the ergonomic efficiency, hence reproductive output of the colony. However, the reproductive output of different caste ratios has been documented in few species of insects with equivocal support for the theory. This study investigated whether the ratios of nonreproductive and reproductive morphs affect the reproductive output of a recently discovered social trematode, Philophthalmus sp., in which the nonreproductive members are hypothesized to be defensive specialists. A census of natural infections and a manipulative in vitro experiment demonstrated a positive association between the reproductive output of trematode colonies and the ratio of nonreproductive to reproductive morphs in the presence of an intra-host trematode competitor, Maritrema novaezealandensis. On the contrary, without the competitor, reproductive output was negatively associated with the proportion of nonreproductive castes in colonies. Our findings demonstrate for the first time a clear fitness benefit associated with the nonreproductive castes in the presence of a competitor while illustrating the cost of maintaining such morphs in noncompetitive situations. Although the proximate mechanisms controlling caste ratio remain unclear in this trematode system, this study supports the prediction that the fitness of colonies is influenced by the composition of specialized functional morphs in social organisms, suggesting a potential for adaptive shifts of caste ratios over evolutionary time.

  19. Baroreceptor output during normal and obstructed breathing and Mueller maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R S; Robotham, J L; Anand, A

    1981-05-01

    Cardiovascular control during asthma and other forms of obstructed breathing has not been extensively investigated. Previous studies in dogs have shown that obstructed breathing or an inspiratory effort against a blocked airway (Mueller maneuver) provoke large oscillations in blood pressure. During the inspiratory phase transmural systolic pressure relative to atmosphere drops initially, but transmural systolic pressure relative to intrathoracic pressure can remain unchanged or even increase. Because the carotid baroreceptors are located in the extrathoracic circulation, whereas the aortic baroreceptors are located in the intrathoracic circulation, and each responds to local transmural arterial pressure, simultaneous baroreceptor output from these two areas was measured in the anesthetized cat during normal and obstructed breathing and during Mueller maneuvers. Both whole-nerve and single-fiber preparations showed a significantly decreased output from the carotid baroreceptors during obstructed inspiratory efforts, whereas aortic baroreceptor output decreased significantly less or not at all. Transmural systolic pressure decreased significantly less in the aorta than in the carotid regions. Further, the aortic baroreceptors were more sensitive to changes in pulse pressure than were the carotid baroreceptors. These results suggest a mechanism for stabilizing the cardiac responses to precipitous falls in blood pressure that occur in obstructed breathing.

  20. Relationship between peak cardiac pumping capability and indices of cardio-respiratory fitness in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Popadic-Gacesa, Jelena Z; Barak, Otto F; Nunan, David; Donovan, Gay; Trenell, Michael I; Grujic, Nikola G; Brodie, David A

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac power output (CPO) is a unique and direct measure of overall cardiac function (i.e. cardiac pumping capability) that integrates both flow- and pressure-generating capacities of the heart. The present study assessed the relationship between peak exercise CPO and selected indices of cardio-respiratory fitness. Thirty-seven healthy adults (23 men and 14 women) performed an incremental exercise test to volitional fatigue using the Bruce protocol with gas exchange and ventilatory measurements. Following a 40-min recovery, the subjects performed a constant maximum workload exercise test at or above 95% of maximal oxygen consumption. Cardiac output was measured using the exponential CO(2) rebreathing method. The CPO, expressed in W, was calculated as the product of the mean arterial blood pressure and cardiac output. At peak exercise, CPO was well correlated with cardiac output (r = 0·92, P<0·01), stroke volume (r = 0·90, P<0·01) and peak oxygen consumption (r = 0·77, P<0·01). The coefficient of correlation was moderate between CPO and anaerobic threshold (r = 0·47, P<0·01), oxygen pulse (r = 0·57, P<0·01), minute ventilation (r = 0·53, P<0·01) and carbon dioxide production (r = 0·56, P<0·01). Small but significant relationship was found between peak CPO and peak heart rate (r = 0·23, P<0·05). These findings suggest that only peak cardiac output and stroke volume truly reflect CPO. Other indices of cardio-respiratory fitness such as oxygen consumption, anaerobic threshold, oxygen pulse, minute ventilation, carbon dioxide production and heart rate should not be used as surrogates for overall cardiac function and pumping capability of the heart.

  1. [Psychosomatic aspects of cardiac arrhythmias].

    PubMed

    Siepmann, Martin; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2010-07-01

    Emotional stress facilitates the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias including sudden cardiac death. The prevalence of anxiety and depression is increased in cardiac patients as compared to the normal population. The risk of cardiovascular mortality is enhanced in patients suffering from depression. Comorbid anxiety disorders worsen the course of cardiac arrhythmias. Disturbance of neurocardiac regulation with predominance of the sympathetic tone is hypothesized to be causative for this. The emotional reaction to cardiac arrhythmias is differing to a large extent between individuals. Emotional stress may result from coping with treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Emotional stress and cardiac arrhythmias may influence each other in the sense of a vicious circle. Somatoform cardiac arrhythmias are predominantly of psychogenic origin. Instrumental measures and frequent contacts between physicians and patients may facilitate disease chronification. The present review is dealing with the multifaceted relationships between cardiac arrhythmias and emotional stress. The underlying mechanisms and corresponding treatment modalities are discussed.

  2. Compensatory mechanisms for cardiac dysfunction in myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ertl, G; Gaudron, P; Eilles, C; Schorb, W; Kochsiek, K

    1991-01-01

    Loss of contractile myocardial tissue by myocardial infarction would result in depressed cardiac output if compensatory mechanisms would not be operative. Frank-Straub-Starling-mechanism and increased heart rate and contractility due to sympathetic stimulation are unlikely to chronically compensate for cardiac dysfunction. Structural left ventricular dilatation may be compensatory, but results in increased wall stress and, ultimately, in progressive dilatation and heart failure. In patients with myocardial infarction, we have shown left-ventricular dilatation in dependence of infarct size and time after infarction. Dilatation is compensatory first and normalizes stroke volume. However, left ventricular dilatation progresses without further hemodynamic profit and, thus, may participate in development of heart failure.

  3. Intensive insulin therapy in the intensive cardiac care unit.

    PubMed

    Hasin, Tal; Eldor, Roy; Hammerman, Haim

    2006-01-01

    Treatment in the intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU) enables rigorous control of vital parameters such as heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, oxygen saturation, serum electrolyte levels, urine output and many others. The importance of controlling the metabolic status of the acute cardiac patient and specifically the level of serum glucose was recently put in focus but is still underscored. This review aims to explain the rationale for providing intensive control of serum glucose levels in the ICCU, especially using intensive insulin therapy and summarizes the available clinical evidence suggesting its effectiveness.

  4. Berberine attenuates cardiac dysfunction in hyperglycemic and hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi-Fen; Hong, Ying; Liu, Ming; Hao, Ying-Zhi; Yu, Hai-Shi; Liu, Yang; Sun, Jian-Ning

    2011-06-25

    The positive effects of berberine (30 mg/kg/day, i.g. for 6 weeks) on cardiac dysfunction were evaluated in the rat model of hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia. Hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia were induced by feeding high-sucrose/fat diet (HSFD) consisting of 20% sucrose, 10% lard, 2.5% cholesterol, 1% bile salt for 12 weeks and streptozotocin (30 mg/kg, i.p.). The plasma sugar, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were significantly increased (422, 194 and 82%, respectively) in the HSFD/streptozotocin-treated rats, when compared with control animals receiving normal diet and vehicle. Berberine treatment reduced the plasma sugar and lipid levels by 24-69% in the rat model of hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia. Cardiac functions signed as values of cardiac output, left ventricular systolic pressure, the maximum rate of myocardial contraction (+dp/dtmax), left ventricular end diastolic pressure and the maximum rate of myocardial diastole (-dp/dtmax) were injured by 16-55% in the hyperglycemic/hypercholesterolemic rats. Berberine increased cardiac output, left ventricular systolic pressure and +dp/dtmax by 64, 16 and 79%, but decreased left ventricular end diastolic pressure and -dp/dtmax by 121 and 61% in the rats receiving HSFD/streptozotocin, respectively, when compared with the drug-untreated rats of hyperglycemia and hypercholesterolemia. Berberine caused significant increase in cardiac fatty acid transport protein-1 (159%), fatty acid transport proteins (56%), fatty acid beta-oxidase (52%), as well as glucose transporter-4 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), but decrease in PPARα mRNA and protein expression in hyperglycemic/hypercholesterolemic rats. These results indicated that berberine exerted protective effects on cardiac dysfunction induced by hyperglycemia/hypercholesterolemia through alleviating cardiac lipid accumulation and promoting glucose transport.

  5. Branchial membrane-associated carbonic anhydrase activity maintains CO2 excretion in severely anemic dogfish.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, K M; Perry, S F

    2004-06-01

    Plasma CO(2) reactions in Pacific spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) have access to plasma and gill membrane-associated carbonic anhydrase (CA). Acute severe experimental anemia and selective CA inhibitors were used to investigate the role of extracellular CA in CO(2) excretion. Anemia was induced by blood withdrawal coupled to volume replacement with saline. Lowering hematocrit from 14.2 +/- 0.4% (mean +/- SE; N = 31) to 5.2 +/- 0.1% (N = 31) had no significant impact on arterial or venous CO(2) tensions (Pa(CO(2)) and Pv(CO(2)), respectively) over the subsequent 2 h. PCO(2) was maintained despite the reduction in red cell number and a significant 32% increase in cardiac output (V(b)), both of which have been found to cause Pa(CO(2)) increases in teleost fish. By contrast, treatment of anemic dogfish with the CA inhibitors benzolamide (1.3 mg/kg) or F3500 (50 mg/kg), to selectively inhibit extracellular CA, elicited rapid and significant increases in Pa(CO(2)) of 0.68 +/- 0.17 Torr (N = 6) and 0.53 +/- 0.11 Torr (N = 7), respectively, by 30 min after treatment. These findings provide a functional context in which extracellular CA in dogfish contributes substantially to CO(2) excretion. Additionally, the apparent lack of effect of V(b) changes on PCO(2) suggests that, in contrast to teleost fish, CO(2) excretion in dogfish does not behave as a diffusion-limited system.

  6. Maintaining consistency in distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth P.

    1991-01-01

    In systems designed as assemblies of independently developed components, concurrent access to data or data structures normally arises within individual programs, and is controlled using mutual exclusion constructs, such as semaphores and monitors. Where data is persistent and/or sets of operation are related to one another, transactions or linearizability may be more appropriate. Systems that incorporate cooperative styles of distributed execution often replicate or distribute data within groups of components. In these cases, group oriented consistency properties must be maintained, and tools based on the virtual synchrony execution model greatly simplify the task confronting an application developer. All three styles of distributed computing are likely to be seen in future systems - often, within the same application. This leads us to propose an integrated approach that permits applications that use virtual synchrony with concurrent objects that respect a linearizability constraint, and vice versa. Transactional subsystems are treated as a special case of linearizability.

  7. When to maintain centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Karassik, I.J.

    1993-04-01

    Centrifugal pumps comprise critical maintenance equipment. The rationale of when to maintain them relates to a spreading tendency to contain costs in the face of tight money. Plant managers are thus entitled to a thorough analysis of whether reduced expenditures truly lower costs or actually hinder maintenance and increase costs. Absence of such an analysis hides the fact that proper and timely maintenance has a double effect: it not only reduces power consumption but also extends equipment life, and thus reduces the frequency of labor and material expenditures for scheduled or crisis maintenance. Centrifugal pump maintenance can demonstrate well the validity of this observation. The paper discusses: restoring internal clearances; real cost of renewing clearances; and monitoring clearances and pump performance.

  8. Installing and maintaining gear pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmire, K.

    1996-03-01

    While not as common as centrifugal pumps in the CPI, gear pumps play important roles in handling many of today`s more difficult-to-pump fluids. Because they operate at lower speeds -- generally, 900 rpm or less -- their seals and bearings tend to last longer than those of centrifugal models. In addition, unlike centrifugal pumps, gear pumps` flows are independent of their systems` pressure curves, and they can handle a wider range of viscosities. Although high-flow, low-head applications remain the domain of centrifugal pumps, the use of gear pumps is increasing in the chemical process industries (CPI). While some application boundaries between gears and centrifugals are blurring, there are some crucial differences between the way the two are operated and maintained -- for example, where pressure relief is concerned. This article provides a general summary of gear pump characteristics and applications, highlighting critical aspects of installation, operation and maintenance.

  9. Cardiac radiology: centenary review.

    PubMed

    de Roos, Albert; Higgins, Charles B

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, cardiac imaging technologies have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of acquired and congenital heart disease. Many important contributions to the field of cardiac imaging were initially reported in Radiology. The field developed from the early stages of cardiac imaging, including the use of coronary x-ray angiography and roentgen kymography, to nowadays the widely used echocardiographic, nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) applications. It is surprising how many of these techniques were not recognized for their potential during their early inception. Some techniques were described in the literature but required many years to enter the clinical arena and presently continue to expand in terms of clinical application. The application of various CT and MR contrast agents for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is a case in point, as the utility of contrast agents continues to expand the noninvasive characterization of myocardium. The history of cardiac imaging has included a continuous process of advances in our understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, along with advances in imaging technology that continue to the present day.

  10. A New Frontier for Cardiac Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    CardioDynamics International Corporation (CDIC) has created the BioZ(TM) System through a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) award from Johnson Space Center, providing patients and physicians with a cost-effective and highly accurate monitoring system.The BioZ non-invasive heart monitor is based on a technology known as Impedance Cardiography (ICG). BioZ provides the physician with vital information about the heart's ability to deliver blood to the body, the force one's heart exerts with each beat, and the amount of fluid in the chest. Specially designed bioimpedance sensors placed on the neck and chest monitor 12 different parameters, including cardiac output, contractility, systemic vascular resistance, and thoracic fluid content. These sensors monitor the electrical conductivity of the body-information that is converted into blood flow data and is displayed in real time on a monitoring screen. BioZ.com(TM) and BioZ.pc(TM) are two additional products that incorporate the same sensors present in the original BioZ system. The "com" in BioZ.com stands for cardiac output monitor. This fully integrated system is essentially a smaller version of the BioZ, combining the same abilities with a compact, lightweight design, while providing greater portability.

  11. Influence of gravity on cardiac performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantalos, G. M.; Sharp, M. K.; Woodruff, S. J.; O'Leary, D. S.; Lorange, R.; Everett, S. D.; Bennett, T. E.; Shurfranz, T.

    1998-01-01

    Results obtained by the investigators in ground-based experiments and in two parabolic flight series of tests aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft with a hydraulic simulator of the human systemic circulation have confirmed that a simple lack of hydrostatic pressure within an artificial ventricle causes a decrease in stroke volume of 20%-50%. A corresponding drop in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) was observed over a range of atrial pressures (AP), representing a rightward shift of the classic CO versus AP cardiac function curve. These results are in agreement with echocardiographic experiments performed on space shuttle flights, where an average decrease in SV of 15% was measured following a three-day period of adaptation to weightlessness. The similarity of behavior of the hydraulic model to the human system suggests that the simple physical effects of the lack of hydrostatic pressure may be an important mechanism for the observed changes in cardiac performance in astronauts during the weightlessness of space flight.

  12. The Psycholinguistics of the Output Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Bot, Kees

    1996-01-01

    Elucidates the psycholinguistic mechanics of the "output hypothesis" and argues that output serves an important role in second language acquisition because it generates specific input the cognitive system needs to build up a coherent set of knowledge. The article hypothesizes that the locus of the effect of output is in the transition of…

  13. Fetal cardiac scanning today.

    PubMed

    Allan, Lindsey

    2010-07-01

    The ability to examine the structure of the fetal heart in real-time started over 30 years ago now. The field has seen very great advances since then, both in terms of technical improvements in ultrasound equipment and in dissemination of operator skills. A great deal has been learnt about normal cardiac function in the human fetus throughout gestation and how it is affected by pathologies of pregnancy. There is increasing recognition of abnormal heart structure during routine obstetric scanning, allowing referral for specialist diagnosis and counselling. It is now possible to make accurate diagnosis of cardiac malformations as early as 12 weeks of gestation. Early diagnosis of a major cardiac malformation in the fetus can provide the parents with a comprehensive prognosis, enabling them to make the most informed choice about the management of the pregnancy.

  14. Autoantibodies and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hon-Chi; Huang, Kristin T. L.; Wang, Xiao-Li; Shen, Win-Kuang

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, afflicting about 5% of the population of the United States. They encompass a wide range of disorders that affect all organs of the human body and have a predilection for women. In the past, autoimmune pathogenesis was not thought to be a major mechanism for cardiovascular disorders, and potential relationships remain understudied. However, accumulating evidence suggests that a number of vascular and cardiac conditions are autoimmune-mediated. Recent studies indicate that autoantibodies play an important role in the development of cardiac arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation, modulation of autonomic influences on heart rate and rhythm, conduction system abnormalities, and ventricular arrhythmias. This manuscript will review the current evidence for the role of autoantibodies in the development of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:21740882

  15. Toothache of cardiac origin.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, M; Okeson, J P

    1999-01-01

    Pain referred to the orofacial structures can sometimes be a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. In some instances, a patient may complain of tooth pain that is completely unrelated to any dental source. This poses a diagnostic and therapeutic problem for the dentist. Cardiac pain most commonly radiates to the left arm, shoulder, neck, and face. In rare instances, angina pectoris may present as dental pain. When this occurs, an improper diagnosis frequently leads to unnecessary dental treatment or, more significantly, a delay of proper treatment. This delay may result in the patient experiencing an acute myocardial infarction. It is the dentist's responsibility to establish a proper diagnosis so that the treatment will be directed toward the source of pain and not to the site of pain. This article reviews the literature concerning referred pain of cardiac origin and presents a case report of toothache of cardiac origin.

  16. Artificial gravity with ergometric exercise preserves the cardiac, but not cerebrovascular, functions during 4 days of head-down bed rest.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-Bin; Wang, Yong-Chun; Gao, Yuan; Geng, Jie; Wu, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Fei; Sun, Xi-Qing

    2011-12-01

    Cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning occurring in long-term spaceflight requires new strategies to counteract these adverse effects. We previously reported that a short-arm centrifuge produced artificial gravity (AG), together with ergometer, has an approving effect on promoting cardiovascular function. The current study sought to investigate whether the cardiac and cerebrovascular functions were maintained and improved using a strategy of AG combined with exercise training on cardiovascular function during 4-day head-down bed rest (HDBR). Twelve healthy male subjects were assigned to a control group (CONT, n=6) and an AG combined with ergometric exercise training group (CM, n=6). Simultaneously, cardiac pumping and systolic functions, cerebral blood flow were measured before, during, and after HDBR. The results showed that AG combined with ergometric exercise caused an increase trend of number of tolerance, however, there was no significant difference between the two groups. After 4-day HDBR in the CONT group, heart rate increased significantly (59±6 vs 66±7 beats/min), while stroke volume (98±12 vs 68±13 mL) and cardiac output (6±1 vs 4±1 L/min) decreased significantly (p<0.05). All subjects had similar drops on cerebral vascular function. Volume regulating hormone aldosterone increased in both groups (by 119.9% in CONT group and 112.8% in the CM group), but only in the CONT group there were a significant changes (p<0.05). Angiotensin II was significantly increased by 140.5% after 4-day HDBR in the CONT group (p<0.05), while no significant changes were observed in the CM group. These results indicated that artificial gravity with ergometric exercise successfully eliminated changes induced by simulated weightlessness in heart rate, volume regulating hormones, and cardiac pumping function and partially maintained cardiac systolic function. Hence, a daily 1h alternating +1.0 and +2.0 Gz with 40 W exercise training appear to be an effective

  17. Hypokalemia and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately three million people suffer sudden cardiac death annually. These deaths often emerge from a complex interplay of substrates and triggers. Disturbed potassium homeostasis among heart cells is an example of such a trigger. Thus, hypokalemia and, also, more transient reductions in plasma potassium concentration are of importance. Hypokalemia is present in 7% to 17% of patients with cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, up to 20% of hospitalized patients and up to 40% of patients on diuretics suffer from hypokalemia. Importantly, inadequate management of hypokalemia was found in 24% of hospitalized patients. Hypokalemia is associated with increased risk of arrhythmia in patients with cardiovascular disease, as well as increased all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and heart failure mortality by up to 10-fold. Long-term potassium homeostasis depends on renal potassium excretion. However, skeletal muscles play an important role in short-term potassium homeostasis, primarily because skeletal muscles contain the largest single pool of potassium in the body. Moreover, due to the large number of Na(+)/K(+) pumps and K(+) channels, the skeletal muscles possess a huge capacity for potassium exchange. In cardiovascular patients, hypokalemia is often caused by nonpotassium-sparing diuretics, insufficient potassium intake and a shift of potassium into stores by increased potassium uptake stimulated by catecholamines, beta-adrenoceptor agonists and insulin. Interestingly, drugs with a proven significant positive effect on mortality and morbidity rates in heart failure patients all increase plasma potassium concentration. Thus, it may prove beneficial to pay more attention to hypokalemia and to maintain plasma potassium levels in the upper normal range. The more at risk of fatal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death a patient is, the more attention should be given to the potassium homeostasis.

  18. Drug Treatment of Cardiac Failure

    PubMed Central

    Achong, M. R.; Kumana, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Treatment of cardiac failure should first be aimed at reversing or ameliorating the underlying pathological processes. This review highlights the common problems and pitfalls in the use of digoxin, diuretics and vasodilators in patients with cardiac failure. PMID:21289849

  19. Mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Blood circulation is the result of the beating of the heart, which provides the mechanical force to pump oxygenated blood to, and deoxygenated blood away from, the peripheral tissues. This depends critically on the preceding electrical activation. Disruptions in the orderly pattern of this propagating cardiac excitation wave can lead to arrhythmias. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying their generation and maintenance requires knowledge of the ionic contributions to the cardiac action potential, which is discussed in the first part of this review. A brief outline of the different classification systems for arrhythmogenesis is then provided, followed by a detailed discussion for each mechanism in turn, highlighting recent advances in this area. PMID:27092186

  20. Mechanisms of Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Uygur, Aysu; Lee, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    Adult humans fail to regenerate their hearts following injury, and this failure to regenerate myocardium is a leading cause of heart failure and death worldwide. Although all adult mammals appear to lack significant cardiac regeneration potential, some vertebrates can regenerate myocardium throughout life. In addition, new studies indicate that mammals have cardiac regeneration potential during development and very soon after birth. The mechanisms of heart regeneration among model organisms, including neonatal mice, appear remarkably similar. Orchestrated waves of inflammation, matrix deposition and remodeling, and cardiomyocyte proliferation are commonly seen in heart regeneration models. Understanding why adult mammals develop extensive scarring instead of regeneration is a crucial goal for regenerative biology. PMID:26906733

  1. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a) Individuals may maintain authorization under the following conditions: (1)...

  2. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a) Individuals may maintain authorization under the following conditions: (1)...

  3. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a) Individuals may maintain authorization under the following conditions: (1)...

  4. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a) Individuals may maintain authorization under the following conditions: (1)...

  5. 10 CFR 26.71 - Maintaining authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maintaining authorization. 26.71 Section 26.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Granting and Maintaining Authorization § 26.71 Maintaining authorization. (a) Individuals may maintain authorization under the following conditions: (1)...

  6. Emergency Cardiac Care: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Richard W.

    1988-01-01

    The authors review the new guidelines for basic life support and advanced cardiac life support and the recommended changes to the standards. The changes recommended for basic life support will simplify the psychomotor skills required. The recommended changes to the guidelines for advanced cardiac life support, which include discontinuing the use of isoproterenol and limiting the use of sodium bicarbonate in cardiac arrest, are likely to improve survival rates. Controversies in the management of cardiac arrest are also discussed. PMID:21253157

  7. Model output: fact or artefact?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melsen, Lieke

    2015-04-01

    As a third-year PhD-student, I relatively recently entered the wonderful world of scientific Hydrology. A science that has many pillars that directly impact society, for example with the prediction of hydrological extremes (both floods and drought), climate change, applications in agriculture, nature conservation, drinking water supply, etcetera. Despite its demonstrable societal relevance, hydrology is often seen as a science between two stools. Like Klemeš (1986) stated: "By their academic background, hydrologists are foresters, geographers, electrical engineers, geologists, system analysts, physicists, mathematicians, botanists, and most often civil engineers." Sometimes it seems that the engineering genes are still present in current hydrological sciences, and this results in pragmatic rather than scientific approaches for some of the current problems and challenges we have in hydrology. Here, I refer to the uncertainty in hydrological modelling that is often neglected. For over thirty years, uncertainty in hydrological models has been extensively discussed and studied. But it is not difficult to find peer-reviewed articles in which it is implicitly assumed that model simulations represent the truth rather than a conceptualization of reality. For instance in trend studies, where data is extrapolated 100 years ahead. Of course one can use different forcing datasets to estimate the uncertainty of the input data, but how to prevent that the output is not a model artefact, caused by the model structure? Or how about impact studies, e.g. of a dam impacting river flow. Measurements are often available for the period after dam construction, so models are used to simulate river flow before dam construction. Both are compared in order to qualify the effect of the dam. But on what basis can we tell that the model tells us the truth? Model validation is common nowadays, but validation only (comparing observations with model output) is not sufficient to assume that a

  8. Optical Waveguide Output Couplers Fabricated in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Abushagur, Mustafa A. G.; Ashley, Paul R.; Johnson-Cole, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Waveguide output couplers fabricated in Norland Optical Adhesive (NOA) #81 and AMOCO Ultradel 9020D polyimide are investigated. The output couplers are implemented using periodic relief gratings on a planar waveguide. Design theory of the couplers is based on the perturbation approach. Coupling of light from waveguide propagation modes to output radiation modes is described by coupled mode theory and the transmission line approximation of the perturbed area (grating structure). Using these concepts, gratings can be accurately designed to output a minimum number of modes at desired output angles. Waveguide couplers were designed using these concepts. These couplers were fabricated and analyzed for structural accuracy, output beam accuracy, and output efficiency. The results for the two different materials are compared.

  9. Data analysis in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Miguel; Pedrón-Torecilla, Jorge; Hernández, Ismael; Liberos, Alejandro; Climent, Andreu M; Guillem, María S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are an increasingly present in developed countries and represent a major health and economic burden. The occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is closely linked to the electrical function of the heart. Consequently, the analysis of the electrical signal generated by the heart tissue, either recorded invasively or noninvasively, provides valuable information for the study of cardiac arrhythmias. In this chapter, novel cardiac signal analysis techniques that allow the study and diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias are described, with emphasis on cardiac mapping which allows for spatiotemporal analysis of cardiac signals.Cardiac mapping can serve as a diagnostic tool by recording cardiac signals either in close contact to the heart tissue or noninvasively from the body surface, and allows the identification of cardiac sites responsible of the development or maintenance of arrhythmias. Cardiac mapping can also be used for research in cardiac arrhythmias in order to understand their mechanisms. For this purpose, both synthetic signals generated by computer simulations and animal experimental models allow for more controlled physiological conditions and complete access to the organ.

  10. Cardiac safety in vascular access surgery and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Malik, Jan; Kudlicka, Jaroslav; Tesar, Vladimir; Linhart, Ales

    2015-01-01

    More than 50% of all end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients die from cardiovascular complications. Among them, heart failure and pulmonary hypertension play a major role, and published studies document significantly higher mortality rates in patients with these two states. Arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) and arteriovenous grafts (AVG) are the preferred types of vascular access (VA). However, both AVF and AVG increase cardiac output and in turn could contribute to (the decompensation of) heart failure or pulmonary hypertension. No really safe access flow volume exists, and the ESRD patients' reactions to it vary considerably. We review the mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular consequences of increased cardiac output and available literary data. The link between access flow volume and increased mortality due to pulmonary hypertension or heart failure probably exists, but still has not been directly evidenced. Regular echocardiography is advisable especially in patients with symptoms or with high VA flow (>1,500 ml/min).

  11. Cardiac troponins and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Michael J; Jarolim, Petr

    2014-03-01

    Measurement of circulating cardiac troponins I and T has become integral to the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. This article discusses the structure and function of the troponin complex and the release of cardiac troponin molecules from the injured cardiomyocyte into the circulation. An overview of current cardiac troponin assays and their classification according to sensitivity is presented. The diagnostic criteria, role, and usefulness of cardiac troponin for myocardial infarction are discussed. In addition, several examples are given of the usefulness of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays for short-term and long-term prediction of adverse events.

  12. Moore's law, Dabbawalas, and pediatric cardiac care in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Duminda

    2015-01-01

    Sri Lanka is an island nation in Indian Ocean that provides free healthcare to all citizens through government healthcare system. It has commendable health indices in the region. Pediatric cardiac services have rapidly progressed over past few years helping to further bring down infant and under-five mortality rates. Lady Ridgeway Hospital for Children (LRH) is the only tertiary care referral center for children with heart disease in the country. Currently it performs approximately 1,000 cardiac catheterizations and 1,000 cardiac surgeries every year. Target is to double the surgical output to treat all children with heart diseases in a timely and appropriate manner. Being a middle-income country, this is not an easy task. Technology used in diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases is rapidly advancing with its price tag. In such a setting, it is challenging to proceed to achieve this target in a resource-limited environment.

  13. Moore's law, Dabbawalas, and pediatric cardiac care in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Samarasinghe, Duminda

    2015-01-01

    Sri Lanka is an island nation in Indian Ocean that provides free healthcare to all citizens through government healthcare system. It has commendable health indices in the region. Pediatric cardiac services have rapidly progressed over past few years helping to further bring down infant and under-five mortality rates. Lady Ridgeway Hospital for Children (LRH) is the only tertiary care referral center for children with heart disease in the country. Currently it performs approximately 1,000 cardiac catheterizations and 1,000 cardiac surgeries every year. Target is to double the surgical output to treat all children with heart diseases in a timely and appropriate manner. Being a middle-income country, this is not an easy task. Technology used in diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases is rapidly advancing with its price tag. In such a setting, it is challenging to proceed to achieve this target in a resource-limited environment. PMID:26085764

  14. Basal ganglia outputs map instantaneous position coordinates during behavior.

    PubMed

    Barter, Joseph W; Li, Suellen; Sukharnikova, Tatyana; Rossi, Mark A; Bartholomew, Ryan A; Yin, Henry H

    2015-02-11

    The basal ganglia (BG) are implicated in many movement disorders, yet how they contribute to movement remains unclear. Using wireless in vivo recording, we measured BG output from the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) in mice while monitoring their movements with video tracking. The firing rate of most nigral neurons reflected Cartesian coordinates (either x- or y-coordinates) of the animal's head position during movement. The firing rates of SNr neurons are either positively or negatively correlated with the coordinates. Using an egocentric reference frame, four types of neurons can be classified: each type increases firing during movement in a particular direction (left, right, up, down), and decreases firing during movement in the opposite direction. Given the high correlation between the firing rate and the x and y components of the position vector, the movement trajectory can be reconstructed from neural activity. Our results therefore demonstrate a quantitative and continuous relationship between BG output and behavior. Thus, a steady BG output signal from the SNr (i.e., constant firing rate) is associated with the lack of overt movement, when a stable posture is maintained by structures downstream of the BG. Any change in SNr firing rate is associated with a change in position (i.e., movement). We hypothesize that the SNr output quantitatively determines the direction, velocity, and amplitude of voluntary movements. By changing the reference signals to downstream position control systems, the BG can produce transitions in body configurations and initiate actions.

  15. Biventricular Pacing (Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Issue In 2002, (before the establishment of the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee), the Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a health technology policy assessment on biventricular (BiV) pacing, also called cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The goal of treatment with BiV pacing is to improve cardiac output for people in heart failure (HF) with conduction defect on ECG (wide QRS interval) by synchronizing ventricular contraction. The Medical Advisory Secretariat concluded that there was evidence of short (6 months) and longer-term (12 months) effectiveness in terms of cardiac function and quality of life (QoL). More recently, a hospital submitted an application to the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee to review CRT, and the Medical Advisory Secretariat subsequently updated its health technology assessment. Background Chronic HF results from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the heart to act as a pump. It is estimated that 1% to 5% of the general population (all ages) in Europe have chronic HF. (1;2) About one-half of the patients with HF are women, and about 40% of men and 60% of women with this condition are aged older than 75 years. The incidence (i.e., the number of new cases in a specified period) of chronic HF is age dependent: from 1 to 5 per 1,000 people each year in the total population, to as high as 30 to 40 per 1,000 people each year in those aged 75 years and older. Hence, in an aging society, the prevalence (i.e., the number of people with a given disease or condition at any time) of HF is increasing, despite a reduction in cardiovascular mortality. A recent study revealed 28,702 patients were hospitalized for first-time HF in Ontario between April 1994 and March 1997. (3) Women comprised 51% of the cohort. Eighty-five percent were aged 65 years or older, and 58% were aged 75 years or older. Patients with chronic HF experience shortness of breath, a limited capacity

  16. Cardiac T1 Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2014-01-01

    T1 mapping of the heart has evolved into a valuable tool to evaluate myocardial tissue properties, with or without contrast injection, including assessment of myocardial edema and free water content, extra-cellular volume (expansion), and most recently cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The MRI pulse sequence techniques developed for these applications have had to address at least two important considerations for cardiac applications: measure magnetization inversion recoveries during cardiac motion with sufficient temporal resolution for the shortest expected T1 values, and, secondly, obtain these measurements within a time during which a patient can comfortably suspend breathing. So-called Look-Locker techniques, and variants thereof, which all sample multiple points of a magnetization recovery after each magnetization preparation have therefore become a mainstay in this field. The rapid pace of advances and new findings based on cardiac T1 mapping for assessment of diffuse fibrosis, or myocardial edema show that these techniques enrich the capabilities of MRI for myocardial tissue profiling, which is arguably unmatched by other cardiac imaging modalities. PMID:24509619

  17. Hepato-cardiac disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Yasser Mahrous; Yehia, Reem

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationship between the liver and the heart is important for both hepatologists and cardiologists. Hepato-cardiac diseases can be classified into heart diseases affecting the liver, liver diseases affecting the heart, and conditions affecting the heart and the liver at the same time. Differential diagnoses of liver injury are extremely important in a cardiologist’s clinical practice calling for collaboration between cardiologists and hepatologists due to the many other diseases that can affect the liver and mimic haemodynamic injury. Acute and chronic heart failure may lead to acute ischemic hepatitis or chronic congestive hepatopathy. Treatment in these cases should be directed to the primary heart disease. In patients with advanced liver disease, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may develop including hemodynamic changes, diastolic and systolic dysfunctions, reduced cardiac performance and electrophysiological abnormalities. Cardiac evaluation is important for patients with liver diseases especially before and after liver transplantation. Liver transplantation may lead to the improvement of all cardiac changes and the reversal of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. There are systemic diseases that may affect both the liver and the heart concomitantly including congenital, metabolic and inflammatory diseases as well as alcoholism. This review highlights these hepatocardiac diseases PMID:24653793

  18. Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document contains materials for an advanced college course in cardiac life support developed for the State of Iowa. The course syllabus lists the course title, hours, number, description, prerequisites, learning activities, instructional units, required text, six references, evaluation criteria, course objectives by units, course…

  19. The TEA CO2-Lasers with High Output Emission Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yu. N.; Losev, V. F.; Puchikin, А. V.; Jun, Yao

    2014-03-01

    TEA CO2-lasers generating short pulse radiation and operating in a pulse-periodic mode with the repetition rate up to 10 Hz have been developed. It is shown that the addition of nitrogen up to 8% in the mixture of molecular gases СО2:H2 = 500:50 at a total pressure of P = 0.6 bar enhances the peak emission power maintaining the temporary pulse shape. An output beam intensity of 12.3 MW/cm2 was obtained for the 30 ns pulse at a laser efficiency of 2.8%. In a compact TEA СО2-laser with an active medium volume of 6 cm3, a beam with an output intensity of 24 MW/cm2 at pulse duration of 70 ns was obtained.

  20. Light-operated proximity detector with linear output

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Marc L.; McNeilly, David R.

    1985-01-01

    A light-operated proximity detector is described in which reflected light intensity from a surface whose proximity to the detector is to be gauged is translated directly into a signal proportional to the distance of the detector from the surface. A phototransistor is used to sense the reflected light and is connected in a detector circuit which maintains the phototransistor in a saturated state. A negative feedback arrangement using an operational amplifier connected between the collector and emitter of the transistor provides an output at the output of the amplifier which is linearly proportional to the proximity of the surface to the detector containing the transistor. This direct proportional conversion is true even though the light intensity is varying with the proximity in proportion to the square of the inverse of the distance. The detector may be used for measuring the distance remotely from any target surface.

  1. Light-operated proximity detector with linear output

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, M.L.; McNeilly, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    A light-operated proximity detector is described in which reflected light intensity from a surface whose proximity to the detector is to be gauged is translated directly into a signal proportional to the distance of the detector from the surface. A phototransistor is used to sense the reflected light and is connected in a detector circuit which maintains the phtotransistor in a saturated state. A negative feedback arrangement using an operational amplifier connected between the collector and emitter of the transistor provides an output at the output of the amplifier which is linearly proportional to the proximity of the surface to the detector containing the transistor. This direct proportional conversion is true even though the light intensity is varying with the proximity in proportion to the square of the inverse of the distance. The detector may be used for measuring the distance remotely from any target surface.

  2. PREVIMER : Meteorological inputs and outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravenel, H.; Lecornu, F.; Kerléguer, L.

    2009-09-01

    PREVIMER is a pre-operational system aiming to provide a wide range of users, from private individuals to professionals, with short-term forecasts about the coastal environment along the French coastlines bordering the English Channel, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Mediterranean Sea. Observation data and digital modelling tools first provide 48-hour (probably 96-hour by summer 2009) forecasts of sea states, currents, sea water levels and temperatures. The follow-up of an increasing number of biological parameters will, in time, complete this overview of coastal environment. Working in partnership with the French Naval Hydrographic and Oceanographic Service (Service Hydrographique et Océanographique de la Marine, SHOM), the French National Weather Service (Météo-France), the French public science and technology research institute (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, IRD), the European Institute of Marine Studies (Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, IUEM) and many others, IFREMER (the French public institute fo marine research) is supplying the technologies needed to ensure this pertinent information, available daily on Internet at http://www.previmer.org, and stored at the Operational Coastal Oceanographic Data Centre. Since 2006, PREVIMER publishes the results of demonstrators assigned to limited geographic areas and to specific applications. This system remains experimental. The following topics are covered : Hydrodynamic circulation, sea states, follow-up of passive tracers, conservative or non-conservative (specifically of microbiological origin), biogeochemical state, primary production. Lastly, PREVIMER provides researchers and R&D departments with modelling tools and access to the database, in which the observation data and the modelling results are stored, to undertake environmental studies on new sites. The communication will focus on meteorological inputs to and outputs from PREVIMER. It will draw the lessons from almost 3 years during

  3. The left ventricle as a mechanical engine: from Leonardo da Vinci to the echocardiographic assessment of peak power output-to-left ventricular mass.

    PubMed

    Dini, Frank L; Guarini, Giacinta; Ballo, Piercarlo; Carluccio, Erberto; Maiello, Maria; Capozza, Paola; Innelli, Pasquale; Rosa, Gian M; Palmiero, Pasquale; Galderisi, Maurizio; Razzolini, Renato; Nodari, Savina

    2013-03-01

    The interpretation of the heart as a mechanical engine dates back to the teachings of Leonardo da Vinci, who was the first to apply the laws of mechanics to the function of the heart. Similar to any mechanical engine, whose performance is proportional to the power generated with respect to weight, the left ventricle can be viewed as a power generator whose performance can be related to left ventricular mass. Stress echocardiography may provide valuable information on the relationship between cardiac performance and recruited left ventricular mass that may be used in distinguishing between adaptive and maladaptive left ventricular remodeling. Peak power output-to-mass, obtained during exercise or pharmacological stress echocardiography, is a measure that reflects the number of watts that are developed by 100 g of left ventricular mass under maximal stimulation. Power output-to-mass may be calculated as left ventricular power output per 100 g of left ventricular mass: 100× left ventricular power output divided by left ventricular mass (W/100 g). A simplified formula to calculate power output-to-mass is as follows: 0.222 × cardiac output (l/min) × mean blood pressure (mmHg)/left ventricular mass (g). When the integrity of myocardial structure is compromised, a mismatch becomes apparent between maximal cardiac power output and left ventricular mass; when this occurs, a reduction of the peak power output-to-mass index is observed.

  4. Prediction of electron beam output factors.

    PubMed

    Mills, M D; Hogstrom, K R; Almond, P R

    1982-01-01

    A method to predict square and rectangular field output factors from the measurement of selected fields of electron beams on the Therac 20 Saturne has been developed. A two parameter fit of the square field output factor data, based on the functional dependence as predicted by a pencil beam calculational model, has proven clinically acceptable. The pencil beam distributions are given by the Fermi-Eyges theory of multiple Coulomb scattering. For a rectangular field, the output factor can be calculated from the square root of the product of the two square field output factors wtih sides equal to those of the rectangular field. If however, there is a significant asymmetry between the X and Y collimator systems, then rectangular field output factors should be predicted from the product of the X and Y one-dimensional output factors. One-dimensional output factors are defined as output factors of rectangular fields where one side remains constant and equal to the side of the square reference field. Measured data indicate either of the two methods of determining rectangular field output factors to be clinically acceptable for the Therac 20, the use of one-dimensional output factors demonstrating greater accuracy. Data show agreement to within approximately 1.5% at electron energies of 6, 9, 13, and 17 MeV.

  5. Polarization maintaining linear cavity Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Heesuk; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Kim, Seungman; Lee, Keunwoo; Han, Seongheum; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    We present a polarization-maintaining (PM) type of Er-doped fiber linear oscillator designed to produce femtosecond laser pulses with high operational stability. Mode locking is activated using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) attached to one end of the linear PM oscillator. To avoid heat damage, the SESAM is mounted on a copper-silicon-layered heat sink and connected to the linear oscillator through a fiber buffer dissipating the residual pump power. A long-term stability test is performed to prove that the proposed oscillator design maintains a soliton-mode single-pulse operation without breakdown of mode locking over a week period. With addition of an Er-doped fiber amplifier, the output power is raised to 180 mW with 60 fs pulse duration, from which an octave-spanning supercontinuum is produced.

  6. Ethical Issues in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kavarana, Minoo N.; Sade, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    While ethical behavior has always been part of cardiac surgical practice, ethical deliberation has only recently become an important component of cardiac surgical practice. Issues such as informed consent, conflict of interest, and professional self-regulation, among many others, have increasingly attracted the attention of cardiac surgeons. This review covers several broad topics of interest to cardiac surgeons and cardiologists, and treats several other topics more briefly. There is much uncertainty about what the future holds for cardiac surgical practice, research, and culture, and we discuss the background of ethical issues to serve as a platform for envisioning what is to come. PMID:22642634

  7. Maintaining quality in blood banking.

    PubMed

    Harvey, E; Hewison, C; Nevalainen, D E; Lloyd, H L

    1995-03-01

    component will warrant redress. The degree of fault attributed to the producer will in part depend on whether they have met the best available standards at all stages in the preparation of the product. If a Transfusion Service can show that it's operation has external accreditation, particularly to an internationally recognised standard such as ISO 9000 and they can show that staff have been properly trained, that equipment is properly supplied and maintained and that the facility is appropriate to the work being carried out, then the liability that exists when something goes wrong will be reduced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  8. When the heart stops: a review of cardiac arrest in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Gillian; Paglia, Michael; Bourjeily, Ghada

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is a rare occurrence in pregnancy and may be related to obstetric or medical causes. Pregnancy is associated with profound physiologic changes that prepare the gravida for the challenges of labor and delivery, and resuscitation of the pregnant patient needs to take these changes into consideration. Cardiac output and plasma volume increase in pregnancy and distribute differently with the uterine circulation receiving approximately 17% of the total cardiac output. On the other hand, cardiac output is sensitive to positional changes in the second half of pregnancy but may improve with a lateral tilt of the gravida. Both oxygen reserve and upper airway size decrease in pregnancy, leading to difficulties surrounding airway management. Changes in the volume of distribution, renal and hepatic clearance may impact drug effects and need to be recognized. This review will discuss an overview of pregnancy physiology that is relevant to cardiac resuscitation, detail the challenges in the various resuscitative steps including a synopsis on perimortem delivery, and describe obstetric and nonobstetric causes of mortality and cardiac arrest in pregnancy.

  9. In vivo assessment of cardiac metabolism and function in the abdominal aortic banding model of compensated cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Anne-Marie L.; Giles, Lucia; Ball, Vicky; Miller, Jack J.; Clarke, Kieran; Carr, Carolyn A.; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Left ventricular hypertrophy is an adaptive response of the heart to chronic mechanical overload and can lead to functional deterioration and heart failure. Changes in cardiac energy metabolism are considered as key to the hypertrophic remodelling process. The concurrence of obesity and hypertrophy has been associated with contractile dysfunction, and this work therefore aimed to investigate the in vivo structural, functional, and metabolic remodelling that occurs in the hypertrophied heart in the setting of a high-fat, high-sucrose, Western diet (WD). Methods and results Following induction of cardiac hypertrophy through abdominal aortic banding, male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to either a standard diet or a WD (containing 45% fat and 16% sucrose) for up to 14 weeks. Cardiac structural and functional characteristics were determined by CINE MRI, and in vivo metabolism was investigated using hyperpolarized 13C-labelled pyruvate. Cardiac hypertrophy was observed at all time points, irrespective of dietary manipulation, with no evidence of cardiac dysfunction. Pyruvate dehydrogenase flux was unchanged in the hypertrophied animals at any time point, but increased incorporation of the 13C label into lactate was observed by 9 weeks and maintained at 14 weeks, indicative of enhanced glycolysis. Conclusion Hypertrophied hearts revealed little evidence of a switch towards increased glucose oxidation but rather an uncoupling of glycolytic metabolism from glucose oxidation. This was maintained under conditions of dietary stress provided by a WD but, at this compensated phase of hypertrophy, did not result in any contractile dysfunction. PMID:25750189

  10. Genetics of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Bezzina, Connie R; Lahrouchi, Najim; Priori, Silvia G

    2015-06-05

    Sudden cardiac death occurs in a broad spectrum of cardiac pathologies and is an important cause of mortality in the general population. Genetic studies conducted during the past 20 years have markedly illuminated the genetic basis of the inherited cardiac disorders associated with sudden cardiac death. Here, we review the genetic basis of sudden cardiac death with a focus on the current knowledge on the genetics of the primary electric disorders caused primarily by mutations in genes encoding ion channels, and the cardiomyopathies, which have been attributed to mutations in genes encoding a broader category of proteins, including those of the sarcomere, the cytoskeleton, and desmosomes. We discuss the challenges currently faced in unraveling genetic factors that predispose to sudden cardiac death in the setting of sequela of coronary artery disease and present the genome-wide association studies conducted in recent years on electrocardiographic parameters, highlighting their potential in uncovering new biological insights into cardiac electric function.

  11. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  12. Effects of Obesity on Cardiovascular Hemodynamics, Cardiac Morphology, and Ventricular Function.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Martin A; Omran, Jad; Bostick, Brian P

    2016-12-01

    Obesity produces a variety of hemodynamic alterations that may cause changes in cardiac morphology which predispose to left and right ventricular dysfunction. Various neurohormonal and metabolic alterations commonly associated with obesity may contribute to these abnormalities of cardiac structure and function. These changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics, cardiac morphology, and ventricular function may, in severely obese patients, predispose to heart failure, even in the absence of other forms of heart disease (obesity cardiomyopathy). In normotensive obese patients, cardiac involvement is commonly characterized by elevated cardiac output, low peripheral vascular resistance, and increased left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure. Sleep-disordered breathing may lead to pulmonary arterial hypertension and, in association with left heart failure, may contribute to elevation of right heart pressures. These alterations, in association with various neurohormonal and metabolic abnormalities, may produce LV hypertrophy; impaired LV diastolic function; and less commonly, LV systolic dysfunction. Many of these alterations are reversible with substantial voluntary weight loss.

  13. Design of a specialized computer for on-line monitoring of cardiac stroke volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. A., Jr.; Gebben, V. D.

    1972-01-01

    The design of a specialized analog computer for on-line determination of cardiac stroke volume by means of a modified version of the pressure pulse contour method is presented. The design consists of an analog circuit for computation and a timing circuit for detecting necessary events on the pressure waveform. Readouts of arterial pressures, systolic duration, heart rate, percent change in stroke volume, and percent change in cardiac output are provided for monitoring cardiac patients. Laboratory results showed that computational accuracy was within 3 percent, while animal experiments verified the operational capability of the computer. Patient safety considerations are also discussed.

  14. Therapeutic application of inhaled nitric oxide in adult cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Makker, Robina; Mehta, Yatin; Trehan, Naresh; Bapna, Rk

    2006-01-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance can be detrimental to the cardiac output in post-operative cardiac surgical patients. Pulmonary vasodilator therapy by systemic pharmacologic agents is non-selective. Inhaled nitric oxide is a selective pulmonary vasodilator and does not cause systemic hypotension. In this prospective study, 14 adult post-operative cardiac surgical patients with pulmonary hypertension underwent inhaled nitric oxide therapy and their hemodynamic changes were evaluated. Inhaled nitric oxide was administered in doses of 5 ppm-25 ppm. The result was a decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance from 456.57 +/- 137.13 to 357.64 +/- 119.80 dynes-sec- Continued. - See Free Full Text.

  15. Transcriptional control of cardiac fibroblast plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lighthouse, Janet K; Small, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts help maintain the normal architecture of the healthy heart and are responsible for scar formation and the healing response to pathological insults. Various genetic, biomechanical, or humoral factors stimulate fibroblasts to become contractile smooth muscle-like cells called myofibroblasts that secrete large amounts of extracellular matrix. Unfortunately, unchecked myofibroblast activation in heart disease leads to pathological fibrosis, which is a major risk factor for the development of cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control fibroblast plasticity and myofibroblast activation is essential to develop novel strategies to specifically target pathological cardiac fibrosis without disrupting the adaptive healing response. This review highlights the major transcriptional mediators of fibroblast origin and function in development and disease. The contribution of the fetal epicardial gene program will be discussed in the context of fibroblast origin in development and following injury, primarily focusing on Tcf21 and C/EBP. We will also highlight the major transcriptional regulatory axes that control fibroblast plasticity in the adult heart, including transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/Smad signaling, the Rho/myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)/serum response factor (SRF) axis, and Calcineurin/transient receptor potential channel (TRP)/nuclear factor of activated T-Cell (NFAT) signaling. Finally, we will discuss recent strategies to divert the fibroblast transcriptional program in an effort to promote cardiomyocyte regeneration. This article is a part of a Special Issue entitled "Fibrosis and Myocardial Remodeling".

  16. A recirculating cooling system for improved topical cardiac hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeldt, F L; Fambiatos, A; Pastoriza-Pinol, J; Stirling, G R

    1981-10-01

    A simple system is described that recirculates cooling fluid for topical cardiac hypothermia. This disposable system can produce a flow of 1,500 ml/min at 2 degrees to 4 degrees C. The recirculating cooler produced significantly lower myocardial temperatures than a conventional fluid-discard system in 22 patients having coronary operation. This system has been used as part of the technique of hypothermic cardioplegia in more than 600 patients. During various cardiac procedures, septal temperatures were maintained well below 20 degrees C for 60 minutes or more without the need to reinfuse the cardioplegic solution.

  17. For neonates undergoing cardiac surgery does thymectomy as opposed to thymic preservation have any adverse immunological consequences?

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ahmed; Raja, Shahzad G; Pennington, Daniel J; Tsang, Victor T

    2010-09-01

    A best evidence topic in congenital cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether neonatal thymectomy in patients undergoing cardiac surgery has any adverse immunological consequences. Altogether 164 papers were found using the reported search, of which nine papers represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses were tabulated. The thymus is the major production site of T cells, whose stocks are built-up during foetal and early postnatal life. However, its function diminishes after the first years of life, and although thymic output is maintained into adulthood, the thymus mostly degenerates into fatty tissue in elderly adults. To date, there has been no general consensus with regard to the importance of this organ during childhood and adulthood. As a consequence, during cardiac surgery in neonates, partial or total thymectomy is routinely performed to enable better access to the heart and great vessels to correct congenital heart defects, suggesting that it may be dispensable during childhood and adulthood. Interestingly, current best available evidence from nine case-control studies suggests that neonatal thymectomy affects peripheral T-cell populations both in the short- as well as long-term and results in premature immunosenescence. However, the impact of these changes on the risk of infectious diseases or malignancy has not been thoroughly evaluated by any of these studies. Maintenance of a registry of patients undergoing neonatal thymectomy and further studies to assess the functional or clinical consequences of this practice would be valuable.

  18. Endothelin receptor B, a candidate gene from human studies at high altitude, improves cardiac tolerance to hypoxia in genetically engineered heterozygote mice

    PubMed Central

    Stobdan, Tsering; Zhou, Dan; Ao-Ieong, Eilleen; Ortiz, Daniel; Ronen, Roy; Hartley, Iain; Gan, Zhuohui; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Bafna, Vineet; Cabrales, Pedro; Haddad, Gabriel G.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand human adaptation to stress, and in particular to hypoxia, we took advantage of one of nature’s experiments at high altitude (HA) and studied Ethiopians, a population that is well-adapted to HA hypoxic stress. Using whole-genome sequencing, we discovered that EDNRB (Endothelin receptor type B) is a candidate gene involved in HA adaptation. To test whether EDNRB plays a critical role in hypoxia tolerance and adaptation, we generated EdnrB knockout mice and found that when EdnrB−/+ heterozygote mice are treated with lower levels of oxygen (O2), they tolerate various levels of hypoxia (even extreme hypoxia, e.g., 5% O2) very well. For example, they maintain ejection fraction, cardiac contractility, and cardiac output in severe hypoxia. Furthermore, O2 delivery to vital organs was significantly higher and blood lactate was lower in EdnrB−/+ compared with wild type in hypoxia. Tissue hypoxia in brain, heart, and kidney was lower in EdnrB−/+ mice as well. These data demonstrate that a lower level of EDNRB significantly improves cardiac performance and tissue perfusion under various levels of hypoxia. Transcriptomic profiling of left ventricles revealed three specific genes [natriuretic peptide type A (Nppa), sarcolipin (Sln), and myosin light polypeptide 4 (Myl4)] that were oppositely expressed (q < 0.05) between EdnrB−/+ and wild type. Functions related to these gene networks were consistent with a better cardiac contractility and performance. We conclude that EDNRB plays a key role in hypoxia tolerance and that a lower level of EDNRB contributes, at least in part, to HA adaptation in humans. PMID:26240367

  19. Photonics: Maintaining Competitiveness in the Information Era

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Photonics Maintaining Competitiveness in the Information Era \\ATIONAL RESEIARCII COUVIIII, -mail Photonics: Maintaining Competitiveness in the... Information Era Panel on Photonics Science and Tcchnology Assessment Solid State Sciences Committee Board on Physics and Astronomy Commission on Physical

  20. Psychosocial components of cardiac recovery and rehabilitation attendance

    PubMed Central

    King, K; Humen, D; Smith, H; Phan, C; Teo, K

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the relations between demographic factors, specific psychosocial factors, and cardiac rehabilitation attendance.
DESIGN—Cohort, repeated measures design.
SETTING—A large tertiary care centre in western Canada
PATIENTS—304 consecutive consenting patients discharged following acute myocardial infarction and/or coronary artery bypass graft surgery.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—The Jenkins self-efficacy expectation scales and activity checklists of behaviour performance for maintaining health and role resumption, modified version of the self-motivation inventory, and the shortened social support scale.
RESULTS—Those who had higher role resumption behaviour performance scores at two weeks after discharge were significantly less likely to attend cardiac rehabilitation programmes. At six months after discharge, those who attended cardiac rehabilitation demonstrated higher health maintenance self-efficacy expectation and behaviour performance scores. Health maintenance self-efficacy expectation and behaviour performance improved over time. Women reported less social support but showed greater improvement in health maintenance self-efficacy expectation. Changes in self-efficacy scores were unrelated to—but changes in health maintenance behaviour performance scores were strongly associated with—cardiac rehabilitation attendance.
CONCLUSIONS—Cardiac patients and practitioners may have misconceptions about the mandate and potential benefits of rehabilitation programmes. Patients who resumed role related activities early and more completely apparently did not see the need to "rehabilitate" while those who attended cardiac rehabilitation programmes enhanced their secondary prevention behaviours.


Keywords: self-efficacy; motivation; social support; cardiac recovery; cardiac rehabilitation PMID:11179268

  1. Cardiac adaptations of bullfrog tadpoles in response to chytrid infection.

    PubMed

    Salla, Raquel Fernanda; Gamero, Fernando Urban; Ribeiro, Larissa Rodrigues; Rizzi, Gisele Miglioranza; Medico, Samuel Espinosa Dal; Rissoli, Rafael Zanelli; Vieira, Conrado Augusto; Silva-Zacarin, Elaine Cristina Mathias; Leite, Domingos Silva; Abdalla, Fábio Camargo; Toledo, Luis Felipe; Costa, Monica Jones

    2015-08-01

    The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) can result in heart failure in Bd-susceptible species. Since Bd infection generally does not cause mortality in North American bullfrogs, the aim of this work was to verify whether this species presents any cardiac adaptation that could improve the tolerance to the fungus. Thus, we analyzed tadpoles' activity level, relative ventricular mass, ventricle morphology, in loco heart frequency, and in vitro cardiac function. The results indicate that infected animals present an increase in both ventricular relative mass and in myofibrils' incidence, which accompanied the increase in myocytes' diameter. Such morphological alterations enabled an increase in the in vitro twitch force that, in vivo, would result in elevation of the cardiac stroke volume. This response requires much less energy expenditure than an elevation in heart frequency, but still enables the heart to pump a higher volume of blood per minute (i.e., an increase in cardiac output). As a consequence, the energy saved in the regulation of the cardiac function of Bd-infected tadpoles can be employed in other homeostatic adjustments to avoid the lethal effect of the fungus. Whether other species present this ability, and to what extent, remains uncertain, but such possible interspecific variability might explain different mortality rates among different species of Bd-infected amphibians.

  2. Breeding maintainer lines for hybrid rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintainer lines are a component of 3-line hybrid rice production, necessary to perpetuate the male-sterile (MS) line. In practice, it is often the maintainer that is bred with an array of desirable traits, then male-sterility is transferred in through several backcrosses with the new maintainer to...

  3. A novel, low cost, disposable, pediatric pulsatile rotary ventricular pump for cardiac surgery that provides a physiological flow pattern.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Daniel E; Osterholzer, Kathryn R; Toomasian, John M; Merz, Scott I

    2008-01-01

    Research is underway to develop a novel, low cost, disposable pediatric pulsatile rotary ventricular pump (PRVP) for cardiac surgery that provides a physiological flow pattern. This is believed to offer reduced morbidity and risk exposure within this population. The PRVP will have a durable design suitable for use in short- to mid-length prolonged support after surgery without changing pumps. The design is based on proprietary MC3 technology which provides variable pumping volume per stroke, thereby allowing the pump to respond to hemodynamic status changes of the patient. The novel pump design also possesses safety advantages that prevent retrograde flow, and maintain safe circuit pressures upon occlusion of the inlet and outlet tubing. The design is ideal for simple, safe and natural flow support. Computational methods have been developed that predict output for pump chambers of varying geometry. A scaled chamber and pump head (diameter = 4 in) were prototyped to demonstrate target performance for pediatrics (2 L/min at 100 rpm). A novel means of creating a pulsatile flow and pressure output at constant RPM was developed and demonstrated to create significant surplus hydraulic energy (>10%) in a simplified mock patient circuit.

  4. Investigating data envelopment analysis model with potential improvement for integer output values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Mushtaq Taleb; Ramli, Razamin; Khalid, Ruzelan

    2015-12-01

    The decrement of input proportions in DEA model is associated with its input reduction. This reduction is apparently good for economy since it could reduce unnecessary cost resources. However, in some situations the reduction of relevant inputs such as labour could create social problems. Such inputs should thus be maintained or increased. This paper develops an advanced radial DEA model dealing with mixed integer linear programming to improve integer output values through the combination of inputs. The model can deal with real input values and integer output values. This model is valuable for situations dealing with input combination to improve integer output values as faced by most organizations.

  5. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett Jr., John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2007-04-24

    An x-ray source assembly (2700) and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode (2125) having a source spot upon which electrons (2120) impinge and a control system (2715/2720) for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure (2710) notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  6. Distributed formation output regulation of switching heterogeneous multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoli

    2013-11-01

    In this article, the distributed formation output regulation problem of linear heterogeneous multi-agent systems with uncertainty under switching topology is considered. It is a generalised framework for multi-agent coordination problems, which contains or concerns a variety of important multi-agent problems in a quite unified way. Its background includes active leader following formation for the agents to maintain desired relative distances and orientations to the leader with a predefined trajectory, and multi-agent formation with environmental inputs. With the help of canonical internal model we design a distributed dynamic output feedback to handle the distributed formation output regulation problem.

  7. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett, John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2008-06-08

    An x-ray source assembly and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode having a source spot upon which electrons impinge and a control system for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  8. Cardiac arrhythmias in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Knotts, Robert J; Garan, Hasan

    2014-08-01

    As more women with repaired congenital heart disease survive to their reproductive years and many other women are delaying pregnancy until later in life, a rising concern is the risk of cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy. Naturally occurring cardiovascular changes during pregnancy increase the likelihood that a recurrence of a previously experienced cardiac arrhythmia or a de novo arrhythmia will occur. Arrhythmias should be thoroughly investigated to determine if there is a reversible etiology, and risks/benefits of treatment options should be fully explored. We discuss the approach to working up and treating various arrhythmias during pregnancy with attention to fetal and maternal risks as well as treatment of fetal arrhythmias. Acute management in stable patients includes close monitoring and intravenous pharmacologic therapy, while DC cardioversion should be used to terminate arrhythmias in hemodynamically unstable patients. Long-term management may require continued oral antiarrhythmic therapy, with particular attention to fetal safety, to prevent complications associated with arrhythmias.

  9. Practical cardiac auscultation.

    PubMed

    Shindler, Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the practical use of the stethoscope. The art of the cardiac physical examination includes skillful auscultation. The article provides the author's personal approach to the patient for the purpose of best hearing, recognizing, and interpreting heart sounds and murmurs. It should be used as a brief introduction to the art of auscultation. This article also attempts to illustrate heart sounds and murmurs by using words and letters to phonate the sounds, and by presenting practical clinical examples where auscultation clearly influences cardiac diagnosis and treatment. The clinical sections attempt to go beyond what is available in standard textbooks by providing information and stethoscope techniques that are valuable and useful at the bedside.

  10. Cardiac nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gerson, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    The book begins with a review of the radionuclide methods available for evaluating cardiac perfusion and function. The authors discuss planar and tomographic thallium myocardial imaging, first-pass and equilibrium radionuclide angiography, and imaging with infarct-avid tracers. Several common but more specialized procedures are then reviewed: nonogemetric measurement of left ventricular volume, phase (Fourier) analysis, stroke volume ratio, right ventricular function, and diastolic function. A separate chapter is devoted to drug interventions and in particular the use of radionuclide ventriculography to monitor doxorubicin toxicity and therapy of congestive heart failure. The subsequent chapters provide a comprehensive guide to test selection, accuracy, and results in acute myocardial infarction, in postmyocardial infarction, in chronic coronary artery disease, before and after medical or surgical revascularization, in valvular heart disease, in cardiomyopathies, and in cardiac trauma.

  11. The Role of Cardiac Side Population Cells in Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yellamilli, Amritha; van Berlo, Jop H.

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited ability to regenerate. It is important to identify therapeutic strategies that enhance cardiac regeneration in order to replace cardiomyocytes lost during the progression of heart failure. Cardiac progenitor cells are interesting targets for new regenerative therapies because they are self-renewing, multipotent cells located in the heart. Cardiac side population cells (cSPCs), the first cardiac progenitor cells identified in the adult heart, have the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts. They become activated in response to cardiac injury and transplantation of cSPCs into the injured heart improves cardiac function. In this review, we will discuss the current literature on the progenitor cell properties and therapeutic potential of cSPCs. This body of work demonstrates the great promise cSPCs hold as targets for new regenerative strategies. PMID:27679798

  12. Ultrasound in cardiac trauma.

    PubMed

    Saranteas, Theodosios; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Mandila, Christina; Poularas, John; Panou, Fotios

    2017-04-01

    In the perioperative period, the emergency department or the intensive care unit accurate assessment of variable chest pain requires meticulous knowledge, diagnostic skills, and suitable usage of various diagnostic modalities. In addition, in polytrauma patients, cardiac injury including aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, acute myocardial infarction, and pericardial effusion should be immediately revealed and treated. In these patients, arrhythmias, mainly tachycardia, cardiac murmurs, or hypotension must alert physicians to suspect cardiovascular trauma, which would potentially be life threatening. Ultrasound of the heart using transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography are valuable diagnostic tools that can be used interchangeably in conjunction with other modalities such as the electrocardiogram and computed tomography for the diagnosis of cardiovascular abnormalities in trauma patients. Although ultrasound of the heart is often underused in the setting of trauma, it does have the advantages of being easily accessible, noninvasive, and rapid bedside assessment tool. This review article aims to analyze the potential cardiac injuries in trauma patients, and to provide an elaborate description of the role of echocardiography for their accurate diagnosis.

  13. Cardiac surgery 2015 reviewed.

    PubMed

    Doenst, Torsten; Strüning, Constanze; Moschovas, Alexandros; Gonzalez-Lopez, David; Essa, Yasin; Kirov, Hristo; Diab, Mahmoud; Faerber, Gloria

    2016-10-01

    For the year 2015, almost 19,000 published references can be found in PubMed when entering the search term "cardiac surgery". The last year has been again characterized by lively discussions in the fields where classic cardiac surgery and modern interventional techniques overlap. Lacking evidence in the field of coronary revascularization with either percutaneous coronary intervention or bypass surgery has been added. As in the years before, CABG remains the gold standard for the revascularization of complex stable triple-vessel disease. Plenty of new information has been presented comparing the conventional to transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) demonstrating similar short- and mid-term outcomes at high and low risk, but even a survival advantage with transfemoral TAVI at intermediate risk. In addition, there were many relevant and interesting other contributions from the purely operative arena. This review article will summarize the most pertinent publications in the fields of coronary revascularization, surgical treatment of valve disease, heart failure (i.e., transplantation and ventricular assist devices), and aortic surgery. While the article does not have the expectation of being complete and cannot be free of individual interpretation, it provides a condensed summary that is intended to give the reader "solid ground" for up-to-date decision-making in cardiac surgery.

  14. Attenuated cardiac baroreflex in men with presyncope evoked by lower body negative pressure.

    PubMed

    Wijeysundera, D N; Butler, G C; Ando, S; Pollard, M; Picton, P; Floras, J S

    2001-03-01

    Mechanisms responsible for presyncope during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in otherwise healthy subjects are poorly understood. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), blood pressure, heart rate (HR), HR power spectra, central venous pressure (CVP) and stroke volume were determined in 14 healthy men subjected to incremental LBNP. Of these, seven experienced presyncope at LBNP >-15 mmHg. Subjects who tolerated LBNP >-15 mmHg had significantly lower CVP (2.6+/-1.0 versus 7.2+/-1.2 mmHg; means+/-S.E.M., P<0.02), HR (59+/-2 versus 66+/-3 beats/min, P<0.05) and MSNA burst frequency (29.0+/-2.4 versus 39.0+/-3.5 bursts/min, P<0.05) during supine rest. LBNP at -15 mmHg had no effect on blood pressure, but caused similar and significant reductions in stroke volume and cardiac output in both groups. Subjects who tolerated LBNP had significant reflex increases in HR, MSNA burst frequency and burst amplitude with LBNP of -15 mmHg. These responses were absent in those who experienced presyncope. The gain of the cardiac baroreflex regulation of MSNA was markedly attenuated in pre-syncopal subjects (1.2+/-0.6 versus 8.8+/-1.4 bursts/100 heart beats per mmHg; P<0.001). Healthy subjects who experience presyncope in response to LBNP appear more dependent, when supine, upon MSNA to maintain preload, and less able to increase sympathetic vasoconstrictor discharge to skeletal muscle reflexively in response to orthostatic stimuli.

  15. DIST/AVC Out-Put Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Gene L.

    The first stage of development of a management information system for DIST/AVC (Division of Instructional Technology/Audio-Visual Center) is the definition of out-put units. Some constraints on the definition of output units are: 1) they should reflect goals of the organization, 2) they should reflect organizational structure and procedures, and…

  16. Power output measurement during treadmill cycling.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D A; Wiles, J D; Davison, R C R; Smith, M F; Swaine, I L

    2007-06-01

    The study aim was to consider the use of a motorised treadmill as a cycling ergometry system by assessing predicted and recorded power output values during treadmill cycling. Fourteen male cyclists completed repeated cycling trials on a motorised treadmill whilst riding their own bicycle fitted with a mobile ergometer. The speed, gradient and loading via an external pulley system were recorded during 20-s constant speed trials and used to estimate power output with an assumption about the contribution of rolling resistance. These values were then compared with mobile ergometer measurements. To assess the reliability of measured power output values, four repeated trials were conducted on each cyclist. During level cycling, the recorded power output was 257.2 +/- 99.3 W compared to the predicted power output of 258.2 +/- 99.9 W (p > 0.05). For graded cycling, there was no significant difference between measured and predicted power output, 268.8 +/- 109.8 W vs. 270.1 +/- 111.7 W, p > 0.05, SEE 1.2 %. The coefficient of variation for mobile ergometer power output measurements during repeated trials ranged from 1.5 % (95 % CI 1.2 - 2.0 %) to 1.8 % (95 % CI 1.5 - 2.4 %). These results indicate that treadmill cycling can be used as an ergometry system to assess power output in cyclists with acceptable accuracy.

  17. High Power Amplifier Harmonic Output Level Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, R. M.; Hoppe, D. J.; Khan, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented for the measurement of the harmonic output power of high power klystron amplifiers, involving coherent hemispherical radiation pattern measurements of the radiated klystron output. Results are discussed for the operation in saturated and unsaturated conditions, and with a waveguide harmonic filter included.

  18. Computer Output Microfilm and Library Catalogs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Richard W.

    Early computers dealt with mathematical and scientific problems requiring very little input and not much output, therefore high speed printing devices were not required. Today with increased variety of use, high speed printing is necessary and Computer Output Microfilm (COM) devices have been created to meet this need. This indirect process can…

  19. Reinvestigating the Noticing Function of Output

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uggen, Maren S.

    2012-01-01

    A conceptual replication of Izumi and Bigelow's research, this study used multiple measures to investigate second language (L2) learners' processes in output-input-output sequences. Specifically, it examined whether producing the target language impacts learners' attention to L2 structures in subsequent input. Thirty learners of English as a…

  20. Silicon carbide diode for increased light output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, L. B.; Mlavsky, A. I.

    1969-01-01

    Transition metals improve the overall light output and the output in particular regions of the electroluminescent of a silicon carbide semiconductor device. These metals /impurities/ introduce levels that can be pumped electrically and affect the efficiency of the recombination process involved in emission of radiation.

  1. The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative: improving the cardiac patient journey.

    PubMed

    Blackadar, Robyn; Houle, Mishaela

    2009-01-01

    The Alberta Cardiac Access Collaborative (ACAC) is a joint initiative of Alberta's health system to improve access to adult cardiac services across the patient journey. ACAC has created new care delivery models and implemented best practices across Alberta in four streams across the continuum: heart attack, patient navigation, heart failure and arrhythmia. Emergency medical providers, nurses, primary care physicians, hospitals, cardiac specialists and clinicians are all working together to integrate services, bridge jurisdictions and geography with one aim--improving the patient journey for adults in need of cardiac care.

  2. Optimal Output Trajectory Redesign for Invertible Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devasia, Santosh

    1996-01-01

    Given a desired output trajectory, inversion-based techniques find input-state trajectories required to exactly track the output. These inversion-based techniques have been successfully applied to the endpoint tracking control of multi-joint flexible manipulators and to aircraft control. The specified output trajectory uniquely determines the required input and state trajectories that are found through inversion. These input-state trajectories exactly track the desired output; however, they might not meet acceptable performance requirements. For example, during slewing maneuvers of flexible structures, the structural deformations, which depend on the required state trajectories, may be unacceptably large. Further, the required inputs might cause actuator saturation during an exact tracking maneuver for example, in the flight control of conventional takeoff and landing aircraft. In such situations, a compromise is desired between the tracking requirement and other goals such as reduction of internal vibrations and prevention of actuator saturation; the desired output trajectory needs to be redesigned.

  3. Cardiac Emergencies in Neurosurgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Petropolis, Andrea; Cappellani, Ronald B.

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative safety concerns are a major area of interest in recent years. Severe cardiac perturbation such as cardiac arrest is one of the most dreaded complications in the intraoperative period; however, little is known about the management of these events in the patients undergoing elective neurosurgery. This special group needs further attention, as it is often neither feasible nor appropriate to apply conventional advanced cardiac life support algorithms in patients undergoing neurosurgery. Factors such as neurosurgical procedure and positioning can also have a significant effect on the occurrence of cardiac arrest. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the various causes and management of cardiac emergencies with special reference to cardiac arrest during elective neurosurgical procedures, including discussion of position-related factors and resuscitative considerations in these situations. This will help to formulate possible guidelines for management of such events. PMID:25692145

  4. Sudden Cardiac Death in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wasfy, Meagan M.; Hutter, Adolph M.; Weiner, Rory B.

    2016-01-01

    There are clear health benefits to exercise; even so, patients with cardiac conditions who engage in exercise and athletic competition may on rare occasion experience sudden cardiac death (SCD). This article reviews the epidemiology and common causes of SCD in specific athlete populations. There is ongoing debate about the optimal mechanism for SCD prevention, specifically regarding the inclusion of the ECG and/or cardiac imaging in routine preparticipation sports evaluation. This controversy and contemporary screening recommendations are also reviewed. PMID:27486488

  5. Registry of Unexplained Cardiac Arrest

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Cardiac Arrest; Long QT Syndrome; Brugada Syndrome; Catecholaminergi Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia; Idiopathic VentricularFibrillation; Early Repolarization Syndrome; Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

  6. Cardiac risk stratification and protection.

    PubMed

    Halub, Meghan E; Sidwell, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    The goal of preoperative cardiac evaluation is to screen for undiagnosed cardiac disease or to find evidence of known conditions that are poorly controlled to allow management that reduces the risk of perioperative cardiac complications. A careful history and physical examination combined with the procedure-specific risk is the cornerstone of this assessment. This article reviews a brief history of prior cardiac risk stratification indexes, explores current practice guidelines by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association Task Force, reviews current methods for preoperative evaluation, discusses revascularization options, and evaluates perioperative medication recommendations.

  7. Cardiac surgery for Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tkebuchava, T; von Segesser, L K; Niederhäuser, U; Bauersfeld, U; Turina, M

    1997-01-01

    Two patients (one girl, one boy) with Kartagener syndrome (situs inversus, bronchiectasis, sinusitis), despite pulmonary problems and associated congenital cardiac anomalies, were operated on at the ages of 4 years and 7 years, respectively. They had had previous palliative treatment at the age of 3 months and 1.3 years, respectively. Both postoperative periods after total correction were without significant complications. Long-term follow-up was available for 9 and 19 years, respectively, with no manifestations of heart insufficiency. Both patients are physically active, and neither requires cardiac medication. Patients with Kartagener syndrome and associated congenital cardiac anomalies can successfully undergo multiple cardiac operations with good long-term outcome.

  8. Cardiac Dysautonomia in Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Abildtrup, Mads; Shattock, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal, hereditary, neurodegenerative disorder best known for its clinical triad of progressive motor impairment, cognitive deficits and psychiatric disturbances. Although a disease of the central nervous system, mortality surveys indicate that heart disease is a leading cause of death. The nature of such cardiac abnormalities remains unknown. Clinical findings indicate a high prevalence of autonomic nervous system dysfunction - dysautonomia - which may be a result of pathology of the central autonomic network. Dysautonomia can have profound effects on cardiac health, and pronounced autonomic dysfunction can be associated with neurogenic arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Significant advances in the knowledge of neural mechanisms in cardiac disease have recently been made which further aid our understanding of cardiac mortality in Huntington's disease. Even so, despite the evidence of aberrant autonomic activity the potential cardiac consequences of autonomic dysfunction have been somewhat ignored. In fact, underlying cardiac abnormalities such as arrhythmias have been part of the exclusion criteria in clinical autonomic Huntington's disease research. A comprehensive analysis of cardiac function in Huntington's disease patients is warranted. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to clarify how the autonomic nervous system is controlled and regulated in higher, central areas of the brain - and how these regions may be altered in neurological pathology, such as Huntington's disease. Ultimately, research will hopefully result in an improvement of management with the aim of preventing early death in Huntington's disease from cardiac causes.

  9. Salacia oblonga root improves cardiac lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: Modulation of cardiac PPAR-{alpha}-mediated transcription of fatty acid metabolic genes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tom H.-W.; Yang Qinglin; Harada, Masaki; Uberai, Jasna; Radford, Jane; Li, George Q.; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Li Yuhao . E-mail: yuhao@pharm.usyd.edu.au

    2006-01-15

    Excess cardiac triglyceride accumulation in diabetes and obesity induces lipotoxicity, which predisposes the myocytes to death. On the other hand, increased cardiac fatty acid (FA) oxidation plays a role in the development of myocardial dysfunction in diabetes. PPAR-{alpha} plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of lipid metabolism. We have previously demonstrated that the extract from Salacia oblonga root (SOE), an Ayurvedic anti-diabetic and anti-obesity medicine, improves hyperlipidemia in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats (a genetic model of type 2 diabetes and obesity) and possesses PPAR-{alpha} activating properties. Here we demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SOE reduces cardiac triglyceride and FA contents and decreases the Oil red O-stained area in the myocardium of ZDF rats, which parallels the effects on plasma triglyceride and FA levels. Furthermore, the treatment suppressed cardiac overexpression of both FA transporter protein-1 mRNA and protein in ZDF rats, suggesting inhibition of increased cardiac FA uptake as the basis for decreased cardiac FA levels. Additionally, the treatment also inhibited overexpression in ZDF rat heart of PPAR-{alpha} mRNA and protein and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, acyl-CoA oxidase and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase mRNAs and restored the downregulated acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA. These results suggest that SOE inhibits cardiac FA oxidation in ZDF rats. Thus, our findings suggest that improvement by SOE of excess cardiac lipid accumulation and increased cardiac FA oxidation in diabetes and obesity occurs by reduction of cardiac FA uptake, thereby modulating cardiac PPAR-{alpha}-mediated FA metabolic gene transcription.

  10. Silicon central pattern generators for cardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nogaret, Alain; O'Callaghan, Erin L; Lataro, Renata M; Salgado, Helio C; Meliza, C Daniel; Duncan, Edward; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm management devices provide therapies for both arrhythmias and resynchronisation but not heart failure, which affects millions of patients worldwide. This paper reviews recent advances in biophysics and mathematical engineering that provide a novel technological platform for addressing heart disease and enabling beat-to-beat adaptation of cardiac pacing in response to physiological feedback. The technology consists of silicon hardware central pattern generators (hCPGs) that may be trained to emulate accurately the dynamical response of biological central pattern generators (bCPGs). We discuss the limitations of present CPGs and appraise the advantages of analog over digital circuits for application in bioelectronic medicine. To test the system, we have focused on the cardio-respiratory oscillators in the medulla oblongata that modulate heart rate in phase with respiration to induce respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). We describe here a novel, scalable hCPG comprising physiologically realistic (Hodgkin–Huxley type) neurones and synapses. Our hCPG comprises two neurones that antagonise each other to provide rhythmic motor drive to the vagus nerve to slow the heart. We show how recent advances in modelling allow the motor output to adapt to physiological feedback such as respiration. In rats, we report on the restoration of RSA using an hCPG that receives diaphragmatic electromyography input and use it to stimulate the vagus nerve at specific time points of the respiratory cycle to slow the heart rate. We have validated the adaptation of stimulation to alterations in respiratory rate. We demonstrate that the hCPG is tuneable in terms of the depth and timing of the RSA relative to respiratory phase. These pioneering studies will now permit an analysis of the physiological role of RSA as well as its any potential therapeutic use in cardiac disease. PMID:25433077

  11. Silicon central pattern generators for cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Nogaret, Alain; O'Callaghan, Erin L; Lataro, Renata M; Salgado, Helio C; Meliza, C Daniel; Duncan, Edward; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-02-15

    Cardiac rhythm management devices provide therapies for both arrhythmias and resynchronisation but not heart failure, which affects millions of patients worldwide. This paper reviews recent advances in biophysics and mathematical engineering that provide a novel technological platform for addressing heart disease and enabling beat-to-beat adaptation of cardiac pacing in response to physiological feedback. The technology consists of silicon hardware central pattern generators (hCPGs) that may be trained to emulate accurately the dynamical response of biological central pattern generators (bCPGs). We discuss the limitations of present CPGs and appraise the advantages of analog over digital circuits for application in bioelectronic medicine. To test the system, we have focused on the cardio-respiratory oscillators in the medulla oblongata that modulate heart rate in phase with respiration to induce respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). We describe here a novel, scalable hCPG comprising physiologically realistic (Hodgkin-Huxley type) neurones and synapses. Our hCPG comprises two neurones that antagonise each other to provide rhythmic motor drive to the vagus nerve to slow the heart. We show how recent advances in modelling allow the motor output to adapt to physiological feedback such as respiration. In rats, we report on the restoration of RSA using an hCPG that receives diaphragmatic electromyography input and use it to stimulate the vagus nerve at specific time points of the respiratory cycle to slow the heart rate. We have validated the adaptation of stimulation to alterations in respiratory rate. We demonstrate that the hCPG is tuneable in terms of the depth and timing of the RSA relative to respiratory phase. These pioneering studies will now permit an analysis of the physiological role of RSA as well as its any potential therapeutic use in cardiac disease.

  12. Cell-Specific Cardiac Electrophysiology Models

    PubMed Central

    Groenendaal, Willemijn; Ortega, Francis A.; Kherlopian, Armen R.; Zygmunt, Andrew C.; Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Christini, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional cardiac model-building paradigm involves constructing a composite model using data collected from many cells. Equations are derived for each relevant cellular component (e.g., ion channel, exchanger) independently. After the equations for all components are combined to form the composite model, a subset of parameters is tuned, often arbitrarily and by hand, until the model output matches a target objective, such as an action potential. Unfortunately, such models often fail to accurately simulate behavior that is dynamically dissimilar (e.g., arrhythmia) to the simple target objective to which the model was fit. In this study, we develop a new approach in which data are collected via a series of complex electrophysiology protocols from single cardiac myocytes and then used to tune model parameters via a parallel fitting method known as a genetic algorithm (GA). The dynamical complexity of the electrophysiological data, which can only be fit by an automated method such as a GA, leads to more accurately parameterized models that can simulate rich cardiac dynamics. The feasibility of the method is first validated computationally, after which it is used to develop models of isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes that simulate the electrophysiological dynamics significantly better than does a standard guinea pig model. In addition to improving model fidelity generally, this approach can be used to generate a cell-specific model. By so doing, the approach may be useful in applications ranging from studying the implications of cell-to-cell variability to the prediction of intersubject differences in response to pharmacological treatment. PMID:25928268

  13. Extracorporeal life support in pediatric cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Low cardiac output (LCO) after corrective surgery remains a serious complication in pediatric congenital heart diseases (CHD). In the case of refractory LCO, extra corporeal life support (ECLS) extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) or ventricle assist devices (VAD) is the final therapeutic option. In the present study we have reviewed the outcomes of pediatric patients after corrective surgery necessitating ECLS and compared outcomes with pediatric patients necessitating ECLS because of dilatated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Methods A retrospective single-centre cohort study was evaluated in pediatric patients, between 1991 and 2008, that required ECLS. A total of 48 patients received ECLS, of which 23 were male and 25 female. The indications for ECLS included CHD in 32 patients and DCM in 16 patients. Results The mean age was 1.2 ± 3.9 years for CHD patients and 10.4 ± 5.8 years for DCM patients. Twenty-six patients received ECMO and 22 patients received VAD. A total of 15 patients out of 48 survived, 8 were discharged after myocardial recovery and 7 were discharged after successful heart transplantation. The overall mortality in patients with extracorporeal life support was 68%. Conclusion Although the use of ECLS shows a significantly high mortality rate it remains the ultimate chance for children. For better results, ECLS should be initiated in the operating room or shortly thereafter. Bridge to heart transplantation should be considered if there is no improvement in cardiac function to avoid irreversible multiorgan failure (MFO). PMID:21083896

  14. High Output Piezo/Triboelectric Hybrid Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Woo-Suk; Kang, Min-Gyu; Moon, Hi Gyu; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Wang, Zhong-Lin; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kang, Chong-Yun

    2015-03-01

    Recently, piezoelectric and triboelectric energy harvesting devices have been developed to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy. Especially, it is well known that triboelectric nanogenerators have a simple structure and a high output voltage. However, whereas nanostructures improve the output of triboelectric generators, its fabrication process is still complicated and unfavorable in term of the large scale and long-time durability of the device. Here, we demonstrate a hybrid generator which does not use nanostructure but generates much higher output power by a small mechanical force and integrates piezoelectric generator into triboelectric generator, derived from the simultaneous use of piezoelectric and triboelectric mechanisms in one press-and-release cycle. This hybrid generator combines high piezoelectric output current and triboelectric output voltage, which produces peak output voltage of ~370 V, current density of ~12 μA.cm-2, and average power density of ~4.44 mW.cm-2. The output power successfully lit up 600 LED bulbs by the application of a 0.2 N mechanical force and it charged a 10 μF capacitor to 10 V in 25 s. Beyond energy harvesting, this work will provide new opportunities for developing a small, built-in power source in self-powered electronics such as mobile electronics.

  15. High Output Piezo/Triboelectric Hybrid Generator

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woo-Suk; Kang, Min-Gyu; Moon, Hi Gyu; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Wang, Zhong-Lin; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kang, Chong-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Recently, piezoelectric and triboelectric energy harvesting devices have been developed to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy. Especially, it is well known that triboelectric nanogenerators have a simple structure and a high output voltage. However, whereas nanostructures improve the output of triboelectric generators, its fabrication process is still complicated and unfavorable in term of the large scale and long-time durability of the device. Here, we demonstrate a hybrid generator which does not use nanostructure but generates much higher output power by a small mechanical force and integrates piezoelectric generator into triboelectric generator, derived from the simultaneous use of piezoelectric and triboelectric mechanisms in one press-and-release cycle. This hybrid generator combines high piezoelectric output current and triboelectric output voltage, which produces peak output voltage of ~370 V, current density of ~12 μA·cm−2, and average power density of ~4.44 mW·cm−2. The output power successfully lit up 600 LED bulbs by the application of a 0.2 N mechanical force and it charged a 10 μF capacitor to 10 V in 25 s. Beyond energy harvesting, this work will provide new opportunities for developing a small, built-in power source in self-powered electronics such as mobile electronics. PMID:25791299

  16. Potential output and the recent productivity decline

    SciTech Connect

    Tatom, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Recent revisions in the measures of the nation's output and capital stock, as well as minor changes in procedures, have altered the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis' measures of potential output. The major conclusions of earlier Bank studies, however, have been unaffected by these changes. In particular, the growth of potential output has been sharply reduced by the 1973 to 1974 and 1979 to 1980 energy shocks and subsequent adjustments in the desired capital intensity of production. These effects have been confirmed by the re-estimation of earlier production function coefficients, and, more important, the confirmation of the prior empirical estimates in the latest round of energy price increases. The decline in the growth of potential output since 1973 has, in recent years, been acknowledged by the Council of Economic Advisers, (CEA), but through a trend reduction rather than through sharp temporary declines in 1974 to 1975 and 1979 to 1980 as implied here. Nonetheless, the level of potential output estimated by the CEA in recent years is little different from this Bank's estimate. The slowing in potential output masks a sharper reduction in the growth of productivity in recent years. A detailed analysis of productivity developments shows a marked deterioration in growth relative to past trends. In the measurement of potential output, this deterioration has been partially offset by a more rapid growth of both potential and actual employment. 17 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  17. High output piezo/triboelectric hybrid generator.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo-Suk; Kang, Min-Gyu; Moon, Hi Gyu; Baek, Seung-Hyub; Yoon, Seok-Jin; Wang, Zhong-Lin; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kang, Chong-Yun

    2015-03-20

    Recently, piezoelectric and triboelectric energy harvesting devices have been developed to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy. Especially, it is well known that triboelectric nanogenerators have a simple structure and a high output voltage. However, whereas nanostructures improve the output of triboelectric generators, its fabrication process is still complicated and unfavorable in term of the large scale and long-time durability of the device. Here, we demonstrate a hybrid generator which does not use nanostructure but generates much higher output power by a small mechanical force and integrates piezoelectric generator into triboelectric generator, derived from the simultaneous use of piezoelectric and triboelectric mechanisms in one press-and-release cycle. This hybrid generator combines high piezoelectric output current and triboelectric output voltage, which produces peak output voltage of ~370 V, current density of ~12 μA · cm(-2), and average power density of ~4.44 mW · cm(-2). The output power successfully lit up 600 LED bulbs by the application of a 0.2 N mechanical force and it charged a 10 μF capacitor to 10 V in 25 s. Beyond energy harvesting, this work will provide new opportunities for developing a small, built-in power source in self-powered electronics such as mobile electronics.

  18. Pulmonary tissue volume, cardiac output, and diffusing capacity in sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbanck, S.; Larsson, H.; Linnarsson, D.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.; Paiva, M.

    1997-01-01

    In microgravity (microG) humans have marked changes in body fluids, with a combination of an overall fluid loss and a redistribution of fluids in the cranial direction. We investigated whether interstitial pulmonary edema develops as a result of a headward fluid shift or whether pulmonary tissue fluid volume is reduced as a result of the overall loss of body fluid. We measured pulmonary tissue volume (Vti), capillary blood flow, and diffusing capacity in four subjects before, during, and after 10 days of exposure to microG during spaceflight. Measurements were made by rebreathing a gas mixture containing small amounts of acetylene, carbon monoxide, and argon. Measurements made early in flight in two subjects showed no change in Vti despite large increases in stroke volume (40%) and diffusing capacity (13%) consistent with increased pulmonary capillary blood volume. Late in-flight measurements in four subjects showed a 25% reduction in Vti compared with preflight controls (P < 0.001). There was a concomittant reduction in stroke volume, to the extent that it was no longer significantly different from preflight control. Diffusing capacity remained elevated (11%; P < 0.05) late in flight. These findings suggest that, despite increased pulmonary perfusion and pulmonary capillary blood volume, interstitial pulmonary edema does not result from exposure to microG.

  19. Changes in cardiac output and tibial artery flow during and after progressive LBNP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A 3.0 MHz Pulsed Doppler velocity meter (PD) was used to determine blood velocities in the ascending aorta from the suprasternal notch before, during and after progressive 5 min stages of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in 7 subjects. Changes in stroke volume were calculated from the systolic velocity integrals. A unique 20 MHz PD was used to estimate bloodflow in the posterior tibial artery. With -20 torr mean stroke volume fell 11% and then continued to decline by 48% before LBNP was terminated. Mean tibial flow fell progressively with LBNP stress, due to an increase in reverse flow component and a reduction in peak forward flow and diameter. Stroke volume increased and heart rate fell dramatically during the first 15 sec of recovery. The LBNP was terminated early in 2 subjects because of vasovagal symptons (V). During V the stroke volume rose 86% which more than compensated for the drop in heart rate. This implies that V is accompanied by a paradoxical increase in venous return and that the reduction in HR is the primary cardiovascular event. During the first 15 sec of recovery these 2 subjects had a distinctive marked rise to heart rate reminiscent of the Bainbridge reflex.

  20. Allometric scaling of decompression sickness risk in terrestrial mammals; cardiac output explains risk of decompression sickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlman, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    A probabilistic model was used to predict decompression sickness (DCS) outcome in pig (70 and 20 kg), hamster (100 g), rat (220 g) and mouse (20 g) following air saturation dives. The data set included 179 pig, 200 hamster, 360 rat, and 224 mouse exposures to saturation pressures ranging from 1.9–15.2 ATA and with varying decompression rates (0.9–156 ATA • min‑1). Single exponential kinetics described the tissue partial pressures (Ptiss) of N2: Ptiss =  ∫(Pamb – Ptiss) • τ‑1 dt, where Pamb is ambient N2 pressure and τ is a time constant. The probability of DCS [P(DCS)] was predicted from the risk function: P(DCS) = 1‑e‑r, where r = ∫(PtissN2 ‑ Thr ‑ Pamb) • Pamb–1 dt, and Thr is a threshold parameter. An equation that scaled τ with body mass included a constant (c) and an allometric scaling parameter (n), and the best model included n, Thr, and two c. The final model provided accurate predictions for 58 out of 61 dive profiles for pig, hamster, rat, and mouse. Thus, body mass helped improve the prediction of DCS risk in four mammalian species over a body mass range covering 3 orders of magnitude.

  1. Allometric scaling of decompression sickness risk in terrestrial mammals; cardiac output explains risk of decompression sickness

    PubMed Central

    Fahlman, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    A probabilistic model was used to predict decompression sickness (DCS) outcome in pig (70 and 20 kg), hamster (100 g), rat (220 g) and mouse (20 g) following air saturation dives. The data set included 179 pig, 200 hamster, 360 rat, and 224 mouse exposures to saturation pressures ranging from 1.9–15.2 ATA and with varying decompression rates (0.9–156 ATA • min−1). Single exponential kinetics described the tissue partial pressures (Ptiss) of N2: Ptiss =  ∫(Pamb – Ptiss) • τ−1 dt, where Pamb is ambient N2 pressure and τ is a time constant. The probability of DCS [P(DCS)] was predicted from the risk function: P(DCS) = 1−e−r, where r = ∫(PtissN2 − Thr − Pamb) • Pamb–1 dt, and Thr is a threshold parameter. An equation that scaled τ with body mass included a constant (c) and an allometric scaling parameter (n), and the best model included n, Thr, and two c. The final model provided accurate predictions for 58 out of 61 dive profiles for pig, hamster, rat, and mouse. Thus, body mass helped improve the prediction of DCS risk in four mammalian species over a body mass range covering 3 orders of magnitude. PMID:28150725

  2. Assessment of cardiac output from noninvasive determination of arterial pressure profile in subjects at rest.

    PubMed

    Antonutto, G; Girardis, M; Tuniz, D; Petri, E; Capelli, C

    1994-01-01

    The stroke volume of the left ventricle (SV) was calculated from noninvasive recordings of the arterial pressure using a finger photoplethysmograph and compared to the values obtained by pulsed Doppler echocardiography (PDE). A group of 19 healthy men and 12 women [mean ages: 20.8 (SD 1.6) and 22.2 (SD 1.6) years respectively] were studied at rest in the supine position. The ratio of the area below the ejection phase of the arterial pressure wave (A(s)) to SV, as obtained by PDE, yielded a "calibration factor" dimensionally equal to the hydraulic impedance of the system (Zao = A(s).SV-1). The Zao amounted on average to 0.062 (SD 0.018) mmHg.s.cm-3 for the men and to 0.104 (SD 0.024) mmHg.s.cm-3 for the women. The Zao was also estimated from the equation: Zao = a.(d + b.HR + c.PP + e.MAP)-1, where HR was the heart rate, PP the pulse pressure, MAP the mean arterial pressure and the coefficients of the equation were obtained by an iterating statistical package. The value of Zao thus obtained allowed the calculation of SV from measurements derived from the photoplethysmograph only. The mean percentage error between the SV thus obtained and those experimentally determined by PDE amounted to 14.8 and 15.6 for the men and the women, respectively. The error of the estimate was reduced to 12.3 and to 11.1, respectively, if the factor Zao, experimentally obtained from a given heart beat, was subsequently applied to other beats to obtain SV from the A(s) measurement in the same subject.

  3. Monitoring Non-Invasive Cardiac Output and Stroke Volume during Experimental Human Hypovolaemia and Resuscitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Methods. Healthy human subjects (n¼21) underwent central hypovolaemia through progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) until the onset of presyncope...lower body negative pressure (LBNP), a well-established experimental model of central hypovolaemia.15 We assessed how well the investiga- tional methods...JJ, Schreuder JJ. Computation of aortic flow from pressure in humans using a nonlinear, three-element model. J Appl Physiol 1993; 74: 2566–73 8

  4. Cardiac output, O2 delivery and VO2 kinetics during step exercise in acute normobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lador, Frédéric; Tam, Enrico; Adami, Alessandra; Kenfack, Marcel Azabji; Bringard, Aurélien; Cautero, Michela; Moia, Christian; Morel, Denis R; Capelli, Carlo; Ferretti, Guido

    2013-04-01

    We hypothesised that phase II time constant (τ2) of alveolar O2 uptake ( [Formula: see text] ) is longer in hypoxia than in normoxia as a consequence of a parallel deceleration of the kinetics of O2 delivery ( [Formula: see text] ). To test this hypothesis, breath-by-breath [Formula: see text] and beat-by-beat [Formula: see text] were measured in eight male subjects (25.4±3.4yy, 1.81±0.05m, 78.8±5.7kg) at the onset of cycling exercise (100W) in normoxia and acute hypoxia ( [Formula: see text] ). Blood lactate ([La]b) accumulation during the exercise transient was also measured. The τ2 for [Formula: see text] was shorter than that for [Formula: see text] in normoxia (8.3±6.8s versus 17.8±3.1s), but not in hypoxia (31.5±21.7s versus 28.4 5.4±5.4s). [La]b was increased in the exercise transient in hypoxia (3.0±0.5mM at exercise versus 1.7±0.2mM at rest), but not in normoxia. We conclude that the slowing down of the [Formula: see text] kinetics generated the longer τ2 for [Formula: see text] in hypoxia, with consequent contribution of anaerobic lactic metabolism to the energy balance in exercise transient, witnessed by the increase in [La]b.

  5. Allometric scaling of decompression sickness risk in terrestrial mammals; cardiac output explains risk of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Andreas

    2017-02-02

    A probabilistic model was used to predict decompression sickness (DCS) outcome in pig (70 and 20 kg), hamster (100 g), rat (220 g) and mouse (20 g) following air saturation dives. The data set included 179 pig, 200 hamster, 360 rat, and 224 mouse exposures to saturation pressures ranging from 1.9-15.2 ATA and with varying decompression rates (0.9-156 ATA • min(-1)). Single exponential kinetics described the tissue partial pressures (Ptiss) of N2: Ptiss =  ∫(Pamb - Ptiss) • τ(-1) dt, where Pamb is ambient N2 pressure and τ is a time constant. The probability of DCS [P(DCS)] was predicted from the risk function: P(DCS) = 1-e(-r), where r = ∫(PtissN2 - Thr - Pamb) • Pamb(-1) dt, and Thr is a threshold parameter. An equation that scaled τ with body mass included a constant (c) and an allometric scaling parameter (n), and the best model included n, Thr, and two c. The final model provided accurate predictions for 58 out of 61 dive profiles for pig, hamster, rat, and mouse. Thus, body mass helped improve the prediction of DCS risk in four mammalian species over a body mass range covering 3 orders of magnitude.

  6. Short Duration Combined Mild Hypothermia Improves Resuscitation Outcomes in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Zhengfei; Li, Heng; Ding, Youde; Huang, Zitong; Li, Yongqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effects of combined hypothermia with short duration maintenance on the resuscitation outcomes in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods. Fourteen porcine models were electrically induced with VF and untreated for 11 mins. All animals were successfully resuscitated manually and then randomized into two groups: combined mild hypothermia (CH group) and normothermia group (NT group). A combined hypothermia of ice cold saline infusion and surface cooling was implemented in the animals of the CH group and maintained for 4 hours. The survival outcomes and neurological function were evaluated every 24 hours until a maximum of 96 hours. Neuron apoptosis in hippocampus was analyzed. Results. There were no significant differences in baseline physiologies and primary resuscitation outcomes between both groups. Obvious improvements of cardiac output were observed in the CH group at 120, 180, and 240 mins following resuscitation. The animals demonstrated better survival at 96 hours in the CH group when compared to the NT group. In comparison with the NT group, favorable neurological functions were observed in the CH group. Conclusion. Short duration combined cooling initiated after resuscitation improves survival and neurological outcomes in a porcine model of prolonged VF. PMID:26558261

  7. [Cardiac rehabilitation in women].

    PubMed

    Ghannem, M; Ghannem, L; Lamouchi, S; Justin, K D; Meimoun, P; Ghannem, L

    2016-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) occurs later in life in women when compared to men (10 years later). The FAST-MI study has shown that the profile of women with CAD has changed in the past 15 years, they are younger, more obese, and usually smokers. Whatever the age at which CAD occurs in women, the prognosis tends to be worse than in men, despite a higher frequency of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with angiographically normal coronary arteries in women. In women without significant lesion at coronary angiography, the WISE study has shown abnormalities of the coronary vasomotricy. Despite its beneficial effect on morbidity and mortality, cardiac rehabilitation is underused particularly in women. Indeed, several factors do not encourage a woman to follow a cardiac rehabilitation program, even after an ACS. These factors may be cultural, domestic, familial, orthopedic, or even the fear of exercising. Therefore, physicians have to be particularly convincing in women, in order to have them participating in rehabilitation programs. Physical capacity is lower in women when compared to men. However, the weaker the physical capacity, the better the benefit of cardiac rehabilitation. Physical endurance training continuously or in interval, associated to muscle strengthening can improve the physical capacity in women. Vascular risk factors correction is also an important step for the management of women with CAD. Therapeutic education and several available workshops help women to better understand their disease and to improve their self-management when they return home. Anxiety, depression, and sexual dysfunction frequently deteriorate the quality of life of our patients. Therefore, psychological management is also essential in our departments.

  8. Design of hydraulic output Stirling engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toscano, W. M.; Harvey, A. C.; Lee, K.

    1983-01-01

    A hydraulic output system for the RE-1000 free piston stirling engine (FPSE) was designed. The hydraulic output system can be readily integrated with the existing hot section of RE-1000 FPSE. The system has two simply supported diaphragms which separate the engine gas from the hydraulic fluid, a dynamic balance mechanism, and a novel, null center band hydraulic pump. The diaphragms are designed to endure more than 10 billion cycles, and to withstand the differential pressure load as high as 14 MPa. The projected thermodynamic performance of the hydraulic output version of RE-1000 FPSE is 1.87 kW at 29/7 percent brake efficiency.

  9. Output-Isolation And Protection Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Charles A.; Kellogg, Gary V.

    1989-01-01

    Output-isolation circuit couples precise analog signals (-10 to +10 V, 0 to 20 kHz) from computer or from other electronic equipment to external electronic equipment that may be at different ground potential. Circuit functions in presence of common-mode voltages up to 2,500 Vac or 3,500 Vdc. To prevent damage from accidental connection of output leads to powerlines or other sources of high voltage, circuit includes features that protect input and output signal lines against normal-mode overvoltages up to 120 V ac or dc.

  10. Generalization ability of perceptrons with continuous outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bös, S.; Kinzel, W.; Opper, M.

    1993-02-01

    In this paper we examine the influence of different input-output relations on the generalization ability of a single-layer perceptron. The input-output relations can be linear, binary, or sigmoid. With this choice we take into account most of the cases which are of present interest. The generalization problem will be realizable or unrealizable if the input-output relations for teacher and student are identical or not. We show that sometimes it can have a positive effect on the generalization ability, if one learns with errors.

  11. Cardiac Rehabilitation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercising are other risk factors. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Start Here Cardiac Rehabilitation (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Cardiac Rehabilitation (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? (American Heart Association) - ...

  12. Transgenic overexpression of ribonucleotide reductase improves cardiac performance

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowski, Sarah G.; Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Korte, Frederick Steven; Luo, Zhaoxiong; Robinson-Hamm, Jacqueline N.; Page, Jennifer L.; Brozovich, Frank; Weiss, Robert S.; Tian, Rong; Murry, Charles E.; Regnier, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that cardiac myosin can use 2-deoxy-ATP (dATP) as an energy substrate, that it enhances contraction and relaxation with minimal effect on calcium-handling properties in vitro, and that contractile enhancement occurs with only minor elevation of cellular [dATP]. Here, we report the effect of chronically enhanced dATP concentration on cardiac function using a transgenic mouse that overexpresses the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (TgRR), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in de novo deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis. Hearts from TgRR mice had elevated left ventricular systolic function compared with wild-type (WT) mice, both in vivo and in vitro, without signs of hypertrophy or altered diastolic function. Isolated cardiomyocytes from TgRR mice had enhanced contraction and relaxation, with no change in Ca2+ transients, suggesting targeted improvement of myofilament function. TgRR hearts had normal ATP and only slightly decreased phosphocreatine levels by 31P NMR spectroscopy, and they maintained rate responsiveness to dobutamine challenge. These data demonstrate long-term (at least 5-mo) elevation of cardiac [dATP] results in sustained elevation of basal left ventricular performance, with maintained β-adrenergic responsiveness and energetic reserves. Combined with results from previous studies, we conclude that this occurs primarily via enhanced myofilament activation and contraction, with similar or faster ability to relax. The data are sufficiently compelling to consider elevated cardiac [dATP] as a therapeutic option to treat systolic dysfunction. PMID:23530224

  13. Designing for Maintainability and System Availability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lalli, Vincent R.; Packard, Michael H.

    1997-01-01

    The final goal for a delivered system (whether a car, aircraft, avionics box or computer) should be its availability to operate and perform its intended function over its expected design life. Hence, in designing a system, we cannot think in terms of delivering the system and just walking away. The system supplier needs to provide support throughout the operating life of the product. Here, supportability requires an effective combination of reliability, maintainability, logistics and operations engineering (as well as safety engineering) to have a system that is available for its intended use throughout its designated mission lifetime. Maintainability is a key driving element in the effective support and upkeep of the system as well as providing the ability to modify and upgrade the system throughout its lifetime. This paper then, will concentrate on maintainability and its integration into the system engineering and design process. The topics to be covered include elements of maintainability, the total cost of ownership, how system availability, maintenance and logistics costs and spare parts cost effect the overall program costs. System analysis and maintainability will show how maintainability fits into the overall systems approach to project development. Maintainability processes and documents will focus on how maintainability is to be performed and what documents are typically generated for a large scale program. Maintainability analysis shows how trade-offs can be performed for various alternative components. The conclusions summarize the paper and are followed by specific problems for hands-on training.

  14. Programmed evolution for optimization of orthogonal metabolic output in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Eckdahl, Todd T; Campbell, A Malcolm; Heyer, Laurie J; Poet, Jeffrey L; Blauch, David N; Snyder, Nicole L; Atchley, Dustin T; Baker, Erich J; Brown, Micah; Brunner, Elizabeth C; Callen, Sean A; Campbell, Jesse S; Carr, Caleb J; Carr, David R; Chadinha, Spencer A; Chester, Grace I; Chester, Josh; Clarkson, Ben R; Cochran, Kelly E; Doherty, Shannon E; Doyle, Catherine; Dwyer, Sarah; Edlin, Linnea M; Evans, Rebecca A; Fluharty, Taylor; Frederick, Janna; Galeota-Sprung, Jonah; Gammon, Betsy L; Grieshaber, Brandon; Gronniger, Jessica; Gutteridge, Katelyn; Henningsen, Joel; Isom, Bradley; Itell, Hannah L; Keffeler, Erica C; Lantz, Andrew J; Lim, Jonathan N; McGuire, Erin P; Moore, Alexander K; Morton, Jerrad; Nakano, Meredith; Pearson, Sara A; Perkins, Virginia; Parrish, Phoebe; Pierson, Claire E; Polpityaarachchige, Sachith; Quaney, Michael J; Slattery, Abagael; Smith, Kathryn E; Spell, Jackson; Spencer, Morgan; Taye, Telavive; Trueblood, Kamay; Vrana, Caroline J; Whitesides, E Tucker

    2015-01-01

    Current use of microbes for metabolic engineering suffers from loss of metabolic output due to natural selection. Rather than combat the evolution of bacterial populations, we chose to embrace what makes biological engineering unique among engineering fields - evolving materials. We harnessed bacteria to compute solutions to the biological problem of metabolic pathway optimization. Our approach is called Programmed Evolution to capture two concepts. First, a population of cells is programmed with DNA code to enable it to compute solutions to a chosen optimization problem. As analog computers, bacteria process known and unknown inputs and direct the output of their biochemical hardware. Second, the system employs the evolution of bacteria toward an optimal metabolic solution by imposing fitness defined by metabolic output. The current study is a proof-of-concept for Programmed Evolution applied to the optimization of a metabolic pathway for the conversion of caffeine to theophylline in E. coli. Introduced genotype variations included strength of the promoter and ribosome binding site, plasmid copy number, and chaperone proteins. We constructed 24 strains using all combinations of the genetic variables. We used a theophylline riboswitch and a tetracycline resistance gene to link theophylline production to fitness. After subjecting the mixed population to selection, we measured a change in the distribution of genotypes in the population and an increased conversion of caffeine to theophylline among the most fit strains, demonstrating Programmed Evolution. Programmed Evolution inverts the standard paradigm in metabolic engineering by harnessing evolution instead of fighting it. Our modular system enables researchers to program bacteria and use evolution to determine the combination of genetic control elements that optimizes catabolic or anabolic output and to maintain it in a population of cells. Programmed Evolution could be used for applications in energy

  15. Managing high-output stomas: module 3 of 3.

    PubMed

    Slater, Rebecca; Gabe, Simon

    Enterocutaneous fistulae (ECF) and high-output stomas are challenging to manage, owing to the large volume of loss that may result in severe dehydration, electrolyte imbalances, malnutrition and sepsis. It is imperative that this group of patients receive adequate nutrition, as malnutrition and sepsis are the leading cause of death. Treatment is complex and based on various situations, treatment can be medical/conservative management or surgical. Depending on the site of the fistula and the length of residual intestine contributing as the cause of a high output stoma with the nutritional status of the patient, clinicians have to decide whether parenteral nutrition (PN) or enteral nutrition (EN) should be established. As previously discussed in module 1 and 2 (Gabe, 2013; Gabe and Slater, 2013) the theme of nutritional management and appliance/accessory selection to manage patients with ECF and high output stomas was outlined. The aim of providing an understanding of the nutritional needs and the practicalities of maintaining appliance adherence, and in turn, a reduction in the breakdown of the peri-stomal skin was described. Module 3 aims to provide understanding for the reader that may encounter patients undergoing surgery for the management of their ECF or high-output stoma. Lastly it was felt necessary to discuss the subject of intestinal transplantation. This complex surgical option is not available to all patients with intestinal failure and only undertaken at a couple of recognised centres. The process of referring patients that are deemed suitable for intestinal transplantation will be addressed and what the surgery entails with long-term outcomes and the quality of life for the patient.

  16. Programmed Evolution for Optimization of Orthogonal Metabolic Output in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Eckdahl, Todd T.; Campbell, A. Malcolm; Heyer, Laurie J.; Poet, Jeffrey L.; Blauch, David N.; Snyder, Nicole L.; Atchley, Dustin T.; Baker, Erich J.; Brown, Micah; Brunner, Elizabeth C.; Callen, Sean A.; Campbell, Jesse S.; Carr, Caleb J.; Carr, David R.; Chadinha, Spencer A.; Chester, Grace I.; Chester, Josh; Clarkson, Ben R.; Cochran, Kelly E.; Doherty, Shannon E.; Doyle, Catherine; Dwyer, Sarah; Edlin, Linnea M.; Evans, Rebecca A.; Fluharty, Taylor; Frederick, Janna; Galeota-Sprung, Jonah; Gammon, Betsy L.; Grieshaber, Brandon; Gronniger, Jessica; Gutteridge, Katelyn; Henningsen, Joel; Isom, Bradley; Itell, Hannah L.; Keffeler, Erica C.; Lantz, Andrew J.; Lim, Jonathan N.; McGuire, Erin P.; Moore, Alexander K.; Morton, Jerrad; Nakano, Meredith; Pearson, Sara A.; Perkins, Virginia; Parrish, Phoebe; Pierson, Claire E.; Polpityaarachchige, Sachith; Quaney, Michael J.; Slattery, Abagael; Smith, Kathryn E.; Spell, Jackson; Spencer, Morgan; Taye, Telavive; Trueblood, Kamay; Vrana, Caroline J.; Whitesides, E. Tucker

    2015-01-01

    Current use of microbes for metabolic engineering suffers from loss of metabolic output due to natural selection. Rather than combat the evolution of bacterial populations, we chose to embrace what makes biological engineering unique among engineering fields – evolving materials. We harnessed bacteria to compute solutions to the biological problem of metabolic pathway optimization. Our approach is called Programmed Evolution to capture two concepts. First, a population of cells is programmed with DNA code to enable it to compute solutions to a chosen optimization problem. As analog computers, bacteria process known and unknown inputs and direct the output of their biochemical hardware. Second, the system employs the evolution of bacteria toward an optimal metabolic solution by imposing fitness defined by metabolic output. The current study is a proof-of-concept for Programmed Evolution applied to the optimization of a metabolic pathway for the conversion of caffeine to theophylline in E. coli. Introduced genotype variations included strength of the promoter and ribosome binding site, plasmid copy number, and chaperone proteins. We constructed 24 strains using all combinations of the genetic variables. We used a theophylline riboswitch and a tetracycline resistance gene to link theophylline production to fitness. After subjecting the mixed population to selection, we measured a change in the distribution of genotypes in the population and an increased conversion of caffeine to theophylline among the most fit strains, demonstrating Programmed Evolution. Programmed Evolution inverts the standard paradigm in metabolic engineering by harnessing evolution instead of fighting it. Our modular system enables researchers to program bacteria and use evolution to determine the combination of genetic control elements that optimizes catabolic or anabolic output and to maintain it in a population of cells. Programmed Evolution could be used for applications in energy

  17. Home cardiac rehabilitation for congestive heart failure: a nursing case management approach.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, B A

    1999-01-01

    As the only major cardiovascular disease increasing in incidence and prevalence, congestive heart failure (CHF) is a major health threat. Progression of the disease often leads to severe disability and requires intensive medical and psychological management. Cardiac rehabilitation for CHF can improve a patient's functional ability, alleviate activity-related symptoms, improve quality of life, and restore and maintain physiological, psychological, and social status. The expansion of home care services and advances in technology allow cardiac rehabilitation to take place in the patient's home. Because of their training in health promotion and prevention, assessment, and coordination of services, nurses are the ideal providers of comprehensive home cardiac rehabilitation. Financially, physically, and psychologically beneficial for CHF patients and their families, home cardiac rehabilitation is also cost-effective for society. This article substantiates the benefits of home cardiac rehabilitation for patients with CHF and explains why nurses are the ideal case managers for such programs.

  18. Calcineurin activity is required for cardiac remodelling in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eunhee; Yeung, Fan; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Calcium fluctuations and cardiac hypertrophy occur during pregnancy, but the role of the well-studied calcium-activated phosphatase, calcineurin, has not been studied in this setting. The purpose of this study was to determine whether calcineurin signalling is required for cardiac remodelling during pregnancy in mice. Methods and results We first examined calcineurin expression in the heart of mice during pregnancy. We found both calcineurin levels and activity were significantly increased in early-pregnancy and decreased in late-pregnancy. Since progesterone levels start to rise in early-pregnancy, we investigated whether progesterone alone was sufficient to modulate calcineurin levels in vivo. After implantation of progesterone pellets in non-pregnant female mice, cardiac mass increased, whereas cardiac function was maintained. In addition, calcineurin levels increased, which is also consistent with early-pregnancy. To determine whether these effects were occurring in the cardiac myocytes, we treated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) with pregnancy-associated sex hormones. We found that progesterone treatment, but not oestradiol, increased calcineurin levels. To obtain a functional read-out of increased calcineurin activity, we measured the activity of the transcription factor NFAT, a downstream target of calcineurin. Progesterone treatment significantly increased NFAT activity in NRVMs, and this was blocked by the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA), showing that the progesterone-mediated increase in NFAT activity requires calcineurin activity. Importantly, CsA treatment of mice completely blocked pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Conclusion Our results show that calcineurin is required for pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy, and that calcineurin activity in early-pregnancy is due at least in part to increased progesterone. PMID:23985902

  19. Are older patients’ cardiac rehabilitation needs being met?

    PubMed Central

    Tolmie, Elizabeth P; Lindsay, Grace M; Kelly, Tim; Tolson, Debbie; Baxter, Susan; Belcher, Philip R

    2009-01-01

    Aims. The primary aim of this study was to examine the needs of older people in relation to cardiac rehabilitation and to determine if these were currently being met. A secondary aim was to compare illness representations, quality of life and anxiety and depression in groups with different levels of attendance at a cardiac rehabilitation programme. Background. Coronary heart disease accounted for over seven million cardiovascular deaths globally in 2001. Associated deaths increase with age and are highest in those older than 65. Effective cardiac rehabilitation can assist independent function and maintain health but programme uptake rates are low. We have, therefore, focussed specifically on the older patient to determine reasons for the low uptake. Design. Mixed methods. Methods. A purposive sample of 31 older men and women (≥65 years) completed three questionnaires to determine illness representations, quality of life and anxiety and depression. They then underwent a brief clinical assessment and participated in a face-to-face audio-taped interview. Results. Quantitative: Older adults, who did not attend a cardiac rehabilitation programme, had significantly poorer personal control and depression scores (p < 0·01) and lower quality of life scores than those who had attended. Few achieved recommended risk factor reduction targets. Qualitative: The three main themes identified as reflecting the views and experiences of and attendance at the cardiac rehabilitation programme were: ‘The sensible thing to do’, ‘Assessing the impact’ and ‘Nothing to gain’. Conclusions. Irrespective of level of attendance, cardiac rehabilitation programmes are not meeting the needs of many older people either in terms of risk factor reduction or programme uptake. More appropriate programmes are needed. Relevance to clinical practice. Cardiac rehabilitation nurses are ideally placed to identify the rehabilitation needs of older people. Identifying these from the older

  20. Hierarchical approaches for systems modeling in cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Gould, Russell A; Aboulmouna, Lina M; Varner, Jeffrey D; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2013-01-01

    Ordered cardiac morphogenesis and function are essential for all vertebrate life. The heart begins as a simple contractile tube, but quickly grows and morphs into a multichambered pumping organ complete with valves, while maintaining regulation of blood flow and nutrient distribution. Though not identical, cardiac morphogenesis shares many molecular and morphological processes across vertebrate species. Quantitative data across multiple time and length scales have been gathered through decades of reductionist single variable analyses. These range from detailed molecular signaling pathways at the cellular levels to cardiac function at the tissue/organ levels. However, none of these components act in true isolation from others, and each, in turn, exhibits short- and long-range effects in both time and space. With the absence of a gene, entire signaling cascades and genetic profiles may be shifted, resulting in complex feedback mechanisms. Also taking into account local microenvironmental changes throughout development, it is apparent that a systems level approach is an essential resource to accelerate information generation concerning the functional relationships across multiple length scales (molecular data vs physiological function) and structural development. In this review, we discuss relevant in vivo and in vitro experimental approaches, compare different computational frameworks for systems modeling, and the latest information about systems modeling of cardiac development. Finally, we conclude with some important future directions for cardiac systems modeling.

  1. NITROGEN OUTPUTS FROM FECAL AND URINE DEPOSITION OF SMALL MAMMALS: IMPLICATIONS FOR NITROGEN CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contribution of small mammals to nitrogen cycling is poorly understood, but it could have reverberations back to the producer community by maintaining or perhaps magnifying nitrogen availability. Our objective was to model nitrogen outputs (deposition of feces and urine) of ...

  2. Curvature Analysis of Cardiac Excitation Wavefronts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    computational cardiac-cell network accurately reproduces a particular kind of cardiac arrhythmia , such as ventricular fibrillation. Curvature Analysis of Cardiac...network accurately reproduces a particular kind of cardiac arrhythmia , such as ventricular fibrillation. Index Terms Cardiac excitation waves...isopotentials, Bézier curves, curvature, cardiac arrhythmia and fibrillation Ç 1 INTRODUCTION AN estimated 81,000,000 American adults, more than onein three

  3. Capillary Force Lithography for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Macadangdang, Jesse; Lee, Hyun Jung; Carson, Daniel; Jiao, Alex; Fugate, James; Pabon, Lil; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide1. Cardiac tissue engineering holds much promise to deliver groundbreaking medical discoveries with the aims of developing functional tissues for cardiac regeneration as well as in vitro screening assays. However, the ability to create high-fidelity models of heart tissue has proven difficult. The heart’s extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex structure consisting of both biochemical and biomechanical signals ranging from the micro- to the nanometer scale2. Local mechanical loading conditions and cell-ECM interactions have recently been recognized as vital components in cardiac tissue engineering3-5. A large portion of the cardiac ECM is composed of aligned collagen fibers with nano-scale diameters that significantly influences tissue architecture and electromechanical coupling2. Unfortunately, few methods have been able to mimic the organization of ECM fibers down to the nanometer scale. Recent advancements in nanofabrication techniques, however, have enabled the design and fabrication of scalable scaffolds that mimic the in vivo structural and substrate stiffness cues of the ECM in the heart6-9. Here we present the development of two reproducible, cost-effective, and scalable nanopatterning processes for the functional alignment of cardiac cells using the biocompatible polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)8 and a polyurethane (PU) based polymer. These anisotropically nanofabricated substrata (ANFS) mimic the underlying ECM of well-organized, aligned tissues and can be used to investigate the role of nanotopography on cell morphology and function10-14. Using a nanopatterned (NP) silicon master as a template, a polyurethane acrylate (PUA) mold is fabricated. This PUA mold is then used to pattern the PU or PLGA hydrogel via UV-assisted or solvent-mediated capillary force lithography (CFL), respectively15,16. Briefly, PU or PLGA pre-polymer is drop dispensed onto a glass coverslip and the PUA

  4. Coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guolin; Shu Ting; Yuan Chengwei; Zhang Jun; Yang Jianhua; Jin Zhenxing; Yin Yi; Wu Dapeng; Zhu Jun; Ren Heming; Yang Jie

    2010-12-15

    The coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves is a promising technique for the development of high power microwave technologies, as it can enhance the output capacities of presently studied devices. According to the investigations on the spatial filtering method and waveguide filtering method, the hybrid filtering method is proposed for the coupling output of multichannel high power microwaves. As an example, a specific structure is designed for the coupling output of S/X/X band three-channel high power microwaves and investigated with the hybrid filtering method. In the experiments, a pulse of 4 GW X band beat waves and a pulse of 1.8 GW S band microwave are obtained.

  5. Memory-based parallel data output controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stattel, R. J.; Niswander, J. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A memory-based parallel data output controller employs associative memories and memory mapping to decommutate multiple channels of telemetry data. The output controller contains a random access memory (RAM) which has at least as many address locations as there are channels. A word counter addresses the RAM which provides as it outputs an encoded peripheral device number and a MSB/LSB-first flag. The encoded device number and a bit counter address a second RAM which contains START and STOP flags to pick out the required bits from the specified word number. The LSB/MSB, START and STOP flags, along with the serial input digital data go to a control block which selectively fills a shift register used to drive the parallel data output bus.

  6. Effect of hypokinesia on cardiac contractile function and nervous regulation of the heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyerson, F. Z.; Kapelko, V. I.; Gorina, M. S.; Shchegolkov, A. N.; Larinov, N. P.

    1980-01-01

    Longterm hypokinesia caused cardiac deadaptation in rabbits, which resulted in the diminishing of the left ventricular rate of contraction and relaxation, joined later by decreased vascular resistance. As a results, the ejection rate as well as stroke volume and cardiac output were normal. The decrease of the relaxation speed was more obvious at a high heart rate and results in shortening of the diastolic pause and diminishing of cardiac output. Hearts of the hypokinetic animals were characterized by normal maximal pressure developed by a unit of muccardial mass aorta clamping, decreased adrenoreactivity, and increased cholinoreactivity. This complex of changes is contrary to changes observed in adaptation to exercise, but is similar to changes observed in compensatory hypertrophy of the heart.

  7. New Developments in Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Le, Thi Yen Loan; Thavapalachandran, Sujitha; Kizana, Eddy; Chong, James Jh

    2017-04-01

    Numerous pharmacological and device therapies have improved adverse cardiac remodelling and mortality in heart failure. However, none are able to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue. Stem cell based therapies using multipotent (adult) stem cells and pluripotent stem cells are new approaches that could potentially achieve the elusive goal of true cardiac regeneration. Over the past two decades, various stem cell based approaches have been shown to improve left ventricular function in pre-clinical animal models. Promising results rapidly led to clinical trials, initially using bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells, then mesenchymal stromal cell populations and, more recently, progenitor cells from the adult heart itself. These have been shown to be safe and have advanced our understanding of potential suitable recipients, cell delivery routes, and possible mechanisms of action. However, efficacy in these trials has been inconsistent. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are another potential source of stem cells for cardiac regeneration. They could theoretically provide an unlimited source of cardiomyocytes or cardiac progenitors. Pre-clinical studies in both small and large animal models have shown robust engraftment and improvements in cardiac function. The first clinical trial using hPSC-derived cardiac derivatives has now commenced and others are imminent. In this brief review article, we summarise recent developments in stem cell therapies aimed at cardiac regeneration, including discussion of types of cell and non-cell-based strategies being explored.

  8. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw…

  9. Mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiac pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Rimbaud, Stéphanie; Garnier, Anne; Ventura-Clapier, Renée

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac performance depends on a fine balance between the work the heart has to perform to satisfy the needs of the body and the energy that it is able to produce. Thus, energy production by oxidative metabolism, the main energy source of the cardiac muscle, has to be strictly regulated to adapt to cardiac work. Mitochondrial biogenesis is the mechanism responsible for mitochondrial component synthesis and assembly. This process controls mitochondrial content and thus correlates with energy production that, in turn, sustains cardiac contractility. Mitochondrial biogenesis should be finely controlled to match cardiac growth and cardiac work. When the heart is subjected to an increase in work in response to physiological and pathological challenges, it adapts by increasing its mass and expressing a new genetic program. In response to physiological stimuli such as endurance training, mitochondrial biogenesis seems to follow a program involving increased cardiac mass. But in the context of pathological hypertrophy, the modifications of this mechanism remain unclear. What appears clear is that mitochondrial biogenesis is altered in heart failure, and the imbalance between cardiac work demand and energy production represents a major factor in the development of heart failure.

  10. GPCR signaling and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Capote, Leany A; Mendez Perez, Roberto; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), such as β-adrenergic and angiotensin II receptors, located in the membranes of all three major cardiac cell types, i.e. myocytes, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, play crucial roles in regulating cardiac function and morphology. Their importance in cardiac physiology and disease is reflected by the fact that, collectively, they represent the direct targets of over a third of the currently approved cardiovascular drugs used in clinical practice. Over the past few decades, advances in elucidation of their structure, function and the signaling pathways they elicit, specifically in the heart, have led to identification of an increasing number of new molecular targets for heart disease therapy. Here, we review these signaling modalities employed by GPCRs known to be expressed in the cardiac myocyte membranes and to directly modulate cardiac contractility. We also highlight drugs and drug classes that directly target these GPCRs to modulate cardiac function, as well as molecules involved in cardiac GPCR signaling that have the potential of becoming novel drug targets for modulation of cardiac function in the future.

  11. Anomalous light output from lightning dart leaders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, C.; Krider, E. P.

    1985-01-01

    About 5 percent of the multiple-stroke cloud-to-ground lightning discharges recorded at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 1981 contained dart leaders that produced an unusually large light output. An analysis of these cases indicates that the average peak light output per unit length in the leader may be comparable to or even exceed that of the return stroke that follows.

  12. Surface emitting lasers with combined output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlin, Donald B. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Surface emitting lasers are laterally aligned and coupled together and also have their light output signals combined. This results in greater phase and frequency coherency and narrower and reduced amplitude sidelobes. Preferably, not more than two lasers are longitudinally aligned along the same axis for still greater coherency compared with adding the light output signals of more than two longitudinally aligned lasers. The lasers can be of the DH-LOC type or of the QW type.

  13. Revisiting Cardiac Cellular Composition

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Alexander R.; Ilinykh, Alexei; Ivey, Malina J.; Kuwabara, Jill T.; D'Antoni, Michelle L.; Debuque, Ryan; Chandran, Anjana; Wang, Lina; Arora, Komal; Rosenthal, Nadia; Tallquist, Michelle D.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Accurate knowledge of the cellular composition of the heart is essential to fully understand the changes that occur during pathogenesis and to devise strategies for tissue engineering and regeneration. Objective To examine the relative frequency of cardiac endothelial cells, hematopoietic-derived cells and fibroblasts in the mouse and human heart. Methods and Results Using a combination of genetic tools and cellular markers, we examined the occurrence of the most prominent cell types in the adult mouse heart. Immunohistochemistry revealed that endothelial cells constitute over 60%, hematopoietic-derived cells 5–10%, and fibroblasts under 20% of the non-myocytes in the heart. A refined cell isolation protocol and an improved flow cytometry approach provided an independent means of determining the relative abundance of non-myocytes. High dimensional analysis and unsupervised clustering of cell populations confirmed that endothelial cells are the most abundant cell population. Interestingly, fibroblast numbers are smaller than previously estimated, and two commonly assigned fibroblast markers, Sca-1 and CD90, underrepresent fibroblast numbers. We also describe an alternative fibroblast surface marker that more accurately identifies the resident cardiac fibroblast population. Conclusions This new perspective on the abundance of different cell types in the heart demonstrates that fibroblasts comprise a relatively minor population. By contrast, endothelial cells constitute the majority of non-cardiomyocytes and are likely to play a greater role in physiologic function and response to injury than previously appreciated. PMID:26635390

  14. Leadership in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Rao, Christopher; Patel, Vanash; Ibrahim, Michael; Ahmed, Kamran; Wong, Kathie A; Darzi, Ara; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2011-06-01

    Despite the efficacy of cardiac surgery, less invasive interventions with more uncertain long-term outcomes are increasingly challenging surgery as first-line treatment for several congenital, degenerative and ischemic cardiac diseases. The specialty must evolve if it is to ensure its future relevance. More importantly, it must evolve to ensure that future patients have access to treatments with proven long-term effectiveness. This cannot be achieved without dynamic leadership; however, our contention is that this is not enough. The demands of a modern surgical career and the importance of the task at hand are such that the serendipitous emergence of traditional charismatic leadership cannot be relied upon to deliver necessary change. We advocate systematic analysis and strategic leadership at a local, national and international level in four key areas: Clinical Care, Research, Education and Training, and Stakeholder Engagement. While we anticipate that exceptional individuals will continue to shape the future of our specialty, the creation of robust structures to deliver collective leadership in these key areas is of paramount importance.

  15. Decoding the Cardiac Message

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Gerald W

    2012-01-01

    This review reflects and expands upon the contents of the author’s presentation at The Thomas W. Smith Memorial Lecture at AHA Scientific Sessions, 2011. “Decoding the cardiac message” refers to accumulating results from ongoing microRNA research that is altering longstanding concepts of the mechanisms for, and consequences of, messenger RNA (mRNA) regulation in the heart. First, I provide a brief historical perspective of the field of molecular genetics, touching upon seminal research that paved the way for modern molecular cardiovascular research and helped establish the foundation for current concepts of mRNA regulation in the heart. I follow with some interesting details about the specific research that led to the discovery and appreciation of microRNAs as highly conserved pivotal regulators of RNA expression and translation. Finally, I provide a personal viewpoint as to how agnostic genome-wide techniques for measuring microRNAs, their mRNA targets, and their protein products can be applied in an integrated multi-systems approach to uncover direct and indirect effects of microRNAs. Experimental designs integrating next-generation sequencing and global proteomics have the potential to address unanswered questions regarding microRNA-mRNA interactions in cardiac disease, how disease alters mRNA targeting by specific microRNAs, and how mutational and polymorphic nucleotide variation in microRNAs can affect end-organ function and stress-response. PMID:22383710

  16. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, J D

    1976-09-01

    The concept of cardiac reconditioning centers for the prevention and rehabilitation of coronary patients has been tremendously successful in Germany over the past 20 years. At least 40 such centers are located throughout the country. Physicians, nurses, and physical therapists work closely together in the various facets of the rehabilitation process. The financial backing for these facilities is primarily through governmental and regional insurance companies, whose officials are apparently convinced that in the long run supporting preventive measures is financially sound. Objective data supporting their convictions come from studies such as that of Brusis, who showed that such as that of 1,500 employees was diminished by nearly 70 percent during a two-year period after cardiac reconditioning, as compared to a similar time period before the rehabilitation experience. Subjective benefits, which are extremely difficult to quantitate in meaningful terms, were nonetheless expressed by nearly all the patients with whom I conversed. Perhaps they have experienced the same feelings that Mark Twain did when he observed that "all frets and worries and chafings sank to sleep in the presence of the benignant serenity of the Alps; the Great Spirit of the Mountains breathed his own peace upon their hurt minds and sore hearts and healed them."

  17. Persistent left superior vena cava in cardiac congenital surgery.

    PubMed

    Giuliani-Poncini, Cristina; Perez, Marie-Hélène; Cotting, Jacques; Hurni, Michel; Sekarski, Nicole; Pfammatter, Jean-Pierre; Di Bernardo, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) is a relatively frequent finding in congenital cardiac malformation. The scope of the study was to analyze the timing of diagnosis of persistent LSVC, the timing of diagnosis of associated anomalies of the coronary sinus, and the global impact on morbidity and mortality of persistent LSVC in children with congenital heart disease after cardiac surgery. Retrospective analysis of a cohort of children after cardiac surgery on bypass for congenital heart disease. Three hundred seventy-one patients were included in the study, and their median age was 2.75 years (IQR 0.65-6.63). Forty-seven children had persistent LSVC (12.7 %), and persistent LSVC was identified on echocardiography before surgery in 39 patients (83 %). In three patients (6.4 %) with persistent LSVC, significant inflow obstruction of the left ventricle developed after surgery leading to low output syndrome or secondary pulmonary hypertension. In eight patients (17 %), persistent LSVC was associated with a partially or completely unroofed coronary sinus and in two cases (4 %) with coronary sinus ostial atresia. Duration of mechanical ventilation was significantly shorter in the control group (1.2 vs. 3.0 days, p = 0.04), whereas length of stay in intensive care did not differ. Mortality was also significantly lower in the control group (2.5 vs. 10.6 %, p = 0.004). The results of study show that persistent LSVC in association with congenital cardiac malformation increases the risk of mortality in children with cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass. Recognition of a persistent LSVC and its associated anomalies is mandatory to avoid complications during or after cardiac surgery.

  18. The Cost of Maintaining Educational Communications Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, David A.

    Tentative formulas for calculating the cost of maintaining educational communications equipment are proposed. The formulas are based on a survey of campuses of the State University of New York. The survey analyzed the types of equipment to be maintained, types of maintenance, who uses the equipment, who services the equipment, and the cost…

  19. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.; Benson, Jennifer; Green, Martin J.; Milner, Timothy N.

    2006-04-11

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  20. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.; Benson, Jennifer; Green, Martin J.; Milner, Timothy N.

    2002-01-01

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  1. 7 CFR 784.12 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintaining records. 784.12 Section 784.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS 2004 EWE LAMB REPLACEMENT AND RETENTION PAYMENT PROGRAM § 784.12 Maintaining...

  2. 7 CFR 1430.508 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maintaining records. 1430.508 Section 1430.508 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... Program § 1430.508 Maintaining records. Dairy operations making application for benefits under...

  3. 7 CFR 1430.508 - Maintaining records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maintaining records. 1430.508 Section 1430.508 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... Program § 1430.508 Maintaining records. Dairy operations making application for benefits under...

  4. THE CHEMOTHERAPY OF CARDIAC ARREST.

    PubMed

    MINUCK, M

    1965-01-02

    Direct-air ventilation, external cardiac compression, and external defibrillation are established techniques for patients who unexpectedly develop cardiac arrest. The proper use of drugs can increase the incidence of successful resuscitation. Intracardiac adrenaline (epinephrine) acts as a powerful stimulant during cardiac standstill and, in addition, converts fine ventricular fibrillation to a coarser type, more responsive to electrical defibrillation. Routine use of intravenous sodium bicarbonate is recommended to combat the severe metabolic acidosis accompanying cardiac arrest. Lidocaine is particularly useful when ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia tends to recur. Analeptics are contraindicated, since they invariably increase oxygen requirements of already hypoxic cerebral tissues. The following acrostic is a useful mnemonic for recalling the details of the management of cardiac arrest in their proper order: A (Airway), B (Breathing), C (Circulation), D (Diagnosis of underlying cause), E (Epinephrine), F (Fibrillation), G (Glucose intravenously), pH (Sodium bicarbonate), I (Intensive care).

  5. Pediatric cardiac surgery in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Asou, T; Rachmat, J

    1998-10-01

    Pediatric cardiac surgery in Indonesia first developed thanks to the cooperation of various cardiac centers abroad. The establishment of the 'Harapan Kita' National Cardiac Center in 1985 was one of the most important initial steps. Thereafter, the discipline advanced remarkably in terms of the number of the operations performed and the variety of the diseases treated and, as a result, the surgical outcome also improved. Numerous problems remain to be solved. Only 1% of the children with congenital heart disease are today properly treated in Indonesia. Some of the underlying problems responsible for this situation include a shortage of pediatric cardiac professionals, the lack of the information and education on the part of the patients, and a shortage of funding, both privately and publicly. It would thus be welcome for pediatric cardiac surgeons, cardiologists and nurses in Indonesia to learn about congenital heart disease from doctors and nurses in advanced countries in order to improve the outlook at home.

  6. Phenotypic screen quantifying differential regulation of cardiac myocyte hypertrophy identifies CITED4 regulation of myocyte elongation

    PubMed Central

    Ryall, Karen A.; Bezzerides, Vassilios J.; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Saucerman, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is controlled by a highly connected signaling network with many effectors of cardiac myocyte size. Quantification of the contribution of individual pathways to specific changes in shape and transcript abundance is needed to better understand hypertrophy signaling and to improve heart failure therapies. We stimulated cardiac myocytes with 15 hypertrophic agonists and quantitatively characterized differential regulation of 5 shape features using high-throughput microscopy and transcript levels of 12 genes using qPCR. Transcripts measured were associated with phenotypes including fibrosis, cell death, contractility, proliferation, angiogenesis, inflammation, and the fetal cardiac gene program. While hypertrophy pathways are highly connected, the agonist screen revealed distinct hypertrophy phenotypic signatures for the 15 receptor agonists. We then used k-means clustering of inputs and outputs to identify a network map linking input modules to output modules. Five modules were identified within inputs and outputs with many maladaptive outputs grouping together in one module: Bax, C/EBPβ, Serca2a, TNFα, and CTGF. Subsequently, we identified mechanisms underlying two correlations revealed in the agonist screen: correlation between regulators of fibrosis and cell death signaling (CTGF and Bax mRNA) caused by AngII; and myocyte proliferation (CITED4 mRNA) and elongation caused by Nrg1. Follow-up experiments revealed positive regulation of Bax mRNA level by CTGF and an incoherent feedforward loop linking Nrg1, CITED4 and elongation. With this agonist screen, we identified the most influential inputs in the cardiac hypertrophy signaling network for a variety of features related to pathological and protective hypertrophy signaling and shared regulation among cardiac myocyte phenotypes. PMID:24613264

  7. Cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Aashish S

    2011-12-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention programs are recognized as integral to the comprehensive care of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), and as such are recommended as useful and effective (Class I) by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology in the treatment of patients with CHD. The term cardiac rehabilitation refers to coordinated, multifaceted interventions designed to optimize a cardiac patient's physical, psychological, and social functioning, in addition to stabilizing, slowing, or even reversing the progression of the underlying atherosclerotic processes, thereby reducing morbidity and mortality. Cardiac rehabilitation, aims at returning the patient back to normal functioning in a safe and effective manner and to enhance the psychosocial and vocational state of the patient. The program involves education, exercise, risk factor modification and counselling. A meta-analysis based on a review of 48 randomized trials that compared outcomes of exercise-based rehabilitation with usual medical care, showed a reduction of 20% in total mortality and 26% in cardiac mortality rates, with exercise-based rehabilitation compared with usual medical care. Risk stratification helps identify patients who are at increased risk for exercise-related cardiovascular events and who may require more intensive cardiac monitoring in addition to the medical supervision provided for all cardiac rehabilitation program participants. During exercise, the patients' ECG is continuously monitored through telemetry, which serves to optimize the exercise prescription and enhance safety. The safety of cardiac rehabilitation exercise programs is well established, and the occurrence of major cardiovascular events during supervised exercise is extremely low. As hospital stays decrease, cardiac rehabilitation is assuming an increasingly important role in secondary prevention. In contrast with its growing importance internationally, there are very few

  8. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Guida, Gustavo; Angelini, Gianni D

    2015-03-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was the impact of modified ultrafiltration on adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery in terms of inflammatory and metabolic changes, blood loss and early clinical outcomes. A total of 155 papers were identified using the search as described below. Of these, six papers presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question as they reported data to reach conclusions regarding the issues of interest for this review. The author, date and country of publication, patient group, study type and weaknesses and relevant outcomes were tabulated. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery seems to attenuate the levels of inflammatory molecules associated with surgery, reduces blood loss and blood transfusion and improves cardiac output, index and systemic vascular resistance. However, this was not translated in any reduction in length of stay in intensive care unit or hospital. Most studies were single-centre prospective non-blinded trials that included a small cohort of elective coronary artery bypass grafting patients, which makes it underpowered to provide unbiased evidence regarding clinical outcomes. Properly designed and conducted prospective randomized studies are required to answer whether the beneficial effect of modified ultrafiltration on systemic inflammatory molecules associated with surgery can translate with improvement in clinical outcome.

  9. Development of a cardiac evaluation method using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) system: a feasibility study using a cardiac motion phantom.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Tsujioka, Katsumi; Matsui, Takeshi; Takata, Tadanori; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of cardiac evaluation with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD), based on changes in pixel values during cardiac pumping. To investigate the feasibility of cardiac evaluation with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD), based on changes in pixel values during cardiac pumping. Sequential radiographs of a cardiac motion phantom and water-equivalent material step were obtained with an FPD system. Various combinations of cardiac output and heart rate were evaluated with and without contrast medium. The ventricular area and summation of pixel values in the ventricles were measured. The ejection fraction (EF) was calculated based on the rate of changes and then compared to EF obtained from computed tomography images. In addition, slight changes in pixel values were visualized by use of inter-frame subtraction and color-mapping. The result of a clinical case was examined according to cardiac physiology. There were strong correlations between EF and our results. There was no significant difference between the findings with and without contrast medium. When the heart rate was greater than 60 bpm, EF obtained with our method were underestimated. It is necessary for a patient to be examined at an imaging rate between 7.5 and 10 fps at least. In addition, a +/-1.2% change in pixel value was equivalent to a +/-10 mm change in the thickness of water. Color-mapping images were supported by cardiac physiology. Evaluating changes in pixel values on dynamic chest radiography with FPD has the potential to demonstrate cardiac function without contrast medium. Inter-frame subtraction and color-mapping are very useful for interpreting changes in pixel value as velocities of blood flow.

  10. New perspectives of nitric oxide donors in cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation treatment.

    PubMed

    Kruzliak, Peter; Pechanova, Olga; Kara, Tomas

    2014-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is often used to treat heart failure accompanied with pulmonary edema. According to present knowledge, however, NO donors are contraindicated when systolic blood pressure is less than 90 mmHg. Based on recent findings and our own clinical experience, we formulated a hypothesis about the new breakthrough complex lifesaving effects of NO donors in patients with cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation therapy. It includes a direct hemodynamic effect of NO donors mediated through vasodilation of coronary arteries in cooperation with improvement of cardiac function and cardiac output through reversible inhibition of mitochondrial complex I and mitochondrial NO synthase, followed by reduction in reactive oxygen species and correction of myocardial stunning. Simultaneously, an increase in vascular sensitivity to sympathetic stimulation could lead to an increase in diastolic blood pressure. Confirmation of this hypothesis in clinical practice would mean a milestone in the treatment for cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  11. Compact Relativistic Magnetron with Output Mode Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Andrey; Fuks, Mikhail; Schamiloglu, Edl

    2003-10-01

    We consider a relativistic magnetron in which all of the resonators of the anode block are smoothly continued onto a conical antenna up to the radius corresponding to the cutoff frequency of the radiated wave in a cylindrical waveguide. Such a magnetron is capable of high output power, is compact, has a high resistance to microwave breakdown, is able to work with extremely high currents, and has the possibility of forming desirable output radiation patterns. The magnetic field can be provided by a small solenoid over the resonant system, which is a much smaller volume than is required for the Helmholtz coils used in traditional relativistic magnetrons. The maximum size of this magnetron is the aperture of the horn antenna. The unique aspect of such a design is the possibility of using the horn antenna for conversion of the operating mode to lower order modes, including the TE_11 mode, which is radiated as a narrow wave beam. For a magnetron operating in π-mode, the mode converter comprises a continuation of the resonantor blocks onto the horn for those resonators that correspond to the symmetry of the output mode. For example, in order to provide Gaussian mode output only two diametrically opposite resonators of even-numbered resonators must be continued onto the horn. In this case the aperture of the horn antenna can be close to the cut-off diameter for the TE_11 mode, and the output power is limited only by breakdown of the output window. In this presentation results of preliminary calculations of the magnetron with output mode converters are presented.

  12. Physics of Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain

    2013-04-01

    A normal heartbeat is orchestrated by the stable propagation of an excitation wave that produces an orderly contraction. In contrast, wave turbulence in the ventricles, clinically known as ventricular fibrillation (VF), stops the heart from pumping and is lethal without prompt defibrillation. I review experimental, computational, and theoretical studies that have shed light on complex dynamical phenomena linked to the initiation, maintenance, and control of wave turbulence. I first discuss advances made to understand the precursor state to a reentrant arrhythmia where the refractory period of cardiac tissue becomes spatiotemporally disordered; this is known as an arrhythmogenic tissue substrate. I describe observed patterns of transmembrane voltage and intracellular calcium signaling that can contribute to this substrate, and symmetry breaking instabilities to explain their formation. I then survey mechanisms of wave turbulence and discuss novel methods that exploit electrical pacing stimuli to control precursor patterns and low-energy pulsed electric fields to control turbulence.

  13. [Thrombolysis in cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Bailén, M; Rucabado Aguilar, L; Morante Valle, A; Castillo Rivera, A

    2006-03-01

    Both acute myocardial infarction and pulmonary thromboembolism are responsible for a great number of cardiac arrests. Both present high rates of mortality. Thrombolysis has proved to be an effective treatment for acute myocardial infarction and pulmonary thromboembolism with shock. It would be worth considering whether thrombolysis could be effective and safe during or after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Unfortunately, too few clinical studies presenting sufficient scientific data exist in order to respond adequately to this question. However, most studies they show that thrombolysis applied during and after CPR is a therapeutic option that is not associated with greater risk of serious hemorrhaging and could possibly have beneficial effects. On the other hand, experimental data exists which show that thrombolytics can attenuate neurological damage produced after CPR. Nevertheless, clinical trials would be necessary in order to adequately establish the effectiveness and safety of thrombolysis in patients who require CPR.

  14. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher deg