Science.gov

Sample records for major control point

  1. Galactosyltransferase 4 is a major control point for glycan branching in N-linked glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Andrew G.; Hayes, Jerrard M.; Bezak, Tania; Głuchowska, Sonia A.; Cosgrave, Eoin F. J.; Struwe, Weston B.; Stroop, Corné J. M.; Kok, Han; van de Laar, Teun; Rudd, Pauline M.; Tipton, Keith F.; Davey, Gavin P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein N-glycosylation is a common post-translational modification that produces a complex array of branched glycan structures. The levels of branching, or antennarity, give rise to differential biological activities for single glycoproteins. However, the precise mechanism controlling the glycan branching and glycosylation network is unknown. Here, we constructed quantitative mathematical models of N-linked glycosylation that predicted new control points for glycan branching. Galactosyltransferase, which acts on N-acetylglucosamine residues, was unexpectedly found to control metabolic flux through the glycosylation pathway and the level of final antennarity of nascent protein produced in the Golgi network. To further investigate the biological consequences of glycan branching in nascent proteins, we glycoengineered a series of mammalian cells overexpressing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). We identified a mechanism in which galactosyltransferase 4 isoform regulated N-glycan branching on the nascent protein, subsequently controlling biological activity in an in vivo model of hCG activity. We found that galactosyltransferase 4 is a major control point for glycan branching decisions taken in the Golgi of the cell, which might ultimately control the biological activity of nascent glycoprotein. PMID:25271059

  2. Floating Point Control Library

    2007-08-02

    Floating Point Control is a Library that allows for the manipulation of floating point unit exception masking funtions control exceptions in both the Streaming "Single Instruction, Multiple Data" Extension 2 (SSE2) unit and the floating point unit simultaneously. FPC also provides macros to set floating point rounding and precision control.

  3. SPS antenna pointing control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The pointing control of a microwave antenna of the Satellite Power System was investigated emphasizing: (1) the SPS antenna pointing error sensing method; (2) a rigid body pointing control design; and (3) approaches for modeling the flexible body characteristics of the solar collector. Accuracy requirements for the antenna pointing control consist of a mechanical pointing control accuracy of three arc-minutes and an electronic phased array pointing accuracy of three arc-seconds. Results based on the factors considered in current analysis, show that the three arc-minute overall pointing control accuracy can be achieved in practice.

  4. Pointing control for LDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Briggs, C.

    1988-01-01

    One important aspect of the LDR control problem is the possible excitations of structural modes due to random disturbances, mirror chopping, and slewing maneuvers. An analysis was performed to yield a first order estimate of the effects of such dynamic excitations. The analysis involved a study of slewing jitters, chopping jitters, disturbance responses, and pointing errors, making use of a simplified planar LDR model which describes the LDR dynamics on a plane perpendicular to the primary reflector. Briefly, the results indicate that the command slewing profile plays an important role in minimizing the resultant jitter, even to a level acceptable without any control action. An optimal profile should therefore be studied.

  5. Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, P.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ground control is required to georeferenced airborne and spaceborne images. The production of ortho-photogrammetric data requires ground control that is traditionally provided as Ground Control Points (GCPs) by GNSS measurements in the field. However, it can be difficult to acquire accurate ground control points due to required turn-around time, high costs or impossible access. CompassData, Inc. a specialist in ground control, has expanded its service to deliver Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points (RSGCPs®). TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X are two satellites with such high accuracy of their orbital positions and SAR data that RSGCPs® can be produced to a sub-meter quality depending on certain parameters and circumstances. The technology and required parameters are discussed in this paper as well as the resulting accuracies.

  6. Wavefront sensing, control, and pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Thomas; Sevaston, George; Agronin, Michael; Bely, Pierre; Colavita, Mark; Clampin, Mark; Harvey, James; Idell, Paul; Sandler, Dave; Ulmer, Melville

    1992-01-01

    A majority of future NASA astrophysics missions from orbiting interferometers to 16-m telescopes on the Moon have, as a common requirement, the need to bring light from a large entrance aperture to the focal plane in a way that preserves the spatial coherence properties of the starlight. Only by preserving the phase of the incoming wavefront, can many scientific observations be made, observations that range from measuring the red shift of quasi-stellar objects (QSO's) to detecting the IR emission of a planet in orbit around another star. New technologies for wavefront sensing, control, and pointing hold the key to advancing our observatories of the future from those already launched or currently under development. As the size of the optical system increases, either to increase the sensitivity or angular resolution of the instrument, traditional technologies for maintaining optical wavefront accuracy become prohibitively expensive or completely impractical. For space-based instruments, the low mass requirement and the large temperature excursions further challenge existing technologies. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is probably the last large space telescope to rely on passive means to keep its primary optics stable and the optical system aligned. One needs only look to the significant developments in wavefront sensing, control, and pointing that have occurred over the past several years to appreciate the potential of this technology for transforming the capability of future space observatories. Future developments in space-borne telescopes will be based in part on developments in ground-based systems. Telescopes with rigid primary mirrors much larger than 5 m in diameter are impractical because of gravity loading. New technologies are now being introduced, such as active optics, that address the scale problem and that allow very large telescopes to be built. One approach is a segmented design such as that being pioneered by the W.M. Keck telescope now under

  7. 36 CFR 1010.5 - Major decision points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... accordance with 40 CFR 1501.7. An EIS, if determined necessary, must be completed and circulated at the... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Major decision points. 1010.5 Section 1010.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY § 1010.5...

  8. 36 CFR 907.6 - Major decision points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... decisionmaking process. For most Corporation projects there are three distinct stages in the decision making...) Implementation stage. (b) Environmental review will be integrated into the decision making process of the... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Major decision points....

  9. Satellite Power System (SPS) antenna pointing control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Accuracy requirements for the SPS antenna pointing control consists of a mechanical pointing accuracy of three arc minutes and an electronic phased array pointing accuracy of three arc seconds. Results of this study, based on the factors considered in current analysis, show that the three arc minute overall pointing control accuracy can be achieved for the SPS in practice.

  10. A low cost LST pointing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, J. R.; Kennel, H. F.; Nurre, G. S.; Seltzer, S. M.; Shelton, H. L.

    1975-01-01

    Vigorous efforts to reduce costs, coupled with changes in LST guidelines, took place in the Fall of 1974. These events made a new design of the LST and its Pointing and Attitude Control System possible. The major design changes are summarized as: an annular Support Systems Module; removal of image motion compensation; reaction wheels instead of CMG's; a magnetic torquer system to also perform the emergency and backup functions, eliminating the previously required mass expulsion system. Preliminary analysis indicates the Low Cost LST concept can meet the newly defined requirements and results in a significantly reduced development cost.

  11. 47 CFR 22.325 - Control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Control points. 22.325 Section 22.325... Operational and Technical Requirements Operational Requirements § 22.325 Control points. Each station in the Public Mobile Services must have at least one control point and a person on duty who is responsible...

  12. 47 CFR 22.325 - Control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Control points. 22.325 Section 22.325... Operational and Technical Requirements Operational Requirements § 22.325 Control points. Each station in the Public Mobile Services must have at least one control point and a person on duty who is responsible...

  13. 47 CFR 22.325 - Control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Control points. 22.325 Section 22.325... Operational and Technical Requirements Operational Requirements § 22.325 Control points. Each station in the Public Mobile Services must have at least one control point and a person on duty who is responsible...

  14. 47 CFR 22.325 - Control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Control points. 22.325 Section 22.325... Operational and Technical Requirements Operational Requirements § 22.325 Control points. Each station in the Public Mobile Services must have at least one control point and a person on duty who is responsible...

  15. 47 CFR 22.325 - Control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control points. 22.325 Section 22.325... Operational and Technical Requirements Operational Requirements § 22.325 Control points. Each station in the Public Mobile Services must have at least one control point and a person on duty who is responsible...

  16. Pointing control for the International Comet Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, D. R.; Schumacher, L. L.

    1980-01-01

    The design of the pointing control system for the proposed International Comet Mission, intended to fly by Comet Halley and rendezvous with Comet Tempel-2 is presented. Following a review of mission objectives and the spacecraft configuration, design constraints on the pointing control system controlling the two-axis gimballed scan platform supporting the science instruments are discussed in relation to the scientific requirements of the mission. The primary design options considered for the pointing control system design for the baseline spacecraft are summarized, and the design selected, which employs a target-referenced, inertially stabilized control system, is described in detail. The four basic modes of operation of the pointing control subsystem (target acquisition, inertial hold, target track and slew) are discussed as they relate to operations at Halley and Tempel-2. It is pointed that the pointing control system design represents a significant advance in the state of the art of pointing controls for planetary missions.

  17. Controlling firms through the majority voting rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapelle, Ariane; Szafarz, Ariane

    2005-09-01

    Pyramids, cross-ownership, rings and other complex features inducing control tunnelling are frequent in the European and Asian industrial world. Based on the matrix methodology, this paper offers a model for measuring integrated ownership and threshold-based control, applicable to any group of interrelated firms. In line with the theory on pyramidal control, the model avoids the double counting problem and sets the full control threshold at the conservative-but incontestable-majority level of 50% of the voting shares. Any lower threshold leads to potential inconsistencies and leaves the observed high level of ownership of many dominant shareholders unexplained. Furthermore, the models leads to ultimate shareholders’ control ratios consistent with the majority voting rule. Finally, it is applied to the Frère Group, a large European pyramidal holding company known for mastering control leverages.

  18. 22 CFR 161.5 - Major decision points and timing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... major Federal action which could significantly affect the quality of the human environment. To... consideration without specifying a Departmental preference. If the content and dimensions of a proposed action... prepared in time for Congressional hearings and deliberations. (e) Because actions having effects on...

  19. Micro-Precision Interferometer: Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, John

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the wavefront tilt (pointing) control system for the JPL Micro-Precision Interferometer (MPI). This control system employs piezo-electric actuators and a digital imaging sensor with feedback compensation to reject errors in instrument pointing. Stringent performance goals require large feedback, however, several characteristics of the plant tend to restrict the available bandwidth. A robust 7th-order wavefront tilt control system was successfully implemented on the MPI instrument, providing sufficient disturbance rejection performance to satisfy the established interference fringe visibility.

  20. 7 CFR 372.8 - Major planning and decision points and public involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLEMENTING PROCEDURES § 372.8 Major planning and decision points and public involvement. (a) Major planning... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Major planning and decision points and...

  1. 7 CFR 372.8 - Major planning and decision points and public involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLEMENTING PROCEDURES § 372.8 Major planning and decision points and public involvement. (a) Major planning... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Major planning and decision points and...

  2. Remote temperature-set-point controller

    DOEpatents

    Burke, William F.; Winiecki, Alan L.

    1986-01-01

    An instrument for carrying out mechanical strain tests on metallic samples with the addition of an electrical system for varying the temperature with strain, the instrument including opposing arms and associated equipment for holding a sample and varying the mechanical strain on the sample through a plurality of cycles of increasing and decreasing strain within predetermined limits, circuitry for producing an output signal representative of the strain during the tests, apparatus including a set point and a coil about the sample for providing a controlled temperature in the sample, and circuitry interconnected between the strain output signal and set point for varying the temperature of the sample linearly with strain during the tests.

  3. Controlling superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points.

    PubMed

    Seo, S; Park, E; Bauer, E D; Ronning, F; Kim, J N; Shim, J-H; Thompson, J D; Park, Tuson

    2015-03-04

    The heavy fermion compound CeRhIn5 is a rare example where a quantum critical point, hidden by a dome of superconductivity, has been explicitly revealed and found to have a local nature. The lack of additional examples of local types of quantum critical points associated with superconductivity, however, has made it difficult to unravel the role of quantum fluctuations in forming Cooper pairs. Here, we show the precise control of superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points in CeRhIn5. Slight tin-substitution for indium in CeRhIn5 shifts its antiferromagnetic quantum critical point from 2.3 GPa to 1.3 GPa and induces a residual impurity scattering 300 times larger than that of pure CeRhIn5, which should be sufficient to preclude superconductivity. Nevertheless, superconductivity occurs at the quantum critical point of the tin-doped metal. These results underline that fluctuations from the antiferromagnetic quantum criticality promote unconventional superconductivity in CeRhIn5.

  4. Controlling superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points.

    PubMed

    Seo, S; Park, E; Bauer, E D; Ronning, F; Kim, J N; Shim, J-H; Thompson, J D; Park, Tuson

    2015-01-01

    The heavy fermion compound CeRhIn5 is a rare example where a quantum critical point, hidden by a dome of superconductivity, has been explicitly revealed and found to have a local nature. The lack of additional examples of local types of quantum critical points associated with superconductivity, however, has made it difficult to unravel the role of quantum fluctuations in forming Cooper pairs. Here, we show the precise control of superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points in CeRhIn5. Slight tin-substitution for indium in CeRhIn5 shifts its antiferromagnetic quantum critical point from 2.3 GPa to 1.3 GPa and induces a residual impurity scattering 300 times larger than that of pure CeRhIn5, which should be sufficient to preclude superconductivity. Nevertheless, superconductivity occurs at the quantum critical point of the tin-doped metal. These results underline that fluctuations from the antiferromagnetic quantum criticality promote unconventional superconductivity in CeRhIn5. PMID:25737108

  5. Digital controller design: Analysis of the annular suspension pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, B. C.

    1979-01-01

    The Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS) is a payload auxiliary pointing device of the Space Shuttle. The ASPS is comprised of two major subassemblies, a vernier and a coarse pointing subsystem. The experiment is attached to a mounting plate/rim combination which is suspended on magnetic bearing/actuators (MBA) strategically located about the rim. Fine pointing is achieved by gimballing the plate/rim within the MBA gaps. Control about the experiment line-of-sight is obtained through the use of a non-contacting rim drive and positioning torquer. All sensors used to close the servo loops on the vernier system are noncontacting elements. Therefore, the experiment is a free-flyer constrained only by the magnetic forces generated by the control loops.

  6. Remote temperature-set-point controller

    DOEpatents

    Burke, W.F.; Winiecki, A.L.

    1984-10-17

    An instrument is described for carrying out mechanical strain tests on metallic samples with the addition of means for varying the temperature with strain. The instrument includes opposing arms and associated equipment for holding a sample and varying the mechanical strain on the sample through a plurality of cycles of increasing and decreasing strain within predetermined limits, circuitry for producing an output signal representative of the strain during the tests, apparatus including a a set point and a coil about the sample for providing a controlled temperature in the sample, and circuitry interconnected between the strain output signal and set point for varying the temperature of the sample linearly with strain during the tests.

  7. Algebraic grid generation with control points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.; Choo, Yung K.; Smith, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    The control-point form (CPF) formulation is an algebraically defined class of coordinate transformations by means of which the interior form of the coordinates can be manipulated in the local fashion, and any boundary can be either specified or manipulated in a similar manner. Currently, the most intense activity involving CPF is with such graphic interactive codes as TurboI and TurboT, for which detailed illustrative examples are given; these have furnished experience on whose basis future interactive strategies can be developed.

  8. Do Nondomestic Undergraduates Choose a Major Field in Order to Maximize Grade Point Averages?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Matthew E.; Fass-Holmes, Barry

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigated whether undergraduates attending an American West Coast public university who were not U.S. citizens (nondomestic) maximized their grade point averages (GPA) through their choice of major field. Multiple regression hierarchical linear modeling analyses showed that major field's effect size was small for these…

  9. Point to Point Control of the Hydrogen Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, Enrique; Richter, Hanz; Figueroa, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    We continue to build on the theoretical modelling of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) and gas hydrogen (GH2) mixer subsystem. The mixer described in this work is responsible for combining high pressure LH2 and GH2 to produce a hydrogen flow that meets certain thermodynamic properties. The desired properties are maintained by precise control of the LH2 and GH2 flows. The mixer is modelled as a general multi-flow lumped volume for single constituent fluids using density and internal energy as states. The set of nonlinear differential equations is modelled in the SIMULINK environment including a table look-up feature of the fluid thermodynamic properties. A small signal (linear) model is developed based on the nonlinear model and simulated as well. Pulse disturbances are introduced to the valve positions and the quality of the linear model is ascertained by comparing its behavior against the nonlinear model simulations. Valve control strategies that simulate an operator-in-the-loop scenario are then explored demonstrating the need for automatic feedback control. Finally, optimal single-output and multi-output Proportional/Integral controllers are designed based on the linear model and applied to the nonlinear model with excellent results to track simultaneous, constant setpoint changes in desired exit flow, exit temperature, and mixer pressure, as well as to reject unmeasureable but bounded additive step perturbations in the valve positions.

  10. Major tanker spill off Spain under control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-14

    This paper reports that a 23 sq mile oil slick along Spain's northwest coast, spreading form the wreckage of the Greek oil tanker Aegean Sea, was for the most part under control as of Dec. 10, Spanish authorities reported. Various press reports put the total spill volume at 490,000 bbl, about double that leaked by the Exxon Valdez supertanker off Alaska in 1989. If initial reports of the spill volume are borne out, the Aegean Sea spill would rank at least as one of the 10 biggest tanker spills.

  11. Modular control of pointing beyond arm's length.

    PubMed

    Berret, Bastien; Bonnetblanc, François; Papaxanthis, Charalambos; Pozzo, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Hand reaching and bipedal equilibrium are two important functions of the human motor behavior. However, how the brain plans goal-oriented actions combining target reaching with equilibrium regulation is not yet clearly understood. An important question is whether postural control and reaching are integrated in one single module or controlled separately. Here, we show that postural control and reaching motor commands are processed by means of a modular and flexible organization. Principal component and correlation analyses between pairs of angles were used to extract global and local coupling during a whole-body pointing beyond arm's length. A low-dimensional organization of the redundant kinematic chain allowing simultaneous target reaching and regulation of the center of mass (CoM) displacement in extrinsic space emerged from the first analysis. In follow-up experiments, both the CoM and finger trajectories were constrained by asking participants to reach from a reduced base of support with or without knee flexion, or by moving the endpoint along a predefined trajectory (straight or semicircular trajectories). Whereas joint covaried during free conditions and under equilibrium restrictions, it was decomposed in two task-dependent and task-independent modules, corresponding to a dissociation of arm versus legs, trunk, and head coordination, respectively, under imposed finger path conditions. A numerical simulation supported the idea that both postural and focal subtasks are basically integrated into the same motor command and that the CNS is able to combine or to separate the movement into autonomous functional synergies according to the task requirements.

  12. Polio control after certification: major issues outstanding.

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Paul E. M.; Oblapenko, George; Sutter, Roland W.

    2004-01-01

    Now that the global eradication of wild poliovirus is almost within sight, planning for the post-certification era is becoming a priority issue. It is agreed that a stockpile of appropriate polio vaccines will need to be established, and a surveillance and response capacity will need to be maintained, in order to protect the world against any possible future outbreaks attributable either to the persistence of wild poliovirus or vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) or to the unintentional or intentional release of poliovirus from a laboratory or vaccine store. Although it has been suggested that the stockpile should consist of monovalent oral poliovirus vaccine (mOPV), many questions remain concerning its nature, financing, management, and use--in particular, because of uncertainties over future national vaccination policies, and over the availability of different vaccines, after the certification of wild poliovirus eradication. There are further uncertainties concerning the possible role and efficacy of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) used either routinely or in outbreak control in low-hygiene settings, the potential for rapid geographical spread of polioviruses should an outbreak occur after certification, and the risks inherent in introducing additional oral polio vaccine (OPV) viruses into populations in which the vaccine coverage and prevalence of immunity have declined, and which may thus favour the spread of VDPVs. Given these important gaps in knowledge, no country should discontinue polio vaccination until a coordinated policy for the post-certification era has been developed and the recommended measures have been put in place. PMID:15106300

  13. 7 CFR 372.8 - Major planning and decision points and public involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Major planning and decision points and public involvement. 372.8 Section 372.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY...

  14. 7 CFR 372.8 - Major planning and decision points and public involvement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Major planning and decision points and public involvement. 372.8 Section 372.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY...

  15. MSFC Skylab attitude and pointing control system mission evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The results of detailed performance analyses of the attitude and pointing control system in-orbit hardware and software on Skylab are reported. Performance is compared with requirements, test results, and prelaunch predictions. A brief history of the altitude and pointing control system evolution leading to the launch configuration is presented. The report states that the attitude and pointing system satisfied all requirements.

  16. Pointing control design for autonomous space vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.D.

    1993-03-01

    This paper addresses the design of pointing control systems for autonomous space vehicles. The function of the pointing control system is to keep distant orbiting objects within the field-of-view of an on-board optical sensor. We outline the development of novel nonlinear control algorithms which exploit the availability of on- board sensors. Simulation results comparing the performance of the different pointing control implementations are presented.

  17. Validation of acid washes as critical control points in hazard analysis and critical control point systems.

    PubMed

    Dormedy, E S; Brashears, M M; Cutter, C N; Burson, D E

    2000-12-01

    A 2% lactic acid wash used in a large meat-processing facility was validated as an effective critical control point (CCP) in a hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) plan. We examined the microbial profiles of beef carcasses before the acid wash, beef carcasses immediately after the acid wash, beef carcasses 24 h after the acid wash, beef subprimal cuts from the acid-washed carcasses, and on ground beef made from acid-washed carcasses. Total mesophilic, psychrotrophic, coliforms, generic Escherichia coli, lactic acid bacteria, pseudomonads, and acid-tolerant microorganisms were enumerated on all samples. The presence of Salmonella spp. was also determined. Acid washing significantly reduced all counts except for pseudomonads that were present at very low numbers before acid washing. All other counts continued to stay significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those on pre-acid-washed carcasses throughout all processing steps. Total bacteria, coliforms, and generic E. coli enumerated on ground beef samples were more than 1 log cycle lower than those reported in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Baseline data. This study suggests that acid washes may be effective CCPs in HACCP plans and can significantly reduce the total number of microorganisms present on the carcass and during further processing. PMID:11131890

  18. Control points within the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Van't Hof, J.

    1984-01-01

    Evidence of the temporal order of chromosomal DNA replication argues favorably for the view that the cell cycle is controlled by genes acting in sequence whose time of expression is determined by mitosis and the amount of nuclear DNA (2C vs 4C) in the cell. Gl and G2 appear to be carbohydrate dependent in that cells starved of either carbohydrate of phosphate fail to make these transitions. Cells deprived of nitrate, however, fail only at Gl to S transition indicating that the controls that operate in G1 differ from those that operate in G2. 46 references, 5 figures.

  19. Strike Point Control for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Kolemen, E.; Gates, D. A.; Rowley, C. W.; Kasdin, N. J.; Kallman, J.; Gerhardt, S.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Mueller, D.

    2010-07-09

    This paper presents the first control algorithm for the inner and outer strike point position for a Spherical Torus (ST) fusion experiment and the performance analysis of the controller. A liquid lithium divertor (LLD) will be installed on NSTX which is believed to provide better pumping than lithium coatings on carbon PFCs. The shape of the plasma dictates the pumping rate of the lithium by channeling the plasma to LLD, where strike point location is the most important shape parameter. Simulations show that the density reduction depends on the proximity of strike point to LLD. Experiments were performed to study the dynamics of the strike point, design a new controller to change the location of the strike point to desired location and stabilize it. The most effective PF coils in changing inner and outer strike points were identified using equilibrium code. The PF coil inputs were changed in a step fashion between various set points and the step response of the strike point position was obtained. From the analysis of the step responses, PID controllers for the strike points were obtained and the controller was tuned experimentally for better performance. The strike controller was extended to include the outer-strike point on the inner plate to accommodate the desired low outer-strike points for the experiment with the aim of achieving "snowflake" divertor configuration in NSTX.

  20. Proliferation and Differentiation Deficits are a Major Convergence Point for Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Carl

    2016-05-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that proliferation and differentiation in neural stem cells (NSCs) are a major convergence point of neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Most genes with truncating mutations are implicated in NSC proliferation and differentiation (e.g., MBD5, CDKL5, and MECP2). Similarly, reciprocal deletion/duplication copy-number variants (CNVs), such as 1q21.1 and 16p11.2, are inversely correlated with head size. In addition, pathways such as MAPK, mTOR, and RAS, which are important in cancer, a disease of uncontrolled cell proliferation, are implicated in NDDs. These deficits are a measurable output of patient-derived induced neural progenitor cells, and may represent a diagnostic tool and a possible clinical intervention point for molecular therapies, irrespective of genotype. PMID:27032601

  1. Mass Measurements beyond the Major r-Process Waiting Point {sup 80}Zn

    SciTech Connect

    Baruah, S.; Herlert, A.; Schweikhard, L.; Audi, G.; Guenaut, C.; Lunney, D.; Blaum, K.; George, S.; Dworschak, M.; Herfurth, F.; Yazidjian, C.; Hager, U.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Schatz, H.

    2008-12-31

    High-precision mass measurements on neutron-rich zinc isotopes {sup 71m,72-81}Zn have been performed with the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP. For the first time, the mass of {sup 81}Zn has been experimentally determined. This makes {sup 80}Zn the first of the few major waiting points along the path of the astrophysical rapid neutron-capture process where neutron-separation energy and neutron-capture Q-value are determined experimentally. The astrophysical conditions required for this waiting point and its associated abundance signatures to occur in r-process models can now be mapped precisely. The measurements also confirm the robustness of the N=50 shell closure for Z=30.

  2. Onboard utilization of ground control points for image correction. Volume 3: Ground control point simulation software design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The software developed to simulate the ground control point navigation system is described. The Ground Control Point Simulation Program (GCPSIM) is designed as an analysis tool to predict the performance of the navigation system. The system consists of two star trackers, a global positioning system receiver, a gyro package, and a landmark tracker.

  3. A multiple pointing-mount control strategy for space platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. D.

    1992-01-01

    A new disturbance-adaptive control strategy for multiple pointing-mount space platforms is proposed and illustrated by consideration of a simplified 3-link dynamic model of a multiple pointing-mount space platform. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the new platform control strategy. The simulation results also reveal a system 'destabilization phenomena' that can occur if the set of individual platform-mounted experiment controllers are 'too responsive.'

  4. Cognitive control in majority search: a computational modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbin; Liu, Xun; Fan, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Despite the importance of cognitive control in many cognitive tasks involving uncertainty, the computational mechanisms of cognitive control in response to uncertainty remain unclear. In this study, we develop biologically realistic neural network models to investigate the instantiation of cognitive control in a majority function task, where one determines the category to which the majority of items in a group belong. Two models are constructed, both of which include the same set of modules representing task-relevant brain functions and share the same model structure. However, with a critical change of a model parameter setting, the two models implement two different underlying algorithms: one for grouping search (where a subgroup of items are sampled and re-sampled until a congruent sample is found) and the other for self-terminating search (where the items are scanned and counted one-by-one until the majority is decided). The two algorithms hold distinct implications for the involvement of cognitive control. The modeling results show that while both models are able to perform the task, the grouping search model fit the human data better than the self-terminating search model. An examination of the dynamics underlying model performance reveals how cognitive control might be instantiated in the brain for computing the majority function.

  5. Nonpoint and Point Sources of Nitrogen in Major Watersheds of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puckett, Larry J.

    1994-01-01

    Estimates of nonpoint and point sources of nitrogen were made for 107 watersheds located in the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program study units throughout the conterminous United States. The proportions of nitrogen originating from fertilizer, manure, atmospheric deposition, sewage, and industrial sources were found to vary with climate, hydrologic conditions, land use, population, and physiography. Fertilizer sources of nitrogen are proportionally greater in agricultural areas of the West and the Midwest than in other parts of the Nation. Animal manure contributes large proportions of nitrogen in the South and parts of the Northeast. Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen is generally greatest in areas of greatest precipitation, such as the Northeast. Point sources (sewage and industrial) generally are predominant in watersheds near cities, where they may account for large proportions of the nitrogen in streams. The transport of nitrogen in streams increases as amounts of precipitation and runoff increase and is greatest in the Northeastern United States. Because no single nonpoint nitrogen source is dominant everywhere, approaches to control nitrogen must vary throughout the Nation. Watershed-based approaches to understanding nonpoint and point sources of contamination, as used by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program, will aid water-quality and environmental managers to devise methods to reduce nitrogen pollution.

  6. Octopuses use a human-like strategy to control precise point-to-point arm movements.

    PubMed

    Sumbre, Germán; Fiorito, Graziano; Flash, Tamar; Hochner, Binyamin

    2006-04-18

    One of the key problems in motor control is mastering or reducing the number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) through coordination. This problem is especially prominent with hyper-redundant limbs such as the extremely flexible arm of the octopus. Several strategies for simplifying these control problems have been suggested for human point-to-point arm movements. Despite the evolutionary gap and morphological differences, humans and octopuses evolved similar strategies when fetching food to the mouth. To achieve this precise point-to-point-task, octopus arms generate a quasi-articulated structure based on three dynamic joints. A rotational movement around these joints brings the object to the mouth . Here, we describe a peripheral neural mechanism-two waves of muscle activation propagate toward each other, and their collision point sets the medial-joint location. This is a remarkably simple mechanism for adjusting the length of the segments according to where the object is grasped. Furthermore, similar to certain human arm movements, kinematic invariants were observed at the joint level rather than at the end-effector level, suggesting intrinsic control coordination. The evolutionary convergence to similar geometrical and kinematic features suggests that a kinematically constrained articulated limb controlled at the level of joint space is the optimal solution for precise point-to-point movements.

  7. Digital controller design: Analysis of the annular suspension pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The annular suspension and pointing system (ASPS) a payload auxiliary pointing device of the space shuttle is briefly described along with the function of the digital controller. The equations of motion of a simplified plan planar model of the ASPS are derived. Results of computer simulations are discussed.

  8. Conceptual design of pointing control systems for space station gimballed payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Robert O.

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual design of the control system for Payload Pointing Systems (PPS) is developed using classic Proportional-Integral-Derivatives (PID) techniques. The major source of system pointing error is due to the disturbance-rich environment of the space station in the form of gimbal baseplate motions. These baseplate vibrations are characterized using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) techniques. Both time domain and frequency domain dynamic models are developed to assess control system performance. Three basic methods exist for the improvement of PPS pointing performance: increase control system bandwidth, add Image Motion Compensation, and/or reduce (or change) the baseplate disturbance environment.

  9. Controller design and performance of the Spacelab instrument pointing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woelker, A.

    The Spacelab instrument pointing system (IPS) is designed for high-precision pointing of space experiments. The IPS demonstrated its performance during the maiden flight on the Shuttle in July 1985. The control system provides three-axis pointing and stabilization in the arcsec range for a variety of experiments. The envisaged pointing accuracy as well as the structural flexibility of the plant and disturbances imposed challenging requirements on the controller design. The control system comprises a feedback loop with attenuation filters and PID control as well as feed-forward compensation of external disturbances. Based on optical sensor and gyro measurements the attitude is determined via a special version of the Kalman filter.

  10. Feedback control of major disruptions in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A. K.

    2011-08-15

    It is argued that major disruptions in ITER can be avoided by the feedback control of the causative MHD precursors. The sensors will be 2D-arrays of ECE detectors and the suppressors will be modulated ECH beams injected radially to produce non-thermal radial pressures to counter the radial dynamics of MHD modes. The appropriate amplitude and phase of this signal can stabilize the relevant MHD modes and prevent their evolution to a major disruption. For multimode MHD precursors, an optimal feedback scheme with a Kalman filter is discussed.

  11. Flight performance of Skylab attitude and pointing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, W. B.; Kennel, H. F.; Rupp, C. C.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab attitude and pointing control system (APCS) requirements are briefly reviewed and the way in which they became altered during the prelaunch phase of development is noted. The actual flight mission (including mission alterations during flight) is described. The serious hardware failures that occurred, beginning during ascent through the atmosphere, also are described. The APCS's ability to overcome these failures and meet mission changes are presented. The large around-the-clock support effort on the ground is discussed. Salient design points and software flexibility that should afford pertinent experience for future spacecraft attitude and pointing control system designs are included.

  12. Annular suspension and pointing system with controlled DC electromagnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Josephine Lynn; Tam, Kwok Hung

    1993-01-01

    The Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS) developed by the Flight System division of Sperry Corporation is a six-degree of freedom payload pointing system designed for use with the space shuttle. This magnetic suspension and pointing system provides precise controlled pointing in six-degrees of freedom, isolation of payload-carrier disturbances, and end mount controlled pointing. Those are great advantages over the traditional mechanical joints for space applications. In this design, we first analyzed the assumed model of the single degree ASPS bearing actuator and obtained the plant dynamics equations. By linearizing the plant dynamics equations, we designed the cascade and feedback compensators such that a stable and satisfied result was obtained. The specified feedback compensator was computer simulated with the nonlinearized plant dynamics equations. The results indicated that an unstable output occurred. In other words, the designed feedback compensator failed. The failure of the design is due to the Taylor's series expansion not converging.

  13. Athlete use and opinion of point of choice nutrition labels at a major international competition.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Sarah J; Pelly, Fiona E

    2013-11-01

    Point of choice (POC) labels may assist individuals to choose food appropriate for their needs when dining away from home. However, limited research exists on the use and opinion of labels by athletes in a large dining hall environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate athletes' utilisation and opinion of POC nutrition labels provided in the athletes village main dining hall at a major competition event (the 2010 Commonwealth Games, New Delhi, India). A questionnaire was distributed to athletes from a range of cultural and sporting backgrounds (n=351) while present within the dining hall during main meal periods throughout the competition event (23rd September-14th October, 2010). While the majority of respondents (79%) reported that it was important/very important to provide POC information for menu items and 59% rated the POC labels as useful/very useful, only 14% of athletes reported using labels all of the time. Athletes from specific regions (India/Sri Lanka, Africa), sports (team and weight category), and those with less education reported using the labels more frequently. Although females rated the importance of providing nutrition information higher than males (p=0.008), there was no gender difference in reported use of POC labels. Athletes believed that POC labels could be improved with the addition of more information, better aesthetic properties, and better positioning in more convenient locations. Further research to identify the most effective POC label for use in this environment, and ultimately the development of a standardised label may assist a broader range of athletes at future competitions.

  14. Noise Control for a Moving Evaluation Point Using Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Toshiki; Shiraishi, Toshihiko

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the noise control for a moving evaluation point using neural networks by making the best use of its learning ability. Noise control is a technology which is effective on low-frequency noise. Based on the principle of superposition, a primary sound wave can be cancelled at an evaluation point by emitting a secondary opposite sound wave. To obtain good control performance, it is important to precisely identify the characteristics of all the sound paths. One of the most popular algorithms of noise control is filtered-x LMS algorithm. This algorithm can deliver a good result while all the sound paths do not change. However, the control system becomes uncontrollable while the evaluation point is moving. To solve the problem, the characteristics of all the paths are must be identified at all time. In this paper, we applied neural networks with the learning ability to the noise control system to follow the time-varying paths and verified its control performance by numerical simulations. Then, dropout technique for the networks is also applied. Dropout is a technique that prevent the network from overfitting and enables better control performance. By applying dropout for noise control, it prevents the system from diverging.

  15. Digital pointing control. [for Space Shuttle Data Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.; Brown, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The digital pointing control system developed for the Space Shuttle Data Bus is discussed. The device, which interfaces with NASA standard sensor units, contains a front panel controller, a development system to load, inspect, print, and store the program and data, and a 'test jig' to provide closed-loop controller operation. The system is described with particular reference to the tracker-gyro interfaces, the control algorithms and compensation procedures, Kalman-estimation filtering, the proportional power output, and the discrete output capability. The results of simulation studies are presented and the development status is noted.

  16. Control implementation for the SPUR floating point coprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, D.

    1987-01-01

    SPUR is a RISC-based multiprocessor workstation being designed to facilitate parallel-processing research. Typically, RISC architectures achieve low performance levels for floating-point intensive applications, as the multiple-cycle floating-point instructions are not implemented in the hardware. In an attempt to raise these performance levels, the SPUR system provides floating-point support through an extended instruction set and tightly-coupled floating-point coprocessor. This report documents the implementation of the control unit for this floating-point coprocessor; describing the coprocessor interface, control PLA definitions, the finite state machine, the dynamic cycle counter, the 4-stage load-store pipeline, and the random logic generated to drive the datapath modules. Implementation techniques and trade-offs are discussed; including design strategy, area and speed optimization, noise margin considerations, and delay balancing rf the datapath control signals for clock skew minimization. Finally, in an attempt to raise these performance levels, the SPUR system The chip is implemented in 2-layer-metal 2..mu..m CMOS technology, and uses a four-phase non-overlapping clock with a target cycle time of approximately 100ns - 140 ns.

  17. Engineering to Control Noise, Loading, and Optimal Operating Points

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell R. Swartz

    2000-11-12

    Successful engineering of low-energy nuclear systems requires control of noise, loading, and optimum operating point (OOP) manifolds. The latter result from the biphasic system response of low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR)/cold fusion systems, and their ash production rate, to input electrical power. Knowledge of the optimal operating point manifold can improve the reproducibility and efficacy of these systems in several ways. Improved control of noise, loading, and peak production rates is available through the study, and use, of OOP manifolds. Engineering of systems toward the OOP-manifold drive-point peak may, with inclusion of geometric factors, permit more accurate uniform determinations of the calibrated activity of these materials/systems.

  18. Two Axis Pointing System (TAPS) attitude acquisition, determination, and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azzolini, John D.; Mcglew, David E.

    1990-01-01

    The Two Axis Pointing System (TAPS) is a 2 axis gimbal system designed to provide fine pointing of Space Transportation System (STS) borne instruments. It features center-of-mass instrument mounting and will accommodate instruments of up to 1134 kg (2500 pounds) which fit within a 1.0 by 1.0 by 4.2 meter (40 by 40 by 166 inch) envelope. The TAPS system is controlled by a microcomputer based Control Electronics Assembly (CEA), a Power Distribution Unit (PDU), and a Servo Control Unit (SCU). A DRIRU-II inertial reference unit is used to provide incremental angles for attitude propagation. A Ball Brothers STRAP star tracker is used for attitude acquisition and update. The theory of the TAPS attitude determination and error computation for the Broad Band X-ray Telescope (BBXRT) are described. The attitude acquisition is based upon a 2 star geometric solution. The acquisition theory and quaternion algebra are presented. The attitude control combines classical position, integral and derivative (PID) control with techniques to compensate for coulomb friction (bias torque) and the cable harness crossing the gimbals (spring torque). Also presented is a technique for an adaptive bias torque compensation which adjusts to an ever changing frictional torque environment. The control stability margins are detailed, with the predicted pointing performance, based upon simulation studies. The TAPS user interface, which provides high level operations commands to facilitate science observations, is outlined.

  19. Galileo Spacecraft Scan Platform Celestial Pointing Cone Control Gain Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    In, C-H. C.; Hilbert, K. B.

    1994-01-01

    During September and October 1991, pictures of the Gaspra asteroid and neighboring stars were taken by the Galileo Optical Navigation (OPNAV) Team for the purpose of navigation the spacecraft for a successful Gaspra encounter. The star tracks in these pictures showed that the scan platform celestial pointing cone controller performed poorly in compensating for wobble-induced cone offsets.

  20. 47 CFR 90.473 - Operation of internal transmitter control systems through licensed fixed control points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation of internal transmitter control... Transmitter Control Internal Transmitter Control Systems § 90.473 Operation of internal transmitter control systems through licensed fixed control points. An internal transmitter control system may be...

  1. The Validity of the SAT for Predicting Cumulative Grade Point Average by College Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Emily J.; Kobrin, Jennifer L.; Patterson, Brian F.; Mattern, Krista D.

    2011-01-01

    Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) in New Orleans, LA in April 2011. The current study examined the differential validity of the SAT for predicting cumulative GPA through the second-year of college by college major, as well as the differential prediction of cumulative GPA by college major among…

  2. Optimal periodic control for spacecraft pointing and attitude determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittelkau, Mark E.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach to autonomous magnetic roll/yaw control of polar-orbiting, nadir-pointing momentum bias spacecraft is considered as the baseline attitude control system for the next Tiros series. It is shown that the roll/yaw dynamics with magnetic control are periodically time varying. An optimal periodic control law is then developed. The control design features a state estimator that estimates attitude, attitude rate, and environmental torque disturbances from Earth sensor and sun sensor measurements; no gyros are needed. The state estimator doubles as a dynamic attitude determination and prediction function. In addition to improved performance, the optimal controller allows a much smaller momentum bias than would otherwise be necessary. Simulation results are given.

  3. Accuracy analysis of pointing control system of solar power station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, J. C.; Peebles, P. Z., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The first-phase effort concentrated on defining the minimum basic functions that the retrodirective array must perform, identifying circuits that are capable of satisfying the basic functions, and looking at some of the error sources in the system and how they affect accuracy. The initial effort also examined three methods for generating torques for mechanical antenna control, performed a rough analysis of the flexible body characteristics of the solar collector, and defined a control system configuration for mechanical pointing control of the array.

  4. Testing Set-Point Theory in a Swiss National Sample: Reaction and Adaptation to Major Life Events.

    PubMed

    Anusic, Ivana; Yap, Stevie C Y; Lucas, Richard E

    2014-12-01

    Set-point theory posits that individuals react to the experience of major life events, but quickly adapt back to pre-event baseline levels of subjective well-being in the years following the event. A large, nationally representative panel study of Swiss households was used to examine set-point theory by investigating the extent of adaptation following the experience of marriage, childbirth, widowhood, unemployment, and disability. Our results demonstrate that major life events are associated with marked change in life satisfaction and, for some events (e.g., marriage, disability), these changes are relatively long lasting even when accounting for normative, age related change.

  5. Dynamics and control simulation of the Spacelab Experiment Pointing Mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, E. L.; Ward, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Computer simulations were developed to evaluate the performance of four Experiment Pointing Mounts (EPM) being considered for Spacelab experiments in the 1980-1990 time frame. The system modeled compromises a multibody system consisting of the shuttle, a mechanical isolation device, the EPM, celestial and inertial sensors, bearings, gimbal torque motors and associated nonlinearities, the experiment payload, and control and estimator algorithms. Each mount was subjected to a common disturbance (shuttle vernier thruster firing and man push off) and command (stellar pointing or solar raster scan) input. The fundamental limitation common to all mounts was found to be sensor noise. System dynamics and hardware nonlinearities have secondary effects on pointing performance for sufficiently high bandwidth.

  6. Detecting major genetic loci controlling phenotypic variability in experimental crosses.

    PubMed

    Rönnegård, Lars; Valdar, William

    2011-06-01

    Traditional methods for detecting genes that affect complex diseases in humans or animal models, milk production in livestock, or other traits of interest, have asked whether variation in genotype produces a change in that trait's average value. But focusing on differences in the mean ignores differences in variability about that mean. The robustness, or uniformity, of an individual's character is not only of great practical importance in medical genetics and food production but is also of scientific and evolutionary interest (e.g., blood pressure in animal models of heart disease, litter size in pigs, flowering time in plants). We describe a method for detecting major genes controlling the phenotypic variance, referring to these as vQTL. Our method uses a double generalized linear model with linear predictors based on probabilities of line origin. We evaluate our method on simulated F₂ and collaborative cross data, and on a real F₂ intercross, demonstrating its accuracy and robustness to the presence of ordinary mean-controlling QTL. We also illustrate the connection between vQTL and QTL involved in epistasis, explaining how these concepts overlap. Our method can be applied to a wide range of commonly used experimental crosses and may be extended to genetic association more generally. PMID:21467569

  7. Residential Proximity to a Major Roadway Is Associated with Features of Asthma Control in Children

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Meredith S.; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; DeMuth, Karen A.; Brown, Lou Ann S.; Whitlock, Denise R.; Brown, Shanae W.; Tolbert, Paige E.; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    Background While several studies suggest that traffic-related air pollutants are detrimental for respiratory health, few studies have examined relationships between residential proximity to a major roadway and asthma control in children. Furthermore, a major limitation of existing research is reliance on self-reported outcomes. We therefore determined the spatial relationship between the distance from a major roadway and clinical, physiologic and inflammatory features of asthma in a highly characterized sample of asthmatic children 6–17 years of age across a wide range of severities. We hypothesized that a closer residential proximity to a major roadway would be associated with increased respiratory symptoms, altered pulmonary function and a greater magnitude of airway and systemic inflammation. Methodology/Principal Findings 224 children 6–17 years with confirmed asthma completed questionnaires and underwent spirometry, plethysmography, exhaled nitric oxide determination, exhaled breath condensate collection and venipuncture. Residential distance from a major roadway was determined by mapping the geographic coordinates of the residential address in Geographic Information System software. The distance between the home address and the nearest major roadway was calculated according to the shortest distance between the two points (i.e., “as the crow flies”). Asthmatic children living in closer proximity to a major roadway had an increased frequency of wheezing associated with increased medication requirements and more hospitalizations even after controlling for potential confounders. These children also had increased airway resistance, increased airway inflammation reflected by a lower breath condensate pH, and higher plasma EGF concentrations. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that closer residential proximity to a major roadway is associated with poorer asthma control in school-age children. Assessment of residential proximity to major roadways

  8. Change point detection in risk adjusted control charts.

    PubMed

    Assareh, Hassan; Smith, Ian; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2015-12-01

    Precise identification of the time when a change in a clinical process has occurred enables experts to identify a potential special cause more effectively. In this article, we develop change point estimation methods for a clinical dichotomous process in the presence of case mix. We apply Bayesian hierarchical models to formulate the change point where there exists a step change in the odds ratio and logit of risk of a Bernoulli process. Markov Chain Monte Carlo is used to obtain posterior distributions of the change point parameters including location and magnitude of changes and also corresponding probabilistic intervals and inferences. The performance of the Bayesian estimator is investigated through simulations and the result shows that precise estimates can be obtained when they are used in conjunction with the risk-adjusted CUSUM and EWMA control charts. In comparison with alternative EWMA and CUSUM estimators, more accurate and precise estimates are obtained by the Bayesian estimator. These superiorities enhance when probability quantification, flexibility and generaliability of the Bayesian change point detection model are also considered. The Deviance Information Criterion, as a model selection criterion in the Bayesian context, is applied to find the best change point model for a given dataset where there is no prior knowledge about the change type in the process.

  9. Precision pointing control for SPICA: risk mitigation phase study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitani, Shinji; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Sakai, Shin-ichiro; Murakami, Naomi; Yamawaki, Toshihiko; Mizutani, Tadahito; Komatsu, Keiji; Kataza, Hirokazu; Enya, Keigo; Nakagawa, Takao

    2014-08-01

    SPICA (Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics) is an astronomical mission optimized for mid- and far-infrared astronomy with a 3-m class telescope which is cryogenically cooled to be less than 6 K. The SPICA mechanical cooling system is indispensable for the mission but, generates micro-vibrations which could affect to the pointing stability performances. Activities to be undertaken during a risk mitigation phase (RMP) include consolidation of micro-vibration control design for the satellite, as well as a number of breadboarding activities centered on technologies that are critical to the success of the mission. This paper presents the RMP activity results on the microvibration control design.

  10. Controlling systems that drift through a tipping point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Ott, Edward

    2014-09-01

    Slow parameter drift is common in many systems (e.g., the amount of greenhouse gases in the terrestrial atmosphere is increasing). In such situations, the attractor on which the system trajectory lies can be destroyed, and the trajectory will then go to another attractor of the system. We consider the case where there are more than one of these possible final attractors, and we ask whether we can control the outcome (i.e., the attractor that ultimately captures the trajectory) using only small controlling perturbations. Specifically, we consider the problem of controlling a noisy system whose parameter slowly drifts through a saddle-node bifurcation taking place on a fractal boundary between the basins of multiple attractors. We show that, when the noise level is low, a small perturbation of size comparable to the noise amplitude applied at a single point in time can ensure that the system will evolve toward a target attracting state with high probability. For a range of noise levels, we find that the minimum size of perturbation required for control is much smaller within a time period that starts some time after the bifurcation, providing a "window of opportunity" for driving the system toward a desirable state. We refer to this procedure as tipping point control.

  11. Controlling systems that drift through a tipping point

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Ott, Edward

    2014-09-01

    Slow parameter drift is common in many systems (e.g., the amount of greenhouse gases in the terrestrial atmosphere is increasing). In such situations, the attractor on which the system trajectory lies can be destroyed, and the trajectory will then go to another attractor of the system. We consider the case where there are more than one of these possible final attractors, and we ask whether we can control the outcome (i.e., the attractor that ultimately captures the trajectory) using only small controlling perturbations. Specifically, we consider the problem of controlling a noisy system whose parameter slowly drifts through a saddle-node bifurcation taking place on a fractal boundary between the basins of multiple attractors. We show that, when the noise level is low, a small perturbation of size comparable to the noise amplitude applied at a single point in time can ensure that the system will evolve toward a target attracting state with high probability. For a range of noise levels, we find that the minimum size of perturbation required for control is much smaller within a time period that starts some time after the bifurcation, providing a “window of opportunity” for driving the system toward a desirable state. We refer to this procedure as tipping point control.

  12. Coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy system for point temperature and major species concentration measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.P.; Yueh, Fang-Yu

    1993-10-01

    The Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy system (CARS) has been developed as a laser-based, advanced, combustion-diagnostic technique to measure temperature and major species concentration. Principles of operation, description of the system and its capabilities, and operational details of this instrument are presented in this report.

  13. Control of asteroid retrieval trajectories to libration point orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceriotti, Matteo; Sanchez, Joan Pau

    2016-09-01

    The fascinating idea of shepherding asteroids for science and resource utilization is being considered as a credible concept in a not too distant future. Past studies identified asteroids which could be efficiently injected into manifolds which wind onto periodic orbits around collinear Lagrangian points of the Sun-Earth system. However, the trajectories are unstable, and errors in the capture maneuver would lead to complete mission failure, with potential danger of collision with the Earth, if uncontrolled. This paper investigates the controllability of some asteroids along the transfers and the periodic orbits, assuming the use of a solar-electric low-thrust system shepherding the asteroid. Firstly, an analytical approach is introduced to estimate the stability of the trajectories from a dynamical point of view; then, a numerical control scheme based on a linear quadratic regulator is proposed, where the gains are optimized for each trajectory through a genetic algorithm. A stochastic simulation with a Monte Carlo approach is used to account for different perturbed initial conditions and the epistemic uncertainty on the asteroid mass. Results show that only a small subset of the considered combinations of trajectories/asteroids are reliably controllable, and therefore controllability must be taken into account in the selection of potential targets.

  14. New Ganymede control point network and global shape model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubarev, A.; Nadezhdina, I.; Oberst, J.; Hussmann, H.; Stark, A.

    2015-11-01

    We computed a 3D control point network for Ganymede using combinations of 126 Voyager-1 and -2 and 87 Galileo images, benefiting from reconstructed trajectory data for the three spacecraft and a more complete Galileo image data base than was available for earlier studies. Using more than 3000 control point coordinates, we determine global shape parameters, including mean radius, spheroid- and ellipsoidal axes, and make tests for various equilibrium shape models, constrained by the most recent estimates for gravity field parameters. We confirm that Ganymede has a pronounced ellipsoidal shape, approximately aligned with the Jupiter-direction, in agreement with Ganymede being in tidal equilibrium. The point heights, suffering from large individual errors, do not reveal any large-scale topography below our typical error levels (97% <5 km). By analysis of data residuals we search for, but cannot detect Ganymede longitudinal forced librations. We conclude that libration amplitudes cannot be larger than 0.1° (corresponding to a lateral displacement of 4.6 km at the equator).

  15. Accuracy assessment of minimum control points for UAV photography and georeferencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarlatos, D.; Procopiou, E.; Stavrou, G.; Gregoriou, M.

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (AUAV) became popular among researchers across disciplines because they combine many advantages. One major application is monitoring and mapping. Their ability to fly beyond eye sight autonomously, collecting data over large areas whenever, wherever, makes them excellent platform for monitoring hazardous areas or disasters. In both cases rapid mapping is needed while human access isn't always a given. Indeed, current automatic processing of aerial photos using photogrammetry and computer vision algorithms allows for rapid orthophomap production and Digital Surface Model (DSM) generation, as tools for monitoring and damage assessment. In such cases, control point measurement using GPS is either impossible, or time consuming or costly. This work investigates accuracies that can be attained using few or none control points over areas of one square kilometer, in two test sites; a typical block and a corridor survey. On board GPS data logged during AUAV's flight are being used for direct georeferencing, while ground check points are being used for evaluation. In addition various control point layouts are being tested using bundle adjustment for accuracy evaluation. Results indicate that it is possible to use on board single frequency GPS for direct georeferencing in cases of disaster management or areas without easy access, or even over featureless areas. Due to large numbers of tie points in the bundle adjustment, horizontal accuracy can be fulfilled with a rather small number of control points, but vertical accuracy may not.

  16. Fixed Point Transformations Based Iterative Control of a Polymerization Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tar, József K.; Rudas, Imre J.

    As a paradigm of strongly coupled non-linear multi-variable dynamic systems the mathematical model of the free-radical polymerization of methyl-metachrylate with azobis (isobutyro-nitrile) as an initiator and toluene as a solvent taking place in a jacketed Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is considered. In the adaptive control of this system only a single input variable is used as the control signal (the process input, i.e. dimensionless volumetric flow rate of the initiator), and a single output variable is observed (the process output, i.e. the number-average molecular weight of the polymer). Simulation examples illustrate that on the basis of a very rough and primitive model consisting of two scalar variables various fixed-point transformations based convergent iterations result in a novel, sophisticated adaptive control.

  17. Guaranteeing Pointing Performance of the SDO Sun-Pointing Controllers in Light of Nonlinear Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starin, Scott R.; Bourkland, Kristin L.

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission is the first Space Weather Research Network mission, part of NASA s Living With a Star program.1 This program seeks to understand the changing Sun and its effects on the Solar System, life, and society. To this end, the SDO spacecraft will carry three Sun-observing instruments to geosynchronous orbit: Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), led by Stanford University; Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), led by Lockheed Martin Space and Astrophysics Laboratory; and Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE), led by the University of Colorado. Links describing the instruments in detail may be found through the SDO web site.2 The basic mission goals are to observe the Sun for a very high percentage of the 5-year mission (10-year goal) with long stretches of uninterrupted observations and with constant, high-data-rate transmission to a dedicated ground station. These goals guided the design of the spacecraft bus that will carry and service the three-instrument payload. At the time of this publication, the SDO spacecraft bus is well into the integration and testing phase at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). A three-axis stabilized attitude control system (ACS) is needed both to point at the Sun accurately and to keep the roll about the Sun vector correctly positioned. The ACS has four reaction wheel modes and 2 thruster actuated modes. More details about the ACS in general and the control modes in particular can be found in Refs. [3-6]. All four of SDO s wheel-actuated control modes involve Sun-pointing controllers, as might be expected from such a mission. Science mode, during which most science data is collected, uses specialized guide telescopes to point accurately at the Sun. Inertial mode has two sub-modes, one tracks a Sun-referenced target orientation, and another maintains an absolute (star-referenced) target orientation, that both employ a Kalman filter to process data from a digital Sun sensor and

  18. Pointing Control System for a High Precision Flight Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    BENTLEY,ANTHONY E.; WILCOXEN,JEFFREY LEE

    2000-12-01

    A pointing control system is developed and tested for a flying gimbaled telescope. The two-axis pointing system is capable of sub-microradian pointing stability and high accuracy in the presence of large host vehicle jitter. The telescope also has high agility--it is capable of a 50-degree retarget (in both axes simultaneously) in less than 2 seconds. To achieve the design specifications, high-accuracy, high-resolution, two-speed resolvers were used, resulting in gimbal-angle measurements stable to 1.5 microradians. In addition, on-axis inertial angle displacement sensors were mounted on the telescope to provide host-vehicle jitter cancellation. The inertial angle sensors are accurate to about 100 nanoradians, but do not measure low frequency displacements below 2 Hz. The gimbal command signal includes host-vehicle attitude information, which is band-limited. This provides jitter data below 20 Hz, but includes a variable latency between 15 and 25 milliseconds. One of the most challenging aspects of this design was to combine the inertial-angle-sensor data with the less perfect information in the command signal to achieve maximum jitter reduction. The optimum blending of these two signals, along with the feedback compensation were designed using Quantitative Feedback Theory.

  19. Floating-point system quantization errors in digital control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of research into the effects on system operation of signal quantization in a digital control system. The investigation considered digital controllers (filters) operating in floating-point arithmetic in either open-loop or closed-loop systems. An error analysis technique is developed, and is implemented by a digital computer program that is based on a digital simulation of the system. As an output the program gives the programing form required for minimum system quantization errors (either maximum of rms errors), and the maximum and rms errors that appear in the system output for a given bit configuration. The program can be integrated into existing digital simulations of a system.

  20. Pointing Control System Architecture for the Eclipse Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kia, Tooraj; Brugarolas, Paul B.; Alexander, James W.; Li, Diane G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the high performance pointing control system used to point the Eclipse telescope. Eclipse is a new mission under study at Jet Propulsion Laboratory for a proposal as a discovery mission. Eclipse is a space telescope for high-contrast optical astronomy. It will be used to investigate the planetary bodies and environments. The main objective of the Eclipse mission is to study planets around nearby stars. Eclipse is designed to reveal planets or dust structures by reducing the scattered and diffracted light within a few arcseconds of a star to a level three orders of magnitude lower than any instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Eclipse achieves this high contrast using a 1.8 meter diameter telescope, a coronagraphic system for control of diffracted light, and active wavefront correction using a Precision Deformable Mirror (DM) for the suppression of scattered light. The observatory will be launched into a Sun-synchronous 690 Km, 98.2(deg) Earth Orbit in 2012.

  1. Pointing and tracking control for freedom's Solar Dynamic modules and vibration control of freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Roger D.; Chen, Jiunn-Liang

    1992-01-01

    A control strategy is presented for pointing particular modules of flexible multibody space structures while simultaneously attenuating structural vibrations. The application that is addressed is the planned Space Station Freedom in a growth configuration with Solar Dynamic (SD) module. A NASTRAN model of Freedom is used to demonstrate the control strategy. Two cases of SD concentrator fine-pointing controller bandwidths are studied with examples. The effect of limiting the controller motor torques to realistic baseline values is examined. SD pointing and station vibration control is accomplished during realistic disturbances due to aerodynamic drag, Shuttle docking, and Shuttle reaction control system plume impingement on SD. Gravity gradient induced torques on SD are relatively small and pseudo-steady.

  2. A MultiCenter Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Major Vascular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Healy, D A; Boyle, E; McCartan, D; Bourke, M; Medani, M; Ferguson, J; Yagoub, H; Bashar, K; O'Donnell, M; Newell, J; Canning, C; McMonagle, M; Dowdall, J; Cross, S; O'Daly, S; Manning, B; Fulton, G; Kavanagh, E G; Burke, P; Grace, P A; Moloney, M Clarke; Walsh, S R

    2015-11-01

    A pilot randomized controlled trial that evaluated the effect of remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) on clinical outcomes following major vascular surgery was performed. Eligible patients were those scheduled to undergo open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, endovascular aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy, and lower limb revascularization procedures. Patients were randomized to RIPC or to control groups. The primary outcome was a composite clinical end point comprising any of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, new-onset arrhythmia, cardiac arrest, congestive cardiac failure, cerebrovascular accident, renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy, mesenteric ischemia, and urgent cardiac revascularization. Secondary outcomes were components of the primary outcome and myocardial injury as assessed by serum troponin values. The primary outcome occurred in 19 (19.2%) of 99 controls and 14 (14.1%) of 99 RIPC group patients (P = .446). There were no significant differences in secondary outcomes. Our trial generated data that will guide future trials. Further trials are urgently needed.

  3. The pointing, acquisition and tracking system of SILEX European program - A major technological step for intersatellites optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailly, Michel; Perez, Eric

    1991-06-01

    The overall architecture and the performances of the pointing, acquisition, and tracking (PAT) subsystem of the European SILEX program are examined. The mission constraints are described, and attention is given to the retained baseline built around a two-stage beam steering system, an open loop point-ahead control, and a full digital implementation. Performance prediction is based on signal processing, control algorithms, and detailed modeling of equipment and flexible structures. The way in which an accurate performance of the order of a microradian can be achieved with a correct allocation of the performance for each instrument of the system is shown. The rejection of the microvibrations coming from the platform when the terminal is operating is singled out as a key feature of the design. The PAT equipment and softwares - sensors, electromechanisms, and control units - are presented.

  4. Control-structure interaction in precision pointing servo loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, John T.

    1989-01-01

    The control-structure interaction problem is addressed via stability analysis of a generic linear servo loop model. With the plant described by the rigid body mode and a single elastic mode, structural flexibility is categorized into one of three types: (1) appendage, (2) in-the-loop minimum phase, and (3) in-the-loop nonminimum phase. Closing the loop with proportional-derivative (PD) control action and introducing sensor roll-off dynamics in the feedback path, stability conditions are obtained. Trade studies are conducted with modal frequency, modal participation, modal damping, loop bandwidth, and sensor bandwidth treated as free parameters. Results indicate that appendage modes are most likely to produce instability if they are near the sensor rolloff, whereas in-the-loop modes are most dangerous near the loop bandwidth. The main goal of this paper is to provide a fundamental understanding of the control-structure interaction problem so that it may benefit the design of complex spacecraft and pointing system servo loops. In this framework, the JPL Pathfinder gimbal pointer is considered as an example.

  5. End point control of an actinide precipitation reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Muske, K.R.; Palmer, M.J.

    1997-10-01

    The actinide precipitation reactors in the nuclear materials processing facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory are used to remove actinides and other heavy metals from the effluent streams generated during the purification of plutonium. These effluent streams consist of hydrochloric acid solutions, ranging from one to five molar in concentration, in which actinides and other metals are dissolved. The actinides present are plutonium and americium. Typical actinide loadings range from one to five grams per liter. The most prevalent heavy metals are iron, chromium, and nickel that are due to stainless steel. Removal of these metals from solution is accomplished by hydroxide precipitation during the neutralization of the effluent. An end point control algorithm for the semi-batch actinide precipitation reactors at Los Alamos National Laboratory is described. The algorithm is based on an equilibrium solubility model of the chemical species in solution. This model is used to predict the amount of base hydroxide necessary to reach the end point of the actinide precipitation reaction. The model parameters are updated by on-line pH measurements.

  6. Developing control points for halal slaughtering of poultry.

    PubMed

    Shahdan, I A; Regenstein, J M; Shahabuddin, A S M; Rahman, M T

    2016-07-01

    Halal (permissible or lawful) poultry meat production must meet industry, economic, and production needs, and government health requirements without compromising the Islamic religious requirements derived from the Qur'an and the Hadiths (the actions and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings be upon him). Halal certification authorities may vary in their interpretation of these teachings, which leads to differences in halal slaughter requirements. The current study proposes 6 control points (CP) for halal poultry meat production based on the most commonly used halal production systems. CP 1 describes what is allowed and prohibited, such as blood and animal manure, and feed ingredients for halal poultry meat production. CP 2 describes the requirements for humane handling during lairage. CP 3 describes different methods for immobilizing poultry, when immobilization is used, such as water bath stunning. CP 4 describes the importance of intention, details of the halal slaughter, and the equipment permitted. CP 5 and CP 6 describe the requirements after the neck cut has been made such as the time needed before the carcasses can enter the scalding tank, and the potential for meat adulteration with fecal residues and blood. It is important to note that the proposed halal CP program is presented as a starting point for any individual halal certifying body to improve its practices.

  7. Developing control points for halal slaughtering of poultry.

    PubMed

    Shahdan, I A; Regenstein, J M; Shahabuddin, A S M; Rahman, M T

    2016-07-01

    Halal (permissible or lawful) poultry meat production must meet industry, economic, and production needs, and government health requirements without compromising the Islamic religious requirements derived from the Qur'an and the Hadiths (the actions and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings be upon him). Halal certification authorities may vary in their interpretation of these teachings, which leads to differences in halal slaughter requirements. The current study proposes 6 control points (CP) for halal poultry meat production based on the most commonly used halal production systems. CP 1 describes what is allowed and prohibited, such as blood and animal manure, and feed ingredients for halal poultry meat production. CP 2 describes the requirements for humane handling during lairage. CP 3 describes different methods for immobilizing poultry, when immobilization is used, such as water bath stunning. CP 4 describes the importance of intention, details of the halal slaughter, and the equipment permitted. CP 5 and CP 6 describe the requirements after the neck cut has been made such as the time needed before the carcasses can enter the scalding tank, and the potential for meat adulteration with fecal residues and blood. It is important to note that the proposed halal CP program is presented as a starting point for any individual halal certifying body to improve its practices. PMID:26994198

  8. A controlled trial of amitriptyline and cianopramine in major depression.

    PubMed

    Mellsop, G W; Burgess, C D; Vijayasenan, M E

    1985-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects of amitriptyline and cianopramine were compared in a double-blind, randomized, flexible-dose trial in 40 patients with major depressive episodes. The two drugs were equally effective in reducing scores on the Hamilton Psychiatric Rating Scale for Depression and on a global scale. Both drugs were associated with significant adverse effects. Fewer adverse effects were associated with cianopramine, however, which lacks antimuscarinic activity.

  9. [Spatial heterogeneity and classified control of agricultural non-point source pollution in Huaihe River Basin].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Xu, Jian-Gang; Sun, Dong-Qi; Ni, Tian-Hua

    2013-02-01

    Agricultural non-point source pollution is of importance in river deterioration. Thus identifying and concentrated controlling the key source-areas are the most effective approaches for non-point source pollution control. This study adopts inventory method to analysis four kinds of pollution sources and their emissions intensity of the chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) in 173 counties (cities, districts) in Huaihe River Basin. The four pollution sources include livestock breeding, rural life, farmland cultivation, aquacultures. The paper mainly addresses identification of non-point polluted sensitivity areas, key pollution sources and its spatial distribution characteristics through cluster, sensitivity evaluation and spatial analysis. A geographic information system (GIS) and SPSS were used to carry out this study. The results show that: the COD, TN and TP emissions of agricultural non-point sources were 206.74 x 10(4) t, 66.49 x 10(4) t, 8.74 x 10(4) t separately in Huaihe River Basin in 2009; the emission intensity were 7.69, 2.47, 0.32 t.hm-2; the proportions of COD, TN, TP emissions were 73%, 24%, 3%. The paper achieves that: the major pollution source of COD, TN and TP was livestock breeding and rural life; the sensitivity areas and priority pollution control areas among the river basin of non-point source pollution are some sub-basins of the upper branches in Huaihe River, such as Shahe River, Yinghe River, Beiru River, Jialu River and Qingyi River; livestock breeding is the key pollution source in the priority pollution control areas. Finally, the paper concludes that pollution type of rural life has the highest pollution contribution rate, while comprehensive pollution is one type which is hard to control.

  10. Major geogenic factors controlling geographical clustering of urolithiasis in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yijun; Deng, Yamin; Wang, Yanxin

    2016-11-15

    The prevalence of urolithiasis is increasing across the world and exhibits a distinctive characteristic of geographical distribution. Geographical clustering and major geogenic factors for urolithiasis prevalence in China were investigated. High risks of urolithiasis are found in southern China clustered in coastal provinces such as Fujian and Zhejiang and karst regions such as Sichuan, Chongqing, Guizhou, Guangxi, Guangdong, Hunan, and Hubei. The predominant urinary stone composition is a mixture of calcium oxalate and phosphate. We found that the spatial distribution of phosphate-type stones is closely related to that of phosphate ore deposits and carbonate rocks. Hot or warm climate and seasons increase the risk of lithogenesis through high average air temperature. Water and soil environment influence the quality and composition of drinking water and food, thus affecting stone formation in the urinary system. In particular, the increase of Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) ratio (in meq) in drinking water might be the main factor. Besides, the high content of calcium in local plants grown on karst soils and the intake of high oxalate food might contribute to the high prevalence in South China. This study indicates that urolithiasis could be endemic, with geogenic factors playing critical roles in urolithiasis etiology. PMID:27496076

  11. Effective variable switching point predictive current control for ac low-voltage drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolze, Peter; Karamanakos, Petros; Kennel, Ralph; Manias, Stefanos; Endisch, Christian

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an effective model predictive current control scheme for induction machines driven by a three-level neutral point clamped inverter, called variable switching point predictive current control. Despite the fact that direct, enumeration-based model predictive control (MPC) strategies are very popular in the field of power electronics due to their numerous advantages such as design simplicity and straightforward implementation procedure, they carry two major drawbacks. These are the increased computational effort and the high ripples on the controlled variables, resulting in a limited applicability of such methods. The high ripples occur because in direct MPC algorithms the actuating variable can only be changed at the beginning of a sampling interval. A possible remedy for this would be to change the applied control input within the sampling interval, and thus to apply it for a shorter time than one sample. However, since such a solution would lead to an additional overhead which is crucial especially for multilevel inverters, a heuristic preselection of the optimal control action is adopted to keep the computational complexity at bay. Experimental results are provided to verify the potential advantages of the proposed strategy.

  12. Major safety and operational concerns for fuel debris criticality control

    SciTech Connect

    Tonoike, K.; Sono, H.; Umeda, M.; Yamane, Y.; Kugo, T.; Suyama, K.

    2013-07-01

    It can be seen from the criticality control viewpoint that the requirement divides the decommissioning work into two parts. One is the present condition where it is requested to prevent criticality and to monitor subcritical condition while the debris is untouched. The other is future work where the subcritical condition shall be ensured even if the debris condition is changed intentionally by raising water level, debris retrieval, etc. Repair of damages on the containment vessel (CV) walls is one of the most important objectives at present in the site. On completion of this task, it will become possible to raise water levels in the CVs and to shield the extremely high radiation emitted from the debris but there is a dilemma: raising the water level in the CVs implies to bring the debris closer to criticality because of the role of water for slowing down neutrons. This may be solved if the coolant water will start circulating in closed loops, and if a sufficient concentration of soluble neutron poison (borated water for instance) will be introduced in the loop. It should be still noted that this solution has a risk of worsening corrosion of the CV walls. Design of the retrieval operation of debris should be proposed as early as possible, which must include a neutron poison concentration required to ensure that the debris chunk is subcritical. In parallel, the development of the measurement system to monitor subcritical condition of the debris chunk should be conducted in case the borated water cannot be used continuously. The system would be based on a neutron counter with a high sensitivity and an appropriate shield for gamma-rays, and the adequate statistical signal processing.

  13. Instrument Pointing Control System for the Stellar Interferometry Mission - Planet Quest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul B.; Kang, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the high precision Instrument Pointing Control System (PCS) for the Stellar Interferometry Mission (SIM) - Planet Quest. The PCS system provides front-end pointing, compensation for spacecraft motion, and feedforward stabilization, which are needed for proper interference. Optical interferometric measurements require very precise pointing (0.03 as, 1-(sigma) radial) for maximizing the interference pattern visibility. This requirement is achieved by fine pointing control of articulating pointing mirrors with feedback from angle tracking cameras. The overall pointing system design concept is presentcd. Functional requirements and an acquisition concept are given. Guide and Science pointing control loops are discussed. Simulation analyses demonstrate the feasibility of the design.

  14. Pointing and control system design study for the space infrared telescope facility (SIRTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorell, K. R.; Aubrun, J. N.; Sridhar, B.; Cochran, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The design and performance of pointing and control systems for two space infrared telescope facility vehicles were examined. The need for active compensation of image jitter using the secondary mirror or other optical elements was determined. In addition, a control system to allow the telescope to perform small angle slews, and to accomplish large angle slews at the rate of 15 deg per minute was designed. Both the 98 deg and the 28 deg inclination orbits were examined, and spacecraft designs were developed for each. The results indicate that active optical compensation of line-of-sight errors is not necessary if the system is allowed to settle for roughly ten seconds after a slew maneuver. The results are contingent on the assumption of rigid body dynamics, and a single structural mode between spacecraft and telescope. Helium slosh for a half full 4000 liter tank was analyzed, and did not represent a major control problem.

  15. Preparation of the pointing and control system of the SOFIA Airborne Telescope for early science missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampater, Ulrich; Herter, Terry; Keas, Paul; Harms, Franziska; Engfer, Christian; Salewsky, Peter; Jakob, Holger; Roeser, Hans-Peter

    2010-07-01

    During observation flights the telescope structure of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is subject to disturbance excitations over a wide frequency band. The sources can be separated into two groups: inertial excitation caused by vibration of the airborne platform, and aerodynamic excitation that acts on the telescope assembly (TA) through an open port cavity. These disturbance sources constitute a major difference of SOFIA to other ground based and space observatories and achieving the required pointing accuracy of 1 arcsecond cumulative rms or better below 70 Hz in this environment is driving the design of the TA pointing and control system. In the current design it consists of two parts, the rigid body attitude control system and a feed forward based compensator of flexible TA deformation. This paper discusses the characterization and control system tuning of the as-built system. It is a process that integrates the study of the structural dynamic behavior of the TA, the resulting image motion in the focal plane, and the design and implementation of active control systems. Ground tests, which are performed under controlled experimental conditions, and in-flight characterization tests, both leading up to the early science performance capabilities of the observatory, are addressed.

  16. A chronology of the on-orbit pointing control system changes on the Hubble Space Telescope and associated pointing improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharkey, J. P.; Nurre, G. S.; Beals, G. A.; Nelson, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The pointing control system on the Hubble Space Telescope was designed to keep an image stable in the focal plane to 0.007 arc seconds (rms) for observations lasting from seconds to hours. Following the on-orbit deployment, this level of pointing performance was achieved only for short intervals during each orbit because of unexpected disturbances originating in the Solar Arrays. Since this problem was first recognized, several control system redesigns have been carried out and uplinked to the spacecraft with increasing degrees of success. This paper presents a chronology of those activities. In addition, sufficient background material is included regarding the pointing control system and the Solar Array disturbance so that the contents can be understood without reverting to the details in the reference material.

  17. A chronology of the on-orbit pointing control system changes on the Hubble Space Telescope and associated pointing improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, J. P.; Nurre, G. S.; Beals, G. A.; Nelson, J. D.

    1992-08-01

    The pointing control system on the Hubble Space Telescope was designed to keep an image stable in the focal plane to 0.007 arc seconds (rms) for observations lasting from seconds to hours. Following the on-orbit deployment, this level of pointing performance was achieved only for short intervals during each orbit because of unexpected disturbances originating in the Solar Arrays. Since this problem was first recognized, several control system redesigns have been carried out and uplinked to the spacecraft with increasing degrees of success. This paper presents a chronology of those activities. In addition, sufficient background material is included regarding the pointing control system and the Solar Array disturbance so that the contents can be understood without reverting to the details in the reference material.

  18. Formation Flying With Decentralized Control in Libration Point Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Carpenter, J. Russell; Wagner, Christoph

    2000-01-01

    A decentralized control framework is investigated for applicability of formation flying control in libration orbits. The decentralized approach, being non-hierarchical, processes only direct measurement data, in parallel with the other spacecraft. Control is accomplished via linearization about a reference libration orbit with standard control using a Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) or the GSFC control algorithm. Both are linearized about the current state estimate as with the extended Kalman filter. Based on this preliminary work, the decentralized approach appears to be feasible for upcoming libration missions using distributed spacecraft.

  19. 21 CFR 123.6 - Hazard analysis and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... identified food safety hazards, including as appropriate: (i) Critical control points designed to control... control points designed to control food safety hazards introduced outside the processing plant environment... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hazard analysis and Hazard Analysis...

  20. 49 CFR 236.303 - Control circuits for signals, selection through circuit controller operated by switch points or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-point frogs and derails shall be selected through circuit controller operated directly by switch points... switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the routes governed by such signal. Circuits shall be arranged... when each switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the route is in proper position....

  1. 49 CFR 236.303 - Control circuits for signals, selection through circuit controller operated by switch points or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-point frogs and derails shall be selected through circuit controller operated directly by switch points... switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the routes governed by such signal. Circuits shall be arranged... when each switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the route is in proper position....

  2. 49 CFR 236.303 - Control circuits for signals, selection through circuit controller operated by switch points or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-point frogs and derails shall be selected through circuit controller operated directly by switch points... switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the routes governed by such signal. Circuits shall be arranged... when each switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the route is in proper position....

  3. 49 CFR 236.303 - Control circuits for signals, selection through circuit controller operated by switch points or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-point frogs and derails shall be selected through circuit controller operated directly by switch points... switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the routes governed by such signal. Circuits shall be arranged... when each switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the route is in proper position....

  4. 49 CFR 236.303 - Control circuits for signals, selection through circuit controller operated by switch points or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-point frogs and derails shall be selected through circuit controller operated directly by switch points... switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the routes governed by such signal. Circuits shall be arranged... when each switch, movable-point frog, and derail in the route is in proper position....

  5. Anatomy of an experimental two-link flexible manipulator under end-point control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakley, Celia M.; Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The design and experimental implementation of an end-point controller for two-link flexible manipulators are presented. The end-point controller is based on linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) theory and is shown to exhibit significant improvements in trajectory tracking over a conventional controller design. To understand the behavior of the manipulator structure under end-point control, a strobe sequence illustrating the link deflections during a typical slew maneuver is included.

  6. a Libration Model for Enceladus Based on Geodetic Control Point Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadezhdina, I. E.; Zubarev, A. E.; Brusnikin, E. S.; Oberst, J.

    2016-06-01

    A new global control point network was derived for Enceladus, based on Cassini and Voyager-2 image data. Cassini images were taken from 2005 to 2014, for Voyager we have only one flyby in the middle of 1981. We have derived 3D Cartesian coordinates for 1128 control points as well as improved pointing data for 12 Voyager and 193 Cassini images in the Enceladus-fixed coordinate system. The point accuracies vary from 55 m to 2900 m (average point accuracy - 221 m). From tracking of the control points we detect a librational motion described by a model which includes 3 different periods and amplitudes (Rambaux et al., 2011). We determine the amplitudes for each term. Our new control point network has a higher number of point measurements and a higher accuracy than previous data (Giese et al., 2014).

  7. The Validity of the SAT® for Predicting Cumulative Grade Point Average by College Major. Research Report 2012-6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Emily J.; Kobrin, Jennifer L.; Patterson, Brian F.; Mattern, Krista D.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the differential validity of the SAT for predicting cumulative GPA (cGPA) through the second year of college by college major, as well as the differential prediction of cGPA by college major across student subgroups. The relationship between the SAT and cGPA varied somewhat by major, as well as by major and subgroup…

  8. Stability analysis of fixed points via chaos control.

    PubMed

    Locher, M.; Johnson, G. A.; Hunt, E. R.

    1997-12-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the application of chaos control techniques to the stability analysis of two-dimensional dynamical systems. We demonstrate how the system's response to one or multiple feedback controllers can be utilized to calculate the characteristic multipliers associated with an unstable periodic orbit. The experimental results, obtained for a single and two coupled diode resonators, agree well with the presented theory. (c) 1997 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779684

  9. Controlled-release fertilizer (CRF): a green fertilizer for controlling non-point contamination in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao-yun; Sun, Ke-jun; Wang, De-han; Liao, Zong-wen

    2005-01-01

    Fertilizers contribute greatly to high yields but also result in environmental non-point contamination, including the emission of greenhouse gas (N2O) and eutrophication of water bodies. How to solve this problem has become a serious challenge, especially for China as its high ecological pressure. Controlled-release fertilizer(CRF) has been developed to minimize the contamination while keeping high yield and has become a green fertilizer for agriculture. Several CRFs made with special coating technology were used for testing the fertilizer effects in yield and environment through pot experiment and field trial. The result indicated that the CRFs had higher N use efficiency, thus reducing N loss through leaching and volatilization while keeping higher yields. Comparing with imported standard CRFs, the test on CRFs showed similar fertilizer effect but with much lower cost. CRFs application is becoming a new approach for minimizing non-point contamination in agriculture. PMID:16295884

  10. Controlled-release fertilizer (CRF): a green fertilizer for controlling non-point contamination in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao-yun; Sun, Ke-jun; Wang, De-han; Liao, Zong-wen

    2005-01-01

    Fertilizers contribute greatly to high yields but also result in environmental non-point contamination, including the emission of greenhouse gas (N2O) and eutrophication of water bodies. How to solve this problem has become a serious challenge, especially for China as its high ecological pressure. Controlled-release fertilizer(CRF) has been developed to minimize the contamination while keeping high yield and has become a green fertilizer for agriculture. Several CRFs made with special coating technology were used for testing the fertilizer effects in yield and environment through pot experiment and field trial. The result indicated that the CRFs had higher N use efficiency, thus reducing N loss through leaching and volatilization while keeping higher yields. Comparing with imported standard CRFs, the test on CRFs showed similar fertilizer effect but with much lower cost. CRFs application is becoming a new approach for minimizing non-point contamination in agriculture.

  11. 21 CFR 120.8 - Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...: (i) Critical control points designed to control food hazards that are reasonably likely to occur and... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan. 120.8 Section 120.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  12. [Pharmacist education from the view point of infection control pharmacist].

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Anyone may get infectious diseases without depending on normal persons or patients. We have the probability of infection in hospital or in community. Pharmacists need to have knowledge of the infection control from the viewpoint to contribute to sanitary improvement and an increase, and to secure the healthy life of the nation. And it is necessary to participate in prevention of hospital infection and infectious disease treatment. However, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences six years system education or postgraduate education is not enough for the education of infection control to pharmacists. Therefore, in Nagasaki University Hospital, three Board Certified Infection Control Pharmacy Specialists (BCICPS) play a starring role in educating about the infection control for pharmacists. They lecture on the basic idea of nosocomial infection control and antibacterial chemotherapy, and perform the instruction by the practical skill about the hand antisepsis. We enhance the education effect by carrying out courses on lectures and practical skills. In this symposium, I introduce educational activities in the Nagasaki University Hospital. PMID:23208038

  13. Automatic control-point selection for image registration using disparity fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, Damon M.; Delaney, John K.; Ricciardi, Paola; Loew, Murray H.

    2012-02-01

    We present an algorithm for automatically selecting and matching control points for the purpose of registering images acquired using different imaging modalities. The modulus maxima of the wavelet transform were used to define a criterion for identifying control points. This criterion is capable of selecting points based on the size of features in the image. This technique can be tailored, by adjusting the scale of the filters in the modulus calculation, to the specific objects or structures known to occur in each image being registered. The control-point matching technique includes an iterative method for reducing the set of control-point pairs using the horizontal and vertical disparities between the matched pairs of points. Least-squares planes are fit to the horizontal and vertical disparity data, and control-point pairings are deleted based on their distances from those planes. The remaining points are used to recompute the planes. The process is iterated until the remaining points fall within a certain distance from the planes. Finally, a spatial transformation is performed on the template image to bring it into alignment with the reference image. The result of the control-point pair reduction is a more accurate alignment than what would have been produced using the initial control-point pairs. These techniques are applicable to medical images, but examples are given using images of paintings.

  14. [Spatial discharge characteristics and total load control of non-point source pollutants based on the catchment scale].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia-Hui; Lu, Jun; Zhang, Qing-Zhong; Wang, Bo; Yao, Rui-Hua; Zhang, Hui-Yuan; Huang, Feng

    2011-09-01

    Agricultural non-point source pollution is one of the major causes of water quality deterioration. Based on the analysis of the spatial discharge characteristics and intensity of major pollutants from the agricultural pollution source, the establishment of spatial management subzones for controlling agricultural non-point pollution and a design of a plan for total load control of pollutants from each subzone is an important way to improve the efficiency of control measures. In this paper the Four Lake basin in Hubei Province is adopted as the research case region and a systematic research of the control countermeasures of agricultural non-point pollution based on the catchment scale is carried out. The results shows that in the Four Lake basin, the COD, total nitrogen, total phosphorus and ammonia nitrogen load of the water environment are mainly caused by agricultural non-point pollution. These four kinds of non-point source pollutants respectively account for 67.6%, 82.2%, 84.7% and 50.9% of the total pollutant discharge amount in the basin. The analysis of the spatial discharge characteristics of non-point source pollutants in the Four Lake basin shows that the major contributor source regions of non-point source pollutant in the basin are the four counties, including Honghu, Jianli, Qianjiang and Shayang where the aquatic and livestock production are relatively developed. According to the spatial discharge characteristics of the pollutants and the evaluation of the discharge intensity of pollutants, the Four Lake basin is divided into three agricultural non-point pollution management subzones, which including Changhu upstream aquatic and livestock production pollution control subzone, Four-lake trunk canal rural non-point source pollution control subzone and Honghu aquatic production pollution control subzone. Specific pollution control measures are put forward for each subzone. With a comprehensive consideration of the water quality amelioration and the

  15. [Spatial discharge characteristics and total load control of non-point source pollutants based on the catchment scale].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia-Hui; Lu, Jun; Zhang, Qing-Zhong; Wang, Bo; Yao, Rui-Hua; Zhang, Hui-Yuan; Huang, Feng

    2011-09-01

    Agricultural non-point source pollution is one of the major causes of water quality deterioration. Based on the analysis of the spatial discharge characteristics and intensity of major pollutants from the agricultural pollution source, the establishment of spatial management subzones for controlling agricultural non-point pollution and a design of a plan for total load control of pollutants from each subzone is an important way to improve the efficiency of control measures. In this paper the Four Lake basin in Hubei Province is adopted as the research case region and a systematic research of the control countermeasures of agricultural non-point pollution based on the catchment scale is carried out. The results shows that in the Four Lake basin, the COD, total nitrogen, total phosphorus and ammonia nitrogen load of the water environment are mainly caused by agricultural non-point pollution. These four kinds of non-point source pollutants respectively account for 67.6%, 82.2%, 84.7% and 50.9% of the total pollutant discharge amount in the basin. The analysis of the spatial discharge characteristics of non-point source pollutants in the Four Lake basin shows that the major contributor source regions of non-point source pollutant in the basin are the four counties, including Honghu, Jianli, Qianjiang and Shayang where the aquatic and livestock production are relatively developed. According to the spatial discharge characteristics of the pollutants and the evaluation of the discharge intensity of pollutants, the Four Lake basin is divided into three agricultural non-point pollution management subzones, which including Changhu upstream aquatic and livestock production pollution control subzone, Four-lake trunk canal rural non-point source pollution control subzone and Honghu aquatic production pollution control subzone. Specific pollution control measures are put forward for each subzone. With a comprehensive consideration of the water quality amelioration and the

  16. Point of care and patient privacy: who is in control?

    PubMed

    Morgan, J D

    1994-05-01

    Public and patient access to medical records has been severely limited through policies limiting physical and timely access and intellectual understanding of content. New expectations of patient/public access and control have arisen accompanying the new paradigms of health care delivery and health information (computer-based patient records). Examples from these new paradigms are personalized and presented in information system contexts from bedside to community settings. Patient and family involvement in care delivery, education, assessment, and control of privacy are explored. A personalized confidentiality/security/privacy module of the computer-based patient record is suggested.

  17. [An Analysis of El Camino College Students According to Their Majors, Perceptions of Academic Relevancy, and Unit and Grade Point Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garlock, Jerry

    These three separate studies of students at El Camino College (California) discuss their majors, perceptions of academic relevancy, and grade point characteristics. Sub-groups of students (freshman/sophomore, full-time/part-time) are compared according to their major divisions (physical sciences, fine arts, natural sciences, etc.) and also…

  18. Pointing and control system enabling technology for future automated space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlgren, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    Future automated space missions present challenging opportunities in the pointing-and-control technology disciplines. The enabling pointing-and-control system technologies for missions from 1985 to the year 2000 were identified and assessed. A generic mission set including Earth orbiter, planetary, and other missions which predominantly drive the pointing-and-control requirements was selected for detailed evaluation. Technology candidates identified were prioritized as planning options for future NASA-OAST advanced development programs. The primary technology thrusts in each candidate program were cited, and advanced development programs in pointing-and-control were recommended for the FY 80 to FY 87 period, based on these technology thrusts.

  19. Ubiquitous Points of Control over Regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fan; Barbi, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Posttranslational modification by ubiquitin tagging is crucial for regulating the stability, activity and cellular localization of many target proteins and processes including DNA repair, cell cycle progression, protein quality control and signal transduction. It has long been appreciated that ubiquitin-mediated events are important for certain signaling pathways leading to leukocyte activation and the stimulation of effector function. It is now clear that the activities of molecules and pathways central to immune regulation are also modified and regulated through ubiquitin. Among the mechanisms of immune control, regulatory T cells (or Tregs) are themselves particularly sensitive to such regulation. E3 ligases and deubiquitinases both influence Tregs through their effects on signaling pathways pertinent for these cells or through the direct, posttranslational regulation of Foxp3. In this review we will summarize and discuss several examples of ubiquitin-mediated control over multiple aspects of biology of Tregs including their generation, function and phenotypic fidelity. Fully explored and exploited, these potential opportunities for Treg modulation may lead to novel immunotherapies for both positive and negative fine-tuning of immune restraint. PMID:24777637

  20. Point mutations in the major outer membrane protein drive hypervirulence of a rapidly expanding clone of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zuowei; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Sahin, Orhan; Yaeger, Michael; Plummer, Paul; Zhai, Weiwei; Shen, Zhangqi; Dai, Lei; Chen, Swaine L; Zhang, Qijing

    2016-09-20

    Infections due to clonal expansion of highly virulent bacterial strains are clear and present threats to human and animal health. Association of genetic changes with disease is now a routine, but identification of causative mutations that enable disease remains difficult. Campylobacter jejuni is an important zoonotic pathogen transmitted to humans mainly via the foodborne route. C. jejuni typically colonizes the gut, but a hypervirulent and rapidly expanding clone of C. jejuni recently emerged, which is able to translocate across the intestinal tract, causing systemic infection and abortion in pregnant animals. The genetic basis responsible for this hypervirulence is unknown. Here, we developed a strategy, termed "directed genome evolution," by using hybridization between abortifacient and nonabortifacient strains followed by selection in an animal disease model and whole-genome sequence analysis. This strategy successfully identified SNPs in porA, encoding the major outer membrane protein, are responsible for the hypervirulence. Defined mutagenesis verified that these mutations were both necessary and sufficient for causing abortion. Furthermore, sequence analysis identified porA as the gene with the top genome-wide signal of adaptive evolution using Fu's Fs, a population genetic metric for recent population size changes, which is consistent with the recent expansion of clone "sheep abortion." These results identify a key virulence factor in Campylobacter and a potential target for the control of this zoonotic pathogen. Furthermore, this study provides general, unbiased experimental and computational approaches that are broadly applicable for efficient elucidation of disease-causing mutations in bacterial pathogens. PMID:27601641

  1. Implementation of control point form of algebraic grid-generation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choo, Yung K.; Miller, David P.; Reno, Charles J.

    1991-01-01

    The control point form (CPF) provides explicit control of physical grid shape and grid spacing through the movement of the control points. The control point array, called a control net, is a space grid type arrangement of locations in physical space with an index for each direction. As an algebraic method CPF is efficient and works well with interactive computer graphics. A family of menu-driven, interactive grid-generation computer codes (TURBO) is being developed by using CPF. Key features of TurboI (a TURBO member) are discussed and typical results are presented. TurboI runs on any IRIS 4D series workstation.

  2. Configuration trade-offs for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility pointing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pue, A. J.; Strohbehn, K.; Hunt, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Conceptual pointing control system designs for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) are examined in terms of fine guidance pointing and large-angle slewing accuracies. In particular, basic trade-offs between body pointing only and body pointing plus image motion compensation (IMC) are considered using a steady-state linear covariance analysis to compute rms pointing errors. It is shown that body pointing can provide good performance during nominal fine pointing but limits the telescope capability to rapidly slew and acquire targets. Overall, body pointing plus IMC would offer superior performance but must be judged against the difficulties posed by the attitude sensor noise and the higher cost and complexity of IMC. It is recommended that improved sensor designs be pursued while slewing performance be enhanced by a combination of an appropriate command profile and control compensation.

  3. Control of node crossing points in Saturnian gravity-assist tours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strange, N.

    2003-01-01

    In the Saturnian system, the control of the node crossing point is important to avoid debris in Saturn's ring plane and to target flybys of moons other than Titan. This paper describes how to use Titan gravity assists to control the spacecraft's node crossing point.

  4. Point mutations in the major outer membrane protein drive hypervirulence of a rapidly expanding clone of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zuowei; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Sahin, Orhan; Yaeger, Michael; Plummer, Paul; Zhai, Weiwei; Shen, Zhangqi; Dai, Lei; Zhang, Qijing

    2016-01-01

    Infections due to clonal expansion of highly virulent bacterial strains are clear and present threats to human and animal health. Association of genetic changes with disease is now a routine, but identification of causative mutations that enable disease remains difficult. Campylobacter jejuni is an important zoonotic pathogen transmitted to humans mainly via the foodborne route. C. jejuni typically colonizes the gut, but a hypervirulent and rapidly expanding clone of C. jejuni recently emerged, which is able to translocate across the intestinal tract, causing systemic infection and abortion in pregnant animals. The genetic basis responsible for this hypervirulence is unknown. Here, we developed a strategy, termed “directed genome evolution,” by using hybridization between abortifacient and nonabortifacient strains followed by selection in an animal disease model and whole-genome sequence analysis. This strategy successfully identified SNPs in porA, encoding the major outer membrane protein, are responsible for the hypervirulence. Defined mutagenesis verified that these mutations were both necessary and sufficient for causing abortion. Furthermore, sequence analysis identified porA as the gene with the top genome-wide signal of adaptive evolution using Fu’s Fs, a population genetic metric for recent population size changes, which is consistent with the recent expansion of clone “sheep abortion.” These results identify a key virulence factor in Campylobacter and a potential target for the control of this zoonotic pathogen. Furthermore, this study provides general, unbiased experimental and computational approaches that are broadly applicable for efficient elucidation of disease-causing mutations in bacterial pathogens. PMID:27601641

  5. Parameter Space of Fixed Points of the Damped Driven Pendulum Susceptible to Control of Chaos Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmore, Andrew; Trail, Collin; Olsen, Thomas; Wiener, Richard J.

    2003-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated the experimental control of chaos in a Modified Taylor-Couette system with hourglass geometry( Richard J. Wiener et al), Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2340 (1999).. Identifying fixed points susceptible to algorithms for the control of chaos is key. We seek to learn about this process in the accessible numerical model of the damped, driven pendulum. Following Baker(Gregory L. Baker, Am. J. Phys. 63), 832 (1995)., we seek points susceptible to the OGY(E. Ott, C. Grebogi, and J. A. Yorke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64), 1196 (1990). algorithm. We automate the search for fixed points that are candidates for control. We present comparisons of the space of candidate fixed points with the bifurcation diagrams and Poincare sections of the system. We demonstrate control at fixed points which do not appear on the attractor. We also show that the control algorithm may be employed to shift the system between non-communicating branches of the attractor.

  6. Robust optimal sun-pointing control of a large solar power satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shunan; Zhang, Kaiming; Peng, Haijun; Wu, Zhigang; Radice, Gianmarco

    2016-10-01

    The robust optimal sun-pointing control strategy for a large geostationary solar power satellite (SPS) is addressed in this paper. The SPS is considered as a huge rigid body, and the sun-pointing dynamics are firstly proposed in the state space representation. The perturbation effects caused by gravity gradient, solar radiation pressure and microwave reaction are investigated. To perform sun-pointing maneuvers, a periodically time-varying robust optimal LQR controller is designed to assess the pointing accuracy and the control inputs. It should be noted that, to reduce the pointing errors, the disturbance rejection technique is combined into the proposed LQR controller. A recursive algorithm is then proposed to solve the optimal LQR control gain. Simulation results are finally provided to illustrate the performance of the proposed closed-loop system.

  7. Design of a new high-performance pointing controller for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. D.

    1993-01-01

    A new form of high-performance, disturbance-adaptive pointing controller for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is proposed. This new controller is all linear (constant gains) and can maintain accurate 'pointing' of the HST in the face of persistent randomly triggered uncertain, unmeasurable 'flapping' motions of the large attached solar array panels. Similar disturbances associated with antennas and other flexible appendages can also be accommodated. The effectiveness and practicality of the proposed new controller is demonstrated by a detailed design and simulation testing of one such controller for a planar-motion, fully nonlinear model of HST. The simulation results show a high degree of disturbance isolation and pointing stability.

  8. Internal quality control in point-of-care testing: where's the evidence?

    PubMed

    Holt, Helen; Freedman, Danielle B

    2016-03-01

    ISO 22870 standards require protocols for performance of internal quality control for all point-of-care testing devices and training of users in its theory and practice. However, the unique setting of point-of-care testing (i.e. processes conducted by non-scientific users) means that laboratory internal quality control programmes do not easily translate to point-of-care testing. In addition, while the evidence base for internal quality control within the laboratory has been increasing, the equivalent literature surrounding point-of-care testing is very limited. This has led to wide variation in what is considered acceptable practice for internal quality control at the point of care. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that internal quality control is an area of deficiency in point-of-care testing. Internal quality control protocols used at point-of-care testing should be defined based on risk management. The protocol will therefore be dependent on analyser complexity and availability of inbuilt system checks, the risk associated with release of an incorrect patient result as well as frequency of use. The emphasis should be on designing an effective internal quality control protocol as opposed to the inherent tendency of introducing high-frequency quality control. Typically a simple pass or fail criterion is used for internal quality control in point-of-care testing based on whether internal quality control results fall within assigned ranges. While simply taught, such criteria can require broad internal quality control ranges to decrease the probability of false rejection (also reducing the probability of error detection). Customized internal quality control ranges, two-tier acceptance systems and assay-specific internal quality control can be used to improve error detection rates.

  9. Internal quality control in point-of-care testing: where's the evidence?

    PubMed

    Holt, Helen; Freedman, Danielle B

    2016-03-01

    ISO 22870 standards require protocols for performance of internal quality control for all point-of-care testing devices and training of users in its theory and practice. However, the unique setting of point-of-care testing (i.e. processes conducted by non-scientific users) means that laboratory internal quality control programmes do not easily translate to point-of-care testing. In addition, while the evidence base for internal quality control within the laboratory has been increasing, the equivalent literature surrounding point-of-care testing is very limited. This has led to wide variation in what is considered acceptable practice for internal quality control at the point of care. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that internal quality control is an area of deficiency in point-of-care testing. Internal quality control protocols used at point-of-care testing should be defined based on risk management. The protocol will therefore be dependent on analyser complexity and availability of inbuilt system checks, the risk associated with release of an incorrect patient result as well as frequency of use. The emphasis should be on designing an effective internal quality control protocol as opposed to the inherent tendency of introducing high-frequency quality control. Typically a simple pass or fail criterion is used for internal quality control in point-of-care testing based on whether internal quality control results fall within assigned ranges. While simply taught, such criteria can require broad internal quality control ranges to decrease the probability of false rejection (also reducing the probability of error detection). Customized internal quality control ranges, two-tier acceptance systems and assay-specific internal quality control can be used to improve error detection rates. PMID:26486440

  10. Barriers to Point-of-Care Testing in India: Results from Qualitative Research across Different Settings, Users and Major Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Nora; Ganesh, Gayatri; Patil, Mamata; Yellappa, Vijayashree; Pant Pai, Nitika; Vadnais, Caroline; Pai, Madhukar

    2015-01-01

    Background Successful point-of-care testing, namely ensuring the completion of the test and treat cycle in the same encounter, has immense potential to reduce diagnostic and treatment delays, and impact patient outcomes. However, having rapid tests is not enough, as many barriers may prevent their successful implementation in point-of-care testing programs. Qualitative research on diagnostic practices may help identify such barriers across different points of care in health systems. Methods In this exploratory qualitative study, we conducted 78 semi-structured interviews and 13 focus group discussions in an urban and rural area of Karnataka, India, with healthcare providers (doctors, nurses, specialists, traditional healers, and informal providers), patients, community health workers, test manufacturers, laboratory technicians, program managers and policy-makers. Participants were purposively sampled to represent settings of hospitals, peripheral labs, clinics, communities and homes, in both the public and private sectors. Results In the Indian context, the onus is on the patient to ensure successful point-of-care testing across homes, clinics, labs and hospitals, amidst uncoordinated providers with divergent and often competing practices, in settings lacking material, money and human resources. We identified three overarching themes affecting point-of-care testing: the main theme is ‘relationships’ among providers and between providers and patients, influenced by the cross-cutting theme of ‘infrastructure’. Challenges with both result in ‘modified practices’ often favouring empirical (symptomatic) treatment over treatment guided by testing. Conclusions Even if tests can be conducted on the spot and infrastructure challenges have been resolved, relationships among providers and between patients and providers are crucial for successful point-of-care testing. Furthermore, these barriers do not act in isolation, but are interlinked and need to be examined

  11. e-VLBI Access Point (eAXP) - a centralized control and EGAE configuration / management application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruszczyk, Chester Whitney, Alan

    Setting up experiments to utilize Experiment Guided Adaptive Endpoint (EGAE) and e-VLBI is presently a complex and time intensive process requiring scientific, Mark5 and networking knowledge. There is no central access to point to configure and manage all of these aspects of an experiment. The e-VLBI Access Point (eAXP) is a centralized control plane management tool that offers a GUI interface to augment the command line interface presently being used to set up and conduct experiments. eAXP contains three major toolsets: one to set up and execute an experiment using real-time or non-real time modes; the second to configure and manage EGAE; and a third to view statistics of the experiments. Initially the overall system architecture for eAXP is presented, followed by details of the Experiment Profiler toolset including screen shots of the system presently being tested. This will be followed by how eAXP will support real-time modes interfacing to the Dynamic Resource Allocation over GMPLS Optical Network (DRAGON) resource management project.

  12. Control of large space structures and associated precision-pointed payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.; Goglia, G. L.

    1982-01-01

    Stability and robustness of a two-level control system for large space structures were investigated. In particular, the effects of actuator/sensor nonlinearities and dynamics on the closed-loop stability were studied and the problem of control-systems design for fine-pointing of several individually pointed payloads mounted on a large space platform was examined. A composite controller is proposed and is stable and robust.

  13. Pointing and figure control system for a space-based far-IR segmented telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    A pointing and figure control system for two space-based far-IR telescopes, the 10-20 m Large Deployable Reflector and the 3.6 m Submillimeter Intermediate Mission, is described. The figure maintenance control system is designed to counter the optical elements translational and rotational changes induced by long-term thermal drifts that the support structure may experience. The pointing system applies optical truss to telescope pointing; a laser metrology system is used to transfer pointing informaton from an external fine guidance sensor to the telescope optical boresight, defined by the primary mirror, secondary mirror, and focal plane assembly.

  14. Methodological demonstration of laser beam pointing control for space gravitational wave detection missions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu-Hui; Liu, He-Shan; Luo, Zi-Ren; Li, Yu-Qiong; Jin, Gang

    2014-07-01

    In space laser interferometer gravitational wave (G.W.) detection missions, the stability of the laser beam pointing direction has to be kept at 10 nrad/√Hz. Otherwise, the beam pointing jitter noise will dominate the noise budget and make the detection of G.W. impossible. Disturbed by the residue non-conservative forces, the fluctuation of the laser beam pointing direction could be a few μrad/√Hz at frequencies from 0.1 mHz to 10 Hz. Therefore, the laser beam pointing control system is an essential requirement for those space G.W. detection missions. An on-ground test of such beam pointing control system is performed, where the Differential Wave-front Sensing technique is used to sense the beams pointing jitter. An active controlled steering mirror is employed to adjust the beam pointing direction to compensate the jitter. The experimental result shows that the pointing control system can be used for very large dynamic range up to 5 μrad. At the interested frequencies of space G.W. detection missions, between 1 mHz and 1 Hz, beam pointing stability of 6 nrad/√Hz is achieved. PMID:25085155

  15. Methodological demonstration of laser beam pointing control for space gravitational wave detection missions

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yu-Hui; Liu, He-Shan; Luo, Zi-Ren; Li, Yu-Qiong; Jin, Gang

    2014-07-15

    In space laser interferometer gravitational wave (G.W.) detection missions, the stability of the laser beam pointing direction has to be kept at 10 nrad/√Hz. Otherwise, the beam pointing jitter noise will dominate the noise budget and make the detection of G.W. impossible. Disturbed by the residue non-conservative forces, the fluctuation of the laser beam pointing direction could be a few μrad/√Hz at frequencies from 0.1 mHz to 10 Hz. Therefore, the laser beam pointing control system is an essential requirement for those space G.W. detection missions. An on-ground test of such beam pointing control system is performed, where the Differential Wave-front Sensing technique is used to sense the beams pointing jitter. An active controlled steering mirror is employed to adjust the beam pointing direction to compensate the jitter. The experimental result shows that the pointing control system can be used for very large dynamic range up to 5 μrad. At the interested frequencies of space G.W. detection missions, between 1 mHz and 1 Hz, beam pointing stability of 6 nrad/√Hz is achieved.

  16. Wireless power charging using point of load controlled high frequency power converters

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John M.; Campbell, Steven L.; Chambon, Paul H.; Seiber, Larry E.; White, Clifford P.

    2015-10-13

    An apparatus for wirelessly charging a battery of an electric vehicle is provided with a point of load control. The apparatus includes a base unit for generating a direct current (DC) voltage. The base unit is regulated by a power level controller. One or more point of load converters can be connected to the base unit by a conductor, with each point of load converter comprising a control signal generator that transmits a signal to the power level controller. The output power level of the DC voltage provided by the base unit is controlled by power level controller such that the power level is sufficient to power all active load converters when commanded to do so by any of the active controllers, without generating excessive power that may be otherwise wasted.

  17. [Major advances in Oncology in 2013: the editorial board of the Bulletin du Cancer point of view].

    PubMed

    Vignot, Stéphane; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; André, Thierry; Blay, Jean-Yves; Goncalves, Anthony; Massard, Christophe; Orbach, Daniel; Wislez, Marie; Thariat, Juliette; Magné, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Many data are presented each year during the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting and others international major meetings. This article is proposed by the editorial board of the Bulletin du Cancer as a synthesis of important new data. The purpose is to identify in these results those who may have an immediate impact on our clinical practices.

  18. Point-of-care testing for HIV in an Irish prison setting: results from three major Irish prisons.

    PubMed

    Bannan, Ciaran L; Lynch, Pamela A; Conroy, Emmett P; O'Dea, Siobhan; Surah, Saloni; Betts-Symonds, Graham; Lyons, Fiona E

    2016-10-01

    HIV is more prevalent in the prison population compared to the general population. Prison inmates are at an increased risk of blood-borne infections. Considerable stigma has been documented amongst inmates with HIV infection. In collaboration with the schools, healthcare facilities, prison authorities and inmate Irish Red Cross groups in Wheatfield, Cloverhill and Mountjoy prisons in Dublin, Ireland, the Department of Genito Urinary Medicine and Infectious Diseases at St James' Hospital in Dublin developed a campaign for raising awareness of HIV, educating inmates about HIV and tackling HIV stigma. Following this campaign, large-scale point-of-care testing for HIV was offered over a short period. In total, 741 inmates were screened for HIV. One inmate tested positive for HIV. We experienced a large number of invalid test results, requiring formal laboratory serum testing, and a small number of false positive results. Large-scale point-of-care testing in the Irish prison setting is acceptable and achievable.

  19. [Major advances in oncology in 2014: the editorial board of the Bulletin du Cancer point of view].

    PubMed

    Massard, Christophe; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; André, Thierry; Blay, Jean-Yves; Goncalves, Anthony; Orbach, Daniel; Wislez, Marie; Thariat, Juliette; Magné, Nicolas; Vignot, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Results of many clinical trials are presented each year during the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting, ESMO meeting and other international major meetings. This article is proposed by the editorial board of the Bulletin du Cancer as a synthesis of new important results in clinical trials concerning cancer patients treated for hematology cancer or solid tumors. The goal of this review is to highlight the main results that may have an immediate impact on our clinical practices for physicians and patients.

  20. The Feasibility of the Disturbance Accommodating Controller for Precision Antenna Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gresham, L. L.; Lansing, F. L.; Guiar, C. N.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a pointing (position loop) controller for the NASA-JPL Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas using the Disturbance Accommodating Control (DAC) theory. A model that includes state dependent disturbances was developed, and an example demonstrating the noise estimator is presented as an initial phase in the controller design. The goal is to improve pointing accuracy by the removal of the systematic errors caused by the antenna misalignment as well as sensor noise and random wind and thermal disturbances. Preliminary simulation results show that the DAC technique is successful in both cancelling the imposed errors and maintaining an optimal control policy.

  1. Serologic evaluation of celiac disease in patients with beta thalassemia major and control

    PubMed Central

    Shahramian, Iraj; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Haghighat, Mahmood; Noori, Noor Mohammad; Teimouri, Ali Reza; Sharafi, Elham; Kalili, Manijeh

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study reports evaluated prevalence of CD in patients with Beta-thalassemia major. Background: Celiac Disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder triggered by ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Patients and methods: In this case-control study in a period of 3 years, which was performed on 620 children in two groups of Beta-thalassemia major patients (n=200) and control (n=420), serum tissue transglutamianse (tTG) IgA levels were measured. The two groups were compared together in terms of tTG IgA levels, and p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The means of serum tTG IgA levels in patients with Beta-thalassemia major and control groups were 28.81±68.44 and 6.94±6.68 U/mL, respectively. There was a significant difference in favor of the case group (p=0.000). Body mass index in the two case and control groups had a significant difference (t=3.859, p=0.001). Belonging to each group will change the probability of having less than 20 in tTG IgA (odds=0.285) and it means that belonging to the control group has a protective role. There is only a significant association in the case of all population (r=0.102, p=0.011). Body mass index in the two case and control groups had a significant difference (t=3.859, p=0.001). Conclusion: Probability of CD should be considered since the prevalence of CD is high in patients with and Beta-thalassemia major. Patients with thalassemia major are recommended for screening for CD. PMID:25926941

  2. The Use of Principal Components for Creating Improved Imagery for Geometric Control Point Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    A directed principal component (PC) analysis and its transformation was applied to 7-channel thematic mapper simulator (TMS) data and 4-channel LANDSAT multispectral scanner system (MSS) data collected over the city of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, to create improved imagery for geometric control point selection for image to image registration. Nineteen temporally stable geometric control points, such as road interactions and bridges, were selected for a 236 sq km area. The control points were visible on both the TMS and MSS imagery. On the first attempt the corresponding image control points were selected on both data sets without using the principal components transformation. Many of the road intersection locations were visible but the actual road crossings could not be distinguished. As a result, mensuration errors using raw data exceeded the equivalent of two (79 x 79 m) pixels. The application of a guided principal components transformation yielded TMS and MSS single band images showing improved detail in the scene's urban and residential infrastructure. The PC transformed data sets were then utilized for the reselection of geometric control points. By shown greater detail, control points on both the TMS and MSS imagery could be located with greater precision using the PC transformed data.

  3. Reduced Anterior Cingulate Glutamatergic Concentrations in Childhood Ocd and Major Depression Versus Healthy Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, David R.; Mirza, Yousha; Russell, Aileen; Tang, Jennifer; Smith, Janet M.; Banerjee, Preeya S.; Bhandari, Rashmi; Rose, Michelle; Ivey, Jennifer; Boyd, Courtney; Moore, Gregory J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine in vivo glutamatergic neurochemical alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex of pediatric patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) without major depressive disorder (MDD) versus pediatric patients with MDD without OCD and healthy controls. Method: Single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic examinations…

  4. Control of a pointing, acquisition, and tracking subsystem for intersatellite laser links ISL2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, R.; Kuel, U.; Hettlage, E.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that the dynamical requirements determined for a CO2 lasercom system can be met with the fine pointing assembly (FPA) and the coarse pointing assembly (CPA) described here. The implemented control loops and the corresponding control logic provide the PAT subsystem with a high bandwidth and a short transition time from the acquisition to the tracking mode. It is demonstrated that the maximum angular rate of the LOS in connection with the maximum slew rate of the CPA and the magnification factor of the telescope determine the area around the singular point which the FPA must be able to cover.

  5. Simulation of flexible appendage interactions with Mariner Venus/Mercury attitude control and science platform pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischer, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    A new computer subroutine, which solves the attitude equations of motion for any vehicle idealized as a topological tree of hinge-connected rigid bodies, is used to simulate and analyze science instrument pointing control interaction with a flexible Mariner Venus/Mercury (MVM) spacecraft. The subroutine's user options include linearized or partially linearized hinge-connected models whose computational advantages are demonstrated for the MVM problem. Results of the pointing control/flexible vehicle interaction simulations, including imaging experiment pointing accuracy predictions and implications for MVM science sequence planning, are described in detail.

  6. Costs and water quality effects of controlling point and nonpoint pollution sources

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C.M.; Broomfield, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Costs and water quality effects of controlling point and nonpoint pollution sources are compared for the DuPage River basin in northern Illinois. Costs are estimated for effluent standards for municipal wastewater treatment plants and for the alternative, controlling runoff from nonpoint sources such as streets, agricultural lands, and forests. A dynamic water-quality/hydrology simulation model is used to determine water quality effects of various treatment plant standards and nonpoint-source controls. Costs and water quality data are combined, and the point-source and nonpoint-source plans are compared on a cost-effectiveness basis. Nonpoint-source controls are found to be more cost-effective than stricter control of pollutants from point sources.

  7. A concept for the examination of reference points stability in horizontal control networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malarski, Ryszard

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a concept for the identification of stable reference points used in horizontal control networks, which is based on the lengths of apparent displacement vectors and their mean errors. These vectors and their mean errors are obtained during the process of calculating displacements with free adjustment conditions. It will be shown that the influence of the apparent displacement vectors has a significant effect on the calculation of results. The identification of stable points, using the proposed method, is an integral part of the adjustment process and allows for the interrogation the influence of individual point inclusion or deletion from the reference database, on the values of displacements of controlled points. A detailed process of stable reference points identification is presented using the example of a linear-angular network for a barrage.

  8. Disease progression subtype discovery from longitudinal EMR data with a majority of missing values and unknown initial time points.

    PubMed

    Huopaniemi, Ilkka; Nadkarni, Girish; Nadukuru, Rajiv; Lotay, Vaneet; Ellis, Steve; Gottesman, Omri; Bottinger, Erwin P

    2014-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) contain a longitudinal collection of laboratory data that contains valuable phenotypic information on disease progression of a large collection of patients. These data can be potentially used in medical research or patient care; finding disease progression subtypes is a particularly important application. There are, however, two significant difficulties in utilizing this data for statistical analysis: (a) a large proportion of data is missing and (b) patients are in very different stages of disease progression and there are no well-defined start points of the time series. We present a Bayesian machine learning model that overcomes these difficulties. The method can use highly incomplete time-series measurement of varying lengths, it aligns together similar trajectories in different phases and is capable of finding consistent disease progression subtypes. We demonstrate the method on finding chronic kidney disease progression subtypes.

  9. Major parasitic diseases of poverty in mainland China: perspectives for better control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Lei; Li, Ting-Ting; Huang, Si-Yang; Cong, Wei; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-08-01

    Significant progress has been made in the prevention, control, and elimination of human parasitic diseases in China in the past 60 years. However, parasitic diseases of poverty remain major causes of morbidity and mortality, and inflict enormous economic costs on societies.In this article, we review the prevalence rates, geographical distributions, epidemic characteristics, risk factors, and clinical manifestations of parasitic diseases of poverty listed in the first issue of the journal Infectious Diseases of Poverty on 25 October 2012. We also address the challenges facing control of parasitic diseases of poverty and provide suggestions for better control.

  10. Major parasitic diseases of poverty in mainland China: perspectives for better control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Lei; Li, Ting-Ting; Huang, Si-Yang; Cong, Wei; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the prevention, control, and elimination of human parasitic diseases in China in the past 60 years. However, parasitic diseases of poverty remain major causes of morbidity and mortality, and inflict enormous economic costs on societies.In this article, we review the prevalence rates, geographical distributions, epidemic characteristics, risk factors, and clinical manifestations of parasitic diseases of poverty listed in the first issue of the journal Infectious Diseases of Poverty on 25 October 2012. We also address the challenges facing control of parasitic diseases of poverty and provide suggestions for better control. PMID:27476746

  11. Paleogeographic controls of coal accumulation, Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation and Star Point Sandstone, Wasatch Plateau, Utah.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, R.M.; Blanchard, L.F.; Sanchez, J.D.; Marley, W.E.; Muldoon, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Considers the paleogeographic controls affecting the accumulation of coals in delta-barrier-island complexes. Progradation, lateral shifting, and abandonment of these complexes created four major landward-thinning tongues.-from Authors

  12. Abnormal proactive and reactive cognitive control during conflict processing in major depression.

    PubMed

    Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne; De Raedt, Rudi; De Paepe, Annick; Aarts, Kristien; Otte, Georges; Van Dorpe, Jan; Pourtois, Gilles

    2014-02-01

    According to the Dual Mechanisms of Control framework, cognitive control consists of two complementary components: proactive control refers to anticipatory maintenance of goal-relevant information, whereas reactive control acts as a correction mechanism that is activated when a conflict occurs. Possibly, the well-known diminished inhibitory control in response to negative stimuli in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) patients stems from a breakdown in proactive control, and/or anomalies in reactive cognitive control. In our study, MDD patients specifically showed increased response latencies when actively inhibiting a dominant response to a sad compared with a happy face. This condition was associated with a longer duration of a dominant ERP topography (800-900 ms poststimulus onset) and a stronger activity in the bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, reflecting abnormal reactive control when inhibiting attention to a negative stimulus. Moreover, MDD patients showed abnormalities in proactive cognitive control when preparing for the upcoming imperative stimulus (abnormal modulation of the contingent negative variation component), accompanied by more activity in brain regions belonging to the default mode network. All together, deficits to inhibit attention to negative information in MDD might originate from an abnormal use of both proactive resources and reactive control processes.

  13. Performance improvement of PI controllers through dynamic set-point weighting.

    PubMed

    Mudi, Rajani K; Dey, Chanchal

    2011-04-01

    Responses of high-order systems under Ziegler-Nichols tuned PI controllers (ZNPIs) are characterized by excessive oscillation with a large overshoot. Although, a fixed set-point weighting based PI controller (FSWPI) may decrease the overshoot considerably, it fails to reduce the oscillation in the set-point response. Moreover, both FSWPI and ZNPI exhibit equally poor load regulation. Keeping in mind an overall improved performance, we propose an online dynamic set-point weighting technique for ZNPIs. The dynamic set-point weighting factor (β(d)) is heuristically derived from the instantaneous process trend. Performance of the proposed dynamic set-point weighting based PI controller (DSWPI) for various second- and third-order processes including a pH process shows a significant improvement during both the set-point and load disturbance responses over other methods. Stability and robustness of the proposed DSWPI are addressed. Effectiveness of the DSWPI is demonstrated through the real-time implementation on a practical DC position control system.

  14. Performance indicators for initial regional medical response to major incidents: a possible quality control tool

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Timely decisions concerning mobilization and allocation of resources and distribution of casualties are crucial in medical management of major incidents. The aim of this study was to evaluate documented initial regional medical responses to major incidents by applying a set of 11 measurable performance indicators for regional medical command and control and test the feasibility of the indicators. Methods Retrospective data were collected from documentation from regional medical command and control at major incidents that occurred in two Swedish County Councils. Each incident was assigned to one of nine different categories and 11 measurable performance indicators for initial regional medical command and control were systematically applied. Two-way analysis of variance with one observation per cell was used for statistical analysis and the post hoc Tukey test was used for pairwise comparisons. Results The set of indicators for regional medical command and control could be applied in 102 of the130 major incidents (78%), but 36 incidents had to be excluded due to incomplete documentation. The indicators were not applicable as a set for 28 incidents (21.5%) due to different characteristics and time frames. Based on the indicators studied in 66 major incidents, the results demonstrate that the regional medical management performed according to the standard in the early phases (1–10 min after alert), but there were weaknesses in the secondary phase (10–30 min after alert). The significantly lowest scores were found for Indicator 8 (formulate general guidelines for response) and Indicator 10 (decide whether or not resources in own organization are adequate). Conclusions Measurable performance indicators for regional medical command and control can be applied to incidents that directly or indirectly involve casualties provided there is sufficient documentation available. Measurable performance indicators can enhance follow- up and be used as a structured

  15. Attitude control/momentum management and payload pointing in advanced space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Jayasuriya, Suhada

    1990-01-01

    The design and evaluation of an attitude control/momentum management system for highly asymmetric spacecraft configurations are presented. The preliminary development and application of a nonlinear control system design methodology for tracking control of uncertain systems, such as spacecraft payload pointing systems are also presented. Control issues relevant to both linear and nonlinear rigid-body spacecraft dynamics are addressed, whereas any structural flexibilities are not taken into consideration. Results from the first task indicate that certain commonly used simplifications in the equations of motions result in unstable attitude control systems, when used for highly asymmetric spacecraft configurations. An approach is suggested circumventing this problem. Additionally, even though preliminary results from the second task are encouraging, the proposed nonlinear control system design method requires further investigation prior to its application and use as an effective payload pointing system design technique.

  16. Immunoregulatory pathways in murine leishmaniasis: different regulatory control during Leishmania mexicana mexicana and Leishmania major infections.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J; Kaye, P M

    1985-01-01

    The effect of whole body sublethal gamma irradiation on the subsequent growth of Leishmania mexicana mexicana and Leishmania major was studied in CBA/Ca and BALB/c mice. Whereas BALB/c mice are highly susceptible to both parasites developing non healing progressively growing lesions at the site of cutaneous infection, CBA/Ca mice develop small healing cutaneous ulcers following subcutaneous infection with L. major but non healing lesions following subcutaneous infection with L.m. mexicana. Prior whole body sublethal irradiation of CBA/Ca mice, but not BALB/c mice, resulted in strong resistance against infection with L.m. mexicana: no lesions developed at the site of cutaneous infection. Irradiated BALB/c mice did, however, develop small lesions which healed when infected with L. major. The protective effects of irradiation coincided with the development of delayed type hypersensitivity. Both naive and sensitized nylon wool purified lymphocytes could restore susceptibility to L. major in irradiated BALB/c mice but only lymphocytes from long term infected donor mice adoptively transferred a non healing response to irradiated CBA/Ca mice infected with L.m. mexicana. Non-irradiated, L. major infected, CBA/Ca mice, but not similarly treated BALB/c mice, were found to be resistant to subsequent infection with L.m. mexicana. On the other hand, irradiated BALB/c mice infected with L. major were resistant to subsequent infectious challenge with L.m. mexicana. We suggest that the susceptibility of CBA/Ca mice to L.m. mexicana is under the control of an as yet unidentified gene which is not dependent on the generation of T suppressor cells and is bypassed by previous infection with L. major. Therefore, BALB/c mice immunized against L. major by prior sublethal irradiation are also resistant to L.m. mexicana. PMID:3907906

  17. CMG-induced LST dynamics. [application of control moment gyroscope to pointing and control systems of large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    The application of control moment gyroscopes to the pointing and control system of the large space telescope is discussed. The parameter plane analysis technique is used to present the nonlinearity representing the control moment gyroscope gimbal bearing friction. The technique affords both analytic and graphic portrayal of the effects of variations is selected system parameters. Diagrams of the systems involved in the tests are presented.

  18. Rectification of single and multiple frames of satellite scanner imagery using points and edges as control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paderes, F. C., Jr.; Mikhail, E. M.; Foerstner, W.

    1984-01-01

    Rectification of single and overlapping multiple scanner frames produced by such satellite-borne scanners as the LANDSAT MSS was carried out using a newly developed comprehensive parametric model. Tests with both simulated and real image data demonstrate conclusively that this model in general is superior to the widely used polynomial model, and that the simultaneous rectification of overlapping frames using least squares techniques yields a high accuracy than sngle frame rectification due to the inclusion of tie points between the image frames. Used to control, edges or lines, whic are much more likely to be found in images, can replace conventional control points and can easily be implemented into the least squares approach. An efficient algorithm for findng corresponding points in image paris was developed which can be used for determining tie points between image frames and thus increase the ecnomy of the whole rectification procedure.

  19. Preservicing mission, on-orbit modifications to Hubble Space Telescope pointing control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurre, G. S.; Sharkey, J. P.; Nelson, J. D.; Bradley, A. J.

    1995-03-01

    Because of unexpected, thermally induced disturbances originating in the solar arrays (SAs), the Hubble Space Telescope was initially unable to meet its pointing error specifications of 0.007 arc-s (root mean square) for observations lasting from a few seconds to several hours. The effort to pinpoint the mechanism causing the problem and to redesign the onboard controller to accommodate the disturbance began shortly after deployment. After controller modifications, the pointing errors were well within the specification for all of the orbit except for short intervals during transitions in and out of Earth's shadow. This paper presents a chronology of the redesign process and flight data showing the achieved pointing performance. During the recent servicing mission (December 1993) the SAs were replaced with arrays of a modified mechanical design. A preliminary assessment of pointing performance since that time is presented.

  20. Neuromuscular control of the point to point and oscillatory movements of a sagittal arm with the actor-critic reinforcement learning method.

    PubMed

    Golkhou, Vahid; Parnianpour, Mohamad; Lucas, Caro

    2005-04-01

    In this study, we have used a single link system with a pair of muscles that are excited with alpha and gamma signals to achieve both point to point and oscillatory movements with variable amplitude and frequency.The system is highly nonlinear in all its physical and physiological attributes. The major physiological characteristics of this system are simultaneous activation of a pair of nonlinear muscle-like-actuators for control purposes, existence of nonlinear spindle-like sensors and Golgi tendon organ-like sensor, actions of gravity and external loading. Transmission delays are included in the afferent and efferent neural paths to account for a more accurate representation of the reflex loops.A reinforcement learning method with an actor-critic (AC) architecture instead of middle and low level of central nervous system (CNS), is used to track a desired trajectory. The actor in this structure is a two layer feedforward neural network and the critic is a model of the cerebellum. The critic is trained by state-action-reward-state-action (SARSA) method. The critic will train the actor by supervisory learning based on the prior experiences. Simulation studies of oscillatory movements based on the proposed algorithm demonstrate excellent tracking capability and after 280 epochs the RMS error for position and velocity profiles were 0.02, 0.04 rad and rad/s, respectively. PMID:16154874

  1. Reducing Pointing Errors During Cassini Reaction Control System Orbit Trim Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    2013-01-01

    The effect of altering a gain parameter in the Cassini reaction control system (RCS) delta-V controller on the maneuver execution errors during orbit trim maneuvers (OTMs) is explored. Cassini consists of two reaction control thruster branches (A & B) each with eight thrusters. Currently, the B-branch is operational while the A-branch serves as a back-up. The four Z-thrusters control the X and Y-axes, while the four Y-thrusters control the Z-axis. During an OTM, the Z-thrusters fire to maintain the X and Y-axes pointing within an attitude control dead-zone (-10 to 10 milliradians). The errors do not remain at zero due to pointing error sources such as spacecraft center of mass offset from the geometric center of the Z-facing thrusters, and variability in the thruster forces due to the thruster hardware differences. The delta-V reaction control system (RCS) controller ensures that the attitude error remains within this dead-zone. Gain parameters within the RCS delta-V controller affect the maneuver execution errors. Different parameter values are used to explore effect on these errors. It is found that pointing error decreases and magnitude error increases rapidly for gain parameters 10 times greater than the current parameter values used in the flight software.

  2. Dual-mode disturbance-accommodating pointing controller for Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addington, Stewart I.; Johnson, C. D.

    1995-03-01

    Cyclic thermal expansions and mechanical stiction effects in the solar arrays on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are triggering repeated occurrences of damped, relaxation-type flex-body vibrations of the solar arrays. Those solar array vibrations are, in turn, causing unwanted deviations of the telescope from its specified pointing direction. In this paper we propose two strategies one can adopt in designing a telescope-pointing controller to cope with the aforementioned disturbances: 1) a total isolation (TI) control strategy whereby the HST controller torques are designed to adaptively counteract and cancel out the persistent disturbing torques that are causing the unwanted telescope motions and 2) an array damping (AD) control strategy whereby the HST controller torques are used to actively augment the natural dampening of the solar array vibrations and the attendant telescope motions, between triggerings of the stiction-related flex-body relaxation oscillations. Using the principles of disturbance accommodation control theory, a dual-mode controller for a generic, planar-motion (single-axis) model of the HST is proposed. This controller incorporates both the TI and AD modes of disturbance accommodation. Simulation studies of the closed-loop system using generic parameter values clearly indicate, qualitatively, the enhanced pointing performance such a controller can achieve.

  3. Maximum Power Point Tracking Controller for Thermoelectric Generators with Peak Gain Control of Boost DC-DC Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungyong; Kim, Shiho

    2012-06-01

    An analog maximum power point tracking (MPPT) circuit for a thermoelectric generator (TEG) is proposed. We show that the peak point of the voltage conversion gain of a boost DC-DC converter with an input voltage source having an internal resistor is the maximum power point of the TEG. The key characteristic of the proposed MPPT controller is that the duty ratio of the input clock pulse to the boost DC-DC converter shifts toward the maximum power point of the TEG by seeking the peak gain point of the boost DC-DC converters. The proposed MPPT technique provides a simple and useful analog MPPT solution, without employing digital microcontroller units.

  4. The major genetic determinants of HIV-1 control affect HLA class I peptide presentation.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I W; Walker, Bruce D; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J; Pulit, Sara L; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M; Carlson, Jonathan M; Heckerman, David; Graham, Robert R; Plenge, Robert M; Deeks, Steven G; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L; Lemay, Paul; O'Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M; Allen, Todd M; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Haas, David W; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Robbins, Gregory K; Shafer, Robert W; Gulick, Roy M; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E; Daar, Eric S; Ribaudo, Heather J; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L; Allen, Brady L; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C; Benson, Anne M; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F; Bernard, Annette M; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J; Bolan, Robert K; Boudreaux, Emilie T; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F; Brndjar, Jon E; Brown, Stephen J; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H; Carmichael, J Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M; Cimoch, Paul J; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T; Cristofano, Michael V; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L; Dahman, Joseph M; Daly, Jennifer S; Davis, Benjamin T; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E; Ellerin, Todd B; Eron, Joseph J; Fangman, John J W; Farel, Claire E; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A; French, Neel K; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Fuller, Jon D; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C; Gaultier, Cyril R; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A; Gottlieb, Michael S; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K; Gurley, T Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W David; Harrigan, P Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M; Henry, W Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P; Horton, James M; Hsu, Ricky K; Huhn, Gregory D; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J; Illeman, Mark L; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A; Johnson, Kristin L; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C; Kauffman, Carol A; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K; Kim, Arthur Y; Kim, David D; Kinder, Clifford A; Kirchner, Jeffrey T; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M; Lee, David M; Lee, Jean M L; Lee, Marah J; Lee, Edward T Y; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A; Llibre, Josep M; Liguori, Michael A; Little, Susan J; Liu, Anne Y; Lopez, Alvaro J; Loutfy, Mono R; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K; Marconi, Vincent C; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N; Martin, Harold L; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A; McGovern, Barbara H; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C; Nagami, Ellen H; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G; Nelson, Margret O; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L; O'Connor, David H; Ojikutu, Bisola O; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O; Oldfield, Edward C; Olender, Susan A; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M; Perlmutter, Aaron M; Pierce, Michael N; Pincus, Jonathan M; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J; Rhame, Frank S; Richards, Constance Shamuyarira; Richman, Douglas D; Rodes, Berta; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rose, Richard C; Rosenberg, Eric S; Rosenthal, Daniel; Ross, Polly E; Rubin, David S; Rumbaugh, Elease; Saenz, Luis; Salvaggio, Michelle R; Sanchez, William C; Sanjana, Veeraf M; Santiago, Steven; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sestak, Philip M; Shalit, Peter; Shay, William; Shirvani, Vivian N; Silebi, Vanessa I; Sizemore, James M; Skolnik, Paul R; Sokol-Anderson, Marcia; Sosman, James M; Stabile, Paul; Stapleton, Jack T; Starrett, Sheree; Stein, Francine; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; Sterman, F Lisa; Stone, Valerie E; Stone, David R; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Taplitz, Randy A; Tedaldi, Ellen M; Telenti, Amalio; Theisen, William; Torres, Richard; Tosiello, Lorraine; Tremblay, Cecile; Tribble, Marc A; Trinh, Phuong D; Tsao, Alice; Ueda, Peggy; Vaccaro, Anthony; Valadas, Emilia; Vanig, Thanes J; Vecino, Isabel; Vega, Vilma M; Veikley, Wenoah; Wade, Barbara H; Walworth, Charles; Wanidworanun, Chingchai; Ward, Douglas J; Warner, Daniel A; Weber, Robert D; Webster, Duncan; Weis, Steve; Wheeler, David A; White, David J; Wilkins, Ed; Winston, Alan; Wlodaver, Clifford G; van't Wout, Angelique; Wright, David P; Yang, Otto O; Yurdin, David L; Zabukovic, Brandon W; Zachary, Kimon C; Zeeman, Beth; Zhao, Meng

    2010-12-10

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA-viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection. PMID:21051598

  5. The major genetic determinants of HIV-1 control affect HLA class I peptide presentation.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I W; Walker, Bruce D; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J; Pulit, Sara L; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M; Carlson, Jonathan M; Heckerman, David; Graham, Robert R; Plenge, Robert M; Deeks, Steven G; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L; Lemay, Paul; O'Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M; Allen, Todd M; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Haas, David W; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Robbins, Gregory K; Shafer, Robert W; Gulick, Roy M; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E; Daar, Eric S; Ribaudo, Heather J; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L; Allen, Brady L; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C; Benson, Anne M; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F; Bernard, Annette M; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J; Bolan, Robert K; Boudreaux, Emilie T; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F; Brndjar, Jon E; Brown, Stephen J; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H; Carmichael, J Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M; Cimoch, Paul J; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T; Cristofano, Michael V; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L; Dahman, Joseph M; Daly, Jennifer S; Davis, Benjamin T; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E; Ellerin, Todd B; Eron, Joseph J; Fangman, John J W; Farel, Claire E; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A; French, Neel K; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Fuller, Jon D; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C; Gaultier, Cyril R; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A; Gottlieb, Michael S; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K; Gurley, T Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W David; Harrigan, P Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M; Henry, W Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P; Horton, James M; Hsu, Ricky K; Huhn, Gregory D; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J; Illeman, Mark L; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A; Johnson, Kristin L; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C; Kauffman, Carol A; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K; Kim, Arthur Y; Kim, David D; Kinder, Clifford A; Kirchner, Jeffrey T; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M; Lee, David M; Lee, Jean M L; Lee, Marah J; Lee, Edward T Y; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A; Llibre, Josep M; Liguori, Michael A; Little, Susan J; Liu, Anne Y; Lopez, Alvaro J; Loutfy, Mono R; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K; Marconi, Vincent C; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N; Martin, Harold L; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A; McGovern, Barbara H; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C; Nagami, Ellen H; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G; Nelson, Margret O; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L; O'Connor, David H; Ojikutu, Bisola O; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O; Oldfield, Edward C; Olender, Susan A; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M; Perlmutter, Aaron M; Pierce, Michael N; Pincus, Jonathan M; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J; Rhame, Frank S; Richards, Constance Shamuyarira; Richman, Douglas D; Rodes, Berta; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rose, Richard C; Rosenberg, Eric S; Rosenthal, Daniel; Ross, Polly E; Rubin, David S; Rumbaugh, Elease; Saenz, Luis; Salvaggio, Michelle R; Sanchez, William C; Sanjana, Veeraf M; Santiago, Steven; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sestak, Philip M; Shalit, Peter; Shay, William; Shirvani, Vivian N; Silebi, Vanessa I; Sizemore, James M; Skolnik, Paul R; Sokol-Anderson, Marcia; Sosman, James M; Stabile, Paul; Stapleton, Jack T; Starrett, Sheree; Stein, Francine; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; Sterman, F Lisa; Stone, Valerie E; Stone, David R; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Taplitz, Randy A; Tedaldi, Ellen M; Telenti, Amalio; Theisen, William; Torres, Richard; Tosiello, Lorraine; Tremblay, Cecile; Tribble, Marc A; Trinh, Phuong D; Tsao, Alice; Ueda, Peggy; Vaccaro, Anthony; Valadas, Emilia; Vanig, Thanes J; Vecino, Isabel; Vega, Vilma M; Veikley, Wenoah; Wade, Barbara H; Walworth, Charles; Wanidworanun, Chingchai; Ward, Douglas J; Warner, Daniel A; Weber, Robert D; Webster, Duncan; Weis, Steve; Wheeler, David A; White, David J; Wilkins, Ed; Winston, Alan; Wlodaver, Clifford G; van't Wout, Angelique; Wright, David P; Yang, Otto O; Yurdin, David L; Zabukovic, Brandon W; Zachary, Kimon C; Zeeman, Beth; Zhao, Meng

    2010-12-10

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA-viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection.

  6. The Major Genetic Determinants of HIV-1 Control Affect HLA Class I Peptide Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Walker, Bruce D.; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J.; Pulit, Sara L.; Telenti, Amalio; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Heckerman, David; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Pereyra, Florencia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Graham, Robert R.; Plenge, Robert M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Walker, Bruce D.; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M.; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P.; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Carrington, Mary; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Pereyra, Florencia; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L.; Lemay, Paul; O’Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L.; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M.; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Walker, Bruce D.; Haas, David W.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Shafer, Robert W.; Gulick, Roy M.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E.; Daar, Eric S.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L.; Allen, Brady L.; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L.; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J.; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C.; Benson, Anne M.; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F.; Bernard, Annette M.; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J.; Bolan, Robert K.; Boudreaux, Emilie T.; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F.; Brndjar, Jon E.; Brown, Stephen J.; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T.; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M.; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H.; Carmichael, J. Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K.; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T.; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M.; Cimoch, Paul J.; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E.; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A.; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T.; Cristofano, Michael V.; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L.; Dahman, Joseph M.; Daly, Jennifer S.; Davis, Benjamin T.; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M.; Deeks, Steven G.; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A.; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E.; Ellerin, Todd B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Fangman, John J.W.; Farel, Claire E.; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; French, Neel K.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Fuller, Jon D.; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C.; Gaultier, Cyril R.; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D.; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A.; Gottlieb, Michael S.; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K.; Gurley, T. Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W. David; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N.; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M.; Henry, W. Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P.; Horton, James M.; Hsu, Ricky K.; Huhn, Gregory D.; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J.; Illeman, Mark L.; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M.; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Johnson, Kristin L.; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Kim, David D.; Kinder, Clifford A.; Kirchner, Jeffrey T.; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P. Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S.; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M.; Lee, David M.; Lee, Jean M.L.; Lee, Marah J.; Lee, Edward T.Y.; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A.; Llibre, Josep M.; Liguori, Michael A.; Little, Susan J.; Liu, Anne Y.; Lopez, Alvaro J.; Loutfy, Mono R.; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y.; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Martin, Harold L.; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M. Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A.; McGovern, Barbara H.; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X.; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E.; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O.; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C.; Nagami, Ellen H.; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G.; Nelson, Margret O.; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L.; O’Connor, David H.; Ojikutu, Bisola O.; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O.; Oldfield, Edward C.; Olender, Susan A.; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F.; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M.; Perlmutter, Aaron M.; Pierce, Michael N.; Pincus, Jonathan M.; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C.; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J.; Rhame, Frank S.; Richards, Constance Shamuyarira; Richman, Douglas D.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Rodes, Berta; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rose, Richard C.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Rosenthal, Daniel; Ross, Polly E.; Rubin, David S.; Rumbaugh, Elease; Saenz, Luis; Salvaggio, Michelle R.; Sanchez, William C.; Sanjana, Veeraf M.; Santiago, Steven; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sestak, Philip M.; Shalit, Peter; Shay, William; Shirvani, Vivian N.; Silebi, Vanessa I.; Sizemore, James M.; Skolnik, Paul R.; Sokol-Anderson, Marcia; Sosman, James M.; Stabile, Paul; Stapleton, Jack T.; Starrett, Sheree; Stein, Francine; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; Sterman, F. Lisa; Stone, Valerie E.; Stone, David R.; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Taplitz, Randy A.; Tedaldi, Ellen M.; Telenti, Amalio; Theisen, William; Torres, Richard; Tosiello, Lorraine; Tremblay, Cecile; Tribble, Marc A.; Trinh, Phuong D.; Tsao, Alice; Ueda, Peggy; Vaccaro, Anthony; Valadas, Emilia; Vanig, Thanes J.; Vecino, Isabel; Vega, Vilma M.; Veikley, Wenoah; Wade, Barbara H.; Walworth, Charles; Wanidworanun, Chingchai; Ward, Douglas J.; Warner, Daniel A.; Weber, Robert D.; Webster, Duncan; Weis, Steve; Wheeler, David A.; White, David J.; Wilkins, Ed; Winston, Alan; Wlodaver, Clifford G.; Wout, Angelique van’t; Wright, David P.; Yang, Otto O.; Yurdin, David L.; Zabukovic, Brandon W.; Zachary, Kimon C.; Zeeman, Beth; Zhao, Meng

    2011-01-01

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA–viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection. PMID:21051598

  7. Acquisition Tracking and Pointing Control of the Bifocal Relay Mirror Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Marcello; Agrawal, Brij N.

    This spacecraft consists of two large gimbaled telescopes, that are optically coupled and used to redirect a laser beam from a ground-based or spacecraft based source to a distant point on the earth or in space. The attitude control system consists of reaction wheels, star trackers and gyros. The optical control system consists of two fast steering mirrors and two optical tracker sensors. The very tight pointing and jitter requirements, together with the multi-body nature of the spacecraft, make the acquisition, tracking and pointing control very challenging. The control techniques developed in this research can be applied to imaging spacecrafts and spacecrafts with optical communications. numerical simulations. The simulations were performed to analyze two different control approaches proposed for the tracking and pointing of the Bifocal Relay Mirror spacecraft during operational phase. In the first control option considered, feed forward and feedback control are used for the spacecraft attitude control, while independent feedback is used by the optical subsystem in order to compensate the pointing error of the spacecraft. In the second control approach, the spacecraft and optical control systems are integrated. In case of uncertainty in target position and use of realistic sensors, using star tracker and rate gyros with Kalman Filter, the integrated control provides better performance. dynamics and control simulator of the Spacecraft Research and Design Center of Naval Postgraduate School. The attitude of this spherical air bearing based test-bed was controlled by three reaction wheels, while its attitude and angular velocity were sensed by an optical attitude sensor and three rate gyros, respectively. The three axes simulator platform included as payload a fully functional model of the transmitter section of the Bifocal Relay Mirror Spacecraft, consisting in one telescope with fast steering mirror and one optical tracker sensor. Two preliminary experiments have

  8. Impact of adaptive signal control on major and minor approach delay

    SciTech Connect

    Wolshon, B.; Taylor, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    One of the primary difficulties in completing evaluations of real-time adaptive traffic signal systems has been the lack of effective modeling tools to perform controlled and repeatable analytical experiments. Recently, a method to analyze the delay characteristics of an existing real-time adaptive traffic signal control system has been developed. The procedure has been used to evaluate the performance of the Sydney Coordinated Adaptive Traffic System (SCATS) in South Lyon, Michigan. The objective of this study was to more closely examine the relationship of major and minor street delay under the SCATS and fixed-time forms of signal control. The effect on left turn delay at critical locations was also compared to the delay change in the through traffic. The comparisons showed that SCATS control resulted in significant delay reductions to left turn traffic compared to the through movements. The improvement was especially pronounced at the major street approaches. To further address the delay effect of SCATS control in South Lyon, the relationships between volume, delay, and green time of the various traffic moments were also compared. These comparisons showed that SCATS tended to allocate more green time to left turn traffic when compared to the fixed-time system.

  9. The Hubble Space Telescope fine guidance system operating in the coarse track pointing control mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittlesey, Richard

    1993-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Fine Guidance System has set new standards in pointing control capability for earth orbiting spacecraft. Two precision pointing control modes are implemented in the Fine Guidance System; one being a Coarse Track Mode which employs a pseudo-quadrature detector approach and the second being a Fine Mode which uses a two axis interferometer implementation. The Coarse Track Mode was designed to maintain FGS pointing error to within 20 milli-arc seconds (rms) when guiding on a 14.5 Mv star. The Fine Mode was designed to maintain FGS pointing error to less than 3 milli-arc seconds (rms). This paper addresses the HST FGS operating in the Coarse Track Mode. An overview of the implementation, the operation, and both the predicted and observed on orbit performance is presented. The discussion includes a review of the Fine Guidance System hardware which uses two beam steering Star Selector servos, four photon counting photomultiplier tube detectors, as well as a 24 bit microprocessor, which executes the control system firmware. Unanticipated spacecraft operational characteristics are discussed as they impact pointing performance. These include the influence of spherically aberrated star images as well as the mechanical shocks induced in the spacecraft during and following orbital day/night terminator crossings. Computer modeling of the Coarse Track Mode verifies the observed on orbit performance trends in the presence of these optical and mechanical disturbances. It is concluded that the coarse track pointing control function is performing as designed and is providing a robust pointing control capability for the Hubble Space Telescope.

  10. Precision Pointing Control System (PPCS) system design and analysis. [for gimbaled experiment platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frew, A. M.; Eisenhut, D. F.; Farrenkopf, R. L.; Gates, R. F.; Iwens, R. P.; Kirby, D. K.; Mann, R. J.; Spencer, D. J.; Tsou, H. S.; Zaremba, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    The precision pointing control system (PPCS) is an integrated system for precision attitude determination and orientation of gimbaled experiment platforms. The PPCS concept configures the system to perform orientation of up to six independent gimbaled experiment platforms to design goal accuracy of 0.001 degrees, and to operate in conjunction with a three-axis stabilized earth-oriented spacecraft in orbits ranging from low altitude (200-2500 n.m., sun synchronous) to 24 hour geosynchronous, with a design goal life of 3 to 5 years. The system comprises two complementary functions: (1) attitude determination where the attitude of a defined set of body-fixed reference axes is determined relative to a known set of reference axes fixed in inertial space; and (2) pointing control where gimbal orientation is controlled, open-loop (without use of payload error/feedback) with respect to a defined set of body-fixed reference axes to produce pointing to a desired target.

  11. Single supplier single retailer inventory model controlled by the reorder and shipping points with sharing information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Wen-Tsung; Hsiao, Yu-Cheng

    2012-04-01

    This study investigated the integrated stochastic inventory problem for a two-stage supply chain consisting of a single retailer and a single supplier. By using batch shipment policy, the expected total cost can be significantly reduced. An equally sized batch shipment model, controlled by both the reorder and shipping points, with sharing information by enterprise resource planning and radio frequency identification is constructed. The problem is solved optimally by the proposed algorithm that determines the economic lot size, the optimal batch sizes and number of batches. A numerical example is included to illustrate the algorithmic procedures and to prove that the model controlled both by the reorder and shipping points is superior to the classic model controlled only by the reorder point.

  12. ATS-6 - Spacecraft Attitude Precision Pointing and Slewing Adaptive Control Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isley, W. C.; Endres, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The primary objective of the Spacecraft Attitude Precision Pointing and Slewing Adaptive Control (SAPPSAC) experiment is to establish feasibility and evaluate capabilities of a ground-based spacecraft attitude control system, wherein RF command and telemetry links, together with a ground station on-line minicomputer, perform closed loop attitude control of the Applications Technology Satellite-6 (ATS-6). The ground processor is described, including operational characteristics and the controller software. Attitude maneuvers include precision pointing to fixed targets, slewing between targets, and generation of prescribed ground tracks. Test results show high performance and reliability for over 30 hours of on-line control with no serious anomalies. Attitude stabilization relative to a prescribed target has been achieved to better than 0.007 deg in pitch and roll and 0.02 deg in yaw for a period of 43 min. Ground tracks were generated which had maximum latitude/longitude deviations less than 0.15 deg from reference.

  13. Venlafaxine treatment reduces the deficit of executive control of attention in patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yanghua; Du, Jing; Spagna, Alfredo; Mackie, Melissa-Ann; Gu, Xiaosi; Dong, Yi; Fan, Jin; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Attention plays an essential role in supporting other cognitive functions and behavior, and disturbance of attention is one of the most common symptoms in major depressive disorder (MDD). Although treatment with venlafaxine for MDD symptoms has been shown to reduce deficits in cognition and emotion regulation, it remains unclear whether venlafaxine improves specific attentional functions. We used the Attention Network Test to measure the attentional functions of alerting, orienting, and executive control before and after treatment with venlafaxine in patients with MDD compared to untreated healthy controls. Before treatment, the MDD group showed a selective impairment in alerting and executive control of attention, while there were no significant group differences in the orienting function. The interaction between group and session was significant for executive control, and after treatment with venlafaxine, the performance of the MDD group on executive control of attention was not significantly different from that of controls. Reported symptoms of MDD were also significantly reduced after treatment with venlafaxine. These results demonstrate that treatment with venlafaxine selectively normalizes the executive control function of attention in addition to improving clinical symptoms in MDD. PMID:27306061

  14. Linear-quadratic-regulator pointing control system design for a high-altitude balloon payload

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.E.; Etter, J.R.

    1987-11-01

    A pointing control system design for the science package of a NASA high-altitude research balloon is described. The balloon assembly consists of a single helium balloon connected to a payload recovery parachute, payload gondola, and ballast hopper. Pointing of the scientific payload is accomplished via an arrangement of drive motors and a flywheel. Linear quadratic regulator (LQR) synthesis techniques are employed to produce the azimuth and elevation controller designs. The use of LQR synthesis is motivated by the azimuthal dynamic coupling encountered between the balloon and gondola. Two control devices are employed in azimuth, one of which is a decoupler motor and the other a flywheel. The decoupler motor is intended to isolate the gondola from the balloon such that the flywheel can be accelerated or decelerated about a steady-state angular velocity to provide precise azimuthal pointing. The multiple-input/multiple-output nature of the azimuth pointing problem is best handled in a matrix synthesis procedure such as LQR. The controller design methodology is explained, and a combination of time responses and singular value analyses are used to analytically evaluate the performance of the control system. 11 refs., 17 figs.

  15. Optimal control problems with switching points. Ph.D. Thesis, 1990 Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seywald, Hans

    1991-01-01

    An overview is presented of the problems and difficulties that arise in solving optimal control problems with switching points. A brief discussion of existing optimality conditions is given and a numerical approach for solving the multipoint boundary value problems associated with the first-order necessary conditions of optimal control is presented. Two real-life aerospace optimization problems are treated explicitly. These are altitude maximization for a sounding rocket (Goddard Problem) in the presence of a dynamic pressure limit, and range maximization for a supersonic aircraft flying in the vertical, also in the presence of a dynamic pressure limit. In the second problem singular control appears along arcs with active dynamic pressure limit, which in the context of optimal control, represents a first-order state inequality constraint. An extension of the Generalized Legendre-Clebsch Condition to the case of singular control along state/control constrained arcs is presented and is applied to the aircraft range maximization problem stated above. A contribution to the field of Jacobi Necessary Conditions is made by giving a new proof for the non-optimality of conjugate paths in the Accessory Minimum Problem. Because of its simple and explicit character, the new proof may provide the basis for an extension of Jacobi's Necessary Condition to the case of the trajectories with interior point constraints. Finally, the result that touch points cannot occur for first-order state inequality constraints is extended to the case of vector valued control functions.

  16. Control of Spacecraft Formations Around the Libration Points Using Electric Motors with One Bit of Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpelloni, Edoardo; Maggiore, Manfredi; Damaren, Christopher J.

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates a formation control problem for two space vehicles in the vicinity of the L 2 libration point of the Sun-Earth/Moon system. The objective is to accurately regulate the relative position vector between the vehicles to a desired configuration, under tight tolerances. It is shown that the formation control problem is solvable using six constant thrust electric actuators requiring only one bit of resolution, and bounded switching frequency. The proposed control law is hybrid, and it coordinates the sequence of on-off switches of the thrusters so as to achieve the control objective and, at the same time, avoid high-frequency switching.

  17. Complement receptor immunoglobulin: a control point in infection and immunity, inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Small, Annabelle Grace; Al-Baghdadi, Marwah; Quach, Alex; Hii, Charles; Ferrante, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The B7 family-related protein, V-set and Ig domain (VSIG4) / Z39Ig / complement receptor immunoglobulin (CRIg), is a new player in the regulation of immunity to infection and inflammation. The unique features of this receptor as compared with classical complement receptors, CR3 and CR4, have heralded the emergence of new concepts in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. Its selective expression in tissue macrophages and dendritic cells has been considered of importance in host defence and in maintaining tolerance against self-antigens. Although a major receptor for phagocytosis of complement opsonised bacteria, its array of emerging functions which incorporates the immune suppressive and anti-inflammatory action of the receptor have now been realised. Accumulating evidence from mouse experimental models indicates a potential role for CRIg in protection against bacterial infection and inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus, and also in promotion of tumour growth. CRIg expression can be considered as a control point in these diseases, through which inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, act. The ability of CRIg to suppress cytotoxic T cell proliferation and function may underlie its promotion of cancer growth. Thus, the unique properties of this receptor open up new avenues for understanding of the pathways that regulate inflammation during infection, autoimmunity and cancer with the potential for new drug targets to be identified. While some complement receptors may be differently expressed in mice and humans, as well as displaying different properties, mouse CRIg has a structure and function similar to the human receptor, suggesting that extrapolation to human diseases is appropriate. Furthermore, there is emerging evidence in human conditions that CRIg may be a valuable biomarker in infection and immunity, inflammatory conditions and cancer prognosis. PMID:27045607

  18. Sliding mode control of magnetic suspensions for precision pointing and tracking applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misovec, Kathleen M.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Johnson, Bruce G.; Hedrick, J. Karl

    1991-01-01

    A recently developed nonlinear control method, sliding mode control, is examined as a means of advancing the achievable performance of space-based precision pointing and tracking systems that use nonlinear magnetic actuators. Analytic results indicate that sliding mode control improves performance compared to linear control approaches. In order to realize these performance improvements, precise knowledge of the plant is required. Additionally, the interaction of an estimating scheme and the sliding mode controller has not been fully examined in the literature. Estimation schemes were designed for use with this sliding mode controller that do not seriously degrade system performance. The authors designed and built a laboratory testbed to determine the feasibility of utilizing sliding mode control in these types of applications. Using this testbed, experimental verification of the authors' analyses is ongoing.

  19. Design and development of an acquisition, tracking, pointing, and fire control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Carey J.; VanAllen, Robert; Dimmler, W. Michael; Dillow, James D.

    1999-08-01

    The ABL Acquisition, Tracking, Pointing and Fire Control systems functions are described. The key to the design process is a detailed situation that models the controls, algorithms, engagement sequence, mode logic, passive track sensors, active track sensor, plume phenomenology, active return from the target, and the effects of atmosphere. The application of the simulation to the design process is described, including passive track, active track, and kill assessment. Two field tests used to validate the simulation are briefly described.

  20. Classical and adaptive control algorithms for the solar array pointing system of the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ianculescu, G. D.; Klop, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Classical and adaptive control algorithms for the solar array pointing system of the Space Station Freedom are designed using a continuous rigid body model of the solar array gimbal assembly containing both linear and nonlinear dynamics due to various friction components. The robustness of the design solution is examined by performing a series of sensitivity analysis studies. Adaptive control strategies are examined in order to compensate for the unfavorable effect of static nonlinearities, such as dead-zone uncertainties.

  1. Design and Implementation of a Digital Controller for a Vibration Isolation and Vernier Pointing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, Daniel J.; Britcher, Colin P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the recommissioning of the Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS), originally developed in the mid 1970's for pointing and vibration isolation of space experiments. The hardware was developed for NASA Langley Research Center by Sperry Flight Systems (now Honeywell Satellite Systems), was delivered to NASA in 1983. Recently, the hardware was loaned to Old Dominion University (ODU). The ASPS includes coarse gimbal assemblies and a Vernier Pointing Assembly (VPA) that utilize magnetic suspension to provide noncontacting vibration isolation and vernier pointing of the payload. The VPA is the main focus of this research. At ODU, the system has been modified such that it can now be operated in a l-g environment without a gravity offload. Suspension of the annular iron rotor in five degrees-of-freedom has been achieved with the use of modern switching power amplifiers and a digital controller implemented on a 486-class PC.

  2. Design Considerations for Miniaturized Control Moment Gyroscopes for Rapid Retargeting and Precision Pointing of Small Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patankar, Kunal; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Roithmayr, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design as well as characterization of a practical control moment gyroscope (CMG) based attitude control system (ACS) for small satellites in the 15-20 kilogram mass range performing rapid retargeting and precision pointing maneuvers. The paper focuses on the approach taken in the design of miniaturized CMGs while considering the constraints imposed by the use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components as well as the size of the satellite. It is shown that a hybrid mode is more suitable for COTS based moment exchange actuators; a mode that uses the torque amplification of CMGs for rapid retargeting and direct torque capabilities of the flywheel motors for precision pointing. A simulation is provided to demonstrate on-orbit slew and pointing performance.

  3. A major gene controlling warfarin-resistance in the house mouse.

    PubMed

    Wallace, M E; MacSwiney, F J

    1976-04-01

    The spread of a "cream" mutant in a wild population of house mice is reported. The hypothesis that the gene responsible for the colour, extreme chinchilla, ce, has spread because of linkage with a major gene for warfarin-resistance, is tested by a linkage backcross. The results prove that a major gene does exist, that it is very closely linked with frizzy, fr, in chromosome 7, which in turn is linked with ce, that it is fully dominant in females at 4 months of age, and that its partial dominance in males is under the control of modifiers. The symbol War is proposed for the gene. Its position in chromosome 7 is analagous with the position of the resistant gene, Rw2, in the rat in the analagous chromosome. The adaptive significance of the finding is discussed, as also are reports of certain other mutants in wild populations of mice. PMID:1063212

  4. Acute Alcohol Consumption Impairs Controlled but Not Automatic Processes in a Psychophysical Pointing Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Kevin; Timney, Brian; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the effects of alcohol consumption on controlled and automatic cognitive processes. Such studies have shown that alcohol impairs performance on tasks requiring conscious, intentional control, while leaving automatic performance relatively intact. Here, we sought to extend these findings to aspects of visuomotor control by investigating the effects of alcohol in a visuomotor pointing paradigm that allowed us to separate the influence of controlled and automatic processes. Six male participants were assigned to an experimental “correction” condition in which they were instructed to point at a visual target as quickly and accurately as possible. On a small percentage of trials, the target “jumped” to a new location. On these trials, the participants’ task was to amend their movement such that they pointed to the new target location. A second group of 6 participants were assigned to a “countermanding” condition, in which they were instructed to terminate their movements upon detection of target “jumps”. In both the correction and countermanding conditions, participants served as their own controls, taking part in alcohol and no-alcohol conditions on separate days. Alcohol had no effect on participants’ ability to correct movements “in flight”, but impaired the ability to withhold such automatic corrections. Our data support the notion that alcohol selectively impairs controlled processes in the visuomotor domain. PMID:23861934

  5. 47 CFR 90.471 - Points of operation in internal transmitter control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... transmitter control systems are not synonymous with dispatch points (See § 90.467) nor with telephone positions which are part of the public, switched telephone network; and the scheme of regulation is to be... the licensee. The fixed position may be part of a private telephone exchange or it may be any...

  6. Public Data Set: Control and Automation of the Pegasus Multi-point Thomson Scattering System

    DOE Data Explorer

    Bodner, Grant M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000324979172); Bongard, Michael W. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000231609746); Fonck, Raymond J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000294386762); Reusch, Joshua A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000284249422); Rodriguez Sanchez, Cuauhtemoc [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000334712586); Schlossberg, David J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000287139448)

    2016-08-12

    This public data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data corresponding to figures published in G.M. Bodner et al., 'Control and Automation of the Pegasus Multi-point Thomson Scattering System,' Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, 11E523 (2016).

  7. 21 CFR 120.8 - Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) plan. 120.8 Section 120.8 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... General Provisions § 120.8 Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan. (a) HACCP plan. Each processor shall have and implement a written HACCP plan whenever a hazard analysis reveals one or more...

  8. Evaluating the Possibility of Defining Cut-Off Points for ΔFA% in Order to Differentiate Four Major Types of Peri-Tumoral White Matter Tract Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Deilami, Tourisa; Hadizadeh Kharrazi, Homayoun; Seddighi, Amir Saied; Tanzifi, Parin; Tayebivaljouzi, Reza; Zamani, Fatemeh; Chavoshzadeh Tafti, Atefeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and its different scalar values such as fractional anisotropy (FA) have recently been used for evaluation of peri-tumoral white matter (WM) involvement to help define safer surgical excision margins. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the possibility of defining diagnostic cut-off points for differentiating four major types of peri-tumoral WM involvement using FA. Patients and Methods: DTI was performed in 12 patients with high presumption of having brain tumors, on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. DTI data was processed by MedINRIA software. Two-hundred region of interests (ROI) were evaluated: 100 in the lesion zone and the rest in the normal WM in the contralateral hemisphere. FA value related to each ROI was measured, and the percentage of FA decrement (ΔFAs%) was calculated. Results: Of the 100 ROIs on the lesion side, 74 were related to high-grade lesions, 23 to low-grade ones, and three to “gliosis”. There were 54 “infiltrated”, 22 “displaced”, 15 “disrupted”, and 9 “edematous” tracts. The major type of fiber involvement, both in low-grade and high-grade tumors was “infiltrated, whereas “edematous” fibers comprised the minority. ΔFA% was more than -35 for “displaced” and “edematous” fibers, and less than -35 for the majority of “disrupted” ones, but “infiltrated” fibers had scattered distribution. Mean ΔFA% was the least for “disrupted”, followed by “infiltrated”, “edematous” and “displaced” parts. Conclusion: Introducing definite diagnostic cut-points was not possible, due to overlap. Based on the fact that “disruption” is the most aggressive process, a sensitivity analysis was carried out for “disrupted” fibers for several presumptive cut-off points. PMID:26528388

  9. ppGpp is the major source of growth rate control in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Potrykus, Katarzyna; Murphy, Helen; Philippe, Nadège; Cashel, Michael

    2011-03-01

    It is widely accepted that the DNA, RNA and protein content of Enterobacteriaceae is regulated as a function of exponential growth rates; macromolecular content increases with faster growth regardless of specific composition of the growth medium. This phenomenon, called growth rate control, primarily involves regulation of ribosomal RNA and ribosomal protein synthesis. However, it was uncertain whether the global regulator ppGpp is the major determinant for growth rate control. Therefore, here we re-evaluate the effect of ppGpp on macromolecular content for different balanced growth rates in defined media. We find that when ppGpp is absent, RNA/protein and RNA/DNA ratios are equivalent in fast and slow growing cells. Moreover, slow growing ppGpp-deficient cells with increased RNA content, display a normal ribosomal subunit composition although polysome content is reduced when compared with fast growing wild-type cells. From this we conclude that growth rate control does not occur in the absence of ppGpp. Also, artificial elevation of ppGpp or introduction of stringent RNA polymerase mutants in ppGpp-deficient cells restores this control. We believe these findings strongly argue in favour of ppGpp and against redundant regulation of growth rate control by other factors in Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria.

  10. Subliminal psychodynamic activation: an experiment controlling for major possible confounding influences outlined by Fudin.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, R; Källmén, H

    1991-08-01

    40 and 48 subjects participated in two separate experiments aimed at reproducing the subliminal psychodynamic activation (SPA) phenomenon and taking into account the major methodological critique by Fudin (1986, 1990). Subjects were first exposed either to a full or one of all possible partial symbiotic messages and then to their anagram equivalents. Confounding and irrelevant influences were controlled; the results indicate that only the full symbiotic message improved motor performance. This strongly suggests that subjects encode the meaning of the full message and supports an interpretation in terms of an alleviation of an internal symbiotic conflict leading to a state of calmness conducive to improved motor performance. PMID:1945681

  11. Loop Heat Pipe Operation Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) have been used for thermal control of several NASA and commercial orbiting spacecraft. The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its compensation chamber (CC). Most LHPs use the CC temperature for feedback control of its operating temperature. There exists a thermal resistance between the heat source to be cooled by the LHP and the LHP's CC. Even if the CC set point temperature is controlled precisely, the heat source temperature will still vary with its heat output. For most applications, controlling the heat source temperature is of most interest. A logical question to ask is: "Can the heat source temperature be used for feedback control of the LHP operation?" A test program has been implemented to answer the above question. Objective is to investigate the LHP performance using the CC temperature and the heat source temperature for feedback control

  12. Reconstructing 3D coastal cliffs from airborne oblique photographs without ground control points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewez, T. J. B.

    2014-05-01

    Coastal cliff collapse hazard assessment requires measuring cliff face topography at regular intervals. Terrestrial laser scanner techniques have proven useful so far but are expensive to use either through purchasing the equipment or through survey subcontracting. In addition, terrestrial laser surveys take time which is sometimes incompatible with the time during with the beach is accessible at low-tide. By comparison, structure from motion techniques (SFM) are much less costly to implement, and if airborne, acquisition of several kilometers of coastline can be done in a matter of minutes. In this paper, the potential of GPS-tagged oblique airborne photographs and SFM techniques is examined to reconstruct chalk cliff dense 3D point clouds without Ground Control Points (GCP). The focus is put on comparing the relative 3D point of views reconstructed by Visual SFM with their synchronous Solmeta Geotagger Pro2 GPS locations using robust estimators. With a set of 568 oblique photos, shot from the open door of an airplane with a triplet of synchronized Nikon D7000, GPS and SFM-determined view point coordinates converge to X: ±31.5 m; Y: ±39.7 m; Z: ±13.0 m (LE66). Uncertainty in GPS position affects the model scale, angular attitude of the reference frame (the shoreline ends up tilted by 2°) and absolute positioning. Ground Control Points cannot be avoided to orient such models.

  13. Hospital food hygiene: the application of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points to conventional hospital catering.

    PubMed

    Richards, J; Parr, E; Riseborough, P

    1993-08-01

    The Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) concept is a preventive approach to quality control. It is based on a logical, structured exploration of potential hazard points in a food operation and the introduction of control and monitoring measures. HACCP studies have been extensively applied to manufacturing systems. It has been difficult to extend this detailed systematic analysis to conventional catering, partly due to the wide range of foods being processed. We describe here the application of HACCP methods to a hospital department that uses conventional catering methods. Basic principles, based on the work flow and the range of products are established. The guidelines produced can be applied to any kitchen using similar catering methods. Examples of log charts used for monitoring are provided.

  14. Evaluation of the leap motion controller as a new contact-free pointing device.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Daniel; Weichert, Frank; Rinkenauer, Gerhard

    2014-12-24

    This paper presents a Fitts' law-based analysis of the user's performance in selection tasks with the Leap Motion Controller compared with a standard mouse device. The Leap Motion Controller (LMC) is a new contact-free input system for gesture-based human-computer interaction with declared sub-millimeter accuracy. Up to this point, there has hardly been any systematic evaluation of this new system available. With an error rate of 7.8% for the LMC and 2.8% for the mouse device, movement times twice as large as for a mouse device and high overall effort ratings, the Leap Motion Controller's performance as an input device for everyday generic computer pointing tasks is rather limited, at least with regard to the selection recognition provided by the LMC.

  15. Evaluation of the Leap Motion Controller as a New Contact-Free Pointing Device

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Daniel; Weichert, Frank; Rinkenauer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a Fitts' law-based analysis of the user's performance in selection tasks with the Leap Motion Controller compared with a standard mouse device. The Leap Motion Controller (LMC) is a new contact-free input system for gesture-based human-computer interaction with declared sub-millimeter accuracy. Up to this point, there has hardly been any systematic evaluation of this new system available. With an error rate of 7.8 % for the LMC and 2.8% for the mouse device, movement times twice as large as for a mouse device and high overall effort ratings, the Leap Motion Controller's performance as an input device for everyday generic computer pointing tasks is rather limited, at least with regard to the selection recognition provided by the LMC. PMID:25609043

  16. Application of Model Reference Adaptive Control System to Instrument Pointing System /IPS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waites, H. B.

    1979-01-01

    A Model Reference Adaptive Controller (MRAC) is derived for a Shuttle payload called the Instrument Pointing System (IPS). The unique features of this MRAC design are that total state feedback is not required, that the internal structure of the model is independent of the internal structure of the IPS, and that the model input is of bounded variation and not required a priori. An application of Liapunov's stability theorems is used to synthesize a control signal which assures MRAC asymptotic stability. Exponential observers are used to obtain the necessary state information to implement the control synthesis. Results are presented which show how effectively the MRAC can maneuver the IPS.

  17. Fuzzy logic based feedback control system for laser beam pointing stabilization.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjeet; Patel, Kiran; Govindarajan, J; Kumar, Ajai

    2010-09-20

    This paper reports a fuzzy logic based feedback control system for beam pointing stabilization of a high-power nanosecond Nd:YAG laser operating at 30 Hz. This is achieved by generating the correcting signal for each consequent pulse from the error in the pointing position of the previous laser pulse. We have successfully achieved a reduction of beam position fluctuation from ±60 to ±5.0 μrad without the focusing optics and ±0.9 μrad with focusing optics. PMID:20856289

  18. Using Fast-Steering Mirror Control to Reduce Instrument Pointing Errors Caused by Spacecraft Jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antol, Jeffery; Holtz, Ted M.; Cuda, Vince; Johnson, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    The scope of this study was to investigate the benefit of using feedback control of a Fast Steering Mirror (FSM) to reduce instrument pointing errors. Initially, the study identified FSM control technologies and categorized them according to their use, range of applicability, and physical requirements. Candidate payloads were then evaluated according to their relevance in use of fast steering minor control technologies. This leads to the mission and instrument selection which served as the candidate mission for numerical modeling. A standard SmallSat was designed in order to accommodate the payload requirements (weight, size, power, etc.). This included sizing the SmallSat bus, sizing the solar array, choosing appropriate antennas, and identifying an attitude control system (ACS). A feedback control system for the FSM compensation was then designed, and the instrument pointing error and SmallSat jitter environment for open-loop and closed-loop FSM control were evaluated for typical SmallSat disturbances. The results were then compared to determine the effectiveness of the FSM feedback control system.

  19. A Globally Stable Lyapunov Pointing and Rate Controller for the Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission (MMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Neerav

    2011-01-01

    The Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission (MMS) is scheduled to launch in late 2014. Its primary goal is to discover the fundamental plasma physics processes of reconnection in the Earth's magnetosphere. Each of the four MMS spacecraft is spin-stabilized at a nominal rate of 3 RPM. Traditional spin-stabilized spacecraft have used a number of separate modes to control nutation, spin rate, and precession. To reduce the number of modes and simplify operations, the Delta-H control mode is designed to accomplish nutation control, spin rate control, and precession control simultaneously. A nonlinear design technique, Lyapunov's method, is used to design the Delta-H control mode. A global spin rate controller selected as the baseline controller for MMS, proved to be insufficient due to an ambiguity in the attitude. Lyapunov's design method was used to solve this ambiguity, resulting in a controller that meets the design goals. Simulation results show the advantage of the pointing and rate controller for maneuvers larger than 90 deg and provide insight into the performance of this controller.

  20. Effects of a major earthquake on calls to regional poison control centers.

    PubMed

    Nathan, A R; Olson, K R; Everson, G W; Kearney, T E; Blanc, P D

    1992-03-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the effect of the Loma Prieta earthquake on calls to 2 designated regional poison control centers (San Francisco and Santa Clara) in the area. In the immediate 12 hours after the earthquake, there was an initial drop (31%) in call volume, related to telephone system overload and other technical problems. Calls from Bay Area counties outside of San Francisco and Santa Clara decreased more dramatically than those from within the host counties where the poison control centers are located. In the next 2 days, each poison control center then handled a 27% increase in call volume. Requests for information regarding safety of water supplies and other environmental concerns were significantly increased. The number of cases of actual poisoning exposure decreased, particularly poison and drug ingestions in children. Most calls directly related to the earthquake included spills and leaks of hazardous materials and questions about water and food safety. Regional poison control centers play an essential role in the emergency medical response to major disasters and are critically dependent on an operational telephone system.

  1. The terrestrial plant and herbivore arms race -- A major control of Phanerozoic atmospheric CO[sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, P.E. )

    1993-03-01

    Much recent work points to chemical weathering of continental silicates as the principal control of atmospheric CO[sub 2]. Presently, chemical weathering is mediated by plants. Vascular plants increase chemical weathering by drastically increasing acid leaching through respiration, decay, and microbial symbionts. Through the Phanerozoic the continuing evolution of terrestrial plant communities must have had a major effect on weathering rates. However, the efficacy of plant-induced-weathering is decreased by herbivory, which in turn decreases the invasion of soil by roots and leads to increased physical weathering. The author proposes that the major ice house--hot house cycles of the Devonian-Quaternary were caused by the lag between plant innovations and complete compensation by herbivore-detritivore response. In this way, it seems possible that: (1) the Carboniferous coals are a consequence of limited herbivory and soil litter decomposition and the Permo-Carboniferous glaciations were caused by dramatically increased chemical weathering caused by the previous global spread of vascular plants; (2) the Mesozoic hot house was brought on by massive increases in megaherbivores and litter decomposers; and (3) Cenozoic cooling and Quaternary glaciations resulted from the spread of herbaceous angiosperms and most recently grasslands. Earth's own superherbivory, if continued for tens of millions of years, will brings one back to mid-Mesozoic hot house conditions, not by the burning of fossil fuels, but rather by a global increase in physical over chemical weathering.

  2. Initial experiments on the end-point control of a flexible one-link robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, R. H., Jr.; Schmitz, E.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with initial experiments regarding a specific unsolved control problem which appeared to be central to advances in the art of robotics. This problem involves the control of a flexible member (one link of a robot system). The position of the end-effector, called the end point or tip, is controlled by measuring that position and using the measurement as a basis for applying control torque to the other end of the flexible member, as for instance, the robot's elbow joint. A description is presented of the features of the first experimental arm which has been made, and an outline is provided of the general strategy for controlling it using its tip sensor and shoulder torquer.

  3. Design of set-point weighting PIλ + Dμ controller for vertical magnetic flux controller in Damavand tokamak.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, H; Fatehi, A

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a simple method is presented for tuning weighted PI(λ) + D(μ) controller parameters based on the pole placement controller of pseudo-second-order fractional systems. One of the advantages of this controller is capability of reducing the disturbance effects and improving response to input, simultaneously. In the following sections, the performance of this controller is evaluated experimentally to control the vertical magnetic flux in Damavand tokamak. For this work, at first a fractional order model is identified using output-error technique in time domain. For various practical experiments, having desired time responses for magnetic flux in Damavand tokamak, is vital. To approach this, at first the desired closed loop reference models are obtained based on generalized characteristic ratio assignment method in fractional order systems. After that, for the identified model, a set-point weighting PI(λ) + D(μ) controller is designed and simulated. Finally, this controller is implemented on digital signal processor control system of the plant to fast/slow control of magnetic flux. The practical results show appropriate performance of this controller.

  4. Loop Heat Pipe Operation Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its reservoir. Controlling the reservoir saturation temperature is commonly accomplished by cold biasing the reservoir and using electrical heaters to provide the required control power. Using this method, the loop operating temperature can be controlled within +/- 0.5K. However, because of the thermal resistance that exists between the heat source and the LHP evaporator, the heat source temperature will vary with its heat output even if LHP operating temperature is kept constant. Since maintaining a constant heat source temperature is of most interest, a question often raised is whether the heat source temperature can be used for LHP set point temperature control. A test program with a miniature LHP has been carried out to investigate the effects on the LHP operation when the control temperature sensor is placed on the heat source instead of the reservoir. In these tests, the LHP reservoir is cold-biased and is heated by a control heater. Tests results show that it is feasible to use the heat source temperature for feedback control of the LHP operation. Using this method, the heat source temperature can be maintained within a tight range for moderate and high powers. At low powers, however, temperature oscillations may occur due to interactions among the reservoir control heater power, the heat source mass, and the heat output from the heat source. In addition, the heat source temperature could temporarily deviate from its set point during fast thermal transients. The implication is that more sophisticated feedback control algorithms need to be implemented for LHP transient operation when the heat source temperature is used for feedback control.

  5. Low-boiling-point solvent additives can also enable morphological control in polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevapuram, Rakesh C.; Carr, John A.; Chen, Yuqing; Bose, Sayantan; Nalwa, Kanwar S.; Petrich, Jacob W.; Chaudhary, Sumit

    2013-11-02

    Processing organic photovoltaic (OPV) blend solutions with high-boiling-point solvent additives has recently been used for morphological control in bulk-heterojunction OPV cells. Here we show that even low-boiling-point solvents can be effective additives. When P3HT:PCBM OPV cells were processed with a low-boiling-point solvent tetrahydrafuran as an additive in parent solvent o-dichlorobenzene, charge extraction increased leading to fill factors as high as 69.5%, without low work-function cathodes, electrode buffer layers or thermal treatment. This was attributed to PCBM demixing from P3HT domains and better vertical phase separation, as indicated by photoluminescence lifetimes, hole mobilities, and shunt leakage currents. Dependence on solvent parameters and applicability beyond P3HT system was also investigated. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. "The real point is control": the reception of Barbara McClintock's controlling elements.

    PubMed

    Comfort, N C

    1999-01-01

    In the standard narrative of her life, Barbara McClintock discovered genetic transposition in the 1940s but no one believed her. She was ignored until molecular biologists of the 1970s "rediscovered" transposition and vindicated her heretical discovery. New archival documents, as well as interviews and close reading of published papers, belie this narrative. Transposition was accepted immediately by both maize and bacterial geneticists. Maize geneticists confirmed it repeatedly in the early 1950s and by the late 1950s it was considered a classic discovery. But for McClintock, movable elements were part of an elaborate system of genetic control that she hypothesized to explain development and differentiation. This theory was highly speculative and was not widely accepted, even by those who had discovered transposition independently. When Jacob and Monod presented their alternative model for gene regulation, the operon, her controller argument was discarded as incorrect. Transposition, however, was soon discovered in microorganisms and by the late 1970s was recognized as a phenomenon of biomedical importance. For McClintock, the award of the 1983 Nobel Prize to her for the discovery of movable genetic elements, long treated as a legitimation, may well have been bittersweet. This new look at McClintock's experiments and theory has implications for the intellectual history of biology, the social history of American genetics, and McClintock's role in the historiography of women in science. PMID:11623812

  7. "The real point is control": the reception of Barbara McClintock's controlling elements.

    PubMed

    Comfort, N C

    1999-01-01

    In the standard narrative of her life, Barbara McClintock discovered genetic transposition in the 1940s but no one believed her. She was ignored until molecular biologists of the 1970s "rediscovered" transposition and vindicated her heretical discovery. New archival documents, as well as interviews and close reading of published papers, belie this narrative. Transposition was accepted immediately by both maize and bacterial geneticists. Maize geneticists confirmed it repeatedly in the early 1950s and by the late 1950s it was considered a classic discovery. But for McClintock, movable elements were part of an elaborate system of genetic control that she hypothesized to explain development and differentiation. This theory was highly speculative and was not widely accepted, even by those who had discovered transposition independently. When Jacob and Monod presented their alternative model for gene regulation, the operon, her controller argument was discarded as incorrect. Transposition, however, was soon discovered in microorganisms and by the late 1970s was recognized as a phenomenon of biomedical importance. For McClintock, the award of the 1983 Nobel Prize to her for the discovery of movable genetic elements, long treated as a legitimation, may well have been bittersweet. This new look at McClintock's experiments and theory has implications for the intellectual history of biology, the social history of American genetics, and McClintock's role in the historiography of women in science.

  8. Neuromodulation of Attentional Control in Major Depression: A Pilot DeepTMS Study.

    PubMed

    Naim-Feil, Jodie; Bradshaw, John L; Sheppard, Dianne M; Rosenberg, Oded; Levkovitz, Yechiel; Dannon, Pinhas; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Isserles, Moshe; Zangen, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    While Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is primarily characterized by mood disturbances, impaired attentional control is increasingly identified as a critical feature of depression. Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (deepTMS), a noninvasive neuromodulatory technique, can modulate neural activity and induce neuroplasticity changes in brain regions recruited by attentional processes. This study examined whether acute and long-term high-frequency repetitive deepTMS to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) can attenuate attentional deficits associated with MDD. Twenty-one MDD patients and 26 matched control subjects (CS) were administered the Beck Depression Inventory and the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) at baseline. MDD patients were readministered the SART and depressive assessments following a single session (n = 21) and after 4 weeks (n = 13) of high-frequency (20 Hz) repetitive deepTMS applied to the DLPFC. To control for the practice effect, CS (n = 26) were readministered the SART a further two times. The MDD group exhibited deficits in sustained attention and cognitive inhibition. Both acute and long-term high-frequency repetitive frontal deepTMS ameliorated sustained attention deficits in the MDD group. Improvement after acute deepTMS was related to attentional recovery after long-term deepTMS. Longer-term improvement in sustained attention was not related to antidepressant effects of deepTMS treatment. PMID:26823985

  9. Neuromodulation of Attentional Control in Major Depression: A Pilot DeepTMS Study

    PubMed Central

    Naim-Feil, Jodie; Bradshaw, John L.; Sheppard, Dianne M.; Rosenberg, Oded; Levkovitz, Yechiel; Fitzgerald, Paul B.; Isserles, Moshe; Zangen, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    While Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is primarily characterized by mood disturbances, impaired attentional control is increasingly identified as a critical feature of depression. Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (deepTMS), a noninvasive neuromodulatory technique, can modulate neural activity and induce neuroplasticity changes in brain regions recruited by attentional processes. This study examined whether acute and long-term high-frequency repetitive deepTMS to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) can attenuate attentional deficits associated with MDD. Twenty-one MDD patients and 26 matched control subjects (CS) were administered the Beck Depression Inventory and the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) at baseline. MDD patients were readministered the SART and depressive assessments following a single session (n = 21) and after 4 weeks (n = 13) of high-frequency (20 Hz) repetitive deepTMS applied to the DLPFC. To control for the practice effect, CS (n = 26) were readministered the SART a further two times. The MDD group exhibited deficits in sustained attention and cognitive inhibition. Both acute and long-term high-frequency repetitive frontal deepTMS ameliorated sustained attention deficits in the MDD group. Improvement after acute deepTMS was related to attentional recovery after long-term deepTMS. Longer-term improvement in sustained attention was not related to antidepressant effects of deepTMS treatment. PMID:26823985

  10. Hazard analysis and critical control point systems in the United States Department of Agriculture regulatory policy.

    PubMed

    Billy, T J; Wachsmuth, I K

    1997-08-01

    Recent outbreaks of foodborne illness and studies by expert groups have established the need for fundamental change in the United States meat and poultry inspection programme to reduce the risk of foodborne illness. The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has embarked on a broad effort to bring about such change, with particular emphasis on the reduction of pathogenic micro-organisms in raw meat and poultry products. The publication on 25 July 1996 of the Final Rule on pathogen reduction and hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) systems was a major milestone in the FSIS strategy for change. The Final Rule provides a framework for change and clarifies the respective roles of industry and government in ensuring the safety of meat and poultry products. With the implementation of this Final Rule underway, the FSIS has been exploring ways in which slaughter inspection carried out under an HACCP-based system can be changed so that food safety risks are addressed more adequately and the allocation of inspection resources is improved further. In addition, the FSIS is broadening the focus of food safety activities to extend beyond slaughter and processing plants by working with industry, academia and other government agencies. Such co-operation should lead to the development of measures to improve food safety before animals reach the slaughter plant and after products leave the inspected establishment for distribution to the retail level. For the future, the FSIS believes that quantitative risk assessments will be at the core of food safety activities. Risk assessments provide the most effective means of identifying how specific pathogens and other hazards may be encountered throughout the farm-to-table chain and of measuring the potential impact of various interventions. In addition, these assessments will be used in the development and evaluation of HACCP systems. The FSIS is currently conducting a

  11. Critical control points of complementary food preparation and handling in eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed Central

    Ehiri, J. E.; Azubuike, M. C.; Ubbaonu, C. N.; Anyanwu, E. C.; Ibe, K. M.; Ogbonna, M. O.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate microbial contamination and critical control points (CCPs) in the preparation and handling of complementary foods in 120 households in Imo state, Nigeria. METHODS: The Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) approach was used to investigate processes and procedures that contributed to microbial contamination, growth and survival, and to identify points where controls could be applied to prevent or eliminate these microbiological hazards or reduce them to acceptable levels. Food samples were collected and tested microbiologically at different stages of preparation and handling. FINDINGS: During cooking, all foods attained temperatures capable of destroying vegetative forms of food-borne pathogens. However, the risk of contamination increased by storage of food at ambient temperature, by using insufficiently high temperatures to reheat the food, and by adding contaminated ingredients such as dried ground crayfish and soybean powder at stages where no further heat treatment was applied. The purchasing of contaminated raw foodstuffs and ingredients, particularly raw akamu, from vendors in open markets is also a CCP. CONCLUSION: Although an unsafe environment poses many hazards for children's food, the hygienic quality of prepared food can be assured if basic food safety principles are observed. When many factors contribute to food contamination, identification of CCPs becomes particularly important and can facilitate appropriate targeting of resources and prevention efforts. PMID:11417038

  12. Testing of an End-Point Control Unit Designed to Enable Precision Control of Manipulator-Coupled Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Raymond C.; Ghosh, Dave; Tobbe, Patrick A.; Weathers, John M.; Manouchehri, Davoud; Lindsay, Thomas S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an end-point control concept designed to enable precision telerobotic control of manipulator-coupled spacecraft. The concept employs a hardware unit (end-point control unit EPCU) that is positioned between the end-effector of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System and the payload. Features of the unit are active compliance (control of the displacement between the end-effector and the payload), to allow precision control of payload motions, and inertial load relief, to prevent the transmission of loads between the end-effector and the payload. This paper presents the concept and studies the active compliance feature using a simulation and hardware. Results of the simulation show the effectiveness of the EPCU in smoothing the motion of the payload. Results are presented from initial, limited tests of a laboratory hardware unit on a robotic arm testbed at the l Space Flight Center. Tracking performance of the arm in a constant speed automated retraction and extension maneuver of a heavy payload with and without the unit active is compared for the design speed and higher speeds. Simultaneous load reduction and tracking performance are demonstrated using the EPCU.

  13. Optimal control of a spinning double-pyramid Earth-pointing tethered formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Paul

    2009-06-01

    The dynamics and control of a tethered satellite formation for Earth-pointing observation missions is considered. For most practical applications in Earth orbit, a tether formation must be spinning in order to maintain tension in the tethers. It is possible to obtain periodic spinning solutions for a triangular formation whose initial conditions are close to the orbit normal. However, these solutions contain significant deviations of the satellites on a sphere relative to the desired Earth-pointing configuration. To maintain a plane of satellites spinning normal to the orbit plane, it is necessary to utilize "anchors". Such a configuration resembles a double-pyramid. In this paper, control of a double-pyramid tethered formation is studied. The equations of motion are derived in a floating orbital coordinate system for the general case of an elliptic reference orbit. The motion of the satellites is derived assuming inelastic tethers that can vary in length in a controlled manner. Cartesian coordinates in a rotating reference frame attached to the desired spin frame provide a simple means of expressing the equations of motion, together with a set of constraint equations for the tether tensions. Periodic optimal control theory is applied to the system to determine sets of controlled periodic trajectories by varying the lengths of all interconnecting tethers (nine in total), as well as retrieval and simple reconfiguration trajectories. A modal analysis of the system is also performed using a lumped mass representation of the tethers.

  14. Dithering Digital Ripple Correlation Control for Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, C; Pilawa-Podgurski, RCN

    2015-08-01

    This study demonstrates a new method for rapid and precise maximum power point tracking in photovoltaic (PV) applications using dithered PWM control. Constraints imposed by efficiency, cost, and component size limit the available PWM resolution of a power converter, and may in turn limit the MPP tracking efficiency of the PV system. In these scenarios, PWM dithering can be used to improve average PWM resolution. In this study, we present a control technique that uses ripple correlation control (RCC) on the dithering ripple, thereby achieving simultaneous fast tracking speed and high tracking accuracy. Moreover, the proposed method solves some of the practical challenges that have to date limited the effectiveness of RCC in solar PV applications. We present a theoretical derivation of the principles behind dithering digital ripple correlation control, as well as experimental results that show excellent tracking speed and accuracy with basic hardware requirements.

  15. Rapid torque-limited line-of-sight pointing of SCOLE (Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment) configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    The design concept of a control for rapid torque-limited slewing of a rigid-mast version of the NASA SCOLE configuration is presented and demonstrated by means of numerical simulation. The time-optimal control problem for the system is decomposed into separate single-axis problems, expanding analytically the implicit nonlinear transcendental expression for the SCOLE line-of-sight error, and the final Euler attitude angles and slew angles are determined. The simulation results are presented in tables and graphs, and it is found that bang-bang or bang-pause-bang slew maneuvers with control moment applied to the Shuttle and control force applied to the reflector, and with a 5-deg/s slew-rate limit, produce the best pointing accuracy and the shortest slew times, although the specified line-of-sight error of 0.02 deg cannot be achieved using such open-loop single-axis maneuvers.

  16. Randomized controlled trials of iron chelators for the treatment of cardiac siderosis in thalassaemia major.

    PubMed

    Baksi, A John; Pennell, Dudley J

    2014-01-01

    In conditions requiring repeated blood transfusion or where iron metabolism is abnormal, heart failure may result from accumulation of iron in the heart (cardiac siderosis). Death due to heart failure from cardiac iron overload has accounted for considerable early mortality in β-thalassemia major. The ability to detect iron loading in the heart by cardiovascular magnetic resonance using T2* sequences has created an opportunity to intervene in the natural history of such conditions. However, effective and well tolerated therapy is required to remove iron from the heart. There are currently three approved commercially available iron chelators: deferoxamine, deferiprone and deferasirox. We review the high quality randomized controlled trials in this area for iron chelation therapy in the management of cardiac siderosis.

  17. Analysing and controlling the tax evasion dynamics via majority-vote model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    2010-09-01

    Within the context of agent-based Monte-Carlo simulations, we study the well-known majority-vote model (MVM) with noise applied to tax evasion on simple square lattices, Voronoi-Delaunay random lattices, Barabasi-Albert networks, and Erdös-Rényi random graphs. In the order to analyse and to control the fluctuations for tax evasion in the economics model proposed by Zaklan, MVM is applied in the neighborhod of the noise critical qc to evolve the Zaklan model. The Zaklan model had been studied recently using the equilibrium Ising model. Here we show that the Zaklan model is robust because this can be studied using equilibrium dynamics of Ising model also through the nonequilibrium MVM and on various topologies cited above giving the same behavior regardless of dynamic or topology used here.

  18. Infection control as a major World Health Organization priority for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Pittet, D; Allegranzi, B; Storr, J; Bagheri Nejad, S; Dziekan, G; Leotsakos, A; Donaldson, L

    2008-04-01

    Healthcare-associated infection affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is a major global issue for patient safety. It complicates between 5 and 10% of admissions in acute care hospitals in industrialised countries. In developing countries, the risk is two to twenty times higher and the proportion of infected patients frequently exceeds 25%. A growing awareness of this problem prompted the World Health Organization to promote the creation of the World Alliance for Patient Safety. Prevention of healthcare-associated infection is the target of the Alliance First Global Patient Safety Challenge, 'Clean Care is Safer Care', launched in October 2005. After 2 years, a formal statement has been signed by 72 ministries of health as a pledge of their support to implement actions to reduce healthcare-associated infection; of these, 30 are developing countries. Additional countries, mostly from the developing world, have planned to sign by the end of 2008 and will represent in total more than three-quarters of the world's population. Given the emphasis of the proposed strategy on simple and affordable solutions, the impact of the Challenge is expected to be high in developing countries. The combined efforts expected under the Challenge have the potential to save millions of lives, prevent morbidities and long-term disability for hundreds of millions of patients, and lead to major cost savings through the improvement of basic infection control measures in any healthcare setting, regardless of resources available or level of development.

  19. A pooled analysis of two placebo-controlled trials of desvenlafaxine in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Daniel Z; Montgomery, Stuart A; Tourian, Karen A; Brisard, Claudine; Rosas, Gregory; Padmanabhan, Krishna; Germain, Jean-Michel; Pitrosky, Bruno

    2008-07-01

    The efficacy, safety, and tolerability of desvenlafaxine (administered as desvenlafaxine succinate) were evaluated in two similarly designed, phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, venlafaxine-extended-release-referenced, flexible-dose studies of outpatients with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder. Owing to a high placebo response, the individual studies were underpowered. Therefore, a post-hoc pooled analysis was performed (desvenlafaxine and placebo data were pooled; venlafaxine extended release data were not, owing to different flexible-dose regimens in the two studies). The primary outcome measure was the change from baseline on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression; the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement item score was a secondary outcome. Analysis of the pooled data (using a mixed-effect model for repeated measures) revealed that after 8 weeks of treatment, desvenlafaxine was significantly better than placebo on 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression [-14.21 vs. -11.87 for desvenlafaxine and placebo, respectively; magnitude of effect=-2.34 (P<0.001)] and Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement item scores [1.95 vs. 2.32 for desvenlafaxine and placebo, respectively; magnitude of effect=-0.37 (P<0.001)]. Adverse events were comparable to those found with other drugs sharing a similar mechanism of action. These data support the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of desvenlafaxine in the treatment of major depressive disorder.

  20. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for major depression following perinatal loss: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer E; Price, Ann Back; Kao, Jennifer Chienwen; Fernandes, Karen; Stout, Robert; Gobin, Robyn L; Zlotnick, Caron

    2016-10-01

    This randomized controlled pilot trial examined the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of an adapted interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for major depressive disorder (MDD) following perinatal loss (miscarriage, stillbirth, or early neonatal death). Fifty women who experienced a perinatal loss within the past 18 months, whose current depressive episode onset occurred during or after the loss, were randomized to the group IPT adapted for perinatal loss (the Group IPT for Major Depression Following Perinatal Loss manual developed for this study is available at no cost by contacting either of the first two authors) or to the group Coping with Depression (CWD), a cognitive behavioral treatment which did not focus on perinatal loss nor social support. Assessments occurred at baseline, treatment weeks 4 and 8, post-treatment, and 3 and 6 months after the end of treatment. IPT was feasible and acceptable in this population. Although some participants were initially hesitant to discuss their losses in a group (as occurred in IPT but not CWD), end of treatment satisfaction scores were significantly (p = 0.001) higher in IPT than in CWD. Confidence intervals around between-groups effect sizes favored IPT for reductions in depressive symptoms during treatment as well as for improvement in mode-specific targets (social support, grief symptoms) and recovery from a post-traumatic stress disorder over follow-up. This group IPT treatment adapted for MDD after perinatal loss is feasible, acceptable, and possibly efficacious. PMID:27003141

  1. A major QTL controls susceptibility to spinal curvature in the curveback guppy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the genetic basis of heritable spinal curvature would benefit medicine and aquaculture. Heritable spinal curvature among otherwise healthy children (i.e. Idiopathic Scoliosis and Scheuermann kyphosis) accounts for more than 80% of all spinal curvatures and imposes a substantial healthcare cost through bracing, hospitalizations, surgery, and chronic back pain. In aquaculture, the prevalence of heritable spinal curvature can reach as high as 80% of a stock, and thus imposes a substantial cost through production losses. The genetic basis of heritable spinal curvature is unknown and so the objective of this work is to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting heritable spinal curvature in the curveback guppy. Prior work with curveback has demonstrated phenotypic parallels to human idiopathic-type scoliosis, suggesting shared biological pathways for the deformity. Results A major effect QTL that acts in a recessive manner and accounts for curve susceptibility was detected in an initial mapping cross on LG 14. In a second cross, we confirmed this susceptibility locus and fine mapped it to a 5 cM region that explains 82.6% of the total phenotypic variance. Conclusions We identify a major QTL that controls susceptibility to curvature. This locus contains over 100 genes, including MTNR1B, a candidate gene for human idiopathic scoliosis. The identification of genes associated with heritable spinal curvature in the curveback guppy has the potential to elucidate the biological basis of spinal curvature among humans and economically important teleosts. PMID:21269476

  2. Identification of a major QTL controlling the content of B-type starch granules in Aegilops

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Thomas; Rejab, Nur Ardiyana; Griffiths, Simon; Leigh, Fiona; Leverington-Waite, Michelle; Simmonds, James; Uauy, Cristobal; Trafford, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Starch within the endosperm of most species of the Triticeae has a unique bimodal granule morphology comprising large lenticular A-type granules and smaller near-spherical B-type granules. However, a few wild wheat species (Aegilops) are known to lack B-granules. Ae. peregrina and a synthetic tetraploid Aegilops with the same genome composition (SU) were found to differ in B-granule number. The synthetic tetraploid had normal A- and B-type starch granules whilst Ae. peregrina had only A-granules because the B-granules failed to initiate. A population segregating for B-granule number was generated by crossing these two accessions and was used to study the genetic basis of B-granule initiation. A combination of Bulked Segregant Analysis and QTL mapping identified a major QTL located on the short arm of chromosome 4S that accounted for 44.4% of the phenotypic variation. The lack of B-granules in polyploid Aegilops with diverse genomes suggests that the B-granule locus has been lost several times independently during the evolution of the Triticeae. It is proposed that the B-granule locus is susceptible to silencing during polyploidization and a model is presented to explain the observed data based on the assumption that the initiation of B-granules is controlled by a single major locus per haploid genome. PMID:21227932

  3. Major QTLs control resistance to rice hoja blanca virus and its vector Tagosodes orizicolus.

    PubMed

    Romero, Luz E; Lozano, Ivan; Garavito, Andrea; Carabali, Silvio J; Triana, Monica; Villareal, Natalia; Reyes, Luis; Duque, Myriam C; Martinez, César P; Calvert, Lee; Lorieux, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Rice hoja blanca (white leaf) disease can cause severe yield losses in rice in the Americas. The disease is caused by the rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV), which is transmitted by the planthopper vector Tagosodes orizicolus. Because classical breeding schemes for this disease rely on expensive, time-consuming screenings, there is a need for alternatives such as marker-aided selection. The varieties Fedearroz 2000 and Fedearroz 50, which are resistant to RHBV and to the feeding damage caused by T. orizicolus, were crossed with the susceptible line WC366 to produce segregating F2:3 populations. The F3 families were scored for their resistance level to RHBV and T. orizicolus. The F2:3 lines of both crosses were genotyped using microsatellite markers. One major QTL on the short arm of chromosome 4 was identified for resistance to RHBV in the two populations. Two major QTL on chromosomes 5 and 7 were identified for resistance to T. orizicolus in the Fd2000 × WC366 and Fd50 × WC366 crosses, respectively. This comparative study using two distinct rice populations allowed for a better understanding of how the resistance to RHBV and its vector are controlled genetically. Simple marker-aided breeding schemes based on QTL information can be designed to improve rice germplasm to reduce losses caused by this important disease. PMID:24240781

  4. Major QTLs Control Resistance to Rice Hoja Blanca Virus and Its Vector Tagosodes orizicolus

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Luz E.; Lozano, Ivan; Garavito, Andrea; Carabali, Silvio J.; Triana, Monica; Villareal, Natalia; Reyes, Luis; Duque, Myriam C.; Martinez, César P.; Calvert, Lee; Lorieux, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Rice hoja blanca (white leaf) disease can cause severe yield losses in rice in the Americas. The disease is caused by the rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV), which is transmitted by the planthopper vector Tagosodes orizicolus. Because classical breeding schemes for this disease rely on expensive, time-consuming screenings, there is a need for alternatives such as marker-aided selection. The varieties Fedearroz 2000 and Fedearroz 50, which are resistant to RHBV and to the feeding damage caused by T. orizicolus, were crossed with the susceptible line WC366 to produce segregating F2:3 populations. The F3 families were scored for their resistance level to RHBV and T. orizicolus. The F2:3 lines of both crosses were genotyped using microsatellite markers. One major QTL on the short arm of chromosome 4 was identified for resistance to RHBV in the two populations. Two major QTL on chromosomes 5 and 7 were identified for resistance to T. orizicolus in the Fd2000 × WC366 and Fd50 × WC366 crosses, respectively. This comparative study using two distinct rice populations allowed for a better understanding of how the resistance to RHBV and its vector are controlled genetically. Simple marker-aided breeding schemes based on QTL information can be designed to improve rice germplasm to reduce losses caused by this important disease. PMID:24240781

  5. Screening for the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and its major metabolites in human doping controls.

    PubMed

    Möller, Ines; Wintermeyer, Annette; Bender, Katja; Jübner, Martin; Thomas, Andreas; Krug, Oliver; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2011-09-01

    Referred to as 'spice', several new drugs, advertised as herbal blends, have appeared on the market in the last few years, in which the synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and a C(8) homologue of CP 47,497 were identified as major active ingredients. Due to their reported cannabis-like effects, many European countries have banned these substances. The World Anti-Doping Agency has also explicitly prohibited synthetic cannabinoids in elite sport in-competition. Since urine specimens have been the preferred doping control samples, the elucidation of the metabolic pathways of these substances is of particular importance to implement them in sports drug testing programmes. In a recent report, an in vitro phase-I metabolism study of JWH-018 was presented yielding mainly hydroxylated and N-dealkylated metabolites. Due to these findings, a urine sample of a healthy man declaring to have smoked a 'spice' product was screened for potential phase-I and -II metabolites by high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry in the present report. The majority of the phase-I metabolites observed in earlier in vitro studies of JWH-018 were detected in this urine specimen and furthermore most of their respective monoglucuronides. As no intact JWH-018 was detectable, the monohydroxylated metabolite being the most abundant one was chosen as a target analyte for sports drug testing purposes; a detection method was subsequently developed and validated in accordance to conventional screening protocols based on enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction, and liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The method was applied to approximately 7500 urine doping control samples yielding two JWH-018 findings and demonstrated its capability for a sensitive and selective identification of JWH-018 and its metabolites in human urine.

  6. The double burden of age and major depressive disorder on the cognitive control network.

    PubMed

    Rao, Julia A; Kassel, Michelle T; Weldon, Anne L; Avery, Erich T; Briceno, Emily M; Mann, Megan; Cornett, Bridget; Kales, Helen C; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Welsh, Robert C; Langenecker, Scott A; Weisenbach, Sara L

    2015-06-01

    Poor cognitive control (CC) is common among older individuals with major depressive disorder (OMDD). At the same time, studies of CC in OMDD with fMRI are relatively limited and often have small samples. The present study was conducted to further examine poor CC in OMDD with early onset depression, as well as to investigate the interactive effects of MDD and aging on cognitive control. Twenty OMDD, 17 older never-depressed comparisons (ONDC), 16 younger adults with MDD (YMDD), and 18 younger never-depressed comparisons (YNDC) participated. All participants completed the Go level of the Parametric Go/No-Go Test, which requires sustained attention and inhibitory control while undergoing functional MRI (fMRI). YNDC were faster in reaction times (RTs) to go targets relative to the other 3 groups, and the YMDD group was faster than the OMDD group. fMRI effects of both age and diagnosis were present, with greater activation in MDD, and in aging. Additionally, the interaction of age and MDD was also significant, such that OMDD exhibited greater recruitment of fronto-subcortical regions relative to older comparisons. These results are consistent with prior research reporting that OMDD recruit more fronto-striatal regions in order to perform at the same level as their never-depressed peers, here on a task of sustained attention and inhibitory control. There may be an interaction of cognitive aging and depression to create a double burden on the CC network in OMDD, including possible fronto-striatal compensation during CC that is unique to OMDD, as younger MDD individuals do not show this pattern.

  7. The double burden of age and major depressive disorder on the cognitive control network.

    PubMed

    Rao, Julia A; Kassel, Michelle T; Weldon, Anne L; Avery, Erich T; Briceno, Emily M; Mann, Megan; Cornett, Bridget; Kales, Helen C; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Welsh, Robert C; Langenecker, Scott A; Weisenbach, Sara L

    2015-06-01

    Poor cognitive control (CC) is common among older individuals with major depressive disorder (OMDD). At the same time, studies of CC in OMDD with fMRI are relatively limited and often have small samples. The present study was conducted to further examine poor CC in OMDD with early onset depression, as well as to investigate the interactive effects of MDD and aging on cognitive control. Twenty OMDD, 17 older never-depressed comparisons (ONDC), 16 younger adults with MDD (YMDD), and 18 younger never-depressed comparisons (YNDC) participated. All participants completed the Go level of the Parametric Go/No-Go Test, which requires sustained attention and inhibitory control while undergoing functional MRI (fMRI). YNDC were faster in reaction times (RTs) to go targets relative to the other 3 groups, and the YMDD group was faster than the OMDD group. fMRI effects of both age and diagnosis were present, with greater activation in MDD, and in aging. Additionally, the interaction of age and MDD was also significant, such that OMDD exhibited greater recruitment of fronto-subcortical regions relative to older comparisons. These results are consistent with prior research reporting that OMDD recruit more fronto-striatal regions in order to perform at the same level as their never-depressed peers, here on a task of sustained attention and inhibitory control. There may be an interaction of cognitive aging and depression to create a double burden on the CC network in OMDD, including possible fronto-striatal compensation during CC that is unique to OMDD, as younger MDD individuals do not show this pattern. PMID:26030776

  8. Point-and-Click Cursor Control With an Intracortical Neural Interface System by Humans With Tetraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Phil; Simeral, John D.; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Donoghue, John P.; Friehs, Gerhard M.; Black, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a point-and-click intracortical neural interface system (NIS) that enables humans with tetraplegia to volitionally move a 2-D computer cursor in any desired direction on a computer screen, hold it still, and click on the area of interest. This direct brain–computer interface extracts both discrete (click) and continuous (cursor velocity) signals from a single small population of neurons in human motor cortex. A key component of this system is a multi-state probabilistic decoding algorithm that simultaneously decodes neural spiking activity of a small population of neurons and outputs either a click signal or the velocity of the cursor. The algorithm combines a linear classifier, which determines whether the user is intending to click or move the cursor, with a Kalman filter that translates the neural population activity into cursor velocity. We present a paradigm for training the multi-state decoding algorithm using neural activity observed during imagined actions. Two human participants with tetraplegia (paralysis of the four limbs) performed a closed-loop radial target acquisition task using the point-and-click NIS over multiple sessions. We quantified point-and-click performance using various human-computer interaction measurements for pointing devices. We found that participants could control the cursor motion and click on specified targets with a small error rate (<3% in one participant). This study suggests that signals from a small ensemble of motor cortical neurons (~40) can be used for natural point-and-click 2-D cursor control of a personal computer. PMID:21278024

  9. Control of sediment concentration in major rivers of the Nepal Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crave, A.; Andermann, C.; Gloaguen, R.; Bonnet, S.

    2010-12-01

    Sediment concentration in river systems of active mountain belts is key indicators to estimate present-day erosion rates. Erosion in the Himalayas is mainly controlled by the annual recurrence and intensity of the Indian summer monsoon system. But nevertheless short lasting events can be responsible for more than the half of the material transported. Temporal variability in concentration is attributed by changes of discharge and hence access to different supply sources as well as alteration of mobilization properties. Controlling factors are precipitation rates and intensities, vegetation cover, duration and limit of annual snow cover as well as seismic events. Today remotely sensed area-wide measurements are available to relate single observable events, such as extreme suspended sediment concentration peaks to their eventual sources. Due to the distinct seasonality, Himalayan rivers experience a distinct annual hydrographe which is highly repetitive. These annual flood cycles cause seasonal hysteresis loops in suspended concentration engraved by short events. Here we present a study on several major rivers in the Nepal Himalayas analyzing there discharge - sediment concentration relationship and its relation with upstream controlling properties, detected by remote sensing. Due to political unsteadiness and difficult accessible terrain, river gauging stations are rare and data not always available. Our station data covers nearly all major rivers, spanning a rainfall gradient from East to West along the Himalayan front. The average annual increase of discharge during monsoon is 1 to two magnitudes with respect to winter baseflow. Considerable Suspended concentrations (100 - 1000 g/l) are observable only within the monsoon season. Short lasting events however can catapult concentration for few short periods above 103 g/l. The occurrence of such events is commonly before peak discharge and its frequency varies from year to year. In same cases one or two events account

  10. Two-axis Beam Steering Mirror Control system for Precision Pointing and Tracking Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ulander, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Precision pointing and tracking of laser beams is critical in numerous military and industrial applications. This is particularly true for systems requiring atmospheric beam propagation. Such systems are plagued by environmental influences which cause the optical signal to break up and wander. Example applications include laser communications, precision targeting, active imaging, chemical remote sensing, and laser vibrometry. The goal of this project is to build a beam steering system using a two-axis mirror to maintain precise pointing control. Ultimately, position control to 0.08% accuracy (40 {micro}rad) with a bandwidth of 200 Hz is desired. The work described encompasses evaluation of the instrumentation system and the subsequent design and implementation of an analog electronic controller for a two-axis mirror used to steer the beam. The controller operates over a wide temperature range, through multiple mirror resonances, and is independent of specific mirrors. The design was built and successfully fielded in a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory free-space optics experiment. All measurements and performance parameters are derived from measurements made on actual hardware that was built and field tested. In some cases, specific design details have been omitted that involve proprietary information pertaining to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory patent positions and claims. These omissions in no way impact the general validity of the work or concepts presented in this thesis.

  11. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures, 2. Part A: Shape and orientation control using point actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The equations of planar motion for a flexible beam in orbit which includes the effects of gravity gradient torques and control torques from point actuators located along the beam was developed. Two classes of theorems are applied to the linearized form of these equations to establish necessary conditions for controlability for preselected actuator configurations. The feedback gains are selected: (1) based on the decoupling of the original coordinates and to obtain proper damping, and (2) by applying the linear regulator problem to the individual model coordinates separately. The linear control laws obtained using both techniques were evaluated by numerical integration of the nonlinear system equations. Numerical examples considering pitch and various number of modes with different combination of actuator numbers and locations are presented. The independent model control concept used earlier with a discretized model of the thin beam in orbit was reviewed for the case where the number of actuators is less than the number of modes. Results indicate that although the system is controllable it is not stable about the nominal (local vertical) orientation when the control is based on modal decoupling. An alternate control law not based on modal decoupling ensures stability of all the modes.

  12. Comparison of controller design approaches from a vibration suppression point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestorovic Trajkov, Tamara; Koeppe, Heinz; Gabbert, Ulrich

    2003-07-01

    The paper is aimed at presenting, in the sense of analyzing and comparison, some aspects of modeling, simulation and control of piezoelectric flexible smart structures from the vibration suppression point of view. Taking into account the necessity of a good model development for the purpose of the structure simulation and model-based control design, two approaches are considered: finite element (FEM) method based methodology and system identification approach. The finite element analysis includes modal analysis of the structures with piezoelectric active elements (actuators and sensors) together with the active elements dynamics. Resulting dynamic model of the structure is represented in the form of equations of motion, which after appropriate transformations and modal reduction lead to a state-space model convenient for the controller design. As an alternative, the subspace based system identification is proposed, which in case of the real structure availability, provides a model of the structure from the input-output measured data. Controller design for the purpose of vibration suppression is model based. Optimal LQ tracking and direct model reference adaptive control laws are considered. Uncontrolled and controlled behavior of structures is investigated and the comparison of the proposed control laws and their efficiency verification is performed through the examples.

  13. Integrated watershed approach in controlling point and non-point source pollution within Zelivka drinking water reservoir.

    PubMed

    Holas, J; Hrncir, M

    2002-01-01

    An agricultural watershed involves manipulation of soil, water and other natural resources and it has profound impacts on ecosystems. To manage these complex issues, we must understand causes and consequences and interactions-related transport of pollutants, quality of the environment, mitigation measures and policy measures. A ten year period of economic changes has been analysed with respect to sustainable development concerning Zelivka drinking water reservoir and its watershed, where agriculture and forestry are the main human activities. It is recommended that all land users within a catchment area should receive payments for their contribution to water cycle management. Setting up the prevention principles and best management practices financially subsidized by a local water company has been found very effective in both point and non-point source pollution abatement, and the newly prepared Clean Water Programme actively involves local municipal authorities as well. The first step based on systems analysis was to propose effective strategies and select alternative measures and ways for their financing. Long term monitoring of nutrient loads entering the reservoir and hazardous events statistics resulted in maps characterising the territory including vulnerable zones and risk factors. Financing involves providing annual payments to farmers, who undertake to manage specified areas of their land in a particular way and one-off payments to realise proposed issues ensuring soil conservation and watershed ecosystem benefits.

  14. Relapse Prevention in Major Depressive Disorder: Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Versus an Active Control Condition

    PubMed Central

    Shallcross, Amanda J.; Gross, James J.; Visvanathan, Pallavi D.; Kumar, Niketa; Palfrey, Amy; Ford, Brett Q.; Dimidjian, Sona; Shirk, Stephen; Holm-Denoma, Jill; Goode, Kari M.; Cox, Erica; Chaplin, William; Mauss, Iris B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the comparative effectiveness of Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) versus an active control condition (ACC) for depression relapse prevention, depressive symptom reduction, and improvement in life satisfaction. Method Ninety-two participants in remission from Major Depressive Disorder with residual depressive symptoms were randomized to either an 8-week MBCT or a validated ACC that is structurally equivalent to MBCT and controls for non-specific effects (e.g., interaction with a facilitator, perceived social support, treatment outcome expectations). Both interventions were delivered according to their published manuals. Results Intention-to-treat analyses indicated no differences between MBCT and ACC in depression relapse rates or time to relapse over a 60-week follow-up. Both groups experienced significant and equal reductions in depressive symptoms and improvements in life satisfaction. A significant quadratic interaction (group x time) indicated that the pattern of depressive symptom reduction differed between groups. The ACC experienced immediate symptom reduction post-intervention and then a gradual increase over the 60-week follow-up. The MBCT group experienced a gradual linear symptom reduction. The pattern for life satisfaction was identical but only marginally significant. Conclusions MBCT did not differ from an ACC on rates of depression relapse, symptom reduction, or life satisfaction, suggesting that MBCT is no more effective for preventing depression relapse and reducing depressive symptoms than the active components of the ACC. Differences in trajectory of depressive symptom improvement suggest that the intervention-specific skills acquired may be associated with differential rates of therapeutic benefit. This study demonstrates the importance of comparing psychotherapeutic interventions to active control conditions. PMID:26371618

  15. Genetic Control over mtDNA and Its Relationship to Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cai, Na; Li, Yihan; Chang, Simon; Liang, Jieqin; Lin, Chongyun; Zhang, Xiufei; Liang, Lu; Hu, Jingchu; Chan, Wharton; Kendler, Kenneth S; Malinauskas, Tomas; Huang, Guo-Jen; Li, Qibin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2015-12-21

    Control over the number of mtDNA molecules per cell appears to be tightly regulated, but the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. Reversible alterations in the amount of mtDNA occur in response to stress suggesting that control over the amount of mtDNA is involved in stress-related diseases including major depressive disorder (MDD). Using low-coverage sequence data from 10,442 Chinese women to compute the normalized numbers of reads mapping to the mitochondrial genome as a proxy for the amount of mtDNA, we identified two loci that contribute to mtDNA levels: one within the TFAM gene on chromosome 10 (rs11006126, p value = 8.73 × 10(-28), variance explained = 1.90%) and one over the CDK6 gene on chromosome 7 (rs445, p value = 6.03 × 10(-16), variance explained = 0.50%). Both loci replicated in an independent cohort. CDK6 is thus a new molecule involved in the control of mtDNA. We identify increased rates of heteroplasmy in women with MDD, and show from an experimental paradigm using mice that the increase is likely due to stress. Furthermore, at least one heteroplasmic variant is significantly associated with changes in the amount of mtDNA (position 513, p value = 3.27 × 10(-9), variance explained = 0.48%) suggesting site-specific heteroplasmy as a possible link between stress and increase in amount of mtDNA. These findings indicate the involvement of mitochondrial genome copy number and sequence in an organism's response to stress.

  16. Doping control analysis of trimetazidine and characterization of major metabolites using mass spectrometric approaches.

    PubMed

    Sigmund, Gerd; Koch, Anja; Orlovius, Anne-Katrin; Guddat, Sven; Thomas, Andreas; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Since January 2014, the anti-anginal drug trimetazidine [1-(2,3,4-trimethoxybenzyl)-piperazine] has been classified as prohibited substance by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), necessitating specific and robust detection methods in sports drug testing laboratories. In the present study, the implementation of the intact therapeutic agent into two different initial testing procedures based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is reported, along with the characterization of urinary metabolites by electrospray ionization-high resolution/high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry. For GC-MS analyses, urine samples were subjected to liquid-liquid extraction sample preparation, while LC-MS/MS analyses were conducted by established 'dilute-and-inject' approaches. Both screening methods were validated for trimetazidine concerning specificity, limits of detection (0.5-50 ng/mL), intra-day and inter-day imprecision (<20%), and recovery (41%) in case of the GC-MS-based method. In addition, major metabolites such as the desmethylated trimetazidine and the corresponding sulfoconjugate, oxo-trimetazidine, and trimetazidine-N-oxide as identified in doping control samples were used to complement the LC-MS/MS-based assay, although intact trimetazidine was found at highest abundance of the relevant trimetazidine-related analytes in all tested sports drug testing samples. Retrospective data mining regarding doping control analyses conducted between 1999 and 2013 at the Cologne Doping Control Laboratory concerning trimetazidine revealed a considerable prevalence of the drug particularly in endurance and strength sports accounting for up to 39 findings per year.

  17. Interferometric adaptive optics testbed for laser pointing, wave-front control and phasing.

    PubMed

    Baker, K L; Homoelle, D; Utternback, E; Stappaerts, E A; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2009-09-14

    Implementing the capability to perform fast ignition experiments, as well as, radiography experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) places stringent requirements on the control of each of the beam's pointing, intra-beam phasing and overall wave-front quality. In this article experimental results are presented which were taken on an interferometric adaptive optics testbed that was designed and built to test the capabilities of such a system to control phasing, pointing and higher order beam aberrations. These measurements included quantification of the reduction in Strehl ratio incurred when using the MEMS device to correct for pointing errors in the system. The interferometric adaptive optics system achieved a Strehl ratio of 0.83 when correcting for a piston, tip/tilt error between two adjacent rectangular apertures, the geometry expected for the National ignition Facility. The interferometric adaptive optics system also achieved a Strehl ratio of 0.66 when used to correct for a phase plate aberration of similar magnitude as expected from simulations of the ARC beam line. All of these corrections included measuring both the upstream and downstream aberrations in the testbed and applying the sum of these two measurements in open-loop to the MEMS deformable mirror.

  18. Interferometric adaptive optics testbed for laser pointing, wave-front control and phasing.

    PubMed

    Baker, K L; Homoelle, D; Utternback, E; Stappaerts, E A; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2009-09-14

    Implementing the capability to perform fast ignition experiments, as well as, radiography experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) places stringent requirements on the control of each of the beam's pointing, intra-beam phasing and overall wave-front quality. In this article experimental results are presented which were taken on an interferometric adaptive optics testbed that was designed and built to test the capabilities of such a system to control phasing, pointing and higher order beam aberrations. These measurements included quantification of the reduction in Strehl ratio incurred when using the MEMS device to correct for pointing errors in the system. The interferometric adaptive optics system achieved a Strehl ratio of 0.83 when correcting for a piston, tip/tilt error between two adjacent rectangular apertures, the geometry expected for the National ignition Facility. The interferometric adaptive optics system also achieved a Strehl ratio of 0.66 when used to correct for a phase plate aberration of similar magnitude as expected from simulations of the ARC beam line. All of these corrections included measuring both the upstream and downstream aberrations in the testbed and applying the sum of these two measurements in open-loop to the MEMS deformable mirror. PMID:19770884

  19. Post-operative endophthalmitis: the application of hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP) to an infection control problem.

    PubMed

    Baird, D R; Henry, M; Liddell, K G; Mitchell, C M; Sneddon, J G

    2001-09-01

    Hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP) is a quality assurance system widely used in the food industry to ensure safety. We adopted the HACCP approach when conventional infection control measures had failed to solve an ongoing problem with an increased incidence of postoperative endophthalmitis, and our ophthalmology unit was threatened with permanent cessation of intraocular surgery. Although time-consuming, the result was an entirely new set of protocols for the care of patients undergoing intraocular surgery, the development of an integrated care pathway, and a comprehensive and robust audit programme, which enabled intraocular surgery to continue in a new spirit of confidence. HACCP methodology has so far been little used in healthcare, but it might be usefully applied to a variety of apparently intractable infection control problems.

  20. Application of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points system to enteral tube feeding in hospital.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M R; Batista, C R; Aidoo, K E

    2001-10-01

    An HACCP system was implemented for the quality assurance of preparation, storage and delivery of enteral feeds to patients in hospital. Routine methods of feed preparation, storage and delivery to patients were studied and a flow chart was initially made. After identifying hazards, an HACCP team was assembled, a flow chart was modified and critical control points were defined using a decision tree. Control measures for each step of the process and its monitoring and corrective measures to be applied were also defined. In addition, feed samples were analysed for microbiological quality and feed storage temperatures were also recorded, before and after the implementation of the HACCP system. When the control measures were applied and monitored, the hazard was reduced. Bacterial counts in feed were reduced from 105 cfu mL-1 to < 101 cfu mL-1. The results show that contamination of enteral feed may be reduced or eliminated if a systematic approach such as HACCP is applied effectively.

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Intranasal Ketamine in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lapidus, Kyle A.B.; Levitch, Cara F.; Perez, Andrew M.; Brallier, Jess W.; Parides, Michael K.; Soleimani, Laili; Feder, Adriana; Iosifescu, Dan V.; Charney, Dennis S.; Murrough, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Background The N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist ketamine, delivered via an intravenous route, has shown rapid antidepressant effects in patients with treatment-resistant depression. The current study was designed to test the safety, tolerability and efficacy of intranasal ketamine in patients with depression who had failed at least one prior antidepressant trial. Methods Twenty patients with major depression were randomized and 18 completed two treatment days with intranasal ketamine hydrochloride (50 mg) or saline solution in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. The primary efficacy outcome measure was change in depression severity 24 hours following ketamine or placebo, measured using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale. Secondary outcomes included persistence of benefit, changes in self-reports of depression, changes in anxiety, and proportion of responders. Potential psychotomimetic, dissociative, hemodynamic, and general adverse effects associated with ketamine were also measured. Results Patients showed significant improvement in depressive symptoms at 24 hours following ketamine compared to placebo [t=4.39, p<0.001; estimated mean MADRS score difference of 7.6 ± 3.7 (95% CI: 3.9 – 11.3)]. Eight of 18 patients (44%) met response criteria 24 hours following ketamine administration, compared to 1 of 18 (6%) following placebo (p=0.033). Intranasal ketamine was well tolerated with minimal psychotomimetic or dissociative effects and was not associated with clinically significant changes in hemodynamic parameters. Conclusions This study provides the first controlled evidence for the rapid antidepressant effects of intranasal ketamine. Treatment was associated with minimal adverse effects. If replicated, these findings may lead to novel approaches to the pharmacologic treatment of patients with major depression. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01304147 PMID:24821196

  2. Bone disease in adult patients with β-thalassaemia major: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Marina; Forti, Stella; Orsatti, Alessandra; Ulivieri, Fabio Massimo; Airaghi, Lorena; Zanaboni, Laura; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2014-02-01

    Despite the extraordinary improvements carried out in diagnostic and therapeutic management of thalassaemia major over the past few decades, bone demineralization is still a common finding, even in optimally treated patients. The relationships between bone density and several clinical characteristics or hematological markers have been described, and many factors contributing to demineralization have been identified; among them endocrine complications seem to play an important role. Nevertheless, the complex etiological mechanisms of this heterogeneous osteopathy still remains incompletely clarified. While previous studies focused on the characteristics of thalassaemic patients affected from bone demineralization, we conducted a case-control study focused on thalassaemic patients free from bone disease, aimed to detect the distinctive characteristics and any possible protective feature. Among a large cohort of 150 adult patients with β-thalassaemia major, we enrolled 20 patients with normal bone mineralization and 20 patients with osteoporosis matched for gender, BMI, age at first transfusion, serum ferritin and pre-transfusional hemoglobin (Hb) levels. The differences in demographic, clinical and endocrinological profiles were investigated, correcting for physical and hematological features known as confounding variables. The comparison of the two groups for biochemical parameters and endocrine function showed a protective role of normal gonadic function and IGF-1 levels against osteoporosis, and a similar influence of hypoparathyroidism. Treatment-corrected hypothyroidism and diabetes seemed not to affect bone mineralization. In conclusion, from a different perspective our results corroborate the role of endocrinopathies in thalassaemic osteopathy, and once again underline the crucial importance of an early and multi-disciplinary intervention in preventing bone complications in thalassaemic patients. PMID:22179745

  3. Point source modeling of matched case–control data with multiple disease subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shi; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Batterman, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose nonlinear distance-odds models investigating elevated odds around point sources of exposure, under a matched case-control design where there are subtypes within cases. We consider models analogous to the polychotomous logit models and adjacent-category logit models for categorical outcomes and extend them to the nonlinear distance-odds context. We consider multiple point sources as well as covariate adjustments. We evaluate maximum likelihood, profile likelihood, iteratively reweighted least squares, and a hierarchical Bayesian approach using Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques under these distance-odds models. We compare these methods using an extensive simulation study and show that with multiple parameters and a nonlinear model, Bayesian methods have advantages in terms of estimation stability, precision, and interpretation. We illustrate the methods by analyzing Medicaid claims data corresponding to the pediatric asthma population in Detroit, Michigan, from 2004 to 2006. PMID:22826092

  4. A new approach for automatic matching of ground control points in urban areas from heterogeneous images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Chao; Liu, Dingsheng; Zhao, Lingjun

    2008-12-01

    This paper discusses a new method for the automatic matching of ground control points (GCPs) between satellite remote sensing Image and digital raster graphic (DRG) in urban areas. The key of this method is to automatically extract tie point pairs according to geographic characters from such heterogeneous images. Since there are big differences between such heterogeneous images respect to texture and corner features, more detail analyzations are performed to find similarities and differences between high resolution remote sensing Image and (DRG). Furthermore a new algorithms based on the fuzzy-c means (FCM) method is proposed to extract linear feature in remote sensing Image. Based on linear feature, crossings and corners extracted from these features are chosen as GCPs. On the other hand, similar method was used to find same features from DRGs. Finally, Hausdorff Distance was adopted to pick matching GCPs from above two GCP groups. Experiences shown the method can extract GCPs from such images with a reasonable RMS error.

  5. Solar Sails as a Tool for Spacecraft Motion Control Near Solar-Terrestrial Libration Points.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eismont, N. A.

    Two problems are considered connected with the use of solar sails on spacecraft (s/c) moving in the vicinity of solar-terrestrial libration points L1 and L2. First problem is related to the exploration of s/c trajectories modification under influence of solar radiation pressure in case with comparatively big solar sails are mounted on s/c. In this case trajectory is shifted further from the Earth and closer to the Sun along Sun-Earth line. The shift may reach one million km or more. Simultaneously its size and shape are also changed. The dependence of these variations upon the mass to area ratio is determined. Such trajectories are interesting for solar wind shock waves investigations because it allows earlier detection of these waves as compared with use of "usual" motion of the s/c in L1 proximity. The other problem explored in the paper is s/c motion control using variation of forces produced by solar radiation pressure. The following approach for this variation is supposed: the sails include liquid crystal films with controllable transparency. When electrical voltage is applied film becomes transparent and solar pressure is minimal, in opposite case it is opaque and pressure increases. The other version of transparency variation use is two layer film: one layer is liquid crystal film; the other one is aluminium foil. With transparent liquid crystal film we have approximately two times higher solar radiation pressure than with opaque one. It gives the possibilities to control as orbital motion of s/c as its attitude. It is shown in the paper that comparatively small solar sails not bigger than usual solar array panels may be used for orbital control of s/c in the vicinity Sun-Earth collinear libration points if above described technics is applied. The required sails area to s/c mass is determined for solving the task of keeping s/c in vicinity of libration point and for trajectory amplitude change maneuvers. Thus the paper shows rather good perspective for the

  6. [Major Ionic Features and Their Controlling Factors in the Upper-Middle Reaches of Wujiang River].

    PubMed

    Huang, Qi-bo; Qin, Xiao-qun; Liu, Peng-yu; Lan, Fu-ning; Zhang, Lian-kai; Su, Chun-tian

    2016-05-15

    The Wujing River, the largest river in Guizhou Province, is one of the most important water resources for social and economical development. Recently, with the fast population proliferation and rapid economic growth, the drainage basin is intensively interfered by anthropogenic activities. The hydrochemistry of surface water was analyzed from the upper-middle reaches of Wujiang River for investigating the hydrochemical characteristics and their main influencing factors. The results showed that the major cations of the four rivers were Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺, accounting for more than 70%, and the main anions were HCO₃⁻ and SO₄²⁻, occupying more than 85%. The hydrochemical characteristics in the four rivers were found to be of HCO₃-Ca type, and mainly determined by the carbonate rock dissolution, while only a small proportion of them were of HCO₃ · SO₄-Ca type, reflecting the influence of SO₄²⁻ from anthropogenic activities. Compared to hydrochemical data in 1999, there was an obvious increase in cations and anions concentrations, majorly in NO₃⁻, SO2- ion concentrations, which were significantly affected by human activities. The Na⁺, K⁺ , Cl⁻ in the river mainly came from atmospheric precipitation, and Ca²⁺, HCO₃⁻, Mg²⁺, mainly came from carbonate rocks dissolution, while NO₃⁻ and SO₄²⁻ mainly came from human activities. According to principal component analysis and correlation analysis, hydrochemical composition of Liuchong River was affected by human activity, and that in the upstream of Sancha River was controlled by atmospheric precipitation and the dissolution of carbonate rocks, that to the downstream was enhanced by human activities. The main ion of Maotiao River was controlled by atmospheric precipitation and carbonate rocks dissolution, and also affected by human activity. The Nanming River, the Qingshui river's tributary, was mainly affected by human activity, while the middle and lower reaches of Qingshui

  7. [Major Ionic Features and Their Controlling Factors in the Upper-Middle Reaches of Wujiang River].

    PubMed

    Huang, Qi-bo; Qin, Xiao-qun; Liu, Peng-yu; Lan, Fu-ning; Zhang, Lian-kai; Su, Chun-tian

    2016-05-15

    The Wujing River, the largest river in Guizhou Province, is one of the most important water resources for social and economical development. Recently, with the fast population proliferation and rapid economic growth, the drainage basin is intensively interfered by anthropogenic activities. The hydrochemistry of surface water was analyzed from the upper-middle reaches of Wujiang River for investigating the hydrochemical characteristics and their main influencing factors. The results showed that the major cations of the four rivers were Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺, accounting for more than 70%, and the main anions were HCO₃⁻ and SO₄²⁻, occupying more than 85%. The hydrochemical characteristics in the four rivers were found to be of HCO₃-Ca type, and mainly determined by the carbonate rock dissolution, while only a small proportion of them were of HCO₃ · SO₄-Ca type, reflecting the influence of SO₄²⁻ from anthropogenic activities. Compared to hydrochemical data in 1999, there was an obvious increase in cations and anions concentrations, majorly in NO₃⁻, SO2- ion concentrations, which were significantly affected by human activities. The Na⁺, K⁺ , Cl⁻ in the river mainly came from atmospheric precipitation, and Ca²⁺, HCO₃⁻, Mg²⁺, mainly came from carbonate rocks dissolution, while NO₃⁻ and SO₄²⁻ mainly came from human activities. According to principal component analysis and correlation analysis, hydrochemical composition of Liuchong River was affected by human activity, and that in the upstream of Sancha River was controlled by atmospheric precipitation and the dissolution of carbonate rocks, that to the downstream was enhanced by human activities. The main ion of Maotiao River was controlled by atmospheric precipitation and carbonate rocks dissolution, and also affected by human activity. The Nanming River, the Qingshui river's tributary, was mainly affected by human activity, while the middle and lower reaches of Qingshui

  8. Efficacy and safety of deep transcranial magnetic stimulation for major depression: a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Levkovitz, Yechiel; Isserles, Moshe; Padberg, Frank; Lisanby, Sarah H; Bystritsky, Alexander; Xia, Guohua; Tendler, Aron; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Winston, Jaron L; Dannon, Pinhas; Hafez, Hisham M; Reti, Irving M; Morales, Oscar G; Schlaepfer, Thomas E; Hollander, Eric; Berman, Joshua A; Husain, Mustafa M; Sofer, Uzi; Stein, Ahava; Adler, Shmulik; Deutsch, Lisa; Deutsch, Frederic; Roth, Yiftach; George, Mark S; Zangen, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a prevalent and disabling condition, and many patients do not respond to available treatments. Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) is a new technology allowing non-surgical stimulation of relatively deep brain areas. This is the first double-blind randomized controlled multicenter study evaluating the efficacy and safety of dTMS in MDD. We recruited 212 MDD outpatients, aged 22–68 years, who had either failed one to four antidepressant trials or not tolerated at least two antidepressant treatments during the current episode. They were randomly assigned to monotherapy with active or sham dTMS. Twenty sessions of dTMS (18 Hz over the prefrontal cortex) were applied during 4 weeks acutely, and then biweekly for 12 weeks. Primary and secondary efficacy endpoints were the change in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-21) score and response/remission rates at week 5, respectively. dTMS induced a 6.39 point improvement in HDRS-21 scores, while a 3.28 point improvement was observed in the sham group (p+0.008), resulting in a 0.76 effect size. Response and remission rates were higher in the dTMS than in the sham group (response: 38.4 vs. 21.4%, p+0.013; remission: 32.6 vs. 14.6%, p+0.005). These differences between active and sham treatment were stable during the 12-week maintenance phase. dTMS was associated with few and minor side effects apart from one seizure in a patient where a protocol violation occurred. These results suggest that dTMS constitutes a novel intervention in MDD, which is efficacious and safe in patients not responding to antidepressant medications, and whose effect remains stable over 3 months of maintenance treatment. PMID:25655160

  9. [The different point of view about the sanitary control of importation of psychotropic substances in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Sebastião, Patrícia Cristina Antunes; Lucchese, Geraldo

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to analyze the process of importation, that is a part of the sanitary control of psychotropic substances, made by Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency's ports, airports and borders. For this work, psychotropic substances are defined as active pharmaceutical raw materials present in the list B1 of Portaria nº 344/98; which need Anvisa's permission to be imported. For this purpose we used semistructured interviews with key informers and participant observation. The information were collected and systematized through the content analysis, thematic modality. The results show a very complex control which involves an intense bureaucratic process. The main identified critical points of the process were: the information system precariousness; the absence of human resources; deficiency of laboratorial support and infra-structure at customs. Anvisa's web page and the specific law are strong points of the process, but still needing improvements. We understood that despite of the progress made, there are many things to do for giving the country an efficient health control system to the importation of these substances. PMID:21120327

  10. Synergies in the space of control variables within the equilibrium-point hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Ambike, S; Mattos, D; Zatsiorsky, V M; Latash, M L

    2016-02-19

    We use an approach rooted in the recent theory of synergies to analyze possible co-variation between two hypothetical control variables involved in finger force production based on the equilibrium-point (EP) hypothesis. These control variables are the referent coordinate (R) and apparent stiffness (C) of the finger. We tested a hypothesis that inter-trial co-variation in the {R; C} space during repeated, accurate force production trials stabilizes the fingertip force. This was expected to correspond to a relatively low amount of inter-trial variability affecting force and a high amount of variability keeping the force unchanged. We used the "inverse piano" apparatus to apply small and smooth positional perturbations to fingers during force production tasks. Across trials, R and C showed strong co-variation with the data points lying close to a hyperbolic curve. Hyperbolic regressions accounted for over 99% of the variance in the {R; C} space. Another analysis was conducted by randomizing the original {R; C} data sets and creating surrogate data sets that were then used to compute predicted force values. The surrogate sets always showed much higher force variance compared to the actual data, thus reinforcing the conclusion that finger force control was organized in the {R; C} space, as predicted by the EP hypothesis, and involved co-variation in that space stabilizing total force. PMID:26701299

  11. Synergies in the space of control variables within the equilibrium-point hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Ambike, S; Mattos, D; Zatsiorsky, V M; Latash, M L

    2016-02-19

    We use an approach rooted in the recent theory of synergies to analyze possible co-variation between two hypothetical control variables involved in finger force production based on the equilibrium-point (EP) hypothesis. These control variables are the referent coordinate (R) and apparent stiffness (C) of the finger. We tested a hypothesis that inter-trial co-variation in the {R; C} space during repeated, accurate force production trials stabilizes the fingertip force. This was expected to correspond to a relatively low amount of inter-trial variability affecting force and a high amount of variability keeping the force unchanged. We used the "inverse piano" apparatus to apply small and smooth positional perturbations to fingers during force production tasks. Across trials, R and C showed strong co-variation with the data points lying close to a hyperbolic curve. Hyperbolic regressions accounted for over 99% of the variance in the {R; C} space. Another analysis was conducted by randomizing the original {R; C} data sets and creating surrogate data sets that were then used to compute predicted force values. The surrogate sets always showed much higher force variance compared to the actual data, thus reinforcing the conclusion that finger force control was organized in the {R; C} space, as predicted by the EP hypothesis, and involved co-variation in that space stabilizing total force.

  12. Uncertainty Analysis of non-point source pollution control facilities design techniques in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Okjeong, L.; Gyeong, C. B.; Park, M. W.; Kim, S.

    2015-12-01

    The design of non-point sources control facilities in Korea is divided largely by the stormwater capture ratio, the stormwater load capture ratio, and the pollutant reduction efficiency of the facility. The stormwater capture ratio is given by a design formula as a function of the water quality treatment capacity, the greater the capacity, the more the amount of stormwater intercepted by the facility. The stormwater load capture ratio is defined as the ratio of the load entering the facility of the total pollutant load generated in the target catchment, and is given as a design formula represented by a function of the stormwater capture ratio. In order to estimate the stormwater capture ratio and load capture ratio, a lot of quantitative analysis of hydrologic processes acted in pollutant emission is required, but these formulas have been applied without any verification. Since systematic monitoring programs were insufficient, verification of these formulas was fundamentally impossible. However, recently the Korean ministry of Environment has conducted an long-term systematic monitoring project, and thus the verification of the formulas became possible. In this presentation, the stormwater capture ratio and load capture ratio are re-estimated using actual TP data obtained from long-term monitoring program at Noksan industrial complex located in Busan, Korea. Through the re-estimated process, the uncertainty included in the design process that has been applied until now will be shown in a quantitative extent. In addition, each uncertainty included in the stormwater capture ratio estimation and in the stormwater load capture ratio estimation will be expressed to quantify the relative impact on the overall non-point pollutant control facilities design process. Finally, the SWMM-Matlab interlocking module for model parameters estimation will be introduced. Acknowledgement This subject is supported by Korea Ministry of Environment as "The Eco Innovation Project : Non-point

  13. Datum maintenance of the main Egyptian geodetic control networks by utilizing Precise Point Positioning "PPP" technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabah, Mostafa; Elmewafey, Mahmoud; Farahan, Magda H.

    2016-06-01

    A geodetic control network is the wire-frame or the skeleton on which continuous and consistent mapping, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and surveys are based. Traditionally, geodetic control points are established as permanent physical monuments placed in the ground and precisely marked, located, and documented. With the development of satellite surveying methods and their availability and high degree of accuracy, a geodetic control network could be established by using GNSS and referred to an international terrestrial reference frame used as a three-dimensional geocentric reference system for a country. Based on this concept, in 1992, the Egypt Survey Authority (ESA) established two networks, namely High Accuracy Reference Network (HARN) and the National Agricultural Cadastral Network (NACN). To transfer the International Terrestrial Reference Frame to the HARN, the HARN was connected with four IGS stations. The processing results were 1:10,000,000 (Order A) for HARN and 1:1,000,000 (Order B) for NACN relative network accuracy standard between stations defined in ITRF1994 Epoch1996. Since 1996, ESA did not perform any updating or maintaining works for these networks. To see how non-performing maintenance degrading the values of the HARN and NACN, the available HARN and NACN stations in the Nile Delta were observed. The Processing of the tested part was done by CSRS-PPP Service based on utilizing Precise Point Positioning "PPP" and Trimble Business Center "TBC". The study shows the feasibility of Precise Point Positioning in updating the absolute positioning of the HARN network and its role in updating the reference frame (ITRF). The study also confirmed the necessity of the absent role of datum maintenance of Egypt networks.

  14. Robust Brain-Machine Interface Design Using Optimal Feedback Control Modeling and Adaptive Point Process Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Carmena, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Much progress has been made in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) using decoders such as Kalman filters and finding their parameters with closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA). However, current decoders do not model the spikes directly, and hence may limit the processing time-scale of BMI control and adaptation. Moreover, while specialized CLDA techniques for intention estimation and assisted training exist, a unified and systematic CLDA framework that generalizes across different setups is lacking. Here we develop a novel closed-loop BMI training architecture that allows for processing, control, and adaptation using spike events, enables robust control and extends to various tasks. Moreover, we develop a unified control-theoretic CLDA framework within which intention estimation, assisted training, and adaptation are performed. The architecture incorporates an infinite-horizon optimal feedback-control (OFC) model of the brain’s behavior in closed-loop BMI control, and a point process model of spikes. The OFC model infers the user’s motor intention during CLDA—a process termed intention estimation. OFC is also used to design an autonomous and dynamic assisted training technique. The point process model allows for neural processing, control and decoder adaptation with every spike event and at a faster time-scale than current decoders; it also enables dynamic spike-event-based parameter adaptation unlike current CLDA methods that use batch-based adaptation on much slower adaptation time-scales. We conducted closed-loop experiments in a non-human primate over tens of days to dissociate the effects of these novel CLDA components. The OFC intention estimation improved BMI performance compared with current intention estimation techniques. OFC assisted training allowed the subject to consistently achieve proficient control. Spike-event-based adaptation resulted in faster and more consistent performance convergence compared with batch-based methods, and was robust to

  15. Robust Brain-Machine Interface Design Using Optimal Feedback Control Modeling and Adaptive Point Process Filtering.

    PubMed

    Shanechi, Maryam M; Orsborn, Amy L; Carmena, Jose M

    2016-04-01

    Much progress has been made in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) using decoders such as Kalman filters and finding their parameters with closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA). However, current decoders do not model the spikes directly, and hence may limit the processing time-scale of BMI control and adaptation. Moreover, while specialized CLDA techniques for intention estimation and assisted training exist, a unified and systematic CLDA framework that generalizes across different setups is lacking. Here we develop a novel closed-loop BMI training architecture that allows for processing, control, and adaptation using spike events, enables robust control and extends to various tasks. Moreover, we develop a unified control-theoretic CLDA framework within which intention estimation, assisted training, and adaptation are performed. The architecture incorporates an infinite-horizon optimal feedback-control (OFC) model of the brain's behavior in closed-loop BMI control, and a point process model of spikes. The OFC model infers the user's motor intention during CLDA-a process termed intention estimation. OFC is also used to design an autonomous and dynamic assisted training technique. The point process model allows for neural processing, control and decoder adaptation with every spike event and at a faster time-scale than current decoders; it also enables dynamic spike-event-based parameter adaptation unlike current CLDA methods that use batch-based adaptation on much slower adaptation time-scales. We conducted closed-loop experiments in a non-human primate over tens of days to dissociate the effects of these novel CLDA components. The OFC intention estimation improved BMI performance compared with current intention estimation techniques. OFC assisted training allowed the subject to consistently achieve proficient control. Spike-event-based adaptation resulted in faster and more consistent performance convergence compared with batch-based methods, and was robust to parameter

  16. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C-C; Cole, S W

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1-4 (EGR1-4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators. PMID:27219347

  17. Alterations in leukocyte transcriptional control pathway activity associated with major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, S H; Wolkowitz, O M; Schonemann, M D; Epel, E S; Rosser, R; Burke, H B; Mahan, L; Reus, V I; Stamatiou, D; Liew, C -C; Cole, S W

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with a significantly elevated risk of developing serious medical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, immune impairments, infection, dementia and premature death. Previous work has demonstrated immune dysregulation in subjects with MDD. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling and promoter-based bioinformatic strategies, we assessed leukocyte transcription factor (TF) activity in leukocytes from 20 unmedicated MDD subjects versus 20 age-, sex- and ethnicity-matched healthy controls, before initiation of antidepressant therapy, and in 17 of the MDD subjects after 8 weeks of sertraline treatment. In leukocytes from unmedicated MDD subjects, bioinformatic analysis of transcription control pathway activity indicated an increased transcriptional activity of cAMP response element-binding/activating TF (CREB/ATF) and increased activity of TFs associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2, NFE2l2 or NRF2). Eight weeks of antidepressant therapy was associated with significant reductions in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and reduced activity of NRF2, but not in CREB/ATF activity. Several other transcriptional regulation pathways, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), nuclear factor kappa-B cells (NF-κB), early growth response proteins 1–4 (EGR1–4) and interferon-responsive TFs, showed either no significant differences as a function of disease or treatment, or activities that were opposite to those previously hypothesized to be involved in the etiology of MDD or effective treatment. Our results suggest that CREB/ATF and NRF2 signaling may contribute to MDD by activating immune cell transcriptome dynamics that ultimately influence central nervous system (CNS) motivational and affective processes via circulating mediators. PMID:27187237

  18. The hazard analysis and critical control point system in food safety.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Anavella Gaitan

    2004-01-01

    The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) system is a preventive method of ensuring food safety. Its objectives are the identification of consumer safety hazards that can occur in the production line and the establishment of a control process to guarantee a safer product for the consumer; it is based on the identification of potential hazards to food safety and on measures aimed at preventing these hazards. HACCP is the system of choice in the management of food safety. The principles of HACCP are applicable to all phases of food production, including basic husbandry practices, food preparation and handling, food processing, food service, distribution systems, and consumer handling and use. The HACCP system is involved in every aspect of food safety production (according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization [FAO] and the International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods [ICMSF]). The most basic concept underlying the HACCP system is that of prevention rather than inspection. The control of processes and conditions comprises the critical control point (CCP) element. HACCP is simply a methodical, flexible, and systematic application of the appropriate science and technology for planning, controlling, and documenting the safe production of foods. The successful application of HACCP requires the full commitment and involvement of management and the workforce, using a multidisciplinary approach that should include, as appropriate, expertise in agronomy, veterinary health, microbiology, public health, food technology, environmental health, chemistry, engineering, and so on according to the particular situation. Application of the HACCP system is compatible with the implementation of total quality management (TQM) systems such as the ISO 9000 series. PMID:15156035

  19. The hazard analysis and critical control point system in food safety.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Anavella Gaitan

    2004-01-01

    The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) system is a preventive method of ensuring food safety. Its objectives are the identification of consumer safety hazards that can occur in the production line and the establishment of a control process to guarantee a safer product for the consumer; it is based on the identification of potential hazards to food safety and on measures aimed at preventing these hazards. HACCP is the system of choice in the management of food safety. The principles of HACCP are applicable to all phases of food production, including basic husbandry practices, food preparation and handling, food processing, food service, distribution systems, and consumer handling and use. The HACCP system is involved in every aspect of food safety production (according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization [FAO] and the International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods [ICMSF]). The most basic concept underlying the HACCP system is that of prevention rather than inspection. The control of processes and conditions comprises the critical control point (CCP) element. HACCP is simply a methodical, flexible, and systematic application of the appropriate science and technology for planning, controlling, and documenting the safe production of foods. The successful application of HACCP requires the full commitment and involvement of management and the workforce, using a multidisciplinary approach that should include, as appropriate, expertise in agronomy, veterinary health, microbiology, public health, food technology, environmental health, chemistry, engineering, and so on according to the particular situation. Application of the HACCP system is compatible with the implementation of total quality management (TQM) systems such as the ISO 9000 series.

  20. 41 CFR 101-26.606 - Supply support available from the inventory control points of the military departments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from the inventory control points of the military departments. 101-26.606 Section 101-26.606 Public... § 101-26.606 Supply support available from the inventory control points of the military departments. Federal civil agencies may obtain items of supply which are procured and managed by the inventory...

  1. Knowledge-based monitoring of the pointing control system on the Hubble space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, Larry L.; Laffey, Thomas J.; Kao, Simon M.; Schmidt, James L.; Read, Jackson Y.

    1987-01-01

    A knowledge-based system for the real time monitoring of telemetry data from the Pointing and Control System (PCS) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) that enables the retention of design expertise throughout the three decade project lifespan by means other than personnel and documentation is described. The system will monitor performance, vehicle status, success or failure of various maneuvers, and in some cases diagnose problems and recommend corrective actions using a knowledge base built using mission scenarios and the more than 4,500 telemetry monitors from the HST.

  2. [Incorporation of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point system (HACCP) in food legislation].

    PubMed

    Castellanos Rey, Liliana C; Villamil Jiménez, Luis C; Romero Prada, Jaime R

    2004-01-01

    The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point system (HACCP), recommended by different international organizations as the Codex Alimentarius Commission, the World Trade Organization (WTO), the International Office of Epizootics (OIE) and the International Convention for Vegetables Protection (ICPV) amongst others, contributes to ensuring the innocuity of food along the agro-alimentary chain and requires of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) for its implementation, GMP's which are legislated in most countries. Since 1997, Colombia has set rules and legislation for application of HACCP system in agreement with international standards. This paper discusses the potential and difficulties of the legislation enforcement and suggests some policy implications towards food safety.

  3. Evolution of Motor Control: From Reflexes and Motor Programs to the Equilibrium-Point Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Latash, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    This brief review analyzes the evolution of motor control theories along two lines that emphasize active (motor programs) and reactive (reflexes) features of voluntary movements. It suggests that the only contemporary hypothesis that integrates both approaches in a fruitful way is the equilibrium-point hypothesis. Physical, physiological, and behavioral foundations of the EP-hypothesis are considered as well as relations between the EP-hypothesis and the recent developments of the notion of motor synergies. The paper ends with a brief review of the criticisms of the EP-hypothesis and challenges that the hypothesis faces at this time. PMID:19823595

  4. School food safety program based on hazard analysis and critical control point principles. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2009-12-15

    This final rule implements a legislative provision which requires school food authorities participating in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) or the School Breakfast Program (SBP) to develop a school food safety program for the preparation and service of school meals served to children. The school food safety program must be based on the hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) system established by the Secretary of Agriculture. The food safety program will enable schools to take systematic action to prevent or minimize the risk of foodborne illness among children participating in the NSLP and SBP. PMID:20169679

  5. HACCP models for quality control of entrée production in hospital foodservice systems. I. Development of hazard analysis critical control point models.

    PubMed

    Bobeng, B J; David, B D

    1978-11-01

    HACCP models were developed as part of a research project for quality control of entrée production in three types of hospital foodservice systems: Conventional, cook/chill, and cook/freeze. Critical control points at process stages were identified. Time-temperature was a critical control point throughout entrée production in each model; time-temperature parameters were established for critical control points. Equipment sanitation and personnel sanitation are critical control points for which standards must be established by each foodservice system. Determination of the effectiveness of control measures included continuous monitoring of critical control points for time-temperature. Sanitation of equipment and personnel should be monitored using standards established by the foodservice system.

  6. Formation Flying Satellite Control Around the L2 Sun-Earth Libration Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Nicholas H.

    2001-12-01

    A growing interest in formation flying satellites demands development and analysis of control and estimation algorithms for station-keeping and formation maneuvering. This thesis discusses the development of a discrete linear-quadratic- regulator control algorithm for formations in the vicinity of the L2 sun-earth libration point. The development of an appropriate Kalman filter is included as well. Simulations are created for the analysis of the station-keeping and various formation maneuvers of the Stellar Imager mission. The simulations provide tracking error, estimation error, and control effort results. From the control effort, useful design parameters such as AV and propellant mass are determined. For formation maneuvering, the drone spacecraft track to within 4 meters of their desired position and within 1.3 millimeters per second of their desired zero velocity. The filter, with few exceptions, keeps the estimation errors within their three-sigma values. Without noise, the controller performs extremely well, with the drones tracking to within several micrometers. Bach drone uses around 1 to 2 grams of propellant per maneuver, depending on the circumstances.

  7. Cortisol/DHEA ratio and hippocampal volume: A pilot study in major depression and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rowen O; Mason, Sara; Mellon, Synthia H; Epel, Elissa S; Reus, Victor I; Mahan, Laura; Rosser, Rebecca L; Hough, Christina M; Burke, Heather M; Mueller, Susanne G; Wolkowitz, Owen M

    2016-10-01

    Structural imaging studies investigating the relationship between hippocampal volume (HCV) and peripheral measures of glucocorticoids (GCs) have produced conflicting results in both normal populations and in individuals with MDD, raising the possibility of other modulating factors. In preclinical studies, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate ester (DHEAS; together abbreviated, DHEA(S)) have been shown to antagonize the actions of GCs on the central nervous system. Therefore, considering the relationship of HCV to both of these hormones simultaneously may be important, although it has rarely been done in human populations. Using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the present pilot study examined the relationship between morning serum cortisol, DHEA(S), and HCV in nineteen normal controls and eighteen unmedicated subjects with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Serum cortisol and DHEA(S) were not significantly correlated with HCV across all subjects (cortisol: r=-0.165, p=0.33; DHEA: r=0.164, p=0.35; DHEAS: r=0.211, p=0.22, respectively). However, the ratios of cortisol/DHEA(S) were significantly negatively correlated with HCV in combined group (Cortisol/DHEA: r=-0.461, p=0.005; Cortisol/DHEAS: r=-0.363, p=0.03). Significant or near-significant correlations were found between some hormonal measurements and HCV in the MDDs alone (DHEA: r=0.482, p=0.059; DHEAS: r=0.507, p=0.045; cort/DHEA: r=-0.589, p=0.02; cort/DHEAS: r=-0.424p=0.10), but not in the controls alone (DHEA: r=0.070, p=0.79; DHEAS: r=0.077, p=0.77; cort/DHEA: r=-0.427, p=0.09; cort/DHEAS: r=-0.331, p=0.19). However, Group (MDDs vs controls) did not have a significant effect on the relationship between cortisol, DHEA(S), and their ratios with HCV (p>0.475 in all analyses). Although the exact relationship between serum and central steroid concentrations as well as their effects on the human hippocampus remains not known, these preliminary results suggest that the ratio of cortisol to

  8. A unified point process probabilistic framework to assess heartbeat dynamics and autonomic cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, time-varying inhomogeneous point process models have been introduced for assessment of instantaneous heartbeat dynamics as well as specific cardiovascular control mechanisms and hemodynamics. Assessment of the model's statistics is established through the Wiener-Volterra theory and a multivariate autoregressive (AR) structure. A variety of instantaneous cardiovascular metrics, such as heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), and baroreceptor-cardiac reflex (baroreflex) sensitivity (BRS), are derived within a parametric framework and instantaneously updated with adaptive and local maximum likelihood estimation algorithms. Inclusion of second-order non-linearities, with subsequent bispectral quantification in the frequency domain, further allows for definition of instantaneous metrics of non-linearity. We here present a comprehensive review of the devised methods as applied to experimental recordings from healthy subjects during propofol anesthesia. Collective results reveal interesting dynamic trends across the different pharmacological interventions operated within each anesthesia session, confirming the ability of the algorithm to track important changes in cardiorespiratory elicited interactions, and pointing at our mathematical approach as a promising monitoring tool for an accurate, non-invasive assessment in clinical practice. We also discuss the limitations and other alternative modeling strategies of our point process approach.

  9. Pinhole/coronograph pointing control system integration and noise reduction analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, M.

    1981-01-01

    The Pinhole Occulter Facility (P/OF) is a Space Shuttle based experiment for the production of solar coronographics and hard X-ray images. The system is basically pinhole camera utilizing a deployable 50-m flexible boom for separating the pinholes and coronograph shields from the recording devices located in the Shuttle bay. At the distal end of the boom from the Shuttle is a 25 kg mask containing pinholes and coronograph shields. At the proximal end the detectors are located and mounted, along with the deployable boom, to the ASPS gimbal pointing system (AGS). The mask must be pointed at the Sun with a high degree of pointing stability and accuracy to align the axes of the detectors with the pinholes and shields. Failure to do so will result in a blurring of the images on the detectors and a loss of resolution. Being a Shuttle based experiment, the system will be subjected to the disturbances of the Shuttle. The worst of these is thruster firing for orbit correction; the Shuttle uses a bang-bang thruster control system to maintain orbit to within preset limits. Other disturbances include man motion, motion induced by other systems, and gravity gradient torques.

  10. Interferometric adaptive optics for high-power laser pointing, wavefront control, and phasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, K. L.; Stappaerts, E. A.; Homoelle, D. C.; Henesian, M. A.; Bliss, E. S.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2009-02-01

    Implementing the capability to perform fast ignition experiments, as well as, radiography experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) places stringent requirements on the control of each of the beam's pointing and overall wavefront quality. One quad of the NIF beams, 4 beam pairs, will be utilized for these experiments and hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations indicate that for the fast ignition experiments, these beams will be required to deliver 50%(4.0 kJ) of their total energy(7.96 kJ) within a 40 μm diameter spot at the end of a fast ignition cone target. This requirement implies a stringent pointing and overall phase conjugation error budget on the adaptive optics system used to correct these beam lines. The overall encircled energy requirement is more readily met by phasing of the beams in pairs but still requires high Strehl ratios, Sr, and RMS tip/tilt errors of approximately one μrad. To accomplish this task we have designed an interferometric adaptive optics system capable of beam pointing, high Strehl ratio and beam phasing with a single pixilated MEMS deformable mirror and interferometric wave-front sensor. We present the design of a testbed used to evaluate the performance of this wave-front sensor below along with simulations of its expected performance level.

  11. Interferometric adaptive optics for high power laser pointing, wave-front control and phasing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Homoelle, D C; Henesian, M A; Bliss, E S; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-01-21

    Implementing the capability to perform fast ignition experiments, as well as, radiography experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) places stringent requirements on the control of each of the beam's pointing and overall wavefront quality. One quad of the NIF beams, 4 beam pairs, will be utilized for these experiments and hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations indicate that for the fast ignition experiments, these beams will be required to deliver 50% (4.0 kJ) of their total energy (7.96 kJ) within a 40 {micro}m diameter spot at the end of a fast ignition cone target. This requirement implies a stringent pointing and overall phase conjugation error budget on the adaptive optics system used to correct these beam lines. The overall encircled energy requirement is more readily met by phasing of the beams in pairs but still requires high Strehl ratios, Sr, and rms tip/tilt errors of approximately one {micro}rad. To accomplish this task we have designed an interferometric adaptive optics system capable of beam pointing, high Strehl ratio and beam phasing with a single pixilated MEMS deformable mirror and interferometric wave-front sensor. We present the design of a testbed used to evaluate the performance of this wave-front sensor below along with simulations of its expected performance level.

  12. Critical Point Facility (CPE) Group in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPE) group in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  13. Critical Point Facility (CPF) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Critical Point Facility (CPF) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  14. Adaptive robust maximum power point tracking control for perturbed photovoltaic systems with output voltage estimation.

    PubMed

    Koofigar, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    The problem of maximum power point tracking (MPPT) in photovoltaic (PV) systems, despite the model uncertainties and the variations in environmental circumstances, is addressed. Introducing a mathematical description, an adaptive sliding mode control (ASMC) algorithm is first developed. Unlike many previous investigations, the output voltage is not required to be sensed and the upper bound of system uncertainties and the variations of irradiance and temperature are not required to be known. Estimating the output voltage by an update law, an adaptive-based H∞ tracking algorithm is then developed for the case the perturbations are energy-bounded. The stability analysis is presented for the proposed tracking control schemes, based on the Lyapunov stability theorem. From a comparison viewpoint, some numerical and experimental studies are also presented and discussed. PMID:26606851

  15. Expressed breast milk on a neonatal unit: a hazard analysis and critical control points approach.

    PubMed

    Cossey, Veerle; Jeurissen, Axel; Thelissen, Marie-José; Vanhole, Chris; Schuermans, Annette

    2011-12-01

    With the increasing use of human milk and growing evidence of the benefits of mother's milk for preterm and ill newborns, guidelines to ensure its quality and safety are an important part of daily practice in neonatal intensive care units. Operating procedures based on hazard analysis and critical control points can standardize the handling of mother's expressed milk, thereby improving nutrition and minimizing the risk of breast milk-induced infection in susceptible newborns. Because breast milk is not sterile, microorganisms can multiply when the milk is not handled properly. Additional exogenous contamination should be prevented. Strict hygiene and careful temperature and time control are important during the expression, collection, transport, storage, and feeding of maternal milk. In contrast to formula milk, no legal standards exist for the use of expressed maternal milk. The need for additional measures, such as bacteriological screening or heat treatment, remains unresolved.

  16. Adaptive robust maximum power point tracking control for perturbed photovoltaic systems with output voltage estimation.

    PubMed

    Koofigar, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    The problem of maximum power point tracking (MPPT) in photovoltaic (PV) systems, despite the model uncertainties and the variations in environmental circumstances, is addressed. Introducing a mathematical description, an adaptive sliding mode control (ASMC) algorithm is first developed. Unlike many previous investigations, the output voltage is not required to be sensed and the upper bound of system uncertainties and the variations of irradiance and temperature are not required to be known. Estimating the output voltage by an update law, an adaptive-based H∞ tracking algorithm is then developed for the case the perturbations are energy-bounded. The stability analysis is presented for the proposed tracking control schemes, based on the Lyapunov stability theorem. From a comparison viewpoint, some numerical and experimental studies are also presented and discussed.

  17. Acupuncture point injection treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea: a randomised, double blind, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Wade, C; Wang, L; Zhao, W J; Cardini, F; Kronenberg, F; Gui, S Q; Ying, Z; Zhao, N Q; Chao, M T; Yu, J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if injection of vitamin K3 in an acupuncture point is optimal for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea, when compared with 2 other injection treatments. Setting A Menstrual Disorder Centre at a public hospital in Shanghai, China. Participants Chinese women aged 14–25 years with severe primary dysmenorrhoea for at least 6 months not relieved by any other treatment were recruited. Exclusion criteria were the use of oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices or anticoagulant drugs, pregnancy, history of abdominal surgery, participation in other therapies for pain and diagnosis of secondary dysmenorrhoea. Eighty patients with primary dysmenorrhoea, as defined on a 4-grade scale, completed the study. Two patients withdrew after randomisation. Interventions A double-blind, double-dummy, randomised controlled trial compared vitamin K3 acupuncture point injection to saline acupuncture point injection and vitamin K3 deep muscle injection. Patients in each group received 3 injections at a single treatment visit. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was the difference in subjective perception of pain as measured by an 11 unit Numeric Rating Scale (NRS). Secondary measurements were Cox Pain Intensity and Duration scales and the consumption of analgesic tablets before and after treatment and during 6 following cycles. Results Patients in all 3 groups experienced pain relief from the injection treatments. Differences in NRS measured mean pain scores between the 2 active control groups were less than 1 unit (−0.71, CI −1.37 to −0.05) and not significant, but the differences in average scores between the treatment hypothesised to be optimal and both active control groups (1.11, CI 0.45 to 1.78) and (1.82, CI 1.45 to 2.49) were statistically significant in adjusted mixed-effects models. Menstrual distress and use of analgesics were diminished for 6 months post-treatment. Conclusions Acupuncture point injection of

  18. Method for pan-tilt camera calibration using single control point.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunting; Zhang, Jun; Hu, Wenwen; Tian, Jinwen

    2015-01-01

    The pan-tilt (PT) camera is widely used in video surveillance systems due to its rotatable property and low cost. The rough output of a PT camera may not satisfy the demand of practical applications; hence an accurate calibration method of a PT camera is desired. However, high-precision camera calibration methods usually require sufficient control points not guaranteed in some practical cases of a PT camera. In this paper, we present a novel method to online calibrate the rotation angles of a PT camera by using only one control point. This is achieved by assuming that the intrinsic parameters and position of the camera are known in advance. More specifically, we first build a nonlinear PT camera model with respect to two parameters Pan and Tilt. We then convert the nonlinear model into a linear model according to sine and cosine of Tilt, where each element in the augmented coefficient matrix is a function of the single variable Pan. A closed-form solution of Pan and Tilt can then be derived by solving a quadratic equation of tangent of Pan. Our method is noniterative and does not need features matching; thus its time efficiency is better. We evaluate our calibration method on various synthetic and real data. The quantitative results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms other state-of-the-art methods if the intrinsic parameters and position of the camera are known in advance.

  19. Quality Assurance and Quality Control in Point-of-Care Testing.

    PubMed

    Newman, Ashleigh W; Behling-Kelly, Erica

    2016-03-01

    With advancements in the standard of care in veterinary medicine and instrument technology, performing in-house laboratory work on a variety of point-of-care instruments, ranging from glucometers to benchtop chemistry analyzers, has become increasingly commonplace. However, the ability of an instrument to perform a test does not guarantee that those results are accurate. Ensuring that your in-clinic laboratory is providing reliable data requires a comprehensive plan that encompasses both common sense practices aimed at preventing errors at each stage of the testing process, as well as standard operating procedures to validate and monitor analyzer performance. These 2 arms of the plan are known as quality assurance and quality control. Although these concepts are typically out of the comfort zone for veterinarians, just as the thought of business management may deter some veterinarians from practice ownership, it is not beyond the capabilities of veterinarians to learn, understand, and incorporate them into their practice. The objectives of this article are to convey the importance of quality assurance and quality control, walk you through the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology guidelines on this topic, and provide direction to additional resources for further education on this topic, all with the focus on point-of-care testing in the in-clinic laboratory. PMID:27451043

  20. Research on the modeling of the missile's disturbance motion and the initial control point optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jie; Zhu, Dalin; Tang, Shengjing

    2012-11-01

    The initial trajectory design of the missile is an important part of the overall design, but often a tedious calculation and analysis process due to the large dimension nonlinear differential equations and the traditional statistical analysis methods. To improve the traditional design methods, a robust optimization concept and method are introduced in this paper to deal with the determination of the initial control point. First, the Gaussian Radial Basis Network is adopted to establish the approximate model of the missile's disturbance motion based on the disturbance motion and disturbance factors analysis. Then, a direct analytical relationship between the disturbance input and statistical results is deduced on the basis of Gaussian Radial Basis Network model. Subsequently, a robust optimization model is established aiming at the initial control point design problem and the niche Pareto genetic algorithm for multi-objective optimization is adopted to solve this optimization model. An integral design example is give at last and the simulation results have verified the validity of this method.

  1. Morphological control in polymer solar cells using low-boiling-point solvent additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevapuram, Rakesh C.

    In the global search for clean, renewable energy sources, organic photovoltaics (OPVs) have recently been given much attention. Popular modern-day OPVs are made from solution-processible, carbon-based polymers (e.g. the model poly(3-hexylthiophene) that are intimately blended with fullerene derivatives (e.g. [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester) to form what is known as the dispersed bulk-heterojunction (BHJ). This BHJ architecture has produced some of the most efficient OPVs to date, with reports closing in on 10% power conversion efficiency. To push efficiencies further into double digits, many groups have identified the BHJ nanomorphology---that is, the phase separations and grain sizes within the polymer: fullerene composite---as a key aspect in need of control and improvement. As a result, many methods, including thermal annealing, slow-drying (solvent) annealing, vapor annealing, and solvent additives, have been developed and studied to promote BHJ self-organization. Processing organic photovoltaic (OPV) blend solutions with high-boiling-point solvent additives has recently been used for morphological control in BHJ OPV cells. Here we show that even low-boiling-point solvents can be effective additives. When P3HT:PCBM OPV cells were processed with a low-boiling-point solvent tetrahydrafuran as an additive in parent solvent o-dichlorobenzene, charge extraction increased leading to fill factors as high as 69.5%, without low work-function cathodes, electrode buffer layers or thermal treatment. This was attributed to PCBM demixing from P3HT domains and better vertical phase separation, as indicated by photoluminescence lifetimes, hole mobilities, and shunt leakage currents. Dependence on solvent parameters and applicability beyond P3HT system was also investigated.

  2. Binocular and Monocular Depth Cues in Online Feedback Control of 3-D Pointing Movement

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Knill, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown that humans continuously use visual feedback of the hand to control goal-directed movements online. In most studies, visual error signals were predominantly in the image plane and thus were available in an observer’s retinal image. We investigate how humans use visual feedback about finger depth provided by binocular and monocular depth cues to control pointing movements. When binocularly viewing a scene in which the hand movement was made in free space, subjects were about 60 ms slower in responding to perturbations in depth than in the image plane. When monocularly viewing a scene designed to maximize the available monocular cues to finger depth (motion, changing size and cast shadows), subjects showed no response to perturbations in depth. Thus, binocular cues from the finger are critical to effective online control of hand movements in depth. An optimal feedback controller that takes into account of the low peripheral stereoacuity and inherent ambiguity in cast shadows can explain the difference in response time in the binocular conditions and lack of response in monocular conditions. PMID:21724567

  3. Impact of Albumin on Coagulation Competence and Hemorrhage During Major Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Kirsten C; Højskov, Michael; Johansson, Pär I; Kridina, Irina; Kistorp, Thomas; Salling, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Henning B; Ruhnau, Birgitte; Pedersen, Tom; Secher, Niels H

    2016-03-01

    For patients exposed to a massive blood loss during surgery, maintained coagulation competence is important. It is less obvious whether coagulation competence influences bleeding during elective surgery where patients are exposed to infusion of a crystalloid or a colloid. This randomized controlled trial evaluates whether administration of 5% human albumin (HA) or lactated Ringer solution (LR) affects coagulation competence and in turn blood loss during cystectomy due to bladder cancer. Forty patients undergoing radical cystectomy were included to receive either 5% HA (n = 20) or LR (n = 20). Nineteen patients were analyzed in the HA group and 20 patients in the lactated Ringer group. Blinded determination of the blood loss was similar in the 2 groups of patients: 1658 (800-3300) mL with the use of HA and 1472 (700-4330) mL in the lactated Ringer group (P = 0.45). Yet, by thrombelastography (TEG) evaluated coagulation competence, albumin affected clot growth (TEG-angle 69 ± 5 vs 74° ± 3°, P < 0.01) and strength (TEG-MA: 59 ± 6 vs 67 ± 6 mm, P < 0.001) more than LR. Furthermore, by multivariate linear regression analyses reduced TEG-MA was independently associated with the blood loss (P = 0.042) while administration of albumin was related to the changes in TEG-MA (P = 0.029), aPPT (P < 0.022), and INR (P < 0.033). This randomized controlled trial demonstrates that administration of HA does not affect the blood loss as compared to infusion of LR. Also the use of HA did not affect the need for blood transfusion, the incidence of postoperative complications, or the hospital in-stay. Yet, albumin decreases coagulation competence during major surgery and the blood loss is related to TEG-MA rather than to plasma coagulation variables.

  4. [Patient-controlled intravenous versus epidural analgesia after major joint replacement].

    PubMed

    Peng, W L; Wu, G J; Sun, W Z; Fan, S Z; Chen, T L; Huang, F Y

    1992-06-01

    The analgesic efficacy, side effects, and satisfaction of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with intravenous and epidural morphine for postoperative pain were evaluated in this study. Twenty patients undergoing major joint replacement surgery were randomly allocated to intravenous PCA (IPCA) group or epidural PCA (EPCA) group. All patients had a standardized balanced anesthesia, and an epidural catheter was introduced after the operation in EPCA group. Postoperative pain relief was evaluated with verbal pain scale. The result showed that pain intensity and pain relief were similar in either group without significant difference (p greater than 0.05). Morphine consumption in IPCA group was 1.72 +/- 0.30 mg/h in the postoperative 0 - 12 h and 1.14 +/- 0.44 mg/h in 12 - 24 h. In EPCA group, relatively low doses of morphine were used, i.e., 0.20 +/- 0.07 mg/h in the postoperative 0 - 12 h and 0.17 +/- 0.07 mg/h in 12 - 24 h. Both groups showed an "incomplete" but satisfactory analgesia with relatively low doses of morphine. The "equianalgesic dose ratio" of IPCA to EPCA with morphine was approximately 8.5:1. Sedation was minimal in both groups. No respiratory depression developed in all patients. Nausea and vomiting were the most prominent side effects which might limit the usefulness of PCA. The incidence was 5 out of 10 patients in IPCA group and 4 out of 10 patients in EPCA group, despite under the treatment of droperidol (15 micrograms/kg, iv, prn) for most of the patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Rhodiola rosea versus sertraline for major depressive disorder: A randomized placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jun J.; Xie, Sharon X.; Zee, Jarcy; Soeller, Irene; Li, Qing S.; Rockwell, Kenneth; Amsterdam, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    Background We performed a proof of concept trial to evaluate relative safety and efficacy of Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) versus sertraline for mild to moderate major depressive disorder. Hypothesis We hypothesize that R. rosea would have similar therapeutic effects as sertraline but with less adverse events. Study Design Phase II randomized placebo controlled clinical trial Methods 57 subjects were randomized to 12 weeks of standardized R. rosea extract, sertraline, or placebo. Changes over time in Hamilton Depression Rating (HAM-D), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Clinical Global Impression Change (CGI/C) scores among groups were examined using mixed-effects models. Results Modest, albeit statistically non-significant, reductions were observed for HAM-D, BDI, and CGI/C scores for all treatment conditions with no significant difference between groups (p=0.79, p=0.28, and p=0.17, respectively). The decline in HAM-D scores was greater for sertraline (−8.2, 95% confidence interval [CI], −12.7 to −3.6) versus R. rosea (−5.1, 95% CI: −8.8 to −1.3) and placebo (−4.6, 95% CI: −8.6 to −0.6). While the odds of improving (versus placebo) were greater for sertraline (1.90 [0.44–8.20]; odds ratio [95% CI]) than R. rosea (1.39 [0.38–5.04]), more subjects on sertraline reported adverse events (63.2%) than R. rosea (30.0%) or placebo (16.7%) (p=0.012). Conclusions Although R. rosea produced less antidepressant effect versus sertraline, it also resulted in significantly fewer adverse events and was better tolerated. These findings suggest that R. rosea, although less effective than sertraline, may possess a more favorable risk to benefit ratio for individuals with mild to moderate depression. PMID:25837277

  6. The value of intermittent point-prevalence surveys of healthcare-associated infections for evaluating infection control interventions at Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Stoesser, N; Emary, K; Soklin, S; Peng An, K; Sophal, S; Chhomrath, S; Day, NPJ; Limmathurotsakul, D; Nget, P; Pangnarith, Y; Sona, S; Kumar, V; Moore, CE; Chanpheaktra, N; Parry, CM

    2013-01-01

    Background There are limited data on the epidemiology of paediatric healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) and infection control in low-income countries. We describe the value of intermittent point-prevalence surveys for monitoring HCAI and evaluating infection control interventions in a Cambodian paediatric hospital. Methods Hospital-wide, point-prevalence surveys were performed monthly in 2011. Infection control interventions introduced during this period included a hand hygiene programme and a ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) care bundle. Results Overall HCAI prevalence was 13.8/100 patients at-risk, with a significant decline over time. The highest HCAI rates (50%) were observed in critical care; the majority of HCAIs were respiratory (61%). Klebsiella pneumoniae was most commonly isolated and antimicrobial resistance was widespread. Hand hygiene compliance doubled to 51.6%, and total VAP cases/1000 patient-ventilator days fell from 30 to 10. Conclusion Rates of HCAI were substantial in our institution, and antimicrobial resistance a major concern. Point-prevalence surveys are effective for HCAI surveillance, and in monitoring trends in response to infection control interventions. PMID:23418156

  7. Control Point Analysis comparison for 3 different treatment planning and delivery complexity levels using a commercial 3-dimensional diode array

    SciTech Connect

    Abdellatif, Ady; Gaede, Stewart

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the use of “Control Point Analysis” (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) to analyze and compare delivered volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for 3 different treatment planning complexity levels. A total of 30 patients were chosen and fully anonymized for the purpose of this study. Overall, 10 lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), 10 head-and-neck (H and N), and 10 prostate VMAT plans were generated on Pinnacle{sup 3} and delivered on a Varian linear accelerator (LINAC). The delivered dose was measured using ArcCHECK (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL). Each plan was analyzed using “Sun Nuclear Corporation (SNC) Patient 6” and “Control Point Analysis.” Gamma passing percentage was used to assess the differences between the measured and planned dose distributions and to assess the role of various control point binning combinations. Of the different sites considered, the prostate cases reported the highest gamma passing percentages calculated with “SNC Patient 6” (97.5% to 99.2% for the 3%, 3 mm) and “Control Point Analysis” (95.4% to 98.3% for the 3%, 3 mm). The mean percentage of passing control point sectors for the prostate cases increased from 51.8 ± 7.8% for individual control points to 70.6 ± 10.5% for 5 control points binned together to 87.8 ± 11.0% for 10 control points binned together (2%, 2-mm passing criteria). Overall, there was an increasing trend in the percentage of sectors passing gamma analysis with an increase in the number of control points binned together in a sector for both the gamma passing criteria (2%, 2 mm and 3%, 3 mm). Although many plans passed the clinical quality assurance criteria, plans involving the delivery of high Monitor Unit (MU)/control point (SBRT) and plans involving high degree of modulation (H and N) showed less delivery accuracy per control point compared with plans with low MU/control point and low degree of modulation (prostate)

  8. Prevalence, quantification and antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter spp. on chicken neck-skins at points of slaughter in 5 major cities located on 4 continents.

    PubMed

    Garin, Benoit; Gouali, Malika; Wouafo, Marguerite; Perchec, Anne-Marie; Pham, Minh Thu; Ravaonindrina, Noro; Urbès, Florence; Gay, Manu; Diawara, Abdoulaye; Leclercq, Alexandre; Rocourt, Jocelyne; Pouillot, Régis

    2012-06-15

    Quantitative data on Campylobacter contamination of food are lacking, notably in developing countries. We assessed Campylobacter contamination of chicken neck-skins at points of slaughter in 5 major cities in Africa (Dakar in Senegal, Yaounde in Cameroon), Oceania (Noumea in New Caledonia), the Indian Ocean (Antananarivo in Madagascar) and Asia (Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) in Vietnam. One hundred and fifty slaughtered chickens were collected in each of the 5 major cities from semi-industrial abattoirs or markets (direct slaughter by the seller), and 65.5% (491/750) were found to be Campylobacter-positive. Two cities, Yaounde and Noumea, demonstrated high prevalence Campylobacter detection rates (92.7% and 96.7% respectively) in contrast with HCMC (15.3%). Four species were identified among 633 isolates, namely C. jejuni (48.3%), C. coli (37.3%), C. lari (11.7%) and C. upsaliensis (1%). HCMC was the only city with C. lari isolation as was Antananarivo for C. upsaliensis. C. coli was highly prevalent only in Yaounde (69.5%). Among the 491 samples positive in Campylobacter detection, 329 were also positive with the enumeration method. The number of Campylobacter colony-forming units (CFU) per gram of neck-skin in samples positive in enumeration was high (mean of the log(10): 3.2 log(10) CFU/g, arithmetic mean: 7900CFU/g). All the cities showed close enumeration means except HCMC with a 1.81 log(10) CFU/g mean for positive samples. Semi-industrial abattoir was linked to a significant lower count of Campylobacter contamination than direct slaughter by the seller (p=0.006). On 546 isolates (546/633, 86.3%) tested for antibiotic susceptibility, resistance to erythromycin, ampicillin and ciprofloxacin was observed for respectively 11%, 19% and 50%. HCMC was the city where antibiotic resistant rates were the highest (95%, p=0.014). Considering the 329 positive chickens in Campylobacter enumeration, the mean number of resistant isolates to at least 2 different antibiotic

  9. Prevalence, quantification and antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter spp. on chicken neck-skins at points of slaughter in 5 major cities located on 4 continents.

    PubMed

    Garin, Benoit; Gouali, Malika; Wouafo, Marguerite; Perchec, Anne-Marie; Pham, Minh Thu; Ravaonindrina, Noro; Urbès, Florence; Gay, Manu; Diawara, Abdoulaye; Leclercq, Alexandre; Rocourt, Jocelyne; Pouillot, Régis

    2012-06-15

    Quantitative data on Campylobacter contamination of food are lacking, notably in developing countries. We assessed Campylobacter contamination of chicken neck-skins at points of slaughter in 5 major cities in Africa (Dakar in Senegal, Yaounde in Cameroon), Oceania (Noumea in New Caledonia), the Indian Ocean (Antananarivo in Madagascar) and Asia (Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) in Vietnam. One hundred and fifty slaughtered chickens were collected in each of the 5 major cities from semi-industrial abattoirs or markets (direct slaughter by the seller), and 65.5% (491/750) were found to be Campylobacter-positive. Two cities, Yaounde and Noumea, demonstrated high prevalence Campylobacter detection rates (92.7% and 96.7% respectively) in contrast with HCMC (15.3%). Four species were identified among 633 isolates, namely C. jejuni (48.3%), C. coli (37.3%), C. lari (11.7%) and C. upsaliensis (1%). HCMC was the only city with C. lari isolation as was Antananarivo for C. upsaliensis. C. coli was highly prevalent only in Yaounde (69.5%). Among the 491 samples positive in Campylobacter detection, 329 were also positive with the enumeration method. The number of Campylobacter colony-forming units (CFU) per gram of neck-skin in samples positive in enumeration was high (mean of the log(10): 3.2 log(10) CFU/g, arithmetic mean: 7900CFU/g). All the cities showed close enumeration means except HCMC with a 1.81 log(10) CFU/g mean for positive samples. Semi-industrial abattoir was linked to a significant lower count of Campylobacter contamination than direct slaughter by the seller (p=0.006). On 546 isolates (546/633, 86.3%) tested for antibiotic susceptibility, resistance to erythromycin, ampicillin and ciprofloxacin was observed for respectively 11%, 19% and 50%. HCMC was the city where antibiotic resistant rates were the highest (95%, p=0.014). Considering the 329 positive chickens in Campylobacter enumeration, the mean number of resistant isolates to at least 2 different antibiotic

  10. Thermoplastic fusion bonding using a pressure-assisted boiling point control system.

    PubMed

    Park, Taehyun; Song, In-Hyouk; Park, Daniel S; You, Byoung Hee; Murphy, Michael C

    2012-08-21

    A novel thermoplastic fusion bonding method using a pressure-assisted boiling point (PABP) control system was developed to apply precise temperatures and pressures during bonding. Hot embossed polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) components containing microchannels were sealed using the PABP system. Very low aspect ratio structures (AR = 1/100, 10 μm in depth and 1000 μm in width) were successfully sealed without collapse or deformation. The integrity and strength of the bonds on the sealed PMMA devices were evaluated using leakage and rupture tests; no leaks were detected and failure during the rupture tests occurred at pressures greater than 496 kPa. The PABP system was used to seal 3D shaped flexible PMMA devices successfully.

  11. Controlled excitation of electromagnetic band-gap line and point defect modes at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, M.; Klein, N.

    2003-03-01

    We report on the controlled excitation of line and point defect modes in a two-dimensional hexagonal electromagnetic band-gap structure made of rods of dielectric material (aluminium oxide). We compared simulation performed with a numerical field simulation software and experimental measurements at microwave frequencies with regard to coupling from external waveguides to line defects and subsequent coupling to resonant modes. We observed that for a line defect in the photonic crystal the impedance matching to a waveguide is strongly dependent on the defect width. We furthermore demonstrated that the coupling to a localized defect resonance can be strongly influenced by the variation of certain single lattice elements, affecting transmission behavior and quality factor of the resonant modes.

  12. Mesoscopic capacitor and zero-point energy: Poisson's distribution for virtual charges, pressure, and decoherence control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, J. C.

    2014-08-01

    Mesoscopic capacitor theory, which includes intrinsic inductive effects from quantum tunneling, is applied to conducting spherical shells. The zero-point pressure and the number of virtual charged pairs are determined assuming a Poisson distribution. They are completely defined by a dimensionless mesoscopic parameter (χc) measuring the average number of virtual pairs per solid angle and carrying mesoscopic information. Fluctuations remain finite and well defined. Connections with usual quantum-field-theory limit enables us to evaluate χc 1.007110. Equivalently, for a mesoscopic parallel-plate capacitor, the shot noise distribution becomes operative with χc 0.94705 as well being related to the density of virtual pairs. Temperature decoherence and capacitor control are discussed by considering typical values of quantum dot devices and Coulomb blockade theory.

  13. [A turning point in the therapeutic history of open leg fractures: osteosynthesis coupled to the immediate dressing in the presence of major damage to the soft tissues].

    PubMed

    Vichard, P; Tropet, Y; Garbuio, P

    1999-01-01

    A brief history of the treatment of open leg fractures (OLF) points out the problems posed by the present therapy with regard to the soft tissues in the most serious cases (type III from cauchoix, Duparc, type III A and B from Gustilo). Which strategy should be foremost, knowing that the debridement, stabilization and cover are the three essential procedures? Rigorous debridement certainly carries unanimous approval but some are opposed to this procedure during the first few days. Also widely recognized is the beneficial aspect of early cover when regarding aseptic evolution, consolidation, low rate of complications, rehabilitation and the patient's helplessness. However, despite the well demonstrated results of BYRD [14] and GODINA [15] and because of the debridement concept and logistical insufficiencies, thorough treatment in a true emergency has not achieved full acceptance. In general, the majority of surgeons first clear, stabilize with the use of an external fixator in true emergency situations and cover several days later. For the past ten years, in real emergencies, in the Department of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Plastic Surgery at the Besançon University Hospital Center we have subscribed to a radical treatment which simultaneously combines debridement, osteosynthesis (locked centro-medullary nailing) and cover with the use of free flaps in the same operating period. A study based on 27 wounded patients seeks to validate the advantages of looked centro-medullary nailing over the use of an external fixator and the use of free flaps rather than local flaps in the most serious cases. PMID:10437287

  14. Assessment of potential jaw-tracking advantage using control point sequences of VMAT planning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-in; Park, Jong Min; Park, So-Yeon; Choi, Chang Heon; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2014-03-06

    This study aims to evaluate the potential jaw-tracking advantage using control point sequences of volume volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning. VMAT plans for patients with prostate and head and neck (H&N) cancers were converted into new static arc (SA) plans. The SA plan consisted of a series of static fields at each control point of the VMAT plan. All other machine parameters of the SA plan were perfectly identical to those of the original VMAT plan. The jaw-tracking static arc (JTSA) plans were generated with fields that closed the jaws of each SA field into the multileaf collimators (MLCs) aperture. The dosimetric advantages of JTSA over SA were evaluated in terms of a dose-volume histogram (DVH) of organ at risk (OAR) after renormalizing both plans to make the same target coverage. Both plans were delivered to the MatriXX-based COMPASS system for 3D volume dose verification. The average jaw size reduction of the JTSA along the X direction was 3.1 ± 0.9 cm for prostate patients and 6.9 ± 1.9 cm for H&N patients. For prostate patients, the organs far from the target showed larger sparing (3.7%-8.1% on average) in JTSA than the organs adjacent to the target (1.1%-1.5%). For the H&N plans, the mean dose reductions for all organs ranged from 4.3% to 11.9%. The dose reductions were more significant in the dose regions of D80, D90, and D95 than the dose regions of D5, D10, and D20 for all patients. Likewise, the deliverability and reproducibility of jaw-tracking plan were validated. The measured dosimetric advantage of JTSA over SA coincided with the calculated one above.

  15. Statistical process control in the hybrid microelectronics manufacturing industry: A Navy view point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azu, Charles C., Jr.

    1993-04-01

    The U.S. Navy is concerned with receiving high quality hybrid microelectronic circuits. The Navy recognizes that in order to obtain high quality circuits a manufacturer must have an effective statistical process control (SPC) program implemented. The implementation of effective SPC programs is an objective of the military hybrid microelectronics industry. Often the smaller sized manufacturers in the industry have little SPC implementation, while the larger manufacturers have practices originally developed for the control of other product lines outside the hybrid technology area. The industry recognizes that SPC programs will result in high quality hybrid microcircuits which the U.S. Navy requires. In the past, the goal of the industry had not been to put in effective process control methods, but to merely meet the government military standards on the quality of the hybrids they produce. This practice, at best, resulted in a 'hit or miss' situation when it comes to hybrid microcircuit assemblies meeting military standards. The U.S. Navy through its MicroCIM program has been challenging and working with the industry in the area of SPC practice methods. The major limitations so far have been a lack of available sensors for the real-time collection of effective SPC data on the factory floor. This paper will discuss the Navy's efforts in bringing about effective SPC programs in the military hybrid manufacturing industry.

  16. Sfm_georef: Automating image measurement of ground control points for SfM-based projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mike R.

    2016-04-01

    Deriving accurate DEM and orthomosaic image products from UAV surveys generally involves the use of multiple ground control points (GCPs). Here, we demonstrate the automated collection of GCP image measurements for SfM-MVS processed projects, using sfm_georef software (James & Robson, 2012; http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/staff/jamesm/software/sfm_georef.htm). Sfm_georef was originally written to provide geo-referencing procedures for SfM-MVS projects. It has now been upgraded with a 3-D patch-based matching routine suitable for automating GCP image measurement in both aerial and ground-based (oblique) projects, with the aim of reducing the time required for accurate geo-referencing. Sfm_georef is compatible with a range of SfM-MVS software and imports the relevant files that describe the image network, including camera models and tie points. 3-D survey measurements of ground control are then provided, either for natural features or artificial targets distributed over the project area. Automated GCP image measurement is manually initiated through identifying a GCP position in an image by mouse click; the GCP is then represented by a square planar patch in 3-D, textured from the image and oriented parallel to the local topographic surface (as defined by the 3-D positions of nearby tie points). Other images are then automatically examined by projecting the patch into the images (to account for differences in viewing geometry) and carrying out a sub-pixel normalised cross-correlation search in the local area. With two or more observations of a GCP, its 3-D co-ordinates are then derived by ray intersection. With the 3-D positions of three or more GCPs identified, an initial geo-referencing transform can be derived to relate the SfM-MVS co-ordinate system to that of the GCPs. Then, if GCPs are symmetric and identical, image texture from one representative GCP can be used to search automatically for all others throughout the image set. Finally, the GCP observations can be

  17. Work-related treatment for major depressive disorder and incapacity to work: preliminary findings of a controlled, matched study.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Christoph; Bode, Katharina; Wunsch, Eva-Maria; Kliem, Sören; Grocholewski, Anja; Finger, Friederike

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of work-related cognitive-behavioral treatment (W-CBT) with that of cognitive-behavioral treatment as usual (CBT-AU) for employees on sick leave as a result of a major depressive disorder (MDD). We collected data for 26 matched outpatients at pre- and posttreatment, as well as at 1-year follow-up. Outcome measures were the days of incapacity to work (DIW) as well as self-report measures (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI], Symptom Checklist 90-R [GSI], Life Satisfaction Questionnaire [FLZ]). We analyzed data with hierarchical linear modeling in a 2-level model. Therapy effects were defined in 3 ways: effect size (ES), response (based on the reliable change index), and remission compared with the general population's symptom level. The DIW were reduced significantly after both types of treatment, but employees showed even fewer DIW after W-CBT. At follow-up, significantly more employees were working as a result of W-CBT than with CBT-AU. Significant improvements on scores of self-rating measures corresponded with moderate-to-large effect sizes for both treatment types. Approximately 2 thirds of the treated employees were categorized as unimpaired on BDI scores at posttreatment and at follow-up. At least 1 half of the employees were classified as unimpaired on GSI scores at both assessment points. In future research, a randomized controlled trial should be conducted using a larger sample size to investigate the impact of moderators (e.g., employees at different branches of the company). Findings provided support for using common CBT techniques to enhance return to work without losing expected improvements at the symptom level.

  18. Optical tools and techniques for aligning solar payloads with the SPARCS control system. [Solar Pointing Aerobee Rocket Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, N. L.; Chisel, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The success of a rocket-borne experiment depends not only on the pointing of the attitude control system, but on the alignment of the attitude control system to the payload. To ensure proper alignment, special optical tools and alignment techniques are required. Those that were used in the SPARCS program are described and discussed herein. These tools include theodolites, autocollimators, a 38-cm diameter solar simulator, a high-performance 1-m heliostat to provide a stable solar source during the integration of the rocket payload, a portable 75-cm sun tracker for use at the launch site, and an innovation called the Solar Alignment Prism. Using the real sun as the primary reference under field conditions, the Solar Alignment Prism facilitates the coalignment of the attitude sun sensor with the payload. The alignment techniques were developed to ensure the precise alignment of the solar payloads to the SPARCS attitude sensors during payload integration and to verify the required alignment under field conditions just prior to launch.

  19. Impact of phosphorus control measures on in-river phosphorus retention associated with point source pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demars, B. O. L.; Harper, D. M.; Pitt, J.-A.; Slaughter, R.

    2005-01-01

    In-river phosphorus retention alters the quantity and timings of phosphorus delivery to downstream aquatic systems. Many intensive studies of in-river phosphorus retention have been carried out but generally on a short time scale (2-4 years). In this paper, monthly water quality data, collected by the Environment Agency of England and Wales over 12 years (1990-2001), were used to model daily phosphorus fluxes and monthly in-river phosphorus retention in the lowland calcareous River Wensum, Norfolk, UK. The effectiveness of phosphorus stripping at two major sewage treatment works was quantified over different hydrological conditions. The model explained 78% and 88% of the observed variance before and after phosphorus control, respectively. During relatively dry years, there was no net export of phosphorus from the catchment. High retention of phosphorus occurred, particularly during the summer months, which was not compensated for, by subsequent higher flow events. The critical discharge (Q) above which net remobilisation would occur, was only reached during few, high flow events Q25-Q13. Phosphorus removal from the effluent at two major STWs (Sewage Treatment Works) reduced the phosphorus catchment mass balance variability by 20-24% under the Q99-Q1. range of flow conditions. Although the absorbing capacity of the catchment against human impact was remarkable, further phosphorus remedial strategies will be necessary to prevent downstream risks of eutrophication occuring independently of the unpredictable variability in weather conditions.

  20. A study of attitude control concepts for precision-pointing non-rigid spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likins, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Attitude control concepts for use onboard structurally nonrigid spacecraft that must be pointed with great precision are examined. The task of determining the eigenproperties of a system of linear time-invariant equations (in terms of hybrid coordinates) representing the attitude motion of a flexible spacecraft is discussed. Literal characteristics are developed for the associated eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system. A method is presented for determining the poles and zeros of the transfer function describing the attitude dynamics of a flexible spacecraft characterized by hybrid coordinate equations. Alterations are made to linear regulator and observer theory to accommodate modeling errors. The results show that a model error vector, which evolves from an error system, can be added to a reduced system model, estimated by an observer, and used by the control law to render the system less sensitive to uncertain magnitudes and phase relations of truncated modes and external disturbance effects. A hybrid coordinate formulation using the provided assumed mode shapes, rather than incorporating the usual finite element approach is provided.

  1. A new method to obtain uniform distribution of ground control points based on regional statistical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chao; An, Wei; Deng, Xinpu

    2015-10-01

    The Ground Control Points (GCPs) is an important source of fundamental data in geometric correction for remote sensing imagery. The quantity, accuracy and distribution of GCPs are three factors which may affect the accuracy of geometric correction. It is generally required that the distribution of GCP should be uniform, so they can fully control the accuracy of mapping regions. In this paper, we establish an objective standard of evaluating the uniformity of the GCPs' distribution based on regional statistical information (RSI), and get an optimal distribution of GCPs. This sampling method is called RSIS for short in this work. The Amounts of GCPs in different regions by equally partitioning the image in regions in different manners are counted which forms a vector called RSI vector in this work. The uniformity of GCPs' distribution can be evaluated by a mathematical quantity of the RSI vector. An optimal distribution of GCPs is obtained by searching the RSI vector with the minimum mathematical quantity. In this paper, the simulation annealing is employed to search the optimal distribution of GCPs that have the minimum mathematical quantity of the RSI vector. Experiments are carried out to test the method proposed in this paper, and sampling designs compared are simple random sampling and universal kriging model-based sampling. The experiments indicate that this method is highly recommended as new GCPs sampling design method for geometric correction of remotely sensed imagery.

  2. [Powdered infant formulae preparation guide for hospitals based on Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) principles].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Leguás, H; Rodríguez Garrido, V; Lorite Cuenca, R; Pérez-Portabella, C; Redecillas Ferreiro, S; Campins Martí, M

    2009-06-01

    This guide for the preparation of powdered infant formulae in hospital environments is a collaborative work between several hospital services and is based on national and European regulations, international experts meetings and the recommendations of scientific societies. This guide also uses the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point principles proposed by Codex Alimentarius and emphasises effective verifying measures, microbiological controls of the process and the corrective actions when monitoring indicates that a critical control point is not under control. It is a dynamic guide and specifies the evaluation procedures that allow it to be constantly adapted.

  3. Effects of changing gravity on anticipatory grip force control during point-to-point movements of a hand-held object.

    PubMed

    Nowak, D A; Hermsdörfer, J; Philipp, J; Marquardt, C; Glasauer, S; Mai, N

    2001-07-01

    We investigated the quality of predictive grip force control during gravity changes induced by parabolic flight maneuvers. During these maneuvers gravity varied: There were 2 periods of hypergravity, in which terrestrial gravity nearly doubled, and a 20-s period of microgravity, during which a manipulated object was virtually weightless. We determined grip and load forces during vertical point-to-point movements of an instrumented object. Point-to-point movements were a combination of static (stationary holding) and dynamic (continuous movements) task conditions, which were separately analyzed in our previous studies. Analysis of the produced grip forces revealed that grip adjustments were closely linked to load force fluctuations under each gravity condition. In particular, grip force maxima coincided closely in time with load force peaks, although these occurred at different phases of the movement depending on the gravity level. However, quantitative analysis of the ratio of maximum grip force to the corresponding load force peak revealed an increased force ratio during microgravity when compared to that during normal and hypergravity. We hypothesize that the impaired precision of force coupling with respect to force magnitude during microgravity results from reduced feedback information about the object's mass during the stationary holding of the object in between each movement. The results indicate that the temporal grip force regulation is highly automatized and stable, whereas economical planning of force magnitude is more flexible and might reflect changes of the external loading condition.

  4. Ground Control Point - Wireless System Network for UAV-based environmental monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Aguilar, Abraham

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have seen widespread civil applications including usage for survey and monitoring services in areas such as agriculture, construction and civil engineering, private surveillance and reconnaissance services and cultural heritage management. Most aerial monitoring services require the integration of information acquired during the flight (such as imagery) with ground-based information (such as GPS information or others) for improved ground truth validation. For example, to obtain an accurate 3D and Digital Elevation Model based on aerial imagery, it is necessary to include ground-based information of coordinate points, which are normally acquired with surveying methods based on Global Position Systems (GPS). However, GPS surveys are very time consuming and especially for longer time series of monitoring data repeated GPS surveys are necessary. In order to improve speed of data collection and integration, this work presents an autonomous system based on Waspmote technologies build on single nodes interlinked in a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) star-topology for ground based information collection and later integration with surveying data obtained by UAV. Nodes are designed to be visible from the air, to resist extreme weather conditions with low-power consumption. Besides, nodes are equipped with GPS as well as Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), accelerometer, temperature and soil moisture sensors and thus provide significant advantages in a broad range of applications for environmental monitoring. For our purpose, the WSN transmits the environmental data with 3G/GPRS to a database on a regular time basis. This project provides a detailed case study and implementation of a Ground Control Point System Network for UAV-based vegetation monitoring of dry mountain grassland in the Matsch valley, Italy.

  5. Topical treatment of major omphalocoele: Acacia nilotica versus povidone-iodine: A randomised controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Eltayeb, Almoutaz A.; Mostafa, Mahmoud M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Conservative management for major omphalocoele with topical agents as escharotics therapy is well established in practice. Different agents have been used in the past, including mercurochrome and alcohol, proved later to be unsafe. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the application of Acacia nilotica paste compared to povidone-iodine solution as a primary non-surgical treatment of major omphalocoele. Patients and Methods: A double-blind, randomised study was conducted on 24 cases of major omphalocoele where they were randomly divided into two equal groups; Group A treated with topical application of A. nilotica paste and Group B treated with topical application of povidone-iodine solution. Cases with gastroschisis, ruptured major omphalocoele or minor omphalocoele were excluded from the study. The evaluating parameters were size of the fascial defect in cm, period of mechanical ventilation if needed, time required for full oral feeding tolerance, duration of hospital stay and any short- or long-term complications. Results: There was no statistical significant difference between both groups regarding their gestational or post-natal age, weight and the mean umbilical port defect. Patients from Group A tolerated full oral feeding earlier and had shorter total hospital stay duration than those from Group B, but without a statistical significant difference (P = 0.347 and 0.242, respectively). The overall mortality rate was 33.3% without a statistical significant difference between both groups (P = 0.667). Conclusions: Application of A. nilotica is a safe and effective treatment of major omphalocoele as it was associated with rapid full enteral feeding tolerance, short duration of hospital stay and low mortality rate. PMID:26712288

  6. Optimization strategy integrity for watershed agricultural non-point source pollution control based on Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Y.; Yu, Y. J.; Zhang, W. Y.

    2016-08-01

    This study has established a set of methodological systems by simulating loads and analyzing optimization strategy integrity for the optimization of watershed non-point source pollution control. First, the source of watershed agricultural non-point source pollution is divided into four aspects, including agricultural land, natural land, livestock breeding, and rural residential land. Secondly, different pollution control measures at the source, midway and ending stages are chosen. Thirdly, the optimization effect of pollution load control in three stages are simulated, based on the Monte Carlo simulation. The method described above is applied to the Ashi River watershed in Heilongjiang Province of China. Case study results indicate that the combined three types of control measures can be implemented only if the government promotes the optimized plan and gradually improves implementation efficiency. This method for the optimization strategy integrity for watershed non-point source pollution control has significant reference value.

  7. [Major ion chemistry of surface water in the Xilin River Basin and the possible controls].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xi-Wen; Wu, Jin-Kui

    2014-01-01

    Under the increasing pressure of water shortage and steppe degradation, information on the hydrological cycle in the steppe region in Inner Mongolia is urgently needed. Major ions are widely used to identify the hydrological processes in a river basin. Based on the analysis results of 239 river water samples collected in 13 sections along the Xilin River system during 2006 to 2008, combined with data from groundwater and precipitation samples collected in the same period and the meteorological and hydrological data in the Xilin River Basin, hydrochemical characteristics and the chemistry of major ions of the Xilin River water have been studied by means of Piper triangle plots and Gibbs diagrams. The results showed that: (1) the total dissolved solid (TDS) in river water mainly ranged between 136.7 mg x L(-1) and 376.5 mg x L(-1), and (2) it had an increasing trend along the river flow path. (3) The major cations and anions of river water were Ca2+ and HCO3-, respectively, and the chemical type of the river water varied from HCO3- -Ca2+ in the headwater area to HCO(3-)-Ca2+ Mg2+ in the lower part. (4) The variation in the concentration of major irons in surface water was not significant at the temporal scale. Usually, the concentration values of major irons were much higher in May than those in other months during the runoff season, while the values were a bit lower in 2007 than those in 2006 and 2008. Except for SO4(2-), the concentrations of other ions such as Ca2+, Na+, Mg2+, K+, Cl- and HCO3- showed a upward trend along the river flow path. Comparing major ion concentrations of the river water with those of local groundwater and precipitation, the concentration in river water was between those of precipitation and groundwater but was much closer to the concentration of groundwater. This indicated that the surface water was recharged by a mixture of precipitation and groundwater, and groundwater showed a larger impact. The Gibbs plot revealed that the chemical

  8. [Major ion chemistry of surface water in the Xilin River Basin and the possible controls].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xi-Wen; Wu, Jin-Kui

    2014-01-01

    Under the increasing pressure of water shortage and steppe degradation, information on the hydrological cycle in the steppe region in Inner Mongolia is urgently needed. Major ions are widely used to identify the hydrological processes in a river basin. Based on the analysis results of 239 river water samples collected in 13 sections along the Xilin River system during 2006 to 2008, combined with data from groundwater and precipitation samples collected in the same period and the meteorological and hydrological data in the Xilin River Basin, hydrochemical characteristics and the chemistry of major ions of the Xilin River water have been studied by means of Piper triangle plots and Gibbs diagrams. The results showed that: (1) the total dissolved solid (TDS) in river water mainly ranged between 136.7 mg x L(-1) and 376.5 mg x L(-1), and (2) it had an increasing trend along the river flow path. (3) The major cations and anions of river water were Ca2+ and HCO3-, respectively, and the chemical type of the river water varied from HCO3- -Ca2+ in the headwater area to HCO(3-)-Ca2+ Mg2+ in the lower part. (4) The variation in the concentration of major irons in surface water was not significant at the temporal scale. Usually, the concentration values of major irons were much higher in May than those in other months during the runoff season, while the values were a bit lower in 2007 than those in 2006 and 2008. Except for SO4(2-), the concentrations of other ions such as Ca2+, Na+, Mg2+, K+, Cl- and HCO3- showed a upward trend along the river flow path. Comparing major ion concentrations of the river water with those of local groundwater and precipitation, the concentration in river water was between those of precipitation and groundwater but was much closer to the concentration of groundwater. This indicated that the surface water was recharged by a mixture of precipitation and groundwater, and groundwater showed a larger impact. The Gibbs plot revealed that the chemical

  9. Associations between chronotype, sleep quality, suicidality, and depressive symptoms in patients with major depression and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Selvi, Yavuz; Aydin, Adem; Boysan, Murat; Atli, Abdullah; Agargun, Mehmed Yucel; Besiroglu, Lutfullah

    2010-10-01

    Research interest concerning associations between sleep characteristics and suicidality in psychopathology has been growing. However, possible linkages of suicidality to sleep characteristics in terms of sleep quality and chronotypes among depressive patients have not been well documented. In the current study, the authors investigated the possible effects of sleep quality and chronotype on the severity of depressive symptoms and suicide risk in patients with depressive disorder and healthy controls. The study was conducted on 80 patients clinically diagnosed with major depression and 80 healthy subjects who were demographically matched with the patient group. All participants completed a questionnaire package containing self-report measures, including the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ), and Suicide Ideation Scale (SIS), and subjects were interviewed with the suicidality section of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Results are as follows: (a) logistic regression analyses revealed that poor sleep quality and depression symptom severity significantly predicted onset of major depression; (b) morningness-type circadian rhythm may play as a significant relief factor after onset of major depression; (c) sleep variables of chronotype and sleep quality did not significantly predict suicide ideation after controlling for depressive symptoms in the major depression group; and (d) suicide ideation and poor sleep quality were antecedents of depression symptom severity in patients with major depression, and in healthy controls. Findings are discussed under the theoretical assumptions concerning possible relations between chronotype, sleep quality, depression, and suicidality. PMID:20969525

  10. [Mechanism of contour hedgerow's control for non-point pollution in the semiarid region in northwest Hebei Province].

    PubMed

    Tang, Z; Cai, Q; Xu, F; Li, S; Wang, Z

    2001-11-01

    Slope nutrient loss is an important type of non-point pollution. The mechanism of non-point pollution control by using plenty of natural observed data in Hilly Loess region in Northwest Hebei Province, as well as combating with the large-scale artificial simulation rainfall in the field slope was analyzed. The study results show that the critical slope length was 10-15 m on the condition of rainstorm, which led to the generation of rill and made the erosion amount went up obviously. The study show that the nutrient loss in sediment was the main type of non-point pollution, the contour hedgerow the process of non-point pollution by controlling the nutrient loss in sediment, then the study got the erosion control model of the contour hedgerow.

  11. Leishmania major Infection-Induced VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 Signaling Promotes Lymphangiogenesis That Controls Disease.

    PubMed

    Weinkopff, Tiffany; Konradt, Christoph; Christian, David A; Discher, Dennis E; Hunter, Christopher A; Scott, Phillip

    2016-09-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis causes a spectrum of diseases from self-healing to severe nonhealing lesions. Defining the factors contributing to lesion resolution may help in developing new therapies for those patients with chronic disease. We found that infection with Leishmania major increases the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2 and is associated with significant changes in the blood and lymphatic vasculature at the site of infection. Ab blockade of VEGFR-2 during infection led to a reduction in lymphatic endothelial cell proliferation and simultaneously increased lesion size without altering the parasite burden. These data show that L. major infection initiates enhanced vascular endothelial growth factor-A/VEGFR-2 signaling and suggest that VEGFR-2-dependent lymphangiogenesis is a mechanism that restricts tissue inflammation in leishmaniasis. PMID:27474074

  12. Desferrioxamine Attenuates Pancreatic Injury after Major Hepatectomy under Vascular Control of the Liver: Experimental Study in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Varsos, Panagiotis; Nastos, Constantinos; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Kalimeris, Konstantinos; Defterevos, George; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Pafiti, Agathi; Fragulidis, George; Economou, Emmanuel; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia; Smyrniotis, Vassilios; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Pancreatic injury can manifest after major hepatectomy under vascular control. The main mechanism involved seems to be remote oxidative injury due to “spillage” of reactive oxygen species and cytokines from the liver. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of desferrioxamine in the prevention of pancreatic injury following major hepatectomy. Methods. Twelve Landrace pigs were subjected to a combination of major hepatectomy (70–75%), using the Pringle maneuver for 150 minutes, after constructing a porta-caval side-to-side anastomosis. The duration of reperfusion was 24 hours. Animals were randomly divided into a control group (n = 6) and a desferrioxamine group (DFX, n = 6). DFX animals were treated with continuous IV infusion of desferrioxamine 100 mg/kg. Pancreatic tissue injury, c-peptide and amylase concentrations, and pancreatic tissue oxidative markers were evaluated. Results. Desferrioxamine-treated animals showed decreased c-peptide levels, decreased acinar cell necrosis, and decreased tissue malondialdehyde levels 24 hours after reperfusion compared with the control group. There was no difference in portal pressure or serum amylase levels between the groups. Conclusions. Desferrioxamine seems to attenuate pancreatic injury after major hepatectomy under vascular control possibly by preventing and reversing production and circulation of oxidative products. PMID:22791933

  13. Differences in Trauma Experience Between Patients With Bipolar I Disorder, Patients With Major Depressive Disorder, and Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Song, Wonyoung; Park, Jae Woo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare differences in traumatic experiences between patients with bipolar I disorder, patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and controls. The traumatic experiences (as measured by the Trauma Experience Questionnaire) of 40 participants with bipolar I disorder were compared with those of 38 participants with MDD and 92 controls. Participants with bipolar I disorder exhibited a significantly higher frequency of traumatic experiences and higher impact ratings when traumas did occur than did patients with MDD and controls. In addition, the present impact of past trauma for patients in the bipolar I disorder and MDD groups was significantly higher than for controls. The bipolar I disorder group reported more severe traumatic experiences than did both the MDD and control groups, and the MDD group in turn reported more severe traumatic experiences than did the control group.

  14. Decentralized Control of Centipede-like Multi-legged Robots with Passive Intersegment Joints Based on Follow-the-Contact-Point Gait Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Shinkichi; Niwa, Tomoya; Suzuki, Tatsuya

    This paper proposes a novel locomotion control, called Follow-the-Contact-Point (FCP) gait control, for a centipede-like multi-legged robot. The centipede-like multi-legged robot is composed by connecting segments, which have a trunk and a pair of legs, via a passive joint. This control method is motivated from behavioral knowledge of a centipede that each leg always contacts on the point which the anterior leg contacted. The FCP gait control realizes the walking behavior of centipede via decentralized event-driven control structure. In addition, merely by planning and allocating the contact point of legs of a head segment adequately, the robot can change the moving direction and also climb over an obstacle. We clarify the feasibility of the FCP gait control by showing the result of physical simulation of a 20-legged robot.

  15. The development of an UAV borne direct georeferenced photogrammetric platform for Ground Control Point free applications.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Tsai, Meng-Lun; Chu, Chien-Hsun

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate applications such as environment detection or disaster monitoring, the development of rapid low cost systems for collecting near real time spatial information is very critical. Rapid spatial information collection has become an emerging trend for remote sensing and mapping applications. In this study, a fixed-wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)-based spatial information acquisition platform that can operate in Ground Control Point (GCP) free environments is developed and evaluated. The proposed UAV based photogrammetric platform has a Direct Georeferencing (DG) module that includes a low cost Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Inertial Navigation System (INS)/Global Positioning System (GPS) integrated system. The DG module is able to provide GPS single frequency carrier phase measurements for differential processing to obtain sufficient positioning accuracy. All necessary calibration procedures are implemented. Ultimately, a flight test is performed to verify the positioning accuracy in DG mode without using GCPs. The preliminary results of positioning accuracy in DG mode illustrate that horizontal positioning accuracies in the x and y axes are around 5 m at 300 m flight height above the ground. The positioning accuracy of the z axis is below 10 m. Therefore, the proposed platform is relatively safe and inexpensive for collecting critical spatial information for urgent response such as disaster relief and assessment applications where GCPs are not available.

  16. High-accuracy stereo matching based on adaptive ground control points.

    PubMed

    Chenbo Shi; Guijin Wang; Xuanwu Yin; Xiaokang Pei; Bei He; Xinggang Lin

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a novel high-accuracy stereo matching scheme based on adaptive ground control points (AdaptGCP). Different from traditional fixed GCP-based methods, we consider color dissimilarity, spatial relation, and the pixel-matching reliability to select GCP adaptively in each local support window. To minimize the global energy, we propose a practical solution, named as alternating updating scheme of disparity and confidence map, which can effectively eliminate the redundant and interfering information of unreliable pixels. The disparity values of those unreliable pixels are reassigned with the information provided by local plane model, which is fitted with GCPs. Then, the confidence map is updated according to the disparity reassignment and the left-right consistency. Finally, the disparity map is refined by multistep filers. Quantitative evaluations demonstrate the effectiveness of our AdaptGCP scheme for regularizing the ill-posed matching problem. The top ranks on Middlebury benchmark with different error thresholds show that our algorithm achieves the state-of-the-art performance among the latest stereo matching algorithms. This paper provides a new insight toward high-accuracy stereo matching. PMID:25608303

  17. The development of an UAV borne direct georeferenced photogrammetric platform for Ground Control Point free applications.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Tsai, Meng-Lun; Chu, Chien-Hsun

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate applications such as environment detection or disaster monitoring, the development of rapid low cost systems for collecting near real time spatial information is very critical. Rapid spatial information collection has become an emerging trend for remote sensing and mapping applications. In this study, a fixed-wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)-based spatial information acquisition platform that can operate in Ground Control Point (GCP) free environments is developed and evaluated. The proposed UAV based photogrammetric platform has a Direct Georeferencing (DG) module that includes a low cost Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Inertial Navigation System (INS)/Global Positioning System (GPS) integrated system. The DG module is able to provide GPS single frequency carrier phase measurements for differential processing to obtain sufficient positioning accuracy. All necessary calibration procedures are implemented. Ultimately, a flight test is performed to verify the positioning accuracy in DG mode without using GCPs. The preliminary results of positioning accuracy in DG mode illustrate that horizontal positioning accuracies in the x and y axes are around 5 m at 300 m flight height above the ground. The positioning accuracy of the z axis is below 10 m. Therefore, the proposed platform is relatively safe and inexpensive for collecting critical spatial information for urgent response such as disaster relief and assessment applications where GCPs are not available. PMID:23012538

  18. The Development of an UAV Borne Direct Georeferenced Photogrammetric Platform for Ground Control Point Free Applications

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Tsai, Meng-Lun; Chu, Chien-Hsun

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate applications such as environment detection or disaster monitoring, the development of rapid low cost systems for collecting near real time spatial information is very critical. Rapid spatial information collection has become an emerging trend for remote sensing and mapping applications. In this study, a fixed-wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)-based spatial information acquisition platform that can operate in Ground Control Point (GCP) free environments is developed and evaluated. The proposed UAV based photogrammetric platform has a Direct Georeferencing (DG) module that includes a low cost Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Inertial Navigation System (INS)/Global Positioning System (GPS) integrated system. The DG module is able to provide GPS single frequency carrier phase measurements for differential processing to obtain sufficient positioning accuracy. All necessary calibration procedures are implemented. Ultimately, a flight test is performed to verify the positioning accuracy in DG mode without using GCPs. The preliminary results of positioning accuracy in DG mode illustrate that horizontal positioning accuracies in the x and y axes are around 5 m at 300 m flight height above the ground. The positioning accuracy of the z axis is below 10 m. Therefore, the proposed platform is relatively safe and inexpensive for collecting critical spatial information for urgent response such as disaster relief and assessment applications where GCPs are not available. PMID:23012538

  19. Occurrence of Listeria spp. in critical control points and the environment of Minas Frescal cheese processing.

    PubMed

    Silva, Isabella M M; Almeida, R C C; Alves, M A O; Almeida, P F

    2003-03-25

    Critical control points (CCPs) associated with Minas Frescal cheese (a Brazilian soft white cheese, eaten fresh) processing in two dairy factories were determined using flow diagrams and microbiological tests for detection of Listeria monocytogenes and other species of Listeria. A total of 218 samples were collected along the production line and environment. The CCPs identified were reception of raw milk, pasteurization, coagulation and storage. Thirteen samples were positive for Listeria; 9 samples were Listeria innocua, 2 were Listeria grayi and 2 were L. monocytogenes. In factory A, Listeria was found in 50% of raw milk samples, 33.3% of curd samples, 16.7% of pasteurized milk samples, 16.7% of cheese samples and 25% of rubber pipes used to transport the whey. The microorganism was not obtained from environmental samples in this plant. In factory B, Listeria was found in one sample of raw milk (16.7%) and in three samples of environment (17.6%) and L. monocytogenes was obtained from raw milk (16.7%) and the floor of the cheese refrigeration room (14.3%). Two serotypes, 4b and 1/2a, were observed among the strains of L. monocytogenes isolated, both which are frequently involved in outbreaks of food-borne listeriosis and sporadic cases of the disease all over the world.

  20. Heliocentric trajectory analysis of Sun-pointing smart dust with electrochromic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengali, Giovanni; Quarta, Alessandro A.

    2016-02-01

    A smart dust is a micro spacecraft, with a characteristic side length on the order of a few millimeters, whose surface is coated with electrochromic material. Its orbital dynamics is controlled by exploiting the differential force due to the solar radiation pressure, which is obtained by modulating the reflectivity coefficient of the electrochromic material within a range of admissible values. A significant thrust level can be reached due to the high values of area-to-mass ratio of such a spacecraft configuration. Assuming that the smart dust is designed to achieve a passive Sun-pointing attitude, the propulsive acceleration due to the solar radiation pressure lies along the Sun-spacecraft direction. The aim of this paper is to study the smart dust heliocentric dynamics in order to find a closed form, analytical solution of its trajectory when the reflectivity coefficient of the electrochromic material can assume two values only. The problem is addressed by introducing a suitable transformation that regularizes the spacecraft motion and translates the smart-dust dynamics into that of a linear harmonic oscillator with unitary frequency, whose forcing input is a boxcar function. The solution is found using the Laplace transform method, and afterwards the problem is generalized by accounting for the degradation of the electrochromic material due to its exposition to the solar radiation. Three spacecraft configurations, corresponding to low, medium and high performance smart dusts, are finally used to quantify the potentialities of these advanced devices in an interplanetary mission scenario.

  1. A Non-Linear Approach to Spacecraft Formation Control in the Vicinity of a Collinear Libration Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Sanner, Robert M.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An expanding interest in mission design strategies that exploit libration point regions, demands the continued development of enhanced, efficient, control algorithms for station-keeping and formation maintenance. Linear control strategies have been developed for station-keeping. However, their region of stability is bounded by the assumptions required for linearizing the governing equations of motion. For example, reference [I] discusses the development of a linear control design for maintaining a halo orbit about the Earth-Moon L2 libration point. Trial runs indicated the trajectory was unstable for starting points exceeding 45,000 km from the L2 point. Also, there was significant growth in the control effort required to maintain the orbit as the nominal radius increased. This result is a consequence of the increased influence of the system non-linearities, as the trajectory deviated from the linearization point, L2. As an alternative, this paper presents the development of a non-linear control strategy, based on a Hamiltonian formulation of the equations of motion. The control strategy is applied to the problem of formation maintenance, rather than simple station

  2. A Non-Linear Approach to Spacecraft Formation Control in the Vicinity of a Collinear Libration Point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Sanner, Robert M.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An expanding interest in mission design strategies that exploit libration point regions demands the continued development of enhanced, efficient, control algorithms for station-keeping and formation maintenance. This paper discusses the development of a non-linear, formation maintenance, control algorithm for trajectories in the vicinity of a libration point. However, the formulation holds for any trajectory governed by the equations of motion for the restricted three body problem. The control law guarantees exponential convergence, based on a Lyaponov analysis. FreeFlyer and MATLAB provide the simulation environment for controller performance evaluation. The simulation, modeled after the MAXIM Pathfinder mission, maintains the relative position of a "follower" spacecraft with respect to a "leader" spacecraft, stationed near the L2 libration point in the Sun-Earth system. Evaluation metrics are fuel usage and tracking accuracy.

  3. Impact of phosphorus control measures on in-river phosphorus retention associated with point source pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demars, B. O. L.; Harper, D. M.; Pitt, J.-A.; Slaughter, R.

    2005-06-01

    In-river phosphorus retention alters the quantity and timings of phosphorus delivery to downstream aquatic systems. Many intensive studies of in-river phosphorus retention have been carried out but generally on a short time scale (2-4 years). In this paper, monthly water quality data, collected by the Environment Agency of England and Wales over 12 years (1990-2001), were used to model daily phosphorus fluxes and monthly in-river phosphorus retention in the lowland calcareous River Wensum, Norfolk, UK. The calibrated model explained 79% and 89% of the observed variance before and after phosphorus control, respectively. A split test revealed that predicted TP loads were in good agreement with observed TP loads (r2=0.85), although TP loads were underestimated under high flow conditions. During relatively dry years, there was no net export of phosphorus from the catchment. High retention of phosphorus occurred, particularly during the summer months, which was not compensated for, by subsequent higher flow events. This was despite a relatively modest critical discharge (Q) above which net remobilisation occur. Phosphorus removal from the effluent at two major STWs (Sewage Treatment Works) reduced phosphorus retention but not the remobilisation. This may indicate that the presence of impoundments and weirs, or overbank flows may have more control on the phosphorus dynamics under high flow conditions. Further phosphorus remedial strategies will be necessary to prevent downstream risks of eutrophication occurring independently of the unpredictable variability in weather conditions. More research is also needed to quantify the impact of the weir and overbank flows on phosphorus dynamics.

  4. Glutamine synthetase in the phloem plays a major role in controlling proline production

    PubMed Central

    Brugiere, N; Dubois, F; Limami, AM; Lelandais, M; Roux, Y; Sangwan, RS; Hirel, B

    1999-01-01

    To inhibit expression specifically in the phloem, a 274-bp fragment of a cDNA (Gln1-5) encoding cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1) from tobacco was placed in the antisense orientation downstream of the cytosolic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase promoter of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. After Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, two transgenic N. tabacum lines exhibiting reduced levels of GS1 mRNA and GS activity in midribs, stems, and roots were obtained. Immunogold labeling experiments allowed us to verify that the GS protein content was markedly decreased in the phloem companion cells of transformed plants. Moreover, a general decrease in proline content in the transgenic plants in comparison with wild-type tobacco was observed when plants were forced to assimilate large amounts of ammonium. In contrast, no major changes in the concentration of amino acids used for nitrogen transport were apparent. A (15)NH(4)(+)-labeling kinetic over a 48-hr period confirmed that in leaves of transgenic plants, the decrease in proline production was directly related to glutamine availability. After 2 weeks of salt treatment, the transgenic plants had a pronounced stress phenotype, consisting of wilting and bleaching in the older leaves. We conclude that GS in the phloem plays a major role in regulating proline production consistent with the function of proline as a nitrogen source and as a key metabolite synthesized in response to water stress. PMID:10521528

  5. Innovative point focus solar concentrator: Volume 5, Electronic controls and electrical interface; Phase 1 topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1986-03-07

    This report discusses the following electronic equipment for the solar collector: LEC-1700 electrical control system; LEC-1700 controller; hand-held remote control unit; communications interface controller; RS-232C to CIC interface card; audio interface card; communications interface controller backplane; wiring harness; and ac power controller.

  6. A vision-based end-point control for a two-link flexible manipulator. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obergfell, Klaus

    1991-01-01

    The measurement and control of the end-effector position of a large two-link flexible manipulator are investigated. The system implementation is described and an initial algorithm for static end-point positioning is discussed. Most existing robots are controlled through independent joint controllers, while the end-effector position is estimated from the joint positions using a kinematic relation. End-point position feedback can be used to compensate for uncertainty and structural deflections. Such feedback is especially important for flexible robots. Computer vision is utilized to obtain end-point position measurements. A look-and-move control structure alleviates the disadvantages of the slow and variable computer vision sampling frequency. This control structure consists of an inner joint-based loop and an outer vision-based loop. A static positioning algorithm was implemented and experimentally verified. This algorithm utilizes the manipulator Jacobian to transform a tip position error to a joint error. The joint error is then used to give a new reference input to the joint controller. The convergence of the algorithm is demonstrated experimentally under payload variation. A Landmark Tracking System (Dickerson, et al 1990) is used for vision-based end-point measurements. This system was modified and tested. A real-time control system was implemented on a PC and interfaced with the vision system and the robot.

  7. Can Coffee Chemical Compounds and Insecticidal Plants Be Harnessed for Control of Major Coffee Pests?

    PubMed

    Green, Paul W C; Davis, Aaron P; Cossé, Allard A; Vega, Fernando E

    2015-11-01

    Pests and pathogens threaten coffee production worldwide and are difficult to control using conventional methods, such as insecticides. We review the literature on the chemistry of coffee, concentrating on compounds most commonly reported from Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora. Differences in chemistry can distinguish coffee species and varieties, and plants grown under different biogeographic conditions exhibit different chemotypes. A number of chemical groups, such as alkaloids and caffeoylquinic acids, are known to be insecticidal, but most studies have investigated their effects on coffee quality and flavor. More research is required to bridge this gap in knowledge, so that coffee can be bred to be more resistant to pests. Furthermore, we report on some pesticidal plants that have been used for control of coffee pests. Locally sourced pesticidal plants have been underutilized and offer a sustainable alternative to conventional insecticides and could be used to augment breeding for resilience of coffee plants.

  8. Can Coffee Chemical Compounds and Insecticidal Plants Be Harnessed for Control of Major Coffee Pests?

    PubMed

    Green, Paul W C; Davis, Aaron P; Cossé, Allard A; Vega, Fernando E

    2015-11-01

    Pests and pathogens threaten coffee production worldwide and are difficult to control using conventional methods, such as insecticides. We review the literature on the chemistry of coffee, concentrating on compounds most commonly reported from Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora. Differences in chemistry can distinguish coffee species and varieties, and plants grown under different biogeographic conditions exhibit different chemotypes. A number of chemical groups, such as alkaloids and caffeoylquinic acids, are known to be insecticidal, but most studies have investigated their effects on coffee quality and flavor. More research is required to bridge this gap in knowledge, so that coffee can be bred to be more resistant to pests. Furthermore, we report on some pesticidal plants that have been used for control of coffee pests. Locally sourced pesticidal plants have been underutilized and offer a sustainable alternative to conventional insecticides and could be used to augment breeding for resilience of coffee plants. PMID:26458882

  9. NRRI summary of Florida Public Service Commission: Fraud control policies of seven major Florida utilities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Florida Public Service Commission (PSC) Staff recently completed an audit of fraud control policies and programs at the State`s largest regulated electric and local telephone utilities. The purpose of the audit was to examine the ability of Florida`s largest regulated utilities to deter, detect, and resolve occurrences of fraud. The Staff audited the state`s seven largest regulated electric and local telephone utilities: Florida Power Corporation, Florida Power and Light, Gulf Power Corporation, Tampa Electric Company, GTE-Florida, BellSouth Telecommunications (Southern Bell), and Sprint United/Centel. The audit scope was limited to fraudulent acts committed by employees, contractors, suppliers, or agents of the seven utilities. Information regarding the utilities` fraud control policies and programs was obtained through surveys, document requests, and interviews with managers and officers.

  10. On the Relationship between Locus of Control and the Grade Point Average of the Iranian Azad University EFL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozorgi, Simin

    2009-01-01

    The present study sponsored by Islamic Azad University of Bandar Abbas, Iran, intended to see if locus of control really affected students' language achievement. It was hypothesized that subjects' loci of controls affected their GPA's in meaningful and significant ways. The study also tried to measure the effects of students' major and their…

  11. Application of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) to the handling of expressed breast milk on a neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Hunter, P R

    1991-02-01

    Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) is a powerful procedure for ensuring quality and safety and has gained widespread use in industry. This paper describes the basic method which is a four-stage process including process analysis, hazard identification, identification of critical control points and devising effective control options. Suggestions as to how the method can be adapted to the control of hospital infection are made. A HACCP analysis, on the supply of expressed human breast milk to babies on a Special Care Baby Unit, is presented. Although only the mother's own milk was given to babies on the unit, several potential hazards were identified and suggestions have been made for their control.

  12. Efficacy and safety of curcumin in major depressive disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sanmukhani, Jayesh; Satodia, Vimal; Trivedi, Jaladhi; Patel, Tejas; Tiwari, Deepak; Panchal, Bharat; Goel, Ajay; Tripathi, Chandra Bhanu

    2014-04-01

    Curcumin, an active ingredient of Curcuma longa Linn (Zingiberaceae), has shown potential antidepressant-like activity in animal studies. The objectives of this trial were to compare the efficacy and safety of curcumin with fluoxetine in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Herein, 60 patients diagnosed with MDD were randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio for six weeks observer-masked treatment with fluoxetine (20 mg) and curcumin (1000 mg) individually or their combination. The primary efficacy variable was response rates according to Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, 17-item version (HAM-D17 ). The secondary efficacy variable was the mean change in HAM-D17 score after six weeks. We observed that curcumin was well tolerated by all the patients. The proportion of responders as measured by the HAM-D17 scale was higher in the combination group (77.8%) than in the fluoxetine (64.7%) and the curcumin (62.5%) groups; however, these data were not statistically significant (P = 0.58). Interestingly, the mean change in HAM-D17 score at the end of six weeks was comparable in all three groups (P = 0.77). This study provides first clinical evidence that curcumin may be used as an effective and safe modality for treatment in patients with MDD without concurrent suicidal ideation or other psychotic disorders. . PMID:23832433

  13. Doping control analysis for adrafinil and its major metabolites in human urine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianghai; Wang, Xiaobing; Yang, Shuming; Liu, Xin; Qin, Yang; Shen, Li; Wu, Yun; Xu, Youxuan; Wu, Moutian; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2009-06-01

    A new and reliable two-step liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method in combination with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the screening and confirmation of adrafinil and its major metabolites, modafinil and modafinil acid, in human urine has been developed and validated. The method involved reversed-phase C18 solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge extraction and MS analysis by means of LC/MS/MS and GC/MS. The study illustrated that the ESI capillary temperature played a key role in the formation of the protonated molecule. The limits of detection (LODs) of the developed method for the three compounds were lower than the minimum required performance limit (MRPL) of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). The human urine samples obtained after the oral administration of modafinil and from the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games were analyzed by using the described method, which has also been successfully applied to routine analyses and the WADA Proficiency Test. PMID:19399790

  14. Resistance to potato leaf roll virus multiplication in potato is under major gene control.

    PubMed

    Barker, H; Solomon-Blackburn, R M; McNicol, J W; Bradshaw, J E

    1994-08-01

    The concentration of potato leaf roll virus (PLRV), as measured by a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in the foliage of potato plants (Solanum tuberosum) of cv 'Maris Piper' with secondary infection was 2900 ng/g leaf, whereas in clones G7445(1) and G7032(5) it was 180 ng/g leaf and 120 ng/g leaf, respectively. To examine the genetic control of resistance to PLRV multiplication, reciprocal crosses were made between the susceptible cultivar 'Maris Piper' and the two resistant clones, and the three parents were selfed. Seedling progenies of these families were grown to generate tubers of individual genotypes (clones). Clonally propagated plants were graft-inoculated, and their daughter tubers were collected and used to grow plants with secondary infection in which PLRV concentration was estimated. The expression of resistance to PLRV multiplication had a bimodal distribution in progenies from crosses between 'Maris Piper' and either resistant clone, and also in progeny from selfing the resistant parents, with genotypes segregating into high and low virus titre groups. Only the progeny obtained from selfing 'Maris Piper' did not segregate, all genotypes being susceptible to PLRV multiplication. The pattern of segregation obtained from these progenies fits more closely with the genetical hypothesis that resistance to PLRV multiplication is controlled by two unlinked dominant complementary genes, both of which are required for resistance, than with the simpler hypothesis that resistance is conferred by a single dominant gene, as published previously.

  15. Choosing the Optimal Number of B-spline Control Points (Part 1: Methodology and Approximation of Curves)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmening, Corinna; Neuner, Hans

    2016-09-01

    Due to the establishment of terrestrial laser scanner, the analysis strategies in engineering geodesy change from pointwise approaches to areal ones. These areal analysis strategies are commonly built on the modelling of the acquired point clouds. Freeform curves and surfaces like B-spline curves/surfaces are one possible approach to obtain space continuous information. A variety of parameters determines the B-spline's appearance; the B-spline's complexity is mostly determined by the number of control points. Usually, this number of control points is chosen quite arbitrarily by intuitive trial-and-error-procedures. In this paper, the Akaike Information Criterion and the Bayesian Information Criterion are investigated with regard to a justified and reproducible choice of the optimal number of control points of B-spline curves. Additionally, we develop a method which is based on the structural risk minimization of the statistical learning theory. Unlike the Akaike and the Bayesian Information Criteria this method doesn't use the number of parameters as complexity measure of the approximating functions but their Vapnik-Chervonenkis-dimension. Furthermore, it is also valid for non-linear models. Thus, the three methods differ in their target function to be minimized and consequently in their definition of optimality. The present paper will be continued by a second paper dealing with the choice of the optimal number of control points of B-spline surfaces.

  16. Integrated quality control: implementation and validation of instrument function checks and procedural controls for a cartridge-based point-of-care system for critical care analysis.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Paul; Mansouri, Sohrab

    2013-03-01

    In this article, the process used to develop and validate an integrated quality-control system for a cartridge-based, point-of-care system for critical care analysis is outlined. Application of risk management principles has resulted in a quality control system using a combination of statistical quality control with onboard reference solutions and failure pattern recognition used to flag common failure modes during the analytical phase of the testing process. A combination of traditional external quality control, integrated quality control to monitor ongoing instrument functionality, operator training, and other laboratory-implemented monitors is most effective in controlling known failure modes during the testing process.

  17. Mode of inheritance of major genes controlling life span differences between two inbred strains of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Yonemura, I; Motoyama, T; Hasekura, H

    1989-01-01

    Although life span is generally considered to be under polygenic control, we obtained experimental evidence of Mendelian genes exerting major effects on life span differences between two inbred strains of Drosophila melanogaster. Our data indicate two loci with major effects, one being autosomal and the other sex-linked. The alleles at the autosomal locus are designated A1 and A2, the latter producing longer life. Heterozygotes, A1A2, exhibit over-dominance. The alleles at the sex-linked locus, designated X1 and X2, produce life-extending effects. X1 revealed a dosage effect, causing homozygous females to live longer than hemizygous males; X2 showed no dosage effect. The identified genes are considered to control the period of activity of many genes maintaining life. PMID:2517284

  18. Mode of inheritance of major genes controlling life span differences between two inbred strains of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Yonemura, I; Motoyama, T; Hasekura, H

    1989-01-01

    Although life span is generally considered to be under polygenic control, we obtained experimental evidence of Mendelian genes exerting major effects on life span differences between two inbred strains of Drosophila melanogaster. Our data indicate two loci with major effects, one being autosomal and the other sex-linked. The alleles at the autosomal locus are designated A1 and A2, the latter producing longer life. Heterozygotes, A1A2, exhibit over-dominance. The alleles at the sex-linked locus, designated X1 and X2, produce life-extending effects. X1 revealed a dosage effect, causing homozygous females to live longer than hemizygous males; X2 showed no dosage effect. The identified genes are considered to control the period of activity of many genes maintaining life.

  19. Fractures, not Plumes, Have Controlled Major Seamount Volcanism in the Pacific over 170 Million Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natland, J. H.; Winterer, E. L.

    2003-12-01

    The distribution of guyots and atolls and large volcanic islands on the Pacific plate can be used to outline the likely connection between stresses acting on the plate and the gradual development of large, linear volcanic chains over the past 170 Ma. We construe three general periods with different stress regimes in the history of the Pacific plate. 1) During the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, the Pacific plate was surrounded by ridge segments and there were no major stress alignments within it. Within-plate volcanism thus assumed the scattered arrangement for the condition of no tectonic stress (1), and the large Magellan and Wake seamount clusters formed. Near the eastern boundaries of the plate, complex and shifting patterns of ridge reorganization dictated formation of very long, splayed, near-axis ridges such as Horizon Guyot and Necker Ridge. 2) At about 90 Ma, the growing middle-aged Pacific plate achieved its first persistent stress regime with the formation of subduction boundaries along its western or northwestern margin. The plate was no longer static but began to move over the asthenosphere and into the mantle. Subduction boundaries and the overall direction of subduction are uncertain, but this imparted a general yet not fully stable component of tension across the plate, producing the NNW Gilbert-Marshall, Line and Emperor Seamount ridges, generally orthogonal to the overall direction of least principal stress. The Line Island seamount chain, being near ridge axes, sustained a variable stress regime. It thus has no age progression of rocks dated between 70-90 Ma (2), great width, and a dual orientations of ridges. 3) By 47 Ma, nearly half of the boundaries of the Pacific plate now were trenches spanning from the Aleutians to New Zealand. In addition, northward migration of the Indian plate and Australia caught a major portion of the westerly moving Pacific plate between the northeast corner of the Tonga Trench and the Aleutians. The plate could not

  20. Growth hormone response to catecholamine depletion in unmedicated, remitted subjects with major depressive disorder and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Homan, Philipp; Drevets, Wayne C; Hasler, Gregor

    2013-10-01

    We investigated whether the human growth hormone (HGH) response to catecholamine depletion differs between fully remitted patients with major depressive disorder and healthy control subjects. Fourteen unmedicated subjects with remitted major depressive disorder (RMDD) and 11 healthy control subjects underwent catecholamine depletion with oral α-methylparatyrosine (AMPT) in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study. The main outcome measure was the serum level of HGH. The diagnosis × drug interaction for HGH serum concentration was significant (F₁,₂₃ = 7.66, P < 0.02). This interaction was attributable to the HGH level increasing after AMPT administration in the RMDD subjects but not in the healthy subjects. In the RMDD sample, the AMPT-induced increase in HGH concentration correlated inversely with AMPT-induced anxiety symptoms as assessed using the Beck Anxiety Inventory (r = -0.63, P < 0.02). There was a trend toward an inverse correlation of the AMPT-induced HGH concentration changes with AMPT-induced depressive symptoms as measured by the BDI (r = -0.53, P = 0.05). Following catecholamine depletion, the RMDD subjects were differentiated from control subjects by their HGH responses. This finding, together with the negative correlation between HGH response and AMPT-induced anxiety symptoms in RMDD subjects, suggests that AMPT administration results in a deeper nadir in central catecholaminergic transmission, as reflected by a greater disinhibition of HGH secretion, in RMDD subjects versus control subjects.

  1. Major neurotransmitter systems in dorsal hippocampus and basolateral amygdala control social recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Garrido Zinn, Carolina; Clairis, Nicolas; Silva Cavalcante, Lorena Evelyn; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2016-08-16

    Social recognition memory (SRM) is crucial for reproduction, forming social groups, and species survival. Despite its importance, SRM is still relatively little studied. Here we examine the participation of the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) and the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and that of dopaminergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic systems in both structures in the consolidation of SRM. Male Wistar rats received intra-CA1 or intra-BLA infusions of different drugs immediately after the sample phase of a social discrimination task and 24-h later were subjected to a 5-min retention test. Animals treated with the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin, into either the CA1 or BLA were unable to recognize the previously exposed juvenile (familiar) during the retention test. When infused into the CA1, the β-adrenoreceptor agonist, isoproterenol, the D1/D5 dopaminergic receptor antagonist, SCH23390, and the H2 histaminergic receptor antagonist, ranitidine, also hindered the recognition of the familiar juvenile 24-h later. The latter drug effects were more intense in the CA1 than in the BLA. When infused into the BLA, the β-adrenoreceptor antagonist, timolol, the D1/D5 dopamine receptor agonist, SKF38393, and the H2 histaminergic receptor agonist, ranitidine, also hindered recognition of the familiar juvenile 24-h later. In all cases, the impairment to recognize the familiar juvenile was abolished by the coinfusion of agonist plus antagonist. Clearly, both the CA1 and BLA, probably in that order, play major roles in the consolidation of SRM, but these roles are different in each structure vis-à-vis the involvement of the β-noradrenergic, D1/D5-dopaminergic, and H2-histaminergic receptors therein. PMID:27482097

  2. Air quality control in the ART laboratory is a major determinant of IVF success

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sandro C; Bento, Fabiola C

    2016-01-01

    A recently published article described how a fertility center in the United States implemented air quality control to newly designed in vitro fertilization (IVF) laboratory.1 A highly-efficient air filtration was achieved by installing a centered system supplying filtered air to the IVF laboratory and related critical areas, combining air particulate and volatile organic compound (VOC) filtration. As a consequence, live birth rates were increased by improvements in air quality. This article highlights the key aspects of air contamination in the IVF context. The topic is important not only to IVF specialists but also to Andrologists due to the great number of male infertility patients referred to assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments. The evidence is growing that laboratory air quality is paramount importance for improved IVF outcome. PMID:26585700

  3. Biological control of major postharvest pathogens on apple with Candida sake.

    PubMed

    Viñas, I; Usall, J; Teixidó, N; Sanchis, V

    1998-03-01

    Epiphytic microorganisms isolated from apples, pears and the surfaces of apple leaves were screened for antagonistic activity against Penicillium expansum (blue-mold), Botrytis cinerea (gray-mold) and Rhizopus nigricans (Rhizopus rot) on apple (Malus domestica). A total of 933 bacteria and yeasts were tested in primary screening against P. expansum. Ninety-two strains reduced the lesion size on apples by more than 50%, 72 of which were isolated from the surface of apples. For secondary screening against P. expansum, B. cinerea and R. nigricans, 31 strains were selected. The most promising isolate, CPA-1, was identified as Candida sake. This yeast, isolated from apples in storage season was very effective against all three diseases. Wounded Golden Delicious apples protected with the yeast suspension at a concentration of 2.6 x 10(6) CFU/ml and inoculated with conidia of B. cinerea and R. nigricans of 10(5) and 10(4) conidia/ml, respectively, did not develop rot. Complete control of P. expansum was obtained at the same concentration of the antagonist with a pathogen inoculum concentration of 10(3) conidia/ml. This strain, also provided excellent control of rot development under cold storage conditions. The strain of Candida sake can grow actively in aerobic conditions. In drop-inoculated wounds of apples, the populations of C. sake increased by more than 50-fold during the first 24 h at 20 degrees C. The maximum population of C. sake on apple wounds was the same at 20 as at 1 degrees C and was recovered after three and twenty days, respectively.

  4. Malaria indicator survey 2007, Ethiopia: coverage and use of major malaria prevention and control interventions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In 2005, a nationwide survey estimated that 6.5% of households in Ethiopia owned an insecticide-treated net (ITN), 17% of households had been sprayed with insecticide, and 4% of children under five years of age with a fever were taking an anti-malarial drug. Similar to other sub-Saharan African countries scaling-up malaria interventions, the Government of Ethiopia set an ambitious national goal in 2005 to (i) provide 100% ITN coverage in malarious areas, with a mean of two ITNs per household; (ii) to scale-up indoor residual spraying of households with insecticide (IRS) to cover 30% of households targeted for IRS; and (iii) scale-up the provision of case management with rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), particularly at the peripheral level. Methods A nationally representative malaria indicator survey (MIS) was conducted in Ethiopia between September and December 2007 to determine parasite and anaemia prevalence in the population at risk and to assess coverage, use and access to scaled-up malaria prevention and control interventions. The survey used a two-stage random cluster sample of 7,621 households in 319 census enumeration areas. A total of 32,380 people participated in the survey. Data was collected using standardized Roll Back Malaria Monitoring and Evaluation Reference Group MIS household and women's questionnaires, which were adapted to the local context. Results Data presented is for households in malarious areas, which according to the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Health are defined as being located <2,000 m altitude. Of 5,083 surveyed households, 3,282 (65.6%) owned at least one ITN. In ITN-owning households, 53.2% of all persons had slept under an ITN the prior night, including 1,564/2,496 (60.1%) children <5 years of age, 1,891/3,009 (60.9%) of women 15 - 49 years of age, and 166/266 (65.7%) of pregnant women. Overall, 906 (20.0%) households reported to have had IRS in the past 12 months. Of 747

  5. The coarse pointing assembly for SILEX program or how to achieve outstanding pointing accuracy with simple hardware associated with consistent control laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buvat, Daniel; Muller, Gerard; Peyrot, Patrick

    1991-06-01

    Attention is given to the coarse pointing assembly (CPA) for the SILEX program, designed on the basis of 10 years of MATRA experience in very accurate drive mechanisms successfully conducted by the SPOT 1 and 2 flights as well as EURECA IOC. The basic key design feature of the mechanism is a 1200-step stepper motor driven in microstepping with harmonic defects compensation. This allows very low torque noise associated with a high accuracy (0.01 deg). The direct drive principle avoids backlash and permits a linear control of the output shaft of each drive. The only parts susceptible to possible wear are the ball bearings, which have a design margin of greater than 1000 for 10 yr of service life. In order to meet the dynamic performances required by SILEX, a closed loop active damping system is added to each drive unit. Two accelerometers used in a differential way sense the hinge microvibrations and an active damping loop reduces their Q factor down to a few dB. All CPA electrical parts (including motor, optical encoder, and accelerometer) are redundant to avoid single point of failure.

  6. The spatial-temporal variations of water quality in controlling points of the main rivers flowing into the Miyun Reservoir from 1991 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongqing; Liang, Ji; Di, Yanming; Gong, Huili; Guo, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Cluster analysis (CA), discriminant analysis (DA), and principal component analysis/factor analysis (PCA/FA) were used to analyze the interannual, seasonal, and spatial variations of water quality from 1991 to 2011 in controlling points (Xinzhuang Bridge, Daguan Bridge) of the main rivers (Chaohe River, Baihe River) flowing into the Miyun Reservoir. The results demonstrated that total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) exceeded China National Standard II for surface water separately 5.08 times and 1 time. CA showed that the water quality could be divided into three interannual (IA) groups: IAI (1991-1995, 1998), IAII (1996-1997, 1999-2000, 2002-2006), and IAIII (2001, 2007-2011) and two seasonal clusters: dry season 1 (December), dry season 2 (January-February), and non-dry season (March-November). At interannual scale, the higher concentration of SO4 (2-) from industrial activities, atmospheric sedimentation, and fertilizer use in IAIII accelerated dissolution of carbonate, which increased Ca(2+), Mg(2+), total hardness (T-Hard), and total alkalinity (T-Alk). The decreasing trend of CODMn contributed to the establishment of sewage treatment plants and water and soil conservation in the Miyun upstream. The changing trend of NO3 (-)-N indicated increasing non-point pollution load of IAII and effective non-point pollution controlling of IAIII. Only one parameter T in the seasonal scale verified improved non-point pollution controlling. The major pollution in two controlling points was NO3 (-)-N, T-Hard, TN, and other ion pollution (SO4 (2-), F(-), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), T-Hard, T-Alk). Higher concentration of NO3 (-)-N in Xinzhuang and CODMn in Daguan indicated different controlling measures, especially controlling agriculture intensification in Chaohe River to decrease N pollution and decreasing water and soil loss and cage culture in Baihe River to weaken organic pollution. Controlling SO4 (2-) from industrial activity, atmospheric sedimentation and fertilizer use in

  7. The spatial-temporal variations of water quality in controlling points of the main rivers flowing into the Miyun Reservoir from 1991 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongqing; Liang, Ji; Di, Yanming; Gong, Huili; Guo, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Cluster analysis (CA), discriminant analysis (DA), and principal component analysis/factor analysis (PCA/FA) were used to analyze the interannual, seasonal, and spatial variations of water quality from 1991 to 2011 in controlling points (Xinzhuang Bridge, Daguan Bridge) of the main rivers (Chaohe River, Baihe River) flowing into the Miyun Reservoir. The results demonstrated that total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) exceeded China National Standard II for surface water separately 5.08 times and 1 time. CA showed that the water quality could be divided into three interannual (IA) groups: IAI (1991-1995, 1998), IAII (1996-1997, 1999-2000, 2002-2006), and IAIII (2001, 2007-2011) and two seasonal clusters: dry season 1 (December), dry season 2 (January-February), and non-dry season (March-November). At interannual scale, the higher concentration of SO4 (2-) from industrial activities, atmospheric sedimentation, and fertilizer use in IAIII accelerated dissolution of carbonate, which increased Ca(2+), Mg(2+), total hardness (T-Hard), and total alkalinity (T-Alk). The decreasing trend of CODMn contributed to the establishment of sewage treatment plants and water and soil conservation in the Miyun upstream. The changing trend of NO3 (-)-N indicated increasing non-point pollution load of IAII and effective non-point pollution controlling of IAIII. Only one parameter T in the seasonal scale verified improved non-point pollution controlling. The major pollution in two controlling points was NO3 (-)-N, T-Hard, TN, and other ion pollution (SO4 (2-), F(-), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), T-Hard, T-Alk). Higher concentration of NO3 (-)-N in Xinzhuang and CODMn in Daguan indicated different controlling measures, especially controlling agriculture intensification in Chaohe River to decrease N pollution and decreasing water and soil loss and cage culture in Baihe River to weaken organic pollution. Controlling SO4 (2-) from industrial activity, atmospheric sedimentation and fertilizer use in

  8. Distinguishing among major controls on the apparent thermal and barometric structure of metamorphic belts

    SciTech Connect

    Day, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    The apparent thermal and barometric structures of metamorphosed terrains are expressed in the map patterns of isograds and bathograds. Geographic variation in the apparent P,T of peak metamorphism may be the result of: (1) differences in the amount of tectonic thickening (2) variation in the thermal properties of the lithosphere or (3) differential uplift across the mountain belt. Oversimplified tectonic models of a burial and uplift event, combined with simple physical models for the conductive transfer of heat, have normally been used. The results suggest that the relative roles of the three large scale controls on metamorphism may be distinguished. In mountain belts having variable tectonic thickening, apparent isotherms and isobars of peak metamorphism are parallel. Geographic variation in either thermal properties or uplift history, by contrast, leads to patterns of intersecting apparent isobars and isotherms (e.g.. the New England Appalachians). In terrains that experienced rapid and differential uplift, the most rapidly uplifted portions show the shortest cooling times, the least discordance between apparent mineral ages, and the lowest pressures at peak metamorphism and no necessary correlation between metamorphic grade and cooling time (e.g.. the Alps). In contrast, in terrains with large variations in either thermal parameters or tectonic thickening, long cooling times are directly associated with the highest metamorphic temperatures and the least discordance between apparent mineral ages (e.g.. the Scottish Highlands).

  9. Landscape controls on dissolved nutrients, organic matter and major ions in a suburbanizing watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, M. L.; McDowell, W. H.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the relative importance of anthropogenic and natural landscape features that drive spatial variability in water quality is a central challenge in studying the biogeochemistry of heterogeneous landscapes. We quantified the average annual flux and concentration of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), phosphate-P (PO4-P), sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-) at ~40 stream sites in three major (51 to 903 km2) NH basins. We used GIS to quantify anthropogenic (e.g. human population density, % impervious surface cover and % agriculture) and natural (e.g. % forest, % wetlands and soil C:N) landscape features for each sub-basin and then employed multiple-regression analysis to relate water quality parameters to landscape characteristics. Anthropogenic features were strong predictors of DIN flux and Na+ and Cl- concentrations, whereas wetland cover (a natural feature) was a significant, but weak predictor of DOC (r2=0.26, p<0.01) and DON (r2 = 0.14, p<0.05) flux. Anthropogenic features could not explain a significant amount of variance in DON or DOC flux. Mean PO4-P concentrations were surprisingly low (<0.015 mg P/L) when compared to the larger range in mean DIN concentrations (0.03 to 0.96 mg/L) and consequently no landscape characteristics could explain a significant amount of spatial variability in PO4-P flux or concentration. Human population density was the single best predictor of DIN flux (r2=0.76, p<0.01), and together with % impervious surface and % agriculture explained 86% (p<0.01) of the total variance. Among all sites, % road pavement was a strong predictor of stream Na+ and Cl- concentrations (r2 = 0.75 to 0.78, p<0.01) and % impervious surface was a stronger predictor (r2 = 0.86 to 0.92, p<0.01) among a subset of sites. Our results suggest that DIN and DON result from different sources in the landscape and although sources of DON and DOC are similar, DON and DOC concentrations respond

  10. Application of hazard analysis and critical control point methodology and risk-based grading to consumer food safety surveys.

    PubMed

    Røssvoll, Elin Halbach; Ueland, Øydis; Hagtvedt, Therese; Jacobsen, Eivind; Lavik, Randi; Langsrud, Solveig

    2012-09-01

    Traditionally, consumer food safety survey responses have been classified as either "right" or "wrong" and food handling practices that are associated with high risk of infection have been treated in the same way as practices with lower risks. In this study, a risk-based method for consumer food safety surveys has been developed, and HACCP (hazard analysis and critical control point) methodology was used for selecting relevant questions. We conducted a nationally representative Web-based survey (n = 2,008), and to fit the self-reported answers we adjusted a risk-based grading system originally developed for observational studies. The results of the survey were analyzed both with the traditional "right" and "wrong" classification and with the risk-based grading system. The results using the two methods were very different. Only 5 of the 10 most frequent food handling violations were among the 10 practices associated with the highest risk. These 10 practices dealt with different aspects of heat treatment (lacking or insufficient), whereas the majority of the most frequent violations involved storing food at room temperature for too long. Use of the risk-based grading system for survey responses gave a more realistic picture of risks associated with domestic food handling practices. The method highlighted important violations and minor errors, which are performed by most people and are not associated with significant risk. Surveys built on a HACCP-based approach with risk-based grading will contribute to a better understanding of domestic food handling practices and will be of great value for targeted information and educational activities.

  11. Locus control region HS2 point mutations are generally not responsible for elevated fetal hemoglobin expression of sickle cell patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.G.

    1994-09-01

    The locus control region (LCR), composed of four hypersensitive sites (HS1-4) 5{prime} of the {epsilon} globin gene, confers strong, copy-number dependent expression on globin genes in transgenic mice. Several {beta}-globin gene cluster haplotypes carry the sickle cell gene, and show variable levels of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) expression in association with DNA sequence differences in HS2, {gamma} and {beta} globin promoters, and {gamma}IVSII: The Senegal (SEN or No. 3) haplotype generally has high (>10%) Hb F, Benin (BEN or No. 19) has intermediate Hb F (but some low and some high), and Banu (BAN or No. 20) generally has low Hb F. Huisman and colleagues have proposed that `factors produced under conditions of hematopoietic stress, together with genetic determinants on the haplotype-3 like LCR sequences, allow for high level expression of {gamma} globin genes`. We have now used slot blot to screen high Hb F (>9.5%) and low Hb F cases for two of the three HS2 point mutations described by Oener et al. Comparing eight high Hb F BEN/BEN with two low Hb F BEN/BEN, all ten had the BEN mutations considered by Oener et al. to be associated with low Hb F. Comparing three high Hb F BEN/BAN with two low Hb F BEN/BAN, all five were heterozygous at three positions; this is consistent with BEN having G and T and BAN having A at both positions. DNA sequencing of HS2 for BAN, which is generally associated with low HB F, showed that the point mutations at all three positions were those seen in SEN (generally high Hb F); only the AT repeat region showed major differences, confirming results of Huisman and colleagues. Hence, if there is any effect of HS2 of the Senegal sickle cell haplotype in causing elevated Hb F under hematopoietic stress, it must be due to specific variation in the AT repeat region, which Oener et al. have suggested may bind a silencer.

  12. Physiology of food poisoning microorganisms and the major problems in food poisoning control.

    PubMed

    Gould, G W; Abee, T; Granum, P E; Jones, M V

    1995-12-01

    There remains considerable public concern regarding the current high level of food poisoning disease in Europe and the fact that, year by year, it continues to rise rather than fall. At the same time, there are strong and increasing demands from consumers for foods that are more convenient, fresher, more natural, less heavily processed (e.g. 'REPFEDS' and 'Sous Vide' foods, mildly heated and distributed at chill temperatures; Lund and Notermans, 1992), less heavily preserved (e.g. less acid, less salt, less sugar; Gould, 1995) and less reliant on additive preservatives than hitherto (e.g. sulphite, nitrite, organic acids and esters; Russell and Gould, 1991). Most of these trends result in a general reduction in the intrinsic preservation of foods. Furthermore, many food poisoning microorganisms escape the attention of preservation techniques altogether, reaching the consumer more or less directly from contaminated foods, most often foods of animal origin. It has therefore been argued that a substantial reduction in food poisoning in the near future will be difficult to achieve unless we obtain a greatly improved understanding of the physiology of the most important target organisms (Knochel and Gould, 1995). This knowledge must then be exploited in ways which effectively improve our means for the control of these hazards and reduce the risk to the consumer. A three year AAIR Concerted Action Programme (PL920630: 'Physiology of Food Poisoning Microorganisms') was therefore initiated in 1992 in order to bring together research groups working on the physiology and related aspects of food poisoning microorganisms. The principal objectives of the programme were: 1. To determine the physiological, biochemical and genetical bases of the organisms' survival of and responses to food-relevant stresses; 2. to determine the physiological and genetical factors influencing infectivity and toxinogenesis; 3. to understand the physiological bases of those synergistic systems that

  13. Angle-of-Attack-Modulated Terminal Point Control for Neptune Aerocapture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queen, Eric M.

    2004-01-01

    An aerocapture guidance algorithm based on a calculus of variations approach is developed, using angle of attack as the primary control variable. Bank angle is used as a secondary control to alleviate angle of attack extremes and to control inclination. The guidance equations are derived in detail. The controller has very small onboard computational requirements and is robust to atmospheric and aerodynamic dispersions. The algorithm is applied to aerocapture at Neptune. Three versions of the controller are considered with varying angle of attack authority. The three versions of the controller are evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations with expected dispersions.

  14. Recommendations for dealing with waste contaminated with Ebola virus: a Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points approach

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Kelly L; Elrahman, Samira Abd; Bell, Diana J; Brainard, Julii; Dervisevic, Samir; Fedha, Tsimbiri P; Few, Roger; Howard, Guy; Lake, Iain; Maes, Peter; Matofari, Joseph; Minnigh, Harvey; Mohamedani, Ahmed A; Montgomery, Maggie; Morter, Sarah; Muchiri, Edward; Mudau, Lutendo S; Mutua, Benedict M; Ndambuki, Julius M; Pond, Katherine; Sobsey, Mark D; van der Es, Mike; Zeitoun, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess, within communities experiencing Ebola virus outbreaks, the risks associated with the disposal of human waste and to generate recommendations for mitigating such risks. Methods A team with expertise in the Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points framework identified waste products from the care of individuals with Ebola virus disease and constructed, tested and confirmed flow diagrams showing the creation of such products. After listing potential hazards associated with each step in each flow diagram, the team conducted a hazard analysis, determined critical control points and made recommendations to mitigate the transmission risks at each control point. Findings The collection, transportation, cleaning and shared use of blood-soiled fomites and the shared use of latrines contaminated with blood or bloodied faeces appeared to be associated with particularly high levels of risk of Ebola virus transmission. More moderate levels of risk were associated with the collection and transportation of material contaminated with bodily fluids other than blood, shared use of latrines soiled with such fluids, the cleaning and shared use of fomites soiled with such fluids, and the contamination of the environment during the collection and transportation of blood-contaminated waste. Conclusion The risk of the waste-related transmission of Ebola virus could be reduced by the use of full personal protective equipment, appropriate hand hygiene and an appropriate disinfectant after careful cleaning. Use of the Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points framework could facilitate rapid responses to outbreaks of emerging infectious disease. PMID:27274594

  15. Nonlinear control design techniques for precision formation flying at Lagrange points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luquette, Richard J.

    Precision spacecraft formation flying is an enabling technology for a variety of proposed space-based observatories, such as NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF), the Micro-Arcsecond X-Ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), and Stellar Imager (SI). This research specifically examines the precision formation flying control architecture, characterizing the relative performance of linear and nonlinear controllers. Controller design is based on a 6DOF control architecture, characteristic of precision formation flying control. In an effort to minimize the influence of design parameters in the comparison, analysis employs "equivalent" controller gains, and incorporates an integrator in the linear control design. Controller performance is evaluated through various simulations designed to reflect a realistic space environment. The simulation architecture includes a full gravitational model and solar pressure effects. Spacecraft model properties are based on realistic mission design parameters. Control actuators are modeled as a fixed set of thrusters for both translation and attitude control. Analysis includes impact on controller performance due to omitted dynamics in the model (gravitational sources and solar pressure) and model uncertainty (mass properties, thruster placement and thruster alignment). Linearized equations of relative motion are derived for spacecraft operating in the context of the Restricted Three Body Problem. Linearization is performed with respect to a reference spacecraft within the formation. Analysis demonstrates robust stability for the Linear Quadratic Regulator controller design based on the linearized dynamics. Nonlinear controllers are developed based on Lyapunov analysis, including both non-adaptive and adaptive designs. While the linear controller demonstrates greater robustness to model uncertainty, both nonlinear controllers exhibit superior performance. The adaptive controller provides the best performance. As a key feature, the adaptive

  16. SU-E-T-199: How Number of Control Points Influences the Dynamic IMRT Plan Quality and Deliverability

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S; Manigandan, D; Chander, S; Subramani, V; Julka, P; Rath, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the influence of number of control points on plan quality and deliverability. Methods: Five previously treated patients of carcinoma of rectum were selected. Planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) i.e. bladder and bowel were contoured. Dynamic IMRT plans (6MV, 7-fields, 45Gy/25 fractions and prescribed at 95% isodose) were created in Eclipse (Varian medical system, Palo Alto, CA) treatment planning system (TPS) for Varian CL2300C/D linear-accelerator. Base plan was calculated with 166 control points, variable mode (Eclipse Default). For generating other plans, all parameters were kept constant, only number of control points (Fixed mode) was varied as follows: 100, 166 and 200. Then, plan quality was analyzed in terms of maximum and mean dose received by the PTV and OARs. For plan deliverability, TPS calculated fluence was verified with I’matriXX (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) array and compared with TPS dose-plane using gamma index criteria of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement (DTA). Total number of monitor units (MU) required to deliver a plan was also noted. Results: The maximum variation for the PTV maximum with respect to eclipse default control point (166) was 0.28% (0.14Gy). Similarly, PTV mean varied only up to 0.22 %( 0.11Gy). Bladder maximum and bladder mean varied up to 0.51% (0.24Gy) and 0.16% (0.06Gy). The variation for the bowel maximum and bowel mean was also only 0.39% (0.19Gy) and 0.33% (0.04Gy). Total MU was within 0.32 % (4MU). Average gamma pass rate using different control points for five patients are 98.75±0.33%, 99.37±0.09%, 99.29±0.12%, 98.14±0.13% and 99.25±0.14% respectively. Conclusion: Slight variation (<1%) in PTV and OARs maximum and mean doses was observed with varying number of control points. Monitor unit was also not varied much. Reducing number of control points did not showed any comprise in plan deliverability in terms of gamma index pass rate.

  17. Evaluation of Plantago major L. seed mucilage as a rate controlling matrix for sustained release of propranolol hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Majid; Morteza-Semnani, Katayoun; Sagheb-Doust, Mehdi

    2013-03-01

    Polysaccharide mucilage derived from the seeds of Plantago major L. (family Plantaginaceae) was investigated for use in matrix formulations containing propranolol hydrochloride. HPMC K4M and tragacanth were used as standards for comparison. The hardness, tensile strength, and friability of tablets increased as the concentration of mucilage increased, indicating good compactibility of mucilage powders. The rate of release of propranolol hydrochloride from P. major mucilage matrices was mainly controlled by the drug/mucilage ratio. Formulations containing P. major mucilage were found to exhibit a release rate comparable to HPMC containing matrices at a lower drug/polymer ratio (drug/HPMC 2:1). These results demonstrated that P. major mucilage is a better release retardant compared to tragacanth at an equivalent content. The results of kinetic analysis showed that in F3 (containing 1:2 drug/mucilage) the highest correlation coefficient was achieved with the zero order model. The swelling and erosion studies revealed that as the proportion of mucilage in tablets was increased, there was a corresponding increase in percent swelling and a decrease in percent erosion of tablets. The DSC and FT-IR studies showed that no formation of complex between the drug and mucilage or changes in crystallinity of the drug had occurred. PMID:23482316

  18. Evaluation of Plantago major L. seed mucilage as a rate controlling matrix for sustained release of propranolol hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Majid; Morteza-Semnani, Katayoun; Sagheb-Doust, Mehdi

    2013-03-01

    Polysaccharide mucilage derived from the seeds of Plantago major L. (family Plantaginaceae) was investigated for use in matrix formulations containing propranolol hydrochloride. HPMC K4M and tragacanth were used as standards for comparison. The hardness, tensile strength, and friability of tablets increased as the concentration of mucilage increased, indicating good compactibility of mucilage powders. The rate of release of propranolol hydrochloride from P. major mucilage matrices was mainly controlled by the drug/mucilage ratio. Formulations containing P. major mucilage were found to exhibit a release rate comparable to HPMC containing matrices at a lower drug/polymer ratio (drug/HPMC 2:1). These results demonstrated that P. major mucilage is a better release retardant compared to tragacanth at an equivalent content. The results of kinetic analysis showed that in F3 (containing 1:2 drug/mucilage) the highest correlation coefficient was achieved with the zero order model. The swelling and erosion studies revealed that as the proportion of mucilage in tablets was increased, there was a corresponding increase in percent swelling and a decrease in percent erosion of tablets. The DSC and FT-IR studies showed that no formation of complex between the drug and mucilage or changes in crystallinity of the drug had occurred.

  19. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wognum, S.; Chai, X.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; Bel, A.; Bondar, L.; Zolnay, A. G.; Hoogeman, M. S.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Future developments in image guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) for bladder cancer require accurate deformable image registration techniques for the precise assessment of tumor and bladder motion and deformation that occur as a result of large bladder volume changes during the course of radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to employ an extended version of a point-based deformable registration algorithm that allows control over tissue-specific flexibility in combination with the authors' unique patient dataset, in order to overcome two major challenges of bladder cancer registration, i.e., the difficulty in accounting for the difference in flexibility between the bladder wall and tumor and the lack of visible anatomical landmarks for validation. Methods: The registration algorithm used in the current study is an extension of the symmetric-thin plate splines-robust point matching (S-TPS-RPM) algorithm, a symmetric feature-based registration method. The S-TPS-RPM algorithm has been previously extended to allow control over the degree of flexibility of different structures via a weight parameter. The extended weighted S-TPS-RPM algorithm was tested and validated on CT data (planning- and four to five repeat-CTs) of five urinary bladder cancer patients who received lipiodol injections before radiotherapy. The performance of the weighted S-TPS-RPM method, applied to bladder and tumor structures simultaneously, was compared with a previous version of the S-TPS-RPM algorithm applied to bladder wall structure alone and with a simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. Performance was assessed in terms of anatomical and geometric accuracy. The anatomical accuracy was calculated as the residual distance error (RDE) of the lipiodol markers and the geometric accuracy was determined by the surface distance, surface coverage, and inverse consistency errors. Optimal parameter values for the flexibility and bladder weight

  20. A single point in protein trafficking by Plasmodium falciparum determines the expression of major antigens on the surface of infected erythrocytes targeted by human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jo-Anne; Howell, Katherine B; Langer, Christine; Maier, Alexander G; Hasang, Wina; Rogerson, Stephen J; Petter, Michaela; Chesson, Joanne; Stanisic, Danielle I; Duffy, Michael F; Cooke, Brian M; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Bull, Peter C; Marsh, Kevin; Fowkes, Freya J I; Beeson, James G

    2016-11-01

    Antibodies to blood-stage antigens of Plasmodium falciparum play a pivotal role in human immunity to malaria. During parasite development, multiple proteins are trafficked from the intracellular parasite to the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs). However, the relative importance of different proteins as targets of acquired antibodies, and key pathways involved in trafficking major antigens remain to be clearly defined. We quantified antibodies to surface antigens among children, adults, and pregnant women from different malaria-exposed regions. We quantified the importance of antigens as antibody targets using genetically engineered P. falciparum with modified surface antigen expression. Genetic deletion of the trafficking protein skeleton-binding protein-1 (SBP1), which is involved in trafficking the surface antigen PfEMP1, led to a dramatic reduction in antibody recognition of IEs and the ability of human antibodies to promote opsonic phagocytosis of IEs, a key mechanism of parasite clearance. The great majority of antibody epitopes on the IE surface were SBP1-dependent. This was demonstrated using parasite isolates with different genetic or phenotypic backgrounds, and among antibodies from children, adults, and pregnant women in different populations. Comparisons of antibody reactivity to parasite isolates with SBP1 deletion or inhibited PfEMP1 expression suggest that PfEMP1 is the dominant target of acquired human antibodies, and that other P. falciparum IE surface proteins are minor targets. These results establish SBP1 as part of a critical pathway for the trafficking of major surface antigens targeted by human immunity, and have key implications for vaccine development, and quantifying immunity in populations.

  1. Neuro Emotional Technique for the treatment of trigger point sensitivity in chronic neck pain sufferers: A controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Bablis, Peter; Pollard, Henry; Bonello, Rod

    2008-01-01

    Background Trigger points have been shown to be active in many myofascial pain syndromes. Treatment of trigger point pain and dysfunction may be explained through the mechanisms of central and peripheral paradigms. This study aimed to investigate whether the mind/body treatment of Neuro Emotional Technique (NET) could significantly relieve pain sensitivity of trigger points presenting in a cohort of chronic neck pain sufferers. Methods Sixty participants presenting to a private chiropractic clinic with chronic cervical pain as their primary complaint were sequentially allocated into treatment and control groups. Participants in the treatment group received a short course of Neuro Emotional Technique that consists of muscle testing, general semantics and Traditional Chinese Medicine. The control group received a sham NET protocol. Outcome measurements included pain assessment utilizing a visual analog scale and a pressure gauge algometer. Pain sensitivity was measured at four trigger point locations: suboccipital region (S); levator scapulae region (LS); sternocleidomastoid region (SCM) and temporomandibular region (TMJ). For each outcome measurement and each trigger point, we calculated the change in measurement between pre- and post- treatment. We then examined the relationships between these measurement changes and six independent variables (i.e. treatment group and the above five additional participant variables) using forward stepwise General Linear Model. Results The visual analog scale (0 to 10) had an improvement of 7.6 at S, 7.2 at LS, 7.5 at SCM and 7.1 at the TMJ in the treatment group compared with no improvement of at S, and an improvement of 0.04 at LS, 0.1 at SCM and 0.1 at the TMJ point in the control group, (P < 0.001). Conclusion After a short course of NET treatment, measurements of visual analog scale and pressure algometer recordings of four trigger point locations in a cohort of chronic neck pain sufferers were significantly improved when

  2. Design and evaluation of an optical fine-pointing control system for telescopes utilizing a digital star sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Romanczyk, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    One of the most significant problems associated with the development of large orbiting astronomical telescopes is that of maintaining the very precise pointing accuracy required. A proposed solution to this problem utilizes dual-level pointing control. The primary control system maintains the telescope structure attitude stabilized within the field of view to the desired accuracy. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of optically stabilizing the star images to the desired accuracy a regulating system has been designed and evaluated. The control system utilizes a digital star sensor and an optical star image motion compensator, both of which have been developed for this application. These components have been analyzed mathematically, analytical models have been developed, and hardware has been built and tested.

  3. Maximum Principle of Optimal Control of the Primitive Equations of the Ocean with Two Point Boundary State Constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Tachim Medjo, Theodore

    2010-08-15

    We study in this article the Pontryagin's maximum principle for a class of control problems associated with the primitive equations (PEs) of the ocean with two point boundary state constraint. These optimal problems involve a two point boundary state constraint similar to that considered in Wang, Nonlinear Anal. 51, 509-536, 2002 for the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The main difference between this work and Wang, Nonlinear Anal. 51, 509-536, 2002 is that the nonlinearity in the PEs is stronger than in the three-dimensional NS systems.

  4. Design of robust line-of-sight pointing control system for the SCOLE configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.; Armstrong, E. S.

    1987-01-01

    Robust compensator design for attitude control of the Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) configuration is considered. A loop-shaping procedure similar to that used in the LQG/LTR method is used to iteratively design the compensator. A satisfactory compensator is obtained by including the rigid modes and three elastic modes in the design model.

  5. Selection and allocation of manual traffic control points and personnel during emergencies.

    PubMed

    Parr, Scott A; Wolshon, Brian; Dixit, Vinayak

    2015-01-01

    Manual traffic control is an intersection control strategy in which law enforcement officers allocate intersection right-of-way to turning movements. Many emergency traffic management plans call for manual traffic control in response to oversaturated roadway conditions. This is because it is thought to more effectively move traffic during temporary surges in demand. The goal of this research was to evaluate the current state-of-the-practice used by the Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) in selecting intersections for manual traffic control and allocating police personnel to them during emergencies. This research uses the emergency traffic management plans developed by the ACE for nine counties in the Maryland Eastern Shore region. This area encompassing 14,318 intersections of which 74 were selected for manual traffic control during emergencies. This work sought to quantify the correlations that exist between intersection attributes and the ACE' decision to allocate officers to control them. The research findings suggest that US routes, State routes, and emergency evacuation routes are statistically significant in determining the need for police control at intersections. Also significant are intersection on contraflow corridors and intersections near grade separated interchanges. The model also determined that intersections isolated from evacuation routes and county exits were more likely to be selected for manual control, indicating that rural areas may rely on manual traffic control in the absence of multilane highway and freeways. This research also found that intersections involving evacuation routes, contraflow corridors, and grade separated interchanges may warrant additional police personnel (two or more officers) for manual traffic control.

  6. Selection and allocation of manual traffic control points and personnel during emergencies.

    PubMed

    Parr, Scott A; Wolshon, Brian; Dixit, Vinayak

    2015-01-01

    Manual traffic control is an intersection control strategy in which law enforcement officers allocate intersection right-of-way to turning movements. Many emergency traffic management plans call for manual traffic control in response to oversaturated roadway conditions. This is because it is thought to more effectively move traffic during temporary surges in demand. The goal of this research was to evaluate the current state-of-the-practice used by the Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) in selecting intersections for manual traffic control and allocating police personnel to them during emergencies. This research uses the emergency traffic management plans developed by the ACE for nine counties in the Maryland Eastern Shore region. This area encompassing 14,318 intersections of which 74 were selected for manual traffic control during emergencies. This work sought to quantify the correlations that exist between intersection attributes and the ACE' decision to allocate officers to control them. The research findings suggest that US routes, State routes, and emergency evacuation routes are statistically significant in determining the need for police control at intersections. Also significant are intersection on contraflow corridors and intersections near grade separated interchanges. The model also determined that intersections isolated from evacuation routes and county exits were more likely to be selected for manual control, indicating that rural areas may rely on manual traffic control in the absence of multilane highway and freeways. This research also found that intersections involving evacuation routes, contraflow corridors, and grade separated interchanges may warrant additional police personnel (two or more officers) for manual traffic control. PMID:25902295

  7. Hardware description ADSP-21020 40-bit floating point DSP as designed in a remotely controlled digital CW Doppler radar

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, R.E.; Robinson, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    A continuous wave Doppler radar system has been designed which is portable, easily deployed, and remotely controlled. The heart of this system is a DSP/control board using Analog Devices ADSP-21020 40-bit floating point digital signal processor (DSP) microprocessor. Two 18-bit audio A/D converters provide digital input to the DSP/controller board for near real time target detection. Program memory for the DSP is dual ported with an Intel 87C51 microcontroller allowing DSP code to be up-loaded or down-loaded from a central controlling computer. The 87C51 provides overall system control for the remote radar and includes a time-of-day/day-of-year real time clock, system identification (ID) switches, and input/output (I/O) expansion by an Intel 82C55 I/O expander. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Multi-Scale Matching for the Automatic Location of Control Points in Large Scale Aerial Images Using Terrestrial Scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berveglieri, A.; Tommaselli, A. M. G.

    2014-03-01

    A technique to automatically locate Ground Control Points (GCPs) in large aerial images is presented considering the availability of low accuracy direct georeferencing data. The approach is based on image chips of GCPs extracted from vertical terrestrial images. A strategy combining image matching techniques was implemented to select correct matches. These matches were used to define a 2D transformation with which the GCP is projected close to its correct position, reducing the search space in the aerial image. Area-based matching with some refinements is used to locate GCPs with sub-pixel precision. Experiments were performed with multi-scale images and assessed with a bundle block adjustment simulating an indirect sensor orientation. The accuracy analysis was accomplished based on discrepancies obtained from GCPs and check points. The results were better than interactive measurements and a planimetric accuracy of 1/5 of the Ground Sample Distance (GSD) for the check points was achieved.

  9. Control and automation of the Pegasus multi-point Thomson scattering system

    DOE PAGES

    Bodner, Grant M.; Bongard, Michael W.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Reusch, Joshua A.; Rodriguez Sanchez, C.; Schlossberg, David J.

    2016-08-12

    A new control system for the Pegasus Thomson scattering diagnostic has recently been deployed to automate the laser operation, data collection process, and interface with the system-wide Pegasus control code. Automation has been extended to areas outside of data collection, such as manipulation of beamline cameras and remotely controlled turning mirror actuators to enable intra-shot beam alignment. In addition, the system has been upgraded with a set of fast (~1 ms) mechanical shutters to mitigate contamination from background light. Modification and automation of the Thomson system have improved both data quality and diagnostic reliability.

  10. Control and automation of the Pegasus multi-point Thomson scattering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Rodriguez Sanchez, C.; Schlossberg, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    A new control system for the Pegasus Thomson scattering diagnostic has recently been deployed to automate the laser operation, data collection process, and interface with the system-wide Pegasus control code. Automation has been extended to areas outside of data collection, such as manipulation of beamline cameras and remotely controlled turning mirror actuators to enable intra-shot beam alignment. Additionally, the system has been upgraded with a set of fast (˜1 ms) mechanical shutters to mitigate contamination from background light. Modification and automation of the Thomson system have improved both data quality and diagnostic reliability.

  11. Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points among Chinese Food Business Operators

    PubMed Central

    Amadei, Paolo; Masotti, Gianfranco; Condoleo, Roberto; Guidi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to highlight some critical situations emerged during the implementation of long-term projects locally managed by Prevention Services, to control some manufacturing companies in Rome and Prato, Central Italy. In particular, some critical issues on the application of self-control in marketing and catering held by Chinese operators are underlined. The study showed serious flaws in preparing and controlling of manuals for good hygiene practice, participating of the consultants among food business operators (FBOs) to the control of the procedures. Only after regular actions by the Prevention Services, there have been satisfying results. This confirms the need to have qualified and expert partners able to promptly act among FBOs and to give adequate support to authorities in charge in order to guarantee food safety. PMID:27800356

  12. Effects of cortisol on hippocampal subfields volumes and memory performance in healthy control subjects and patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Travis, Scott G; Coupland, Nicholas J; Hegadoren, K; Silverstone, Peter H; Huang, Yushan; Carter, Rawle; Fujiwara, Esther; Seres, Peter; Malykhin, Nikolai V

    2016-09-01

    Overactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in major depressive disorder (MDD) is among the most consistently replicated biological findings in psychiatry. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have consistently demonstrated that hippocampal (HC) volume is decreased in patients with MDD. The improved spatial resolution of high field strength MRI has recently enabled measurements of HC subfield volumes in vivo. The main goal of the present study was to examine the relationship between cortisol concentrations over a day and HC subfield volumes in patients with MDD compared to healthy controls and to investigate whether diurnal cortisol measures are related to memory performance. Fourteen MDD patients with moderate or severe episodes were recruited, together with 14 healthy controls. Imaging was performed using a 4.7T whole-body imaging system. HC subfields and subregions were segmented manually using previously defined protocol. Memory performance was assessed using the Wechsler Memory Scale IV. The salivary cortisol levels were measured over the course of one day. We found that cortisol awakening response to 8h (CAR-8h) was higher in MDD patients compared to controls and that this increase in CAR-8h in MDD patients correlated negatively with left total Cornu Ammonis (CA)1-3 and left HC head volume. In healthy controls mean cortisol levels were negatively associated with right total CA1-3, right HC head, and right total HC volume. In addition, in healthy controls higher CAR-8h was related to worse performance on the immediate content memory. These results provide the first in vivo evidence of the negative associations between cortisol level, CA1-3 HC subfield volume and memory performance in patients with MDD and healthy controls. PMID:27162154

  13. Pitch Characteristics Before Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Major League Pitchers Compared With Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Prodromo, John; Patel, Nimit; Kumar, Neil; Denehy, Kevin; Tabb, Loni Philip; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is commonly performed in Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers, but little is known about the preoperative pitch type and velocity characteristics of pitchers who go on to undergo UCLR. Hypothesis: Pitchers who required UCLR have thrown a greater percentage of fastballs and have greater pitch velocities compared with age-matched controls in the season before injury. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: MLB pitchers active during the 2002 to 2015 seasons were included. The UCLR group consisted of MLB pitchers who received UCLR between 2003 and 2015, utilizing the season before surgery (2002-2014) for analysis. The control group comprised age-matched controls of the same season. Players who pitched less than 20 innings in the season before surgery were excluded. Pitch types were recorded as percentage of total pitches thrown. Pitch velocities were recorded for each pitch type. Pitch type and pitch velocities during preoperative seasons for UCLR pitchers were compared with age-matched controls using univariate and multivariate models. Results: A total of 114 cases that went on to UCLR and 3780 controls were included in the study. Pitchers who went on to UCLR appear to have greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities; there were no significant differences in pitch selection between the 2 groups. Conclusion: In the season before surgery, MLB pitchers who underwent UCLR demonstrated greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities, with no significant difference in pitch type. PMID:27350954

  14. Active control on high-order coherence and statistic characterization on random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources.

    PubMed

    Hong, Peilong; Li, Liming; Liu, Jianji; Zhang, Guoquan

    2016-01-01

    Young's double-slit or two-beam interference is of fundamental importance to understand various interference effects, in which the stationary phase difference between two beams plays the key role in the first-order coherence. Different from the case of first-order coherence, in the high-order optical coherence the statistic behavior of the optical phase will play the key role. In this article, by employing a fundamental interfering configuration with two classical point sources, we showed that the high- order optical coherence between two classical point sources can be actively designed by controlling the statistic behavior of the relative phase difference between two point sources. Synchronous position Nth-order subwavelength interference with an effective wavelength of λ/M was demonstrated, in which λ is the wavelength of point sources and M is an integer not larger than N. Interestingly, we found that the synchronous position Nth-order interference fringe fingerprints the statistic trace of random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources, therefore, it provides an effective way to characterize the statistic properties of phase fluctuation for incoherent light sources.

  15. Active control on high-order coherence and statistic characterization on random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Peilong; Li, Liming; Liu, Jianji; Zhang, Guoquan

    2016-01-01

    Young’s double-slit or two-beam interference is of fundamental importance to understand various interference effects, in which the stationary phase difference between two beams plays the key role in the first-order coherence. Different from the case of first-order coherence, in the high-order optical coherence the statistic behavior of the optical phase will play the key role. In this article, by employing a fundamental interfering configuration with two classical point sources, we showed that the high- order optical coherence between two classical point sources can be actively designed by controlling the statistic behavior of the relative phase difference between two point sources. Synchronous position Nth-order subwavelength interference with an effective wavelength of λ/M was demonstrated, in which λ is the wavelength of point sources and M is an integer not larger than N. Interestingly, we found that the synchronous position Nth-order interference fringe fingerprints the statistic trace of random phase fluctuation of two classical point sources, therefore, it provides an effective way to characterize the statistic properties of phase fluctuation for incoherent light sources. PMID:27021589

  16. A double-loop structure in the adaptive generalized predictive control algorithm for control of robot end-point contact force.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shuhuan; Zhu, Jinghai; Li, Xiaoli; Chen, Shengyong

    2014-09-01

    Robot force control is an essential issue in robotic intelligence. There is much high uncertainty when robot end-effector contacts with the environment. Because of the environment stiffness effects on the system of the robot end-effector contact with environment, the adaptive generalized predictive control algorithm based on quantitative feedback theory is designed for robot end-point contact force system. The controller of the internal loop is designed on the foundation of QFT to control the uncertainty of the system. An adaptive GPC algorithm is used to design external loop controller to improve the performance and the robustness of the system. Two closed loops used in the design approach realize the system׳s performance and improve the robustness. The simulation results show that the algorithm of the robot end-effector contacting force control system is effective. PMID:24973336

  17. A double-loop structure in the adaptive generalized predictive control algorithm for control of robot end-point contact force.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shuhuan; Zhu, Jinghai; Li, Xiaoli; Chen, Shengyong

    2014-09-01

    Robot force control is an essential issue in robotic intelligence. There is much high uncertainty when robot end-effector contacts with the environment. Because of the environment stiffness effects on the system of the robot end-effector contact with environment, the adaptive generalized predictive control algorithm based on quantitative feedback theory is designed for robot end-point contact force system. The controller of the internal loop is designed on the foundation of QFT to control the uncertainty of the system. An adaptive GPC algorithm is used to design external loop controller to improve the performance and the robustness of the system. Two closed loops used in the design approach realize the system׳s performance and improve the robustness. The simulation results show that the algorithm of the robot end-effector contacting force control system is effective.

  18. Prevention and control of major non-communicable diseases in China from 1990 to 2009: results of a two-round Delphi survey

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jun; Liu, Miao; Jiang, Yu; Li, Li-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to learn about the progress of the prevention and control of major non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in China from 1990 to 2009 and to determine what prevention and control gaps remain based on the opinions of a group of panellists. Design Sixty-four panellists, who are members of the Subcommittee of the Non-Communicable Diseases, the Expert Committee on Disease Control and Prevention established by China's Ministry of Health in 2010, were invited to participate in an email-based, two-round Delphi survey. In each round, a structured questionnaire was given to participants, who were asked to rate the importance and practical implementation of items relevant to the prevention and control of NCDs over two periods, 1990–1999 and 2000–2009, on a 10-point scale. Results Of the 64 panellists invited, 20 (31.3%) completed the first-round survey, and, of those, 14 (70.0%) completed the second-round survey. Of the 237 common variables in the two survey rounds, there were 161 (67.9%) and 209 (88.2%) with an interquartile range ≤2 in the first round and second round, respectively. These results indicated a better expert consensus in the second round. There were 92 items in total in the second round of the questionnaire, 88 (95.7%) of which had median importance rating scores of equal to or greater than 7.00. The median scores for the practical implementation items during 2000–2009 were greater than those for the 1990–1999 period. The results indicate improved implementation in the recent decade. Conclusions China has made progress in the prevention and control of NCDs during the 21st century. However, these intuitive rating results indicate that there are still large action gaps in the fight against epidemic NCDs in China. PMID:23406920

  19. Design of state-feedback controllers including sensitivity reduction, with applications to precision pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadass, Z.

    1974-01-01

    The design procedure of feedback controllers was described and the considerations for the selection of the design parameters were given. The frequency domain properties of single-input single-output systems using state feedback controllers are analyzed, and desirable phase and gain margin properties are demonstrated. Special consideration is given to the design of controllers for tracking systems, especially those designed to track polynomial commands. As an example, a controller was designed for a tracking telescope with a polynomial tracking requirement and some special features such as actuator saturation and multiple measurements, one of which is sampled. The resulting system has a tracking performance comparing favorably with a much more complicated digital aided tracker. The parameter sensitivity reduction was treated by considering the variable parameters as random variables. A performance index is defined as a weighted sum of the state and control convariances that sum from both the random system disturbances and the parameter uncertainties, and is minimized numerically by adjusting a set of free parameters.

  20. The differential characteristics of control rods of VVER-1000 core simulator at a low number of axial mesh points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolsunov, A. A.; Karpov, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    An algorithm for refining the differential characteristics of the control rods (CRs) of the control and protection system (CPS) for a neutronics model of the VVER-1000 simulator at a low number of axial mesh points of the core is described. The problem of determining the constants for a cell with a partially inserted CR is solved. The cell constants obtained using the proposed approach ensure smoothing of the differential characteristics of an absorbing rod. The algorithm was used in the VVER-1000 simulators (Bushehr NPP, unit no. 1; Rostov NPP, unit no. 1; and Balakovo NPP, unit no. 4).

  1. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Active-Reference, Double-Blind, Flexible-Dose Study of the Efficacy of Vortioxetine on Cognitive Function in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mahableshwarkar, Atul R; Zajecka, John; Jacobson, William; Chen, Yinzhong; Keefe, Richard SE

    2015-01-01

    This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, active-referenced (duloxetine 60 mg), parallel-group study evaluated the short-term efficacy and safety of vortioxetine (10–20 mg) on cognitive function in adults (aged 18–65 years) diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) who self-reported cognitive dysfunction. Efficacy was evaluated using ANCOVA for the change from baseline to week 8 in the digit symbol substitution test (DSST)–number of correct symbols as the prespecified primary end point. The patient-reported perceived deficits questionnaire (PDQ) and physician-assessed clinical global impression (CGI) were analyzed in a prespecified hierarchical testing sequence as key secondary end points. Additional predefined end points included the objective performance-based University of San Diego performance-based skills assessment (UPSA) (ANCOVA) to measure functionality, MADRS (MMRM) to assess efficacy in depression, and a prespecified multiple regression analysis (path analysis) to calculate direct vs indirect effects of vortioxetine on cognitive function. Safety and tolerability were assessed at all visits. Vortioxetine was statistically superior to placebo on the DSST (P<0.05), PDQ (P<0.01), CGI-I (P<0.001), MADRS (P<0.05), and UPSA (P<0.001). Path analysis indicated that vortioxetine's cognitive benefit was primarily a direct treatment effect rather than due to alleviation of depressive symptoms. Duloxetine was not significantly different from placebo on the DSST or UPSA, but was superior to placebo on the PDQ, CGI-I, and MADRS. Common adverse events (incidence ⩾5%) for vortioxetine were nausea, headache, and diarrhea. In this study of MDD adults who self-reported cognitive dysfunction, vortioxetine significantly improved cognitive function, depression, and functionality and was generally well tolerated. PMID:25687662

  2. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Pointing Control System Performance During Transfer Orbit and Initial On-Orbit Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quast, Peter; Tung, Frank; West, Mark; Wider, John

    2000-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO, formerly AXAF) is the third of the four NASA great observatories. It was launched from Kennedy Space Flight Center on 23 July 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia and was successfully inserted in a 330 x 72,000 km orbit by the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS). Through a series of five Integral Propulsion System burns, CXO was placed in a 10,000 x 139,000 km orbit. After initial on-orbit checkout, Chandra's first light images were unveiled to the public on 26 August, 1999. The CXO Pointing Control and Aspect Determination (PCAD) subsystem is designed to perform attitude control and determination functions in support of transfer orbit operations and on-orbit science mission. After a brief description of the PCAD subsystem, the paper highlights the PCAD activities during the transfer orbit and initial on-orbit operations. These activities include: CXO/IUS separation, attitude and gyro bias estimation with earth sensor and sun sensor, attitude control and disturbance torque estimation for delta-v burns, momentum build-up due to gravity gradient and solar pressure, momentum unloading with thrusters, attitude initialization with star measurements, gyro alignment calibration, maneuvering and transition to normal pointing, and PCAD pointing and stability performance.

  3. Initial performance improvements due to design modifications for the Pointing Control System on the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurre, G. S.; Sharkey, J. P.; Waites, H. B.

    Shortly after Hubble Space Telescope was deployed on orbit it became apparent that the Pointing Control System was experiencing unexpectedly large disturbances during certain portions of the orbit. While these disturbances were most pronounced during transitions of the Earth's shadow, significant disruptions to the pointing occurred at other times in the orbit. Careful analysis of the flight data has lead to the conclusion that the disturbances are caused by a combination of rapid thermal deformations of the Solar Arrays together with striction-friction mechanisms within the array that randomly release stored thermal/mechanical energy. This paper describes the baseline pointing control system design and the flight data that characterized the effects of the extraneous disturbances. The paper goes on to describe the procedure for modifying the onboard controller to attenuate the disturbances to levels consistent with the science operations. Flight data demonstrating the improved performance are shown and are tabulated to compare performance prior to and after phase I of the redesign.

  4. Precision Pointing Control to and Accurate Target Estimation of a Non-Cooperative Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanEepoel, John; Thienel, Julie; Sanner, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, NASA began investigating a robotic servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Such a mission would not only require estimates of the HST attitude and rates in order to achieve capture by the proposed Hubble Robotic Vehicle (HRV), but also precision control to achieve the desired rate and maintain the orientation to successfully dock with HST. To generalize the situation, HST is the target vehicle and HRV is the chaser. This work presents a nonlinear approach for estimating the body rates of a non-cooperative target vehicle, and coupling this estimation to a control scheme. Non-cooperative in this context relates to the target vehicle no longer having the ability to maintain attitude control or transmit attitude knowledge.

  5. Improvement of a geodetic triangulation through control points established by means of satellite or precision traversing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxena, N. K.

    1972-01-01

    Whether any significant increment to accuracy could be transferred from a super-control continental net (continental satellite net or super-transcontinental traverse) to the fundamental geodetic net (first-order triangulation) is discussed. This objective was accomplished by evaluating the positional accuracy improvement for a triangulation station, which is near the middle of the investigated geodetic triangulation net, by using various station constraints over its geodetic position. This investigation on a 1858 kilometer long triangulation chain shows that the super-control net can provide a useful constraint to the investigated geodetic triangulation net, and thus can improve it only when the accuracy of super-control net is at least 1 part in 500,000.

  6. Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Raymond P.; Schmalzer, David K.; Wright, Charles H.

    1982-12-21

    The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships.

  7. Method for controlling boiling point distribution of coal liquefaction oil product

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.P.; Schmalzer, D.K.; Wright, C.H.

    1982-12-21

    The relative ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate produced in a coal liquefaction process is continuously controlled by automatically and continuously controlling the ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in a liquid solvent used to form the feed slurry to the coal liquefaction zone, and varying the weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the liquid solvent inversely with respect to the desired weight ratio of heavy distillate to light distillate in the distillate fuel oil product. The concentration of light distillate and heavy distillate in the liquid solvent is controlled by recycling predetermined amounts of light distillate and heavy distillate for admixture with feed coal to the process in accordance with the foregoing relationships. 3 figs.

  8. Assessment of autonomic control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia using point process models of human heart beat dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2009-07-01

    Tracking the autonomic control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) from electrocardiogram and respiratory measurements is an important problem in cardiovascular control. We propose a point process adaptive filter algorithm based on an inverse Gaussian model to track heart beat intervals that incorporates respiratory measurements as a covariate and provides an analytic form for computing a dynamic estimate of RSA gain. We use Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests and autocorrelation function analyses to assess model goodness-of-fit. We illustrate the properties of the new dynamic estimate of RSA in the analysis of simulated heart beat data and actual heart beat data recorded from subjects in a four-state postural study of heart beat dynamics: control, sympathetic blockade, parasympathetic blockade, and combined sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade. In addition to giving an accurate description of the heart beat data, our adaptive filter algorithm confirms established findings pointing at a vagally mediated RSA and provides a new dynamic RSA estimate that can be used to track cardiovascular control between and within a broad range of postural, pharmacological, and age conditions. Our paradigm suggests a possible framework for designing a device for ambulatory monitoring and assessment of autonomic control in both laboratory research and clinical practice.

  9. Assessment of Autonomic Control and Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia Using Point Process Models of Human Heart Beat Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe; Brown, Emery N.; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Tracking the autonomic control and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) from electrocardiogram and respiratory measurements is an important problem in cardiovascular control. We propose a point process adaptive filter algorithm based on an inverse Gaussian model to track heart beat intervals that incorporates respiratory measurements as a covariate and provides an analytic form for computing a dynamic estimate of RSA gain. We use Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests and autocorrelation function analyses to assess model goodness-of-fit. We illustrate the properties of the new dynamic estimate of RSA in the analysis of simulated heart beat data and actual heart beat data recorded from subjects in a four-state postural study of heart beat dynamics: control, sympathetic blockade, parasympathetic blockade, and combined sympathetic and parasympathetic blockade. In addition to giving an accurate description of the heart beat data, our adaptive filter algorithm confirms established findings pointing at a vagally mediated RSA, and it provides a new dynamic RSA estimate that can be used to track cardiovascular control between and within a broad range of postural, pharmacological and age conditions. Our paradigm suggests a possible framework for designing a device for ambulatory monitoring and assessment of autonomic control in both laboratory research and clinical practice. PMID:19272971

  10. Design and Integration of an All-Magnetic Attitude Control System for FASTSAT-HSV01's Multiple Pointing Objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeKock, Brandon; Sanders, Devon; Vanzwieten, Tannen; Capo-Lugo, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    The FASTSAT-HSV01 spacecraft is a microsatellite with magnetic torque rods as it sole attitude control actuator. FASTSAT s multiple payloads and mission functions require the Attitude Control System (ACS) to maintain Local Vertical Local Horizontal (LVLH)-referenced attitudes without spin-stabilization, while the pointing errors for some attitudes be significantly smaller than the previous best-demonstrated for this type of control system. The mission requires the ACS to hold multiple stable, unstable, and non-equilibrium attitudes, as well as eject a 3U CubeSat from an onboard P-POD and recover from the ensuing tumble. This paper describes the Attitude Control System, the reasons for design choices, how the ACS integrates with the rest of the spacecraft, and gives recommendations for potential future applications of the work.

  11. Assessment Of ASTER GDEM And SRTM Performance By Comparing With Survey Control Points And Icesat/GLAS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarihani, A. A.; Callow, J. N.

    2011-12-01

    Topographic data plays a critical role in water resources modeling with determining watershed hydrologic characteristics from raster-based digital elevation models (DEM). Raster-based DEMs have been widely used to derive topographic attributes used in hydraulic and hydrologic modeling such as slope, stream network, basins boundary and area. Accurate models of floodplain topography are essential for having accurate output of hydrologic models. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) provides near-global topographic coverage of the Earth's surface with unprecedented consistency and accuracy with the resolution of 1-3 arc sec. A new Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) from optical stereo data acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) was recently released with the resolution of 1 arc sec. This study the performance of the ASTER GDEM and SRTM DEMs is assessed by comparing with ground-based survey control points and point data from ICESat/GLAS (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite/Geoscience Laser Altimeter System) for a 7x7degree area in Queensland Australia. This area contains large and remote river basins, where these datasets provide an invaluable resource from which river floodplain inundation can be measured and modelled. Our study focuses on both data and datum issues, which are required to provide a realistic assessment of the achievable relative and absolute ground topographic accuracies. We assessed ground-based survey control points' with ICESat satellite altimetry points and in turn assessed accuracy of the ASTER GDEM and SRTM DEMs over the study area. ICESat provides globally-distributed elevation data of high accuracy (2.47.3 m horizontal error and 0.040.13 m (per degree of incidence angle) vertical error)We applied the GLA14 elevation products (Land/Canopy elevations) for the Laser 3a observation period and Release 31 to compare with 5000 ground survey control points in study area.Our ICESat-control

  12. Optical Data Links For Point-Of-Sale (POS) Electronic Terminals, Communications And Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Charles C. K.; Parikh, Bipin D.

    1980-09-01

    This paper describes an optical data link designed to meet high performance, reliability, and cost requirements at 1.25 and 10 Mb/s. Several new technologies are embodied in this design. This link utilizes a fast, broad-area, low-brightness light-emitting diode (LED) optical source, a low-loss optical fiber having a large core and high numerical aperture (N.A.), and a PIN photodiode detector. Rather simple circuitry is used to drive the LED and to regenerate the received optical signal at the PIN. The optical interfacing hardware is designed to provide simultaneous transmission of the optical and electrical signals, making the optical data link compatible with mainframe hardware and providing relocatability and reduced installation costs. The data link has met the various performance specifications for point-of-sale (POS) terminals in the laboratory, and it is presently being evaluated more extensively.

  13. Survey on advances in orbital dynamics and control for libration point orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming; Liang, Yuying; Ren, Kewei

    2016-04-01

    Libration point orbits (LPOs) have drawn a lot of interest because of their great significance in deep space exploration. This paper summarizes the past developments and then presents the current state-of-art of LPOs including the dynamical structure of phase space, the transfer trajectories and homoclinic/heterclinic connections of LPOs, the station-keeping strategies, and some constellation deployments employing LPOs. Subsequently addressed are the applications of the LPO theory into the fields of lunar transfers, solar sail equilibria and formation flying. Finally, future research directions on LPOs are described from the aspects of the existence proof of Halo orbits, orbital design for the potential missions motivated by LPOs, and so on.

  14. Evaluation of Control Points in Youngstock and Adult Dairy Cow Management to Control Transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Goal Complete a series of controlled on-farm trials to critically evaluate the efficacy and cost-benefit of commonly recommended management practices for reducing the transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) in infected herds. Objective 1. Evaluate the effect of maternity...

  15. AKT3 controls mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy via regulation of the major nuclear export protein CRM-1.

    PubMed

    Corum, Daniel G; Tsichlis, Philip N; Muise-Helmericks, Robin C

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that Akt3 is required for mitochondrial biogenesis in primary human endothelial cells (ECs) and in Akt3-null mice; Akt3 affects subcellular localization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1 (PGC-1α), the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. The purpose of this study is to determine the mechanism by which Akt3 controls the subcellular distribution of PGC-1α and to explore the effect on mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover during angiogenesis. Here we use standard biochemical analyses and Akt3-knockdown strategies to show that Akt3 controls the stabilization of chromosome maintenance region-1 (CRM-1), the major nuclear export receptor. Site-directed mutagenesis and association analyses show that PGC-1α nuclear export is CRM-1 dependent. Akt3 knockdown and CRM-1 overexpression cause 3-fold reductions in PGC-1α target gene expression, compared to control levels. Akt3 inhibition causes autophagy, as measured by autophagosome formation, in a CRM-1-dependent, Akt1/mTOR-independent pathway. In vivo, Akt3-null and heterozygous mice show dose-dependent decreases in angiogenesis compared to wild-type littermates (~5- and 2.5-fold decreases, respectively), as assessed by Matrigel plug assays. This correlates with an ~1.5-fold decrease in mitochondrial Cox IV expression. Our studies suggest that Akt3 is a regulator of mitochondrial dynamics in the vasculature via regulation of CRM-1-dependent nuclear export.

  16. Population and forensic genetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA control region variation from six major provinces in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung Beom; Kim, Ki Cheol; Kim, Wook

    2015-07-01

    We generated complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences from 704 unrelated individuals residing in six major provinces in Korea. In addition to our earlier survey of the distribution of mtDNA haplogroup variation, a total of 560 different haplotypes characterized by 271 polymorphic sites were identified, of which 473 haplotypes were unique. The gene diversity and random match probability were 0.9989 and 0.0025, respectively. According to the pairwise comparison of the 704 control region sequences, the mean number of pairwise differences between individuals was 13.47±6.06. Based on the result of mtDNA control region sequences, pairwise FST genetic distances revealed genetic homogeneity of the Korean provinces on a peninsular level, except in samples from Jeju Island. This result indicates there may be a need to formulate a local mtDNA database for Jeju Island, to avoid bias in forensic parameter estimates caused by genetic heterogeneity of the population. Thus, the present data may help not only in personal identification but also in determining maternal lineages to provide an expanded and reliable Korean mtDNA database. These data will be available on the EMPOP database via accession number EMP00661.

  17. Prevention of Relapse and Recurrence in Adults with Major Depressive Disorder: Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses of Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wai Keat; Sim, Jordan; Sum, Min Yi; Baldessarini, Ross J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Findings of substantial remaining morbidity in treated major depressive disorder (MDD) led us to review controlled trials of treatments aimed at preventing early relapses or later recurrences in adults diagnosed with MDD to summarize available data and to guide further research. Methods: Reports (n = 97) were identified through systematic, computerized literature searching up to February 2015. Treatment versus control outcomes were summarized by random-effects meta-analyses. Results: In 45 reports of 72 trials (n = 14 450 subjects) lasting 33.4 weeks, antidepressants were more effective than placebos in preventing relapses (response rates [RR] = 1.90, confidence interval [CI]: 1.73–2.08; NNT = 4.4; p < 0.0001). In 35 reports of 37 trials (n = 7253) lasting 27.0 months, antidepressants were effective in preventing recurrences (RR = 2.03, CI 1.80–2.28; NNT = 3.8; p < 0.0001), with minor differences among drug types. In 17 reports of 22 trials (n = 1 969) lasting 23.7 months, psychosocial interventions yielded inconsistent or inconclusive results. Conclusions: Despite evidence of the efficacy of drug treatment compared to placebos or other controls, the findings further underscore the substantial, unresolved morbidity in treated MDD patients and strongly encourage further evaluations of specific, improved individual and combination therapies (pharmacological and psychological) conducted over longer times, as well as identifying clinical predictors of positive or unfavorable responses and of intolerability of long-term treatments in MDD. PMID:26152228

  18. Cognitive functions in adults with β-thalassemia major: before and after blood transfusion and comparison with healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Raz, Sivan; Koren, Ariel; Dan, Orrie; Levin, Carina

    2016-07-01

    While β-thalassemia major (β-TM)-related physiological complications have been well established, less is known about implications for neuropsychological and cognitive function. The few existing studies have focused almost exclusively on children. We evaluated cognitive function in adult β-TM patients compared to healthy controls (study 1) and in β-TM patients before and after blood transfusion (study 2). Performance intelligence quotient (IQ) was evaluated with four subtests from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III). Attention functions were evaluated using the online continuous performance test (OCPT). The results of study 1 revealed poorer performance of β-TM patients on three of the four intelligence subtests, with significantly lower total performance IQ scores compared with controls. The percentage of participants with abnormal performance IQ (<85) was almost five times higher in the β-TM group (58%) than in the control group (12%). In study 2, significant differences were found in OCPT performance as a function of blood transfusion. Before transfusion, patients had higher rates of omission and commission errors, slower response times (RTs), and lower RT consistency than after transfusion. As β-TM patients' life expectancy is increasing, assessment and treatment of neurocognitive functions should become an integral part of appropriate follow-up to improve patients' quality of life. PMID:27447535

  19. Cognitive functions in adults with β-thalassemia major: before and after blood transfusion and comparison with healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Raz, Sivan; Koren, Ariel; Dan, Orrie; Levin, Carina

    2016-07-01

    While β-thalassemia major (β-TM)-related physiological complications have been well established, less is known about implications for neuropsychological and cognitive function. The few existing studies have focused almost exclusively on children. We evaluated cognitive function in adult β-TM patients compared to healthy controls (study 1) and in β-TM patients before and after blood transfusion (study 2). Performance intelligence quotient (IQ) was evaluated with four subtests from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-III). Attention functions were evaluated using the online continuous performance test (OCPT). The results of study 1 revealed poorer performance of β-TM patients on three of the four intelligence subtests, with significantly lower total performance IQ scores compared with controls. The percentage of participants with abnormal performance IQ (<85) was almost five times higher in the β-TM group (58%) than in the control group (12%). In study 2, significant differences were found in OCPT performance as a function of blood transfusion. Before transfusion, patients had higher rates of omission and commission errors, slower response times (RTs), and lower RT consistency than after transfusion. As β-TM patients' life expectancy is increasing, assessment and treatment of neurocognitive functions should become an integral part of appropriate follow-up to improve patients' quality of life.

  20. New Research on Multitasking Points to Role of Self-Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    For a generation of children immersed in technology, emerging research suggests that while the temptation to multitask may be pervasive, the ability to control it could be the real bellwether of academic success. The pervasiveness of technology and social media, coupled with a fear of missing out on something important, has led students to pay…

  1. 21 CFR 123.6 - Hazard analysis and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... establish controls because experience, illness data, scientific reports, or other information provide a... kinds of fish and fishery products together, or group kinds of production methods together, if the food... all production methods so grouped. (c) The contents of the HACCP plan. The HACCP plan shall, at...

  2. Ziprasidone Augmentation of Escitalopram for Major Depressive Disorder: Efficacy Results from a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Papakostas, George I.; Fava, Maurizio; Baer, Lee; Swee, Michaela B.; Jaeger, Adrienne; Bobo, William V.; Shelton, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the efficacy of adjunctive ziprasidone in adults with non-psychotic unipolar major depression experiencing persistent symptoms following 8 weeks of open-label escitalopram. Method This was a multi-center, parallel randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted at three academic medical centers in the United States. The participant pool consisted of 139 outpatients with persistent symptoms of major depressive disorder following an 8-week open label trial of escitalopram (phase 1). Subjects were randomized (1:1, n=139) to adjunctive ziprasidone (escitalopram+ziprasidone, n=71) or adjunctive placebo (escitalopram+placebo, n=68), with 8 weekly follow-up assessments. Primary outcome was defined by clinical response according to the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) and determined by a 50% or greater reduction in scale scores. The Hamilton Anxiety Rating scale (HAM-A) and Visual Analogue Scale for Pain were defined a priori as key secondary outcome measures. Results Rates of clinical response (35.2% vs. 20.5%, p=0.04) and mean improvement in HAMD-17 total scores (−6.4 ± 6.4 vs. −3.3 ± 6.2, p=0.04) were significantly greater for the escitalopram+ziprasidone group. Several secondary measures of antidepressant efficacy were also in favor of adjunctive ziprasidone. Escitalopram+ziprasidone also resulted in significantly greater improvement in HAM-A, but not Visual Analogue Scale for Pain scores. Ten (14%) patients discontinued escitalopram+ziprasidone due to intolerance versus none for escitalopram+placebo (p<0.01 versus placebo). Conclusions Adjunctive ziprasidone, when added to escitalopram, demonstrated antidepressant efficacy in adult patients with major depressive disorder experiencing persistent symptoms following 8 weeks of open-label escitalopram. PMID:26085041

  3. A conserved RpoS-dependent small RNA controls the synthesis of major porin OmpD.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Kathrin S; Papenfort, Kai; Berger, Allison A; Vogel, Jörg

    2012-04-01

    A remarkable feature of many small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) of Escherichia coli and Salmonella is their accumulation in the stationary phase of bacterial growth. Several stress response regulators and sigma factors have been reported to direct the transcription of stationary phase-specific sRNAs, but a widely conserved sRNA gene that is controlled by the major stationary phase and stress sigma factor, σ(S) (RpoS), has remained elusive. We have studied in Salmonella the conserved SdsR sRNA, previously known as RyeB, one of the most abundant stationary phase-specific sRNAs in E. coli. Alignments of the sdsR promoter region and genetic analysis strongly suggest that this sRNA gene is selectively transcribed by σ(S). We show that SdsR down-regulates the synthesis of the major Salmonella porin OmpD by Hfq-dependent base pairing; SdsR thus represents the fourth sRNA to regulate this major outer membrane porin. Similar to the InvR, MicC and RybB sRNAs, SdsR recognizes the ompD mRNA in the coding sequence, suggesting that this mRNA may be primarily targeted downstream of the start codon. The SdsR-binding site in ompD was localized by 3'-RACE, an experimental approach that promises to be of use in predicting other sRNA-target interactions in bacteria.

  4. Regional cerebral blood flow in mood disorders. I. Comparison of major depressives and normal controls at rest

    SciTech Connect

    Sackeim, H.A.; Prohovnik, I.; Moeller, J.R.; Brown, R.P.; Apter, S.; Prudic, J.; Devanand, D.P.; Mukherjee, S. )

    1990-01-01

    We measured regional cerebral blood flow with the xenon 133 inhalation technique in 41 patients with major depressive disorder and 40 matched, normal controls during an eyes-closed, resting condition. The depressed group had a marked reduction in global cortical blood flow. To examine topographic abnormalities, traditional multivariate analyses were applied, as well as a new scaled subprofile model developed to identify abnormal functional neural networks in clinical samples. Both approaches indicated that the depressed sample had an abnormality in topographic distribution of blood flow, in addition to the global deficit. The scaled subprofile model identified the topographic abnormality as being due to flow reduction in the depressed patients in selective frontal, central, superior temporal, and anterior parietal regions. This pattern may reflect dysfunction in the parallel distributed cortical network involving frontal and temporoparietal polymodal association areas. The extent of this topographic abnormality, as revealed by the scaled subprofile model, was associated with both patient age and severity of depressive symptoms.

  5. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of desvenlafaxine succinate in the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Septien-Velez, Lucia; Pitrosky, Bruno; Padmanabhan, Sudharshan Krishna; Germain, Jean-Michel; Tourian, Karen A

    2007-11-01

    The antidepressant efficacy and safety of desvenlafaxine succinate (desvenlafaxine) were evaluated in a phase III, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Outpatients with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder were treated with fixed once-daily doses of desvenlafaxine 200 or 400 mg for 8 weeks. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. At the final on-therapy evaluation, adjusted mean change from baseline in 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression total score was greater for desvenlafaxine 200 and 400 mg/day vs. placebo. Both desvenlafaxine doses showed greater efficacy than placebo on the secondary efficacy measures, including the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale scores, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores, CGI-Severity, and 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression response rate. Desvenlafaxine 200 mg/day was also significantly better than placebo on remission, Visual Analog Scale-Pain Intensity overall scores, and some Visual Analog Scale-Pain Intensity subscale scores. Desvenlafaxine 400 mg/day was significantly better than placebo on selected Visual Analog Scale-Pain Intensity subscale scores. Most adverse events were mild or moderate in severity, and safety assessments revealed few clinically significant changes in vital signs, laboratory tests, and electrocardiogram results. These data provide support for the efficacy and safety of desvenlafaxine in the treatment of major depressive disorder.

  6. Learning Quality Assurance/Quality Control Using U.S. EPA Techniques. An Undergraduate Course for Environmental Chemistry Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libes, Susan M.

    1999-12-01

    Chemical analyses should always be accompanied by activities that ensure and document quality control (QC). An undergraduate course in environmental analysis is a practical point at which to teach this, as the U.S. EPA has developed a standard set of QC activities. Such a course should be a requirement for all environmental chemistry programs because the collection of reliable and defensible data is central to regulatory monitoring work as well as modeling efforts and risk assessment. In the environmental realm, QC includes activities associated with sampling, sample preservation and storage, method validation, and analysis involving solids, liquids, and gases. Students should be led to discover the need for QC by first performing analyses with little guidance. This is followed by a class discussion in which they critique their data. Once convinced of the value of QC, students learn specific techniques by performing an Initial Demonstration of Capability for a relatively simple analysis in which they perform an instrumental calibration, determine method detection limits, and demonstrate adequate precision and accuracy. Particular focus is put on the use of spreadsheets for generating forms, producing control charts, and performing statistical tests. A variety of analytical methods are covered, including atomic and molecular spectrometry, ion selective electrodes, and gas chromatography.

  7. Low intensity vs. self-guided Internet-delivered psychotherapy for major depression: a multicenter, controlled, randomized study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Major depression will become the second most important cause of disability in 2020. Computerized cognitive-behaviour therapy could be an efficacious and cost-effective option for its treatment. No studies on cost-effectiveness of low intensity vs self-guided psychotherapy has been carried out. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of low intensity vs self-guided psychotherapy for major depression in the Spanish health system. Methods The study is made up of 3 phases: 1.- Development of a computerized cognitive-behaviour therapy for depression tailored to Spanish health system. 2.- Multicenter controlled, randomized study: A sample (N=450 patients) with mild/moderate depression recruited in primary care. They should have internet availability at home, not receive any previous psychological treatment, and not suffer from any other severe somatic or psychological disorder. They will be allocated to one of 3 treatments: a) Low intensity Internet-delivered psychotherapy + improved treatment as usual (ITAU) by GP, b) Self-guided Internet-delivered psychotherapy + ITAU or c) ITAU. Patients will be diagnosed with MINI psychiatric interview. Main outcome variable will be Beck Depression Inventory. It will be also administered EuroQol 5D (quality of life) and Client Service Receipt Inventory (consume of health and social services). Patients will be assessed at baseline, 3 and 12 months. An intention to treat and a per protocol analysis will be performed. Discussion The comparisons between low intensity and self-guided are infrequent, and also a comparative economic evaluation between them and compared with usual treatment in primary. The strength of the study is that it is a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial of low intensity and self-guided Internet-delivered psychotherapy for depression in primary care, being the treatment completely integrated in primary care setting. Trial registration Clinical Trials NCT01611818 PMID:23312003

  8. The Major Brain Endocannabinoid 2-AG Controls Neuropathic Pain and Mechanical Hyperalgesia in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica

    PubMed Central

    Pellkofer, Hannah L.; Havla, Joachim; Hauer, Daniela; Schelling, Gustav; Azad, Shahnaz C.; Kuempfel, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent myelitis is one of the predominant characteristics in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO). While paresis, visual loss, sensory deficits, and bladder dysfunction are well known symptoms in NMO patients, pain has been recognized only recently as another key symptom of the disease. Although spinal cord inflammation is a defining aspect of neuromyelitis, there is an almost complete lack of data on altered somatosensory function, including pain. Therefore, eleven consecutive patients with NMO were investigated regarding the presence and clinical characteristics of pain. All patients were examined clinically as well as by Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) following the protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS). Additionally, plasma endocannabinoid levels and signs of chronic stress and depression were determined. Almost all patients (10/11) suffered from NMO-associated neuropathic pain for the last three months, and 8 out of 11 patients indicated relevant pain at the time of examination. Symptoms of neuropathic pain were reported in the vast majority of patients with NMO. Psychological testing revealed signs of marked depression. Compared to age and gender-matched healthy controls, QST revealed pronounced mechanical and thermal sensory loss, strongly correlated to ongoing pain suggesting the presence of deafferentation-induced neuropathic pain. Thermal hyperalgesia correlated to MRI-verified signs of spinal cord lesion. Heat hyperalgesia was highly correlated to the time since last relapse of NMO. Patients with NMO exhibited significant mechanical and thermal dysesthesia, namely dynamic mechanical allodynia and paradoxical heat sensation. Moreover, they presented frequently with either abnormal mechanical hypoalgesia or hyperalgesia, which depended significantly on plasma levels of the endogenous cannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerole (2-AG). These data emphasize the high prevalence of neuropathic pain and hyperalgesia in patients

  9. Design of set-point weighting PI{sup λ} + D{sup μ} controller for vertical magnetic flux controller in Damavand tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rasouli, H.; Fatehi, A.

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, a simple method is presented for tuning weighted PI{sup λ} + D{sup μ} controller parameters based on the pole placement controller of pseudo-second-order fractional systems. One of the advantages of this controller is capability of reducing the disturbance effects and improving response to input, simultaneously. In the following sections, the performance of this controller is evaluated experimentally to control the vertical magnetic flux in Damavand tokamak. For this work, at first a fractional order model is identified using output-error technique in time domain. For various practical experiments, having desired time responses for magnetic flux in Damavand tokamak, is vital. To approach this, at first the desired closed loop reference models are obtained based on generalized characteristic ratio assignment method in fractional order systems. After that, for the identified model, a set-point weighting PI{sup λ} + D{sup μ} controller is designed and simulated. Finally, this controller is implemented on digital signal processor control system of the plant to fast/slow control of magnetic flux. The practical results show appropriate performance of this controller.

  10. Public Support for Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act Point-of-Sale Provisions: Results of a National Study

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Sherry L.; Ennett, Susan; McNaughton Reyes, Heath Luz; Scott, John C.; Ribisl, Kurt M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed public and smoker support for enacted and potential point-of-sale (POS) tobacco-control policies under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act. Methods. We surveyed a US nationally representative sample of 17 507 respondents (6595 smokers) in January through February 2013, and used linear regression to calculate weighted point estimates and identify factors associated with support for POS policies among adults and smokers. Results. Overall, nonsmokers were more supportive than were smokers. Regardless of smoking status, African Americans, Hispanics, women, and those of older ages were more supportive than White, male, and younger respondents, respectively. Policy support varied by provision. More than 80% of respondents supported minors’ access restrictions and more than 45% supported graphic warnings. Support was lowest for plain packaging (23%), black-and-white advertising (26%), and a ban on menthol cigarettes (36%). Conclusions. Public support for marketing and POS provisions is low relative to other areas of tobacco control. Tobacco-control advocates and the Food and Drug Administration should build on existing levels of public support to promote and maintain evidence-based, but controversial, policy changes in the retail environment. PMID:26270303

  11. Characterization of the alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a key control point in lipooligosaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wakarchuk, Warren; Schur, Melissa J; St Michael, Frank; Li, Jinjuan; Eichler, Eva; Whitfield, Dennis

    2004-06-01

    The biosynthesis of the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) in Neisseria meningitidis has a control point that regulates the extension of the alpha-chain on heptose (I) of the LOS. The gene that encodes the protein responsible for this control had been identified elsewhere, but the enzyme encoded by the gene was not characterized. We have now shown that this same control mechanism operates in the related species, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, using a gene knockout and subsequent characterization of the LOS species produced. We also cloned and expressed the enzyme from both of these pathogens. Using a synthetic acceptor substrate, we have shown unequivocally that the enzyme is an alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase. Experiments with both the core oligosaccharide and the synthetic acceptors suggests that the addition of the alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosamine moiety on the heptose (II) residue precedes the addition of the ethanolamine phosphate at the O3 position on this heptose (II), and that in the absence of the alpha-1,2-N-acetylglucosamine moiety leads to the addition of an extra ethanolamine phosphate on the heptose (II) residue. Our data do not support the hypothesis that ethanolamine phosphate at O3 of heptose (II) is added and is then required for the addition of the N-acetylglucosamine at O2 by the LgtK enzyme. This enzyme represents a control point in the biosynthesis of the LOS of this pathogen and is a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:15044393

  12. Working-point control technique for the homodyne interferometry in hydrophone calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ping; Xing, Guangzhen

    2015-02-01

    The stabilization of a homodyne type Michelson interferometer for calibrating the high frequency hydrophone is presented in this article. For the detection of the ultrasonic field, a 5 um thickness pellicle was inserted in water moving in sympathy with the ultrasonic wave. To ensure high signal to noise ratio at high frequencies, a 5 MHz focusing transducer was driven by high voltage and harmonics of the shocked ultrasonic field could be activated. Nevertheless, the homodyne interferometer suffered from the drawback of signal fading caused by the low frequency noise in environment, including acoustic noise and water surface agitation. Direct Current Phase Tracking was utilized to maintain the quadrature working point for the interferometer. Most of environmental noises could be effectively compensated while stabilization was maintained. A piezoelectric actuator supporting the reference mirror was utilized as the stabilizing element whose output was frequency independent over the low frequency disturbances, usually below 200 Hz. The ultrasonic signal fading caused by environmental disturbances could be solved while the negative electric feedback loop was operating. The displacement and voltage output of the hydrophone under test were then processed by DFT to derive the fundamental and harmonic components. Under plane wave conditions, the ultrasonic pressure could be derived by the detected displacement with a stabilized homodyne interferometer, and the hydrophone could then be calibrated. Measurement results indicated that the hydrophone calibration system based on the active stabilization of homodyne interferometry was sound in theory and feasible in practice.

  13. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures, 3. Part A: Shape and orientation control of a platform in orbit using point actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Krishna, R.; James, P. K.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics, attitude, and shape control of a large thin flexible square platform in orbit are studied. Attitude and shape control are assumed to result from actuators placed perpendicular to the main surface and one edge and their effect on the rigid body and elastic modes is modelled to first order. The equations of motion are linearized about three different nominal orientations: (1) the platform following the local vertical with its major surface perpendicular to the orbital plane; (2) the platform following the local horizontal with its major surface normal to the local vertical; and (3) the platform following the local vertical with its major surface perpendicular to the orbit normal. The stability of the uncontrolled system is investigated analytically. Once controllability is established for a set of actuator locations, control law development is based on decoupling, pole placement, and linear optimal control theory. Frequencies and elastic modal shape functions are obtained using a finite element computer algorithm, two different approximate analytical methods, and the results of the three methods compared.

  14. Robust control chart for change point detection of process variance in the presence of disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huat, Ng Kooi; Midi, Habshah

    2015-02-01

    A conventional control chart for detecting shifts in variance of a process is typically developed where in most circumstances the nominal value of variance is unknown and based upon one of the essential assumptions that the underlying distribution of the quality characteristic is normal. However, this is not always the case as it is fairly evident that the statistical estimates used for these charts are very sensitive to the occurrence of occasional outliers. This is for the reason that the robust control charts are put forward when the underlying normality assumption is not met, and served as a remedial measure to the problem of contamination in process data. Realizing that the existing approach, namely Biweight A pooled residuals method, appears to be resistance to localized disturbances but lack of efficiency when there are diffuse disturbances. To be concrete, diffuse disturbances are those that have equal change of being perturbed by any observation, while a localized disturbance will have effect on every member of a certain subsample or subsamples. Since the efficiency of estimators in the presence of disturbances can rely heavily upon whether the disturbances are distributed throughout the observations or concentrated in a few subsamples. Hence, to this end, in this paper we proposed a new robust MBAS control chart by means of subsample-based robust Modified Biweight A scale estimator in estimating the process standard deviation. It has strong resistance to both localized and diffuse disturbances as well as high efficiency when no disturbances are present. The performance of the proposed robust chart was evaluated based on some decision criteria through Monte Carlo simulation study.

  15. Distribution of controlled substances in the U.S. supply chain: where does the compass point?

    PubMed

    Ruble, James H

    2012-09-01

    Recent administrative actions taken by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) in Florida have prompted an articulate and detailed discussion of the pharmaceutical supply chain for controlled substances. Current practices in commercial distribution systems may have a partial nexus to the proliferation of opioid prescription drug abuse in Florida. No single factor or entity is responsible for this abuse proliferation, and there is no intent to harm consumers; however, distribution practices are adding risk to public health. This commentary extends a discussion on supply chain practices that seem misaligned in the promotion of legitimate business objectives and advancing public health.

  16. Loop Heat Pipe Transient Behavior Using Heat Source Temperature for Set Point Control with Thermoelectric Converter on Reservoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Paiva, Kleber; Mantelli, Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The LHP operating temperature is governed by the saturation temperature of its reservoir. Controlling the reservoir saturation temperature is commonly done by cold biasing the reservoir and using electrical heaters to provide the required control power. With this method, the loop operating temperature can be controlled within 0.5K or better. However, because the thermal resistance that exists between the heat source and the LHP evaporator, the heat source temperature will vary with its heat output even if the LHP operating temperature is kept constant. Since maintaining a constant heat source temperature is of most interest, a question often raised is whether the heat source temperature can be used for LHP set point temperature control. A test program with a miniature LHP was carried out to investigate the effects on the LHP operation when the control temperature sensor was placed on the heat source instead of the reservoir. In these tests, the LHP reservoir was cold-biased and was heated by a control heater. Test results show that it was feasible to use the heat source temperature for feedback control of the LHP operation. In particular, when a thermoelectric converter was used as the reservoir control heater, the heat source temperature could be maintained within a tight range using a proportional-integral-derivative or on/off control algorithm. Moreover, because the TEC could provide both heating and cooling to the reservoir, temperature oscillations during fast transients such as loop startup could be eliminated or substantially reduced when compared to using an electrical heater as the control heater.

  17. Space infrared telescope pointing control system. Infrared telescope tracking in the presence of target motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Schneider, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    The use of charge-coupled-devices, or CCD's, has been documented by a number of sources as an effective means of providing a measurement of spacecraft attitude with respect to the stars. A method exists of defocussing and interpolation of the resulting shape of a star image over a small subsection of a large CCD array. This yields an increase in the accuracy of the device by better than an order of magnitude over the case when the star image is focussed upon a single CCD pixel. This research examines the effect that image motion has upon the overall precision of this star sensor when applied to an orbiting infrared observatory. While CCD's collect energy within the visible spectrum of light, the targets of scientific interest may well have no appreciable visible emissions. Image motion has the effect of smearing the image of the star in the direction of motion during a particular sampling interval. The presence of image motion is incorporated into a Kalman filter for the system, and it is shown that the addition of a gyro command term is adequate to compensate for the effect of image motion in the measurement. The updated gyro model is included in this analysis, but has natural frequencies faster than the projected star tracker sample rate for dim stars. The system state equations are reduced by modelling gyro drift as a white noise process. There exists a tradeoff in selected star tracker sample time between the CCD, which has improved noise characteristics as sample time increases, and the gyro, which will potentially drift further between long attitude updates. A sample time which minimizes pointing estimation error exists for the random drift gyro model as well as for a random walk gyro model.

  18. Vertical Field of View Reference Point Study for Flight Path Control and Hazard Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, J. Raymond, Jr.; Rudisill, Marianne; Kramer, Lynda J.; Busquets, Anthony M.

    2002-01-01

    Researchers within the eXternal Visibility System (XVS) element of the High-Speed Research (HSR) program developed and evaluated display concepts that will provide the flight crew of the proposed High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) with integrated imagery and symbology to permit path control and hazard avoidance functions while maintaining required situation awareness. The challenge of the XVS program is to develop concepts that would permit a no-nose-droop configuration of an HSCT and expanded low visibility HSCT operational capabilities. This study was one of a series of experiments exploring the 'design space' restrictions for physical placement of an XVS display. The primary experimental issues here was 'conformality' of the forward display vertical position with respect to the side window in simulated flight. 'Conformality' refers to the case such that the horizon and objects appear in the same relative positions when viewed through the forward windows or display and the side windows. This study quantified the effects of visual conformality on pilot flight path control and hazard avoidance performance. Here, conformality related to the positioning and relationship of the artificial horizon line and associated symbology presented on the forward display and the horizon and associated ground, horizon, and sky textures as they would appear in the real view through a window presented in the side window display. No significant performance consequences were found for the non-conformal conditions.

  19. Salivary cortisol patterns and cognitive speed in major depression: a comparison with allergic rhinitis and healthy control subjects.

    PubMed

    den Hartog, H M; Nicolson, N A; Derix, M M A; van Bemmel, A L; Kremer, B; Jolles, J

    2003-04-01

    Few studies have investigated the relationship between cortisol and cognitive functions other than memory in depression. This study investigated daily salivary cortisol patterns (basal cortisol levels at 08:00, 16:00, and 21:00 h and flatness of the diurnal curve) in relation to cognitive speed and memory. Twenty-seven unmedicated outpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD) were compared with 36 healthy controls and with 20 allergic rhinitis patients, to determine whether effects should be ascribed to MDD or to more general disease-related processes. MDD patients were characterised by a flatter diurnal cortisol curve and by reduced cognitive speed. Flatter cortisol curves were associated with cognitive slowness. However, this relationship is unlikely to be causal; after control for depressive symptoms and group membership, flatness of the diurnal cortisol curve was no longer a significant predictor of cognitive slowness. Thus, MDD and related depressive symptoms appeared to be independently associated with altered cortisol secretory patterns and with decrements in cognitive speed.

  20. A major locus controlling malondialdehyde content under water stress is associated with Fusarium crown rot resistance in wheat.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Du, Guangyue; Li, Xihuan; Zhang, Caiying; Guo, Jinkao

    2015-10-01

    Malondialdehyde (MDA) is a naturally occurring product of lipid peroxidation and the level of MDA in plant is often used as a parameter to evaluate the damage to plants' cells due to stress. Plant with lower amounts of MDA under drought conditions is generally considered as more tolerant to drought. In this study, a population of recombinant inbred lines was used to map the quantitative trait locus (QTLs) that controlled MDA content under well-watered condition (WW) and water deficit (WD) condition. A major QTL, designated as Qheb.mda-3B, was detected on the long arm of chromosome 3B. Based on interval mapping analysis, Qheb.mda-3B explained 31.5 and 39.0 % of the phenotypic variance under WW and WD conditions, respectively. Qheb.mda-3B was located in the same interval as a previously identified QTL (Qcrs.cpi-3B) that controlled resistance to Fusarium crown rot (FCR), a fungal disease caused by Fusarium species. Three pairs of near-isogenic lines (NILs) previously developed for Qcrs.cpi-3B were found to show significant differences in MDA content under WD condition. These results suggested that same set of genes is likely to be involved in drought tolerance and FCR resistance in wheat.

  1. Methionine metabolism: major pathways and enzymes involved and strategies for control and diversification of volatile sulfur compounds in cheese.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cuesta, María Del Carmen; Peláez, Carmen; Requena, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    For economical reasons and to accommodate current market trends, cheese manufacturers and product developers are increasingly interested in controlling cheese flavor formation and developing new flavors. Due to their low detection threshold and diversity, volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are of prime importance in the overall flavor of cheese and make a significant contribution to their typical flavors. Thus, the control of VSCs formation offers considerable potential for industrial applications. This paper gives an overview of the main VSCs found in cheese, along with the major pathways and key enzymes leading to the formation of methanethiol from methionine, which is subsequently converted into other sulfur-bearing compounds. As these compounds arise primarily from methionine, the metabolism of this amino acid and its regulation is presented. Attention is focused in the enzymatic potential of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that are widely used as starter and adjunct cultures in cheese-making. In view of industrial applications, different strategies such as the enhancement of the abilities of LAB to produce high amounts and diversity of VSCs are highlighted as the principal future research trend.

  2. A new method to obtain ground control points based on SRTM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pu; An, Wei; Deng, Xin-pu; Zhang, Xi

    2013-09-01

    The GCPs are widely used in remote sense image registration and geometric correction. Normally, the DRG and DOM are the major data source from which GCPs are extracted. But the high accuracy products of DRG and DOM are usually costly to obtain. Some of the production are free, yet without any guarantee. In order to balance the cost and the accuracy, the paper proposes a method of extracting the GCPs from SRTM data. The method consist of artificial assistance, binarization, data resample and reshape. With artificial assistance to find out which part of SRTM data could be used as GCPs, such as the islands or sharp coast line. By utilizing binarization algorithm , the shape information of the region is obtained while other information is excluded. Then the binary data is resampled to a suitable resolution required by specific application. At last, the data would be reshaped according to satellite imaging type to obtain the GCPs which could be used. There are three advantages of the method proposed in the paper. Firstly, the method is easy for implementation. Unlike the DRG data or DOM data that charges a lot, the SRTM data is totally free to access without any constricts. Secondly, the SRTM has a high accuracy about 90m that is promised by its producer, so the GCPs got from it can also obtain a high quality. Finally, given the SRTM data covers nearly all the land surface of earth between latitude -60° and latitude +60°, the GCPs which are produced by the method can cover most important regions of the world. The method which obtain GCPs from SRTM data can be used in meteorological satellite image or some situation alike, which have a relative low requirement about the accuracy. Through plenty of simulation test, the method is proved convenient and effective.

  3. Altered functional interaction hub between affective network and cognitive control network in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-li; Yang, Shu-zhen; Sun, Wei-li; Shi, Yu-zhong; Duan, Hui-feng

    2016-02-01

    Emotional and cognitive dysregulation in major depressive disorder (MDD) have been consistently considered to be attributed to structural and functional abnormalities in affective network (AN) and cognitive control network (CCN). This study was to investigate the functional connectivity (FC) patterns and altered functional interactions between both networks in MDD. We investigated resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging in the AN and the CCN in 25 MDD and 35 healthy controls (HC). The seeds were from voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis results. Then FC within the AN was assessed from a seed placed in the left amygdala (AMG) and FC within CCN was determined by placing seeds in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Compared with HC, MDD showed reduced FC between left AMG and bilateral precuneus and right anterior cingulated cortex (ACC) within AN and reduced FC between right DLPFC and left cuneus, left lingual gyrus, and right ACC within CCN. An interaction hub of altered FC in MDD between AN and CCN located in the right ACC. Interestingly, the altered FC between right ACC and left AMG was negatively correlated with depressive symptom score while the altered FC between right ACC and DLPFC was positively correlated the executive function in MDD. The right ACC not only supports the cognitive and emotional processes, but also is an altered functional interaction hub between AN and CCN in MDD. It further suggest multiple sources of dysregulation in AN and CCN implicate both top-down cognitive control and bottom-up emotional expression dysfunction in MDD. PMID:26519557

  4. Experimental and computational models of neurite extension at a choice point in response to controlled diffusive gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catig, G. C.; Figueroa, S.; Moore, M. J.

    2015-08-01

    Ojective. Axons are guided toward desired targets through a series of choice points that they navigate by sensing cues in the cellular environment. A better understanding of how microenvironmental factors influence neurite growth during development can inform strategies to address nerve injury. Therefore, there is a need for biomimetic models to systematically investigate the influence of guidance cues at such choice points. Approach. We ran an adapted in silico biased turning axon growth model under the influence of nerve growth factor (NGF) and compared the results to corresponding in vitro experiments. We examined if growth simulations were predictive of neurite population behavior at a choice point. We used a biphasic micropatterned hydrogel system consisting of an outer cell restrictive mold that enclosed a bifurcated cell permissive region and placed a well near a bifurcating end to allow proteins to diffuse and form a gradient. Experimental diffusion profiles in these constructs were used to validate a diffusion computational model that utilized experimentally measured diffusion coefficients in hydrogels. The computational diffusion model was then used to establish defined soluble gradients within the permissive region of the hydrogels and maintain the profiles in physiological ranges for an extended period of time. Computational diffusion profiles informed the neurite growth model, which was compared with neurite growth experiments in the bifurcating hydrogel constructs. Main results. Results indicated that when applied to the constrained choice point geometry, the biased turning model predicted experimental behavior closely. Results for both simulated and in vitro neurite growth studies showed a significant chemoattractive response toward the bifurcated end containing an NGF gradient compared to the control, though some neurites were found in the end with no NGF gradient. Significance. The integrated model of neurite growth we describe will allow

  5. Hazard analysis of critical control points assessment as a tool to respond to emerging infectious disease outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Kelly L; Hunter, Paul R; Few, Roger; Bell, Diana J

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI) strain H5N1 has had direct and indirect economic impacts arising from direct mortality and control programmes in over 50 countries reporting poultry outbreaks. HPAI H5N1 is now reported as the most widespread and expensive zoonotic disease recorded and continues to pose a global health threat. The aim of this research was to assess the potential of utilising Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points (HACCP) assessments in providing a framework for a rapid response to emerging infectious disease outbreaks. This novel approach applies a scientific process, widely used in food production systems, to assess risks related to a specific emerging health threat within a known zoonotic disease hotspot. We conducted a HACCP assessment for HPAI viruses within Vietnam's domestic poultry trade and relate our findings to the existing literature. Our HACCP assessment identified poultry flock isolation, transportation, slaughter, preparation and consumption as critical control points for Vietnam's domestic poultry trade. Introduction of the preventative measures highlighted through this HACCP evaluation would reduce the risks posed by HPAI viruses and pressure on the national economy. We conclude that this HACCP assessment provides compelling evidence for the future potential that HACCP analyses could play in initiating a rapid response to emerging infectious diseases. PMID:23967294

  6. Application of hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) as a possible control measure for Opisthorchis viverrini infection in cultured carp (Puntius gonionotus).

    PubMed

    Khamboonruang, C; Keawvichit, R; Wongworapat, K; Suwanrangsi, S; Hongpromyart, M; Sukhawat, K; Tonguthai, K; Lima dos Santos, C A

    1997-01-01

    Opisthorchiasis due to Opisthorchis viverrini and transmitted through infected freshwater cyprinoid fish (carps) affects more than 8 million people in Thailand, People's Democratic Republic of Lao, and Vietnam. The Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP)-concept has been recommended by FAO and WHO to be included in programs to control foodborne trematode infections (FBT). HACCP is a multifactorial approach to control food hazards through surveillance of diseases, foods, and operations and education. This study describes the first attempt to apply HACCP to the prevention and control of Opisthorchis viverrini in pond culture carp (Puntius gonionotus). The experiment was designed and carried out by a multidisciplinary "HACCP team" including experts in the field of public health, parasitology, epidemiology, aquaculture, fisheries extension and fish inspection. The investigation was performed in two fish ponds in the District of Sun Pa Tong, Chiang Mai, Thailand. In the experimental pond, fish was cultured according to HACCP principles and compared with the control pond, which followed conventional aquaculture practices. Water supply to the pond, fish fry, fish feed and pond conditions during the growing period were identified as critical control points (CCPs). Hazards were identified and analyzed, as well as control measures, critical limits, monitoring procedures, corrective actions, and record keeping developed for each one of the above CCPs. Complete pond preparation, particularly aiming to eliminate contamination of pond water with O. viverrini eggs, fish infected with parasite meacercariae and the first intermediate host (Bithynia spp), was conducted. After the pond was filled with water, O. viverrini metacercaria-free fry were released into the pond. The preliminary results obtained indicate that HACCP-based principles applied to carp pond culture could be used as a strategy to prevent and control O. viverrini. Further studies should be undertaken aiming

  7. Point and counterpoint: patient control of access to data in their electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Caine, Kelly; Tierney, William M

    2015-01-01

    Information collection, storage, and management is central to the practice of health care. For centuries, patients' and providers' expectations kept medical records confidential between providers and patients. With the advent of electronic health records, patient health information has become more widely available to providers and health care managers and has broadened its potential use beyond individual patient care. Adhering to the principles of Fair Information Practice, including giving patients control over the availability and use of their individual health records, would improve care by fostering the sharing of sensitive information between patients and providers. However, adherence to such principles could put patients at risk for unsafe care as a result of both missed opportunities for providing needed care as well as provision of contraindicated care, as it would prevent health care providers from having full access to health information. Patients' expectations for the highest possible quality and safety of care, therefore, may be at odds with their desire to limit provider access to their health records. Conversely, provider expectations that patients would willingly seek care for embarrassing conditions and disclose sensitive information may be at odds with patients' information privacy rights. An open dialogue between patients and providers will be necessary to balance respect for patient rights with provider need for patient information.

  8. Point and counterpoint: patient control of access to data in their electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Caine, Kelly; Tierney, William M

    2015-01-01

    Information collection, storage, and management is central to the practice of health care. For centuries, patients' and providers' expectations kept medical records confidential between providers and patients. With the advent of electronic health records, patient health information has become more widely available to providers and health care managers and has broadened its potential use beyond individual patient care. Adhering to the principles of Fair Information Practice, including giving patients control over the availability and use of their individual health records, would improve care by fostering the sharing of sensitive information between patients and providers. However, adherence to such principles could put patients at risk for unsafe care as a result of both missed opportunities for providing needed care as well as provision of contraindicated care, as it would prevent health care providers from having full access to health information. Patients' expectations for the highest possible quality and safety of care, therefore, may be at odds with their desire to limit provider access to their health records. Conversely, provider expectations that patients would willingly seek care for embarrassing conditions and disclose sensitive information may be at odds with patients' information privacy rights. An open dialogue between patients and providers will be necessary to balance respect for patient rights with provider need for patient information. PMID:25480723

  9. Populating a Control Point Database: A cooperative effort between the USGS, Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center and the Grand Canyon Youth Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, K. M.; Fritzinger, C.; Wharton, E.

    2004-12-01

    The Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center measures the effects of Glen Canyon Dam operations on the resources along the Colorado River from Glen Canyon Dam to Lake Mead in support of the Grand Canyon Adaptive Management Program. Control points are integral for geo-referencing the myriad of data collected in the Grand Canyon including aerial photography, topographic and bathymetric data used for classification and change-detection analysis of physical, biologic and cultural resources. The survey department has compiled a list of 870 control points installed by various organizations needing to establish a consistent reference for data collected at field sites along the 240 mile stretch of Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. This list is the foundation for the Control Point Database established primarily for researchers, to locate control points and independently geo-reference collected field data. The database has the potential to be a valuable mapping tool for assisting researchers to easily locate a control point and reduce the occurrance of unknowingly installing new control points within close proximity of an existing control point. The database is missing photographs and accurate site description information. Current site descriptions do not accurately define the location of the point but refer to the project that used the point, or some other interesting fact associated with the point. The Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (GCMRC) resolved this problem by turning the data collection effort into an educational exercise for the participants of the Grand Canyon Youth organization. Grand Canyon Youth is a non-profit organization providing experiential education for middle and high school aged youth. GCMRC and the Grand Canyon Youth formed a partnership where GCMRC provided the logistical support, equipment, and training to conduct the field work, and the Grand Canyon Youth provided the time and personnel to complete the field work. Two data

  10. Burdock root extracts limit quorum-sensing-controlled phenotypes and biofilm architecture in major urinary tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rajasekharan, Satish Kumar; Ramesh, Samiraj; Bakkiyaraj, Dhamodharan; Elangomathavan, Ramaraj; Kamalanathan, Chakkaravarthi

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial biofilms are serious concern in patients infected with urinary tract infections, complicated urinary tract infections and other device-associated infections. Microbes within the biofilms are effectively shielded from antibiotics and host immune cells, hence can be treated only with agents which has the potential to disassemble the biofilms. The study is focused on the root extracts of Arctium lappa Linn. as a source for complementary medicine against three major biofilm forming clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Serratia marcescens. Methanol extracts of burdock roots (BR) showed no bactericidal activity (p > 0.05) against the uropathogens, whereas restrained the biofilms (p < 0.05) on polystyrene and glass surfaces at a biofilm inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL. The 3D confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to analyze the biofilm architecture which showed significant reduction in the surface area. Z-stack analysis has also revealed substantial reduction in the biofilm thickness (E. coli-50.79%, P. mirabilis-69.49%, and S. marcescens-75.84%). Further, BR extracts also inhibited quorum-sensing (QS)-controlled cellular phenotypes such as violacein, prodigiosin, swarming motility, and cell surface hydrophobicity. LC-MS/MS analysis of BR extracts identified the presence of two major quercetin derivatives (miquelianin and peltatoside) along with few other constituent components. Exploring such phytocompounds will provide potential agents to treat infections caused by biofilm forming uropathogens. The antibiofilm and anti-QS agents will ultimately serve as armor, facilitating the host immune system to fight infections.

  11. Burdock root extracts limit quorum-sensing-controlled phenotypes and biofilm architecture in major urinary tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rajasekharan, Satish Kumar; Ramesh, Samiraj; Bakkiyaraj, Dhamodharan; Elangomathavan, Ramaraj; Kamalanathan, Chakkaravarthi

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial biofilms are serious concern in patients infected with urinary tract infections, complicated urinary tract infections and other device-associated infections. Microbes within the biofilms are effectively shielded from antibiotics and host immune cells, hence can be treated only with agents which has the potential to disassemble the biofilms. The study is focused on the root extracts of Arctium lappa Linn. as a source for complementary medicine against three major biofilm forming clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Serratia marcescens. Methanol extracts of burdock roots (BR) showed no bactericidal activity (p > 0.05) against the uropathogens, whereas restrained the biofilms (p < 0.05) on polystyrene and glass surfaces at a biofilm inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL. The 3D confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to analyze the biofilm architecture which showed significant reduction in the surface area. Z-stack analysis has also revealed substantial reduction in the biofilm thickness (E. coli-50.79%, P. mirabilis-69.49%, and S. marcescens-75.84%). Further, BR extracts also inhibited quorum-sensing (QS)-controlled cellular phenotypes such as violacein, prodigiosin, swarming motility, and cell surface hydrophobicity. LC-MS/MS analysis of BR extracts identified the presence of two major quercetin derivatives (miquelianin and peltatoside) along with few other constituent components. Exploring such phytocompounds will provide potential agents to treat infections caused by biofilm forming uropathogens. The antibiofilm and anti-QS agents will ultimately serve as armor, facilitating the host immune system to fight infections. PMID:25226848

  12. Multi-Allelic Major Effect Genes Interact with Minor Effect QTLs to Control Adaptive Color Pattern Variation in Heliconius erato

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Riccardo; Kapan, Durrell D.; Counterman, Brian A.; Maldonado, Karla; Lindstrom, Daniel P.; Reed, Robert D.; Nijhout, H. Frederik; Hrbek, Tomas; McMillan, W. Owen

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that relatively few genomic regions are repeatedly involved in the evolution of Heliconius butterfly wing patterns. Although this work demonstrates a number of cases where homologous loci underlie both convergent and divergent wing pattern change among different Heliconius species, it is still unclear exactly how many loci underlie pattern variation across the genus. To address this question for Heliconius erato, we created fifteen independent crosses utilizing the four most distinct color pattern races and analyzed color pattern segregation across a total of 1271 F2 and backcross offspring. Additionally, we used the most variable brood, an F2 cross between H. himera and the east Ecuadorian H. erato notabilis, to perform a quantitative genetic analysis of color pattern variation and produce a detailed map of the loci likely involved in the H. erato color pattern radiation. Using AFLP and gene based markers, we show that fewer major genes than previously envisioned control the color pattern variation in H. erato. We describe for the first time the genetic architecture of H. erato wing color pattern by assessing quantitative variation in addition to traditional linkage mapping. In particular, our data suggest three genomic intervals modulate the bulk of the observed variation in color. Furthermore, we also identify several modifier loci of moderate effect size that contribute to the quantitative wing pattern variation. Our results are consistent with the two-step model for the evolution of mimetic wing patterns in Heliconius and support a growing body of empirical data demonstrating the importance of major effect loci in adaptive change. PMID:23533571

  13. Multi-allelic major effect genes interact with minor effect QTLs to control adaptive color pattern variation in Heliconius erato.

    PubMed

    Papa, Riccardo; Kapan, Durrell D; Counterman, Brian A; Maldonado, Karla; Lindstrom, Daniel P; Reed, Robert D; Nijhout, H Frederik; Hrbek, Tomas; McMillan, W Owen

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that relatively few genomic regions are repeatedly involved in the evolution of Heliconius butterfly wing patterns. Although this work demonstrates a number of cases where homologous loci underlie both convergent and divergent wing pattern change among different Heliconius species, it is still unclear exactly how many loci underlie pattern variation across the genus. To address this question for Heliconius erato, we created fifteen independent crosses utilizing the four most distinct color pattern races and analyzed color pattern segregation across a total of 1271 F2 and backcross offspring. Additionally, we used the most variable brood, an F2 cross between H. himera and the east Ecuadorian H. erato notabilis, to perform a quantitative genetic analysis of color pattern variation and produce a detailed map of the loci likely involved in the H. erato color pattern radiation. Using AFLP and gene based markers, we show that fewer major genes than previously envisioned control the color pattern variation in H. erato. We describe for the first time the genetic architecture of H. erato wing color pattern by assessing quantitative variation in addition to traditional linkage mapping. In particular, our data suggest three genomic intervals modulate the bulk of the observed variation in color. Furthermore, we also identify several modifier loci of moderate effect size that contribute to the quantitative wing pattern variation. Our results are consistent with the two-step model for the evolution of mimetic wing patterns in Heliconius and support a growing body of empirical data demonstrating the importance of major effect loci in adaptive change. PMID:23533571

  14. a New Control Points Based Geometric Correction Algorithm for Airborne Push Broom Scanner Images Without On-Board Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strakhov, P.; Badasen, E.; Shurygin, B.; Kondranin, T.

    2016-06-01

    Push broom scanners, such as video spectrometers (also called hyperspectral sensors), are widely used in the present. Usage of scanned images requires accurate geometric correction, which becomes complicated when imaging platform is airborne. This work contains detailed description of a new algorithm developed for processing of such images. The algorithm requires only user provided control points and is able to correct distortions caused by yaw, flight speed and height changes. It was tested on two series of airborne images and yielded RMS error values on the order of 7 meters (3-6 source image pixels) as compared to 13 meters for polynomial-based correction.

  15. Lissajous Orbit Control for the Deep Space Climate Observatory Sun-Earth L1 Libration Point Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Craig; Case, Sarah; Reagoso, John

    2015-01-01

    DSCOVR Lissajous Orbit sized such that orbit track never extends beyond 15 degrees from Earth-Sun line (as seen from Earth). Requiring delta-V maneuvers, control orbit to obey a Solar Exclusion Zone (SEZ) cone of half-angle 4 degrees about the Earth-Sun line. Spacecraft should never be less than 4 degrees from solar center as seen from Earth. Following Lissajous Orbit Insertion (LOI), DSCOVR should be in an opening phase that just skirts the 4-degree SEZ. Maximizes time to the point where a closing Lissajous will require avoidance maneuvers to keep it out of the SEZ. Station keeping maneuvers should take no more than 15 minutes.

  16. Application of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point in the local manufacture of ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs).

    PubMed

    Henry, C Jeya K; Xin, Janice Lim Wen

    2014-06-01

    The local manufacture of ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs) is increasing, and there is a need to develop methods to ensure their safe production. We propose the application of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles to achieve this goal. The basic principles of HACCP in the production of RUTFs are outlined. It is concluded that the implementation of an HACCP system in the manufacture of RUTFs is not only feasible but also attainable. The introduction of good manufacturing practices, coupled with an effective HACCP system, will ensure that RUTFs are produced in a cost-effective, safe, and hygienic manner. PMID:25069295

  17. Can the Hazard Assessment and Critical Control Points (HACCP) system be used to design process-based hygiene concepts?

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, N.-O.; Fleßa, S.; Haak, J.; Wilke, F.; Hübner, C.; Dahms, C.; Hoffmann, W.; Kramer, A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) concept was proposed as possible way to implement process-based hygiene concepts in clinical practice, but the extent to which this food safety concept can be transferred into the health care setting is unclear. We therefore discuss possible ways for a translation of the principles of the HACCP for health care settings. While a direct implementation of food processing concepts into health care is not very likely to be feasible and will probably not readily yield the intended results, the underlying principles of process-orientation, in-process safety control and hazard analysis based counter measures are transferable to clinical settings. In model projects the proposed concepts should be implemented, monitored, and evaluated under real world conditions. PMID:22242105

  18. An Set-Free, All Digital Controlled Point-of-Load Regulator for Next Generation Power Systems: ADC-POL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adell, Philippe C.; Liu, Tao; Vermeire, Bert; Bakkaloglu, Bertan; Aveline, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a digitally controlled programmable point-of-load regulator for next-generation power systems. A novel digital control scheme was designed to minimize single-event effect (SEE)-induced transient effects. By effectively programming the loop transmission, the POL can trade off transient response time with SET robustness. The IC works with 1 to 5.5 V input voltage, 1-4.5V regulated output voltage, high efficiency (peak efficiency at 94%) and power of up to 5 W. The design was fabricated in the AMI i2t100 0.7 mu m complimentary, metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process and characterized with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) pulsed laser system.

  19. Murine retroviruses control class I major histocompatibility antigen gene expression via a trans effect at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L D; Flyer, D C; Faller, D V

    1987-07-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) and Moloney murine sarcoma virus (M-MSV) exert a regulatory effect on the class I genes of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We have previously shown that M-MuLV infection of mouse fibroblasts results in a substantial increase in cell surface expression of H-2K, H-2D, and H-2L proteins, whereas M-MSV, upon coinfection of the same cells, is apparently able to override the MuLV-induced increase in H-2 expression. As a result of this modulation, immune recognition of the infected cells is profoundly altered. Our efforts have been directed toward elucidating the molecular basis for this phenomenon. We report here that stimulation of interferon production as a result of infection with MuLV does not occur and, therefore, is not the cause of MuLV-induced enhancement of MHC expression. Control of H-2 class I and beta 2-microglobulin gene expression by M-MuLV, and probably by M-MSV, takes place at the transcriptional level as indicated by nuclear runoff studies and analysis of steady-state mRNA levels. Our demonstration that M-MuLV controls expression of widely separated endogenous cellular genes (those coding for H-2D, H-2K, H-2L, and beta 2-microglobulin), transfected class I MHC genes, and unintegrated chimeric genes consisting of fragments of class I MHC genes linked to sequences encoding a procaryotic enzyme, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, suggests that M-MuLV exerts its effect in trans and not by proviral integration in the vicinity of the H-2 gene complex. Finally, we show that the sequences of at least one MHC gene, which are responsive to trans regulation by M-MuLV, lie within 1.2 kilobases upstream of the initiation codon for that gene.

  20. A randomised, controlled trial of a dietary intervention for adults with major depression (the “SMILES” trial): study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite increased investment in its recognition and treatment, depression remains a substantial health and economic burden worldwide. Current treatment strategies generally focus on biological and psychological pathways, largely neglecting the role of lifestyle. There is emerging evidence to suggest that diet and nutrition play an important role in the risk, and the genesis, of depression. However, there are limited data regarding the therapeutic impact of dietary changes on existing mental illness. Using a randomised controlled trial design, we aim to investigate the efficacy and cost-efficacy of a dietary program for the treatment of Major Depressive Episodes (MDE). Methods/Design One hundred and seventy six eligible participants suffering from current MDE are being randomised into a dietary intervention group or a social support group. Depression status is assessed using the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Non Patient Edition) (SCID-I/NP). The intervention consists of 7 individual nutrition consulting sessions (of approximately 60 minutes), delivered by an Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD). Sessions commence within one week of baseline assessment. The intervention focuses on advocating a healthy diet based on the Australian Dietary Guidelines and the Dietary Guidelines for Adults in Greece. The control condition comprises a befriending protocol using the same visit schedule and length as the diet intervention. The study is being conducted at two locations in Victoria, Australia (a metropolitan and regional centre). Data collection occurs at baseline (pre-intervention), 3-months (post-intervention) and 6– months. The primary endpoint is MADRS scores at 3 months. A cost consequences analysis will determine the economic value of the intervention. Discussion If efficacious, this program could provide an alternative or adjunct treatment

  1. Preliminary randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of tryptophan combined with fluoxetine to treat major depressive disorder: antidepressant and hypnotic effects.

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, R D; Shen, J H; Jindal, R; Driver, H S; Kennedy, S H; Shapiro, C M

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because the initial phase of treatment of depression with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is often complicated by a delayed onset of action of the antidepressant or severe insomnia or both, we investigated whether tryptophan, an amino acid with both antidepressant-augmenting and hypnotic effects, would benefit patients with depression at the beginning of treatment with fluoxetine. DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. PATIENTS: Thirty individuals with major depressive disorder. INTERVENTIONS: Treatment over 8 weeks with 20 mg of fluoxetine per day and either tryptophan (2 to 4 g per day) or placebo. OUTCOME MEASURES: Mood was assessed using the 29-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-29) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Laboratory sleep studies were done at baseline and after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment using standard procedures. RESULTS: During the first week of treatment, there was a significantly greater decrease in HDRS-29 depression scores, and a similar trend in BDI scores, in the tryptophan/fluoxetine group than in the placebo/fluoxetine group. No significant differences were noted at later time points. With respect to sleep measures, there was a significant group-by-time interaction for slow-wave sleep at week 4. Further analysis revealed a significant decrease in slow-wave sleep after 4 weeks of treatment in the placebo/fluoxetine group, but not in the tryptophan/fluoxetine group. No cases of serotonin syndrome occurred, and the combination was well tolerated, although the 4 g per day dosage of tryptophan produced daytime drowsiness. CONCLUSIONS: Combining 20 mg of fluoxetine with 2 g of tryptophan daily at the outset of treatment for major depressive disorder appears to be a safe protocol that may have both a rapid antidepressant effect and a protective effect on slow-wave sleep. Further large-scale studies are needed to confirm these initial findings. PMID:11022398

  2. A Multi-Serotype Approach Clarifies the Catabolite Control Protein A Regulon in the Major Human Pathogen Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    DebRoy, Sruti; Saldaña, Miguel; Travisany, Dante; Montano, Andrew; Galloway-Peña, Jessica; Horstmann, Nicola; Yao, Hui; González, Mauricio; Maass, Alejandro; Latorre, Mauricio; Shelburne, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Catabolite control protein A (CcpA) is a highly conserved, master regulator of carbon source utilization in gram-positive bacteria, but the CcpA regulon remains ill-defined. In this study we aimed to clarify the CcpA regulon by determining the impact of CcpA-inactivation on the virulence and transcriptome of three distinct serotypes of the major human pathogen Group A Streptococcus (GAS). CcpA-inactivation significantly decreased GAS virulence in a broad array of animal challenge models consistent with the idea that CcpA is critical to gram-positive bacterial pathogenesis. Via comparative transcriptomics, we established that the GAS CcpA core regulon is enriched for highly conserved CcpA binding motifs (i.e. cre sites). Conversely, strain-specific differences in the CcpA transcriptome seems to consist primarily of affected secondary networks. Refinement of cre site composition via analysis of the core regulon facilitated development of a modified cre consensus that shows promise for improved prediction of CcpA targets in other medically relevant gram-positive pathogens. PMID:27580596

  3. A Multi-Serotype Approach Clarifies the Catabolite Control Protein A Regulon in the Major Human Pathogen Group A Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    DebRoy, Sruti; Saldaña, Miguel; Travisany, Dante; Montano, Andrew; Galloway-Peña, Jessica; Horstmann, Nicola; Yao, Hui; González, Mauricio; Maass, Alejandro; Latorre, Mauricio; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2016-01-01

    Catabolite control protein A (CcpA) is a highly conserved, master regulator of carbon source utilization in gram-positive bacteria, but the CcpA regulon remains ill-defined. In this study we aimed to clarify the CcpA regulon by determining the impact of CcpA-inactivation on the virulence and transcriptome of three distinct serotypes of the major human pathogen Group A Streptococcus (GAS). CcpA-inactivation significantly decreased GAS virulence in a broad array of animal challenge models consistent with the idea that CcpA is critical to gram-positive bacterial pathogenesis. Via comparative transcriptomics, we established that the GAS CcpA core regulon is enriched for highly conserved CcpA binding motifs (i.e. cre sites). Conversely, strain-specific differences in the CcpA transcriptome seems to consist primarily of affected secondary networks. Refinement of cre site composition via analysis of the core regulon facilitated development of a modified cre consensus that shows promise for improved prediction of CcpA targets in other medically relevant gram-positive pathogens. PMID:27580596

  4. Effects of messenger RNA structure and other translational control mechanisms on major histocompatibility complex-I mediated antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Murat, Pierre; Tellam, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Effective T-cell surveillance of antigen-presenting cells is dependent on the expression of an array of antigenic peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (MHC-I) or class II (MHC-II) molecules. Pathogens co-evolving with their hosts exploit crucial translational regulatory mechanisms in order to evade host immune recognition and thereby sustain their infection. Evasion strategies that downregulate viral protein synthesis and thereby restrict antigen presentation to cytotoxic T-cells through the endogenous MHC-I pathway have been implicated in the pathogenesis of viral-associated malignancies. An understanding of the mechanisms by which messenger RNA (mRNA) structure modulates both viral mRNA translation and the antigen processing machinery to escape immune surveillance, will stimulate the development of alternative therapeutic strategies focused on RNA-directed drugs designed to enhance immune responses against infected cells. In this review, we discuss regulatory aspects of the MHC-I pathway and summarize current knowledge of the role attributed by mRNA structure and other translational regulatory mechanisms in immune evasion. In particular we highlight the impact of recently identified G-quadruplex structures within virally encoded transcripts as unique regulatory signals for translational control and antigen presentation. WIREs RNA 2015, 6:157–171. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1262 PMID:25264139

  5. Mirtazapine in comorbid major depression and an alcohol use disorder: A double-blind placebo-controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Jack R; Chung, Tammy; Douaihy, Antoine B; Kirisci, Levent; Glance, Jody; Kmiec, Julie; FitzGerald, Douglas; Wesesky, Maribeth A; Salloum, Ihsan

    2016-08-30

    This was a first double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of the novel antidepressant medication mirtazapine for treating both the depressive symptoms and the level of alcohol consumption of subjects with comorbid major depressive disorder and an alcohol use disorder (MDD/AUD). The results of two previous studies of mirtazapine in MDD/AUD subjects had suggested efficacy for mirtazapine for decreasing their level of depressive symptoms, but level of alcohol consumption had not been assessed in those studies. All subjects in this 12-week pilot study were randomized to either mirtazapine or placebo, and also received motivational enhancement therapy. Between-group analyses involving the outcome measures of depressive symptoms, level of alcohol consumption, and level of alcohol craving indicated no significant differences between groups, possibly because of limited sample size. However, within-group t tests in the mirtazapine group showed a significant decrease in depressive symptoms by week 2, also noted at all subsequent assessments (weeks 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12) during the 12-week study. In contrast, no significant decrease in depressive symptoms was noted in the placebo group until week 8. No evidence of efficacy was found for mirtazapine for decreasing level of alcohol consumption in MDD /AUD subjects. PMID:27327217

  6. Acidic Residues Control the Dimerization of the N-terminal Domain of Black Widow Spiders’ Major Ampullate Spidroin 1

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Joschka; Schaal, Daniel; Eisoldt, Lukas; Schweimer, Kristian; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Scheibel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dragline silk is the most prominent amongst spider silks and comprises two types of major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) differing in their proline content. In the natural spinning process, the conversion of soluble MaSp into a tough fiber is, amongst other factors, triggered by dimerization and conformational switching of their helical amino-terminal domains (NRN). Both processes are induced by protonation of acidic residues upon acidification along the spinning duct. Here, the structure and monomer-dimer-equilibrium of the domain NRN1 of Latrodectus hesperus MaSp1 and variants thereof have been investigated, and the key residues for both could be identified. Changes in ionic composition and strength within the spinning duct enable electrostatic interactions between the acidic and basic pole of two monomers which prearrange into an antiparallel dimer. Upon naturally occurring acidification this dimer is stabilized by protonation of residue E114. A conformational change is independently triggered by protonation of clustered acidic residues (D39, E76, E81). Such step-by-step mechanism allows a controlled spidroin assembly in a pH- and salt sensitive manner, preventing premature aggregation of spider silk proteins in the gland and at the same time ensuring fast and efficient dimer formation and stabilization on demand in the spinning duct. PMID:27681031

  7. Acidic Residues Control the Dimerization of the N-terminal Domain of Black Widow Spiders’ Major Ampullate Spidroin 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Joschka; Schaal, Daniel; Eisoldt, Lukas; Schweimer, Kristian; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Scheibel, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Dragline silk is the most prominent amongst spider silks and comprises two types of major ampullate spidroins (MaSp) differing in their proline content. In the natural spinning process, the conversion of soluble MaSp into a tough fiber is, amongst other factors, triggered by dimerization and conformational switching of their helical amino-terminal domains (NRN). Both processes are induced by protonation of acidic residues upon acidification along the spinning duct. Here, the structure and monomer-dimer-equilibrium of the domain NRN1 of Latrodectus hesperus MaSp1 and variants thereof have been investigated, and the key residues for both could be identified. Changes in ionic composition and strength within the spinning duct enable electrostatic interactions between the acidic and basic pole of two monomers which prearrange into an antiparallel dimer. Upon naturally occurring acidification this dimer is stabilized by protonation of residue E114. A conformational change is independently triggered by protonation of clustered acidic residues (D39, E76, E81). Such step-by-step mechanism allows a controlled spidroin assembly in a pH- and salt sensitive manner, preventing premature aggregation of spider silk proteins in the gland and at the same time ensuring fast and efficient dimer formation and stabilization on demand in the spinning duct.

  8. Dissociation of β2-microglobulin determines the surface quality control of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules.

    PubMed

    Montealegre, Sebastián; Venugopalan, Vaishnavi; Fritzsche, Susanne; Kulicke, Corinna; Hein, Zeynep; Springer, Sebastian

    2015-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I proteins, which present antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes at the surface of all nucleated cells, are endocytosed and destroyed rapidly once their peptide ligand has dissociated. The molecular mechanism of this cellular quality control process, which prevents rebinding of exogenous peptides and thus erroneous immune responses, is unknown. To identify the nature of the decisive step in endocytic sorting of class I molecules and its location, we have followed the removal of optimally and suboptimally peptide-loaded murine H-2K(b) class I proteins from the cell surface. We find that the binding of their light chain, β2-microglobulin (β2m), protects them from endocytic destruction. Thus, the extended survival of suboptimally loaded K(b) molecules at 25°C is attributed to decreased dissociation of β2m. Because all forms of K(b) are constantly internalized but little β2m-receptive heavy chain is present at the cell surface, it is likely that β2m dissociation and recognition of the heavy chain for lysosomal degradation take place in an endocytic compartment.

  9. Synchroneity of major Late Neogene sea level fluctuations and paleoceanographically controlled changes as recorded by two carbonate platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betzler, Christian; Kroon, Dick; Reijmer, John J. G.

    2000-12-01

    Shallow-water carbonate systems are reliable recorders of sea level fluctuations and changes in ambient seawater conditions. Drilling results from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Legs 133 and 166 indicate that the timing of late Neogene sedimentary breaks triggered by sea level lowerings is synchronous in the sedimentary successions of the Queensland Plateau and the Great Bahama Bank. This synchrony indicates that these sea level changes were eustatic in origin. The carbonate platforms were also affected by contemporary, paleoceanographically controlled fluctuations in carbonate production. Paleoceanographic changes are recorded at 10.7, 3.6, and 1.7-2.0 Ma. At the Queensland Plateau, sea surface temperature shifts are documented by shifts from tropical to temperate carbonates (10.7 Ma) and vice versa (3.6 Ma); the modern tropical platform was established at 2.0-1.8 Ma. At Great Bahama Bank, changes were registered in compositional variations of platform-derived sediment, such as major occurrence of peloids (3.6 Ma) and higher rates of neritic carbonate input (1.7 Ma). The synchroneity of these changes attests to the far-field effects of modifications in the oceanographic circulation on shallow-water, low-latitude carbonate production.

  10. Intraflagellar transport particle size scales inversely with flagellar length: revisiting the balance-point length control model

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Benjamin D.; Ludington, William B.

    2009-01-01

    The assembly and maintenance of eukaryotic flagella are regulated by intraflagellar transport (IFT), the bidirectional traffic of IFT particles (recently renamed IFT trains) within the flagellum. We previously proposed the balance-point length control model, which predicted that the frequency of train transport should decrease as a function of flagellar length, thus modulating the length-dependent flagellar assembly rate. However, this model was challenged by the differential interference contrast microscopy observation that IFT frequency is length independent. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to quantify protein traffic during the regeneration of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagella, we determined that anterograde IFT trains in short flagella are composed of more kinesin-associated protein and IFT27 proteins than trains in long flagella. This length-dependent remodeling of train size is consistent with the kinetics of flagellar regeneration and supports a revised balance-point model of flagellar length control in which the size of anterograde IFT trains tunes the rate of flagellar assembly. PMID:19805630

  11. Spacecraft Formation Flying near Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange Point: Trajectory Generation and Adaptive Full-State Feedback Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Hong; Kapila, Vikram

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for trajectory generation and adaptive full-state feedback control to facilitate spacecraft formation flying near the Sun-Earth L2 Lagrange point. Specifically, the dynamics of a spacecraft in the neighborhood of a Halo orbit reveals that there exist quasi-periodic orbits surrounding the Halo orbit. Thus, a spacecraft formation is created by placing a leader spacecraft on a desired Halo orbit and placing follower spacecraft on desired quasi-periodic orbits. To produce a formation maintenance controller, we first develop the nonlinear dynamics of a follower spacecraft relative to the leader spacecraft. We assume that the leader spacecraft is on a desired Halo orbit trajectory and the follower spacecraft is to track a desired quasi-periodic orbit surrounding the Halo orbit. Then, we design an adaptive, full-state feedback position tracking controller for the follower spacecraft providing an adaptive compensation for the unknown mass of the follower spacecraft. The proposed control law is simulated for the case of the leader and follower spacecraft pair and is shown to yield global, asymptotic convergence of the relative position tracking errors.

  12. Permafrost coverage, watershed area and season control of dissolved carbon and major elements in western Siberian rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovsky, O. S.; Manasypov, R. M.; Loiko, S.; Shirokova, L. S.; Krickov, I. A.; Pokrovsky, B. G.; Kolesnichenko, L. G.; Kopysov, S. G.; Zemtzov, V. A.; Kulizhsky, S. P.; Vorobyev, S. N.; Kirpotin, S. N.

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of organic and inorganic carbon (DOC and DIC, respectively), pH, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO4 and Si in ~ 100 large and small rivers (< 10 to ≤ 150 000 km2) of western Siberia sampled in winter, spring, and summer over a more than 1500 km latitudinal gradient allowed establishing main environmental factors controlling the transport of river dissolved components in this environmentally important region, comprising continuous, discontinuous, sporadic and permafrost-free zones. There was a significant latitudinal trend consisting in a general decrease in DOC, DIC, SO4, and major cation (Ca, Mg, Na, K) concentration northward, reflecting the interplay between groundwater feeding (detectable mostly in the permafrost-free zone, south of 60° N) and surface flux (in the permafrost-bearing zone). The northward decrease in concentration of inorganic components was strongly pronounced both in winter and spring, whereas for DOC, the trend of concentration decrease with latitude was absent in winter, and less pronounced in spring flood than in summer baseflow. The most significant decrease in K concentration from the southern (< 59° N) to the northern (61-67° N) watersheds occurs in spring, during intense plant litter leaching. The latitudinal trends persisted for all river watershed size, from < 100 to > 10 000 km2. Environmental factors are ranked by their increasing effect on DOC, DIC, δ13CDIC, and major elements in western Siberian rivers as follows: watershed area < season < latitude. Because the degree of the groundwater feeding is different between large and small rivers, we hypothesize that, in addition to groundwater feeding of the river, there was a significant role of surface and shallow subsurface flow linked to plant litter degradation and peat leaching. We suggest that plant-litter- and topsoil-derived DOC adsorbs on clay mineral horizons in the southern, permafrost-free and discontinuous/sporadic permafrost zone but lacks the interaction with minerals in

  13. Major Molecular Response Achievement in CML Patients Can Be Predicted by BCR-ABL1/ABL1 or BCR-ABL1/GUS Ratio at an Earlier Time Point of Follow-Up than Currently Recommended

    PubMed Central

    Huet, Sarah; Cony-Makhoul, Pascale; Heiblig, Maël; Tigaud, Isabelle; Gazzo, Sophie; Belhabri, Amine; Souche, Denis; Michallet, Mauricette; Magaud, Jean-Pierre; Hayette, Sandrine; Nicolini, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that early molecular response to tyrosine-kinase inhibitors is strongly predictive of outcome in chronic myeloid leukemia patients and that early response landmarks may identify patients at higher risk for transformation who would benefit from an early switch to second-line therapy. In this study, we evaluated the ability of the control gene GUS to identify relevant thresholds for known therapeutic decision levels (BCR-ABL1/ABL1IS  = 10% and 0.1%). We then defined the most relevant cut-offs for early molecular response markers (transcript level at 3 months, halving time and log reduction between diagnosis and 3 months of treatment) using GUS or ABL1. We demonstrated that, although both control genes could be used (in an equivalent way) to accurately assess early molecular response, the BCR-ABL1/GUS level at diagnosis is impacted by the higher GUS copy number over-expressed in CML cells, thus negatively impacting its ability to completely replace ABL1 at diagnosis. Furthermore, we pointed out, for the first time, that it would be helpful to monitor BCR-ABL1 levels at an earlier time point than that currently performed, in order to assess response to first-line tyrosine-kinase inhibitors and consider a potential switch of therapy as early as possible. We evaluated this optimal time point as being 19 days after the start of treatment in our cohort. PMID:25203717

  14. Screening Mosquito House Entry Points as a Potential Method for Integrated Control of Endophagic Filariasis, Arbovirus and Malaria Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Ogoma, Sheila B.; Lweitoijera, Dickson W.; Ngonyani, Hassan; Furer, Benjamin; Russell, Tanya L.; Mukabana, Wolfgang R.; Killeen, Gerry F.; Moore, Sarah J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Partial mosquito-proofing of houses with screens and ceilings has the potential to reduce indoor densities of malaria mosquitoes. We wish to measure whether it will also reduce indoor densities of vectors of neglected tropical diseases. Methodology The main house entry points preferred by anopheline and culicine vectors were determined through controlled experiments using specially designed experimental huts and village houses in Lupiro village, southern Tanzania. The benefit of screening different entry points (eaves, windows and doors) using PVC-coated fibre glass netting material in terms of reduced indoor densities of mosquitoes was evaluated compared to the control. Findings 23,027 mosquitoes were caught with CDC light traps; 77.9% (17,929) were Anopheles gambiae sensu lato, of which 66.2% were An. arabiensis and 33.8% An. gambiae sensu stricto. The remainder comprised 0.2% (50) An. funestus, 10.2% (2359) Culex spp. and 11.6% (2664) Mansonia spp. Screening eaves reduced densities of Anopheles gambiae s. l. (Relative ratio (RR)  = 0.91; 95% CI = 0.84, 0.98; P = 0.01); Mansonia africana (RR = 0.43; 95% CI = 0.26, 0.76; P<0.001) and Mansonia uniformis (RR = 0.37; 95% CI = 0.25, 0.56; P<0.001) but not Culex quinquefasciatus, Cx. univittatus or Cx. theileri. Numbers of these species were reduced by screening windows and doors but this was not significant. Significance This study confirms that across Africa, screening eaves protects households against important mosquito vectors of filariasis, Rift Valley Fever and O'Nyong nyong as well as malaria. While full house screening is required to exclude Culex species mosquitoes, screening of eaves alone or fitting ceilings has considerable potential for integrated control of other vectors of filariasis, arbovirus and malaria. PMID:20689815

  15. Equilibrium point control of a monkey arm simulator by a fast learning tree structured artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Dornay, M; Sanger, T D

    1993-01-01

    A planar 17 muscle model of the monkey's arm based on realistic biomechanical measurements was simulated on a Symbolics Lisp Machine. The simulator implements the equilibrium point hypothesis for the control of arm movements. Given initial and final desired positions, it generates a minimum-jerk desired trajectory of the hand and uses the backdriving algorithm to determine an appropriate sequence of motor commands to the muscles (Flash 1987; Mussa-Ivaldi et al. 1991; Dornay 1991b). These motor commands specify a temporal sequence of stable (attractive) equilibrium positions which lead to the desired hand movement. A strong disadvantage of the simulator is that it has no memory of previous computations. Determining the desired trajectory using the minimum-jerk model is instantaneous, but the laborious backdriving algorithm is slow, and can take up to one hour for some trajectories. The complexity of the required computations makes it a poor model for biological motor control. We propose a computationally simpler and more biologically plausible method for control which achieves the benefits of the backdriving algorithm. A fast learning, tree-structured network (Sanger 1991c) was trained to remember the knowledge obtained by the backdriving algorithm. The neural network learned the nonlinear mapping from a 2-dimensional cartesian planar hand position (x,y) to a 17-dimensional motor command space (u1, . . ., u17). Learning 20 training trajectories, each composed of 26 sample points [[x,y], [u1, . . ., u17] took only 20 min on a Sun-4 Sparc workstation. After the learning stage, new, untrained test trajectories as well as the original trajectories of the hand were given to the neural network as input. The network calculated the required motor commands for these movements. The resulting movements were close to the desired ones for both the training and test cases. PMID:8324058

  16. Contingent Valuation of Residents' Attitudes and Willingness-to-Pay for Non-point Source Pollution Control: A Case Study in AL-Prespa, Southeastern Albania.

    PubMed

    Grazhdani, Dorina

    2015-07-01

    Recently, local governments in Albania have begun paying attention to management of small watershed, because there are specific boundaries and people living within a watershed basin tend to be more concerned about the basin's environmental, economic, and social development. But this natural resource management and non-point source (NPS) pollution control is still facing challenges. Albanian part of Prespa Park (AL-Prespa) is a good case study, as it is a protected wetland area of high biodiversity and long human history. In this framework, this study was undertaken, the main objectives of which were to explore: (1) the attitudes of the residents toward NPS pollution control, (2) their willingness-to-pay for improving water quality, and (3) factors affecting the residents' willingness-to-pay. Descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA (analysis of variance), Chi-square analysis, and multivariate data analysis techniques were used. Findings strongly suggested that the residents' attitudes toward NPS pollution control in this area were positive. With the combination of two major contingent valuation methods--dichotomous choice and open-ended formats, the survey results indicated that the average yearly respondents' WTP was 6.4. The survey revealed that residents' yearly income and education level were the main factors affecting residents' willingness-to-pay for NPS pollution control in this area, and there was no significant correlation between residents' yearly income and their education level. The current study would lay a solid foundation on decision-making in further NPS pollution control and public participation through community-based watershed management policies in AL-Prespa watershed and similar areas. PMID:25860594

  17. Contingent Valuation of Residents' Attitudes and Willingness-to-Pay for Non-point Source Pollution Control: A Case Study in AL-Prespa, Southeastern Albania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazhdani, Dorina

    2015-07-01

    Recently, local governments in Albania have begun paying attention to management of small watershed, because there are specific boundaries and people living within a watershed basin tend to be more concerned about the basin's environmental, economic, and social development. But this natural resource management and non-point source (NPS) pollution control is still facing challenges. Albanian part of Prespa Park (AL-Prespa) is a good case study, as it is a protected wetland area of high biodiversity and long human history. In this framework, this study was undertaken, the main objectives of which were to explore: (1) the attitudes of the residents toward NPS pollution control, (2) their willingness-to-pay for improving water quality, and (3) factors affecting the residents' willingness-to-pay. Descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA (analysis of variance), Chi-square analysis, and multivariate data analysis techniques were used. Findings strongly suggested that the residents' attitudes toward NPS pollution control in this area were positive. With the combination of two major contingent valuation methods—dichotomous choice and open-ended formats, the survey results indicated that the average yearly respondents' WTP was €6.4. The survey revealed that residents' yearly income and education level were the main factors affecting residents' willingness-to-pay for NPS pollution control in this area, and there was no significant correlation between residents' yearly income and their education level. The current study would lay a solid foundation on decision-making in further NPS pollution control and public participation through community-based watershed management policies in AL-Prespa watershed and similar areas.

  18. Contingent Valuation of Residents' Attitudes and Willingness-to-Pay for Non-point Source Pollution Control: A Case Study in AL-Prespa, Southeastern Albania.

    PubMed

    Grazhdani, Dorina

    2015-07-01

    Recently, local governments in Albania have begun paying attention to management of small watershed, because there are specific boundaries and people living within a watershed basin tend to be more concerned about the basin's environmental, economic, and social development. But this natural resource management and non-point source (NPS) pollution control is still facing challenges. Albanian part of Prespa Park (AL-Prespa) is a good case study, as it is a protected wetland area of high biodiversity and long human history. In this framework, this study was undertaken, the main objectives of which were to explore: (1) the attitudes of the residents toward NPS pollution control, (2) their willingness-to-pay for improving water quality, and (3) factors affecting the residents' willingness-to-pay. Descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA (analysis of variance), Chi-square analysis, and multivariate data analysis techniques were used. Findings strongly suggested that the residents' attitudes toward NPS pollution control in this area were positive. With the combination of two major contingent valuation methods--dichotomous choice and open-ended formats, the survey results indicated that the average yearly respondents' WTP was 6.4. The survey revealed that residents' yearly income and education level were the main factors affecting residents' willingness-to-pay for NPS pollution control in this area, and there was no significant correlation between residents' yearly income and their education level. The current study would lay a solid foundation on decision-making in further NPS pollution control and public participation through community-based watershed management policies in AL-Prespa watershed and similar areas.

  19. Postoperative pain control using continuous i.m. bupivacaine infusion plus patient-controlled analgesia compared with epidural analgesia after major hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Lun-Hing, Edgar M; van Dam, Ronald M; Welsh, Fenella K S; Wells, John K G; John, Timothy G; Cresswell, Adrian B; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Rees, Myrddin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is debate concerning the best mode of delivery of analgesia following liver resection, with continuous i.m. infusion of bupivacaine (CIB) plus patient-controlled i.v. analgesia (PCA) suggested as an alternative to continuous epidural analgesia (CEA). This study compares these two modalities. Methods A total of 498 patients undergoing major hepatectomy between July 2004 and July 2011 were included. Group 1 received CIB + PCA (n = 429) and Group 2 received CEA (n = 69). Groups were analysed on baseline patient and surgical characteristics. Primary endpoints were pain severity scores and total opioid consumption. Secondary endpoints were pain management failures, need for rescue medication, postoperative (opioid-related) morbidity and hospital length of stay (LoS). Results In both groups pain was well controlled and >70% of patients had no or minimal pain on PoDs 1 and 2. The numbers of patients experiencing severe pain were similar in both groups: PoD 1 at rest: 0.3% in Group 1 and 0% in Group 2 (P = 1.000); PoD 1 on movement: 8% in Group 1 and 2% in Group 2 (P = 0.338); PoD 2 at rest: 0% in Group 1 and 2% in Group 2 (P = 0.126), and PoD 2 on movement: 5% in Group 1 and 5% in Group 2 (P = 1.000). Although the CIB + PCA group required more opioid rescue medication on PoD 0 (53% versus 22%; P < 0.001), they used less opioids on PoDs 0–3 (P ≤ 0.001), had lower morbidity (26% versus 39%; P = 0.018), and a shorter LoS (7 days versus 8 days; P = 0.005). Conclusions The combination of CIB + PCA provides pain control similar to that provided by CEA, but facilitates lower opioid consumption after major hepatectomy. It has the potential to replace epidural analgesia, thereby avoiding the occurrence of rare but serious complications. PMID:24151899

  20. Comparison of dexmedetomidine with fentanyl for maintenance of intraoperative hemodynamics in hypertensive patients undergoing major surgery: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bilgi, Kanchan V.; Vasudevan, Arumugam; Bidkar, Prasanna Udupi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to study and compare the effects of intravenous dexmedetomidine and fentanyl on intraoperative hemodynamics, opioid consumption, and recovery characteristics in hypertensive patients. Methods: Fifty-seven hypertensive patients undergoing major surgery were randomized into two groups, Group D (dexmedetomidine, n = 29) and Group F (fentanyl, n = 28). The patients received 1 μg/kg of either dexmedetomidine or fentanyl, followed by 0.5 μg/kg/h infusion of the same drug, followed by a standard induction protocol. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressures (MAPs), end-tidal isoflurane concentration, and use of additional fentanyl and vasopressors were recorded throughout. Results: Both dexmedetomidine and fentanyl caused significant fall in HR and MAP after induction and dexmedetomidine significantly reduced the induction dose of thiopentone (P = 0.026). After laryngoscopy and intubation, patients in Group D experienced a fall in HR and a small rise in MAP (P = 0.094) while those in Group F showed significant rise in HR (P = 0.01) and MAP (P = 0.004). The requirement of isoflurane and fentanyl boluses was significantly less in Group D. The duration of postoperative analgesia was longer in Group D (P = 0.015) with significantly lower postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Infusion of dexmedetomidine in hypertensive patients controlled the sympathetic stress response better than fentanyl and provided stable intraoperative hemodynamics. It reduced the dose of thiopentone, requirement of isoflurane and fentanyl boluses. The postoperative analgesia was prolonged, and incidence of PONV was less in patients who received dexmedetomidine. PMID:27212770

  1. Telephone and In-Person Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Major Depression after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bombardier, Charles H.; Vannoy, Steven; Dyer, Joshua; Ludman, Evette; Dikmen, Sureyya; Marshall, Kenneth; Barber, Jason; Temkin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Major depressive disorder (MDD) is prevalent after traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, there is a lack of evidence regarding effective treatment approaches. We conducted a choice-stratified randomized controlled trial in 100 adults with MDD within 10 years of complicated mild to severe TBI to test the effectiveness of brief cognitive behavioral therapy administered over the telephone (CBT-T) (n=40) or in-person (CBT-IP) (n=18), compared with usual care (UC) (n=42). Participants were recruited from clinical and community settings throughout the United States. The main outcomes were change in depression severity on the clinician-rated 17 item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) and the patient-reported Symptom Checklist-20 (SCL-20) over 16 weeks. There was no significant difference between the combined CBT and UC groups over 16 weeks on the HAMD-17 (treatment effect=1.2, 95% CI: −1.5–4.0; p=0.37) and a nonsignificant trend favoring CBT on the SCL-20 (treatment effect=0.28, 95% CI: −0.03–0.59; p=0.074). In follow-up comparisons, the CBT-T group had significantly more improvement on the SCL-20 than the UC group (treatment effect=0.36, 95% CI: 0.01–0.70; p=0.043) and completers of eight or more CBT sessions had significantly improved SCL-20 scores compared with the UC group (treatment effect=0.43, 95% CI: 0.10–0.76; p=0.011). CBT participants reported significantly more symptom improvement (p=0.010) and greater satisfaction with depression care (p<0.001), than did the UC group. In-person and telephone-administered CBT are acceptable and feasible in persons with TBI. Although further research is warranted, telephone CBT holds particular promise for enhancing access and adherence to effective depression treatment. PMID:25072405

  2. Telephone and in-person cognitive behavioral therapy for major depression after traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fann, Jesse R; Bombardier, Charles H; Vannoy, Steven; Dyer, Joshua; Ludman, Evette; Dikmen, Sureyya; Marshall, Kenneth; Barber, Jason; Temkin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is prevalent after traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, there is a lack of evidence regarding effective treatment approaches. We conducted a choice-stratified randomized controlled trial in 100 adults with MDD within 10 years of complicated mild to severe TBI to test the effectiveness of brief cognitive behavioral therapy administered over the telephone (CBT-T) (n = 40) or in-person (CBT-IP) (n = 18), compared with usual care (UC) (n = 42). Participants were recruited from clinical and community settings throughout the United States. The main outcomes were change in depression severity on the clinician-rated 17 item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) and the patient-reported Symptom Checklist-20 (SCL-20) over 16 weeks. There was no significant difference between the combined CBT and UC groups over 16 weeks on the HAMD-17 (treatment effect = 1.2, 95% CI: -1.5-4.0; p = 0.37) and a nonsignificant trend favoring CBT on the SCL-20 (treatment effect = 0.28, 95% CI: -0.03-0.59; p = 0.074). In follow-up comparisons, the CBT-T group had significantly more improvement on the SCL-20 than the UC group (treatment effect = 0.36, 95% CI: 0.01-0.70; p = 0.043) and completers of eight or more CBT sessions had significantly improved SCL-20 scores compared with the UC group (treatment effect = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.10-0.76; p = 0.011). CBT participants reported significantly more symptom improvement (p = 0.010) and greater satisfaction with depression care (p < 0.001), than did the UC group. In-person and telephone-administered CBT are acceptable and feasible in persons with TBI. Although further research is warranted, telephone CBT holds particular promise for enhancing access and adherence to effective depression treatment.

  3. A randomized controlled trial of venlafaxine XR for major depressive disorder after spinal cord injury: Methods and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Bombardier, Charles H.; Fann, Jesse R.; Wilson, Catherine S.; Heinemann, Allen W.; Richards, J. Scott; Warren, Ann Marie; Brooks, Larry; Warms, Catherine A.; Temkin, Nancy R.; Tate, Denise G.

    2014-01-01

    Context/objective We describe the rationale, design, methods, and lessons learned conducting a treatment trial for major depressive disorder (MDD) or dysthymia in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design A multi-site, double-blind, randomized (1:1) placebo controlled trial of venlafaxine XR for MDD or dysthymia. Subjects were block randomized and stratified by site, lifetime history of substance dependence, and prior history of MDD. Setting Six SCI centers throughout the United States. Participants Across participating centers, 2536 subjects were screened and 133 were enrolled into the trial. Subjects were 18–64 years old and at least 1 month post-SCI. Interventions Twelve-week trial of venlafaxine XR versus placebo using a flexible titration schedule. Outcome measures The primary outcome was improvement in depression severity at 12 weeks. The secondary outcome was improvement in pain. Results This article includes study methods, modifications prompted by a formative review process, preliminary data on the study sample and lessons learned. We describe common methodological and operational challenges conducting multi-site trials and how we addressed them. Challenges included study organization and decision making, staff training, obtaining human subjects approval, standardization of measurement and treatment, data and safety monitoring, subject screening and recruitment, unblinding and continuity of care, database management, and data analysis. Conclusions The methodological and operational challenges we faced and the lessons we learned may provide useful information for researchers who aim to conduct clinical trials, especially in the area of medical treatment of depression in people with SCI. PMID:24090228

  4. Broad and efficient control of major foodborne pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli by mixtures of plant-produced colicins.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Steve; Stephan, Anett; Hahn, Simone; Bortesi, Luisa; Jarczowski, Franziska; Bettmann, Ulrike; Paschke, Anne-Katrin; Tusé, Daniel; Stahl, Chad H; Giritch, Anatoli; Gleba, Yuri

    2015-10-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is one of the leading causes of bacterial enteric infections worldwide, causing ∼100,000 illnesses, 3,000 hospitalizations, and 90 deaths annually in the United States alone. These illnesses have been linked to consumption of contaminated animal products and vegetables. Currently, other than thermal inactivation, there are no effective methods to eliminate pathogenic bacteria in food. Colicins are nonantibiotic antimicrobial proteins, produced by E. coli strains that kill or inhibit the growth of other E. coli strains. Several colicins are highly effective against key EHEC strains. Here we demonstrate very high levels of colicin expression (up to 3 g/kg of fresh biomass) in tobacco and edible plants (spinach and leafy beets) at costs that will allow commercialization. Among the colicins examined, plant-expressed colicin M had the broadest antimicrobial activity against EHEC and complemented the potency of other colicins. A mixture of colicin M and colicin E7 showed very high activity against all major EHEC strains, as defined by the US Department of Agriculture/Food and Drug Administration. Treatments with low (less than 10 mg colicins per L) concentrations reduced the pathogenic bacterial load in broth culture by 2 to over 6 logs depending on the strain. In experiments using meats spiked with E. coli O157:H7, colicins efficiently reduced the population of the pathogen by at least 2 logs. Plant-produced colicins could be effectively used for the broad control of pathogenic E. coli in both plant- and animal-based food products and, in the United States, colicins could be approved using the generally recognized as safe (GRAS) regulatory approval pathway.

  5. Broad and efficient control of major foodborne pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli by mixtures of plant-produced colicins

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Steve; Stephan, Anett; Hahn, Simone; Bortesi, Luisa; Jarczowski, Franziska; Bettmann, Ulrike; Paschke, Anne-Katrin; Tusé, Daniel; Stahl, Chad H.; Giritch, Anatoli; Gleba, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is one of the leading causes of bacterial enteric infections worldwide, causing ∼100,000 illnesses, 3,000 hospitalizations, and 90 deaths annually in the United States alone. These illnesses have been linked to consumption of contaminated animal products and vegetables. Currently, other than thermal inactivation, there are no effective methods to eliminate pathogenic bacteria in food. Colicins are nonantibiotic antimicrobial proteins, produced by E. coli strains that kill or inhibit the growth of other E. coli strains. Several colicins are highly effective against key EHEC strains. Here we demonstrate very high levels of colicin expression (up to 3 g/kg of fresh biomass) in tobacco and edible plants (spinach and leafy beets) at costs that will allow commercialization. Among the colicins examined, plant-expressed colicin M had the broadest antimicrobial activity against EHEC and complemented the potency of other colicins. A mixture of colicin M and colicin E7 showed very high activity against all major EHEC strains, as defined by the US Department of Agriculture/Food and Drug Administration. Treatments with low (less than 10 mg colicins per L) concentrations reduced the pathogenic bacterial load in broth culture by 2 to over 6 logs depending on the strain. In experiments using meats spiked with E. coli O157:H7, colicins efficiently reduced the population of the pathogen by at least 2 logs. Plant-produced colicins could be effectively used for the broad control of pathogenic E. coli in both plant- and animal-based food products and, in the United States, colicins could be approved using the generally recognized as safe (GRAS) regulatory approval pathway. PMID:26351689

  6. Effect of Latent Myofascial Trigger Points on Strength Measurements of the Upper Trapezius: A Case-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Anshul

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this article was to determine whether strength is altered in the upper trapezius in the presence of latent myofascial trigger points (MTrP). Methods: This study was case controlled and used convenience sampling. The sample recruited was homogeneous with respect to age, sex, height, and body mass. Participants were assessed for the presence of latent MTrP in the upper trapezius and placed into two groups: an experimental group that had latent MTrP in the upper trapezius and a control group that did not. Eighteen women (mean age 21.4 y, SD 1.89; mean height 156.9 cm, SD 4.03; and mean body mass 51.7 kg, SD 5.84) made up the experimental group, and 19 women (mean age 20.3 y, SD 1.86; mean height 158.6 cm, SD 3.14; and mean body mass 53.2 kg, SD 5.17) made up the control group. We obtained strength measurements of the non-dominant arm using a handheld dynamometer and compared them between the two groups. Results: The difference in the strength measurements between the two groups was not statistically significant (p=0.59). Conclusions: The presence of latent MTrPs may not affect the strength of the upper trapezius. PMID:22942517

  7. Nausea control by needling at acupuncture point Neiguan (PC6) during an intraoral impression-taking procedure.

    PubMed

    Zotelli, Vera Lucia Rasera; Grillo, Cássia Maria; de Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosário

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture point PC6 (Neiguan) in controlling nausea during intraoral impression taking. This study was conducted in Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil. The sample consisted of 33 adult volunteers with nausea, who were randomly divided into control and study groups, and treated with nonpenetrating sham acupuncture and real acupuncture, respectively, at acupoint PC6. The two groups had two maxillary impressions taken, one prior to acupuncture and the other after acupuncture. The nausea assessment was made using the visual analog scale, Gagging Severity Index (GSI), and Gagging Prevention Index. Volunteers' expectation that nausea would be reduced through acupuncture was also assessed. For statistical analysis, we used the t test and the Spearman correlation (p < 0.05). When assessed by Gagging Severity Index/Gagging Prevention Index, nausea was reduced in the real acupuncture group (p < 0.01). In the visual analog scale assessment, similar reductions of nausea were noted in both groups (p > 0.05). No correlation existed between the expected and the actual reductions in nausea. Our results indicate that acupoint PC6 was effective for controlling nausea during the maxillary impression-taking procedure. Patients' expectation did not influence the results.

  8. Hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) in public catering services: a modified method, combined to bacteriologic assay.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, P

    1992-01-01

    During 1990 and 1991 the Veterinary and Public Health Services of USL 35 of Ravenna carried out a research programme aimed at the control of food-borne diseases in the sector of public catering services, in collaboration with the Public Health Laboratory (Presidio Multizonale di Prevenzione). The objectives were: obtaining sure information about health hazards in public catering services; checking structural characteristics and equipment of workrooms in restaurants, hotels and refectories; verifying food preparation and preservation methods; promoting health education to increase employees' awareness of hygiene-related problems. The first objective, evaluation of the level of the control of the workrooms exerted on the food contamination hazard by pathogenic or potentially pathogenic organisms, was carried out by allotting specific scores to several characteristics of laboratories or workers' habits, as suggested by the "Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point" (HACCP) method for butcher's shops and fish markets. Five hundred ninety-eight public catering service units have been inspected in restaurants, hotels, school-refectories, factories, hospitals and social houses; 2,097 bacteriological examinations by agar-contact plates and swabs were carried out; 118 preserved-food temperatures were measured, especially in deep-frozen and cooked food; 70 food specimens were tested to search for Salmonella spp. and Staphylococcus aureus and measure Total Aerobic Mesophilic Weight. The presence of Enterobacteriaceae and Escherichia coli was also tested.

  9. Control of a Vanadium Redox Battery and supercapacitor using a Three-Level Neutral Point Clamped converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etxeberria, A.; Vechiu, I.; Baudoin, S.; Camblong, H.; Kreckelbergh, S.

    2014-02-01

    The increasing use of distributed generators, which are mainly based on renewable sources, can create several issues in the operation of the electric grid. The microgrid is being analysed as a solution to the integration in the grid of the renewable sources at a high penetration level in a controlled way. The storage systems play a vital role in order to keep the energy and power balance of the microgrid. Due to the technical limitations of the currently available storage systems, it is necessary to use more than one storage technology to satisfy the requirements of the microgrid application. This work validates in simulations and experimentally the use of a Three-Level Neutral Point Clamped converter to control the power flow of a hybrid storage system formed by a SuperCapacitor and a Vanadium Redox Battery. The operation of the system is validated in two case studies in the experimental platform installed in ESTIA. The experimental results prove the validity of the proposed system as well as the designed control algorithm. The good agreement among experimental and simulation results also validates the simulation model, that can therefore be used to analyse the operation of the system in different case studies.

  10. Paroxetine Treatment in Children and Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder: A Randomized, Multicenter, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emslie, Graham J.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Kutcher, Stan; Krulewicz, Stan; Fong, Regan; Carpenter, David J.; Lipschitz, Alan; Machin, Andrea; Wilkinson, Christel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and tolerability of paroxetine in pediatric major depressive disorder. Method: Subjects 7 to 17 years old with major depressive disorder received paroxetine (10-50 mg/day) or placebo for 8 weeks from 2000 to 2001. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline in the Children's Depression Rating…

  11. The pyruvate-tricarboxylic acid cycle node: a focal point of virulence control in the enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bücker, René; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Becker, Judith; Dersch, Petra; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-10-24

    Despite our increasing knowledge of the specific pathogenicity factors in bacteria, the contribution of metabolic processes to virulence is largely unknown. Here, we elucidate a tight connection between pathogenicity and core metabolism in the enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis by integrated transcriptome and [(13)C]fluxome analysis of the wild type and virulence-regulator mutants. During aerobic growth on glucose, Y. pseudotuberculosis reveals an unusual flux distribution with a high level of secreted pyruvate. The absence of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators RovA, CsrA, and Crp strongly perturbs the fluxes of carbon core metabolism at the level of pyruvate metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and these perturbations are accompanied by transcriptional changes in the corresponding enzymes. Knock-outs of regulators of this metabolic branch point and of its central enzyme, pyruvate kinase (ΔpykF), result in mutants with significantly reduced virulence in an oral mouse infection model. In summary, our work identifies the pyruvate-TCA cycle node as a focal point for controlling the host colonization and virulence of Yersinia.

  12. Mitochondrial Development during Life Cycle Differentiation of African Trypanosomes: Evidence for a Kinetoplast-dependent Differentiation Control Point

    PubMed Central

    Timms, Mark W.; van Deursen, Frederick J.; Hendriks, Edward F.; Matthews, Keith R.

    2002-01-01

    Life cycle differentiation of African trypanosomes entails developmental regulation of mitochondrial activity. This requires regulation of the nuclear genome and the kinetoplast, the trypanosome's unusual mitochondrial genome. To investigate the potential cross talk between the nuclear and mitochondrial genome during the events of differentiation, we have 1) disrupted expression of a nuclear-encoded component of the cytochrome oxidase (COX) complex; and 2) generated dyskinetoplastid cells, which lack a mitochondrial genome. Using RNA interference (RNAi) and by disrupting the nuclear COX VI gene, we demonstrate independent regulation of COX component mRNAs encoded in the nucleus and kinetoplast. However, two independent approaches (acriflavine treatment and RNA interference ablation of mitochondrial topoisomerase II) failed to establish clonal lines of dyskinetoplastid bloodstream forms. Nevertheless, dyskinetoplastid forms generated in vivo could undergo two life cycle differentiation events: transition from bloodstream slender to stumpy forms and the initiation of transformation to procyclic forms. However, they subsequently arrested at a specific point in this developmental program before cell cycle reentry. These results provide strong evidence for a requirement for kinetoplast DNA in the bloodstream and for a kinetoplast-dependent control point during differentiation to procyclic forms. PMID:12388771

  13. Policy on Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) and adherence to food preparation guidelines: a cross sectional survey of stakeholders in food service in Kumasi, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Food borne diseases claim more lives and are growing public health concerns. Simple preventive techniques such as adoption and adherence to hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) policy can significantly reduce this disease burden. Though food screening and inspection are done, the ultimate regulation, Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point, which is known and accepted worldwide, appears not to be popular among food operators in Ghana. This paper examines the level of awareness of the existence of policy on hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) and its adherence to food preparation guidelines among food service providers in Ghana. Results The results revealed the mean age of food providers as 33.1 years with a standard deviation of 7.5, range of 18–55 years, more females, in full time employment and with basic education. Of the fifty institutional managers, 42 (84%) were senior officers and had worked for more than five years. Education and type of food operator had strong statistically significant relationship with the implementation of HCCP policy and adherence with food preparation guidelines. The enforcement of HACCP policy and adherence with food safety guidelines was led by the Ghana Tourist Board, Public Health officers, and KMA, respectively. While a majority of food operators 373/450 (83.3%) did not know HACCP policy is part of food safety guidelines, staff of food safety law enforcement 44/50 (88%) confirmed knowing that food operators were not aware of the HACCP policy. Conclusion The study documents evidence on the practice of food safety principles or HACCP policy or adherence to food preparation guidelines. Existing food safety guidelines incorporate varying principles of HACCP, however, awareness is low among food operators. The implication is that food production is likely to fall short of acceptable standards and not be wholesome putting consumers at health risk. Repeating this study in rural and urban

  14. 40 CFR 63.1586 - What are the emission points and control requirements for a non-industrial POTW treatment plant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for closed-vent systems and control devices in § 63.693 of subpart DD of this part, except you may... control requirements for a non-industrial POTW treatment plant? 63.1586 Section 63.1586 Protection of... are the emission points and control requirements for a non-industrial POTW treatment plant? There...

  15. Permafrost coverage, watershed area and season control of dissolved carbon and major elements in western Siberian rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovsky, O. S.; Manasypov, R. M.; Loiko, S.; Shirokova, L. S.; Krivtzov, I. A.; Pokrovsky, B. G.; Kolesnichenko, L. G.; Kopysov, S. G.; Zemtzov, V. A.; Kulizhsky, S. P.; Vorobiev, S. N.; Kirpotin, S. N.

    2015-07-01

    Analysis of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC and DIC, respectively), pH, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO4 and Si in ~ 100 large and small rivers (< 100 to ≤ 150 000 km2) of western Siberia sampled in winter, spring, summer and autumn over a more than 1500 km latitudinal gradient allowed for establishing the main environmental factors controlling the transport of dissolved river components in this environmentally important region, comprising continuous, discontinuous, sporadic and permafrost-free zones. There was significant latitudinal trend consisting in general decrease of DOC, DIC, SO4, and major cation (Ca, Mg, Na, K) concentrations northward, reflecting the interplay between groundwater feeding (detectable mostly in the permafrost-free zone, south of 60° N) and surface flux (in the permafrost-bearing zone). The trend of inorganic components was mostly pronounced in winter and less visible in spring, whereas for DOC, the trend of concentration decrease with latitude was absent in winter, and less pronounced in the spring flood than in the summer baseflow. The latitudinal trends persisted over all river watershed sizes, from < 100 to > 10 000 km2. This suggested that in addition to groundwater feeding of the river, there was a significant role of surface and shallow subsurface flow linked to plant litter degradation and peat leaching. Environmental factors are ranked by their increasing effect on DOC, DIC, δ13CDIC, and major elements in western Siberian rivers as the following: watershed area < season < latitude. Seasonal fluxes of dissolved components did not significantly depend on the river size and as such could be calculated as a~function of watershed latitude. Unexpectedly, the DOC flux remained stable around 3 t km-2 yr-1 until 61° N, decreased two-fold in the discontinuous permafrost zone (62-66° N), and increased again to 3 t km-2 yr-1 in the continuous permafrost zone (67° N). The DIC, Mg, K and Ca followed this pattern. The total dissolved

  16. Major structural controls on the distribution of pre-Tertiary rocks, Nevada Test Site vicinity, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.C.

    1998-10-23

    The lateral and vertical distributions of Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in southern Nevada are the combined products of original stratigraphic relationships and post-depositional faults and folds. This map compilation shows the distribution of the pre-Tertiary rocks in the region including and surrounding the Nevada Test Site. It is based on considerable new evidence from detailed geologic mapping, biostratigraphic control, sedimentological analysis, and a review of regional map relationships. Proterozoic and Paleozoic rocks of the region record paleogeographic transitions between continental shelf depositional environments on the east and deeper-water slope-facies depositional environments on the west. Middle Devonian and Mississippian sequences, in particular, show strong lateral facies variations caused by contemporaneous changes in the western margin of North America during the Antler orogeny. Sections of rock that were originally deposited in widely separated facies localities presently lie in close proximity. These spatial relationships chiefly result from major east- and southeast-directed thrusts that deformed the region in Permian or later time. Somewhat younger contractional structures are identified within two irregular zones that traverse the region. These folds and thrusts typically verge toward the west and northwest and overprint the relatively simple pattern of the older contractional terranes. Local structural complications are significant near these younger structures due to the opposing vergence and due to irregularities in the previously folded and faulted crustal section. Structural and stratigraphic discontinuities are identified on opposing sides of two north-trending fault zones in the central part of the compilation region north of Yucca Flat. The origin and significance of these zones are enigmatic because they are largely covered b Tertiary and younger deposits. These faults most likely results from significant lateral

  17. Huperzine A for treatment of cognitive impairment in major depressive disorder: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, Wei; XIANG, Ying-Qiang; UNGVARI, Gabor S.; CHIU, F.K. Helen; H. NG, Chee; WANG, Ying; XIANG, Yu-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Background Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors have been shown to be effective in treating cognitive impairment in animal models and in human subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). Huperzine A (HupA), a Traditional Chinese Medicine derived from a genus of clubmosses known as Huperzineserrata, is a powerful AChE inhibitor that has been used as an adjunctive treatment for MDD, but no meta-analysis on HupA augmentation for MDD has yet been reported. Aim Conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTS) about HupA augmentation in the treatment of MDD to evaluate its efficacy and safety. Methods Two evaluators independently searched nine English-language and Chinese-language databases, selected relevant studies that met pre-determined inclusion criteria, extracted data about outcome and safety, and conducted quality assessments and data synthesis. Results Three low-quality RCTs (pooled n=238) from China were identified that compared monotherapy antidepressant treatment for depression versus combined treatment with antidepressants and HupA. Participants in the studies ranged from 16 to 60 years of age. The average duration of adjunctive antidepressant and HupA treatment in the studies was only 6.7 weeks. All three studies were open label and non-blinded, so their overall quality was judged as poor. Meta-analysis of the pooled sample found no significant difference in the improvement in depressive symptoms between the two groups (weighted mean difference: -1.90 (95%CI: -4.23, 0.44), p=0.11). However, the adjunctive HupA group did have significantly greater improvement than the antidepressant only group in cognitive functioning (as assessed by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised) and in quality of life. There was no significant difference in the incidence of adverse drug reactions between groups. Conclusions The data available on the effectiveness and safety of adjunctive treatment using Hup

  18. Fine mapping and identification of a candidate gene for a major locus controlling maturity date in peach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maturity date (MD) is a crucial factor for marketing of fresh fruit, especially those with limited shelf-life such as peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch): selection of several cultivars with differing MD would be advantageous to cover and extend the marketing season. Aims of this work were the fine mapping and identification of candidate genes for the major maturity date locus previously identified on peach linkage group 4. To improve genetic resolution of the target locus two F2 populations derived from the crosses Contender x Ambra (CxA, 306 individuals) and PI91459 (NJ Weeping) x Bounty (WxBy, 103 individuals) were genotyped with the Sequenom and 9K Illumina Peach Chip SNP platforms, respectively. Results Recombinant individuals from the WxBy F2 population allowed the localisation of maturity date locus to a 220 kb region of the peach genome. Among the 25 annotated genes within this interval, functional classification identified ppa007577m and ppa008301m as the most likely candidates, both encoding transcription factors of the NAC (NAM/ATAF1, 2/CUC2) family. Re-sequencing of the four parents and comparison with the reference genome sequence uncovered a deletion of 232 bp in the upstream region of ppa007577m that is homozygous in NJ Weeping and heterozygous in Ambra, Bounty and the WxBy F1 parent. However, this variation did not segregate in the CxA F2 population being the CxA F1 parent homozygous for the reference allele. The second gene was thus examined as a candidate for maturity date. Re-sequencing of ppa008301m, showed an in-frame insertion of 9 bp in the last exon that co-segregated with the maturity date locus in both CxA and WxBy F2 populations. Conclusions Using two different segregating populations, the map position of the maturity date locus was refined from 3.56 Mb to 220 kb. A sequence variant in the NAC gene ppa008301m was shown to co-segregate with the maturity date locus, suggesting this gene as a candidate controlling ripening time in

  19. Impact of the number of control points has on isodose distributions in a dynamic multileaf collimator intensity-modulated radiation therapy delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Goraj, Andrew; Boer, Steven F. de

    2012-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a powerful technique in planning the delivery of dose. The most common IMRT delivery requires the use of moving multileaf collimators (MLCs) to deliver the requested fluence pattern. A dynamic delivery IMRT field file will contain several control points that are defined MLC shapes at a marked fraction of the delivered monitor units. The size of this file and the fidelity of the deliverable fluence are proportional to the number of control points defined. This study investigates the effect of reducing the number of control points has on the resultant dose distribution quality in complex IMRT in efforts to reduce transfer times, loading times, check sum times and file storage. Analysis was performed with 6 head and neck patients on an Eclipse version 8.5 treatment planning system (Varian, Palo Alto, CA). To ensure the quality of all treatments, Eclipse defines a minimum of 64 and a maximum of 320 control points per subfield (Eclipse Algorithms Reference guide). All 6 patients' plans were calculated with fixed 64, 166, and 320 control points using the sliding window technique. In addition, each plan was calculated in variable mode (Normal mode) in which the planning system determined the required number of control points. Each of the 4 plans for each patient was renormalized to provide the same mean planning target volume (PTV) 70 dose. Dose values for critical and target structures were examined for each patient. When examining the minimum, maximum, and mean doses to all target structures, it was noted that the greatest reduction in target dose coverage caused by reduced number of control points was 0.5%, which occurred for the minimum dose to the PTV56 structure in one plan.' Dose analysis for critical structures showed no clinically significant increase in dose when compared with the 320 control point plan.

  20. Evaluation of food additives as alternative or complementary chemicals to conventional fungicides for the control of major postharvest diseases of stone fruit for the control of major postharvest diseases of stone fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among more than twenty food additives and GRAS (generally regarded as safe) compounds that were tested at three concentrations in in vivo primary screenings with several cultivars of California peaches, nectarines, and plums that had been artificially inoculated with seven major postharvest pathogen...

  1. Mechanisms of Evolutionary Innovation Point to Genetic Control Logic as the Key Difference Between Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Bains, William; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2015-08-01

    The evolution of life from the simplest, original form to complex, intelligent animal life occurred through a number of key innovations. Here we present a new tool to analyze these key innovations by proposing that the process of evolutionary innovation may follow one of three underlying processes, namely a Random Walk, a Critical Path, or a Many Paths process, and in some instances may also constitute a "Pull-up the Ladder" event. Our analysis is based on the occurrence of function in modern biology, rather than specific structure or mechanism. A function in modern biology may be classified in this way either on the basis of its evolution or the basis of its modern mechanism. Characterizing key innovations in this way helps identify the likelihood that an innovation could arise. In this paper, we describe the classification, and methods to classify functional features of modern organisms into these three classes based on the analysis of how a function is implemented in modern biology. We present the application of our categorization to the evolution of eukaryotic gene control. We use this approach to support the argument that there are few, and possibly no basic chemical differences between the functional constituents of the machinery of gene control between eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea. This suggests that the difference between eukaryotes and prokaryotes that allows the former to develop the complex genetic architecture seen in animals and plants is something other than their chemistry. We tentatively identify the difference as a difference in control logic, that prokaryotic genes are by default 'on' and eukaryotic genes are by default 'off.' The Many Paths evolutionary process suggests that, from a 'default off' starting point, the evolution of the genetic complexity of higher eukaryotes is a high probability event.

  2. Control of optical and electrical properties of nanosheets by the chemical structure of the turning point in a foldable polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Taichi; Tamura, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Tsuneaki; Seki, Shu

    2016-07-01

    Oligomers of tetra(ethylene glycol)-disubstituted phenyl-capped bithiophene (Ph2TPh) linked by catechol and resorcinol were prepared. Catechol and resorcinol link the monomers via the ortho- and meta-positions of the benzene ring, respectively, and function as turning points in the folding process of the polymer. It was confirmed that the ortho-linked 8mer (o-8mer) and meta-linked 8mer (m-8mer) could form nanosheets through the self-assembly of folded polymers in o-dichlorobenzene. We confirmed that the arrangement of thiophene units inside the nanosheets was controllable by changing the chemical structure of the turning point. The different arrangements of the Ph2TPh units led to changes in other physical properties such as UV-Vis absorption, nanosheet thickness and charge carrier transport. The absorption spectrum of the o-8mer nanosheets suggested that the Ph2TPh units are arranged vertical to the lateral direction of the nanosheets. On the other hand, the Ph2TPh units in the m-8mer nanosheets were considered to have a tilted orientation. The change in the Ph2TPh tilt angle inside the nanosheets was supported by the different thicknesses of the o-8mer and m-8mer nanosheets. The relationship between the absorption spectrum and Ph2TPh unit arrangement was discussed based on the DFT calculation. Intrinsic charge carrier transport properties were evaluated by a noncontact microwave-based method. The o-8mer nanosheets showed higher conductivity than the m-8mer and triazole-linked-8mer nanosheets. The lifetime of charge carriers in the nanosheet was longer than that in the lamellar structure of the drop-cast film.Oligomers of tetra(ethylene glycol)-disubstituted phenyl-capped bithiophene (Ph2TPh) linked by catechol and resorcinol were prepared. Catechol and resorcinol link the monomers via the ortho- and meta-positions of the benzene ring, respectively, and function as turning points in the folding process of the polymer. It was confirmed that the ortho-linked 8mer (o

  3. Pain control of thoracoscopic major pulmonary resection: is pre-emptive local bupivacaine injection able to replace the intravenous patient controlled analgesia?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee Chul; Lee, Ja-young; Ahn, Soyeon; Cho, Sukki; Kim, Kwhanmien; Jheon, Sanghoon

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this open-label, non-inferiority trial was to evaluate whether pre-emptive local bupivacaine injection (PLBI) can replace intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IV PCA) in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) major pulmonary resection. Methods A total of 86 patients scheduled for VATS segmentectomy/lobectomy were randomly assigned into two groups. The PLBI group (n=42) received 0.5% bupivacaine wound infiltration before skin incision, and the IV PCA group (n=44) received a continuous infusion of fentanyl with a basal rate of 10 µg/mL/h. Visual analogue scale (VAS; range, 0-10) was measured as the primary endpoint. The secondary endpoint was an additional use of analgesics and drug induced side effects. Results Both groups showed no difference in terms of age, sex, disease entity, operation time, chest tube indwelling time, and hospital stay. Serial pain scores between the PLBI and IV PCA groups demonstrated no statistical differences (non-inferiority margin; ΔVAS =1.0) (Recovery room: 8.3±2.1 vs. 8.5±1.7; Day 0: 5.1±1.6 vs. 5.2±1.4; Day 1: 3.5±1.6 vs. 3.3±1.2; Day 2: 2.7±1.3 vs. 2.5±1.2; Day 3: 2.3±1.3 vs. 2.1±1.5; 1 week after discharge: 3.0±1.7 vs. 2.8±1.5; 1 month: 1.9±1.2 vs. 2.3±1.4 and 2 months: 1.5±1.2 vs. 1.3±1.2; 95% confidential interval (CI) of ΔVAS <1.0; P>0.05). The mean one-additional usage of IV analgesics was needed in the PLBI group (3.3±2.1 vs. 2.3±1.3; P=0.03). The occurrence of nausea/vomiting was higher in the IV PCA group (12.5% vs. 38.9%; P=0.026) and 41.7% of IV PCA patients experienced drug side effects that required IV PCA removal within postoperative day (POD) 1. Conclusions PLBI is a simple, safe, effective, and economical method, which is not inferior to IV PCA in VATS major pulmonary resection. PMID:26716034

  4. Monoamines and protein intake: are control mechanisms designed to monitor a threshold intake or a set point?

    PubMed

    Fernstrom, J D; Fernstrom, M H

    2001-08-01

    The concentration of TYR in brain changes directly with dietary protein content in the 0-10% PE range, but not higher. The effect is large: TYR concentrations rise as much as two- to threefold between 0% and 10% dietary protein content. This increase produces a clear stimulation of the rate of catecholamine synthesis, observed both for DA and NE, and notably in the hypothalamus, a brain area involved in appetite regulation. A similar relationship to chronic dietary protein intake may also exist for tryptophan and its neurotransmitter product, 5HT. Because the natural diet of rats, the animal model most commonly used in such studies, typically contains between 6% and 14% protein, and may contain less under unfavorable environmental circumstances, rats in the wild may frequently operate on the portion of the protein intake curve producing maximal changes in brain TYR (and perhaps TRP) concentrations. If so, then the production of catecholamines and 5HT may be similarly affected. By such a scenario, the brain might receive information regarding the animal's success in acquiring adequate amounts of protein in its diet. A similar argument can also be made for monkeys in the wild, based on their dietary habits, and thus possibly for humans. From this perspective, animals are hypothesized to monitor/regulate their intake of protein based on a threshold, rather than a set-point model. This notion is not new or unique to amino acids. For example, one current notion of leptin action is that it serves as a signal for energy intake important during periods of deficiency, but not excess. More generally, given the primacy in nature of the need to acquire adequate amounts of food in order to survive and reproduce, and the difficulty in achieving this nutritional goal, it may be that appetite control mechanisms have evolved in nature to center more on attaining and exceeding adequacy than on maintaining intake around a set-point well in excess of adequacy.

  5. Colloid Microthruster Feed System Development for Fine Pointing and Drag-Free Control of Multi-Year Astronomical Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemer, John; Mueller, J.; Spence, D.; Hruby, V.

    2014-01-01

    A new Colloid Microthruster feed system, including a propellant tank and redundant Microvalves, is being developed for fine pointing and drag-free operations of multi-year astronomical observatories under the PCOS SAT program. Almost all Gravitational Wave Observatory (GWO) concepts require microthrusters to maintain a drag-free environment for the inertial sensor instrument to meet the mission science objectives. The current state-of-the-art microthruster in the US is the Busek Colloid Micro-Newton Thruster (CMNT) originally developed under the New Millennium Program for the Space Technology 7 (ST7) and ESA's LISA Pathfinder (LPF) technology demonstration mission. The ST7 CMNT design includes a bellows propellant storage tank that is sized to provide up to 90 days of maximum thrust (30 µN). The new propellant tank is based on a blow-down, metal-diaphragm spherical tank design with enough capacity for a 5-year GWO mission. The new feed system will also include the third generation of Busek’s Microvalve, currently being developed under a NASA Phase II SBIR. The Microvalve is responsible for the picoliter per second control of the propellant from the tank to the thruster head, demanding parts with micron-level tolerances, critical alignments, and challenging acceptance test protocols. This microthruster system could also be considered for replacement of reaction wheels for slewing and fine pointing of other astronomical observatories, including Exo-Planet Observatory concepts. The goal of the PCOS SAT effort is to raise the new system to TRL 5 with performance and environmental testing within the next two years.

  6. Adaptation to elastic loads and BMI robot controls during rat locomotion examined with point-process GLMs.

    PubMed

    Song, Weiguo; Cajigas, Iahn; Brown, Emery N; Giszter, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    Currently little is known about how a mechanically coupled BMI system's actions are integrated into ongoing body dynamics. We tested a locomotor task augmented with a BMI system driving a robot mechanically interacting with a rat under three conditions: control locomotion (BL), "simple elastic load" (E) and "BMI with elastic load" (BMI/E). The effect of the BMI was to allow compensation of the elastic load as a function of the neural drive. Neurons recorded here were close to one another in cortex, all within a 200 micron diameter horizontal distance of one another. The interactions of these close assemblies of neurons may differ from those among neurons at longer distances in BMI tasks and thus are important to explore. A point process generalized linear model (GLM), was used to examine connectivity at two different binning timescales (1 ms vs. 10 ms). We used GLM models to fit non-Poisson neural dynamics solely using other neurons' prior neural activity as covariates. Models at different timescales were compared based on Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) goodness-of-fit and parsimony. About 15% of cells with non-Poisson firing were well fitted with the neuron-to-neuron models alone. More such cells were fitted at the 1 ms binning than 10 ms. Positive connection parameters ("excitation" ~70%) exceeded negative parameters ("inhibition" ~30%). Significant connectivity changes in the GLM determined networks of well-fitted neurons occurred between the conditions. However, a common core of connections comprising at least ~15% of connections persisted between any two of the three conditions. Significantly almost twice as many connections were in common between the two load conditions (~27%), compared to between either load condition and the baseline. This local point process GLM identified neural correlation structure and the changes seen across task conditions in the rats in this neural subset may be intrinsic to cortex or due to feedback and input reorganization in adaptation.

  7. Attachment as Moderator of Treatment Outcome in Major Depression: A Randomized Control Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy versus Cognitive Behavior Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Carolina; Atkinson, Leslie; Quilty, Lena C.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Anxiety and avoidance dimensions of adult attachment insecurity were tested as moderators of treatment outcome for interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Fifty-six participants with major depression were randomly assigned to these treatment conditions. Beck Depression Inventory-II, Six-Item Hamilton Rating Scale…

  8. Treatment of myofascial trigger-points with ultrasound combined with massage and exercise--a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gam, A N; Warming, S; Larsen, L H; Jensen, B; Høydalsmo, O; Allon, I; Andersen, B; Gøtzsche, N E; Petersen, M; Mathiesen, B

    1998-07-01

    The effect of treatment with ultrasound, massage and exercises on myofascial trigger-points (MTrP) in the neck and shoulder was assessed in a randomised controlled trial. The outcome measures were pain at rest and on daily function (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS), analgesic usage, global preference and index of MTrP. Long-term effect for treatment and control groups was assessed after 6 months using a questionnaire. The patients were randomised to three groups. The first group was treated with ultrasound, massage and exercise (A), the second group with sham-ultrasound, massage and exercise (B), while the third group was a control group (C). The duration of the study was 6 weeks. Treatment was given twice a week from the second to the fifth week. The number and index of MTrPs were recorded at each treatment session in groups A and B but only at entry as well as end of study in group C. VAS and analgesic usage was recorded in all three groups throughout the study period. Six months after the last treatment session a questionnaire was send to the patients. A total of 67 patients were included. Nine patients dropped-out during the study, which left 58 patients that could be included in the final analysis. Twenty patients were randomised to group A, 18 to group B and 18 to group C. A significant reduction in index were found between treatment groups (A and B) and control group (C), but no difference between group A and B. VAS scores, analgesic usage or global preference showed no difference between group A, B or C. The patients in the group C were offered treatment (ultrasound, massage, exercise) after the 6 weeks treatment period. At the questionnaire after 6 month 44 (87%) of the 52 patients from all three groups who had treatment responded. Sixty-four percent answered that they had had good or some effects, 68 percent were still doing the exercise programme and 17 percent had received other forms of therapy after they had completed the study. No difference between

  9. Impacts of DEM uncertainties on critical source areas identification for non-point source pollution control based on SWAT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fei; Dong, Guangxia; Wang, Qingrui; Liu, Lumeng; Yu, Wenwen; Men, Cong; Liu, Ruimin

    2016-09-01

    The impacts of different digital elevation model (DEM) resolutions, sources and resampling techniques on nutrient simulations using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model have not been well studied. The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivities of DEM resolutions (from 30 m to 1000 m), sources (ASTER GDEM2, SRTM and Topo-DEM) and resampling techniques (nearest neighbor, bilinear interpolation, cubic convolution and majority) to identification of non-point source (NPS) critical source area (CSA) based on nutrient loads using the SWAT model. The Xiangxi River, one of the main tributaries of Three Gorges Reservoir in China, was selected as the study area. The following findings were obtained: (1) Elevation and slope extracted from the DEMs were more sensitive to DEM resolution changes. Compared with the results of the 30 m DEM, 1000 m DEM underestimated the elevation and slope by 104 m and 41.57°, respectively; (2) The numbers of subwatersheds and hydrologic response units (HRUs) were considerably influenced by DEM resolutions, but the total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) loads of each subwatershed showed higher correlations with different DEM sources; (3) DEM resolutions and sources had larger effects on CSAs identifications, while TN and TP CSAs showed different response to DEM uncertainties. TN CSAs were more sensitive to resolution changes, exhibiting six distribution patterns at all DEM resolutions. TP CSAs were sensitive to source and resampling technique changes, exhibiting three distribution patterns for DEM sources and two distribution patterns for DEM resampling techniques. DEM resolutions and sources are the two most sensitive SWAT model DEM parameters that must be considered when nutrient CSAs are identified.

  10. Impact of point-of-sale tobacco display bans: findings from the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Borland, Ron; Fong, Geoffrey T.; Thrasher, James F.; Hammond, David; Cummings, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of point-of-sale (POS) tobacco marketing restrictions in Australia and Canada, in relation to the United Kingdom and the United States where there were no such restrictions during the study period (2006–10). The data came from the International Tobacco Control Four Country Survey, a prospective multi-country cohort survey of adult smokers. In jurisdictions where POS display bans were implemented, smokers’ reported exposure to tobacco marketing declined markedly. From 2006 to 2010, in Canada, the percentages noticing POS tobacco displays declined from 74.1 to 6.1% [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.26, P < 0.001]; and reported exposure to POS tobacco advertising decreased from 40.3 to 14.1% (adjusted OR = 0.61, P < 0.001). Similarly, in Australia, noticing of POS displays decreased from 73.9 to 42.9%. In contrast, exposure to POS marketing in the United States and United Kingdom remained high during this period. In parallel, there were declines in reported exposures to other forms of advertising/promotion in Canada and Australia, but again, not in the United States or United Kingdom. Impulse purchasing of cigarettes was lower in places that enacted POS display bans. These findings indicate that implementing POS tobacco display bans does result in lower exposure to tobacco marketing and less frequent impulse purchasing of cigarettes. PMID:23640986

  11. The Application of Two-Point Touch Cane Technique to Theories of Motor Control and Learning Implications for Orientation and Mobility Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croce, Ronald V.; Jacobson, William H.

    1986-01-01

    Basic behavioral processes involved in motor control based on theories of motor control and learning are outlined using the teaching of two-point touch cane technique as an application of the theories. The authors assert the importance of repetition, practice, and sufficient learning time. (Author/CL)

  12. Stochastic analysis of the control of the movement of the spacecraft in the vicinity of the colinear libration point by means of the forces of luminous pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukyanov, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the possible investigation of the utilization of the solar radiation pressure for the spacecraft motion control in the vicinity of collinear libration point of planar restricted ring problem of three bodies. The control is realized by changing the solar sail area at its permanent orientation. In this problem the influence of the trajectory errors and the errors of the execution control is accounted. It is worked out, the estimation method of the solar sail sizes, which are necessary for spacecraft keeping in the vicinity of collinear libration point during the certain time with given probability. The main control parameters were calculated for some examples in case of libration points of the Sun-Earth and Earth-Moon systems.

  13. Cathepsin B in Antigen-Presenting Cells Controls Mediators of the Th1 Immune Response during Leishmania major Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Leal, Iris J.; Röger, Bianca; Schwarz, Angela; Schirmeister, Tanja; Reinheckel, Thomas; Lutz, Manfred B.; Moll, Heidrun

    2014-01-01

    Resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection in the murine model is determined by the capacity of the host to mount either a protective Th1 response or a Th2 response associated with disease progression. Previous reports involving the use of cysteine cathepsin inhibitors indicated that cathepsins B (Ctsb) and L (Ctsl) play important roles in Th1/Th2 polarization during L. major infection in both susceptible and resistant mouse strains. Although it was hypothesized that these effects are a consequence of differential patterns of antigen processing, the mechanisms underlying these differences were not further investigated. Given the pivotal roles that dendritic cells and macrophages play during Leishmania infection, we generated bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) and macrophages (BMM) from Ctsb−/− and Ctsl−/− mice, and studied the effects of Ctsb and Ctsl deficiency on the survival of L. major in infected cells. Furthermore, the signals used by dendritic cells to instruct Th cell polarization were addressed: the expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, and cytokine production. We found that Ctsb−/− BMDC express higher levels of MHC class II molecules than wild-type (WT) and Ctsl−/− BMDC, while there were no significant differences in the expression of co-stimulatory molecules between cathepsin-deficient and WT cells. Moreover, both BMDC and BMM from Ctsb−/− mice significantly up-regulated the levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12) expression, a key Th1-inducing cytokine. These findings indicate that Ctsb−/− BMDC display more pro-Th1 properties than their WT and Ctsl−/− counterparts, and therefore suggest that Ctsb down-regulates the Th1 response to L. major. Moreover, they propose a novel role for Ctsb as a regulator of cytokine expression. PMID:25255101

  14. Changes in total plasma and serum N-glycome composition and patient-controlled analgesia after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Gudelj, Ivan; Baciarello, Marco; Ugrina, Ivo; De Gregori, Manuela; Napolioni, Valerio; Ingelmo, Pablo M; Bugada, Dario; De Gregori, Simona; Đerek, Lovorka; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Novokmet, Mislav; Gornik, Olga; Saccani Jotti, Gloria; Meschi, Tiziana; Lauc, Gordan; Allegri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation participates to the complex healing process occurring after major surgery, thus directly affecting the surgical outcome and patient recovery. Total plasma N-glycome might be an indicator of inflammation after major surgery, as well as an anti-inflammatory therapy response marker, since protein glycosylation plays an essential role in the inflammatory cascade. Therefore, we assessed the effects of surgery on the total plasma N-glycome and the association with self-administration of postoperative morphine in two cohorts of patients that underwent major abdominal surgery. We found that plasma N-glycome undergoes significant changes one day after surgery and intensifies one day later, thus indicating a systemic physiological response. In particular, we observed the increase of bisialylated biantennary glycan, A2G2S[3,6]2, 12 hours after surgery, which progressively increased until 48 postoperative hours. Most changes occurred 24 hours after surgery with the decrease of most core-fucosylated biantennary structures, as well as the increase in sialylated tetraantennary and FA3G3S[3,3,3]3 structures. Moreover, we observed a progressive increase of sialylated triantennary and tetraantennary structures two days after surgery, with a concomitant decrease of the structures containing bisecting N-acetylglucosamine along with bi- and trisialylated triantennary glycans. We did not find any statistically significant association between morphine consumption and plasma N-glycome. PMID:27501865

  15. Changes in total plasma and serum N-glycome composition and patient-controlled analgesia after major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gudelj, Ivan; Baciarello, Marco; Ugrina, Ivo; De Gregori, Manuela; Napolioni, Valerio; Ingelmo, Pablo M.; Bugada, Dario; De Gregori, Simona; Đerek, Lovorka; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Novokmet, Mislav; Gornik, Olga; Saccani Jotti, Gloria; Meschi, Tiziana; Lauc, Gordan; Allegri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation participates to the complex healing process occurring after major surgery, thus directly affecting the surgical outcome and patient recovery. Total plasma N-glycome might be an indicator of inflammation after major surgery, as well as an anti-inflammatory therapy response marker, since protein glycosylation plays an essential role in the inflammatory cascade. Therefore, we assessed the effects of surgery on the total plasma N-glycome and the association with self-administration of postoperative morphine in two cohorts of patients that underwent major abdominal surgery. We found that plasma N-glycome undergoes significant changes one day after surgery and intensifies one day later, thus indicating a systemic physiological response. In particular, we observed the increase of bisialylated biantennary glycan, A2G2S[3,6]2, 12 hours after surgery, which progressively increased until 48 postoperative hours. Most changes occurred 24 hours after surgery with the decrease of most core-fucosylated biantennary structures, as well as the increase in sialylated tetraantennary and FA3G3S[3,3,3]3 structures. Moreover, we observed a progressive increase of sialylated triantennary and tetraantennary structures two days after surgery, with a concomitant decrease of the structures containing bisecting N-acetylglucosamine along w