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Sample records for major depression personality

  1. Major depression, dysthymia and depressive personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Hirschfeld, R M

    1994-12-01

    The separation of persistent depression into meaningful and useful subcategories, including major depression, dysthymia, recurrent brief depression, and depressive personality disorder, is the subject of much debate. Depressions can be grouped on the basis of their type and severity of symptoms, aetiology, clinical course, or their association with other psychiatric illnesses. Several investigators have conducted epidemiologic and family studies to evaluate the prevalence of depressive disorders, their diagnostic stability over time, and the amount of overlap among the disorders. Although progress has been made toward a better understanding of the different disorders, insufficient evidence exists to support the hypothesis that these disorders are separate and distinct from one another. However, preliminary data suggest that depressive personality disorder is separate from the other disorders. Additionally, several questions have been raised, particularly the extent to which differentiation between the depressive disorders, specifically major depression and dysthymia, has an impact on treatment decisions.

  2. Clinical differentiation between major depression only, major depression with panic disorder and panic disorder only. Childhood, personality and personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Alnaes, R; Torgersen, S

    1989-04-01

    A consecutive sample of 298 nonpsychotic psychiatric outpatients was classified according to DSM-III and divided into 4 diagnostic groups: pure major depression, mixed major depression/panic disorder, pure panic disorder and a remaining group of other disorders. The patients' report of childhood relationship to parents and siblings, family atmosphere, their own personality characteristics as children and precipitating events were compared in the various groups. In addition, differences in personality and frequencies of personality disorders were investigated by means of various instruments. Our results show that the type of relationship to parents in childhood differed in the various groups. The mother seems to be the most crucial person for the development of depression, the father for the development of panic disorder. Patients with major depression are more obsessive and patients with panic disorder more infantile and avoidant with less control of their personality. Finally, patients with mixed conditions are more in accordance with the DSM-III anxious personality disorder cluster.

  3. Malevolent object representations in borderline personality disorder and major depression.

    PubMed

    Nigg, J T; Lohr, N E; Western, D; Gold, L J; Silk, K R

    1992-02-01

    To study malevolent representations, earliest memories were reliably coded on scales of affect tone. Ss were diagnosed with borderline personality disorder: 31 without and 30 with concurrent major depression. Nonborderline comparison subjects had either major depressive disorder (n = 26) or no psychiatric diagnosis (n = 30). Borderline subjects were discriminated from comparison subjects by their more malevolent representations; they more frequently produced memories involving deliberate injury; and they portrayed potential helpers as less helpful. Results suggest the diagnostic significance of malevolent representations, which need to be explained by any theory of borderline personality disorder.

  4. Personality and personality disorders among patients with major depression in combination with dysthymic or cyclothymic disorders.

    PubMed

    Alnaes, R; Torgensen, S

    1989-04-01

    Personality traits and personality disorders in 298 consecutive outpatients with pure major depression, major depression with dysthymic or cyclothymic disorder, pure dysthymic or cyclothymic disorder and other disorders were investigated. Patients with dysthymic or cyclothymic disorders alone or in combination with major depression showed more self-doubt, insecurity, sensitivity, compliance, rigidity and emotional instability. They were more schizoid, schizotypal, borderline and avoidant according to MCMI and had a higher prevalence of DSM-III Axis II diagnoses, and more borderline, avoidant, and passive-aggressive personality disorders, as measured by SIDP. All in all, dramatic and anxious clusters of personality disorders were more frequent among patients with dysthymic-cyclothymic disorders in addition to major depression than among patients with major depression only. The findings elucidated the close connection between the more chronic affective disorders and the personality disorders, irrespective of any concomitant diagnosis of major depression.

  5. State Effects of Major Depression on the Assessment of Personality and Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Morey, Leslie C.; Shea, M. Tracie; Markowitz, John C.; Stout, Robert L.; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Gunderson, John G.; Grilo, Carlos M.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Yen, Shirley; Sanislow, Charles A.; Skodol, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether personality disorders diagnosed during a depressive episode have long-term outcomes more typical of other patients with personality disorders or of patients with non-comorbid major depression. Method The study used six year outcome data collected from the multisite Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study (CLPS). Diagnoses and personality measures gathered from the study cohort at the index assessment using interview and self-report methods were associated with symptomatic, functional, and personality measures at six year follow-up. 668 patients were initially recruited to the CLPS study, of whom 522 were successfully followed for six years. All individuals had a DSM-IV diagnosis of one of four personality disorders (PD: Borderline, Schizotypal, Obsessive-Compulsive, or Avoidant) or had a DSM-IV diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) with no accompanying personality disorder. Results Results demonstrated that the group of patients with comorbid PD/MDD at the index evaluation had six year outcomes similar to patients with pure PD, and significantly worse than those of patients with pure MDD. Stability estimates of personality traits were similar for PD patients with and without MDD at the index evaluation. Conclusions The long term outcome of patients diagnoses with comorbid PD/MDD appears similar to those with pure PD and is significantly worse than those with pure MDD, suggesting that PD diagnoses established during depressive episodes are valid reflects of personality pathology rather than an artifact of depressive mood. PMID:20160004

  6. Mental state decoding impairment in major depression and borderline personality disorder: meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Richman, Mara J; Unoka, Zsolt

    2015-12-01

    Patients with major depression and borderline personality disorder are characterised by a distorted perception of other people's intentions. Deficits in mental state decoding are thought to be the underlying cause of this clinical feature. To examine, using meta-analysis, whether mental state decoding abilities in patients with major depression and borderline personality disorder differ from those of healthy controls. A systematic review of 13 cross-sectional studies comparing Reading in the Mind of the Eyes Test (RMET) accuracy performance of patients with major depression or borderline personality disorder and healthy age-matched controls (n = 976). Valence scores, where reported, were also assessed. Large significant deficits were seen for global RMET performance in patients with major depression (d = -0.751). The positive RMET valence scores of patients with depression were significantly worse; patients with borderline personality disorder had worse neutral scores. Both groups were worse than controls. Moderator analysis revealed that individuals with comorbid borderline personality disorder and major depression did better than those with borderline personality disorder alone on accuracy. Those with comorbid borderline personality disorder and any cluster B or C personality disorder did worse than borderline personality disorder alone. Individuals with both borderline personality disorder and major depression performed better then those with borderline personality disorder without major depression for positive valence. These findings highlight the relevance of RMET performance in patients with borderline personality disorder and major depression, and the importance of considering comorbidity in future analysis. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  7. Sustained unemployment in psychiatric outpatients with bipolar depression compared to major depressive disorder with comorbid borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Martinez, Jennifer H; Young, Diane; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy

    2012-12-01

    The morbidity associated with bipolar disorder is, in part, responsible for repeated calls for improved detection and recognition. No such clinical commentary exists for improved detection of borderline personality disorder in depressed patients. Clinical experience suggests that borderline personality disorder is as disabling as bipolar disorder; however, no studies have directly compared the two disorders. For this reason we undertook the current analysis from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project comparing unemployment and disability rates in patients with bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder. Patients were interviewed with semi-structured interviews. We compared three non-overlapping groups of depressed patients: (i) 181 patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder and borderline personality disorder, (ii) 1068 patients with major depressive disorder without borderline personality disorder, and (iii) 84 patients with bipolar depression without borderline personality disorder. Compared to depressed patients without borderline personality disorder, depressed patients with borderline personality disorder were significantly more likely to have been persistently unemployed. A similar difference was found between patients with bipolar depression and major depressive disorder without borderline personality disorder. No differences were found between patients with bipolar depression and depression with borderline personality disorder. Both bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder were associated with impaired occupational functioning and thus carry a significant public health burden. Efforts to improve detection of borderline personality disorder in depressed patients might be as important as the recognition of bipolar disorder. © 2012 John Wiley and Sons A/S.

  8. Personalized medicine in major depressive disorder -- opportunities and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Miller, Diane B; O'Callaghan, James P

    2013-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome in the early days of this millennium was greeted with great fanfare as this accomplishment was expected to revolutionize medicine and result in individualized treatments based on the genetic make-up of the patient. The ultimate promise of personalized medicine would be fulfilled with the identification of disease biomarkers that would be widely available for use in diagnosis and treatment. Progress, however, has been slow in providing disease biomarkers or approved diagnostic tests. This is true for major depressive disorder (MDD), despite its prevalence in the general population and the widespread acceptance of its biological basis. Studies using strategies like genome-wide association and candidate gene analyses have identified a number of possible biomarkers of MDD, including serum levels of neurotrophic factors, inflammatory cytokines and HPA axis hormones, but none have proven sufficiently powerful for clinical use. The lack of biologically based tests available for use in identifying patients with MDD is a significant impediment to personalized and more effective treatment, because it means diagnosis continues to be driven by subjective symptoms. While genetic studies of MDD have not yet led to diagnostic and treatment biomarkers, progress in determining the role of the genome in drug metabolism heralds the first effort in personalized prescribing for the antidepressants. The FDA suggested and approved genotyping tests for common variants of drug metabolism genes, such as the cytochrome p450s. By using these tests a physician can select an appropriate antidepressant for a given patient, as differences in clearance, half-life, and peak blood concentrations are controlled by genetic variability in drug metabolism. Personalization in drug choice can be achieved because these tests: (1) identify responders and non-responders; (2) provide alerts to possible adverse drug events; and (3) help optimize dose. Improved ways of

  9. Eating Disorders and Major Depression: Role of Anger and Personality

    PubMed Central

    Giovanni, Abbate-Daga; Carla, Gramaglia; Enrica, Marzola; Federico, Amianto; Maria, Zuccolin; Secondo, Fassino

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate comorbidity for MD in a large ED sample and both personality and anger as clinical characteristics of patients with ED and MD. We assessed 838 ED patients with psychiatric evaluations and psychometric questionnaires: Temperament and Character Inventory, Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. 19.5% of ED patients were found to suffer from comorbid MD and 48.7% reported clinically significant depressive symptomatology: patients with Anorexia Binge-Purging and Bulimia Nervosa were more likely to be diagnosed with MD. Irritable mood was found in the 73% of patients with MD. High Harm Avoidance (HA) and low Self-Directedness (SD) predicted MD independently of severity of the ED symptomatology, several clinical variables, and ED diagnosis. Assessing both personality and depressive symptoms could be useful to provide effective treatments. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate the pathogenetic role of HA and SD for ED and MD. PMID:21977317

  10. Personality, Stressful Life Events, and Treatment Response in Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulmash, Eric; Harkness, Kate L.; Stewart, Jeremy G.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined whether the personality traits of self-criticism or dependency moderated the effect of stressful life events on treatment response. Depressed outpatients (N = 113) were randomized to 16 weeks of cognitive-behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, or antidepressant medication (ADM). Stressful life events were…

  11. Personality, Stressful Life Events, and Treatment Response in Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulmash, Eric; Harkness, Kate L.; Stewart, Jeremy G.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined whether the personality traits of self-criticism or dependency moderated the effect of stressful life events on treatment response. Depressed outpatients (N = 113) were randomized to 16 weeks of cognitive-behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, or antidepressant medication (ADM). Stressful life events were…

  12. Personality traits in the differentiation of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder during a depressive episode.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Jaciana Marlova Gonçalves; dos Passos, Miguel Bezerra; Molina, Mariane Lopez; da Silva, Ricardo Azevedo; Souza, Luciano Dias de Mattos

    2016-02-28

    The aim of this study was to determine the differences in personality traits between individuals with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Bipolar Disorder (BD) during a depressive episode, when it can be hard to differentiate them. Data on personality traits (NEO-FFI), mental disorders (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Plus) and socioeconomic variables were collected from 245 respondents who were in a depressive episode. Individuals with MDD (183) and BD (62) diagnosis were compared concerning personality traits, clinical aspects and socioeconomic variables through bivariate analyses (chi-square and ANOVA) and multivariate analysis (logistic regression). There were no differences in the prevalence of the disorders between socioeconomic and clinical variables. As for the personality traits, only the difference in Agreeableness was statistically significant. Considering the control of suicide risk, gender and anxiety comorbidity in the multivariate analysis, the only variable that remained associated was Agreeableness, with an increase in MDD cases. The brief version of the NEO inventories (NEO-FFI) does not allow for the analysis of personality facets. During a depressive episode, high levels of Agreeableness can indicate that MDD is a more likely diagnosis than BD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Relationship of personality disorders to the course of major depressive disorder in a nationally representative sample.

    PubMed

    Skodol, Andrew E; Grilo, Carlos M; Keyes, Katherine M; Geier, Timothy; Grant, Bridget F; Hasin, Deborah S

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of specific personality disorder comorbidity on the course of major depressive disorder in a nationally representative sample. Data were drawn from 1,996 participants in a national survey. Participants who met criteria for major depressive disorder at baseline in face-to-face interviews (in 2001-2002) were reinterviewed 3 years later (in 2004-2005) to determine persistence and recurrence. Predictors included all DSM-IV personality disorders. Control variables included demographic characteristics, other axis I disorders, family and treatment histories, and previously established predictors of the course of major depressive disorder. A total of 15.1% of participants had persistent major depressive disorder, and 7.3% of those who remitted had a recurrence. Univariate analyses indicated that avoidant, borderline, histrionic, paranoid, schizoid, and schizotypal personality disorders all elevated the risk for persistence. With axis I comorbidity controlled, all personality disorders except histrionic personality disorder remained significant. With all other personality disorders controlled, borderline and schizotypal disorders remained significant predictors. In final, multivariate analyses that controlled for age at onset of major depressive disorder, the number of previous episodes, duration of the current episode, family history, and treatment, borderline personality disorder remained a robust predictor of major depressive disorder persistence. Neither personality disorders nor other clinical variables predicted recurrence. In this nationally representative sample of adults with major depressive disorder, borderline personality disorder robustly predicted persistence, a finding that converges with recent clinical studies. Personality psychopathology, particularly borderline personality disorder, should be assessed in all patients with major depressive disorder, considered in prognosis, and addressed in treatment.

  14. Relationship of Personality Disorders to the Course of Major Depressive Disorder in a Nationally Representative Sample

    PubMed Central

    Skodol, Andrew E.; Grilo, Carlos M.; Keyes, Katherine; Geier, Timothy; Grant, Bridget F.; Hasin, Deborah S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of specific personality disorder co-morbidity on the course of major depressive disorder in a nationally-representative sample. Method Data were drawn from 1,996 participants in a national survey. Participants who met criteria for major depressive disorder at baseline in face-to-face interviews (2001–2002) were re-interviewed three years later (2004–2005) to determine persistence and recurrence. Predictors included all DSM-IV personality disorders. Control variables included demographic characteristics, other Axis I disorders, family and treatment histories, and previously established predictors of the course of major depressive disorder. Results 15.1% of participants had persistent major depressive disorder and 7.3% of those who remitted had a recurrence. Univariate analyses indicated that avoidant, borderline, histrionic, paranoid, schizoid, and schizotypal personality disorders all elevated the risk for persistence. With Axis I co-morbidity controlled, all but histrionic personality disorder remained significant. With all other personality disorders controlled, borderline and schizotypal remained significant predictors. In final, multivariate analyses that controlled for age at onset of major depressive disorder, number of previous episodes, duration of current episode, family history, and treatment, borderline personality disorder remained a robust predictor of major depressive disorder persistence. Neither personality disorders nor other clinical variables predicted recurrence. Conclusions In this nationally-representative sample of adults with major depressive disorder, borderline personality disorder robustly predicted persistence, a finding that converges with recent clinical studies. Personality psychopathology, particularly borderline personality disorder, should be assessed in all patients with major depressive disorder, considered in prognosis, and addressed in treatment. PMID:21245088

  15. Stressful life events interacting with cognitive/personality styles to predict late-onset major depression.

    PubMed

    Mazure, Carolyn M; Maciejewski, Paul K; Jacobs, Selby C; Bruce, Martha L

    2002-01-01

    The current work evaluated the interaction of life stressors with cognitive/personality styles in predicting late-onset depression in 42 elderly outpatients with DSM-IV unipolar Major Depression and 42 nondepressed controls. Control subjects were matched to cases on age, sex, race, and years of education. As suggested by Beck's cognitive theory of depression, a multivariate model indicated that specific stressful-event types interacted with specific cognitive/personality styles in strongly predicting depression onset, adjusting for the positive associations of medical illness and reduced physical functioning with depression.

  16. Association study of the dopamine transporter gene with personality traits and major depressive disorder in the Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chang-Chih; Lu, Ru-Band; Shih, Mei-Chen; Yen, Che-Hung; Huang, San-Yuan

    2011-02-01

    Major depression is a complex psychiatric disorder involving multiple factors, including genetic and personality components. This study used 17 polymorphisms of dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) to explore whether this gene is associated with major depression and whether it influences personality traits in patients with major depression. The DAT1 polymorphisms were analyzed in 1017 unrelated individuals and 459 patients were eligible to assess personality traits. We found a borderline association between controls and total major depression and between major depression with family history versus controls; however, these differences were obscured after correction for multiple testing. Furthermore, the DAT1 polymorphisms were not associated either with major depression in haplotype analysis or with personality traits. Despite the fact that several association tendencies were found between DAT1 and major depression, we did not confirm a major role for DAT1 in the susceptibility to major depression. In addition, DAT1 does not seem to affect personality traits observed in patients with major depression.

  17. Major depression.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Susan M; Pagalilauan, Genevieve L; Simpson, Scott A

    2014-09-01

    Major depression is a common, disabling condition seen frequently in primary care practices. Non-psychiatrist ambulatory providers are increasingly responsible for diagnosing, and primarily managing patients suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal of this review is to help primary care providers to understand the natural history of MDD, identify practical tools for screening, and a thoughtful approach to management. Clinically challenging topics like co-morbid conditions, treatment resistant depression and pharmacotherapy selection with consideration to side effects and medication interactions, are also covered.

  18. The association of major depressive episode and personality traits in patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    de Melo Santos, Danyella; Lage, Laís Verderame; Jabur, Eleonora Kehl; Kaziyama, Helena Hideko Seguchi; Iosifescu, Dan V; de Lucia, Mara Cristina Souza; Fráguas, Renério

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Personality traits have been associated with primary depression. However, it is not known whether this association takes place in the case of depression comorbid with fibromyalgia. OBJECTIVE: The authors investigated the association between a current major depressive episode and temperament traits (e.g., harm avoidance). METHOD: A sample of 69 adult female patients with fibromyalgia was assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview severity of depressive symptomatology with the Beck Depression Inventory, and anxiety symptomatology with the IDATE-state and pain intensity with a visual analog scale. RESULTS: A current major depressive episode was diagnosed in 28 (40.5%) of the patients. They presented higher levels of harm avoidance and lower levels of cooperativeness and self-directedness compared with non-depressed patients, which is consistent with the Temperament and Character Inventory profile of subjects with primary depression. However, in contrast to previous results in primary depression, no association between a major depressive episode and self-transcendence was found. CONCLUSIONS: The results highlight specific features of depression in fibromyalgia subjects and may prove important for enhancing the diagnosis and prognosis of depression in fibromyalgia patients. PMID:21808861

  19. Temperament, personality, and treatment outcome in major depression: a 6-month preliminary prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Yuka; Nakagawa, Atsuo; Wake, Taisei; Ishikawa, Natsumi; Kurata, Chika; Nakahara, Mizuki; Nojima, Teruo; Mimura, Masaru

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite available treatments, major depression is a highly heterogeneous disorder, which leads to problems in classification and treatment specificity. Previous studies have reported that personality traits predict and influence the course and treatment response of depression. The Temperament and Personality Questionnaire (T&P) assesses eight major constructs of personality traits observed in those who develop depression. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of T&P’s eight constructs on the treatment outcome of depressed patients. Patients and methods A preliminary 6-month prospective study was conducted with a sample of 51 adult patients with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) without remarkable psychomotor disturbance using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition. All patients received comprehensive assessment including the T&P at baseline. We compared each T&P construct score between patients who achieved remission and those who did not achieve remission after 6 months of treatment for depression using both subjective and objective measures. All 51 (100%) patients received the 6-month follow-up assessment. Results This study demonstrated that higher scores on T&P personal reserve predicted poorer treatment outcome in patients with MDD. Higher levels of personal reserve, rejection sensitivity, and self-criticism correlated with higher levels of depression. Higher levels of rejection sensitivity and self-criticism were associated with non-remitters; however, when we controlled for baseline depression severity, this relationship did not show significance. Conclusion Although the results are preliminary, this study suggests that high scores on T&P personal reserve predict poorer treatment outcome and T&P rejection sensitivity and self-criticism correlate with the severity of depression. Longer follow-up studies with large sample sizes are required to improve the understanding of these

  20. Major depressive disorder: mechanism-based prescribing for personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Saltiel, Philip F; Silvershein, Daniel I

    2015-01-01

    Individual patients with depression present with unique symptom clusters – before, during, and even after treatment. The prevalence of persistent, unresolved symptoms and their contribution to patient functioning and disease progression emphasize the importance of finding the right treatment choice at the onset and the utility of switching medications based on suboptimal responses. Our primary goal as clinicians is to improve patient function and quality of life. In fact, feelings of well-being and the return to premorbid levels of functioning are frequently rated by patients as being more important than symptom relief. However, functional improvements often lag behind resolution of mood, attributed in large part to persistent and functionally impairing symptoms – namely, fatigue, sleep/wake disturbance, and cognitive dysfunction. Thus, patient outcomes can be optimized by deconstructing each patient’s depressive profile to its component symptoms and specifically targeting those domains that differentially limit patient function. This article will provide an evidence-based framework within which clinicians may tailor pharmacotherapy to patient symptomatology for improved treatment outcomes. PMID:25848287

  1. Distinguishing bipolar II depression from major depressive disorder with comorbid borderline personality disorder: demographic, clinical, and family history differences.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Martinez, Jennifer H; Morgan, Theresa A; Young, Diane; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy

    2013-09-01

    Because of the potential treatment implications, it is clinically important to distinguish between bipolar II depression and major depressive disorder with comorbid borderline personality disorder. The high frequency of diagnostic co-occurrence and resemblance of phenomenological features has led some authors to suggest that borderline personality disorder is part of the bipolar spectrum. Few studies have directly compared patients with bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder. In the present study from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services project, we compared these 2 groups of patients on demographic, clinical, and family history variables. From December 1995 to May 2012, 3,600 psychiatric patients presenting to the outpatient practice at Rhode Island Hospital (Providence, Rhode Island) were evaluated with semistructured diagnostic interviews for DSM-IV Axis I and Axis II disorders. The focus of the present study is the 206 patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder and borderline personality disorder (MDD-BPD) and 62 patients with DSM-IV bipolar II depression without borderline personality disorder. The patients with MDD-BPD were significantly more often diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (P < .001), a current substance use disorder (P < .01), somatoform disorder (P < .05), and other nonborderline personality disorder (P < .05). Clinical ratings of anger, anxiety, paranoid ideation, and somatization were significantly higher in the MDD-BPD group (all P < .01). The MDD-BPD patients were rated significantly lower on the Global Assessment of Functioning (P < .001), their current social functioning was poorer (P < .01), and they made significantly more suicide attempts (P < .01). The patients with bipolar II depression had a significantly higher morbid risk for bipolar disorder in their first-degree relatives than the MDD-BPD patients (P < .05). Patients diagnosed with bipolar II depression and major

  2. Interpersonal impacts mediate the association between personality and treatment response in major depression.

    PubMed

    Dermody, Sarah S; Quilty, Lena C; Bagby, R Michael

    2016-07-01

    Personality, as characterized by the Five-Factor Model, predicts response to psychotherapy for depression. To explain how personality impacts treatment response, the present study investigated patient and therapist interpersonal processes in treatment sessions as an explanatory pathway. A clinical trial was conducted in which 103 outpatients (mean age: 41.17 years, 65% female) with primary major depressive disorder completed 16-20 weeks of cognitive-behavioral or interpersonal therapy. Before treatment, patients completed the Revised NEO Personality Inventory to assess personality domains (neuroticism, extraversion, openness-to-experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness). After 3 and 13 weeks, patient interpersonal behavior was rated by the therapist and vice versa to determine levels of patient and therapist communal and agentic behaviors. Depression levels were measured before and after treatment. Structural equation modeling supported that patients' interpersonal behavior during therapy mediated the associations between pretreatment personality and depression treatment outcome. Specifically, extraversion, conscientiousness, and neuroticism (inverse) predicted higher levels of patient communion throughout treatment, which was in turn associated with improved treatment outcomes. Furthermore, patient agreeableness was inversely associated with agency throughout treatment, which was linked to poorer treatment response. Therapist interpersonal behavior was not a significant mediator. Results suggest that patient interpersonal behavior during treatment may be one way that patient personality impacts clinical outcomes in depression. Results underscore the clinical utility of Five-Factor Model domains in treatment process and outcome. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. Cognitive conflicts in major depression: Between desired change and personal coherence

    PubMed Central

    Feixas, Guillem; Montesano, Adrián; Compañ, Victoria; Salla, Marta; Dada, Gloria; Pucurull, Olga; Trujillo, Adriana; Paz, Clara; Muñoz, Dámaris; Gasol, Miquel; Saúl, Luis Ángel; Lana, Fernando; Bros, Ignasi; Ribeiro, Eugenia; Winter, David; Carrera-Fernández, María Jesús; Guàrdia, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The notion of intrapsychic conflict has been present in psychopathology for more than a century within different theoretical orientations. However, internal conflicts have not received enough empirical attention, nor has their importance in depression been fully elaborated. This study is based on the notion of cognitive conflict, understood as implicative dilemma (ID), and on a new way of identifying these conflicts by means of the Repertory Grid Technique. Our aim was to explore the relevance of cognitive conflicts among depressive patients. Design Comparison between persons with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder and community controls. Methods A total of 161 patients with major depression and 110 non-depressed participants were assessed for presence of IDs and level of symptom severity. The content of these cognitive conflicts was also analysed. Results Repertory grid analysis indicated conflict (presence of ID/s) in a greater proportion of depressive patients than in controls. Taking only those grids with conflict, the average number of IDs per person was higher in the depression group. In addition, participants with cognitive conflicts displayed higher symptom severity. Within the clinical sample, patients with IDs presented lower levels of global functioning and a more frequent history of suicide attempts. Conclusions Cognitive conflicts were more prevalent in depressive patients and were associated with clinical severity. Conflict assessment at pre-therapy could aid in treatment planning to fit patient characteristics. Practitioner points Internal conflicts have been postulated in clinical psychology for a long time but there is little evidence about its relevance due to the lack of methods to measure them. We developed a method for identifying conflicts using the Repertory Grid Technique. Depressive patients have higher presence and number of conflicts than controls. Conflicts (implicative dilemmas) can be a new target for intervention in

  4. Assessing and Interpreting Personality Change and Continuity in Patients Treated for Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Fruyt, Filip; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Bagby, R. Michael; Rolland, Jean-Pierre; Rouillon, Frederic

    2006-01-01

    Structural, mean- and individual-level, differential, and positive personality continuity were examined in 599 patients treated for major depression assigned to 1 of 6 forms of a 6-month pharmacy-psychotherapy program. Covariation among traits from the Five Factor model remained invariant across treatment, and patients described themselves as…

  5. Assessing and Interpreting Personality Change and Continuity in Patients Treated for Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Fruyt, Filip; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Bagby, R. Michael; Rolland, Jean-Pierre; Rouillon, Frederic

    2006-01-01

    Structural, mean- and individual-level, differential, and positive personality continuity were examined in 599 patients treated for major depression assigned to 1 of 6 forms of a 6-month pharmacy-psychotherapy program. Covariation among traits from the Five Factor model remained invariant across treatment, and patients described themselves as…

  6. Reduced Specificity of Personal Goals and Explanations for Goal Attainment in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Joanne M.; Moberly, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Overgeneralization has been investigated across many domains of cognitive functioning in major depression, including the imagination of future events. However, it is unknown whether this phenomenon extends to representations of personal goals, which are important in structuring long-term behaviour and providing meaning in life. Furthermore, it is not clear whether depressed individuals provide less specific explanations for and against goal attainment. Method Clinically depressed individuals and controls generated personally important approach and avoidance goals, and then generated explanations why they would and would not achieve these goals. Goals and causal explanations were subsequently coded as either specific or general. Results Compared to controls, depressed individuals did not generate significantly fewer goals or causal explanations for or against goal attainment. However, compared to controls, depressed individuals generated less specific goals, less specific explanations for approach (but not avoidance) goal attainment, and less specific explanations for goal nonattainment. Significance Our results suggest that motivational deficits in depression may stem partly from a reduction in the specificity of personal goal representations and related cognitions that support goal-directed behaviour. Importantly, the findings have the potential to inform the ongoing development of psychotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of depression. PMID:23691238

  7. Identifying Personality Pathology Associated With Major Depressive Episodes: Incremental Validity of Informant Reports

    PubMed Central

    Galione, Janine N.; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Major limitations are associated with the use of a single source of information to assess personality pathology. The construct validity of standardized interviews and informant reports on personality pathology has been established relative to other measures of personality pathology, but it is also important to consider these measures in relation to other constructs that should be related to personality pathology. One example is major depression. In this study, we evaluated whether less common clinical methods of assessment for measuring the same personality pathology constructs, including semistructured interviews and informant reports, demonstrate unique validity, using major depressive episode (MDE) as the external criterion. This analysis focuses on a representative, community-based sample of 1,437 participants and informants. We conducted a hierarchical logistic regression analysis and determined the order of entering the predictor variables based on likelihood of being used in a clinical setting as well as empirical recommendations. Each step of our regression model significantly increased our ability to predict lifetime MDE, including self, interviewer, and informant reports of personality pathology. Overall, these findings indicate that multiple sources of personality assessment provide unique information about the relationship between maladaptive personality traits and a history of MDE. Thus, semistructured diagnostic interviews and informant reports can be used as a resource to improve the validity of personality assessments. PMID:24004355

  8. Pharmacogenetics of antidepressive drugs: a way towards personalized treatment of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Weizman, Shira; Gonda, Xenia; Dome, Peter; Faludi, Gabor

    2012-06-01

    Major depressive disorder is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders, and in spite of extensive ongoing research, we neither fully understand its etiopathological background, nor do we possess sufficient pharmacotherapeutic tools to provide remission for all patients. Depression is a heterogenous phenomenon both in its manifestation and its biochemical and genetic background with multiple systems involved. Similarly, the employed pharmaceutical agents in the treatment of depression also effect multiple neurotransmitter systems in the brain. However, we do not yet possess sufficient tools to be able to choose the medication that treats the symptoms most effectively while contributing to minimal side effects in parallel and thus provide personalized pharmacotherapy for depression. In the present paper we review genetic polymorphisms that may be involved in the therapeutic effects and side effects of antidepressive medications and which, in the future, may guide customized selection of the pharmacotherapeutic regimen in case of each patient.

  9. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and personality traits in patients with major depression.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, Hiroshi; Baba, Hajime; Satomura, Emi; Maeshima, Hitoshi; Takebayashi, Naoko; Namekawa, Yuki; Suzuki, Toshihito; Arai, Heii

    2015-03-04

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors. Previous studies have demonstrated lower serum BDNF levels in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and reported an association between BDNF levels and depression-related personality traits in healthy subjects. The aim of the present study was to explore for a possible association between peripheral BDNF levels and personality traits in patients with MDD. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 123 inpatients with MDD (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, 4th edition) at the Juntendo University Koshigaya Hospital were recruited. Serum levels of BDNF were measured. Personality traits were assessed using the 125-item short version of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, dose of antidepressant, and depression severity showed that TCI Self-Directedness (SD) scores were negatively associated with serum BDNF levels (β = -0.23, p = 0.026). MDD patients who have low SD did not show the reduction in serum BDNF levels that is normally associated with depressive state. Our findings suggest that depression-related biological changes may not occur in these individuals.

  10. Type-d personality can predict suicidality in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Min; Ko, Young-Hoon; Lee, Moon-Soo; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Kim, Leen

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the putative association between type-D personality and suicidality, including the history of suicide attempt and suicidal ideation in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Eighty-six outpatients aged between 18 and 65 years with MDD were recruited for this study from Ilsan Paik Hospital. The cohort was stratified into two subgroups according to the presence of type-D personality and history of suicide attempt (yes vs. no). Depression severity was evaluated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. The type-D Personality Scale-14 (DS-14), the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, and the Beck Scale for Suicidal Ideation (BSS) were also applied. The total BSS, BHS, and BIS scores were higher for the group with type-D personality than for the group without this personality (p=0.004, 0.01, and 0.003, respectively). In addition, the total scores for the BSS, BHS, and social inhibition (SI; subscale of DS-14) were higher for the group with a history of suicide attempt than for the group without this history (p=0.0000004, 0.003, and 0.033, respectively). There were positive correlations between the total DS-14 score and the total BSS, BHS, and BIS scores (r=0.413 and p=0.000077, r=0.404 and p=0.00012, and r=0.245 and p=0.024, respectively). Depressed patients with type-D personality are more vulnerable to suicidality than those without type-D personality, even when the MDD severity is identical. In addition, the SI score was higher in patients with a history of suicide attempt than in those without this history.

  11. Relationship between personality and disability in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Güleç, Medine Yazici; Hocaoğlu, Ciçek

    2011-01-01

    The co-morbidity of major depressive disorder (MDD ) with personality disorders (PDs) in patients with long-standing work disability at a psychiatry clinic was investigated. The purpose of our study was to evaluate personality for contributing to disability in patients with MDD and to investigate the relationship with these two psychometric characters in patients with MDD. Seventy-two patients with a MDD and 72 healthy controls were assessed by means of both clinician and self-rating scales for depression, anxiety, disability, and the SCID-II personality inventory. There was no difference between the personality parameters of the groups regarding schizotypal and antisocial PDs. Avoidant personality was found to be less common in the patient group (p=0.030). Dependent (p less than 0.001), obsessive (p=0.003), passive-aggressive (p=0.025), self-defeating (p less than 0.001), paranoid (p less than 0.001), schizoid (p=0.012), histrionic (p=0.001), narcissistic (p less than 0.001), and borderline (p less than 0.001) PDs in patients were more common than in controls. On the disability sub-scales, physical role limitation, vitality, social functioning, emotional role limitation, and mental health were significantly lower in patient group than normal control group. While Cluster A was not related to any disability subscale, Cluster B had a positive correlation with vitality and mental health, whereas Cluster C and Cluster NOS had a negative correlation with emotional role limitation. Only the emotional role limitation predicts the presence of depression, whereas only self-defeating, obsessive, paranoid, and passive aggressive personality predict the emotional role limitation. Patients with MDD have personality and disability problems. PDs in depression contribute to disability. Our results demonstrated that the emotional role limitation is the unique sub-scale that predicts the MDD group.

  12. [Comorbid personality disorders in major depressive disorder: a comparative study in 160 Tunisian female inpatients].

    PubMed

    El Kissi, Yousri; Ben Nasr, Selma; Ayachi, Mouna; Jedidi, Nader; Ghnaya, Habib; Ben Hadj Ali, Bechir

    2009-11-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is often comorbid with personality disorders which are known to change its clinical aspects and worsen its outcome. This study aimed to compare clinical and outcome aspects of a female depressed inpatients group according to the existence or not of a comorbid personality disorder. The study was carried in the psychiatry female inpatient unit of Farhat Hached hospital of Sousse. All entrances to the unit from January 1999 to August 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. 160, corresponding to MDD, were selected. Assessment was based on demographic characteristics, medical history, axis I comorbid disorders, clinical aspects of the index episode and outcome characteristics. 77 patients (48.1%) had personality disorder. Compared to those without comorbid personality disorder, these patients were younger (p < 10-4), with higher educational level (p = 0.005) and better vocational functioning (p = 0.018). They also had an earlier age at onset of their depression (p < 10-4), more previous suicide attempts (p = 0.012) and more axis I comorbid disorders (p < 10-4). Comorbid personality disorders were correlated to an impaired outcome, with higher rate of relapses (p = 0.021), more recurrences (p = 0.026), more persistent symptoms (p < 10-4) and more suicide attempts (p = 0.031).

  13. Personality pathology factors predict recurrent major depressive disorder in emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Erin S; Duncan, Laramie E; Bjornsson, Andri S; Craighead, Linda W; Craighead, W Edward

    2014-06-01

    Prior investigations consistently indicate that personality pathology is a risk factor for recurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD). Lack of emipircal support, however, for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) Fourth Edition organization of Axis II disorders supports the investigation of empirically derived factors of personality pathology as predictors of recurrence. A sample of 130 previously depressed emerging adults (80% female; aged 18 to 21 years) were assessed for personality disorder symptoms at baseline. Participants were then followed for 18 months to identify MDD recurrence during the first 2 years of college. Based on a previous factor analysis of DSM personality disorder criteria, eight personality pathology factors were examined as predictors of MDD recurrence. Survival analysis indicated that factors of interpersonal hypersensitivity, antisocial conduct, and social anxiety were associated with increased risk of MDD recurrence. These findings suggest that an empirically based approach to personality pathology organization may yield useful predictors of MDD recurrence during emerging adulthood. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Patients' and informants' reports of personality traits during and after major depression.

    PubMed

    Peselow, E D; Sanfilipo, M P; Fieve, R R

    1994-11-01

    The influence of major depression on patients' and informants' reports of personality traits was examined using the Structured Interview for DSM-III Personality Disorder, both before and after successful antidepressant or placebo treatment (N = 58). According to patients' reports, Cluster A and C traits decreased significantly from pre- to posttreatment, but Cluster B traits were unchanged, excluding an increase in histrionic traits. According to informants' reports, Cluster A and B traits did not change from pre- to posttreatment, but Cluster C traits decreased significantly after treatment, not including passive-aggressive traits. Moreover, informants generally reported much higher levels of maladaptive personality traits than patients themselves. These results suggest that informants should be used in future research on personality disorders until better assessment techniques are developed.

  15. Comparison of Clinical Features and Personality Dimensions between Patients with Major Depressive Disorder and Normal Control.

    PubMed

    Hur, Ji-Won; Kim, Yong-Ku

    2009-09-01

    Personality dimension is considered as a risk factor of depression. This study was to compare aggression, impulsivity, hopelessness, and TCI (temperament and character dimensions) between patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and normal controls. A total of 56 MDD patients and the same number of normal controls who were matched for age, gender, and education were recruited. All subjects completed the following questionnaires; Aggression Questionnaire (AQ), Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, 11th Version (BIS-11), and Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). MDD patients were significantly higher scores in anger, hostility of AQ, BHS, motor impulsivity of BIS-11, and Harm Avoidances (HA) of TCI with all subscales of HA than normal controls, whereas novelty seeking 1 (NS1) (Exploratory of NS), Reward Dependence (RD) with RD3 (Attachment) . RD4 (Dependence), Self-Directedness (SD) with most subscales of SD, Cooperativeness (CO), and ST3 (Spiritual Acceptance) showed lower scores than normal controls. Moreover, BHS and HA, BIS and NS showed moderate positive correlation in MDD patients, while BHS and SD, HA and SD were negatively correlated. The present study showed unique clinical features, especially personality dimensions of patients with MDD. Our results could be applicable to suggest treatment process and to predict one's prognosis for depression in that psychological properties are important for drug compliance and treatment response.

  16. Comparison of Clinical Features and Personality Dimensions between Patients with Major Depressive Disorder and Normal Control

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Ji-Won

    2009-01-01

    Objective Personality dimension is considered as a risk factor of depression. This study was to compare aggression, impulsivity, hopelessness, and TCI (temperament and character dimensions) between patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and normal controls. Methods A total of 56 MDD patients and the same number of normal controls who were matched for age, gender, and education were recruited. All subjects completed the following questionnaires; Aggression Questionnaire (AQ), Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, 11th Version (BIS-11), and Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Results MDD patients were significantly higher scores in anger, hostility of AQ, BHS, motor impulsivity of BIS-11, and Harm Avoidances (HA) of TCI with all subscales of HA than normal controls, whereas novelty seeking 1 (NS1) (Exploratory of NS), Reward Dependence (RD) with RD3 (Attachment) · RD4 (Dependence), Self-Directedness (SD) with most subscales of SD, Cooperativeness (CO), and ST3 (Spiritual Acceptance) showed lower scores than normal controls. Moreover, BHS and HA, BIS and NS showed moderate positive correlation in MDD patients, while BHS and SD, HA and SD were negatively correlated. Conclusion The present study showed unique clinical features, especially personality dimensions of patients with MDD. Our results could be applicable to suggest treatment process and to predict one's prognosis for depression in that psychological properties are important for drug compliance and treatment response. PMID:20046389

  17. Opening toward life: Experiences of basic body awareness therapy in persons with major depression

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, Louise; Rosberg, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Although there is a vast amount of research on different strategies to alleviate depression, knowledge of movement-based treatments focusing on body awareness is sparse. This study explores the experiences of basic body awareness therapy (BBAT) in 15 persons diagnosed with major depression who participated in the treatment in a randomized clinical trial. Hermeneutic phenomenological methodology inspired the approach to interviews and data analysis. The participants’ experiences were essentially grasped as a process of enhanced existential openness, opening toward life, exceeding the tangible corporeal dimension to also involve emotional, temporal, and relational aspects of life. Five constituents of this meaning were described: vitality springing forth, grounding oneself, recognizing patterns in one's body, being acknowledged and allowed to be oneself, and grasping the vagueness. The process of enhanced perceptual openness challenges the numbness experienced in depression, which can provide hope for change, but it is connected to hard work and can be emotionally difficult to bear. Inspired by a phenomenological framework, the results of this study illuminate novel clinical and theoretical insight into the meaning of BBAT as an adjunctive approach in the treatment of depression. PMID:25956354

  18. Opening toward life: experiences of basic body awareness therapy in persons with major depression.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Louise; Rosberg, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Although there is a vast amount of research on different strategies to alleviate depression, knowledge of movement-based treatments focusing on body awareness is sparse. This study explores the experiences of basic body awareness therapy (BBAT) in 15 persons diagnosed with major depression who participated in the treatment in a randomized clinical trial. Hermeneutic phenomenological methodology inspired the approach to interviews and data analysis. The participants' experiences were essentially grasped as a process of enhanced existential openness, opening toward life, exceeding the tangible corporeal dimension to also involve emotional, temporal, and relational aspects of life. Five constituents of this meaning were described: vitality springing forth, grounding oneself, recognizing patterns in one's body, being acknowledged and allowed to be oneself, and grasping the vagueness. The process of enhanced perceptual openness challenges the numbness experienced in depression, which can provide hope for change, but it is connected to hard work and can be emotionally difficult to bear. Inspired by a phenomenological framework, the results of this study illuminate novel clinical and theoretical insight into the meaning of BBAT as an adjunctive approach in the treatment of depression.

  19. Depression (Major Depressive Disorder)

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition. However, some treatments may help with both: Antidepressant medications may relieve both pain and depression because of shared chemical messengers in the brain. Talk therapy, also called psychological counseling (psychotherapy), can ...

  20. [A case of major depressive disorder barely distinguishable from narcissistic personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Saito, Shinnosuke; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Kato, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    The recent increase in cases of depression with a narcissistic tendency, especially among young individuals, has been pointed out. When the narcissistic tendency is conspicuous, patients may be treated for a personality disorder or pervasive developmental disorder, and not for a mood disorder. A case is described of a man in his late twenties who developed depression due to his failure in research work and job hunting, and, after a time, due to the break off of his engagement with his fiancée, manifested with narcissistic symptoms including an exaggerated opinion of himself, a sense of entitlement, interpersonal exploitation, lack of empathy, strong feelings of envy, and an extrapunitive tendency. He was regarded at the start of treatment as having narcissistic personality disorder. However, persevering treatment, mainly with supportive psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy including antidepressants (high dose of maprotiline combined with low dose of mirtazapine), sodium valprote and aripiprazole, finally improved not only his depressive symptoms, but also the symptoms regarded as a deriving from a personality disorder. He presented fierce anger and aggression regarded as a mixed state, and showed the rapid improvement in his depressive state after hospitalization, which we considered to show potential bipolarity. We diagnosed the patient with narcissistic depression, emphasizing the aspect which suggested a mood disorder, such as the episodic presence of narcissistic symptoms as long as a depressive state resided, his circular, recursive discourse, and his potential bipolarity. To accurately evaluate the aspect of mood disorders which patients appearing to show personality disorders have, it is considered useful to grasp a patient's condition from the viewpoint of a personality structure and viable dynamics. From a therapeutic standpoint, we suggest the importance of simple but persevering psychotherapy and a sufficient quantity of antidepressant medication for

  1. Specificity of abnormal brain volume in major depressive disorder: a comparison with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Depping, Malte S; Wolf, Nadine D; Vasic, Nenad; Sambataro, Fabio; Thomann, Philipp A; Christian Wolf, R

    2015-03-15

    Abnormal brain volume has been frequently demonstrated in major depressive disorder (MDD). It is unclear if these findings are specific for MDD since aberrant brain structure is also present in disorders with depressive comorbidity and affective dysregulation, such as borderline personality disorder (BPD). In this transdiagnostic study, we aimed to investigate if regional brain volume loss differentiates between MDD and BPD. Further, we tested for associations between brain volume and clinical variables within and between diagnostic groups. 22 Females with a DSM-IV diagnosis of MDD, 17 females with a DSM-IV diagnosis of BPD and without comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder, and 22 age-matched female healthy controls (HC) were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging. High-resolution structural data were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry. A significant (p<0.05, cluster-corrected) volume decrease of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) was found in MDD compared to HC, as opposed to volume decreases of the amygdala in BPD compared to both HC and MDD. Sensitivity and specificity of regional gray matter volume for a diagnosis of MDD were modest to fair. Amygdala volume was related to depressive symptoms across the entire patient sample. Potential limitations of this study include the modest sample size and the heterogeneous psychotropic drug treatment. ACC volume reduction is more pronounced in MDD with an intermediate degree of volume loss in BPD compared to HC. In contrast, amygdala volume loss is more pronounced in BPD compared to MDD, yet amygdala volume is associated with affective symptom expression in both disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Personality and Differential Treatment Response in Major Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy and Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagby, R Michael; Quilty, Lena C; Segal, Zindel V; McBride, Carolina C; Kennedy, Sidney H; Costa, Paul T

    2008-01-01

    Objective Effective treatments for major depressive disorder exist, yet some patients fail to respond, or achieve only partial response. One approach to optimizing treatment success is to identify which patients are more likely to respond best to which treatments. The objective of this investigation was to determine if patient personality characteristics are predictive of response to either cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) or pharmacotherapy (PHT). Method Depressed patients completed the Revised NEO Personality Inventory, which measures the higher-order domain and lower-order facet traits of the Five-Factor Model of Personality, and were randomized to receive either CBT or PHT. Result Four personality traits—the higher-order domain neuroticism and 3 lower-order facet traits: trust, straightforwardness, and tendermindedness—were able to distinguish a differential response rate to CBT, compared with PHT. Conclusion The assessment of patient dimensional personality traits can assist in the selection and optimization of treatment response for depressed patients. PMID:18616856

  3. Characterizing Emotional Dysfunction in Borderline Personality, Major Depression, and their Co-occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Gordon, Katherine L.; Weiss, Nicole H.; Tull, Matthew T.; DiLillo, David; Messman-Moore, Terri; Gratz, Kim L.

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to characterize patterns of emotional reactivity and dysregulation in borderline personality, depression, and their co-occurrence. In Study 1, 488 young adult women from the community were categorized into four groups based on self-reported major depressive disorder (MDD) and borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms (Low BPD/Low MDD; Low BPD/High MDD; High BPD/Low MDD; High BPD/High MDD). Immediate and prolonged subjective emotional reactivity to a laboratory stressor were assessed, and participants completed self-report and behavioral measures of emotion dysregulation. Study 2 extended these findings, examining emotional reactivity and dysregulation in a clinical population of 176 substance dependent patients with diagnoses of BPD and MDD and including a biological index of emotional reactivity. Results revealed greater prolonged fear reactivity in the High BPD/High MDD (vs. Low BPD/Low MDD) group in Study 1, and greater prolonged anxiety and negative affect reactivity in both High BPD groups (vs. Low BPD/Low MDD and Low BPD/High MDD groups) in Study 2 (but no differences in cortisol reactivity). Results also demonstrated greater subjective (but not behavioral) emotion dysregulation in the High BPD/High MDD (vs. Low BPD/Low MDD) group in Study 1 and both High BPD groups (vs. both Low BPD groups) in Study 2. Finally, the High BPD/High MDD group reported greater difficulties controlling impulsive behaviors compared with all other groups in Study 1 and the Low BPD groups in Study 2. Findings suggest that BPD pathology (but not MDD pathology alone) is characterized by greater prolonged emotional (especially anxiety/fear-related) reactivity and heightened emotion dysregulation. PMID:26343484

  4. Childhood trauma, personality disorders symptoms and current major depressive disorder in Togo.

    PubMed

    Kounou, Kossi B; Bui, Eric; Dassa, Kolou S; Hinton, Devon; Fischer, Laura; Djassoa, Gnansa; Birmes, Philippe; Schmitt, Laurent

    2013-07-01

    Childhood trauma (CT) has been found to be associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and personality disorders (PD) in adulthood in Western countries, but little is known about the relationship between CT, PD and MDD in sub-Saharan Africa. The present study aims to examine: (1) the frequency of the CT, (2) the association between CT, PD symptoms and MDD and (3) the mediating role of PD between CT and MDD in Togo. One hundred and eighty-one participants (91 individuals with current MDD and 90 healthy controls without psychiatric history) completed the 28-item CT Questionnaire (CTQ) and the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire (PDQ-4+). Participants in the MDD group reported more frequently emotional, sexual and physical abuse and emotional and physical neglect than controls (p < 0.001). There was a significant positive correlation between the total abuse and the PDQ-4 + score (r = 0.48, p < 0.01) in the total sample. Emotional and sexual abuses were associated with current MDD and the number of PD criteria endorsed. Furthermore, PD symptoms mediated partially the relationship between CT and current MDD. Our results suggest an association between CT and current MDD in French-speaking sub-Saharan Africa, and that this relationship may be explained by PD symptoms. Prospective studies to confirm these results are warranted.

  5. Borderline personality disorder in major depression: symptomatology, temperament, character, differential drug response, and 6-month outcome.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Peter R; Mulder, Roger T; Luty, Suzanne E; McKenzie, Janice M; Sullivan, Patrick F; Cloninger, Robert C

    2003-01-01

    Among 183 depressed patients participating in a randomized long-term treatment trial of fluoxetine and nortriptyline, 30 patients had borderline personality disorder (BPD), 53 had other personality disorders (OPD), and 100 had no personality disorders (NPD). The borderline depressed patients had earlier age of onset of their depressions, more chronic depressions, more alcohol and cannabis comorbidity, and were more likely to have histories of suicide attempts and of self-mutilation. On self-report, patients with BPD and OPD reported more phobic symptoms, greater interpersonal sensitivity, and more paranoid ideation. Uniquely, BPD patients were more angry than OPD patients. BPD patients had high novelty seeking, high harm avoidance, low self-directedness, and low cooperativeness. Depressed patients with BPD did poorly in the short term if treated with nortriptyline rather than fluoxetine. After 6 months, those with BPD had a favorable outcome in regard to depressive symptoms, social adjustment, and even improvement in the character measure of self-directedness. Those with the poorest outcome were those with OPD.

  6. Neuropsychological impairment corresponds with poor understanding of informed consent disclosures in persons diagnosed with major depression.

    PubMed

    Ghormley, Courtney; Basso, Michael; Candlis, Philip; Combs, Dennis

    2011-05-15

    Incapacity to make decisions about medical treatment is associated with neuropsychological impairment in a variety of illnesses. Although cognitive deficits occur often in people with major depressive illness, little research has studied its association with decisional capacity. The present investigation examined ability to understand treatment disclosures, which is a core component of decisional capacity, in 31 inpatients with depression and 16 normal controls. Depressed inpatients with diminished neuropsychological function showed poor understanding of treatment disclosures compared to the control group. Nonetheless, with sufficient cueing, depressed inpatients with diminished neuropsychological function were able to display understanding that was equivalent to the control group. Exploratory regression analyses revealed that diminished new-learning correlated with poorer understanding. Implications of these results for clinical practice and medical research involving people with major depressive illness are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. PERSONAL HISTORY OF MAJOR DEPRESSION MAY PUT WOMEN AT RISK FOR PREMENSTRUAL DYSPHORIC SYMPTOMATOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Accortt, Eynav E.; Kogan, Anya V.; Allen, John J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a chronic condition that significantly affects a woman’s well-being on a monthly basis. Although co-occurrence of PMDD and major depressive disorder (MDD) is common, most studies examine whether women with PMDD are at risk for depression and investigations of PMDD in depressed women are scant. Therefore, the present study examined rates of PMDD in young depressed women. Methods PMDD was assessed using a structured clinical interview (SCID-PMDD) in a sample of 164 young women with (n=85) and without (n=79) any history of depression. Results Rates of PMDD were elevated among women with MDD in this sample. This result held true regardless of participants’ MDD status (current, lifetime or past history-only symptoms of MDD) and regardless of whether all or most DSM-IV-TR PMDD criteria were met. Limitations Sample size in the present study was relatively small, and daily diary data were not available to confirm a PMDD diagnosis. Conclusions The current study highlights the need for clinicians to assess for PMDD in young female patients with major depression. Depressed women experiencing the added physical and psychological burden of PMDD may have a more severe disease course, and future studies will need to identify appropriate treatments for this subset of depressed women. PMID:23800446

  8. Affective personality predictors of disrupted reward learning and pursuit in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    DelDonno, Sophie R; Weldon, Anne L; Crane, Natania A; Passarotti, Alessandra M; Pruitt, Patrick J; Gabriel, Laura B; Yau, Wendy; Meyers, Kortni K; Hsu, David T; Taylor, Stephen F; Heitzeg, Mary M; Herbener, Ellen; Shankman, Stewart A; Mickey, Brian J; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Langenecker, Scott A

    2015-11-30

    Anhedonia, the diminished anticipation and pursuit of reward, is a core symptom of major depressive disorder (MDD). Trait behavioral activation (BA), as a proxy for anhedonia, and behavioral inhibition (BI) may moderate the relationship between MDD and reward-seeking. The present studies probed for reward learning deficits, potentially due to aberrant BA and/or BI, in active or remitted MDD individuals compared to healthy controls (HC). Active MDD (Study 1) and remitted MDD (Study 2) participants completed the modified monetary incentive delay task (mMIDT), a behavioral reward-seeking task whose response window parameters were individually titrated to theoretically elicit equivalent accuracy between groups. Participants completed the BI Scale and BA Reward-Responsiveness and Drive Scales. Despite individual titration, active MDD participants won significantly less money than HCs. Higher Reward-Responsiveness scores predicted more won; Drive and BI were not predictive. Remitted MDD participants' performance did not differ from controls', and trait BA and BI measures did not predict r-MDD performance. These results suggest that diminished reward-responsiveness may contribute to decreased motivation and reward pursuit during active MDD, but that reward learning is intact in remission. Understanding individual reward processing deficits in MDD may inform personalized intervention addressing anhedonia and motivation deficits in select MDD patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception in persons with major depressive disorder (MDD)

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Ellen L.; DelVentura, Jennifer L.; Bartley, Emily J.; Vincent, Ashley; Rhudy, Jamie L.

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with risk for chronic pain, but the mechanisms contributing to the MDD and pain relationship are unclear. To examine whether disrupted emotional modulation of pain might contribute, this study assessed emotional processing and emotional modulation of pain in healthy controls and unmedicated persons with MDD (14 MDD, 14 controls). Emotionally-charged pictures (erotica, neutral, mutilation) were presented in four blocks. Two blocks assessed physiological-emotional reactions (pleasure/arousal ratings, corrugator EMG, startle modulation, skin conductance) in the absence of pain and two blocks assessed emotional modulation of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR, a physiological measure of spinal nociception) evoked by suprathreshold electric stimulations. Results indicated pictures generally evoked the intended emotional responses; erotic pictures elicited pleasure, subjective arousal, and smaller startle magnitudes, whereas mutilation pictures elicited displeasure, corrugator EMG activation, and subjective/physiological arousal. However, emotional processing was partially disrupted in MDD as evidenced by a blunted pleasure response to erotica and a failure to modulate startle according to a valence linear trend. Furthermore, emotional modulation of pain was observed in controls, but not MDD, even though there were no group differences in NFR threshold or emotional modulation of NFR. Together, these results suggest supraspinal processes associated with emotion processing and emotional modulation of pain may be disrupted in MDD, but brain-to-spinal cord processes that modulate spinal nociception are intact. Thus, emotional modulation of pain deficits may be a phenotypic marker for future pain risk in MDD. PMID:23954763

  10. Two-Year Prospective Naturalistic Study of Remission from Major Depressive Disorder as a Function of Personality Disorder Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Sanislow, Charles A.; Shea, Tracie M.; Skodol, Andrew E.; Stout, Robert L.; Gunderson, John G.; Yen, Shirley; Bender, Donna S.; Pagano, Maria E.; Morey, Leslie C.; McGlashan, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined prospectively the 24-month natural course of remission from major depressive disorder (MDD) as a function of personality disorder (PD) comorbidity. In 302 participants (196 women, 106 men), psychiatric and PDs were assessed at baseline with diagnostic interviews, and the course of MDD was assessed with the…

  11. Categorical and dimensional stability of comorbid personality disorder symptoms in DSM-IV major depressive disorder: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Melartin, Tarja K; Haukka, Jari; Rytsälä, Heikki J; Jylhä, Pekka J; Isometsä, Erkki T

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the categorical and dimensional temporal stability of Axis II personality disorders among depressive patients, and to determine whether variations in Axis I comorbid disorders or self-reported personality traits predict changes in researcher-assigned personality disorder symptoms. Patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD) in the Vantaa Depression Study (N = 269) were interviewed with the World Health Organization Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry, version 2.0, and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R Axis II Disorders and were assessed with the 57-item Eysenck Personality Inventory at baseline, 6 months, and 18 months. Baseline interviews occurred between February 1, 1997, and May 31, 1998; follow-up interviews were 6 months and 18 months after baseline for each patient. Of the patients included in the study, 193 remained unipolar and could be interviewed at both follow-ups. The covariation of the severity of depression, anxiety, alcohol use, and reported neuroticism and extraversion with assigned personality disorder symptoms was investigated by using general estimation equations. The diagnosis of personality disorder persisted at all time points in about half (43%) of the 81 MDD patients diagnosed with personality disorder at baseline. The number of positive personality disorder criteria declined, particularly during the first 6 months, by a mean of 3 criteria. The decline in reported personality disorder symptoms covaried significantly with declines in the severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms (depressive: P = .02 for paranoid, P = .02 for borderline, and P = .01 for avoidant; anxiety: P = .08 for paranoid, P = .01 for borderline, and P < .001 for avoidant). Changes in patients' perceptions of self as measured by neuroticism covaried with changes in paranoid (P = .01) and borderline (P < .001) personality disorder symptoms. Among MDD patients, the categorical stability of concurrent personality

  12. Word use of outpatients with a personality disorder and concurrent or previous major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Molendijk, Marc L; Bamelis, Lotte; van Emmerik, Arnold A P; Arntz, Arnoud; Haringsma, Rimke; Spinhoven, Philip

    2010-01-01

    In a recent study, Rude, Gortner, and Pennebaker (2004) found word use to be related to depression and vulnerability to depression in the essays of college students. We sought to replicate and extend these findings in a clinical sample. Written essays of 304 psychiatric outpatients with a personality disorder and a mixed psychiatric profile on DSM-IV axis-I and 108 healthy controls were examined with word count software. Data on the tendency to be discrepant about the current self compared to a more ideal self were also gathered. We found that psychiatric outpatients in general used more words referring to the self and negative emotion words and fewer positive emotion words, compared to healthy controls. However, word-use proved unrelated to depression specifically. Actual-ideal self discrepancies were related to patient status and to current depression. Contrary to our hypothesis, these discrepancies did not correlate with the use of words referring to the self. We conclude that the negative content and self-focus of written essays and high levels of discrepancy reflect a negative thinking style that is common to a range of psychiatric disorders rather than being specific to depression.

  13. Influence of personality on objective and subjective social support among patients with major depressive disorder: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Leskelä, Ulla; Melartin, Tarja; Rytsälä, Heikki; Jylhä, Pekka; Sokero, Petteri; Lestelä-Mielonen, Paula; Isometsä, Erkki

    2009-10-01

    Personality and social support (SS) influence risk for depression and modify its outcome through multiple pathways. The impact of personality dimensions neuroticism and extraversion on SS among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) has been little studied. In the Vantaa Depression Study, we assessed neuroticism and extraversion with the Eysenck Personality Inventory, objective SS with the Interview Measure of Social Relationships, and subjective SS with the Perceived Social Support Scale-Revised at baseline, at 6 and 18 months among 193 major depressive disorder patients diagnosed according to the fourth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DMS-IV). At all time-points, low neuroticism and high extraversion associated significantly with between-subject differences in levels of objective and subjective SS. Lower neuroticism (beta = 0.213, p = 0.003) and higher extraversion (beta = 0.159, p = 0.038) predicted greater within-subject change of subjective, but not objective SS. Thus, neuroticism and extraversion associated with the size of objective and subjective SS and predicted change of subjective SS. Modification of subjective SS, particularly, may indirectly influence future vulnerability to depression.

  14. Emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception in persons with major depressive disorder (MDD).

    PubMed

    Terry, Ellen L; DelVentura, Jennifer L; Bartley, Emily J; Vincent, Ashley L; Rhudy, Jamie L

    2013-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with risk for chronic pain, but the mechanisms contributing to the MDD and pain relationship are unclear. To examine whether disrupted emotional modulation of pain might contribute, this study assessed emotional processing and emotional modulation of pain in healthy controls and unmedicated persons with MDD (14 MDD, 14 controls). Emotionally charged pictures (erotica, neutral, mutilation) were presented in 4 blocks. Two blocks assessed physiological-emotional reactions (pleasure/arousal ratings, corrugator electromyography (EMG), startle modulation, skin conductance) in the absence of pain and 2 blocks assessed emotional modulation of pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR, a physiological measure of spinal nociception) evoked by suprathreshold electric stimulations. Results indicated pictures generally evoked the intended emotional responses; erotic pictures elicited pleasure, subjective arousal, and smaller startle magnitudes, whereas mutilation pictures elicited displeasure, corrugator EMG activation, and subjective/physiological arousal. However, emotional processing was partially disrupted in MDD, as evidenced by a blunted pleasure response to erotica and a failure to modulate startle according to a valence linear trend. Furthermore, emotional modulation of pain was observed in controls but not MDD, even though there were no group differences in NFR threshold or emotional modulation of NFR. Together, these results suggest supraspinal processes associated with emotion processing and emotional modulation of pain may be disrupted in MDD, but brain to spinal cord processes that modulate spinal nociception are intact. Thus, emotional modulation of pain deficits may be a phenotypic marker for future pain risk in MDD. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Electroconvulsive therapy in a physically restrained man with comorbid major depression, severe agoraphobia with panic disorder, and histrionic personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Serata, Daniele; Del Casale, Antonio; Kotzalidis, Giorgio D; Romano, Silvia; Milioni, Mara; Capezzuto, Silvia; Carbonetti, Paolo; Angeletti, Gloria; Fensore, Claudio; Tatarelli, Roberto; Girardi, Paolo

    2012-03-01

    A 36-year-old man with comorbid panic disorder with agoraphobia, major depression, and histrionic personality disorder since age 21 was resistant to combined drug and psychotherapy treatment. His conditions had progressively worsened with time, causing him to withdraw socially and to simultaneously require continuous physical restraint, which further worsened his functioning. He spent almost 3 consecutive years in restraint, until he consented to receive bilateral ECT treatment. He improved after 13 sessions in all areas (social and role functioning, and panic, depressive, and histrionic symptoms) and is well 3 months later with a lithium-atypical antipsychotic combination.

  16. Oxidative stress and glutathione response in tissue cultures from persons with major depression.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Sara A; Korade, Željka; Shelton, Richard C

    2012-10-01

    There is evidence that major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with increased peripheral markers of oxidative stress. To explore oxidation and antioxidant response in MDD, we assayed human dermal fibroblast cultures derived from skin biopsies of age-, race-, and sex-matched individuals in depressed and normal control groups (n = 16 each group), cultured in glucose and galactose conditions, for relative protein carbonylation (a measure of oxidative stress), glutathione reductase (GR) expression, and total glutathione concentration. In control-group fibroblasts, galactose induced a significant increase from the glucose condition in both protein carbonylation and GR. The cells from the MDD group showed total protein carbonylation and GR expression in the glucose condition that was significantly higher than control cells in glucose and equivalent to controls in galactose. There was a small decrease in protein carbonylation in MDD cells from glucose to galactose and no significant change in GR. There was no difference in total glutathione among any of the groups. Increased protein carbonylation and GR expression, cellular responses to oxidative stress induced by galactose in control fibroblasts, are present in fibroblasts derived from MDD patients and are not explainable by reduced GR or total glutathione in the depressed patients. These studies support the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of MDD. Further confirmation of these findings could lead to the development of novel antioxidant approaches for the treatment of depression.

  17. Relationship among Dexamethasone Suppression Test, personality disorders and stressful life events in clinical subtypes of major depression: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Kn; Iacovides, A; Fotiou, F; Karamouzis, M; Demetriadou, A; Kaprinis, G

    2004-12-14

    : BACKGROUND: The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between dexamethasone suppression test, personality disorder, stressful life events and depression. MATERIAL: Fifty patients (15 males and 35 females) aged 41.0 +/- 11.4 years, suffering from Major Depression according to DSM-IV criteria entered the study. METHOD: Diagnosis was obtained with the aid of the SCAN v 2.0 and the IPDE. Psychometric assessment included the HDRS, HAS, the Newcastle Scale (version 1965 and 1971), the Diagnostic Melancholia Scale, the Personality Deviance Scale and the GAF scale. The 1 mg DST was used. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Included MANOVA, ANOVA with LSD post hoc test and chi-square test. RESULTS: Sixteen (32%) patients were non-suppressors. Eight patients without Personality Disorder (PD) (23.5%), and 5 of those with PD of cluster B (50%) were non-suppressors. Atypical patients were the subtype with the highest rate of non-suppression (42.85%). No difference between suppressors and non-suppressors was detected in any of the scales. DISCUSSION: The results of the current study suggest that pathological DST is not a core feature of major depression. They also suggest that there are more than one subtypes of depression, concerning the response to stress. It seems that the majority of depressed patients (50%) does not experience high levels of stress either in terms of self reported experience or neuroendocrine function. The rest of patients however, either experience high levels of stress, or manifest its somatic analogue (DST non-suppression) or have a very low threshold of stress tolerance, which makes them to behave in a hostile way.

  18. Relationship among Dexamethasone Suppression Test, personality disorders and stressful life events in clinical subtypes of major depression: An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Fountoulakis, KN; Iacovides, A; Fotiou, F; Karamouzis, M; Demetriadou, A; Kaprinis, G

    2004-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between dexamethasone suppression test, personality disorder, stressful life events and depression. Material Fifty patients (15 males and 35 females) aged 41.0 ± 11.4 years, suffering from Major Depression according to DSM-IV criteria entered the study. Method Diagnosis was obtained with the aid of the SCAN v 2.0 and the IPDE. Psychometric assessment included the HDRS, HAS, the Newcastle Scale (version 1965 and 1971), the Diagnostic Melancholia Scale, the Personality Deviance Scale and the GAF scale. The 1 mg DST was used. Statistical Analysis Included MANOVA, ANOVA with LSD post hoc test and chi-square test. Results Sixteen (32%) patients were non-suppressors. Eight patients without Personality Disorder (PD) (23.5%), and 5 of those with PD of cluster B (50%) were non-suppressors. Atypical patients were the subtype with the highest rate of non-suppression (42.85%). No difference between suppressors and non-suppressors was detected in any of the scales. Discussion The results of the current study suggest that pathological DST is not a core feature of major depression. They also suggest that there are more than one subtypes of depression, concerning the response to stress. It seems that the majority of depressed patients (50%) does not experience high levels of stress either in terms of self reported experience or neuroendocrine function. The rest of patients however, either experience high levels of stress, or manifest its somatic analogue (DST non-suppression) or have a very low threshold of stress tolerance, which makes them to behave in a hostile way. PMID:15598349

  19. Major Depression Among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), in the NSDUH study a major depressive ... and self-image. Unlike the definition in the DSM-IV, no exclusions were made for a major ...

  20. How is childhood emotional abuse related to major depression in adulthood? The role of personality and emotion acceptance.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Philipp; Beblo, Thomas; Ribbert, Hedda; Kater, Leona; Spannhorst, Stephanie; Driessen, Martin; Hennig-Fast, Kristina

    2017-08-05

    Accumulated evidence provides support that childhood emotional abuse (CEA) is related to adult major depressive disorder (MDD) outcomes. However, the psychological mechanisms of this relation are still not well understood. Changes in personality and emotion regulation are indicated to play a mediating role what should be examined in this paper. A sample of 123 MDD inpatients was examined in a prospective observational study with two times of measurement. Patients provided data on childhood trauma history, personality disorder (PD) traits and emotion acceptance. Self- and expert-ratings of depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline and at the end of treatment. Treatment duration as an objective indicator of treatment outcome was additionally considered. Partial correlation analyses revealed associations between CEA and self-ratings of MDD symptom severity and symptom improvement independent of sexual and physical abuse. Expert-ratings of depression and treatment duration were not related to CEA. Mediation analyses revealed that particularly the factors borderline psychopathology as well as acceptance of pleasant emotions mediated the association of CEA and self-rated MDD symptoms. Passive-aggressive PD traits mediated the link between CEA and a lower self-rated symptom improvement. CEA affect specific personality traits and acceptance of emotions. This association may play a critical role for self-reported depressive symptoms with implications for prevention, psychoeducation, and treatment of MDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluating the Psychometric Properties of 3 Depression Measures in a Sample of Persons With Traumatic Brain Injury and Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Joshua R; Williams, Ryan; Bombardier, Charles H; Vannoy, Steven; Fann, Jesse R

    2016-01-01

    To explore the psychometric properties of 3 widely used measures of depression in a sample of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and major depressive disorder and refine them to maximize efficiency. Secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression after TBI. Nationwide recruitment from community and clinical settings. One hundred adults within 10 years of complicated mild to severe TBI. Telephone and in-person cognitive-behavioral therapy. Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Symptom Checklist-20, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. We used Rasch rating scale analysis and multilevel modeling to investigate the 3 measures. Measurement properties of each of the depression measures were strong. We explored modifications to the rating scales to improve efficiency while retaining strong psychometric characteristics. Correlations among these revised measures were high. Treatment effects of each revised depression measure were compared using a multilevel model, and effect size estimates were comparable among the revised PHQ-9, Symptom Checklist-20, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Although each of the 3 measures demonstrated adequate reliability, the efficiency of all 3 instruments was improved with rating scale analysis. The PHQ-9 required the fewest modifications and functions well as a measure of depression among those with TBI.

  2. Childhood maltreatment and personality disorders in patients with a major depressive disorder: A comparative study between France and Togo.

    PubMed

    Kounou, Kossi B; Dogbe Foli, Ayoko A; Djassoa, G; Amétépé, Léonard K; Rieu, J; Mathur, A; Biyong, I; Schmitt, L

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have examined the association between childhood maltreatment (CM) and personality disorders (PDs) in adulthood in two different cultural contexts, including sub-Saharan Africa. The aims of this study were to compare the frequency of CM between patients in treatment in France and Togo for a major depressive disorder (MDD), to explore the link between CM and PDs, and to examine the mediating effect of personality dimensions in the pathway from CM to PDs in 150 participants (75 in each country). The 28-item Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, the International Personality Item Pool, and the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire (PDQ-4+) were used to assess CM, personality dimensions, and PDs respectively. Togolese participants reported sexual and physical abuse (PA) and emotional and physical neglect significantly more frequently than French participants. In Togo, severe PA was associated with schizoid, antisocial, narcissistic, obsessive-compulsive, depressive, and negativist PDs whereas in France, PA was only linked to paranoid PD. In Togo, emotional instability partly mediated the relationship between CM and PDs while in France, no personality dimension appeared to mediate this link. Our results support the hypothesis that CM is more common in low-income countries and suggest that the links between CM and PDs are influenced by social environment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. The relevance of personality assessment in estimating the risk of onset and the outcome of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Bogdan; Cozman, Doina

    2016-01-01

    In the past two decades, numerous studies have focused on the relationship between the psychobiological model of temperament and character and the development and evolution of major depressive disorder. This interest has been generated primarily because this particular model was developed as a tool for a comprehensive diagnosis of mental disorders. Such a diagnosis model, based on fewer diagnostic categories and a more phenomenological and person oriented approach seems to be supported by more recent research. The aim of this paper was to review the latest developments in this area, but in the context of the initial development of the psychobiological model of temperament and character, i.e. as a tool for the comprehensive diagnosis of depressed individuals. Data published so far supports the following observations: (1) high harm avoidance and low self-directedness are risk factors for the development of major depressive disorder, but further research is needed to clearly establish the role of the other dimensions or their facets as predictors for the development of a depressive episode; (2) although some evidence has been obtained so far regarding the use of harm avoidance, novelty seeking, reward dependence and cooperativeness in predicting treatment response in major depressive disorder, further research is needed to clarify and/or to replicate these findings; and (3) data on temperament and character dimensions related to relapse in major depressive disorder are insufficient, although some evidence has been brought to support the hypothesis that high harm avoidance scores, and low self-directedness and novelty seeking scores might serve as predictors; further prospective studies need to be carried out to establish their utility in this respect.

  4. Neuroimaging markers of cellular function in major depressive disorder: implications for therapeutics, personalized medicine, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J H

    2012-02-01

    It is estimated that 15% of all individuals will experience a major depressive episode (MDE) during their lifetime and that treatment response is inadequate in 40% of these cases. To address this, neuroimaging is being used to identify MDE subtypes and mechanisms of onset as well as to optimize target occupancy of novel treatments. Neuroimaging of monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) binding; glutamate levels; indexes of 5-HT(2A), 5-HTT, 5-HT(1A), and 5-HT(1B) receptors; levels of dopamine transporters D(1) and D(2); and hippocampal volume are described here. Three themes emerge. First, symptoms such as pessimism, motor retardation, anxiety disorder, and verbal memory deficits best indicate the subtype of depression. Second, measures related to mechanisms of monoamine loss, particularly elevated MAO-A binding in prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex, are present in MDE and in high-risk states for MDE. Third, clinical trials show a consistent 80% 5-HTT occupancy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors at doses sufficient to distinguish from placebo in clinical trials (although in vitro affinities vary 100-fold), thereby supporting the need for further occupancy studies to accelerate therapeutic development.

  5. Telephone and In-Person Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Major Depression after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bombardier, Charles H.; Vannoy, Steven; Dyer, Joshua; Ludman, Evette; Dikmen, Sureyya; Marshall, Kenneth; Barber, Jason; Temkin, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Major depressive disorder (MDD) is prevalent after traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, there is a lack of evidence regarding effective treatment approaches. We conducted a choice-stratified randomized controlled trial in 100 adults with MDD within 10 years of complicated mild to severe TBI to test the effectiveness of brief cognitive behavioral therapy administered over the telephone (CBT-T) (n=40) or in-person (CBT-IP) (n=18), compared with usual care (UC) (n=42). Participants were recruited from clinical and community settings throughout the United States. The main outcomes were change in depression severity on the clinician-rated 17 item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) and the patient-reported Symptom Checklist-20 (SCL-20) over 16 weeks. There was no significant difference between the combined CBT and UC groups over 16 weeks on the HAMD-17 (treatment effect=1.2, 95% CI: −1.5–4.0; p=0.37) and a nonsignificant trend favoring CBT on the SCL-20 (treatment effect=0.28, 95% CI: −0.03–0.59; p=0.074). In follow-up comparisons, the CBT-T group had significantly more improvement on the SCL-20 than the UC group (treatment effect=0.36, 95% CI: 0.01–0.70; p=0.043) and completers of eight or more CBT sessions had significantly improved SCL-20 scores compared with the UC group (treatment effect=0.43, 95% CI: 0.10–0.76; p=0.011). CBT participants reported significantly more symptom improvement (p=0.010) and greater satisfaction with depression care (p<0.001), than did the UC group. In-person and telephone-administered CBT are acceptable and feasible in persons with TBI. Although further research is warranted, telephone CBT holds particular promise for enhancing access and adherence to effective depression treatment. PMID:25072405

  6. Utilizing a Personal Smartphone Custom App to Assess the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Patrick; Shanahan, Meghan; Lin, Charlie; Peck, Pamela; Keshavan, Matcheri; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Background Accurate reporting of patient symptoms is critical for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in psychiatry. Smartphones offer an accessible, low-cost means to collect patient symptoms in real time and aid in care. Objective To investigate adherence among psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with major depressive disorder in utilizing their personal smartphones to run a custom app to monitor Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) depression symptoms, as well as to examine the correlation of these scores to traditionally administered (paper-and-pencil) PHQ-9 scores. Methods A total of 13 patients with major depressive disorder, referred by their clinicians, received standard outpatient treatment and, in addition, utilized their personal smartphones to run the study app to monitor their symptoms. Subjects downloaded and used the Mindful Moods app on their personal smartphone to complete up to three survey sessions per day, during which a randomized subset of PHQ-9 symptoms of major depressive disorder were assessed on a Likert scale. The study lasted 29 or 30 days without additional follow-up. Outcome measures included adherence, measured by the percentage of completed survey sessions, and estimates of daily PHQ-9 scores collected from the smartphone app, as well as from the traditionally administered PHQ-9. Results Overall adherence was 77.78% (903/1161) and varied with time of day. PHQ-9 estimates collected from the app strongly correlated (r=.84) with traditionally administered PHQ-9 scores, but app-collected scores were 3.02 (SD 2.25) points higher on average. More subjects reported suicidal ideation using the app than they did on the traditionally administered PHQ-9. Conclusions Patients with major depressive disorder are able to utilize an app on their personal smartphones to self-assess their symptoms of major depressive disorder with high levels of adherence. These app-collected results correlate with the traditionally administered PHQ-9. Scores

  7. Personality in recovered depressed elderly.

    PubMed

    Schneider, L S; Zemansky, M F; Bender, M; Sloane, R B

    1992-01-01

    Personality traits in euthymic elderly subjects with and without past histories of major depressive episodes were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R and the Social Adjustment Scale-SR. Recovered depressed subjects were characterized by significantly more personality traits from DSM-III-R Clusters B and C than controls, and they exhibited differences in social adjustment, as well. Subjects who have recovered from depressive episodes may show significant differences in personality and social adjustment that might represent residua of past depression, a trait characteristic, or a risk factor for recurrence.

  8. An investigation of emotion dynamics in major depressive disorder patients and healthy persons using sparse longitudinal networks

    PubMed Central

    de Vos, Stijn; Wardenaar, Klaas J.; Bos, Elisabeth H.; Wit, Ernst C.; Bouwmans, Mara E. J.; de Jonge, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background Differences in within-person emotion dynamics may be an important source of heterogeneity in depression. To investigate these dynamics, researchers have previously combined multilevel regression analyses with network representations. However, sparse network methods, specifically developed for longitudinal network analyses, have not been applied. Therefore, this study used this approach to investigate population-level and individual-level emotion dynamics in healthy and depressed persons and compared this method with the multilevel approach. Methods Time-series data were collected in pair-matched healthy persons and major depressive disorder (MDD) patients (n = 54). Seven positive affect (PA) and seven negative affect (NA) items were administered electronically at 90 times (30 days; thrice per day). The population-level (healthy vs. MDD) and individual-level time series were analyzed using a sparse longitudinal network model based on vector autoregression. The population-level model was also estimated with a multilevel approach. Effects of different preprocessing steps were evaluated as well. The characteristics of the longitudinal networks were investigated to gain insight into the emotion dynamics. Results In the population-level networks, longitudinal network connectivity was strongest in the healthy group, with nodes showing more and stronger longitudinal associations with each other. Individually estimated networks varied strongly across individuals. Individual variations in network connectivity were unrelated to baseline characteristics (depression status, neuroticism, severity). A multilevel approach applied to the same data showed higher connectivity in the MDD group, which seemed partly related to the preprocessing approach. Conclusions The sparse network approach can be useful for the estimation of networks with multiple nodes, where overparameterization is an issue, and for individual-level networks. However, its current inability to model

  9. Characterizing Factors of Employment Status in Persons With Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang-Pei; Samet, Sharon; Gorroochurn, Prakash; O'Hara, Kathleen M

    2016-09-01

    Employment is fundamental to mental health recovery. The aim of this study is to construct a parsimonious profile indicating employment potential of people with major depressive disorder (MDD) to facilitate clinical assessment on employment participation. Data were drawn from Waves 1 (2001-2002) and 2 (2004-2005) of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. We included participants who had MDD at Wave 1 and were interviewed in both waves (N = 2,864). We conducted Classification and Regression Tree (CART) analysis to identify key characterizing factors of Wave 2 employment among 32 Wave 1 risk and protective factors. The results show that 82.1% of those employed at Wave 1 were likely to be employed at Wave 2. Among those unemployed at Wave 1, 51% of those motivated to work, measured by work-seeking behavior in the prior year, were likely to be employed at Wave 2. Among those unemployed and motivated to work, better functional mental health was associated with employment (>25.3 vs. ≤25.3). Results highlight the importance of motivation to work, shown in active work seeking, in facilitating employment despite clinical conditions.

  10. Taking Personalized Medicine Seriously: Biomarker Approaches in Phase IIb/III Studies in Major Depression and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Laughren, Thomas; Lamers, Femke; Picard, Rosalind; Walther, Sebastian; Goff, Donald; Sainati, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The success rate in the development of psychopharmacological compounds is insufficient. Two main reasons for failure have been frequently identified: 1) treating the wrong patients and 2) using the wrong dose. This is potentially based on the known heterogeneity among patients, both on a syndromal and a biological level. A focus on personalized medicine through better characterization with biomarkers has been successful in other therapeutic areas. Nevertheless, obstacles toward this goal that exist are 1) the perception of a lack of validation, 2) the perception of an expensive and complicated enterprise, and 3) the perception of regulatory hurdles. The authors tackle these concerns and focus on the utilization of biomarkers as predictive markers for treatment outcome. The authors primarily cover examples from the areas of major depression and schizophrenia. Methodologies covered include salivary and plasma collection of neuroendocrine, metabolic, and inflammatory markers, which identified subgroups of patients in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. A battery of vegetative markers, including sleep-electroencephalography parameters, heart rate variability, and bedside functional tests, can be utilized to characterize the activity of a functional system that is related to treatment refractoriness in depression (e.g., the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system). Actigraphy and skin conductance can be utilized to classify patients with schizophrenia and provide objective readouts for vegetative activation as a functional marker of target engagement. Genetic markers, related to folate metabolism, or folate itself, has prognostic value for the treatment response in patients with schizophrenia. Already, several biomarkers are routinely collected in standard clinical trials (e.g., blood pressure and plasma electrolytes), and appear to be differentiating factors for treatment outcome. Given the availability of a wide variety of markers, the further development

  11. Associations of childhood trauma with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function in borderline personality disorder and major depression.

    PubMed

    Carvalho Fernando, Silvia; Beblo, Thomas; Schlosser, Nicole; Terfehr, Kirsten; Otte, Christian; Löwe, Bernd; Wolf, Oliver Tobias; Spitzer, Carsten; Driessen, Martin; Wingenfeld, Katja

    2012-10-01

    Alterations of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are hallmarks in major depressive disorder (MDD) and there is some evidence about similar patterns in borderline personality disorder (BPD). This study examines HPA axis abnormalities with respect to clinical characteristics in both BPD (n=24) and MDD patients (n=33) as well as in healthy control participants (n=41). A 0.5mg dexamethasone suppression test was administered to evaluate basal cortisol release and HPA feedback sensitivity via salivary cortisol. Traumatic experiences in childhood as well as severity of borderline and depressive symptom severity and dissociation were obtained by self-report questionnaires. Compared to the healthy control group, BPD and MDD patients exhibited both enhanced cortisol concentrations before and after the administration of 0.5mg dexamethasone. Higher cortisol levels were positively correlated to a history of childhood trauma, current dissociative symptoms and severity of borderline and depressive symptoms. Regression analyses revealed that some aspects of early trauma were associated with cortisol release before and after dexamethasone, whereas psychopathology did not contribute to the regression model. HPA dysfunctions appear to be related rather to childhood trauma than to psychopathology in adulthood. Exposure to childhood trauma may contribute to long-lasting alterations in HPA activity and might enhance the risk for the development of later mental disorder. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating the Psychometric Properties and Responsiveness to Change of 3 Depression Measures in a Sample of Persons With Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury and Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ryan T; Heinemann, Allen W; Neumann, Holly Demark; Fann, Jesse R; Forchheimer, Martin; Richardson, Elizabeth J; Bombardier, Charles H

    2016-06-01

    To compare the measurement properties and responsiveness to change of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-20 (HSCL-20), and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) in people with spinal cord injury (SCI) diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD). Secondary analysis of depression symptoms measured at 6 occasions over 12 weeks as part of a randomized controlled trial of venlafaxine XR for MDD in persons with SCI. Outpatient and community settings. Individuals (N=133) consented and completed the drug trial. Eligibility criteria were age at least 18 years, traumatic SCI, and diagnosis of MDD. Venlafaxine XR. Patients completed the PHQ-9 and the HSCL-20 depression scales; clinical investigators completed the HAM-D and the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) Dissociative Disorders, which was used as a diagnostic criterion measure. All 3 instruments were improved with rating scale analysis. The HSCL-20 and the HAM-D contained items that misfit the underlying construct and that correlated weakly with the total scores. Removing these items improved the internal consistency, with floor effects increasing slightly. The HAM-D correlated most strongly with Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders diagnoses. Improvement in depression was similar on all outcome measures in both treatment and control groups. The psychometric properties of the revised depression instruments are more than adequate for routine use in adults with SCI and are responsive to clinical improvement. The PHQ-9 is the simplest instrument with measurement properties as good as or better than those of the other instruments and required the fewest modifications. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The impact of personality disorder pathology on the effectiveness of Cognitive Therapy and Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    van Bronswijk, Suzanne C; Lemmens, Lotte H J M; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Huibers, Marcus J H; Arntz, Arnoud; Peeters, Frenk P M L

    2017-08-17

    Despite extensive research, there is no consensus how Personality Disorders (PD) and PD features affect outcome for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). The present study evaluated the effects of PD (features) on treatment continuation and effectiveness in Cognitive Therapy (CT) and Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) for MDD. Depressed outpatients were randomized to CT (n=72) and IPT (n=74). Primary outcome was depression severity measured repeatedly with the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) at baseline, three months, at the start of each therapy session, at post-treatment and monthly during five months follow-up. Comorbid PD and PD features did not affect dropout. Multilevel and Cox regression models indicated no negative effect of PD on BDI-II change and remission rates during treatment and follow-up, irrespective of the treatment received. For both therapies, higher dependent PD features predicted overall lower BDI-II scores during treatment, however this effect did not sustain through follow-up. Cluster A PD features moderated treatment outcome during treatment and follow-up: individuals with high cluster A PD features had greater BDI-II reductions over time in CT as compared to IPT. Not all therapists and participants were blind to the assessment of PD (features), and assessments were performed by one rater. Further research must investigate the state and trait dependent changes of PD and MDD over time. We found no negative impact of PD on the effectiveness and treatment retention of CT and IPT for MDD during treatment and follow-up. If replicated, cluster A PD features can be used to optimize treatment selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Premenstrual depression predicts future major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Graze, K K; Nee, J; Endicott, J

    1990-02-01

    To assess the power of premenstrual changes as a risk factor for future major depressive disorder (MDD), we conducted a follow-up study of 36 women who had volunteered for menstrual cycle studies. Scores on the depressive subscale of the Premenstrual Assessment Form (PAF) at initial evaluation were found to be significantly correlated (r = 0.35) with the occurrence of MDD during the follow-up period. Moreover, multiple regression analysis indicated that the PAF scores had predictive value above and beyond 2 known risk factors for MDD, family history of depression and prior personal history of depression. The Premenstrual Change Index, a score derived from prospective daily self-ratings of severity of dysphoric symptoms, was also correlated with interval MDD, but did not enhance the predictive power of the PAF score. We conclude that the assessment of premenstrual depression has validity in identifying women at risk for future MDD, even when a retrospective instrument, PAF, is utilized for such assessment.

  15. The impact of self-reported childhood trauma on emotion regulation in borderline personality disorder and major depression.

    PubMed

    Carvalho Fernando, Silvia; Beblo, Thomas; Schlosser, Nicole; Terfehr, Kirsten; Otte, Christian; Löwe, Bernd; Wolf, Oliver Tobias; Spitzer, Carsten; Driessen, Martin; Wingenfeld, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Early life stress is said to play a critical role in the development of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and major depressive disorder (MDD), but the underlying mediating factors remain uncertain. This study aimed to investigate self-reported childhood trauma, emotion regulation difficulties, and their associations in a sample of BPD (n = 49) and MDD (n = 48) patients and healthy control participants (n = 63). Multiple regressions were used to evaluate the impact of the quality and severity of self-reported childhood trauma on self-reported emotion regulation. The results supported an association between self-reported maltreatment experiences, especially emotional abuse and neglect, and emotion regulation difficulties. Additional analyses showed that emotion regulation difficulties influence the association between self-reported emotional abuse and acute symptomatology in the BPD subgroup. Emotion regulation difficulties may be 1 pathway through which early life stress, particularly emotional abuse, increases the risk for developing BPD symptomatology.

  16. EFFECTS OF RELIGIOUS VERSUS STANDARD COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY ON OPTIMISM IN PERSONS WITH MAJOR DEPRESSION AND CHRONIC MEDICAL ILLNESS.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Harold G; Pearce, Michelle J; Nelson, Bruce; Daher, Noha

    2015-11-01

    We compared the effectiveness of religiously integrated cognitive behavioral therapy (RCBT) versus standard CBT (SCBT) on increasing optimism in persons with major depressive disorder (MDD) and chronic medical illness. Participants aged 18-85 were randomized to either RCBT (n = 65) or SCBT (n = 67) to receive ten 50-min sessions remotely (94% by telephone) over 12 weeks. Optimism was assessed at baseline, 12 and 24 weeks by the Life Orientation Test-Revised. Religiosity was assessed at baseline using a 29-item scale composed of religious importance, individual religious practices, intrinsic religiosity, and daily spiritual experiences. Mixed effects growth curve models were used to compare the effects of treatment group on trajectory of change in optimism. In the intention-to-treat analysis, both RCBT and SCBT increased optimism over time, although there was no significant difference between treatment groups (B = -0.75, SE = 0.57, t = -1.33, P = .185). Analyses in the highly religious and in the per protocol analysis indicated similar results. Higher baseline religiosity predicted an increase in optimism over time (B = 0.07, SE = 0.02, t = 4.12, P < .0001), and higher baseline optimism predicted a faster decline in depressive symptoms over time (B = -0.61, SE = 0.10, t = -6.30, P < .0001), both independent of treatment group. RCBT and SCBT are equally effective in increasing optimism in persons with MDD and chronic medical illness. While baseline religiosity does not moderate this effect, religiosity predicts increases in optimism over time independent of treatment group. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Personalized Medicine: Review and Perspectives of Promising Baseline EEG Biomarkers in Major Depressive Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, Sebastian; van Dinteren, Rik; Arns, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine in psychiatry is in need of biomarkers that resemble central nervous system function at the level of neuronal activity. Electroencephalography (EEG) during sleep or resting-state conditions and event-related potentials (ERPs) have not only been used to discriminate patients from healthy subjects, but also for the prediction of treatment outcome in various psychiatric diseases, yielding information about tailored therapy approaches for an individual. This review focuses on baseline EEG markers for two psychiatric conditions, namely major depressive disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It covers potential biomarkers from EEG sleep research and vigilance regulation, paroxysmal EEG patterns and epileptiform discharges, quantitative EEG features within the EEG main frequency bands, connectivity markers and ERP components that might help to identify favourable treatment outcome. Further, the various markers are discussed in the context of their potential clinical value and as research domain criteria, before giving an outline for future studies that are needed to pave the way to an electrophysiological biomarker-based personalized medicine.

  18. Do You Have Major Depression?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Depression Do You Have Major Depression? Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Simple ... member may have major depression. —NIMH Types of Depression Just like other illnesses, such as heart disease, ...

  19. Agreement Between Self and Informant-Reported Ratings of Personality Traits: The Moderating Effects of Major Depressive and/or Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Lynne; Gorka, Stephanie M.; Huggins, Ashley A.; Katz, Andrea C.; Sarapas, Casey; Shankman, Stewart A.

    2015-01-01

    Several personality traits are risk factors for psychopathology. As symptoms of psychopathology may influence self-rated personality, informant-reports of personality are also sometimes collected. However, little is known about self-informant agreement in individuals with anxiety and/or depression. We investigated whether self-informant agreement on positive and negative affectivity (PA and NA), and anxiety sensitivity differs for individuals with major depression (MDD) and/or panic disorder (PD, total n=117). Informant- and self-reported PA was correlated among those with MDD, but not those without MDD. Informant- and self-reported anxiety sensitivity was correlated among those with PD, but not those without PD. Informant- and self-reported NA was correlated irrespective of diagnosis. Results indicate that the agreement of self and informant-reported personality may vary as a function of depression and/or anxiety disorders. PMID:26658660

  20. Associations of Childhood Trauma, Trauma in Adulthood and Previous-Year Stress with Psychopathology in Patients with Major Depression and Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingenfeld, Katja; Schaffrath, Camille; Rullkoetter, Nina; Mensebach, Christoph; Schlosser, Nicole; Beblo, Thomas; Driessen, Martin; Meyer, Bjorn

    2011-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an important possible outcome of exposure to traumatic events that occur in childhood. However, early traumatic experiences are also an important risk factor for several other mental disorders, such as borderline personality disorder and major depressive disorder. Furthermore, chronic stress, including daily…

  1. The Diagnostic Drawing Series and the Tree Rating Scale: An Isomorphic Representation of Multiple Personality Disorder, Major Depression, and Schizophrenic Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Maureen Batza

    1995-01-01

    The tree drawings of 80 subjects, who were diagnosed with either multiple personality disorder, schizophrenia, or major depression, and a control group, were rated. Patterns were examined and graphs were used to depict results. Certain features were found to distinguish each category. The descriptive statistical findings were both consistent and…

  2. The Diagnostic Drawing Series and the Tree Rating Scale: An Isomorphic Representation of Multiple Personality Disorder, Major Depression, and Schizophrenic Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Maureen Batza

    1995-01-01

    The tree drawings of 80 subjects, who were diagnosed with either multiple personality disorder, schizophrenia, or major depression, and a control group, were rated. Patterns were examined and graphs were used to depict results. Certain features were found to distinguish each category. The descriptive statistical findings were both consistent and…

  3. Associations of Childhood Trauma, Trauma in Adulthood and Previous-Year Stress with Psychopathology in Patients with Major Depression and Borderline Personality Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingenfeld, Katja; Schaffrath, Camille; Rullkoetter, Nina; Mensebach, Christoph; Schlosser, Nicole; Beblo, Thomas; Driessen, Martin; Meyer, Bjorn

    2011-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an important possible outcome of exposure to traumatic events that occur in childhood. However, early traumatic experiences are also an important risk factor for several other mental disorders, such as borderline personality disorder and major depressive disorder. Furthermore, chronic stress, including daily…

  4. Personality Disorders Predict Relapse after Remission from an Episode of Major Depressive Disorder: A Six-year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Stout, Robert L.; Markowitz, John C.; Sanislow, Charles A.; Ansell, Emily B.; Skodol, Andrew E.; Bender, Donna S.; Pinto, Anthony; Shea, M. Tracie; Yen, Shirley; Gunderson, John G.; Morey, Leslie C.; Hopwood, Christopher J.; McGlashan, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine prospectively the course of major depressive disorder (MDD) and to test for the moderating effects of personality disorder (PD) co-morbidity on relapse after remission from an episode of MDD. Method Participants were 303 patients (196 women and 107 men) with current MDD at baseline enrollment in the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study. MDD and Axis I psychiatric disorders were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and Axis II PDs were assessed with the Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV PD. The course of MDD was assessed with the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation at 6- and 12-months and then yearly through 6 years. Survival analyses were used to analyze time to remission and time to relapse. Results 260 (86%) of 303 patients remitted from MDD; lifetable survival analyses revealed that patients with MDD who had PDs at baseline had significantly longer time to remission from MDD than patients without PDs. Among the 260 patients whose MDD remitted, 183 (70%) relapsed. MDD patients with PDs -- specifically those with borderline and obsessive-compulsive PDs -- at baseline had significantly shorter time to relapse than MDD patients without PDs. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses revealed that the presence of PDs at baseline (hazard ratio 1.5) and recurrent-type MDD (hazard ratio 2.2), but not gender (hazard ratio 1.03) or dysthymic disorder (hazard ratio 0.97), significantly predicted time to relapse. Conclusions PDs at baseline were robust predictors prospectively of accelerated relapse after remission from an episode of MDD. PDs at baseline significantly moderated eventual time to relapse in MDD among patients who remitted from an episode of MDD, even when controlling for other potential negative prognostic predictors. PMID:20584514

  5. Comorbid trajectories of substance use as predictors of Antisocial Personality Disorder, Major Depressive Episode, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Brook, Judith S; Zhang, Chenshu; Rubenstone, Elizabeth; Primack, Brian A; Brook, David W

    2016-11-01

    To determine longitudinal associations between patterns of comorbid cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana use and Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD), Major Depressive Episode (MDE), and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) in adulthood. A random community-based sample [X̅ age=36.6 (SD=2.8)] from the Children and Adults in the Community Study, an on-going investigation of substance use and psychiatric disorders. Data were collected at six time waves. Conjoint trajectories of cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana use spanning adolescence to adulthood were determined; multivariable logistic regression analyses assessed associations between trajectory group membership and having ASPD, MDE, or GAD in adulthood. Five conjoint trajectory groups were obtained: HHH (chronic cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana use), DDD (delayed/late-starting cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana use), LML (low/no smoking, moderate alcohol use, occasional marijuana use), HMN (chronic smoking, moderate alcohol use, no marijuana use), and NON (occasional alcohol use only). Compared with members of the NON group, those in the HHH group had significantly greater odds for having ASPD (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR]=28.52, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]=9.44-86.17), MDE (AOR=2.67, 95% CI=1.14-6.26), and GAD (AOR=6.39, 95% CI=2.62-15.56). Members of the DDD, LML, and HMN groups had weaker and less consistent associations with the three psychiatric outcomes. In a large, community-based sample, long-term concurrent use of more than one substance was associated with both externalizing and internalizing psychiatric disorders in adulthood. Prevention and treatment programs might target individuals in the community and general clinical populations with comorbid substance use, even if they haven't been identified as having a substance use disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Major depressive disorder, personality disorders, and coping strategies are independent risk factors for lower quality of life in non-metastatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Brunault, Paul; Champagne, Anne-Laure; Huguet, Grégoire; Suzanne, Isabelle; Senon, Jean-Louis; Body, Gilles; Rusch, Emmanuel; Magnin, Guillaume; Voyer, Mélanie; Réveillère, Christian; Camus, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Our aim was to identify risk factors for lower quality of life (QOL) in non-metastatic breast cancer patients. Our study included 120 patients from the University Hospital Centers of Tours and Poitiers. This cross-sectional study was conducted 7 months after patients' breast cancer diagnosis and assessed QOL (Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 = QLQ-C30), socio-demographic characteristics, coping strategies (Brief-COPE), physiological and biological variables (e.g., initial tumor severity and types of treatment received), the existence of major depressive disorder (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview), and pain severity (Questionnaire de Douleur Saint Antoine). We assessed personality disorders 3 months after diagnosis (Vragenlijst voor Kenmerken van de Persoonlijkheid questionnaire). We used multiple linear regression models to determine which factors were associated with physical, emotional, and global QOL. Lower physical QOL was associated with major depressive disorder, younger age, a more severe initial tumor stage, and the use of the behavioral disengagement coping. Lower emotional QOL was associated with major depressive disorder, the existence of a personality disorder, a more severe pain level, higher use of self-blame, and lower use of acceptance coping strategies. Lower global QOL was associated with major depressive disorder, the existence of a personality disorder, a more severe pain level, higher use of self-blame, lower use of positive reframing coping strategies, and an absence of hormone therapy. Lower QOL scores were more strongly associated with variables related to the individual's premorbid psychological characteristics and the manner in which this individual copes with the cancer (e.g., depression, personality, and coping) than to cancer-related variables (e.g., treatment types and cancer severity). Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Personality and endogenous/major depression: an empirical approach to typus melancholicus. 2. Validation of typus melancholicus core-properties by personality inventory scales.

    PubMed

    Mundt, C; Backenstrass, M; Kronmiller, K T; Fiedler, P; Kraus, A; Stanghellini, G

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to objectify some of the personality dimensions of the typus melancholicus (TM) personality formation in endogenous depressives and to compare the consistency of the term used in questionnaires with the original concept as delineated in our preceding paper. The prevalence of TM in endogenous-depressive inpatients was 51% for patients with clearly salient TM features. In addition 25% of the sample showed TM features to a minor extent. These findings are consistent with the literature. MMPI and MPI could not separate TM and non-typus melancholicus (NTM) in univariate analyses. However, the Munich Personality Test (MPT) contributes to validating the TM concept. TM depressives scored significantly higher in MPT subscales rigidity and norm orientation. According to its item structure the MPT rigidity subscore can be considered to conceptually encompass hypernomia, i.e. the patient's incapacity to change the norms that were once adopted. Based on the characteristics of item formulations in the MPT subscore norm orientation it was hypothesized that this subscore corresponds to the concept of heteronomia, i.e. conformism towards externally determined and uncritically followed social norms. Since MPT norm orientation in TM does not covariate with control scales of the other inventories used in this study, it is likely that MPT norm orientation refers to the TM patient's sincere commitment to social norms rather than to a sham reaction in the sense of a lie scale. There was no consistent indication that TM shows lower neuroticism scores than NTM.

  8. Differentiating Burnout from Depression: Personality Matters!

    PubMed

    Melchers, Martin Christoph; Plieger, Thomas; Meermann, Rolf; Reuter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Stress-related affective disorders have been identified as a core health problem of the twenty-first century. In the endeavor to identify vulnerability factors, personality has been discussed as a major factor explaining and predicting disorders like depression or burnout. An unsolved question is whether there are specific personality factors allowing differentiation of burnout from depression. The present study tested the relation between one of the most prominent, biological personality theories, Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory, and common measures of burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory General) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory 2) in a sample of German employees (N = 944) and a sample of inpatients (N = 425). Although the same personality traits (harm avoidance and self-directedness) were predominantly associated with burnout and depression, there was a much stronger association to depression than to burnout in both samples. Besides, we observed specific associations between personality traits and subcomponents of burnout. Our results underline differences in the association of burnout vs. depression to personality, which may mirror differences in scope. While symptoms of depression affect all aspects of life, burnout is supposed to be specifically related to the workplace and its requirements. The much stronger association of personality to depression can be important to select appropriate therapy methods and to develop a more specified treatment for burnout in comparison to depression.

  9. Differentiating Burnout from Depression: Personality Matters!

    PubMed Central

    Melchers, Martin Christoph; Plieger, Thomas; Meermann, Rolf; Reuter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Stress-related affective disorders have been identified as a core health problem of the twenty-first century. In the endeavor to identify vulnerability factors, personality has been discussed as a major factor explaining and predicting disorders like depression or burnout. An unsolved question is whether there are specific personality factors allowing differentiation of burnout from depression. The present study tested the relation between one of the most prominent, biological personality theories, Cloninger’s Temperament and Character Inventory, and common measures of burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory General) and depression (Beck Depression Inventory 2) in a sample of German employees (N = 944) and a sample of inpatients (N = 425). Although the same personality traits (harm avoidance and self-directedness) were predominantly associated with burnout and depression, there was a much stronger association to depression than to burnout in both samples. Besides, we observed specific associations between personality traits and subcomponents of burnout. Our results underline differences in the association of burnout vs. depression to personality, which may mirror differences in scope. While symptoms of depression affect all aspects of life, burnout is supposed to be specifically related to the workplace and its requirements. The much stronger association of personality to depression can be important to select appropriate therapy methods and to develop a more specified treatment for burnout in comparison to depression. PMID:26321963

  10. Major depression: emerging therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sen, Srijan; Sanacora, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    The first effective antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants, were identified 50 years ago, largely through serendipity. These medications were found to improve mood in a little more than half of depressed patients after a few weeks of chronic use. Almost all antidepressants prescribed today were developed through minor modifications of these original antidepressants and, like monoamine oxidase inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants, act primarily through monoaminergic mechanisms. Although there have been improvements in side-effect profiles and overdose toxicity, these newer medications have not provided substantial advances in the efficacy and speed of the antidepressant effect for patients. Over the last 2 decades, our understanding of the neurobiology underlying depression has expanded exponentially. Given this expansion, we may be nearing an inflection point in antidepressant drug development, at which useful medicines will be designed through a rational understanding of the biological systems. In this review, we discuss the biological basis and preclinical and clinical evidence for a series of promising classes of antidepressants developed primarily out of a pathophysiologically informed approach.

  11. Affective and cognitive theory of mind abilities in youth with borderline personality disorder or major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Tay, Sarah-Ann; Hulbert, Carol A; Jackson, Henry J; Chanen, Andrew M

    2017-09-01

    Theory of mind (ToM) is an important social cognitive ability that has been investigated in BPD, with inconsistent findings indicating impaired, comparable, and enhanced ToM in BPD. This study aimed to clarify and extend previous findings by investigating affective and cognitive ToM abilities in youth early in the course of BPD, by including a clinical comparison group of youth with major depressive disorder (MDD). Female participants aged 15-24 years diagnosed with BPD (n = 41) or MDD (n = 37) completed the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET) and Happé's Cartoon Task, measures of affective and cognitive dimensions of ToM, respectively. The BPD group performed significantly worse than the MDD group on the affective ToM task, even after controlling for age, intelligence and depressive symptoms. Results for cognitive ToM were not significantly different. Finding of poorer performance on a measure of affective ToM, in BPD youth, relative to youth with MDD early in the course of BPD suggest a developmental failure of sociocognitive abilities needed for mentalising and which are theorised as giving rise to core features of BPD. Future research should employ more naturalistic paradigms to study social cognition and should assess individuals even earlier in the course of BPD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Personality disorders, but not cancer severity or treatment type, are risk factors for later generalised anxiety disorder and major depressive disorder in non metastatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Anne-Laure; Brunault, Paul; Huguet, Grégoire; Suzanne, Isabelle; Senon, Jean-Louis; Body, Gilles; Rusch, Emmanuel; Magnin, Guillaume; Voyer, Mélanie; Réveillère, Christian; Camus, Vincent

    2016-02-28

    This study aimed to determine whether personality disorders were associated with later Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) or Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD) in breast cancer patients. This longitudinal and multicentric study included 120 French non-metastatic breast cancer patients. After cancer diagnosis (T1) and 7 months after diagnosis (T3), we assessed MDD and GAD (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview 5.0). We assessed personality disorders 3 months after diagnosis (VKP). We used multiple logistic regression analysis to determine what were the factors associated with GAD and MDD at T3. At T3, prevalence rate was 10.8% for MDD and 19.2% for GAD. GAD at T3 was significantly and independently associated with GAD at T1 and with existence of a personality disorder, no matter the cluster type. MDD at T3 was significantly and independently associated with MDD at T1 and with the existence of a cluster C personality disorder. Initial cancer severity and the type of treatment used were not associated with GAD or MDD at T3. Breast cancer patients with personality disorders are at higher risk for GAD and MDD at the end of treatment. Patients with GAD should be screened for personality disorders. Specific interventions for patients with personality disorders could prevent psychiatric disorders.

  13. SNP-based heritability estimates of the personality dimensions and polygenic prediction of both neuroticism and major depression: findings from CONVERGE.

    PubMed

    Docherty, A R; Moscati, A; Peterson, R; Edwards, A C; Adkins, D E; Bacanu, S A; Bigdeli, T B; Webb, B T; Flint, J; Kendler, K S

    2016-10-25

    Biometrical genetic studies suggest that the personality dimensions, including neuroticism, are moderately heritable (~0.4 to 0.6). Quantitative analyses that aggregate the effects of many common variants have recently further informed genetic research on European samples. However, there has been limited research to date on non-European populations. This study examined the personality dimensions in a large sample of Han Chinese descent (N=10 064) from the China, Oxford, and VCU Experimental Research on Genetic Epidemiology study, aimed at identifying genetic risk factors for recurrent major depression among a rigorously ascertained cohort. Heritability of neuroticism as measured by the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) was estimated to be low but statistically significant at 10% (s.e.=0.03, P=0.0001). In addition to EPQ, neuroticism based on a three-factor model, data for the Big Five (BF) personality dimensions (neuroticism, openness, conscientiousness, extraversion and agreeableness) measured by the Big Five Inventory were available for controls (n=5596). Heritability estimates of the BF were not statistically significant despite high power (>0.85) to detect heritabilities of 0.10. Polygenic risk scores constructed by best linear unbiased prediction weights applied to split-half samples failed to significantly predict any of the personality traits, but polygenic risk for neuroticism, calculated with LDpred and based on predictive variants previously identified from European populations (N=171 911), significantly predicted major depressive disorder case-control status (P=0.0004) after false discovery rate correction. The scores also significantly predicted EPQ neuroticism (P=6.3 × 10(-6)). Factor analytic results of the measures indicated that any differences in heritabilities across samples may be due to genetic variation or variation in haplotype structure between samples, rather than measurement non-invariance. Findings demonstrate that neuroticism

  14. SNP-based heritability estimates of the personality dimensions and polygenic prediction of both neuroticism and major depression: findings from CONVERGE

    PubMed Central

    Docherty, A R; Moscati, A; Peterson, R; Edwards, A C; Adkins, D E; Bacanu, S A; Bigdeli, T B; Webb, B T; Flint, J; Kendler, K S

    2016-01-01

    Biometrical genetic studies suggest that the personality dimensions, including neuroticism, are moderately heritable (~0.4 to 0.6). Quantitative analyses that aggregate the effects of many common variants have recently further informed genetic research on European samples. However, there has been limited research to date on non-European populations. This study examined the personality dimensions in a large sample of Han Chinese descent (N=10 064) from the China, Oxford, and VCU Experimental Research on Genetic Epidemiology study, aimed at identifying genetic risk factors for recurrent major depression among a rigorously ascertained cohort. Heritability of neuroticism as measured by the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) was estimated to be low but statistically significant at 10% (s.e.=0.03, P=0.0001). In addition to EPQ, neuroticism based on a three-factor model, data for the Big Five (BF) personality dimensions (neuroticism, openness, conscientiousness, extraversion and agreeableness) measured by the Big Five Inventory were available for controls (n=5596). Heritability estimates of the BF were not statistically significant despite high power (>0.85) to detect heritabilities of 0.10. Polygenic risk scores constructed by best linear unbiased prediction weights applied to split-half samples failed to significantly predict any of the personality traits, but polygenic risk for neuroticism, calculated with LDpred and based on predictive variants previously identified from European populations (N=171 911), significantly predicted major depressive disorder case–control status (P=0.0004) after false discovery rate correction. The scores also significantly predicted EPQ neuroticism (P=6.3 × 10−6). Factor analytic results of the measures indicated that any differences in heritabilities across samples may be due to genetic variation or variation in haplotype structure between samples, rather than measurement non-invariance. Findings demonstrate that neuroticism

  15. Discovering endophenotypes for major depression.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Gregor; Drevets, Wayne C; Manji, Husseini K; Charney, Dennis S

    2004-10-01

    The limited success of genetic studies of major depression has raised questions concerning the definition of genetically relevant phenotypes. This paper presents strategies to improve the phenotypic definition of major depression by proposing endophenotypes at two levels: First, dissecting the depressive phenotype into key components results in narrow definitions of putative psychopathological endophenotypes: mood bias toward negative emotions, impaired reward function, impaired learning and memory, neurovegetative signs, impaired diurnal variation, impaired executive cognitive function, psychomotor change, and increased stress sensitivity. A review of the recent literature on neurobiological and genetic findings associated with these components is given. Second, the most consistent heritable biological markers of major depression are proposed as biological endophenotypes for genetic studies: REM sleep abnormalities, functional and structural brain abnormalities, dysfunctions in serotonergic, catecholaminergic, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, and CRH systems, and intracellular signal transduction endophenotypes. The associations among the psychopathological and biological endophenotypes are discussed with respect to specificity, temporal stability, heritability, familiality, and clinical and biological plausibility. Finally, the case is made for the development of a new classification system in order to reduce the heterogeneity of depression representing a major impediment to elucidating the genetic and neurobiological basis of this common, severe, and often life-threatening illness.

  16. Risk of major depressive disorder among older persons living in HIV-endemic central and southwestern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kinyanda, Eugene; Kuteesa, Monica; Scholten, Francien; Mugisha, Joseph; Baisley, Kathy; Seeley, Janet

    2016-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is projected to become the second most common cause of disability by 2020 calling for a better understanding its antecedents across the lifespan and in diverse socio-cultural settings. In this paper we describe the risk factors of MDD among older people (50 years +) living in HIV-endemic central and southwestern Uganda. A cross-sectional study was undertaken among 471 respondents (50 years +) participating in the Wellbeing of Older People's Study cohort of the MRC/UVRI Uganda research Unit on AIDS in Uganda. Participants were from five strata: HIV negative, HIV positive on ART, HIV positive not on ART, having an adult child on ART, and having an adult child who died of HIV. Overall MDD prevalence was 9.2% (95% CI 6.7-12.2%) with a prevalence among males of 7.4% (95% CI 4.0-12.3%) and females of 10.3% (95% CI 7.0-14.3%). Factors significantly associated with MDD included: declining socio-economic status, increasing disability scores, decreasing mean grip strength, reported back pain, and not having hypertension. Marginally associated with MDD was being HIV infected and not on ART.

  17. Assessing the contribution of borderline personality disorder and features to suicide risk in psychiatric inpatients with bipolar disorder, major depression and schizoaffective disorder.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ruifan; Cohen, Lisa J; Tanis, Thachell; Qizilbash, Azra; Lopatyuk, Yana; Yaseen, Zimri S; Galynker, Igor

    2015-03-30

    Suicidal behavior often accompanies both borderline personality disorder (BPD) and severe mood disorders, and comorbidity between the two appears to further increase suicide risk. The current study aims to quantify the risk of suicidality conferred by comorbid BPD diagnosis or features in three affective disorders: major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder (BP) and schizoaffective disorder. One hundred forty-nine (149) psychiatric inpatients were assessed by SCID I and II, and the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale. Logistic regression analyses investigated the associations between previous suicide attempt and BPD diagnosis or features in patients with MDD, BP, and schizoaffective disorder, as well as a history of manic or major depressive episodes, and psychotic symptoms. Comorbid BPD diagnosis significantly increased suicide risk in the whole sample, and in those with MDD, BP, and history of depressive episode or psychotic symptoms. Each additional borderline feature also increased risk of past suicide attempt in these same groups (excepting BP) and in those with a previous manic episode. Of the BPD criteria, only unstable relationships and impulsivity independently predicted past suicide attempt. Overall, among patients with severe mood disorders, the presence of comorbid BPD features or disorder appears to substantially increase the risk of suicide attempts.

  18. Major depression with psychotic features

    MedlinePlus

    Psychotic depression; Delusional depression ... People with psychotic depression have symptoms of depression and psychosis . Psychosis is a loss of contact with reality. It usually includes: Delusions: ...

  19. Major Depression Can Be Prevented

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Ricardo F.; Beardslee, William R.; Leykin, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 Institute of Medicine report on prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders (National Research Council & Institute of Medicine, 2009b) presented evidence that major depression can be prevented. In this article, we highlight the implications of the report for public policy and research. Randomized controlled trials have shown…

  20. Major Depression Can Be Prevented

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Ricardo F.; Beardslee, William R.; Leykin, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 Institute of Medicine report on prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders (National Research Council & Institute of Medicine, 2009b) presented evidence that major depression can be prevented. In this article, we highlight the implications of the report for public policy and research. Randomized controlled trials have shown…

  1. Cognitive impairment in major depression.

    PubMed

    Marazziti, Donatella; Consoli, Giorgio; Picchetti, Michela; Carlini, Marina; Faravelli, Luca

    2010-01-10

    In the past decade, a growing bulk of evidence has accumulated to suggest that patients suffering from major depression (MD) present some cognitive disturbances, such as impairment in attention, working memory, and executive function, including cognitive inhibition, problem- and task-planning. If the results of short-term memory assessment in depressed patients are equivocal, a general consensus exists that memory problems are secondary to attentional dysfunctions, and reflect the inability to concentrate. Moreover, both unipolar and bipolar patients show evidence of impaired verbal learning that has been commonly interpreted as reflecting an inability to transfer information from short-term to long-term storage. According to some authors, there would be a gender-related as well age-related specificity of some disturbances. Depressed patients also show impairments of executive functions and their recent exploration through brain imaging techniques has recently permitted to formulate some general hypotheses on the possible involvement of different brain areas in MD.

  2. The genetic association between personality and major depression or bipolar disorder. A polygenic score analysis using genome-wide association data.

    PubMed

    Middeldorp, C M; de Moor, M H M; McGrath, L M; Gordon, S D; Blackwood, D H; Costa, P T; Terracciano, A; Krueger, R F; de Geus, E J C; Nyholt, D R; Tanaka, T; Esko, T; Madden, P A F; Derringer, J; Amin, N; Willemsen, G; Hottenga, J-J; Distel, M A; Uda, M; Sanna, S; Spinhoven, P; Hartman, C A; Ripke, S; Sullivan, P F; Realo, A; Allik, J; Heath, A C; Pergadia, M L; Agrawal, A; Lin, P; Grucza, R A; Widen, E; Cousminer, D L; Eriksson, J G; Palotie, A; Barnett, J H; Lee, P H; Luciano, M; Tenesa, A; Davies, G; Lopez, L M; Hansell, N K; Medland, S E; Ferrucci, L; Schlessinger, D; Montgomery, G W; Wright, M J; Aulchenko, Y S; Janssens, A C J W; Oostra, B A; Metspalu, A; Abecasis, G R; Deary, I J; Räikkönen, K; Bierut, L J; Martin, N G; Wray, N R; van Duijn, C M; Smoller, J W; Penninx, B W J H; Boomsma, D I

    2011-10-18

    The relationship between major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) remains controversial. Previous research has reported differences and similarities in risk factors for MDD and BD, such as predisposing personality traits. For example, high neuroticism is related to both disorders, whereas openness to experience is specific for BD. This study examined the genetic association between personality and MDD and BD by applying polygenic scores for neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness and conscientiousness to both disorders. Polygenic scores reflect the weighted sum of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphism alleles associated with the trait for an individual and were based on a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for personality traits including 13,835 subjects. Polygenic scores were tested for MDD in the combined Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN-MDD) and MDD2000+ samples (N=8921) and for BD in the combined Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder and Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium samples (N=6329) using logistic regression analyses. At the phenotypic level, personality dimensions were associated with MDD and BD. Polygenic neuroticism scores were significantly positively associated with MDD, whereas polygenic extraversion scores were significantly positively associated with BD. The explained variance of MDD and BD, ∼0.1%, was highly comparable to the variance explained by the polygenic personality scores in the corresponding personality traits themselves (between 0.1 and 0.4%). This indicates that the proportions of variance explained in mood disorders are at the upper limit of what could have been expected. This study suggests shared genetic risk factors for neuroticism and MDD on the one hand and for extraversion and BD on the other.

  3. The genetic association between personality and major depression or bipolar disorder. A polygenic score analysis using genome-wide association data

    PubMed Central

    Middeldorp, C M; de Moor, M H M; McGrath, L M; Gordon, S D; Blackwood, D H; Costa, P T; Terracciano, A; Krueger, R F; de Geus, E J C; Nyholt, D R; Tanaka, T; Esko, T; Madden, P A F; Derringer, J; Amin, N; Willemsen, G; Hottenga, J-J; Distel, M A; Uda, M; Sanna, S; Spinhoven, P; Hartman, C A; Ripke, S; Sullivan, P F; Realo, A; Allik, J; Heath, A C; Pergadia, M L; Agrawal, A; Lin, P; Grucza, R A; Widen, E; Cousminer, D L; Eriksson, J G; Palotie, A; Barnett, J H; Lee, P H; Luciano, M; Tenesa, A; Davies, G; Lopez, L M; Hansell, N K; Medland, S E; Ferrucci, L; Schlessinger, D; Montgomery, G W; Wright, M J; Aulchenko, Y S; Janssens, A C J W; Oostra, B A; Metspalu, A; Abecasis, G R; Deary, I J; Räikkönen, K; Bierut, L J; Martin, N G; Wray, N R; van Duijn, C M; Smoller, J W; Penninx, B W J H; Boomsma, D I

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) remains controversial. Previous research has reported differences and similarities in risk factors for MDD and BD, such as predisposing personality traits. For example, high neuroticism is related to both disorders, whereas openness to experience is specific for BD. This study examined the genetic association between personality and MDD and BD by applying polygenic scores for neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness and conscientiousness to both disorders. Polygenic scores reflect the weighted sum of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphism alleles associated with the trait for an individual and were based on a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for personality traits including 13 835 subjects. Polygenic scores were tested for MDD in the combined Genetic Association Information Network (GAIN-MDD) and MDD2000+ samples (N=8921) and for BD in the combined Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder and Wellcome Trust Case–Control Consortium samples (N=6329) using logistic regression analyses. At the phenotypic level, personality dimensions were associated with MDD and BD. Polygenic neuroticism scores were significantly positively associated with MDD, whereas polygenic extraversion scores were significantly positively associated with BD. The explained variance of MDD and BD, ∼0.1%, was highly comparable to the variance explained by the polygenic personality scores in the corresponding personality traits themselves (between 0.1 and 0.4%). This indicates that the proportions of variance explained in mood disorders are at the upper limit of what could have been expected. This study suggests shared genetic risk factors for neuroticism and MDD on the one hand and for extraversion and BD on the other. PMID:22833196

  4. Early maladaptive schema-related impairment and co-occurring current major depressive episode-related enhancement of mental state decoding ability in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Unoka, Zsolt Szabolcs; Fogd, Dóra; Seres, Imola; Kéri, Szabolcs; Csukly, Gábor

    2015-04-01

    Disturbed interpersonal relationships specific to borderline personality disorder (BPD) suggest biased processing of social information. The goal of this study was to examine alterations in mental state decoding (MSD) and their associations with early maladaptive schemas (EMS) that may lead to the misinterpretation of incoming information. In addition, the authors' aim was to evaluate the effects of a co-occurring current major depressive episode (MDE) on the MSD performance of BPD patients. Seventy-eight BPD patients (34 with MDE) and 76 matched healthy controls (HC) were assessed for Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET) and the level of EMS. The authors found that impairment in the total RMET performance, as well as specific impairment regarding the recognition of positive and neutral items, was associated with EMS, and enhanced vigilance to negative mental states was characteristic to BPD with MDE. Results suggest that MSD ability is altered in two independent ways in BPD.

  5. Self-efficacy and social networks after treatment for alcohol or drug dependence and major depression: disentangling person and time-level effects.

    PubMed

    Worley, Matthew J; Trim, Ryan S; Tate, Susan R; Roesch, Scott C; Myers, Mark G; Brown, Sandra A

    2014-12-01

    Proximal personal and environmental factors typically predict outcomes of treatment for alcohol or drug dependence (AODD), but longitudinal treatment studies have rarely examined these factors in adults with co-occurring psychiatric disorders. In adults with AODD and major depression, the aims of this study were to: (a) disaggregate person-and time-level components of network substance use and self-efficacy, (b) examine their prospective effects on posttreatment alcohol/drug use, and (c) examine whether residential environment moderated relations between these proximal factors and substance use outcomes. Veterans (N = 201) enrolled in a trial of group psychotherapy for AODD and independent MDD completed assessments every 3 months during 1 year of posttreatment follow-up. Outcome variables were percent days drinking (PDD) and using drugs (PDDRG). Proximal variables included abstinence self-efficacy and social network drinking and drug use. Self-efficacy and network substance use at the person-level prospectively predicted PDD (ps < .05) and PDDRG (ps < .05). Within-person, time-level effects of social networks predicted future PDD (ps < .05) but not PDDRG. Controlled environments moderated person-level social network effects (ps < .05), such that greater time in controlled settings attenuated the association between a heavier drinking/using network and posttreatment drinking and drug use. Both individual differences and time-specific fluctuations in proximal targets of psychosocial interventions are related to posttreatment substance use in adults with co-occurring AODD and MDD. More structured environmental settings appear to alleviate risk associated with social network substance use, and may be especially advised for those who have greater difficulty altering social networks during outpatient treatment.

  6. Borderline personality disorder and depression: an update.

    PubMed

    Luca, Maria; Luca, Antonina; Calandra, Carmela

    2012-09-01

    To review the literature related to recent temperamental and biological findings on borderline personality disorder (BPD) and major depression, the close link between the two disorders, and the latest therapeutical findings on BPD, focusing on the conditions of co-morbidity between depression and BPD. The National Institutes of Health's PubMed database was used to identify indexed studies on BPD, depression and the co-morbidity between the two. Only studies published between 2000 and 2011 were assessed. Similar temperamental features have been demonstrated in BPD and depression. The strong link between the two disorders seems to be widely recognized by scientific community. Psychotherapy and new antipsychotics are the topics of current major interest of research. The therapeutic targets in the case of co-morbidity are BPD features associated with depressive symptoms, thus influencing prognosis. A global assessment is, in fact, fundamental for a successful therapy for the treatment of the several aspects of a complex psychopathological phenomenon.

  7. Molecular signatures of major depression.

    PubMed

    Cai, Na; Chang, Simon; Li, Yihan; Li, Qibin; Hu, Jingchu; Liang, Jieqin; Song, Li; Kretzschmar, Warren; Gan, Xiangchao; Nicod, Jerome; Rivera, Margarita; Deng, Hong; Du, Bo; Li, Keqing; Sang, Wenhu; Gao, Jingfang; Gao, Shugui; Ha, Baowei; Ho, Hung-Yao; Hu, Chunmei; Hu, Jian; Hu, Zhenfei; Huang, Guoping; Jiang, Guoqing; Jiang, Tao; Jin, Wei; Li, Gongying; Li, Kan; Li, Yi; Li, Yingrui; Li, Youhui; Lin, Yu-Ting; Liu, Lanfen; Liu, Tiebang; Liu, Ying; Liu, Yuan; Lu, Yao; Lv, Luxian; Meng, Huaqing; Qian, Puyi; Sang, Hong; Shen, Jianhua; Shi, Jianguo; Sun, Jing; Tao, Ming; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guangbiao; Wang, Jian; Wang, Linmao; Wang, Xueyi; Wang, Xumei; Yang, Huanming; Yang, Lijun; Yin, Ye; Zhang, Jinbei; Zhang, Kerang; Sun, Ning; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zhang, Zhen; Zhong, Hui; Breen, Gerome; Wang, Jun; Marchini, Jonathan; Chen, Yiping; Xu, Qi; Xu, Xun; Mott, Richard; Huang, Guo-Jen; Kendler, Kenneth; Flint, Jonathan

    2015-05-04

    Adversity, particularly in early life, can cause illness. Clues to the responsible mechanisms may lie with the discovery of molecular signatures of stress, some of which include alterations to an individual's somatic genome. Here, using genome sequences from 11,670 women, we observed a highly significant association between a stress-related disease, major depression, and the amount of mtDNA (p = 9.00 × 10(-42), odds ratio 1.33 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.29-1.37]) and telomere length (p = 2.84 × 10(-14), odds ratio 0.85 [95% CI = 0.81-0.89]). While both telomere length and mtDNA amount were associated with adverse life events, conditional regression analyses showed the molecular changes were contingent on the depressed state. We tested this hypothesis with experiments in mice, demonstrating that stress causes both molecular changes, which are partly reversible and can be elicited by the administration of corticosterone. Together, these results demonstrate that changes in the amount of mtDNA and telomere length are consequences of stress and entering a depressed state. These findings identify increased amounts of mtDNA as a molecular marker of MD and have important implications for understanding how stress causes the disease.

  8. Molecular Signatures of Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Na; Chang, Simon; Li, Yihan; Li, Qibin; Hu, Jingchu; Liang, Jieqin; Song, Li; Kretzschmar, Warren; Gan, Xiangchao; Nicod, Jerome; Rivera, Margarita; Deng, Hong; Du, Bo; Li, Keqing; Sang, Wenhu; Gao, Jingfang; Gao, Shugui; Ha, Baowei; Ho, Hung-Yao; Hu, Chunmei; Hu, Jian; Hu, Zhenfei; Huang, Guoping; Jiang, Guoqing; Jiang, Tao; Jin, Wei; Li, Gongying; Li, Kan; Li, Yi; Li, Yingrui; Li, Youhui; Lin, Yu-Ting; Liu, Lanfen; Liu, Tiebang; Liu, Ying; Liu, Yuan; Lu, Yao; Lv, Luxian; Meng, Huaqing; Qian, Puyi; Sang, Hong; Shen, Jianhua; Shi, Jianguo; Sun, Jing; Tao, Ming; Wang, Gang; Wang, Guangbiao; Wang, Jian; Wang, Linmao; Wang, Xueyi; Wang, Xumei; Yang, Huanming; Yang, Lijun; Yin, Ye; Zhang, Jinbei; Zhang, Kerang; Sun, Ning; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xiuqing; Zhang, Zhen; Zhong, Hui; Breen, Gerome; Wang, Jun; Marchini, Jonathan; Chen, Yiping; Xu, Qi; Xu, Xun; Mott, Richard; Huang, Guo-Jen; Kendler, Kenneth; Flint, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Adversity, particularly in early life, can cause illness. Clues to the responsible mechanisms may lie with the discovery of molecular signatures of stress, some of which include alterations to an individual’s somatic genome. Here, using genome sequences from 11,670 women, we observed a highly significant association between a stress-related disease, major depression, and the amount of mtDNA (p = 9.00 × 10−42, odds ratio 1.33 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.29–1.37]) and telomere length (p = 2.84 × 10−14, odds ratio 0.85 [95% CI = 0.81–0.89]). While both telomere length and mtDNA amount were associated with adverse life events, conditional regression analyses showed the molecular changes were contingent on the depressed state. We tested this hypothesis with experiments in mice, demonstrating that stress causes both molecular changes, which are partly reversible and can be elicited by the administration of corticosterone. Together, these results demonstrate that changes in the amount of mtDNA and telomere length are consequences of stress and entering a depressed state. These findings identify increased amounts of mtDNA as a molecular marker of MD and have important implications for understanding how stress causes the disease. PMID:25913401

  9. Metabolic depression in hibernation and major depression: an explanatory theory and an animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Tsiouris, John A

    2005-01-01

    Metabolic depression, an adaptive biological process for energy preservation, is responsible for torpor, hibernation and estivation. We propose that a form of metabolic depression, and not mitochondrial dysfunction, is the process underlying the observed hypometabolism, state-dependent neurobiological changes and vegetative symptoms of major depression in humans. The process of metabolic depression is reactivated via differential gene expression in response to perceived adverse stimuli in predisposed persons. Behavior inhibition by temperament, anxiety disorders, genetic vulnerabilities, and early traumatic experiences predispose persons to depression. The proposed theory is supported by similarities in the presentation and neurobiology of hibernation in bears and major depression and explains the yet unexplained neurobiological changes of depression. Although, gene expression is suppressed in other hibernators by deep hypothermia, bears were chosen because they hibernate with mild hypothermia. Pre-hibernation in bears and major depression with atypical features are both characterized by fat storage through overeating, oversleeping, and decreased mobility. Hibernation in bears and major depression with melancholic features are characterized by withdrawal from the environment, lack of energy, loss of weight from not eating and burning stored fat, changes in sleep pattern, and the following similar neurobiological findings: reversible subclinical hypothyroidism; increased concentration of serum cortisol; acute phase protein response; low respiratory quotient; oxidative stress response; decreased neurotransmitter levels; and changes in cyclic-adenosine monophosphate-binding activity. Signaling systems associated with protein phosphorylation, transcription factors, and gene expression are responsible for the metabolic depression process during pre-hibernation and hibernation. Antidepressants and mood stabilizers interfere with the hibernation process and produce their

  10. Neurobiology of Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We survey studies which relate abnormal neurogenesis to major depressive disorder. Clinically, descriptive gene and protein expression analysis and genetic and functional studies revised here show that individual alterations of a complex signaling network, which includes the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; the production of neurotrophins and growth factors; the expression of miRNAs; the production of proinflammatory cytokines; and, even, the abnormal delivery of gastrointestinal signaling peptides, are able to induce major mood alterations. Furthermore, all of these factors modulate neurogenesis in brain regions involved in MDD, and are functionally interconnected in such a fashion that initial alteration in one of them results in abnormalities in the others. We highlight data of potential diagnostic significance and the relevance of this information to develop new therapeutic approaches. Controversial issues, such as whether neurogenesis is the basis of the disease or whether it is a response induced by antidepressant treatments, are also discussed. PMID:24222865

  11. Neurobiology of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    We survey studies which relate abnormal neurogenesis to major depressive disorder. Clinically, descriptive gene and protein expression analysis and genetic and functional studies revised here show that individual alterations of a complex signaling network, which includes the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; the production of neurotrophins and growth factors; the expression of miRNAs; the production of proinflammatory cytokines; and, even, the abnormal delivery of gastrointestinal signaling peptides, are able to induce major mood alterations. Furthermore, all of these factors modulate neurogenesis in brain regions involved in MDD, and are functionally interconnected in such a fashion that initial alteration in one of them results in abnormalities in the others. We highlight data of potential diagnostic significance and the relevance of this information to develop new therapeutic approaches. Controversial issues, such as whether neurogenesis is the basis of the disease or whether it is a response induced by antidepressant treatments, are also discussed.

  12. The incremental validity of borderline personality disorder relative to major depressive disorder for suicidal ideation and deliberate self-harm in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Carla; Green, Kelly L; Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Venta, Amanda; Zanarini, Mary C; Pettit, Jeremy

    2012-12-01

    Few studies have examined the relation between suicide-related behaviors and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) in adolescent samples. The current study investigated the incremental validity of BPD relative to Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) for suicide-related behaviors in a psychiatric sample of adolescents at the cross-sectional level of analysis. The sample included N = 156 consecutive admissions (55.1% female; M age = 15.47; SD = 1.41), to the adolescent treatment program of an inpatient treatment facility. Of the sample 19.2% (n = 30) met criteria for BPD on the Child Interview for DSM-IV Borderline Personality Disorder and 39.1% (n = 61) met criteria for MDD on the Computerized Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children-IV. Results showed that BPD conferred additional risk for suicidal ideation and deliberate self-harm. Our findings support the clinical impression that BPD should be evaluated in inpatient samples of adolescents either through intake interviews or more structured assessments.

  13. THE INCREMENTAL VALIDITY OF BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER RELATIVE TO MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER FOR SUICIDAL IDEATION AND DELIBERATE SELF-HARM IN ADOLESCENTS

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Carla; Green, Kelly L.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Venta, Amanda; Zanarini, Mary C.; Pettit, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relation between suicide-related behaviors and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) in adolescent samples. The current study investigated the incremental validity of BPD relative to Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) for suicide-related behaviors in a psychiatric sample of adolescents at the cross-sectional level of analysis. The sample included N = 156 consecutive admissions (55.1% female; M age = 15.47; SD = 1.41), to the adolescent treatment program of an inpatient treatment facility. Of the sample 19.2% (n = 30) met criteria for BPD on the Child Interview for DSM-IV Borderline Personality Disorder and 39.1% (n = 61) met criteria for MDD on the Computerized Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children–IV. Results showed that BPD conferred additional risk for suicidal ideation and deliberate self-harm. Our findings support the clinical impression that BPD should be evaluated in inpatient samples of adolescents either through intake interviews or more structured assessments. PMID:23281677

  14. Major Depression as a Complex Dynamic System

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Angélique O. J.; van Borkulo, Claudia D.; Giltay, Erik J.; van der Maas, Han L. J.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Scheffer, Marten; Borsboom, Denny

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we characterize major depression (MD) as a complex dynamic system in which symptoms (e.g., insomnia and fatigue) are directly connected to one another in a network structure. We hypothesize that individuals can be characterized by their own network with unique architecture and resulting dynamics. With respect to architecture, we show that individuals vulnerable to developing MD are those with strong connections between symptoms: e.g., only one night of poor sleep suffices to make a particular person feel tired. Such vulnerable networks, when pushed by forces external to the system such as stress, are more likely to end up in a depressed state; whereas networks with weaker connections tend to remain in or return to a non-depressed state. We show this with a simulation in which we model the probability of a symptom becoming ‘active’ as a logistic function of the activity of its neighboring symptoms. Additionally, we show that this model potentially explains some well-known empirical phenomena such as spontaneous recovery as well as accommodates existing theories about the various subtypes of MD. To our knowledge, we offer the first intra-individual, symptom-based, process model with the potential to explain the pathogenesis and maintenance of major depression. PMID:27930698

  15. Personal and Perceived Depression Stigma among Arab Adolescents: Associations with Depression Severity and Personal Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dardas, Latefa Ali; Silva, Susan G; Smoski, Moria J; Noonan, Devon; Simmons, Leigh Ann

    2017-10-01

    In Arab communities, the selection, utilization, and attitudes towards mental health services are substantially affected by existing mental illness stigma. However, little is known about how the stigma of depression manifests among Arab adolescents, which makes it difficult to design, implement, and disseminate effective anti-stigma interventions for this vulnerable population. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine levels of depression stigma among Arab adolescents. The specific aims were to (1) describe the severity of personal and perceived depression stigma among Arab adolescents and its relationship to severity of depression, and (2) determine characteristics associated with severity of depression stigma among Arab adolescents. This study was conducted in Jordan, a Middle Eastern Arab country. A nationally representative, school-based survey was utilized. A total of 2349 Jordanian adolescents aged 12-17 completed and returned the survey packets, which included measures on individual characteristics, depression severity, and depression stigma. The majority of the adolescents (88%) reported scores indicating moderate to high depression stigma. Adolescents reported higher rates of perceived stigma than personal stigma. Depression stigma was not significantly associated with severity of depression, but with adolescent's sex, age, region of residence, parents' education, and history of mental health problem. This is the first Arab study to isolate the influence of adolescent depression and personal characteristics on personal and perceived depression stigmas, and highlight the presence of these distinctions early in adolescence. Such distinction can inform the design and implementation of policies and interventions to reduce both personal and perceived stigma. The study provides important recommendations on when, how, and why to utilize school settings for anti-depression stigma interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Recurrence in Major Depression: A Conceptual Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Scott M.; Harkness, Kate L.

    2011-01-01

    Theory and research on major depression have increasingly assumed a recurrent and chronic disease model. Yet not all people who become depressed suffer recurrences, suggesting that depression is also an acute, time-limited condition. However, few if any risk indicators are available to forecast which of the initially depressed will or will not…

  17. Molecular epidemiology of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kiyohara, Chikako; Yoshimasu, Kouichi

    2009-03-01

    Major depressive disorder causes significant morbidity, affecting people's ability to work, function in relationships, and engage in social activities. Moreover, major depressive disorder increases the risk of suicidal ideation, attempted suicide and death by completed suicide. There is evidence that chronic stress can cause major depressive disorder. As for genetic factors, only minor susceptibility genes have been reliably identified. The serotonin system provides a logical source of susceptibility genes for depression, because this system is the target of selective serotonin reuptake-inhibitor drugs that are effective in treating depression. The 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) transporter (5-HTT) has received particular attention because it is involved in the reuptake of serotonin at brain synapses. One common polymorphic variant of the 5-HTT-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), which affects the promoter of the 5-HTT gene, causes reduced uptake of the neurotransmitter serotonin into the presynaptic cells in the brain. The authors discussed the relationship between genetic polymorphisms and major depressive disorder, with special emphasis on the 5-HTTTLPR polymorphism. As the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism was significantly associated with an increased risk of major depressive disorder, the 5-HTT gene may be a candidate for a major depressive disorder susceptibility gene. As major depressive disorder is a multifactorial disease, an improved understanding of the interplay of environmental and genetic polymorphisms at multiple loci may help identify individuals who are at increased risk for major depressive disorder. Hopefully, in the future we will be able to screen for major depressive disorder susceptibility by using specific biomarkers.

  18. Predisposition for borderline personality disorder with comorbid major depression is associated with that for polycystic ovary syndrome in female Japanese population

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Satoshi; Maesawa, Chihaya; Nakamura, Koji; Nakayama, Kazuhiko; Morita, Michiaki; Hiruma, Yohei; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Akio; Masuda, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common lifestyle-related endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age and is associated with several mental health problems. We examined the genotypic distributions of IRS-1 Gly972Arg and CYP11B2 -344T/C, which were previously described as influencing PCOS, and assayed the serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), in a set of female patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) with comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD) (n = 50) and age-matched control subjects (n = 100), to investigate the predisposition for BPD with MDD. The results showed that the patients were more frequently IRS-1 972Arg variant allele carriers (P = 0.013; OR 6.68; 95% CI = 1.30–34.43) and homozygous for the CYP11B2 −344C variant allele (P = 0.022; OR = 3.32; 95% CI = 1.18–9.35) than the control subjects. The IL-6 level was significantly higher in the patients than in the controls (P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the serum TNF-α level between patients with BPD with MDD and the healthy comparison group (P = 0.5273). In conclusion, the predisposition for BPD with MDD is associated with that for PCOS, in the female Japanese population. An elevated serum IL-6 level is considered to be a possible biomarker of BPD with MDD. PMID:22090801

  19. Effects of cortisol on memory in women with borderline personality disorder: role of co-morbid post-traumatic stress disorder and major depression.

    PubMed

    Wingenfeld, K; Driessen, M; Terfehr, K; Schlosser, N; Fernando, S Carvalho; Otte, C; Beblo, T; Spitzer, C; Löwe, B; Wolf, O T

    2013-03-01

    Stress and cortisol administration are known to have impairing effects on memory retrieval in healthy humans. These effects are reported to be altered in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) but they have not yet been investigated in borderline personality disorder (BPD). In a placebo-controlled cross-over study, 71 women with BPD and 40 healthy controls received either placebo or 10 mg of hydrocortisone orally before undertaking a declarative memory retrieval task (word list learning) and an autobiographical memory test (AMT). A working memory test was also applied. Overall, opposing effects of cortisol on memory were observed when comparing patients with controls. In controls, cortisol had impairing effects on memory retrieval whereas in BPD patients cortisol had enhancing effects on memory retrieval of words, autobiographical memory and working memory. These effects were most pronounced for specificity of autobiographical memory retrieval. Patients with BPD alone and those with co-morbid PTSD showed this effect. We also found that co-morbid MDD influenced the cortisol effects: in this subgroup (BPD + MDD) the effects of cortisol on memory were absent. The present results demonstrate beneficial effects of acute cortisol elevations on hippocampal-mediated memory processes in BPD. The absence of these effects in patients with co-morbid MDD suggests that these patients differ from other BPD patients in terms of their sensitivity to glucocorticoids (GCs).

  20. Does fludrocortisone influence autobiographical memory retrieval? A study in patients with major depression, patients with borderline personality disorder and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Juliane; Wingenfeld, Katja; Kuehl, Linn K; Hinkelmann, Kim; Roepke, Stefan; Otte, Christian

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that stimulation of mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) enhances memory in healthy subjects and in patients with major depression (MDD). In contrast, in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD), this effect seems to be task dependent. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of MR stimulation on autobiographical memory retrieval in healthy individuals, patients with MDD, and patients with BPD. We conducted a placebo-controlled study in an intra-individual cross-over design. Twenty-four patients with MDD, 37 patients with BPD, and 67 healthy participants completed an autobiographical memory test after receiving 0.4 mg fludrocortisone, a mineralocorticoid receptor preferring agonist, or placebo in a randomized order. Healthy subjects, patients with MDD, and patients with BPD did not differ in their autobiographical memory retrieval. Furthermore, the administration of fludrocortisone had no effect on autobiographical memory. In conclusion, the stimulation of MR does not influence autobiographical memory retrieval in healthy subjects, patients with MDD, and patients with BPD. Our results do not support a role of MR in autobiographical memory.

  1. Health care costs of borderline personality disorder and matched controls with major depressive disorder: a comparative study based on anonymized claims data.

    PubMed

    Bode, Katharina; Vogel, Rolf; Walker, Jochen; Kröger, Christoph

    2016-12-18

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) pose a significant burden to the German health care system in terms of direct and indirect costs. The aim of this study was to determine the incremental costs that arise due to the treatment of patients with BPD, in relation to MDD patients adjusted for gender and age. Insured persons who suffered from BPD (F60.3; N = 6599) or MDD (F32, F33; N = 26,396) in the year 2010 were identified from the German Health Risk Institute research database. To estimate the costs resulting from disorder-specific health care service utilization and the mean total costs per patient for the health care system, we analyzed anonymized claims data of individuals with BPD and matched individuals with MDD. The costs resulting from disorder-specific health care service utilization 1 year after index diagnosis amounted to 8508 EUR for BPD and 8281 EUR for MDD per patient utilizing services. With mean total annual costs per patient of 4636 EUR versus 2020 EUR 1 year preceding index diagnosis, 7478 EUR versus 3638 EUR in the year after index diagnosis, and 11,817 EUR versus 6058 EUR 2 years after index diagnosis, BPD patients incurred markedly higher costs. Since the treatment of BPD causes incremental costs for the German health care system compared to the treatment of MDD, and since both conditions are associated with a high level of suffering, there is a need for establishing adequate and early treatment of these mental disorders.

  2. Major depressive disorder in children and adolescents after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ghanizadeh, A; Mansoori, Y; Ashkani, H; Fallahzadeh, M H; Derakhshan, A; Shokrpour, N; Akhondzadeh, S

    2009-06-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence of major depressive disorder and depressive symptoms in children and adolescents after renal transplantation. A total of 71 patients who had undergone renal transplantation were interviewed in person using the Farsi (Persian) version of the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders diagnostic criteria. Major depressive disorder, depressive symptoms, and suicidal behaviors were assessed. The rate of major depressive disorder was 2.8%; two-thirds of the patients had irritability; and approximately 40% had recurrent thoughts of death and suicidal ideation. The rate of major depressive disorder was lower than in other chronic diseases such as thallasemia or hemophilia; however, the rate of suicidal behaviors was high.

  3. Predictors of Treatment Utilization in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Dana M.; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill M.; Stanley, Barbara; Burke, Ainsley; Mann, J. John; Oquendo, Maria A.

    2013-01-01

    Suicide attempters with major depression are at risk for repeat attempts and often do not utilize treatment. Identifying predictors of treatment non-utilization could inform interventions to motivate treatment use and reduce suicide risk in major depression. Two hundred and seventy three participants with a major depressive episode as part of a major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder, were assessed for socio-demographic and clinical characteristics at baseline and again 1 year later to identify predictors of treatment utilization. Treatment utilization rate was high 1 year after initial evaluation (72.5%). Severity of baseline depression, baseline treatment status, and education were associated with treatment utilization at 1 year. Interventions focused on increasing knowledge about depression and treatment efficacy may improve treatment adherence when treating depression. PMID:21541862

  4. Personality and Depression: Explanatory Models and Review of the Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Daniel N.; Kotov, Roman; Bufferd, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the association between personality and depression has implications for elucidating etiology and comorbidity, identifying at-risk individuals, and tailoring treatment. We discuss seven major models that have been proposed to explain the relation between personality and depression, and we review key methodological issues, including study design, the heterogeneity of mood disorders, and the assessment of personality. We then selectively review the extensive empirical literature on the role of personality traits in depression in adults and children. Current evidence suggests that depression is linked to traits such as neuroticism/negative emotionality, extraversion/positive emotionality, and conscientiousness. Moreover, personality characteristics appear to contribute to the onset and course of depression through a variety of pathways. Implications for prevention and prediction of treatment response are discussed, as well as specific considerations to guide future research on the relation between personality and depression. PMID:21166535

  5. Personality and risk for postpartum depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Iliadis, S I; Koulouris, P; Gingnell, M; Sylvén, S M; Sundström-Poromaa, I; Ekselius, L; Papadopoulos, F C; Skalkidou, A

    2015-06-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common childbirth complication, affecting 10-15 % of newly delivered mothers. This study aims to assess the association between personality factors and PPD. All pregnant women during the period September 2009 to September 2010, undergoing a routine ultrasound at Uppsala University Hospital, were invited to participate in the BASIC study, a prospective study designed to investigate maternal well-being. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) while the Depression Self-Rating Scale (DSRS) was used as a diagnostic tool for major depression. Personality traits were evaluated using the Swedish Universities Scale of Personality (SSP). One thousand thirty-seven non-depressed pregnant women were included in the study. Non-depressed women reporting high levels of neuroticism in late pregnancy were at high risk of developing postpartum depressive symptoms (PPDSs) at 6 weeks and 6 months after delivery, even after adjustment for confounders (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.4, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.8-6.5 and adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.9, 95 % CI 1.9-7.9). The same was true for a DSRS-based diagnosis of major depression at 6 months postpartum. Somatic trait anxiety and psychic trait anxiety were associated with increased risk for PPDS at 6 weeks (aOR = 2.1, 95 % CI 1.2-3.5 and aOR = 1.9, 95 % CI 1.1-3.1), while high scores of mistrust were associated with a twofold increased risk for PPDS at 6 months postpartum (aOR 1.9, 95 % CI 1.1-3.4). Non-depressed pregnant women with high neuroticism scores have an almost fourfold increased risk to develop depressive symptoms postpartum, and the association remains robust even after controlling for most known confounders. Clinically, this could be of importance for health care professionals working with pregnant and newly delivered women.

  6. Direct and indirect influences of childhood abuse on depression symptoms in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yumi; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Takagaki, Koki; Okada, Go; Toki, Shigeru; Inoue, Takeshi; Tanabe, Hajime; Kobayakawa, Makoto; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2015-10-14

    It is known that the onset, progression, and prognosis of major depressive disorder are affected by interactions between a number of factors. This study investigated how childhood abuse, personality, and stress of life events were associated with symptoms of depression in depressed people. Patients with major depressive disorder (N = 113, 58 women and 55 men) completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), the Neuroticism Extroversion Openness Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), the Child Abuse and Trauma Scale (CATS), and the Life Experiences Survey (LES), which are self-report scales. Results were analyzed with correlation analysis and structural equation modeling (SEM), by using SPSS AMOS 21.0. Childhood abuse directly predicted the severity of depression and indirectly predicted the severity of depression through the mediation of personality. Negative life change score of the LES was affected by childhood abuse, however it did not predict the severity of depression. This study is the first to report a relationship between childhood abuse, personality, adulthood life stresses and the severity of depression in depressed patients. Childhood abuse directly and indirectly predicted the severity of depression. These results suggest the need for clinicians to be receptive to the possibility of childhood abuse in patients suffering from depression. SEM is a procedure used for hypothesis modeling and not for causal modeling. Therefore, the possibility of developing more appropriate models that include other variables cannot be excluded.

  7. Emerging antidepressants to treat major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Block, Samantha G; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2014-12-01

    Depression is a common disorder with an annual risk of a depressive episode in the United States of 6.6%. Only 30-40% of patients remit with antidepressant monotherapy, leaving 60-70% of patients who do not optimally respond to therapy. Unremitted depressive patients are at increased risk for suicide. Considering the prevalence of treatment resistant depression and its consequences, treatment optimization is imperative. This review summarizes the latest treatment modalities for major depressive disorder including pharmacotherapy, electroconvulsive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and psychotherapy. Through advancements in research to better understand the pathophysiology of depression, advances in treatment will be realized.

  8. Self-stigma in borderline personality disorder - cross-sectional comparison with schizophrenia spectrum disorder, major depressive disorder, and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Grambal, Ales; Prasko, Jan; Kamaradova, Dana; Latalova, Klara; Holubova, Michaela; Marackova, Marketa; Ociskova, Marie; Slepecky, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Self-stigma arises from one's acceptance of societal prejudices and is common in psychiatric patients. This investigation compares the self-stigma of a sample of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD), schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SCH), major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar affective disorder (BAD), and anxiety disorders (AD) and explores of the self-stigma with the subjective and objective measures of the severity of the disorder and demographic factors. The total of 184 inpatients admitted to the psychotherapeutic department diagnosed with BPD, SCH, MDD, BAP, and AD were compared on the internalized stigma of mental illness (ISMI) scale. The ISMI-total score was correlated with the subjective and objective evaluation of the disorder severity (clinical global impression), and clinical and demographic factors. The self-stigma levels were statistically significantly different among the diagnostic groups (BPD 71.15±14.74; SCH 63.2±13.27; MDD 64.09±12.2; BAD 62.0±14.21; AD 57.62±15.85; one-way analysis of variance: F=8.698, df=183; P<0.005). However after applying the Bonferroni's multiple comparison test, the only significant difference was between the BPD patients and the patients with AD (P<0.001). Stepwise regression analysis showed that the strongest factors connected with the higher level of self-stigma were being without partner, the number of hospitalization, and the severity of the disorder. The BPD patients suffer from a higher level of self-stigma compared to patients with AD. In practice, it is necessary to address the reduction of self-stigma by using specific treatment strategies, such as cognitive therapy.

  9. Self-stigma in borderline personality disorder – cross-sectional comparison with schizophrenia spectrum disorder, major depressive disorder, and anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Grambal, Ales; Prasko, Jan; Kamaradova, Dana; Latalova, Klara; Holubova, Michaela; Marackova, Marketa; Ociskova, Marie; Slepecky, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Self-stigma arises from one’s acceptance of societal prejudices and is common in psychiatric patients. This investigation compares the self-stigma of a sample of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD), schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SCH), major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar affective disorder (BAD), and anxiety disorders (AD) and explores of the self-stigma with the subjective and objective measures of the severity of the disorder and demographic factors. Methods The total of 184 inpatients admitted to the psychotherapeutic department diagnosed with BPD, SCH, MDD, BAP, and AD were compared on the internalized stigma of mental illness (ISMI) scale. The ISMI-total score was correlated with the subjective and objective evaluation of the disorder severity (clinical global impression), and clinical and demographic factors. Results The self-stigma levels were statistically significantly different among the diagnostic groups (BPD 71.15±14.74; SCH 63.2±13.27; MDD 64.09±12.2; BAD 62.0±14.21; AD 57.62±15.85; one-way analysis of variance: F=8.698, df=183; P<0.005). However after applying the Bonferroni’s multiple comparison test, the only significant difference was between the BPD patients and the patients with AD (P<0.001). Stepwise regression analysis showed that the strongest factors connected with the higher level of self-stigma were being without partner, the number of hospitalization, and the severity of the disorder. Conclusion The BPD patients suffer from a higher level of self-stigma compared to patients with AD. In practice, it is necessary to address the reduction of self-stigma by using specific treatment strategies, such as cognitive therapy. PMID:27703362

  10. Effects of cortisol on cognition in major depressive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder and borderline personality disorder - 2014 Curt Richter Award Winner.

    PubMed

    Wingenfeld, Katja; Wolf, Oliver T

    2015-01-01

    Stress hormones influence a wide range of cognitive functions, including memory performance and executive function. It is well established that glucocorticoids enhance memory consolidation but impair memory retrieval. While most of the effects have been attributed to glucocorticoid receptors (GR), the importance of mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) has been also emphasized. Dysfunctions in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis have been reported for several mental disorders. While major depressive disorder (MDD) as well as borderline personality disorder (BPD) seem to be characterized by enhanced cortisol release in concert with a reduced feedback sensitivity of the HPA axis, in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) a contrary picture has been reported. Despite the fact that altered GR function has been discussed for these disorders only very few studies have investigated the effects of glucocorticoids on cognitive performance in these patients so far. In a series of studies, we investigated the effects of glucocorticoids on cognition (i.e. declarative memory, working memory and response inhibition) in different mental disorders such as MDD, PTSD and BPD. While in patients with MDD cortisol administration failed to effect memory retrieval, patients with PTSD and BPD showed enhanced rather than impaired memory retrieval after cortisol administration. These results indicate an altered sensitivity to cortisol in these disorders. Results from one of our recent studies in the field of social cognition underline the importance of the MR. We found that emotional empathy was enhanced through stimulation of the MR via fludrocortisone in healthy participants and women with BPD. This review aims to integrate these findings and discuss potential mechanisms and implications.

  11. Major depressive episodes and diet pills.

    PubMed

    Patten, Scott B

    2002-10-01

    A variety of medications used to assist with weight loss have been implicated in the precipitation or induction of depressive symptoms and disorders. This is true of a large number of phenylethylamine agents possessing psychostimulant properties, non-phenylethylamine psychostimulants (e.g., caffeine) and the serotonergic agent, fenfluramine. There is, as yet, no substantial evidence linking the more modern weight loss drugs, sibutramine and orlistat, to the aetiology of major depression. Nevertheless, when these drugs are used, major depression will continue to be an important clinical consideration because of the elevated frequency with which major depression occurs in obese patients, the contribution that major depression may make to poor outcomes in non-pharmacological weight loss treatment and because of the interplay between symptoms of depression and weight loss treatment.

  12. Comorbid Problem Gambling and Major Depression in a Community Sample.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Leanne; Yakovenko, Igor; Hodgins, David C; Dobson, Keith S; El-Guebaly, Nady; Casey, David M; Currie, Shawn R; Smith, Garry J; Williams, Robert J; Schopflocher, Don P

    2015-12-01

    Major depression is among the most common comorbid conditions in problem gambling. However, little is known about the effects of comorbid depression on problem gambling. The present study examined the prevalence of current major depression among problem gamblers (N = 105) identified from a community sample of men and women in Alberta, and examined group differences in gambling severity, escape motivation for gambling, family functioning, childhood trauma, and personality traits across problem gamblers with and without comorbid depression. The prevalence of major depression among the sample of problem gamblers was 32.4%. Compared to problem gamblers without depression (n = 71), problem gamblers with comorbid depression (n = 34) reported more severe gambling problems, greater history of childhood abuse and neglect, poorer family functioning, higher levels of neuroticism, and lower levels of extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. Furthermore, the problem gamblers with comorbid depression had greater levels of childhood abuse and neglect, worse family functioning, higher neuroticism, and lower agreeableness and conscientiousness than a comparison sample of recreational gamblers with depression (n = 160). These findings underscore the need to address comorbid depression in assessment and treatment of problem gambling and for continued research on how problem gambling is related to frequently co-occurring disorders such as depression.

  13. Towards Personalizing Treatment for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Knashawn H.; Cary, Mark; Gallo, Joseph J.; Bartels, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Background While ‘personalized medicine’ commonly refers to genetic markers or profiles associated with pharmacological treatment response, tailoring treatments to patient preferences and values is equally important. Objective To describe and demonstrate a method to develop ‘values markers,’ or profiles based on the relative importance of attributes of depression treatment. Study Design Discrete choice analysis was used to assess individuals’ relative preferences for features of depression treatment. Preference profiles were developed using latent profile analysis. Patients or Other Participants Eighty-six adults participating in an internet-based discrete choice questionnaire. Main Outcome Measure Participants were presented with two depression scenarios representing mild and severe depression. For each scenario, they were asked to compare 18 choice sets based on the type of medication side effect (nausea, dizziness, and sexual dysfunction) and severity (mild, moderate, and severe); and for counseling frequency (once per week or every other week) and provider setting (the office of a mental health professional, primary care doctor, or spiritual counselor). Results Three profiles were identified: profile 1 was associated with a preference for counseling and an avoidance of medication side effects; profile 2 with an avoidance of strong medication side effects and for receiving counseling in medical settings; and profile 3 with a preference for medication over counseling. When presented with a severe depression scenario, there was a higher prevalence for profile 1 and patients were more likely to prefer mental health over primary care and spiritual settings. Conclusions Values markers may provide a foundation for personalized medicine, and reflect current initiatives emphasizing patient-centered care. Next steps should assess whether values markers are predictive of treatment initiation and adherence. PMID:23420133

  14. DEXAMETHASONE SUPPRESSION TEST FOR MAJOR DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Ghulam, R.; Anand, Mohini; Lal, Narottam; Trivedi, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    SUMMARY Overnight post dexamethasone plasma Cortisol levels were estimated in thirty patients of major depression and 30 controls. The cut-off point after which post dexamethasone plasma Cortisol level could be considered abnormal, in patients of major depression, has been worked out at 15 μg/dl in the present study. The results are discussed. PMID:21927130

  15. Delayed mood transitions in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Korf, Jakob

    2014-05-01

    The hypothesis defended here is that the process of mood-normalizing transitions fails in a significant proportion of patients suffering from major depressive disorder. Such a failure is largely unrelated to the psychological content. Evidence for the hypothesis is provided by the highly variable and unpredictable time-courses of the depressive episodes. The main supporting observations are: (1) mood transitions within minutes or days have been reported during deep brain stimulation, naps after sleep deprivation and bipolar mood disorders; (2) sleep deprivation, electroconvulsive treatment and experimental drugs (e.g., ketamine) may facilitate mood transitions in major depressive disorder within hours or a few days; (3) epidemiological and clinical studies show that the time-to-recovery from major depressive disorder can be described with decay models implying very short depressive episodes; (4) lack of relationship between the length of depression and recovery episodes in recurrent depression; (5) mood fluctuations predict later therapeutic success in major depressive disorder. We discuss some recent models aimed to describe random mood transitions. The observations together suggest that the mood transitions have a wide variety of apparently unrelated causes. We suggest that the mechanism of mood transition is compromised in major depressive disorder, which has to be recognized in diagnostic systems.

  16. Hippocampal atrophy in recurrent major depression.

    PubMed Central

    Sheline, Y I; Wang, P W; Gado, M H; Csernansky, J G; Vannier, M W

    1996-01-01

    Hippocampal volumes of subjects with a history of major depressive episodes but currently in remission and with no known medical comorbidity were compared to matched normal controls by using volumetric magnetic resonance images. Subjects with a history of major depression had significantly smaller left and right hippocampal volumes with no differences in total cerebral volumes. The degree of hippocampal volume reduction correlated with total duration of major depression. In addition, large (diameter > or = 4.5 mm)-hippocampal low signal foci (LSF) were found within the hippocampus, and their number also correlated with the total number of days depressed. These results suggest that depression is associated with hippocampal atrophy, perhaps due to a progressive process mediated by glucocorticoid neurotoxicity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8632988

  17. Examining Minor and Major Depression in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Tejera, Gloria; Canino, Glorisa; Ramirez, Rafael; Chavez, Ligia; Shrout, Patrick; Bird, Hector; Bravo, Milagros; Martinez-Taboas, Alfonso; Ribera, Julio; Bauermeister, Jose

    2005-01-01

    Background: Research has shown that a large proportion of adolescents with symptoms of depression and substantial distress or impairment fail to meet the diagnostic criteria for a major depressive disorder (MDD). However, many of these undiagnosed adolescents may meet criteria for a residual category of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of…

  18. Seasonal Variation of Depressive Symptoms in Unipolar Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Bryan S.; Coryell, William H.; Cavanaugh, Joseph; Keller, Martin; Solomon, David A.; Endicott, Jean; Potash, James B.; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Retrospective and cross-sectional studies of seasonal variation of depressive symptoms in unipolar major depression have yielded conflicting results. We examined seasonal variation of mood symptoms in a long-term prospective cohort – the Collaborative Depression Study (CDS). Methods The sample included 298 CDS participants from five academic centers with a prospectively derived diagnosis of unipolar major depression who were followed for at least ten years of annual or semi-annual assessments. Generalized linear mixed models were utilized to investigate the presence of seasonal patterns. In a subset of 271 participants followed for at least 20 years, the stability of a winter depressive pattern was assessed across the first two decades of follow-up. Results A small increase in proportion of time depressed was found in the months surrounding the winter solstice, although the greatest symptom burden was seen in December through April with a peak in March. The relative burden of winter depressive symptoms in the first decade demonstrated no relationship to that of the second decade. The onset of new episodes was highest October through January, peaking in January. Conclusions There exists a small but statistically significant peak in depressive symptoms from the month of the winter solstice to the month of the spring equinox. However, the predominance of winter depressive symptoms did not appear stable over the long-term course of illness. PMID:25176622

  19. [Impact of personality factors in depression].

    PubMed

    Quitkin, F M

    1993-08-01

    Patients meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder are heterogeneous. Our studies suggest that at least two sub-types exist which benefit from specific treatments. Data will be presented which suggests that some patients who meet borderline criteria and have atypical depression (patients meeting DSM III-R criteria for major depression or dysthymia reactive wills mood and any vegetative atypical symptoms, i.e. overeating, oversleeping, rejection sensitivity, leaden paralysis) clearly benefit from treatment with antidepressant medication. Although some patients with atypical depression who meet borderline criteria will improve with tricyclic therapy, a significantly greater proportion will improve with the monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) phenelzine if they suffer from atypical depression. The validity of emotionally unstable character disorder (EUCD) will also be examined. Patients with this disorder frequently meet criteria for borderline character disorder. The validity of this sub-group is supported by the presence of neurological soft signs, their negative response to anti-depressants, and their positive response to chlorpromazine and lithium.

  20. [Major depression: features indicative of bipolarity?].

    PubMed

    Azorin, J-M

    2011-12-01

    Several recent studies have shown that bipolar disorder is underdiagnosed in patients with major depression. Missing the diagnosis of a bipolar disorder may have serious and even occasionally fatal consequences for a patient with the disease. Moreover misdiagnosis may lead to inappropriate treatment and therefore contribute to worsening medical and functional prognosis. Although there are no pathognomonic characteristics of bipolar depression compared to unipolar depression, evidence-based findings suggest that some features may be indicative of bipolarity, in patients with depression. These features are related to clinical picture of depressive state, course of episode and illness, response to treatment, family history, comorbid conditions, as well as demographic and temperamental characteristics. Based on such features, some authors have proposed operationalized criteria or a diagnostic specific for bipolarity, to identify bipolar depression. Screening instruments may also be used, to facilitate early recognition. Validation studies of these diagnostic features and instruments are underway.

  1. Depression and major depressive disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takeshi; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Tanaka, Teruaki; Nakagawa, Shin; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2010-01-15

    The prevalence of depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) varies greatly. In this study, we investigated major depressive disorder (MDD) and depressive symptoms without MDD in patients with PD. The psychopathological characteristics of depressive symptoms were assessed by a psychiatric interview. A total of 105 Japanese patients with PD without dementia were included. The Japanese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) with a cutoff score of 13/14 was used to screen for depression. Using a structured interview, a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation of patients with BDI-II scores >13 (high BDI patients) was completed using the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR. Forty patients (38%) had a BDI-II >13, but 29 did not show any depressed mood. Five cases met the criteria for MDD (three current, two past) and one patient was diagnosed with minor depressive disorder. A slight depressed mood that was associated with worrying about PD was seen in 6 of 34 patients without any depressive disorder and fluctuated with aggravation of PD symptoms in two of these patients. For the diagnosis of MDD, the number of positive items from the DSM-IV-TR definition of MDD is most important and useful for differentiating MDD and non-MDD. The low-prevalence rate of MDD in our patient population suggests that PD may be a psychological stressor for MDD, but does not necessarily induce MDD.

  2. Emerging from Depression: Treatment of Adolescent Depression Using the Major Treatment Models of Adult Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Kathleen M.

    Noting that adolescents who commit suicide are often clinically depressed, this paper examines various approaches in the treatment of depression. Major treatment models of adult depression, which can be directly applied to the treatment of the depressed adolescent, are described. Major treatment models and selected research studies are reviewed in…

  3. Emerging from Depression: Treatment of Adolescent Depression Using the Major Treatment Models of Adult Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Kathleen M.

    Noting that adolescents who commit suicide are often clinically depressed, this paper examines various approaches in the treatment of depression. Major treatment models of adult depression, which can be directly applied to the treatment of the depressed adolescent, are described. Major treatment models and selected research studies are reviewed in…

  4. Dependency and self-criticism: relationship with major depressive disorder, severity of depression, and clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Luyten, Patrick; Sabbe, Bernard; Blatt, Sidney J; Meganck, Sieglinde; Jansen, Bart; De Grave, Carmen; Maes, Frank; Corveleyn, Jozef

    2007-01-01

    Dependency and self-criticism have been proposed as personality dimensions that confer vulnerability to depression. In this study we set out to investigate the diagnostic specificity of these personality dimensions and their relationship with gender differences, severity of depression, and specific depressive symptoms. Levels of dependency and self-criticism as measured by the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire (DEQ) were compared among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD; n=93), mixed psychiatric patients (n=43), university students (n=501), and community adults (n=253). Associations with severity of depression and specific depressive symptoms were also explored. Results showed that dependency was more specifically associated with MDD, whereas self-criticism did not differ between depressed and mixed psychiatric patients. In line with the gender incongruence hypothesis, women with MDD and other psychiatric disorders had higher levels of self-criticism compared to men, whereas men with MDD had higher levels of dependency compared to women. Severity of depression was more clearly linked to self-criticism than to dependency, particularly in patients with MDD. Finally, both dependency and self-criticism were related to theoretically predicted clusters of depressive symptoms, especially after we controlled for shared variance between self-critical and dependent symptoms, respectively. Limitations of this study include the cross-sectional design, which limited the ability to draw causal conclusions. In addition, this study relied exclusively on self-reported personality and mood. Overall, findings of this study suggest that both dependency and self-criticism are associated with MDD, severity of depression, and specific depressive symptoms, and that gender-incongruent personality traits may be associated with increased risk for depression and other disorders.

  5. Different biogenetic causal explanations and attitudes towards persons with major depression, schizophrenia and alcohol dependence: is the concept of a chemical imbalance beneficial?

    PubMed

    Speerforck, Sven; Schomerus, Georg; Pruess, Susanne; Angermeyer, Matthias C

    2014-10-01

    It is unclear whether different biogenetic causal beliefs affect stigmatization of mentally-ill patients differently. It has been argued that in particular believing in a 'chemical imbalance' as a cause of mental disorder might be associated with more tolerant attitudes. In a representative population survey in Germany (n=3642), using unlabelled case vignettes of persons with depression, schizophrenia, or alcohol dependence, we elicited agreement with three different biogenetic explanations of the illness: 'Chemical imbalance of the brain', 'brain disease' and 'heredity'. We further investigated emotional reactions as well as the desire for social distance. For each vignette condition we calculated linear regressions with each biogenetic explanation as independent and emotional reactions as well as social distance as dependent variable controlling for socio-demographic variables. Our cross-sectional study does not allow statements regarding causality and the explanatory power of our statistical models was low. 'Chemical imbalance of the brain' and 'brain disease' were both associated with a stronger desire for social distance in schizophrenia and depression, and with more social acceptance in alcohol dependence, whereas 'heredity' was not significantly associated with social distance in any of the investigated illnesses. All three biogenetic causal beliefs were associated with more fear in all three illnesses. Our study corroborates findings that biogenetic explanations have different effects in different disorders, and seem to be harmful in depression and schizophrenia. A particular de-stigmatizing potential of the causal belief 'chemical imbalance' could not be found. Implications for useful anti-stigma messages are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Depression as a systemic syndrome: mapping the feedback loops of major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wittenborn, A. K.; Rahmandad, H.; Rick, J.; Hosseinichimeh, N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is a complex public health problem with considerable variation in treatment response. The systemic complexity of depression, or the feedback processes among diverse drivers of the disorder, contribute to the persistence of depression. This paper extends prior attempts to understand the complex causal feedback mechanisms that underlie depression by presenting the first broad boundary causal loop diagram of depression dynamics. Method We applied qualitative system dynamics methods to map the broad feedback mechanisms of depression. We used a structured approach to identify candidate causal mechanisms of depression in the literature. We assessed the strength of empirical support for each mechanism and prioritized those with support from validation studies. Through an iterative process, we synthesized the empirical literature and created a conceptual model of major depressive disorder. Results The literature review and synthesis resulted in the development of the first causal loop diagram of reinforcing feedback processes of depression. It proposes candidate drivers of illness, or inertial factors, and their temporal functioning, as well as the interactions among drivers of depression. The final causal loop diagram defines 13 key reinforcing feedback loops that involve nine candidate drivers of depression. Conclusions Future research is needed to expand upon this initial model of depression dynamics. Quantitative extensions may result in a better understanding of the systemic syndrome of depression and contribute to personalized methods of evaluation, prevention and intervention. PMID:26621339

  7. Depression as a systemic syndrome: mapping the feedback loops of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Wittenborn, A K; Rahmandad, H; Rick, J; Hosseinichimeh, N

    2016-02-01

    Depression is a complex public health problem with considerable variation in treatment response. The systemic complexity of depression, or the feedback processes among diverse drivers of the disorder, contribute to the persistence of depression. This paper extends prior attempts to understand the complex causal feedback mechanisms that underlie depression by presenting the first broad boundary causal loop diagram of depression dynamics. We applied qualitative system dynamics methods to map the broad feedback mechanisms of depression. We used a structured approach to identify candidate causal mechanisms of depression in the literature. We assessed the strength of empirical support for each mechanism and prioritized those with support from validation studies. Through an iterative process, we synthesized the empirical literature and created a conceptual model of major depressive disorder. The literature review and synthesis resulted in the development of the first causal loop diagram of reinforcing feedback processes of depression. It proposes candidate drivers of illness, or inertial factors, and their temporal functioning, as well as the interactions among drivers of depression. The final causal loop diagram defines 13 key reinforcing feedback loops that involve nine candidate drivers of depression. Future research is needed to expand upon this initial model of depression dynamics. Quantitative extensions may result in a better understanding of the systemic syndrome of depression and contribute to personalized methods of evaluation, prevention and intervention.

  8. Depressive Symptoms Displayed by Persons with Mental Retardation: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawlarcyzk, Douglas; Beckwith, Bill E.

    1987-01-01

    The applicability of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders III" diagnostic criteria for "Major Depressive Episode" within a population of persons with mild and moderate mental retardation was validated by reviewing reports of severe depression among these individuals. (Author/DB)

  9. The parkinsonian personality and concomitant depression.

    PubMed

    Damholdt, Malene Flensborg; Ostergaard, Karen; Borghammer, Per; Larsen, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has been associated with a distinctive parkinsonian personality, characterized by conscientiousness, punctuality, industriousness, and reduced novelty-seeking, as compared with healthy elderly persons. Similar traits are identified in relation to depression. The objective of the study was to elucidate the relationship between the parkinsonian personality and depression. Thirty-two depressed and 86 nondepressed PD patients and 30 healthy control subjects completed the NEO-Personality Inventory Revised Short Version. PD patients with depression displayed a distinct personality profile, with increased Neuroticism and reduced Extroversion, as compared with nondepressed PD patients and control subjects. It seems plausible that a subgroup of PD patients possesses a distinct personality profile that renders them sensitive to development of depression, although the reverse might also be possible.

  10. Interpersonal Pathoplasticity in the Course of Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Nicole M.; Ansell, Emily B.; Wright, Aidan G. C.; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Thomas, Katherine M.; Pinto, Anthony; Markowitz, John C.; Sanislow, Charles A.; Zanarini, Mary C.; Shea, M. Tracie; Morey, Leslie C.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Skodol, Andrew E.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The identification of reliable predictors of course in major depressive disorder (MDD) has been difficult. Evidence suggests that the co-occurrence of personality pathology is associated with longer time to MDD remission. Interpersonal pathoplasticity, the mutually influencing nonetiological relationship between psychopathology and…

  11. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Frase, Lukas

    2012-11-01

    In this article, we will introduce interpersonal psychotherapy as an effective short-term treatment strategy in major depression. In IPT, a reciprocal relationship between interpersonal problems and depressive symptoms is regarded as important in the onset and as a maintaining factor of depressive disorders. Therefore, interpersonal problems are the main therapeutic targets of this approach. Four interpersonal problem areas are defined, which include interpersonal role disputes, role transitions, complicated bereavement, and interpersonal deficits. Patients are helped to break the interactions between depressive symptoms and their individual interpersonal difficulties. The goals are to achieve a reduction in depressive symptoms and an improvement in interpersonal functioning through improved communication, expression of affect, and proactive engagement with the current interpersonal network. The efficacy of this focused and structured psychotherapy in the treatment of acute unipolar major depressive disorder is summarized. This article outlines the background of interpersonal psychotherapy, the process of therapy, efficacy, and the expansion of the evidence base to different subgroups of depressed patients.

  12. [Vortioxetine in the treatment of major depression].

    PubMed

    de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Fagiolini, Andrea; Maina, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Notwithstanding the high prevalence, functional burden, negative consequences and risk of chronicity of major depressive disorder, few innovative medications have been developed in recent years for the treatment of this heterogeneous disease. Vortioxetine is a multi-modal antidepressant that functions both as serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitor and as 5-HT3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptors antagonist, 5-HT1A receptor agonist and 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist. A recent meta-analysis of 11 randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled, acute (6-8 weeks) treatment studies has demonstrated the efficacy of vortioxetine 5-20 mg/day in the treatment of depression, with an increasing effect associated with increasing dose. Additionally, vortioxetine 5-20 mg/day has shown efficacy on the whole range of depression symptoms (as demonstrated by the improvement of all single-item MADRS scores). Vortioxetine has also been shown effective in the treatment of severe depression and depression with inadequate response to a previous SSRI or SNRI treatment, as well as in the prevention of relapse. In studies designed to assess cognition in depression, vortioxetine showed evidence of improving cognitive performance in patients with acute major depressive disorder. Vortioxetine appears well-tolerated, with very limited effects on weight gain and sexual functioning. The most commonly occurring adverse event (nausea) was generally transitory.

  13. The Mistreatment of Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of classification on treatment in major depressive disorder (MDD). Method: This is a narrative review. Results: MDD is a highly heterogeneous category, leading to problems in classification and in specificity of treatment. Current models classify all depressions within a single category. However, the construct of MDD obscures important differences between severe disorders that require pharmacotherapy, and mild-to-moderate disorders that can respond to psychotherapy or remit spontaneously. Patients with mild-to-moderate MDD are being treated with routine or overly aggressive pharmacotherapy. Conclusions: The current classification fails to address the heterogeneity of depression, leading to mistreatment. PMID:24881163

  14. Frontostriatal functional connectivity in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Furman, Daniella J; Hamilton, J Paul; Gotlib, Ian H

    2011-12-08

    Abnormalities of the striatum and frontal cortex have been reported consistently in studies of neural structure and function in major depressive disorder (MDD). Despite speculation that compromised connectivity between these regions may underlie symptoms of MDD, little work has investigated the integrity of frontostriatal circuits in this disorder. Functional magnetic resonance images were acquired from 21 currently depressed and 19 never-disordered women during wakeful rest. Using four predefined striatal regions-of-interest, seed-to-whole brain correlations were computed and compared between groups. Compared to controls, depressed participants exhibited attenuated functional connectivity between the ventral striatum and both ventromedial prefrontal cortex and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex. Depressed participants also exhibited stronger connectivity between the dorsal caudate and dorsal prefrontal cortex, which was positively correlated with severity of the disorder. Depressed individuals are characterized by aberrant connectivity in frontostriatal circuits that are posited to support affective and cognitive processing. Further research is required to examine more explicitly the link between patterns of disrupted connectivity and specific symptoms of depression, and the extent to which these patterns precede the onset of depression and normalize with recovery from depressive illness.

  15. Residual symptoms in elderly major depression remitters.

    PubMed

    Gastó, C; Navarro, V; Catalán, R; Portella, M J; Marcos, T

    2003-07-01

    To assess residual symptoms in severe geriatric major depression in remission, and to determine baseline clinical and sociodemographic predictors of residual symptoms in remitters. A total of 108 elderly patients with unipolar major depression were evaluated and treated naturalistically for 9 months so as to record the predictors of residual symptoms in remitters. In order to reduce the likelihood of confusing residual symptoms with normal effects of age, 30 control subjects were also monitored. Seventy-nine patients (73.1%) were considered remitters and 82.3% of remitters showed residual symptoms. Medical burden, chronic stress and subjective social support were the only variables which predicted the severity of residual symptoms in remitters. Residual symptoms in elderly patients with major depression in remission should not only be attributed exclusively to intrinsic factors of the illness or the age of the individual patient, but also to external factors.

  16. Paroxetine treatment of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Keller, Martin B

    2003-01-01

    Major depression is recognized as a common, often chronic and recurrent illness that is associated with significant disability and comorbidity. The treatment of patients with major depressive disorder has advanced tremendously in the past decade as a result of the availability of effective and well-tolerated antidepressants. Paroxetine is a widely studied selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) with evidence for efficacy and safety that is supported by a large body of published literature. Evidence for the efficacy and tolerability of anew controlled-release formulation of paroxetine also has been published. Findings from paroxetine clinical studies have added considerably to our knowledge and understanding of the treatment of major depressive disorder, particularly with regard to duration of treatment, the need for treating to full remission and with full doses, and treatment of patients with concurrent symptoms of anxiety.

  17. Personalized medicine in Alzheimer's disease and depression.

    PubMed

    Souslova, Tatiana; Marple, Teresa C; Spiekerman, A Michael; Mohammad, Amin A

    2013-11-01

    Latest research in the mental health field brings new hope to patients and promises to revolutionize the field of psychiatry. Personalized pharmacogenetic tests that aid in diagnosis and treatment choice are now becoming available for clinical practice. Amyloid beta peptide biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's disease are now available. For the first time, radiologists are able to visualize amyloid plaques specific to Alzheimer's disease in live patients using Positron Emission Tomography-based tests approved by the FDA. A novel blood-based assay has been developed to aid in the diagnosis of depression based on activation of the HPA axis, metabolic, inflammatory and neurochemical pathways. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors have shown increased remission rates in specific ethnic subgroups and Cytochrome P450 gene polymorphisms can predict antidepressant tolerability. The latest research will help to eradicate "trial and error" prescription, ushering in the most personalized medicine to date. Like all major medical breakthroughs, integration of new algorithms and technologies requires sound science and time. But for many mentally ill patients, diagnosis and effective therapy cannot happen fast enough. This review will describe the newest diagnostic tests, treatments and clinical studies for the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's disease and unipolar, major depressive disorder. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cognitive hypnotherapy for major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Alladin, Assen

    2012-04-01

    Since the publication of the special issue on cognitive hypnotherapy in the Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy: An International Quarterly (1994), there have been major developments in the application of hypnosis to the treatment of depression. However, there is no "one-size-fits-all" treatment for depressive disorders as the conditions represent a complex set of heterogeneous symptoms, involving multiple etiologies. It is thus important for therapists to promote a multimodal approach to treating depressive disorders. This article describes cognitive hypnotherapy (CH), an evidence-based multimodal psychological treatment that can be applied to a wide range of depressed patients. CH combines hypnosis with cognitive behavior therapy as the latter provides the best integrative lodestone for assimilating empirically supported treatment techniques derived from various psychotherapies.

  19. Treatment of resistant insomnia and major depression.

    PubMed

    Vellante, F; Cornelio, M; Acciavatti, T; Cinosi, E; Marini, S; Dezi, S; De Risio, L; Di Iorio, G; Martinotti, G; Di Giannantonio, M

    2013-01-01

    Daily rhythms regulate everiday life and sleep/wake alternation is the best expression of this. Disruptions in biological rhythms is strongly associated with mood disorders, often being the major feature of this, major depressive disorder first of all. Although stabilization of rhythms produced by treatments have important outcome on therapeutic efficacy, insomnia often remains an unresolved symptom when major depression has otherwise been successfully treated with antidepressant. We review scientific literature in order to better clarify how to better approach insomnia as a clinical aspect to investigate and to early treat while treating other psychiatric conditions, major depression in particular. Insomnia is associated with impaired quality of life. It can be resolved with adequate diagnosis and treatment: it should be considered a comorbid condition and should be early identificated and treated in a multidisciplinary way, so that the ideal of treatment for patients with treatment resistant insomnia in major depression is an integration of non-pharmacologic measures, along with judicious use of medication, often used as an adjunctive therapy.

  20. Major depressive disorder: reification and (maybe) rheostasis.

    PubMed

    Patten, S B

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneity of clinical syndromes subsumed by diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD) is regarded by some as a reason to abandon or modify the criteria. However, heterogeneity may be unavoidable because of the biopsychosocial complexity of depression. MDD may be characterised by complexities that cannot be distilled down to any brief set of diagnostic criteria. Psychiatrists and psychiatric epidemiologists may need to revise their expectations of this diagnosis in order to avoid over-estimating its ability to guide the selection of treatments and prediction of prognosis. An opposing perspective is that of reification, in which the diagnosis is viewed as being more real than it really is. The concept of rheostasis may help to explain some features of this condition, such as why major depressive episodes sometimes seem understandable or even adaptive (e.g. in the context of bereavement) whereas at other times such episodes are inexplicable and maladaptive.

  1. [Influence of depressive history on biological parameters in major depression].

    PubMed

    Van Wijnendaele, R; Hubain, P; Dramaix, M; Mendlewicz, J; Linkowski, P

    2002-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is associated with several biological abnormalities. Among them, sleep disturbances and alterations of hypothalamic structures and cortisol system have been largely studied. Most studies have found a relationship between depression and alteration of sleep. Electroencephalic sleep profiles during depression demonstrate abnormalities of sleep continuity, reduction of slow waves sleep and REM pressure (27). The cortisol system, investigated by the Dexamethasone Suppression Test (DST), is abnormal in about an half of the depressed subjects. We confirm a cortisol escape from suppression by dexamethasone (21). A complex dysregulation of the Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal axis (HPA) is thought to explain this escape (15, 33). The HPA has been first involved in the theory of stress. There are two ways to study this. First by looking at early adversities and genetic susceptibility to stress, and second by studying acute stressors and depressive reactions (8). The sensitization model postulated that the acute abnormalities of depression may leave biological scares. Those scares could make people more vulnerable to latter depressive triggers (34). We could then suppose that biological correlates of depression become more severe during the course of the illness. The present study further examines relationships between DST, polysomnography and some clinical and epidemiological characteristics of the depressive illness. We tried to examine if there were increasing biological disturbances during the course of the illness. We also examined the effect of the history of illness on the psychosocial stressors, and the effects of those stressors on the biological correlates of depression. The DST and polysomnographic recordings were performed in a sample of 130 inpatients with primary major depressive disorder, unipolar form, as defined with the RDC (41). All of those patients have been consecutively admitted to the Sleep Laboratory of the Department of

  2. Major Depression and Psoriasis: A Psychodermatological Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Tohid, Hassaan; Aleem, Daniyal; Jackson, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to highlight the mechanisms involved and the relationship between depression and psoriasis. A comprehensive literature search was performed in various databases, and finally 88 studies were deemed relevant. A significant link was found between depression and psoriasis, primarily through immune mechanisms related but not limited to the actions of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-2, IL-10, interferon-γ, IL-1β, prostaglandin E2, C-reactive protein, IL-6, and IL-8. Various neuroimmunological studies point towards the notion that depression and psoriasis are associated with each other. Melatonin has also been found to be associated with both conditions. A possibility exists that both conditions can cause each other due to the possible bidirectional relationship of psoriasis and major depression. However, if this is the case, then why all depressed patients fail to develop psoriasis and why all psoriatic patients fail to develop depression remains a question unanswered. We believe that future studies will unmask this mystery. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. [Cognition - the core of major depressive disorder].

    PubMed

    Polosan, M; Lemogne, C; Jardri, R; Fossati, P

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive deficits have been only recently recognized as a major phenotype determinant of major depressive disorder, although they are an integral part of the definition of the depressive state. Congruent evidence suggest that these cognitive deficits persist beyond the acute phase and may be identified at all ages. The aim of the current study was to review the main meta-analyses on cognition and depression, which encompasses a large range of cognitive domains. Therefore, we discuss the "cold" (attention, memory, executive functions) and "hot" (emotional bias) cognitive impairments in MDD, as well as those of social cognition domains (empathy, theory of mind). Several factors interfere with cognition in MDD such as clinical (melancholic, psychotic...) features, age, age of onset, illness severity, medication and comorbid condition. As still debated in the literature, the type of relationship between the severity of cognitive symptoms and functioning in depression is detailed, thus highlighting their predictive value of functional outcome, independently of the affective symptoms. A better identification of the cognitive deficits in MDD and a monitoring of the effects of different treatments require appropriate instruments, which may be developed by taking advantage of the increasing success of computing tools. Overall, current data suggest a core role for different cognitive deficits in MDD, therefore opening new perspectives for optimizing the treatment of depression.

  4. Examining minor and major depression in adolescents.

    PubMed

    González-Tejera, Gloria; Canino, Glorisa; Ramírez, Rafael; Chávez, Ligia; Shrout, Patrick; Bird, Hector; Bravo, Milagros; Martínez-Taboas, Alfonso; Ribera, Julio; Bauermeister, José

    2005-08-01

    Research has shown that a large proportion of adolescents with symptoms of depression and substantial distress or impairment fail to meet the diagnostic criteria for a major depressive disorder (MDD). However, many of these undiagnosed adolescents may meet criteria for a residual category of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition-Text Revised (DSM-IV-TR), Depressive Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. Minor Depression (mDEP), an example of one of these categories, allows the inclusion of sub-threshold cases that fall below the diagnostic criteria of the five symptoms required for MDD. Minor depression in adolescence is important because it is significantly related to MDD in adulthood. The present study examines a number of risk factors, functional impairment, comorbidity and service utilization patterns associated with depression in community adolescents who met the DSM-IV criteria for mDEP and compares their profile to adolescents who met the criteria for MDD. Puerto Rican adolescents 11 to 17 years old were selected from an island-wide probability household sample of children ranging in age from 4 to 17. The Diagnostic Interview Schedule in Spanish (DISC IV), together with a structured protocol of risks and protective factors, and service utilization questionnaires were administered to primary caretakers and their children. Our findings indicate that youngsters with mDEP had significant impairment and used more mental health services than those with major depression. In addition, adolescents with mDEP had similar outcomes when compared to those meeting full criteria for MDD in terms of psychosocial correlates and comorbidity. The results, although not definitive, suggest a need for further research in order to determine the validity of the present DSM IV diagnostic criteria for mDEP in adolescents.

  5. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of patients with a major depressive episode

    PubMed Central

    Rothuber, Helfried; Mitterauer, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background A major depressive episode diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria can be accompanied by symptoms that DSM-IV does not include. These symptoms are sometimes classified as comorbidities. Our study assessed altered behavioral modes during a major depressive episode; ie, if 1 or more modes of behavior operated less or even not at all (“never”), or if the operation of others was more frequent or even constant (“always”). We hypothesize that these altered behavioral modes, especially the extreme positions “never” (hypomodes) and “always” (hypermodes) might correlate with depression scores and thus represent a typical symptom of depression. Material/Methods We used the 35-item Salzburg Subjective Behavioral Analysis (SSBA) questionnaire to measure altered behavioral modes in 63 depressed patients and 87 non-depressed controls. Depression was assessed using the Hamilton Depression Scale. Results In our test group (n=63) we found a total of 888 extreme positions. The mean number of extreme positions per patient was 11.15±5.173 (SD). Extreme positions were found in all 35 behavioral modes. The mean Hamilton score was 22.08±7.35 (SD). The association of the incidence of extreme positions and the Hamilton score in our test group was highly significant (Spearman’s Rho=0.41; p=.001). In the control group (n=87), only 11 persons were found to display extreme positions, with a total of only 25. Conclusions Although this study has several limitations, such as the small sample or the use of a questionnaire in the validation procedure, the significant correlation of extreme positions and the Hamilton score indicate that altered modes of behavior as detected with the SSBA might be typical symptoms in a major depressive episode. PMID:21525807

  6. Sensitivity and specificity of the Major Depression Inventory in outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Cuijpers, Pim; Dekker, Jack; Noteboom, Annemieke; Smits, Niels; Peen, Jaap

    2007-01-01

    Background The Major Depression Inventory (MDI) is a new, brief, self-report measure for depression based on the DSM-system, which allows clinicians to assess the presence of a depressive disorder according to the DSM-IV, but also to assess the severity of the depressive symptoms. Methods We examined the sensitivity, specificity, and psychometric qualities of the MDI in a consecutive sample of 258 psychiatric outpatients. Of these patients, 120 had a mood disorder (70 major depression, 49 dysthymia). A total of 139 subjects had a comorbid axis-I diagnosis, and 91 subjects had a comorbid personality disorder. Results Crohnbach's alpha of the MDI was a satisfactory 0.89, and the correlation between the MDI and the depression subscale of the SCL-90 was 0.79 (p < .001). Subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD) had a significantly higher MDI score than subjects with anxiety disorders (but no MDD), dysthymias, bipolar, psychotic, other neurotic disorders, and subjects with relational problems. In ROC analysis we found that the area under the curve was 0.68 for the MDI. A good cut-off point for the MDI seems to be 26, with a sensitivity of 0.66, and a specificity of 0.63. The indication of the presence of MDD based on the MDI had a moderate agreement with the diagnosis made by a psychiatrist (kappa: 0.26). Conclusion The MDI is an attractive, brief depression inventory, which seems to be a reliable tool for assessing depression in psychiatric outpatients. PMID:17688685

  7. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of patients with a major depressive episode.

    PubMed

    Rothuber, Helfried; Mitterauer, Bernhard

    2011-05-01

    A major depressive episode diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria can be accompanied by symptoms that DSM-IV does not include. These symptoms are sometimes classified as comorbidities. Our study assessed altered behavioral modes during a major depressive episode; ie, if 1 or more modes of behavior operated less or even not at all ("never"), or if the operation of others was more frequent or even constant ("always"). We hypothesize that these altered behavioral modes, especially the extreme positions "never" (hypomodes) and "always" (hypermodes) might correlate with depression scores and thus represent a typical symptom of depression. We used the 35-item Salzburg Subjective Behavioral Analysis (SSBA) questionnaire to measure altered behavioral modes in 63 depressed patients and 87 non-depressed controls. Depression was assessed using the Hamilton Depression Scale. In our test group (n=63) we found a total of 888 extreme positions. The mean number of extreme positions per patient was 11.15±5.173 (SD). Extreme positions were found in all 35 behavioral modes. The mean Hamilton score was 22.08±7.35 (SD). The association of the incidence of extreme positions and the Hamilton score in our test group was highly significant (Spearman's Rho=0.41; p=.001). In the control group (n=87), only 11 persons were found to display extreme positions, with a total of only 25. Although this study has several limitations, such as the small sample or the use of a questionnaire in the validation procedure, the significant correlation of extreme positions and the Hamilton score indicate that altered modes of behavior as detected with the SSBA might be typical symptoms in a major depressive episode.

  8. Gender differences in substance abuse treatment and barriers to care among persons with substance use disorders with and without comorbid major depression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lian-Yu; Strain, Eric C; Crum, Rosa M; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    To compare substance use disorders (SUD) treatment patterns and barriers to such treatment among men and women with SUD with and without comorbid major depressive episodes (MDE) in a community sample. Using data from adult participants in the National Survey on Drug Use and Health 2005-2010, we investigated differences by sex in the association of MDE comorbidity with SUD on patterns of, perceived unmet need for, and the perceived barriers to SUD treatments. Compared with participants with SUD without MDE, both men and women with comorbid SUD and MDE were more likely to use SUD services or to report an unmet need for such treatment. Sex modified the association of comorbidity and treatment patterns: males with MDE comorbidity had a greater likelihood of emergency room visits and use of inpatient services than females. Barriers to substance treatment were remarkably similar for males and females in both the SUD without MDE group and with MDE group, with attitudinal factors being the most common barriers. Comorbidity with MDE seems to be an important predictor of service utilization and perceived need for SUD treatment in both men and women. The association of comorbidity with the use of some types of services, however, seems to vary according to sex. The findings have implications for the design of sex-specific SUD treatment programs.

  9. Proposed multigenic Composite Inheritance in major depression.

    PubMed

    Raymer, Katherine A; Waters, Robert F; Price, Catherine R

    2005-01-01

    Various rationale have been considered in the familial inheritance pattern of major depression ranging from simple one-gene Mendelian inheritance to pseudo-additive gene action. We instead predict broad genetic expressivity patterns in the progeny of parents where at least one parent has recurrent major depression. In keeping with this idea, we feel that recurrent major depression could involve an expression imbalance of "normal" genes either exclusively or along with allelic variation(s). The patterns of pathology are theoretically conceptualized as qualitative and quantitative, meaning that expressivity of the genetic pattern in these children may range from minimal to complete even among siblings. Thus, prediction of the particular genetic pattern expressed by a particular child might prove difficult. The complex inheritance pattern that we propose is referred to as Composite Inheritance. Composite Inheritance considers that both the up- and down-regulation of luxury genes and housekeeping genes are involved in this dichotomous qualitative inheritance pattern and also the wide quantitative expressivity. The luxury genes include such genes as those coding for the neurotransmitter transporters and receptors. The housekeeping genes found to date include those that code for proteins involved in gene transcription, secondary signaling systems, fatty acid metabolism and transport, and intracellular calcium homeostasis. Other luxury and housekeeping genes no doubt remain to be discovered. Our current research utilizes an empirical approach involving advanced genomics and specialized pattern recognition mathematics in families having at least one parent with recurrent major depression. The goal of our research is to develop a pattern recognition system of genetic expressivity in major depression to which prevention and early intervention may be tailored.

  10. Clinical management of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Mignon, Laurence; Stahl, Stephen M

    2009-11-01

    Individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) have high rates of disability, morbidity, and mortality, and are responsible for as many as one-fourth of all healthcare visits. Within primary care settings, 5% to 10% of adults have MDD, but only one-third of those are diagnosed. Thus, despite the devastating decrease in the quality-of-life and productivity of patients, depression is often under-diagnosed and therefore inadequately treated. Most patients with depression who are adherent with their treatment plan still experience residual symptoms, and require lon-term treatment. Adequately managing residual symptoms will hopefully lead to increased remission in these patients. This supplement focuses on the different types of residual symptoms that patients experience and suggests various treatment options.

  11. Natural course of adolescent major depressive disorder in a community sample: predictors of recurrence in young adults.

    PubMed

    Lewinsohn, P M; Rohde, P; Seeley, J R; Klein, D N; Gotlib, I H

    2000-10-01

    The primary purpose was to identify factors related to the recurrence of major depressive disorder during young adulthood (19-23 years of age) in a community sample of formerly depressed adolescents. A total of 274 participants with adolescent-onset major depressive disorder were assessed twice during adolescence and again after their 24th birthday. Lifetime psychiatric information was obtained from their first-degree relatives. Adolescent predictor variables included demographic characteristics, psychosocial variables, characteristics of adolescent major depressive disorder, comorbidity, family history of major depressive disorder and nonmood disorder, and antisocial and borderline personality disorder symptoms. Low levels of excessive emotional reliance, a single episode of major depressive disorder in adolescence, low proportion of family members with recurrent major depressive disorder, low levels of antisocial and borderline personality disorder symptoms, and a positive attributional style (males only) independently predicted which formerly depressed adolescents would remain free of future psychopathology. Female gender, multiple major depressive disorder episodes in adolescence, higher proportion of family members with recurrent major depressive disorder, elevated borderline personality disorder symptoms, and conflict with parents (females only) independently predicted recurrent major depressive disorder. Comorbid anxiety and substance use disorders in adolescence and elevated antisocial personality disorder symptoms independently distinguished adolescents who developed recurrent major depressive disorder comorbid with nonmood disorder from those who developed pure major depressive disorder. Formerly depressed adolescents with the risk factors identified in this study are at elevated risk for recurrence of major depressive disorder during young adulthood and therefore warrant continued monitoring and preventive or prophylactic treatment.

  12. Vortioxetine for the treatment of major depression.

    PubMed

    Dhir, A

    2013-12-01

    Vortioxetine (Lu-AA-21004; 1-[2-(2,4-dimethylphenylsulfanyl)phenyl]piperazine hydrobromide) is a novel orally active molecule that is being investigated by Lundbeck and Takeda for the treatment of major depression and generalized anxiety disorders. Vortioxetine has a unique "multi-modal" mechanism of action. It inhibits the activity of serotonin transporters and is an agonist of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor, partial agonist of 5-HT1B and antagonist of 5-HT3A, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptors. Vortioxetine has been effective in various animal models of depression and anxiety and clinical studies have shown the antidepressant and antianxiety properties of vortioxetine in a dose range of 5-20 mg/day. Vortioxetine reverses cognitive decline in patients with depression making it a unique molecule. The molecule lacks any serious side effects and drug-drug interactions. However, dose adjustments are required if vortioxetine is co-administered with rifampicin or bupropion. The molecule is under review by various regulatory agencies around the world for the treatment of major depression. Copyright 2013 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  13. [Depression and personality disorders: mutual influences].

    PubMed

    Rimlinger, B

    2010-12-01

    The first disposition described as having an influence on mood date back to ancient Greece. The current modeling of personality disorders is organized essentially in a category-specific logic (DSMIV, CIM-10) and dimensional logic ("big five", Eysenck model, Cloninger model, etc.). The heterogeneity of these evaluation tools affects the readability of the studies concerning the effects of comorbidity on depressive disorders. The frequency of the coexistence of personality disorders/depression (≥50%) which is associated with the severity of the depressive episodes, with pejorative evolutionary prognosis and resistance in treatments, appears to justify a reorganization of classifications in the future DSM-V.

  14. Serum proteomic profiling of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bot, M; Chan, M K; Jansen, R; Lamers, F; Vogelzangs, N; Steiner, J; Leweke, F M; Rothermundt, M; Cooper, J; Bahn, S; Penninx, B W J H

    2015-07-14

    Much has still to be learned about the molecular mechanisms of depression. This study aims to gain insight into contributing mechanisms by identifying serum proteins related to major depressive disorder (MDD) in a large psychiatric cohort study. Our sample consisted of 1589 participants of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety, comprising 687 individuals with current MDD (cMDD), 482 individuals with remitted MDD (rMDD) and 420 controls. We studied the relationship between MDD status and the levels of 171 serum proteins detected on a multi-analyte profiling platform using adjusted linear regression models. Pooled analyses of two independent validation cohorts (totaling 78 MDD cases and 156 controls) was carried out to validate our top markers. Twenty-eight analytes differed significantly between cMDD cases and controls (P < 0.05), whereas 10 partly overlapping markers differed significantly between rMDD cases and controls. Antidepressant medication use and comorbid anxiety status did not substantially impact on these findings. Sixteen of the cMDD-related markers had been assayed in the pooled validation cohorts, of which seven were associated with MDD. The analytes prominently associated with cMDD related to diverse cell communication and signal transduction processes (pancreatic polypeptide, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, ENRAGE, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and tenascin-C), immune response (growth-regulated alpha protein) and protein metabolism (von Willebrand factor). Several proteins were implicated in depression. Changes were more prominent in cMDD, suggesting that molecular alterations in serum are associated with acute depression symptomatology. These findings may help to establish serum-based biomarkers of depression and could improve our understanding of its pathophysiology.

  15. Fluoxetine and sertraline dosages in major depression.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, R; Gillespie, W; Altshuler, L

    1999-01-01

    In a retrospective study, we sought to determine medication dosages usually prescribed to obtain euthymia in 59 outpatients with a diagnosis of major depression treated with fluoxetine or sertraline. Charts of veterans admitted to the outpatient mental health clinic at the West Los Angeles Veterans Hospital with a diagnosis of major depression and treated with either fluoxetine or sertraline were reviewed. Progress notes were analyzed for a 6-month time period after the initiation of the medication treatment, and improvement was rated by a physician blind to the drug used for treatment. No significant differences were found in overall response rates between the fluoxetine (81% responders) and sertraline (76% responders) groups. Eighty-one percent of the fluoxetine responders compared to 32% of sertraline responders were at the manufacturer's recommended starting dose (MRSD) at the time of clinical response. One-third of patients receiving sertraline were started on or rapidly titrated to more than 50 mg/day. When only those patients receiving an adequate trial of sertraline at 50 mg were considered, 47% required a dose increase to achieve a remission. These data suggest that 50 mg of sertraline may be inadequate for some patients to achieve a resolution of symptoms of major depression and that many clinicians currently prescribe in a manner suggesting that they believe the MRSD is a suboptimal dosage.

  16. Early parental loss and depression history: associations with recent life stress in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Slavich, George M; Monroe, Scott M; Gotlib, Ian H

    2011-09-01

    Although exposure to early adversity and prior experiences with depression have both been associated with lower levels of precipitating life stress in depression, it is unclear whether these stress sensitization effects are similar for all types of stress or whether they are specific to stressors that may be particularly depressogenic, such as those involving interpersonal loss. To investigate this issue, we administered structured, interview-based measures of early adversity, depression history, and recent life stress to one hundred adults who were diagnosed with major depressive disorder. As predicted, individuals who experienced early parental loss or prolonged separation (i.e., lasting one year or longer) and persons with more lifetime episodes of depression became depressed following lower levels of life stress occurring in the etiologically-central time period of three months prior to onset of depression. Importantly, however, additional analyses revealed that these effects were unique to stressors involving interpersonal loss. These data highlight potential stressor-specific effects in stress sensitization and demonstrate for the first time that individuals exposed to early parental loss or separation, and persons with greater histories of MDD, may be selectively sensitized to stressors involving interpersonal loss. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Major depressive disorder and impulsive reactivity to emotion: toward a dual-process view of depression.

    PubMed

    Carver, Charles S; Johnson, Sheri L; Joormann, Jutta

    2013-09-01

    Dual-process theories of behaviour have been used to suggest that vulnerability to depression involves elevated reactivity to emotions. This study tests that idea, examining self-reported reactivity. Comparison between persons with at least one lifetime episode of major depressive disorder (lifetime MDD) and those without this diagnosis, controlling for symptoms of alcohol use (a potential externalizing confound) and current symptoms of depression (a potential state-dependent confound). Undergraduates (N = 120) completed a clinical interview to diagnose lifetime MDD and a series of self-reports bearing on diverse aspects of self-control, including reactivity to emotion. Thirty-four people were diagnosed with lifetime MDD; 86 did not meet criteria for MDD. The groups were then compared on three factors underlying the scales assessing self-control. The MDD group had higher scores than controls on the two factors that reflect impulsive reactivity to diverse emotions, including emotions that are positive in valence. These effects were not explained by associations with either externalizing symptoms or current depressive symptoms. Reflexive reactivity to emotions characterizes depression, in addition to some externalizing problems, and it may deserve study as a potential trans-diagnostic feature. Reflexive reactivity to emotions characterizes persons diagnosed with major depressive disorder. Findings suggest desirability of focusing treatment partly on management of reflexive reactions to emotions. Measures were self-reports, rather than behavioural responses to emotions. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  18. St. John's Wort for Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Alicia Ruelaz; Hempel, Susanne; Apaydin, Eric; Shanman, Roberta M.; Booth, Marika; Miles, Jeremy N. V.; Sorbero, Melony E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract RAND researchers conducted a systematic review that synthesized evidence from randomized controlled trials of St. John's wort (SJW)—used adjunctively or as monotherapy—to provide estimates of its efficacy and safety in treating adults with major depressive disorder. Outcomes of interest included changes in depressive symptomatology, quality of life, and adverse effects. Efficacy meta-analyses used the Hartung-Knapp-Sidik-Jonkman method for random-effects models. Quality of evidence was assessed using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. In total, 35 studies met inclusion criteria. There is moderate evidence, due to unexplained heterogeneity between studies, that depression improvement based on the number of treatment responders and depression scale scores favors SJW over placebo, and results are comparable to antidepressants. The existing evidence is based on studies testing SJW as monotherapy; there is a lack of evidence for SJW given as adjunct therapy to standard antidepressant therapy. We found no systematic difference between SJW extracts, but head-to-head trials are missing; LI 160 (0.3% hypericin, 1–4% hyperforin) was the extract with the greatest number of studies. Only two trials assessed quality of life. SJW adverse events reported in included trials were comparable to placebo, and were fewer compared with antidepressant medication; however, adverse event assessments were limited, and thus we have limited confidence in this conclusion. PMID:28083422

  19. Disrupted habenula function in major depression

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, R P; Nord, C L; Seymour, B; Thomas, D L; Dayan, P; Pilling, S; Roiser, J P

    2017-01-01

    The habenula is a small, evolutionarily conserved brain structure that plays a central role in aversive processing and is hypothesised to be hyperactive in depression, contributing to the generation of symptoms such as anhedonia. However, habenula responses during aversive processing have yet to be reported in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD). Unmedicated and currently depressed MDD patients (N=25, aged 18–52 years) and healthy volunteers (N=25, aged 19–52 years) completed a passive (Pavlovian) conditioning task with appetitive (monetary gain) and aversive (monetary loss and electric shock) outcomes during high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging; data were analysed using computational modelling. Arterial spin labelling was used to index resting-state perfusion and high-resolution anatomical images were used to assess habenula volume. In healthy volunteers, habenula activation increased as conditioned stimuli (CSs) became more strongly associated with electric shocks. This pattern was significantly different in MDD subjects, for whom habenula activation decreased significantly with increasing association between CSs and electric shocks. Individual differences in habenula volume were negatively associated with symptoms of anhedonia across both groups. MDD subjects exhibited abnormal negative task-related (phasic) habenula responses during primary aversive conditioning. The direction of this effect is opposite to that predicted by contemporary theoretical accounts of depression based on findings in animal models. We speculate that the negative habenula responses we observed may result in the loss of the capacity to actively avoid negative cues in MDD, which could lead to excessive negative focus. PMID:27240528

  20. Disrupted habenula function in major depression.

    PubMed

    Lawson, R P; Nord, C L; Seymour, B; Thomas, D L; Dayan, P; Pilling, S; Roiser, J P

    2017-02-01

    The habenula is a small, evolutionarily conserved brain structure that plays a central role in aversive processing and is hypothesised to be hyperactive in depression, contributing to the generation of symptoms such as anhedonia. However, habenula responses during aversive processing have yet to be reported in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD). Unmedicated and currently depressed MDD patients (N=25, aged 18-52 years) and healthy volunteers (N=25, aged 19-52 years) completed a passive (Pavlovian) conditioning task with appetitive (monetary gain) and aversive (monetary loss and electric shock) outcomes during high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging; data were analysed using computational modelling. Arterial spin labelling was used to index resting-state perfusion and high-resolution anatomical images were used to assess habenula volume. In healthy volunteers, habenula activation increased as conditioned stimuli (CSs) became more strongly associated with electric shocks. This pattern was significantly different in MDD subjects, for whom habenula activation decreased significantly with increasing association between CSs and electric shocks. Individual differences in habenula volume were negatively associated with symptoms of anhedonia across both groups. MDD subjects exhibited abnormal negative task-related (phasic) habenula responses during primary aversive conditioning. The direction of this effect is opposite to that predicted by contemporary theoretical accounts of depression based on findings in animal models. We speculate that the negative habenula responses we observed may result in the loss of the capacity to actively avoid negative cues in MDD, which could lead to excessive negative focus.

  1. Clinical efficacy of reboxetine in major depression.

    PubMed

    Schatzberg, A F

    2000-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed the advent of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) as first-line treatments for major depression. Still, there is considerable debate as to whether these agents are as effective or as potent as the first-generation tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) or the mixed reuptake inhibitor, venlafaxine, all of which exert considerable effect on norepinephrine (NE) reuptake. Recently, reboxetine, a selective NE reuptake inhibitor (selective NRI), has been introduced in Europe. This drug has only a minimal affinity for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and therefore causes less dry mouth, constipation, or other such effects than do the TCAs. Reboxetine does not block serotonin reuptake or alpha1 receptors and, thus, does not appear to produce significant nausea, diarrhea, or hypotension. Unlike other antidepressants, reboxetine appears to be nonsedating. Data on acute and long-term clinical efficacy and safety from double-blind, placebo-controlled, and active comparator studies with reboxetine are reviewed. These studies indicate that reboxetine is significantly more effective than placebo and as effective as fluoxetine in reducing depressive symptoms. Improvements in social adjustments were reported to be more favorable with reboxetine than with fluoxetine. Further, data from controlled clinical trials have shown that the side effect profile for reboxetine is relatively benign. The clinical implications of studies on reboxetine are discussed with an eye toward understanding the potential role NE reuptake blockers may play in the treatment of patients with major depression.

  2. Psychosocial and neurocognitive profiles in depressed patients with major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Godard, Julie; Grondin, Simon; Baruch, Philippe; Lafleur, Martin F

    2011-12-30

    Previous studies have revealed psychosocial and cognitive impairments in patients during depression. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with major depression (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) differ in psychosocial and neurocognitive profiles. A second aim was to examine whether cognitive impairments are homogeneous among depressed patients. Patients with MDD (n=16) and BD (n=14) were enrolled during a major depressive episode. About half of them had comorbidities, including personality, substance use, and anxiety disorders. Information was collected about symptomatology and psychosocial functioning, whereas an exhaustive neuropsychological battery was administered to assess cognition. During a depressive episode, MDD and BD patients had global psychosocial dysfunction, characterized by occupational and relational impairments. A cognitive slowing was also observed, as well as deficits related to alertness, spontaneous flexibility, sustained and divided attention. Moreover, severity of depression and cognitive functions were significantly associated with psychosocial functioning. In the case of severe mood disorders, psychosocial and neurocognitive functioning seem similar among MDD and BD patients during a depressive episode. In addition to an altered daily functioning, the neurocognitive profile was heterogeneous with regard to the nature and extent of cognitive deficits. Executive functions, as well as verbal learning and memory, were preserved better than attentional processes.

  3. Depressotypic Cognitive Patterns in Major Depression and Conjugal Bereavement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Paul J.; Fleming, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    Investigated differences among both uncomplicated and depressed reactions to conjugal bereavement and major depression unrelated to widowhood. Both uncomplicated and depressed bereaved evidenced less intense depressive mood, and less dysfunctional pattern of depressotypic cognition, than did nonbereaved psychiatric depressed. Concluded that…

  4. Interpersonal Pathoplasticity in the Course of Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Nicole M.; Ansell, Emily B.; Wright, Aidan G.C.; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Thomas, Katherine M.; Pinto, Anthony; Markowitz, John C.; Sanislow, Charles A.; Zanarini, Mary C.; Shea, M. Tracie; Morey, Leslie C.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Skodol, Andrew E.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The identification of reliable predictors of course in major depressive disorder (MDD) has been difficult. Evidence suggests that the co-occurrence of personality pathology is associated with longer time to MDD remission. Interpersonal pathoplasticity, the mutually influencing non-etiological relationship between psychopathology and interpersonal traits, offers an avenue for examining specific personality vulnerabilities that may be associated with depressive course. Method This study examined 312 participants with and without a co-occurring personality disorder diagnosis who met criteria for a current MDD episode at baseline and were followed for 10 years in the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study (CLPS). Results Latent profile analysis (LPA) identified six interpersonal groups (extraverted, dominant, arrogant, cold, submissive, and unassuming) and circular statistical profile analysis confirmed group interpersonal distinctiveness. No significant differences between groups were found in comorbid Axis I disorders or baseline MDD severity. Chronicity and functioning analyses found significantly greater chronicity and poorer functioning in individuals with a submissive interpersonal style over 10 years. Conclusions These findings support the relevance of interpersonal pathoplasticity in depressive course and that this heterogeneity has clinical significance. This study is the first to use LPA and circular profiles to examine interpersonal heterogeneity within a diagnostic group. The implications of these findings for therapeutic intervention, interpersonal functioning, and psychopathological course are discussed. PMID:22103955

  5. Clinical features of soft bipolarity in major depressive inpatients.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Takeshi; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Shimada, Iwao; Mabuchi, Mayuko; Motonaga, Takuro; Ohtani, Toshiyuki; Tochigi, Mamoru; Kato, Nobumasa; Nanko, Shinichiro

    2006-10-01

    Because of the difficulties of ascertaining episode of hypomania by past history of the patients, it is of clinical value to find variables which predict the development of bipolar II disorder in depressive patients. Taking advantage of relatively long hospitalization, the authors tried to elucidate fine clinical features of the soft bipolarity. The subjects were 39 patients with Major Depressive Episode, diagnosed according to the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual criteria. Among them, 15 patients were diagnosed as bipolar II disorder (BPII), whereas 24 patients were with unipolar depression (UP), using a structured clinical interview to assess the mood spectrum (SCI-MOODS). In addition to ordinary clinical and demographic variables, the authors studied fine symptomatology of depression, premorbid personality, and interpersonal relationship. Continuous variables were analyzed by t-test. Categorical variables were tested by chi2 analysis. In terms of premorbid personality, manic type (Zerssen) was found more frequently in BPII (UP 2/24, BPII 9/15, P < 0.05). Patients with BPII tended to show apparently quick disappearance of depressive symptoms (UP 2/24, BPII 9/15, P = 0.01). The most prominent result was a high prevalence of comorbidity of borderline personality disorder (BPD) among BPII (UP 0/24, BPII 6/15, P = 0.02). As Akiskal indicated that mood lability represents the most powerful predictor of hypomanias, patients with BPII showed quick response in mood to admission. The current subjects with BPII had high frequency of manic type of premorbid personality, indicating the usefulness of this variable for the prediction of hypomanias. Finally, the authors could observe development of BPD during hospitalization exclusively among BPII, to support the possibility of BPD as a state effect of BPII.

  6. Epigenetic Modifications of Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Kathleen; Molina-Márquez, Ana María; Saavedra, Nicolás; Zambrano, Tomás; Salazar, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a chronic disease whose neurological basis and pathophysiology remain poorly understood. Initially, it was proposed that genetic variations were responsible for the development of this disease. Nevertheless, several studies within the last decade have provided evidence suggesting that environmental factors play an important role in MDD pathophysiology. Alterations in epigenetics mechanism, such as DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA expression could favor MDD advance in response to stressful experiences and environmental factors. The aim of this review is to describe genetic alterations, and particularly altered epigenetic mechanisms, that could be determinants for MDD progress, and how these alterations may arise as useful screening, diagnosis and treatment monitoring biomarkers of depressive disorders. PMID:27527165

  7. Epigenetic Modifications of Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Kathleen; Molina-Márquez, Ana María; Saavedra, Nicolás; Zambrano, Tomás; Salazar, Luis A

    2016-08-05

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a chronic disease whose neurological basis and pathophysiology remain poorly understood. Initially, it was proposed that genetic variations were responsible for the development of this disease. Nevertheless, several studies within the last decade have provided evidence suggesting that environmental factors play an important role in MDD pathophysiology. Alterations in epigenetics mechanism, such as DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA expression could favor MDD advance in response to stressful experiences and environmental factors. The aim of this review is to describe genetic alterations, and particularly altered epigenetic mechanisms, that could be determinants for MDD progress, and how these alterations may arise as useful screening, diagnosis and treatment monitoring biomarkers of depressive disorders.

  8. Atypical depressive symptoms as a predictor of treatment response to exercise in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Rethorst, Chad D; Tu, Jian; Carmody, Thomas J; Greer, Tracy L; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2016-08-01

    Effective treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) will require the development of alternative treatments and the ability for clinicians to match patients with the treatment likely to produce the greatest effect. We examined atypical depression subtype as a predictor of treatment response to aerobic exercise augmentation in persons with non-remitted MDD. Our results revealed a small-to-moderate effect, particularly in a group assigned to high-dose exercise (semi-partial eta-squared =0.0335, p=0.0735), indicating that those with atypical depression tended to have larger treatment response to exercise. Through this hypothesis-generating analysis, we indicate the need for research to examine depression subtype, along with other demographic, clinical and biological factors as predictors of treatment response to exercise.

  9. Temporal discounting in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Pulcu, E; Trotter, P D; Thomas, E J; McFarquhar, M; Juhasz, G; Sahakian, B J; Deakin, J F W; Zahn, R; Anderson, I M; Elliott, R

    2014-07-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with abnormalities in financial reward processing. Previous research suggests that patients with MDD show reduced sensitivity to frequency of financial rewards. However, there is a lack of conclusive evidence from studies investigating the evaluation of financial rewards over time, an important aspect of reward processing that influences the way people plan long-term investments. Beck's cognitive model posits that patients with MDD hold a negative view of the future that may influence the amount of resources patients are willing to invest into their future selves. We administered a delay discounting task to 82 participants: 29 healthy controls, 29 unmedicated participants with fully remitted MDD (rMDD) and 24 participants with current MDD (11 on medication). Patients with current MDD, relative to remitted patients and healthy subjects, discounted large-sized future rewards at a significantly higher rate and were insensitive to changes in reward size from medium to large. There was a main effect of clinical group on discounting rates for large-sized rewards, and discounting rates for large-sized rewards correlated with severity of depressive symptoms, particularly hopelessness. Higher discounting of delayed rewards in MDD seems to be state dependent and may be a reflection of depressive symptoms, specifically hopelessness. Discounting distant rewards at a higher rate means that patients are more likely to choose immediate financial options. Such impairments related to long-term investment planning may be important for understanding value-based decision making in MDD, and contribute to ongoing functional impairment.

  10. History of major depressive disorder and endothelial function in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julie A; Tennen, Howard; Mansoor, George A; Abbott, Gina

    2006-01-01

    To determine whether history of depression is associated with endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in postmenopausal women. Thirty-nine postmenopausal women with no known or suspected cardiovascular disease participated. Nineteen had a positive lifetime history of major depressive disorder, and 20 were never depressed. None were currently depressed, and all had been free of major depressive disorder and antidepressant medications for > or =1 year. History of depression was assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, enhanced by a modified version of the timeline follow-back method. Current depressive symptoms were measured with the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D). Brachial artery FMD was measured with ultrasound and calculated as percent dilation from baseline. After controlling for current subclinical depressive symptoms, ethnicity, hormone replacement therapy, and presence of the metabolic syndrome, previously depressed women showed significantly and clinically meaningful lower FMD than never depressed women. Controlling the same covariates, there was a dose-response relationship between number of depressive episodes and FMD. Examination of FMD means showed a significant negative correlation between number of depressive episodes and FMD. In postmenopausal women, depression continues to show a negative relationship to endothelial functioning even after years of remission. This relationship is not accounted for by residual depressive symptoms. Implications pertain to exclusion of previously depressed persons from control groups in research exploring the relationship between depression and cardiovascular disease.

  11. Biomarkers for Major Depressive Disorder: Economic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Bogavac-Stanojevic, Natasa; Lakic, Dragana

    2016-11-01

    Preclinical Research Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a major psychiatric illness and it is predicted to be the second leading cause of disability by 2020 with a lifetime prevalence of about 13%. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly used therapeutic class for MDD. However, response to SSRI treatment varies considerably between patients. Biomarkers of treatment response may enable clinicians to target the appropriate drug for each patient. Biomarkers need to have accuracy in real life, sensitivity, specificity, and relevance to depression. Introduction of MDD biomarkers into the health care system can increase the overall cost of clinical diagnosis of patients. Because of that, decisions to allocate health research funding must be based on drug effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. The assessment of MDD biomarkers should include reliable evidence of associated drug effectiveness, adverse events and consequences (reduced productivity and quality of life, disability) and effectiveness of alternative approaches, other drug classes or behavioral or alternative therapies. In addition, all the variables included in an economic model (probabilities, outcomes, and costs) should be based on reliable evidence gained from the literature-ideally meta-analyses-and the evidence should also be determined by informed and specific expert opinion. Early assessment can guide decisions about whether or not to continue test development, and ideally to optimize the process. Drug Dev Res 77 : 374-378, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. RSA Reactivity in Current and Remitted Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bylsma, Lauren M.; Salomon, Kristen; Taylor-Clift, April; Morris, Bethany H.; Rottenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Low resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) levels and blunted RSA reactivity are thought to index impaired emotion regulation capacity. Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) has been associated with abberant RSA reactivity and recovery to a speech stressor task relative to healthy controls. Whether impaired RSA functioning reflects aspects of the depressed mood state or a stable vulnerability marker for depression is unknown. Methods We compared resting RSA and RSA reactivity between individuals with MDD (n=49), remitted depression (RMD, n=24), and healthy controls (n=45). ECG data were collected during a resting baseline, a paced-breathing baseline, and two reactivity tasks (speech stressor, cold exposure). Results A group by time quadratic effect emerged (F=4.36(2,109), p=.015) for RSA across phases of the speech stressor (baseline, instruction, preparation, speech, recovery). Follow-up analyses revealed that those with MDD uniquely exhibited blunted RSA reactivity, whereas RMD and controls both exhibited normal task-related vagal withdrawal and post-task recovery. The group by time interaction remained after covariation for age, sex, waist circumference, physical activity, and respiration, but not sleep quality. Conclusions These results provide new evidence that abberant RSA reactivity marks features that track the depressed state, such as poor sleep, rather than a stable trait evident among asymtomatic persons. PMID:24367127

  13. Desvenlafaxine succinate for major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Sproule, Beth A; Hazra, Monica; Pollock, Bruce G

    2008-07-01

    Desvenlafaxine (O-desmethylvenlafaxine) is the major active metabolite of venlafaxine. Desvenlafaxine succinate is now undergoing active evaluation for its therapeutic efficacy in a variety of disorders, including major depressive disorder, vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause, fibromyalgia and diabetic neuropathy. Desvenlafaxine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) with similar activity to its parent compound venlafaxine, and little affinity for other brain targets, including muscarinic, cholinergic, histamine H(1) and alpha-adrenergic receptors. Desvenlafaxine has linear pharmacokinetics, low protein binding, a half-life of approximately 10 hours and is metabolized primarily via glucuronidation, and to a minor extent through CYP3A4. The desvenlafaxine succinate formulation appears to have good oral bioavailability. Clearance rates are reduced in the elderly, those with severe renal dysfunction and those with moderate to severe hepatic dysfunction, which may require dosage adjustments. Three published clinical trials have shown supportive but mixed results for the efficacy of desvenlafaxine in the treatment of major depressive disorder with daily doses ranging from 100 mg to 400 mg. One published clinical trial has shown mixed results for the efficacy of desvenlafaxine in the treatment of vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause with daily doses ranging from 50 mg to 200 mg. In these four clinical trials, desvenlafaxine was associated with several mild adverse effects, with the most common effect being nausea. Less common, but more serious, adverse effects reported in these trials included hypertension, QTc interval prolongation, exacerbation of ischemic cardiac disease, elevated lipids and elevated liver enzymes. The exact nature of these serious adverse effects, including the prevalence, clinical significance and potential risk factors, still needs to be fully elucidated. Desvenlafaxine has a low propensity for pharmacokinetic

  14. Cortical thickness differences between bipolar depression and major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Martin J; Chhetry, Binod Thapa; Oquendo, Maria A; Sublette, M Elizabeth; Sullivan, Gregory; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Bipolar disorder (BD) is a psychiatric disorder with high morbidity and mortality that cannot be distinguished from major depressive disorder (MDD) until the first manic episode. A biomarker able to differentiate BD and MDD could help clinicians avoid risks of treating BD with antidepressants without mood stabilizers. Methods Cortical thickness differences were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging in BD depressed patients (n = 18), MDD depressed patients (n = 56), and healthy volunteers (HVs) (n = 54). A general linear model identified clusters of cortical thickness difference between diagnostic groups. Results Compared to the HV group, the BD group had decreased cortical thickness in six regions, after controlling for age and sex, located within frontal and parietal lobes, and posterior cingulate cortex. Mean cortical thickness changes in clusters ranged from 7.6–9.6% (cluster wise p-values from 1.0 e−4 to 0.037). When compared to MDD, three clusters of lower cortical thickness in BD were identified that overlapped with clusters that differentiated the BD and HV groups. Mean cortical thickness changes in the clusters ranged from 7.5–8.2% (cluster wise p-values from 1.0 e−4 to 0.023). The difference in cortical thickness was more pronounced when the subgroup of subjects with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) was compared to the MDD group. Conclusions Cortical thickness patterns were distinct between BD and MDD. These results are a step toward developing an imaging test to differentiate the two disorders. PMID:24428430

  15. Big Five personality characteristics are associated with depression subtypes and symptom dimensions of depression in older adults.

    PubMed

    Koorevaar, A M L; Hegeman, J M; Lamers, F; Dhondt, A D F; van der Mast, R C; Stek, M L; Comijs, H C

    2017-01-16

    This study examined the associations of personality characteristics with both subtypes and symptom dimensions of depression in older adults. Three hundred and seventy-eight depressed older adults participated in the Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons. Personality characteristics were assessed by the NEO-Five Factor Inventory. Subtypes and symptom dimensions of depression were determined using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS). Multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the associations between personality and atypical, melancholic, and unspecified subtypes of major depression. Linear regression analyses examined the associations between personality and the IDS mood, somatic, and motivation symptom dimensions. The analyses were adjusted for confounders and additionally adjusted for depression severity. Neuroticism, Extraversion, Conscientiousness, and Agreeableness were associated with specified (atypical or melancholic) major depression compared with unspecified major depression in the bivariate analyses but lost their significance after adjustments for functional limitations and severity of depression. Neuroticism was positively associated with the IDS mood and motivation symptom dimensions, also in the adjusted models. Further, Extraversion and Agreeableness were negatively associated with the IDS mood symptom dimension, and Extraversion and Conscientiousness were negatively associated with the IDS motivation symptom dimension. None was associated with the IDS somatic symptom dimension. This study demonstrated the association of personality characteristics with mood and motivational symptoms of late-life depression. The lacking ability of personality to differentiate between melancholic and atypical depression seems to be largely explained by severity of depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Generalized Anxiety and Major Depressive syndrome ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Objective: Environmental exposure to manganese (Mn) may cause generalized anxiety (GA) and major depression (MD) in residents living in Mn-exposed areas. Marietta and East Liverpool are two Ohio towns identified as having elevated levels of Mn. The objective was to determine if levels of Mn exposure were associated with levels of GA and MD.Participants and methods: 186 participants (Mean age: 55.0 ± 10.80) were examined. Levels of air-Mn were assessed over a period of ten years using U.S. EPA’s AERMOD dispersion model. Average air-Mn exposure was 0.53 μg/m3 in the two towns. The GA syndrome was comprised of anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, and phobic scales from the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90-R). The MD syndrome was comprised of depression, anxiety, and psychoticism scales also from the SCL-90-R. Linear regression models were used to determine the relationship between Mn and GA, MD and the specific components of each.Results: Elevated air-Mn was associated with GA (β= 0.240, p=0.002), and MD (β= 0.202, p=0.011). Air-Mn was associated with specific components of GA anxiety (β= 0.255, p=0.001), phobic anxiety (β= 0.159, p=0.046), and obsessive-compulsive (β= 0.197, p=0.013). Similarly, components of MD syndrome suggested an association as well: depression (β= 0.180, p=0.023), anxiety (β= 0.255, p=0.001), and psychoticism (β= 0.188, p=0.018). Conclusions: The results suggest that residents with elevated exposure to environmental Mn have elevated levels of

  17. Glutamate Metabolism in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Chadi G.; Jiang, Lihong; De Feyter, Henk M.; Fasula, Madonna; Krystal, John H.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Mason, Graeme F.; Sanacora, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Objective Emerging evidence suggests abnormalities in amino acid neurotransmitter function and impaired energy metabolism contribute to the underlying pathophysiology of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). To test whether impairments in energetics and glutamate neurotransmitter cycling are present in MDD we used in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C MRS) to measure these fluxes in individuals diagnosed with MDD relative to non-depressed subjects. Method 1H MRS and 13C MRS data were collected on 23 medication-free MDD and 17 healthy subjects. 1H MRS provided total glutamate and GABA concentrations, and 13C MRS, coupled with intravenous infusion of [1-13C]-glucose, provided measures of the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle (VTCAN) for mitochondrial energy production, GABA synthesis, and glutamate/glutamine cycling, from voxels placed in the occipital cortex. Results Our main finding was that mitochondrial energy production of glutamatergic neurons was reduced by 26% in MDD subjects (t = 2.57, p = 0.01). Paradoxically we found no difference in the rate of glutamate/glutamine cycle (Vcycle). We also found a significant correlation between glutamate concentrations and Vcycle considering the total sample. Conclusions We interpret the reduction in mitochondrial energy production as being due to either mitochondrial dysfunction or a reduction in proper neuronal input or synaptic strength. Future MRS studies could help distinguish these possibilities. PMID:25073688

  18. Major depressive disorder treatment guidelines in Japan.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Teruhiko

    2010-01-01

    Japanese treatment guidelines, consensus guidelines, and treatment algorithms for managing patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) have been developed and/or updated in the past decade. The treatment guidelines, which are evidence-based, are the most detailed of the 3 types of guidance; they describe how to establish a treatment plan, treatment methods, and special problems such as intractable depression and suicide. The Japanese consensus guidelines were compiled from the results of a survey about treatment choices in MDD that was sent to members of the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors were the most common first-line treatments, followed by tricyclic antidepressants and tetracyclic antidepressants. The consensus guidelines are not evidence-based but are practical and easy to use. The Japanese treatment algorithm for MDD is a flowchart created in conjunction with the International Psychopharmacology Algorithm Project. The flowchart shows steps in treatment both for patients who respond to initial treatment and for those who need several trials of treatment. These 3 forms of guidance for managing patients with MDD in Japan are reviewed.

  19. Maternal Depressive Symptoms in Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder: Relationship to Acute Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Mayes, Taryn; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Tao, Rongrong; Carmody, Thomas; Emslie, Graham J.

    2008-01-01

    A study examined maternal depressive symptoms at the beginning and end of acute pediatric treatment of children with major depressive disorder (MDD). Results suggested a direct and possible reciprocal association between maternal and child depression severity.

  20. Maternal Depressive Symptoms in Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder: Relationship to Acute Treatment Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Mayes, Taryn; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Tao, Rongrong; Carmody, Thomas; Emslie, Graham J.

    2008-01-01

    A study examined maternal depressive symptoms at the beginning and end of acute pediatric treatment of children with major depressive disorder (MDD). Results suggested a direct and possible reciprocal association between maternal and child depression severity.

  1. Advances in biomarkers of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tiao-Lai; Lin, Chin-Chuen

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by mood, vegetative, cognitive, and even psychotic symptoms and signs that can cause substantial impairments in quality of life and functioning. Biomarkers are measurable indicators that could help diagnosing MDD or predicting treatment response. In this chapter, lipid profiles, immune/inflammation, and neurotrophic factor pathways that have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of MDD are discussed. Then, pharmacogenetics and epigenetics of serotonin transport and its metabolism pathway, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and abnormality of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis also revealed new biomarkers. Lastly, new techniques, such as proteomics and metabolomics, which allow researchers to approach the studying of MDD with new directions and make new discoveries are addressed. In the future, more data are needed regarding pathophysiology of MDD, including protein levels, single nucleotide polymorphism, epigenetic regulation, and clinical data in order to better identify reliable and consistent biomarkers for diagnosis, treatment choice, and outcome prediction.

  2. [Sequence learning in major depressive disorder].

    PubMed

    Borbély-Ipkovich, Emöke; Németh, Dezsö; Janacsek, Karolina; Gonda, Xénia

    2014-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric diagnoses, accompanied by several psychological, behavioural and emotional symptoms, and in addition to the symptoms affecting the quality of life, it can lead to severe consequences, including suicide. Sequence learning plays a key role in adapting to the environment, neural plasticity, first language acquisition, social learning and skills, at the same time it defines the behaviour of the patient and also therapeutic possibilities. The aim of this paper is to review sequence learning and its consolidation in MDD. We know little about the effects of mood disorders on sequence learning; the results are contradictory, therefore, further studies are needed to test the effects of MDD on sequence learning and on the consolidation of implicitly acquired sequence knowledge.

  3. Sheehan's Syndrome Presenting as Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Mehmood I; Mushtaq, Mohsin Bin; Qazi, Iram; Yousuf, Sameena; Rashid, Aaliya

    2015-01-01

    Sheehan's syndrome or Simmond's disease is a rare endocrine disorder seen in clinical practice. The clinical spectrum is diverse and a high index of suspicion together with a good clinical acumen and proper diagnostic approach helps in early diagnosis and prompt treatment of this endocrinopathy. Sheehan's syndrome presenting as a major depressive disorder finds less mention in the literature. The patient discussed here is a 45-year-old female who had been on antidepressants and psychiatry follow up for a long time until she presented to our Out Patient Department (OPD), where she was evaluated in detail and diagnosed as a case of Sheehan's syndrome. The patient is doing well and is on a regular follow-up with us. Further studies are required to demystify the strength of this association in more detail and to elucidate the possible underlying mechanism.

  4. Suicide: risk factors and prevention in refractory major depression.

    PubMed

    Oquendo, M A; Malone, K M; Mann, J J

    1997-01-01

    The literature regarding risk factors for suicidal behavior in the context of major depressive episode is reviewed. An organized framework for prevention strategies is provided. Risk factors for suicide in major depression can be organized according to whether their effect is on the threshold for suicidal acts or whether they serve mainly as triggers or precipitants of suicidal acts. For patients sufficiently depressed to present for evaluation and treatment, severity of depression is a poor guide to risk for suicidal acts. The best predictors relate to the threshold or predisposition to suicidal acts in response to major depression. Although available literature on suicidal behavior focuses on major depression in general, the findings may be usefully applied in refractory depression. Guidelines for assessment and management of suicidal behavior in major depression are offered.

  5. Autobiographical Memory Specificity in Major Depression Treated With Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Jelovac, Ana; OʼConnor, Stephanie; McCarron, Shane; McLoughlin, Declan M

    2016-03-01

    Autobiographical memory in major depression is characterized by reduced specificity, which reflects the tendency to summarize categories of events rather than recall specific instances of events situated in a time and place. This widely studied cognitive marker for depression has not been extensively examined in patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). We conducted a retrospective chart review of a naturalistic cohort of patients receiving a course of brief-pulse predominantly bitemporal ECT for a major depressive episode. Patients completed the recent life section of the Kopelman Autobiographical Memory Interview (AMI) at pre-ECT baseline, end of treatment course, and 3-month follow-up as part of routine clinical practice. Mood was assessed using the 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. We identified 48 patients (mean age, 61.6; female, 62.5%) meeting inclusion criteria. A total of 77.1% of patients responded to the ECT course, 29.7% subsequently relapsed. There were no significant changes over time on either AMI total score or semantic and episodic subscales. However, patients were markedly impaired on episodic autobiographical memory compared with the normative sample at all 3 assessment points, whereas personal semantic memory recall was normal. Specificity of episodic autobiographical memory at baseline did not predict response to ECT or likelihood of relapse. We found reduced specificity of episodic autobiographical memory in depressed patients before ECT, which persisted at long-term follow-up despite significant improvement in mood. The finding of no detectable retrograde amnesia likely reflects lack of sensitivity of the recent life section of the AMI to detect ECT-induced changes.

  6. Illness representations of depression and perceptions of the helpfulness of social support: comparing depressed and never-depressed persons.

    PubMed

    Vollmann, Manja; Scharloo, Margreet; Salewski, Christel; Dienst, Alexander; Schonauer, Klaus; Renner, Britta

    2010-09-01

    Interactions between depressed persons and persons within their social network are often characterized by misunderstanding and unsuccessful social support attempts. These interpersonal problems could be fostered by discrepancies between depressed and never-depressed persons' illness representations of depression and/or discrepancies in the perceived helpfulness of supportive behaviors. Illness representations of depression (IPQ-R) and perceptions of the helpfulness of different social support behaviors (ISU-DYA and ISAD) were assessed in 41 currently depressed persons and 58 persons without a history of depression. Never-depressed persons perceived depression as more controllable by treatment and as less emotionally impairing than depressed persons, but also as having more severe consequences. Never-depressed persons considered activation-oriented support (motivation to approach problems) as more helpful and protection-oriented support (allowance to draw back) as less helpful in comparison to depressed persons. Data were collected in unrelated samples of depressed and never-depressed persons. Discrepancies in illness representations and perceptions of the helpfulness of social support do exist and may be the origin of problematic social interactions between depressed patients and persons within their social network. Therapeutic interventions should address the issue of conflicting perceptions and encourage depressed patients to acknowledge and discuss this topic within their social network. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Childhood depression and adult personality disorder: alternative pathways of continuity.

    PubMed

    Kasen, S; Cohen, P; Skodol, A E; Johnson, J G; Smailes, E; Brook, J S

    2001-03-01

    This study extends previous findings of the risks posed by childhood major depressive disorder and other psychopathological features for later personality disorder (PD) in a random sample of 551 youths. Self-reports and mother reports were used to evaluate DSM-III-R (Axes I and II) psychiatric disorders at mean ages of 12.7, 15.2, and 21.1 years. Logistic regression was used to examine the independent effects of major depressive disorder in childhood or adolescence on 10 PDs in young adulthood. Odds of dependent, antisocial, passive-aggressive, and histrionic PDs increased by more than 13, 10, 7, and 3 times, respectively, given prior major depressive disorder. Those effects were independent of age, sex, disadvantaged socioeconomic status, a history of child maltreatment, nonintact family status, parental conflict, preexisting PD in adolescence, and other childhood or adolescent Axis I psychopathological features, including disruptive and anxiety disorders. In addition, odds of schizoid and narcissistic PD increased by almost 6 times and odds of antisocial PD increased by almost 5 times given a prior disruptive disorder, and odds of paranoid PD increased by 4 times given a prior anxiety disorder. Personality disorders may represent alternative pathways of continuity for major depressive disorder and other Axis I disorders across the child-adult transition.

  8. Subtypes of major depression in substance dependence.

    PubMed

    Niciu, Mark J; Chan, Grace; Gelernter, Joel; Arias, Albert J; Douglas, Kara; Weiss, Roger; Anton, Raymond F; Farrer, Lindsay; Cubells, Joseph F; Kranzler, Henry R

    2009-10-01

    This study evaluated features that differentiate subtypes of major depressive episode (MDE) in the context of substance dependence (SD). Design  Secondary data analysis using pooled data from family-based and case-control genetic studies of SD. Community recruitment through academic medical centers. A total of 1929 unrelated subjects with alcohol and/or drug dependence. Demographics, diagnostic criteria for psychiatric and substance use disorders and related clinical features were obtained using the Semi-Structured Assessment for Drug Dependence and Alcoholism. We compared four groups: no life-time MDE (no MDE), independent MDE only (I-MDE), substance-induced MDE only (SI-MDE) and both types of MDE. Psychiatric measures were better predictors of MDE subtype than substance-related or socio-demographic ones. Subjects with both types of MDE reported more life-time depressive symptoms and comorbid anxiety disorders and were more likely to have attempted suicide than subjects with I-MDE or SI-MDE. Subjects with both types of MDE, like those with I-MDE, were also more likely than subjects with SI-MDE to be alcohol-dependent only than either drug-dependent only or both alcohol- and drug-dependent. SD individuals with both types of MDE have greater psychiatric severity than those with I-MDE only or SI-MDE only. These and other features that distinguish among the MDE subtypes have important diagnostic and potential therapeutic implications. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Major depression and secondhand smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Patten, Scott B; Williams, Jeanne V A; Lavorato, Dina H; Woolf, Benjamin; Wang, Jian Li; Bulloch, Andrew G M; Sajobi, Tolulope

    2018-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have consistently linked smoking to poor mental health. Among non-smokers, some studies have also reported associations between secondhand smoke exposure and psychological symptoms. However, an association between secondhand smoke exposure and depressive disorders has not been well established. This analysis used cross-sectional data from a series of 10 population surveys conducted in Canada between 2003 and 2013. The surveys targeted the Canadian household population, included a brief structured interview for past year major depressive episode (MDE) and included items assessing secondhand smoke exposure. We used two-stage individual-level random-effects meta-regression to synthesize results from these surveys. Over the study interval, about 20% of non-smokers reported substantial exposure to secondhand smoke. In this group, the pooled annual prevalence of MDE was 6.1% (95% CI 5.3-6.9) compared to 4.0% (95% CI 3.7-4.3) in non-smokers without secondhand smoke exposure. The crude odds ratio was 1.5 (95% CI 1.4-1.7). With adjustment for a set of potential confounding variables the odds ratio was unchanged, 1.4 (95% CI 1.2 - 1.6). These results provide additional support for public health measures aimed at reducing secondhand smoke exposure. A causal connection between secondhand smoke exposure and MDEs cannot be confirmed due to the cross-sectional nature of the data. Longitudinal studies are needed to establish temporal sequencing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Gray colored glasses: is major depression partially a sensory perceptual disorder?

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    Major depression is a neuropsychiatric disorder that can involve profound dysregulation of mood. While depression is associated with additional abnormalities besides reduced mood, such as cognitive dysfunction, it is not well established that sensory perception is also altered in this disorder (aside from in psychotic depression). Recent studies have shown that visual processing, in as early a stage as the retina, is impaired in depression. This paper examines the hypothesis that major depression can involve alterations in sensory perception. A Pubmed literature search investigated several lines of evidence: innervation of sensory cortex by serotonin and norepinephrine; antidepressant drugs and depression itself affecting processing of facial expressions of emotion; electroencephalography (EEG) studies of depressed persons and antidepressant drugs; involvement of the serotonergic 5HT2A receptor in both depression and hallucinogenic drug action; psychotic depression involving sensory distortions; dopamine possibly playing a role in depression; and the antidepressant effect of blocking the NMDA receptor with ketamine. Data from each of these lines of evidence support the hypothesis that major depression can involve sensory perceptual alterations. Loss of interest in one's daily activities and inability to experience pleasure, also known as anhedonia, in major depression may in part be mediated by sensory abnormalities, whereby normal sensory perceptions are no longer present to activate reward circuitry. The data supporting the hypothesis tend to be associative, so further confirmation of the hypothesis awaits additional controlled experiments. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Major depression in primary care: making the diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chung Wai Mark; How, Choon How; Ng, Yin Ping

    2016-01-01

    Major depression is a common condition seen in the primary care setting, often presenting with somatic symptoms. It is potentially a chronic illness with considerable morbidity, and a high rate of relapse and recurrence. Major depression has a bidirectional relationship with chronic diseases, and a strong association with increased age and coexisting mental illnesses (e.g. anxiety disorders). Screening can be performed using clinical tools for major depression, such as the Patient Health Questionaire-2, Patient Health Questionaire-9 and Beck Depression Inventory, so that timely treatment can be initiated. An accurate diagnosis of major depression and its severity is essential for prompt treatment to reduce morbidity and mortality. This is the first of a series of articles that illustrates the approach to the management of major depression in primary care. Our next articles will cover suicide risk assessment in a depressed patient and outline the basic principles of management and treatment modalities. PMID:27872937

  12. The Role of Personality Pathology in Depression Treatment Outcome With Psychotherapy and Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Levenson, Jessica C.; Wallace, Meredith L.; Fournier, Jay C.; Rucci, Paola; Frank, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Background Depressed patients with comorbid personality pathology may fare worse in treatment for depression than those without this additional pathology, and comorbid personality pathology may be associated with superior response in one form of treatment relative to another, though recent findings have been mixed. We aimed to evaluate the effect of personality pathology on time to remission of patients randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment strategies for depression and to determine whether personality pathology moderated the effect of treatment assignment on outcome. Method Individuals undergoing an episode of unipolar major depression (n = 275) received interpersonal psychotherapy (Klerman, Weissman, Rounsaville, & Chevron, 1984) or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) pharmacotherapy for depression. Depressive symptoms were measured with the HRSD-17. Remission was a mean HRSD-17 score of 7 or below over a period of 3 weeks. Personality disorders were measured according to SCID-II diagnoses, and personality pathology was measured dimensionally by summing the positive probes on the SCID-II. Results The presence of at least 1 personality disorder was not a significant predictor of time to remission, but a higher level of dimensionally measured personality pathology and the presence of borderline personality disorder were associated with a longer time to remission. Personality pathology did not moderate the effect of treatment assignment on time to remission. Conclusions The findings suggest that depressed individuals with comorbid personality pathology generally fare worse in treatment for depression, although in this report, the effect of personality pathology did not differ by the type of treatment received. PMID:22823857

  13. Genetic variants within the serotonin transporter associated with familial risk for major depression

    PubMed Central

    Talati, Ardesheer; Guffanti, Guia; Odgerel, Zagaa; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Malm, Heli; Sourander, Andre; Brown, Alan S.; Wickramaratne, Priya J.; Gingrich, Jay A.; Weissman, Myrna M.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the serotonin transporter promoter linked polymorphism (5HTTLPR) in depression, despite much research, remains unclear. Most studies compare persons with and without depression to each other. We show offspring at high (N=192) as compared to low (N=101) familial risk for major depressive disorder were almost four times as likely to have two copies of the short allele at 5HTTLPR, suggesting that incorporation of family history could be helpful in identifying genetic differences. PMID:25920807

  14. [Bipolarity correlated factors in major depression: about 155 Tunisian inpatients].

    PubMed

    Gassab, L; Mechri, A; Gaha, L; Khiari, G; Zaafrane, F; Zougaghi, L

    2002-01-01

    The distinction between the depressive troubles according to their inclusion in bipolar disorders or in recurrent depressive disorders offers an evident practical interest. In fact, the curative and mainly the preventive treatment of these troubles are different. So it is necessary to identify the predictive factors of bipolar development in case of inaugural depressive episode. In 1983, Akiskal was the first who identified those factors: pharmacological hypomania, puerperal depression, onset at early age (<25 years), presence of psychotic characteristics, hypersomnia and psychomotor inhibition. Through this study, the authors try to compare the epidemiological, clinical and evolution characteristics of major depression in bipolar disorders to recurrent depressive disorders in order to indicate the correlated factors with bipolarity. It is a retrospective and comparative study based on about 155 inpatients for major depressive episode during the period between January 1994 and December 1998. These patients were divided into two groups according the DSM IV criteria: bipolar group (96 patients) and recurrent depressive group (59 patients). Both groups were compared according to socio-demographic data, life events in childhood, personal and family history, clinical and evolution characteristics of the index depressive episode. The predictive factors proposed by Akiskal were systematically examined. It was found out that the following factors were correlated with bipolarity: high rate of separation and divorce (17.7% versus 5.1%; p=0.02), family history of psychiatric disorders (56.3% versus 35.6%; p=0.012) especially bipolar ones (29.2% versus 3.4%; p=0,00008), onset at early age (mean age of onset: 24.8 8.2 years versus 34.1 12.6 years; p=0.000004), number of affective episode significantly more frequent (mean 3.6 versus 2.5; p=0.03), sudden onset of depressive episode (44.8% versus 15.9%; p=0.0003) and presence of psychotic characteristics (69.8% versus 16.7%; p=0

  15. Major Depressive Disorder and Impulsive Reactivity to Emotion: Toward a Dual Process View of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Charles S.; Johnson, Sheri L.; Joormann, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    Objective Dual process theories of behavior have been used to suggest that vulnerability to depression involves elevated reactivity to emotions. This study tests that idea, examining self-reported reactivity. Design Comparison between persons with at least one lifetime episode of major depressive disorder (lifetime MDD) and those without this diagnosis, controlling for symptoms of alcohol use (a potential externalizing confound) and current symptoms of depression (a potential state-dependent confound). Methods Undergraduates (N = 120) completed a clinical interview to diagnose lifetime MDD and a series of self-reports bearing on diverse aspects of self-control, including reactivity to emotion. Thirty-four were diagnosed with lifetime MDD; 86 did not meet criteria for MDD. The groups were then compared on three factors underlying the scales assessing self-control. Results The MDD group had higher scores than controls on the two factors that reflect impulsive reactivity to diverse emotions, including emotions that are positive in valence. These effects were not explained by associations with either externalizing symptoms or current depressive symptoms. Conclusions Reflexive reactivity to emotions characterizes depression, in addition to some externalizing problems, and it may deserve study as a potential transdiagnostic feature. PMID:23865405

  16. Cerebellar vermis volume in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Kaan; Nazarov, Anthony; Taylor, Valerie H; Macdonald, Kathryn; Hall, Geoffrey B; Macqueen, Glenda M

    2013-07-01

    The vermis is located in the midline of the cerebellum and is involved in the regulation of affect and cognitive processes. Although changes in vermis size have been reported in several psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, no volumetric studies have been conducted on samples of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). One-hundred and five adult subjects were recruited: 35 patients who were presenting for first treatment (FT; 22 females), 35 patients with known previous treatment (PT; 22 females), and 35 healthy controls (NC; 22 females), matched for age and gender. We compared the volumes of the total vermis, the anterior lobe (V1), the superior-posterior lobe (V2), and the inferior-posterior lobe (V3), among these study groups. Anterior vermis (V1) was larger in patients with MDD with a long history of antidepressant treatment compared to healthy controls. This finding was evident only in men [F(2, 36) = 9.23, p = .001]. Patients in the FT group did not differ from healthy controls in any vermian region. We found no correlations between vermian subregional volumes and clinical variables such as illness duration or age at onset of illness. We speculate that the larger anterior vermis volumes might arise from abnormalities in connectivity or as compensatory responses to the prefrontal dysfunction noted in patients with MDD but confirmation of this hypothesis awaits further studies.

  17. Hippocampal neuroplasticity in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Malykhin, N V; Coupland, N J

    2015-11-19

    One of the most replicated findings has been that hippocampus volume is decreased in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies suggest that localized differences in hippocampal volume may be more prominent than global differences. Preclinical and post-mortem studies in MDD indicated that different subfields of the hippocampus may respond differently to stress and may also have differential levels of plasticity in response to antidepressant treatment. Advances in high-field MRI allowed researchers to visualize and measure hippocampal subfield volumes in MDD patients in vivo. The results of these studies provide the first in vivo evidence that hippocampal volume reductions in MDD are specific to the cornu ammonis and dentate gyrus hippocampal subfields, findings that appear, on the surface, consistent with preclinical evidence for localized mechanisms of hippocampal neuroplasticity. In this review we discuss how recent advances in neuroimaging allow researchers to further understand hippocampal neuroplasticity in MDD and how it is related to antidepressant treatment, memory function, and disease progression.

  18. Serotonin and beyond: therapeutics for major depression

    PubMed Central

    Blier, Pierre; El Mansari, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptamine) system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD). The case for its contribution to the therapeutic efficacy of a wide variety of antidepressant treatments is, however, much stronger. All antidepressant strategies have been shown to enhance 5-HT transmission in the brain of laboratory animals. Catecholamines, norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) can also play a pivotal role in the mechanism of action of certain antidepressant strategies. The enhancement of 5-HT transmission by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, which leads to a dampening of the activity of NE and DA neurons, may account in part for the low remission rate achieved with these medications and/or the residuals symptoms after remission is achieved. The functional connectivity between the 5-HT, NE and DA systems can be used to understand the mechanism of action of a wide variety of augmentation strategies in treatment-resistant MDD. Proof-of-concept studies have shown that antidepressant medications with complementary mechanisms of action on monoaminergic systems can double the remission rate achieved in a trial of standard duration. Novel approaches are also being used to treat MDD, which also appear to involve the monoaminergic system(s) to a varying extent. PMID:23440470

  19. Detrended fluctuation analysis for major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Wajid; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Ali, Syed Saad Azhar; Yasin, Mohd Azhar Mohd; Amin, Hafeezullah

    2015-01-01

    Clinical utility of Electroencephalography (EEG) based diagnostic studies is less clear for major depressive disorder (MDD). In this paper, a novel machine learning (ML) scheme was presented to discriminate the MDD patients and healthy controls. The proposed method inherently involved feature extraction, selection, classification and validation. The EEG data acquisition involved eyes closed (EC) and eyes open (EO) conditions. At feature extraction stage, the de-trended fluctuation analysis (DFA) was performed, based on the EEG data, to achieve scaling exponents. The DFA was performed to analyzes the presence or absence of long-range temporal correlations (LRTC) in the recorded EEG data. The scaling exponents were used as input features to our proposed system. At feature selection stage, 3 different techniques were used for comparison purposes. Logistic regression (LR) classifier was employed. The method was validated by a 10-fold cross-validation. As results, we have observed that the effect of 3 different reference montages on the computed features. The proposed method employed 3 different types of feature selection techniques for comparison purposes as well. The results show that the DFA analysis performed better in LE data compared with the IR and AR data. In addition, during Wilcoxon ranking, the AR performed better than LE and IR. Based on the results, it was concluded that the DFA provided useful information to discriminate the MDD patients and with further validation can be employed in clinics for diagnosis of MDD.

  20. Symptoms of Major Depression and Complicated Grief

    MedlinePlus

    ... Depression It’s common for people to have sadness, pain, anger, bouts of crying, and a depressed mood after a loved one dies. It’s important to know about normal grief responses so that you can know if the bereaved ...

  1. Differential diagnosis of bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hirschfeld, R M

    2014-12-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder spend approximately half of their lives symptomatic and the majority of that time suffering from symptoms of depression, which complicates the accurate diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Challenges in the differential diagnosis of bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder are reviewed, and the clinical utility of several screening instruments is evaluated. The estimated lifetime prevalence of major depressive disorder (i.e., unipolar depression) is over 3 and one-half times that of bipolar spectrum disorders. The clinical presentation of a major depressive episode in a bipolar disorder patient does not differ substantially from that of a patient with major depressive disorder (unipolar depression). Therefore, it is not surprising that without proper screening and comprehensive evaluation many patients with bipolar disorder may be misdiagnosed with major depressive disorder (unipolar depression). In general, antidepressants have demonstrated little or no efficacy for depressive episodes associated with bipolar disorder, and treatment guidelines recommend using antidepressants only as an adjunct to mood stabilizers for patients with bipolar disorder. Thus, correct identification of bipolar disorder among patients who present with depression is critical for providing appropriate treatment and improving patient outcomes. Clinical characteristics indicative of bipolar disorder versus major depressive disorder identified in this review are based on group differences and may not apply to each individual patient. The overview of demographic and clinical characteristics provided by this review may help medical professionals distinguish between major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. Several validated, easily administered screening instruments are available and can greatly improve the recognition of bipolar disorder in patients with depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Screening for Major Depression in Private Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Ira H.; Wendt, Burdette; Nasr, Suhayl J.; Rush, A. John

    2009-01-01

    Background Several studies have contrasted the 16-item self-report version of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-SR16) with other depression scales, but none has used patients in single, large, private psychiatric practice. This study compared 175 outpatients on the QIDS-SR16, the 17-item Carroll Depression Rating Scale (CDRS-SR17, a self-report modification of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression), and the thirteen depression items from the Symptom Check List-90 (SCL-D13). The Mini version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (MiniSCID) served as a “gold standard” to assess depression. Methods Basic Item and scale statistics were obtained using classical test theory. Dimensionalities were obtained using factor analysis. Test information functions obtained from the Samejima item response theory model provided additional reliability-like results. This model was also used to compare patients classified as depressed vs. nondepressed on the basis of the MiniSCID. Additional validity information was assessed comparing: (a) ANOVA effect sizes, (b) receiver operating characteristic curves, (c) univariate logistic regression, (d) the MANOVA, and (e) multivariate logistic regression. Results The QIDS-SR16 related most strongly to MiniSCID diagnoses. The SCL-D13, however, was the most reliable of the three scales (α = .91). It was the most sensitive to differences in depression for all but the most depressed patients, for whom the CDRS-SR17 was the most sensitive. Conclusions All three measures performed satisfactorily, but there are clearly defined advantages to using the QIDS-SR16, as, by its very design, it assesses the core symptoms of depression and does not require a clinician. PMID:19339842

  3. Association of major depression with sexual dysfunction in men.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Louis F; Clayton, Anita H; Smith, Louis C; Goldstein, Irwin M; Derogatis, Leonard R

    2013-01-01

    The effect of type and severity of depression on sexual functioning was examined before treatment in 591 men with Major Depression (MDD) or Atypical Depression, as determined by percentage of subjects meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th Edition (DSM-IV) sexual dysfunction criteria (A and B only), and percentage with Derogatis Inventory of Sexual Function (DISF) scores greater than 1 standard deviation below normal. Sexual dysfunction rates were higher for MDD than for Atypical Depression. Depression affected DISF domains differently: orgasm was most impaired, whereas sexual desire was preserved. More severe depression resulted in greater sexual dysfunction.

  4. A Japanese treatment used in major depressive disorder in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Dadkhah, Asghar; Raoufi, Mohammad Bagher

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of the present report is to study the efficacy of a Dohsahou, a Japanese Psychorehabilitation method, in a treatment of major depression in three men (M age = 20 yr.), selected randomly for treatment. Initially, participants' baseline condition was assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and the Family Assessment of Depression Questionnaire. Each subject had 12 sessions of 45 min. training over 4 wk. Postassessment and follow-up assessment were done. Findings for pre- and posttreatment test data indicated depression was reduced, being mainly evident in cognitive, somatic, and affective symptoms related to lower depression.

  5. Motor Imagery in Unipolar Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Bennabi, Djamila; Monnin, Julie; Haffen, Emmanuel; Carvalho, Nicolas; Vandel, Pierre; Pozzo, Thierry; Papaxanthis, Charalambos

    2014-01-01

    Background: Motor imagery is a potential tool to investigate action representation, as it can provide insights into the processes of action planning and preparation. Recent studies suggest that depressed patients present specific impairment in mental rotation. The present study was designed to investigate the influence of unipolar depression on motor imagery ability. Methods: Fourteen right-handed patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for unipolar depression were compared to 14 matched healthy controls. Imagery ability was accessed by the timing correspondence between executed and imagined movements during a pointing task, involving strong spatiotemporal constraints (speed/accuracy trade-off paradigm). Results: Compared to controls, depressed patients showed marked motor slowing on both actual and imagined movements. Furthermore, we observed greater temporal discrepancies between actual and mental movements in depressed patients than in healthy controls. Lastly, depressed patients modulated, to some extent, mental movement durations according to the difficulty of the task, but this modulation was not as strong as that of healthy subjects. Conclusion: These results suggest that unipolar depression significantly affects the higher stages of action planning and point out a selective decline of motor prediction. PMID:25538580

  6. Effects of music on major depression in psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Chi; Lai, Hui-Ling

    2004-10-01

    The study was to assess the effectiveness of soft music for treatment of major depressive disorder inpatients in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. A pretest-posttest with a two-group repeated measures design was used. Patients with major depressive disorder were recruited through referred by the psychiatric physicians. Subjects listened to their choice of music for 2 weeks. Depression was measured with the Zung's Depression Scale before the study and at two weekly posttests. Using repeated measures ANCOVA, music resulted in significantly better depressive scores, as well as significantly better subscores of depression compared with controls. Depression improved weekly, indicating a cumulative dose effect. The findings provide evidence for psychiatric nurses to use soft music as an empirically based intervention for depressed inpatients.

  7. Unstructured interviews: challenges when participants have a major depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Moyle, Wendy

    2002-08-01

    There is debate about undertaking sensitive research with vulnerable populations. Primarily, the literature has focused on informed consent, confidentiality and the principle of beneficence, with little discussion about data collection methods. This paper discusses the challenges of conducting unstructured interviews when participants have a major depressive illness. Issues arose during a phenomenological study that explored the meaning of being nurtured with seven people who were hospitalized for depression. The depressive illness and treatment were found to impact on participants' articulation and recalling of their experience, and raised ethical concerns about their informed consent. Personal engagement with participants raised the ethical issue of research vs. therapy. Furthermore, participants being in a hospital complicated the necessity for privacy. The methodological issue of bracketing of assumptions was deemed to be important to 'see' the phenomenological relevance of patients' experiences. Knowledge and experience are required when conducting unstructured interviews. Debates about the challenges of unstructured interviewing needs to be highlighted in research texts to assist novice researchers. Support from an experienced research mentor would assist novice interviewers through the interview process and provide post-interview debriefing.

  8. Spotlight on bupropion in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Sohita; Yang, Lily P H; Curran, Monique P

    2008-01-01

    Bupropion is presumed to be a dopamine-noradrenaline (norepinephrine) reuptake inhibitor and is an effective antidepressant. It is available as three oral formulations: (i) bupropion immediate release (IR) [Wellbutrin] administered three times daily; (ii) bupropion sustained release (SR) [Wellbutrin SR] administered twice daily; and (iii) bupropion extended/modified release (XR) [Wellbutrin XL/Wellbutrin XR] administered once daily. All three formulations are bioequivalent in terms of systemic exposure to bupropion. Oral three-times-daily bupropion IR was effective and generally well tolerated in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). It was as efficacious and as well tolerated as some TCAs and the SSRI fluoxetine. Moreover, it was associated with less somnolence and weight gain than some TCAs. Twice-daily bupropion SR was also efficacious and generally well tolerated in the treatment of MDD. It was as effective as and had a generally similar tolerability profile to some SSRIs, but had the advantage of less somnolence and sexual dysfunction. The efficacy of bupropion XR in terms of primary efficacy measures was established in two of six well designed placebo-controlled studies. Bupropion XR also demonstrated efficacy in terms of some secondary outcomes in five of these studies. Additionally, bupropion XR was similar, in terms of the primary efficacy outcomes, to the SSRI escitalopram in two placebo-controlled trials and to the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) venlafaxine extended release (XR) in two trials (one of which was placebo-controlled), but not in a third placebo-controlled trial where venlafaxine XR was better than bupropion XR. It was generally as well tolerated as escitalopram and venlafaxine XR, but was associated with less sexual dysfunction than escitalopram. Available clinical data suggest that bupropion is an effective and generally well tolerated option in the treatment of MDD, with the newer formulations having the

  9. Novel Augmentation Strategies in Major Depression.

    PubMed

    Martiny, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    Hypothesis The hypotheses of all the four included studies share the common idea that it is possible to augment the effect of antidepressant drug treatment by applying different interventions and with each intervention attain a clinically meaningful better effect compared to a control condition, and with minor side effects, thus improving the short- and medium-term outcome in major depression. Procedures Study design The basic study design has been the double blind randomised controlled trial (RCT). In the light therapy study, all patients were treated with sertraline for the whole of the study duration. In the first five weeks of the study, patients were randomised to treatment with either 60 minutes of bright white or 30 minutes of dim red light (sham condition). In the four weeks follow-up period, patients were treated with sertraline alone. In the Pindolol study, all patients were treated with venlafaxine and randomised to augmentation with either active or placebo matching pindolol tablets. In the PEMF study patients were continued on ongoing medication and randomised to augmentation with active or inactive (sham) 30 minutes daily PEMF treatment on weekdays. In the Chronos study all patients were treated with duloxetine and randomized to either a combination of three wake therapies with daily bright light treatment and sleep time stabilisation (wake group) or to daily exercise of minimum 30 minutes as an active control intervention (exercise group). The Chronos study was divided into: (1) a one-week run-in phase where duloxetine were started (and continued for the whole 29 week study period), (2) a one-week inpatient intervention phase where patient in the wake group did three wake therapies (sleep abstinence for the whole night and the following day until evening) in combination with daily light therapy and guidance on sleep time stabilisation and patients in the exercise group started a daily exercise program, (3) a seven week continuation phase where

  10. Does major depression affect risk for adolescent obesity?

    PubMed

    Roberts, Robert E; Duong, Hao T

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to reexamine the association between major depression and obesity in adolescents, testing the hypothesis that body image mediates this association. This is the first paper to examine this question using DSM-IV diagnosis of depression and data from a two-wave cohort of adolescents. Participants were 4175 youths 11-17 years of age sampled from the community who were followed up a year later (n=3134). Major depression was assessed using DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Body image was measured with perceived weight. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥95th percentile using measured height and weight. When we examined a model which included obesity, perceived weight, major depression and covariates, there was no association between major depression at baseline and obesity at follow-up. We found no independent association between major depression and body weight. The study was limited in that it is not a national sample, BMI was the only measure of adiposity, perceived weight was the only measure of body image, and there were no data on lifetime trajectories of depression, obesity, or body image. If there is an etiologic link between major depression and body weight among adolescents, it most likely operates through processes involving components of body image, since controlling for body image eliminated the association between depression and obesity. Clinically, addressing body image in depressed patients who are obese may improve outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Borderline personality features in depressed or anxious patients.

    PubMed

    Distel, Marijn A; Smit, Johannes H; Spinhoven, Philip; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2016-07-30

    Anxiety and depression frequently co-occur with borderline personality disorder. Relatively little research examined the presence of borderline personality features and its main domains (affective instability, identity problems, negative relationships and self-harm) in individuals with remitted and current anxiety and depression. Participants with current (n=597) or remitted (n=1115) anxiety and/or depression and healthy controls (n=431) were selected from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Assessments included the Personality Assessment Inventory - Borderline Features Scale and several clinical characteristics of anxiety and depression. Borderline personality features were more common in depression than in anxiety. Current comorbid anxiety and depression was associated with most borderline personality features. Anxiety and depression status explained 29.7% of the variance in borderline personality features and 3.8% (self-harm) to 31% (identity problems) of the variance in the four domains. A large part of the variance was shared between anxiety and depression but both disorders also explained a significant amount of unique variance. The severity of anxiety and depression and the level of daily dysfunctioning was positively associated with borderline personality features. Individuals with a longer duration of anxiety and depression showed more affective instability and identity problems. These findings suggest that patients with anxiety and depression may benefit from an assessment of personality pathology as it may have implications for psychological and pharmacological treatment.

  12. Social Support Modifies the Relationship between Personality and Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Oddone, Cameron G.; Hybels, Celia F.; McQuoid, Douglas R.; Steffens, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between personality, social support, and depression in older adults, identify the personality trait and social support dimension most closely associated with depression, and determine if the relationship between personality and depression varies by level of social support. Design Cross-sectional analysis within longitudinal study. Participants Older patients originally diagnosed with major depression (n=108) and never depressed comparison group of older adults (n=103). Measurements Patients sufficiently recovered from major depression and comparison participants were administered the NEO Personality Inventory. Social support was measured annually for both groups. Patients were administered the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) every three months. Results Patients and comparison participants differed on four of the five NEO domains and all four social support dimensions, but personality did not significantly predict depression status (patient/comparison) in controlled analyses. Within the patient group, subjective social support was the only dimension correlated with MADRS score. In separate linear regression analyses among the patients, controlling for age, sex, and subjective social support, the domains of Neuroticism, Openness to Experience, Conscientiousness, and Extraversion were associated with MADRS score. For Neuroticism and Openness, the association varied by level of subjective social support. Conclusions Our research confirmed older patients differed from never depressed older adults in dimensions of personality and social support, and the relationship between these variables differed by depression status. The relationship between personality, social support, and depressive symptoms in older adults recovering from depression is also complex, with subjective social support modifying the association between personality and depression. PMID:21328795

  13. Do reasons for major depression act as causes?

    PubMed Central

    Kendler, KS; Myers, J; Halberstadt, LJ

    2011-01-01

    We make sense of human behavior using reasons, which produce understanding via a subjective empathy-based first-person perspective and causes, which leads to explanations utilizing objective facts about the world assessed scientifically. We evaluate the common sense hypothesis that for episodes of major depression (MD), reasons act as causes. That is, individuals who have highly understandable depressive episodes will have, on average, fewer objective scientifically validated causes than those who have un-understandable episodes. The understandability of a MD as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th Edition (DSM IV) experienced in the past year in 630 personally interviewed twins from a population-based registry was rated, with high reliability, from rich contextual information. We predicted, from these understandability ratings, via linear and logistic regression, 12 validated risk factors for MD reflecting genetic and long-term environmental liability. No significant association was observed between 11 of these indices and the understandability of the depressive episode. The only significant finding—higher cotwin risk for MD associated with greater understandability— was opposite that predicted by the reasons-as-causes hypothesis. Our results do not support the hypothesis that reasons for MD act as causes. These findings, unlikely to result from low power, may be explicable from an empirical and/or philosophical perspective. Our results are, however, consistent with ‘the trap of meaning’ hypothesis, which suggests that understanding does not equal explanation and that while reasons may be critical to help us empathize with our patients, they are unreliable indices of objective risk factors for illness. PMID:21383746

  14. Is major depressive disorder a metabolic encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Brian H

    2008-07-01

    Metabolic encephalopathy is an acute disturbance in cellular metabolism in the brain evoked by conditions of hypoxia, hypoglycaemia, oxidative stress and/or inflammation. It usually develops acutely or subacutely and is reversible if the systemic disorder is treated. If left untreated, however, metabolic encephalopathy may result in secondary structural damage to the brain. Most encephalopathies are present with neuropsychiatric symptoms, one in particular being depression. However, mood disorders are often co-morbid with cardiovascular, liver, kidney and endocrine disorders, while increasing evidence concurs that depression involves inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes. This would suggest that metabolic disturbances resembling encephalopathy may underscore the basic neuropathology of depression at a far deeper level than currently realized. Viewing depression as a form of encephalopathy, and exploiting knowledge gleaned from our understanding of the neurochemistry and treatment of metabolic encephalopathy, may assist in our understanding of the neurobiology of depression, but also in realizing new ideas in the pharmacotherapy of mood disorders. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Benchmarks for Psychotherapy Efficacy in Adult Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minami, Takuya; Wampold, Bruce E.; Serlin, Ronald C.; Kircher, John C.; Brown, George S.

    2007-01-01

    This study estimates pretreatment-posttreatment effect size benchmarks for the treatment of major depression in adults that may be useful in evaluating psychotherapy effectiveness in clinical practice. Treatment efficacy benchmarks for major depression were derived for 3 different types of outcome measures: the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression…

  16. Mechanisms Underlying Neurocognitive Dysfunctions in Recurrent Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Gałecki, Piotr; Talarowska, Monika; Anderson, George; Berk, Michael; Maes, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Recent work shows that depression is intimately associated with changes in cognitive functioning, including memory, attention, verbal fluency, and other aspects of higher-order cognitive processing. Changes in cognitive functioning are more likely to occur when depressive episodes are recurrent and to abate to some degree during periods of remission. However, with accumulating frequency and duration of depressive episodes, cognitive deficits can become enduring, being evident even when mood improves. Such changes in cognitive functioning give depression links to mild cognitive impairment and thereby with neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, and multiple sclerosis. Depression may then be conceptualized on a dimension of depression – mild cognitive impairment – dementia. The biological underpinnings of depression have substantial overlaps with those of neurodegenerative conditions, including reduced neurogenesis, increased apoptosis, reactive oxygen species, tryptophan catabolites, autoimmunity, and immune-inflammatory processes, as well as decreased antioxidant defenses. These evolving changes over the course of depressive episodes drive the association of depression with neurodegenerative conditions. As such, the changes in cognitive functioning in depression have important consequences for the treatment of depression and in reconceptualizing the role of depression in wider neuroprogressive conditions. Here we review the data on changes in cognitive functioning in recurrent major depression and their association with other central conditions. PMID:26017336

  17. A Brain-Based Endophenotype for Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Bradley S.; Weissman, Myrna M.

    2012-01-01

    We have identified a brain-based endophenotype for major depressive disorder (MDD) that includes thinning of the cortex of the lateral aspect of the right hemisphere and the medial aspect of the left, as well as bilateral hypoplasia of frontal and parietal white matter. The endophenotype status of these abnormalities is supported by their presence in a multi-generational cohort of persons who themselves do not have MDD but who are at increased familial risk for developing the illness. Those who have the endophenotype but who are not ill nevertheless still suffer from inattention and poor visual memory for social stimuli in direct proportion to the magnitude of cortical thinning and white matter hypoplasia within the endophenotype. Identification of this endophenotype and its cognitive correlates provides targets for devising new preventive and therapeutic interventions for MDD. PMID:21226617

  18. Patient-reported functioning in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    IsHak, Waguih William; James, David M.; Mirocha, James; Youssef, Haidy; Tobia, Gabriel; Pi, Sarah; Collison, Katherine L.; Cohen, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Compared with the general population, patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) report substantial deficits in their functioning that often go beyond the clinical resolution of depressive symptoms. This study examines the impact of MDD and its treatment on functioning. Methods: From the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) trial, we analyzed complete data of 2280 adult outpatients with MDD at entry and exit points of each level of antidepressant treatment and again 12 months post treatment. Functioning was measured using the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS). Results: The results show that only 7% of patients with MDD reported within-normal functioning before treatment. The proportion of patients achieving within-normal functioning (WSAS) scores significantly increased after treatment. However, the majority of patients (>60%) were still in the abnormal range on functioning at exit. Although remitted patients had greater improvements compared with nonremitters, a moderate proportion of remitted patients continued to experience ongoing deficits in functioning after treatment (20–40%). Follow-up data show that the proportions of patients experiencing normal scores for functioning after 12 months significantly decreased from the end of treatment to the follow-up phase, from 60.1% to 49% (p < 0.0001), a finding that was particularly significant in nonremitters. Limitations of this study include the reliance on self-report of functioning and the lack of information on patients who dropped out. Conclusion: This study points to the importance of functional outcomes of MDD treatment as well as the need to develop personalized interventions to improve functioning in MDD. PMID:27347363

  19. Brain Structural Effects of Antidepressant Treatment in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Dusi, Nicola; Barlati, Stefano; Vita, Antonio; Brambilla, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Depressive disorder is a very frequent and heterogeneous syndrome. Structural imaging techniques offer a useful tool in the comprehension of neurobiological alterations that concern depressive disorder. Altered brain structures in depressive disorder have been particularly located in the prefrontal cortex (medial prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex, OFC) and medial temporal cortex areas (hippocampus). These brain areas belong to a structural and functional network related to cognitive and emotional processes putatively implicated in depressive symptoms. These volumetric alterations may also represent biological predictors of response to pharmacological treatment. In this context, major findings of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, in relation to treatment response in depressive disorder, will here be presented and discussed. PMID:26412065

  20. Trajectories of depressive symptoms after a major cardiac event.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Oskar; Kampling, Hanna; Farin, Erik; Tully, Phillip J

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a common comorbidity in cardiac patients. This study sought to document fluctuations of depressive symptoms in the 12 months after a first major cardiac event. In all, 310 patients completed a battery of psychosocial measures including the depression subscale of the Symptom Check List-90-Revised. A total of 252 of them also completed follow-up measures at 3 and 12 months. Trajectories of depressive symptoms were classified as none, worsening symptoms, sustained remission, and persistent symptoms. Although the prevalence of depressive symptoms was consistent at each assessment, there was considerable fluctuation between symptom classes. Regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of different trajectories.

  1. Social functioning in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kupferberg, Aleksandra; Bicks, Lucy; Hasler, Gregor

    2016-10-01

    Depression is associated with social risk factors, social impairments and poor social functioning. This paper gives an overview of these social aspects using the NIMH Research and Domain Criteria 'Systems for Social Processes' as a framework. In particular, it describes the bio-psycho-social interplay regarding impaired affiliation and attachment (social anhedonia, hyper-sensitivity to social rejection, competition avoidance, increased altruistic punishment), impaired social communication (impaired emotion recognition, diminished cooperativeness), impaired social perception (reduced empathy, theory-of-mind deficits) and their impact on social networks and the use of social media. It describes these dysfunctional social processes at the behavioural, neuroanatomical, neurochemical and genetic levels, and with respect to animal models of social stress. We discuss the diagnostic specificity of these social deficit constructs for depression and in relation to depression severity. Since social factors are importantly involved in the pathogenesis and the consequences of depression, such research will likely contribute to better diagnostic assessments and concepts, treatments and preventative strategies both at the diagnostic and transdiagnostic level.

  2. [Relapse and insomnia in unipolar major depression].

    PubMed

    Falussy, Linda; Balla, Petra; Frecska, Ede

    2014-09-01

    The connection between mood and sleep disorders is highly complex and can be studied and interpreted in many respects. Epidemiologic data show that the co-occurrence of the two disorders is quite frequent. Thus an approach regarding them as a unit promotes biological psychiatric research by revealing new pathophysiological and therapeutic conclusions. Chronobiological results related to mood disorders have recently been described in excellent reviews including Hungarian ones. In the present review, the necessity of treatment of sleep disorders is evaluated in the context of relapse/remission/recurrence. Scientific data suggest that patients with insomnia have a ten-fold risk of developing depression, and insomnia plays an important role in depression relapses, recurrence of depressive episodes and becoming depression chronic. From neurobiological point of view, mood and sleep disorders have many features in common. Research has revealed decreased levels of melatonin and advanced sleep phases (shifted earlier) in depression, and altered and imbalanced monoaminergic pathways, and REM abnormalities in sleep disorders. Some authors suggest that REM abnormalities disappear along with the mood improvement, and the sleep structure can completely restore after remission. However, persistent abnormalities of REM sleep and slow wave sleep have also been found in remission, which increased the risk of the relapse and recurrence. Recently, there is an agreement as to the early treatment of insomnia can prevent the development of mood abnormalities. Alterations of cascades related to neural plasticity can also be a link between sleep and mood disorders. Neural plasticity is closely related to learning, sleeping, and cortisol regulation (coping with stress), and this draws the attention to comorbidity with further disorders (anxiety, dementia).

  3. Atypical depressive symptoms and obesity in a national sample of older adults with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kee-Lee; Yu, Kar-Ming

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this study are to present findings on the rate of obesity associated with classic, atypical, and undifferentiated depression by comparing with those without depression in a nationally representative sample of United States older adults. The authors used data from the 2001 to 2002 National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), which included 10,557 adults 60 years of age and older. Chi-square tests were used to compare classic, atypical, and undifferentiated as well as nondepressed control in sociodemographic characteristics. Then, logistic regressions adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics were used to evaluate associations of rate of current obesity (defined as Body Mass Index (BMI) > 30) across the three depressive groups (classic, atypical, and undifferentiated depression) and nondepressed control. Lifetime, current, and past depression were examined. Significant differences were found between atypical and classic depression in sex, age, marital status, race, and personal income. After adjusting for sex, age, marital status, race, and personal income, the rate of obesity was significantly greater for respondents with atypical depression than respondents with classic, undifferentiated depression, or without depression. Same results were found in lifetime, current, and past depression. Our findings suggest that the heterogeneity of depression should be considered when examining the effect of depression on obesity in old age. Prevention measures should be designed and delivered to older adults with atypical depression. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Early Intervention to Preempt Major Depression in Older Black and White Adults

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Charles F.; Thomas, Stephen B.; Morse, Jennifer Q.; Anderson, Stewart J.; Albert, Steven; Dew, Mary Amanda; Begley, Amy; Karp, Jordan F.; Gildengers, Ariel; Butters, Meryl A.; Stack, Jacqueline A.; Kasckow, John; Miller, Mark D.; Quinn, Sandra C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to assess the efficacy of Problem Solving Therapy for Primary Care (PST-PC) for preventing episodes of major depression and mitigating depressive symptoms in older black and white adults, as compared with an active control condition-- coaching in healthy dietary practices (“DIET”), Methods 247 participants (90 blacks, 154 whites, 3 Asians) with subsyndromal depressive symptoms were recruited into a randomized, “indicated” depression prevention trial comparing effects of PST-PC and DIET on time to episodes of major depressive disorder (SCID/DSM-IV) and level of depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory) over two years. Cumulative intervention time was similar in PST-PC or DIET, averaging 5.5- 6.0 hours in each arm. Results PST-PC and DIET did not differ significantly in time to major depressive episodes (HR = .87; p > .748). Participants in both arms experienced low incidence of such episodes (blacks: n=8, 9%; whites n=13, 8%), compared to published rates of one in four or five over one year in persons with subsyndromal symptoms receiving care as usual. Participants also showed a mean decrease of 4 points in depressive symptoms, sustained over two years. Despite greater burden of depression risk factors among blacks, no significant differences with whites were found in the primary outcome Conclusion Both PST-PC and DIET are potentially effective in protecting older black and white adults with subsyndromal depressive symptoms from developing episodes of major depression over two years. Absent a control for concurrent usual care, this conclusion is preliminary. If confirmed, both interventions hold promise as scalable, safe, non-stigmatizing interventions for delaying or preventing episodes of major depression in the nation’s increasingly diverse older population. PMID:24632760

  5. HPA Axis Genetic Variation, Cortisol, and Psychosis in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Schatzberg, Alan F.; Keller, Jennifer; Tennakoon, Lakshika; Lembke, Anna; Williams, Gordon; Kraemer, Fredric B.; Sarginson, Jane E.; Lazzeroni, Laura C.; Murphy, Greer M.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation underlying hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis over-activity in healthy controls and patients with severe forms of major depression has not been well explored but could explain risk for cortisol dysregulation. 95 participants were studied: 40 patients with psychotic major depression (PMD); 26 patients with nonpsychotic major depression (NPMD); and 29 healthy controls (HC). Collection of genetic material was added one third of the way into a larger study on cortisol, cognition, and psychosis in major depression. Subjects were assessed using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Blood was collected hourly for determination of cortisol from 6pm to 9am and for the assessment of alleles for 6 genes involved in HPA Axis regulation. Two of the 6 genes contributed significantly to cortisol levels, psychosis measures or depression severity. After accounting for age, depression, and psychosis, and medication status, only allelic variation for the glucocorticoid receptor gene (GR) accounted for significant variance for mean cortisol levels from 6pm to 1am (r2=.317) and from 1am to 9am (r2=.194). Interestingly, neither depression severity nor psychosis predicted cortisol variance. In addition, GR and corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRH-R1) contributed significantly to psychosis measures and CRH-R1 contributed significantly to depression severity rating. PMID:24166410

  6. Personality Traits as Risk Factors for Treatment-Resistant Depression

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Michio; Shirayama, Yukihiko; Muneoka, Katsumasa; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Sato, Koichi; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinical outcome of antidepressant treatment in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) is thought to be associated with personality traits. A number of studies suggest that depressed patients show high harm avoidance, low self-directedness and cooperativeness, as measured on the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). However, the psychology of these patients is not well documented. Methods Psychological evaluation using Cloninger’s TCI, was performed on treatment-resistant MDD patients (n = 35), remission MDD patients (n = 31), and age- and gender-matched healthy controls (n = 174). Results Treatment-resistant patients demonstrated high scores for harm avoidance, and low scores for reward dependence, self-directedness, and cooperativeness using the TCI, compared with healthy controls and remission patients. Interestingly, patients in remission continued to show significantly high scores for harm avoidance, but not other traits in the TCI compared with controls. Moreover, there was a significant negative correlation between reward dependence and harm avoidance in the treatment-resistant depression cohort, which was absent in the control and remitted depression groups. Conclusions This study suggests that low reward dependence and to a lesser extent, low cooperativeness in the TCI may be risk factors for treatment-resistant depression. PMID:23717477

  7. Mental health in senior housing: racial/ethnic patterns and correlates of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Robison, Julie; Schensul, Jean J; Coman, Emil; Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Radda, Kim E; Gaztambide, Sonia; Disch, William B

    2009-09-01

    Mental health problems are associated with disability, overuse of medical care, higher rates of mortality and suicide as well as personal suffering for older adults. Residents of urban, low-income senior housing may face increased risk of a variety of mental health problems, including depression. This study identified the prevalence of multiple mental health problems in older residents of low-income senior housing and explored correlates of major depressive disorder for the two largest ethnic groups: black and Latino. In-person diagnostic interviews identified rates of mental illness in a sample of 635 residents of 13 low-income senior housing buildings in a medium-sized northeastern city. Applying George's Social Antecedent Model of Depression, logistic regression analyses identified shared and unique correlates of depression for Latino and black participants. This population had high rates of major depressive disorder (26%), generalized anxiety disorder (12%) and other mental health problems that varied significantly by ethnic and racial group. Separate multivariate models for Latino and black people showed that younger age, more chronic conditions and social distress were related to major depressive disorder for both ethnic groups. Perceived environmental stress, shorter tenure in the building, poorer perceived health, higher life stress and fewer leisure activities were associated with depression for Latinos only. Mental health screening and treatment services are needed in senior housing to address these high rates of mental illness. Unique constellations of correlates of depression for different ethnic groups underscore a need for culturally competent approaches to identification and treatment.

  8. Current understanding of the neurobiology of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chiriţă, Anca Livia; Gheorman, Victor; Bondari, Dan; Rogoveanu, Ion

    2015-01-01

    Depression is highly prevalent worldwide and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Approximately 340 million people worldwide suffer from depression at any given time. Based on estimates from the World Health Organization (WHO), depression is responsible for the greatest proportion of burden associated with non-fatal health outcomes and accounts for approximately 12% total years lived with disability. Probably no single risk factor can be completely isolated in major depressive disorder (MDD), as interactions between many sources of vulnerability are the most likely explanation. Buttressing the identification of grief, demoralization, hopelessness and styles of psychological coping of the depressed patient are vital, ongoing scientific developments that flow from an increased understanding of this interplay amongst the immune system, endocrine system and brain. The rapidly accumulating body of neurobiological knowledge has catalyzed fundamental changes in how we conceptualize depressive symptoms and has important implications regarding the treatment and even prevention of depressive symptoms in patients.

  9. An IRT Analysis of the Symptoms of Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Emmert-Aronson, Benjamin O; Brown, Timothy A

    2015-06-01

    This study examines the psychometric properties of a major depressive episode using a large sample (N = 2,907) of outpatients with mood and anxiety disorders. A two-parameter logistic model yielded item threshold and discrimination parameters. A two-group confirmatory factor analysis was used to evaluate gender bias. Item thresholds fell along a continuum with the core features of depressed mood and anhedonia, along with fatigue, endorsed at lower levels of depression, and change in appetite and suicidal ideation endorsed at more severe levels. Item discriminations were highest for depressed mood and anhedonia, and lowest for change in appetite and suicidal ideation. The data indicate that the symptoms of depression assess a range of severity, with varying precision in discriminating depression. No gender differences were observed. Three exploratory symptom sets were compared with the full symptom set for depression, offering quantitative evidence that can be used to modify the psychiatric classification system.

  10. Major depressive disorder treatment guidelines in America and Europe.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Jonathan R T

    2010-01-01

    The various major American and European guidelines for the treatment of depression provide similar basic principles of treatment, which include individualizing the treatment plan, preparing the patient for potential long-term treatment, providing measurement-based care, and treating to remission. While the guidelines are all evidence-based, certain factors can influence differences in specific recommendations, such as the consensus group's composition, underlying mandates, and cultural attitudes. The similarities and differences among 6 sets of guidelines from Europe and the Americas published in the past decade are reviewed here (American Psychiatric Association, British Association for Psychopharmacology, Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments, National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, Texas Medication Algorithm Project, and World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry). In the guidelines, mild depression has the most variance in treatment recommendations; some, but not all, guidelines suggest that it may resolve with exercise or watchful waiting, but psychotherapy or antidepressants could be used if initial efforts fail. Moderate and severe major depression carry broadly similar recommendations among the guidelines. First-line treatment recommendations for moderate major depressive disorder include antidepressant monotherapy, psychotherapy, and the combination of both. Severe depression may require the combination of an antidepressant and an antipsychotic, electroconvulsive therapy, or the combination of an antidepressant and psychotherapy. Benzodiazepines play a very limited role in the treatment of depression; if the patient has catatonic depression, acutely suicidal depression, or depression with symptoms of anxiety, agitation, or insomnia, benzodiazepines are recommended by some guidelines for short-term treatment only.

  11. Omega-3 fatty acids in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Marlene P

    2009-01-01

    Patients with major depressive disorder have high rates of cardiovascular disease and other medical comorbidity. Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly those found in fish and seafood, have cardiovascular health benefits and may play an adjunctive role in the treatment of mood disorders. However, existing studies on omega-3 fatty acids in depression have limitations such as small sample sizes and a wide variance in study design, and results regarding efficacy are mixed. The preponderance of data from placebo-controlled treatment studies suggests that omega-3 fatty acids are a reasonable augmentation strategy for the treatment of major depressive disorder. More research is necessary before omega-3 supplements can be recommended as monotherapy for the treatment of depression. For many individuals with major depressive disorder, augmentation with omega-3 fatty acids should be considered, as general health benefits are well established and adjunctive use is low risk.

  12. Patterns and frequency of the treatment of depression in persons with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fiest, Kirsten M; Patten, Scott B; Altura, K Chelsea; Bulloch, Andrew G M; Maxwell, Colleen J; Wiebe, Samuel; Macrodimitris, Sophia; Jetté, Nathalie

    2014-10-01

    Though depression is common in persons with epilepsy, it often remains undiagnosed and/or untreated. The current study aimed to determine the proportion of persons with epilepsy receiving depression-related treatment and to characterize the type of treatment received. Persons with epilepsy (n=185) from the only epilepsy clinic in a city of 1.2 million people completed questionnaires and the gold-standard Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders (SCID) to assess current and past depression. Treatment for depression (pharmacological and nonpharmacological) was ascertained through patient self-report and chart review. Of those with current depression (n=27), the majority (70.3%) were not on any depression-related treatment. In persons with current depression, nonpharmacological management was the most common treatment method, followed by treatment with psychotropic medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. More individuals with a past history of depression but without a current episode (n=43) were treated (37.2%); it was more common for these individuals to be treated with pharmacological measures. After using an algorithm that adjusts the treated prevalence for those who are successfully treated, the adjusted proportion of depression treatment was 53.1%. The proportion of people treated for current depression in this cohort was very low. Future studies should investigate barriers to treatment and how depression treatment can be optimized for those with epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reports of the childhood home environment in early-onset dysthymia and episodic major depression.

    PubMed

    Lizardi, H; Klein, D N; Ouimette, P C; Riso, L P; Anderson, R L; Donaldson, S K

    1995-02-01

    This study addressed 2 questions: (a) is early-onset dysthymia associated with reports of a disturbed childhood home environment; and (b) can adverse early experiences account, at least in part, for the differing clinical presentations of dysthymia and major depression? Participants included 97 outpatients with early-onset dysthymia, 45 outpatients with episodic major depression, and 45 normal controls. The early home environment was assessed blind to diagnosis using both interview and self-report measures. Early-onset dysthymia patients reported significantly more physical and sexual abuse and poorer relationships with both parents than normal controls. In addition, patients with dysthymia reported having received significantly poorer parenting than those with episodic major depression. The results could not be accounted for by mood state effects, comorbidity with borderline and antisocial personality disorder, or comorbid major depression.

  14. Are depressive persons capable of describing changes in their reactions without being able to explain them? A proof of a cybernetic hypothesis of depression.

    PubMed

    Leibetseder, Max; Kamolz, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Many studies on the autobiographical memory and the explanation of reasons for success and failure proved that persons suffering from major depression tend to overgeneralize. This study examines the hypothesis that changes of reactions caused by a depressive disorder can be described by the affected persons but not explained. Persons suffering from major depression and persons with posttraumatic stress disorder or disturbance of accommodation with depressive mood (= reactive form of a depressive disorder) were presented with a list of modalities (behaviour, emotional and physical reactions) characteristic for depression. They were asked to identify modalities applicable to them and to describe and explain them. Their responses were analysed using a content analysis and assigned to the categories description and explanation. Persons with a major depression tended to use explanations or evaluations rather than descriptions for their depression-related modalities. Those persons suffering from a reactive form of depressive disorder tended to prefer evaluations. These results support the assumption that states of depression cause general descriptions of depression-relevant behaviour. The specific characteristics that have been perceived confirm the general concepts, which however make the patient prone to the respective selective perceptions. Persons suffering from a reactive form of depressive mood cannot be assumed to have this tendency of self-affirmation. Their depressive state may be maintained by perseverating general pessimistic schemes. It must however be conceded that it was not possible to control the physical comorbidity methodically and to take its effects into consideration, even though only persons without serious illnesses were included in the samples. This study did not verify whether other clinical groups, like patients suffering from anxiety, show the same patterns of explaining and describing their problems. It should furthermore be reviewed how other

  15. Major Depressive Disorder in Adolescence: The Role of Subthreshold Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiades, Katholiki; Lewinsohn, Peter M.; Monroe, Scott M.; Seeley, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine the longitudinal association between individual subthreshold symptoms and onset of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescence. Method: Data for analysis come from the Oregon Adolescent Depression Project, a prospective epidemiological study of psychological disorders among adolescents, ages 14 to 18 years, from the…

  16. Major Depressive Disorder in Adolescence: The Role of Subthreshold Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiades, Katholiki; Lewinsohn, Peter M.; Monroe, Scott M.; Seeley, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine the longitudinal association between individual subthreshold symptoms and onset of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescence. Method: Data for analysis come from the Oregon Adolescent Depression Project, a prospective epidemiological study of psychological disorders among adolescents, ages 14 to 18 years, from the…

  17. Decreased Prostaglandin D2 Levels in Major Depressive Disorder Are Associated with Depression-Like Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Cuilin; Wei, Hui; Zhu, Wanwan; Shen, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Prostaglandin (PG) D2 is the most abundant prostaglandin in the mammalian brain. The physiological and pharmacological actions of PGD2 in the central nervous system seem to be associated with some of the symptoms exhibited by patients with major depressive disorder. Previous studies have found that PGD2 synthase was decreased in the cerebrospinal fluid of major depressive disorder patients. We speculated that there may be a dysregulation of PGD2 levels in major depressive disorder. Methods Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with a stable isotopic-labeled internal standard was used to determine PGD2 levels in the plasma of major depressive disorder patients and in the brains of depressive mice. A total of 32 drug-free major depressive disorder patients and 30 healthy controls were recruited. An animal model of depression was constructed by exposing mice to 5 weeks of chronic unpredictable mild stress. To explore the role of PGD2 in major depressive disorder, selenium tetrachloride was administered to simulate the change in PGD2 levels in mice. Results Mice exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress exhibited depression-like behaviors, as indicated by reduced sucrose preference and increased immobility time in the forced swimming test. PGD2 levels in the plasma of major depressive disorder patients and in the brains of depressive mice were both decreased compared with their corresponding controls. Further inhibiting PGD2 production in mice resulted in an increased immobility time in the forced swimming test that could be reversed by imipramine. Conclusion Decreased PGD2 levels in major depressive disorder are associated with depression-like behaviors. PMID:28582515

  18. Decreased Prostaglandin D2 Levels in Major Depressive Disorder Are Associated with Depression-Like Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cuilin; Wei, Hui; Zhu, Wanwan; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qi

    2017-09-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) D2 is the most abundant prostaglandin in the mammalian brain. The physiological and pharmacological actions of PGD2 in the central nervous system seem to be associated with some of the symptoms exhibited by patients with major depressive disorder. Previous studies have found that PGD2 synthase was decreased in the cerebrospinal fluid of major depressive disorder patients. We speculated that there may be a dysregulation of PGD2 levels in major depressive disorder. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with a stable isotopic-labeled internal standard was used to determine PGD2 levels in the plasma of major depressive disorder patients and in the brains of depressive mice. A total of 32 drug-free major depressive disorder patients and 30 healthy controls were recruited. An animal model of depression was constructed by exposing mice to 5 weeks of chronic unpredictable mild stress. To explore the role of PGD2 in major depressive disorder, selenium tetrachloride was administered to simulate the change in PGD2 levels in mice. Mice exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress exhibited depression-like behaviors, as indicated by reduced sucrose preference and increased immobility time in the forced swimming test. PGD2 levels in the plasma of major depressive disorder patients and in the brains of depressive mice were both decreased compared with their corresponding controls. Further inhibiting PGD2 production in mice resulted in an increased immobility time in the forced swimming test that could be reversed by imipramine. Decreased PGD2 levels in major depressive disorder are associated with depression-like behaviors.

  19. Replication and Extension: Separate Personality Traits from States to Predict Depression

    PubMed Central

    Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Thase, Michael E.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in personality trait levels often parallel episodes of major depressive disorder (MDD), whereas trait factor structures and substantial retest correlations are preserved. We explicated this dual state/trait nature of personality assessments among adults with recurrent MDD (N=351) receiving cognitive therapy (CT). We tested stability and change in the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality, 2nd Edition (SNAP-2; Clark et al., in press), separated state and trait variance, and predicted depressive symptoms and clinical outcomes. Many SNAP scale scores changed in CT (e.g., positive temperament increased, negative temperament decreased), and decreases in depressive symptoms accounted for most scales' score changes. Nonetheless, SNAP scales' state and trait components predicted depressive symptoms early and late in CT as well as clinical outcomes, and state components predicted changes in symptoms and clinical outcomes. These results support the validity of the SNAP-2 among depressed patients and highlight the salience of personality-relevant state affect. PMID:23786268

  20. Major depression in panic disorder patients with comorbid social phobia.

    PubMed

    Reiter, S R; Otto, M W; Pollack, M H; Rosenbaum, J F

    1991-07-01

    Rates of depression among panic disorder patients are particularly elevated in patients with comorbid social phobia. However, it is unclear whether this association is specific to social phobia, or whether any comorbid anxiety disorder increases the risk of depression. We assessed 100 panic disorder patients and found a significantly higher incidence of lifetime major depression for panic patients with comorbid social phobia or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Panic patients with comorbid social phobia had significantly higher scores on measures of dysfunctional attitudes and lower scores on measures of assertiveness; these variables may mediate the link between social phobia and depression in this population.

  1. Neurobiology of chronic mild stress: Parallels to major depression

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Matthew N.; Hellemans, Kim G.C.; Verma, Pamela; Gorzalka, Boris B.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    The chronic mild (or unpredictable/variable) stress (CMS) model was developed as an animal model of depression more than 20 years ago. The foundation of this model was that following long-term exposure to a series of mild, but unpredictable stressors, animals would develop a state of impaired reward salience that was akin to the anhedonia observed in major depressive disorder. In the time since its inception, this model has also been used for a variety of studies examining neurobiological variables that are associated with depression, despite the fact that this model has never been critically examined to validate that the neurobiological changes induced by CMS are parallel to those documented in depressive disorder. The aim of the current review is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the effects of chronic mild stress on neurobiological variables, such as neurochemistry, neurochemical receptor expression and functionality, neurotrophin expression and cellular plasticity. These findings are then compared to those of clinical research examining common variables in populations with depressive disorders to determine if the changes observed following chronic mild stress are in fact consistent with those observed in major depression. We conclude that the chronic mild stress paradigm: (1) evokes an array of neurobiological changes that mirror those seen in depressive disorders and (2) may be a suitable tool to investigate novel systems that could be disturbed in depression, and thus aid in the development of novel targets for the treatment of depression. PMID:22776763

  2. Subcortical volumes differentiate Major Depressive Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, and remitted Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Sacchet, Matthew D; Livermore, Emily E; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Glover, Gary H; Gotlib, Ian H

    2015-09-01

    Subcortical gray matter regions have been implicated in mood disorders, including Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Bipolar Disorder (BD). It is unclear, however, whether or how these regions differ among mood disorders and whether such abnormalities are state- or trait-like. In this study, we examined differences in subcortical gray matter volumes among euthymic BD, MDD, remitted MDD (RMD), and healthy (CTL) individuals. Using automated gray matter segmentation of T1-weighted MRI images, we estimated volumes of 16 major subcortical gray matter structures in 40 BD, 57 MDD, 35 RMD, and 61 CTL individuals. We used multivariate analysis of variance to examine group differences in these structures, and support vector machines (SVMs) to assess individual-by-individual classification. Analyses yielded significant group differences for caudate (p = 0.029) and ventral diencephalon (VD) volumes (p = 0.003). For the caudate, both the BD (p = 0.004) and the MDD (p = 0.037) participants had smaller volumes than did the CTL participants. For the VD, the MDD participants had larger volumes than did the BD and CTL participants (ps < 0.005). SVM distinguished MDD from BD with 59.5% accuracy. These findings indicate that mood disorders are characterized by anomalies in subcortical gray matter volumes and that the caudate and VD contribute uniquely to differential affective pathology. Identifying abnormalities in subcortical gray matter may prove useful for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of mood disorders.

  3. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Edward H

    2013-01-01

    There is controversy about depression being a physical illness, in part because a reproducible, sensitive, and specific biologic marker is not available. However, there is evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress may be associated with abnormal brain function and mood disorders, such as depression. This paper reviews selected human and animal studies providing evidence that intracellular mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction in specific brain regions is associated with major depressive disorder. This supports the hypothesis that chronic mitochondrial dysfunction in specific tissues may be associated with depression. Evaluation of mitochondrial dysfunction in specific tissues may broaden the perspective of depression beyond theories about neurotransmitters or receptor sites, and may explain the persistent signs and symptoms of depression. PMID:23650447

  4. Long-term morbidity in bipolar-I, bipolar-II, and unipolar major depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Forte, Alberto; Baldessarini, Ross J; Tondo, Leonardo; Vázquez, Gustavo H; Pompili, Maurizio; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-06-01

    Long-term symptomatic status in persons with major depressive and bipolar disorders treated clinically is not well established, although mood disorders are leading causes of disability worldwide. To pool data on long-term morbidity, by type and as a proportion of time-at-risk, based on published studies and previously unreported data. We carried out systematic, computerized literature searches for information on percentage of time in specific morbid states in persons treated clinically and diagnosed with recurrent major depressive or bipolar I or II disorders, and incorporated new data from one of our centers. We analyzed data from 25 samples involving 2479 unipolar depressive and 3936 bipolar disorder subjects (total N=6415) treated clinically for 9.4 years. Proportions of time ill were surprisingly and similarly high across diagnoses: unipolar depressive (46.0%), bipolar I (43.7%), and bipolar II (43.2%) disorders, and morbidity was predominantly depressive: unipolar (100%), bipolar-II (81.2%), bipolar-I (69.6%). Percent-time-ill did not differ between UP and BD subjects, but declined significantly with longer exposure times. The findings indicate that depressive components of all major affective disorders accounted for 86% of the 43-46% of time in affective morbidity that occurred despite availability of effective treatments. These results encourage redoubled efforts to improve treatments for depression and adherence to their long-term use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Additive genetic contribution to symptom dimensions in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Rahel; Palmer, Rohan H C; Brick, Leslie A; McGeary, John E; Knopik, Valerie S; Beevers, Christopher G

    2016-05-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder with a complex genetic architecture. In this study, genomic-relatedness-matrix restricted maximum-likelihood analysis (GREML) was used to investigate the extent to which variance in depression symptoms/symptom dimensions can be explained by variation in common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of individuals with MDD (N = 1,558) who participated in the National Institute of Mental Health Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. A principal components analysis of items from the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) obtained prior to treatment revealed 4 depression symptom components: (a) appetite, (b) core depression symptoms (e.g., depressed mood, anhedonia), (c) insomnia, and (d) anxiety. These symptom dimensions were associated with SNP-based heritability (hSNP2) estimates of 30%, 14%, 30%, and 5%, respectively. Results indicated that the genetic contribution of common SNPs to depression symptom dimensions were not uniform. Appetite and insomnia symptoms in MDD had a relatively strong genetic contribution whereas the genetic contribution was relatively small for core depression and anxiety symptoms. While in need of replication, these results suggest that future gene discovery efforts may strongly benefit from parsing depression into its constituent parts. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Immunological differences between patients with major depression and somatization syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rief, W; Pilger, F; Ihle, D; Bosmans, E; Egyed, B; Maes, M

    2001-12-31

    There is some evidence that major depression is accompanied by activation of the inflammatory response system (IRS). There is also evidence that proinflammatory cytokines and induction of IRS activation are associated with sickness behavior in experimental animals. However, no research has examined the IRS in somatization disorder. The aim of this study was to examine possible immunological differences between major depression, somatization and healthy controls. We measured the following IRS variables in patients with major depression (n=36), somatization syndrome (SSI-8; n=37), major depression and somatization (n=40) and healthy controls (n=37): interleukin-6 (IL-6); interleukin-1-receptor-antagonist (IL-1RA); plasma soluble interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R); soluble suppressor/cytotoxic antigen (CD8); leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF-R); and Clara cell protein (CC16), an endogenous anticytokine. Serum CD8 concentrations were significantly increased in patients with major depression compared with concentrations in patients with somatization syndrome, whereas concentrations in normal controls were intermediate between those of the two groups of patients. Serum CC16 was significantly lower in major depression than in healthy controls. The highest CC16 scores were found in patients with somatization syndrome. Somatizing patients have significantly lower serum IL-6 values than normal controls and depressed patients. The present results indicate (1) an activation of the IRS in depression with signs of T-cell activation (increased CD8), monocytic activation (IL-1RA) and a lowered anti-inflammatory capacity of the serum (lower CC16) and (2) an immune alteration in somatizing syndrome, such as monocytic activation (increased IL-1RA) and indicators of lowered T-lymphocytic activity (lowered CD8 and IL-6). These results suggest different immune alterations in somatization syndrome and depression.

  7. Discriminating Between Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Vöhringer, Paul A; Perlis, Roy H

    2016-03-01

    Rates of misdiagnosis between major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder have been reported to be substantial, and the consequence of such misdiagnosis is likely to be a delay in achieving effective control of symptoms, in some cases spanning many years. Particularly in the midst of a depressive episode, or early in the illness course, it may be challenging to distinguish the 2 mood disorders purely on the basis of cross-sectional features. To date, no useful biological markers have been reliably shown to distinguish between bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder.

  8. Personality-related core beliefs in patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia plus depression: A comparison with depressed and healthy control groups.

    PubMed

    Taymur, Ibrahim; Ozdel, Kadir; Gundogdu, Ibrahim; Efe, Canan; Tulaci, Riza Gokcer; Kervancioglu, Aysegul

    2015-07-01

    Personality has an important role in understanding both fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and major depressive disorder (MDD). This study considers the question that specific personality features may characterize depressed FMS patients. To this end, 125 individuals were included in the study: 40 of them diagnosed with FMS+ MDD, 40 with MDD only and 45 healthy controls. Individual Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Personality Belief Questionnaire-Short Form (PBQ-SF) scores were compared between the three groups. The mean scores for each personality domain of the PBQ-SF were the highest in the MDD group and the lowest mean scores appeared in the control group. Dependent personality and obsessive-compulsive personality scores were higher in the MDD group (t = 2.510, P = 0.014 and t = 2.240, P = 0.028, respectively) in comparison with the FM+ MDD group. However, this difference disappeared when PBQ-SF scores were controlled for depression severity. Although some common personality features are evident in FMS patients, it seems that the differences identified are primarily related to depression symptom severity.

  9. Twin pregnancies: evaluation of major depression, stress, and social support.

    PubMed

    Benute, Glaucia R G; Nozzella, Debora C R; Prohaska, Cecilia; Liao, Adolfo; de Lucia, Mara C S; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2013-04-01

    Twin pregnancies are at increased physiological and psychosocial risks. To investigate the prevalence of major depression in twin pregnancies and correlate with stress and social support. The study included 51 pregnant women under specialized prenatal care who were evaluated by a Portuguese version of the semi-structured questionnaire Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD) for Major Depression, and the Prenatal Psychosocial Profile (PPP) for evaluation of stress and social support. Major depression was found in 33.3% of pregnant women, and prevailing symptoms were fatigue or loss of energy (100%), insomnia or hypersomnia (82.4%), changes in appetite (82.4%), decreased interest in daily activities (82.4%), and psychomotor agitation or retardation (82.4%). Among pregnant women who were diagnosed depressive, 76.5% also had a high level of stress and 47.1% complained about lack of social support. Statistical significance was found when correlating depression with perception of negative aspects of having twins and belief in significant body changes during pregnancy (p = .005 and .03, respectively). Marital status, occupation, and pregnancy planning were not significantly associated with the diagnosis of depression. Major depression occurs in one-third of pregnant women expecting twins and is associated with higher levels of stress and lack of social support. A multidisciplinary approach in these cases is fundamental to minimize further risks and complications.

  10. SEPARATE PERSONALITY TRAITS FROM STATES TO PREDICT DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Vittengl, Jeffrey; Kraft, Dolores

    2005-01-01

    Results have been inconsistent regarding the ability of personality measures to predict future depression severity levels, leading some researchers to question the validity of personality assessment, especially when patients are acutely depressed. Using a combination of regression and factor analytic techniques, we separated the variance of personality measures into stable trait and variable state-affect components. Findings supported the hypotheses that depression severity measured at different time points would correlate with both stable trait and concurrent state-affect components in personality measures, whereas change in depression severity would correlate with state changes but not with stable trait scores. Thus, personality assessments tap both state affect and trait variance, with the state-affect variance masking the trait variance when patients are depressed. PMID:12755328

  11. Verbal fluency in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and major depression

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Narahyana Bom; Barca, Maria Lage; Engedal, Knut; Coutinho, Evandro Silva Freire; Deslandes, Andrea Camaz; Laks, Jerson

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare verbal fluency among Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and major depression and to assess the sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with the disease severity. METHODS: Patients from an outpatient university center with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or major depression were studied. Severity was staged using the Hoehn & Yahr scale, the Hamilton Depression scale and the Clinical Dementia Rating for Parkinson's disease, major depression, and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. All subjects were tested with the Mini-Mental State Examination, the digit span test, and the verbal fluency test (animals). We fit four types of regression models for the count variable: Poisson model, negative binomial model, zero-inflated Poisson model, and zero-inflated negative binomial model. RESULTS: The mean digit span and verbal fluency scores were lower in patients with Alzheimer's disease (n = 34) than in patients with major depression (n = 52) or Parkinson's disease (n = 17) (p<0.001). The average number of words listed was much lower for Alzheimer's disease patients (7.2 words) compared to the patients presenting with major depression (14.6 words) or Parkinson's disease (15.7 words) (KW test = 32.4; p<0.01). Major depression and Parkinson's disease groups listed 44% (ROM = 1.44) and 48% (ROM = 1.48) more words, respectively, compared to those patients with Alzheimer's disease; these results were independent of age, education, disease severity and attention. Independently of diagnosis, age, and education, severe disease showed a 26% (ROM = 0.74) reduction in the number of words listed when compared to mild cases. CONCLUSIONS: Verbal fluency provides a better characterization of Alzheimer's disease, major depression, and Parkinson's disease, even at later stages. PMID:21655757

  12. Major depressive disorder, antidepressants, and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Anita H; Montejo, Angel L

    2006-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common problem with a number of causes, including psychosocial factors, general medical illness, psychiatric disorders, and psychotropic and nonpsychiatric medications. It is especially prevalent among patients with poor emotional health and has been strongly associated with antidepressant medications. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in particular have demonstrated a higher incidence of sexual dysfunction than other antidepressants that work through different mechanisms of action. Further supporting the relationship between sexual dysfunction and antidepressant mechanism of action, data from a number of studies indicate that bupropion, nefazodone, and mirtazapine alleviate symptoms of sexual dysfunction and are as effective as SSRIs at controlling depressive symptoms. Although a number of strategies besides drug substitution have been utilized to help manage antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction, many patients remain suboptimally treated; as many as 42% of patients were found to passively wait for spontaneous remission. The addition of antidotal therapy has been proven to be among the effective management strategies for sexual dysfunction. However, due to a lack of systematic data, additional studies are warranted to further investigate these findings.

  13. Insular and hippocampal gray matter volume reductions in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Stratmann, Mirjam; Konrad, Carsten; Kugel, Harald; Krug, Axel; Schöning, Sonja; Ohrmann, Patricia; Uhlmann, Christina; Postert, Christian; Suslow, Thomas; Heindel, Walter; Arolt, Volker; Kircher, Tilo; Dannlowski, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is a serious psychiatric illness with a highly variable and heterogeneous clinical course. Due to the lack of consistent data from previous studies, the study of morphometric changes in major depressive disorder is still a major point of research requiring additional studies. The aim of the study presented here was to characterize and quantify regional gray matter abnormalities in a large sample of clinically well-characterized patients with major depressive disorder. For this study one-hundred thirty two patients with major depressive disorder and 132 age- and gender-matched healthy control participants were included, 35 with their first episode and 97 with recurrent depression. To analyse gray matter abnormalities, voxel-based morphometry (VBM8) was employed on T1 weighted MRI data. We performed whole-brain analyses as well as a region-of-interest approach on the hippocampal formation, anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala, correlating the number of depressive episodes. Compared to healthy control persons, patients showed a strong gray-matter reduction in the right anterior insula. In addition, region-of-interest analyses revealed significant gray-matter reductions in the hippocampal formation. The observed alterations were more severe in patients with recurrent depressive episodes than in patients with a first episode. The number of depressive episodes was negatively correlated with gray-matter volume in the right hippocampus and right amygdala. The anterior insula gray matter structure appears to be strongly affected in major depressive disorder and might play an important role in the neurobiology of depression. The hippocampal and amygdala volume loss cumulating with the number of episodes might be explained either by repeated neurotoxic stress or alternatively by higher relapse rates in patients showing hippocampal atrophy.

  14. Insular and Hippocampal Gray Matter Volume Reductions in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kugel, Harald; Krug, Axel; Schöning, Sonja; Ohrmann, Patricia; Uhlmann, Christina; Postert, Christian; Suslow, Thomas; Heindel, Walter; Arolt, Volker; Kircher, Tilo; Dannlowski, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder is a serious psychiatric illness with a highly variable and heterogeneous clinical course. Due to the lack of consistent data from previous studies, the study of morphometric changes in major depressive disorder is still a major point of research requiring additional studies. The aim of the study presented here was to characterize and quantify regional gray matter abnormalities in a large sample of clinically well-characterized patients with major depressive disorder. Methods For this study one-hundred thirty two patients with major depressive disorder and 132 age- and gender-matched healthy control participants were included, 35 with their first episode and 97 with recurrent depression. To analyse gray matter abnormalities, voxel-based morphometry (VBM8) was employed on T1 weighted MRI data. We performed whole-brain analyses as well as a region-of-interest approach on the hippocampal formation, anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala, correlating the number of depressive episodes. Results Compared to healthy control persons, patients showed a strong gray-matter reduction in the right anterior insula. In addition, region-of-interest analyses revealed significant gray-matter reductions in the hippocampal formation. The observed alterations were more severe in patients with recurrent depressive episodes than in patients with a first episode. The number of depressive episodes was negatively correlated with gray-matter volume in the right hippocampus and right amygdala. Conclusions The anterior insula gray matter structure appears to be strongly affected in major depressive disorder and might play an important role in the neurobiology of depression. The hippocampal and amygdala volume loss cumulating with the number of episodes might be explained either by repeated neurotoxic stress or alternatively by higher relapse rates in patients showing hippocampal atrophy. PMID:25051163

  15. Rumination mediates the relationship between overgeneral autobiographical memory and depression in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yansong; Yu, Xinnian; Yang, Bixiu; Zhang, Fuquan; Zou, Wenhua; Na, Aiguo; Zhao, Xudong; Yin, Guangzhong

    2017-03-21

    Overgeneral autobiographical memory has been identified as a risk factor for the onset and maintenance of depression. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms that might explain overgeneral autobiographical memory phenomenon in depression. The purpose of this study was to test the mediation effects of rumination on the relationship between overgeneral autobiographical memory and depressive symptoms. Specifically, the mediation effects of brooding and reflection subtypes of rumination were examined in patients with major depressive disorder. Eighty-seven patients with major depressive disorder completed the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Ruminative Response Scale, and Autobiographical Memory Test. Bootstrap mediation analysis for simple and multiple mediation models through the PROCESS macro was applied. Simple mediation analysis showed that rumination significantly mediated the relationship between overgeneral autobiographical memory and depression symptoms. Multiple mediation analyses showed that brooding, but not reflection, significantly mediated the relationship between overgeneral autobiographical memory and depression symptoms. Our results indicate that global rumination partly mediates the relationship between overgeneral autobiographical memory and depressive symptoms in patients with major depressive disorder. Furthermore, the present results suggest that the mediating role of rumination in the relationship between overgeneral autobiographical memory and depression is mainly due to the maladaptive brooding subtype of rumination.

  16. Lithium augmentation of venlafaxine in adolescent major depression.

    PubMed

    Walter, G; Lyndon, B; Kubb, R

    1998-06-01

    Studies on the pharmacotherapy of adolescent major depression are limited but suggest that the illness is often resistant to drug treatment. We aim to report the use of lithium augmentation of venlafaxine in two teenagers with major depression. Two 16-year-olds with major depression are described. In both patients, the treatment involved trials of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, venlafaxine, and psychotherapy preceded lithium augmentation of venlafaxine. The trial of venlafaxine alone had been short in one patient. Combining lithium and venlafaxine was rapidly followed by marked improvement in mood and function. Augmentation of antidepressants should be considered in young depressed patients who fail to respond to adequate trials of new antidepressants alone.

  17. Genetic variants within the serotonin transporter associated with familial risk for major depression.

    PubMed

    Talati, Ardesheer; Guffanti, Guia; Odgerel, Zagaa; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Malm, Heli; Sourander, Andre; Brown, Alan S; Wickramaratne, Priya J; Gingrich, Jay A; Weissman, Myrna M

    2015-07-30

    The role of the serotonin transporter promoter linked polymorphism (5HTTLPR) in depression, despite much research, remains unclear. Most studies compare persons with and without depression to each other. We show offspring at high (N = 192) as compared to low (N = 101) familial risk for major depressive disorder were almost four times as likely to have two copies of the short allele at 5HTTLPR, suggesting that incorporation of family history could be helpful in identifying genetic differences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gender differences in the symptoms of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Romans, Sarah E; Tyas, Jeanette; Cohen, Marsha M; Silverstone, Trevor

    2007-11-01

    Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey 1.2 were used for a gender analysis of individual symptoms and overall rates of depression in the preceding 12 months. Major depressive disorder was assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview in this national, cross-sectional survey. The female to male ratio of major depressive disorder prevalence was 1.64:1, with n = 1766 having experienced depression (men 668, women 1098). Women reported statistically more depressive symptoms than men (p < 0.001). Depressed women were more likely to report "increased appetite" (15.5% vs. 10.7%), being "often in tears" (82.6% vs. 44.0%), "loss of interest" (86.9% vs. 81.1%), and "thoughts of death" (70.3% vs. 63.4%). No significant gender differences were found for the remaining symptoms. The data are interpreted against women's greater tendency to cry and to restrict food intake when not depressed. The question is raised whether these items preferentially bias assessment of gender differences in depression, particularly in nonclinic samples.

  19. Major depression, physical illness, and suicidal ideation in primary care.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Renee D; Kroenke, Kurt; Hoven, Christina W; Spitzer, Robert L

    2003-01-01

    To determine the association between major depression and suicidal ideation and the role of physical illness in this link among primary care patients. More than 3,000 randomly selected primary care patients at eight sites across the United States completed the PRIME-MD PHQ, a screen for mental disorders for use in primary care. Physicians independently diagnosed physical illnesses. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to determine the relationship between PRIME-MD depression, physical illness, and suicidal ideation. Pulmonary disease was associated with an increased likelihood of suicidal ideation, even among patients without major depression [odds ratio = 1.9 (1.04, 3.4)]. There was evidence of statistical interaction between pulmonary disease and depression in increasing the odds of suicidal ideation. Specifically, patients with pulmonary disease without depression, those with depression without pulmonary disease, and patients with both pulmonary disease and depression had significantly increased odds of suicidal ideation with odd ratios of 1.9 (1.04, 3.4), 7.4 (5.6, 9.7), and 9.6 (5.1, 18.0), respectively. These data suggest that some physical disorders may be associated with increased suicidal ideation in primary care and may also play a role in the relationship between depression and suicidal ideation among primary care patients. Primary care physicians may wish to engage in an in-depth evaluation of psychiatric problems, especially current suicidal ideation, among patients with specific ongoing physical illnesses.

  20. Childhood abuse, personality traits, and depressive symptoms in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Ah; Song, Rira

    2017-03-01

    This study examined associations among childhood abuse, personality traits, and depressive symptoms in adulthood, and whether and how the effects of childhood abuse on depressive symptoms are mediated by the Big Five personality traits (i.e., extraversion, conscientiousness, emotional stability, agreeableness, and openness). The data were drawn from the 2012 Korean General Social Survey, a nationally representative survey using a multistage area proportional probability sampling method. Random effects regression and the Sobel test were used. Random effects models showed that physical and emotional abuse in childhood significantly increased depressive symptoms in adulthood, even after controlling for personality traits and socio-demographic factors. The coefficients of childhood abuse slightly decreased when personality traits were controlled, suggesting that personality traits mediated the relationship between childhood abuse and depressive symptoms. Among the personality traits, extraversion and emotional stability were negatively associated with depressive symptoms whereas agreeableness was positively associated with depressive symptoms. The results of the Sobel test showed that only emotional stability significantly mediated the effects of childhood abuse on depressive symptoms. Those who were exposed to childhood abuse had lower levels of emotional stability, which, in turn, led to depressive symptoms in adulthood. The findings suggest that childhood abuse may have a long lasting effect on mental health over the life course by influencing the formation of personality traits through developmental periods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Internal medical residents' ability to diagnose and characterize major depression.

    PubMed Central

    Medow, M A; Borowsky, S J; Dysken, S; Hillson, S D; Woods, S; Wilt, T J

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess medical residents' knowledge of symptom criteria and subtypes of major depressive episode and their accuracy in diagnosing major depressive disorders and classifying episode severity and subtype according to criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Thirty-five third-year internal medicine residents completed a self-administered, written instrument containing 2 open-ended questions and 21 hypothetical scenarios. The sensitivity for recognizing major depressive disorder was 64%, and the specificity was 69%. The sensitivity for classifying severity was 86% for mild, 66% for moderate, 71% for severe, and 66% for severe with psychosis. Misclassification of severity was most commonly to a less severe class. For scenarios with a diagnosable subtype of a major depressive disorder, the sensitivity for classification was 34% for atypical, 51% for catatonic, 74% for melancholic, 100% for postpartum, and 94% for seasonal depression. When asked to enumerate the criteria symptoms for depression, 80% or more of the residents listed sad mood, loss of interest, weight change, and sleep disturbances; 14 to 21 (40%-60%) listed thoughts of death and worthlessness; other criteria were listed by 7 to 11 (20%-31%). When asked to list the episode subtypes, none was listed by more than 3 (9%) residents, although 13 (37%) residents volunteered psychotic as a subtype. Residents frequently failed to recognize the presence or absence of major depressive disorder and often misclassified episode severity and subtype on scenarios. Few could spontaneously list the episode subtypes. Methods must be developed to improve the recognition and classification of major depressive episodes to better direct treatment. Images Figure 3. PMID:9926734

  2. Internal medical residents' ability to diagnose and characterize major depression.

    PubMed

    Medow, M A; Borowsky, S J; Dysken, S; Hillson, S D; Woods, S; Wilt, T J

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess medical residents' knowledge of symptom criteria and subtypes of major depressive episode and their accuracy in diagnosing major depressive disorders and classifying episode severity and subtype according to criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Thirty-five third-year internal medicine residents completed a self-administered, written instrument containing 2 open-ended questions and 21 hypothetical scenarios. The sensitivity for recognizing major depressive disorder was 64%, and the specificity was 69%. The sensitivity for classifying severity was 86% for mild, 66% for moderate, 71% for severe, and 66% for severe with psychosis. Misclassification of severity was most commonly to a less severe class. For scenarios with a diagnosable subtype of a major depressive disorder, the sensitivity for classification was 34% for atypical, 51% for catatonic, 74% for melancholic, 100% for postpartum, and 94% for seasonal depression. When asked to enumerate the criteria symptoms for depression, 80% or more of the residents listed sad mood, loss of interest, weight change, and sleep disturbances; 14 to 21 (40%-60%) listed thoughts of death and worthlessness; other criteria were listed by 7 to 11 (20%-31%). When asked to list the episode subtypes, none was listed by more than 3 (9%) residents, although 13 (37%) residents volunteered psychotic as a subtype. Residents frequently failed to recognize the presence or absence of major depressive disorder and often misclassified episode severity and subtype on scenarios. Few could spontaneously list the episode subtypes. Methods must be developed to improve the recognition and classification of major depressive episodes to better direct treatment.

  3. Risk Factors for Anxiety in Major Depressive Disorder Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Li-Min; Chen, Lin; Ji, Zhen-Peng; Zhang, Suo-Yuan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Yan-Hong; Chen, Da-Fang; Yang, Fu-De; Wang, Gang; Fang, Yi-Ru; Lu, Zheng; Yang, Hai-Chen; Hu, Jian; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Huang, Yi; Sun, Jing; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Hui-Chun; Zhang, Jin-Bei; Si, Tian-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the sociodemographic and clinical factors related to anxiety in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods This study involved a secondary analysis of data obtained from the Diagnostic Assessment Service for People with Bipolar Disorders in China (DASP), which was initiated by the Chinese Society of Psychiatry (CSP) and conducted from September 1, 2010 to February 28, 2011. Based on the presence or absence of anxiety-related characteristics, 1,178 MDD patients were classified as suffering from anxious depression (n=915) or non-anxious depression (n=263), respectively. Results Compared with the non-anxious group, the anxious-depression group had an older age at onset (t=−4.39, p<0.001), were older (t=−4.69, p<0.001), reported more lifetime depressive episodes (z=−3.24, p=0.001), were more likely to experience seasonal depressive episodes (χ2=6.896, p=0.009) and depressive episodes following stressful life events (χ2=59.350, p<0.001), and were more likely to have a family history of psychiatric disorders (χ2=6.091, p=0.014). Their positive and total scores on the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) and the 32-item Hypomania Checklist (HCL-32) (p<0.05) were also lower. The logistic regression analysis indicated that age (odds ratio [OR]=1.03, p<0.001), a lower total MDQ score (OR=0.94, p=0.011), depressive episodes following stressful life events (OR=3.04, p<0.001), and seasonal depressive episodes (OR=1.75, p=0.039) were significantly associated with anxious depression. Conclusion These findings indicate that older age, fewer subclinical bipolar features, an increased number of depressive episodes following stressful life events, and seasonal depressive episodes may be risk factors for anxiety-related characteristics in patients with MDD. PMID:26598584

  4. Risk Factors for Anxiety in Major Depressive Disorder Patients.

    PubMed

    Xin, Li-Min; Chen, Lin; Ji, Zhen-Peng; Zhang, Suo-Yuan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Yan-Hong; Chen, Da-Fang; Yang, Fu-De; Wang, Gang; Fang, Yi-Ru; Lu, Zheng; Yang, Hai-Chen; Hu, Jian; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Huang, Yi; Sun, Jing; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Hui-Chun; Zhang, Jin-Bei; Si, Tian-Mei

    2015-12-31

    To analyze the sociodemographic and clinical factors related to anxiety in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This study involved a secondary analysis of data obtained from the Diagnostic Assessment Service for People with Bipolar Disorders in China (DASP), which was initiated by the Chinese Society of Psychiatry (CSP) and conducted from September 1, 2010 to February 28, 2011. Based on the presence or absence of anxiety-related characteristics, 1,178 MDD patients were classified as suffering from anxious depression (n=915) or non-anxious depression (n=263), respectively. Compared with the non-anxious group, the anxious-depression group had an older age at onset (t=-4.39, p<0.001), were older (t=-4.69, p<0.001), reported more lifetime depressive episodes (z=-3.24, p=0.001), were more likely to experience seasonal depressive episodes (χ(2)=6.896, p=0.009) and depressive episodes following stressful life events (χ2=59.350, p <0.001), and were more likely to have a family history of psychiatric disorders (χ(2)=6.091, p=0.014). Their positive and total scores on the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) and the 32-item Hypomania Checklist (HCL-32) (p<0.05) were also lower. The logistic regression analysis indicated that age (odds ratio [OR]=1.03, p<0.001), a lower total MDQ score (OR=0.94, p=0.011), depressive episodes following stressful life events (OR=3.04, p<0.001), and seasonal depressive episodes (OR=1.75, p=0.039) were significantly associated with anxious depression. These findings indicate that older age, fewer subclinical bipolar features, an increased number of depressive episodes following stressful life events, and seasonal depressive episodes may be risk factors for anxiety-related characteristics in patients with MDD.

  5. Within-person Changes in Individual Symptoms of Depression Predict Subsequent Depressive Episodes in Adolescents: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Morris, Matthew C.; Garber, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The current longitudinal study examined which individual symptoms of depression uniquely predicted a subsequent Major Depressive Episode (MDE) in adolescents, and whether these relations differed by sex. Adolescents (N=240) were first interviewed in grade 6 (M=11.86 years old; SD = 0.56; 54% female; 81.5% Caucasian) and then annually through grade 12 regarding their individual symptoms of depression as well as the occurrence of MDEs. Individual symptoms of depression were assessed with the Children’s Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R) and depressive episodes were assessed with the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE). Results showed that within-person changes in sleep problems and low self-esteem/excessive guilt positively predicted an increased likelihood of an MDE for both boys and girls. Significant sex differences also were found. Within-person changes in anhedonia predicted an increased likelihood of a subsequent MDE among boys, whereas irritability predicted a decreased likelihood of a future MDE among boys, and concentration difficulties predicted a decreased likelihood of an MDE in girls. These results identified individual depressive symptoms that predicted subsequent depressive episodes in male and female adolescents, and may be used to guide the early detection, treatment, and prevention of depressive disorders in youth. PMID:26105209

  6. Incident Major Depressive Episodes increase the severity and risk of apathy in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Rujvi; Cattie, Jordan E.; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Woods, Steven Paul; Franklin, Donald R.; Corkran, Stephanie H.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Apathy and depression are inter-related yet separable and prevalent neuropsychiatric disturbances in persons infected with HIV. In the present study of 225 HIV+ persons, we investigated the role of an incident depressive episode in changes in apathy. Participants completed the apathy subscale of the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale during a detailed neuropsychiatric and neuromedical evaluation at visit 1 and again at approximately a 14 month follow-up. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to obtain diagnoses of a new major depressive disorder. At their follow-up visit, participants were classified into four groups depending on their visit 1 elevation in apathy and new major depressive episode (MDE) status. Apathetic participants at baseline with a new MDE (n=23) were at risk for continued, clinically elevated apathy at follow-up, although severity of symptoms did not increase. Of the 144 participants without clinically elevated apathy at visit 1, those who developed a new MDE (n=16) had greater apathy symptomatology at follow-up than those without MDE. These findings suggest that HIV+ individuals, who do not as yet present with elevated apathy, may be at greater risk of elevated psychiatric distress should they experience a new/recurrent depressive episode. Thus, in the context of previous findings, it appears that although apathy and depression are separable constructs, they interact such that a new depressive episode is a risk factor for incident apathy. PMID:25679203

  7. Incident major depressive episodes increase the severity and risk of apathy in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Rujvi; Cattie, Jordan E; Marcotte, Thomas D; Woods, Steven Paul; Franklin, Donald R; Corkran, Stephanie H; Ellis, Ronald J; Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K

    2015-04-01

    Apathy and depression are inter-related yet separable and prevalent neuropsychiatric disturbances in persons infected with HIV. In the present study of 225 HIV+ persons, we investigated the role of an incident depressive episode in changes in apathy. Participants completed the apathy subscale of the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale during a detailed neuropsychiatric and neuromedical evaluation at visit 1 and again at approximately a 14 month follow-up. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to obtain diagnoses of a new major depressive disorder. At their follow-up visit, participants were classified into four groups depending on their visit 1 elevation in apathy and new major depressive episode (MDE) status. Apathetic participants at baseline with a new MDE (n=23) were at risk for continued, clinically elevated apathy at follow-up, although severity of symptoms did not increase. Of the 144 participants without clinically elevated apathy at visit 1, those who developed a new MDE (n=16) had greater apathy symptomatology at follow-up than those without MDE. These findings suggest that HIV+ individuals, who do not as yet present with elevated apathy, may be at greater risk of elevated psychiatric distress should they experience a new/recurrent depressive episode. Thus, in the context of previous findings, it appears that although apathy and depression are separable constructs, they interact such that a new depressive episode is a risk factor for incident apathy.

  8. Increased Amygdala Response to Shame in Remitted Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pulcu, Erdem; Lythe, Karen; Elliott, Rebecca; Green, Sophie; Moll, Jorge; Deakin, John F. W.; Zahn, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Proneness to self-blaming moral emotions such as shame and guilt is increased in major depressive disorder (MDD), and may play an important role in vulnerability even after symptoms have subsided. Social psychologists have argued that shame-proneness is relevant for depression vulnerability and is distinct from guilt. Shame depends on the imagined critical perception of others, whereas guilt results from one’s own judgement. The neuroanatomy of shame in MDD is unknown. Using fMRI, we compared 21 participants with MDD remitted from symptoms with no current co-morbid axis-I disorders, and 18 control participants with no personal or family history of MDD. The MDD group exhibited higher activation of the right amygdala and posterior insula for shame relative to guilt (SPM8). This neural difference was observed despite equal levels of rated negative emotional valence and frequencies of induced shame and guilt experience across groups. These same results were found in the medication-free MDD subgroup (N = 15). Increased amygdala and posterior insula activations, known to be related to sensory perception of emotional stimuli, distinguish shame from guilt responses in remitted MDD. People with MDD thus exhibit changes in the neural response to shame after symptoms have subsided. This supports the hypothesis that shame and guilt play at least partly distinct roles in vulnerability to MDD. Shame-induction may be a more sensitive probe of residual amygdala hypersensitivity in MDD compared with facial emotion-evoked responses previously found to normalize on remission. PMID:24497992

  9. Associations of polyunsaturated fatty acids with residual depression or anxiety in older people with major depression.

    PubMed

    Jadoon, Ayesha; Chiu, Chih-Chiang; McDermott, Lindsay; Cunningham, Phil; Frangou, Sophia; Chang, Ching-Jui; Sun, I-Wen; Liu, Shen-Ing; Lu, Mong-Liang; Su, Kuan-Pin; Huang, Shih-Yi; Stewart, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Depression in late life often follows a chronic course with residual depressive and anxiety symptoms. Levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been found to be depleted in people with major depression in the acute stage. Additionally, lower omega-3 PUFA levels have been suggested to be associated with anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigate whether PUFAs levels (omega-3 or omega-6) are correlated with residual depressive or anxiety symptoms in older people with previous depression. Participants aged 60 years or over with previous major depression in remission were enrolled from outpatient psychiatric services of four hospitals. Participants with residual depressive symptoms were defined as the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) scores>5, and those with anxiety were defined as sum of scores for the two anxiety subscale of HDRS≧2. The levels of fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes and in plasma were measured separately by gas chromatography. One hundred and thirty two older people with previous major depression (mean age of 68 years, range 60-86 years) were analyzed. Erythrocyte membrane linoleic acid levels had a curvilinear association with depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms. Plasma linoleic acid levels were found to have a negative linear relationship with depressive symptoms. No significant associations were found between any omega-3 fatty acid level and depressive or anxiety symptoms. Linoleic acid levels may be a possible biomarker for residual depression and anxiety in older people with previous depression. Possible clinical applications need further investigation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Course of major depressive disorder and suicide outcome: a psychological autopsy study.

    PubMed

    McGirr, Alexander; Renaud, Johanne; Séguin, Monique; Alda, Martin; Turecki, Gustavo

    2008-06-01

    There is considerable debate as to whether suicide is more likely to occur early in the course of major depressive disorder or by cumulative risk, with an increasing risk with each subsequent major depressive episode (MDE). By considering the number of MDEs among representative suicides, we aimed to further investigate the relationship between suicide outcome and the course of major depressive disorder. A psychological autopsy method with best informants was used to investigate 154 consecutive suicides who died in the context of a DSM-IV MDE. Proxy-based interviews were conducted by using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R; the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II; and a series of behavioral and personality-trait assessments. Second, 143 living depressed outpatients of comparable age to the suicide group were assessed for their history of MDEs. The study was conducted between 2000 and 2005. The distribution of MDEs among depressed suicide completers was as follows: first MDE, 74.7%; second MDE, 18.8%; more than 2 MDEs, 6.5%. This distribution is compared to 32.9% of depressed living outpatients with a single MDE. Increased levels of hostility were associated with single MDE suicide completers. The anxious trait of harm avoidance increased among multiple MDE suicide completers. Alcohol abuse increased among first MDE suicide completers. Suicide in major depressive disorder is most likely to occur during the first MDE, and this appears to be related to increased levels of the impulsive-aggressive diathesis.

  11. Neurokinin-1 receptors are decreased in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Stockmeier, Craig A; Shi, Xiaochun; Konick, Lisa; Overholser, James C; Jurjus, George; Meltzer, Herbert Y; Friedman, Lee; Blier, Pierre; Rajkowska, Grazyna

    2002-07-02

    Treatment with an antagonist at the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor may alleviate depression, however the brain region(s) in which the NK-1 receptor antagonist exerts its therapeutic effect is unknown. [125I]BH-Substance P was used to measure NK-1 receptors postmortem in cytoarchitectonically defined areas of rostral orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 47) of subjects with major depressive disorder (n = 12, six females) and psychiatrically normal subjects (n = 11, five females). Six subjects with depression died by suicide. Subjects with depression showed decreased binding to NK-1 receptors across all cortical layers (p = 0.024). The pathophysiology of depression, and the reported therapeutic benefit of NK-1 receptor antagonists, may thus involve NK-1 receptors in prefrontal cortex.

  12. Trajectories of depressive symptoms after a major cardiac event

    PubMed Central

    Mittag, Oskar; Kampling, Hanna; Farin, Erik; Tully, Phillip J

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a common comorbidity in cardiac patients. This study sought to document fluctuations of depressive symptoms in the 12 months after a first major cardiac event. In all, 310 patients completed a battery of psychosocial measures including the depression subscale of the Symptom Check List-90-Revised. A total of 252 of them also completed follow-up measures at 3 and 12 months. Trajectories of depressive symptoms were classified as none, worsening symptoms, sustained remission, and persistent symptoms. Although the prevalence of depressive symptoms was consistent at each assessment, there was considerable fluctuation between symptom classes. Regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of different trajectories. PMID:28070385

  13. Major depression in the transition to adulthood: risks and impairments.

    PubMed

    Reinherz, H Z; Giaconia, R M; Hauf, A M; Wasserman, M S; Silverman, A B

    1999-08-01

    An ongoing longitudinal community study (N = 375) examined childhood risks and later adult impairments associated with 1-year Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (3rd ed., rev.; American Psychiatric Association, 1987) diagnoses of major depression during the transition to adulthood. Risks from birth to age 9 were reported by mothers, participants, and teachers. Teacher-reported hostility at age 6 predicted later depression. At age 9, self-perceptions of anxiety/depression, unpopularity, familial rejection, and abuse were potent risks. For men, neonatal and childhood health problems predicted later depression. For women, risks included family constellation, parental death, and poor academic achievement at age 9. Men and women who were depressed at age 18, age 21, or both demonstrated extensive psychosocial impairments in early adulthood, including poor overall functioning, interpersonal and behavioral problems, low self-esteem, and suicidality.

  14. Personality patterns and outcome in depressive and bipolar disorders.

    PubMed

    Heerlein, A; Richter, P; Gonzalez, M; Santander, J

    1998-01-01

    Personality traits and disorders have a strong influence on the course and outcome of depressive and bipolar disorders. Studies of the influence of personality disorders (PD) and some PD clusters on outcome of mood disorders are controversial and suggest that more specific assessment of underlying traits or dimensions is needed. Utilizing the Munich Personality test (MP-T) scales of von Zerssen, this study tries to identify specific personality traits that may influence the outcome and clinical course of unipolar endogenous depression and bipolar disorder. Six unipolar depressives and 6 bipolar patients, according to DSM III-R and ICD 10 criteria, were assessed with the MP-T self- and family-reporting scales. Three years later, their outcome scores were correlated with the corresponding premorbid personality profile. Preliminary results show that introversion has a negative effect on outcome of unipolar melancholic depression, while extraversion, esoteric tendencies and rigidity have a positive influence. Neuroticism has a negative influence on outcome of bipolar disorder, but not on unipolar endogenous depression. Data from the literature suggest that neuroticism, hostility and social dysfunction seem to have a negative prognostic value only for nonendogenous depressives and bipolar disorder, thus supporting the notion that the diagnostic distinction between bipolar disorder, endogenous and nonendogenous depression is relevant to prognostic discussions. These observations help to understand the differences between depressive syndromes and their relationship to prognosis, but also to comprehend the role of personality in clinical and theoretical research of mood disorders.

  15. Use of the five-factory inventory in characterizing patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Petersen, T; Bottonari, K; Alpert, J E; Fava, M; Nierenberg, A A

    2001-01-01

    Research on personality traits has suggested an association between depression and certain personality traits, such as neuroticism and extraversion. Costa and McCrae's five-factor personality inventory (NEO) has been shown to measure personality traits in a nonclinical population, but its use has not been fully explored in clinical populations. This study aims to compare NEO results in a sample of depressed outpatients with published test norms, and determine if different levels of neuroticism and extraversion are associated with differences in certain psychosocial and clinical characteristics. Seventy-six depressed outpatients participating in antidepressant clinical trials completed this self-report questionnaire before beginning pharmacological treatment. Diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) was made using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R or DSM-IV and the severity of depression was measured with the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). The three analyses conducted were as follows: (1) NEO factor scores were compared with published normative means; (2) three groups, based on level of neuroticism, were compared on certain psychosocial and clinical characteristics; and (3) three groups, based on level of extraversion, were compared on the same psychosocial and clinical characteristics. Both the males and females obtained T score values for the Neuroticism Scale 1.5 SD above the mean, for the Extraversion Scale 1.5 SD below the mean, and for the Conscientiousness Scale 1.5 SD below the mean. No significant differences were found between subjects with different levels of neuroticism and extraversion, although a trend did exist indicating a positive relationship between neuroticism and severity of depression. Depressed outpatients experience frequent negative affects, have irrational thought processes, cope with stress poorly, have difficulty controlling impulses, prefer to be alone, and have difficulty carrying out tasks. Future

  16. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of major depression

    PubMed Central

    Janicak, Philip G; Dokucu, Mehmet E

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is often difficult to diagnose accurately. Even when the diagnosis is properly made, standard treatment approaches (eg, psychotherapy, medications, or their combination) are often inadequate to control acute symptoms or maintain initial benefit. Additional obstacles involve safety and tolerability problems, which frequently preclude an adequate course of treatment. This leaves an important gap in our ability to properly manage major depression in a substantial proportion of patients, leaving them vulnerable to ensuing complications (eg, employment-related disability, increased risk of suicide, comorbid medical disorders, and substance abuse). Thus, there is a need for more effective and better tolerated approaches. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a neuromodulation technique increasingly used to partly fill this therapeutic void. In the context of treating depression, we critically review the development of transcranial magnetic stimulation, focusing on the results of controlled and pragmatic trials for depression, which consider its efficacy, safety, and tolerability. PMID:26170668

  17. Major depressive disorder: new clinical, neurobiological, and treatment perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kupfer, David J; Frank, Ellen; Phillips, Mary L

    2012-01-01

    In this Seminar we discuss developments from the past 5 years in the diagnosis, neurobiology, and treatment of major depressive disorder. For diagnosis, psychiatric and medical comorbidity have been emphasised as important factors in improving the appropriate assessment and management of depression. Advances in neurobiology have also increased, and we aim to indicate genetic, molecular, and neuroimaging studies that are relevant for assessment and treatment selection of this disorder. Further studies of depression-specific psychotherapies, the continued application of antidepressants, the development of new treatment compounds, and the status of new somatic treatments are also discussed. We address two treatment-related issues: suicide risk with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and the safety of antidepressants in pregnancy. Although clear advances have been made, no fully satisfactory treatments for major depression are available. PMID:22189047

  18. Major depressive disorder induced by prolactinoma--a case report.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei-Ting; Bai, Ya-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Prolactinomas, the most common type of pituitary tumor, can induce hyperprolactinemia and cause some psychiatric symptoms, such as anxiety, depression and even psychotic symptoms. However, in previous case reports, no information about estrogen levels was mentioned. Here, we present a 48-year-old female patient who had a recurrent episode of major depressive disorder (MDD) and amenorrhea. Hyperprolactinemia (167 ng/ml), low estrogen (15.31 pg/ml) and a pituitary prolactinoma were found by MRI. After a dopamine agonist (Dostinex) and aripiprazole were prescribed, the patient's depressed mood remitted and her menstruation normalized. The possible mechanism of MDD induced by prolactinoma is discussed.

  19. Anticipatory Pleasure Predicts Motivation for Reward in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Sherdell, Lindsey; Waugh, Christian E.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2012-01-01

    Anhedonia, the lack of interest or pleasure in response to hedonic stimuli or experiences, is a cardinal symptom of depression. This deficit in hedonic processing has been posited to influence depressed individuals’ motivation to engage in potentially rewarding experiences. Accumulating evidence indicates that hedonic processing is not a unitary construct but rather consists of an anticipatory and a consummatory phase. We examined how these components of hedonic processing influence motivation to obtain reward in participants diagnosed with major depression and in never-disordered controls. Thirty-eight currently depressed and 30 never-disordered control participants rated their liking of humorous and nonhumorous cartoons and then made a series of choices between viewing a cartoon from either group. Each choice was associated with a specified amount of effort participants would have to exert before viewing the chosen cartoon. Although depressed and control participants did not differ in their consummatory liking of the rewards, levels of reward liking predicted motivation to expend effort for the rewards only in the control participants; in the depressed participants, liking and motivation were dissociated. In the depressed group, levels of anticipatory anhedonia predicted motivation to exert effort for the rewards. These findings support the formulation that anhedonia is not a unitary construct and suggest that, for depressed individuals, deficits in motivation for reward are driven primarily by low anticipatory pleasure and not by decreased consummatory liking. PMID:21842963

  20. Anticipatory pleasure predicts motivation for reward in major depression.

    PubMed

    Sherdell, Lindsey; Waugh, Christian E; Gotlib, Ian H

    2012-02-01

    Anhedonia, the lack of interest or pleasure in response to hedonic stimuli or experiences, is a cardinal symptom of depression. This deficit in hedonic processing has been posited to influence depressed individuals' motivation to engage in potentially rewarding experiences. Accumulating evidence indicates that hedonic processing is not a unitary construct but rather consists of an anticipatory and a consummatory phase. We examined how these components of hedonic processing influence motivation to obtain reward in participants diagnosed with major depression and in never-disordered controls. Thirty-eight currently depressed and 30 never-disordered control participants rated their liking of humorous and nonhumorous cartoons and then made a series of choices between viewing a cartoon from either group. Each choice was associated with a specified amount of effort participants would have to exert before viewing the chosen cartoon. Although depressed and control participants did not differ in their consummatory liking of the rewards, levels of reward liking predicted motivation to expend effort for the rewards only in the control participants; in the depressed participants, liking and motivation were dissociated. In the depressed group, levels of anticipatory anhedonia predicted motivation to exert effort for the rewards. These findings support the formulation that anhedonia is not a unitary construct and suggest that, for depressed individuals, deficits in motivation for reward are driven primarily by low anticipatory pleasure and not by decreased consummatory liking. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Subcortical brain alterations in major depressive disorder: findings from the ENIGMA Major Depressive Disorder working group.

    PubMed

    Schmaal, L; Veltman, D J; van Erp, T G M; Sämann, P G; Frodl, T; Jahanshad, N; Loehrer, E; Tiemeier, H; Hofman, A; Niessen, W J; Vernooij, M W; Ikram, M A; Wittfeld, K; Grabe, H J; Block, A; Hegenscheid, K; Völzke, H; Hoehn, D; Czisch, M; Lagopoulos, J; Hatton, S N; Hickie, I B; Goya-Maldonado, R; Krämer, B; Gruber, O; Couvy-Duchesne, B; Rentería, M E; Strike, L T; Mills, N T; de Zubicaray, G I; McMahon, K L; Medland, S E; Martin, N G; Gillespie, N A; Wright, M J; Hall, G B; MacQueen, G M; Frey, E M; Carballedo, A; van Velzen, L S; van Tol, M J; van der Wee, N J; Veer, I M; Walter, H; Schnell, K; Schramm, E; Normann, C; Schoepf, D; Konrad, C; Zurowski, B; Nickson, T; McIntosh, A M; Papmeyer, M; Whalley, H C; Sussmann, J E; Godlewska, B R; Cowen, P J; Fischer, F H; Rose, M; Penninx, B W J H; Thompson, P M; Hibar, D P

    2016-06-01

    The pattern of structural brain alterations associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) remains unresolved. This is in part due to small sample sizes of neuroimaging studies resulting in limited statistical power, disease heterogeneity and the complex interactions between clinical characteristics and brain morphology. To address this, we meta-analyzed three-dimensional brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 1728 MDD patients and 7199 controls from 15 research samples worldwide, to identify subcortical brain volumes that robustly discriminate MDD patients from healthy controls. Relative to controls, patients had significantly lower hippocampal volumes (Cohen's d=-0.14, % difference=-1.24). This effect was driven by patients with recurrent MDD (Cohen's d=-0.17, % difference=-1.44), and we detected no differences between first episode patients and controls. Age of onset ⩽21 was associated with a smaller hippocampus (Cohen's d=-0.20, % difference=-1.85) and a trend toward smaller amygdala (Cohen's d=-0.11, % difference=-1.23) and larger lateral ventricles (Cohen's d=0.12, % difference=5.11). Symptom severity at study inclusion was not associated with any regional brain volumes. Sample characteristics such as mean age, proportion of antidepressant users and proportion of remitted patients, and methodological characteristics did not significantly moderate alterations in brain volumes in MDD. Samples with a higher proportion of antipsychotic medication users showed larger caudate volumes in MDD patients compared with controls. This currently largest worldwide effort to identify subcortical brain alterations showed robust smaller hippocampal volumes in MDD patients, moderated by age of onset and first episode versus recurrent episode status.

  2. Subcortical brain alterations in major depressive disorder: findings from the ENIGMA Major Depressive Disorder working group

    PubMed Central

    Schmaal, L; Veltman, D J; van Erp, T G M; Sämann, P G; Frodl, T; Jahanshad, N; Loehrer, E; Tiemeier, H; Hofman, A; Niessen, W J; Vernooij, M W; Ikram, M A; Wittfeld, K; Grabe, H J; Block, A; Hegenscheid, K; Völzke, H; Hoehn, D; Czisch, M; Lagopoulos, J; Hatton, S N; Hickie, I B; Goya-Maldonado, R; Krämer, B; Gruber, O; Couvy-Duchesne, B; Rentería, M E; Strike, L T; Mills, N T; de Zubicaray, G I; McMahon, K L; Medland, S E; Martin, N G; Gillespie, N A; Wright, M J; Hall, G B; MacQueen, G M; Frey, E M; Carballedo, A; van Velzen, L S; van Tol, M J; van der Wee, N J; Veer, I M; Walter, H; Schnell, K; Schramm, E; Normann, C; Schoepf, D; Konrad, C; Zurowski, B; Nickson, T; McIntosh, A M; Papmeyer, M; Whalley, H C; Sussmann, J E; Godlewska, B R; Cowen, P J; Fischer, F H; Rose, M; Penninx, B W J H; Thompson, P M; Hibar, D P

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of structural brain alterations associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) remains unresolved. This is in part due to small sample sizes of neuroimaging studies resulting in limited statistical power, disease heterogeneity and the complex interactions between clinical characteristics and brain morphology. To address this, we meta-analyzed three-dimensional brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 1728 MDD patients and 7199 controls from 15 research samples worldwide, to identify subcortical brain volumes that robustly discriminate MDD patients from healthy controls. Relative to controls, patients had significantly lower hippocampal volumes (Cohen's d=−0.14, % difference=−1.24). This effect was driven by patients with recurrent MDD (Cohen's d=−0.17, % difference=−1.44), and we detected no differences between first episode patients and controls. Age of onset ⩽21 was associated with a smaller hippocampus (Cohen's d=−0.20, % difference=−1.85) and a trend toward smaller amygdala (Cohen's d=−0.11, % difference=−1.23) and larger lateral ventricles (Cohen's d=0.12, % difference=5.11). Symptom severity at study inclusion was not associated with any regional brain volumes. Sample characteristics such as mean age, proportion of antidepressant users and proportion of remitted patients, and methodological characteristics did not significantly moderate alterations in brain volumes in MDD. Samples with a higher proportion of antipsychotic medication users showed larger caudate volumes in MDD patients compared with controls. This currently largest worldwide effort to identify subcortical brain alterations showed robust smaller hippocampal volumes in MDD patients, moderated by age of onset and first episode versus recurrent episode status. PMID:26122586

  3. [Residual symptoms and recurrence in major depressive disorder].

    PubMed

    Spadone, C; Corruble, E

    2010-12-01

    The persistence of residual symptoms after treatment of a major depressive episode is found in approximately a third of all cases. Definitions of partial remission of a major depressive episode with residual symptoms are either criteriologic, like the DSM, which require a defined number of symptoms with functional effect ; or quantitative, with a score localized in a defined range on a depression evaluation scale. The persistence of residual symptoms following a major depressive episode and the risk of a new episode are closely linked as outlined in guidelines created by expert groups and savant societies as well as clinical studies done in this field. Among the risk factors to predict further depressive episodes, the weight of persisting residual symptoms may be higher than the number of previous depressive episodes. In case of residual symptoms, the therapeutic proposals rely on pharmacological or psychotherapeutic tools are essentially of two types: nonspecific potentialization of previous antidepressive treatments or additional treatment specifically targeting each patients residual symptoms. A strong consensus exists on necessity of maintaining the therapeutic efforts until disappearance of residual symptoms, this objective must be pursued in a definite and continuous way by the practitioner.

  4. Perceived parenting and risk for major depression in Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Gao, J; Li, Y; Cai, Y; Chen, J; Shen, Y; Ni, S; Wei, Y; Qiu, Y; Zhu, X; Liu, Y; Lu, C; Chen, C; Niu, Q; Tang, C; Yang, Y; Wang, Q; Cui, W; Xia, J; Liu, T; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Guo, Z; Pan, J; Chen, H; Luo, Y; Sun, L; Xiao, X; Chen, Q; Zhao, X; He, F; Lv, L; Guo, L; Liu, L; Li, H; Shi, S; Flint, J; Kendler, K S; Tao, M

    2012-05-01

    In Western countries, a history of major depression (MD) is associated with reports of received parenting that is low in warmth and caring and high in control and authoritarianism. Does a similar pattern exist in women in China? Received parenting was assessed by a shortened version of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) in two groups of Han Chinese women: 1970 clinically ascertained cases with recurrent MD and 2597 matched controls. MD was assessed at personal interview. Factor analysis of the PBI revealed three factors for both mothers and fathers: warmth, protectiveness, and authoritarianism. Lower warmth and protectiveness and higher authoritarianism from both mother and father were significantly associated with risk for recurrent MD. Parental warmth was positively correlated with parental protectiveness and negatively correlated with parental authoritarianism. When examined together, paternal warmth was more strongly associated with lowered risk for MD than maternal warmth. Furthermore, paternal protectiveness was negatively and maternal protectiveness positively associated with risk for MD. Although the structure of received parenting is very similar in China and Western countries, the association with MD is not. High parental protectiveness is generally pathogenic in Western countries but protective in China, especially when received from the father. Our results suggest that cultural factors impact on patterns of parenting and their association with MD.

  5. Perceived parenting and risk for major depression in Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J.; Li, Y.; Cai, Y.; Chen, J.; Shen, Y.; Ni, S.; Wei, Y.; Qiu, Y.; Zhu, X.; Liu, Y.; Lu, C.; Chen, C.; Niu, Q.; Tang, C.; Yang, Y.; Wang, Q.; Cui, W.; Xia, J.; Liu, T.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Guo, Z.; Pan, J.; Chen, H.; Luo, Y.; Sun, L.; Xiao, X.; Chen, Q.; Zhao, X.; He, F.; Lv, L.; Guo, L.; Liu, L.; Li, H.; Shi, S.; Flint, J.; Kendler, K. S.; Tao, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background In Western countries, a history of major depression (MD) is associated with reports of received parenting that is low in warmth and caring and high in control and authoritarianism. Does a similar pattern exist in women in China? Method Received parenting was assessed by a shortened version of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) in two groups of Han Chinese women: 1970 clinically ascertained cases with recurrent MD and 2597 matched controls. MD was assessed at personal interview. Results Factor analysis of the PBI revealed three factors for both mothers and fathers: warmth, protectiveness, and authoritarianism. Lower warmth and protectiveness and higher authoritarianism from both mother and father were significantly associated with risk for recurrent MD. Parental warmth was positively correlated with parental protectiveness and negatively correlated with parental authoritarianism. When examined together, paternal warmth was more strongly associated with lowered risk for MD than maternal warmth. Furthermore, paternal protectiveness was negatively and maternal protectiveness positively associated with risk for MD. Conclusions Although the structure of received parenting is very similar in China and Western countries, the association with MD is not. High parental protectiveness is generally pathogenic in Western countries but protective in China, especially when received from the father. Our results suggest that cultural factors impact on patterns of parenting and their association with MD. PMID:21943491

  6. Prevalence and correlates of DSM-IV-TR major depressive disorder, self-reported diagnosed depression and current depressive symptoms among adults in Germany.

    PubMed

    Maske, Ulrike E; Buttery, Amanda K; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Riedel-Heller, Steffi; Hapke, Ulfert; Busch, Markus A

    2016-01-15

    While standardized diagnostic interviews using established criteria are the gold standard for assessing depression, less time consuming measures of depression and depressive symptoms are commonly used in large population health surveys. We examine the prevalence and health-related correlates of three depression measures among adults aged 18-79 years in Germany. Using cross-sectional data from the national German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS1) (n=7987) and its mental health module (DEGS1-MH) (n=4483), we analysed prevalence and socio-demographic and health-related correlates of (a) major depressive disorder (MDD) established by Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) using DSM-IV-TR criteria (CIDI-MDD) in the last 12 months, (b) self-reported physician or psychotherapist diagnosed depression in the last 12 months, and (c) current depressive symptoms in the last two weeks (PHQ-9, score ≥10). Prevalence of 12-month CIDI-MDD was 4.2% in men and 9.9% in women. Prevalence of 12-month self-reported health professional-diagnosed depression was 3.8% and 8.1% and of current depressive symptoms 6.1% and 10.2% in men and women, respectively. Case-overlap between measures was only moderate (32-45%). In adjusted multivariable analyses, depression according to all three measures was associated with lower self-rated health, lower physical and social functioning, higher somatic comorbidity (except for women with 12-month CIDI-MDD), more sick leave and higher health service utilization. Persons with severe depression may be underrepresented. Associations between CIDI-MDD and correlates and overlap with other measures may be underestimated due to time lag between DEGS1 and DEGS1-MH. Prevalence and identified cases varied between these three depression measures, but all measures were consistently associated with a wide range of adverse health outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Personality Predispositions to Depression in Children of Affectively-Ill Parents: The Buffering Role of Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abela, John R. Z.; Fishman, Michael B.; Cohen, Joseph R.; Young, Jami F.

    2012-01-01

    A major theory of personality predispositions to depression posits that individuals who possess high levels of self-criticism and/or dependency are vulnerable to developing depression following negative life events. The goal of the current study was to test this theory of personality predispositions and the self-esteem buffering hypothesis in a…

  8. Personality Predispositions to Depression in Children of Affectively-Ill Parents: The Buffering Role of Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abela, John R. Z.; Fishman, Michael B.; Cohen, Joseph R.; Young, Jami F.

    2012-01-01

    A major theory of personality predispositions to depression posits that individuals who possess high levels of self-criticism and/or dependency are vulnerable to developing depression following negative life events. The goal of the current study was to test this theory of personality predispositions and the self-esteem buffering hypothesis in a…

  9. Irritable bowel syndrome, anxiety, depression and personality characteristics.

    PubMed

    Tosic-Golubovic, Suzana; Miljkovic, Srbobran; Nagorni, Aleksandar; Lazarevic, Dusan; Nikolic, Gordana

    2010-09-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that 54%-100% of patients with IBS may have associated psychiatric illness and personality pathology. This transversal controlled study was realized in order to evaluate anxiety and depression levels, as well as the personality characteristics of patients with IBS and to compare the results obtained with patients with episodes of depression and healthy individuals. The experimental group consisted of 30 IBS patients, while two control groups consisted of the same number of inpatients with episodes of depression and healthy individuals from the general population. There were equal number of men and women in the study sample and all subjects were aged between 25 to 65 years. Standard psychometric instruments employed included Hamilton anxiety scale, Zung depression scale, Hamilton depression scale, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), Eysenck Perosonality Inventory (EPI). The average Hamilton and Zung depression scores were significantly higher in patients with depressive episodes compared with the IBS patients, while the mentioned scores among them were also significantly higher compared with the healthy controls. There were no significant differences between IBS and the group with depressive episodes in the average Hamilton anxiety levels, EPI neuroticism and extraversion levels and MMPI neurotic scales levels (Hs, D, and Hy). The significant differences were observed comparing the IBS patients to healthy individuals. The patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome who asked for medical help (consulters) because of their intestinal symptoms, presented emotional problems such as depression and anxiety and expressed neurotic personality characteristics.

  10. Predictors of personal, perceived and self-stigma towards anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Busby Grant, J; Bruce, C P; Batterham, P J

    2016-06-01

    Stigma towards individuals experiencing a mental illness is associated with a range of negative psychological, social and financial outcomes. Factors associated with stigma remain unclear; the relationship between stigma and various personal factors may depend on both the type of disorder being stigmatised and what type of stigma is assessed. Different forms of stigma include personal stigma (negative attitudes towards others), perceived stigma (perceived attitudes of others) and self-stigma (self-attribution of others' negative attitudes). Three hundred and fifty university students and members of the general public completed an online survey assessing contact with and knowledge of both depression and anxiety, age, gender, current depression and anxiety symptoms, and personal, perceived and self-stigma for both depression and anxiety. Greater contact with, and knowledge of that illness predicted lower personal stigma for both anxiety and depression. Participants with greater levels of current depression symptomatology and females, reported higher perceived stigma towards depression. Males reported higher personal stigma for anxiety. For both anxiety and depression, higher current symptomatology was associated with greater levels of self-stigma towards the illness. Findings confirm the role of contact and knowledge in personal stigma for both disorders, consistent with previous findings. This finding also supports evidence that interventions addressing these factors are associated with a decline in personal stigma. However, lack of relationship between contact with, and knowledge of a mental illness and perceived and self-stigma for either depression or anxiety suggests that these factors may not play a major role in perceived or self-stigma. The identification of symptomatology as a key factor associated with self-stigma for both anxiety and depression is significant, and has implications for community-wide interventions aiming to increase help-seeking behaviour

  11. Major depressive disorder discrimination using vocal acoustic features.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Takaya; Tachikawa, Hirokazu; Nemoto, Kiyotaka; Suzuki, Masayuki; Nagano, Toru; Tachibana, Ryuki; Nishimura, Masafumi; Arai, Tetsuaki

    2017-08-16

    The voice carries various information produced by vibrations of the vocal cords and the vocal tract. Though many studies have reported a relationship between vocal acoustic features and depression, including mel-frequency cepstrum coefficients (MFCCs) which applied to speech recognition, there have been few studies in which acoustic features allowed discrimination of patients with depressive disorder. Vocal acoustic features as biomarker of depression could make differential diagnosis of patients with depressive state. In order to achieve differential diagnosis of depression, in this preliminary study, we examined whether vocal acoustic features could allow discrimination between depressive patients and healthy controls. Subjects were 36 patients who met the criteria for major depressive disorder and 36 healthy controls with no current or past psychiatric disorders. Voices of reading out digits before and after verbal fluency task were recorded. Voices were analyzed using OpenSMILE. The extracted acoustic features, including MFCCs, were used for group comparison and discriminant analysis between patients and controls. The second dimension of MFCC (MFCC 2) was significantly different between groups and allowed the discrimination between patients and controls with a sensitivity of 77.8% and a specificity of 86.1%. The difference in MFCC 2 between the two groups reflected an energy difference of frequency around 2000-3000Hz. The MFCC 2 was significantly different between depressive patients and controls. This feature could be a useful biomarker to detect major depressive disorder. Sample size was relatively small. Psychotropics could have a confounding effect on voice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Black bile: are elevated monoamines an etiological factor in some cases of major depression?

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Paul J

    2013-06-01

    It was hypothesized decades ago that reduced levels of brain monoamines such as serotonin or norepinephrine form, at least in part, a pathophysiological basis for major depression. Consistent with this hypothesis, a conventional strategy used, with varying success, to treat major depression involves administering antidepressant drugs that are thought to boost the synaptic concentration of serotonin and/or norepinephrine. While the reduced monoamine hypothesis is well known but highly controversial and widely considered to be incomplete or simply incorrect, the possibility that elevated monoamines are an etiological factor in some cases of major depression (rather than or in addition to hypomania or mania) has received little attention at all. This paper puts forth the novel hypothesis elevated brain levels of three monoamines - serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine - are each etiological factors in some cases of major depression. In support of this hypothesis, the paper very briefly reviews relevant data on each of these neurotransmitter systems, including: transporter knockout mice, human genetic association studies, and pharmaceutical studies that enhance or diminish transmitter signaling in either rodents or humans. While all of the published data do not support the hypothesis, there are studies that do for each of the three transmitter systems. The etiological basis of the putative effect of monoamines on depression may be mediated both through genetics and exposure to psychological stress. If the elevated monoamine hypothesis is correct for some persons, pharmaceutical treatment of depression may be significantly improved if the particular elevated monoamine(s) could be identified and then altered on a personalized basis, or perhaps for different putative subtypes of depression. One possibility is that atypical depression involves elevated noradrenergic signaling.

  13. Dopaminergic Enhancement of Striatal Response to Reward in Major Depression.

    PubMed

    Admon, Roee; Kaiser, Roselinde H; Dillon, Daniel G; Beltzer, Miranda; Goer, Franziska; Olson, David P; Vitaliano, Gordana; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2017-04-01

    Major depressive disorder is characterized by reduced reward-related striatal activation and dysfunctional reward learning, putatively reflecting decreased dopaminergic signaling. The goal of this study was to test whether a pharmacological challenge designed to facilitate dopaminergic transmission can enhance striatal responses to reward and improve reward learning in depressed individuals. In a double-blind placebo-controlled design, 46 unmedicated depressed participants and 43 healthy control participants were randomly assigned to receive either placebo or a single low dose (50 mg) of the D2/D3 receptor antagonist amisulpride, which is believed to increase dopamine signaling through presynaptic autoreceptor blockade. To investigate the effects of increased dopaminergic transmission on reward-related striatal function and behavior, a monetary incentive delay task (in conjunction with functional MRI) and a probabilistic reward learning task were administered at absorption peaks of amisulpride. Depressed participants selected previously rewarded stimuli less frequently than did control participants, indicating reduced reward learning, but this effect was not modulated by amisulpride. Relative to depressed participants receiving placebo (and control participants receiving amisulpride), depressed participants receiving amisulpride exhibited increased striatal activation and potentiated corticostriatal functional connectivity between the nucleus accumbens and the midcingulate cortex in response to monetary rewards. Stronger corticostriatal connectivity in response to rewards predicted better reward learning among depressed individuals receiving amisulpride as well as among control participants receiving placebo. Acute enhancement of dopaminergic transmission potentiated reward-related striatal activation and corticostriatal functional connectivity in depressed individuals but had no behavioral effects. Taken together, the results suggest that targeted pharmacological

  14. Prevalence and patterns of major depressive disorder in the United States labor force.

    PubMed

    Marcotte, Dave E.; Wilcox-Gök, Virginia; Redmon, Patrick D.

    1999-09-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS OF THE STUDY: In this paper, we identify the 12-month and lifetime prevalence of major depressive disorder in and out of the labor force, and among the employed and unemployed. We examine whether prevalence by labor force and employment status varies by gender and over the life cycle. Finally, we examine whether people can "recover" from depression with time by identifying patterns of labor force participation and employment as time since most recent episode passes. METHODS: We examine data collected as part of the National Comorbidity Survey, a survey representative of the population of the United States designed to identify the prevalence of major mental illnesses. The National Comorbidity Study identified cases of major depression via the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Using these data, we estimate univariate and bivariate frequency distributions of major depressive disorder. We also estimate a set of multivariate models to identify the effect of a variety of dimensions of major depression on the propensity to participate in the labor force, and be employed if participating. RESULTS: Lifetime and 12-month prevalence rates of depression are similar in and out of the labor force. Within the labor force, however, depression is strongly associated with unemployment. The negative relationship between depressive disorder and employment is particularly strong for middle age workers. Depression and the number of depressive episodes have a differing pattern of effects on labor market outcomes for men and women. We find evidence that labor force participation and employment rates for people with a history of depression increase significantly over time in the absence of additional depressive episodes. DISCUSSION: Labor market status represents an important dimension along which prevalence of major depression varies. The relationship between depression and employment status is particularly strong for middle aged persons, but becomes weaker

  15. The relationship between fibromyalgia and major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J I; Pope, H G

    1996-05-01

    Looking at the results of the seven types of studies discussed previously, it appears that there is strong evidence for an association between fibromyalgia and major depressive disorder on the basis of (1) overlapping symptomatology, (2) similar pattern of comorbid disorders, and (3) high rates of major depressive disorder among relatives of patients with fibromyalgia. There is additional support for an association on the basis of responses to psychological tests and rating scales and the high lifetime rates of mood disorders in fibromyalgia. Two lines of evidence, (1) response to antidepressant medications and (2) response to biologic tests, offer little evidence either for or against an association. On balance, then the weight of the evidence favors an association between fibromyalgia and major depressive disorder. We therefore turn to an analysis of the nature of the association.

  16. [Gap junctions: A new therapeutic target in major depressive disorder?].

    PubMed

    Sarrouilhe, D; Dejean, C

    2015-11-01

    Major depressive disorder is a multifactorial chronic and debilitating mood disease with high lifetime prevalence and is associated with excess mortality, especially from cardiovascular diseases and through suicide. The treatments of this disease with tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors are poorly tolerated and those that selectively target serotonin and norepinephrine re-uptake are not effective in all patients, showing the need to find new therapeutic targets. Post-mortem studies of brains from patients with major depressive disorders described a reduced expression of the gap junction-forming membrane proteins connexin 30 and connexin 43 in the prefrontal cortex and the locus coeruleus. The use of chronic unpredictable stress, a rodent model of depression, suggests that astrocytic gap junction dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. Chronic treatments of rats with fluoxetine and of rat cultured cortical astrocytes with amitriptyline support the hypothesis that the upregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication between brain astrocytes could be a novel mechanism for the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. In conclusion, astrocytic gap junctions are emerging as a new potential therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. sigma-1 receptors in major depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas K; Dhir, Ashish

    2009-07-01

    Major depression and anxiety are two of the major psychiatric disorders that have some overlapping pathophysiologies, the most significant being the dysfunction in the monoaminergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic systems. A large number of drugs that alter these neurotransmitter levels/systems are effective in the treatment of major depression and anxiety. However, full remission of the clinical symptoms has not been achieved, perhaps owing to the complex pathophysiology of the diseases. Thus, the search for newer targets and target-specific drugs continues. Recently, the role of sigma-receptors, particularly the sigma-1 receptor subtype, has been identified as a target for the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders, and sigma-1 receptor modulators are considered to be the drugs of the future for the treatment of major depression and anxiety. The present review attempts to discuss the role of sigma-1 receptors in the pathophysiology of major depression and anxiety and also tries to position the use of its receptor modulators in the treatment of these two major disorders. The role of sigma-1 receptors in the mechanism of antidepressant action of venlafaxine, bupropion, neurosteroids and one of the herbal antidepressants, berberine, is reviewed. Although, sigma-1 receptor modulators may be future therapeutic options, either as individual agents or adjuvants in the treatment of mental disorders, the topic needs further preclinical and clinical exploration.

  18. The cortisol awakening response and major depression: examining the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Dedovic, Katarina; Ngiam, Janice

    2015-01-01

    A vast body of literature has revealed that dysregulation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) stress axis is associated with etiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). There are many ways that the dysregulation of the HPA axis can be assessed: by sampling diurnal basal secretion and/or in response to a stress task, pharmacological challenge, and awakening. Here, we focus on the association between cortisol awakening response (CAR), as one index of HPA axis function, and MDD, given that the nature of this association is particularly unclear. Indeed, in the following selective review, we attempt to reconcile sometimes-divergent evidence of the role of CAR in the pathway to depression. We first examine association of CAR with psychological factors that have been linked with increased vulnerability to develop depression. Then, we summarize the findings regarding the CAR profile in those with current depression, and evaluate evidence for the role of CAR following depression resolution and continued vulnerability. Finally, we showcase longitudinal studies showing the role of CAR in predicting depression onset and recurrence. Overall, the studies reveal an important, but complex, association between CAR and vulnerability to depression. PMID:25999722

  19. Role of Kynurenine Metabolism Pathway Activation in Major Depressive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Savitz, Jonathan

    A proportion of depressed individuals show evidence of inflammation. Both animal, quasi-experimental, and longitudinal studies indicate that inflammatory processes may play a causal role in the developmental of depressive illness. While there may be multiple causal pathways through which inflammatory processes affect mood, activation of the kynurenine pathway is essential for the development of depression-like behavior in rodents. Studies of hepatitis C or cancer patients receiving treatment with inflammation-inducing medications show increased activation of the kynurenine pathway and decreased levels of tryptophan that correlate with inflammation-induced depression. Further, this treatment has been shown to lead to increased production of neurotoxic kynurenine pathway metabolites such as quinolinic acid (QA). Similarly, in non-medically ill patients with major depression, multiple studies have found activation of the kynurenine pathway and/or preferential activation of the neurotoxic (QA) pathway at the expense of the production of the NMDA antagonist, kynurenic acid. Initially, activation of the kynurenine pathway was believed to precipitate depressive symptoms by depleting brain serotonin, however, the weight of the evidence now suggests that an imbalance between neurotoxic and neuroprotective metabolites may be the principal driver of depression; conceivably via its effects on glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  20. An astroglial basis of major depressive disorder? An overview.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Jie, Wei; Liu, Ji-Hong; Yang, Jian-Ming; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2017-03-20

    Depression is a chronic, recurring, and serious mood disorder that afflicts up to 20% of the global population. The monoamine hypothesis has dominated our understanding of the pharmacotherapy of depression for more than half a century; however, our understanding of the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of major depression has lagged far behind. Astrocytes are the most abundant and versatile cells in the brain, participating in most, if not all, of brain functions as both a passive housekeeper and an active player. Mounting evidence from clinical, preclinical and post-mortem studies has revealed a decrease in the number or density of astrocytes and morphological and functional astroglial atrophy in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and in animal models of depression. Furthermore, currently available antidepressant treatments at least partially exert their therapeutic effects on astrocytes. More importantly, dysfunctional astrocytes lead to depressive-like phenotypes in animals. Together, current studies point to astroglial pathology as the potential root cause of MDD. Thus, a shift from a neuron-centric to an astrocyte-centric cause of MDD has gained increasing attention during the past two decades. Here we will summarize the current evidence supporting the hypothesis that MDD is a disease of astrocyte pathology and highlight previous studies on promising strategies that directly target astrocytes for the development of novel antidepressant treatments.

  1. Linking major depression and the neural substrates of associative processing.

    PubMed

    Harel, Eiran Vadim; Tennyson, Robert Langley; Fava, Maurizio; Bar, Moshe

    2016-12-01

    It has been proposed that mood correlates with the breadth of associative thinking. Here we set this hypothesis to the test in healthy and depressed individuals. Generating contextual associations engages a network of cortical regions including the parahippocampal cortex (PHC), retrosplenial complex, and medial prefrontal cortex. The link between mood, associative processing, and its underlying cortical infrastructure provides a promising avenue for elucidating the mechanisms underlying the cognitive impairments in major depressive disorder (MDD). The participants included 15 nonmedicated individuals with acute major depressive episodes and 15 healthy matched controls. In an fMRI experiment, participants viewed images of objects that were either strongly or weakly associated with a specific context (e.g., a beach chair vs. a water bottle) while rating the commonality of each object. Analyses were performed to examine the brain activation and structural differences between the groups. Consistent with our hypothesis, controls showed greater activation of the contextual associations network than did depressed participants. In addition, PHC structural volume was correlated with ruminative tendencies, and the volumes of the hippocampal subfields were significantly smaller in depressed participants. Surprisingly, depressed participants showed increased activity in the entorhinal cortex (ERC), as compared with controls. We integrated these findings within a mechanistic account linking mood and associative thinking and suggest directions for the future.

  2. Women and vulnerability to depression: some personality and clinical factors.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Jesús M; Rojo, Nieves; Staats, Arthur W

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the role of sex differences and personality in vulnerability to depression. Sex differences in personality and some clinical variables are described. We also assess the value of the variables that revealed significant sex differences as predictors of vulnerability to depression. In a group of adult participants (N = 112), 50% males and 50% females (mean age = 41.30; SD = 15.09; range 17-67), we studied sex differences in the three-factor personality model, using the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, Form A (EPQ-A; Eysenck & Eysenck, 1975), and in the Five-Factor Personality Model, with the NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI; Costa & McCrae, 1985). The following clinical scales were used: the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; Beck, Rush, Shaw, & Emery, 1979), the Schizotypy Questionnaire (STQ; Claridge & Broks, 1984; Spanish version, Carrillo & Rojo, 1999), the THARL Scales (Dua, 1989, 1990; Spanish version, Dua & Carrillo, 1994) and the Adjustment Inventory (Bell, 1937; Spanish version, Cerdá, 1980). Subsequently, simple linear regression analysis, with BDI scores as criterion, were performed to estimate the value of the variables as predictors of vulnerability to depression. The results indicate that a series of personality variables cause women to be more vulnerable to depression than men and that these variables could be explained by a negative emotion main factor. Results are discussed within the framework of the psychological behaviorism theory of depression.

  3. Functional and structural brain correlates of risk for major depression in children with familial depression

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Xiaoqian J.; Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina; Biederman, Joseph; Uchida, Mai; Doehrmann, Oliver; Leonard, Julia A.; Salvatore, John; Kenworthy, Tara; Brown, Ariel; Kagan, Elana; de los Angeles, Carlo; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Gabrieli, John D.E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing evidence for atypical amygdala function and structure in major depression, it remains uncertain as to whether these brain differences reflect the clinical state of depression or neurobiological traits that predispose individuals to major depression. We examined function and structure of the amygdala and associated areas in a group of unaffected children of depressed parents (at-risk group) and a group of children of parents without a history of major depression (control group). Compared to the control group, the at-risk group showed increased activation to fearful relative to neutral facial expressions in the amygdala and multiple cortical regions, and decreased activation to happy relative to neutral facial expressions in the anterior cingulate cortex and supramarginal gyrus. At-risk children also exhibited reduced amygdala volume. The extensive hyperactivation to negative facial expressions and hypoactivation to positive facial expressions in at-risk children are consistent with behavioral evidence that risk for major depression involves a bias to attend to negative information. These functional and structural brain differences between at-risk children and controls suggest that there are trait neurobiological underpinnings of risk for major depression. PMID:26106565

  4. Functional and structural brain correlates of risk for major depression in children with familial depression.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xiaoqian J; Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina; Biederman, Joseph; Uchida, Mai; Doehrmann, Oliver; Leonard, Julia A; Salvatore, John; Kenworthy, Tara; Brown, Ariel; Kagan, Elana; de Los Angeles, Carlo; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Gabrieli, John D E

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing evidence for atypical amygdala function and structure in major depression, it remains uncertain as to whether these brain differences reflect the clinical state of depression or neurobiological traits that predispose individuals to major depression. We examined function and structure of the amygdala and associated areas in a group of unaffected children of depressed parents (at-risk group) and a group of children of parents without a history of major depression (control group). Compared to the control group, the at-risk group showed increased activation to fearful relative to neutral facial expressions in the amygdala and multiple cortical regions, and decreased activation to happy relative to neutral facial expressions in the anterior cingulate cortex and supramarginal gyrus. At-risk children also exhibited reduced amygdala volume. The extensive hyperactivation to negative facial expressions and hypoactivation to positive facial expressions in at-risk children are consistent with behavioral evidence that risk for major depression involves a bias to attend to negative information. These functional and structural brain differences between at-risk children and controls suggest that there are trait neurobiological underpinnings of risk for major depression.

  5. Psychopathology in children of parents with opiate dependence and/or major depression.

    PubMed

    Nunes, E V; Weissman, M M; Goldstein, R B; McAvay, G; Seracini, A M; Verdeli, H; Wickramaratne, P J

    1998-11-01

    To evaluate psychiatric disorders and impairment in school-age and adolescent children of opiate-dependent patients. One hundred fourteen children, aged 6 to 17 years, of 69 white methadone maintenance patients with (n = 30) and without (n = 39) major depression were evaluated for DSM-III-R diagnoses by the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Epidemiologic version and best estimate, and by measures of functioning (Children's Global Assessment Scale, Social Adjustment Inventory for Children and Adolescents, WISC, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test), and compared with children of historical controls without substance abuse history. Sons of opiate addicts with major depression were at increased risk for conduct disorder and global, social, and intellectual impairment compared with sons of opiate addicts without major depression and/or sons of controls with neither drug dependence nor depression. Sons of opiate addicts without major depression differed little from controls. Daughters of opiate addicts did not differ from controls in rates of disorders but had poorer social adjustment and nonverbal intelligence. Children of opiate-dependent patients, particularly sons of addicts with depression, may be at risk for a developmental path toward antisocial personality and poor social and intellectual functioning. Treatment settings such as methadone maintenance might afford an opportunity for primary and secondary prevention, both through early detection of childhood disorders and treatment of parental drug dependence and psychopathology.

  6. Physical activity and depression symptom profiles in young men and women with major depression.

    PubMed

    McKercher, Charlotte; Patton, George C; Schmidt, Michael D; Venn, Alison J; Dwyer, Terence; Sanderson, Kristy

    2013-05-01

    This study explored whether young adults with major depression who are physically active differ in their depression symptom profile from those physically inactive. Analyses included data from 950 (47.6%) men and 1045 women (mean [standard deviation] age = 31.5 [2.6] years) participating in a national study. Participants reported leisure physical activity (International Physical Activity Questionnaire) and ambulatory activity (pedometer steps per day). Diagnosis and symptoms of major depression were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Prevalence of major depression was 5.5% (n = 52) for men and 11.6% (n = 121) for women. Interactions between physical activity and sex were observed for depressed mood, appetite changes, vacillating thoughts, and suicidality (all, p < .050). Among those with major depression, physically active men were significantly less likely to endorse the presence of insomnia (prevalence ratio [PR] = 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.63-0.96), fatigue (PR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.69-0.99), and suicidality (PR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.49-0.96) compared with inactive men. Physically active women were significantly less likely to endorse hypersomnia (PR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.27-0.95), excessive/irrational guilt (PR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.59-0.97), vacillating thoughts (PR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.58-0.95), and suicidality (PR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.20-0.89) compared with inactive women. Associations were adjusted for age, physical health, educational attainment, depression severity, and other depressive symptoms. Among adults with major depression, those physically active seem to differ in their depression symptom profile from those physically inactive.

  7. The Major Depressive Disorder Hierarchy: Rasch Analysis of 6 items of the Hamilton Depression Scale Covering the Continuum of Depressive Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Melancholic features of depression (MFD) seem to be a unidimensional group of signs and symptoms. However, little importance has been given to the evaluation of what features are related to a more severe disorder. That is, what are the MFD that appear only in the most depressed patients. We aim to demonstrate how each MFD is related to the severity of the major depressive disorder. Methods We evaluated both the Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS-17) and its 6-item melancholic subscale (HAM-D6) in 291 depressed inpatients using Rasch analysis, which computes the severity of each MFD. Overall measures of model fit were mean (±SD) of items and persons residual = 0 (±1); low χ2 value; p>0.01. Results For the HDRS-17 model fit, mean (±SD) of item residuals = 0.35 (±1.4); mean (±SD) of person residuals = -0.15 (±1.09); χ2 = 309.74; p<0.00001. For the HAM-D6 model fit, mean (±SD) of item residuals = 0.5 (±0.86); mean (±SD) of person residuals = 0.15 (±0.91); χ2 = 56.13; p = 0.196. MFD ordered by crescent severity were depressed mood, work and activities, somatic symptoms, psychic anxiety, guilt feelings, and psychomotor retardation. Conclusions Depressed mood is less severe, while guilt feelings and psychomotor retardation are more severe MFD in a psychiatric hospitalization. Understanding depression as a continuum of symptoms can improve the understanding of the disorder and may improve its perspective of treatment. PMID:28114341

  8. Vilazodone in the treatment of major depressive disorder: efficacy across symptoms and severity of depression

    PubMed Central

    Sambunaris, Angelo; Edwards, John; Ruth, Adam; Robinson, Donald S.

    2014-01-01

    Vilazodone is a potent selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and serotonin 1A receptor partial agonist approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder in adults. To assess the efficacy of vilazodone across a range of symptoms and severities of depression, data from two phase III, 8-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials were pooled for analysis. Overall improvement in depressive symptoms measured using the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was statistically significant (P<0.05) for vilazodone treatment compared with placebo as early as Week 1 and continued throughout double-blind treatment. Vilazodone treatment compared with placebo showed significant improvement on all 10 individual MADRS symptom items at end of treatment (P<0.01). Rates of response and remission were significantly greater in the vilazodone group relative to the placebo group, with numbers needed to treat ranging from eight to nine for response and 12–17 for remission. Between-group treatment differences in MADRS and the other outcome measures were similar among all depression subgroups, with no consistent pattern associated with depression severity. These findings support the efficacy of vilazodone across a broad range of depressive symptoms and severities for the treatment of major depressive disorder. PMID:24247740

  9. Vilazodone in the treatment of major depressive disorder: efficacy across symptoms and severity of depression.

    PubMed

    Khan, Arif; Sambunaris, Angelo; Edwards, John; Ruth, Adam; Robinson, Donald S

    2014-03-01

    Vilazodone is a potent selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and serotonin 1A receptor partial agonist approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder in adults. To assess the efficacy of vilazodone across a range of symptoms and severities of depression, data from two phase III, 8-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials were pooled for analysis. Overall improvement in depressive symptoms measured using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was statistically significant (P<0.05) for vilazodone treatment compared with placebo as early as Week 1 and continued throughout double-blind treatment. Vilazodone treatment compared with placebo showed significant improvement on all 10 individual MADRS symptom items at end of treatment (P<0.01). Rates of response and remission were significantly greater in the vilazodone group relative to the placebo group, with numbers needed to treat ranging from eight to nine for response and 12-17 for remission. Between-group treatment differences in MADRS and the other outcome measures were similar among all depression subgroups, with no consistent pattern associated with depression severity. These findings support the efficacy of vilazodone across a broad range of depressive symptoms and severities for the treatment of major depressive disorder.

  10. Thyroid hormones association with depression severity and clinical outcome in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Berent, Dominika; Zboralski, Krzysztof; Orzechowska, Agata; Gałecki, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The clinical implications of thyroid hormones in depression have been studied extensively and still remains disputable. Supplementation of thyroid hormones is considered to augment and accelerate antidepressant treatment. Studies on the role of thyroid hormones in depression deliver contradictory results. Here we assess theirs impact on depression severity and final clinical outcome in patients with major depression. Thyrotropin, free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations were measured with automated quantitative enzyme immunoassay. Depression severity and final clinical outcome were rated with 17-itemic Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression [HDRS(17)] and Clinical Global Impression Scales for severity and for improvement (CGIs, CGIi). FT3 and FT4 concentrations were significantly positively correlated with clinical improvement evaluated with CGIi (R = 0.38, P = 0.012; R = 0.33, P = 0.034, respectively). There was a significant correlation between FT4 concentrations and depression severity assessed in HDRS(17) (R = 0.31, P = 0.047). Male patients presented significantly higher FT3 serum levels (Z = 2.34, P = 0.018) and significantly greater clinical improvement (Z = 2.36, P = 0.018) when compared to female patients. We conclude that free thyroid hormones concentrations are associated with depression severity and have an impact on final clinical outcome. It can be more efficient to augment and accelerate the treatment of major depressive disorder with triiodothyronine instead of levothyroxine because of individual differences in thyroid hormones metabolism.

  11. The Role of the Harm Avoidance Personality in Depression and Anxiety During the Medical Internship

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ching-Yen; Lin, Sheng-Hsuan; Li, Peng; Huang, Wei-Lieh; Lin, Yu-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To determine whether physicians with harm avoidance (HA) personality traits were more prone to developing increased anxiety and depression during the medical internship. A prospective longitudinal study of 74 medical interns was carried out using repeated measures of symptoms of anxiety and depression with the Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventories (BAI and BDI) before, at the 3rd, 6th, and 12th months during the internship, and 2 weeks after the internship was completed. Baseline personality was assessed by the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire with 3 dimensions: novelty-seeking, HA, and reward dependence (RD). Levels of both depression and anxiety increased (6.4 and 3.4 on scores for BDI and BAI, respectively) during the internship and returned to baseline 2 weeks after it ended. HA scores were significantly correlated with depression and anxiety (0.3 scores on both the BDI and the BAI) and the scores for RD were significantly correlated with anxiety but not with depression. The interaction of HA and point in internship showed no significant differences. Internship plays a major role in the increase in depression and anxiety. A HA personality was also associated with the development of both depression and anxiety. PMID:25590843

  12. The role of the harm avoidance personality in depression and anxiety during the medical internship.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Yen; Lin, Sheng-Hsuan; Li, Peng; Huang, Wei-Lieh; Lin, Yu-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether physicians with harm avoidance (HA) personality traits were more prone to developing increased anxiety and depression during the medical internship. A prospective longitudinal study of 74 medical interns was carried out using repeated measures of symptoms of anxiety and depression with the Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventories (BAI and BDI) before, at the 3rd, 6th, and 12th months during the internship, and 2 weeks after the internship was completed. Baseline personality was assessed by the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire with 3 dimensions: novelty-seeking, HA, and reward dependence (RD). Levels of both depression and anxiety increased (6.4 and 3.4 on scores for BDI and BAI, respectively) during the internship and returned to baseline 2 weeks after it ended. HA scores were significantly correlated with depression and anxiety (0.3 scores on both the BDI and the BAI) and the scores for RD were significantly correlated with anxiety but not with depression. The interaction of HA and point in internship showed no significant differences. Internship plays a major role in the increase in depression and anxiety. A HA personality was also associated with the development of both depression and anxiety.

  13. Exercise as an augmentation strategy for treatment of major depression.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Madhukar H; Greer, Tracy L; Grannemann, Bruce D; Chambliss, Heather O; Jordan, Alexander N

    2006-07-01

    The use of augmentation strategies among patients with major depression is increasing because rates of complete remission with standard antidepressant monotherapy are quite low. Clinical and neurobiological data suggest that exercise may be a good candidate for use as an augmentation treatment for depression. This pilot study examined the use of exercise to augment antidepressant medication in patients with major depression. Seventeen patients with incomplete remission of depressive symptoms began a 12-week exercise program while continuing their antidepressant medication (unchanged in type or dose). Individual exercise prescriptions were calculated based on an exercise dose consistent with currently recommended public health guidelines. The exercise consisted of both supervised and home-based sessions. The 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) and the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (IDS-SR30) were used to assess symptoms of depression on a weekly basis. Intent-to-treat analyses yielded significant decreases on both the HRSD17 (5.8 points, p < 0.008) and IDS-SR30 (13.9 points, p < 0.002). For patients who completed the study (n = 8), HRSD17 scores decreased by 10.4 points and IDS-SR30 scores decreased by 18.8 points. This study provides preliminary evidence for exercise as an effective augmentation treatment for antidepressant medication. This is a lower-cost augmentation strategy that has numerous health benefits and may further reduce depressive symptoms in partial responders to antidepressant treatment. Practical tips on how practitioners can use exercise to enhance antidepressant treatment are discussed. Longer-term use of exercise is also likely to confer additional health benefits for this population.

  14. Night Eating Syndrome in Major Depression and Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    KÜÇÜKGÖNCÜ, Suat; BEŞTEPE, Emrem

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence and the clinical features of night eating syndrome (NES) in patients with depression and anxiety disorders. Method The study was conducted at Bakırköy State Hospital for Mental Health and Neurological Disorders. Three-hundred out-patients who had major depression (MD), panic disorders (PD), general anxiety disorders (GAD) and obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) participated in the study. The semi-structured socio-demographic form, the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I), Night Eating Questionnaire, and NES Evaluation Questionnaire were implemented. Results In our sample, the prevalence of the NES was 15.7% (n=47). NES frequency was significantly higher in the patients diagnosed with major depression (MD 22%, GAD 7.8%, OCD 12.5%, PD 14%). Smoking, presence of past suicide attempts, rates of antipsychotic drugs use, and average scores of body mass index (BMI) were significantly higher in the patients who had NES. In this sample, depression, BMI, and smoking were found to be determinants of NES. Conclusion This study shows that NES may be frequently observed in patients admitted to psychiatric clinics, especially in those with major depression. Evaluation of NES in psychiatric patients may help the treatment of the primary psychopathology and prevent the adverse effects, like weight gain, which may reduce the quality of life.

  15. The relationship between interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety disorders and major depression.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Kay; Boyce, Philip; Brownhill, Suzanne

    2004-04-01

    While interpersonal sensitivity, as rated by the Interpersonal Sensitivity Measure (IPSM) has previously been found to be an efficient predictor of depression, there has been less interest in the relationship between the IPSM and anxiety disorders. This study examines the performance of the IPSM in discriminating between cases and non-cases of the various anxiety disorders. The contribution of depression and the perception of parental environment, to any relationships found, are also examined. A cohort of 156 men and women has been assessed at 5-yearly intervals since baseline in 1978, in their last year of teacher training. In this fourth wave of follow-up, subjects completed a series of self-report questionnaires, including the IPSM, and scales measuring neuroticism and trait depression. Perceived parental environment, measured at baseline, was also included. DSM-III-R major depression and anxiety disorders were generated using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. The IPSM subscales were moderately stable over time. 'Timidity' was associated with agoraphobia and simple phobia, and 'separation anxiety' with agoraphobia, panic disorder and generalised anxiety disorder. 'Separation anxiety' and 'timidity' showed differential gender effects for simple phobia. 'Fragile inner self' and 'separation anxiety' were associated with subjects with a history of repeated episodes of major depression, and the former, with perception of poor parental care. The IPSM was not available for inclusion prior to the 1988 wave. While the IPSM subscales were consistently correlated with neuroticism, they displayed differential associations with specific anxiety disorders, episodes of major depression and early parental environment. These findings offer greater understanding of mechanisms concerning the relationship of vulnerability to anxiety disorders and depression.

  16. Diagnosing Depression in Chronic Pain Patients: DSM-IV Major Depressive Disorder vs. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnosing depression in chronic pain is challenging due to overlapping somatic symptoms. In questionnaires, such as the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), responses may be influenced more by pain than by the severity of depression. In addition, previous studies have suggested that symptoms of negative self-image, a key element in depression, are uncommon in chronic pain-related depression. The object of this study is to assess the relationship of the somatic and cognitive-emotional items of BDI with the diagnosis of depression, pain intensity, and disability. Methods One hundred consecutive chronic pain patients completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders (SCID) for the diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) according to DSM-IV. Two subscales of BDI (negative view of self and somatic-physical function) were created according to the factor model presented by Morley. Results In the regression analysis, the somatic-physical function factor associated with MDD, while the negative view of self factor did not. Patients with MDD had higher scores in several of the BDI items when analysed separately. Insomnia and weight loss were not dependent on the depression diagnosis. Limitations The relatively small sample size and the selected patient sample limit the generalisability of the results. Conclusions Somatic symptoms of depression are also common in chronic pain and should not be excluded when diagnosing depression in pain patients. Regardless of the assessment method, diagnosing depression in chronic pain remains a challenge and requires careful interpretation of symptoms. PMID:27008161

  17. Diagnosing Depression in Chronic Pain Patients: DSM-IV Major Depressive Disorder vs. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI).

    PubMed

    Knaster, Peter; Estlander, Ann-Mari; Karlsson, Hasse; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kalso, Eija

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosing depression in chronic pain is challenging due to overlapping somatic symptoms. In questionnaires, such as the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), responses may be influenced more by pain than by the severity of depression. In addition, previous studies have suggested that symptoms of negative self-image, a key element in depression, are uncommon in chronic pain-related depression. The object of this study is to assess the relationship of the somatic and cognitive-emotional items of BDI with the diagnosis of depression, pain intensity, and disability. One hundred consecutive chronic pain patients completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders (SCID) for the diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) according to DSM-IV. Two subscales of BDI (negative view of self and somatic-physical function) were created according to the factor model presented by Morley. In the regression analysis, the somatic-physical function factor associated with MDD, while the negative view of self factor did not. Patients with MDD had higher scores in several of the BDI items when analysed separately. Insomnia and weight loss were not dependent on the depression diagnosis. The relatively small sample size and the selected patient sample limit the generalisability of the results. Somatic symptoms of depression are also common in chronic pain and should not be excluded when diagnosing depression in pain patients. Regardless of the assessment method, diagnosing depression in chronic pain remains a challenge and requires careful interpretation of symptoms.

  18. [Depression and aggression in Amish persons].

    PubMed

    Jakubaschk, J

    1994-09-01

    The Old Order Amish are a conservative, anabaptistic religious community of Swiss origin in the USA. They practise absolute pacifism and lead a life free of hostility and aggression. Depression, however, is as much as three times more frequent in Amish populations. In order to study the possible relationship between hostility and depression, we investigated 43 Amish people, using the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory. As expected, the total hostility score was significantly lower and the depression score significantly higher in comparison to the normal population. The positive correlation between the two scores (0.45; p < or = 0.002) indicates that the hypothesized reciprocal relationship between hostility and depression is unlikely in the Old Order Amish.

  19. Parental bonding and depression: personality as a mediating factor.

    PubMed

    Avagianou, Penelope-Alexia; Zafiropoulou, Maria

    2008-01-01

    According to Bowlby's theory of attachment, the role of early experience and parenting is of crucial importance to child development and mental health. In addition, several research findings suggest that parental bonding and different types of attachment play a crucial role in personality development. The present study examines the association between parental bonding experiences (lack of parental care, overprotection or both) and depression during adulthood. The objective of the present study was to evaluate different personality dimensions as possible mediators of the relation between perceptions of parental bonding and depressive symptoms in adult life. 181 participants (15- 49-years-old) completed the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF). The results show that lack of parental care and overprotection is linked with depressive symptoms and a number of personality characteristics, such as low self-esteem, introversion, distress and emotional instability. In contrast, high care and low protection (optimal bonding) is linked with increased self-confidence, less distress and less depressive symptoms. The results presented here are in line with Bowlby's theory of attachment and show that parental bonding is linked with problematic personality development and psychopathology. The present study provided evidence that personality factors may mediate the observed relationship between parental rearing style and depression. The potential causal mechanisms warrant longitudinal evaluation.

  20. Depression and pain impair daily functioning and quality of life in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hua; Yen, Yung-Chieh; Chen, Ming-Chao; Chen, Cheng-Chung

    2014-09-01

    Depression and pain frequently occur together. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of depression and pain on the impairment of daily functioning and quality of life (QOL) of depressed patients. We enrolled 131 acutely ill inpatients with major depressive disorder. Depression, pain, and daily functioning were assessed using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) Body Pain Index, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. Health-related QOL was assessed using three primary domains of the SF-36: social functioning, vitality, and general health perceptions. Pearson׳s correlation and structural equation modeling were used to examine relationships among the study variables. Five models were proposed. In all, 129 patients completed all the measures. Model 5, both depression and pain impaired daily functioning and QOL, was the most fitted structural equation model (χ(2)=9.2, df=8, p=0.33, GFI=0.98, AGFI=0.94, TLI=0.99, CFI=0.99, RMSEA=0.03). The correlation between pain and depression was weak (r=-0.27, z=-2.95, p=0.003). This was a cross-sectional study with a small sample size. Depression and pain exert a direct influence on the impairment of daily functioning and QOL of depressed patients; this impairment could be expected regardless of increased pain, depression, or both pain and depression. Pain had a somewhat separate entity from depression. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Mood Induction and Beck's Theory of Depression: A Test of Major Hypotheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Linda D.

    Beck's (1967) hypotheses concerning depression build upon notions that a depressed person's cognitions differ from those of nondepressed persons and that a relationship exists in which depressive cognitions assume primacy over mood. A study was conducted to test Beck's hypotheses and to examine the roles that cognition and mood play in depression.…

  2. Sertraline in Children and Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Craig L.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Rynn, Moira; Ambrosini, Paul; Landau, Phyllis; Yang, Ruoyong; Wohlberg, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore time to first response and time to first persistent response of sertraline versus placebo and compare these parameters between children (6-11 years old, n = 177) and adolescents (12-17 years old, n = 199) with major depressive disorder. Method: A 10-week placebo-controlled treatment was followed by a 24-week open-label…

  3. Reduced Anterior Cingulate Cortex Glutamatergic Concentrations in Childhood Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirza, Yousha; Tang, Jennifer; Russell, Aileen; Banerjee, S. Preeya; Bhandari, Rashmi; Ivey, Jennifer; Rose, Michelle; Moore, Gregory J.; Rosenberg, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine in vivo glutamatergic neurochemical alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex of children with major depressive disorder (MDD). Method: Single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic ([.sup.1]H-MRS) examinations of the anterior cingulate cortex were conducted in 13 psychotropic-naive children and adolescents with MDD…

  4. Reduced Anterior Cingulate Cortex Glutamatergic Concentrations in Childhood Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirza, Yousha; Tang, Jennifer; Russell, Aileen; Banerjee, S. Preeya; Bhandari, Rashmi; Ivey, Jennifer; Rose, Michelle; Moore, Gregory J.; Rosenberg, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine in vivo glutamatergic neurochemical alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex of children with major depressive disorder (MDD). Method: Single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic ([.sup.1]H-MRS) examinations of the anterior cingulate cortex were conducted in 13 psychotropic-naive children and adolescents with MDD…

  5. Selective Neurocognitive Impairments in Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Georges; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie; Jepsen, Susie; Ballard, Kristin; Nelson, Megan; Houri, Alaa; Kumra, Sanjiv; Cullen, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether major depression in adolescence is characterized by neurocognitive deficits in attention, affective decision making, and cognitive control of emotion processing. Neuropsychological tests including the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, the Continuous Performance Test-Identical Pairs, the Attention Network…

  6. Voice Acoustical Measurement of the Severity of Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannizzaro, Michael; Harel, Brian; Reilly, Nicole; Chappell, Phillip; Snyder, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    A number of empirical studies have documented the relationship between quantifiable and objective acoustical measures of voice and speech, and clinical subjective ratings of severity of Major Depression. To further explore this relationship, speech samples were extracted from videotape recordings of structured interviews made during the…

  7. Consumers with Major Depressive Disorder: Factors Influencing Job Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hergenrather, Kenneth C.; Haase, Eileen; Zeglin, Robert J.; Rhodes, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    The theory of planned behavior (TPB) was applied to study the factors that influence the intention of public rehabilitation placement professionals to place consumers with major depressive disorder (MDD) in jobs. A sample of 108 public rehabilitation placement professionals in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States completed the MDD…

  8. Consumers with Major Depressive Disorder: Factors Influencing Job Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hergenrather, Kenneth C.; Haase, Eileen; Zeglin, Robert J.; Rhodes, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    The theory of planned behavior (TPB) was applied to study the factors that influence the intention of public rehabilitation placement professionals to place consumers with major depressive disorder (MDD) in jobs. A sample of 108 public rehabilitation placement professionals in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States completed the MDD…

  9. Abnormal Temporal Difference Reward-Learning Signals in Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, P.; Waiter, G.; Ahearn, T.; Milders, M.; Reid, I.; Steele, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    Anhedonia is a core symptom of major depressive disorder (MDD), long thought to be associated with reduced dopaminergic function. However, most antidepressants do not act directly on the dopamine system and all antidepressants have a delayed full therapeutic effect. Recently, it has been proposed that antidepressants fail to alter dopamine…

  10. Processing of facial emotion expression in major depression: a review.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Cecilia; Douglas, Katie; Porter, Richard

    2010-08-01

    Processing of facial expressions of emotion is central to human interaction, and has important effects on behaviour and affective state. A range of methods and paradigms have been used to investigate various aspects of abnormal processing of facial expressions in major depression, including emotion specific deficits in recognition accuracy, response biases and attentional biases. The aim of this review is to examine and interpret data from studies of facial emotion processing in major depression, in the context of current knowledge about the neural correlates of facial expression processing of primary emotions. The review also discusses the methodologies used to examine facial expression processing. Studies of facial emotion processing and facial emotion recognition were identified up to December 2009 utilizing MEDLINE and Web of Science. Although methodological variations complicate interpretation of findings, there is reasonably consistent evidence of a negative response bias towards sadness in individuals with major depression, so that positive (happy), neutral or ambiguous facial expressions tend to be evaluated as more sad or less happy compared with healthy control groups. There is also evidence of increased vigilance and selective attention towards sad expressions and away from happy expressions, but less evidence of reduced general or emotion-specific recognition accuracy. Data is complicated by the use of multiple paradigms and the heterogeneity of major depression. Future studies should address methodological problems, including variations in patient characteristics, testing paradigms and procedures, and statistical methods used to analyse findings.

  11. Voice Acoustical Measurement of the Severity of Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannizzaro, Michael; Harel, Brian; Reilly, Nicole; Chappell, Phillip; Snyder, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    A number of empirical studies have documented the relationship between quantifiable and objective acoustical measures of voice and speech, and clinical subjective ratings of severity of Major Depression. To further explore this relationship, speech samples were extracted from videotape recordings of structured interviews made during the…

  12. Selective Neurocognitive Impairments in Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Georges; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie; Jepsen, Susie; Ballard, Kristin; Nelson, Megan; Houri, Alaa; Kumra, Sanjiv; Cullen, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether major depression in adolescence is characterized by neurocognitive deficits in attention, affective decision making, and cognitive control of emotion processing. Neuropsychological tests including the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, the Continuous Performance Test-Identical Pairs, the Attention Network…

  13. Abnormal Temporal Difference Reward-Learning Signals in Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, P.; Waiter, G.; Ahearn, T.; Milders, M.; Reid, I.; Steele, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    Anhedonia is a core symptom of major depressive disorder (MDD), long thought to be associated with reduced dopaminergic function. However, most antidepressants do not act directly on the dopamine system and all antidepressants have a delayed full therapeutic effect. Recently, it has been proposed that antidepressants fail to alter dopamine…

  14. Sertraline in Children and Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Craig L.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Rynn, Moira; Ambrosini, Paul; Landau, Phyllis; Yang, Ruoyong; Wohlberg, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore time to first response and time to first persistent response of sertraline versus placebo and compare these parameters between children (6-11 years old, n = 177) and adolescents (12-17 years old, n = 199) with major depressive disorder. Method: A 10-week placebo-controlled treatment was followed by a 24-week open-label…

  15. A five-factor model description of depressive personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Vachon, David D; Sellbom, Martin; Ryder, Andrew G; Miller, Joshua D; Bagby, R Michael

    2009-10-01

    This investigation extends previous work on Five-Factor Model (FFM) personality disorder profiles. Specifically, a FFM expert consensus prototype for Depressive Personality Disorder (DPD) using the 30 facets of the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO PI-R) was developed. Initial validation of this prototype in a psychiatric population employed several clinical scales. When combined with trait information yielded by criteria translation and empirical approaches, the composite FFM profile emphasized several facets that represent the core components of DPD. In addition to several traits represented by the current DSM conceptualization of DPD, such as depressiveness, anxiousness, self-consciousness, and low tendermindedness, the composite profile was also characterized by several unrepresented traits, such as high modesty and low positive emotionality, warmth, assertiveness, trust, and achievement striving. Future definitions of depressive personality, conceptualized either as a DSM-V personality disorder or as a multifaceted construct, should consider these additional traits.

  16. Phonologically-based biomarkers for major depressive disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevino, Andrea Carolina; Quatieri, Thomas Francis; Malyska, Nicolas

    2011-12-01

    Of increasing importance in the civilian and military population is the recognition of major depressive disorder at its earliest stages and intervention before the onset of severe symptoms. Toward the goal of more effective monitoring of depression severity, we introduce vocal biomarkers that are derived automatically from phonologically-based measures of speech rate. To assess our measures, we use a 35-speaker free-response speech database of subjects treated for depression over a 6-week duration. We find that dissecting average measures of speech rate into phone-specific characteristics and, in particular, combined phone-duration measures uncovers stronger relationships between speech rate and depression severity than global measures previously reported for a speech-rate biomarker. Results of this study are supported by correlation of our measures with depression severity and classification of depression state with these vocal measures. Our approach provides a general framework for analyzing individual symptom categories through phonological units, and supports the premise that speaking rate can be an indicator of psychomotor retardation severity.

  17. Stability of symptoms across major depressive episodes in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Perlis, Roy H; Ostacher, Michael J; Uher, Rudolf; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Casamassima, Francesco; Kansky, Christine; Calabrese, Joseph R; Thase, Michael; Sachs, Gary S

    2009-12-01

    Some studies suggest that depressive subtypes, defined by groups of symptoms, have predictive or diagnostic utility. These studies make the implicit assumption of stability of symptoms across episodes in mood disorders, which has rarely been investigated. We examined prospective data from a cohort of 3,750 individuals with bipolar I or II disorder participating in the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder study, selecting a subset of individuals who experienced two depressive episodes during up to two years of follow-up. Across-episode association of individual depressive or hypomanic/mixed symptoms was examined using the weighted kappa measure of agreement as well as logistic regression. A total of 583 subjects experienced two prospectively observed depressive episodes, with 149 of those subjects experiencing a third. Greatest evidence of stability was observed for neurovegetative features, suicidality, and guilt/rumination. Loss of interest and fatigue were not consistent across episodes. Structural equation modeling suggested that the dimensional structure of symptoms was not invariant across episodes. While the overall dimensional structure of depressive symptoms lacks temporal stability, individual symptoms including suicidality, mood, psychomotor, and neurovegetative symptoms are stable across major depressive episodes in bipolar disorder and should be considered in future investigations of course and pathophysiology in bipolar disorder.

  18. Stability of symptoms across major depressive episodes in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Perlis, Roy H; Ostacher, Michael J; Uher, Rudolf; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Casamassima, Francesco; Kansky, Christine; Calabrese, Joseph R; Thase, Michael; Sachs, Gary S

    2012-01-01

    Objective Some studies suggest that depressive subtypes, defined by groups of symptoms, have predictive or diagnostic utility. These studies make the implicit assumption of stability of symptoms across episodes in mood disorders, which has rarely been investigated. Methods We examined prospective data from a cohort of 3,750 individuals with bipolar I or II disorder participating in the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder study, selecting a subset of individuals who experienced two depressive episodes during up to two years of follow-up. Across-episode association of individual depressive or hypomanic/mixed symptoms was examined using the weighted kappa measure of agreement as well as logistic regression. Results A total of 583 subjects experienced two prospectively observed depressive episodes, with 149 of those subjects experiencing a third. Greatest evidence of stability was observed for neurovegetative features, suicidality, and guilt/rumination. Loss of interest and fatigue were not consistent across episodes. Structural equation modeling suggested that the dimensional structure of symptoms was not invariant across episodes. Conclusion While the overall dimensional structure of depressive symptoms lacks temporal stability, individual symptoms including suicidality, mood, psychomotor, and neurovegetative symptoms are stable across major depressive episodes in bipolar disorder and should be considered in future investigations of course and pathophysiology in bipolar disorder. PMID:19922555

  19. Major depressive disorder symptoms in male and female young adults.

    PubMed

    Lopez Molina, Mariane Acosta; Jansen, Karen; Drews, Cláudio; Pinheiro, Ricardo; Silva, Ricardo; Souza, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to compare the prevalence rates of major depressive disorder (MDD) and to differentiate the presence and severity of depressive symptoms between women and men aged 18-24 years. In this population-based, cross-sectional study (n = 1560), young adults were screened with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for MDD (n = 137). Participants then completed a self-report questionnaire to gather sociodemographic data, and the presence of each symptom of depression was assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory. The proportion of women (12.2%) with MDD was higher than that of men (5.3%). The symptoms of depression found to be significantly more prevalent in women were sadness, crying, difficulty making decisions, and lack of energy, as well as self-criticism, irritability, changes in self-image, work difficulty, and loss of interest in sex. Sadness and self-criticism were significantly more severe in women than in men. The presentation of depressive symptoms in young adults with MDD differed between men and women.

  20. Multitarget botanical pharmacotherapy in major depression: a toxic brain hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Siu W; Tang, Wayne H; Leonard, Brain E

    2017-06-27

    A significant number of patients with major depression do not respond optimally to current antidepressant drugs. As depression is likely to be a heterogeneous disorder, it is possible that existing neurotransmitter-based antidepressant drugs do not fully address other pathologies that may exist in certain cases. Biological pathologies related to depression that have been proposed and studied extensively include inflammation and immunology, hypercortisolemia, oxidative stress, and impaired angiogenesis. Such pathologies may induce neurodegeneration, which in turn causes cognitive impairment, a symptom increasingly being recognized in depression. A neurotoxic brain hypothesis unifying all these factors may explain the heterogeneity of depression as well as cognitive decline and antidepressant drug resistance in some patients. Compared with neurotransmitter-based antidepressant drugs, many botanical compounds in traditional medicine used for the treatment of depression and its related symptoms have been discovered to be anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory, anti-infection, antioxidative, and proangiogenic. Some botanical compounds also exert actions on neurotransmission. This multitarget nature of botanical medicine may act through the amelioration of the neurotoxic brain environment in some patients resistant to neurotransmitter-based antidepressant drugs. A multitarget multidimensional approach may be a reasonable solution for patients resistant to neurotransmitter-based antidepressant drugs.

  1. Increased suppression of negative and positive emotions in major depression.

    PubMed

    Beblo, Thomas; Fernando, Silvia; Klocke, Sabrina; Griepenstroh, Julia; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Driessen, Martin

    2012-12-10

    Patients with major depression (MDD) show increased suppression of negative emotions. Emotion suppression is related to depressive symptoms such as depressive mood and anhedonia. It is not clear whether MDD patients also suppress positive emotions. In the present study we aim to investigate suppression of both negative and positive emotions in MDD patients as well as the relation between emotion suppression and depressive symptoms. In addition, we suggest that emotion suppression might be associated with fear of emotions. 39 MDD patients and 41 matched healthy control subjects were investigated for emotion suppression and fear of emotions with the Emotion Acceptance Questionnaire (EAQ). In addition, we applied additional questionnaires to validate emotion suppression findings and to assess depressive symptoms. MDD patients reported increased suppression of both negative and positive emotions. Suppression of negative and positive emotions was related to depressive symptoms. Patients also reported more fear of emotions than healthy subjects and this fear was related to emotion suppression in both study samples. Due to the cross-sectional and correlational study design, causal directions between the variables tested cannot be stated. Fear of emotion might be one reason why MDD patients suppress emotions. With regard to positive emotions, our results strongly suggest that therapeutic approaches should not only encourage patients to participate in potentially enjoyable situations but that patients may also benefit from practicing the allowance of pleasant emotions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Racial and Ethnic Disparity in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhili; Richie, William D; Bailey, Rahn Kennedy

    2016-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common and disabling psychiatric disorders in the USA. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are extremely important to prevent disability and improve quality of life. Recent studies have demonstrated racial and ethnic disparities in the diagnosis and treatment of MDD. African Americans (AA), Hispanics, and Asian Americans were significantly less likely to receive a depression diagnosis from a health-care provider than were non-Hispanic whites. The underdiagnosis of MDD in minority groups may be due to differences in socioeconomic status (SES), care affordability, cultural beliefs about depression, help-seeking patterns, access to culturally and linguistically appropriate care, patient-physician relationship, clinical presentation of depression, etc. Meanwhile, the likelihood of both having access to and receiving adequate care for depression was significantly low for AA, Hispanics, and Asian Americans, in contrast to whites. Similar disparities also exist in treatment outcomes. Besides the reasons for MDD underdiagnosis, additional contributing factors include access barriers to preferred mode of treatment, cultural concerns about antidepressants and different metabolism of antidepressants, etc. There are many ways to address these disparities and improve MDD care in minority populations, including universal depression screening, public financial incentives to ensure access to care in low-income and minority neighborhoods, quality improvement programs, cultural competency of mental health professionals, collaborative care management, community engagement and planning, and enhanced participation of minorities in clinical research.

  3. The quality of life of hematological malignancy patients with major depressive disorder or subsyndromal depression.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Omid; Sharifian, Ramezan-Ali; Soleimani, Mehdi; Jahanian, Amirabbas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the quality of life of hematological malignancy patients with major depressive disorder or subsyndromal depression. Sample consisted of 93 hematological malignancy patients recruited from oncology ward of Valieasr hospital for Imam Khomeini complex hospital at Tehran through purposeful sampling. Participants were divided into three groups through diagnostic interview based on DSM-IV-TR criteria and the Beck Depression Inventory-2 (BDI-II): Major depressive disorder (MDD) (n = 41; 44.1%); subsyndromal depression (SSD) (n = 23; 24.7%), and without depression (WD) (n = 29; 31.2%). Participants completed the short-form health survey (SF-36) as a measure of the quality of life. We carried out an analysis of covariance to examine the collected data. Findings showed that there was not a significant difference between patients with MDD and SSD based on measure of quality of life. But patients with MDD and SSD showed significantly worse quality of life than patients with WD. This finding highlights the clinical importance of subsyndromal depressive symptoms and casts doubt on the clinical utility of separation between MDD and subsyndromal depression in terms of important clinical outcomes.

  4. Personal stigma, problem appraisal and perceived need for professional help in currently untreated depressed persons.

    PubMed

    Schomerus, Georg; Auer, Charlotte; Rhode, Dieter; Luppa, Melanie; Freyberger, Harald J; Schmidt, Silke

    2012-06-01

    The role of stigma in help-seeking for depression is unclear. We hypothesize that in persons experiencing symptoms of depression, personal stigmatizing attitudes impair appraisal of the present condition as mental health problem and thus reduce the perceived need for professional help. We recruited a sample of 25 currently untreated depressed persons from the general population using local newspaper articles and emails that listed symptoms of depression avoiding the term "depression" or any other potentially stigma-associated term. We elicited personal stigmatizing attitudes, appraisal of the present problem as mental health problem, and perceived need for any medical or therapeutic help. In linear regression analyses controlling for depression severity and previous help-seeking, high personal stigma was related to lower problem appraisal (beta, -0.38; p<0.05) and to lower perceived need (beta, -0.59, p<0.01). Lower problem appraisal was associated with lower perceived need. Regressing need on both problem appraisal and stigma reduced the direct influence of stigma on need, indicating a partial mediation of this relationship by problem appraisal. Our small sample prohibited the use of path models. Personal stigmatizing attitudes in persons suffering from a depressive syndrome pose an important barrier to help, impairing appraisal of depressive symptoms as potential mental health problem and decreasing perceived need for professional help. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Improvement of major depression is associated with increased erythrocyte DHA.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Barbara J; Grenyer, Brin F S; Crowe, Trevor; Owen, Alice J; Grigonis-Deane, Elizabeth M; Howe, Peter R C

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if changes in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid status following tuna oil supplementation correlated with changes in scores of depression. A total of 95 volunteers receiving treatment for major depression were randomised to consume 8 × 1 g capsules per day of HiDHA (2 g DHA, 0.6 g EPA and 10 mg Vitamin E) or olive oil (placebo) for 16 weeks, whilst undergoing weekly counseling sessions by trained clinical psychologists using a standard empirically validated psychotherapy. Depression status was assessed using the 17 item Hamilton rating scale for depression and the Beck Depression Inventory by a psychodiagnostician who was blind to the treatment. Blood was taken at baseline and 16 weeks (n = 48) for measurement of erythrocyte fatty acids. With HiDHA supplementation, erythrocyte DHA content rose from 4.1 ± 0.2 to 7.9 ± 0.4 % (mean ± SEM, p < 0.001) of total fatty acids but did not change (4.0 ± 0.2 to 4.1 ± 0.2 %) in the olive oil group. The mean changes in scores of depression did not differ significantly between the two groups (-12.2 ± 2.1 for tuna oil and -14.4 ± 2.3 for olive oil). However, analysis of covariance showed that in the fish oil group there was a significant correlation (r = -0.51) between the change in erythrocyte DHA and the change in scores of depression (p < 0.05). Further study of the relationship between DHA and depression is warranted.

  6. Levomilnacipran for the treatment of major depressive disorder: a review.

    PubMed

    Asnis, Gregory M; Henderson, Margaret A

    2015-01-01

    Levomilnacipran (LVM, Fetzima(®)) was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of major depressive disorder. It is a unique dual neurotransmitter reuptake inhibitor. In contrast with other selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, including duloxetine, venlafaxine, and desvenlafaxine, it has greater selectivity for inhibiting norepinephrine reuptake than serotonin reuptake. Our review focuses on the efficacy, safety, and tolerability data for five double-blind, placebo-controlled, short-term studies and two long-term studies. In the short-term studies, LVM was found to be more effective than placebo in reducing depression (Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale) scores as well as improving functional impairment (Sheehan Disability Scale) scores. Long-term studies found LVM to be similarly effective but in the only placebo-controlled long-term study, LVM was not significantly superior to placebo. LVM is fairly well tolerated, with the most common adverse events being nausea, headache, dry mouth, hyperhidrosis, and constipation. Discontinuation rates were mildly increased in those being treated with LVM (9%) versus placebo (3%). Adverse events were not dose-related except for urinary hesitancy and erectile dysfunction. LVM was weight neutral, was not toxic to the liver, and did not cause clinically significant QTc prolongation. Consistent with being a predominant potentiator of norepinephrine, pulse and blood pressure were significantly elevated by LVM but rarely induced tachycardia or hypertension. LVM is a relatively safe alternative antidepressant treatment with minimal drug-drug interactions. It is the only antidepressant that has in its labeling that it is not only effective in improving depression but also effective in improving impaired functioning. Whether this important effect on functioning is unique to LVM must be researched. In addition, whether LVM might be effective in norepinephrine

  7. Validity of a simpler definition of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Mark; Galione, Janine N; Chelminski, Iwona; Young, Diane; Dalrymple, Kristy; Witt, Caren Francione

    2010-10-01

    In previous reports from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services project, we developed a briefer definition of major depressive disorder (MDD), and found high levels of agreement between the simplified and DSM-IV definitions of MDD. The goal of the present study was to examine the validity of the simpler definition of MDD. We hypothesized that compared to patients with adjustment disorder, patients with MDD would be more severely depressed, have poorer psychosocial functioning, have greater suicidal ideation at the time of the intake evaluation, and have an increased morbid risk for depression in their first-degree family members. We compared 1,486 patients who met the symptom criteria for current MDD according to either DSM-IV or the simpler definition to 145 patients with a current diagnosis of adjustment disorder with depressed mood or depressed and anxious mood. The patients with MDD were more severely depressed, more likely to have missed time from work due to psychiatric reasons, reported higher levels of suicidal ideation, and had a significantly higher morbid risk for depression in their first-degree family members. Both definitions of MDD were valid. The simpler definition of MDD was as valid as the DSM-IV definition. This new definition offers two advantages over the DSM-IV definition-it is briefer and therefore more likely to be recalled and applied in clinical practice, and it is free of somatic symptoms thereby making it easier to apply with medically ill patients. Depression and Anxiety, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Learning as a model for neural plasticity in major depression.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Christoph; Holz, Johannes; Blechert, Jens; Feige, Bernd; Riemann, Dieter; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Normann, Claus

    2010-09-15

    The neuroplasticity hypothesis of depression proposes that a dysfunction of neural plasticity-the basic ability of living organisms to adapt their neural function and structure to external and internal cues-might represent a final common pathway underlying the biological and clinical characteristics of the disorder. This study examined learning and memory as correlates of long-term synaptic plasticity in humans to further test the neuroplasticity hypothesis of depression. Learning in three tasks, for which memory consolidation has been shown to depend on local synaptic refinement in areas of interest (hippocampus-dependent declarative word-pair learning, amygdala-dependent fear conditioning, and primary-cortex-dependent visual texture discrimination), was assessed in 23 inpatients who met International Classification of Disease, 10th Revision, criteria for severe unipolar depression and 35 nondepressed comparison subjects. Depressed subjects showed a significant deficit in declarative memory consolidation and enhanced fear acquisition as indicated by skin conductance responses to conditioned stimuli, in comparison with nondepressed subjects. Depressed subjects demonstrated impaired visual discrimination at baseline, not allowing for valid group comparisons of gradual improvement, the plasticity-dependent phase of the task. The results of the study are consistent with the neuroplasticity hypothesis of depression, showing decreased synaptic plasticity in a dorsal executive network that comprises the hippocampus and elevated synaptic plasticity in a ventral emotional network that includes the amygdala in depression. Evaluation of further techniques aimed at modulating synaptic plasticity might prove useful for developing novel treatments for major depressive disorder. Copyright © 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Disability and comorbidity among major depressive disorder and double depression in African-American adults.

    PubMed

    Torres, Elisa R

    2013-09-25

    Few studies have examined differences in disability and comorbity among major depressive disorder (MDD), dysthymia, and double depression in African-Americans (AA). A secondary analysis was performed on AA in the National Survey of American Life. Interviews occurred 2001-2003. A four stage national area probability sampling was performed. DSM-IV-TR diagnoses were obtained with a modified version of the World Health Organization's expanded version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Disability was measured by interview with the World Health Organization's Disability Assessment Schedule II. Compared to non-depressed AA, AA endorsing MDD (t=19.0, p=0.0001) and double depression (t=18.7, p=0.0001) reported more global disability; AA endorsing MDD (t=8.5, p=0.0063) reported more disability in the getting around domain; AA endorsing MDD (t=19.1, p=0.0001) and double depression (t=12.1, p=0.0014) reported more disability in the life activities domain. AA who endorsed double depression reported similar disability and comorbidities with AA who endorsed MDD. Few AA endorsed dysthymia. This was a cross-sectional study subject to recall bias. The NSAL did not measure minor depression. The current study supports the idea of deleting distinct chronic subtypes of depression and consolidating them into a single category termed chronic depression. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A systematic review of yoga for major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Holger; Anheyer, Dennis; Lauche, Romy; Dobos, Gustav

    2017-04-15

    The purpose of this review was to investigate the efficacy and safety of yoga interventions in treating patients with major depressive disorder. MEDLINE, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library were screened through December 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing yoga to inactive or active comparators in patients with major depressive disorder were eligible. Primary outcomes included remission rates and severity of depression. Anxiety and adverse events were secondary outcomes. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane tool. Seven RCTs with 240 participants were included. Risk of bias was unclear for most RCTs. Compared to aerobic exercise, no short- or medium-term group differences in depression severity was found. Higher short-term depression severity was found for yoga compared to electro-convulsive therapy; remission rates did not differ between groups. No short-term group differences occurred when yoga was compared to antidepressant medication. Conflicting evidence was found when yoga was compared to attention-control interventions, or when yoga as an add-on to antidepressant medication was compared to medication alone. Only two RCTs assessed adverse events and reported that no treatment-related adverse events were reported. Few RCTs with low sample size. This review found some evidence for positive effects beyond placebo and comparable effects compared to evidence-based interventions. However, methodological problems and the unclear risk-benefit ratio preclude definitive recommendations for or against yoga as an adjunct treatment for major depressive disorder. Larger and adequately powered RCTs using non-inferiority designs are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Extended-release Trazodone in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, David V.; Croft, Harry A.; Levitt, Randy J.; Brullé, Claire; Bouchard, Sylvie; Rozova, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy, safety, and clinical benefit of a once-daily formulation of trazodone (Trazodone Contramid® OAD) in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Design/Participants: In this double-blind study, 412 patients with major depressive disorder (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria) were randomized 1:1 to receive either Trazodone Contramid OAD (150 to 375mg) or placebo. Treatment was titrated over two weeks to each individual optimal dose. Patients then continued six weeks of treatment; further dose adjustments were allowed based on efficacy and tolerability. Measurements: The primary end point was change in the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale total score from baseline to last study visit. Secondary end points included Hamilton Depression Rating Scale responders/remitters, change in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, Clinician and Patient Global Improvement Scales, and quality of sleep. Results: From the end of titration to the end of the six-week treatment period, the mean maximum daily dose of the intent-to-treat population was 310mg for the active group and 355mg for the placebo group. There was a statistically significant difference between trazodone and placebo on the mean HAMD-17 score (-11.4 vs. -9.3, P=0.012). A significant difference was present as early as Week 1 and was maintained at all subsequent study visits. Many secondary end points supported these findings, including improvements in quality of sleep. The most frequent adverse events were the same for both the treatment and placebo groups: headache and somnolence. There were no serious adverse events that were considered related to treatment. There were no clinically significant electrocardiogram or laboratory abnormalities. Conclusions: The trazodone Contramid formulation was more effective than placebo in major depressive disorder and was well tolerated. PMID:19724732

  12. Personal Computer Ownership--A Major Decision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Eleanor M.

    1982-01-01

    Considerations to be taken into account before buying a home computer include one's attitude toward computers, need, cost, and available space. A personal computer can be beneficial as a tutor, entertainer, record-keeper, and aid to the handicapped. Home economists must attempt to understand the implications of home computers for family life. (JOW)

  13. Major depressive disorder. Psychopathology, medical management and dental implications.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, A H; Mahler, M E

    2001-05-01

    Major depressive disorder, or MDD, is a psychiatric illness in which mood, thoughts and behavioral patterns are impaired for long periods. The illness distresses the person and impairs his or her social functioning and quality of life. MDD is characterized by marked sadness or a loss of interest or pleasure in daily activities, and is accompanied by weight change, sleep disturbance, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, physical impairment and a high suicide rate. In 2000, the World Health Organization, or WHO, identified MDD as the fourth ranked cause of disability and premature death in the world. WHO projected that by 2020, MDD would rise in disease burden to be second only to ischemic heart disease. The disorder is common in the United States, with a lifetime prevalence rate of 17 percent and a recurrence rate of more than 50 percent. MDD may be associated with extensive dental disease, and people may seek dental treatment before becoming aware of their psychiatric illness. MDD frequently is associated with a disinterest in performing appropriate oral hygiene techniques, a cariogenic diet, diminished salivary flow, rampant dental caries, advanced periodontal disease and oral dysesthesias. Many medications used to treat the disease magnify the xerostomia and increase the incidence of dental disease. Appropriate dental management requires a vigorous dental education program, the use of saliva substitutes and anticaries agents containing fluoride, and special precautions when prescribing or administering analgesics and local anesthetics. Dentists cognizant of these signs and symptoms have an opportunity to recognize patients with occult MDD. After confirmation of the diagnosis and institution of treatment by a mental health practitioner, dentists usually can provide a full range of services that may enhance patients' self-esteem and contribute to the psychotherapeutic aspect of management.

  14. Major depression and depressive symptoms in Australian Gulf War veterans 20 years after the Gulf War.

    PubMed

    Ikin, J F; McKenzie, D P; Gwini, S M; Kelsall, H L; Creamer, M; McFarlane, A C; Clarke, D M; Wright, B; Sim, M

    2016-01-01

    Risk of major depression (depression) was elevated in Australia's Gulf War veterans in a 2000-2002 (baseline) study. A follow up study has measured the Gulf War-related risk factors for depression, also the current prevalence and severity of depression, use of anti-depressant medication, and persistence, remittance or incidence of depression since baseline in Gulf War veterans and a military comparison group. Participants completed the Composite International Diagnostic Interview v.2.1, the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire and the Military Service Experience Questionnaire, and consented to Repatriation Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (RPBS) and PBS linkage. Prevalence of depression (9.7% Gulf War veterans and 7.7% comparison group; adj RR=1.2, 95% CI 0.8-1.7), and pattern of persistence, remittance and incidence of depression since baseline, were similar in the two groups, however veterans reported slightly more severe symptoms (adj median difference 1, 95% CI 0.26-1.74) and were more likely to have been dispensed anti-depressant medication (adj RR=1.56, 95% CI 1.05-2.32). Depression amongst veterans was associated with self-reported Gulf War-related stressors in a dose-response relationship (adj RR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02-1.09). Lower participation rates at follow up resulted in reduced statistical power compared with baseline, Gulf War related stressor data collected at baseline was at risk of recall bias, and RPBS and PBS databases do not capture all dispensed Nervous System medications. More than 20 years after the Gulf War, veterans are experiencing slightly more severe depressive symptoms than a military comparison group, and depression continues to be associated with Gulf War-related stressors. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Dynamics of behavioral organization and its alteration in major depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Toru; Kiyono, Ken; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Nakahara, Rika; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2007-07-01

    We describe the nature of human behavioral organization, specifically how resting and active periods are interwoven throughout daily life. Active period durations with physical activity counts successively above a predefined threshold follow a stretched exponential (gamma-type) cumulative distribution with characteristic time, both in healthy individuals and in patients with major depressive disorder. On the contrary, resting period durations below the threshold for both groups obey a scale free power law cumulative distribution over two decades, with significantly lower scaling exponents in the patients. We thus find underlying robust laws governing human behavioral organization, with a parameter altered in depression.

  16. Mirtazapine: a review of its use in major depression.

    PubMed

    Holm, K J; Markham, A

    1999-04-01

    Mirtazapine is a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA) which has predominantly been evaluated in the treatment of major depression. The drug had equivalent efficacy to tricyclic antidepressants and it was at least as effective as trazodone in the majority of available short term trials in patients with moderate or severe depression, including those with baseline anxiety symptoms or sleep disturbance and the elderly. A continuation study also showed that sustained remission rates were higher with mirtazapine than with amitriptyline and that the drugs had similar efficacy for the prevention of relapse. There is some evidence for a faster onset of action with mirtazapine than with the selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Mirtazapine was more effective than the SSRI fluoxetine at weeks 3 and 4 of therapy and it was also more effective than paroxetine and citalopram at weeks 1 and 2, respectively, in short term assessments (6 or 8 weeks). Preliminary data suggest that the drug may be effective as an augmentation or combination therapy in patients with refractory depression. Anticholinergic events and other events including tremor and dyspepsia are less common with mirtazapine than with tricyclic antidepressants. There was a greater tendency for SSRI-related adverse events with fluoxetine than with mirtazapine, but, overall, mirtazapine had a similar tolerability profile to the SSRIs. Increased appetite and bodyweight gain appear to be the only events that are reported more often with mirtazapine than with comparator antidepressants. In vitro and in vivo data have suggested that mirtazapine is unlikely to affect the metabolism of drugs metabolised by cytochrome P450 (CYP)2D6, although few formal drug interaction data are available. Mirtazapine is effective and well tolerated for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe major depression. Further research is required to define the comparative

  17. Discontinuity of Medicaid Coverage: Impact on Cost and Utilization Among Adult Medicaid Beneficiaries With Major Depression.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xu; Wilk, Adam S; Druss, Benjamin G; Lally, Cathy; Cummings, Janet R

    2017-08-01

    Gaps in Medicaid coverage may disrupt access to and continuity of care. This can be detrimental for beneficiaries with chronic conditions, such as major depression, for whom disruptions in access to outpatient care may lead to increased use of acute care. However, little is known about how Medicaid coverage discontinuities impact acute care utilization among adults with depression. Examine the relationship between Medicaid discontinuities and service utilization among adults with major depression. A total of 139,164 adults (18-64) with major depression was identified using the 2003-2004 Medicaid Analytic eXtract Files. We used generalized linear and two-part models to examine the effect of Medicaid discontinuity on service utilization. To establish causality in this relationship, we used instrumental variables analysis, relying on exogenous variation in a state-level policy for identification. Emergency department (ED) visits, inpatient episodes, inpatient days, and Medicaid-reimbursed costs. Approximately 29.4% of beneficiaries experienced coverage disruptions. In instrumental variables models, those with coverage disruptions incurred an increase of $650 in acute care costs per-person per Medicaid-covered month compared with those with continuous coverage, evidenced by an increase in ED use (0.1 more ED visits per-person-month) and inpatient days (0.6 more days per-person-month). The increase in acute costs contributed to an overall increase in all-cause costs by $310 per-person-month (all P-values<0.001). Among depressed adults, those experiencing coverage disruptions have, on average, significantly greater use of costly ED/inpatient services than those with continuous coverage. Maintenance of continuous Medicaid coverage may help prevent acute episodes requiring high-cost interventions.

  18. Atypical depression among psychiatric inpatients: clinical features and personality traits.

    PubMed

    Derecho, C N; Wetzler, S; McGinn, L K; Sanderson, W C; Asnis, G M

    1996-06-20

    This study investigates the frequency and characteristics of Atypical Depression (AD) among depressed inpatients. Twenty-one depressed inpatients received DSM-IV diagnoses, were rated on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD), and assessed for AD using the Atypical Depressive Disorder Scale. AD was defined as the presence of mood reactivity and two of four associated features: hyperphagia, hypersomnia, leaden paralysis, rejection sensitivity. Mood reactivity was defined as the ability to reach 50% of a non-depressed mood. All subjects completed the SCL-90, MCMI-II, and a suicide survey. Seven patients (33%) met criteria for AD. AD and non-AD patients did not differ in terms of severity of depression, history of suicide attempts, levels of clinical symptomatology, age of onset of depression, prior hospitalizations, and most personality characteristics. However, AD patients scored significantly higher than non-AD patients on the SCL-90 Interpersonal Sensitivity and MCMI-II Avoidant scales, and were more likely to be single. AD is fairly prevalent on an inpatient service, comparable to the frequency found in outpatient settings. AD is not a milder form of depression. The only differences between AD and non-AD patients reflect the personality trait of rejection sensitivity which is a defining feature of AD.

  19. Personality Correlates of Depressive Style in Autobiographies of Creative Achievers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, A. Marie; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study compared neurotic and depressive personality characteristics in autobiographies of creative achievers (n=30) versus eminent but noncreative achievers (n=18). California Q-Set ratings assessed the five personality factors of neuroticism, extroversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. Creative achievers were…

  20. The expression of depression among Javanese patients with major depressive disorder: a concept mapping study.

    PubMed

    Brintnell, E Sharon; Sommer, Ryan W; Kuncoro, Bambang; Setiawan, G Pandu; Bailey, Patricia

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we explored the presentation of clinical depression in Java, Indonesia. Interviews were conducted with 20 Javanese patients (male and female) with major depressive disorder from both lower and higher socioeconomic levels. The recruited participants came from provincial and private mental health hospitals in the cities of Solo, Yogykarta (Jogja), Jakarta, and Malang on the island of Java, Indonesia. Concept mapping methodology using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify underlying themes in the expression of depressive phenomena in this Indonesian population. The results identified themes that grouped into six clusters: interpersonal relationships, hopelessness, physical/somatic, poverty of thought, discourage, and defeat. Findings give support to the view that culture influences the expression of Indonesian depressive phenomenology, which nevertheless has some common roots with Western clinical pictures of the disorder. Cultural influences may mask symptoms of the disorder to clinicians. Diagnostic and assessment tools must be carefully selected to ensure they address culturally specific expressions of depression.

  1. The process of major depressive disorder (MDD) in women referred to the health centers

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati-Khameneh, Souraj; Mehrabi, Tayebeh; Izadi-Dehnavi, Maryam; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder is one of the most widespread psychological problems in the world. The feelings of a person who is affected by this condition is boring. This article aimed to shed light on the experiences of women with major depressive disorder. METHODS: A qualitative approach with thematic analysis design has been used to describe the studied phenomenon as experienced by the participants. RESULTS: Analysis of 92 codes from 12 interviewed participants brought about 4 main themes including loss, inappropriate marital life, cognitive errors, and economic condition. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed main concerns of the participants through their life and suggested that psychotherapists should be more sensitive to these aspects of their depress patients’ experiences. PMID:22224114

  2. Imaging genetics studies on monoaminergic genes in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Won, Eunsoo; Ham, Byung-Joo

    2016-01-04

    Although depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide, current understanding of the neurobiology of depression has failed to be translated into clinical practice. Major depressive disorder (MDD) pathogenesis is considered to be significantly influenced by multiple risk genes, however genetic effects are not simply expressed at a behavioral level. Therefore the concept of endophenotype has been applied in psychiatric genetics. Imaging genetics applies anatomical or functional imaging technologies as phenotypic assays to evaluate genetic variation and their impact on behavior. This paper attempts to provide a comprehensive review of available imaging genetics studies, including reports on genetic variants that have most frequently been linked to MDD, such as the monoaminergic genes (serotonin transporter gene, monoamine oxidase A gene, tryptophan hydroxylase-2 gene, serotonin receptor 1A gene and catechol-O-methyl transferase gene), with regard to key structures involved in emotion processing, such as the hippocampus, amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex.

  3. Correlates of Disability in Asian Patients With Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Eurviriyanukul, Kanokkwan; Srisurapanont, Manit; Udomratn, Pichet; Sulaiman, Ahmad Hatim; Liu, Chia-Yih

    2016-10-01

    To examine correlates of disability in Asian patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Participants were outpatients with DSM-IV MDD. Global disability and three disability domains (i.e., work/school, social life/leisure, and family/home life) were key outcomes. Several socio-demographic and clinical characteristics were determined for their associations with disability. The sample was 493 MDD patients. Apart from the number of hospitalizations, the global disability was significantly associated with depression severity, fatigue, physical health, and mental health. Several clinical but only few socio-demographic characteristics associated with the other three disability domains were similar. Disability among Asian patients with MDD correlates with the severity of psychiatric symptoms and the hospitalizations due to depression. Socio-demographic characteristics have little impact on the overall disability. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cognitive control adjustments and conflict adaptation in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Clawson, Ann; Clayson, Peter E; Larson, Michael J

    2013-08-01

    Individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) show alterations in the cognitive control function of conflict processing. We examined the influence of these deficits on behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) indices of conflict adaptation, a cognitive control process wherein previous-trial congruency modulates current-trial performance, in 55 individuals with MDD and 55 matched controls. ERPs were calculated while participants completed a modified flanker task. There were nonsignificant between-groups differences in response time, error rate, and N2 indices of conflict adaptation. Higher depressive symptom scores were associated with smaller mean N2 conflict adaptation scores for individuals with MDD and when collapsed across groups. Results were consistent when comorbidity and medications were analyzed. These findings suggest N2 conflict adaptation is associated with depressive symptoms rather than clinical diagnosis alone.

  5. EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONING IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER

    PubMed Central

    Favre, Tricia; Hughes, Carroll; Emslie, Graham; Stavinoha, Peter; Kennard, Beth; Carmody, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The present investigation examined neurocognitive functioning, focusing on executive functioning (EF), in 39 children and adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and 24 healthy control subjects all ages 8 to 17 years. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition along with several measures of executive functioning including the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task, Trail Making Test, Controlled Oral Word Association Test, and the Stroop Color Word Test were administered. The neurocognitive profiles for the group of depressed children and adolescents were grossly intact as most scores on intellectual and EF measures fell within the average range and did not differ from the comparison group. Mental processing speed was decreased in the MDD versus normal control group and 27% of the depressed group performed below average on the Trail Making Test. This investigation provided a good base from which to compare future literature on EF in outpatients with early-onset MDD. PMID:19089695

  6. Vortioxetine for the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Tritschler, Laurent; Felice, Daniela; Colle, Romain; Guilloux, Jean-Philippe; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Gardier, Alain Michel; David, Denis Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Vortioxetine (Brintellix(®), 1-[2-(2,4-dimethylphenyl-sulfanyl)-phenyl]-piperazine) is a multimodal antidepressant targeting the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT3, 5-HT7 receptors and the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT). Vortioxetine administration induces antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects, and can enhance cognitive performance in rodents. Several clinical trials have reported the efficiency and a satisfactory tolerability of vortioxetine treatment in depressed patients. Remarkably, vortioxetine has a specific positive impact on cognitive symptoms in depressed patients. Overall, vortioxetine is an efficacious antidepressant drug for the treatment of patients with a major depressive episode and has a unique mechanism of action offering a new therapeutic option.

  7. Feeling blue or turquoise? Emotional differentiation in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Demiralp, Emre; Thompson, Renee J; Mata, Jutta; Jaeggi, Susanne M; Buschkuehl, Martin; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Ellsworth, Phoebe C; Demiralp, Metin; Hernandez-Garcia, Luis; Deldin, Patricia J; Gotlib, Ian H; Jonides, John

    2012-01-01

    Some individuals have very specific and differentiated emotional experiences, such as anger, shame, excitement, and happiness, whereas others have more general affective experiences of pleasure or discomfort that are not as highly differentiated. Considering that individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) have cognitive deficits for negative information, we predicted that people with MDD would have less differentiated negative emotional experiences than would healthy people. To test this hypothesis, we assessed participants' emotional experiences using a 7-day experience-sampling protocol. Depression was assessed using structured clinical interviews and the Beck Depression Inventory-II. As predicted, individuals with MDD had less differentiated emotional experiences than did healthy participants, but only for negative emotions. These differences were above and beyond the effects of emotional intensity and variability.

  8. Impaired intuition in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Remmers, Carina; Topolinski, Sascha; Dietrich, Detlef E; Michalak, Johannes

    2015-06-01

    In daily life, many decisions of minor and major importance have to be made. Thereby, intuitive judgments serve as useful guides and help us to adapt to our environment. People with major depressive disorder (MDD) often have difficulties to come to decisions. Is their intuition impaired? Since this question has not been addressed until now, the present study explored intuition in MDD. Depressed patients (n = 29) and healthy control participants (n = 27) completed the Judgment of Semantic Coherence Task, a well-established paradigm used in basic cognitive research to measure intuition. Furthermore, participants' severity of depressive symptoms (BDI-II), negative affect (PANAS), and rumination (RSQ) were assessed. All participants were interviewed with the SCID. Depressed patients showed impaired intuition compared to healthy control participants. In the depressed sample, negative affect accounts for the association between rumination and impaired intuition. Results further reveal that negative affect overall mediates the depression-intuition relationship. Patients with diminished ability to concentrate or indecisiveness had lower intuition indices compared to patients who did not fulfil this diagnostic criterion of MDD. The study introduces the phenomenon of intuition into depression research. Additionally, these results extent findings from basic research showing that induced negative mood as well difficulties to down-regulate negative affect impair intuitive coherence judgments. Current results indicate that the negative affectivity of patients is the crucial mediator in the association between depression and impaired intuition. Limitations of the study as well as the potential etiological role of intuition in MDD are discussed. The finding that intuition is impaired in depressed patients extends our knowledge as to the cognitive profile of patients with MDD. Patients who suffer from indecisiveness have lower intuition indices compared to patients who do not

  9. Tele-Interpersonal Psychotherapy Acutely Reduces Depressive Symptoms in Depressed HIV-Infected Rural Persons: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Timothy G; Heckman, Bernadette D; Anderson, Timothy; Lovejoy, Travis I; Markowitz, John C; Shen, Ye; Sutton, Mark

    2016-04-26

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive rural individuals carry a 1.3-times greater risk of a depressive diagnosis than their urban counterparts. This randomized clinical trial tested whether telephone-administered interpersonal psychotherapy (tele-IPT) acutely relieved depressive symptoms in 132 HIV-infected rural persons from 28 states diagnosed with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV major depressive disorder (MDD), partially remitted MDD, or dysthymic disorder. Patients were randomized to either 9 sessions of one-on-one tele-IPT (n = 70) or standard care (SC; n = 62). A series of intent-to-treat (ITT), therapy completer, and sensitivity analyses assessed changes in depressive symptoms, interpersonal problems, and social support from pre- to postintervention. Across all analyses, tele-IPT patients reported significantly lower depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems than SC controls; 22% of tele-IPT patients were categorized as a priori "responders" who reported 50% or higher reductions in depressive symptoms compared to only 4% of SC controls in ITT analyses. Brief tele-IPT acutely decreased depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems in depressed rural people living with HIV.

  10. Early life trauma and directional brain connectivity within major depression.

    PubMed

    Grant, Merida M; White, David; Hadley, Jennifer; Hutcheson, Nathan; Shelton, Richard; Sreenivasan, Karthik; Deshpande, Gopikrishna

    2014-09-01

    Early life trauma (ELT) is a significant risk factor for the onset of depression. Emerging findings indicate ELT is associated with enhanced amygdala reactivity to aversive stimuli in never-depressed healthy controls as well as those with acute depression but may be absent in non-ELT exposed depressed. The precise mechanism mediating these differences in amygdala reactivity remains unclear. The authors used Granger causality methods to evaluate task-based directional connectivity between medial or lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) and amygdala in 20 unmedicated patients with current major depressive disorder (MDD) and 19 healthy matched controls while participants engaged in an affective variant of the flanker task comparing response to sad and neutral faces. These data were correlated with childhood trauma history. Exposure to ELT was associated with failure of inhibition within the MDD group based on medial PFC-amygdala connectivity. In contrast, non-ELT exposed MDD was associated with a negative causal pathway from medial prefrontal cortex to amygdala, despite reduced dorsolateral PFC input in comparison to healthy controls. Neither MDD group demonstrated significant lateral PFC-amygdala connectivity in comparison to healthy controls. Failure of the circuit implicated in emotion regulation was associated with a significant history of ELT but not with MDD more broadly. Non-ELT related depression was associated with intact regulation of emotion despite the absence of difference in severity of illness. These findings indicate opposing system-level differences within depression relative to ELT are expressed as differential amygdala reactivity. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A Review of Vilazodone, Serotonin, and Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Thase, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review the mechanism of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)–mediated serotonergic neurotransmission, focusing on serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors, which are proposed to be involved in delaying therapeutic efficacy. Vilazodone was specifically designed to function both as an SSRI and a partial agonist at 5-HT1A receptors. This combined mechanism is proposed to decrease time to efficacy, minimize sexual side effects, and provide concomitant anxiolytic properties. Data Sources: A PubMed search of all English-language articles from January 1990 to January 2013 was conducted using the search terms depression and 5-HT1A, depression and buspirone, depression and pindolol, and vilazodone. Study Selection: We found 47 articles and abstracts that were selected for inclusion on the basis of information about the pharmacology of 5-HT1A receptors and the clinical data on pindolol, buspirone, and vilazodone in depression. Data Extraction: This review summarizes current literature involving antidepressant activity, the role of 5-HT1A autoreceptors, and clinical trials involving serotonin reuptake inhibition in conjunction with 5-HT1A agonists and partial agonists, with a focus on vilazodone. Results:Vilazodone has demonstrated efficacy in 2 large, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in major depressive disorder. Results suggest that vilazodone has a low incidence of sexual side effects and is effective in patients with high levels of anxiety. A pooled analysis shows evidence of significant symptom reduction after only 1 week of therapy. Conclusions: If future studies corroborate the clinical benefits attributed to its mechanism of action, vilazodone may show potential advantages in terms of onset of action, sexual side effects, and anxiolytic activity in patients with major depressive disorder. PMID:24940527

  12. Neural mechanisms of cognitive reappraisal in remitted major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Smoski, Moria J; Keng, Shian-Ling; Schiller, Crystal Edler; Minkel, Jared; Dichter, Gabriel S

    2013-10-01

    Down-regulation of negative emotions by cognitive strategies relies on prefrontal cortical modulation of limbic brain regions, and impaired frontolimbic functioning during cognitive reappraisal has been observed in affective disorders. However, no study to date has examined cognitive reappraisal in unmedicated euthymic individuals with a history of major depressive disorder relative to symptom-matched controls. Given that a history of depression is a critical risk factor for future depressive episodes, investigating the neural mechanisms of emotion regulation in remitted major depressive disorder (rMDD) may yield novel insights into depression risk. We assessed 37 individuals (18 rMDD, 19 controls) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a task requiring cognitive reappraisal of sad images. Both groups demonstrated decreased self-reported negative affect after cognitive reappraisal and no group differences in the effects of cognitive reappraisal on mood were evident. Functional MRI results indicated greater paracingulate gyrus (rostral anterior cingulate cortex, Brodmann area 32) activation and decreased right midfrontal gyrus (Brodmann area 6) activation during the reappraisal of sad images. Trial-by-trial ratings of pre-regulation affect were not collected, limiting the interpretation of post-regulation negative affect scores. Results suggest that activation of rostral anterior cingulate cortex, a region linked to the prediction of antidepressant treatment response, and of the right midfrontal gyrus, a region involved in cognitive control in the context of cognitive reappraisal, may represent endophenotypic markers of future depression risk. Future prospective studies will be needed to validate the predictive utility of these neural markers. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Population-Based Longitudinal Study of Risk Factors for Suicide Attempts in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, James M.; Pagura, Jina; Enns, Murray W.; Grant, Bridget; Sareen, Jitender

    2010-01-01

    No longitudinal study has examined risk factors for future suicide attempts in major depressive disorder in a nationally representative sample. The objective of this study was to investigate baseline sociodemographic characteristics, comorbid mental disorders, specific depressive symptoms, and previous suicidal behavior as potential risk factors for suicide attempts at 3 years follow-up. Data came from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a large nationally representative longitudinal survey of mental illness in adults [Wave 1 (2001–2002); Wave 2 (2004–2005) n=34,653]. Logistic regression examined associations between risk factors present at Wave 1 and suicide attempts at Wave 2 (n=169) among individuals with major depressive disorder at baseline assessment (n=6004). Risk factors for incident suicide attempts at Wave 2 (n=63) were identified among those with major depressive disorder at Wave 1 and no lifetime history of suicide attempts (n=5170). Results revealed specific comorbid anxiety, personality, and substance use disorders to be associated with incident suicide attempts at Wave 2. Comorbid borderline personality disorder was strongly associated with suicide attempts in all models. Several comorbid disorders were strongly associated with suicide attempts at Wave 2 even after adjusting for previous suicidal behavior, notably posttraumatic stress disorder [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 2.20; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.27–3.83] and dependent personality disorder (AOR = 4.43; 95% CI 1.93–10.18). These findings suggest that mental illness comorbidity confers an increased risk of future suicide attempts in major depressive disorder that is not solely accounted for by past suicidal behavior. PMID:20122697

  14. A population-based longitudinal study of risk factors for suicide attempts in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bolton, James M; Pagura, Jina; Enns, Murray W; Grant, Bridget; Sareen, Jitender

    2010-10-01

    No longitudinal study has examined risk factors for future suicide attempts in major depressive disorder in a nationally representative sample. The objective of this study was to investigate baseline sociodemographic characteristics, comorbid mental disorders, specific depressive symptoms, and previous suicidal behavior as potential risk factors for suicide attempts at 3 years follow-up. Data came from the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions (NESARC), a large nationally representative longitudinal survey of mental illness in adults [Wave 1 (2001-2002); Wave 2 (2004-2005) n=34,653]. Logistic regression examined associations between risk factors present at Wave 1 and suicide attempts at Wave 2 (n=169) among individuals with major depressive disorder at baseline assessment (n=6004). Risk factors for incident suicide attempts at Wave 2 (n=63) were identified among those with major depressive disorder at Wave 1 and no lifetime history of suicide attempts (n=5170). Results revealed specific comorbid anxiety, personality, and substance use disorders to be associated with incident suicide attempts at Wave 2. Comorbid borderline personality disorder was strongly associated with suicide attempts in all models. Several comorbid disorders were strongly associated with suicide attempts at Wave 2 even after adjusting for previous suicidal behavior, notably posttraumatic stress disorder (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=2.20; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.27-3.83) and dependent personality disorder (AOR=4.43; 95% CI 1.93-10.18). These findings suggest that mental illness comorbidity confers an increased risk of future suicide attempts in major depressive disorder that is not solely accounted for by past suicidal behavior.

  15. Differences in depressive symptoms between Korean and American outpatients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hong Jin; Walker, Rosemary S; Inamori, Aya; Hong, Jin Pyo; Cho, Maeng Je; Baer, Lee; Clain, Alisabet; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David

    2014-05-01

    Previous epidemiologic studies have revealed that East-Asian populations experience fewer depressive symptoms than American populations do. However, it is unclear whether this difference applies to clinical patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This present study included 1592 Korean and 3744 American outpatients who were 18 years of age or older and met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. criteria for single or recurrent episodes of nonpsychotic MDD, and evaluated their symptoms of depression using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire Short Form. Korean patients scored significantly lower for guilt and depressed mood items, and higher for hypochondriasis and suicidality items than American patients did, after adjusting for total Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores. Conversely, no significant differences were found in quality and function of daily life between groups. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that Korean patients experienced less frequent depressed mood and guilt, including verbal and nonverbal expression of depressed mood [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08-0.23] and feelings of punishment (AOR = 0.036, 95% CI 0.025-0.054) when compared with Americans after adjusting for age and sex. Conversely, Korean patients experienced more frequent suicidality and hypochondriasis, including suicidal ideas or gestures (AOR = 2.10, 95% CI 1.60-2.76) and self-absorption of hypochondriasis (AOR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.70-2.20). In conclusion, decreased expression of depressed mood and guilt may cause underdiagnosis of MDD in Korean patients. Early diagnosis of and intervention for depression and suicide may be delayed because of this specific cross-cultural difference in depression symptoms.

  16. Extended release quetiapine fumarate in major depressive disorder: analysis in patients with anxious depression.

    PubMed

    Thase, Michael E; Demyttenaere, Koen; Earley, Willie R; Gustafsson, Urban; Udd, Mattias; Eriksson, Hans

    2012-07-01

    A pooled analysis was performed on data from two studies evaluating the efficacy of once-daily extended-release quetiapine fumarate (quetiapine XR) monotherapy for patients with major depressive disorder. Through these analyses (based on Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) and Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A) measures), we aim to further evaluate the efficacy of quetiapine XR in depressed patients with high levels of anxiety symptoms. Secondary analyses were conducted of pooled individual patient data from two 8-week (6-week randomized phase, 2-week drug discontinuation phase), double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of quetiapine XR (50-300 mg/day). Outcomes included change from randomization at Week 6 in Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score for patients with anxious and nonanxious depression. Of 968 patients included in the analysis, 788 (81.4%) were classified as anxious depressed (defined as HAM-D anxiety/somatization factor score ≥ 7) and 180 (18.6%) were nonanxious. For patients with anxious depression and nonanxious depression, statistically significant differences versus placebo in MADRS total score were recorded for quetiapine XR 150 mg/day (-3.24, P < .001 and -4.82, P < .01, respectively) and 300 mg/day (-3.57, P < .001 and -3.39, P < .05, respectively) at Week 6. In the second analysis using an alternate definition of anxious depression (baseline HAM-A total score ≥ 20), quetiapine XR 150 and 300 mg/day resulted in significant differences versus placebo in MADRS total score reduction in patients with high and lower levels of anxiety. The adverse event (AE) profile was similar irrespective of baseline anxiety levels, although patients with anxious depression reported a somewhat greater incidence of AEs. Quetiapine XR monotherapy improved symptoms of depression in patients with higher and lower levels of anxiety. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Executive Attention Impairment in Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sommerfeldt, Sasha L.; Cullen, Kathryn R.; Han, Georges; Fryza, Brandon J.; Houri, Alaa K.; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neural network models that guide neuropsychological assessment practices are increasingly used to explicate depression, though a paucity of work has focused on regulatory systems that are under development in adolescence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate subsystems of attention related to executive functioning including alerting, orienting, and executive attention networks, as well as sustained attention with varying working memory load, in a sample of depressed and well adolescents. Method Neuropsychological functioning in 99 adolescents diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 63 adolescent healthy controls (M = 16.6 years old) was assessed on the Attention Network Task (ANT) and the Continuous Performance Test, Identical Pairs (CPT). Results Adolescents with MDD, particularly those who were not medicated, were slower to process conflict (slower reaction time on the executive attention scale of the ANT) compared to controls, particularly for those who were not undergoing psychopharmacological treatment. Tentative evidence also suggests that within the MDD group, orienting performance was more impaired in those with a history of comorbid substance use disorder, and alerting was more impaired in those with a history of a suicide attempt. Conclusions Adolescents with depression showed impaired executive attention, although cognitive performance varied across subgroups of patients. These findings highlight the importance of examining neurocognitive correlates associated with features of depression and suggest an avenue for future research to help guide the development of interventions. PMID:26566871

  18. Executive Attention Impairment in Adolescents With Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Sommerfeldt, Sasha L; Cullen, Kathryn R; Han, Georges; Fryza, Brandon J; Houri, Alaa K; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Neural network models that guide neuropsychological assessment practices are increasingly used to explicate depression, though a paucity of work has focused on regulatory systems that are under development in adolescence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate subsystems of attention related to executive functioning including alerting, orienting, and executive attention networks, as well as sustained attention with varying working memory load, in a sample of depressed and well adolescents. Neuropsychological functioning in 99 adolescents diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 63 adolescent healthy controls (M = 16.6 years old) was assessed on the Attention Network Test (ANT) and the Continuous Performance Test, Identical Pairs. Adolescents with MDD, particularly those who were not medicated, were slower to process conflict (slower reaction time on the Executive Attention scale of the ANT) compared to controls, particularly for those who were not undergoing psychopharmacological treatment. Tentative evidence also suggests that within the MDD group, orienting performance was more impaired in those with a history of comorbid substance use disorder, and alerting was more impaired in those with a history of a suicide attempt. Adolescents with depression showed impaired executive attention, although cognitive performance varied across subgroups of patients. These findings highlight the importance of examining neurocognitive correlates associated with features of depression and suggest an avenue for future research to help guide the development of interventions.

  19. Altered fecal microbiota composition in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haiyin; Ling, Zongxin; Zhang, Yonghua; Mao, Hongjin; Ma, Zhanping; Yin, Yan; Wang, Weihong; Tang, Wenxin; Tan, Zhonglin; Shi, Jianfei; Li, Lanjuan; Ruan, Bing

    2015-08-01

    Studies using animal models have shown that depression affects the stability of the microbiota, but the actual structure and composition in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are not well understood. Here, we analyzed fecal samples from 46 patients with depression (29 active-MDD and 17 responded-MDD) and 30 healthy controls (HCs). High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that, according to the Shannon index, increased fecal bacterial α-diversity was found in the active-MDD (A-MDD) vs. the HC group but not in the responded-MDD (R-MDD) vs. the HC group. Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria strongly increased in level, whereas that of Firmicutes was significantly reduced in the A-MDD and R-MDD groups compared with the HC group. Despite profound interindividual variability, levels of several predominant genera were significantly different between the MDD and HC groups. Most notably, the MDD groups had increased levels of Enterobacteriaceae and Alistipes but reduced levels of Faecalibacterium. A negative correlation was observed between Faecalibacterium and the severity of depressive symptoms. These findings enable a better understanding of changes in the fecal microbiota composition in such patients, showing either a predominance of some potentially harmful bacterial groups or a reduction in beneficial bacterial genera. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the temporal and causal relationships between gut microbiota and depression and to evaluate the suitability of the microbiome as a biomarker. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Unintentional Injuries among Psychiatric Outpatients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ching-I; Liu, Chia-Yih; Yang, Ching-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background No study has investigated the percentages of and factors related to unintentional injuries among psychiatric outpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This study aimed to investigate these issues. Methods One-hundred and forty-one outpatients with MDD at baseline were enrolled from psychiatric outpatients by systematic sampling, and 119 subjects attended a one-year follow-up. Self-reported unintentional injuries in the past one year were recorded. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR. The severity of depression was evaluated by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Other data, including body weight and height, cigarette smoking, headaches, and medications, were collected. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to investigate independent factors related to unintentional injuries. Results At baseline and follow-up, 40.4% and 27.7% of subjects had experienced at least one unintentional injury in the past one year, respectively. About half of subjects with unintentional injuries needed medical treatment for injuries and had functional impairment due to injuries. A greater severity of depression, cigarette smoking, a higher body mass index, and an older age were independent risk factors related to unintentional injuries. Conclusion Unintentional injuries that increased the medical burden and functional impairment were common among outpatients with MDD and should not be neglected. Treatment of depression, control of body weight, and quitting cigarettes might be helpful to prevent unintentional injuries. PMID:27992483

  1. St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) in major depression.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Richard C

    2009-01-01

    The herb St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) has been used for centuries to treat a variety of medical illnesses. In certain areas of Europe, St John's wort has been a commonly prescribed treatment for depression, but, in the United States, it is available for purchase over the counter as an herbal supplement. Some researchers believe that specific chemical constituents of St John's wort produce change in depression in a way similar to that of antidepressant medications, yet this hypothesis is problematic. In addition, studies that support the efficacy of St John's wort in patients with mild-to-moderate depression have limitations that may affect the accuracy of their conclusions. Studies measuring the effect of St John's wort in major depression have reported conflicting results and need to be reexamined. Because St John's wort is considered by some to be an alternative to conventional therapies, clinicians need to know whether it is an effective and safe treatment for different levels of severity of depression. Current evidence does not support its use, and, because of potential drug interactions, St John's wort is not a benign treatment.

  2. Disrupted reward circuits is associated with cognitive deficits and depression severity in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Gong, Liang; Yin, Yingying; He, Cancan; Ye, Qing; Bai, Feng; Yuan, Yonggui; Zhang, Haisan; Lv, Luxian; Zhang, Hongxing; Xie, Chunming; Zhang, Zhijun

    2017-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that major depressive disorder (MDD) patients show blunted activity responses to reward-related tasks. However, whether abnormal reward circuits affect cognition and depression in MDD patients remains unclear. Seventy-five drug-naive MDD patients and 42 cognitively normal (CN) subjects underwent a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. The bilateral nucleus accumbens (NAc) were selected as seeds to construct reward circuits across all subjects. A multivariate linear regression analysis was employed to investigate the neural substrates of cognitive function and depression severity on the reward circuits in MDD patients. The common pathway underlying cognitive deficits and depression was identified with conjunction analysis. Compared with CN subjects, MDD patients showed decreased reward network connectivity that was primarily located in the prefrontal-striatal regions. Importantly, distinct and common neural pathways underlying cognition and depression were identified, implying the independent and synergistic effects of cognitive deficits and depression severity on reward circuits. This study demonstrated that disrupted topological organization within reward circuits was significantly associated with cognitive deficits and depression severity in MDD patients. These findings suggest that in addition to antidepressant treatment, normalized reward circuits should be a focus and a target for improving depression and cognitive deficits in MDD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Reduced Venous Blood Basophil Count and Anxious Depression in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Ji Hyun; Kim, Hee-Jin; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David; Papakostas, George I; Nierenberg, Andrew; Heo, Jung-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anxious depression has a distinct neurobiology, clinical course and treatment response from non-anxious depression. Role of inflammation in anxious depression has not been examined. As an exploratory study to characterize the role of inflammation on a development of anxious depression, we aimed to determine the relationship between white blood cell (WBC) subset counts and anxiety in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods A total of 709 patients who were newly diagnosed with MDD were recruited. Anxiety levels of participants were evaluated using the Anxiety/ Somatization subitem of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. The association between WBC subset fraction and anxiety was evaluated. Results Basophil and eosinophil sub-fractions showed significant negative correlations with HAM-D anxiety/somatization factor scores (basophils: r=-0.092, p=0.014 and eosinophils: r=-0.075, p=0.046). When an anxiety score (a sum of somatic and psychic anxiety) was entered as a dependent variable, only basophils showed significant negative association with the anxiety scores after adjusting for all other WBC subset counts and demographic factors (t=-2.57, p=0.010). Conclusion This study showed that anxious depression had a decreased basophil subfraction, which might be associated with involvement of inflammation in development of anxious depression. PMID:27247599

  4. Major depressive disorder with religious struggle and completed suicide after hair transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Mehmet Emin; Önen Ünsalver, Barış; Evrensel, Alper

    2017-01-01

    Psychological outcomes of aesthetic surgical procedures like hair transplantation are mostly positive including decreased anxiety, depression and social phobia and increased general well-being, self-efficacy and self-esteem. However, some patients may suffer from post-surgical depression and post-surgical increased suicide rates have been reported for breast augmentation patients. Difficulty adapting to the new image, unfulfilled psychological needs expected to be met by the surgery, side effects of the surgery like tissue swelling or bruising, uncontrolled pain, presence of body dysmorphic disorder and previous history of mood disorder may be some of the risk factors for post-surgical depression. Here, we present a case without prior psychiatric history who developed major depressive disorder after hair transplantation and died of suicide. He started experiencing religious struggle related to his decision about the hair transplant which he interpreted as acting against God's will. While religious involvement has been reported to be a protective factor against depression, spiritual struggle, which includes religious guilt, has been described as an important risk factor for depression, hopelessness and suicidality which might explain the severity of depression in our patient. This case highlights the importance of a detailed psychiatric evaluation and exploration of religious concerns of any patient before any type of aesthetic surgery. Major depressive disorder is a treatable condition; however, mild depression can go unnoticed. Religious belief and related religious practices affect an individual's personal health attitudes; therefore, we think that every physician is needed to explore the religious concerns of any patient during any medical examination or surgical procedure. Relevant religious authorities should be consulted when necessary.

  5. Elevated morning cortisol is a stratified population-level biomarker for major depression in boys only with high depressive symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Matthew; Herbert, Joe; Jones, Peter B.; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Wilkinson, Paul O.; Dunn, Valerie J.; Croudace, Timothy J.; Goodyer, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MD) is a debilitating public mental health problem with severe societal and personal costs attached. Around one in six people will suffer from this complex disorder at some point in their lives, which has shown considerable etiological and clinical heterogeneity. Overall there remain no validated biomarkers in the youth population at large that can aid the detection of at-risk groups for depression in general and for boys and young men in particular. Using repeated measurements of two well-known correlates of MD (self-reported current depressive symptoms and early-morning cortisol), we undertook a population-based investigation to ascertain subtypes of adolescents that represent separate longitudinal phenotypes. Subsequently, we tested for differential risks for MD and other mental illnesses and cognitive differences between subtypes. Through the use of latent class analysis, we revealed a high-risk subtype (17% of the sample) demarcated by both high depressive symptoms and elevated cortisol levels. Membership of this class of individuals was associated with increased levels of impaired autobiographical memory recall in both sexes and the greatest likelihood of experiencing MD in boys only. These previously unidentified findings demonstrate at the population level a class of adolescents with a common physiological biomarker specifically for MD in boys and for a mnemonic vulnerability in both sexes. We suggest that the biobehavioral combination of high depressive symptoms and elevated morning cortisol is particularly hazardous for adolescent boys. PMID:24550453

  6. Elevated morning cortisol is a stratified population-level biomarker for major depression in boys only with high depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Owens, Matthew; Herbert, Joe; Jones, Peter B; Sahakian, Barbara J; Wilkinson, Paul O; Dunn, Valerie J; Croudace, Timothy J; Goodyer, Ian M

    2014-03-04

    Major depressive disorder (MD) is a debilitating public mental health problem with severe societal and personal costs attached. Around one in six people will suffer from this complex disorder at some point in their lives, which has shown considerable etiological and clinical heterogeneity. Overall there remain no validated biomarkers in the youth population at large that can aid the detection of at-risk groups for depression in general and for boys and young men in particular. Using repeated measurements of two well-known correlates of MD (self-reported current depressive symptoms and early-morning cortisol), we undertook a population-based investigation to ascertain subtypes of adolescents that represent separate longitudinal phenotypes. Subsequently, we tested for differential risks for MD and other mental illnesses and cognitive differences between subtypes. Through the use of latent class analysis, we revealed a high-risk subtype (17% of the sample) demarcated by both high depressive symptoms and elevated cortisol levels. Membership of this class of individuals was associated with increased levels of impaired autobiographical memory recall in both sexes and the greatest likelihood of experiencing MD in boys only. These previously unidentified findings demonstrate at the population level a class of adolescents with a common physiological biomarker specifically for MD in boys and for a mnemonic vulnerability in both sexes. We suggest that the biobehavioral combination of high depressive symptoms and elevated morning cortisol is particularly hazardous for adolescent boys.

  7. Covariation of depressive mood and spontaneous physical activity in major depressive disorder: toward continuous monitoring of depressive mood.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinhyuk; Nakamura, Toru; Kikuchi, Hiroe; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2015-07-01

    The objective evaluation of depressive mood is considered to be useful for the diagnosis and treatment of depressive disorders. Thus, we investigated psychobehavioral correlates, particularly the statistical associations between momentary depressive mood and behavioral dynamics measured objectively, in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and healthy subjects. Patients with MDD ( n = 14) and healthy subjects ( n = 43) wore a watch-type computer device and rated their momentary symptoms using ecological momentary assessment. Spontaneous physical activity in daily life, referred to as locomotor activity, was also continuously measured by an activity monitor built into the device. A multilevel modeling approach was used to model the associations between changes in depressive mood scores and the local statistics of locomotor activity simultaneously measured. We further examined the cross validity of such associations across groups. The statistical model established indicated that worsening of the depressive mood was associated with the increased intermittency of locomotor activity, as characterized by a lower mean and higher skewness. The model was cross validated across groups, suggesting that the same psychobehavioral correlates are shared by both healthy subjects and patients, although the latter had significantly higher mean levels of depressive mood scores. Our findings suggest the presence of robust as well as common associations between momentary depressive mood and behavioral dynamics in healthy individuals and patients with depression, which may lead to the continuous monitoring of the pathogenic processes (from healthy states) and pathological states of MDD.

  8. Facial expression of emotions in borderline personality disorder and depression.

    PubMed

    Renneberg, Babette; Heyn, Katrin; Gebhard, Rita; Bachmann, Silke

    2005-09-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by marked problems in interpersonal relationships and emotion regulation. The assumption of emotional hyper-reactivity in BPD is tested regarding the facial expression of emotions, an aspect highly relevant for communication processes and a central feature of emotion regulation. Facial expressions of emotions are examined in a group of 30 female inpatients with BPD, 27 women with major depression and 30 non-patient female controls. Participants were videotaped while watching two short movie sequences, inducing either positive or negative emotions. Frequency of emotional facial expressions and intensity of happiness expressions were examined, using the Emotional Facial Action Coding System (EMFACS-7, Friesen & Ekman, EMFACS-7: Emotional Facial Action Coding System, Version 7. Unpublished manual, 1984). Group differences were analyzed for the negative and the positive mood-induction procedure separately. Results indicate that BPD patients reacted similar to depressed patients with reduced facial expressiveness to both films. The highest emotional facial activity to both films and most intense happiness expressions were displayed by the non-clinical control group. Current findings contradict the assumption of a general hyper-reactivity to emotional stimuli in patients with BPD.

  9. Personality disorder, depression and functioning: results from the ODIN study.

    PubMed

    Casey, Patricia; Birbeck, Gail; McDonagh, Catherine; Horgan, Ann; Dowrick, Chris; Dalgard, Odd; Lethinen, Ville; Ayuso-Mateos, Jose Luis; Dunn, Graham; Page, Helen; Wilkinson, Claire; Wilkinson, Greg; Vazquez-Barquero, Jose Luis

    2004-10-15

    There is little information of the prevalence of personality disorder (PD) in those with depressive disorder in community samples; neither is there any data on the impact of PD on service utilisation or outcome in this setting. A two stage screening study to identify cases of depressive disorder using SCAN in five European countries. Personality assessed 6 months after the diagnostic interview. Follow-up for 1 year using symptom and social function measures. Personality disorder is present in 22% of a community sample with depressive disorders but the range varied from 13.7% to 33.3% across countries. Cluster C formed 43% of the total. Long-term psychotropic drug use was more common in the PD group even after depression was controlled. Those with PD had higher symptom scores at the outset and, although the PD group was more likely to be cases at follow-up, this disappeared when the depression score was co-varied. Only initial social function predicted outcome at 6 and 12 months. The use of a non-treatment seeking population may limit the application of the findings to clinical populations. PD is common even in a non-treatment seeking population with depressive disorder. It impacts upon outcome at 6 and 12 months but this is related to the initial severity of depressed mood. Social function is the only independent predictor of outcome and should be assessed separately.

  10. The GABAergic Deficit Hypothesis of Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Luscher, Bernhard; Shen, Qiuying; Sahir, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to an association between major depressive disorders (MDDs) and diverse types of GABAergic deficits. Here we summarize clinical and preclinical evidence supporting a central and causal role of GABAergic deficits in the etiology of depressive disorders. Studies of depressed patients indicate that MDDs are accompanied by reduced brain concentration of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as well as alterations in the subunit composition of the principal receptors (GABAA receptors) mediating GABAergic inhibition. In addition, there is abundant evidence that GABA plays a prominent role in the brain control of stress, the most important vulnerability factor in mood disorders. Furthermore, preclinical evidence suggests that currently used antidepressant drugs designed to alter monoaminergic transmission as well as non-pharmacologic therapies may ultimately act to counteract GABAergic deficits. In particular, GABAergic transmission plays an important role in the control of hippocampal neurogenesis and neural maturation, which are now established as cellular substrates of most if not all antidepressant therapies. Lastly, comparatively modest deficits in GABAergic transmission in GABAA-receptor-deficient mice are sufficient to cause behavioral, cognitive, neuroanatomical, and neuroendocrine phenotypes as well as antidepressant drug response characteristics expected of an animal model of MDD. The GABAergic hypothesis of MDD suggests that alterations in GABAergic transmission represent fundamentally important aspects of the etiological sequelae of major depressive disorders that are reversed by monoaminergic antidepressant drug action. PMID:21079608

  11. Probiotics as an Adjuvant Therapy in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Vlainić, Josipa Vlainić; Šuran, Jelena; Vlainić, Toni; Vukorep, Antonella Letizia

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is a common, debilitating psychiatric disorder, which originates from the interaction of susceptibility genes and noxious environmental events, in particular stressful events. It has been shown that dysregulation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, imbalance between anti- and pro-inflammatory cytokines, depletion of neurotransmitters (serotonin, norepinephrine and/or dopamine) in the central nervous system, altered glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission have an important role in the pathogenesis of depression. Due to numerous diverse biological events included in the pathophysiology of depression a large number of antidepressant drugs exerting distinct pharmacological effects have been developed. Nevertheless, clinical needs are still not solved. Relatively new research strategies advanced the understanding of psychiatric illness and their connections with disturbances in gastrointestinal tract. The existence of bidirectional communication between the brain and the gut has been proven, and an increasing body of evidence supports the hypothesis that cognitive and emotional processes are influenced through the brain-gut axis. On the other hand, microbiome may influence brain function and even behavior giving to the specific microorganisms a psychobiotic potential. In this review we discuss the possibilities of classical antidepressant drug treatment being supported with the psychobiotics/probiotic bacteria in patients suffering from major depressive disorder.

  12. Probiotics as an Adjuvant Therapy in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Vlainić, Josipa; Šuran, Jelena; Vlainić, Toni; Vukorep, Antonella Letizia

    2016-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder is a common, debilitating psychiatric disorder, which originates from the interaction of susceptibility genes and noxious environmental events, in particular stressful events. It has been shown that dysregulation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, imbalance between anti- and pro-inflammatory cytokines, depletion of neurotransmitters (serotonin, norepinephrine and/or dopamine) in the central nervous system, altered glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission have an important role in the pathogenesis of depression. Due to numerous diverse biological events included in the pathophysiology of depression a large number of antidepressant drugs exerting distinct pharmacological effects have been developed. Nevertheless, clinical needs are still not solved. Results Relatively new research strategies advanced the understanding of psychiatric illness and their connections with disturbances in gastrointestinal tract. The existence of bidirectional communication between the brain and the gut has been proven, and an increasing body of evidence supports the hypothesis that cognitive and emotional processes are influenced through the brain-gut axis. On the other hand, microbiome may influence brain function and even behavior giving to the specific microorganisms a psychobiotic potential. Conclusions In this review we discuss the possibilities of classical antidepressant drug treatment being supported with the psychobiotics/probiotic bacteria in patients suffering from major depressive disorder. PMID:27226112

  13. Markers of subsyndromal depression in very old persons.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsson, Mikael; Marcusson, Jan; Wressle, Ewa; Milberg, Anna

    2016-06-01

    To investigate factors associated with subsyndromal depression (SSD) in very old persons, and to develop a model for prediction of SSD among very old persons. A cross-sectional, population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden. Data were collected from a postal questionnaire, assessments in the participants' homes and at reception visits. Depressiveness was screened with GDS-15 (Geriatric Depression Scale), and the results were classified into three outcome categories: non-depression (ND), SSD and syndromal depression. Data were analysed with binary logistic, ordinal logistic and linear regression. With univariate logistic regression 20 factors associated with SSD were identified in very old persons, and the four hypothesized domains--sociodemographic factors, declining physical functioning, neuropsychiatric factors and existential factors--significantly related to SSD. The multivariate logistic model included seven independent factors that increase the likelihood of SSD instead of ND (lower self-perceived health, life not meaningful, problems with self-care, use of tranquilizing medication, no contact with neighbours, history of affective disorder and history of stroke). The ordinal logistic and the linear regression models resulted in seven partly different factors for predicting SSD and depressiveness, in the very old. The identified markers may help clinicians with the detection, prevention and treatment of SSD in very old persons. The findings indicate the importance of a comprehensive functional approach to diagnosing and treating depressiveness in this population, and the findings might be interpreted as offering support for the coexistence of a dimensional and a categorical view on depressive disorders. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Age-related variability in the presentation of symptoms of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Schaakxs, R; Comijs, H C; Lamers, F; Beekman, A T F; Penninx, B W J H

    2017-02-01

    The heterogeneous aetiology of major depressive disorder (MDD) might affect the presentation of depressive symptoms across the lifespan. We examined to what extent a range of mood, cognitive, and somatic/vegetative depressive symptoms were differentially present depending on patient's age. Data came from 1404 participants with current MDD (aged 18-88 years) from two cohort studies: the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) and the Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons (NESDO). Associations between age (per 10 years) and 30 depressive symptoms as well as three symptom clusters (mood, cognitive, somatic/vegetative) were assessed using logistic and linear regression analyses. Depression severity was found to be stable with increasing age. Nevertheless, 20 (67%) out of 30 symptoms were associated with age. Most clearly, with ageing there was more often early morning awakening [odds ratio (OR) 1.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36-1.60], reduced interest in sex (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.31-1.53), and problems sleeping during the night (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.24-1.43), whereas symptoms most strongly associated with younger age were interpersonal sensitivity (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.66-0.79), feeling irritable (OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.67-0.79), and sleeping too much (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.68-0.83). The sum score of somatic/vegetative symptoms was associated with older age (B = 0.23, p < 0.001), whereas the mood and cognitive sum scores were associated with younger age (B = -0.20, p < 0.001; B = -0.04, p = 0.004). Depression severity was found to be stable across the lifespan, yet depressive symptoms tend to shift with age from being predominantly mood-related to being more somatic/vegetative. Due to the increasing somatic presentation of depression with age, diagnoses may be missed.

  15. Polycystic ovary syndrome, personality, and depression: A twin study.

    PubMed

    Cesta, Carolyn E; Kuja-Halkola, Ralf; Lehto, Kelli; Iliadou, Anastasia N; Landén, Mikael

    2017-08-10

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at elevated risk for suffering from depression. Neuroticism is a personality trait that has been associated with an increased risk for developing major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of the present study was to quantify and decompose the correlation between neuroticism, PCOS, and MDD into shared and unique genetic and environmental etiologies, by using quantitative genetic methods. In a cohort of 12,628 Swedish female twins born from 1959 to 1985, neuroticism, PCOS identified by symptoms of hyperandrogenemia (i.e., hirsutism) and oligo- and/or anovulation, and lifetime MDD status were determined through questionnaire responses. Structural equation modeling was used to study the genetic and environmental sources of the variation within, and covariation between neuroticism, PCOS, and MDD. Female twins with PCOS (n=752) had significantly higher levels of neuroticism than women without PCOS, and a 2-fold increase in odds for a lifetime prevalence of MDD. The phenotypic correlation between PCOS and MDD was 0.19, with 63% of the correlation attributable to common genetic factors between the two traits. When taking into account neuroticism, 41% was attributable to common genetic factors and 9% attributable to common environmental factors shared between all three traits, with the remainder attributable to components unique to PCOS and MDD. There are common genetic factors between neuroticism, PCOS, and MDD; however, neuroticism shares approximately half of the genetic and environmental components behind the phenotypic correlation between PCOS and MDD, providing some etiological evidence behind the comorbidity between PCOS and depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Interest of scopolamine as a treatment of major depressive disorder].

    PubMed

    Rigal, A; Mouchabac, S; Peretti, C S

    2016-12-01

    The number of patients with depression in the world is 350 millions according to estimates. The search for new treatments, particularly in forms of resistant depression, is necessary given the growing number of patients experiencing treatment failure and resistance. Scopolamine, an anticholinergic antimuscarinic molecule, is one of the treatments under evaluation. It falls within the assumptions of cholinergic disruption of the pathophysiology of depression, at different levels (genetic, receptorial [muscarinic and glutamate receptors], hormonal, synaptic…). In 2006, a pilot study made to evaluate the role of the cholinergic system in cognitive symptoms of depression found unexpected results regarding the antidepressant effect of scopolamine in depressive patients. Since that time other studies have been conducted to evaluate the benefits of treatment with intravenous injections of scopolamine. Our main objective was to evaluate the interest of scopolamine as an antidepressant treatment in depressed populations. We conducted a literature review with the aim of assessing the effectiveness of treatment with scopolamine in uni- and bipolar patients with depressive symptoms. The protocol consisted of two injection blocks (each block consisting of three injections spaced fifteen minutes apart within three to five days) of active ingredient or placebo crossover. The selected patients were between 18 and 45years and had the DSM-IV major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder criteria. Regarding the methods of measurement, the primary endpoint was the reduction in scores of the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) with a total response defined by a decrease of more than 50 % of the score and remission corresponding to a MADRS score<10. Seven sessions of evaluations were performed. The published results are promising in terms of efficiency with rapid antidepressant effect, a total response rate ranging from 59-64% and a remission rate of between 37 and 55

  17. The Role of Lipid Biomarkers in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Amy; Smeeth, Demelza; Milner, Yasmin; Thuret, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    In the UK, the lifetime-documented prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) is currently 10%. Despite its increasing prevalence and devastating impact on quality of life, the pathophysiological mechanisms underpinning MDD remain to be fully elucidated. Current theories of neurobiological components remain incomplete and protein-centric, rendering pharmacological treatment options suboptimal. In this review, we highlight the pivotal role of lipids in intra- and inter-neuronal functioning, emphasising the potential use of lipids as biomarkers for MDD. The latter has significant implications for improving our understanding of MDD at the cellular and circuit level. There is particular focus on cholesterol (high and low density lipoprotein), omega-3, and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids due to established evidence in the literature of a link between atherosclerotic disease and major depression. We argue that there is significant potential scope for the use of such peripheral biomarkers in the diagnosis, stratification and treatment of MDD. PMID:28165367

  18. The inflammatory cytokines: molecular biomarkers for major depressive disorder?

    PubMed

    Martin, Charlotte; Tansey, Katherine E; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Powell, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines are pleotropic cell signaling proteins that, in addition to their role as inflammatory mediators, also affect neurotransmitter systems, brain functionality and mood. Here we explore the potential utility of cytokine biomarkers for major depressive disorder. Specifically, we explore how genetic, transcriptomic and proteomic information relating to the cytokines might act as biomarkers, aiding clinical diagnosis and treatment selection processes. We advise future studies to investigate whether cytokine biomarkers might differentiate major depressive disorder patients from other patient groups with overlapping clinical characteristics. Furthermore, we invite future pharmacogenetic studies to investigate whether early antidepressant-induced changes to cytokine mRNA or protein levels precede behavioral changes and act as longer-term predictors of clinical antidepressant response.

  19. Persistent depressive disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Persistent depressive disorder (PDD) is a chronic (ongoing) type of depression in which a person's moods are regularly low. ... are not as severe as with major depression . Persistent depressive disorder used to be called dysthymia.

  20. Severity of anxiety- but not depression- is associated with oxidative stress in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Steenkamp, Lisa R; Hough, Christina M; Reus, Victor I; Jain, Felipe A; Epel, Elissa S; James, S Jill; Morford, Alexandra E; Mellon, Synthia H; Wolkowitz, Owen M; Lindqvist, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in both depression and anxiety, but it is currently unclear whether this relates to syndromal diagnoses or trans-diagnostic dimensional symptoms. We examined the relationship between oxidative stress and severity of depression and anxiety symptoms in individuals with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Plasma oxidative stress markers F2-isoprostanes and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and the antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH), were assessed in 69 physically healthy, medication-free MDD subjects. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety (HAM-A) and Hamilton Depression (HAM-D) Rating Scales. Total HAM-A and HAM-D scores, along with "core" anxiety and depression subscales, and individual HAM-D items "psychic anxiety" and "depressed mood," were related to oxidative stress markers. Analyses controlled for age, sex, BMI, and smoking. Total HAM-A ratings were positively associated with F2-isoprostanes (β=.26, p=.042) and GSSG (β=.25, p=.049), but not GSH (β=.05, p=.711). Core anxiety severity was positively associated with F2-isoprostanes (β=.34, p=.012) and GSSG, although this did not reach significance (β=.24, p=.074). None of the biological markers were significantly associated with total HAM-D or core depression ratings (all p>.13). Subjects scoring high on "psychic anxiety" had elevated F2-isoprostanes (p=.030) and GSSG (p=.020). This was not seen with "depressed mood" scores (all p>.12). We assessed peripheral oxidative markers, but their relationship to the brain is unclear. Oxidative stress is more closely related to anxiety than depression symptoms in MDD. This highlights the importance of relating oxidative stress to specific symptoms and could provide new insights into the biological correlates of affective disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [THE THERAPUETIC USE OF TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION IN MAJOR DEPRESSION].

    PubMed

    Németh, Viola Luca; Csifcsák, Gábor; Kincses, Zsigmond Tamás; Janka, Zoltán; Must, Anita

    2016-03-30

    The antidepressive effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been investigated for almost 20 years now. Several studies have been published aiming to identify the exact and reliable parameters leading to the desired therapeutic effect. However, the related literature shows great variability. The current overview aims to provide a comprehensive overview of factors associated with the therapeutic effect of rTMS in major depression. High frequency stimulation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) for 3-6 weeks leads to mood improvement comparable to the effect of antidepressive medications in 35-40% of patients. Pharmacotherapy resistant patients treated with rTMS reach remission for 3 months on average. Low frequency stimulation of the right DLPFC appears to be similarly effective, though much less investigated so far. In addition to the exact delineation of the stimulation area, treatment outcome is also related to stimulation intensity as well as the number of sessions and impulses. Considering the safety and tolerability aspects of rTMS, it might be a significant therapeutic support for therapy resistant patients. Above this, patients diagnosed with major depression might benefit from the additional positive influence of rTMS improving the effect of antidepressive medication. Based on converging research evidence, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) agency approved the use of rTMS as a treatment option for therapy resistant major depression in 2008. So far, in Hungary rTMS is primarily considered as a promising tool in research settings only. Hopefully, patients suffering from major depression will increasingly benefit from the positive therapeutic effect of this intervention.

  2. Serotonin receptors in suicide victims with major depression.

    PubMed

    Stockmeier, C A; Dilley, G E; Shapiro, L A; Overholser, J C; Thompson, P A; Meltzer, H Y

    1997-02-01

    Serotonin1A (5-HT1A) and serotonin2A (5-HT2A) receptors in the brain have been implicated in the pathophysiology of suicide. Brain samples were collected at autopsy from suicide victims with a current episode of major depression and matched comparison subjects who died of natural or accidental causes. Retrospective psychiatric assessments were collected from knowledgeable informants for all suicide victims and most of the comparison subjects. Psychiatric diagnoses were determined according to DSM-III-R criteria. Any subjects with current psychoactive substance use disorders were excluded. Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used in serial sections of the right prefrontal cortex (area 10) and hippocampus to measure the binding of [3H]8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propyl)-aminotetralin ([3H]8-OH-DPAT) to 5-HT1A receptors and [3H]ketanserin to 5-HT2A receptors. Analysis of covariance was used to compare control subjects and suicide victims with major depression. The age of subjects, the time from death to freezing the tissue (postmortem interval), and the storage time of tissues in the freezer were used as covariates in the analyses. There were no significant differences between suicide victims with major depression and comparison subjects in 5-HT1A or 5-HT2A receptors in area 10 of the right prefrontal cortex or the hippocampus. The current results suggest that the number of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in the right prefrontal cortex (area 10) or hippocampus are not different in suicide victims with major depression.

  3. Novel glutamatergic agents for major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Ibrahim, Lobna; Henter, Ioline D.; Zarate, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    Mood disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BPD) are common, chronic, recurrent mental illnesses that affect the lives and functioning of millions of individuals worldwide. Growing evidence suggests that the glutamatergic system is central to the neurobiology and treatment of these disorders. Here, we review data supporting the involvement of the glutamatergic system in the pathophysiology of mood disorders as well as the efficacy of glutamatergic agents as novel therapeutics. PMID:21971560

  4. Depression and Anorexia Nervosa of Persons with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, Ludwik S.; Biederman, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    Manifestations of depression in three adults wth Down syndrome, one of whom also exhibited anorexia nervosa, are described. Overall findings indicate that major depression in Down syndrome may be more frequent than previously assumed and that it can be diagnosed with standard diagnostic criteria, modified according to the patient's developmental…

  5. Purine metabolism is dysregulated in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Ali-Sisto, Toni; Tolmunen, Tommi; Toffol, Elena; Viinamäki, Heimo; Mäntyselkä, Pekka; Valkonen-Korhonen, Minna; Honkalampi, Kirsi; Ruusunen, Anu; Velagapudi, Vidya; Lehto, Soili M

    2016-08-01

    The purine cycle and altered purinergic signaling have been suggested to play a role in major depressive disorder (MDD). Nevertheless, data on this topic are scarce. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that compared with non-depressed controls, MDD patients have distinct purine metabolite profiles. The samples comprised 99 MDD patients and 253 non-depressed controls, aged 20-71 years. Background data were collected with questionnaires. Fasting serum samples were analyzed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) to determine seven purine cycle metabolites belonging to the purine cycle. We investigated the levels of these metabolites in three settings: (1) MDD patients vs. non-depressed controls and (2) remitted vs. non-remitted MDD patients, and also (3) within-group changes in metabolite levels during the follow-up period. In logistic regression adjusted for age, gender, smoking, alcohol use, physical exercise, glycosylated hemoglobin, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, lower levels of inosine (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.97) and guanosine (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.17-0.59), and higher levels of xanthine (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.30-3.75) were associated with MDD vs. the non-depressed group. Levels of several metabolites changed significantly during the follow-up period in the MDD group, but there were no differences between remitted and non-remitted groups. We observed altered purine metabolism in MDD patients compared with non-depressed controls. Furthermore, our observations suggest that circulating xanthine may accumulate in MDD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Stressful life events preceding the onset of depression in Asian patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Park, Subin; Hatim, Ahmad; Si, Tian-Mei; Jeon, Hong Jin; Srisurapanont, Manit; Bautista, Dianne; Liu, Shen-ing; Chua, Hong Choon; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have identified the significant role of stressful life events in the onset of depressive episodes. However, there is a paucity of cross-national studies on stressful life events that precede depression. We aimed to compare types of stressful life events associated with the onset of depressive episodes in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) in five Asian countries. A total of 507 outpatients with MDD were recruited in China (n = 114), South Korea (n = 101), Malaysia (n = 90), Thailand (n = 103) and Taiwan (n = 99). All patients were assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and the List of Threatening Experiences. The prevalence of each type of stressful life events was calculated and compared between each country. The type of stressful life event that preceded the onset of a depressive episode differed between patients in China and Taiwan and those in South Korea, Malaysia and Thailand. Patients in China and Taiwan were less likely to report interpersonal relationship problems and occupational/financial problems than patients in South Korea, Malaysia and Thailand. Understanding the nature and basis of culturally determined susceptibilities to specific stressful life events is critical for establishing a policy of depression prevention and providing effective counseling services for depressed patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Quality of depression treatment in Black Americans with major depression and comorbid medical illness

    PubMed Central

    Agyemang, Amma A.; Mezuk, Briana; Perrin, Paul; Rybarczyk, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate how comorbid type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and hypertension (HT) influence depression treatment and to assess whether these effects operate differently in a nationally-representative community-based sample of Black Americans. Methods Data came from the National Survey of American Life (N=3,673), and analysis is limited to respondents who met lifetime criteria for major depression (MD) (N=402). Depression care was defined according to American Psychiatric Association (APA) guidelines and included psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and satisfaction with services. Logistic regression was used to examine the effects of T2DM and HT on quality of depression care. Results Only 19.2% of Black Americans with MD alone, 7.8% with comorbid T2DM, and 22.3% with comorbid HT reported APA guideline-concordant psychotherapy or antidepressant treatment. Compared to respondents with MD alone, respondents with MD + T2DM/HT were no more or less likely to receive depression care. Respondents with MD + HT + T2DM were more likely to report any guideline-concordant care (OR=3.32 95% CI [1.07, 10.31]). Conclusions Although individuals with MD and comorbid T2DM + HT were more likely to receive depression care, guideline-concordant depression care is low among Black Americans, including those with comorbid medical conditions. PMID:24793895

  8. Personality diatheses and Hurricane Sandy: effects on post-disaster depression.

    PubMed

    Kopala-Sibley, D C; Kotov, R; Bromet, E J; Carlson, G A; Danzig, A P; Black, S R; Klein, D N

    2016-03-01

    According to diathesis-stress models, personality traits, such as negative emotionality (NE) and positive emotionality (PE), may moderate the effects of stressors on the development of depression. However, relatively little empirical research has directly examined whether NE and PE act as diatheses in the presence of stressful life events, and no research has examined whether they moderate the effect of disaster exposure on depressive symptoms. Hurricane Sandy, the second costliest hurricane in US history, offers a unique opportunity to address these gaps. A total of 318 women completed measures of NE and PE 5 years prior to Hurricane Sandy. They were also assessed for lifetime depressive disorders on two occasions, the latter occurring an average of 1 year before the hurricane. Approximately 8 weeks after the disaster (mean = 8.40, s.d. = 1.48 weeks), participants completed a hurricane stress exposure questionnaire and a measure of current depressive symptoms. Adjusting for lifetime history of depressive disorders, higher levels of stress from Hurricane Sandy predicted elevated levels of depressive symptoms, but only in participants with high levels of NE or low levels of PE. These findings support the role of personality in the development of depression and suggest that personality traits can be useful in identifying those most vulnerable to major stressors, including natural disasters.

  9. Personality diatheses and Hurricane Sandy: effects on post-disaster depression

    PubMed Central

    Kopala-Sibley, D. C.; Kotov, R.; Bromet, E. J.; Carlson, G. A.; Danzig, A. P.; Black, S. R.; Klein, D. N.

    2015-01-01

    Background According to diathesis–stress models, personality traits, such as negative emotionality (NE) and positive emotionality (PE), may moderate the effects of stressors on the development of depression. However, relatively little empirical research has directly examined whether NE and PE act as diatheses in the presence of stressful life events, and no research has examined whether they moderate the effect of disaster exposure on depressive symptoms. Hurricane Sandy, the second costliest hurricane in US history, offers a unique opportunity to address these gaps. Method A total of 318 women completed measures of NE and PE 5 years prior to Hurricane Sandy. They were also assessed for lifetime depressive disorders on two occasions, the latter occurring an average of 1 year before the hurricane. Approximately 8 weeks after the disaster (mean = 8.40, s.d. = 1.48 weeks), participants completed a hurricane stress exposure questionnaire and a measure of current depressive symptoms. Results Adjusting for lifetime history of depressive disorders, higher levels of stress from Hurricane Sandy predicted elevated levels of depressive symptoms, but only in participants with high levels of NE or low levels of PE. Conclusions These findings support the role of personality in the development of depression and suggest that personality traits can be useful in identifying those most vulnerable to major stressors, including natural disasters. PMID:26619902

  10. Levomilnacipran for the treatment of major depressive disorder: a review

    PubMed Central

    Asnis, Gregory M; Henderson, Margaret A

    2015-01-01

    Levomilnacipran (LVM, Fetzima®) was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of major depressive disorder. It is a unique dual neurotransmitter reuptake inhibitor. In contrast with other selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, including duloxetine, venlafaxine, and desvenlafaxine, it has greater selectivity for inhibiting norepinephrine reuptake than serotonin reuptake. Our review focuses on the efficacy, safety, and tolerability data for five double-blind, placebo-controlled, short-term studies and two long-term studies. In the short-term studies, LVM was found to be more effective than placebo in reducing depression (Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale) scores as well as improving functional impairment (Sheehan Disability Scale) scores. Long-term studies found LVM to be similarly effective but in the only placebo-controlled long-term study, LVM was not significantly superior to placebo. LVM is fairly well tolerated, with the most common adverse events being nausea, headache, dry mouth, hyperhidrosis, and constipation. Discontinuation rates were mildly increased in those being treated with LVM (9%) versus placebo (3%). Adverse events were not dose-related except for urinary hesitancy and erectile dysfunction. LVM was weight neutral, was not toxic to the liver, and did not cause clinically significant QTc prolongation. Consistent with being a predominant potentiator of norepinephrine, pulse and blood pressure were significantly elevated by LVM but rarely induced tachycardia or hypertension. LVM is a relatively safe alternative antidepressant treatment with minimal drug–drug interactions. It is the only antidepressant that has in its labeling that it is not only effective in improving depression but also effective in improving impaired functioning. Whether this important effect on functioning is unique to LVM must be researched. In addition, whether LVM might be effective in norepinephrine

  11. Smoking and Major Depressive Disorder in Chinese Women

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shenxun; Gao, Jingfang; Tao, Ming; Zhang, Kerang; Gao, Chengge; Yang, Lijun; Li, Kan; Shi, Jianguo; Wang, Gang; Liu, Lanfen; Zhang, Jinbei; Du, Bo; Jiang, Guoqing; Shen, Jianhua; Zhang, Zhen; Liang, Wei; Sun, Jing; Hu, Jian; Liu, Tiebang; Wang, Xueyi; Miao, Guodong; Meng, Huaqing; Li, Yi; Hu, Chunmei; Li, Yi; Huang, Guoping; Li, Gongying; Ha, Baowei; Deng, Hong; Mei, Qiyi; Zhong, Hui; Gao, Shugui; Sang, Hong; Zhang, Yutang; Fang, Xiang; Yu, Fengyu; Yang, Donglin; Liu, Tieqiao; Chen, Yunchun; Hong, Xiaohong; Wu, Wenyuan; Chen, Guibing; Cai, Min; Song, Yan; Pan, Jiyang; Dong, Jicheng; Pan, Runde; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Zhenming; Liu, Zhengrong; Gu, Danhua; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Ying; Liu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Qiwen; Li, Yihan; Chen, Yiping; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Wang, Xumei; Li, Youhui; Flint, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk factors that contribute to smoking in female patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and the clinical features in depressed smokers. Methods We examined the smoking status and clinical features in 6120 Han Chinese women with MDD (DSM-IV) between 30 and 60 years of age across China. Logistic regression was used to determine the association between clinical features of MDD and smoking status and between risk factors for MDD and smoking status. Results Among the recurrent MDD patients there were 216(3.6%) current smokers, 117 (2.0%) former smokers and 333(5.6%) lifetime smokers. Lifetime smokers had a slightly more severe illness, characterized by more episodes, longer duration, more comorbid illness (panic and phobias), with more DSM-IV A criteria and reported more symptoms of fatigue and suicidal ideation or attempts than never smokers. Some known risk factors for MDD were also differentially represented among smokers compared to non-smokers. Smokers reported more stressful life events, were more likely to report childhood sexual abuse, had higher levels of neuroticism and an increased rate of familial MDD. Only neuroticism was significantly related to nicotine dependence. Conclusions Although depressed women smokers experience more severe illness, smoking rates remain low in MDD patients. Family history of MDD and environmental factors contribute to lifetime smoking in Chinese women, consistent with the hypothesis that the association of smoking and depression may be caused by common underlying factors. PMID:25180682

  12. Neuropsychological functioning in inpatients with major depression or schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies that compare neuropsychological functioning in inpatients with mood disorder or schizophrenia come to heterogeneous results. This study aims at investigating the question whether there are different neuropsychological test profiles in stabilised post-acute inpatients with affective disorders or schizophrenia. Method We were interested in evaluating impairment in specific areas of cognitive functioning in patients with schizophrenia or depression. In clinical reality, patients with depression and schizophrenia are often treated together with little attention to their specific needs. 74 patients with major depression and 38 patients with schizophrenia were assessed in a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. All patients were in a post-acute stage of their illness, i.e. remission of acute symptoms. Results In spite of a comparable mean score of psychopathological symptoms in the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale-Expanded (BPRS-E) as well as in the Global Assessment Functioning Scale (GAF), patients with depressive disorder showed significantly better results in verbal and visual short-term memory, verbal fluency, visual-motor coordination, information processing in visual-verbal functioning and selective attention compared to patients with schizophrenia. No significant differences between both samples were found in practical reasoning, general verbal abstraction, spatial-figural functioning, speed of cognitive processing. Conclusions These results show that there are differences in scores in psychopathology (BPRS-E, GAF) in patients with affective disorders or schizophrenia and different neuropsychological test profiles in the post-acute stage of their illness. PMID:23914931

  13. St. John's Wort for Major Depressive Disorder: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Maher, Alicia Ruelaz; Hempel, Susanne; Apaydin, Eric; Shanman, Roberta M; Booth, Marika; Miles, Jeremy N V; Sorbero, Melony E

    2016-05-09

    RAND researchers conducted a systematic review that synthesized evidence from randomized controlled trials of St. John's wort (SJW)-used adjunctively or as monotherapy-to provide estimates of its efficacy and safety in treating adults with major depressive disorder. Outcomes of interest included changes in depressive symptomatology, quality of life, and adverse effects. Efficacy meta-analyses used the Hartung-Knapp-Sidik-Jonkman method for random-effects models. Quality of evidence was assessed using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. In total, 35 studies met inclusion criteria. There is moderate evidence, due to unexplained heterogeneity between studies, that depression improvement based on the number of treatment responders and depression scale scores favors SJW over placebo, and results are comparable to antidepressants. The existing evidence is based on studies testing SJW as monotherapy; there is a lack of evidence for SJW given as adjunct therapy to standard antidepressant therapy. We found no systematic difference between SJW extracts, but head-to-head trials are missing; LI 160 (0.3% hypericin, 1-4% hyperforin) was the extract with the greatest number of studies. Only two trials assessed quality of life. SJW adverse events reported in included trials were comparable to placebo, and were fewer compared with antidepressant medication; however, adverse event assessments were limited, and thus we have limited confidence in this conclusion.

  14. Brain membrane lipids in major depression and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian P; Reichel, Martin; Mühle, Christiane; Rhein, Cosima; Gulbins, Erich; Kornhuber, Johannes

    2015-08-01

    Major depression and anxiety disorders have high prevalence rates and are frequently comorbid. The neurobiological bases for these disorders are not fully understood, and available treatments are not always effective. Current models assume that dysfunctions in neuronal proteins and peptide activities are the primary causes of these disorders. Brain lipids determine the localization and function of proteins in the cell membrane and in doing so regulate synaptic throughput in neurons. Lipids may also leave the membrane as transmitters and relay signals from the membrane to intracellular compartments or to other cells. Here we review how membrane lipids, which play roles in the membrane's function as a barrier and a signaling medium for classical transmitter signaling, contribute to depression and anxiety disorders and how this role may provide targets for lipid-based treatment approaches. Preclinical findings have suggested a crucial role for the membrane-forming n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, glycerolipids, glycerophospholipids, and sphingolipids in the induction of depression- and anxiety-related behaviors. These polyunsaturated fatty acids also offer new treatment options such as targeted dietary supplementation or pharmacological interference with lipid-regulating enzymes. While clinical trials support this view, effective lipid-based therapies may need more individualized approaches. Altogether, accumulating evidence suggests a crucial role for membrane lipids in the pathogenesis of depression and anxiety disorders; these lipids could be exploited for improved prevention and treatment. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids.

  15. Duloxetine in the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David J

    2007-04-01

    Since depression impacts all body systems, antidepressant treatments should relieve both the emotional and physical symptoms of depression. Duloxetine demonstrated antidepressant efficacy at a dose of 60 mg qd in two placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind studies and significantly improved remission rates compared with placebo. Duloxetine-treated patients had significant reduction in severity of the symptoms of depression as assessed by the HAM-D(17), anxious symptoms as measured by the HAM-A and quality of life measures compared to placebo. Duloxetine also improved somatic symptoms, particularly painful symptoms which may have contributed to significantly improved remission rates compared to placebo. Approximately 10% of the 1139 patients with major depressive disorder in placebo-controlled trials discontinued treatment due to an adverse event, compared to 4% of the 777 patients receiving placebo. In addition to nausea (1.4% incidence), which was the most common reason for discontinuation, dizziness, somnolence, and fatigue were the most common AEs reported as reasons for discontinuation and all were considered drug-related. Duloxetine treatment lacks effects on ECG, increases heart rate, and has little effect on blood pressure or weight.

  16. EEG alpha power as an intermediate measure between brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met and depression severity in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Zoon, Harriët F A; Veth, C P M; Arns, Martijn; Drinkenburg, W H I M; Talloen, Willem; Peeters, Pieter J; Kenemans, J L

    2013-06-01

    Major depressive disorder has a large impact on patients and society and is projected to be the second greatest global burden of disease by 2020. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene is considered to be one of the important factors in the etiology of major depressive disorder. In a recent study, alpha power was found to mediate between BDNF Met and subclinical depressed mood. The current study looked at a population of patients with major depressive disorder (N = 107) to examine the association between the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism, resting state EEG alpha power, and depression severity. For this purpose, repeated-measures analysis of variance, partial correlation, and multiple linear models were used. Results indicated a negative association between parietal-occipital alpha power in the eyes open resting state and depression severity. In addition, Met/Met patients showed lower global absolute alpha power in the eyes closed condition compared with Val-carriers. These findings are in accordance with the previously uncovered pathway between BDNF Val66Met, resting state EEG alpha power, and depression severity. Additional research is needed for the clarification of this tentative pathway and its implication in personalized treatment of major depressive disorder.

  17. Psychometric evaluation of the depressive personality disorder inventory.

    PubMed

    Huprich, Steven K; Sanford, Keith; Smith, Marinell

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Depressive Personality Disorder Inventory (DPDI; Huprich, Margrett, Barthelemy, & Fine, 1996). The DPDI was found to have strong internal consistency in both an undergraduate and a veteran, psychiatric outpatient population. The DPDI had significant, positive correlations with other measures of depressive personality, supporting its convergent validity. These relationships remained even after controlling for state-like depression, suggesting that the DPDI has incremental validity. The DPDI also significantly predicted scores on measures of interpersonal loss, even after controlling for state-like depression, suggesting that the DPDI has good construct validity. In support of discriminant validity, the DPDI was more correlated with another measure of depressive personality than it was with measures of other personality disorders. Finally, the DPDI had strong diagnostic efficiency statistics: (a) Sensitivity = .82, (b) Specificity = .80, (c) Positive Predictive Power = .75, (d) Negative Predictive Power = .86, and (e) Overall Diagnostic Power = .81. It appears that the DPDI has good psychometric properties.

  18. Psychiatric comorbidities in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Thaipisuttikul, Papan; Ittasakul, Pichai; Waleeprakhon, Punjaporn; Wisajun, Pattarabhorn; Jullagate, Sudawan

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidities are common in major depressive disorder (MDD). They may worsen outcome and cause economic burden. The primary objective was to examine the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in MDD. The secondary objectives were to compare the presence of comorbidities between currently active and past MDD, and between patients with and without suicidal risk. This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 250 patients with lifetime MDD and age ≥18 years were enrolled. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), Thai version, was used to confirm MDD diagnosis and classify comorbidities. MDD diagnosis was confirmed in 190, and 60 patients were excluded due to diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Of the 190 MDD patients, 25.8% had current MDD and 74.2% had past MDD. Eighty percent were women. The mean age at enrollment was 50 years, and at MDD onset was 41 years. Most patients were married (53.2%), employed (54.8%), and had ≥12 years of education (66.9%). There were 67 patients (35.3%) with one or more psychiatric comorbidities. Comorbidities included dysthymia (19.5%), any anxiety disorders (21.1%) (panic disorder [6.8%], agoraphobia [5.8%], social phobia [3.7%], obsessive-compulsive disorder [OCD] [4.7%], generalized anxiety disorder [5.3%], and post-traumatic stress disorder [4.2%]), alcohol dependence (0.5%), psychotic